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Sample records for vessel size imaging

  1. MR evaluation of vessel size imaging of human gliomas: Validation by histopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellner, Elias; Breyer, Tobias; Gall, Peter; Müller, Klaus; Trippel, Michael; Staszewski, Ori; Stein, Florian; Saborowski, Olaf; Dyakova, Olga; Urbach, Horst; Kiselev, Valerij G; Mader, Irina

    2015-10-01

    To compare the vessel size and the cerebral blood volume in human gliomas with histopathology. Vessel size imaging (VSI) is a dynamic susceptibility contrast method for the assessment of the vessel size in normal and pathological tissue. Previous publications in rodents showed a satisfactory conformity with the vessel size derived from histopathology. To assess the clinical value, further, the progression-free interval was determined and correlated. Twenty-five gliomas (WHO grade °II [n = 10], °III [n = 3], °IV [n = 12]) were prospectively included and received a stereotaxic biopsy after VSI. The vessel size and the cerebral blood volume (CBV) were calculated in regions of interest at the tumor edge and correlated with the vessel size measured by histopathology. Both VSI and CBV showed a good correlation with the vessel size in histopathology (up to r = 0.84, P histopathology is in good accordance with the animal studies. The overestimation of small capillary sizes is also known from the animal trials. Vessel size and CBV showed similar results, both for the correlation with the histopathological vessel size and the progression-free interval. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Combretastatin A-4 Phosphate Affects Tumor Vessel Volume and Size Distribution as Assessed Using MRI-Based Vessel Size Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nielsen, T.; Bentzen, L.; Pedersen, M.; Tramm, T.; Rijken, P.F.J.W.; Bussink, J.; Horsman, M.R.; Ostergaard, L.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: Combretastatin A-4 disodium phosphate (CA4P) is a promising vascular disrupting agent (VDA) in clinical trials. As CA4P acts on dividing endothelial cells, we hypothesize that CA4P affects vessels of certain sizes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of CA4P by the MRI-based

  3. Grading vascularity from histopathological images based on traveling salesman distance and vessel size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niazi, M. Khalid Khan; Hemminger, Jessica; Kurt, Habibe; Lozanski, Gerard; Gurcan, Metin

    2014-03-01

    Vascularity represents an important element of tissue/tumor microenvironment and is implicated in tumor growth, metastatic potential and resistence to therapy. Small blood vessels can be visualized using immunohistochemical stains specific to vascular cells. However, currently used manual methods to assess vascular density are poorly reproducible and are at best semi quantitative. Computer based quantitative and objective methods to measure microvessel density are urgently needed to better understand and clinically utilize microvascular density information. We propose a new method to quantify vascularity from images of bone marrow biopsies stained for CD34 vascular lining cells protein as a model. The method starts by automatically segmenting the blood vessels by methods of maxlink thresholding and minimum graph cuts. The segmentation is followed by morphological post-processing to reduce blast and small spurious objects from the bone marrow images. To classify the images into one of the four grades, we extracted 20 features from the segmented blood vessel images. These features include first four moments of the distribution of the area of blood vessels, first four moments of the distribution of 1) the edge weights in the minimum spanning tree of the blood vessels, 2) the shortest distance between blood vessels, 3) the homogeneity of the shortest distance (absolute difference in distance between consecutive blood vessels along the shortest path) between blood vessels and 5) blood vessel orientation. The method was tested on 26 bone marrow biopsy images stained with CD34 IHC stain, which were evaluated by three pathologists. The pathologists took part in this study by quantifying blood vessel density using gestalt assessment in hematopoietic bone marrow portions of bone marrow core biopsies images. To determine the intra-reader variability, each image was graded twice by each pathologist with two-week interval in between their readings. For each image, the ground

  4. Simultaneous assessment of vessel size index, relative blood volume, and vessel permeability in a mouse brain tumor model using a combined spin echo gradient echo echo-planar imaging sequence and viable tumor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kording, Fabian; Weidensteiner, Claudia; Zwick, Stefan; Osterberg, Nadja; Weyerbrock, Astrid; Staszewski, Ori; von Elverfeldt, Dominik; Reichardt, Wilfried

    2014-12-01

    Combining multiple imaging biomarkers in one magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) session would be beneficial to gain more data pertaining to tumor vasculature under therapy. Therefore, simultaneous measurement of perfusion, permeability, and vessel size imaging (VSI) using a gradient echo spin echo (GE-SE) sequence with injection of a clinically approved gadolinium (Gd)-based contrast agent was assessed in an orthotopic glioma model. A combined spin echo gradient echo echo-planar imaging sequence was implemented using a single contrast agent Gd diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA). This sequence was tested in a mouse brain tumor model (U87_MG), also under treatment with an antiangiogenic agent (bevacizumab). T2 maps and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) were used to differentiate regions of cell death and viable tumor tissue. In viable tumor tissue regional blood volume was 5.7 ± 0.6% in controls and 5.2 ± 0.3% in treated mice. Vessel size was 18.1 ± 2.4 μm in controls and 12.8 ± 2.0 μm in treated mice, which correlated with results from immunohistochemistry. Permeability (K(trans) ) was close to zero in treated viable tumor tissue and 0.062 ± 0.024 min(-1) in controls. Our MRI method allows simultaneous assessment of several physiological and morphological parameters and extraction of MRI biomarkers for vasculature. These could be used for treatment monitoring of novel therapeutic agents such as antiangiogenic drugs. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Vessel detection in ultrasound images using deep convolutional neural networks

    OpenAIRE

    Smistad, Erik; Løvstakken, Lasse

    2016-01-01

    Deep convolutional neural networks have achieved great results on image classification problems. In this paper, a new method using a deep convolutional neural network for detecting blood vessels in B-mode ultrasound images is presented. Automatic blood vessel detection may be useful in medical applications such as deep venous thrombosis detection, anesthesia guidance and catheter placement. The proposed method is able to determine the position and size of the vessels in images in real-time. 1...

  6. Nonlinear retinal image enhancement for vessel detection

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    Wang, Xiaohong; Jiang, Xudong

    2017-07-01

    Retinal vessel detection is an essential part of the computer-aided diagnosis of eye diseases. Due to non-perfect imaging environment, retinal images often appear with intensity variations and artificial noises. This work proposes a two-step nonlinear retinal image enhancement to compensate for those imperfections of retinal images. The first step reduces intensity fluctuations of the image and the second step attenuates impulsive noise while preserving retinal vessels. Classification on the feature vector extracted from the enhanced retinal images is performed by using a linear SVM classifier. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method of two-step nonlinear image enhancement visibly improves the vessel detection performance, achieving better accuracy than that without enhancement process on the both DRIVE and STARE databases.

  7. Validation of the performance of a practical blood vessel imaging system to facilitate vessel punctures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuper, Natascha J.; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf M.; de Roode, Rowland

    2009-02-01

    A practical system to visualize vessels underneath the skin has been developed, based on near-infrared (NIR) transillumination. A study in the clinical setting proved the system to be useful as a support in blood withdrawal in young children. During clinical application it was found that performance varied depending on vessel size, depth of vessels and surrounding lighting conditions. To gain more insight on the different variables that determine functioning of the system, we performed phantom studies. A combined liquid/solid phantom was fabricated with similar optical properties as the tissue layers of skin reported in literature at 850 nm. This phantom was used to estimate the depth of visibility in the relation to vessel size and darkness of the skin. Vessel contrast was determined analytically from images and evaluated by 3 independent observers. The knowledge gained from these experiments will be helpful to improve the imaging system and develop a solid phantom to be used as a gold standard to test the system under various clinical lighting conditions. The working range of the system was found to be appropriate to visualize the vessels used for the most procedures, such as blood withdrawal and placement of intravenous lines.

  8. Cerebral vessels segmentation for light-sheet microscopy image using convolutional neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chaoen; Hui, Hui; Wang, Shuo; Dong, Di; Liu, Xia; Yang, Xin; Tian, Jie

    2017-03-01

    Cerebral vessel segmentation is an important step in image analysis for brain function and brain disease studies. To extract all the cerebrovascular patterns, including arteries and capillaries, some filter-based methods are used to segment vessels. However, the design of accurate and robust vessel segmentation algorithms is still challenging, due to the variety and complexity of images, especially in cerebral blood vessel segmentation. In this work, we addressed a problem of automatic and robust segmentation of cerebral micro-vessels structures in cerebrovascular images acquired by light-sheet microscope for mouse. To segment micro-vessels in large-scale image data, we proposed a convolutional neural networks (CNNs) architecture trained by 1.58 million pixels with manual label. Three convolutional layers and one fully connected layer were used in the CNNs model. We extracted a patch of size 32x32 pixels in each acquired brain vessel image as training data set to feed into CNNs for classification. This network was trained to output the probability that the center pixel of input patch belongs to vessel structures. To build the CNNs architecture, a series of mouse brain vascular images acquired from a commercial light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) system were used for training the model. The experimental results demonstrated that our approach is a promising method for effectively segmenting micro-vessels structures in cerebrovascular images with vessel-dense, nonuniform gray-level and long-scale contrast regions.

  9. Neuroradiologic Characteristics of Primary Angiitis of the Central Nervous System According to the Affected Vessel Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaler, Christian; Kaufmann-Bühler, Ann-Katrin; Gansukh, Tserenchunt; Gansukh, Amarjargal; Schuster, Simon; Bachmann, Henrike; Thomalla, Götz; Magnus, Tim; Matschke, Jakob; Fiehler, Jens; Siemonsen, Susanne

    2017-09-05

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has an important impact in diagnosing primary angiitis of the central nervous system (PACNS). However, neuroradiologic findings may vary immensely, making an easy and definite diagnosis challenging. In this retrospective, single center study, we analyzed neuroradiologic findings of patients with PACNS diagnosed at our hospital between 2009 and 2014. Furthermore, we classified patients according to the affected vessel size and compared imaging characteristics between the subgroups. Thirty-three patients were included (mean age 43 [±15.3] years, 17 females) in this study. Patients with positive angiographic findings were classified as either medium or large vessel PACNS and presented more ischemic lesions (p < 0.001) and vessel wall enhancement (p = 0.017) compared to patients with small vessel PACNS. No significant differences were detected for the distribution of contrast-enhancing lesions (parenchymal or leptomeningeal), hemorrhages, or lesions with mass effect. Twenty-five patients underwent brain biopsy. Patients with medium or large vessel PACNS were less likely to have positive biopsy results. It is essential to differentiate between small and medium/large vessel PACNS since results in MRI, digital subtraction angiography and brain biopsy may differ immensely. Since image quality of MR scanners improves gradually and brain biopsy may often be nonspecific or negative, our results emphasize the importance of MRI/MRA in the diagnosis process of PACNS.

  10. Vessel involvement in giant cell arteritis : an imaging approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holm, Pieter W.; Sandovici, Maria; Slart, Riemer H. J. A.; Glaudemans, Andor W. J. M.; Rutgers, Abraham; Brouwer, Elisabeth

    Vasculitis is classified based on the size of the involved vessels. The two major forms are small vessel vasculitis and large vessel vasculitis (LVV). Main forms of LVV are Takayasu arteritis, giant cell arteritis (GCA), isolated aortitis and chronic periaortitis. This manuscript will focus on GCA,

  11. The clinical impact of mean vessel size and solidity in breast carcinoma patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Tore Gyland Mikalsen

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis quantification, through vessel counting or area estimation in the most vascular part of the tumour, has been found to be of prognostic value across a range of carcinomas, breast cancer included. We have applied computer image analysis to quantify vascular properties pertaining to size, shape and spatial distributions in photographed fields of CD34 stained sections. Aided by a pilot (98 cases, seven parameters were selected and validated on a separate set from 293 breast cancer patients. Two new prognostic markers were identified through continuous cox regression with endpoints breast cancer specific survival and distant disease free survival: The average size of the vessels as measured by their perimeter (p = 0.003 and 0.004, respectively, and the average complexity of the vessel shapes measured by their solidity (p = 0.004 and 0.004. The Hazard ratios for the corresponding median-dichotomized markers were 2.28 (p = 0.005 and 1.89 (p = 0.016 for the mean perimeter and 1.80 (p = 0.041 and 1.55 (p = 0.095 for the shape complexity. The markers were associated with poor histologic type, high grade, necrosis, HR negativity, inflammation, and p53 expression (vessel size only. Both markers were found to strongly influence the prognostic properties of vascular invasion (VI and disseminated tumour cells in the bone marrow. The latter being prognostic only in cases with large vessels (p = 0.004 and 0.043 or low complexity (p = 0.018 and 0.024, but not in the small or complex vessel groups (p>0.47. VI was significant in all groups, but showed greater hazard ratios for small and low complexity vessels (6.54-11.2 versus large and high complexity vessels (2.64-3.06. We find that not only the overall amount of produced vasculature in angiogenic hot-spots is of prognostic significance, but also the morphological appearance of the generated vessels, i.e. the size and shape of vessels in the studied hot spots.

  12. Intracranial vessel wall imaging at 7.0 tesla MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kolk, A.G.

    2014-01-01

    Intracranial atherosclerosis is one of the main causes of ischemic stroke. Current conventional imaging techniques assessing intracranial arterial disease in vivo only visualize the vessel wall lumen instead of the pathological vessel wall itself. Therefore, not much is known about the imaging

  13. Imaging of pediatric great vessel stents: Computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. den Harder (Annemarie); D. Suchá (Dominika); R.W. van Hamersvelt (Robbert W.); R.P.J. Budde (Ricardo); P.A. de Jong (Pim); A. Schilham (Arnold); C. Bos (Clemens); J.M.P.J. Breur (Johannes M.P.J.); I. Leiner (Tim)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstract__Background:__ Complications might occur after great vessel stent implantation in children. Therefore follow- up using imaging is warranted. __Purpose:__ To determine the optimal imaging modality for the assessment of stents used to treat great vessel obstructions in children.

  14. Roi Detection and Vessel Segmentation in Retinal Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabaz, F.; Atila, U.

    2017-11-01

    Diabetes disrupts work by affecting the structure of the eye and afterwards leads to loss of vision. Depending on the stage of disease that called diabetic retinopathy, there are sudden loss of vision and blurred vision problems. Automated detection of vessels in retinal images is a useful study to diagnose eye diseases, disease classification and other clinical trials. The shape and structure of the vessels give information about the severity of the disease and the stage of the disease. Automatic and fast detection of vessels allows for a quick diagnosis of the disease and the treatment process to start shortly. ROI detection and vessel extraction methods for retinal image are mentioned in this study. It is shown that the Frangi filter used in image processing can be successfully used in detection and extraction of vessels.

  15. Detection of Blood Vessels in Retinal Fundus Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faraz Oloumi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Detection of blood vessels in retinal fundus images is an important initial step in the development of systems for computer-aided diagnosis of pathologies of the eye. In this study, we perform multifeature analysis for the detection of blood vessels in retinal fundus images. The vessel detection techniques implemented include multiscale vesselness measures, Gabor filters, line operators, and matched filters. The selection of an appropriate threshold is crucial for accurate detection of retinal blood vessels. We evaluate an adaptive threshold selection method along with several others for this purpose. We also propose a postprocessing technique for removal of false-positive pixels around the optic nerve head. Values of the area under the receiver operating haracteristic curve of up to $0.961$ were obtained using the $20$ test images of the DRIVE database.

  16. Computer Analysis of Eye Blood-Vessel Images

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    Wall, R. J.; White, B. S.

    1984-01-01

    Technique rapidly diagnoses diabetes mellitus. Photographs of "whites" of patients' eyes scanned by computerized image analyzer programmed to quantify density of small blood vessels in conjuctiva. Comparison with data base of known normal and diabetic patients facilitates rapid diagnosis.

  17. Smooth muscle cell recruitment to lymphatic vessels requires PDGFB and impacts vessel size but not identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yixin; Jin, Yi; Mäe, Maarja Andaloussi; Zhang, Yang; Ortsäter, Henrik; Betsholtz, Christer; Mäkinen, Taija; Jakobsson, Lars

    2017-10-01

    Tissue fluid drains through blind-ended lymphatic capillaries, via smooth muscle cell (SMC)-covered collecting vessels into venous circulation. Both defective SMC recruitment to collecting vessels and ectopic recruitment to lymphatic capillaries are thought to contribute to vessel failure, leading to lymphedema. However, mechanisms controlling lymphatic SMC recruitment and its role in vessel maturation are unknown. Here, we demonstrate that platelet-derived growth factor B (PDGFB) regulates lymphatic SMC recruitment in multiple vascular beds. PDGFB is selectively expressed by lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) of collecting vessels. LEC-specific deletion of Pdgfb prevented SMC recruitment causing dilation and failure of pulsatile contraction of collecting vessels. However, vessel remodelling and identity were unaffected. Unexpectedly, Pdgfb overexpression in LECs did not induce SMC recruitment to capillaries. This was explained by the demonstrated requirement of PDGFB extracellular matrix (ECM) retention for lymphatic SMC recruitment, and the low presence of PDGFB-binding ECM components around lymphatic capillaries. These results demonstrate the requirement of LEC-autonomous PDGFB expression and retention for SMC recruitment to lymphatic vessels, and suggest an ECM-controlled checkpoint that prevents SMC investment of capillaries, which is a common feature in lymphedematous skin. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  18. Smooth muscle cell recruitment to lymphatic vessels requires PDGFB and impacts vessel size but not identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yixin; Jin, Yi; Mäe, Maarja Andaloussi; Zhang, Yang; Ortsäter, Henrik; Betsholtz, Christer; Mäkinen, Taija

    2017-01-01

    Tissue fluid drains through blind-ended lymphatic capillaries, via smooth muscle cell (SMC)-covered collecting vessels into venous circulation. Both defective SMC recruitment to collecting vessels and ectopic recruitment to lymphatic capillaries are thought to contribute to vessel failure, leading to lymphedema. However, mechanisms controlling lymphatic SMC recruitment and its role in vessel maturation are unknown. Here, we demonstrate that platelet-derived growth factor B (PDGFB) regulates lymphatic SMC recruitment in multiple vascular beds. PDGFB is selectively expressed by lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) of collecting vessels. LEC-specific deletion of Pdgfb prevented SMC recruitment causing dilation and failure of pulsatile contraction of collecting vessels. However, vessel remodelling and identity were unaffected. Unexpectedly, Pdgfb overexpression in LECs did not induce SMC recruitment to capillaries. This was explained by the demonstrated requirement of PDGFB extracellular matrix (ECM) retention for lymphatic SMC recruitment, and the low presence of PDGFB-binding ECM components around lymphatic capillaries. These results demonstrate the requirement of LEC-autonomous PDGFB expression and retention for SMC recruitment to lymphatic vessels, and suggest an ECM-controlled checkpoint that prevents SMC investment of capillaries, which is a common feature in lymphedematous skin. PMID:28851707

  19. Novel Method for Vessel Cross-Sectional Shear Wave Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qiong; Li, Guo-Yang; Lee, Fu-Feng; Zhang, Qihao; Cao, Yanping; Luo, Jianwen

    2017-07-01

    Many studies have investigated the applications of shear wave imaging (SWI) to vascular elastography, mainly on the longitudinal section of vessels. It is important to investigate SWI in the arterial cross section when evaluating anisotropy of the vessel wall or complete plaque composition. Here, we proposed a novel method based on the coordinate transformation and directional filter in the polar coordinate system to achieve vessel cross-sectional shear wave imaging. In particular, ultrasound radiofrequency data were transformed from the Cartesian to the polar coordinate system; the radial displacements were then estimated directly. Directional filtering was performed along the circumferential direction to filter out the reflected waves. The feasibility of the proposed vessel cross-sectional shear wave imaging method was investigated through phantom experiments and ex vivo and in vivo studies. Our results indicated that the dispersion relation of the shear wave (i.e., the guided circumferential wave) within the vessel can be measured via the present method, and the elastic modulus of the vessel can be determined. Copyright © 2017 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Proximal Occlusion of Medium-Sized Vessels with the Penumbra Occlusion Device: A Study of Safety and Efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jambon, E; Petitpierre, F; Brizzi, V; Dubuisson, V; Le Bras, Y; Grenier, N; Cornelis, F

    2017-02-01

    To retrospectively investigate the safety and efficacy of hybrid proximal coiling of various medium-sized vessels (4 to 8 mm) using the Penumbra Occlusion Device (POD). From October 2014 to February 2016, 37 proximal embolizations were performed with PODs in 36 patients (mean age: 50.8, range: 10-86; 29 male, 7 female). Vessel occlusions were achieved under fluoroscopic guidance using a 2.7 French microcatheter. Among the 36 vessels targeted, 16 were splenic arteries, 11 renal arteries, 4 mesenteric arteries, 3 arteriovenous fistulae, 1 iliac artery, and 1 gonadal vein. Intermittent follow-up angiography was performed to assess the flow for final occlusion. Outcomes and complications were assessed by clinical and/or imaging follow-up. To produce proximal occlusion of the intended vessels, the POD was used alone in 19 embolizations (51.4 %). In 12 procedures (32.4 %), POD was used as a coil constrainer to secure the coil construct. In 6 procedures (16.2 %), additional embolic devices were used to achieve vessel occlusion after initial POD deployment. After a mean follow-up of 3.2 months, no POD migration was observed but two complications occurred (5.4 %): one post embolic syndrome and one extensive infarction with splenic abscess. The POD system allows safe and effective proximal embolization of medium-sized vessels in a variety of clinical settings.

  1. Proximal Occlusion of Medium-Sized Vessels with the Penumbra Occlusion Device: A Study of Safety and Efficacy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jambon, E.; Petitpierre, F. [Pellegrin Hospital, Department of Radiology (France); Brizzi, V.; Dubuisson, V. [Pellegrin Hospital, Department of Surgery (France); Bras, Y. Le; Grenier, N.; Cornelis, F., E-mail: cornelisfrancois@gmail.com [Pellegrin Hospital, Department of Radiology (France)

    2017-02-15

    PurposeTo retrospectively investigate the safety and efficacy of hybrid proximal coiling of various medium-sized vessels (4 to 8 mm) using the Penumbra Occlusion Device (POD).Materials and MethodsFrom October 2014 to February 2016, 37 proximal embolizations were performed with PODs in 36 patients (mean age: 50.8, range: 10–86; 29 male, 7 female). Vessel occlusions were achieved under fluoroscopic guidance using a 2.7 French microcatheter. Among the 36 vessels targeted, 16 were splenic arteries, 11 renal arteries, 4 mesenteric arteries, 3 arteriovenous fistulae, 1 iliac artery, and 1 gonadal vein. Intermittent follow-up angiography was performed to assess the flow for final occlusion. Outcomes and complications were assessed by clinical and/or imaging follow-up.ResultsTo produce proximal occlusion of the intended vessels, the POD was used alone in 19 embolizations (51.4 %). In 12 procedures (32.4 %), POD was used as a coil constrainer to secure the coil construct. In 6 procedures (16.2 %), additional embolic devices were used to achieve vessel occlusion after initial POD deployment. After a mean follow-up of 3.2 months, no POD migration was observed but two complications occurred (5.4 %): one post embolic syndrome and one extensive infarction with splenic abscess.ConclusionThe POD system allows safe and effective proximal embolization of medium-sized vessels in a variety of clinical settings.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of vessel wall morphology and function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kröner, Eleanore Sophie Jeanine

    2015-01-01

    This thesis evaluates morphological and functional vessel wall properties measured by magnetic resonance imaging techniques in healthy volunteers and patients with various diseases (i.e. Marfan syndrome patients (MFS), patients with thoracic aortic aneurysm and patients with a previous myocardial

  3. Imaging of Small Vessels Using Photoacoustics: An In Vivo Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siphanto, Ronald I.; Kolkman, R.G.M.; Huisjes, A.; Pilatou, M.H.; de Mul, F.F.M.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; van Adrichem, Leon N.A.

    2004-01-01

    Background and Objectives The ability to correctly visualize the architectural arrangement of microvasculature is valuable to many diverse fields in medicine. In this study, we applied photoacoustics (PA) to obtain high-resolution images of submillimeter blood vessels. - Study Design/Materials and

  4. Pattern Recognition Of Blood Vessel Networks In Ocular Fundus Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akita, K.; Kuga, H.

    1982-11-01

    We propose a computer method of recognizing blood vessel networks in color ocular fundus images which are used in the mass diagnosis of adult diseases such as hypertension and diabetes. A line detection algorithm is applied to extract the blood vessels, and the skeleton patterns of them are made to analyze and describe their structures. The recognition of line segments of arteries and/or veins in the vessel networks consists of three stages. First, a few segments which satisfy a certain constraint are picked up and discriminated as arteries or veins. This is the initial labeling. Then the remaining unknown ones are labeled by utilizing the physical level knowledge. We propose two schemes for this stage : a deterministic labeling and a probabilistic relaxation labeling. Finally the label of each line segment is checked so as to minimize the total number of labeling contradictions. Some experimental results are also presented.

  5. Use of commercial vessels in survey augmentation: the size-frequency distribution

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    Eric N. Powell

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The trend towards use of commercial vessels to enhance survey data requires assessment of the advantages and limitations of various options for their use. One application is to augment information on size-frequency distributions obtained in multispecies trawl surveys where stratum boundaries and sampling density are not optimal for all species. Analysis focused on ten recreationally and commercially important species: bluefish, butterfish, Loligo squid, weakfish, summer flounder, winter flounder, silver hake (whiting, black sea bass, striped bass, and scup (porgy. The commercial vessel took 59 tows in the sampled domain south of Long Island, New York and the survey vessel 18. Black sea bass, Loligo squid, and summer flounder demonstrated an onshore-offshore gradient such that smaller fish were caught disproportionately inshore and larger fish offshore. Butterfish, silver hake, and weakfish were characterized by a southwest-northeast gradient such that larger fish were caught disproportionately northeast of the southwestern-most sector. All sizes of scup, striped bass, and bluefish were caught predominately inshore. Winter flounder were caught predominately offshore. The commercial vessel was characterized by an increased frequency of large catches for most species. Consequently, patchiness was assayed to be higher by the commercial vessel in nearly all cases. The size-frequency distribution obtained by the survey vessel for six of the ten species, bluefish, butterfish, Loligo squid, summer flounder, weakfish, and silver hake, could not be obtained by chance from the size-frequency distribution obtained by the commercial vessel. The difference in sample density did not significantly influence the size-frequency distribution. Of the six species characterized by significant differences in size-frequency distribution between boats, all but one was patchy at the population level and all had one or more size classes so characterized. Although the

  6. Molecular magnetic resonance imaging of atherosclerotic vessel wall disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noerenberg, Dominik [Charite - University Medicine Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); University of Munich - Grosshadern, Department of Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Ebersberger, Hans U. [Heart Center Munich-Bogenhausen, Department of Cardiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Munich (Germany); Diederichs, Gerd; Hamm, Bernd [Charite - University Medicine Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Botnar, Rene M. [King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); Makowski, Marcus R. [Charite - University Medicine Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-03-15

    Molecular imaging aims to improve the identification and characterization of pathological processes in vivo by visualizing the underlying biological mechanisms. Molecular imaging techniques are increasingly used to assess vascular inflammation, remodeling, cell migration, angioneogenesis and apoptosis. In cardiovascular diseases, molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers new insights into the in vivo biology of pathological vessel wall processes of the coronary and carotid arteries and the aorta. This includes detection of early vascular changes preceding plaque development, visualization of unstable plaques and assessment of response to therapy. The current review focuses on recent developments in the field of molecular MRI to characterise different stages of atherosclerotic vessel wall disease. A variety of molecular MR-probes have been developed to improve the non-invasive detection and characterization of atherosclerotic plaques. Specifically targeted molecular probes allow for the visualization of key biological steps in the cascade leading to the development of arterial vessel wall lesions. Early detection of processes which lead to the development of atherosclerosis and the identification of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques may enable the early assessment of response to therapy, improve therapy planning, foster the prevention of cardiovascular events and may open the door for the development of patient-specific treatment strategies. (orig.)

  7. Measurement of contrast of phantom and in vivo subsurface blood vessels using two near-infrared imaging systems

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    Hebden, Jeremy C.; Alkhaja, Aysha; Mahe, Laure; Powell, S.; Everdell, N. L.

    2015-03-01

    A quantitative comparison has been performed between two commercial near-infrared (NIR) vein-viewing systems which are designed to supplement the clinician's traditional skills in locating veins by means of visualization and palpation. The AccuVein AV300 and Novarix IV-eye real-time imaging systems employ very different imaging geometries; the former generates an image from reflected NIR light produced by a beam scanned across the surface, while the latter illuminates the viewed region at four points on the periphery and records the resulting distribution of diffusely transmitted light. The comparison involved measuring the contrast produced by absorbing rods (simulated blood vessels) in a cylindrical phantom with tissue-like optical properties, and the contrast of superficial blood vessels in the arms of healthy volunteers. The locations and sizes of the blood vessels were independently verified using a clinical ultrasound imaging system. The phantom measurements suggested that the AV300 displays the most superficial vessels with greater contrast, but the IV-eye is able to detect vessels when they are at a depth up to 2 mm greater than the limit observed for the AV300. The results for thirty healthy volunteers also indicated that the AV300 typically displays vessels with higher overall contrast, but the effectiveness of the IV-eye at visualizing deeper vessels was even more pronounced, with a maximum depth several millimeters greater than that achieved by the AV300, and more than ten times as many vessels observed at depths below 4 mm.

  8. Breast Contrast Enhanced MR Imaging: Semi-Automatic Detection of Vascular Map and Predominant Feeding Vessel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrillo, Antonella; Fusco, Roberta; Filice, Salvatore; Granata, Vincenza; Catalano, Orlando; Vallone, Paolo; Di Bonito, Maurizio; D'Aiuto, Massimiliano; Rinaldo, Massimo; Capasso, Immacolata; Sansone, Mario

    2016-01-01

    To obtain breast vascular map and to assess correlation between predominant feeding vessel and tumor location with a semi-automatic method compared to conventional radiologic reading. 148 malignant and 75 benign breast lesions were included. All patients underwent bilateral MR imaging. Written informed consent was obtained from the patients before MRI. The local ethics committee granted approval for this study. Semi-automatic breast vascular map and predominant vessel detection was performed on MRI, for each patient. Semi-automatic detection (depending on grey levels threshold manually chosen by radiologist) was compared with results of two expert radiologists; inter-observer variability and reliability of semi-automatic approach were assessed. Anatomic analysis of breast lesions revealed that 20% of patients had masses in internal half, 50% in external half and the 30% in subareolar/central area. As regards the 44 tumors in internal half, based on radiologic consensus, 40 demonstrated a predominant feeding vessel (61% were supplied by internal thoracic vessels, 14% by lateral thoracic vessels, 16% by both thoracic vessels and 9% had no predominant feeding vessel-pfeeding vessel (66% were supplied by internal thoracic vessels, 11% by lateral thoracic vessels, 9% by both thoracic vessels and 14% had no predominant feeding vessel-pfeeding vessel (25% were supplied by internal thoracic vessels, 39% by lateral thoracic vessels, 18% by both thoracic vessels and 18% had no predominant feeding vessel-pfeeding vessel (27% were supplied by internal thoracic vessels, 45% by lateral thoracic vessels, 4% by both thoracic vessels and 24% had no predominant feeding vessel-pfeeding vessel. An excellent reliability for semi-automatic assessment (Cronbach's alpha = 0.96) was reported. Predominant feeding vessel location was correlated with breast lesion location: internal thoracic artery supplied the highest proportion of breasts with tumor in internal half and lateral thoracic

  9. Coronary magnetic resonance angiography and vessel wall imaging in children with Kawasaki disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greil, Gerald F.; Hofbeck, Michael; Sieverding, Ludger [University of Tuebingen, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, Children' s Hospital, Tuebingen (Germany); Seeger, Achim; Miller, Stephan; Claussen, Claus D. [University of Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Botnar, Rene M. [Technical University Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Cardiovascular Division, Munich (Germany)

    2007-07-15

    In patients with Kawasaki disease (KD) serial evaluation of the distribution and size of coronary artery aneurysms (CAA) is necessary for risk stratification and therapeutic management. To apply whole-heart coronary MR angiography (CMRA) and black-blood coronary vessel wall imaging in children with KD. Six children (mean age 4.6 years, range 2.5-7.8 years) with KD underwent CMRA using a free-breathing, T2-prepared, three-dimensional steady-state free-precession (3D-SSFP), whole-heart approach with navigator gating and tracking. Vessel walls were imaged with an ECG-triggered and navigator-gated double inversion recovery (DIR) black-blood segmented turbo spin-echo sequence. There was complete agreement between CMRA and conventional angiography (n=6) in the detection of CAA (n=15). Excellent agreement was found between the two techniques in determining the maximal diameter (mean difference 0.2{+-}0.7 mm), length (mean difference 0.1{+-}0.8 mm) and distance from the ostium (mean difference -0.8{+-}2.1 mm) of the CAAs. In all subjects with a CAA, abnormally thickened vessel walls were found (2.5{+-}0.5 mm). CMRA accurately defines CAA in free-breathing sedated children with KD using the whole-heart approach and detects abnormally thickened vessel walls. This technique may reduce the need for serial X-ray coronary angiography, and improve risk stratification and monitoring of therapy. (orig.)

  10. IMPROVING THE QUALITY OF NEAR-INFRARED IMAGING OF IN VIVOBLOOD VESSELS USING IMAGE FUSION METHODS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Andreas Kryger; Savarimuthu, Thiusius Rajeeth; Sørensen, Anders Stengaard

    2009-01-01

    of their capability of enhancing the blood vessels while preserving the spectral signature of the original color image. Furthermore, we investigate a possibility of removing hair in the images using a fusion rule based on the "a trous" stationary wavelet decomposition. The method with the best overall performance...... with both speed and quality in mind is the Intensity Injection method. Using the developed system and the methods presented in this article, it is possible to create images of high visual quality with highly emphasized blood vessels....

  11. Medical image of the week: athersclerotic aneurysm of great vessels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaffer F

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. A 60 year-old man with a 33 pack-year history of tobacco abuse, presented with difficulty speaking and voice change for several weeks. His review of systems was positive for fatigue, night sweats and weight loss. Physical exam of the oropharynx with flexible laryngoscopy demonstrated immobile bilateral true and false vocal cords fixed in the para-median position without laryngeal lesions. Concern for intra-thoracic process with recurrent laryngeal nerve involvement, a computed tomography (CT of the chest and thoracic vessels demonstrated unusual appearing arteries with multiple penetrating atherosclerotic ulcers versus saccular aneurysms scattered throughout the aorta and its major branches (Figures 1 and 2. A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI with contrast, demonstrated multiple foci of saccular outpouchings involving the arch vessels distal to their origins with the largest dilatation measuring 26 x 25 mm in the case of proximal innominate (Figure 3. Although imaging lacked resolution, it was specialist opinion that the ...

  12. Proximal Bright Vessel Sign on Arterial Spin Labeling Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Acute Cardioembolic Cerebral Infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Ayumi; Shinohara, Yuki; Kuya, Keita; Sakamoto, Makoto; Kowa, Hisanori; Ogawa, Toshihide

    2017-07-01

    The congestion of spin-labeled blood at large-vessel occlusion can present as hyperintense signals on perfusion magnetic resonance imaging with 3-dimensional pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (proximal bright vessel sign). The purpose of this study was to clarify the difference between proximal bright vessel sign and susceptibility vessel sign in acute cardioembolic cerebral infarction. Forty-two patients with cardioembolic cerebral infarction in the anterior circulation territory underwent magnetic resonance imaging including diffusion-weighted imaging, 3-dimensional pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling perfusion magnetic resonance imaging, T2*-weighted imaging, and 3-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography using a 3-T magnetic resonance scanner. Visual assessments of proximal bright vessel sign and the susceptibility vessel sign were performed by consensus of 2 experienced neuroradiologists. The relationship between these signs and the occlusion site of magnetic resonance angiography was also investigated. Among 42 patients with cardioembolic cerebral infarction, 24 patients showed proximal bright vessel sign (57.1%) and 25 showed susceptibility vessel sign (59.5%). There were 19 cases of proximal bright vessel sign and susceptibility vessel sign-clear, 12 cases of proximal bright vessel sign and susceptibility vessel sign-unclear, and 11 mismatched cases. Four out of 6 patients with proximal bright vessel sign-unclear and susceptibility vessel sign-clear showed distal middle cerebral artery occlusion, and 2 out of 5 patients with proximal bright vessel sign-clear and susceptibility vessel sign-unclear showed no occlusion on magnetic resonance angiography. Proximal bright vessel sign is almost compatible with susceptibility vessel sign in patients with cardioembolic cerebral infarction. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of a soluble surfactant on a finite sized bubble motion in a blood vessel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaminathan, T. N.; Mukundakrishnan, K.; Ayyaswamy, P. S.; Eckmann, D. M.

    2009-01-01

    We present detailed results for the motion of a finite sized gas bubble in a blood vessel. The bubble (dispersed phase) size is taken to be such as to nearly occlude the vessel. The bulk medium is treated as a shear thinning Casson fluid and contains a soluble surfactant that adsorbs and desorbs from the interface. Three different vessel sizes, corresponding to a small artery, a large arteriole, and a small arteriole, in normal humans, are considered. The hematocrit (volume fraction of RBCs) has been taken to be 0.45. For arteriolar flow, where relevant, the Fahraeus-Lindqvist effect is taken into account. Bubble motion cause temporal and spatial gradients of shear stress at the cell surface lining the vessel wall as the bubble approaches the cell, moves over it and passes it by. Rapid reversals occur in the sign of the shear stress imparted to the cell surface during this motion. Shear stress gradients together with sign reversals are associated with a recirculation vortex at the rear of the moving bubble. The presence of the surfactant reduces the level of the shear stress gradients imparted to the cell surface as compared to an equivalent surfactant-free system. Our numerical results for bubble shapes and wall shear stresses may help explain phenomena observed in experimental studies related to gas embolism, a significant problem in cardiac surgery and decompression sickness. PMID:20305744

  14. Evaluation of detectable defect size for inner defect of pressure vessel using laser speckle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyeoung Suk; Seon, Sang Woo; Choi, Tae Ho; Kang, Chan Geun; Na, Man Gyun; Jung, Hyun Chul [Chsoun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    Pressure vessels are used in various industrial fields. If a defect occurs on the inner or outer surface of a pressure vessel, it may cause a massive accident. A defect on the outer surface can be detected by visual inspection. However, a defect on the inner surface is generally impossible to detect with visual inspection. Nondestructive testing can be used to detect this type of defect. Laser speckle shearing interferometry is one nondestructive testing method that can optically detect a defect; its advantages include noncontact, full field, and real time inspection. This study evaluated the detectable size for an internal defect of a pressure vessel. The material of the pressure vessel was ASTM A53 Gr.B. The internal defect was detected when the pressure vessel was loaded by internal pressure controlled by a pneumatic system. The internal pressure was controlled from 0.2 MPa to 0.6 MPa in increments of 0.2 MPa. The results confirmed that an internal defect with a 25 % defect depth could be detected even at 0.2 MPa pressure variation.

  15. High-low reflectivity enhancement based retinal vessel projection for SD-OCT images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiang; Niu, Sijie; Yuan, Songtao; Fan, Wen; Liu, Qinghuai

    2016-10-01

    The retinal vessel visualization from spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) images is important for ocular disease diagnosis and multimodal retinal image processing. The purpose is to display the retinal vessel in a single projection image from 3D SD-OCT images by using the light absorption and shadow characteristics of the retinal vessel. The authors present a novel retinal vessel projection method for SD-OCT images, which utilizes the light absorption and shadow characteristics of the retinal vessel, called high-low reflectivity enhancement (HLRE) method. The reflectivity of the retinal vessel increases between the internal limiting membrane and inner nuclear layer-outer plexiform layer (INL-OPL) layers because of the light absorption, and the reflectivity below the retinal vessel decreases because of the influence of the retinal vessel shadow. A retinal vessel mask image generated based on the reflectivity characteristics of the retinal vessel is used to enhance the subvolume projection image restricted between the INL-OPL and Bruch's membrane layers. Experimental results with 22 SD-OCT cubes from 12 patients and 10 normal persons demonstrate that the authors' method is more effective in displaying the retinal vessel than the summed-voxel projection and other five region restriction based projection methods. The average of the mean difference between the retinal vessel and background regions based on their HLRE method is 0.1921. The proposed HLRE method was more effective for the visualization of the retinal vessels than the state-of-art methods because it provides higher contrast and distinction.

  16. Biomechanical deformable image registration of longitudinal lung CT images using vessel information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazoulat, Guillaume; Owen, Dawn; Matuszak, Martha M; Balter, James M; Brock, Kristy K

    2016-07-07

    Spatial correlation of lung tissue across longitudinal images, as the patient responds to treatment, is a critical step in adaptive radiotherapy. The goal of this work is to expand a biomechanical model-based deformable registration algorithm (Morfeus) to achieve accurate registration in the presence of significant anatomical changes. Six lung cancer patients previously treated with conventionally fractionated radiotherapy were retrospectively evaluated. Exhale CT scans were obtained at treatment planning and following three weeks of treatment. For each patient, the planning CT was registered to the follow-up CT using Morfeus, a biomechanical model-based deformable registration algorithm. To model the complex response of the lung, an extension to Morfeus has been developed: an initial deformation was estimated with Morfeus consisting of boundary conditions on the chest wall and incorporating a sliding interface with the lungs. It was hypothesized that the addition of boundary conditions based on vessel tree matching would provide a robust reduction of the residual registration error. To achieve this, the vessel trees were segmented on the two images by thresholding a vesselness image based on the Hessian matrix's eigenvalues. For each point on the reference vessel tree centerline, the displacement vector was estimated by applying a variant of the Demons registration algorithm between the planning CT and the deformed follow-up CT. An expert independently identified corresponding landmarks well distributed in the lung to compute target registration errors (TRE). The TRE was: [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] mm after rigid registration, Morfeus and Morfeus with boundary conditions on the vessel tree, respectively. In conclusion, the addition of boundary conditions on the vessels significantly improved the accuracy in modeling the response of the lung and tumor over the course of radiotherapy. Minimizing and modeling these geometrical

  17. Lung vessel segmentation in CT images using graph-cuts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Zhiwei; Staring, Marius; Stoel, Berend C.

    2016-03-01

    Accurate lung vessel segmentation is an important operation for lung CT analysis. Filters that are based on analyzing the eigenvalues of the Hessian matrix are popular for pulmonary vessel enhancement. However, due to their low response at vessel bifurcations and vessel boundaries, extracting lung vessels by thresholding the vesselness is not sufficiently accurate. Some methods turn to graph-cuts for more accurate segmentation, as it incorporates neighbourhood information. In this work, we propose a new graph-cuts cost function combining appearance and shape, where CT intensity represents appearance and vesselness from a Hessian-based filter represents shape. Due to the amount of voxels in high resolution CT scans, the memory requirement and time consumption for building a graph structure is very high. In order to make the graph representation computationally tractable, those voxels that are considered clearly background are removed from the graph nodes, using a threshold on the vesselness map. The graph structure is then established based on the remaining voxel nodes, source/sink nodes and the neighbourhood relationship of the remaining voxels. Vessels are segmented by minimizing the energy cost function with the graph-cuts optimization framework. We optimized the parameters used in the graph-cuts cost function and evaluated the proposed method with two manually labeled sub-volumes. For independent evaluation, we used 20 CT scans of the VESSEL12 challenge. The evaluation results of the sub-volume data show that the proposed method produced a more accurate vessel segmentation compared to the previous methods, with F1 score 0.76 and 0.69. In the VESSEL12 data-set, our method obtained a competitive performance with an area under the ROC curve of 0.975, especially among the binary submissions.

  18. Pulmonary artery pulsatility and effect on vessel diameter assessment in magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariat, Masoud; Schantz, Daryl; Yoo, Shi-Joon; Wintersperger, Bernd J; Seed, Mike; Alnafisi, Bahiyah; Chu, Leysia; Macgowan, Christopher K; van Amerom, Joshua; Grosse-Wortmann, Lars

    2014-02-01

    Information about thoracic vascular sizes can crucially affect clinical decision-making in cardiovascular disease. A variety of imaging techniques such as catheter angiography, contrast enhanced computed tomography (CT) and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) are routinely used to measure vascular diameters. Traditionally, CMR black blood sequences were the main anatomical tool for visualization of vascular anatomy and still are in many centers. More recently, the vessel diameters are measured on multiplanar reconstructions derived from static magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). This study was performed to investigate the variation of vessel diameter measurements on different CMR techniques with respect to their data acquisition scheme. We recruited two groups of patients for this prospective study. One group included patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot (TOF), with at least moderate pulmonary insufficiency and another group of patients who underwent CMR as part of a diagnostic work-up for arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC). Additional images of the right pulmonary artery (RPA) were acquired in the double inversion recovery (DIR) black blood, cine steady state free precession (SSFP) and MRA. All images were reviewed by two CMR trained readers using the electronic caliper provided within the picture archiving and communication system package. The maximum diameter of each artery was recorded in millimeters with up to one decimal point. Paired t-tests and Bland-Altman plots were used for comparison of measurements between different sequences. A total of 52 patients were recruited for this study, 26 patients in the TOF group (15 males, age 12.55±2.9) and 26 patients in the ARVC group (15 males, age 15.6±2.3). In both groups, the RPA sizes were not significantly different between the DIR images and diastolic cine SSFP (p>0.05). Measurements on DIR were significantly smaller than those made on systolic cine SSFP or MRA in both groups

  19. An in situ optical imaging system for measuring lipid uptake, vessel contraction, and lymph flow in small animal lymphatic vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassis, Timothy; Weiler, Michael J.; Dixon, J. Brandon

    2012-03-01

    All dietary lipids are transported to venous circulation through the lymphatic system, yet the underlying mechanisms that regulate this process remain unclear. Understanding how the lymphatics functionally respond to changes in lipid load is important in the diagnosis and treatment of lipid and lymphatic related diseases such as obesity, hypercholesterolemia, and lymphedema. Therefore, we sought to develop an in situ imaging system to quantify and correlate lymphatic function as it relates to lipid transport. A custom-built optical set-up provides us with the capability of dual-channel imaging of both high-speed bright-field video and fluorescence simultaneously. This is achieved by dividing the light path into two optical bands. Utilizing high-speed and back-illuminated CCD cameras and post-acquisition image processing algorithms, we have the potential quantify correlations between vessel contraction, lymph flow and lipid concentration of mesenteric lymphatic vessels in situ. Local flow velocity is measured through lymphocyte tracking, vessel contraction through measurements of the vessel walls and lipid uptake through fluorescence intensity tracking of a fluorescent long chain fatty acid analogue, Bodipy FL C16. This system will prove to be an invaluable tool for both scientists studying lymphatic function in health and disease, and those investigating strategies for targeting the lymphatic system with orally delivered drugs.

  20. Detection of Blood Vessels in Color Fundus Images using a Local Radon Transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Pourreza

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This paper addresses a method for automatic detection of blood vessels in color fundus images which utilizes two main tools: image partitioning and local Radon transform. Material and Methods: The input images are firstly divided into overlapping windows and then the Radon transform is applied to each. The maximum of the Radon transform in each window corresponds to the probable available sub-vessel. To verify the detected sub-vessel, the maximum is compared with a predefined threshold. The verified sub-vessels are reconstructed using the Radon transform information. All detected and reconstructed sub-vessels are finally combined to make the final vessel tree. Results: The algorithm’s performance was evaluated numerically by applying it to 40 images of DRIVE database, a standard retinal image database. The vessels were extracted manually by two physicians. This database was used to test and compare the available and proposed algorithms for vessel detection in color fundus images. By comparing the output of the algorithm with the manual results, the two parameters TPR and FPR were calculated for each image and the average of TPRs and FPRs were used to plot the ROC curve. Discussion and Conclusion: Comparison of the ROC curve of this algorithm with other algorithms demonstrated the high achieved accuracy. Beside the high accuracy, the Radon transform which is integral-based makes the algorithm robust against noise.

  1. DR HAGIS-a fundus image database for the automatic extraction of retinal surface vessels from diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Sven; Russell, Greg; Nourrit, Vincent; McLoughlin, Niall

    2017-01-01

    A database of retinal fundus images, the DR HAGIS database, is presented. This database consists of 39 high-resolution color fundus images obtained from a diabetic retinopathy screening program in the UK. The NHS screening program uses service providers that employ different fundus and digital cameras. This results in a range of different image sizes and resolutions. Furthermore, patients enrolled in such programs often display other comorbidities in addition to diabetes. Therefore, in an effort to replicate the normal range of images examined by grading experts during screening, the DR HAGIS database consists of images of varying image sizes and resolutions and four comorbidity subgroups: collectively defined as the diabetic retinopathy, hypertension, age-related macular degeneration, and Glaucoma image set (DR HAGIS). For each image, the vasculature has been manually segmented to provide a realistic set of images on which to test automatic vessel extraction algorithms. Modified versions of two previously published vessel extraction algorithms were applied to this database to provide some baseline measurements. A method based purely on the intensity of images pixels resulted in a mean segmentation accuracy of 95.83% ([Formula: see text]), whereas an algorithm based on Gabor filters generated an accuracy of 95.71% ([Formula: see text]).

  2. Pulmonary artery pulsatility and effect on vessel diameter assessment in magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shariat, Masoud, E-mail: masoudshariat@gmail.com [Department of Medical Imaging, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Schantz, Daryl, E-mail: daryl.schantz@gmail.com [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Yoo, Shi-Joon, E-mail: shi-joon.yoo@sickkids.ca [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Wintersperger, Bernd J., E-mail: bernd.wintersperger@uhn.ca [Department of Medical Imaging, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Seed, Mike, E-mail: mike.seed@sickkids.ca [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Cardiology, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Alnafisi, Bahiyah, E-mail: bahiyah.alnafisi@uhn.ca [Department of Medical Imaging, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Chu, Leysia, E-mail: leysia_99@yahoo.com [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); MacGowan, Christopher K., E-mail: christopher.macgowan@sickkids.ca [Department of Physiology and Experimental Medicine, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Amerom, Joshua van, E-mail: Joshu.vanamerom@sickkids.ca [Department of Physiology and Experimental Medicine, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Grosse-Wortmann, Lars, E-mail: lars.grosse-wortmann@sickkids.ca [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Cardiology, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-02-15

    Background: Information about thoracic vascular sizes can crucially affect clinical decision-making in cardiovascular disease. A variety of imaging techniques such as catheter angiography, contrast enhanced computed tomography (CT) and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) are routinely used to measure vascular diameters. Traditionally, CMR black blood sequences were the main anatomical tool for visualization of vascular anatomy and still are in many centers. More recently, the vessel diameters are measured on multiplanar reconstructions derived from static magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). This study was performed to investigate the variation of vessel diameter measurements on different CMR techniques with respect to their data acquisition scheme. Methods: We recruited two groups of patients for this prospective study. One group included patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot (TOF), with at least moderate pulmonary insufficiency and another group of patients who underwent CMR as part of a diagnostic work-up for arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC). Additional images of the right pulmonary artery (RPA) were acquired in the double inversion recovery (DIR) black blood, cine steady state free precession (SSFP) and MRA. All images were reviewed by two CMR trained readers using the electronic caliper provided within the picture archiving and communication system package. The maximum diameter of each artery was recorded in millimeters with up to one decimal point. Paired t-tests and Bland–Altman plots were used for comparison of measurements between different sequences. Results: A total of 52 patients were recruited for this study, 26 patients in the TOF group (15 males, age 12.55 ± 2.9) and 26 patients in the ARVC group (15 males, age 15.6 ± 2.3). In both groups, the RPA sizes were not significantly different between the DIR images and diastolic cine SSFP (p > 0.05). Measurements on DIR were significantly smaller than those made on

  3. The heritability of vessel size of the pampiniform plexus as a means to assess the genetic component of varicocele

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ultrasonography of each testicle was used to capture a coronal-saggital image of the veins of the pampiniform plexus (PP) and the testicular artery of 239 boars at approximately 6 months of age. Three to 10 vessels of the PP were used to derive the average area of right PP vessels (AAR) and the aver...

  4. Robust vessel detection and segmentation in ultrasound images by a data-driven approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ping; Wang, Qiang; Wang, Xiaotao; Hao, Zhihui; Xu, Kuanhong; Ren, Haibing; Kim, Jung Bae; Hwang, Youngkyoo

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents a learning based vessel detection and segmentation method in real-patient ultrasound (US) liver images. We aim at detecting multiple shaped vessels robustly and automatically, including vessels with weak and ambiguous boundaries. Firstly, vessel candidate regions are detected by a data-driven approach. Multi-channel vessel enhancement maps with complement performances are generated and aggregated under a Conditional Random Field (CRF) framework. Vessel candidates are obtained by thresholding the saliency map. Secondly, regional features are extracted and the probability of each region being a vessel is modeled by random forest regression. Finally, a fast levelset method is developed to refine vessel boundaries. Experiments have been carried out on an US liver dataset with 98 patients. The dataset contains both normal and abnormal liver images. The proposed method in this paper is compared with a traditional Hessian based method, and the average precision is promoted by 56 percents and 7.8 percents for vessel detection and classification, respectively. This improvement shows that our method is more robust to noise, therefore has a better performance than the Hessian based method for the detection of vessels with weak and ambiguous boundaries.

  5. Vessel packaging effect in laser speckle contrast imaging and laser Doppler imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredriksson, Ingemar; Larsson, Marcus

    2017-10-01

    Laser speckle-based techniques are frequently used to assess microcirculatory blood flow. Perfusion estimates are calculated either by analyzing the speckle fluctuations over time as in laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF), or by analyzing the speckle contrast as in laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI). The perfusion estimates depend on the amount of blood and its speed distribution. However, the perfusion estimates are commonly given in arbitrary units as they are nonlinear and depend on the magnitude and the spatial distribution of the optical properties in the tissue under investigation. We describe how the spatial confinement of blood to vessels, called the vessel packaging effect, can be modeled in LDF and LSCI, which affect the Doppler power spectra and speckle contrast, and the underlying bio-optical mechanisms for these effects. As an example, the perfusion estimate is reduced by 25% for LDF and often more than 50% for LSCI when blood is located in vessels with an average diameter of 40 μm, instead of being homogeneously distributed within the tissue. This significant effect can be compensated for only with knowledge of the average diameter of the vessels in the tissue.

  6. Fourier cross-sectional profile for vessel detection on retinal images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Tao

    2010-04-01

    Retinal blood vessels are important objects in ophthalmologic images. In spite of many attempts for vessel detection, it appears that existing methodologies are based on edge detection or modeling of vessel cross-sectional profiles in intensity. The application of these methodologies is hampered by the presence of a wide range of retinal vessels. In this paper we define a universal representation for upward and downward vessel cross-sectional profiles with varying boundary sharpness. This expression is used to define a new scheme of vessel detection based on symmetry and asymmetry in the Fourier domain. Phase congruency is utilized for measuring symmetry and asymmetry so that our scheme is invariant to vessel brightness variations. We have performed experiments on fluorescein images and color fundus images to show the efficiency of the proposed algorithm technique. We also have performed a width measurement study, using an optimal medial axis skeletonization scheme as a post-processing step, to compare the technique with the generalized Gaussian profile modeling. The new algorithm technique is promising for automated vessel detection where optimizing profile models is difficult and preserving vessel width information is necessary. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. OPTIMAL RESOLUTION FOR AUTOMATIC QUANTIFICATION OF BLOOD VESSELS ON DIGITIZED IMAGES OF THE WHOLE CANCER SECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronan Françoise

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Discrepancies concerning the prognostic significance of cancer vascularization can be partly explained by biases due to quantification protocols. We recently recommended a swift, inexpensive and automatic analysis of 2,700 dpi slide scanner images of the whole immunostained sections. Another team, proposed, quite at the same time, to work at 4,000 dpi. The aim of the present paper is to check if information contained in images scanned at 2,700 and 4,000 dpi are relevant and equivalent, when compared to the low magnification of the microscope, in order to propose the best compromise between precision and time expense. To evaluate precisely the amount of information gained or lost according to the resolution used, we compared the number and size of blood vessel profiles, manually detected, on twenty one Hodgkin lymphoma acquired with a scanner (2,700 and 4,000 dpi and with a microscope (16,000 dpi. Results obtained at 4,000 dpi were equivalent to the estimation performed at microscopical level either by a biologist or a pathologist, while tiny vessels were lost at 2,700 dpi. Scanning whole histological sections at 4,000 dpi provides a relevant method for evaluating tumour vascularization, which can be easily automated and standardized.

  8. Comparison of approaches for microscopic imaging of skin lymphatic vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiufeng; Yu, Zheyuan; Liu, Ningfei

    2012-01-01

    Assessment of skin lymphatic vessels is of great significance in understanding their roles in many pathological conditions. Our aim was to identify the optimal approach for investigation of cutaneous lymphatic system. We performed comparative studies on skin lymphatic vessels using immunohistochemistry of tissue sections, computer graphic reconstruction method together with immunohistochemically stained serial sections and whole mount fluorescence in human lower limb. Lymphatic vessels were identified with podoplanin antibody. The relative merits and drawbacks of each method in evaluation of structure, spatial organization, and distribution of cutaneous lymphatic vessels were described. Immunohistology of tissue sections enabled the investigation of the structure and distribution of the whole cutaneous lymphatic system in two-dimensional slices, whereas three-dimensional morphology of only the most superficial lymph capillary network immediately under the epidermis could be evaluated with the whole mount technique. Meanwhile, only little segmentation of skin lymphatic vessel from five immunohistochemically stained serial sections was reconstructed and evaluated due to expense and special skills required using computer graphic three-dimensional reconstruction. Furthermore, a great number of artifacts and special skills required in its processes leaded to less accurate structure of skin lymphatic vessels. Our findings demonstrated that the use of either of the proposed techniques alone could not allow a comprehensive analysis of the skin lymphatic system due to their relative drawbacks. Combination of immunohistology of tissue sections and three-dimensional whole-mount preparations appears to be the best candidate for comprehensive evaluation of skin lymphatic system. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of water ascent in embolized xylem vessels of grapevine stem segments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingtao Wang; Melvin T. Tyree; Roderick E. Wasylishen

    2013-01-01

    Temporal and spatial information about water refilling of embolized xylem vessels and the rate of water ascent in these vessels is critical for understanding embolism repair in intact living vascular plants. High-resolution 1H magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) experiments have been performed on embolized grapevine stem segments while they were...

  10. Timing-Invariant Imaging of Collateral Vessels in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, E.J.; Vonken, E.J.; Seeters, T. van; Dankbaar, J.W.; Schaaf, I.C. van der; Kappelle, L.J.; Ginneken, B. van; Velthuis, B.K.; Prokop, M.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Although collateral vessels have been shown to be an important prognostic factor in acute ischemic stroke, patients with lack of collaterals on standard imaging techniques may still have good clinical outcome. We postulate that in these cases collateral vessels are present

  11. Ultrasound Small Vessel Imaging With Block-Wise Adaptive Local Clutter Filtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Pengfei; Manduca, Armando; Trzasko, Joshua D; Chen, Shigao

    2017-01-01

    Robust clutter filtering is essential for ultrasound small vessel imaging. Eigen-based clutter filtering techniques have recently shown great improvement in clutter rejection over conventional clutter filters in small animals. However, for in vivo human imaging, eigen-based clutter filtering can be challenging due to the complex spatially-varying tissue and noise characteristics. To address this challenge, we present a novel block-wise adaptive singular value decomposition (SVD) based clutter filtering technique. The proposed method divides the global plane wave data into overlapped local spatial segments, within which tissue signals are assumed to be locally coherent and noise locally stationary. This, in turn, enables effective separation of tissue, blood and noise via SVD. For each block, the proposed method adaptively determines the singular value cutoff thresholds based on local data statistics. Processing results from each block are redundantly combined to improve both the signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) and the contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR) of the small vessel perfusion image. Experimental results show that the proposed method achieved more than two-fold increase in SNR and more than three-fold increase in CNR in dB scale over the conventional global SVD filtering technique for an in vivo human native kidney study. The proposed method also showed substantial improvement in suppression of the depth-dependent background noise and better rejection of near field tissue clutter. The effects of different processing block size and block overlap percentage were systematically investigated as well as the tradeoff between imaging quality and computational cost.

  12. Image Analysis for Particle Size Distribution

    OpenAIRE

    Shanthi, C; R. Kingsley Porpatham; Pappa, N.

    2014-01-01

    Particle size distribution (PSD) affects properties of particulate materials and is used for denoting their quality and performance. Among many techniques available to measure PSD, many are quite often offline methods and are time consuming. Also methods like sieving involve, handling of the material physically and electromagnetically, which is healthy, if avoided for certain materials. Thus the need for an online PSD analyzer and the advent of digital image processing has rendered the drift ...

  13. Multiplane magnetic resonance imaging of the heart and major vessels: studies in normal volunteers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higgins, C.B.; Stark, D.; McNamara, M.; Lanzer, P.; Crooks, L.E.; Kaufman, L.

    1984-04-01

    The feasibility of magnetic resonance imaging for defining anatomy of internal cardiac structures and major blood vessels was assessed in 14 normal subjects. Both electrocardiogram-gated and standard spin-echo images were obtained. Gated images provided better visualization of internal cardiac morphology and of upper mediastinal vessels than did nongated images. Trabecular detail and components of the mitral valve could be resolved. All segments of the left ventricular wall could be evaluated by combining axial, coronal, and sagittal images. Gated acquisition of magnetic resonance images did not increase imaging time; five transverse slices of the left ventricle were obtained in 6.0-8.5 min. The good image quality, ease of gated acquisition, large field of view, capability of direct imaging in multiple planes, and noninvasiveness of the technique suggest that it will be an important imaging method in cardiovascular disease.

  14. Label-Free In Vivo Imaging of Corneal Lymphatic Vessels Using Microscopic Optical Coherence Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horstmann, Jens; Schulz-Hildebrandt, Hinnerk; Bock, Felix; Siebelmann, Sebastian; Lankenau, Eva; Hüttmann, Gereon; Steven, Philipp; Cursiefen, Claus

    2017-11-01

    Corneal neovascularization, in particular lymphangiogenesis, is a limiting factor in corneal transplant survival. Novel treatment approaches focus on (selective) inhibition and regression of lymphatic vessels. Imaging clinically invisible corneal lymphatic vessels is a prerequisite for these strategies. Using a murine model, this study investigates whether corneal lymphatic vessels can be imaged using microscopic optical coherence tomography (mOCT). Corneal neovascularization was induced by intrastromal placement of 11.0 nylon sutures in one eye of BALB/c mice. After 2 weeks, cross-sectional images and volumes of the corneas with a 0.5 mm lateral and axial field of view were acquired using a custom-built mOCT system enabling a resolution of 1 μm at a B-scan rate of 165/s. Three of the six animals received an additional intrastromal injection of India ink 24 hours before the measurement to stain the corneal lymphatic system in vivo. Immunohistochemistry using CD31 and LYVE-1 was used to validate the mOCT findings. Using mOCT, lymphatic vessels were visible as dark vessel-like structures with the lumen lacking a hyperreflective wall and mostly lacking cells. However, individual, slowly moving particles, which most likely are immune cells, occasionally could be observed inside the lumen. In lymphatic vessels of ink-stained corneas, hyperreflection and shadowing underneath was observed. Ink-filled lymphatic vessels were colocalized in consecutive corneal flat mounts of the same specimen. Corneal lymphatic vessels can be imaged using mOCT. This novel approach opens new options for noninvasive clinical imaging of corneal lymphatic vessels for diagnostic and therapeutic indications.

  15. Distribution of different sized ocular surface vessels in diabetics and normal individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Touka Banaee

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Presence of diabetes mellitus is associated with contraction of larger vessels in the conjunctiva. Smaller vessels dilate with diabetic retinopathy. These findings may be useful in the photographic screening of diabetes mellitus and retinopathy.

  16. Body image: the dimension of size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreitler, S; Kreitler, H

    1988-02-01

    In view of a dearth of clear data concerning phenomenal body size and the shortcomings of the assessment methods, the purpose of the present study was to apply a new kinaesthetically based Body Size Estimation method for investigating differences in size estimations of 10 body parts by men and women of different age groups, comparing them to estimations of a neutral object, and examining their interrelations and relations to attitudinal and personality variables. Two hundred and forty Israeli subjects, 80 (40 male, 40 female) in each of three age groups (4 to 6, 10 to 12, and 28 to 30 years) were administered estimations of body and object, figure drawing, and questionnaires in two individual sessions. Results showed overestimation of body size in all groups, decreasing regularly with age or U-shaped, few gender differences, differences from object estimations, a grouping into bodily and facial images, increasing unitariness, negative correlations with body cathexis and satisfaction, bodily sophistication, and the richness of the self concept and positive correlations with exercise, field dependence, and figure drawing distortions.

  17. Automated image segmentation and registration of vessel wall MRI for quantitative assessment of carotid artery vessel wall dimensions and plaque composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klooster, Ronald van 't

    2014-01-01

    The main goal of this thesis was to develop methods for automated segmentation, registration and classification of the carotid artery vessel wall and plaque components using multi-sequence MR vessel wall images to assess atherosclerosis. First, a general introduction into atherosclerosis and

  18. On-Site Oxy-Lance Size Reduction of South Texas Project Reactor Vessel Heads - 12324

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Posivak, Edward [WMG, inc. (United States); Keeney, Gilbert; Wheeler, Dean [Shaw Group (United States)

    2012-07-01

    On-Site Oxy-Lance size reduction of mildly radioactive large components has been accomplished at other operating plants. On-Site Oxy-Lance size reduction of more radioactive components like Reactor Vessel Heads had previously been limited to decommissioning projects. Building on past decommissioning and site experience, subcontractors for South Texas Project Nuclear Operating Company (STPNOC) developed an innovative integrated system to control smoke, radioactive contamination, worker dose, and worker safety. STP's innovative, easy to use CEDM containment that provided oxy lance access, smoke control, and spatter/contamination control was the key to successful segmentation for cost-effective and ALARA packaging and transport for disposal. Relative to CEDM milling, STP oxy-lance segmentation saved approximately 40 person- REM accrued during 9,000 hours logged into the radiological controlled area (RCA) during more than 3,800 separate entries. Furthermore there were no personnel contamination events or respiratory uptakes of radioactive material during the course of the entire project. (authors)

  19. Ex-vivo imaging of blood and lymphatic vessels in conjunctiva using optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Peijun; Karnowski, Karol; Yu, Paula; An, Dong; Yu, Dao-Yi; Sampson, David D.

    2017-04-01

    Label-free imaging of the blood and lymphatic vessel networks of the conjunctiva of the eye is important in assessing the drainage pathways affected by glaucoma. We utilize the characteristically low signal in optical coherence tomography (OCT) provided by such vessels in ex vivo tissue to characterize their morphology in two and three dimensions. We demonstrate this method on conjunctiva from six porcine eyes, showing the ready visualization of both vessel networks. Such ex vivo characterization is a necessary precursor for future in vivo studies directed towards improving glaucoma surgery.

  20. High-Resolution Vessel Wall Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Varicella-Zoster Virus Vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Lachanis, Stefanos; Magoufis, Georgios; Safouris, Apostolos; Kargiotis, Odysseas; Stamboulis, Elefterios

    2016-06-01

    Varicella-zoster virus vasculopathy is a rare but potentially treatable condition. Diagnosis has been based on angiography, brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and cerebrospinal fluid analysis. High-resolution vessel wall MRI may aid to the diagnosis by differentiating inflammation from other vessel wall pathologies. We present the characteristic MRI findings of this condition in a young patient presenting with ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Use of kurtosis for locating deep blood vessels in raw speckle imaging using a homogeneity representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peregrina-Barreto, Hayde; Perez-Corona, Elizabeth; Rangel-Magdaleno, Jose; Ramos-Garcia, Ruben; Chiu, Roger; Ramirez-San-Juan, Julio C.

    2017-06-01

    Visualization of deep blood vessels in speckle images is an important task as it is used to analyze the dynamics of the blood flow and the health status of biological tissue. Laser speckle imaging is a wide-field optical technique to measure relative blood flow speed based on the local speckle contrast analysis. However, it has been reported that this technique is limited to certain deep blood vessels (about ρ=300 μm) because of the high scattering of the sample; beyond this depth, the quality of the vessel's image decreases. The use of a representation based on homogeneity values, computed from the co-occurrence matrix, is proposed as it provides an improved vessel definition and its corresponding diameter. Moreover, a methodology is proposed for automatic blood vessel location based on the kurtosis analysis. Results were obtained from the different skin phantoms, showing that it is possible to identify the vessel region for different morphologies, even up to 900 μm in depth.

  2. Synthetic range profiling, ISAR imaging of sea vessels and feature extraction, using a multimode radar to classify targets: initial results from field trials

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Abdul Gaffar, MY

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available -based classification of small to medium sized sea vessels in littoral condition. The experimental multimode radar is based on an experimental tracking radar that was modified to generate SRP and ISAR images in both search and tracking modes. The architecture...

  3. Development and validation of a custom made indocyanine green fluorescence lymphatic vessel imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallotta, Olivia J.; van Zanten, Malou; McEwen, Mark; Burrow, Lynne; Beesley, Jack; Piller, Neil

    2015-06-01

    Lymphoedema is a chronic progressive condition often producing significant morbidity. An in-depth understanding of an individual's lymphatic architecture is valuable both in the understanding of underlying pathology and for targeting and tailoring treatment. Severe lower limb injuries resulting in extensive loss of soft tissue require transposition of a flap consisting of muscle and/or soft tissue to close the defect. These patients are at risk of lymphoedema and little is known about lymphatic regeneration within the flap. Indocyanine green (ICG), a water-soluble dye, has proven useful for the imaging of lymphatic vessels. When injected into superficial tissues it binds to plasma proteins in lymph. By exposing the dye to specific wavelengths of light, ICG fluoresces with near-infrared light. Skin is relatively transparent to ICG fluorescence, enabling the visualization and characterization of superficial lymphatic vessels. An ICG fluorescence lymphatic vessel imager was manufactured to excite ICG and visualize real-time fluorescence as it travels through the lymphatic vessels. Animal studies showed successful ICG excitation and detection using this imager. Clinically, the imager has assisted researchers to visualize otherwise hidden superficial lymphatic pathways in patients postflap surgery. Preliminary results suggest superficial lymphatic vessels do not redevelop in muscle flaps.

  4. Comparative analysis of methods for extracting vessel network on breast MRI images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaizer, Bence T.; Vassiou, Katerina G.; Lavdas, Eleftherios; Arvanitis, Dimitrios L.; Fezoulidis, Ioannis V.; Glotsos, Dimitris T.

    2017-11-01

    Digital processing of MRI images aims to provide an automatized diagnostic evaluation of regular health screenings. Cancerous lesions are proven to cause an alteration in the vessel structure of the diseased organ. Currently there are several methods used for extraction of the vessel network in order to quantify its properties. In this work MRI images (Signa HDx 3.0T, GE Healthcare, courtesy of University Hospital of Larissa) of 30 female breasts were subjected to three different vessel extraction algorithms to determine the location of their vascular network. The first method is an experiment to build a graph over known points of the vessel network; the second algorithm aims to determine the direction and diameter of vessels at these points; the third approach is a seed growing algorithm, spreading selection to neighbors of the known vessel pixels. The possibilities shown by the different methods were analyzed, and quantitative measurements were performed. The data provided by these measurements showed no clear correlation with the presence or malignancy of tumors, based on the radiological diagnosis of skilled physicians.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of a small vessel hepatic hemangioma in a cirrhotic patient with histopathologic correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Sara; Aljarallah, Badr; Trivedi, Anshu; Thung, Swan N

    2015-01-01

    The authors report and discuss a rare case of a small vessel hepatic hemangioma in a 59-year-old patient with liver cirrhosis, which was pre-procedurally characterized as indeterminate due to atypical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features. This manuscript reviews the MRI features with pathologic correlation, emphasizes the importance of accurate characterization of liver lesions, and discusses the role of biopsy. We believe this is the first reported case of a small vessel hemangioma in liver cirrhosis with imaging and histopathologic correlation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Automatic segmentation of blood vessels from retinal fundus images ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Machine Learning techniques have been useful in almost every field of concern. Data Mining, a branch of Machine Learning is one of the most extensively used techniques. The ever-increasing demands in the field of medicine are being addressed by computational approaches in which Big Data analysis, image ...

  7. Comparison of vessel enhancement algorithms applied to time-of-flight MRA images for cerebrovascular segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phellan, Renzo; Forkert, Nils D

    2017-11-01

    Vessel enhancement algorithms are often used as a preprocessing step for vessel segmentation in medical images to improve the overall segmentation accuracy. Each algorithm uses different characteristics to enhance vessels, such that the most suitable algorithm may vary for different applications. This paper presents a comparative analysis of the accuracy gains in vessel segmentation generated by the use of nine vessel enhancement algorithms: Multiscale vesselness using the formulas described by Erdt (MSE), Frangi (MSF), and Sato (MSS), optimally oriented flux (OOF), ranking orientations responses path operator (RORPO), the regularized Perona-Malik approach (RPM), vessel enhanced diffusion (VED), hybrid diffusion with continuous switch (HDCS), and the white top hat algorithm (WTH). The filters were evaluated and compared based on time-of-flight MRA datasets and corresponding manual segmentations from 5 healthy subjects and 10 patients with an arteriovenous malformation. Additionally, five synthetic angiographic datasets with corresponding ground truth segmentation were generated with three different noise levels (low, medium, and high) and also used for comparison. The parameters for each algorithm and subsequent segmentation were optimized using leave-one-out cross evaluation. The Dice coefficient, Matthews correlation coefficient, area under the ROC curve, number of connected components, and true positives were used for comparison. The results of this study suggest that vessel enhancement algorithms do not always lead to more accurate segmentation results compared to segmenting nonenhanced images directly. Multiscale vesselness algorithms, such as MSE, MSF, and MSS proved to be robust to noise, while diffusion-based filters, such as RPM, VED, and HDCS ranked in the top of the list in scenarios with medium or no noise. Filters that assume tubular-shapes, such as MSE, MSF, MSS, OOF, RORPO, and VED show a decrease in accuracy when considering patients with an AVM

  8. Walled Carotid Bifurcation Phantoms for Imaging Investigations of Vessel Wall Motion and Blood Flow Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee, Adrian J Y; Ho, Chung Kit; Yiu, Billy Y S; Yu, Alfred C H

    2016-07-18

    As a major application domain of vascular ultrasound, the carotid artery has long been the subject of anthropomorphic phantom design. It is nevertheless not trivial to develop walled carotid phantoms that are compatible for use in integrative imaging of carotid wall motion and flow dynamics. In this paper, we present a novel phantom design protocol that can enable efficient fabrication of walled carotid bifurcation phantoms with: (i) high acoustic compatibility, (ii) artery-like vessel elasticity, and (iii) stenotic narrowing feature. Our protocol first involved direct fabrication of the vessel core and an outer mold using computer-aided design tools and 3-D printing technology; these built parts were then used to construct an elastic vessel tube through investment casting of a polyvinyl alcohol containing mixture, and an agar-gelatin tissue mimicking slab was formed around the vessel tube. For demonstration, we applied our protocol to develop a set of healthy and stenosed (25%, 50%, 75%) carotid bifurcation phantoms. Plane wave imaging experiments were performed on these phantoms using an ultrasound scanner with channel-level configurability. Results show that the wall motion dynamics of our phantoms agreed with pulse wave propagation in an elastic vessel (pulse wave velocity of 4.67±0.71 m/s measured at the common carotid artery), and their flow dynamics matched the expected ones in healthy and stenosed bifurcation (recirculation and flow jet formation observed). Integrative imaging of vessel wall motion and blood flow dynamics in our phantoms was also demonstrated, from which we observed fluid-structure interaction differences between healthy and diseased bifurcation phantoms. These findings show that the walled bifurcation phantoms developed with our new protocol are useful in vascular imaging studies that individually or jointly assess wall motion and flow dynamics.

  9. Threshold segmentation algorithm for automatic extraction of cerebral vessels from brain magnetic resonance angiography images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Li, Chao; Wang, Jie; Wei, Xiaoer; Li, Yuehua; Zhu, Yuemin; Zhang, Su

    2015-02-15

    Cerebrovascular segmentation plays an important role in medical diagnosis. This study was conducted to develop a threshold segmentation algorithm for automatic extraction and volumetric quantification of cerebral vessels on brain magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) images. The MRA images of 10 individuals were acquired using a 3 Tesla MR scanner (Intera-achieva SMI-2.1, Philips Medical Systems). Otsu's method was used to divide the brain MRA images into two parts, namely, foreground and background regions. To extract the cerebral vessels, we performed the threshold segmentation algorithm on the foreground region by comparing two different statistical distributions. Automatically segmented vessels were compared with manually segmented vessels. Different similarity metrics were used to assess the changes in segmentation performance as a function of a weighted parameter w used in segmentation algorithm. Varying w from 2 to 100 resulted in a false positive rate ranging from 117% to 3.21%, and a false negative rate ranging from 8.23% to 28.97%. The Dice similarity coefficient (DSC), which reflected the segmentation accuracy, initially increased and then decreased as w increased. The suggested range of values for w is [10, 20] given that the maximum DSC (e.g., DSC=0.84) was obtained within this range. The performance of our method was validated by comparing with manual segmentation. The proposed threshold segmentation method can be used to accurately and efficiently extract cerebral vessels from brain MRA images. Threshold segmentation may be used for studies focusing on three-dimensional visualization and volumetric quantification of cerebral vessels. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Storage Size Reduction for the Integral Image

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belt, H.J.W.

    2007-01-01

    The integral image is an image containing accumulated sums of pixel values taken from an input image. It is an important concept for the computationally efficient implementation of so-called box filters, where the sums of the values of pixel in a rectangular image region are calculated. An

  11. Photoacoustic imaging of blood vessels with a double-ring sensor featuring a narrow angular aperture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolkman, R.G.M.; Hondebrink, Erwin; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; van Leeuwen, Ton; de Mul, F.F.M.

    2004-01-01

    A photoacoustic double-ring sensor, featuring a narrow angular aperture, is developed for laser-induced photoacoustic imaging of blood vessels. An integrated optical fiber enables reflection-mode detection of ultrasonic waves. By using the cross-correlation between the signals detected by the two

  12. Trainable COSFIRE filters for vessel delineation with application to retinal images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Azzopardi, G; Strisciuglio, N.; Vento, M.; Petkov, N.

    2015-01-01

    Retinal imaging provides a non-invasive opportunity for the diagnosis of several medical pathologies. The automatic segmentation of the vessel tree is an important pre-processing step which facilitates subsequent automatic processes that contribute to such diagnosis. We introduce a novel method for

  13. Image quality in intravenous digital subtraction angiography of renal vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neufang, K.F.R.; Zanella, F.E.; Moedder, U.

    1984-07-01

    Visualisation of the renal arteries and image quality of intravenous DSA were evaluated in 62 patients. The left renal artery is visualized less well and overlying more frequently the right renal artery because of gas in the stomach and colon. IV DSA is not adequate for visualisation of the subsegmental arteries, and cannot be used for tumor angiography. It is not possible to prove that central venous injection technique is superior to peripheral venous injection. Patients must be carefully prepared as is necessary for the urogram. Examination is carried out using Buscopan and a compression device.

  14. Does Instructor's Image Size in Video Lectures Affect Learning Outcomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pi, Z.; Hong, J.; Yang, J.

    2017-01-01

    One of the most commonly used forms of video lectures is a combination of an instructor's image and accompanying lecture slides as a picture-in-picture. As the image size of the instructor varies significantly across video lectures, and so do the learning outcomes associated with this technology, the influence of the instructor's image size should…

  15. Skeletonization algorithm-based blood vessel quantification using in vivo 3D photoacoustic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiburger, K. M.; Nam, S. Y.; Chung, E.; Suggs, L. J.; Emelianov, S. Y.; Molinari, F.

    2016-11-01

    Blood vessels are the only system to provide nutrients and oxygen to every part of the body. Many diseases can have significant effects on blood vessel formation, so that the vascular network can be a cue to assess malicious tumor and ischemic tissues. Various imaging techniques can visualize blood vessel structure, but their applications are often constrained by either expensive costs, contrast agents, ionizing radiations, or a combination of the above. Photoacoustic imaging combines the high-contrast and spectroscopic-based specificity of optical imaging with the high spatial resolution of ultrasound imaging, and image contrast depends on optical absorption. This enables the detection of light absorbing chromophores such as hemoglobin with a greater penetration depth compared to purely optical techniques. We present here a skeletonization algorithm for vessel architectural analysis using non-invasive photoacoustic 3D images acquired without the administration of any exogenous contrast agents. 3D photoacoustic images were acquired on rats (n  =  4) in two different time points: before and after a burn surgery. A skeletonization technique based on the application of a vesselness filter and medial axis extraction is proposed to extract the vessel structure from the image data and six vascular parameters (number of vascular trees (NT), vascular density (VD), number of branches (NB), 2D distance metric (DM), inflection count metric (ICM), and sum of angles metric (SOAM)) were calculated from the skeleton. The parameters were compared (1) in locations with and without the burn wound on the same day and (2) in the same anatomic location before (control) and after the burn surgery. Four out of the six descriptors were statistically different (VD, NB, DM, ICM, p  <  0.05) when comparing two anatomic locations on the same day and when considering the same anatomic location at two separate times (i.e. before and after burn surgery). The study demonstrates an

  16. Non-uniform object counting method in large-format pyramid images applied to CD31 vessel counting in whole-mount digital pathology sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Mayan; Hill, Melissa L.; Liu, Kela; Mainprize, James G.; Yaffe, Martin J.

    2016-03-01

    Whole-mount pathology imaging has the potential to revolutionize clinical practice by preserving context lost when tissue is cut to fit onto conventional slides. Whole-mount digital images are very large, ranging from 4GB to greater than 50GB, making concurrent processing infeasible. Block-processing is a method commonly used to divide the image into smaller blocks and process them individually. This approach is useful for certain tasks, but leads to over-counting objects located on the seams between blocks. This issue is exaggerated as the block size decreases. In this work we apply a novel technique to enumerate vessels, a clinical task that would benefit from automation in whole-mount images. Whole-mount sections of rabbit VX2 tumors were digitized. Color thresholding was used to segment the brown CD31- DAB stained vessels. This vessel enumeration was applied to the entire whole-mount image in two distinct phases of block-processing. The first (whole-processing) phase used a basic grid and only counted objects that did not intersect the block's borders. The second (seam-processing) phase used a shifted grid to ensure all blocks captured the block-seam regions from the original grid. Only objects touching this seam-intersection were counted. For validation, segmented vessels were randomly embedded into a whole-mount image. The technique was tested on the image using 24 different block-widths. Results indicated that the error reaches a minimum at a block-width equal to the maximum vessel length, with no improvement as the block-width increases further. Object-density maps showed very good correlation between the vessel-dense regions and the pathologist outlined tumor regions.

  17. Retina Image Vessel Segmentation Using a Hybrid CGLI Level Set Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guannan Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available As a nonintrusive method, the retina imaging provides us with a better way for the diagnosis of ophthalmologic diseases. Extracting the vessel profile automatically from the retina image is an important step in analyzing retina images. A novel hybrid active contour model is proposed to segment the fundus image automatically in this paper. It combines the signed pressure force function introduced by the Selective Binary and Gaussian Filtering Regularized Level Set (SBGFRLS model with the local intensity property introduced by the Local Binary fitting (LBF model to overcome the difficulty of the low contrast in segmentation process. It is more robust to the initial condition than the traditional methods and is easily implemented compared to the supervised vessel extraction methods. Proposed segmentation method was evaluated on two public datasets, DRIVE (Digital Retinal Images for Vessel Extraction and STARE (Structured Analysis of the Retina (the average accuracy of 0.9390 with 0.7358 sensitivity and 0.9680 specificity on DRIVE datasets and average accuracy of 0.9409 with 0.7449 sensitivity and 0.9690 specificity on STARE datasets. The experimental results show that our method is effective and our method is also robust to some kinds of pathology images compared with the traditional level set methods.

  18. [Imaging Blood Flow and Pulsation of Retinal Vessels with Full-Field Swept-Source OCT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spahr, H; Hillmann, D; Hain, C; Pfäffle, C; Sudkamp, H; Franke, G; Koch, P; Hüttmann, G

    2016-12-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) uses interference to image the retina with high axial resolution. In the last 25 years, new technologies have permitted a steady increase in imaging speed, which made it possible to enlarge the imaged field and to avoid motion artefacts. The speed and precision of retinal imaging is now limited by photodamage of the retina caused by the focused OCT beam and by the speed of the scanning mechanics. Full-field swept-source (FF-SS)-OCT decreases irradiance on the retina and dispenses moving parts by using a camera to acquire the full volume of the retina in parallel. Here we show that FF-SS-OCT is rapid and precise enough to image pulsation in the retina induced by the heart beat. Series of OCT volumes 1.8 × 0.7 mm wide and 1.8 mm deep were recorded in young volunteers over a few cycles of the heart beat. Morphology of the retinal vessels, blood flow and tissue motion as caused by vessel pulsation were calculated from the OCT data. FF-SS-OCT was able to visualise the main structures of the neuronal retina, including vessels and small capillaries and without any motion artefacts. Information on three different dynamic processes was obtained from only one recorded series of OCT volumes: pulsation of blood flow and blood pressure in retinal vessels as well as pulsation of the choroid. Delays between arterial and venous pulse and delay between pulsation in retinal and choroidal vessels were calculated. With a time resolution of 0.5 ms, FF-SS-OCT is able to visualise previously unmeasurably fast changes in the retina, including the propagation of pulse waves. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Predicting effects of blood flow rate and size of vessels in a vasculature on hyperthermia treatments using computer simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih Tzu-Ching

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pennes Bio Heat Transfer Equation (PBHTE has been widely used to approximate the overall temperature distribution in tissue using a perfusion parameter term in the equation during hyperthermia treatment. In the similar modeling, effective thermal conductivity (Keff model uses thermal conductivity as a parameter to predict temperatures. However the equations do not describe the thermal contribution of blood vessels. A countercurrent vascular network model which represents a more fundamental approach to modeling temperatures in tissue than do the generally used approximate equations such as the Pennes BHTE or effective thermal conductivity equations was presented in 1996. This type of model is capable of calculating the blood temperature in vessels and describing a vasculature in the tissue regions. Methods In this paper, a countercurrent blood vessel network (CBVN model for calculating tissue temperatures has been developed for studying hyperthermia cancer treatment. We use a systematic approach to reveal the impact of a vasculature of blood vessels against a single vessel which most studies have presented. A vasculature illustrates branching vessels at the periphery of the tumor volume. The general trends present in this vascular model are similar to those shown for physiological systems in Green and Whitmore. The 3-D temperature distributions are obtained by solving the conduction equation in the tissue and the convective energy equation with specified Nusselt number in the vessels. Results This paper investigates effects of size of blood vessels in the CBVN model on total absorbed power in the treated region and blood flow rates (or perfusion rate in the CBVN on temperature distributions during hyperthermia cancer treatment. Also, the same optimized power distribution during hyperthermia treatment is used to illustrate the differences between PBHTE and CBVN models. Keff (effective thermal conductivity model delivers the

  20. Retinal vessel segmentation in colour fundus images using Extreme Learning Machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chengzhang; Zou, Beiji; Zhao, Rongchang; Cui, Jinkai; Duan, Xuanchu; Chen, Zailiang; Liang, Yixiong

    2017-01-01

    Attributes of the retinal vessel play important role in systemic conditions and ophthalmic diagnosis. In this paper, a supervised method based on Extreme Learning Machine (ELM) is proposed to segment retinal vessel. Firstly, a set of 39-D discriminative feature vectors, consisting of local features, morphological features, phase congruency, Hessian and divergence of vector fields, is extracted for each pixel of the fundus image. Then a matrix is constructed for pixel of the training set based on the feature vector and the manual labels, and acts as the input of the ELM classifier. The output of classifier is the binary retinal vascular segmentation. Finally, an optimization processing is implemented to remove the region less than 30 pixels which is isolated from the retinal vascilar. The experimental results testing on the public Digital Retinal Images for Vessel Extraction (DRIVE) database demonstrate that the proposed method is much faster than the other methods in segmenting the retinal vessels. Meanwhile the average accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity are 0.9607, 0.7140 and 0.9868, respectively. Moreover the proposed method exhibits high speed and robustness on a new Retinal Images for Screening (RIS) database. Therefore it has potential applications for real-time computer-aided diagnosis and disease screening. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Detection of vessel wall calcifications in vertebral arteries using susceptibility weighted imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Lisa C.; Boeker, Sarah M.; Bender, Yvonne Y.; Fallenberg, Eva M.; Wagner, Moritz; Hamm, Bernd; Makowski, Marcus R. [Department of Radiology, Charite, Berlin (Germany); Liebig, Thomas [Department of Neuroradiology, Charite, Berlin (Germany)

    2017-09-15

    Calcification of the brain supplying arteries has been linked to an increased risk for cerebrovascular disease. The purpose of this study was to test the potential of susceptibility weighted MR imaging (SWMR) for the detection of vertebral artery calcifications, based on CT as a reference standard. Four hundred seventy-four patients, who had received head CT and 1.5 T MR scans with SWMR, including the distal vertebral artery, between January 2014 and December 2016, were retrospectively evaluated and 389 patients were included. Sensitivity and specificity for the detection of focal calcifications and intra- and interobserver agreement were calculated for SWMR and standard MRI, using CT as a standard of reference. The diameter of vertebral artery calcifications was used to assess correlations between imaging modalities. Furthermore, the degree of vessel stenosis was determined in 30 patients, who had received an additional angiography. On CT scans, 40 patients showed a total of 52 vertebral artery calcifications. While SWMR reached a sensitivity of 94% (95% CI 84-99%) and a specificity of 97% (95% CI 94-98%), standard MRI yielded a sensitivity of 33% (95% CI 20-46%), and a specificity of 93% (95% CI 90-96%). Linear regression analysis of size measurements confirmed a close correlation between SWMR and CT measurements (R {sup 2} = 0.74, p < 0.001). Compared to standard MRI (ICC = 0.52; CI 0.45-0.59), SWMR showed a higher interobserver agreement for calcification measurements (ICC = 0.84; CI 0.81-0.87). For detection of distal vertebral artery calcifications, SWMR demonstrates a performance comparable to CT and considerably higher than conventional MRI. (orig.)

  2. Unique identification code for medical fundus images using blood vessel pattern for tele-ophthalmology applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anushikha; Dutta, Malay Kishore; Sharma, Dilip Kumar

    2016-10-01

    Identification of fundus images during transmission and storage in database for tele-ophthalmology applications is an important issue in modern era. The proposed work presents a novel accurate method for generation of unique identification code for identification of fundus images for tele-ophthalmology applications and storage in databases. Unlike existing methods of steganography and watermarking, this method does not tamper the medical image as nothing is embedded in this approach and there is no loss of medical information. Strategic combination of unique blood vessel pattern and patient ID is considered for generation of unique identification code for the digital fundus images. Segmented blood vessel pattern near the optic disc is strategically combined with patient ID for generation of a unique identification code for the image. The proposed method of medical image identification is tested on the publically available DRIVE and MESSIDOR database of fundus image and results are encouraging. Experimental results indicate the uniqueness of identification code and lossless recovery of patient identity from unique identification code for integrity verification of fundus images. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Image-guided optical measurement of blood oxygen saturation within capillary vessels (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akons, Kfir; Zeidan, Adel; Yeheskely-Hayon, Daniella; Minai, Limor; Yelin, Dvir

    2016-03-01

    Values of blood oxygenation levels are useful for assessing heart and lung conditions, and are frequently monitored during routine patient care. Independent measurement of the oxygen saturation in capillary blood, which is significantly different from that of arterial blood, is important for diagnosing tissue hypoxia and for increasing the accuracy of existing techniques that measure arterial oxygen saturation. Here, we developed a simple, non-invasive technique for measuring the reflected spectra from individual capillary vessels within a human lip, allowing local measurement of the blood oxygen saturation. The optical setup includes a spatially incoherent broadband light that was focused onto a specific vessel below the lip surface. Backscattered light was imaged by a camera for identifying a target vessel and pointing the illumination beam to its cross section. Scattered light from the vessel was then collected by a single-mode fiber and analyzed by a fast spectrometer. Spectra acquired from small capillary vessels within a volunteer lip showed the characteristic oxyhemoglobin absorption bands in real time and with a high signal-to-noise ratio. Measuring capillary oxygen saturation using this technique would potentially be more accurate compared to existing pulse oximetry techniques due to its insensitivity to the patient's skin color, pulse rate, motion, and medical condition. It could be used as a standalone endoscopic technique for measuring tissue hypoxia or in conjunction with conventional pulse oximetry for a more accurate measurement of oxygen transport in the body.

  4. An Automatic Cognitive Graph-Based Segmentation for Detection of Blood Vessels in Retinal Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasha Al Shehhi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a hierarchical graph-based segmentation for blood vessel detection in digital retinal images. This segmentation employs some of perceptual Gestalt principles: similarity, closure, continuity, and proximity to merge segments into coherent connected vessel-like patterns. The integration of Gestalt principles is based on object-based features (e.g., color and black top-hat (BTH morphology and context and graph-analysis algorithms (e.g., Dijkstra path. The segmentation framework consists of two main steps: preprocessing and multiscale graph-based segmentation. Preprocessing is to enhance lighting condition, due to low illumination contrast, and to construct necessary features to enhance vessel structure due to sensitivity of vessel patterns to multiscale/multiorientation structure. Graph-based segmentation is to decrease computational processing required for region of interest into most semantic objects. The segmentation was evaluated on three publicly available datasets. Experimental results show that preprocessing stage achieves better results compared to state-of-the-art enhancement methods. The performance of the proposed graph-based segmentation is found to be consistent and comparable to other existing methods, with improved capability of detecting small/thin vessels.

  5. Optimal Viewing Angle Determination for Multiple Vessel Segments in Coronary Angiographic Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuehu; Yang, Jian; Chen, Yang; Ai, Danni; Hu, Yining; Wang, Yongtian

    2014-06-01

    Angiographic image is the perspective projection of the whole body from a 3D space to a 2D imaging plane, in which X-ray is used. As such, topological vasculature information has been lost. In 2D angiograms, foreshortening and overlapping are commonly observed in tubular-like structures. Hence, an optimum viewing angle should be determined to observe an interesting vessel segment (IVS) or an interesting vessel bifurcation (IVB) with minimized foreshortening and overlapping from a limited number of angiographic images. In this study, a novel integrated optimization method is proposed to calculate the optimum viewing angle. In the proposed method, the irregular shape and inter-branch distance of vasculatures are considered. Furthermore, three optimized conditions, including projection foreshortening rate, projection stenosis rate, and projection overlapping rate, are designed and integrated to determine the optimum viewing angle in a single vessel segment. The three conditions, including projection foreshortening, projection stenosis, and projection adjacent spacing rates, are also designed to optimize the viewing angle of bifurcations. To evaluate the performance of the proposed method, we simulated an angiographic image based on X-ray propagating principle by integrating 3D coronary artery tree models and the respective CT volume data. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method is very effective and robust; hence, this method can be used to determine the optimum viewing angle of IVS or IVB with irregular stenosis. The proposed method can also help physicians observe the branching structure or stenosis clearly in clinical practice.

  6. Advanced Image Enhancement Method for Distant Vessels and Structures in Capsule Endoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Marius

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes an advanced method for contrast enhancement of capsule endoscopic images, with the main objective to obtain sufficient information about the vessels and structures in more distant (or darker) parts of capsule endoscopic images. The proposed method (PM) combines two algorithms for the enhancement of darker and brighter areas of capsule endoscopic images, respectively. The half-unit weighted-bilinear algorithm (HWB) proposed in our previous work is used to enhance darker areas according to the darker map content of its HSV's component V. Enhancement of brighter areas is achieved thanks to the novel threshold weighted-bilinear algorithm (TWB) developed to avoid overexposure and enlargement of specular highlight spots while preserving the hue, in such areas. The TWB performs enhancement operations following a gradual increment of the brightness of the brighter map content of its HSV's component V. In other words, the TWB decreases its averaged weights as the intensity content of the component V increases. Extensive experimental demonstrations were conducted, and, based on evaluation of the reference and PM enhanced images, a gastroenterologist (Ø.H.) concluded that the PM enhanced images were the best ones based on the information about the vessels, contrast in the images, and the view or visibility of the structures in more distant parts of the capsule endoscopy images. PMID:29225668

  7. Three Dimensional Endoscopic Image of a Blood Vessel Using High Frequency Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshiro, Osamu; Kamada, Kumi; Chihara, Kunihiro; Secomski, Wojciech; Nowicki, Andrzej

    2000-05-01

    This paper describes a high frequency ultrasound (US) imaging system for observation of small tissues and a virtual endoscopic image of a blood vessel. This system consists of a US probe with a central frequency of 32 MHz, a microscope table designed to collect some slices of US brightness mode (B-mode) images, a transmitter containing control logic and a receiver circuit and a personal computer (PC) with an analog to digital (AD) converter. First, US B-mode images with high spatial resolution were obtained by shifting a measurement plane at a constant step of 0.075 mm. Second, three-dimensional (3-D) image reconstruction was performed with linear interpolation and a volume rendering technique. Finally, the point of view of the 3-D image was set in the human body and a virtual endoscopic image was presented. The experimental results present a blood vessel as if an ultrasound probe were inserted in it and reveal the anatomical structure under skin.

  8. Retinal vessel enhancement based on the Gaussian function and image fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraru, Luminita; Obreja, Cristian Dragoş

    2017-01-01

    The Gaussian function is essential in the construction of the Frangi and COSFIRE (combination of shifted filter responses) filters. The connection of the broken vessels and an accurate extraction of the vascular structure is the main goal of this study. Thus, the outcome of the Frangi and COSFIRE edge detection algorithms are fused using the Dempster-Shafer algorithm with the aim to improve detection and to enhance the retinal vascular structure. For objective results, the average diameters of the retinal vessels provided by Frangi, COSFIRE and Dempster-Shafer fusion algorithms are measured. These experimental values are compared to the ground truth values provided by manually segmented retinal images. We prove the superiority of the fusion algorithm in terms of image quality by using the figure of merit objective metric that correlates the effects of all post-processing techniques.

  9. Finding an optimal method for imaging lymphatic vessels of the upper limb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Mahony, Susan; Purushotham, Arnie D. [Cambridge Breast Unit, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Rose, Sarah L.; Chilvers, Alison J.; Ballinger, James R.; Solanki, Chandra K.; Barber, Robert W.; Peters, A. Michael [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Hills Road, CB2 2QQ, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Mortimer, Peter S. [Department of Medicine, St George' s Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2004-04-01

    Lymphoscintigraphy involves interstitial injection of radiolabelled particulate materials or radioproteins. Although several variations in the technique have been described, their place in clinical practice remains controversial. Traditional diagnostic criteria are based primarily on lymph node appearances but in situations such as breast cancer, where lymph nodes may have been excised, these criteria are of limited use. In these circumstances, lymphatic vessel morphology takes on greater importance as a clinical endpoint, so a method that gives good definition of lymphatic vessels would be useful. In patients with breast cancer, for example, such a method, used before and after lymph node resection, may assist in predicting the development of breast cancer-related lymphoedema. The aim of this study was to optimise a method for the visualisation of lymphatic vessels. Subcutaneous (sc) and intradermal (id) injection sites were compared, and technetium-99m nanocolloid, a particulate material, was compared with {sup 99m}Tc-human immunoglobulin (HIG), which is a soluble macromolecule. Twelve normal volunteers were each studied on two occasions. In three subjects, id {sup 99m}Tc-HIG was compared with sc {sup 99m}Tc-HIG, in three id {sup 99m}Tc-nanocolloid was compared with sc {sup 99m}Tc-nanocolloid, in three id {sup 99m}Tc-HIG was compared with id {sup 99m}Tc-nanocolloid and in three sc {sup 99m}Tc-HIG was compared with sc {sup 99m}Tc-nanocolloid. Endpoints were quality of lymphatic vessel definition, the time after injection at which vessels were most clearly visualised, the rate constant of depot disappearance (k) and the systemic blood accumulation rate as measured by gamma camera imaging over the liver or cardiac blood pool. Excellent definition of lymphatic vessels was obtained following id injection of either radiopharmaceutical, an injection route that was clearly superior to sc. Differences between radiopharmaceuticals were less clear, although after id

  10. Construction and characterisation of MRI coils for vessel wall imaging at 7 tesla

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerotic plaques in the bifurcation of the carotid artery vessels can pose a significant stroke risk from stenosis, thrombosis and emboli, or plaque rupture. However, the possibility of the latter depends on the structure of the plaque and its stability. So far, the assessment of such depositions, and the evaluation of the risk they pose, is not satisfactory with 3 Tesla black blood imaging. It is expected that the SNR increase at 7 Tesla, together with an appropriate and patient-safe ...

  11. Method for Separation of Blood Vessels on the Three-Color Images of Biological Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisenko, S. A.

    2017-07-01

    A new technology was developed to improve the visibility of blood vessels on images of tissues of hollow human organs(the alimentary tract and respiratory system) based on the relation between the color components of the image, the scattering properties of the tissue, and its hemoglobin content. A statistical operator was presented to convert the three-color image of the tissue into a parametric map objectively characterizing the concentration of hemoglobin in the tissue regardless of the illumination and shooting conditions. An algorithm for obtaining conversion parameters for image systems with known spectral characteristics was presented. An image of a multilayer multiple-scattering medium modeling bronchial tissue was synthesized and was used to evaluate the efficiency of the proposed conversion system. It was shown that the conversion made it possible to increase the contrast of the blood vessels by almost two orders of magnitude, to significantly improve the clarity of the display of their borders, and to eliminate almost completely the influence of background and nonuniform illumination of the medium in comparison with the original image.

  12. OCT imaging detection of brain blood vessels in mouse, based on semiconducting polymer nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shaozhuang; Chen, Haobin; Liu, Liwei; Chen, Bingling; Yang, Zhigang; Wu, Changfeng; Hu, Siyi; Lin, Huiyun; Li, Buhong; Qu, Junle

    2017-11-20

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is a valuable technology that has been used to obtain microstructure images of tissue, and has several advantages, though its applications are limited in high-scattering tissues. Therefore, semiconducting polymer nanoparticles (SPNs) that possess strong absorption characteristics are applied to decrease light scattering in tissues and used as exogenous contrast agents for enhancing the contrast of OCT imaging detection. In this paper, we prepared two kinds of SPNs, termed PIDT-TBZ SPNs and PBDT-TBZ SPNs, as the contrast agents for OCT detection to enhance the signal. Firstly, we proved that they were good contrast agents for OCT imaging in agar-TiO 2 . After that, the contrast effects of these two SPNs were quantitatively analyzed, and then cerebral blood vessels were monitored by a home-made SD-OCT system. Finally, we created OCT images in vitro and in vivo with these two probes and performed quantitative analysis using the images. The results indicated that these SPNs created a clear contrast enhancement of small vessels in the OCT imaging process, which provides a basis for the application of SPNs as contrast agents for bioimaging studies.

  13. Value of CT angiography in anterior circulation large vessel occlusive stroke: Imaging findings, pearls, and pitfalls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Power, Sarah, E-mail: drsarahpower@gmail.com [Department of Neuroradiology, Beaumont Hospital, P.O. Box 1297, Beaumont Rd, Dublin 9 (Ireland); McEvoy, Sinead H., E-mail: sineadmcevoy@beaumont.ie [Department of Neuroradiology, Beaumont Hospital, P.O. Box 1297, Beaumont Rd, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Cunningham, Jane, E-mail: janecunningham0708@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Beaumont Hospital, P.O. Box 1297, Beaumont Rd, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Ti, Joanna P., E-mail: joannapearlyti@gmail.com [Department of Neuroradiology, Beaumont Hospital, P.O. Box 1297, Beaumont Rd, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Looby, Seamus, E-mail: seamuslooby@beaumont.ie [Department of Neuroradiology, Beaumont Hospital, P.O. Box 1297, Beaumont Rd, Dublin 9 (Ireland); O' Hare, Alan, E-mail: alanohare@beaumont.ie [Department of Neuroradiology, Beaumont Hospital, P.O. Box 1297, Beaumont Rd, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Williams, David, E-mail: davidwilliams@rcsi.ie [Department of Geriatrics and Stroke Medicine, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI) and Beaumont Hospital, P.O. Box 1297, Beaumont Rd, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Brennan, Paul, E-mail: paulbrennan@beaumont.ie [Department of Neuroradiology, Beaumont Hospital, P.O. Box 1297, Beaumont Rd, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Thornton, John, E-mail: johnthornton@beaumont.ie [Department of Neuroradiology, Beaumont Hospital, P.O. Box 1297, Beaumont Rd, Dublin 9 (Ireland)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Site of occlusion determines potential collateralization routes and impacts outcome. • Multifocality of arterial occlusion is common, seen in approximately 20% of cases. • ICA false occlusion sign can be seen in setting of ICA stenosis or carotid T occlusion. • False patency sign: hyperdense thrombus/calcified occlusive plaque misinterpreted as patent vessel. • Additional abnormalities on CTA may infer stroke mechanism or alter decision making. - Abstract: Hyperacute stroke imaging is playing an increasingly important role in determining management decisions in acute stroke patients, particularly patients with large vessel occlusive stroke who may benefit from endovascular intervention. CT angiography (CTA) is an important tool in the work-up of the acute stroke patient. It reliably detects large occlusive thrombi in proximal cerebral arteries and is a quick and highly accurate method in identifying candidates for endovascular stroke treatment. In this article we review the imaging findings on CTA in acute large vessel occlusive stroke using a pictorial case based approach. We retrospectively reviewed CTA studies in 48 patients presenting with acute anterior circulation large vessel occlusive stroke who were brought for intra-arterial acute stroke intervention. We discuss and illustrate patterns of proximal intracranial arterial occlusion, collateralization to the occluded territory, as well as reviewing some important pearls, pitfalls and teaching points in CTA assessment of the acute stroke patient. Performed from the level of the aortic arch CTA also gives valuable information regarding the state of other vessels in the acute stroke patient, identifying additional significant vascular stenoses or occlusions, and as we illustrate, can demonstrate other clinically significant findings which may impact on patient management and outcome.

  14. Elliptical Local Vessel Density: a Fast and Robust Quality Metric for Fundus Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giancardo, Luca [ORNL; Chaum, Edward [ORNL; Karnowski, Thomas Paul [ORNL; Meriaudeau, Fabrice [ORNL; Tobin Jr, Kenneth William [ORNL; Abramoff, M.D. [University of Iowa

    2008-01-01

    A great effort of the research community is geared towards the creation of an automatic screening system able to promptly detect diabetic retinopathy with the use of fundus cameras. In addition, there are some documented approaches to the problem of automatically judging the image quality. We propose a new set of features independent of Field of View or resolution to describe the morphology of the patient's vessels. Our initial results suggest that they can be used to estimate the image quality in a time one order of magnitude shorter respect to previous techniques.

  15. Vessel segmentation in 4D arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance angiography images of the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phellan, Renzo; Lindner, Thomas; Falcão, Alexandre X.; Forkert, Nils D.

    2017-03-01

    4D arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance angiography (4D ASL MRA) is a non-invasive and safe modality for cerebrovascular imaging procedures. It uses the patient's magnetically labeled blood as intrinsic contrast agent, so that no external contrast media is required. It provides important 3D structure and blood flow information but a sufficient cerebrovascular segmentation is important since it can help clinicians to analyze and diagnose vascular diseases faster, and with higher confidence as compared to simple visual rating of raw ASL MRA images. This work presents a new method for automatic cerebrovascular segmentation in 4D ASL MRA images of the brain. In this process images are denoised, corresponding image label/control image pairs of the 4D ASL MRA sequences are subtracted, and temporal intensity averaging is used to generate a static representation of the vascular system. After that, sets of vessel and background seeds are extracted and provided as input for the image foresting transform algorithm to segment the vascular system. Four 4D ASL MRA datasets of the brain arteries of healthy subjects and corresponding time-of-flight (TOF) MRA images were available for this preliminary study. For evaluation of the segmentation results of the proposed method, the cerebrovascular system was automatically segmented in the high-resolution TOF MRA images using a validated algorithm and the segmentation results were registered to the 4D ASL datasets. Corresponding segmentation pairs were compared using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). On average, a DSC of 0.9025 was achieved, indicating that vessels can be extracted successfully from 4D ASL MRA datasets by the proposed segmentation method.

  16. Gadolinium Enhanced MR Coronary Vessel Wall Imaging at 3.0 Tesla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Kelle

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. We evaluated the influence of the time between low-dose gadolinium (Gd contrast administration and coronary vessel wall enhancement (LGE detected by 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in healthy subjects and patients with coronary artery disease (CAD. Materials and Methods. Four healthy subjects (4 men, mean age 29  ±  3 years and eleven CAD patients (6 women, mean age 61±10 years were studied on a commercial 3.0 Tesla (T whole-body MR imaging system (Achieva 3.0 T; Philips, Best, The Netherlands. T1-weighted inversion-recovery coronary magnetic resonance imaging (MRI was repeated up to 75 minutes after administration of low-dose Gadolinium (Gd (0.1 mmol/kg Gd-DTPA. Results. LGE was seen in none of the healthy subjects, however in all of the CAD patients. In CAD patients, fifty-six of 62 (90.3% segments showed LGE of the coronary artery vessel wall at time-interval 1 after contrast. At time-interval 2, 34 of 42 (81.0% and at time-interval 3, 29 of 39 evaluable segments (74.4% were enhanced. Conclusion. In this work, we demonstrate LGE of the coronary artery vessel wall using 3.0 T MRI after a single, low-dose Gd contrast injection in CAD patients but not in healthy subjects. In the majority of the evaluated coronary segments in CAD patients, LGE of the coronary vessel wall was already detectable 30–45 minutes after administration of the contrast agent.

  17. In vivo imaging of stepwise vessel occlusion in cerebral photothrombosis of mice by 19F MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gesa Weise

    Full Text Available (19F magnetic resonance imaging (MRI was recently introduced as a promising technique for in vivo cell tracking. In the present study we compared (19F MRI with iron-enhanced MRI in mice with photothrombosis (PT at 7 Tesla. PT represents a model of focal cerebral ischemia exhibiting acute vessel occlusion and delayed neuroinflammation.Perfluorocarbons (PFC or superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (SPIO were injected intravenously at different time points after photothrombotic infarction. While administration of PFC directly after PT induction led to a strong (19F signal throughout the entire lesion, two hours delayed application resulted in a rim-like (19F signal at the outer edge of the lesion. These findings closely resembled the distribution of signal loss on T2-weighted MRI seen after SPIO injection reflecting intravascular accumulation of iron particles trapped in vessel thrombi as confirmed histologically. By sequential administration of two chemically shifted PFC compounds 0 and 2 hours after illumination the different spatial distribution of the (19F markers (infarct core/rim could be visualized in the same animal. When PFC were applied at day 6 the fluorine marker was only detected after long acquisition times ex vivo. SPIO-enhanced MRI showed slight signal loss in vivo which was much more prominent ex vivo indicative for neuroinflammation at this late lesion stage.Our study shows that vessel occlusion can be followed in vivo by (19F and SPIO-enhanced high-field MRI while in vivo imaging of neuroinflammation remains challenging. The timing of contrast agent application was the major determinant of the underlying processes depicted by both imaging techniques. Importantly, sequential application of different PFC compounds allowed depiction of ongoing vessel occlusion from the core to the margin of the ischemic lesions in a single MRI measurement.

  18. Extraction of Blood Vessels in Retinal Images Using Four Different Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asloob Ahmad Mudassar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A variety of blood vessel extraction (BVE techniques exist in the literature, but they do not always lead to acceptable solutions especially in the presence of anomalies where the reported work is limited. Four techniques are presented for BVE: (1 BVE using Image Line Cross-Sections (ILCS, (2 BVE using Edge Enhancement and Edge Detection (EEED, (3 BVE using Modified Matched Filtering (MMF, and (4 BVE using Continuation Algorithm (CA. These four techniques have been designed especially for abnormal retinal images containing low vessel contrasts, drusen, exudates, and other artifacts. The four techniques were applied to 30 abnormal retinal images, and the success rate was found to be (95 to 99% for CA, (88–91% for EEED, (80–85% for MMF, and (74–78% for ILCS. Application of these four techniques to 105 normal retinal images gave improved results: (99-100% for CA, (96–98% for EEED, (94-95% for MMF, and (88–93% for ILCS. Investigations revealed that the four techniques in the order of increasing performance could be arranged as ILCS, MMF, EEED, and CA. Here we demonstrate these four techniques for abnormal retinal images only. ILCS, EEED, and CA are novel additions whereas MMF is an improved and modified version of an existing matched filtering technique. CA is a promising technique.

  19. Measurement of flow velocity fields in small vessel-mimic phantoms and vessels of small animals using micro ultrasonic particle image velocimetry (micro-EPIV)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian Ming; Niu Lili; Jiang Bo; Jin Qiaofeng; Jiang Chunxiang; Zheng Hairong [Paul C. Lauterbur Research Center for Biomedical Imaging, Institute of Biomedical and Health Engineering, Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenzhen (China); Wang Yanping, E-mail: hr.zheng@siat.ac.c [Medical School of Jinan University, Guangzhou (China)

    2010-10-21

    Determining a multidimensional velocity field within microscale opaque fluid flows is needed in areas such as microfluidic devices, biofluid mechanics and hemodynamics research in animal studies. The ultrasonic particle image velocimetry (EchoPIV) technique is appropriate for measuring opaque flows by taking advantage of PIV and B-mode ultrasound contrast imaging. However, the use of clinical ultrasound systems for imaging flows in small structures or animals has limitations associated with spatial resolution. This paper reports on the development of a high-resolution EchoPIV technique (termed as micro-EPIV) and its application in measuring flows in small vessel-mimic phantoms and vessels of small animals. Phantom experiments demonstrate the validity of the technique, providing velocity estimates within 4.1% of the analytically derived values with regard to the flows in a small straight vessel-mimic phantom, and velocity estimates within 5.9% of the computationally simulated values with regard to the flows in a small stenotic vessel-mimic phantom. Animal studies concerning arterial and venous flows of living rats and rabbits show that the micro-EPIV-measured peak velocities within several cardiac cycles are about 25% below the values measured by the ultrasonic spectral Doppler technique. The micro-EPIV technique is able to effectively measure the flow fields within microscale opaque fluid flows.

  20. The Influence of Dome Size, Parent Vessel Angle, and Coil Packing Density on Coil Embolization Treatment in Cerebral Aneurysms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frakes, David H.; Indahlastari, Aprinda; Ryan, Justin; Babiker, M. Haithem; Nair, Priya; Parthas, Varsha

    2013-11-01

    Intracranial aneurysms (ICAs) are dilated cerebral blood vessels. Treating ICAs effectively prior rupture is crucial since their association with 45% mortality rate. Embolic coiling is the most effective ICA treatment. Series of embolic coils are deployed into the aneurysm with the intent of reaching a sufficient packing density (PD) to help seal off the ICA from circulation. While coiling is effective, treatment failures have been associated with basilar tip aneurysms (BTAs), perhaps because of their geometry. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of dome size, parent vessel (PV) angle, and PD on intraaneurysmal (IA) velocity, crossneck (CN) flow and low wall shear stress (WSS) area using simulations and experiments in idealized BTA models. IA velocity and CN flow decreased after coiling, while low WSS area increased. With increasing PD, IA velocity and CN flow were further reduced, but low WSS area had a minimal change. Coil PD had the greatest impact on post-treatment flow while dome size had a greater impact than PV angle. Overall, the role of aneurysmal geometries may vary depending on treatment goal and timing e.g., high coil PD may reduce IA velocity more effectively during early aneurysmal growth when the dome size is small. Funded by the American Heart Association.

  1. Quantification and Statistical Analysis Methods for Vessel Wall Components from Stained Images with Masson's Trichrome: e0146954

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pablo Hernández-Morera; Irene Castaño-González; Carlos M Travieso-González; Blanca Mompeó-Corredera; Francisco Ortega-Santana

    2016-01-01

    ... (smooth muscle fibers and extracellular matrix) in the vessel wall stained with Masson's trichrome, and a statistical method suitable for small sample sizes to analyze the results previously obtained...

  2. Robust MR assessment of cerebral blood volume and mean vessel size using SPION-enhanced ultrashort echo acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, S H; Cho, J H; Jung, H S; Suh, J Y; Kim, J K; Kim, Y R; Cho, G; Cho, H

    2015-05-15

    Intravascular superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION)-enhanced MR transverse relaxation rates (∆R2(⁎) and ∆R2) are widely used to investigate in vivo vascular parameters, such as the cerebral blood volume (CBV), microvascular volume (MVV), and mean vessel size index (mVSI, ∆R2(⁎)/∆R2). Although highly efficient, regional comparison of vascular parameters acquired using gradient-echo based ∆R2(⁎) is hampered by its high sensitivity to magnetic field perturbations arising from air-tissue interfaces and large vessels. To minimize such demerits, we took advantage of the dual contrast property of SPION and both theoretically and experimentally verified the direct benefit of replacing gradient-echo based ∆R2(⁎) measurement with ultra-short echo time (UTE)-based ∆R1 contrast to generate the robust CBV and mVSI maps. The UTE acquisition minimized the local measurement errors from susceptibility perturbations and enabled dose-independent CBV measurement using the vessel/tissue ∆R1 ratio, while independent spin-echo acquisition enabled simultaneous ∆R2 measurement and mVSI calculation of the cortex, cerebellum, and olfactory bulb, which are animal brain regions typified by significant susceptibility-associated measurement errors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Cerebral Small Vessel Disease: Cognition, Mood, Daily Functioning, and Imaging Findings from a Small Pilot Sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John G. Baker

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral small vessel disease, a leading cause of cognitive decline, is considered a relatively homogeneous disease process, and it can co-occur with Alzheimer’s disease. Clinical reports of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI/computed tomography and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT imaging and neuropsychology testing for a small pilot sample of 14 patients are presented to illustrate disease characteristics through findings from structural and functional imaging and cognitive assessment. Participants showed some decreases in executive functioning, attention, processing speed, and memory retrieval, consistent with previous literature. An older subgroup showed lower age-corrected scores at a single time point compared to younger participants. Performance on a computer-administered cognitive measure showed a slight overall decline over a period of 8–28 months. For a case study with mild neuropsychology findings, the MRI report was normal while the SPECT report identified perfusion abnormalities. Future research can test whether advances in imaging analysis allow for identification of cerebral small vessel disease before changes are detected in cognition.

  4. Processing of MRI images weighted in TOF for blood vessels analysis: 3-D reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez D, J.; Cordova F, T. [Universidad de Guanajuato, Campus Leon, Departamento de Ingenieria Fisica, Loma del Bosque No. 103, Lomas del Campestre, 37150 Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico); Cruz A, I., E-mail: hernandezdj.gto@gmail.com [CONACYT, Centro de Investigacion en Matematicas, A. C., Jalisco s/n, Col. Valenciana, 36000 Guanajuato, Gto. (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    This paper presents a novel presents an approach based on differences of intensities for the identification of vascular structures in medical images from MRI studies of type time of flight method (TOF). The plating method hypothesis gave high intensities belonging to the vascular system image type TOF can be segmented by thresholding of the histogram. The enhanced vascular structures is performed using the filter Vesselness, upon completion of a decision based on fuzzy thresholding minimizes error in the selection of vascular structures. It will give a brief introduction to the vascular system problems and how the images have helped diagnosis, is summarized the physical history of the different imaging modalities and the evolution of digital images with computers. Segmentation and 3-D reconstruction became image type time of flight; these images are typically used in medical diagnosis of cerebrovascular diseases. The proposed method has less error in segmentation and reconstruction of volumes related to the vascular system, clear images and less noise compared with edge detection methods. (Author)

  5. Added Value of Vessel Wall Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Differentiation of Nonocclusive Intracranial Vasculopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossa-Basha, Mahmud; Shibata, Dean K; Hallam, Danial K; de Havenon, Adam; Hippe, Daniel S; Becker, Kyra J; Tirschwell, David L; Hatsukami, Thomas; Balu, Niranjan; Yuan, Chun

    2017-11-01

    Our goal is to determine the added value of intracranial vessel wall magnetic resonance imaging (IVWI) in differentiating nonocclusive vasculopathies compared with luminal imaging alone. We retrospectively reviewed images from patients with both luminal and IVWI to identify cases with clinically defined intracranial vasculopathies: atherosclerosis (intracranial atherosclerotic disease), reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome, and inflammatory vasculopathy. Two neuroradiologists blinded to clinical data reviewed the luminal imaging of defined luminal stenoses/irregularities and evaluated the pattern of involvement to make a presumed diagnosis with diagnostic confidence. Six weeks later, the 2 raters rereviewed the luminal imaging in addition to IVWI for the pattern of wall involvement, presence and pattern of postcontrast enhancement, and presumed diagnosis and confidence. Analysis was performed on per-lesion and per-patient bases. Thirty intracranial atherosclerotic disease, 12 inflammatory vasculopathies, and 12 reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome patients with 201 lesions (90 intracranial atherosclerotic disease, 64 reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome, and 47 inflammatory vasculopathy lesions) were included. For both per-lesion and per-patient analyses, there was significant diagnostic accuracy improvement with luminal imaging+IVWI when compared with luminal imaging alone (per-lesion: 88.8% versus 36.1%; Pimprove the differentiation of nonocclusive intracranial vasculopathies when combined with traditional luminal imaging modalities. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Spatiotemporal image correlation analysis of blood flow in branched vessel networks of zebrafish embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceffa, Nicolo G.; Cesana, Ilaria; Collini, Maddalena; D'Alfonso, Laura; Carra, Silvia; Cotelli, Franco; Sironi, Laura; Chirico, Giuseppe

    2017-10-01

    Ramification of blood circulation is relevant in a number of physiological and pathological conditions. The oxygen exchange occurs largely in the capillary bed, and the cancer progression is closely linked to the angiogenesis around the tumor mass. Optical microscopy has made impressive improvements in in vivo imaging and dynamic studies based on correlation analysis of time stacks of images. Here, we develop and test advanced methods that allow mapping the flow fields in branched vessel networks at the resolution of 10 to 20 μm. The methods, based on the application of spatiotemporal image correlation spectroscopy and its extension to cross-correlation analysis, are applied here to the case of early stage embryos of zebrafish.

  7. Adaptive Image Restoration and Segmentation Method Using Different Neighborhood Sizes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengcheng Li

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available The image restoration methods based on the Bayesian's framework and Markov random fields (MRF have been widely used in the image-processing field. The basic idea of all these methods is to use calculus of variation and mathematical statistics to average or estimate a pixel value by the values of its neighbors. After applying this averaging process to the whole image a number of times, the noisy pixels, which are abnormal values, are filtered out. Based on the Tea-trade model, which states that the closer the neighbor, more contribution it makes, almost all of these methods use only the nearest four neighbors for calculation. In our previous research [1, 2], we extended the research on CLRS (image restoration and segmentation by using competitive learning algorithm to enlarge the neighborhood size. The results showed that the longer neighborhood range could improve or worsen the restoration results. We also found that the autocorrelation coefficient was an important factor to determine the proper neighborhood size. We then further realized that the computational complexity increased dramatically along with the enlargement of the neighborhood size. This paper is to further the previous research and to discuss the tradeoff between the computational complexity and the restoration improvement by using longer neighborhood range. We used a couple of methods to construct the synthetic images with the exact correlation coefficients we want and to determine the corresponding neighborhood size. We constructed an image with a range of correlation coefficients by blending some synthetic images. Then an adaptive method to find the correlation coefficients of this image was constructed. We restored the image by applying different neighborhood CLRS algorithm to different parts of the image according to its correlation coefficient. Finally, we applied this adaptive method to some real-world images to get improved restoration results than by using single

  8. A Retinal Vessel Detection Approach Based on Shearlet Transform and Indeterminacy Filtering on Fundus Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanhui Guo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A fundus image is an effective tool for ophthalmologists studying eye diseases. Retinal vessel detection is a significant task in the identification of retinal disease regions. This study presents a retinal vessel detection approach using shearlet transform and indeterminacy filtering. The fundus image’s green channel is mapped in the neutrosophic domain via shearlet transform. The neutrosophic domain images are then filtered with an indeterminacy filter to reduce the indeterminacy information. A neural network classifier is employed to identify the pixels whose inputs are the features in neutrosophic images. The proposed approach is tested on two datasets, and a receiver operating characteristic curve and the area under the curve are employed to evaluate experimental results quantitatively. The area under the curve values are 0.9476 and 0.9469 for each dataset respectively, and 0.9439 for both datasets. The comparison with the other algorithms also illustrates that the proposed method yields the highest evaluation measurement value and demonstrates the efficiency and accuracy of the proposed method.

  9. Imaging transient blood vessel fusion events in zebrafish by correlative volume electron microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah E J Armer

    Full Text Available The study of biological processes has become increasingly reliant on obtaining high-resolution spatial and temporal data through imaging techniques. As researchers demand molecular resolution of cellular events in the context of whole organisms, correlation of non-invasive live-organism imaging with electron microscopy in complex three-dimensional samples becomes critical. The developing blood vessels of vertebrates form a highly complex network which cannot be imaged at high resolution using traditional methods. Here we show that the point of fusion between growing blood vessels of transgenic zebrafish, identified in live confocal microscopy, can subsequently be traced through the structure of the organism using Focused Ion Beam/Scanning Electron Microscopy (FIB/SEM and Serial Block Face/Scanning Electron Microscopy (SBF/SEM. The resulting data give unprecedented microanatomical detail of the zebrafish and, for the first time, allow visualization of the ultrastructure of a time-limited biological event within the context of a whole organism.

  10. Blood Vessel Extraction in Color Retinal Fundus Images with Enhancement Filtering and Unsupervised Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zafer Yavuz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Retinal blood vessels have a significant role in the diagnosis and treatment of various retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, arteriosclerosis, and hypertension. For this reason, retinal vasculature extraction is important in order to help specialists for the diagnosis and treatment of systematic diseases. In this paper, a novel approach is developed to extract retinal blood vessel network. Our method comprises four stages: (1 preprocessing stage in order to prepare dataset for segmentation; (2 an enhancement procedure including Gabor, Frangi, and Gauss filters obtained separately before a top-hat transform; (3 a hard and soft clustering stage which includes K-means and Fuzzy C-means (FCM in order to get binary vessel map; and (4 a postprocessing step which removes falsely segmented isolated regions. The method is tested on color retinal images obtained from STARE and DRIVE databases which are available online. As a result, Gabor filter followed by K-means clustering method achieves 95.94% and 95.71% of accuracy for STARE and DRIVE databases, respectively, which are acceptable for diagnosis systems.

  11. Transformation of Image Positions, Rotations, and Sizes into Shift Parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov Jensen, A.; Lindvold, L.; Rasmussen, E.

    1987-01-01

    An optical image processing system is described that converts orientation and size to shift properties and simultaneously preserves the positional information as a shift. The system is described analytically and experimentally. The transformed image can be processed further with a classical...... correlator working with a rotational and size-invariant. multiplexed match filter. An optical robot vision system designed on this concept would be able to look at several objects simultaneously and determine their shape, size, orientation, and position with two measurements on the input scene at different...

  12. Classification of Vessels in Single-Pol COSMO-SkyMed Images Based on Statistical and Structural Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Wu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Vessel monitoring is one of the most important maritime applications of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR data. Because of the dihedral reflections between the vessel hull and sea surface and the trihedral reflections among superstructures, vessels usually have strong backscattering in SAR images. Furthermore, in high-resolution SAR images, detailed information on vessel structures can be observed, allowing for vessel classification in high-resolution SAR images. This paper focuses on the feature analysis of merchant vessels, including bulk carriers, container ships and oil tankers, in 3 m resolution COSMO-SkyMed stripmap HIMAGE mode images and proposes a method for vessel classification. After preprocessing, a feature vector is estimated by calculating the average value of the kernel density estimation, three structural features and the mean backscattering coefficient. Support vector machine (SVM classifier is used for the vessel classification, and the results are compared with traditional methods, such as the K-nearest neighbor algorithm (K-NN and minimum distance classifier (MDC. In situ investigations are conducted during the SAR data acquisition. Corresponding Automatic Identification System (AIS reports are also obtained as ground truth to evaluate the effectiveness of the classifier. The preliminary results show that the combination of the average value of the kernel density estimation and mean backscattering coefficient has good ability for classifying the three types of vessels. When adding the three structural features, the results slightly improve. The result of the SVM classifier is better than that of K-NN and MDC. However, the SVM requires more time, when the parameters of the kernel are estimated.

  13. Normalizing Tumor Vessels To Increase the Enzyme-Induced Retention and Targeting of Gold Nanoparticle for Breast Cancer Imaging and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Wei; Ruan, Shaobo; Yu, Wenqi; Wang, Ranran; Hu, Chuan; Liu, Rui; Gao, Huile

    2017-10-02

    Abnormal tumor vessels impede the transport and distribution of chemotherapeutics, resulting in low drug concentration at tumor sites and compromised drug efficacy. Normalizing tumor vessels can modulate tumor vascular permeability, alleviate tumor hypoxia, increase blood perfusion, attenuate interstitial fluid pressure, and improve drug delivery. Herein, a novel strategy combining cediranib, a tumor vessel normalizing agent, with an enzyme responsive size-changeable gold nanoparticle (AuNPs-A&C) was developed. In vivo photoacoustic and fluorescence imaging showed that oral pretreatment with 6 mg/kg/day of cediranib for two consecutive days significantly enhanced the retention of AuNPs-A&C in 4T1 tumor. In vivo photoacoustic imaging for hemoglobin (Hb) and oxyhemoglobin (HbO2), Evans blue assay, and immunofluorescence assay showed that cediranib pretreatment markedly increased tumor vascular permeability and tumor oxygenation, while distinctly decreased the tumor microvessel density, demonstrating normalized tumor vessels and favorably altered microenvironment. Additionally, the combination strategy considerably elevated the tumor targeting capacity of different nanoparticle formulations (AuNPs-PEG, AuNPs-A&C), while coadministration of cediranib and AuNPs-A&C achieved prevailing tumor targeting and antitumor efficacy in 4T1 tumor bearing mouse model. In conclusion, we report a novel combined administration strategy to further improve tumor diagnosis and treatment.

  14. Widespread Myocardial Delivery of Heart-Derived Stem Cells by Nonocclusive Triple-Vessel Intracoronary Infusion in Porcine Ischemic Cardiomyopathy: Superior Attenuation of Adverse Remodeling Documented by Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Histology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseliou, Eleni; Kanazawa, Hideaki; Dawkins, James; Gallet, Romain; Kreke, Michelle; Smith, Rachel; Middleton, Ryan; Valle, Jackelyn; Marbán, Linda; Kar, Saibal; Makkar, Rajendra; Marbán, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Single-vessel, intracoronary infusion of stem cells under stop-flow conditions has proven safe but achieves only limited myocardial coverage. Continuous flow intracoronary delivery to one or more coronary vessels may achieve broader coverage for treating cardiomyopathy, but has not been investigated. Using nonocclusive coronary guiding catheters, we infused allogeneic cardiosphere-derived cells (CDCs) either in a single vessel or sequentially in all three coronary arteries in porcine ischemic cardiomyopathy and used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to assess structural and physiological outcomes. Vehicle-infused animals served as controls. Single-vessel stop-flow and continuous-flow intracoronary infusion revealed equivalent effects on scar size and function. Sequential infusion into each of the three major coronary vessels under stop-flow or continuous-flow conditions revealed equal efficacy, but less elevation of necrotic biomarkers with continuous-flow delivery. In addition, multi-vessel delivery resulted in enhanced global and regional tissue function compared to a triple-vessel placebo-treated group. The functional benefits after global cell infusion were accompanied histologically by minimal inflammatory cellular infiltration, attenuated regional fibrosis and enhanced vessel density in the heart. Sequential multi-vessel non-occlusive delivery of CDCs is safe and provides enhanced preservation of left ventricular function and structure. The current findings provide preclinical validation of the delivery method currently undergoing clinical testing in the Dilated cardiomYopathy iNtervention With Allogeneic MyocardIally-regenerative Cells (DYNAMIC) trial of CDCs in heart failure patients.

  15. Ex vivo and in vivo label-free imaging of lymphatic vessels using OCT lymphangiography (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Peijun; Es'haghian, Shaghayegh; Karnowski, Karol; Rea, Suzanne; Wood, Fiona M.; Yu, Dao-Yi; McLaughlin, Robert A.; Sampson, David D.

    2017-02-01

    We have been developing an automated method to image lymphatic vessels both ex vivo and in vivo with optical coherence tomography (OCT), using their optical transparency. Our method compensates for the OCT signal attenuation for each A-scan in combination with the correction of the confocal function and sensitivity fall-off, enabling reliable thresholding of lymphatic vessels from the OCT scans. Morphological image processing with a segment-joining algorithm is also incorporated into the method to mitigate partial-volume artifacts, which are particularly evident with small lymphatic vessels. Our method is demonstrated for two different clinical application goals: the monitoring of conjunctival lymphatics for surgical guidance and assessment of glaucoma treatment; and the longitudinal monitoring of human burn scars undergoing laser ablation treatment. We present examples of OCT lymphangiography ex vivo on porcine conjunctivas and in vivo on human burn scars, showing the visualization of the lymphatic vessel network and their longitudinal changes due to treatment.

  16. Carotid Intraplaque Hemorrhage Imaging with Quantitative Vessel Wall T1 Mapping: Technical Development and Initial Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Haikun; Sun, Jie; Qiao, Huiyu; Chen, Shuo; Zhou, Zechen; Pan, Xinlei; Wang, Yishi; Zhao, Xihai; Li, Rui; Yuan, Chun; Chen, Huijun

    2017-11-08

    Purpose To develop a three-dimensional (3D) high-spatial-resolution time-efficient sequence for use in quantitative vessel wall T1 mapping. Materials and Methods A previously described sequence, simultaneous noncontrast angiography and intraplaque hemorrhage (SNAP) imaging, was extended by introducing 3D golden angle radial k-space sampling (GOAL-SNAP). Sliding window reconstruction was adopted to reconstruct images at different inversion delay times (different T1 contrasts) for voxelwise T1 fitting. Phantom studies were performed to test the accuracy of T1 mapping with GOAL-SNAP against a two-dimensional inversion recovery (IR) spin-echo (SE) sequence. In vivo studies were performed in six healthy volunteers (mean age, 27.8 years ± 3.0 [standard deviation]; age range, 24-32 years; five male) and five patients with atherosclerosis (mean age, 66.4 years ± 5.5; range, 60-73 years; five male) to compare T1 measurements between vessel wall sections (five per artery) with and without intraplaque hemorrhage (IPH). Statistical analyses included Pearson correlation coefficient, Bland-Altman analysis, and Wilcoxon rank-sum test with data permutation by subject. Results Phantom T1 measurements with GOAL-SNAP and IR SE sequences showed excellent correlation (R(2) = 0.99), with a mean bias of -25.8 msec ± 43.6 and a mean percentage error of 4.3% ± 2.5. Minimum T1 was significantly different between sections with IPH and those without it (mean, 371 msec ± 93 vs 944 msec ± 120; P = .01). Estimated T1 of normal vessel wall and muscle were 1195 msec ± 136 and 1117 msec ± 153, respectively. Conclusion High-spatial-resolution (0.8 mm isotropic) time-efficient (5 minutes) vessel wall T1 mapping is achieved by using the GOAL-SNAP sequence. This sequence may yield more quantitative reproducible biomarkers with which to characterize IPH and monitor its progression. (©) RSNA, 2017.

  17. Estimation of Nanoparticle Size Distributions by Image Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisker, Rune; Carstensen, Jens Michael; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt

    2000-01-01

    . In this paper, we present an automated image analysis technique based on a deformable ellipse model that can perform this task. Results of using this technique are shown for both nearly spherical particles and more irregularly shaped particles. The technique proves to be a very useful tool for nanoparticle......Knowledge of the nanoparticle size distribution is important for the interpretation of experimental results in many studies of nanoparticle properties. An automated method is needed for accurate and robust estimation of particle size distribution from nanoparticle images with thousands of particles...

  18. Cluster sizes in interleaved silent steady state (ISSS) imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akrofi, Kwaku; Sutton, Bradley P; Ouyang, Cheng; Husain, Fatima T

    2011-01-01

    The effect of increasing the number of scans in the "cluster" of an interleaved silent steady state (ISSS) fMRI imaging scheme from 1 to 2, and then to 3 was examined by a fixed-effects analysis of an auditory short-term memory task with four subjects. Compared to a cluster size of 1, a cluster of 2 scans improved sensitivity at detecting brain activity and statistical power, while a cluster of 3 scans further improved statistical power but seemed not to improve sensitivity beyond that achieved with a cluster of 2 scans. The findings reveal that cluster size is a vital parameter for an ISSS imaging scheme.

  19. The impact of vessel size on vulnerability curves: data and models for within-species variability in saplings of aspen, Populus tremuloides Michx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jing; Tyree, Melvin T

    2010-07-01

    The objective of this study was to quantify the relationship between vulnerability to cavitation and vessel diameter within a species. We measured vulnerability curves (VCs: percentage loss hydraulic conductivity versus tension) in aspen stems and measured vessel-size distributions. Measurements were done on seed-grown, 4-month-old aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx) grown in a greenhouse. VCs of stem segments were measured using a centrifuge technique and by a staining technique that allowed a VC to be constructed based on vessel diameter size-classes (D). Vessel-based VCs were also fitted to Weibull cumulative distribution functions (CDF), which provided best-fit values of Weibull CDF constants (c and b) and P(50) = the tension causing 50% loss of hydraulic conductivity. We show that P(50) = 6.166D(-0.3134) (R(2) = 0.995) and that b and 1/c are both linear functions of D with R(2) > 0.95. The results are discussed in terms of models of VCs based on vessel D size-classes and in terms of concepts such as the 'pit area hypothesis' and vessel pathway redundancy.

  20. High-resolution ultrasound imaging and noninvasive optoacoustic monitoring of blood variables in peripheral blood vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Irene Y.; Petrov, Yuriy; Prough, Donald S.; Esenaliev, Rinat O.

    2011-03-01

    Ultrasound imaging is being widely used in clinics to obtain diagnostic information non-invasively and in real time. A high-resolution ultrasound imaging platform, Vevo (VisualSonics, Inc.) provides in vivo, real-time images with exceptional resolution (up to 30 microns) using high-frequency transducers (up to 80 MHz). Recently, we built optoacoustic systems for probing radial artery and peripheral veins that can be used for noninvasive monitoring of total hemoglobin concentration, oxyhemoglobin saturation, and concentration of important endogenous and exogenous chromophores (such as ICG). In this work we used the high-resolution ultrasound imaging system Vevo 770 for visualization of the radial artery and peripheral veins and acquired corresponding optoacoustic signals from them using the optoacoustic systems. Analysis of the optoacoustic data with a specially developed algorithm allowed for measurement of blood oxygenation in the blood vessels as well as for continuous, real-time monitoring of arterial and venous blood oxygenation. Our results indicate that: 1) the optoacoustic technique (unlike pure optical approaches and other noninvasive techniques) is capable of accurate peripheral venous oxygenation measurement; and 2) peripheral venous oxygenation is dependent on skin temperature and local hemodynamics. Moreover, we performed for the first time (to the best of our knowledge) a comparative study of optoacoustic arterial oximetry and a standard pulse oximeter in humans and demonstrated superior performance of the optoacoustic arterial oximeter, in particular at low blood flow.

  1. Infrared tomography for diagnostic imaging of port wine stain blood vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodman, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    The objective of this work is the development of Infrared Tomography (IRT) for detecting and characterizing subsurface chromophores in human skin. Characterization of cutaneous chromophores is crucial for advances in the laser treatment of pigmented lesions (e.g., port wine stain birthmarks and tatoos). Infrared tomography (IRT) uses a fast infrared focal plane array (IR-FPA) to detect temperature rises in a substrate induced by pulsed radiation. A pulsed laser is used to produce transient heating of an object. The temperature rise, due to the optical absorption of the pulsed laser light, creates an increase in infrared emission which is measured by the IR-FPA. Although the application of IRT to image subsurface cracks due to metal fatigue is a topic of great interest in the aircraft industry, the application to image subsurface chromophores in biological materials is novel. We present an image recovery method based on a constrained conjugate gradient algorithm that has obtained the first ever high quality images of port wine blood vessels.

  2. Unlimited-size mosaicking of airborne image data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Nan; Li, Changchun; Abousleman, Glen; Si, Jennie

    2007-04-01

    This paper presents a system that creates and navigates an unlimited-size mosaic with geographical information. The input is a sequence of airborne images with or without telemetry data, and the output is a mosaic with a combined geographical coordinate layer inherited from the input images. Rather than registering input images with an orthoimage, which is popular in existing applications, the proposed system only takes use of telemetry data as prior information. The airborne images embedded with geo-information are pair-wise registered, based on image feature correspondence. We extract feature points and form a modified EDGE-based descriptor for image registration. Subsequently, the geographical coordinate layers derived from the telemetry data stream are fused using a registration matrix computed from the previous step. However, due to the unreliability of the telemetry data, the new geodetic coordinate layer might be inconsistent with the image coordinate layer and therefore requires rectification to minimize the squared error between the mosaic coordinate layer and the warped geographical coordinate layer. The above process is incorporated into a cluster framework so that the output mosaic is extensible to an infinite size. That is, once the current mosaic size has expanded beyond computer memory limitations, the image is saved to a database. Its spatial relationship with respect to the world coordinate system is also saved to the database so that the system can navigate the collection of image mosaic data by querying the spatial database and retrieving the relevant mosaics. This method is especially suitable for video sequences spanning large regions, such as surveillance video from a micro UAV. Results with real-world UAV video are provided to demonstrate the performance of the proposed system.

  3. Segmentation of elastic fibres in images of vessel wall sections stained with Weigert's resorcin-fuchsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Morera, Pablo; Travieso-González, Carlos M; Castaño-González, Irene; Mompeó-Corredera, Blanca; Ortega-Santana, Francisco

    2017-04-01

    The elastic fibres are an essential component of the extracellular matrix in blood vessel walls that allows a long-range of deformability and passive recoil without energy input. The quantitative determination of elastic fibres will provide information on the state of the vascular wall and to determine the role and behaviour of this key structural element in different physiological and pathological vascular processes. We present a segmentation method to identify and quantify elastic fibres based on a local threshold technique and some morphological characteristics measured on the segmented objects that facilitate the discrimination between elastic fibres and other image components. The morphological characteristics analysed are the thickness and the length of an object. The segmentation method was evaluated using an image database of vein sections stained with Weigert's resorcin-fuchsin. The performance results are based on a ground truth generated manually resulting in values of sensitivity greater than 80% with the exception in two samples, and specificity values above 90% for all samples. Medical specialists carried out a visual evaluation where the observations indicate a general agreement on the segmentation results' visual quality, and the consistency between the methodology proposed and the subjective observation of the doctors for the evaluation of pathological changes in vessel wall. The proposed methodology provides more objective measurements than the qualitative methods traditionally used in the histological analysis, with a significant potential for this method to be used as a diagnostic aid for many other vascular pathological conditions and in similar tissues such as skin and mucous membranes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Accuracy and initial clinical experience with measurement software (advanced vessel analysis) in three-dimensional imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Toshi; Hirohata, Masaru [Kurume Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). School of Medicine; Tanigawa, Hitoshi [Kurume Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Hospital] [and others

    2002-12-01

    Recently, the clinical benefits of three dimensional (3D) imaging, such as 3D-CTA and 3D-DSA, in cerebro-vascular disease have been widely recognized. Software for quantitative analysis of vascular structure in 3D imaging (advanced vessel analysis: AVA) has been developed. We evaluated AVA with both phantom studies and a few clinical cases. In spiral and curvy aluminum tube phantom studies, the accuracy of diameter measurements was good in 3D images produced from data set generated by multi-detector row CT or rotational angiography. The measurement error was less than 0.03 mm on aluminum tube phantoms that were 3 mm and 5 mm in diameter. In the clinical studies, the differences of carotid artery diameter measurements between 2D-DSA and 3D-DSA was less than 0.3 mm in. The measurement of length, diameter and angle by AVA should provide useful information for planning surgical and endovascular treatments of cerebro-vascular disease. (author)

  5. Detection and measurement of retinal vessels in fundus images using amplitude modified second-order Gaussian filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gang, Luo; Chutatape, Opas; Krishnan, Shankar M

    2002-02-01

    In this paper, the fitness of estimating vessel profiles with Gaussian function is evaluated and an amplitude-modified second-order Gaussian filter is proposed for the detection and measurement of vessels. Mathematical analysis is given and supported by a simulation and experiments to demonstrate that the vessel width can be measured in linear relationship with the "spreading factor" of the matched filter when the magnitude coefficient of the filter is suitably assigned. The absolute value of vessel diameter can be determined simply by using a precalibrated line, which is typically required since images are always system dependent. The experiment shows that the inclusion of the width measurement in the detection process can improve the performance of matched filter and result in a significant increase in success rate of detection.

  6. Quantitative Flow Imaging in Human Umbilical Vessels In Utero Using Nongated 2D Phase Contrast MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, Uday; Yadav, Brijesh K; Jella, Pavan K; Haacke, Ewart Mark; Hernandez-Andrade, Edgar; Mody, Swati; Yeo, Lami; Hassan, Sonia S; Romero, Roberto; Neelavalli, Jaladhar

    2017-12-23

    Volumetric assessment of afferent blood flow rate provides a measure of global organ perfusion. Phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PCMRI) is a reliable tool for volumetric flow quantification, but given the challenges with motion and lack of physiologic gating signal, such studies, in vivo on the human placenta, are scant. To evaluate and apply a nongated (ng) PCMRI technique for quantifying blood flow rates in utero in umbilical vessels. Prospective study design. Twenty-four pregnant women with median gestational age (GA) 30 4/7 weeks and interquartile range (IQR) 8 1/7 weeks. All scans were performed on a 3.0T Siemens Verio system using the ng-PCMRI technique. The GA-dependent increase in umbilical vein (UV) and arterial (UA) flow was compared to previously published values. Systematic error to be expected from ng-PCMRI, in the context of pulsatile UA flow and partial voluming, was studied through Monte-Carlo simulations, as a function of resolution and number of averages. Correlation between the UA and UV was evaluated using a generalized linear model. Simulations showed that ng-PCMRI measurement variance reduced by increasing the number of averages. For vessels on the order of 2 voxels in radius, partial voluming led to 10% underestimation in the flow. In fetuses, the average flow rates in UAs and UV were measured to be 203 ± 80 ml/min and 232 ± 92 ml/min and the normalized average flow rates were 140 ± 59 ml/min/kg and 155 ± 57 ml/min/kg, respectively. Excellent correlation was found between the total arterial flow vs. corresponding venous flow, with a slope of 1.08 (P = 0.036). Ng-PCMRI can provide accurate volumetric flow measurements in utero in the human umbilical vessels. Care needs to be taken to ensure sufficiently high-resolution data are acquired to minimize partial voluming-related errors. 2 Technical Efficacy Stage 1 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  7. Small-size streak tube for imaging lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jinshou; Hui, Dandan; Luo, Duan; Wang, Tao; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Shaorong; Jia, Hui

    2017-02-01

    Streak tube imaging lidar, as a novel flash lidar, due to its advantages of higher resolution for low contrast conditions, compact and rugged physical configurations, small image distortions owing to its scannerless design, and higher image update rates, has immense potential to provide 3D single-laser-pulse scannerless imaging, 3D multispectral imaging, 3D multispectral fluorescence imaging, and 3D polarimetry. In order to further reduce the size and enlarge the field of view (FOV) of the lidar system, we designed a super small-size, large photocathode area and meshless streak tube with spherical cathode and screen. With the aid of Computer Simulation Technology Software package (CST), a model of the streak tube was built, and its predominant performances were illustrated via tracking electron trajectories. Spatial resolution of the streak tube reaches 20lp/mm over the entire ∅28mm photocathode working area, and its temporal resolution is better than 30ps. Most importantly, the external dimensions of the streak tube are only ∅50mmx100mm. And several prototypes are already manufactured on the basis of the computer design.

  8. Image processing applied to measurement of particle size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Fabio; Lasso, Willian; Torres, Cesar

    2015-01-01

    Five different types of aggregates have been analyzed, and the size of particles on samples immersed in distilled water as silicon dioxide, titanium dioxide, styrenes and crushed silica particles is made; an attempt at applying the digital image processing (DIP) technique to analyze the particle size, we developed a system of measures microparticles using a microscope, a CCD camera and acquisition software and video processing developed in MATLAB. These studies are combined with laser light using measurements by diffractometry and obtain calibration in the system implemented, in this work we achievement measurement particle size on the order of 4 to 6 micrometers. The study demonstrates that DIP is a fast, convenient, versatile, and accurate technique for particle size analysis; the limitations of implemented setup too will be discussed.

  9. Determining wood chip size: image analysis and clustering methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Febbi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available One of the standard methods for the determination of the size distribution of wood chips is the oscillating screen method (EN 15149- 1:2010. Recent literature demonstrated how image analysis could return highly accurate measure of the dimensions defined for each individual particle, and could promote a new method depending on the geometrical shape to determine the chip size in a more accurate way. A sample of wood chips (8 litres was sieved through horizontally oscillating sieves, using five different screen hole diameters (3.15, 8, 16, 45, 63 mm; the wood chips were sorted in decreasing size classes and the mass of all fractions was used to determine the size distribution of the particles. Since the chip shape and size influence the sieving results, Wang’s theory, which concerns the geometric forms, was considered. A cluster analysis on the shape descriptors (Fourier descriptors and size descriptors (area, perimeter, Feret diameters, eccentricity was applied to observe the chips distribution. The UPGMA algorithm was applied on Euclidean distance. The obtained dendrogram shows a group separation according with the original three sieving fractions. A comparison has been made between the traditional sieve and clustering results. This preliminary result shows how the image analysis-based method has a high potential for the characterization of wood chip size distribution and could be further investigated. Moreover, this method could be implemented in an online detection machine for chips size characterization. An improvement of the results is expected by using supervised multivariate methods that utilize known class memberships. The main objective of the future activities will be to shift the analysis from a 2-dimensional method to a 3- dimensional acquisition process.

  10. Detailed features of palisade vessels as a marker of the esophageal mucosa revealed by magnifying endoscopy with narrow band imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Y; Yagi, M; Aida, J; Ishida, H; Suzuki, S; Hashimoto, T; Amanuma, Y; Kusano, M; Mukai, S; Yamazaki, S; Iida, M; Ochiai, T; Matsuura, M; Iwakiri, K; Kawano, T; Hoshihara, Y; Takubo, K

    2012-08-01

    The palisade vessels present at the distal end of the esophagus are considered to be a landmark of the esophagogastric junction and indispensable for diagnosis of columnar-lined esophagus on the basis of the Japanese criteria. Here we clarified the features of normal palisade vessels at the esophagogastric junction using magnifying endoscopy. We prospectively studied palisade vessels in 15 patients undergoing upper gastrointestinal endoscopy using a GIF-H260Z instrument (Olympus Medical Systems Co., Tokyo, Japan). All views of the palisade vessels were obtained at the maximum magnification power in the narrow band imaging mode. We divided the area in which palisade vessels were present into three sections: the area from the squamocolumnar junction (SCJ) to about 1 cm orad within the esophagus (Section 1); the area between sections 1 and 3 (Section 2); and the area from the upper limit of the palisade vessels to about 1 cm distal within the esophagus (Section 3). In each section, we analyzed the vessel density, caliber of the palisade vessels, and their branching pattern. The vessel density in Sections 1, 2, and 3 was 9.1 ± 2.1, 8.0 ± 2.6, and 3.3 ± 1.3 per high-power field (mean ± standard deviation [SD]), respectively, and the differences were significant between Sections 1 and 2 (P= 0.0086) and between Sections 2 and 3 (P caliber in Sections 1, 2, and 3 was 127.6 ± 52.4 µm, 149.6 ± 58.6 µm, and 199.5 ± 75.1 µm (mean ± SD), respectively, and the differences between Sections 1 and 2, and between Sections 2 and 3, were significant (P < 0.0001). With regard to branching form, the frequency of branching was highest in Section 1, and the 'normal Y' shape was observed more frequently than in Sections 2 and 3. Toward the oral side, the frequency of branching diminished, and the frequency of the 'upside down Y' shape increased. The differences in branching form were significant among the three sections (P < 0.0001). These results indicate that the density of

  11. A Three-Dimensional Image Of The Cerebral Blood Vessels And Tumor For Use In Stereotactic Neurosurgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suetens, P.; Gybels, J.; Oosterlinck, A.; Haegemans, A.; Dierckx, P.

    1983-12-01

    A useful method that makes stereotactic neurosurgery safer, is developed. It yields an integrated stereoscopic image of the cerebral blood vessels, CT view of tumor and simulated electrode trajectory, allowing the surgeon to choose any electrode direction that looks convenient to him, without imminent danger of causing a haemorrhage.

  12. Imaging of large vessel vasculitis with {sup 18}FDG PET: illusion or reality? A critical review of the literature data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belhocine, Tarik; Vandevivere, Johan [Department of Nuclear Medicine, A.Z. Middelheim Hospital, 2020, Antwerp (Belgium); Blockmans, Daniel [Department of Internal Medicine, Gasthuisberg University Hospital, Leuven (Belgium); Hustinx, Roland [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital of Liege, Liege (Belgium); Mortelmans, Luc [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Gasthuisberg University Hospital, Leuven (Belgium)

    2003-09-01

    Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ({sup 18}FDG PET) plays a major role in the management of oncology patients. Owing to the singular properties of the glucose tracer, many patients suffering from non-malignant diseases such as inflammatory or infectious diseases may also derive clinical benefit from the appropriate use of metabolic imaging. Large vessel vasculitides such as giant cell arteritis and Takayasu arteritis are other examples that may potentially extend the field of {sup 18}FDG PET indications. The purpose of the present article is to assess the feasibility of metabolic imaging in vasculitis on the basis of the current literature data. In particular, the clinical context and the {sup 18}FDG imaging patterns seen in patients with large vessel vasculitis are analysed in order to identify potential indications for metabolic imaging. (orig.)

  13. Imaging of large vessel vasculitis with (18)FDG PET: illusion or reality? A critical review of the literature data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belhocine, Tarik; Blockmans, Daniel; Hustinx, Roland; Vandevivere, Johan; Mortelmans, Luc

    2003-09-01

    Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ((18)FDG PET) plays a major role in the management of oncology patients. Owing to the singular properties of the glucose tracer, many patients suffering from non-malignant diseases such as inflammatory or infectious diseases may also derive clinical benefit from the appropriate use of metabolic imaging. Large vessel vasculitides such as giant cell arteritis and Takayasu arteritis are other examples that may potentially extend the field of (18)FDG PET indications. The purpose of the present article is to assess the feasibility of metabolic imaging in vasculitis on the basis of the current literature data. In particular, the clinical context and the (18)FDG imaging patterns seen in patients with large vessel vasculitis are analysed in order to identify potential indications for metabolic imaging.

  14. Intravoxel Incoherent Motion Imaging in Small Vessel Disease: Microstructural Integrity and Microvascular Perfusion Related to Cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C Eleana; Wong, Sau May; Uiterwijk, Renske; Staals, Julie; Backes, Walter H; Hoff, Erik I; Schreuder, Tobien; Jeukens, Cécile R L P N; Jansen, Jacobus F A; van Oostenbrugge, Robert J

    2017-03-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is associated with cognitive impairment. This may be because of decreased microstructural integrity and microvascular perfusion, but data on these relationships are scarce. We determined the relationship between cognition and microvascular perfusion and microstructural integrity in SVD patients, using intravoxel incoherent motion imaging-a diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging technique designed to determine microvascular perfusion and microstructural integrity simultaneously. Seventy-three patients with SVD and 39 controls underwent intravoxel incoherent motion imaging and neuropsychological assessment. Parenchymal diffusivity D (a surrogate measure of microstructural integrity) and perfusion-related measure fD* were calculated for the normal appearing white matter, white matter hyperintensities, and cortical gray matter. The associations between cognitive performance and D and fD* were determined. In SVD patients, multivariable analysis showed that lower fD* in the normal appearing white matter and cortical gray matter was associated with lower overall cognition (P=0.03 and P=0.002, respectively), lower executive function (P=0.04 and P=0.01, respectively), and lower information-processing speed (P=0.04 and P=0.01, respectively). D was not associated with cognitive function. In controls, no association was found between D, fD*, and cognition. In SVD patients, lower cognitive performance is associated with lower microvascular perfusion in the normal appearing white matter and cortical gray matter. Our results support recent findings that both cortical gray matter and normal appearing white matter perfusion may play a role in the pathophysiology of cognitive dysfunction in SVD. URL: http://www.trialregister.nl. Unique identifier: NTR3786. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Segmentation of hepatic vessels from MRI images for planning of electroporation-based treatments in the liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcan, Marija; Pavliha, Denis; Music, Maja Marolt; Fuckan, Igor; Magjarevic, Ratko; Miklavcic, Damijan

    2014-09-01

    Electroporation-based treatments rely on increasing the permeability of the cell membrane by high voltage electric pulses delivered to tissue via electrodes. To ensure that the whole tumor is covered by the sufficiently high electric field, accurate numerical models are built based on individual patient geometry. For the purpose of reconstruction of hepatic vessels from MRI images we searched for an optimal segmentation method that would meet the following initial criteria: identify major hepatic vessels, be robust and work with minimal user input. We tested the approaches based on vessel enhancement filtering, thresholding, and their combination in local thresholding. The methods were evaluated on a phantom and clinical data. Results show that thresholding based on variance minimization provides less error than the one based on entropy maximization. Best results were achieved by performing local thresholding of the original de-biased image in the regions of interest which were determined through previous vessel-enhancement filtering. In evaluation on clinical cases the proposed method scored in average sensitivity of 93.68%, average symmetric surface distance of 0.89 mm and Hausdorff distance of 4.04 mm. The proposed method to segment hepatic vessels from MRI images based on local thresholding meets all the initial criteria set at the beginning of the study and necessary to be used in treatment planning of electroporation-based treatments: it identifies the major vessels, provides results with consistent accuracy and works completely automatically. Whether the achieved accuracy is acceptable or not for treatment planning models remains to be verified through numerical modeling of effects of the segmentation error on the distribution of the electric field.

  16. Size-adaptive hepatocellular carcinoma detection from 3D CT images based on the level set method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yui, Shuntaro; Miyakoshi, Junichi; Matsuzaki, Kazuki; Irie, Toshiyuki; Kurazume, Ryo

    2012-03-01

    Automatic detection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) from 3D CT images effectively reduces interpretation work. Several detection methods have been proposed. However, there still remains a tough problem of adaptation detection methods to a wide range of tumor sizes, especially to small nodules, since it is difficult to distinguish tumors from other structures, including noise. Although the level set method (LS) is a powerful tool for detecting objects with arbitrary topology, it is still poor at detecting small nodules due to low contrast. To detect small nodules, early phase images are useful since low contrast in the late phase causes miss-detection of some small nodules. Nevertheless, conventional methods using early phase images face two problems: one is failure to extract small nodules due to low contrast even in early phase images, and the other is false-positive (FP) detection of vessels adjacent to tumors. In this paper, a new robust detection method adapted to the wide range of tumor sizes has been proposed that uses only early phase images. To overcome these two problems, our method consists of two techniques. One is regularizing surface evolution used in LS by applying a new HCC filter that can enhance both small nodules and large tumors. The other is regularizing the surface evolution by applying a Hessian-matrix-based filter that can enhance the vessel structures. Experimental results showed that the proposed method improves sensitivity by over 15% and decreases FP by over 20%, demonstrating that the proposed method is useful for detecting HCC accurately.

  17. A vessel length-based method to compute coronary fractional flow reserve from optical coherence tomography images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyung Eun; Lee, Seo Ho; Shin, Eun-Seok; Shim, Eun Bo

    2017-06-26

    Hemodynamic simulation for quantifying fractional flow reserve (FFR) is often performed in a patient-specific geometry of coronary arteries reconstructed from the images from various imaging modalities. Because optical coherence tomography (OCT) images can provide more precise vascular lumen geometry, regardless of stenotic severity, hemodynamic simulation based on OCT images may be effective. The aim of this study is to perform OCT-FFR simulations by coupling a 3D CFD model from geometrically correct OCT images with a LPM based on vessel lengths extracted from CAG data with clinical validations for the present method. To simulate coronary hemodynamics, we developed a fast and accurate method that combined a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of an OCT-based region of interest (ROI) with a lumped parameter model (LPM) of the coronary microvasculature and veins. Here, the LPM was based on vessel lengths extracted from coronary X-ray angiography (CAG) images. Based on a vessel length-based approach, we describe a theoretical formulation for the total resistance of the LPM from a three-dimensional (3D) CFD model of the ROI. To show the utility of this method, we present calculated examples of FFR from OCT images. To validate the OCT-based FFR calculation (OCT-FFR) clinically, we compared the computed OCT-FFR values for 17 vessels of 13 patients with clinically measured FFR (M-FFR) values. A novel formulation for the total resistance of LPM is introduced to accurately simulate a 3D CFD model of the ROI. The simulated FFR values compared well with clinically measured ones, showing the accuracy of the method. Moreover, the present method is fast in terms of computational time, enabling clinicians to provide solutions handled within the hospital.

  18. Lithiasis size estimation variability depending on image technical methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argüelles Salido, Enrique; Aguilar García, Jesús; Lozano-Blasco, Jose María; Subirá Rios, Jorge; Beardo Villar, Pastora; Campoy-Martínez, Pedro; Medina-López, Rafael A

    2013-11-01

    The lithiasic size is a determining factor in selecting the most suitable treatment, surgical or medical. However, the method for obtaining a reliable lithiasic size is not standardized. Our objetives are to determine the differences between the estimated lithiasic sizes shown by plain radiography test and by computerized axial tomography (CT) scan (using different techniques) in relation to the actual size, and to establish which is the ideal type of imaging for this purpose. We present an in vitro model with lithiasis obtained in cooperation with four centers. lithiasis >0.5 cm, intact, and visible via simple radiography. A sample of 245 lithiases was obtained, with 87 rejected as they did not fulfill the inclusion criteria. Initially the three main actual diameters of each lithiasis were measured with a calibrator, then a plain X-ray and a CT scan were taken of the samples to determine the surface size in cm(2) for simple radiography; surface size and volume in cm(3) for CT scan, in bone window and soft tissue (Toshiba Aquillion 64, sections of 0.5 mm, 120 Kv, 250 mA). The tomographic area was calculated by employing the formula recommended by the European Association of Urology and scanner software. The actual, radiographic and tomographic measurements were taken by three different researchers who were unaware of the results obtained by the each other. The statistics program IBM SPSS Statistics(®) 19 was used. Differences were analyzed using the Wilcoxon sign test. The bone window CT scan slightly overestimated the actual lithiasic size (0.12 vs. 0.17 cm(3)), while in soft tissue window the actual volume was practically doubled (0.12 vs. 0.21 cm(3)) (p lithiasis measurements can be estimated, although the craniocaudal diameter measurement will be overestimated. Using soft tissue window gives an overestimated size.

  19. Dilatation of the left ventricular cavity on dipyridamole thallium-201 imaging: A new marker of triple-vessel disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeishi, Y.; Tono-oka, I.; Ikeda, K.; Komatani, A.; Tsuiki, K.; Yasui, S. (Yamagata Univ. School of Medicine (Japan))

    1991-02-01

    To investigate the significance and mechanism of dilatation of the left ventricular cavity on dipyridamole thallium-201 imaging, we performed both dipyridamole thallium-201 imaging and dipyridamole radionuclide angiography on 83 patients with known angiograms. The dipyridamole/delayed ratio of the left ventricular dimension from the thallium-201 image was defined as the left ventricular dilatation ratio (LVDR). An LVDR greater than the mean + two standard deviations in patients without coronary artery disease was defined as abnormal. Twenty-two of 83 patients showed an abnormal LVDR, and 18 of the 22 patients (82%) had triple-vessel disease. By defect and washout analysis, the sensitivity and specificity for correctly identifying the patients as having triple-vessel disease was 72% and 76%, respectively, whereas LVDR had a sensitivity of 72% and a specificity of 93%. When LVDR was used in combination with the defect and washout criteria, sensitivity increased to 84% without a loss of specificity. In those 22 patients with abnormal LVDRs, end-diastolic volume measured by radionuclide angiography did not change after dipyridamole infusion. Dilatation of the left ventricular cavity on dipyridamole thallium-201 imaging reflected relative subendocardial hypoperfusion induced by dipyridamole rather than actual chamber enlargement. The LVDR was moderately sensitive and highly specific for triple-vessel disease and provided complementary information to dipyridamole thallium-201 imaging.

  20. Image Size Variation Influence on Corrupted and Non-viewable BMP Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azmi, Tengku Norsuhaila T.; Azma Abdullah, Nurul; Rahman, Nurul Hidayah Ab; Hamid, Isredza Rahmi A.; Chai Wen, Chuah

    2017-08-01

    Image is one of the evidence component seek in digital forensics. Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) format is most popular used in the Internet because JPEG files are very lossy and easy to compress that can speed up Internet transmitting processes. However, corrupted JPEG images are hard to recover due to the complexities of determining corruption point. Nowadays Bitmap (BMP) images are preferred in image processing compared to another formats because BMP image contain all the image information in a simple format. Therefore, in order to investigate the corruption point in JPEG, the file is required to be converted into BMP format. Nevertheless, there are many things that can influence the corrupting of BMP image such as the changes of image size that make the file non-viewable. In this paper, the experiment indicates that the size of BMP file influences the changes in the image itself through three conditions, deleting, replacing and insertion. From the experiment, we learnt by correcting the file size, it can able to produce a viewable file though partially. Then, it can be investigated further to identify the corruption point.

  1. Genome size determination in peronosporales (Oomycota) by Feulgen image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voglmayr, H; Greilhuber, J

    1998-12-01

    Genome size was determined, by nuclear Feulgen staining and image analysis, in 46 accessions of 31 species of Peronosporales (Oomycota), including important plant pathogens such as Bremia lactucae, Plasmopara viticola, Pseudoperonospora cubensis, and Pseudoperonospora humuli. The 1C DNA contents ranged from 0.046 (45. 6 Mb) to 0.163 pg (159.9 Mb). This is 0.041- to 0.144-fold that of Glycine max (soybean, 1C = 1.134 pg), which was used as an internal standard for genome size determination. The linearity of Feulgen absorbance photometry method over this range was demonstrated by calibration of Aspergillus species (1C = 31-38 Mb) against Glycine, which revealed differences of less than 6% compared to the published CHEF data. The low coefficients of variation (usually between 5 and 10%), repeatability of the results, and compatibility with CHEF data prove the resolution power of Feulgen image analysis. The applicability and limitations of Feulgen photometry are discussed in relation to other methods of genome size determination (CHEF gel electrophoresis, reassociation kinetics, genomic reconstruction) that have been previously applied to Oomycota. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  2. Interferometric laser imaging for in-flight cloud droplet sizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunker, Christina; Roloff, Christoph; Grassmann, Arne

    2016-12-01

    A non-intrusive particle sizing method with a high spatial distribution is used to estimate cloud droplet spectra during flight test campaigns. The interferometric laser imaging for droplet sizing (ILIDS) method derives particle diameters of transparent spheres by evaluating the out-of-focus image patterns. This sizing approach requires a polarized monochromatic light source, a camera including an objective lens with a slit aperture, a synchronization unit and a processing tool for data evaluation. These components are adapted to a flight test environment to enable the microphysical investigation of different cloud genera. The present work addresses the design and specifications of ILIDS system, flight test preparation and selected results obtained in the lower and middle troposphere. The research platform was a Dornier Do228-101 commuter aircraft at the DLR Flight Operation Center in Braunschweig. It was equipped with the required instrumentation including a high-energy laser as the light source. A comprehensive data set of around 71 800 ILIDS images was acquired over the course of five flights. The data evaluation of the characteristic ILIDS fringe patterns relies, among other things, on a relationship between the fringe spacing and the diameter of the particle. The simplest way to extract this information from a pattern is by fringe counting, which is not viable for such an extensive number of data. A brief contrasting comparison of evaluation methods based on frequency analysis by means of fast Fourier transform and on correlation methods such as minimum quadratic difference is used to encompass the limits and accuracy of the ILIDS method for such applications.

  3. Atherosclerosis: contrast-enhanced MR imaging of vessel wall in rabbit model--comparison of gadofosveset and gadopentetate dimeglumine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobbes, Marc B I; Miserus, Robbert-Jan J H M; Heeneman, Sylvia; Passos, Valeria Lima; Mutsaers, Peter H A; Debernardi, Nicola; Misselwitz, Bernd; Post, Mark; Daemen, Mat J A P; van Engelshoven, Jos M A; Leiner, Tim; Kooi, Marianne E

    2009-03-01

    To investigate the potential of gadofosveset for contrast material-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of plaque in a rabbit model of atherosclerosis. All experiments were approved by the animal ethics committee. Thirty-one New Zealand White rabbits were included in one of four study groups: animals with atherosclerosis imaged with gadofosveset (n = 10) or gadopentetate dimeglumine (n = 7) and control animals imaged with gadofosveset (n = 7) or gadopentetate dimeglumine (n = 7). Aortic atherosclerosis was induced through endothelial denudation combined with a cholesterol-enriched diet. Control rabbits underwent a sham surgical procedure and received a regular diet. After 8 weeks, pre- and postcontrast T1-weighted MR images of the aortic vessel wall were acquired. Relative signal enhancement was determined with dedicated software. Statistical analysis was performed by using a generalized linear mixed model. Immunohistochemical staining with CD31 and albumin was used to assess microvessel density and the albumin content of the vascular wall. Group differences were analyzed by using a chi(2) test. Gadofosveset spatial distribution and content within the vessel wall were determined with proton-induced x-ray emission (PIXE) analysis. Postcontrast signal enhancement was significantly greater for atherosclerotic than for control animals imaged with gadofosveset (P = .022). Gadopentetate dimeglumine could not enable discrimination between normal and atherosclerotic vessel walls (P = .428). PIXE analysis showed higher amounts of gadopentetate dimeglumine than gadofosveset in both atherosclerotic and normal rabbit aortas. Immunohistochemical staining revealed the presence of albumin and increased microvessel density in the vascular walls of atherosclerotic rabbits. These results suggest that gadofosveset can be used to differentiate between atherosclerotic and normal rabbit vessel walls. http://radiology.rsnajnls.org/cgi/content/full/250/3/682/DC1. RSNA, 2009

  4. Reliability of fish size estimates obtained from multibeam imaging sonar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hightower, Joseph E.; Magowan, Kevin J.; Brown, Lori M.; Fox, Dewayne A.

    2013-01-01

    Multibeam imaging sonars have considerable potential for use in fisheries surveys because the video-like images are easy to interpret, and they contain information about fish size, shape, and swimming behavior, as well as characteristics of occupied habitats. We examined images obtained using a dual-frequency identification sonar (DIDSON) multibeam sonar for Atlantic sturgeon Acipenser oxyrinchus oxyrinchus, striped bass Morone saxatilis, white perch M. americana, and channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus of known size (20–141 cm) to determine the reliability of length estimates. For ranges up to 11 m, percent measurement error (sonar estimate – total length)/total length × 100 varied by species but was not related to the fish's range or aspect angle (orientation relative to the sonar beam). Least-square mean percent error was significantly different from 0.0 for Atlantic sturgeon (x̄  =  −8.34, SE  =  2.39) and white perch (x̄  = 14.48, SE  =  3.99) but not striped bass (x̄  =  3.71, SE  =  2.58) or channel catfish (x̄  = 3.97, SE  =  5.16). Underestimating lengths of Atlantic sturgeon may be due to difficulty in detecting the snout or the longer dorsal lobe of the heterocercal tail. White perch was the smallest species tested, and it had the largest percent measurement errors (both positive and negative) and the lowest percentage of images classified as good or acceptable. Automated length estimates for the four species using Echoview software varied with position in the view-field. Estimates tended to be low at more extreme azimuthal angles (fish's angle off-axis within the view-field), but mean and maximum estimates were highly correlated with total length. Software estimates also were biased by fish images partially outside the view-field and when acoustic crosstalk occurred (when a fish perpendicular to the sonar and at relatively close range is detected in the side lobes of adjacent beams). These sources of

  5. Statistical Permutation-based Artery Mapping (SPAM): a novel approach to evaluate imaging signals in the vessel wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Robert; Scherzinger, Aaron; Kiefer, Friedemann; Hermann, Sven; Jiang, Xiaoyi; Schäfers, Michael A

    2017-05-26

    Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death worldwide. A prominent cause of cardiovascular events is atherosclerosis, a chronic inflammation of the arterial wall that leads to the formation of so called atherosclerotic plaques. There is a strong clinical need to develop new, non-invasive vascular imaging techniques in order to identify high-risk plaques, which might escape detection using conventional methods based on the assessment of the luminal narrowing. In this context, molecular imaging strategies based on fluorescent tracers and fluorescence reflectance imaging (FRI) seem well suited to assess molecular and cellular activity. However, such an analysis demands a precise and standardized analysis method, which is orientated on reproducible anatomical landmarks, ensuring to compare equivalent regions across different subjects. We propose a novel method, Statistical Permutation-based Artery Mapping (SPAM). Our approach is especially useful for the understanding of complex and heterogeneous regional processes during the course of atherosclerosis. Our method involves three steps, which are (I) standardisation with an additional intensity normalization, (II) permutation testing, and (III) cluster-enhancement. Although permutation testing and cluster enhancement are already well-established in functional magnetic resonance imaging, to the best of our knowledge these strategies have so far not been applied in cardiovascular molecular imaging. We tested our method using FRI images of murine aortic vessels in order to find recurring patterns in atherosclerotic plaques across multiple subjects. We demonstrate that our pixel-wise and cluster-enhanced testing approach is feasible and useful to analyse tracer distributions in FRI data sets of aortic vessels. We expect our method to be a useful tool within the field of molecular imaging of atherosclerotic plaques since cluster-enhanced permutation testing is a powerful approach for finding significant differences

  6. Hypoattenuation on CTA images with large vessel occlusion: timing affects conspicuity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dave, Prasham [University of Ottawa, MD Program, Faculty of Medicine, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Lum, Cheemun; Thornhill, Rebecca; Chakraborty, Santanu [University of Ottawa, Department of Radiology, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Dowlatshahi, Dar [Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Ottawa, ON (Canada); University of Ottawa, Division of Neurology, Department of Medicine, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2017-05-15

    Parenchymal hypoattenuation distal to occlusions on CTA source images (CTASI) is perceived because of the differences in tissue contrast compared to normally perfused tissue. This difference in conspicuity can be measured objectively. We evaluated the effect of contrast timing on the conspicuity of ischemic areas. We collected consecutive patients, retrospectively, between 2012 and 2014 with large vessel occlusions that had dynamic multiphase CT angiography (CTA) and CT perfusion (CTP). We identified areas of low cerebral blood volume on CTP maps and drew the region of interest (ROI) on the corresponding CTASI. A second ROI was placed in an area of normally perfused tissue. We evaluated conspicuity by comparing the absolute and relative change in attenuation between ischemic and normally perfused tissue over seven time points. The median absolute and relative conspicuity was greatest at the peak arterial (8.6 HU (IQR 5.1-13.9); 1.15 (1.09-1.26)), notch (9.4 HU (5.8-14.9); 1.17 (1.10-1.27)), and peak venous phases (7.0 HU (3.1-12.7); 1.13 (1.05-1.23)) compared to other portions of the time-attenuation curve (TAC). There was a significant effect of phase on the TAC for the conspicuity of ischemic vs normally perfused areas (P < 0.00001). The conspicuity of ischemic areas distal to a large artery occlusion in acute stroke is dependent on the phase of contrast arrival with dynamic CTASI and is objectively greatest in the mid-phase of the TAC. (orig.)

  7. Digital seafloor images and sediment grain size from the mouth of the Columbia River, Oregon and Washington, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelfenbaum, Guy R.; Carlson, Emily; Stevens, Andrew; Rubin, David M.

    2017-01-01

    Geo-referenced digital imagery of in-situ seafloor sediments in the mouth of the Columbia River was collected and analyzed to determine median grain size of the surface sediments. Digital imagery of the seafloor was collected with a “flying eyeball” (Rubin and others, 2007) from the R/V Parke Snavely from September 11 to September 13, 2014 (USGS Field Activity 2014-642-FA). The flying eyeball consists of a standard definition plumbing inspection video camera and LED light ring inserted in a 50 kg wrecking ball. The video camera has a resolution of 480 by 720 pixels with a resolution of 0.009 mm/pixel when the target is flush against the exterior surface of the lens. Sample locations were chosen to allow for the observation of spatial variability of grain size over the length of many large bedforms. The bedforms were identified from a bathymetric survey performed in a previous field effort in 2013 (Gelfenbaum and others, 2015). During survey operations, the flying eyeball was repeatedly lowered to the seafloor with a winch along the transect. The winch was equipped with a conducting cable that transmitted the video signal from the camera to the research vessel in real time where it was recorded with a Sony DV recorder. Positioning of the vessel was determined with an Applanix PosMV and integrated with the digital video recording at 1-Hz intervals using Red Hen Systems (RHS) VMS200 hardware, which encodes the position information on the audio channel of the video tape. In addition to the imagery, surface sediment was collected using a small Ponar, or "grab", sampler at 12 locations throughout the study area. The physical samples were emptied into a tray on the deck of the vessel and observed with the flying eyeball. Approximately 50 g of sediment from each sample was retained and later processed in the lab using a Beckman Coulter laser diffraction analyzer to determine grain-size distributions, which can be accessed on the "child item" to this data release

  8. Coagulation and fibrinolytic parameters as predictors for small-vessel disease revealed by magnetic resonance imaging of the brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohriyama, Tatsuo; Yamaguchi, Shinya; Tanaka, Eiji; Yamamura, Yasuhiro; Nakamura, Shigenobu [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1996-05-01

    We correlated coagulation and fibrinolytic parameters with small-vessel disease revealed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain. One hundred and eleven patients with asymptomatic or symptomatic cerebral infarction were randomly selected for the study; 57 males and 54 females with an average age of 66.6{+-}9.6, age range 40 to 85, years old. Among them, 76 patients had a history of symptomatic cerebral infarction; 38 patients hypertension; and 24 patients diabetes mellitus. Patients with large cortical infarction, cerebral hemorrhage, demyelinating disease or mass lesions were excluded from the present study. The MRI scans were reviewed for areas with increased signal intensity on T2-weighted images. The small infarction was defined as a lesion less than 10 mm in diameter. The activity of von Willebrand factor (vWF) correlated significantly with the grade of caps at the anterior and posterior horns of the lateral ventricle, and the number of small infarctions in the subcortical white matter and basal ganglia, suggesting vWF could be a predictor for these small-vessel disease. The grade of caps at posterior horn of the lateral ventricle and the number of small infarctions in the subcortical white matter were associated significantly with the concentration of plasma fibrinogen and reversely with the activity of antithrombin III, an inhibitory factor in coagulation system. These results indicate that hypercoagulable state may causatively relate with small-vessel disease in the territory of medullary artery branching from cortical artery. On the contrary, these coagulation parameters did not correlate significantly with small ischemic lesions in the territory of perforating artery. No correlation was observed between the level of marker proteins for platelet activation and the degree of small-vessel disease, indicating the activation of platelet could not associate with the etiology of small-vessel disease. (author)

  9. Platform image processing to study the structural properties of retinal vessel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabino VERDE

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a technological platform specialized in assessing retinal vessel caliber and describing the relationship of the results obtained to cardiovascular risk. Retinal circulation is an area of active research by numerous groups, and there is general experimental agreement on the analysis of the patterns of the retinal blood vessels in the normal human retina. The development of automated tools designed to improve performance and decrease interobserver variability, therefore, appears necessary. 

  10. Vessel Sampling and Blood Flow Velocity Distribution With Vessel Diameter for Characterizing the Human Bulbar Conjunctival Microvasculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liang; Yuan, Jin; Jiang, Hong; Yan, Wentao; Cintrón-Colón, Hector R; Perez, Victor L; DeBuc, Delia C; Feuer, William J; Wang, Jianhua

    2016-03-01

    This study determined (1) how many vessels (i.e., the vessel sampling) are needed to reliably characterize the bulbar conjunctival microvasculature and (2) if characteristic information can be obtained from the distribution histogram of the blood flow velocity and vessel diameter. Functional slitlamp biomicroscope was used to image hundreds of venules per subject. The bulbar conjunctiva in five healthy human subjects was imaged on six different locations in the temporal bulbar conjunctiva. The histograms of the diameter and velocity were plotted to examine whether the distribution was normal. Standard errors were calculated from the standard deviation and vessel sample size. The ratio of the standard error of the mean over the population mean was used to determine the sample size cutoff. The velocity was plotted as a function of the vessel diameter to display the distribution of the diameter and velocity. The results showed that the sampling size was approximately 15 vessels, which generated a standard error equivalent to 15% of the population mean from the total vessel population. The distributions of the diameter and velocity were not only unimodal, but also somewhat positively skewed and not normal. The blood flow velocity was related to the vessel diameter (r=0.23, P<0.05). This was the first study to determine the sampling size of the vessels and the distribution histogram of the blood flow velocity and vessel diameter, which may lead to a better understanding of the human microvascular system of the bulbar conjunctiva.

  11. MRA Images Identification of the Artery Blood Vessel of the Knee with SOM LVQ Neural Networks as Auxiliary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hung-Chun; Chien, Chia-Hung; Shih, Ting-Fang; Chong, Fok-Ching

    2005-01-01

    The ways of angiography are divided into two kinds at present: the invasive type and the non invasive type. Because the magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) has advantages of the non invasive type, thus people can accept MRA more easily. Presently, to diagnoses for the initial stage triage of the blood vessel on clinic by MRA mostly. We to be allowed to see clearly that the shape of lower limb artery which like the dendrite and the blood vessel is thick from the trunk to the thin branch, also we can see the narrow embolism and the blocked place through MRA. This study is aiming at the image of artery of blood vessel by MRA assay, and is attempting to use two-dimensional structure of SOM and LVQ to make out topologies for the shape of artery of blood vessel. We expect that MRA could be useful tools for earlier on the quick triage and auxiliary diagnosis of doctors. By actual examples truly prove that patients after peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) treatment can diagnose effectively, shorten the time of patients waiting for reports and improve the whole efficiency of the medical treatment system.

  12. Dark field imaging system for size characterization of magnetic micromarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malec, A.; Haiden, C.; Kokkinis, G.; Keplinger, F.; Giouroudi, I.

    2017-05-01

    In this paper we demonstrate a dark field video imaging system for the detection and size characterization of individual magnetic micromarkers suspended in liquid and the detection of pathogens utilizing magnetically labelled E.coli. The system follows dynamic processes and interactions of moving micro/nano objects close to or below the optical resolution limit, and is especially suitable for small sample volumes ( 10 μl). The developed detection method can be used to obtain clinical information about liquid contents when an additional biological protocol is provided, i.e., binding of microorganisms (e.g. E.coli) to specific magnetic markers. Some of the major advantages of our method are the increased sizing precision in the micro- and nano-range as well as the setup's simplicity making it a perfect candidate for miniaturized devices. Measurements can thus be carried out in a quick, inexpensive, and compact manner. A minor limitation is that the concentration range of micromarkers in a liquid sample needs to be adjusted in such a manner that the number of individual particles in the microscope's field of view is sufficient.

  13. Total Magnetic Resonance Imaging Burden of Small Vessel Disease in Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy: An Imaging-Pathologic Study of Concept Validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charidimou, Andreas; Martinez-Ramirez, Sergi; Reijmer, Yael D; Oliveira-Filho, Jamary; Lauer, Arne; Roongpiboonsopit, Duangnapa; Frosch, Matthew; Vashkevich, Anastasia; Ayres, Alison; Rosand, Jonathan; Gurol, Mahmut Edip; Greenberg, Steven M; Viswanathan, Anand

    2016-08-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is characteristically associated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) biomarkers of small vessel brain injury, including strictly lobar cerebral microbleeds, cortical superficial siderosis, centrum semiovale perivascular spaces, and white matter hyperintensities. Although these neuroimaging markers reflect distinct pathophysiologic aspects in CAA, no studies to date have combined these structural imaging features to gauge total brain small vessel disease burden in CAA. To investigate whether a composite score can be developed to capture the total brain MRI burden of small vessel disease in CAA and to explore whether this score contributes independent and complementary information about CAA severity, defined as intracerebral hemorrhage during life or bleeding-related neuropathologic changes. This retrospective, cross-sectional study examined a single-center neuropathologic CAA cohort of eligible patients from the Massachusetts General Hospital from January 1, 1997, through December 31, 2012. Data analysis was performed from January 2, 2015, to January 9, 2016. Patients with pathologic evidence of CAA (ie, any presence of CAA from routinely collected brain biopsy specimen, biopsy specimen at hematoma evacuation, or autopsy) and available brain MRI sequences of adequate quality, including T2-weighted, T2*-weighted gradient-recalled echo, and/or susceptibility-weighted imaging and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequences, were considered for the study. Brain MRIs were rated for lobar cerebral microbleeds, cortical superficial siderosis, centrum semiovale perivascular spaces, and white matter hyperintensities. All 4 MRI lesions were incorporated into a prespecified ordinal total small vessel disease score, ranging from 0 to 6 points. Associations with severity of CAA-associated vasculopathic changes (fibrinoid necrosis and concentric splitting of the wall), clinical presentation, number of intracerebral hemorrhages, and other

  14. Computer-aided diagnosis of plus disease via measurement of vessel thickness in retinal fundus images of preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oloumi, Faraz; Rangayyan, Rangaraj M; Casti, Paola; Ells, Anna L

    2015-11-01

    Changes in the characteristics of retinal vessels such as width and tortuosity can be signs of the presence of several diseases such retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) and diabetic retinopathy. Plus disease is an indicator of ROP which requires treatment and is signified by an increase in posterior venular width. In this work, we present image processing techniques for the detection, segmentation, tracking, and measurement of the width of the major temporal arcade (MTA), which is the thickest venular branch in the retina. Several image processing techniques have been employed, including the use of Gabor filters to detect the MTA, morphological image processing to obtain its skeleton, Canny's method to detect and select MTA vessel-edge candidates, least-squares fitting to interpolate the MTA edges, and geometrical procedures to measure the width of the MTA. The results, obtained using 110 retinal fundus images of preterm infants, indicate a statistically highly significant difference in MTA width of normal cases as compared to cases with plus disease (pcomputer-aided diagnosis (CAD) of plus disease with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.76. The proposed methods may be used in CAD of plus disease and timely treatment of ROP in a clinical or teleophthalmological setting. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Quantitative measurement of changes in retinal vessel diameter in ocular fundus images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lars; Grunkin, Michael; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær

    2000-01-01

    The change in diameter of retinal vessels as a function of increasing distance to the optic disc is believed to be indicative of the risk level of various vascular diseases such as generalised arteriosclerosis and Diabetes Mellitus. In particular, focal arteriolar narrowing (FAN) is considered re...

  16. Quantitative Measurement of Changes in Retinal Vessel Diameter in Ocular Fundus Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lars; Grunkin, Michael; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær

    1999-01-01

    The Change in diameter of retinal vessels as a funcion of increasing distance to the optic disc is believed to be indicative of the risk level of various vascular diseases such as generalised arteriosclerosis and Diabetes Mellitus. In particular, Focal Arteriolar Narrowing (FAN) is considered...

  17. Comparison of vessel contrast measured with a scanning-beam digital x-ray system and an image intensifier/television system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speidel, M A; Wilfley, B P; Heanue, J A; Betts, T D; Van Lysel, M S

    2001-02-01

    Vessel contrast was measured in the fluoroscopic images produced by a scanning-beam digital x-ray (SBDX) system and an image intensifier/television (II/TV) based system. The SBDX system electronically scans a series of pencil x-ray beams across the patient, each of which is directed at a distant small-area detector array. The reduction in detected scatter achieved with this geometry was expected to provide an increase in image contrast. Vessel contrast was evaluated from images of a phantom containing iodinated tubes. The vessels were inserted into an acrylic stack to provide a patient-mimicking scattering medium. Vessel diameter ranged from 0.3 to 3.1 mm. Images were acquired at 100 kVp with the SBDX and II/TV systems and averaged to reduce x-ray noise. The II/TV system was operated in the 6-in. image intensifier mode with an anti-scatter grid. The increase in contrast in the SBDX images, expressed as a ratio of the measured SBDX and II/TV contrasts, ranged from 1.63 to 1.79 for individual vessels. This agreed well with a prediction of the contrast improvement ratio for this experiment, based on measurements of the scatter fraction, object-plane line spread functions, and consideration of the source spectrum and detector absorption properties. The predicted contrast improvement ratio for SBDX relative to II/TV images was 1.62 to 1.77.

  18. Automated Vessel Segmentation Using Infinite Perimeter Active Contour Model with Hybrid Region Information with Application to Retinal Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yitian; Rada, Lavdie; Chen, Ke; Harding, Simon P; Zheng, Yalin

    2015-09-01

    Automated detection of blood vessel structures is becoming of crucial interest for better management of vascular disease. In this paper, we propose a new infinite active contour model that uses hybrid region information of the image to approach this problem. More specifically, an infinite perimeter regularizer, provided by using L(2) Lebesgue measure of the γ -neighborhood of boundaries, allows for better detection of small oscillatory (branching) structures than the traditional models based on the length of a feature's boundaries (i.e., H(1) Hausdorff measure). Moreover, for better general segmentation performance, the proposed model takes the advantage of using different types of region information, such as the combination of intensity information and local phase based enhancement map. The local phase based enhancement map is used for its superiority in preserving vessel edges while the given image intensity information will guarantee a correct feature's segmentation. We evaluate the performance of the proposed model by applying it to three public retinal image datasets (two datasets of color fundus photography and one fluorescein angiography dataset). The proposed model outperforms its competitors when compared with other widely used unsupervised and supervised methods. For example, the sensitivity (0.742), specificity (0.982) and accuracy (0.954) achieved on the DRIVE dataset are very close to those of the second observer's annotations.

  19. Vessel Operating Units (Vessels)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains data for vessels that are greater than five net tons and have a current US Coast Guard documentation number. Beginning in1979, the NMFS...

  20. Implementation of 3D-Imaging technique for visual testing in a nuclear reactor pressure vessel

    OpenAIRE

    Tanco, André

    2014-01-01

    This master thesis has been performed by request of Dekra Industrial AB. Dekra Industrial AB is a Swedish subsidiary company of the German company Dekra and works for example with safety inspections within the nuclear power industry. The inspections performed by the company are often non-destructive testing (NDT) such as visual inspections of nuclear reactor pressure vessels. The inspection methods used today are considered to be further developed and there is a strong demand of improving the...

  1. Noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging of vessels affected by transplant arteriosclerosis in an experimental mouse aortic allograft model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebhardt, J; Budinsky, L; Reulbach, U; Weyand, M; Hess, A; Ensminger, S M

    2011-03-01

    Transplant arteriosclerosis is still the leading cause of late mortality after heart transplantation despite advances in immunosuppression regimes. Experimental mouse models have substantially contributed to a better understanding of the multifactorial pathogenesis, but the major limitation of these studies is the difficulty in monitoring progression of transplant arteriosclerosis over time. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate whether MR measurements are sensitive enough to detect characteristic vascular lesions in a small animal transplantation model. For this purpose we investigated 22 iso- and allogeneic aortic graft transplanted mice in vivo with a 4.7 T MR scanner using a 2D-RARE technique, 3D time-of-flight angiography and 3D phase contrast angiography as well as a special snake-based reconstruction algorithm. The MR lumen values of patency from native images and from 3D vessel reconstructions of the respective methods were correlated with conventional histological analysis. A comparison of the different techniques showed that angiographic MR modalities correlated well with histological measurements. 2D-RARE sequences were inferior to the sequences obtained by other ones. Superior correlations and the most accurate results were found for vessel reconstruction based on 3D angiographic time-of-flight data. These data demonstrate that mouse in vivo MR imaging is sensitive enough to detect and quantify vascular changes caused by transplant arteriosclerosis. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Weight status and perceived body size image in overweight and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Visual-matching could be considered a more precise measure of body size perception than verbal, which could explain the greater sensitivity to sex differences. Parents in general and of girls specific underestimate the size of their children than boy's parents. The perception of friends of body size was underestimated.

  3. Weight status and perceived body size image in overweight and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Only overweight and obese children were assigned to participant with BMI percentile values for age and sex of >85 to 95, respectively. Students selected a figure to represent their current images. Body image was measured using a body image tool with a sequence of seven body silhouettes progressing from ...

  4. The optimal monochromatic spectral computed tomographic imaging plus adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm can improve the superior mesenteric vessel image quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xiao-Ping; Zuo, Zi-Wei; Xu, Ying-Jin; Wang, Jia-Ning; Liu, Huai-Jun; Liang, Guang-Lu; Gao, Bu-Lang

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the effect of the optimal monochromatic spectral computed tomography (CT) plus adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction on the improvement of the image quality of the superior mesenteric artery and vein. The gemstone spectral CT angiographic data of 25 patients were reconstructed in the following three groups: 70KeV, the optimal monochromatic imaging, and the optimal monochromatic plus 40%iterative reconstruction mode. The CT value, image noises (IN), background CT value and noises, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and image scores of the vessels and surrounding tissues were analyzed. In the 70KeV, the optimal monochromatic and the optimal monochromatic images plus 40% iterative reconstruction group, the mean scores of image quality were 3.86, 4.24 and 4.25 for the superior mesenteric artery and 3.46, 3.78 and 3.81 for the superior mesenteric vein, respectively. The image quality scores for the optimal monochromatic and the optimal monochromatic plus 40% iterative reconstruction groups were significantly greater than for the 70KeV group (Piterative reconstruction group than in the 70KeV group. The optimal monochromatic plus 40% iterative reconstruction group had significantly (Piterative reconstruction using low-contrast agent dosage and low injection rate can significantly improve the image quality of the superior mesenteric artery and vein. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Long-term safety and feasibility of three-vessel multimodality intravascular imaging in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taniwaki, Masanori; Radu, Maria D; Garcia-Garcia, Hector M

    2015-01-01

    in the setting of IBIS-4 study. IBIS4 (NCT00962416) is a prospective cohort study conducted at five European centers including 103 STEMI patients who underwent serial three-vessel coronary imaging during primary PCI and at 13 months. The feasibility parameter was successful imaging, defined as the number......-modality three-vessel i.c. imaging in STEMI patients undergoing primary PCI is consistent a high degree of success and can be performed safely without impact on cardiovascular events at long-term follow-up....

  6. Body image distortions in bulimia nervosa: investigating body size overestimation and body size satisfaction by fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Harald Matthias; Röder, Christian; Zimmermann, Jan; Hummel, Dennis; Negele, Alexa; Grabhorn, Ralph

    2011-06-01

    Body image distortion is a key symptom of eating disorders. In behavioral research two components of body image have been defined: attitudes towards the body and body size estimation. Only few fMRI-studies investigated the neural correlates of body image in bulimia; those are constrained by the lack of a direct distinction between these different body image components. The present study investigates the neural correlates of two aspects of the body image using fMRI: satisfaction rating and size estimation of distorted own body photographs in bulimia nervosa patients (15) and controls (16). Patients were less satisfied with their current body shape than controls and preferred to be thinner. The amount of insula activity reflects the pattern of the satisfaction rating for patients and controls. Patients also overestimated their own body size. For control subjects, an activated cluster in lateral occipital cortex was sensitive for body size distortions, whereas bulimic patients did not demonstrate such a modulation. Furthermore, bulimic subjects did not recruit the middle frontal gyrus (MFG) in contrast to controls during the body size estimation task, maybe indicating a reduced spatial manipulation capacity. Therefore, this activation pattern of lateral occipital cortex and MFG might be responsible for body size overestimation in bulimia. The present results show that bulimic patients exhibit two distinct deficits in body image representations similar to anorectic patients and that specifically associated neuronal correlates can be identified. Concludingly, our study support psychotherapeutic strategies specifically targeting these two aspects of body image distortions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. In vivo photoacoustic imaging of blood vessels with a pulsed laser diode

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolkman, R.G.M.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; van Leeuwen, Ton

    2006-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging is a hybrid imaging modality that is based on the detection of acoustic waves generated by absorption of pulsed light by tissue chromophores such as hemoglobin in blood. For this technique, usually large and costly Q-switched Nd:YAG lasers are used. These lasers provide a pulse

  8. Imaging large vessel vasculitis with fully integrated PET/MRI: a pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Einspieler, Ingo; Pyka, Thomas; Eiber, Matthias [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Thuermel, Klaus; Wolfram, Sabine; Moog, Philipp [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Department of Nephrology, Munich (Germany); Reeps, Christian [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Vascular Surgery, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Essler, Markus [Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universitaet, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Universitaetsklinikum Bonn, Bonn (Germany)

    2015-04-16

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of hybrid [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/MRI in patients with large vessel vasculitis (LVV) by comparing visual and quantitative parameters to that of PET/CT. Furthermore, the value of PET/MRI in disease activity and extent of LVV was assessed. A total of 16 [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/MRI and 12 [{sup 18}F]-FDG PET/CT examinations were performed in 12 patients with LVV. MRI of the vessel wall by T1-weighted and T2-weighted sequences was used for anatomical localization of FDG uptake and identification of morphological changes associated with LVV. In addition, contrast-enhanced (CE) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) was performed. The vascular FDG uptake in the vasculitis group was compared to a reference group of 16 patients using a four-point visual score. Visual scores and quantitative parameters [maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) and target to background ratio (TBR)] were compared between PET/MRI and PET/CT. Furthermore, correlations between C-reactive protein (CRP) and quantitative PET results, as well the extent of vasculitis in PET, MRI/CE-MRA and combined PET/MRI, were analysed. TBRs, SUV{sub max} values and visual scores correlated well between PET/MRI and PET/CT (r = 0.92, r = 0.91; r = 0.84, p < 0.05). There was no significant difference between both modalities concerning SUV{sub max} measurements and visual scores. In PET/MRI, PET alone revealed abnormal FDG uptake in 86 vascular regions. MRI/CE-MRA indicated 49 vessel segments with morphological changes related to vasculitis, leading to a total number of 95 vasculitis regions in combination with PET. Strong and significant correlations between CRP and disease extent in PET alone (r = 0.75, p = 0.0067) and PET/MRI (r = 0.92, p < 0.0001) in contrast to MRI/CE-MRA only were observed. Regarding disease activity, no significant correlations were seen between quantitative PET results and CRP, although there

  9. Weight status and perceived body size image in overweight and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Doaa K. Hussin

    Children;. Obesity;. Body image. Abstract Background: Young people's perception of their weight status attracted much interest. With a better understanding of childhood body image problems, investigating prevention programs within schools is an important next step. Objective: The aim of the study was to investigate body ...

  10. Synchrotron X-ray imaging for nondestructive monitoring of sap flow dynamics through xylem vessel elements in rice leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hae Koo; Lee, Sang Joon

    2010-12-01

    A comprehensive understanding of the sap flow dynamics and xylem hydraulic properties is essential to unravel the functional features of water transport from roots to shoots in vascular plants. To evaluate quantitatively the safety and efficiency of this system, nondestructive methods to assess the interactions between sap ascent kinetics and xylem structure are required. In this study, synchrotron X-ray microscopy was employed to observe anatomical structures and sap flow dynamics in rice (Oryza sativa) xylem simultaneously. The phase-contrast imaging technique allowed nondestructive observation of the xylem structural characteristics and the air-water interfaces generated by dehydration-rehydration cycles in excised leaves. This X-ray microimaging method provided a unique tool to characterize the perforated end walls of vessel elements and to evaluate their influence on hydraulic resistance during the refilling of embolized vessels. The real-time monitoring of the axial and radial sap flow under various environmental conditions highlighted the important role of perforation plates. In summary, we report a new methodology to study the sap flow dynamics and xylem hydraulic properties with μm spatial and ms temporal resolution using X-ray microscopy. The experimental procedure described herein provides a useful handle to understand key sap transport phenomena in xylem. © The Authors (2010). Journal compilation © New Phytologist Trust (2010).

  11. [Ultrasound imaging of bridge vessel transplant used to reconstruct the tributary of middle hepatic vein in living donor liver transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qiang; Luo, Yan; Yuan, Chao-xin; Yan, Lü-nan; Wu, Hong; Zhang, Zhong-wei

    2007-06-01

    To discuss the application of color Doppler ultrasound in the imaging of bridge vein transplant used to reconstruct the tributary of the middle hepatic vein in adult living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). From December 2005 to July 2006, 25 patients underwent the adult living donor liver transplantation with right lobe grafts without middle hepatic vein. Tributaries of middle hepatic vein larger than 5 mm were reconstructed with great saphenous vein. Types and numbers of reconstructed tributaries of middle hepatic vein were listed below: single V5 (n=8), double V5 (n=2), the V5 and V8 (n=9), V8 (n=6). The successive investigation of the vein grafts was performed by color Doppler ultrasound in the period of from postoperative 7 days to 8 months. All vein transplants were detected by color Doppler ultrasound. Among them, 34 vein transplants of 24 cases undergoing adult LDLT appeared patent, but one case was suspected to have reconstructed finally the bypass vessels for blood circle regardless of the grafted bridge vein probably occurring the thrombosis. Color Doppler ultrasound can precisely detect and appear the postoperative bridge vessel grafted, and also measure the blood flow velocity in grafted vein used to reconstruct the tributaries of the middle hepatic vein in LDLT.

  12. A Bio-Informational Theory of Emotion: Motion and Image Size Effects on Viewers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detenber, Benjamin H.; Reeves, Byron

    1996-01-01

    Argues that the human brain is not specialized to deal with 20th-century media. Measures effects of image size and motion on college students' emotional responses. Finds that image size positively affects the arousal and dominates dimensions of emotional responses, but has no significant effect on valance evaluations. Finds that still pictures…

  13. Removal of Arterial Vessel Contributions in Susceptibility-Weighted Images for Quantification of Normalized Visible Venous Volume in Children with Sickle Cell Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam M. Winchell

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To evaluate a new postprocessing framework that eliminates arterial vessel signal contributions in the quantification of normalized visible venous volume (NVVV, a ratio between venous and brain volume in susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI exams in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD. Materials and Methods. We conducted a retrospective study and qualitatively reviewed for hypointense arterial vessel contamination in SWI exams from 21 children with SCD. We developed a postprocessing framework using magnetic resonance angiography in combination with SWI to provide a more accurate quantification of NVVV. NVVV was calculated before and after removing arterial vessel contributions to determine the error from hypointense arterial vessels in quantifying NVVV. Results. Hypointense arterial vessel contamination was observed in 86% SWI exams and was successfully corrected by the proposed method. The contributions of hypointense arterial vessels in the original SWI were significant and accounted for approximately 33% of the NVVV [uncorrected NVVV = 0.012 ± 0.005 versus corrected NVVV = 0.008 ± 0.003 (mean ± SD, P<0.01]. Conclusion. Hypointense arterial vessel contamination occurred in the majority of SWI exams and led to a sizeable overestimation of the visible venous volume. A prospective longitudinal study is needed to evaluate if quantitation of NVVV was improved and to assess the role of NVVV as a biomarker of SCD severity or stroke risk.

  14. Computerized assessment of vessel morphological changes during treatment of glioblastoma multiforme: report of a case imaged serially by MRA over four years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullitt, Elizabeth; Ewend, Matthew; Vredenburgh, James; Friedman, Allan; Lin, Weili; Wilber, Kathy; Zeng, Donglin; Aylward, Stephen R; Reardon, David

    2009-08-01

    A patient with glioblastoma multiforme underwent serial computerized analysis of tumor-associated vasculature defined from magnetic resonance angiographic (MRA) scans obtained over almost a four year period. The clinical course included tumor resection with subsequent radiation therapy, a long symptom-free interval, emergence of a new malignant focus, resection of that focus, a stroke, and treatment with chemotherapy and anti-angiogenic therapy. Image analysis methods included segmentation of vessels from each MRA and statistical comparison of vessel morphology over 4 regions of interest (the initial tumor site, the second tumor site, a distant control region, and the entire brain) to the same 4 regions of interest in 50 healthy volunteers (26 females and 24 males; mean age 39 years). Results suggested that following completion of focal radiation therapy (RT) vessel shape abnormalities, if elevated at the time of RT completion, may progressively normalize for months in focal regions, that progressively severe vessel shape abnormalities can precede the emergence of a gadolinium enhancing lesion by months, that lesion resection can produce a dramatic but highly transient drop in abnormal vessel tortuosity both focally and globally, and that treatment with anti-angiogenic agents does not necessarily normalize vessel shape. Quantitative measurements of vessel morphology as defined from MRA may provide useful insights into tumor development and response to therapy.

  15. SIMILARITY MEASURE WITH ADAPTIVE LOCAL WINDOW IN DIFFERENT SIZE IMAGES

    OpenAIRE

    KILIÇASLAN, MAHMUT; TANYERİ, UFUK; İNCETAŞ, MÜRSEL OZAN; YAKIŞIR GİRGİN, BURCU; DEMİRCİ, RECEP; ATAKAN, CEMAL

    2017-01-01

    Content based image retrieval methods requiredifferent features such as color, pattern and shape information. Theresearchers also use the data obtained from the image histogram in thiscontext. The histogram information is calculated locally or globally. However,even though they have the same content, local approaches cannot be used inimages with different aspect ratios, and methods that process over the entirepixels cannot always give the desired results. In this study, a new methodbased on t...

  16. Spectral diffuse reflectance and autofluorescence imaging can perform early prediction of blood vessel occlusion in skin flaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuo; Zhu, Caigang; Hoe-Kong Chui, Christopher; Sheoran, Gyanendra; Tan, Bien-Keem; Liu, Quan

    2016-11-17

    Flap transfer has become a common technique in reconstructive surgery. However, a significant number of compromised skin flaps are not successfully salvaged because the current clinical method for flap assessment relies heavily on the clinician's experience. Vascular occlusion is the major reason for flap failure, thus the accurate and objective early prediction of blood vessel occlusion is vitally important. Our parallel point measurement study has demonstrated the great potential of joint diffuse reflectance and autofluorescence spectroscopy in the early detection and differentiation of venous and arterial occlusion in skin flaps. Unfortunately, the technique of point measurements is not suitable to examine a large skin flap when a high spatial resolution is required. In this study, we attempted to overcome this problem by performing spectral diffuse reflectance and autofluorescence imaging on a rat skin flap model. Both imaging data and reconstructed spectra were used to statistically differentiate control flaps, arterially occluded flaps and venously occluded flaps. Our preliminary results suggest that the technique of joint diffuse reflectance and autofluorescence spectroscopic imaging can achieve high classification accuracy thus could be used to detect and differentiate flaps with venous and arterial occlusion accurately at an early time point in a large skin flap. Typical reconstructed spectra of (a) diffuse reflectance and (b) autofluorescence after normalization. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Video and thermal imaging system for monitoring interiors of high temperature reaction vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saveliev, Alexei V [Chicago, IL; Zelepouga, Serguei A [Hoffman Estates, IL; Rue, David M [Chicago, IL

    2012-01-10

    A system and method for real-time monitoring of the interior of a combustor or gasifier wherein light emitted by the interior surface of a refractory wall of the combustor or gasifier is collected using an imaging fiber optic bundle having a light receiving end and a light output end. Color information in the light is captured with primary color (RGB) filters or complimentary color (GMCY) filters placed over individual pixels of color sensors disposed within a digital color camera in a BAYER mosaic layout, producing RGB signal outputs or GMCY signal outputs. The signal outputs are processed using intensity ratios of the primary color filters or the complimentary color filters, producing video images and/or thermal images of the interior of the combustor or gasifier.

  18. Differential transport function of lymphatic vessels in the rat tail model and the long-term effects of Indocyanine Green as assessed with near-infrared imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eWeiler

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Near-infrared (NIR imaging has emerged as a novel imaging modality for assessing lymphatic function in vivo. While the technique has provided quantitative data previously unavailable, questions remain in regards to the spatiotemporal capabilities of the approach. We address three of the more important issues here using the rodent tail, one of the most widely utilized in vivo model systems in the lymphatic literature. Specifically we demonstrate 1 the transient vs. steady state response of lymphatics to tracer injection, 2 the functional characteristics of multiple collecting vessels draining the same tissue space in parallel, and 3 the long-term consequences of fluorescent tracers on lymphatic function to repeated functional measurements.Methods: Rat tails were imaged with NIR and metrics of function were calculated for both collecting vessels that drain the tail. A nitric oxide donor cream (GTNO was applied to the tail. Additionally, two different NIR dyes, indocyanine green (ICG and LI-COR IRDye 800CW PEG, were utilized for function imaging at the time of initial injection and at 1, 2, and 4 week follow-up time points after which both draining lymph nodes were harvested.Results and Discussion: Significant differences were found between the two collecting vessels such that the vessel first showing fluorescence (dominant produced enhanced functional metrics compared to the second vessel (non-dominant. GTNO significantly reduced lymphatic function in the non-dominant vessel compared to the dominant. ICG remained visible in the tail for 2 weeks after injection and was accompanied by significant losses in lymphatic function and enlarged draining lymph nodes. The Licor tracer also remained visible for 2 weeks. However, the dye produced significantly lower effects on lymphatic function than ICG, and lymph nodes were not enlarged at any time point, suggesting that this may be a more appropriate contrast agent for longitudinal lymphatic

  19. Differential transport function of lymphatic vessels in the rat tail model and the long-term effects of Indocyanine Green as assessed with near-infrared imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiler, Michael; Dixon, J Brandon

    2013-01-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) imaging has emerged as a novel imaging modality for assessing lymphatic function in vivo. While the technique has provided quantitative data previously unavailable, questions remain in regards to the spatiotemporal capabilities of the approach. We address three of the more important issues here using the rodent tail, one of the most widely utilized in vivo model systems in the lymphatic literature. Specifically we demonstrate (1) the transient vs. steady state response of lymphatics to tracer injection, (2) the functional characteristics of multiple collecting vessels draining the same tissue space in parallel, and (3) the long-term consequences of fluorescent tracers on lymphatic function to repeated functional measurements. Rat tails were imaged with NIR and metrics of function were calculated for both collecting vessels that drain the tail. A nitric oxide donor cream (GTNO) was applied to the tail. Additionally, two different NIR dyes, indocyanine green (ICG) and LI-COR IRDye 800CW PEG, were utilized for function imaging at the time of initial injection and at 1, 2, and 4 week follow-up time points after which both draining lymph nodes were harvested. Significant differences were found between the two collecting vessels such that the vessel first showing fluorescence (dominant) produced enhanced functional metrics compared to the second vessel (non-dominant). GTNO significantly reduced lymphatic function in the non-dominant vessel compared to the dominant. ICG remained visible in the tail for 2 weeks after injection and was accompanied by significant losses in lymphatic function and enlarged draining lymph nodes. The Licor tracer also remained visible for 2 weeks. However, the dye produced significantly lower effects on lymphatic function than ICG, and lymph nodes were not enlarged at any time point, suggesting that this may be a more appropriate contrast agent for longitudinal lymphatic imaging.

  20. Automatic detection and segmentation of vascular structures in dermoscopy images using a novel vesselness measure based on pixel redness and tubularness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharazmi, Pegah; Lui, Harvey; Stoecker, William V.; Lee, Tim

    2015-03-01

    Vascular structures are one of the most important features in the diagnosis and assessment of skin disorders. The presence and clinical appearance of vascular structures in skin lesions is a discriminating factor among different skin diseases. In this paper, we address the problem of segmentation of vascular patterns in dermoscopy images. Our proposed method is composed of three parts. First, based on biological properties of human skin, we decompose the skin to melanin and hemoglobin component using independent component analysis of skin color images. The relative quantities and pure color densities of each component were then estimated. Subsequently, we obtain three reference vectors of the mean RGB values for normal skin, pigmented skin and blood vessels from the hemoglobin component by averaging over 100000 pixels of each group outlined by an expert. Based on the Euclidean distance thresholding, we generate a mask image that extracts the red regions of the skin. Finally, Frangi measure was applied to the extracted red areas to segment the tubular structures. Finally, Otsu's thresholding was applied to segment the vascular structures and get a binary vessel mask image. The algorithm was implemented on a set of 50 dermoscopy images. In order to evaluate the performance of our method, we have artificially extended some of the existing vessels in our dermoscopy data set and evaluated the performance of the algorithm to segment the newly added vessel pixels. A sensitivity of 95% and specificity of 87% were achieved.

  1. A simple autocorrelation algorithm for determining grain size from digital images of sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, D.M.

    2004-01-01

    Autocorrelation between pixels in digital images of sediment can be used to measure average grain size of sediment on the bed, grain-size distribution of bed sediment, and vertical profiles in grain size in a cross-sectional image through a bed. The technique is less sensitive than traditional laboratory analyses to tails of a grain-size distribution, but it offers substantial other advantages: it is 100 times as fast; it is ideal for sampling surficial sediment (the part that interacts with a flow); it can determine vertical profiles in grain size on a scale finer than can be sampled physically; and it can be used in the field to provide almost real-time grain-size analysis. The technique can be applied to digital images obtained using any source with sufficient resolution, including digital cameras, digital video, or underwater digital microscopes (for real-time grain-size mapping of the bed). ?? 2004, SEPM (Society for Sedimentary Geology).

  2. Finding the right RoPax vessel size and freight price. A coste and mode choice model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales Fusco, P.; Grau Sala, M.; Sauri Marchan, S.

    2016-07-01

    Motorways of the sea operated as RoPax services are natural competitors with only-road freight haulage transportation. Cost, time and quality perceived are the determinants that make transporters and shippers use one route or another. This research considers the role that shipping companies and their ship deployment and pricing strategy have in the equation, as incentives for modal shift from road to sea. A model of the ships and transporter costs is developed considering different business models for the transporter (accompanied versus unaccompanied cargo) followed with a discrete choice model that, once calibrated, allows to test the influence that variables such as frequency, ship size and commercial speed might play into the competitiveness of a shipping line. As a result, different pricing strategies for the shipping line are developed and the characteristics of the optimal shipping line for each of them are found, to either maximize the profit of the shipping company or the modal shift. (Author)

  3. In vivo photoacoustic imaging of blood vessels using a homodyne interferometer with zero-crossing triggering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jiao; Gao, Yingzhe; Ma, Zhenhe; Zhou, Hongxian; Wang, Ruikang K.; Wang, Yi

    2017-03-01

    We demonstrate a quasinoncontact photoacoustic imaging method using a homodyne interferometer with a long coherence length laser. The generated photoacoustic signal is detected by a system that is locked at its maximum sensitivity through the use of balanced detection and zero-crossing triggering. The balanced detector is substantially equalized, so its output is zero when the system reaches the maximum sensitivity. The synchronization approach is used to trigger the excitation and detection of the photoacoustic signal. The system is immune to ambient vibrations. A thin water layer on the sample surface is used to reduce the effect of the rough tissue surface. The performance of the system is demonstrated by in vivo imaging of the microvasculature in mouse ears.

  4. Accelerated whole brain intracranial vessel wall imaging using black blood fast spin echo with compressed sensing (CS-SPACE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chengcheng; Tian, Bing; Chen, Luguang; Eisenmenger, Laura; Raithel, Esther; Forman, Christoph; Ahn, Sinyeob; Laub, Gerhard; Liu, Qi; Lu, Jianping; Liu, Jing; Hess, Christopher; Saloner, David

    2017-12-05

    Develop and optimize an accelerated, high-resolution (0.5 mm isotropic) 3D black blood MRI technique to reduce scan time for whole-brain intracranial vessel wall imaging. A 3D accelerated T 1 -weighted fast-spin-echo prototype sequence using compressed sensing (CS-SPACE) was developed at 3T. Both the acquisition [echo train length (ETL), under-sampling factor] and reconstruction parameters (regularization parameter, number of iterations) were first optimized in 5 healthy volunteers. Ten patients with a variety of intracranial vascular disease presentations (aneurysm, atherosclerosis, dissection, vasculitis) were imaged with SPACE and optimized CS-SPACE, pre and post Gd contrast. Lumen/wall area, wall-to-lumen contrast ratio (CR), enhancement ratio (ER), sharpness, and qualitative scores (1-4) by two radiologists were recorded. The optimized CS-SPACE protocol has ETL 60, 20% k-space under-sampling, 0.002 regularization factor with 20 iterations. In patient studies, CS-SPACE and conventional SPACE had comparable image scores both pre- (3.35 ± 0.85 vs. 3.54 ± 0.65, p = 0.13) and post-contrast (3.72 ± 0.58 vs. 3.53 ± 0.57, p = 0.15), but the CS-SPACE acquisition was 37% faster (6:48 vs. 10:50). CS-SPACE agreed with SPACE for lumen/wall area, ER measurements and sharpness, but marginally reduced the CR. In the evaluation of intracranial vascular disease, CS-SPACE provides a substantial reduction in scan time compared to conventional T 1 -weighted SPACE while maintaining good image quality.

  5. Feed particle size evaluation: conventional approach versus digital holography based image analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vittorio Dell’Orto

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the application of image analysis approach based on digital holography in defining particle size in comparison with the sieve shaker method (sieving method as reference method. For this purpose ground corn meal was analyzed by a sieve shaker Retsch VS 1000 and by image analysis approach based on digital holography. Particle size from digital holography were compared with results obtained by screen (sieving analysis for each of size classes by a cumulative distribution plot. Comparison between particle size values obtained by sieving method and image analysis indicated that values were comparable in term of particle size information, introducing a potential application for digital holography and image analysis in feed industry.

  6. Association of Collateral Blood Vessels Detected by Arterial Spin Labeling Magnetic Resonance Imaging With Neurological Outcome After Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Havenon, Adam; Haynor, David R; Tirschwell, David L; Majersik, Jennifer J; Smith, Gordon; Cohen, Wendy; Andre, Jalal B

    2017-04-01

    Robust collateral blood vessels have been associated with better neurologic outcome following acute ischemic stroke (AIS). The most commonly used methods for identifying collaterals are contrast-based angiographic imaging techniques, which are not possible in all patients after AIS. To assess the association between the presence of collateral vessels identified using arterial spin labeling (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging, a technique that does not require exogenous administration of contrast, and neurologic outcome in patients after AIS. This retrospective cohort study examined 38 patients after AIS admitted to a tertiary academic medical center between 2012 and 2014 who underwent MRI with ASL. According to a prespecified hypothesis, ASL images were graded for the presence of collaterals by 2 neuroradiologists. Modified Rankin Scale (mRS) scores at discharge and other composite data were abstracted from the medical record by a neurologist blinded to radiologic data. Of the 38 patients, 19 (50.0%) were male, and the mean (SD) age was 61 (20) years. In 25 of 38 patients (65.8%), collaterals were detected using ASL, which were significantly associated with both a good outcome (mRS score of 0-2 at discharge; P = .02) and a 1-point decrease in mRS score at discharge (odds ratio, 6.4; 95% CI, 1.7-23.4; P = .005). In a multivariable ordinal logistic regression model, controlling for admission National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, history of atrial fibrillation, premorbid mRS score, and stroke parent artery status, there was a strong association between the presence of ASL collaterals and a 1-point decrease in the mRS score at discharge (odds ratio, 5.1; 95% CI, 1.2-22.1; P = .03). Following AIS, the presence of ASL collaterals is strongly associated with better neurological outcome at hospital discharge. This novel association between ASL collaterals and improved neurologic outcome may help guide prognosis and management, particularly in patients

  7. A contrast enhancement and scanning techniques for CT angiography of head and neck. One phase injection method for simultaneous imaging of vessels and tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morita, Yasuhiko; Indo, Hiroko; Noikura, Takenori [Kagoshima Univ. (Japan). Dental School

    1999-09-01

    We report on a method of CT-Angiography useful for examining lesion of the head and neck using three-dimensional images and measured CT value. This study focused on some of the important blood vessels in the head and neck. The aim of this method was to obtain high-contrast enhancement for both vessels and tumors at same time. A total amount of 100 ml nonionic contrast media (Omnipaque 240, 240 mg iodine per milliliter, Daiichi seiyaku, Tokyo, Japan) was injected intravenously with a flow of 1.5 ml/sec. Spiral scans, 24 rotations with 24 seconds, were started at a time when remaining amount of contrast media had become 30 to 20 ml. All CT scans were performed using double speed spiral scan technique with a slice thickness of 2 to 3 mm and table speeds from 3 to 5 mm/rotation. The patients populations consisted of 9 men and 6 women who ranged in age from 37 to 85 years. Sixteen CT-angiography were performed according to this method. Mean CT values of major blood vessels were measured in order to find out threshold at the level of submandibular gland in 13 examinations for 12 subjects. Important vessels like the common, internal, and the external artery, internal and external jugular vein were clearly visible in all subjects. Three dimensional images of these vessels could also be reconstructed for 15 of the subjects. Mean CT values were 211 Hounsfield units (HU) and 209 HU for the right and left internal carotid artery, respectively, and 204 HU and 206 HU for the right and left external carotid artery, respectively. Mean CT values for right and left internal jugular vein were 195 HU and 194 HU respectively. Measured CT values at each important blood vessels showed this method could yields acceptable enhancements. Good enhancement effect of tumor and blood vessels in the same scan seems to be mutually incompatible. One very important trade-off is the early enhancement effect at blood vessels versus the late enhancement effect at tumors. The other important trade

  8. Automated method for identification and artery-venous classification of vessel trees in retinal vessel networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinayak S Joshi

    Full Text Available The separation of the retinal vessel network into distinct arterial and venous vessel trees is of high interest. We propose an automated method for identification and separation of retinal vessel trees in a retinal color image by converting a vessel segmentation image into a vessel segment map and identifying the individual vessel trees by graph search. Orientation, width, and intensity of each vessel segment are utilized to find the optimal graph of vessel segments. The separated vessel trees are labeled as primary vessel or branches. We utilize the separated vessel trees for arterial-venous (AV classification, based on the color properties of the vessels in each tree graph. We applied our approach to a dataset of 50 fundus images from 50 subjects. The proposed method resulted in an accuracy of 91.44% correctly classified vessel pixels as either artery or vein. The accuracy of correctly classified major vessel segments was 96.42%.

  9. Remote non-invasive stereoscopic imaging of blood vessels: first in-vivo results of a new multispectral contrast enhancement technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieringa, F.P.; Mastik, F.; Cate, F.J. ten; Neumann, H.A.M.; Steen, A.F.W. van der

    2006-01-01

    We describe a contactless optical technique selectively enhancing superficial blood vessels below variously pigmented intact human skin by combining images in different spectral bands. Two CMOS-cameras, with apochromatic lenses and dual-band LED-arrays, simultaneously streamed Left (L) and Right (R)

  10. Genetic variants of the NOTCH3 gene in the elderly and magnetic resonance imaging correlates of age-related cerebral small vessel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Schmidt (Reinhold); M. Zeginigg (Marion); M. Wiltgen (Marco); P. Freudenberger (Paul); K. Petrovic (Katja); M. Cavalieri (Margherita); P. Gider (Pierre); C. Enzinger (Christian); M. Fornage (Myriam); S. Debette (Stéphanie); J.I. Rotter (Jerome); M.A. Ikram (Arfan); L.J. Launer (Lenore)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractCerebral small vessel disease-related brain lesions such as white matter lesions and lacunes are common findings of magnetic resonance imaging in the elderly. These lesions are thought to be major contributors to disability in old age, and risk factors that include age and hypertension

  11. Characterization of atherosclerotic disease in thoracic aorta: A 3D, multicontrast vessel wall imaging study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Changwu [Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Beijing (China); Department of Radiology, The Second Clinical Medical College, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou (China); Qiao, Huiyu; He, Le [Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Beijing (China); Yuan, Chun [Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Beijing (China); Department of Radiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Chen, Huijun; Zhang, Qiang; Li, Rui [Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Beijing (China); Wang, Wei; Du, Fang [Department of Radiology, The Second Clinical Medical College, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou (China); Li, Cheng, E-mail: cjr.licheng@vip.163.com [Department of Radiology, Zhongda Hospital, Medical School of Southeast University, Nanjing (China); Zhao, Xihai, E-mail: xihaizhao@tsinghua.edu.cn [Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Beijing (China)

    2016-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate the characteristics of plaque in the thoracic aorta using three dimensional multicontrast magnetic resonance imaging. Materials and methods: Elderly subjects (≥60 years) were recruited in this study. Thoracic aorta was imaged on a 3.0T MR scanner by acquiring multicontrast sequences. The plaque burden was evaluated by measuring lumen area, wall area, wall thickness, and normalized wall index. The presence or absence of plaque and intraplaque hemorrhage (IPH)/mural thrombus (MT) were identified. The characteristics of atherosclerosis among different thoracic aorta segments (AAO: ascending aorta; AOA: aortic arch, and DOA: descending aorta) were determined. Results: Of 66 recruited subjects (mean age 72.3 ± 6.2 years, 30 males), 55 (83.3%) had plaques in the thoracic aorta. The prevalence of plaque in AAO, AOA, and DAO was 5.4%, 72.7%, and 71.2%, respectively. In addition, 21.2% of subjects were found to have lesions with IPH/MT in the thoracic aorta. The prevalence of IPH/MT in segment of AAO, AOA and DAO was 0%, 13.6%, and 12.1%, respectively. The aortic wall showed the highest NWI in DAO (34.1% ± 4.8%), followed by AOA (31.2% ± 5%), and AAO (26.8% ± 3.3%) (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Three dimensional multicontrast MR imaging is capable of characterizing atherosclerotic plaques in the thoracic aorta. The findings of high prevalence of plaques and the presence of high risk plaques in the thoracic aorta suggest early screening for aortic vulnerable lesions in the elderly.

  12. Image analysis of pellet size for a control system in industrial feed production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Georg Ljungqvist

    Full Text Available When producing aquaculture fish feed pellets, the size of the output product is of immense importance. As the production method cannot produce pellets of constant and uniform size using constant machine settings, there is a demand for size control. Fish fed with feed pellets of improper size are prone to not grow as expected, which is undesirable to the aquaculture industry. In this paper an image analysis method is proposed for automatic size-monitoring of pellets. This is called granulometry and the method used here is based on the mathematical morphological opening operation. In the proposed method, no image object segmentation is needed. The results show that it is possible to extract a general size distribution from an image of piled disordered pellets representing both length and diameter of the pellets in combination as an area.

  13. Recent Advancements in Retinal Vessel Segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    L Srinidhi, Chetan; Aparna, P; Rajan, Jeny

    2017-04-01

    Retinal vessel segmentation is a key step towards the accurate visualization, diagnosis, early treatment and surgery planning of ocular diseases. For the last two decades, a tremendous amount of research has been dedicated in developing automated methods for segmentation of blood vessels from retinal fundus images. Despite the fact, segmentation of retinal vessels still remains a challenging task due to the presence of abnormalities, varying size and shape of the vessels, non-uniform illumination and anatomical variability between subjects. In this paper, we carry out a systematic review of the most recent advancements in retinal vessel segmentation methods published in last five years. The objectives of this study are as follows: first, we discuss the most crucial preprocessing steps that are involved in accurate segmentation of vessels. Second, we review most recent state-of-the-art retinal vessel segmentation techniques which are classified into different categories based on their main principle. Third, we quantitatively analyse these methods in terms of its sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, area under the curve and discuss newly introduced performance metrics in current literature. Fourth, we discuss the advantages and limitations of the existing segmentation techniques. Finally, we provide an insight into active problems and possible future directions towards building successful computer-aided diagnostic system.

  14. Identification of intraplaque haemorrhage in carotid artery by simultaneous non-contrast angiography and intraPlaque haemorrhage (SNAP) imaging: a magnetic resonance vessel wall imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongye; Zhao, Huilin; Chen, Xiaoyi; Chen, Shuo; Qiao, Huiyu; He, Le; Li, Rui; Xu, Jianrong; Yuan, Chun; Zhao, Xihai

    2017-11-02

    To investigate the usefulness of Simultaneous Non-contrast Angiography and intraPlaque haemorrhage (SNAP) imaging in characterising carotid intraplaque haemorrhage (IPH) compared with magnetisation-prepared rapid acquisition gradient-echo (MP-RAGE) sequence. Fifty-four symptomatic patients (mean age: 63.1 ± 5.7 years, 38 males) with carotid atherosclerosis were recruited and underwent carotid MR imaging. The presence and area of IPH on SNAP and MP-RAGE images were determined. The agreement in identifying IPH and its area between SNAP and MP-RAGE was analysed. Of 1368 slices with acceptable image quality in 54 patients, 13% and 22.6% were found to have IPH on MP-RAGE and SNAP images, respectively. There was moderate agreement between MP-RAGE and SNAP sequences in identifying IPH (κ = 0.511, p = 0.029). The area of IPH on SNAP images was significantly larger than that on MP-RAGE images (17.9 ± 18.2 mm 2 vs. 9.2 ± 10.5 mm 2 , p SNAP imaging, the area of IPHs also detected by the MP-RAGE sequence was significantly larger than that of IPHs not detected by the MP-RAGE sequence (17.9 ± 19.2 mm 2 vs. 6.4 ± 6.2 mm 2 , p SNAP imaging detects more IPHs, particularly for smaller IPHs, suggesting that SNAP imaging might be a more sensitive tool for identification of carotid haemorrhagic plaques. • Moderate agreement was found between SNAP and MP-RAGE in identification of IPH • SNAP imaging might be a more sensitive tool to detect carotid IPHs • Compared with the MP-RAGE sequence, SNAP imaging can detect carotid IPHs with smaller size • SNAP imaging can help clinicians to optimise the treatment strategy.

  15. Determination of User Distribution Image Size and Position of Each Observation Area of Meteorological Imager in COMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong-Soo Seo

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, requirements of Meteorological Administration about Meteorological Imager (MI of Communications, Ocean and Meteorological Satellite (COMS is analyzed for the design of COMS ground station and according to the analysis results, the distribution image size of each observation area suitable for satellite Field Of View (FOV stated at the requirements of meteorological administration is determined and the precise satellite FOV and the size of distribution image is calculated on the basis of the image size of the determined observation area. The results in this paper were applied to the detailed design for COMS ground station and also are expected to be used for the future observation scheduling and the scheduling of distribution of user data.

  16. Particle Imaging Velocimetry Technique Development for Laboratory Measurement of Fracture Flow Inside a Pressure Vessel Using Neutron Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polsky, Yarom [ORNL; Bingham, Philip R [ORNL; Bilheux, Hassina Z [ORNL; Carmichael, Justin R [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    This paper will describe recent progress made in developing neutron imaging based particle imaging velocimetry techniques for visualizing and quantifying flow structure through a high pressure flow cell with high temperature capability (up to 350 degrees C). This experimental capability has great potential for improving the understanding of flow through fractured systems in applications such as enhanced geothermal systems (EGS). For example, flow structure measurement can be used to develop and validate single phase flow models used for simulation, experimentally identify critical transition regions and their dependence on fracture features such as surface roughness, and study multiphase fluid behavior within fractured systems. The developed method involves the controlled injection of a high contrast fluid into a water flow stream to produce droplets that can be tracked using neutron radiography. A description of the experimental setup will be provided along with an overview of the algorithms used to automatically track droplets and relate them to the velocity gradient in the flow stream. Experimental results will be reported along with volume of fluids based simulation techniques used to model observed flow.

  17. Waif goodbye! Average-size female models promote positive body image and appeal to consumers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diedrichs, Phillippa C; Lee, Christina

    2011-10-01

    Despite consensus that exposure to media images of thin fashion models is associated with poor body image and disordered eating behaviours, few attempts have been made to enact change in the media. This study sought to investigate an effective alternative to current media imagery, by exploring the advertising effectiveness of average-size female fashion models, and their impact on the body image of both women and men. A sample of 171 women and 120 men were assigned to one of three advertisement conditions: no models, thin models and average-size models. Women and men rated average-size models as equally effective in advertisements as thin and no models. For women with average and high levels of internalisation of cultural beauty ideals, exposure to average-size female models was associated with a significantly more positive body image state in comparison to exposure to thin models and no models. For men reporting high levels of internalisation, exposure to average-size models was also associated with a more positive body image state in comparison to viewing thin models. These findings suggest that average-size female models can promote positive body image and appeal to consumers.

  18. The egg, the vessels and the words. From Izdubar to Answer to Job for an imaging thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaillard, Christian

    2012-06-01

    This essay on The Red Book seeks to underscore a characteristic specific to Jung's approach to psychoanalysis. In this book, and more generally, in all of his writings, Jung's thinking is based on his personal experience of the unconscious, in which he leaves himself open to progressive encounters. Some of them, in the years 1913-14 and 1929-30, particularly his meeting with the giant Izdubar, were quite threatening. As a result, he forged an original way of thinking that is qualified here as 'imaging' and 'emergent'. The Red Book served as the first vessel for theories Jung would later express. His way of thinking, with its failures and semi-successes, all of which are always temporary, of course, is compared to the art of the potter. The author shows the kinship between the formation of the main Jungian concepts and the teachings of the French poet, professor, and art critic Yves Bonnefoy. He also considers certain recurrent formal themes in the work of contemporary German painter and sculptor Anselm Kiefer. Lastly, this epistemological study, constantly aware of the demands of Jungian clinical practice, demonstrates the continuity in Jung's work, from The Red Book to Answer to Job, where Jung ultimately elaborated a conception of history that defines our ethical position today. © 2012, The Society of Analytical Psychology.

  19. A universal approximation to grain size from images of non-cohesive sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscombe, D.; Rubin, D.M.; Warrick, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    The two-dimensional spectral decomposition of an image of sediment provides a direct statistical estimate, grid-by-number style, of the mean of all intermediate axes of all single particles within the image. We develop and test this new method which, unlike existing techniques, requires neither image processing algorithms for detection and measurement of individual grains, nor calibration. The only information required of the operator is the spatial resolution of the image. The method is tested with images of bed sediment from nine different sedimentary environments (five beaches, three rivers, and one continental shelf), across the range 0.1 mm to 150 mm, taken in air and underwater. Each population was photographed using a different camera and lighting conditions. We term it a “universal approximation” because it has produced accurate estimates for all populations we have tested it with, without calibration. We use three approaches (theory, computational experiments, and physical experiments) to both understand and explore the sensitivities and limits of this new method. Based on 443 samples, the root-mean-squared (RMS) error between size estimates from the new method and known mean grain size (obtained from point counts on the image) was found to be ±≈16%, with a 95% probability of estimates within ±31% of the true mean grain size (measured in a linear scale). The RMS error reduces to ≈11%, with a 95% probability of estimates within ±20% of the true mean grain size if point counts from a few images are used to correct bias for a specific population of sediment images. It thus appears it is transferable between sedimentary populations with different grain size, but factors such as particle shape and packing may introduce bias which may need to be calibrated for. For the first time, an attempt has been made to mathematically relate the spatial distribution of pixel intensity within the image of sediment to the grain size.

  20. APPLICATION OF IMAGE ANALYSIS TO ASSESSING CRITICAL PORE SIZE FOR PERMEABILITY PREDICTION OF CEMENT PASTE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Hu

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores image analysis techniques that provide insight into the nature of pore structure as observed in backscattered electron images of polished sections. On the basis of mathematical morphology, the pore size distribution is characterised and the critical pore size is determined for cement paste at different hydration time. The influence of image resolution is investigated. The permeability of cement paste can be predicted according to General Effective Media (GEM theory. Comparison between permeability estimation and experiment results reveals good agreement.

  1. Use of Ultrasmall Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Enhanced Susceptibility Weighted Imaging and Mean Vessel Density Imaging to Monitor Antiangiogenic Effects of Sorafenib on Experimental Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuohui Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated effectiveness of ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide enhanced susceptibility weighted imaging (USPIO-enhanced SWI and mean vessel density imaging (Q in monitoring antiangiogenic effects of Sorafenib on orthotopic hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Thirty-five HCC xenografts were established. USPIO-enhanced SWI and Q were performed on a 1.5 T MR scanner at baseline, 7, 14, and 21 days after Sorafenib treatment. Intratumoral susceptibility signal intensity (ITSS and Q were serially measured and compared between the treated (n = 15 and control groups (n = 15. Both ITSS and Q were significantly lower in the treated group at each time point (P < 0.05. Measurements in the treated group showed that ITSS persisted at 7 days (P = 0.669 and increased at 14 and 21 days (P < 0.05, while Q significantly declined at 7 days (P = 0.028 and gradually increased at 14 and 21 days. In the treated group, significant correlation was found between Q and histologic microvessel density (MVD (r = 0.753, P < 0.001, and ITSS correlated well with MVD (r = 0.742, P = 0.002 after excluding the data from baseline. This study demonstrated that USPIO-enhanced SWI and Q could provide novel biomarkers for evaluating antiangiogenic effects of Sorafenib on HCC.

  2. CT angiography of the head-and-neck vessels acquired with low tube voltage, low iodine, and iterative image reconstruction: clinical evaluation of radiation dose and image quality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-lan Zhang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: We aimed to assess the effectiveness and feasibility of head-and-neck Computed Tomography Angiography (CTA with low tube voltage and low concentration contrast media combined with iterative reconstruction algorithm. METHODS: 92 patients were randomly divided into group A and B: patients in group A received a conventional scan with 120 kVp and contrast media of 320 mgI/ml. Patients in group B, 80 kVp and contrast media of 270 mgI/ml were used along with iterative reconstruction algorithm techniques. Image quality, radiation dose and the effectively consumed iodine amount between two groups were analyzed and compared. RESULTS: Image quality of CTA of head-and-neck vessels obtained from patients in group B was significantly improved quantitatively and qualitatively. In addition, CT attenuation values in group B were also significantly higher than that in group A (p<0.001. Furthermore, compared with the protocol whereby 120 kVp and 320 mgI/dl were administrated, the mean radiation dose and consumed iodine amount in protocol B were also reduced by 50% and 15.6%, respectively (p<0.001. CONCLUSIONS: With the help of iterative reconstruction algorithm techniques, the head-and-neck CTA with diagnostic quality can be adequately acquired with low tube voltage and low concentration contrast media. This method could be potentially extended to include any part of the body to reduce the risks related to ionizing radiation.

  3. Reliability and validity of food portion size estimation from images using manual flexible digital virtual meshes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltran, Alicia; Dadabhoy, Hafza; Ryan, Courtney; Dholakia, Ruchita; Baranowski, Janice; Li, Yuecheng; Yan, Guifang; Jia, Wenyan; Sun, Mingui; Baranowski, Tom

    2018-02-12

    The eButton takes frontal images at 4s intervals throughout the day. A three-dimensional manually administered wire mesh procedure has been developed to quantify portion sizes from the two-dimensional images. The present paper reports a test of the inter-rater reliability and validity of use of the wire mesh procedure. Seventeen foods of diverse shapes and sizes served on plates, bowls and cups were selected to rigorously test the portion assessment procedure. A dietitian not involved in inter-rater reliability assessment used standard cups to independently measure the quantities of foods to generate the 'true' value for a total of seventy-five 'served' and seventy-five smaller 'left' images with diverse portion sizes. The images appeared on the computer to which the digital wire meshes were applied. Two dietitians and three engineers independently estimated portion size of the larger ('served') and smaller ('left') images for the same foods. The engineers had higher reliability and validity than the dietitians. The dietitians had lower reliabilities and validities for the smaller more irregular images, but the engineers did not, suggesting training could overcome this limitation. The lower reliabilities and validities for foods served in bowls, compared with plates, suggest difficulties with the curved nature of the bowls. The wire mesh procedure is an important step forward in quantifying portion size, which has been subject to substantial self-report error. Improved training procedures are needed to overcome the identified problems.

  4. Doppler imaging of orbital vessels in the assessment of the activity and severity of thyroid-associated orbitopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Walasik-Szemplińska

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Patients with symptoms of thyroid-associated orbitopathy are classifi ed on the basis of the clinical activity score (CAS proposed by Mourits in 1989. Despite its undoubted clinical usefulness, it has several limitations which can decide about the success or failure of the implemented treatment. Numerous reports mention the presence of hemodynamic changes in orbital and bulbar vessels in the course of an orbitopathy called Graves’ disease. The usage of Doppler sonography in the diagnosis of numerous ophthalmologic vascular diseases suggests that changes in thyroid-associated orbitopathy can correlate with the activity and severity of the disease. This paper presents the overview of the state-of-the-art concerning the usefulness of Doppler imaging in patient selection for the treatment of thyroid-associated orbitopathy. It has been shown that the velocity of blood fl ow in the superior ophthalmic vein, which is the most susceptible to changes in anatomical conditions in the enclosed orbital space, decreases in a statistically signifi cant way. A decrease in blood fl ow velocity is closely associated with the active stage of the disease whereas reverse fl ow or its absence attest to severe orbitopathy and constitute a risk factor of ocular neuropathy. The activity of the infl ammatory process in the eyeball is also confi rmed by an increase in peak systolic velocity (PSV in the ophthalmic artery and central retinal artery as well as end-diastolic velocity (EDV in the ophthalmic artery. Resistance index values decrease in the ophthalmic artery and increase in the central retinal artery mainly in cases with considerable expansion of the extraocular muscles.

  5. Differentiation of deep subcortical infarction using high-resolution vessel wall MR imaging of middle cerebral artery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Yun Jung; Choi, Byung Se; Jung, Cheol Kyu; Yoon, Yeon Hong; Sunwoo, Leonard; Kim, Jae Hyoung; Bae, Hee Joon [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-11-15

    To evaluate the utility of high-resolution vessel wall imaging (HR-VWI) of middle cerebral artery (MCA), and to compare HR-VWI findings between striatocapsular infarction (SC-I) and lenticulostriate infarction (LS-I). This retrospective study was approved by the Institutional Review Board, and informed consent was waived. From July 2009 to February 2012, 145 consecutive patients with deep subcortical infarctions (SC-I, n = 81; LS-I, n = 64) who underwent HR-VWI were included in this study. The degree of MCA stenosis and the characteristics of MCA plaque (presence, eccentricity, location, extent, T2-high signal intensity [T2-HSI], and plaque enhancement) were analyzed, and compared between SC-I and LS-I, using Fisher's exact test. Stenosis was more severe in SC-I than in LS-I (p = 0.040). MCA plaque was more frequent in SC-I than in LS-I (p = 0.028), having larger plaque extent (p = 0.001), more T2-HSI (p = 0.001), and more plaque enhancement (p = 0.002). The eccentricity and location of the plaque showed no significant difference between the two groups.Both SC-I and LS-I have similar HR-VWI findings of the MCA plaque, but SC-I had more frequent, larger plaques with greater T2-HSI and enhancement. This suggests that HR-VWI may have a promising role in assisting the differentiation of underlying pathophysiological mechanism between SC-I and LS-I.

  6. THE SIZE-SPECIFIC DOSE ESTIMATE (SSDE) FOR TRUNCATED COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY IMAGES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anam, Choirul; Haryanto, Freddy; Widita, Rena; Arif, Idam; Dougherty, Geoff

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate truncated axial computed tomography (CT) images in the clinical environment and to produce correction factors for abdomen, thoracic and head regions based on clinical data, in order to accurately predict the water-equivalent diameter (DW) and size-specific dose estimate (SSDE). We investigated axial images of 75 patients who underwent CT examinations. Truncated axial images were characterized by the truncation percentage (TP). Correction factors were calculated by using the value of DW for a certain TP (truncated image) divided by the value of DW for TP = 0% (the non-truncated image). Most of the thorax images acquired for this study were truncated images (86.2%), in the abdomen region about half of the images were truncated (48.1%), and in the head region only a small portion were truncated (9.1%). In the thorax region the value of TP for the truncated images varied up to 50%, in the abdomen region it varied up to 35%, and in the head region it was smaller than 10%. We have shown how to accurately estimate DW and SSDE by applying a correction factor to the truncated images. The correction factors increase exponentially with increasing TP. The corrected DW and SSDE for the truncated images were significant in the thoracic region, but were not significant in the abdomen and head regions. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Single-vessel coronary artery stenosis: myocardial perfusion imaging with Gadomer-17 first-pass MR imaging in a swine model of comparison with gadopentetate dimeglumine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Bernhard L; Bluemke, David A; Chin, Bennett B; Boston, Raymond C; Heldman, Alan W; Lima, João A C; Kraitchman, Dara L

    2002-10-01

    To evaluate the ability of Gadomer-17 to depict perfusion defects in a closed-chest swine model of single-vessel coronary artery disease. Twelve pigs underwent closed-chest placement of a flow reducer for 70%-90% luminal stenosis in the proximal left anterior coronary artery. Magnetic resonance (MR) perfusion imaging with Gadomer-17 and gadopentetate dimeglumine, microsphere blood flow (MBF) testing, and technetium 99m ((99m)Tc) 2 methoxyisobutylisonitrile (MIBI) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) were performed during dipyridamole vasodilation. Comparisons of percentage signal intensity (SI) increase (PSIC) in remote and ischemic myocardium were made with repeated measurements analysis of variance after injection of both tracers. Perfusion defects and reduced PSIC in the anterior ischemic versus the inferior remote myocardium could be identified after injection of both Gadomer-17 (PSIC, 66% +/- 30 [mean +/- SD] vs 100% +/- 32, respectively; P gadopentetate dimeglumine (PSIC, 49% +/- 31 vs 81% +/- 43, respectively; P gadopentetate dimeglumine) and with areas of reduced MBF (r = 0.70, P gadopentetate dimeglumine). PSIC also correlated with MBF (r = 0.89, P gadopentetate dimeglumine). Gadomer-17 allowed differentiation of ischemic from nonischemic myocardium, as demonstrated by reduced PSIC (PSIC, 48% +/- 38 vs 72% +/- 31, respectively; P gadopentetate dimeglumine (PSIC, 36% +/- 24 vs 56% +/- 27, respectively; P gadopentetate dimeglumine.

  8. Digital image processing of nanometer-size metal particles on amorphous substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria, F.; Artal, P.; Bescos, J.; Heinemann, K.

    1989-01-01

    The task of differentiating very small metal aggregates supported on amorphous films from the phase contrast image features inherently stemming from the support is extremely difficult in the nanometer particle size range. Digital image processing was employed to overcome some of the ambiguities in evaluating such micrographs. It was demonstrated that such processing allowed positive particle detection and a limited degree of statistical size analysis even for micrographs where by bare eye examination the distribution between particles and erroneous substrate features would seem highly ambiguous. The smallest size class detected for Pd/C samples peaks at 0.8 nm. This size class was found in various samples prepared under different evaporation conditions and it is concluded that these particles consist of 'a magic number' of 13 atoms and have cubooctahedral or icosahedral crystal structure.

  9. Repeatability and Reproducibility of Superficial Macular Retinal Vessel Density Measurements Using Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography En Face Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Jianqin; Durbin, Mary K; Shi, Yue; Uji, Akihito; Balasubramanian, Siva; Baghdasaryan, Elmira; Al-Sheikh, Mayss; Sadda, Srinivas R

    2017-10-01

    was highest for the 3 × 3-mm pattern in the inner ring (ICC range, 0.92 [95% CI, 0.85-0.96] to 0.96 [95% CI, 0.93-0.98]) and 6 × 6-mm pattern in the outer ring (ICC range, 0.93 [95% CI, 0.86-0.97] to 0.96 [95% CI, 0.92-0.98]). Vessel length density and PD of the superficial retinal vasculature can be obtained from OCTA images with high levels of repeatability and reproducibility but can vary with scan pattern and location.

  10. The effects of particle shape and size on T2 relaxation in magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, Joseph N; Albanese, Christopher; Rodriguez, Olga; Le, Yi-Chien; Ackun-Farmmer, Marian; Van Keuren, Edward

    2014-11-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles have recently been developed as T2 contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. Here we report the dependence of the phase relaxivity, r2, on the particle shape. We show that the size dependence of the relaxivity for spherical particles can be generalized to spheroidal particles. In addition, we show that the saturation of relaxivity above a certain size observed in spherical particles does not occur in the spheroidal particles investigated.

  11. Using Image Attributes to Assure Accurate Particle Size and Count Using Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defante, Adrian P; Vreeland, Wyatt N; Benkstein, Kurt D; Ripple, Dean C

    2017-12-23

    Nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA) obtains particle size by analysis of particle diffusion through a time series of micrographs and particle count by a count of imaged particles. The number of observed particles imaged is controlled by the scattering cross-section of the particles and by camera settings such as sensitivity and shutter speed. Appropriate camera settings are defined as those that image, track, and analyze a sufficient number of particles for statistical repeatability. Here, we test if image attributes, features captured within the image itself, can provide measurable guidelines to assess the accuracy for particle size and count measurements using NTA. The results show that particle sizing is a robust process independent of image attributes for model systems. However, particle count is sensitive to camera settings. Using open-source software analysis, it was found that a median pixel area, 4 pixels 2 , results in a particle concentration within 20% of the expected value. The distribution of these illuminated pixel areas can also provide clues about the polydispersity of particle solutions prior to using a particle tracking analysis. Using the median pixel area serves as an operator-independent means to assess the quality of the NTA measurement for count. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Deconvolution by finite-size-source effects of x-ray phase-contrast images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Caro, Liberato; Scattarella, Francesco; Tangaro, Sabina; Pelliccia, Daniele; Giannini, Cinzia; Bottigli, Ubaldo; Bellotti, Roberto [Istituto di Cristallografia, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (IC-CNR), via Amendola 122/O, I-70125 Bari (Italy) and Istituto Nazionale Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Bari, via Amendola 173, 70126 Bari (Italy); Istituto Nazionale Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Bari, via Amendola 173, 70126 Bari (Italy) and Dipartimento Interateneo di Fisica M. Merlin, Universita degli Studi di Bari, via Amendola 173, 70126 Bari (Italy); Istituto Nazionale Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Bari, via Amendola 173, 70126 Bari (Italy); School of Physics, Monash University, ARC Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-Ray Science, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Istituto di Cristallografia, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (IC-CNR), via Amendola 122/O, I-70125 Bari (Italy) and Istituto Nazionale Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Bari, via Amendola 173, 70126 Bari (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Siena, via Roma 56, 53100 Siena (Italy) and Istituto Nazionale Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, Largo Bruno Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Istituto Nazionale Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Bari, via Amendola 173, 70126 Bari (Italy) and Dipartimento Interateneo di Fisica M. Merlin, Universita degli Studi di Bari, via Amendola 173, 70126 Bari (Italy)

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: In the hard x-ray region, the cross sections for the phase shift of low-Z elements are about 1000 times larger than the absorption ones. As a consequence, phase contrast is detectable even when absorption contrast is minimal or absent. Therefore, phase-contrast imaging could become a valid alternative to absorption contrast without delivering high dose to tissue/human body parts. Methods: To enhance the quality of phase-contrast images without increasing the dose, a possible approach could be the partial deconvolution of the finite source size effects by experimental phase-contrast images. The deconvolution procedure, the authors propose, employs the acquisition of two images on a suitable well-known test sample, one in contact and the other in phase-contrast conditions. Both acquired images are used along with a simulated phase-contrast image (obtained from the test sample in ideal conditions of pointlike source illumination) to correctly retrieve the experimental source distribution function. This information allows a generic experimental phase-contrast image, acquired in the same conditions, to be partially deconvolved by finite source size effects. Results: The performed experimental tests indicate that deconvolved images are equivalent to those which would be obtained with a source 40% smaller than the actual size. In turn, this finding is equivalent to an increase of the ''effective'' lateral spatial coherence length. The corresponding quality improvement of the phase-contrast imaging is directly deducible by the presence of many Fresnel fringes, much better visible with respect to the original experimental phase-contrast images. Conclusions: The use of a test standard sample, always possible in every experimental setup, to partially deconvolve the finite-size-source blurring effects shows that higher quality phase-contrast images could be readily available, making easier diagnoses and tissue/sample analyses. The method could give

  13. Microbubble Void Imaging: A Non-invasive Technique for Flow Visualisation and Quantification of Mixing in Large Vessels Using Plane Wave Ultrasound and Controlled Microbubble Contrast Agent Destruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leow, Chee Hau; Iori, Francesco; Corbett, Richard; Duncan, Neill; Caro, Colin; Vincent, Peter; Tang, Meng-Xing

    2015-11-01

    There is increasing recognition of the influence of the flow field on the physiology of blood vessels and their development of pathology. Preliminary work is reported on a novel non-invasive technique, microbubble void imaging, which is based on ultrasound and controlled destruction of microbubble contrast agents, permitting flow visualisation and quantification of flow-induced mixing in large vessels. The generation of microbubble voids can be controlled both spatially and temporally using ultrasound parameters within the safety limits. Three different model vessel geometries-straight, planar-curved and helical-with known effects on the flow field and mixing were chosen to evaluate the technique. A high-frame-rate ultrasound system with plane wave transmission was used to acquire the contrast-enhanced ultrasound images, and an entropy measure was calculated to quantify mixing. The experimental results were cross-compared between the different geometries and with computational fluid dynamics. The results indicated that the technique is able to quantify the degree of mixing within the different configurations, with a helical geometry generating the greatest mixing, and a straight geometry, the lowest. There is a high level of concordance between the computational fluid dynamics and experimental results. The technique could also serve as a flow visualisation tool. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A Secure and Efficient Scalable Secret Image Sharing Scheme with Flexible Shadow Sizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Dong; Li, Lixiang; Peng, Haipeng; Yang, Yixian

    2017-01-01

    In a general (k, n) scalable secret image sharing (SSIS) scheme, the secret image is shared by n participants and any k or more than k participants have the ability to reconstruct it. The scalability means that the amount of information in the reconstructed image scales in proportion to the number of the participants. In most existing SSIS schemes, the size of each image shadow is relatively large and the dealer does not has a flexible control strategy to adjust it to meet the demand of differen applications. Besides, almost all existing SSIS schemes are not applicable under noise circumstances. To address these deficiencies, in this paper we present a novel SSIS scheme based on a brand-new technique, called compressed sensing, which has been widely used in many fields such as image processing, wireless communication and medical imaging. Our scheme has the property of flexibility, which means that the dealer can achieve a compromise between the size of each shadow and the quality of the reconstructed image. In addition, our scheme has many other advantages, including smooth scalability, noise-resilient capability, and high security. The experimental results and the comparison with similar works demonstrate the feasibility and superiority of our scheme. PMID:28072851

  15. A Secure and Efficient Scalable Secret Image Sharing Scheme with Flexible Shadow Sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Dong; Li, Lixiang; Peng, Haipeng; Yang, Yixian

    2017-01-01

    In a general (k, n) scalable secret image sharing (SSIS) scheme, the secret image is shared by n participants and any k or more than k participants have the ability to reconstruct it. The scalability means that the amount of information in the reconstructed image scales in proportion to the number of the participants. In most existing SSIS schemes, the size of each image shadow is relatively large and the dealer does not has a flexible control strategy to adjust it to meet the demand of differen applications. Besides, almost all existing SSIS schemes are not applicable under noise circumstances. To address these deficiencies, in this paper we present a novel SSIS scheme based on a brand-new technique, called compressed sensing, which has been widely used in many fields such as image processing, wireless communication and medical imaging. Our scheme has the property of flexibility, which means that the dealer can achieve a compromise between the size of each shadow and the quality of the reconstructed image. In addition, our scheme has many other advantages, including smooth scalability, noise-resilient capability, and high security. The experimental results and the comparison with similar works demonstrate the feasibility and superiority of our scheme.

  16. Grain size distributions of chalk from image analysis of electron micrographs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røgen, Birte; Gommesen, Lars; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2001-01-01

    In the chalk of the Ekofisk formation in the Chalk Group of the North Sea, substantial depth-related variations in porosityare observed. With the aim of obtaining a textural interpretation of these porositydata, we have developed a method to assess the grain size distribution of the chalk from...... image analysis. The chalk is composed of a fine-grained matrix of nannofossils and predominantlycalcitic fossil debris with larger microfossil grains, but the chalk may also contain significant amounts of silica and siliciclastic clay. For image analysis, we used backscatter electron images of epoxy...... from image analysis due to rim effects inherent in backscatter images at high magnification. Thus, in order to obtain a consistent interpretation, we use total (He) porosity and insoluble residue as measured in the laboratory. We find that the volume density of larger grains (cross section larger than...

  17. Effect of a novel motion correction algorithm (SSF) on the image quality of coronary CTA with intermediate heart rates: Segment-based and vessel-based analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Qianwen, E-mail: qianwen18@126.com; Li, Pengyu, E-mail: lipyu818@gmail.com; Su, Zhuangzhi, E-mail: suzhuangzhi@xwh.ccmu.edu.cn; Yao, Xinyu, E-mail: 314985151@qq.com; Wang, Yan, E-mail: wy19851121@126.com; Wang, Chen, E-mail: fskwangchen@gmail.com; Du, Xiangying, E-mail: duxying_xw@163.com; Li, Kuncheng, E-mail: kuncheng.li@gmail.com

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • SSF provided better image quality than single-sector and bi-sector reconstruction among the intermediate heart rates (65–75 bpm). • Evidence for the application of prospective ECG-triggered coronary CTA with SSF onto an expanded heart rate range. • Information about the inconsistent effectiveness of SSF among the segments of coronary artery. - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate the effect of SnapShot Freeze (SSF) reconstruction at an intermediate heart-rate (HR) range (65–75 bpm) and compare this method with single-sector reconstruction and bi-sector reconstruction on segmental and vessel bases in retrospective coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA). Materials and methods: Retrospective electrocardiogram-gated CCTA was performed on 37 consecutive patients with HR between 65 and 75 bpm using a 64-row CT scanner. Retrospective single-sector reconstruction, bi-sector reconstruction, and SSF were performed for each patient. Multi-phase single-sector reconstruction was performed to select the optimal phase. SSF and bi-sector images were also reconstructed at the optimal phase. The images were interpreted in an intent-to-diagnose fashion by two experienced readers using a 5-point scale, with 3 points as diagnostically acceptable. Image quality among the three reconstruction groups were compared on per-patient, per-vessel, and per-segment bases. Results: The average HR of the enrolled patients was 69.4 ± 2.7 bpm. A total of 111 vessels and 481 coronary segments were assessed. SSF provided significantly higher interpretability of the coronary segments than bi-sector reconstructions. The qualified and excellent rates of SSF (97.9% and 82.3%) were significantly higher than those of single-sector (92.9% and 66.3%) and bi-sector (90.9% and 64.7%) reconstructions. The image quality score (IQS) using SSF was also significantly higher than those of single-sector and bi-sector reconstructions both on per-patient and per-vessel bases. On per

  18. Angiography technique with a large-sized image amplifier and process control via microprocessor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holsten, D.R.; Jalloul, M.K.; Joetten, G.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of new technological developments it was possible to design and introduce into practice a new generation of large-sized image amplifiers, which were first of all used in X-ray examination equipment and are now also being used in special devices for angiography and digital substraction angiography.

  19. Autonomous bed-sediment imaging-systems for revealing temporal variability of grain size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscombe, Daniel; Rubin, David M.; Lacy, Jessica R.; Storlazzi, Curt D.; Hatcher, Gerald; Chezar, Henry; Wyland, Robert; Sherwood, Christopher R.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a remotely operated video microscope system, designed to provide high-resolution images of seabed sediments. Two versions were developed, which differ in how they raise the camera from the seabed. The first used hydraulics and the second used the energy associated with wave orbital motion. Images were analyzed using automated frequency-domain methods, which following a rigorous partially supervised quality control procedure, yielded estimates to within 20% of the true size as determined by on-screen manual measurements of grains. Long-term grain-size variability at a sandy inner shelf site offshore of Santa Cruz, California, USA, was investigated using the hydraulic system. Eighteen months of high frequency (min to h), high-resolution (μm) images were collected, and grain size distributions compiled. The data constitutes the longest known high-frequency record of seabed-grain size at this sample frequency, at any location. Short-term grain-size variability of sand in an energetic surf zone at Praa Sands, Cornwall, UK was investigated using the ‘wave-powered’ system. The data are the first high-frequency record of grain size at a single location of a highly mobile and evolving bed in a natural surf zone. Using this technology, it is now possible to measure bed-sediment-grain size at a time-scale comparable with flow conditions. Results suggest models of sediment transport at sandy, wave-dominated, nearshore locations should allow for substantial changes in grain-size distribution over time-scales as short as a few hours.

  20. Size tunable fluorescent nano-graphite oxides: preparation and cell imaging applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoyong; Wang, Shiqi; Liu, Meiying; Yang, Bin; Feng, Lin; Ji, Yan; Tao, Lei; Wei, Yen

    2013-11-21

    Fluorescent nano-graphite oxides (NGO) with different size distribution were prepared via a one-pot hydrothermal route using ultrasmall graphite powder as starting material and subsequently separated using dialysis tubes with different molecular weight cutoff. The biomedical applications of these NGO for cell imaging were further investigated. Fourier transform infrared spectra demonstrated that many functional groups including the hydroxyl group, carboxyl group and epoxy group were present on NGO, which endowed them with good water solubility. These NGO showed size-dependent photoluminescence and excellent biocompatibility with A549 cells. As evidenced by laser scanning confocal microscopy images, NGO could be internalized by A549 cells and located in the cytoplasm. Given their good water solubility, size tunable photoluminescence and excellent biocompatibility, these NGO should be promising for bioimaging and various biomedical applications.

  1. Fuzzy-Based Segmentation for Variable Font-Sized Text Extraction from Images/Videos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samabia Tehsin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Textual information embedded in multimedia can provide a vital tool for indexing and retrieval. A lot of work is done in the field of text localization and detection because of its very fundamental importance. One of the biggest challenges of text detection is to deal with variation in font sizes and image resolution. This problem gets elevated due to the undersegmentation or oversegmentation of the regions in an image. The paper addresses this problem by proposing a solution using novel fuzzy-based method. This paper advocates postprocessing segmentation method that can solve the problem of variation in text sizes and image resolution. The methodology is tested on ICDAR 2011 Robust Reading Challenge dataset which amply proves the strength of the recommended method.

  2. Research vessels

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, P.S.

    by the research vessels RV Gaveshani and ORV Sagar Kanya are reported. The work carried out by the three charted ships is also recorded. A short note on cruise plans for the study of ferromanganese nodules is added...

  3. Background intensity correction for terabyte-sized time-lapse images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalfoun, J; Majurski, M; Bhadriraju, K; Lund, S; Bajcsy, P; Brady, M

    2015-03-01

    Several computational challenges associated with large-scale background image correction of terabyte-sized fluorescent images are discussed and analysed in this paper. Dark current, flat-field and background correction models are applied over a mosaic of hundreds of spatially overlapping fields of view (FOVs) taken over the course of several days, during which the background diminishes as cell colonies grow. The motivation of our work comes from the need to quantify the dynamics of OCT-4 gene expression via a fluorescent reporter in human stem cell colonies. Our approach to background correction is formulated as an optimization problem over two image partitioning schemes and four analytical correction models. The optimization objective function is evaluated in terms of (1) the minimum root mean square (RMS) error remaining after image correction, (2) the maximum signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) reached after downsampling and (3) the minimum execution time. Based on the analyses with measured dark current noise and flat-field images, the most optimal GFP background correction is obtained by using a data partition based on forming a set of submosaic images with a polynomial surface background model. The resulting image after correction is characterized by an RMS of about 8, and an SNR value of a 4 × 4 downsampling above 5 by Rose criterion. The new technique generates an image with half RMS value and double SNR value when compared to an approach that assumes constant background throughout the mosaic. We show that the background noise in terabyte-sized fluorescent image mosaics can be corrected computationally with the optimized triplet (data partition, model, SNR driven downsampling) such that the total RMS value from background noise does not exceed the magnitude of the measured dark current noise. In this case, the dark current noise serves as a benchmark for the lowest noise level that an imaging system can achieve. In comparison to previous work, the past fluorescent

  4. Statistical analysis of support thickness and particle size effects in HRTEM imaging of metal nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    House, Stephen D., E-mail: sdh46@pitt.edu [Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, and Physics, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Bonifacio, Cecile S.; Grieshaber, Ross V.; Li, Long; Zhang, Zhongfan [Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, and Physics, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Ciston, Jim [National Center of Electron Microscopy, Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Stach, Eric A. [Center for Functional Nanomaterials, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Yang, Judith C. [Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, and Physics, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States)

    2016-10-15

    High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) examination of nanoparticles requires their placement on some manner of support – either TEM grid membranes or part of the material itself, as in many heterogeneous catalyst systems – but a systematic quantification of the practical imaging limits of this approach has been lacking. Here we address this issue through a statistical evaluation of how nanoparticle size and substrate thickness affects the ability to resolve structural features of interest in HRTEM images of metallic nanoparticles on common support membranes. The visibility of lattice fringes from crystalline Au nanoparticles on amorphous carbon and silicon supports of varying thickness was investigated with both conventional and aberration-corrected TEM. Over the 1–4 nm nanoparticle size range examined, the probability of successfully resolving lattice fringes differed significantly as a function both of nanoparticle size and support thickness. Statistical analysis was used to formulate guidelines for the selection of supports and to quantify the impact a given support would have on HRTEM imaging of crystalline structure. For nanoparticles ≥1 nm, aberration-correction was found to provide limited benefit for the purpose of visualizing lattice fringes; electron dose is more predictive of lattice fringe visibility than aberration correction. These results confirm that the ability to visualize lattice fringes is ultimately dependent on the signal-to-noise ratio of the HRTEM images, rather than the point-to-point resolving power of the microscope. This study provides a benchmark for HRTEM imaging of crystalline supported metal nanoparticles and is extensible to a wide variety of supports and nanostructures. - Highlights: • The impact of supports on imaging nanoparticle lattice structure is quantified. • Visualization probabilities given particle size and support thickness are estimated. • Aberration-correction provided limited benefit

  5. Selecting suitable coherent processing time window lengths for ground-based ISAR imaging of cooperative sea vessels

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Abdul Gaffar, MY

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available ) where mod(a, b) is the modulus operation of a with b, θb,t(n) denotes the bearing of the vessel obtained from GPS position data, and θh,t(n) represents the heading measured from an inertial navigation system. The head- ing that is used in the system...

  6. Nondestructive pigment size detection method of mineral paint film based on image texture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenfeng; Wan, Xiaoxia; Li, Junfeng; Li, Chan; Jin, Guonian; Liu, Qiang

    2017-01-01

    The existing methods-such as sieving, microscope, light scattering, sedimentation, and electrical induction for pigment size detection-require sampling or scattering the mineral pigments, which will inevitably cause damage to the films painted by mineral pigments. A new detection method based on run length texture analysis is proposed to nondestructively detect the pigment size in the mineral paint film. The films painted by mineral pigments with preknown pigment sizes are contactlessly captured by CCD microscope under diffused light. Gray transform, histogram equalization, and median filtering are implemented to preprocess the captured images, and then the run length texture parameters are extracted from the preprocessed images. A parametric relationship between the extracted parameters and the preknown size is established to predict the pigment size in mineral paint film nondestructively. Burnt carnelian is selected as the sample to verify the feasibility of the proposed method. Results show that the max detection error of the proposed method is 5.548 μm and can be applied to the size detection of the mineral pigments used in mineral paint film.

  7. An online detection system for aggregate sizes and shapes based on digital image processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jianhong; Chen, Sijia

    2017-02-01

    Traditional aggregate size measuring methods are time-consuming, taxing, and do not deliver online measurements. A new online detection system for determining aggregate size and shape based on a digital camera with a charge-coupled device, and subsequent digital image processing, have been developed to overcome these problems. The system captures images of aggregates while falling and flat lying. Using these data, the particle size and shape distribution can be obtained in real time. Here, we calibrate this method using standard globules. Our experiments show that the maximum particle size distribution error was only 3 wt%, while the maximum particle shape distribution error was only 2 wt% for data derived from falling aggregates, having good dispersion. In contrast, the data for flat-lying aggregates had a maximum particle size distribution error of 12 wt%, and a maximum particle shape distribution error of 10 wt%; their accuracy was clearly lower than for falling aggregates. However, they performed well for single-graded aggregates, and did not require a dispersion device. Our system is low-cost and easy to install. It can successfully achieve online detection of aggregate size and shape with good reliability, and it has great potential for aggregate quality assurance.

  8. Studying time of flight imaging through scattering media across multiple size scales (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velten, Andreas

    2017-05-01

    Light scattering is a primary obstacle to optical imaging in a variety of different environments and across many size and time scales. Scattering complicates imaging on large scales when imaging through the atmosphere when imaging from airborne or space borne platforms, through marine fog, or through fog and dust in vehicle navigation, for example in self driving cars. On smaller scales, scattering is the major obstacle when imaging through human tissue in biomedical applications. Despite the large variety of participating materials and size scales, light transport in all these environments is usually described with very similar scattering models that are defined by the same small set of parameters, including scattering and absorption length and phase function. We attempt a study of scattering and methods of imaging through scattering across different scales and media, particularly with respect to the use of time of flight information. We can show that using time of flight, in addition to spatial information, provides distinct advantages in scattering environments. By performing a comparative study of scattering across scales and media, we are able to suggest scale models for scattering environments to aid lab research. We also can transfer knowledge and methodology between different fields.

  9. Identification of optimal mask size parameter for noise filtering in 99mTc-methylene diphosphonate bone scintigraphy images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Anil K; Bisht, Chandan S; Sharma, Param D; ArunRaj, Sreedharan Thankarajan; Taywade, Sameer; Patel, Chetan; Bal, Chandrashekhar; Kumar, Rakesh

    2017-11-01

    Tc-methylene diphosphonate (Tc-MDP) bone scintigraphy images have limited number of counts per pixel. A noise filtering method based on local statistics of the image produces better results than a linear filter. However, the mask size has a significant effect on image quality. In this study, we have identified the optimal mask size that yields a good smooth bone scan image. Forty four bone scan images were processed using mask sizes 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, and 15 pixels. The input and processed images were reviewed in two steps. In the first step, the images were inspected and the mask sizes that produced images with significant loss of clinical details in comparison with the input image were excluded. In the second step, the image quality of the 40 sets of images (each set had input image, and its corresponding three processed images with 3, 5, and 7-pixel masks) was assessed by two nuclear medicine physicians. They selected one good smooth image from each set of images. The image quality was also assessed quantitatively with a line profile. Fisher's exact test was used to find statistically significant differences in image quality processed with 5 and 7-pixel mask at a 5% cut-off. A statistically significant difference was found between the image quality processed with 5 and 7-pixel mask at P=0.00528. The identified optimal mask size to produce a good smooth image was found to be 7 pixels. The best mask size for the John-Sen Lee filter was found to be 7×7 pixels, which yielded Tc-methylene diphosphonate bone scan images with the highest acceptable smoothness.

  10. The influence of primary caregivers on body size and self-body image of preschool children in Taiwan

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wong, Yueching; Chang, Yu-Jhen; Lin, Chia-Jung

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate preschool children's body size and image, and analyze the impact of the primary caregiver on a child's body size and awareness in Taiwan. Methods...

  11. Prospective Changes in Body Image Dissatisfaction among Adolescent Bariatric Patients: The Importance of Body Size Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratcliff, M.B.; Eshleman, K.E.; Reiter-Purtill, J.; Zeller, M.H.

    2011-01-01

    Background Body image dissatisfaction (BID) is pervasive among patients presenting for bariatric surgery but significantly improves post-operatively. These findings are based primarily on studies of adults. Objective The objective of this study was to examine changes in BID among adolescents with extreme obesity from baseline/preoperative to 6 and 12 months following bariatric surgery using body size estimation. Setting Pediatric Medical Center. Methods BID was prospectively assessed among 16 adolescent bariatric patients (Mage=16.3±1.2, MBMI=66.2±12.0, 67% female) using a standard visual/perceptual measure [i.e., Stunkard Figure Rating Scale. Participants identified Current and Ideal body size, with a discrepancy score (Current – Ideal) indicating BID. Body size estimation ratings were compared to attitudinal (i.e., IWQOL-Kids: Body Esteem and Self-Perception Profile for Adolescents: Physical Appearance) body image scores, BMI (kg/m2), and Total weight-related quality of life (WRQOL). Results There was a significant reduction in Current body size (7.9 to 6.4, pbody size was related to BMI and %EWL but not attitudinal body image at each time point. Smaller Discrepancy (Current – Ideal) was associated with higher Total WRQOL (r=−0.68), with a trend towards significance for Body Esteem (r=−0.65) at 12 months. Conclusions Adolescents undergoing bariatric surgery experience significantly decreased BID within the first 12 months post-surgery, with the most substantial change between baseline and 6 months. Post-operative WRQOL is more closely associated to body size discrepancy than current body size. PMID:22154271

  12. Ultra-fast bright field and fluorescence imaging of the dynamics of micrometer-sized objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xucai; Wang, Jianjun; Versluis, Michel; de Jong, Nico; Villanueva, Flordeliza S.

    2013-06-01

    High speed imaging has application in a wide area of industry and scientific research. In medical research, high speed imaging has the potential to reveal insight into mechanisms of action of various therapeutic interventions. Examples include ultrasound assisted thrombolysis, drug delivery, and gene therapy. Visual observation of the ultrasound, microbubble, and biological cell interaction may help the understanding of the dynamic behavior of microbubbles and may eventually lead to better design of such delivery systems. We present the development of a high speed bright field and fluorescence imaging system that incorporates external mechanical waves such as ultrasound. Through collaborative design and contract manufacturing, a high speed imaging system has been successfully developed at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. We named the system "UPMC Cam," to refer to the integrated imaging system that includes the multi-frame camera and its unique software control, the customized modular microscope, the customized laser delivery system, its auxiliary ultrasound generator, and the combined ultrasound and optical imaging chamber for in vitro and in vivo observations. This system is capable of imaging microscopic bright field and fluorescence movies at 25 × 106 frames per second for 128 frames, with a frame size of 920 × 616 pixels. Example images of microbubble under ultrasound are shown to demonstrate the potential application of the system.

  13. Effects of pore-size and shape distributions on diffusion pore imaging by nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuder, Tristan Anselm; Laun, Frederik Bernd

    2015-08-01

    In medical imaging and porous media research, NMR diffusion measurements are extensively used to investigate the structure of diffusion restrictions such as cell membranes. Recently, several methods have been proposed to unambiguously determine the shape of arbitrary closed pores or cells filled with an NMR-visible medium by diffusion experiments. The first approach uses a combination of a long and a short diffusion-weighting gradient pulse, while the other techniques employ short gradient pulses only. While the eventual aim of these methods is to determine pore-size and shape distributions, the focus has been so far on identical pores. Thus, the aim of this work is to investigate the ability of these different methods to resolve pore-size and orientation distributions. Simulations were performed comparing the various pore imaging techniques employing different distributions of pore size and orientation and varying timing parameters. The long-narrow gradient profile is most advantageous to investigate pore distributions, because average pore images can be directly obtained. The short-gradient methods suppress larger pores or induce a considerable blurring. Moreover, pore-shape-specific artifacts occur; for example, the central part of a distribution of cylinders may be largely underestimated. Depending on the actual pore distribution, short-gradient methods may nonetheless yield good approximations of the average pore shape. Furthermore, the application of short-gradient methods can be advantageous to differentiate whether pore-size distributions or intensity distributions, e.g., due to surface relaxation, are predominant.

  14. An automated method for accurate vessel segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xin; Liu, Chaoyue; Le Minh, Hung; Wang, Zhiwei; Chien, Aichi; (Tim Cheng, Kwang-Ting

    2017-05-01

    Vessel segmentation is a critical task for various medical applications, such as diagnosis assistance of diabetic retinopathy, quantification of cerebral aneurysm’s growth, and guiding surgery in neurosurgical procedures. Despite technology advances in image segmentation, existing methods still suffer from low accuracy for vessel segmentation in the two challenging while common scenarios in clinical usage: (1) regions with a low signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR), and (2) at vessel boundaries disturbed by adjacent non-vessel pixels. In this paper, we present an automated system which can achieve highly accurate vessel segmentation for both 2D and 3D images even under these challenging scenarios. Three key contributions achieved by our system are: (1) a progressive contrast enhancement method to adaptively enhance contrast of challenging pixels that were otherwise indistinguishable, (2) a boundary refinement method to effectively improve segmentation accuracy at vessel borders based on Canny edge detection, and (3) a content-aware region-of-interests (ROI) adjustment method to automatically determine the locations and sizes of ROIs which contain ambiguous pixels and demand further verification. Extensive evaluation of our method is conducted on both 2D and 3D datasets. On a public 2D retinal dataset (named DRIVE (Staal 2004 IEEE Trans. Med. Imaging 23 501-9)) and our 2D clinical cerebral dataset, our approach achieves superior performance to the state-of-the-art methods including a vesselness based method (Frangi 1998 Int. Conf. on Medical Image Computing and Computer-Assisted Intervention) and an optimally oriented flux (OOF) based method (Law and Chung 2008 European Conf. on Computer Vision). An evaluation on 11 clinical 3D CTA cerebral datasets shows that our method can achieve 94% average accuracy with respect to the manual segmentation reference, which is 23% to 33% better than the five baseline methods (Yushkevich 2006 Neuroimage 31 1116-28; Law and Chung 2008

  15. LANL Robotic Vessel Scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webber, Nels W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-25

    Los Alamos National Laboratory in J-1 DARHT Operations Group uses 6ft spherical vessels to contain hazardous materials produced in a hydrodynamic experiment. These contaminated vessels must be analyzed by means of a worker entering the vessel to locate, measure, and document every penetration mark on the vessel. If the worker can be replaced by a highly automated robotic system with a high precision scanner, it will eliminate the risks to the worker and provide management with an accurate 3D model of the vessel presenting the existing damage with the flexibility to manipulate the model for better and more in-depth assessment.The project was successful in meeting the primary goal of installing an automated system which scanned a 6ft vessel with an elapsed time of 45 minutes. This robotic system reduces the total time for the original scope of work by 75 minutes and results in excellent data accumulation and transmission to the 3D model imaging program.

  16. Blood oxygenation level-dependent magnetic resonance imaging during carbogen breathing: differentiation between prostate cancer and benign prostate hyperplasia and correlation with vessel maturity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di N

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Ningning Di,1,2,* Ning Mao,3,* Wenna Cheng,4 Haopeng Pang,1 Yan Ren,1 Ning Wang,2 Xinjiang Liu,2 Bin Wang5 1Department of Radiology, Affiliated Huashan Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai, 2Department of Radiology, Binzhou Medical University Affiliated Hospital, Binzhou, 3Department of Radiology, Yantai Yuhangding Hospital, Yantai, 4Department of Pharmacy, Binzhou Medical University Affiliated Hospital, Binzhou, 5Department of Medical Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Binzhou Medical University, Yantai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate whether the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI can evaluate tumor maturity and preoperatively differentiate prostate cancer (PCa from benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH.Patients and methods: BOLD MRI based on transverse relaxation time*-weighted echo planar imaging was performed to assess PCa (19 and BPH (22 responses to carbogen (95% O2 and 5% CO2. The average signal values of PCa and BPH before and after carbogen breathing and the relative increased signal values were computed, respectively. The endothelial-cell marker, CD31, and the pericyte marker, α-smooth muscle actin (mature vessels, were detected with immunofluorescence, and were assessed by microvessel density (MVD and microvessel pericyte density (MPD. The microvessel pericyte coverage index (MPI was used to evaluate the degree of vascular maturity. The changed signal from BOLD MRI was correlated with MVD, MPD, and MPI.Results: After inhaling carbogen, both PCa and BPH showed an increased signal, but a lower slope was found in PCa than that in BPH (P<0.05. PCa had a higher MPD and MVD but a lower MPI than BPH. The increased signal intensity was positively correlated with MPI in PCa and that in BPH (r=0.616, P=0.011; r=0.658, P=0.002; however, there was no correlation between the increased signal intensity and MPD or

  17. Body Image in Anorexia Nervosa: Body Size Estimation Utilising a Biological Motion Task and Eyetracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillipou, Andrea; Rossell, Susan Lee; Gurvich, Caroline; Castle, David Jonathan; Troje, Nikolaus Friedrich; Abel, Larry Allen

    2016-03-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a psychiatric condition characterised by a distortion of body image. However, whether individuals with AN can accurately perceive the size of other individuals' bodies is unclear. In the current study, 24 women with AN and 24 healthy control participants undertook two biological motion tasks while eyetracking was performed: to identify the gender and to indicate the walkers' body size. Anorexia nervosa participants tended to 'hyperscan' stimuli but did not demonstrate differences in how visual attention was directed to different body areas, relative to controls. Groups also did not differ in their estimation of body size. The hyperscanning behaviours suggest increased anxiety to disorder-relevant stimuli in AN. The lack of group difference in the estimation of body size suggests that the AN group was able to judge the body size of others accurately. The findings are discussed in terms of body image distortion specific to oneself in AN. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  18. A simple algorithm for measuring particle size distributions on an uneven background from TEM images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gontard, Lionel Cervera; Ozkaya, Dogan; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    2011-01-01

    Nanoparticles have a wide range of applications in science and technology. Their sizes are often measured using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) or X-ray diffraction. Here, we describe a simple computer algorithm for measuring particle size distributions from TEM images in the presence...... of an uneven background. The approach is based on adaptive thresholding, making use of local threshold values that change with spatial coordinate. The algorithm allows particles to be detected and characterized with greater accuracy than using more conventional methods, in which a global threshold is used. Its...

  19. Brief Report: Body Image in Autism: Evidence from Body Size Estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asada, Kosuke; Tojo, Yoshikuni; Hakarino, Koichiro; Saito, Atsuko; Hasegawa, Toshikazu; Kumagaya, Shinichiro

    2018-02-01

    Individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have difficulties with social interaction and communication. First-hand accounts written by individuals with ASD have shown the existence of other atypical characteristics such as difficulties with body awareness. However, few studies have examined whether such atypicalities are found more generally among individuals with ASD. We examined body image (i.e., self-body awareness) by asking individuals with ASD and typically developing (TD) individuals to estimate their own body size (shoulder width). Results show that TD individuals estimated their shoulder width more accurately than individuals with ASD. This study suggests that individuals with ASD often experience misperceptions in their body size.

  20. The Sample Size Influence in the Accuracy of the Image Classification of the Remote Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomaz C. e C. da Costa

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Landuse/landcover maps produced by classification of remote sensing images incorporate uncertainty. This uncertainty is measured by accuracy indices using reference samples. The size of the reference sample is defined by approximation by a binomial function without the use of a pilot sample. This way the accuracy are not estimated, but fixed a priori. In case of divergency between the estimated and a priori accuracy the error of the sampling will deviate from the expected error. The size using pilot sample (theorically correct procedure justify when haven´t estimate of accuracy for work area, referent the product remote sensing utility.

  1. Influence of the particle size on polarization-based range-gated imaging in turbid media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng Tian

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The influence of size of the scatterer on the image contrast for polarization-based range-gated imaging in turbid media is investigated here by Monte Carlo method. Circularly polarized light would be more efficient to eliminate the noise photons for both the isotropic medium as well as the anisotropic medium, as compared with linearly polarized light. The improvement in contrast is pronounced for isotropic medium using either linear or circular polarization. The plausible explanations for these observations are also presented.

  2. High frame rate and high line density ultrasound imaging for local pulse wave velocity estimation using motion matching: A feasibility study on vessel phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fubing; He, Qiong; Huang, Chengwu; Liu, Ke; Shao, Jinhua; Luo, Jianwen

    2016-04-01

    Pulse wave imaging (PWI) is an ultrasound-based method to visualize the propagation of pulse wave and to quantitatively estimate regional pulse wave velocity (PWV) of the arteries within the imaging field of view (FOV). To guarantee the reliability of PWV measurement, high frame rate imaging is required, which can be achieved by reducing the line density of ultrasound imaging or transmitting plane wave at the expense of spatial resolution and/or signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). In this study, a composite, full-view imaging method using motion matching was proposed with both high temporal and spatial resolution. Ultrasound radiofrequency (RF) data of 4 sub-sectors, each with 34 beams, including a common beam, were acquired successively to achieve a frame rate of ∼507 Hz at an imaging depth of 35 mm. The acceleration profiles of the vessel wall estimated from the common beam were used to reconstruct the full-view (38-mm width, 128-beam) image sequence. The feasibility of mapping local PWV variation along the artery using PWI technique was preliminarily validated on both homogeneous and inhomogeneous polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) cryogel vessel phantoms. Regional PWVs for the three homogeneous phantoms measured by the proposed method were in accordance with the sparse imaging method (38-mm width, 32-beam) and plane wave imaging method. Local PWV was estimated using the above-mentioned three methods on 3 inhomogeneous phantoms, and good agreement was obtained in both the softer (1.91±0.24 m/s, 1.97±0.27 m/s and 1.78±0.28 m/s) and the stiffer region (4.17±0.46 m/s, 3.99±0.53 m/s and 4.27±0.49 m/s) of the phantoms. In addition to the improved spatial resolution, higher precision of local PWV estimation in low SNR circumstances was also obtained by the proposed method as compared with the sparse imaging method. The proposed method might be helpful in disease detections through mapping the local PWV of the vascular wall. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Individual thorax geometry reduces position and size differences in reconstructed images of electrical impedance tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhanqi; Frerichs, Inéz; Pulletz, Sven; Müller-Lisse, Ullrich; Möller, Knut

    2014-01-01

    Due to the ill-posed problem, the electrical impedance within the thorax cannot be exactly reconstructed. The aim of our study was to prove that reconstruction with individual thorax geometry improved the quality of EIT (electrical impedance tomography) images. Seven mechanically ventilated patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome were examined by EIT. The thorax contours were determined from routine computed tomography (CT) images based on automatic threshold filtering. EIT raw data was reconstructed offline with (1) back-projection with circular forward model; (2) GREIT reconstruction method with circular forward model and (3) GREIT with individual thorax geometry. The resulting EIT images were compared to rescaled CT images. The distance between the lung contour and the thorax contour was calculated for each method and the differences to that in CT were denoted as position differences. Shape differences was defined as the ratio of thorax (or lungs) size in EIT and that in rescaled CT. Method (3) has the smallest position differences (6.6 ± 2.8, 5.3 ± 3.3, 2.3 ± 1.4 in pixel, for each reconstruction method respectively; mean ± SD). The thorax and lungs sizes in the transformed CT images were 514 ± 73 and 177 ± 39. Shape differences of thorax were 1.81 ± 0.26, 1.81 ± 0.26, 1.10 ± 0.12 and that of lungs were 1.69 ± 0.45, 1.52 ± 0.45, 1.34 ± 0.35 for each method respectively. The reconstructed images using the GREIT method with individual thorax geometry were more realistic. Improvement of EIT image quality may foster the acceptance of EIT in routine clinical use.

  4. Tooth size in patients with supernumerary teeth and a control group measured by image analysis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalaf, K; Robinson, D L; Elcock, C; Smith, R N; Brook, A H

    2005-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare tooth size measurements between patients with supernumerary teeth and a control group. The supernumerary group consisted of 56 subjects (21 females and 35 males) and the control group of 40 subjects (20 females and 20 males). All available permanent teeth on the dental casts were imaged and measured from both buccal and occlusal views using an image analysis system. Mesio-distal, bucco-lingual or occluso-gingival dimensions, area and perimeter were measured from each view. Supernumerary tooth patients tended to have larger tooth size measurements for almost all variables than controls. Significant differences (psupernumerary teeth being a complex dental anomaly with a multifactorial aetiology in which both genetic and environmental factors are important. There is some evidence of a local effect with greater differences in tooth dimension adjacent to the site of the supernumeraries.

  5. High throughput holographic imaging-in-flow for the analysis of a wide plankton size range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yourassowsky, Catherine; Dubois, Frank

    2014-03-24

    We developed a Digital Holographic Microscope (DHM) working with a partial coherent source specifically adapted to perform high throughput recording of holograms of plankton organisms in-flow, in a size range of 3 µm-300 µm, which is of importance for this kind of applications. This wide size range is achieved with the same flow cell and with the same microscope magnification. The DHM configuration combines a high magnification with a large field of view and provides high-resolution intensity and quantitative phase images refocusing on high sample flow rate. Specific algorithms were developed to detect and extract automatically the particles and organisms present in the samples in order to build holograms of each one that are used for holographic refocusing and quantitative phase contrast imaging. Experimental results are shown and discussed.

  6. Standardization of size, shape and internal structure of spinal cord images: comparison of three transformation methods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhisa Fujiki

    Full Text Available Functional fluorescence imaging has been widely applied to analyze spatio-temporal patterns of cellular dynamics in the brain and spinal cord. However, it is difficult to integrate spatial information obtained from imaging data in specific regions of interest across multiple samples, due to large variability in the size, shape and internal structure of samples. To solve this problem, we attempted to standardize transversely sectioned spinal cord images focusing on the laminar structure in the gray matter. We employed three standardization methods, the affine transformation (AT, the angle-dependent transformation (ADT and the combination of these two methods (AT+ADT. The ADT is a novel non-linear transformation method developed in this study to adjust an individual image onto the template image in the polar coordinate system. We next compared the accuracy of these three standardization methods. We evaluated two indices, i.e., the spatial distribution of pixels that are not categorized to any layer and the error ratio by the leave-one-out cross validation method. In this study, we used neuron-specific marker (NeuN-stained histological images of transversely sectioned cervical spinal cord slices (21 images obtained from 4 rats to create the standard atlas and also to serve for benchmark tests. We found that the AT+ADT outperformed other two methods, though the accuracy of each method varied depending on the layer. This novel image standardization technique would be applicable to optical recording such as voltage-sensitive dye imaging, and will enable statistical evaluations of neural activation across multiple samples.

  7. Superresolution Imaging of Aquaporin-4 Cluster Size in Antibody-Stained Paraffin Brain Sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Alex J.; Verkman, Alan S.

    2015-01-01

    The water channel aquaporin-4 (AQP4) forms supramolecular clusters whose size is determined by the ratio of M1- and M23-AQP4 isoforms. In cultured astrocytes, differences in the subcellular localization and macromolecular interactions of small and large AQP4 clusters results in distinct physiological roles for M1- and M23-AQP4. Here, we developed quantitative superresolution optical imaging methodology to measure AQP4 cluster size in antibody-stained paraffin sections of mouse cerebral cortex and spinal cord, human postmortem brain, and glioma biopsy specimens. This methodology was used to demonstrate that large AQP4 clusters are formed in AQP4−/− astrocytes transfected with only M23-AQP4, but not in those expressing only M1-AQP4, both in vitro and in vivo. Native AQP4 in mouse cortex, where both isoforms are expressed, was enriched in astrocyte foot-processes adjacent to microcapillaries; clusters in perivascular regions of the cortex were larger than in parenchymal regions, demonstrating size-dependent subcellular segregation of AQP4 clusters. Two-color superresolution imaging demonstrated colocalization of Kir4.1 with AQP4 clusters in perivascular areas but not in parenchyma. Surprisingly, the subcellular distribution of AQP4 clusters was different between gray and white matter astrocytes in spinal cord, demonstrating regional specificity in cluster polarization. Changes in AQP4 subcellular distribution are associated with several neurological diseases and we demonstrate that AQP4 clustering was preserved in a postmortem human cortical brain tissue specimen, but that AQP4 was not substantially clustered in a human glioblastoma specimen despite high-level expression. Our results demonstrate the utility of superresolution optical imaging for measuring the size of AQP4 supramolecular clusters in paraffin sections of brain tissue and support AQP4 cluster size as a primary determinant of its subcellular distribution. PMID:26682810

  8. Particle sizing of pharmaceutical aerosols via direct imaging of particle settling velocities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishler, Rami; Verhoeven, Frank; de Kruijf, Wilbur; Sznitman, Josué

    2018-02-15

    We present a novel method for characterizing in near real-time the aerodynamic particle size distributions from pharmaceutical inhalers. The proposed method is based on direct imaging of airborne particles followed by a particle-by-particle measurement of settling velocities using image analysis and particle tracking algorithms. Due to the simplicity of the principle of operation, this method has the potential of circumventing potential biases of current real-time particle analyzers (e.g. Time of Flight analysis), while offering a cost effective solution. The simple device can also be constructed in laboratory settings from off-the-shelf materials for research purposes. To demonstrate the feasibility and robustness of the measurement technique, we have conducted benchmark experiments whereby aerodynamic particle size distributions are obtained from several commercially-available dry powder inhalers (DPIs). Our measurements yield size distributions (i.e. MMAD and GSD) that are closely in line with those obtained from Time of Flight analysis and cascade impactors suggesting that our imaging-based method may embody an attractive methodology for rapid inhaler testing and characterization. In a final step, we discuss some of the ongoing limitations of the current prototype and conceivable routes for improving the technique. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Reduced Sampling Size with Nanopipette for Tapping-Mode Scanning Probe Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohigashi, Tsuyoshi; Otsuka, Yoichi; Shimazu, Ryo; Matsumoto, Takuya; Iwata, Futoshi; Kawasaki, Hideya; Arakawa, Ryuichi

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) with ambient sampling and ionization can rapidly and easily capture the distribution of chemical components in a solid sample. Because the spatial resolution of MSI is limited by the size of the sampling area, reducing sampling size is an important goal for high resolution MSI. Here, we report the first use of a nanopipette for sampling and ionization by tapping-mode scanning probe electrospray ionization (t-SPESI). The spot size of the sampling area of a dye molecular film on a glass substrate was decreased to 6 μm on average by using a nanopipette. On the other hand, ionization efficiency increased with decreasing solvent flow rate. Our results indicate the compatibility between a reduced sampling area and the ionization efficiency using a nanopipette. MSI of micropatterns of ink on a glass and a polymer substrate were also demonstrated.

  10. Calibration of Binocular Vision Sensors Based on Unknown-Sized Elliptical Stripe Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Liu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Most of the existing calibration methods for binocular stereo vision sensor (BSVS depend on a high-accuracy target with feature points that are difficult and costly to manufacture and. In complex light conditions, optical filters are used for BSVS, but they affect imaging quality. Hence, the use of a high-accuracy target with certain-sized feature points for calibration is not feasible under such complex conditions. To solve these problems, a calibration method based on unknown-sized elliptical stripe images is proposed. With known intrinsic parameters, the proposed method adopts the elliptical stripes located on the parallel planes as a medium to calibrate BSVS online. In comparison with the common calibration methods, the proposed method avoids utilizing high-accuracy target with certain-sized feature points. Therefore, the proposed method is not only easy to implement but is a realistic method for the calibration of BSVS with optical filter. Changing the size of elliptical curves projected on the target solves the difficulty of applying the proposed method in different fields of view and distances. Simulative and physical experiments are conducted to validate the efficiency of the proposed method. When the field of view is approximately 400 mm × 300 mm, the proposed method can reach a calibration accuracy of 0.03 mm, which is comparable with that of Zhang’s method.

  11. Fine focal spot size improves image quality in computed tomography abdomen and pelvis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goh, Yin P.; Low, Keat; Kuganesan, Ahilan [Monash Health, Diagnostic Imaging Department, 246, Clayton Road, Clayton, Victoria (Australia); Lau, Kenneth K. [Monash Health, Diagnostic Imaging Department, 246, Clayton Road, Clayton, Victoria (Australia); Monash University, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Victoria (Australia); Buchan, Kevin [Philips Healthcare, Clinical Science, PO Box 312, Mont Albert, Victoria (Australia); Oh, Lawrence Chia Wei [Flinders Medical Centre, Division of Medical Imaging, Bedford Park South (Australia); Huynh, Minh [Swinburne University, Department of Statistics, Data Science and Epidemiology, School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health, Arts and Design, Hawthorn (Australia)

    2016-12-15

    To compare the image quality between fine focal spot size (FFSS) and standard focal spot size (SFSS) in computed tomography of the abdomen and pelvis (CTAP) This retrospective review included all consecutive adult patients undergoing contrast-enhanced CTAP between June and September 2014. Two blinded radiologists assessed the margin clarity of the abdominal viscera and the detected lesions using a five-point grading scale. Cohen's kappa test was used to examine the inter-observer reliability between the two reviewers for organ margin clarity. Mann-Whitney U testing was utilised to assess the statistical difference of the organ and lesion margin clarity. 100 consecutive CTAPs were recruited. 52 CTAPs were examined with SFSS of 1.1 x 1.2 mm and 48 CTAPs were examined with FFSS of 0.6 x 0.7 mm. Results showed that there was substantial agreement for organ margin clarity (mean κ = 0.759, p < 0.001) among the reviewers. FFSS produces images with clearer organ margins (U = 76194.0, p < 0.001, r = 0.523) and clearer lesion margins (U = 239, p = 0.052, r = 0.269). FFSS CTAP improves image quality in terms of better organ and lesion margin clarity. Fine focus CT scanning is a novel technique that may be applied in routine CTAP imaging. (orig.)

  12. High frequency transducer for vessel imaging based on lead-free Mn-doped (K0.44Na0.56)NbO3 single crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jinpeng; Xue, Saidong; Zhao, Xiangyong; Wang, Feifei; Tang, Yanxue; Duan, Zhihua; Wang, Tao; Shi, Wangzhou; Yue, Qingwen; Zhou, Huifang; Luo, Haosu; Fang, Bijun

    2017-08-01

    We report a high frequency ultrasonic transducer up to 50 MHz for vessel imaging based on a lead-free (K0.44Na0.56)NbO3-0.5 mol. % Mn (Mn-KNN) single crystal, which has a high electromechanical coupling coefficient kt of 0.64 and a large thickness frequency constant Nt of 3210 kHz . mm. The Krimholtz, Leedom, and Mattaei (KLM) equivalent circuit model was utilized to simulate and optimize the pulse-echo response combined with PiezoCAD software. Theoretically, a high -6 dB bandwidth of 74.94% was obtained at a center frequency of 50.47 MHz and optimized matching conditions. The experimental results showed a center frequency of 51.8 MHz with a -6 dB bandwidth of 70.2%. The excellent global performance makes this lead-free single-crystal transducer quite potential in an environmentally friendly vessel imaging transducer.

  13. Prospective changes in body image dissatisfaction among adolescent bariatric patients: the importance of body size estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratcliff, Megan B; Eshleman, Kate E; Reiter-Purtill, Jennifer; Zeller, Meg H

    2012-01-01

    Body image dissatisfaction (BID) is pervasive among patients presenting for bariatric surgery but improves significantly postoperatively. These findings have been determined primarily from studies of adults. The objective of the present study was to examine the changes in BID among adolescents with extreme obesity from baseline/preoperatively to 6 and 12 months after receiving bariatric surgery at a pediatric medical center using body size estimation. BID was prospectively assessed among 16 adolescent bariatric patients (mean age 16.3 ± 1.2 years, mean body mass index [BMI] 66.2 ± 12.0, 67% female) using a standard visual/perceptual measure (i.e., Stunkard Figure Rating Scale). Participants identified their current and ideal body size, with a discrepancy score (current minus ideal) indicating BID. The body size estimation ratings were compared with attitudinal (i.e., Impact of Weight on Quality Of Life-Kids: Body Esteem and Self-Perception Profile for Adolescents: Physical Appearance) body image scores, BMI, and total weight-related quality of life. A significant reduction occurred in the current body size (from 7.9 to 6.4, P trend toward significance for body esteem (r = -.65) at 12 months. Adolescents undergoing bariatric surgery experience a significantly decreased BID within the first 12 months after surgery, with the most substantial change occurring from baseline to 6 months. The postoperative weight-related quality of life is more closely associated with the body size discrepancy than with the current body size. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Tumor Vessel Compression Hinders Perfusion of Ultrasonographic Contrast Agents1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galiè, Mirco; D'Onofrio, Mirko; Montani, Maura; Amici, Augusto; Calderan, Laura; Marzola, Pasquina; Benati, Donatella; Merigo, Flavia; Marchini, Cristina; Sbarbati, Andrea

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) is an advanced approach to in vivo assessment of tumor vascularity and is being increasingly adopted in clinical oncology. It is based on 1- to 10 µm-sized gas microbubbles, which can cross the capillary beds of the lungs and are effective echo enhancers. It is known that high cell density, high transendothelial fluid exchange, and poorly functioning lymphatic circulation all provoke solid stress, which compresses vessels and drastically reduces tumor blood flow. Given their size, we supposed that the perfusion of microbubbles is affected by anatomic features of tumor vessels more than are contrast agents traditionally used in dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). Here, we compared dynamic information obtained from CEUS and DCE-MRI on two experimental tumor models exhibiting notable differences in vessel anatomy. We found that tumors with small, flattened vessels show a much higher resistance to microbubble perfusion than to MRI contrast agents, and appear scarcely vascularized at CEUS examination, despite vessel volume adequate for normal function. Thus, whereas CEUS alone could induce incorrect diagnosis when tumors have small or collapsed vessels, integrated analysis using CEUS and DCE-MRI allows in vivo identification of tumors with a vascular profile frequently associated with malignant phenotypes. PMID:15967105

  15. Tumor Vessel Compression Hinders Perfusion of Ultrasonographic Contrast Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirco Galiè

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS is an advanced approach to in vivo assessment of tumor vascularity and is being increasingly adopted in clinical oncology. It is based on 1- to 10 μm-sized gas microbubbles, which can cross the capillary beds of the lungs and are effective echo enhancers. It is known that high cell density, high transendothelial fluid exchange, and poorly functioning lymphatic circulation all provoke solid stress, which compresses vessels and drastically reduces tumor blood flow. Given their size, we supposed that the perfusion of microbubbles is affected by anatomic features of tumor vessels more than are contrast agents traditionally used in dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI. Here, we compared dynamic information obtained from CEUS and DCE-MRI on two experimental tumor models exhibiting notable differences in vessel anatomy. We found that tumors with small, flattened vessels show a much higher resistance to microbubble perfusion than to MRI contrast agents, and appear scarcely vascularized at CEUS examination, despite vessel volume adequate for normal function. Thus, whereas CEUS alone could induce incorrect diagnosis when tumors have small or collapsed vessels, integrated analysis using CEUS and DCE-MRI allows in vivo identification of tumors with a vascular profile frequently associated with malignant phenotypes.

  16. An Ultrahigh-Resolution Digital Image Sensor with Pixel Size of 50 nm by Vertical Nanorod Arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chengming; Song, Jinhui

    2015-07-01

    The pixel size limit of existing digital image sensors is successfully overcome by using vertically aligned semiconducting nanorods as the 3D photosensing pixels. On this basis, an unprecedentedly high-resolution digital image sensor with a pixel size of 50 nm and a resolution of 90 nm is fabricated. The ultrahigh-resolution digital image sensor can heavily impact the field of visual information. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Triple therapy with octreotide, galanin, and serotonin reduces the size and blood vessel density and increases apoptosis of a rat colon carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Salhy, Magdy; Sitohy, Basel; Norrgård, Orjan

    2003-03-28

    A rat colonic adenocarcinoma was implanted subcutaneously in female nude (C57BL/6JBom-nu) mice. After 7 days, the animals were divided into different groups. One group received triple therapy with octreotide, galanin, and serotonin, 10 microg/kg body weight of each, twice daily. The second group served as controls and received only saline solution. Three groups received 10 microg/kg body weight twice daily of octreotide, galanin, or serotonin. The last group consisted of controls that received only saline solution. The treatment lasted for 5 days. The tumour volume, wet weight, and relative volume density of blood vessels were significantly decreased after the triple treatment, as compared to controls. Apoptotic index was significantly increased, but the proliferation index was not affected in the group of mice that received triple therapy. There was no significant difference between controls and mice treated with octreotide, galanin, or serotonin regarding tumour volume or weight. The relative volume density of blood vessels was decreased in tumours treated with galanin, but not with octreotide or serotonin. There was no statistical difference in the proliferation index between controls and animals treated with octreotide, galanin, or serotonin, as compared with controls. Tumour necrosis and increased apoptosis may be responsible for the reduction in the volume and weight of the tumour after triple therapy. Tumour necrosis may be caused by the induction of tumour ischemia due to a reduction in tumour blood flow, which is caused by decreased incidence of tumour-feeding blood vessels, and by constriction of tumour-feeding arterioles. These results are promising and may offer treatment for colon cancer. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science B.V.

  18. Quantitative ex-vivo micro-computed tomographic imaging of blood vessels and necrotic regions within tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlene M Downey

    Full Text Available Techniques for visualizing and quantifying the microvasculature of tumors are essential not only for studying angiogenic processes but also for monitoring the effects of anti-angiogenic treatments. Given the relatively limited information that can be gleaned from conventional 2-D histological analyses, there has been considerable interest in methods that enable the 3-D assessment of the vasculature. To this end, we employed a polymerizing intravascular contrast medium (Microfil and micro-computed tomography (micro-CT in combination with a maximal spheres direct 3-D analysis method to visualize and quantify ex-vivo vessel structural features, and to define regions of hypoperfusion within tumors that would be indicative of necrosis. Employing these techniques we quantified the effects of a vascular disrupting agent on the tumor vasculature. The methods described herein for quantifying whole tumor vascularity represent a significant advance in the 3-D study of tumor angiogenesis and evaluation of novel therapeutics, and will also find potential application in other fields where quantification of blood vessel structure and necrosis are important outcome parameters.

  19. Automated determination of size and morphology information from soot transmission electron microscope (TEM)-generated images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Cheng; Chan, Qing N., E-mail: qing.chan@unsw.edu.au; Zhang, Renlin; Kook, Sanghoon; Hawkes, Evatt R.; Yeoh, Guan H. [UNSW, School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering (Australia); Medwell, Paul R. [The University of Adelaide, Centre for Energy Technology (Australia)

    2016-05-15

    The thermophoretic sampling of particulates from hot media, coupled with transmission electron microscope (TEM) imaging, is a combined approach that is widely used to derive morphological information. The identification and the measurement of the particulates, however, can be complex when the TEM images are of low contrast, noisy, and have non-uniform background signal level. The image processing method can also be challenging and time consuming, when the samples collected have large variability in shape and size, or have some degree of overlapping. In this work, a three-stage image processing sequence is presented to facilitate time-efficient automated identification and measurement of particulates from the TEM grids. The proposed processing sequence is first applied to soot samples that were thermophoretically sampled from a laminar non-premixed ethylene-air flame. The parameter values that are required to be set to facilitate the automated process are identified, and sensitivity of the results to these parameters is assessed. The same analysis process is also applied to soot samples that were acquired from an externally irradiated laminar non-premixed ethylene-air flame, which have different geometrical characteristics, to assess the morphological dependence of the proposed image processing sequence. Using the optimized parameter values, statistical assessments of the automated results reveal that the largest discrepancies that are associated with the estimated values of primary particle diameter, fractal dimension, and prefactor values of the aggregates for the tested cases, are approximately 3, 1, and 10 %, respectively, when compared with the manual measurements.

  20. Imaging and sizing of single DNA molecules on a mobile phone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qingshan; Luo, Wei; Chiang, Samuel; Kappel, Tara; Mejia, Crystal; Tseng, Derek; Chan, Raymond Yan Lok; Yan, Eddie; Qi, Hangfei; Shabbir, Faizan; Ozkan, Haydar; Feng, Steve; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2014-12-23

    DNA imaging techniques using optical microscopy have found numerous applications in biology, chemistry and physics and are based on relatively expensive, bulky and complicated set-ups that limit their use to advanced laboratory settings. Here we demonstrate imaging and length quantification of single molecule DNA strands using a compact, lightweight and cost-effective fluorescence microscope installed on a mobile phone. In addition to an optomechanical attachment that creates a high contrast dark-field imaging setup using an external lens, thin-film interference filters, a miniature dovetail stage and a laser-diode for oblique-angle excitation, we also created a computational framework and a mobile phone application connected to a server back-end for measurement of the lengths of individual DNA molecules that are labeled and stretched using disposable chips. Using this mobile phone platform, we imaged single DNA molecules of various lengths to demonstrate a sizing accuracy of <1 kilobase-pairs (kbp) for 10 kbp and longer DNA samples imaged over a field-of-view of ∼2 mm2.

  1. Hard X-Ray Flare Source Sizes Measured with the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Brian R.; Pernak, Rick L.

    2009-01-01

    Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) observations of 18 double hard X-ray sources seen at energies above 25 keV are analyzed to determine the spatial extent of the most compact structures evident in each case. The following four image reconstruction algorithms were used: Clean, Pixon, and two routines using visibilities maximum entropy and forward fit (VFF). All have been adapted for this study to optimize their ability to provide reliable estimates of the sizes of the more compact sources. The source fluxes, sizes, and morphologies obtained with each method are cross-correlated and the similarities and disagreements are discussed. The full width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the major axes of the sources with assumed elliptical Gaussian shapes are generally well correlated between the four image reconstruction routines and vary between the RHESSI resolution limit of approximately 2" up to approximately 20" with most below 10". The FWHM of the minor axes are generally at or just above the RHESSI limit and hence should be considered as unresolved in most cases. The orientation angles of the elliptical sources are also well correlated. These results suggest that the elongated sources are generally aligned along a flare ribbon with the minor axis perpendicular to the ribbon. This is verified for the one flare in our list with coincident Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) images. There is evidence for significant extra flux in many of the flares in addition to the two identified compact sources, thus rendering the VFF assumption of just two Gaussians inadequate. A more realistic approximation in many cases would be of two line sources with unresolved widths. Recommendations are given for optimizing the RHESSI imaging reconstruction process to ensure that the finest possible details of the source morphology become evident and that reliable estimates can be made of the source dimensions.

  2. Fine focal spot size improves image quality in computed tomography abdomen and pelvis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Yin P; Lau, Kenneth K; Low, Keat; Buchan, Kevin; Oh, Lawrence Chia Wei; Kuganesan, Ahilan; Huynh, Minh

    2016-12-01

    To compare the image quality between fine focal spot size (FFSS) and standard focal spot size (SFSS) in computed tomography of the abdomen and pelvis (CTAP) METHODS: This retrospective review included all consecutive adult patients undergoing contrast-enhanced CTAP between June and September 2014. Two blinded radiologists assessed the margin clarity of the abdominal viscera and the detected lesions using a five-point grading scale. Cohen's kappa test was used to examine the inter-observer reliability between the two reviewers for organ margin clarity. Mann-Whitney U testing was utilised to assess the statistical difference of the organ and lesion margin clarity. 100 consecutive CTAPs were recruited. 52 CTAPs were examined with SFSS of 1.1 × 1.2 mm and 48 CTAPs were examined with FFSS of 0.6 × 0.7 mm. Results showed that there was substantial agreement for organ margin clarity (mean κ = 0.759, p < 0.001) among the reviewers. FFSS produces images with clearer organ margins (U = 76194.0, p < 0.001, r = 0.523) and clearer lesion margins (U = 239, p = 0.052, r = 0.269). FFSS CTAP improves image quality in terms of better organ and lesion margin clarity. Fine focus CT scanning is a novel technique that may be applied in routine CTAP imaging. • Fine focal spot improves organ margin clarity. • Fine focal spot improves lesion margin clarity. • Fine focal spot can be used in routine CT abdominal imaging.

  3. Standard test methods for determining average grain size using semiautomatic and automatic image analysis

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2015-01-01

    1.1 These test methods are used to determine grain size from measurements of grain intercept lengths, intercept counts, intersection counts, grain boundary length, and grain areas. 1.2 These measurements are made with a semiautomatic digitizing tablet or by automatic image analysis using an image of the grain structure produced by a microscope. 1.3 These test methods are applicable to any type of grain structure or grain size distribution as long as the grain boundaries can be clearly delineated by etching and subsequent image processing, if necessary. 1.4 These test methods are applicable to measurement of other grain-like microstructures, such as cell structures. 1.5 This standard deals only with the recommended test methods and nothing in it should be construed as defining or establishing limits of acceptability or fitness for purpose of the materials tested. 1.6 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user ...

  4. MR of the pituitary in patients with Prader-Willi syndrome: size determination and imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, L. [Dept. of Radiology, Winthrop University Hospital, Mineola, NY (United States); Angulo, M. [Dept. of Pediatrics, Div. of Endocrinology and Genetics, Winthrop University Hospital, Mineola, NY (United States); Price, D. [Dept. of Radiology, Winthrop University Hospital, Mineola, NY (United States); Taneja, S. [Dept. of Radiology, Winthrop University Hospital, Mineola, NY (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is an unusual genetic disorder characterized by short stature, obesity, hypogonadism, hypotonia, cognitive impairment, and dysmorphic facies. There is an interstitial deletion of the proximal long arm of chromosome 15 in about 70% of patients. Some of these clinical features suggest a central hypothalamic/pituitary dysfunction, and recent investigations have demonstrated a marked impairment in spontaneous growth hormone (GH) secretion. We studied 15 GH-deficient PWS patients by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to determine whether there was a diminution in the gross morphological size of the anterior pituitary gland, the site of GH synthesis. We also set out to catalog the pertinent imaging findings in this patient population. Our results indicate that this is the first report documenting pituitary size by MRI in PWS patients. No statistically significant difference was found in the height of the anterior pituitary gland in PWS patients compared with either normal children or children with isolated GH deficiency. An interesting imaging finding is that three of 15 patients (20%) demonstrated complete absence of the posterior pituitary bright spot (PPBS), and a fourth patient demonstrated a small PPBS. These observations reflect an objective physiologic disturbance in the hypothalamus. The clinical and radiologic implications of these findings are discussed. (orig.)

  5. The use of muscle biopsy in the diagnosis of systemic vasculitis affecting small to medium-sized vessels: a prospective evaluation in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunokawa, T; Yokogawa, N; Shimada, K; Enatsu, K; Sugii, S

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the use of muscle biopsy for histopathological confirmation of small vessel vasculitis (SVV) or medium vessel vasculitis (MVV). Muscle biopsies were performed for all consecutive cases of suspected SVV or MVV seen at Tokyo Metropolitan Tama Medical Centre between February 2012 and May 2014 except those for which a skin or renal biopsy was indicated. Forty-nine patients underwent muscle biopsies. All patients were followed for a minimum of 6 months. Diagnosis of SVV or MVV was made in 35 patients. An unrelated condition was diagnosed in 11 patients and no diagnoses were made in three patients. Of the 35 patients in whom SVV or MVV was diagnosed, positive muscle biopsies were obtained in 20 patients [15 microscopic polyangiitis (MPA), three polyarteritis nodosa (PAN), and two eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA)], while other findings led to the same diagnosis in 15 (seven MPA, four GPA, three PAN, and one rheumatoid vasculitis). The sensitivity of the muscle biopsy was 57% [20/35; 95% confidence interval (CI) 50-57]. Of 13 patients presenting with peripheral neuropathy, the muscle biopsy demonstrated vasculitis in nine patients, with 75% sensitivity (9/12; 95% CI 69-75). There were no complications in the procedure apart from delayed wound healing in one patient. Muscle biopsy is a safe method that offers a high diagnostic yield for SVV or MVV, especially in patients with vasculitic neuropathy.

  6. Early diffusion-weighted imaging and perfusion-weighted imaging lesion volumes forecast final infarct size in DEFUSE 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Hayley M; Mlynash, Michael; Inoue, Manabu; Tipirneni, Aaryani; Liggins, John; Zaharchuk, Greg; Straka, Matus; Kemp, Stephanie; Bammer, Roland; Lansberg, Maarten G; Albers, Gregory W

    2013-03-01

    It is hypothesized that early diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) lesions accurately estimate the size of the irreversibly injured core and thresholded perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) lesions (time to maximum of tissue residue function [Tmax] >6 seconds) approximate the volume of critically hypoperfused tissue. With incomplete reperfusion, the union of baseline DWI and posttreatment PWI is hypothesized to predict infarct volume. This is a substudy of Diffusion and Perfusion Imaging Evaluation for Understanding Stroke Evolution Study 2 (DEFUSE 2); all patients with technically adequate MRI scans at 3 time points were included. Baseline DWI and early follow-up PWI lesion volumes were determined by the RAPID software program. Final infarct volumes were assessed with 5-day fluid-attenuated inversion recovery and were corrected for edema. Reperfusion was defined on the basis of the reduction in PWI lesion volume between baseline and early follow-up MRI. DWI and PWI volumes were correlated with final infarct volumes. Seventy-three patients were eligible. Twenty-six patients with >90% reperfusion show a high correlation between early DWI volume and final infarct volume (r=0.95; PPWI (Tmax >6 seconds) volume and final infarct volume (r=0.86; P=0.002). Using all 73 patients, the union of baseline DWI and early follow-up PWI is highly correlated with final infarct volume (r=0.94; PPWI (Tmax >6 seconds) volumes provide a reasonable approximation of final infarct volume after endovascular therapy.

  7. Fast Automatic Step Size Estimation for Gradient Descent Optimization of Image Registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Yuchuan; van Lew, Baldur; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P F; Staring, Marius

    2016-02-01

    Fast automatic image registration is an important prerequisite for image-guided clinical procedures. However, due to the large number of voxels in an image and the complexity of registration algorithms, this process is often very slow. Stochastic gradient descent is a powerful method to iteratively solve the registration problem, but relies for convergence on a proper selection of the optimization step size. This selection is difficult to perform manually, since it depends on the input data, similarity measure and transformation model. The Adaptive Stochastic Gradient Descent (ASGD) method is an automatic approach, but it comes at a high computational cost. In this paper, we propose a new computationally efficient method (fast ASGD) to automatically determine the step size for gradient descent methods, by considering the observed distribution of the voxel displacements between iterations. A relation between the step size and the expectation and variance of the observed distribution is derived. While ASGD has quadratic complexity with respect to the transformation parameters, fast ASGD only has linear complexity. Extensive validation has been performed on different datasets with different modalities, inter/intra subjects, different similarity measures and transformation models. For all experiments, we obtained similar accuracy as ASGD. Moreover, the estimation time of fast ASGD is reduced to a very small value, from 40 s to less than 1 s when the number of parameters is 105, almost 40 times faster. Depending on the registration settings, the total registration time is reduced by a factor of 2.5-7 × for the experiments in this paper.

  8. Vessel segmentation in screening mammograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordang, J. J.; Karssemeijer, N.

    2015-03-01

    Blood vessels are a major cause of false positives in computer aided detection systems for the detection of breast cancer. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to construct a framework for the segmentation of blood vessels in screening mammograms. The proposed framework is based on supervised learning using a cascade classifier. This cascade classifier consists of several stages where in each stage a GentleBoost classifier is trained on Haar-like features. A total of 30 cases were included in this study. In each image, vessel pixels were annotated by selecting pixels on the centerline of the vessel, control samples were taken by annotating a region without any visible vascular structures. This resulted in a total of 31,000 pixels marked as vascular and over 4 million control pixels. After training, the classifier assigns a vesselness likelihood to the pixels. The proposed framework was compared to three other vessel enhancing methods, i) a vesselness filter, ii) a gaussian derivative filter, and iii) a tubeness filter. The methods were compared in terms of area under the receiver operating characteristics curves, the Az values. The Az value of the cascade approach is 0:85. This is superior to the vesselness, Gaussian, and tubeness methods, with Az values of 0:77, 0:81, and 0:78, respectively. From these results, it can be concluded that our proposed framework is a promising method for the detection of vessels in screening mammograms.

  9. Clearance properties of nano-sized particles and molecules as imaging agents: considerations and caveats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longmire, Michelle; Choyke, Peter L; Kobayashi, Hisataka

    2008-10-01

    Nanoparticles possess enormous potential as diagnostic imaging agents and hold promise for the development of multimodality agents with both imaging and therapeutic capabilities. Yet, some of the most promising nanoparticles demonstrate prolonged tissue retention and contain heavy metals. This presents serious concerns for toxicity. The creation of nanoparticles with optimal clearance characteristics will minimize toxicity risks by reducing the duration of exposure to these agents. Given that many nanoparticles possess easily modifiable surface and interior chemistry, if nanoparticle characteristics associated with optimal clearance from the body were well established, it would be feasible to design and create agents with more favorable clearance properties. This article presents a thorough discussion of the physiologic aspects of nanoparticle clearance, focusing on renal mechanisms, and provides an overview of current research investigating clearance of specific types of nanoparticles and nano-sized macromolecules, including dendrimers, quantum dots, liposomes and carbon, gold and silica-based nanoparticles.

  10. 2D size, position and shape definition of defects by B-scan image analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Scafidi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The non-destructive evaluation of defects by automatic procedures is of great importance for structural components. Thanks to the developments of the non-contact ultrasonic techniques, the automation of the inspections is gaining a progressively important role. In this work, an automatic inspection technique for the evaluation of defects by the analysis of B-scan images obtained by a laser ultrasonic system is presented. The data are extracted directly from a B-scan map obtained for a panel with internal defects, and are used to build an image of the cross section of the panel. The proposed automatic procedure allows the definition of size, position and shape of defects in panels of known thickness

  11. Automatic segmentation of different-sized leukoaraiosis regions in brain MR images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Yoshikazu; Kunieda, Takuya; Hara, Takeshi; Fujita, Hiroshi; Ando, Hiromichi; Yamakawa, Hiroyasu; Asano, Takahiko; Kato, Hiroki; Iwama, Toru; Kanematsu, Masayuki; Hoshi, Hiroaki

    2008-03-01

    Cerebrovascular diseases are the third leading cause of death in Japan. Therefore, a screening system for the early detection of asymptomatic brain diseases is widely used. In this screening system, leukoaraiosis is often detected in magnetic resonance (MR) images. The quantitative analysis of leukoaraiosis is important because its presence and extension is associated with an increased risk of severe stroke. However, thus far, the diagnosis of leukoaraiosis has generally been limited to subjective judgments by radiologists. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to develop a computerized method for the segmentation of leukoaraiosis, and provide an objective measurement of the lesion volume. Our database comprised of T1- and T2-weighted images obtained from 73 patients. The locations of leukoaraiosis regions were determined by an experienced neuroradiologist. We first segment cerebral parenchymal regions in T1-weighted images by using a region growing technique. For determining the initial candidate regions for leukoaraiosis, the k-means clustering of pixel values in the T1- and T2-weighted images was applied to the segmented cerebral region. For the elimination of false positives (FPs), we determined features such as the location, size, and circularity from each of the initial candidates. Finally, rule-based schemes and a quadratic discriminant analysis with these features were employed for distinguishing between the leukoaraiosis regions and the FPs. The results indicated that the sensitivity for the detection of leukoaraiosis was 100% with 5.84 FPs per image. Our computerized scheme can be useful in assisting radiologists for the quantitative analysis of leukoaraiosis in T1- and T2-weighted images.

  12. Estimating the location and size of retinal injections from orthogonal images of an intact retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjorth, J J Johannes; Savier, Elise; Sterratt, David C; Reber, Michaël; Eglen, Stephen J

    2015-11-21

    To study the mapping from the retina to the brain, typically a small region of the retina is injected with a dye, which then propagates to the retina's target structures. To determine the location of the injection, usually the retina is dissected out of the eye, flattened and then imaged, causing tears and stretching of the retina. The location of the injection is then estimated from the image of the flattened retina. Here we propose a new method that avoids dissection of the retina. We have developed IntactEye, a software package that uses two orthogonal images of the intact retina to locate focal injections of a dye. The two images are taken while the retina is still inside the eye. This bypasses the dissection step, avoiding unnecessary damage to the retina, and speeds up data acquisition. By using the native spherical coordinates of the eye, we avoid distortions caused by interpreting a curved structure in a flat coordinate system. Our method compares well to the projection method and to the Retistruct package, which both use the flattened retina as a starting point. We have tested the method also on synthetic data, where the injection location is known. Our method has been designed for analysing mouse retinas, where there are no visible landmarks for discerning retinal orientation, but can also be applied to retinas from other species. IntactEye allows the user to precisely specify the location and size of a retinal injection from two orthogonal images taken of the eye. We are solving the abstract problem of locating a point on a spherical object from two orthogonal images, which might have applications outside the field of neuroscience.

  13. The determinants of fishing vessel accident severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Di

    2014-05-01

    The study examines the determinants of fishing vessel accident severity in the Northeastern United States using vessel accident data from the U.S. Coast Guard for 2001-2008. Vessel damage and crew injury severity equations were estimated separately utilizing the ordered probit model. The results suggest that fishing vessel accident severity is significantly affected by several types of accidents. Vessel damage severity is positively associated with loss of stability, sinking, daytime wind speed, vessel age, and distance to shore. Vessel damage severity is negatively associated with vessel size and daytime sea level pressure. Crew injury severity is also positively related to the loss of vessel stability and sinking. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A study on the inclusion sizing using immersion ultrasonic C-scan imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, D.; Xiao, H. F.; Li, M.; Xu, J. W.

    2017-05-01

    Inclusion sizing, especially for large inclusions greater than 30μm provides important reference for metallurgical process control and fatigue life assessment of steel. Ultrasonic non-destructive testing (NDT) shows great advantages in detecting infrequently occurred large inclusions than eddy current, magnetic particle, microscopic or macroscopic examination procedures. In this paper, the performance of inclusion sizing by immersion ultrasonic C-scan imaging is studied numerically. A two-dimensional model that consists of spherically focused transducer, water couplant and steel with embedded inclusion is established and solved numerically by the finite element method. The signal intensity distributions of inclusion with different sizes are acquired and the effects of inclusion type, shape, orientation on signal intensity distribution are analysed. The results show that the 6dB-drop threshold has the smallest relative error compared with the 12dB-drop threshold and the full-drop threshold, which is better for determining inclusion size larger than 100μm. Experiment is also performed to validate the simulated results.

  15. Effect of feed processing on size of (washed) faeces particles from pigs measured by image analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Peder; Kornfelt, Louise Foged; Hansen, Christian Fink

    2005-01-01

    of particles from the sieving fractions were scanned and the length and width of individual particles were identified using image analysis software. The overall mean, mode and median were estimated from a composite function. The dietary physical characteristics significantly affected the proportion of faecal......Our aim was to study the effect of dietary physical characteristics on size of washed faecal particles from finishing pigs (98±6 kg). The pigs were fed either a finely ground pelleted diet (FP) or a coarsely ground meal diet (CM) comparable in all ingredients. The diets were based on barley, wheat...

  16. A novel aerodynamic sizing method for pharmaceutical aerosols using image-based analysis of settling velocities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishler, Rami; Sznitman, Josué

    2017-06-01

    This article discusses a novel method to estimate aerodynamic particle size distributions (APSDs) of pharmaceutical aerosols through direct measurement of particle settling velocities using image-based analysis and particle tracking techniques. This simple, optical method provides accurate and fast measurements (approximately 1 minute) with few sources of bias due to specific device design choices or operation conditions. A proof-of-concept for the method is demonstrated by measuring APSDs for widely available commercial dry powder inhalers (DPIs), then comparing the results with previously published data from cascade impactors (CIs) and the Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (APS).

  17. Micro-Flow Imaging as a quantitative tool to assess size and agglomeration of PLGA microparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Beers, Miranda M C; Slooten, Cees; Meulenaar, Jelte; Sediq, Ahmad S; Verrijk, Ruud; Jiskoot, Wim

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the potential of flow imaging microscopy to measure particle size and agglomeration of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microparticles. The particle size distribution of pharmaceutical PLGA microparticle products is routinely determined with laser diffraction. In our study, we performed a unique side-by-side comparison between MFI 5100 (flow imaging microscopy) and Mastersizer 2000 (laser diffraction) for the particle size analysis of two commercial PLGA microparticle products, i.e., Risperdal Consta and Sandostatin LAR. Both techniques gave similar results regarding the number and volume percentage of the main particle population (28-220μm for Risperdal Consta; 16-124μm for Sandostatin LAR). MFI additionally detected a 'fines' population (<28μm for Risperdal Consta; <16μm for Sandostatin LAR), which was overlooked by Mastersizer. Moreover, MFI was able to split the main population into 'monospheres' and 'agglomerates' based on particle morphology, and count the number of particles in each sub-population. Finally, we presented how MFI can be applied in process development of risperidone PLGA microparticles and to monitor the physical stability of Sandostatin LAR. These case studies showed that MFI provides insight into the effect of different process steps on the number, size and morphology of fines, monospheres and agglomerates as well as the extent of microparticle agglomeration after reconstitution. This can be particularly important for the suspendability, injectability and release kinetics of PLGA microparticles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Dosimetry analysis of panoramic-imaging devices in different-sized phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahid, Muizz A; Choi, Ella; MacDonald, David S; Ford, Nancy L

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study is to measure the radiographic dose in adult, adolescent, and child head-sized PMMA phantoms for three panoramic-imaging devices: the panoramic mode on two CBCT machines (Carestream 9300 and i-CAT NG) and the Planmeca ProMax 2D. A SEDENTEXCT dose index adult phantom and custom-built adolescent and pediatric PMMA dosimetry phantoms were used. Panoramic radiographs were performed using a Planmeca ProMax 2D and the panoramic mode on a Carestream 9300 CBCT and an i-CAT NG using the protocols used clinically. Point dose measurements were performed at the center, around the periphery and on the surface of each phantom using a thimble ionization chamber. Five repeat measurements were taken at each location. For each machine, single-factor ANOVA was conducted to determine dose differences between protocols in each phantom, as well as determine the differences in absorbed dose when the same protocol was used for different-sized phantoms. For any individual phantom, using protocols with lower kVp, mA, or acquisition times resulted in statistically significant dose savings, as expected. When the same protocol was used for different-sized phantoms, the smaller phantom had a higher radiation dose due to less attenuation of x-rays by the smaller phantom and differences in the positioning of the ion chamber relative to the focal trough. The panoramic-mode on the CBCT machines produce images suitable for clinical use with similar dose levels to the stand-alone panoramic device. Significant dose savings may result by selecting age- and size- appropriate protocols for pediatric patients, but a wider range of protocols for children and adolescents may be beneficial. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  19. An approach to automatic detection of body parts and their size estimation from computed tomography image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharyya, Mausumi; Stoeckel, Jonathan; M. S., Dinesh

    2009-02-01

    Computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) systems usually require information about regions of interest in images, like: lungs (for nodule detection), colon (for identifying polyps), etc. Many times, it is computationally intensive to process large data sets as in CT to find these areas of interest. A fast and accurate recognition of the different regions of interest in the human body from images is therefore necessary. In this paper we propose a fast and efficient algorithm that can detect the organs of interest in a CT volume and estimate their sizes. Instead of analyzing the whole 3D volume; which is computationally expensive, a binary search technique is adapted to search in a few slices. The slices selected in the search process is segmented and different regions are labeled. Decision over whether the image belongs to a lung or colon or both is based on the count of lung/colon pixels in the slice. Once the detection is done we look for the start and end slice of the body part to have an estimate of their sizes. The algorithm involves certain search decisions based on some predefined threshold values which are empirically chosen from a training data set. The effectiveness of our technique is confirmed by applying it on an independent test data set. Detection accuracy of 100% is obtained on a test set. This algorithm can be integrated in a CAD system for running the right application, or can be used in pre-sets for visualization purposes and other post-processing like image registration etc.

  20. Image Size Influences Visual Search and Perception of Hemorrhages When Reading Cranial CT: An Eye-Tracking Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venjakob, Antje C; Marnitz, Tim; Phillips, Peter; Mello-Thoms, Claudia R

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to explore reader gaze, performance, and preference during interpretation of cranial computed tomography (cCT) in stack mode at two different sizes. Digital display of medical images allows for the manipulation of many imaging factors, like image size, by the radiologists, yet it is often not known what display parameters better suit human perception. Twenty-one radiologists provided informed consent to be eye tracked while reading 20 cCT cases. Half of these cases were presented at a size of 14 × 14 cm (512 × 512 pixels), half at 28 × 28 cm (1,024 × 1,024 pixels). Visual search, performance, and preference for the two image sizes were assessed. When reading small images, significantly fewer, but longer, fixations were observed, and these fixations covered significantly more slices. Time to first fixation of true positive findings was faster in small images, but dwell time on true findings was longer. Readers made more false positive decisions in small images, but no overall difference in either jackknife alternative free-response receiver operating characteristic or reading time was found. Overall performance is not affected by image size. However, small-stack-mode cCT images may better support the use of motion perception and acquiring an overview, whereas large-stack-mode cCT images seem better suited for detailed analyses. Subjective and eye-tracking data suggest that image size influences how images are searched and that different search strategies might be beneficial under different circumstances. © 2016, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society.

  1. Study on clear stereo image pair acquisition method for small objects with big vertical size in SLM vision system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuezong; Jin, Yan; Wang, Lika; Geng, Benliang

    2016-05-01

    Microscopic vision system with stereo light microscope (SLM) has been applied to surface profile measurement. If the vertical size of a small object exceeds the range of depth, its images will contain clear and fuzzy image regions. Hence, in order to obtain clear stereo images, we propose a microscopic sequence image fusion method which is suitable for SLM vision system. First, a solution to capture and align image sequence is designed, which outputs an aligning stereo images. Second, we decompose stereo image sequence by wavelet analysis theory, and obtain a series of high and low frequency coefficients with different resolutions. Then fused stereo images are output based on the high and low frequency coefficient fusion rules proposed in this article. The results show that Δw1 (Δw2 ) and ΔZ of stereo images in a sequence have linear relationship. Hence, a procedure for image alignment is necessary before image fusion. In contrast with other image fusion methods, our method can output clear fused stereo images with better performance, which is suitable for SLM vision system, and very helpful for avoiding image fuzzy caused by big vertical size of small objects. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. In-vessel calibration of the imaging diagnostics for the real-time protection of the JET ITER-like wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, V., E-mail: V.Huber@fz-juelich.de [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Supercomputing Centre, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Huber, A.; Mertens, Ph.; Sergienko, G. [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Institut für Energie- und Klimaforschung—Plasmaphysik, Partner of the Trilateral Euregio Cluster (TEC), 52425 Jülich (Germany); Kinna, D.; Balboa, I.; Collins, S.; Conway, N.; Maggi, C. F.; Matthews, G. F.; Meigs, A. G.; Price, M.; Silburn, S.; Zastrow, K.-D. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Drewelow, P. [MPI für Plasmaphysik, Greifswald (Germany); Wynn, A. [York Plasma Institute, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

    2016-11-15

    The in situ absolute calibration of the JET real-time protection imaging system has been performed for the first time by means of radiometric light source placed inside the JET vessel and operated by remote handling. High accuracy of the calibration is confirmed by cross-validation of the near infrared (NIR) cameras against each other, with thermal IR cameras, and with the beryllium evaporator, which lead to successful protection of the JET first wall during the last campaign. The operation temperature ranges of NIR protection cameras for the materials used on JET are Be 650-1600 °C, W coating 600-1320 °C, and W 650-1500 °C.

  3. Designing image segmentation studies: Statistical power, sample size and reference standard quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Eli; Hu, Yipeng; Huisman, Henkjan J; Barratt, Dean C

    2017-12-01

    Segmentation algorithms are typically evaluated by comparison to an accepted reference standard. The cost of generating accurate reference standards for medical image segmentation can be substantial. Since the study cost and the likelihood of detecting a clinically meaningful difference in accuracy both depend on the size and on the quality of the study reference standard, balancing these trade-offs supports the efficient use of research resources. In this work, we derive a statistical power calculation that enables researchers to estimate the appropriate sample size to detect clinically meaningful differences in segmentation accuracy (i.e. the proportion of voxels matching the reference standard) between two algorithms. Furthermore, we derive a formula to relate reference standard errors to their effect on the sample sizes of studies using lower-quality (but potentially more affordable and practically available) reference standards. The accuracy of the derived sample size formula was estimated through Monte Carlo simulation, demonstrating, with 95% confidence, a predicted statistical power within 4% of simulated values across a range of model parameters. This corresponds to sample size errors of less than 4 subjects and errors in the detectable accuracy difference less than 0.6%. The applicability of the formula to real-world data was assessed using bootstrap resampling simulations for pairs of algorithms from the PROMISE12 prostate MR segmentation challenge data set. The model predicted the simulated power for the majority of algorithm pairs within 4% for simulated experiments using a high-quality reference standard and within 6% for simulated experiments using a low-quality reference standard. A case study, also based on the PROMISE12 data, illustrates using the formulae to evaluate whether to use a lower-quality reference standard in a prostate segmentation study. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Human figure drawing size and body image in preschool children from a self-physique perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Chie; Sakuma, Haruo

    2004-10-01

    To learn about the relationship between size of human figure drawings and the physiques of children, we investigated body image characteristics in childhood by using the Human Figure Drawing test. Height, weight, Kaup Index (a body mass index for children) and Human Figure Drawing traits (vertical height, horizontal width, waist size, surface area of head, surface area of the self-drawing) were measured for drawings of 122 4- to 6-yr.-old children (62 boys, 60 girls). Analysis showed that boys, who are physically larger than girls, produced self-drawings with somewhat larger surface areas. For vertical height of self-drawings of boys, 4-yr.-olds characteristically made taller self-drawings than 5-yr.-olds. While we hypothesized that taller children would make vertically taller self-drawings, we observed a negative relationship between children's physical height and the vertical height of the self-drawings. 4-yr.-old boys showed the most interest in their own physical height, making taller drawings and in doing so gave a clue to an early childhood feature of body image.

  5. Rationale, design and methodology of the image analysis protocol for studies of patients with cerebral small vessel disease and mild stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés Hernández, Maria Del C; Armitage, Paul A; Thrippleton, Michael J; Chappell, Francesca; Sandeman, Elaine; Muñoz Maniega, Susana; Shuler, Kirsten; Wardlaw, Joanna M

    2015-12-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is common in ageing and patients with dementia and stroke. Its manifestations on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) include white matter hyperintensities, lacunes, microbleeds, perivascular spaces, small subcortical infarcts, and brain atrophy. Many studies focus only on one of these manifestations. A protocol for the differential assessment of all these features is, therefore, needed. To identify ways of quantifying imaging markers in research of patients with SVD and operationalize the recommendations from the STandards for ReportIng Vascular changes on nEuroimaging guidelines. Here, we report the rationale, design, and methodology of a brain image analysis protocol based on our experience from observational longitudinal studies of patients with nondisabling stroke. The MRI analysis protocol is designed to provide quantitative and qualitative measures of disease evolution including: acute and old stroke lesions, lacunes, tissue loss due to stroke, perivascular spaces, microbleeds, macrohemorrhages, iron deposition in basal ganglia, substantia nigra and brain stem, brain atrophy, and white matter hyperintensities, with the latter separated into intense and less intense. Quantitative measures of tissue integrity such as diffusion fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity, and the longitudinal relaxation time are assessed in regions of interest manually placed in anatomically and functionally relevant locations, and in others derived from feature extraction pipelines and tissue segmentation methods. Morphological changes that relate to cognitive deficits after stroke, analyzed through shape models of subcortical structures, complete the multiparametric image analysis protocol. Final outcomes include guidance for identifying ways to minimize bias and confounds in the assessment of SVD and stroke imaging biomarkers. It is intended that this information will inform the design of studies to examine the underlying pathophysiology of SVD

  6. Inferring the photometric and size evolution of galaxies from image simulations. I. Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carassou, Sébastien; de Lapparent, Valérie; Bertin, Emmanuel; Le Borgne, Damien

    2017-09-01

    Context. Current constraints on models of galaxy evolution rely on morphometric catalogs extracted from multi-band photometric surveys. However, these catalogs are altered by selection effects that are difficult to model, that correlate in non trivial ways, and that can lead to contradictory predictions if not taken into account carefully. Aims: To address this issue, we have developed a new approach combining parametric Bayesian indirect likelihood (pBIL) techniques and empirical modeling with realistic image simulations that reproduce a large fraction of these selection effects. This allows us to perform a direct comparison between observed and simulated images and to infer robust constraints on model parameters. Methods: We use a semi-empirical forward model to generate a distribution of mock galaxies from a set of physical parameters. These galaxies are passed through an image simulator reproducing the instrumental characteristics of any survey and are then extracted in the same way as the observed data. The discrepancy between the simulated and observed data is quantified, and minimized with a custom sampling process based on adaptive Markov chain Monte Carlo methods. Results: Using synthetic data matching most of the properties of a Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey Deep field, we demonstrate the robustness and internal consistency of our approach by inferring the parameters governing the size and luminosity functions and their evolutions for different realistic populations of galaxies. We also compare the results of our approach with those obtained from the classical spectral energy distribution fitting and photometric redshift approach. Conclusions: Our pipeline infers efficiently the luminosity and size distribution and evolution parameters with a very limited number of observables (three photometric bands). When compared to SED fitting based on the same set of observables, our method yields results that are more accurate and free from

  7. Experimental investigation on the influence of instrument settings on pixel size and nonlinearity in SEM image formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carli, Lorenzo; Genta, Gianfranco; Cantatore, Angela

    2010-01-01

    The work deals with an experimental investigation on the influence of three Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) instrument settings, accelerating voltage, spot size and magnification, on the image formation process. Pixel size and nonlinearity were chosen as output parameters related to image...... quality and resolution. A silicon grating calibrated artifact was employed to investigate qualitatively and quantitatively, through a designed experiment approach, the parameters relevance. SEM magnification was found to account by far for the largest contribution on both parameters under consideration...

  8. A simulation environment for validating ultrasonic blood flow and vessel wall imaging based on fluid-structure interaction simulations: ultrasonic assessment of arterial distension and wall shear rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swillens, Abigail; Degroote, Joris; Vierendeels, Jan; Lovstakken, Lasse; Segers, Patrick

    2010-08-01

    Ultrasound (US) is a commonly used vascular imaging tool when screening for patients at high cardiovascular risk. However, current blood flow and vessel wall imaging methods are hampered by several limitations. When optimizing and developing new ultrasound modalities, proper validation is required before clinical implementation. Therefore, the authors present a simulation environment integrating ultrasound and fluid-structure interaction (FSI) simulations, allowing construction of synthetic ultrasound images based on physiologically realistic behavior of an artery. To demonstrate the potential of the model for vascular ultrasound research, the authors studied clinically relevant imaging modalities of arterial function related to both vessel wall deformation and arterial hemodynamics: Arterial distension (related to arterial stiffness) and wall shear rate (related to the development of atherosclerosis) imaging. An in-house code ("TANGO") was developed to strongly couple the flow solver FLUENT and structural solver ABAQUS using an interface quasi-Newton technique. FIELD II was used to model realistic transducer and scan settings. The input to the FSI-US model is a scatterer phantom on which the US waves reflect, with the scatterer displacement derived from the FSI flow and displacement fields. The authors applied the simulation tool to a 3D straight tube, representative of the common carotid artery (length: 5 cm; and inner and outer radius: 3 and 4 mm). A mass flow inlet boundary condition, based on flow measured in a healthy subject, was applied. A downstream pressure condition, based on a noninvasively measured pressure waveform, was chosen and scaled to simulate three different degrees of arterial distension (1%, 4%, and 9%). The RF data from the FSI-US coupling were further processed for arterial wall and flow imaging. Using an available wall tracking algorithm, arterial distensibility was assessed. Using an autocorrelation estimator, blood velocity and shear

  9. Rapid sphere sizing using a Bayesian analysis of reciprocal space imaging data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziovas, K; Sederman, A J; Gehin-Delval, C; Gunes, D Z; Hughes, E; Mantle, M D

    2016-01-15

    Dispersed systems are important in many applications in a wide range of industries such as the petroleum, pharmaceutical and food industries. Therefore the ability to control and non-invasively measure the physical properties of these systems, such as the dispersed phase size distribution, is of significant interest, in particular for concentrated systems, where microscopy or scattering techniques may not apply or with very limited output quality. In this paper we show how reciprocal space data acquired using both 1D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and 2D X-ray micro-tomographic (X-ray μCT) data can be analysed, using a Bayesian statistical model, to extract the sphere size distribution (SSD) from model sphere systems and dispersed food foam samples. Glass spheres-in-xanthan gels were used as model samples with sphere diameters (D) in the range of 45μm⩽D⩽850μm. The results show that the SSD was successfully estimated from both the NMR and X-ray μCT with a good degree of accuracy for the entire range of glass spheres in times as short as two seconds. After validating the technique using model samples, the Bayesian sphere sizing method was successfully applied to air/water foam samples generated using a microfluidics apparatus with 160μm⩽D⩽400μm. The effect of different experimental parameters such as the standard deviation of the bubble size distribution and the volume fraction of the dispersed phase is discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Fourier and granulometry methods on 3D images of soil surfaces for evaluating soil aggregate size distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, T.; Green, O.; Munkholm, Lars Juhl

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this research is to present and compare two methods for evaluating soil aggregate size distribution based on high resolution 3D images of the soil surface. The methods for analyzing the images are discrete Fourier transform and granulometry. The results of these methods correlate with...

  11. Delivery of size-controlled long-circulating polymersomes in solid tumours, visualized by quantum dots and optical imaging in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakalova, Rumiana; Lazarova, Desislava; Nikolova, Biliana; Atanasova, Severina; Zlateva, Genoveva; Zhelev, Zhivko; Aoki, Ichio

    2015-01-02

    The present study was designed to investigate whether poly-ion complex hollow vesicles (polymersomes), based on chemically modified chitosan, are appropriate for passive tumour targeting in the context of their application as drug carriers. The experiments were performed on colon cancer-grafted mice. The mice were subjected to anaesthesia and injected intravenously with water-soluble nanoparticles: (1) QD(705)-labelled polymersomes (average size ∼120 nm; size distribution ∼10%) or (2) native QD(705). The optical imaging was carried out on Maestro EX 2.10 In Vivo Imaging System (excitation filter 435-480 nm; emission filter 700 nm, longpass). In the case of QD(705), the fluorescence appeared in the tumour area within 1 min after injection and disappeared completely within 60 min. A strong fluorescent signal was detected in the liver on the 30th minute. The visualization of tumour using QD(705) was based only on angiogenesis. In the case of QD(705)-labelled polymersomes, the fluorescence appeared in the tumour area immediately after injection with excellent visualization of blood vessels in the whole body. A strong fluorescent signal was detected in the tumour area within 16 hours. This indicated that QD(705)-labelled polymersomes were delivered predominantly into the tumour due to their long circulation in the bloodstream and enhanced permeability and retention effect. A very weak fluorescent signal was found in the liver area. The data suggest that size-controlled long-circulating polymersomes are very promising carriers for drug delivery in solid tumours, including delivery of small nanoparticles and contrast substances.

  12. Is the Susceptibility Vessel Sign on 3-Tesla Magnetic Resonance T2*-Weighted Imaging a Useful Tool to Predict Recanalization in Intravenous Tissue Plasminogen Activator?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, N; Satomi, J; Harada, M; Izumi, Y; Nagahiro, S; Kaji, R

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the independent factors associated with the absence of recanalization approximately 24 h after intravenous administration of tissue-type plasminogen activator (IV TPA). The previous studies have been conducted using 1.5-Tesla (T) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We studied whether the characteristics of 3-T MRI findings were useful to predict outcome and recanalization after IV tPA. Patients with internal carotid artery (ICA) or middle cerebral artery (MCA) (horizontal portion, M1; Sylvian portion, M2) occlusion and treated by IV tPA were enrolled. We studied whether the presence of susceptibility vessel sign (SVS) at M1 and low clot burden score on T2*-weighted imaging (T2*-CBS) on 3-T MRI were associated with the absence of recanalization. A total of 49 patients were enrolled (27 men; mean age, 73.9 years). MR angiography obtained approximately 24 h after IV tPA revealed recanalization in 21 (42.9 %) patients. Independent factors associated with the absence of recanalization included ICA or proximal M1 occlusion (odds ratio, 69.6; 95 % confidence interval, 5.05-958.8, p = 0.002). In this study, an independent factor associated with the absence of recanalization may be proximal occlusion of the cerebral arteries rather than SVS in the MCA or low T2*-CBS on 3-T MRI.

  13. Image quality of virtual monochromatic images obtained using 320-detector row CT: A phantom study evaluating the effects of iterative reconstruction and body size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamura, Teppei; Yamada, Yoshitake; Yamada, Minoru; Yamazaki, Akihisa; Shiraga, Nobuyuki; Jinzaki, Masahiro

    2017-10-01

    To compare the image quality between virtual monochromatic spectral (VMS) images obtained using 320-row detector CT and polychromatic 120-kVp images reconstructed with or without iterative reconstruction using various phantom sizes. Torso phantoms simulating three patient sizes and containing four syringes filled with water or different contrast media (5, 10, 15mgI/mL15mgI/ml) were used. The phantoms were scanned using dual-energy (80/135-kVp) and single-energy (120-kVp) protocols at different settings (20mGy, 12mGy, and 6mGy). VMS images were generated at 1-keV intervals (range, 35-135keV). Both the VMS images and the single-energy 120-kVp images were reconstructed using filtered back projection (FBP) and adaptive iterative dose reduction 3D (AIDR-3D). The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were assessed. Using FBP reconstruction, the SNR and CNR of the VMS images were lower than or similar to those of the 120-kVp images for most dose settings. Using AIDR-3D reconstruction, however, the 70-keV VMS images had higher SNRs and CNRs than the 120-kVp images at most settings. The image quality of VMS images with FBP reconstruction tended to be lower than that of the 120-kVp images. With the use of AIDR-3D, however, approximately 70-keV VMS images had a higher image quality than the 120-kVp images. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Pressure vessel design manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moss, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    The first section of the book covers types of loadings, failures, and stress theories, and how they apply to pressure vessels. The book delineates the procedures for designing typical components as well as those for designing large openings in cylindrical shells, ring girders, davits, platforms, bins and elevated tanks. The techniques for designing conical transitions, cone-cylinder intersections, intermediate heads, flat heads, and spherically dished covers are also described. The book covers the design of vessel supports subject to wind and seismic loads and one section is devoted to the five major ways of analyzing loads on shells and heads. Each procedure is detailed enough to size all welds, bolts, and plate thicknesses and to determine actual stresses.

  15. Consumption spaces within globalization: "Super size me" moving images in the teaching of school geography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Elena Gómez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available At present the reconfiguration and re-signification of traditional eating habits are not only connected to the food production process but also to its adaptation to certain globalized consumption and socialization forms [fast food], which are typical of urban life. This proposal was developed together with the students of a UNICEN-dependant secondary school, Colegio Nacional Ernesto Sabato. This paper is about the social consumption space, and it makes use of Human Sciences qualitative perspective to perform an analysis and interpretation in school geography. The film "Super Size Me" was shown and used as a didactic strategy. The complex relation between consumption, territory and society were explored within the current context of local and global growing social consumption practices. This paper is a qualitative approach, from moving visual images, to consumers'behavior, to their motivations and to their consuming habits within urban recreation and food consumption spaces

  16. Obesity, Insulin Resistance, and Incident Small Vessel Disease on Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dearborn, Jennifer L; Schneider, Andrea L C; Sharrett, A Richey; Mosley, Thomas H; Bezerra, Daniel C; Knopman, David S; Selvin, Elizabeth; Jack, Clifford R; Coker, Laura H; Alonso, Alvaro; Wagenknecht, Lynne E; Windham, Beverly G; Gottesman, Rebecca F

    2015-11-01

    The term metabolic syndrome describes the clustering of risk factors found in many individuals with obesity. Because of their pathophysiology, we hypothesized that 2 features of metabolic syndrome, central obesity and insulin resistance (IR), would be associated with cerebrovascular changes on magnetic resonance imaging, and specifically with incident lacunar disease and not white matter hyperintensity (WMH) progression. Risk factors were defined at study baseline in 934 participants in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study, who completed 2 brain magnetic resonance imagings≈10 years apart. WMH progression and incident lacunes between the 2 magnetic resonance imagings were determined. An IR score for each participant was created using principal component analysis of 11 risk factors, including (among others): insulin, homeostatic model assessment-IR, body mass index, and waist circumference. Metabolic syndrome (presence/absence), using standard clinical definitions, and IR score at the first magnetic resonance imaging, were independent variables, evaluated in multivariate logistic regression to determine odds of WMH progression (Q5 versus Q1-Q4) and incident lacunes. Metabolic syndrome (adjusted odds ratio, 1.98; 95% confidence interval, 1.28-3.05) and IR score (adjusted odds ratio per 1-SD increase, 1.33; 95% confidence interval, 1.05-1.68) were associated with incident lacunes but not with WMH progression. Insulin, homeostatic model assessment-IR, and body mass index were not associated with incident lacunes or WMH progression in separate models. The IR score and central obesity are associated with incident lacunar disease but not WMH progression in individuals. Central obesity and IR may be important risk factors to target to prevent lacunar disease. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Dynamic lymph flow imaging in patients with oedema of the lower limb for evaluation of the functional outcome after autologous lymph vessel transplantation: an 8-year follow-up study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, Mayo; Hahn, Klaus [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Ziemssenstrasse 1, 80335 Munich (Germany); Baumeister, Ruediger G.H. [Department of Micro-, Hand and Reconstructive Surgery, Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich (Germany)

    2003-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to monitor the functional outcome of microsurgical intervention on lymph drainage by means of non-invasive, readily available lymphoscintigraphy. Eight patients with primary or secondary lymphoedema of the lower limb were investigated before and for 8 years after autologous lymph vessel transplantation. For scintigraphy, technetium-99m labelled nanocolloid was subcutaneously injected into the first interdigital space of the affected limb. Sequential images were acquired up to 6 h p.i.; for semiquantitative evaluation a numerical transport index was established by assigning scores of up to 9 on each of five criteria: lymphatic transport kinetics, distribution pattern of the radiopharmaceutical, time to appearance of lymph nodes, visualisation of lymph nodes and visualisation of lymph vessels/grafts. Ti values <10 were considered normal. In all eight patients, lymphatic function significantly (P{<=}0.01) improved after microsurgical treatment. Permanent function of vessel grafts was indicated by persistently low Ti values during the entire observation period, impressively demonstrating the success of this complex microsurgical technique. Patients with scintigraphic visualisation of the vessel graft (n=2/8) showed a substantially better postoperative outcome than those without visualisation of the vessel graft. The findings indicate that lymph vessel transplantation significantly improves lymph drainage in patients with primary or secondary lymphoedema of the lower limb. Thus, lymphoscintigraphy is helpful not only in planning microsurgical treatment but also in monitoring the postoperative outcome. (orig.)

  18. Size-controlled synthesis of dextran sulfate coated iron oxide nanoparticles for magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarrett, Benjamin R; Frendo, Michele; Vogan, Jacob; Louie, Angelique Y [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

    2007-01-24

    In the generation of nanoparticles for biological applications, the control over synthetic parameters influencing the particles' physicochemical properties are of great interest due to the strong influence of particle size and surface properties on cellular uptake and biodistribution. We have synthesized dextran sulfate coated particles and systematically evaluated synthetic parameters that may influence the properties of these nanoparticles as potential magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agents. The amount of base, polysaccharide content, ratio of iron salts, and reaction time were optimized to yield approximately 30 nm particles as determined by dynamic light scattering with good MR properties (r{sub 1} = 14.46 mM{sup -1} s{sup -1} and r{sub 2} = 72.55 mM{sup -1} s{sup -1}) and in good yield (50%). Particle sizes and relaxivities are compared with clinically available dextran coated particles and the resulting physical properties of the dextran sulfate coated particles show these particles could be used as potential MR contrast agents for cardiovascular imaging.

  19. Validation of planning-free vessel-encoded pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling MR imaging as territorial-ASL strategy by comparison to super-selective p-CASL MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartkamp, Nolan S; Helle, Michael; Chappell, Michael A; Okell, Thomas W; Hendrikse, Jeroen; Bokkers, Reinoud P H; van Osch, Matthias J P

    2014-06-01

    Vessel-encoded (VE) pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (p-CASL) is a territorial ASL (T-ASL) technique to identify the perfusion territories of cerebral arteries. The aim of this study was to validate the output of three Vessel-encoded p-CASL image processing methods, k-means clustering with and without subsequent linear analysis and a Bayesian framework, by comparison with the perfusion maps acquired with super-selective p-CASL. The comparison was done quantitatively using the Hausdorff distance and Dice similarity coefficient in the territories of the right and left internal carotid arteries, the basilar artery, and the right and left vertebral arteries. A qualitative comparison was done in the areas of the anterior and posterior circulation, and the deep gray matter. The overall agreement between the Vessel-encoded p-CASL image processing methods and super-selective p-CASL was good; with the difference that the linear analysis and the Bayesian framework were able to detect mixed perfusion. Planning-free Vessel-encoded p-CASL with k-means clustering appears suitable as a general purpose T-ASL strategy, but to determine mixed perfusion a combination with linear analysis, or the Bayesian framework is preferable, which are superior in this regard. To accurately determine the perfusion territory of a single vessel, super-selective p-CASL is still recommended. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Particle size distribution of brown and white rice during gastric digestion measured by image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornhorst, Gail M; Kostlan, Kevin; Singh, R Paul

    2013-09-01

    The particle size distribution of foods during gastric digestion indicates the amount of physical breakdown that occurred due to the peristaltic movement of the stomach walls in addition to the breakdown that initially occurred during oral processing. The objective of this study was to present an image analysis technique that was rapid, simple, and could distinguish between food components (that is, rice kernel and bran layer in brown rice). The technique was used to quantify particle breakdown of brown and white rice during gastric digestion in growing pigs (used as a model for an adult human) over 480 min of digestion. The particle area distributions were fit to a Rosin-Rammler distribution function. Brown and white rice exhibited considerable breakdown as the number of particles per image decreased over time. The median particle area (x(50)) increased during digestion, suggesting a gastric sieving phenomenon, where small particles were emptied and larger particles were retained for additional breakdown. Brown rice breakdown was further quantified by an examination of the bran layer fragments and rice grain pieces. The percentage of total particle area composed of bran layer fragments was greater in the distal stomach than the proximal stomach in the first 120 min of digestion. The results of this study showed that image analysis may be used to quantify particle breakdown of a soft food product during gastric digestion, discriminate between different food components, and help to clarify the role of food structure and processing in food breakdown during gastric digestion. © 2013 Institute of Food Technologists®

  1. Low-cost telemedicine device performing cell and particle size measurement based on lens-free shadow imaging technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Mohendra; Seo, Dongmin; Oh, Chang-Hyun; Nam, Myung-Hyun; Kim, Young Jun; Seo, Sungkyu

    2015-05-15

    Recent advances in lens-free shadow imaging technology have enabled a new class of cell imaging platform, which is a suitable candidate for point-of-care facilities. In this paper, we firstly demonstrate a compact and low-cost telemedicine device providing automated cell and particle size measurement based on lens-free shadow imaging technology. Using the generated shadow (or diffraction) patterns, the proposed approach can detect and measure the sizes of more than several hundreds of micro-objects simultaneously within a single digital image frame. In practical experiments, we defined four types of shadow parameters extracted from each micro-object shadow pattern, and found that a specific shadow parameter (peak-to-peak distance, PPD) demonstrated a linear relationship with the actual micro-object sizes. By using this information, a new algorithm suitable for operation on both a personal computer (PC) and a cell phone was also developed, providing automated size detection of poly-styrenemicro-beads and biological cells such as red blood cells, MCF-7, HepG2, and HeLa. Results from the proposed device were compared with those of a conventional optical microscope, demonstrating good agreement between two approaches. In contrast to other existing cell and particle size measurement approaches, such as Coulter counter, flow-cytometer, particle-size analyzer, and optical microscope, this device can provide accurate cell and particle size information with a 2 µm maximum resolution, at almost no cost (less than 100 USD), within a compact instrumentation size (9.3×9.0×9.0 cm(3)), and in a rapid manner (within 1 min). The proposed lens-free automated particle and cell size measurement device, based on shadow imaging technology, can be utilized as a powerful tool for many cell and particle handling procedures, including environmental, pharmaceutical, biological, and clinical applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The influence of primary caregivers on body size and self-body image of preschool children in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Yueching; Chang, Yu-Jhen; Lin, Chia-Jung

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate preschool children's body size and image, and analyze the impact of the primary caregiver on a child's body size and awareness in Taiwan. In a cross-sectional survey, 699 preschool children and their primary caregivers participated in this study. Our study used an anonymous self-administered questionnaire, which was divided into parts A and part B. Part A was a questionnaire for the primary caregivers, including their demographic and anthropometric information, and expectation for children's body size. Part B was a two part questionnaire for children, including the children's expectation on their own body size and their consciousness in terms of body size evaluation by parents and teachers. Data was analyzed by chi-square analysis. In our study, the majority of boys and girls have a normal body size (69.0% and 64.6%, respectively). There was a significant positive correlation (peducation level. Furthermore, we found that caregiver's satisfaction and evaluation of the children's body size had significantly affected the children's satisfaction towards their body size. Influences by the primary caregiver is an important factor that affects a preschool child's body size and body image in Taiwan. Body size evaluation by caregivers will influence the child's satisfaction level.

  3. The LoG characteristic scale: a consistent measurement of lung nodule size in CT imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diciotti, Stefano; Lombardo, Simone; Coppini, Giuseppe; Grassi, Luca; Falchini, Massimo; Mascalchi, Mario

    2010-02-01

    Nodule growth as observed in computed tomography (CT) scans acquired at different times is the primary feature to malignancy of indeterminate small lung nodules. In this paper, we propose the estimation of nodule size through a scale-space representation which needs no segmentation and has high intra- and inter-operator reproducibility. Lung nodules usually appear in CT images as blob-like patterns and can be analyzed in the scale-space by Laplacian of Gaussian ( LoG ) kernels. For each nodular pattern the LoG scale-space signature was computed and the related characteristic scale adopted as measurement of nodule size. Both in vitro and in vivo validation of LoG characteristic scale were carried out. In vitro validation was done by 40 nondeformable phantoms and 10 deformable phantoms. A close relationship between the characteristic scale and the equivalent diameter, i.e., the diameter of the sphere having the same volume of nodules, (Pearson correlation coefficient was 0.99) and, for nodules undergoing little deformations (obtained at constant volume), small variability of the characteristic scale was observed. The in vivo validation was performed on low and standard-dose CT scans collected from the ITALUNG screening trial (86 nodules) and from the LIDC public data set (89 solid nodules and 40 part-solid nodules or ground-glass opacities). The Pearson correlation coefficient between characteristic scale and equivalent diameter was 0.83-0.93 for ITALUNG and 0.68-0.83 for LIDC data set. Intra- and inter-operator reproducibility of characteristic scale was excellent: on a set of 40 lung nodules of ITALUNG data, two radiologists produced identical results in repeated measurements. The scan-rescan variability of the characteristic scale was also investigated on 86 two-year-stable solid lung nodules (each one observed, on average, in four CT scans) identified in the ITALUNG screening trial: a coefficient of repeatability of about 0.9 mm was observed. Experimental

  4. Angiographic correlations of patients with small vessel disease diagnosed by adenosine-stress cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scheck Roland

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR with adenosine-stress myocardial perfusion is gaining importance for the detection and quantification of coronary artery disease (CAD. However, there is little knowledge about patients with CMR-detected ischemia, but having no relevant stenosis as seen on coronary angiography (CA. The aims of our study were to characterize these patients by CMR and CA and evaluate correlations and potential reasons for the ischemic findings. 73 patients with an indication for CA were first scanned on a 1.5T whole-body CMR-scanner including adenosine-stress first-pass perfusion. The images were analyzed by two independent investigators for myocardial perfusion which was classified as subendocardial ischemia (n = 22, no perfusion deficit (n = 27, control 1, or more than subendocardial ischemia (n = 24, control 2. All patients underwent CA, and a highly significant correlation between the classification of CMR perfusion deficit and the degree of coronary luminal narrowing was found. For quantification of coronary blood flow, corrected Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction (TIMI frame count (TFC was evaluated for the left anterior descending (LAD, circumflex (LCX and right coronary artery (RCA. The main result was that corrected TFC in all coronaries was significantly increased in study patients compared to both control 1 and to control 2 patients. Study patients had hypertension or diabetes more often than control 1 patients. In conclusion, patients with CMR detected subendocardial ischemia have prolonged coronary blood flow. In connection with normal resting flow values in CAD, this supports the hypothesis of underlying coronary microvascular impairment. CMR stress perfusion differentiates non-invasively between this entity and relevant CAD.

  5. Cone-beam CT-based delineation of stereotactic lung targets: the influence of image modality and target size on interobserver variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altorjai, Gabriela; Fotina, Irina; Lütgendorf-Caucig, Carola; Stock, Markus; Pötter, Richard; Georg, Dietmar; Dieckmann, Karin

    2012-02-01

    It is generally agreed that the safe implementation of stereotactic body radiotherapy requires image guidance. The aim of this work was to assess interobserver variability in the delineation of lung lesions on cone-beam CT (CBCT) images compared with CT-based contouring for adaptive stereotactic body radiotherapy. The influence of target size was also evaluated. Eight radiation oncologists delineated gross tumor volumes in 12 patient cases (non-small cell lung cancer I-II or solitary metastasis) on planning CTs and on CBCTs. Cases were divided into two groups with tumor diameters of less than (Group A) or more than 2 cm (Group B). Comparison of mean volumes delineated by all observers and range and coefficient of variation were reported for each case and image modality. Interobserver variability was assessed by means of standard error of measurement, conformity index (CI), and its generalized observer-independent approach. The variance between single observers on CT and CBCT images was measured via interobserver reliability coefficient. Interobserver variability on CT images was 17% with 0.79 reliability, compared with 21% variability on CBCT and 0.76 reliability. On both image modalities, values of the intraobserver reliability coefficient (0.99 for CT and 0.97 for CBCT) indicated high reproducibility of results. In general, lower interobserver agreement was observed for small lesions (CI(genA) = 0.62 ± 0.06 vs. CI(genB) = 0.70 ± 0.03, p < 0.05). The analysis of single patient cases revealed that presence of spicules, diffuse infiltrations, proximity of the tumors to the vessels and thoracic wall, and respiration motion artifacts presented the main sources of the variability. Interobserver variability for Stage I-II non-small cell lung cancer and lung metastasis was slightly higher on CBCT compared with CT. Absence of significant differences in interobserver variability suggests that CBCT imaging provides an effective tool for tumor localization, and image

  6. Radiation dose reduction without compromise to image quality by alterations of filtration and focal spot size in cerebral angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Joon; Park, Min Keun; Jung, Da Eun; Kang, Jung Han; Kim, Byung Moon [Dept. of Radiology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-01

    Different angiographic protocols may influence the radiation dose and image quality. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of filtration and focal spot size on radiation dose and image quality for diagnostic cerebral angiography using an in-vitro model and in-vivo patient groups. Radiation dose and image quality were analyzed by varying the filtration and focal spot size on digital subtraction angiography exposure protocols (1, inherent filtration + large focus; 2, inherent + small; 3, copper + large; 4, copper + small). For the in-vitro analysis, a phantom was used for comparison of radiation dose. For the in-vivo analysis, bilateral paired injections, and patient cohort groups were compared for radiation dose and image quality. Image quality analysis was performed in terms of contrast, sharpness, noise, and overall quality. In the in-vitro analysis, the mean air kerma (AK) and dose area product (DAP)/frame were significantly lower with added copper filtration (protocols 3 and 4). In the in-vivo bilateral paired injections, AK and DAP/frame were significantly lower with filtration, without significant difference in image quality. The patient cohort groups with added filtration (protocols 3 and 4) showed significant reduction of total AK and DAP/patient without compromise to the image quality. Variations in focal spot size showed no significant differences in radiation dose and image quality. Addition of filtration for angiographic exposure studies can result in significant total radiation dose reduction without loss of image quality. Focal spot size does not influence radiation dose and image quality. The routine angiographic protocol should be judiciously investigated and implemented.

  7. 2D Fast Vessel Visualization Using a Vessel Wall Mask Guiding Fine Vessel Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sotirios Raptis

    2010-01-01

    and then try to approach the ridges and branches of the vasculature's using fine detection. Fine vessel screening looks into local structural inconsistencies in vessels properties, into noise, or into not expected intensity variations observed inside pre-known vessel-body areas. The vessels are first modelled sufficiently but not precisely by their walls with a tubular model-structure that is the result of an initial segmentation. This provides a chart of likely Vessel Wall Pixels (VWPs yielding a form of a likelihood vessel map mainly based on gradient filter's intensity and spatial arrangement parameters (e.g., linear consistency. Specific vessel parameters (centerline, width, location, fall-away rate, main orientation are post-computed by convolving the image with a set of pre-tuned spatial filters called Matched Filters (MFs. These are easily computed as Gaussian-like 2D forms that use a limited range sub-optimal parameters adjusted to the dominant vessel characteristics obtained by Spatial Grey Level Difference statistics limiting the range of search into vessel widths of 16, 32, and 64 pixels. Sparse pixels are effectively eliminated by applying a limited range Hough Transform (HT or region growing. Major benefits are limiting the range of parameters, reducing the search-space for post-convolution to only masked regions, representing almost 2% of the 2D volume, good speed versus accuracy/time trade-off. Results show the potentials of our approach in terms of time for detection ROC analysis and accuracy of vessel pixel (VP detection.

  8. Angiographic Findings of the Multicenter Randomized Study With the Sirolimus-Eluting Bx Velocity Balloon-Expandable Stent (RAVEL) : Sirolimus-Eluting Stents Inhibit Restenosis Irrespective of the Vessel Size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.S. Regar (Eveline); M. Degertekin (Muzaffer); M-C. Morice (Marie-Claude); K. Tanabe (Kengo); E. Wülfert (Egon); C. Disco (Clemens); C. Holubarsch; J-L. Guermonprez (Jean-Leon); W. Wijns (William); A. Bartorelli (Antonio); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); C.H. Bode (Christoph); C. Constantini (Constantino)

    2002-01-01

    markdownabstractBACKGROUND: Restenosis remains the major limitation of coronary catheter-based intervention. In small vessels, the amount of neointimal tissue is disproportionately greater than the vessel caliber, resulting in higher restenosis rates. In the Randomized Study With the

  9. Optics based signal processing methods for intraoperative blood vessel detection and quantification in real time (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Amal; Shukair, Shetha A.; Le Rolland, Paul; Vijayvergia, Mayank; Subramanian, Hariharan; Gunn, Jonathan W.

    2016-03-01

    Minimally invasive operations require surgeons to make difficult cuts to blood vessels and other tissues with impaired tactile and visual feedback. This leads to inadvertent cuts to blood vessels hidden beneath tissue, causing serious health risks to patients and a non-reimbursable financial burden to hospitals. Intraoperative imaging technologies have been developed, but these expensive systems can be cumbersome and provide only a high-level view of blood vessel networks. In this research, we propose a lean reflectance-based system, comprised of a dual wavelength LED, photodiode, and novel signal processing algorithms for rapid vessel characterization. Since this system takes advantage of the inherent pulsatile light absorption characteristics of blood vessels, no contrast agent is required for its ability to detect the presence of a blood vessel buried deep inside any tissue type (up to a cm) in real time. Once a vessel is detected, the system is able to estimate the distance of the vessel from the probe and the diameter size of the vessel (with a resolution of ~2mm), as well as delineate the type of tissue surrounding the vessel. The system is low-cost, functions in real-time, and could be mounted on already existing surgical tools, such as Kittner dissectors or laparoscopic suction irrigation cannulae. Having been successfully validated ex vivo, this technology will next be tested in a live porcine study and eventually in clinical trials.

  10. Improving pulmonary vessel image quality with a full model-based iterative reconstruction algorithm in 80kVp low-dose chest CT for pediatric patients aged 0-6 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jihang; Zhang, Qifeng; Hu, Di; Duan, Xiaomin; Peng, Yun

    2015-06-01

    Full model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) algorithm decreasing image noise and improving spatial resolution significantly, combined with low voltage scan may improve image and vessels quality. To evaluate the image quality improvement of pulmonary vessels using a full MBIR in low-dose chest computed tomography (CT) for children. This study was institutional review board approved. Forty-one children (age range, 28 days-6 years, mean age, 2.0 years) who underwent 80 kVp low-dose CT scans were included. Age-dependent noise index (NI) for a 5-mm slice thickness image was used for the acquisition: NI = 11 for 0-12 months old, NI = 13 for 1-2 years old, and NI = 15 for 3-6 years old. Images were retrospectively reconstructed into thin slice thickness of 0.625 mm using the MBIR and a conventional filtered back projection (FBP) algorithm. Two radiologists independently evaluated images subjectively focusing on the ability to display small arteries and diagnosis confidence on a 5-point scale with 3 being clinically acceptable. CT value and image noise in the descending aorta, muscle and fat were measured and statistically compared between the two reconstruction groups. The ability to display small vessels was significantly improved with the MBIR reconstruction. The subjective scores of displaying small vessels were 5.0 and 3.7 with MBIR and FBP, respectively, while the respective diagnosis confidence scores were 5.0 and 3.8. Quantitative image noise for the 0.625 mm slice thickness images in the descending aorta was 15.8 ± 3.8 HU in MBIR group, 57.3% lower than the 37.0 ± 7.3 HU in FBP group. The signal-to-noise ratio and contrast-to-noise ratio for the descending aorta were 28.3 ± 7.9 and 24.05 ± 7.5 in MBIR group, and 12.1 ± 3.7 and 10.6 ± 3.5 in FBP group, respectively. These values were improved by 133.9% and 132.1%, respectively, with MBIR reconstruction compared to FBP reconstruction. Compared to the conventional FBP reconstruction, the image quality and

  11. Study on subset size selection in digital image correlation for speckle patterns

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bing Pan; Huimin Xie; Zhaoyang Wang; Kemao Qian; Zhiyong Wang

    2008-01-01

    Digital Image Correlation (DIC) is a flexible and effective technique to measure the displacements on specimen surfaces by matching the reference subsets in the undeformed image with the target subsets in the deformed image...

  12. Comparison of known food weights with image-based portion-size automated estimation and adolescents' self-reported portion size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Christina D; Chae, Junghoon; Schap, TusaRebecca E; Kerr, Deborah A; Delp, Edward J; Ebert, David S; Boushey, Carol J

    2012-03-01

    Diet is a critical element of diabetes self-management. An emerging area of research is the use of images for dietary records using mobile telephones with embedded cameras. These tools are being designed to reduce user burden and to improve accuracy of portion-size estimation through automation. The objectives of this study were to (1) assess the error of automatically determined portion weights compared to known portion weights of foods and (2) to compare the error between automation and human. Adolescents (n = 15) captured images of their eating occasions over a 24 h period. All foods and beverages served were weighed. Adolescents self-reported portion sizes for one meal. Image analysis was used to estimate portion weights. Data analysis compared known weights, automated weights, and self-reported portions. For the 19 foods, the mean ratio of automated weight estimate to known weight ranged from 0.89 to 4.61, and 9 foods were within 0.80 to 1.20. The largest error was for lettuce and the most accurate was strawberry jam. The children were fairly accurate with portion estimates for two foods (sausage links, toast) using one type of estimation aid and two foods (sausage links, scrambled eggs) using another aid. The automated method was fairly accurate for two foods (sausage links, jam); however, the 95% confidence intervals for the automated estimates were consistently narrower than human estimates. The ability of humans to estimate portion sizes of foods remains a problem and a perceived burden. Errors in automated portion-size estimation can be systematically addressed while minimizing the burden on people. Future applications that take over the burden of these processes may translate to better diabetes self-management. © 2012 Diabetes Technology Society.

  13. Plastic Bonded Explosive (PBX) Particle Size Distribution (PSD) Measurements Using an Image Analysis System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, Gregg K. [Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States)

    2003-06-01

    The slurry process for producing plastic bonded explosives (PBX) has been used for many years. However, until recently the mechanisms involved have not been studied quantitatively to determine the effects of the various control variables. Recently, the effects of operating variables on the final product have been studied; however, no attempt was made to measure particle growth during the slurry process. This study applies an image analysis tool to measure particle size distributions (PSDs) during the slurry process to produce PBX 9501, a specific formulation used in nuclear weapons. The observed PBX 9501 slurry behavior leads away from the typical population balance description of agglomeration, that is, a discrete particle-particle coalescence mechanism. The behavior observed in these experiments indicates that the initial state of the system contains a number of smaller particles clustered together. The cluster then coalesces into a large particle as solvent is removed and the slurry continuously mixed. Other small fragments are picked up and a relatively small amount of growth is observed. A mass transfer model adequately describes solvent removal, and an empirical model is developed to describe the growth behavior in terms of measured process variables. The image system is applied to dried molding powders. The PSD measurement results of the PBX 9501 library lots, historic samples set aside as PBX 9501 lots were accepted from the manufacturer, are also discussed and analyzed. A correlation analysis was conducted to find relationships between the measured PSD and other properties such as bulk density and pressed densities. While no significant correlation was found between the measured PSD and averaged bulk densities for the library lots, significant correlations are found between the measured PSD and pressed density. The final part of the study was to scale-up the PSD measurement capability. Since the large-scale processes are not yet operational, this work

  14. Size Control and Fluorescence Labeling of Polydopamine Melanin-Mimetic Nanoparticles for Intracellular Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devang R. Amin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available As synthetic analogs of the natural pigment melanin, polydopamine nanoparticles (NPs are under active investigation as non-toxic anticancer photothermal agents and as free radical scavenging therapeutics. By analogy to the widely adopted polydopamine coatings, polydopamine NPs offer the potential for facile aqueous synthesis and incorporation of (biofunctional groups under mild temperature and pH conditions. However, clear procedures for the convenient and reproducible control of critical NP properties such as particle diameter, surface charge, and loading with functional molecules have yet to be established. In this work, we have synthesized polydopamine-based melanin-mimetic nanoparticles (MMNPs with finely controlled diameters spanning ≈25 to 120 nm and report on the pH-dependence of zeta potential, methodologies for PEGylation, and the incorporation of fluorescent organic molecules. A comprehensive suite of complementary techniques, including dynamic light scattering (DLS, cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, zeta-potential, ultraviolet–visible (UV–Vis absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, and confocal microscopy, was used to characterize the MMNPs and their properties. Our PEGylated MMNPs are highly stable in both phosphate-buffered saline (PBS and in cell culture media and exhibit no cytotoxicity up to at least 100 µg mL−1 concentrations. We also show that a post-functionalization methodology for fluorophore loading is especially suitable for producing MMNPs with stable fluorescence and significantly narrower emission profiles than previous reports, suggesting they will be useful for multimodal cell imaging. Our results pave the way towards biomedical imaging and possibly drug delivery applications, as well as fundamental studies of MMNP size and surface chemistry dependent cellular interactions.

  15. Size Control and Fluorescence Labeling of Polydopamine Melanin-Mimetic Nanoparticles for Intracellular Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Devang R; Sugnaux, Caroline; Lau, King Hang Aaron; Messersmith, Phillip B

    2017-09-01

    As synthetic analogs of the natural pigment melanin, polydopamine nanoparticles (NPs) are under active investigation as non-toxic anticancer photothermal agents and as free radical scavenging therapeutics. By analogy to the widely adopted polydopamine coatings, polydopamine NPs offer the potential for facile aqueous synthesis and incorporation of (bio)functional groups under mild temperature and pH conditions. However, clear procedures for the convenient and reproducible control of critical NP properties such as particle diameter, surface charge, and loading with functional molecules have yet to be established. In this work, we have synthesized polydopamine-based melanin-mimetic nanoparticles (MMNPs) with finely controlled diameters spanning ≈25 to 120 nm and report on the pH-dependence of zeta potential, methodologies for PEGylation, and the incorporation of fluorescent organic molecules. A comprehensive suite of complementary techniques, including dynamic light scattering (DLS), cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), zeta-potential, ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, and confocal microscopy, was used to characterize the MMNPs and their properties. Our PEGylated MMNPs are highly stable in both phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and in cell culture media and exhibit no cytotoxicity up to at least 100 μg mL -1 concentrations. We also show that a post-functionalization methodology for fluorophore loading is especially suitable for producing MMNPs with stable fluorescence and significantly narrower emission profiles than previous reports, suggesting they will be useful for multimodal cell imaging. Our results pave the way towards biomedical imaging and possibly drug delivery applications, as well as fundamental studies of MMNP size and surface chemistry dependent cellular interactions.

  16. Vessel Operator System

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Operator cards are required for any operator of a charter/party boat and or a commercial vessel (including carrier and processor vessels) issued a vessel permit from...

  17. High-resolution 3D coronary vessel wall imaging with near 100% respiratory efficiency using epicardial fat tracking: reproducibility and comparison with standard methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Andrew D; Keegan, Jennifer; Firmin, David N

    2011-01-01

    To quantitatively assess the performance and reproducibility of 3D spiral coronary artery wall imaging with beat-to-beat respiratory-motion-correction (B2B-RMC) compared to navigator gated 2D spiral and turbo-spin-echo (TSE) acquisitions. High-resolution (0.7 × 0.7 mm) cross-sectional right coronary wall acquisitions were performed in 10 subjects using four techniques (B2B-RMC 3D spiral with alternate (2RR) and single (1RR) R-wave gating, navigator-gated 2D spiral (2RR) and navigator-gated 2D TSE (2RR)) on two occasions. Wall thickness measurements were compared with repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA). Reproducibility was assessed with the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). In all, 91% (73/80) of acquisitions were successful (failures: four TSE, two 3D spiral (1RR) and one 3D spiral (2RR)). Respiratory efficiency of the B2B-RMC was less variable and substantially higher than for navigator gating (99.6 ± 1.2% vs. 39.0 ± 7.5%, P B2B-RMC permits coronary vessel wall assessment over multiple thin contiguous slices in a clinically feasible duration. Excellent reproducibility of the technique potentially enables studies of disease progression/regression. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Aortic stiffness is associated with cardiac function and cerebral small vessel disease in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus: assessment by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elderen, Saskia G.C. van; Brandts, A.; Westenberg, J.J.M.; Grond, J. van der; Buchem, M.A. van; Kroft, L.J.M.; Roos, A. de [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Leiden (Netherlands); Tamsma, J.T.; Romijn, J.A.; Smit, J.W.A. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Endocrinology, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2010-05-15

    To evaluate, with the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), whether aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) is associated with cardiac left ventricular (LV) function and mass as well as with cerebral small vessel disease in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM). We included 86 consecutive type 1 DM patients (49 male, mean age 46.9 {+-} 11.7 years) in a prospective, cross-sectional study. Exclusion criteria included aortic/heart disease and general MRI contra-indications. MRI of the aorta, heart and brain was performed for assessment of aortic PWV, as a marker of aortic stiffness, systolic LV function and mass, as well as for the presence of cerebral white matter hyperintensities (WMHs), microbleeds and lacunar infarcts. Multivariate linear or logistic regression was performed to analyse the association between aortic PWV and outcome parameters, with covariates defined as age, gender, mean arterial pressure, heart rate, BMI, smoking, DM duration and hypertension. Mean aortic PWV was 7.1 {+-} 2.5 m/s. Aortic PWV was independently associated with LV ejection fraction (ss= -0.406, P = 0.006), LV stroke volume (ss=-0.407, P = 0.001), LV cardiac output (ss= -0.458, P = 0.001), and with cerebral WMHs (P < 0.05). There were no independent associations between aortic stiffness and LV mass, cerebral microbleeds or lacunar infarcts. Aortic stiffness is independently associated with systolic LV function and cerebral WMHs in patients with type 1 DM. (orig.)

  19. Toward optimization of in vivo super-resolution ultrasound imaging using size-selected microbubble contrast agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Debabrata; Xiong, Fangyuan; Sirsi, Shashank R; Shaul, Philip W; Mattrey, Robert F; Hoyt, Kenneth

    2017-10-04

    Microvascular processes play key roles in many diseases including diabetes. Improved understanding of the microvascular changes involved in disease development could offer crucial insight into the relationship of these changes to disease pathogenesis. Super-resolution ultrasound (SR-US) imaging has showed the potential to visualize microvascular detail down to the capillary level (i.e., subwavelength resolution), but optimization is still necessary. The purpose of this study was to investigate in vivo SR-US imaging of skeletal muscle microvascularity using microbubble (MB) contrast agents of various size and concentration while evaluating different ultrasound (US) system level parameters such as imaging frame rate and image acquisition length. An US system equipped with a linear array transducer was used in a harmonic imaging mode at low transmit power. C57BL/6J mice fed a normal diet were used in this study. An assortment of size-selected MB contrast agents (1-2 μm, 3-4 μm, and 5-8 μm in diameter) were slowly infused in the tail vein at various doses (1.25 × 10(7) , 2.5 × 10(7) , or 5 × 10(7)  MBs). US image data were collected before MB injection and thereafter for 10 min at 30 frames per s (fps). The US transducer was fixed throughout and between each imaging period to help capture microvascular patterns along the same image plane. An adaptive SR-US image processing technique was implemented using custom Matlab software. Experimental findings illustrate the use of larger MB results in better SR-US images in terms of skeletal muscle microvascular detail. A dose of 2.5 × 10(7)  MBs resulted in SR-US images with optimal spatial resolution. An US imaging rate of at least 20 fps and image acquisition length of at least 8 min also resulted in SR-US images with pronounced microvascular detail. This study indicates that MB size and dose and US system imaging rate and data acquisition length have significant impact on the quality of in vivo SR

  20. Assessment of ischaemic burden in angiographic three-vessel coronary artery disease with high-resolution myocardial perfusion cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motwani, Manish; Maredia, Neil; Fairbairn, Timothy A.; Kozerke, Sebastian; Greenwood, John P.; Plein, Sven

    2014-01-01

    Aims This study compared the myocardial ischaemic burden (MIB) in patients with angiographic three-vessel coronary artery disease (3VD) using high-resolution and standard-resolution myocardial perfusion cardiovascular magnetic resonance (perfusion CMR) imaging. Methods and results One hundred and five patients undergoing coronary angiography had two separate stress/rest perfusion CMR studies, one with standard-resolution (2.5 mm in-plane) and another with high-resolution (1.6 mm in-plane). Quantitative coronary angiography was used to define patients with angiographic 3VD. Perfusion CMR images were anonymized, randomly ordered and visually reported by two observers acting in consensus and blinded to all clinical and angiographic data. Perfusion was graded in each segment on a four-point scale and summed to produce a perfusion score and estimate of MIB for each patient. In patients with angiographic 3VD (n = 35), high-resolution acquisition identified more abnormal segments (7.2 ± 3.8 vs. 5.3 ± 4.0; P = 0.004) and territories (2.4 ± 0.9 vs. 1.6 ± 1.1; P = 0.002) and a higher overall perfusion score (20.1 ± 7.7 vs. 11.9 ± 9.4; P subendocardial ischaemia was greater with high-resolution acquisition (195 vs. 101; P subendocardial ischaemia. High-resolution perfusion CMR may therefore be preferred for risk stratification and management of this high-risk patient group. PMID:24493156

  1. Association between proximal internal carotid artery steno-occlusive disease and diffuse wall thickening in its petrous segment: a magnetic resonance vessel wall imaging study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xiaoyi; Li, Dongye [Capital Medical University and Beijing Institute for Brain Disorders, Center for Brain Disorders Research, Beijing (China); Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Beijing (China); Zhao, Huilin [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Department of Radiology, Renji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Chen, Zhensen; Qiao, Huiyu; He, Le; Li, Rui [Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Beijing (China); Cui, Yuanyuan [PLA General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Beijing (China); Zhou, Zechen [Philips Research China, Healthcare Department, Beijing (China); Yuan, Chun [Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Beijing (China); University of Washington, Department of Radiology, Seattle, WA (United States); Zhao, Xihai [Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Beijing (China); Beijing Institute for Brain Disorders, Center for Stroke, Beijing (China)

    2017-05-15

    Significant stenosis or occlusion in carotid arteries may lead to diffuse wall thickening (DWT) in the arterial wall of downstream. This study aimed to investigate the correlation between proximal internal carotid artery (ICA) steno-occlusive disease and DWT in ipsilateral petrous ICA. Symptomatic patients with atherosclerotic stenosis (>0%) in proximal ICA were recruited and underwent carotid MR vessel wall imaging. The 3D motion sensitized-driven equilibrium prepared rapid gradient-echo (3D-MERGE) was acquired for characterizing the wall thickness and longitudinal extent of the lesions in petrous ICA and the distance from proximal lesion to the petrous ICA. The stenosis degree in proximal ICA was measured on the time-of-flight (TOF) images. In total, 166 carotid arteries from 125 patients (mean age 61.0 ± 10.5 years, 99 males) were eligible for final analysis and 64 showed DWT in petrous ICAs. The prevalence of severe DWT in petrous ICA was 1.4%, 5.3%, 5.9%, and 80.4% in ipsilateral proximal ICAs with stenosis category of 1%-49%, 50%-69%, 70%-99%, and total occlusion, respectively. Proximal ICA stenosis was significantly correlated with the wall thickness in petrous ICA (r = 0.767, P < 0.001). Logistic regression analysis showed that proximal ICA stenosis was independently associated with DWT in ipsilateral petrous ICA (odds ratio (OR) = 2.459, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.896-3.189, P < 0.001). Proximal ICA steno-occlusive disease is independently associated with DWT in ipsilateral petrous ICA. (orig.)

  2. Image Analysis of Pellet Size for a Control System in Industrial Feed Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ljungqvist, Martin Georg; Nielsen, Michael Engelbrecht; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær

    2011-01-01

    When producing aquaculture fish feed pellets, the size of the output product is of immense importance. As the production method cannot produce pellets of constant and uniform size using constant machine settings, there is a demand for size control. Fish fed with feed pellets of improper size are ...

  3. Dynamic lymph flow imaging in patients with oedema of the lower limb for evaluation of the functional outcome after autologous lymph vessel transplantation: an 8-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Mayo; Baumeister, Rüdiger G H; Hahn, Klaus

    2003-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to monitor the functional outcome of microsurgical intervention on lymph drainage by means of non-invasive, readily available lymphoscintigraphy. Eight patients with primary or secondary lymphoedema of the lower limb were investigated before and for 8 years after autologous lymph vessel transplantation. For scintigraphy, technetium-99m labelled nanocolloid was subcutaneously injected into the first interdigital space of the affected limb. Sequential images were acquired up to 6 h p.i.; for semiquantitative evaluation a numerical transport index was established by assigning scores of up to 9 on each of five criteria: lymphatic transport kinetics, distribution pattern of the radiopharmaceutical, time to appearance of lymph nodes, visualisation of lymph nodes and visualisation of lymph vessels/grafts. Ti values success of this complex microsurgical technique. Patients with scintigraphic visualisation of the vessel graft (n=2/8) showed a substantially better postoperative outcome than those without visualisation of the vessel graft. The findings indicate that lymph vessel transplantation significantly improves lymph drainage in patients with primary or secondary lymphoedema of the lower limb. Thus, lymphoscintigraphy is helpful not only in planning microsurgical treatment but also in monitoring the postoperative outcome.

  4. Dimension Reduction Aided Hyperspectral Image Classification with a Small-sized Training Dataset: Experimental Comparisons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinya Su

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Hyperspectral images (HSI provide rich information which may not be captured by other sensing technologies and therefore gradually find a wide range of applications. However, they also generate a large amount of irrelevant or redundant data for a specific task. This causes a number of issues including significantly increased computation time, complexity and scale of prediction models mapping the data to semantics (e.g., classification, and the need of a large amount of labelled data for training. Particularly, it is generally difficult and expensive for experts to acquire sufficient training samples in many applications. This paper addresses these issues by exploring a number of classical dimension reduction algorithms in machine learning communities for HSI classification. To reduce the size of training dataset, feature selection (e.g., mutual information, minimal redundancy maximal relevance and feature extraction (e.g., Principal Component Analysis (PCA, Kernel PCA are adopted to augment a baseline classification method, Support Vector Machine (SVM. The proposed algorithms are evaluated using a real HSI dataset. It is shown that PCA yields the most promising performance in reducing the number of features or spectral bands. It is observed that while significantly reducing the computational complexity, the proposed method can achieve better classification results over the classic SVM on a small training dataset, which makes it suitable for real-time applications or when only limited training data are available. Furthermore, it can also achieve performances similar to the classic SVM on large datasets but with much less computing time.

  5. Imaging nanometer-sized α-synuclein aggregates by superresolution fluorescence localization microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberti, M Julia; Fölling, Jonas; Celej, M Soledad; Bossi, Mariano; Jovin, Thomas M; Jares-Erijman, Elizabeth A

    2012-04-04

    The morphological features of α-synuclein (AS) amyloid aggregation in vitro and in cells were elucidated at the nanoscale by far-field subdiffraction fluorescence localization microscopy. Labeling AS with rhodamine spiroamide probes allowed us to image AS fibrillar structures by fluorescence stochastic nanoscopy with an enhanced resolution at least 10-fold higher than that achieved with conventional, diffraction-limited techniques. The implementation of dual-color detection, combined with atomic force microscopy, revealed the propagation of individual fibrils in vitro. In cells, labeled protein appeared as amyloid aggregates of spheroidal morphology and subdiffraction sizes compatible with in vitro supramolecular intermediates perceived independently by atomic force microscopy and cryo-electron tomography. We estimated the number of monomeric protein units present in these minute structures. This approach is ideally suited for the investigation of the molecular mechanisms of amyloid formation both in vitro and in the cellular milieu. Copyright © 2012 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Reproducibility of Ultrasound and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Measurements of Tendon Size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brushoej, C.; Henriksen, B.M.; Albrecht-Beste, E.; Hoelmich, P.; Larsen, K.; Bachmann Nielsen, M. [Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark). Dept. of Radiology

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate the intra- and inter-tester reproducibility of measurements of the Achilles tendon, tibialis anterior tendon, and the tibialis posterior tendon in football players using ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Material and Methods: Eleven asymptomatic football players were examined. Using a standardized US scanning protocol, the tendons were examined by two observers with US for thickness, width, and cross-sectional area. One observer conducted the procedure twice. The subjects also underwent an MRI examination, and the assessment of tendon size was conducted twice by two observers. Results: The best reproducibility judged by coefficient of variation (CV) and 95% confidence interval was determined for the Achilles tendon on both US and MRI. The variability of US on measurements on the tibialis anterior and tibialis posterior tendons was less than that when using MRI. In 12 out of 18 measurements, there were systematic differences between observers as judged by one-sided F-test. Conclusion: The reproducibility of the three tendons was limited. Precaution should be taken when looking for minor quantitative changes, i.e., training-induced hypertrophy, and when doing so, the Achilles tendon should be used.

  7. A method to obtain the same levels of CT image noise for patients of various sizes, to minimize radiation dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starck, G; Lönn, L; Cederblad, A; Forssell-Aronsson, E; Sjöström, L; Alpsten, M

    2002-02-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a method of obtaining the same levels of CT image noise for patients of various sizes to minimize radiation dose. Two CT systems were evaluated regarding noise characteristics using phantoms and dosimetric measurements. Both CT systems performed well at dose levels used in normal clinical imaging, but only one was found to be suitable for low radiation dose applications. The CT system with the lowest noise level was used for further detailed studies. A simple strategy for manual selection of patient-specific scan parameters, considering patient size and required image quality, was implemented and verified on 11 volunteers. Images were obtained with at least the prescribed image quality at significantly reduced radiation dose levels compared with standard scan parameters. Depending on the diameter of the tomographic section, i.e. size of the subject, the dose levels could be reduced to 1-45% of the radiation dose with standard scan parameters (120 kV, 250 mAs, 10 mm). The results indicate a general potential for dose reduction in CT for slim patients. For tissue volume determination, large dose reductions can be achieved by adjusting the scan parameters for each individual. The concept of patient-specific scan parameters could be fully automated in the CT system design, but would require the scan to be specified in terms of image quality rather than X-ray tube load.

  8. Design and calibration of a digital Fourier holographic microscope for particle sizing via goniometry and optical scatter imaging in transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Vincent M; Jacques, Steven L

    2016-06-13

    Goniometry and optical scatter imaging have been used for optical determination of particle size based upon optical scattering. Polystyrene microspheres in suspension serve as a standard for system validation purposes. The design and calibration of a digital Fourier holographic microscope (DFHM) are reported. Of crucial importance is the appropriate scaling of scattering angle space in the conjugate Fourier plane. A detailed description of this calibration process is described. Spatial filtering of the acquired digital hologram to use photons scattered within a restricted angular range produces an image. A pair of images, one using photons narrowly scattered within 8 - 15° (LNA), and one using photons broadly scattered within 8 - 39° (HNA), are produced. An image based on the ratio of these two images, OSIR = HNA/LNA, following Boustany et al. (2002), yields a 2D Optical Scatter Image (OSI) whose contrast is based on the angular dependence of photon scattering and is sensitive to the microsphere size, especially in the 0.5-1.0µm range. Goniometric results are also given for polystyrene microspheres in suspension as additional proof of principle for particle sizing via the DFHM.

  9. Performance of high-resolution SEM/EDX systems equipped with transmission mode (TSEM) for imaging and measurement of size and size distribution of spherical nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodoroaba, Vasile-Dan; Motzkus, Charles; Macé, Tatiana; Vaslin-Reimann, Sophie

    2014-04-01

    The analytical performance of high-resolution scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDX) for accurate determination of the size, size distribution, qualitative elemental analysis of nanoparticles (NPs) was systematically investigated. It is demonstrated how powerful high-resolution SEM is by using both mono- and bi-modal distributions of SiO2 airborne NPs collected on appropriate substrates after their generation from colloidal suspension. The transmission mode of the SEM (TSEM) is systematically employed for NPs prepared on thin film substrates such as transmission electron microscopy grids. Measurements in the transmission mode were performed by using a "single-unit" TSEM transmission setup as manufactured and patented by Zeiss. This alternative to the "conventional" STEM detector consists of a special sample holder that is used in conjunction with the in-place Everhart-Thornley detector. In addition, the EDX capabilities for imaging NPs, highlighting the promising potential with respect to exploitation of the sensitivity of the new large area silicon drift detector energy dispersive X-ray spectrometers were also investigated. The work was carried out in the frame of a large prenormative VAMAS (Versailles Project on Advanced Materials and Standards) project, dedicated to finding appropriate methods and procedures for traceable characterization of NP size and size distribution.

  10. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... medicine, ultrasound is used to detect changes in appearance, size or contour of organs, tissues, and vessels ... your body. The transducer is placed on the body and moved back and forth over the area of interest until the desired images are captured. There is usually no discomfort from ...

  11. Prosopomorphic vessels from Moesia Superior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Snežana

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The prosopomorphic vessels from Moesia Superior had the form of beakers varying in outline but similar in size. They were wheel-thrown, mould-made or manufactured by using a combination of wheel-throwing and mould-made appliqués. Given that face vessels are considerably scarcer than other kinds of pottery, more than fifty finds from Moesia Superior make an enviable collection. In this and other provinces face vessels have been recovered from military camps, civilian settlements and necropolises, which suggests that they served more than one purpose. It is generally accepted that the faces-masks gave a protective role to the vessels, be it to protect the deceased or the family, their house and possessions. More than forty of all known finds from Moesia Superior come from Viminacium, a half of that number from necropolises. Although tangible evidence is lacking, there must have been several local workshops producing face vessels. The number and technological characteristics of the discovered vessels suggest that one of the workshops is likely to have been at Viminacium, an important pottery-making centre in the second and third centuries.

  12. Estimating age ratios and size of pacific walrus herds on coastal haulouts using video imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel H Monson

    Full Text Available During Arctic summers, sea ice provides resting habitat for Pacific walruses as it drifts over foraging areas in the eastern Chukchi Sea. Climate-driven reductions in sea ice have recently created ice-free conditions in the Chukchi Sea by late summer causing walruses to rest at coastal haulouts along the Chukotka and Alaska coasts, which provides an opportunity to study walruses at relatively accessible locations. Walrus age can be determined from the ratio of tusk length to snout dimensions. We evaluated use of images obtained from a gyro-stabilized video system mounted on a helicopter flying at high altitudes (to avoid disturbance to classify the sex and age of walruses hauled out on Alaska beaches in 2010-2011. We were able to classify 95% of randomly selected individuals to either an 8- or 3-category age class, and we found measurement-based age classifications were more repeatable than visual classifications when using images presenting the correct head profile. Herd density at coastal haulouts averaged 0.88 walruses/m(2 (std. err. = 0.02, herd size ranged from 8,300 to 19,400 (CV 0.03-0.06 and we documented ∼30,000 animals along ∼1 km of beach in 2011. Within the herds, dependent walruses (0-2 yr-olds tended to be located closer to water, and this tendency became more pronounced as the herd spent more time on the beach. Therefore, unbiased estimation of herd age-ratios will require a sampling design that allows for spatial and temporal structuring. In addition, randomly sampling walruses available at the edge of the herd for other purposes (e.g., tagging, biopsying will not sample walruses with an age structure representative of the herd. Sea ice losses are projected to continue, and population age structure data collected with aerial videography at coastal haulouts may provide demographic information vital to ongoing efforts to understand effects of climate change on this species.

  13. Estimating age ratios and size of Pacific walrus herds on coastal haulouts using video imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monson, Daniel H.; Udevitz, Mark S.; Jay, Chadwick V.

    2013-01-01

    During Arctic summers, sea ice provides resting habitat for Pacific walruses as it drifts over foraging areas in the eastern Chukchi Sea. Climate-driven reductions in sea ice have recently created ice-free conditions in the Chukchi Sea by late summer causing walruses to rest at coastal haulouts along the Chukotka and Alaska coasts, which provides an opportunity to study walruses at relatively accessible locations. Walrus age can be determined from the ratio of tusk length to snout dimensions. We evaluated use of images obtained from a gyro-stabilized video system mounted on a helicopter flying at high altitudes (to avoid disturbance) to classify the sex and age of walruses hauled out on Alaska beaches in 2010–2011. We were able to classify 95% of randomly selected individuals to either an 8- or 3-category age class, and we found measurement-based age classifications were more repeatable than visual classifications when using images presenting the correct head profile. Herd density at coastal haulouts averaged 0.88 walruses/m2 (std. err. = 0.02), herd size ranged from 8,300 to 19,400 (CV 0.03–0.06) and we documented ~30,000 animals along ~1 km of beach in 2011. Within the herds, dependent walruses (0–2 yr-olds) tended to be located closer to water, and this tendency became more pronounced as the herd spent more time on the beach. Therefore, unbiased estimation of herd age-ratios will require a sampling design that allows for spatial and temporal structuring. In addition, randomly sampling walruses available at the edge of the herd for other purposes (e.g., tagging, biopsying) will not sample walruses with an age structure representative of the herd. Sea ice losses are projected to continue, and population age structure data collected with aerial videography at coastal haulouts may provide demographic information vital to ongoing efforts to understand effects of climate change on this species.

  14. Estimating age ratios and size of pacific walrus herds on coastal haulouts using video imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monson, Daniel H; Udevitz, Mark S; Jay, Chadwick V

    2013-01-01

    During Arctic summers, sea ice provides resting habitat for Pacific walruses as it drifts over foraging areas in the eastern Chukchi Sea. Climate-driven reductions in sea ice have recently created ice-free conditions in the Chukchi Sea by late summer causing walruses to rest at coastal haulouts along the Chukotka and Alaska coasts, which provides an opportunity to study walruses at relatively accessible locations. Walrus age can be determined from the ratio of tusk length to snout dimensions. We evaluated use of images obtained from a gyro-stabilized video system mounted on a helicopter flying at high altitudes (to avoid disturbance) to classify the sex and age of walruses hauled out on Alaska beaches in 2010-2011. We were able to classify 95% of randomly selected individuals to either an 8- or 3-category age class, and we found measurement-based age classifications were more repeatable than visual classifications when using images presenting the correct head profile. Herd density at coastal haulouts averaged 0.88 walruses/m(2) (std. err. = 0.02), herd size ranged from 8,300 to 19,400 (CV 0.03-0.06) and we documented ∼30,000 animals along ∼1 km of beach in 2011. Within the herds, dependent walruses (0-2 yr-olds) tended to be located closer to water, and this tendency became more pronounced as the herd spent more time on the beach. Therefore, unbiased estimation of herd age-ratios will require a sampling design that allows for spatial and temporal structuring. In addition, randomly sampling walruses available at the edge of the herd for other purposes (e.g., tagging, biopsying) will not sample walruses with an age structure representative of the herd. Sea ice losses are projected to continue, and population age structure data collected with aerial videography at coastal haulouts may provide demographic information vital to ongoing efforts to understand effects of climate change on this species.

  15. The proportionator: unbiased stereological estimation using biased automatic image analysis and non-uniform probability proportional to size sampling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gardi, Jonathan Eyal; Nyengaard, Jens Randel; Gundersen, Hans Jørgen Gottlieb

    2008-01-01

    The proportionator is a novel and radically different approach to sampling with microscopes based on well-known statistical theory (probability proportional to size - PPS sampling). It uses automatic image analysis, with a large range of options, to assign to every field of view in the section a ...

  16. Preoperative Imaging Overestimates the Tumor Size in Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Neoplasms Associated with Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polenta, V; Slater, E P; Kann, P H; Albers, M B; Manoharan, J; Ramaswamy, A; Mahnken, A H; Bartsch, D K

    2017-10-26

    Radiological tumor size of non-functioning pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (Nf-pNENs) associated with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is a crucial parameter to indicate surgery. The aim of this study was to compare radiological size (RS) and pathologic size (PS) of MEN1 associated with pNENs. Prospectively collected data of MEN1 patients who underwent pancreatic resections for pNENs were retrospectively analyzed. RS was defined as the largest tumor diameter measured on endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT). PS was defined as the largest tumor diameter on pathological analysis. Student's t test and linear regression analysis were used to compare the median RS and PS. p  20 mm had in reality a PS < 20 mm. MRI was the imaging technique that best correlated with PS in the total cohort (r = 0.8; p < 0.0001), whereas EUS was the best correlating imaging tool in pNENs < 20 mm (r = 0.5; p = 0.0001). Preoperative imaging, especially EUS, frequently overestimates the size of MEN1-pNENs, especially those with a PS < 20 mm. This should be considered when indicating surgery in MEN1 patients with small Nf-pNENs.

  17. Comparison of Selvester QRS score with magnetic resonance imaging measured infarct size in patients with ST elevation myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Esben A; Bang, Lia E; Ahtarovski, Kiril A

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that the Selvester QRS score is significantly correlated with delayed enhancement-magnetic resonance imaging (DE-MRI) measured myocardial infarct (MI) size in reperfused ST elevation MI (STEMI). This study further tests the hypothesis that Selvester QRS score correlates ...

  18. Early microvascular dysfunction in cerebral small vessel disease is not detectable on 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging: a longitudinal study in spontaneously hypertensive stroke-prone rats

    OpenAIRE

    Kleinschnitz, Christoph; Mencl, Stine; Garz, Cornelia; Niklass, Solveig; Braun, Holger; Göb, Eva; Homola, György; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Reymann, Klaus G; Schreiber, Stefanie

    2013-01-01

    Background Human cerebral small vessel disease (CSVD) has distinct histopathologic and imaging findings in its advanced stages. In spontaneously hypertensive stroke-prone rats (SHRSP), a well-established animal model of CSVD, we recently demonstrated that cerebral microangiopathy is initiated by early microvascular dysfunction leading to the breakdown of the blood–brain barrier and an activated coagulatory state resulting in capillary and arteriolar erythrocyte accumulations (stases). In ...

  19. Investigating the effect of pixel size of high spatial resolution FTIR imaging for detection of colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, G. R.; Nallala, J.; Stone, N.

    2016-03-01

    FTIR is a well-established technique and there is significant interest in applying this technique to medical diagnostics e.g. to detect cancer. The introduction of focal plane array (FPA) detectors means that FTIR is particularly suited to rapid imaging of biopsy sections as an adjunct to digital pathology. Until recently however each pixel in the image has been limited to a minimum of 5.5 µm which results in a comparatively low magnification image or histology applications and potentially the loss of important diagnostic information. The recent introduction of higher magnification optics gives image pixels that cover approx. 1.1 µm. This reduction in image pixel size gives images of higher magnification and improved spatial detail can be observed. However, the effect of increasing the magnification on spectral quality and the ability to discriminate between disease states is not well studied. In this work we test the discriminatory performance of FTIR imaging using both standard (5.5 µm) and high (1.1 µm) magnification for the detection of colorectal cancer and explore the effect of binning to degrade high resolution images to determine whether similar diagnostic information and performance can be obtained using both magnifications. Results indicate that diagnostic performance using high magnification may be reduced as compared to standard magnification when using existing multivariate approaches. Reduction of the high magnification data to standard magnification via binning can potentially recover some of the lost performance.

  20. Size Distribution Imaging by Non-Uniform Oscillating-Gradient Spin Echo (NOGSE) MRI

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shemesh, Noam; Álvarez, Gonzalo A; Frydman, Lucio

    2015-01-01

    .... These size distributions play fundamental roles in defining the physicochemical, biophysical and physiological properties of a wide variety of systems - ranging from advanced catalytic materials...

  1. Novel single-cell mega-size chambers for electrochemical etching of panorama position-sensitive polycarbonate ion image detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohrabi, Mehdi

    2017-11-01

    A novel development is made here by inventing panorama single-cell mega-size electrochemical etching (MS-ECE) chamber systems for processing panorama position-sensitive mega-size polycarbonate ion image detectors (MS-PCIDs) of potential for many neutron and ion detection applications in particular hydrogen ions or proton tracks and images detected for the first time in polycarbonates in this study. The MS-PCID is simply a large polycarbonate sheet of a desired size. The single-cell MS-ECE invented consists of two large equally sized transparent Plexiglas sheets as chamber walls holding a MS-PCID and the ECE chamber components tightly together. One wall has a large flat stainless steel electrode (dry cell) attached to it which is directly in contact with the MS-PCID and the other wall has a rod electrode with two holes to facilitate feeding and draining out the etching solution from the wet cell. A silicon rubber washer plays the role of the wet cell to hold the etchant and the electrical insulator to isolate the dry cell from the wet cell. A simple 50 Hz-HV home-made generator provides an adequate field strength through the two electrodes across the MS-ECE chamber. Two panorama single-cell MS-ECE chamber systems (circular and rectangular shapes) constructed were efficiently applied to processing the MS-PCIDs for 4π ion emission image detection of different gases in particular hydrogen ions or protons in a 3.5 kJ plasma focus device (PFD as uniquely observed by the unaided eyes). The panorama MS-PCID/MS-ECE image detection systems invented are novel with high potential for many applications in particular as applied to 4π panorama ion emission angular distribution image detection studies in PFD space, some results of which are presented and discussed.

  2. BIOASSAY VESSEL FAILURE ANALYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vormelker, P

    2008-09-22

    Two high-pressure bioassay vessels failed at the Savannah River Site during a microwave heating process for biosample testing. Improper installation of the thermal shield in the first failure caused the vessel to burst during microwave heating. The second vessel failure is attributed to overpressurization during a test run. Vessel failure appeared to initiate in the mold parting line, the thinnest cross-section of the octagonal vessel. No material flaws were found in the vessel that would impair its structural performance. Content weight should be minimized to reduce operating temperature and pressure. Outer vessel life is dependent on actual temperature exposure. Since thermal aging of the vessels can be detrimental to their performance, it was recommended that the vessels be used for a limited number of cycles to be determined by additional testing.

  3. Comparison of three-dimensional particle tracking and sizing using plenoptic imaging and digital in-line holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Elise M; Thurow, Brian S; Guildenbecher, Daniel R

    2016-08-10

    Digital in-line holography (DIH) and plenoptic photography are two techniques for single-shot, volumetric measurement of 3D particle fields. Here we present a comparison of the two methods by applying plenoptic imaging to experimental configurations that have been previously investigated with DIH. These experiments include the tracking of secondary droplets from the impact of a water drop on a thin film of water and tracking of pellets from a shotgun. Both plenoptic imaging and DIH successfully quantify the 3D nature of these particle fields. This includes measurement of the 3D particle position, individual particle sizes, and three-component velocity vectors. For the initial processing methods presented here, both techniques give out-of-plane positional accuracy of approximately 1-2 particle diameters. For a fixed image sensor, digital holography achieves higher effective in-plane spatial resolutions. However, collimated and coherent illumination makes holography susceptible to image distortion through index of refraction gradients, as demonstrated in the shotgun experiments. In contrast, plenoptic imaging allows for a simpler experimental configuration and, due to the use of diffuse, white-light illumination, plenoptic imaging is less susceptible to image distortion in the shotgun experiments.

  4. A Preliminary Comparison of Three Dimensional Particle Tracking and Sizing using Plenoptic Imaging and Digital In-line Holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guildenbecher, Daniel Robert; Munz, Elise Dahnke; Farias, Paul Abraham; Thurow, Brian S [Auburn U

    2015-12-01

    Digital in-line holography and plenoptic photography are two techniques for single-shot, volumetric measurement of 3D particle fields. Here we present a preliminary comparison of the two methods by applying plenoptic imaging to experimental configurations that have been previously investigated with digital in-line holography. These experiments include the tracking of secondary droplets from the impact of a water drop on a thin film of water and tracking of pellets from a shotgun. Both plenoptic imaging and digital in-line holography successfully quantify the 3D nature of these particle fields. This includes measurement of the 3D particle position, individual particle sizes, and three-component velocity vectors. For the initial processing methods presented here, both techniques give out-of-plane positional accuracy of approximately 1-2 particle diameters. For a fixed image sensor, digital holography achieves higher effective in-plane spatial resolutions. However, collimated and coherent illumination makes holography susceptible to image distortion through index of refraction gradients, as demonstrated in the shotgun experiments. On the other hand, plenotpic imaging allows for a simpler experimental configuration. Furthermore, due to the use of diffuse, white-light illumination, plenoptic imaging is less susceptible to image distortion in the shotgun experiments. Additional work is needed to better quantify sources of uncertainty, particularly in the plenoptic experiments, as well as develop data processing methodologies optimized for the plenoptic measurement.

  5. Radiation damage in a micron-sized protein crystal studied via reciprocal space mapping and Bragg coherent diffractive imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. D. Coughlan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available For laboratory and synchrotron based X-ray sources, radiation damage has posed a significant barrier to obtaining high-resolution structural data from biological macromolecules. The problem is particularly acute for micron-sized crystals where the weaker signal often necessitates the use of higher intensity beams to obtain the relevant data. Here, we employ a combination of techniques, including Bragg coherent diffractive imaging to characterise the radiation induced damage in a micron-sized protein crystal over time. The approach we adopt here could help screen for potential protein crystal candidates for measurement at X-ray free election laser sources.

  6. Image analysis for measuring the size stratification in sand-gravel laboratory experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orru, C.; Chavarrias Borras, V.; Uijttewaal, W.S.J.; Blom, A.

    2014-01-01

    Measurements of spatial and temporal changes in the grain-size distribution of the bed surface and substrate are crucial to improving the modelling of sediment transport and associated grain-size selective processes. We present three complementary techniques to determine such variations in the

  7. Socializing Young Readers: A Content Analysis of Body Size Images in Caldecott Medal Winners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedwick, Linda; Latham, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    Many studies have examined gender issues in children's literature, but a review of the literature reveals that few studies have examined the instances of fatness in the images. Studying the fat representation in the images of children's literature is important because exposure to a variety of body types may slow the rate of children's body…

  8. 4D Imaging of Salt Precipitation during Evaporation from Saline Porous Media Influenced by the Particle Size Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norouzi Rad, M.; Shokri, N.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the physics of water evaporation from saline porous media is important in many processes such as evaporation from porous media, vegetation, plant growth, biodiversity in soil, and durability of building materials. To investigate the effect of particle size distribution on the dynamics of salt precipitation in saline porous media during evaporation, we applied X-ray micro-tomography technique. Six samples of quartz sand with different grain size distributions were used in the present study enabling us to constrain the effects of particle and pore sizes on salt precipitation patterns and dynamics. The pore size distributions were computed using the pore-scale X-ray images. The packed beds were saturated with NaCl solution of 3 Molal and the X-ray imaging was continued for one day with temporal resolution of 30 min resulting in pore scale information about the evaporation and precipitation dynamics. Our results show more precipitation at the early stage of the evaporation in the case of sand with the larger particle size due to the presence of fewer evaporation sites at the surface. The presence of more preferential evaporation sites at the surface of finer sands significantly modified the patterns and thickness of the salt crust deposited on the surface such that a thinner salt crust was formed in the case of sand with smaller particle size covering larger area at the surface as opposed to the thicker patchy crusts in samples with larger particle sizes. Our results provide new insights regarding the physics of salt precipitation in porous media during evaporation.

  9. Calibration-free device sizing using an inverse geometry x-ray system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomkowiak, Michael T.; Speidel, Michael A.; Raval, Amish N.; Van Lysel, Michael S. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Department of Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 (United States); Department of Medicine and Department Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 (United States)

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: Quantitative coronary angiography (QCA) can be used to support device size selection for cardiovascular interventions. The accuracy of QCA measurements using conventional x-ray fluoroscopy depends on proper calibration using a reference object and avoiding vessel foreshortening. The authors have developed a novel interventional device sizing method using the inverse geometry scanning-beam digital x-ray (SBDX) fluoroscopy system. The proposed method can measure the diameter and length of vessel segments without imaging a reference object and when vessels appear foreshortened. Methods: SBDX creates multiple tomosynthetic x-ray images corresponding to planes through the patient volume. The structures that lie in the plane are in focus and the features above and below the plane are blurred. Three-dimensional localization of the vessel edges was performed by examining the degree of blurring at each image plane. A 3D vessel centerline was created and used to determine vessel magnification and angulation relative to the image planes. Diameter measurements were performed using a model-based method and length measurements were calculated from the 3D centerline. Phantom validation was performed by measuring the diameter and length of vessel segments with nominal diameters ranging from 0.5 to 2.8 mm and nominal lengths of 42 mm. The phantoms were imaged at a range of positions between the source and the detector ({+-}16 cm relative to isocenter) and with a range of foreshortening angles (0 deg. - 75 deg.). Results: Changes in vessel phantom position created magnifications ranging from 87% to 118% relative to isocenter magnification. Average diameter errors were less than 0.15 mm. Average length measurements were within 1% (0.3 mm) of the true length. No trends were observed between measurement accuracy and magnification. Changes in vessel phantom orientation resulted in decreased apparent length down to 28% of the original nonforeshortened length. Average diameter

  10. Size-dependent endocytosis of gold nanoparticles studied by three-dimensional mapping of plasmonic scattering images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Chia-Wei

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding the endocytosis process of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs is important for the drug delivery and photodynamic therapy applications. The endocytosis in living cells is usually studied by fluorescent microscopy. The fluorescent labeling suffers from photobleaching. Besides, quantitative estimation of the cellular uptake is not easy. In this paper, the size-dependent endocytosis of AuNPs was investigated by using plasmonic scattering images without any labeling. Results The scattering images of AuNPs and the vesicles were mapped by using an optical sectioning microscopy with dark-field illumination. AuNPs have large optical scatterings at 550-600 nm wavelengths due to localized surface plasmon resonances. Using an enhanced contrast between yellow and blue CCD images, AuNPs can be well distinguished from cellular organelles. The tracking of AuNPs coated with aptamers for surface mucin glycoprotein shows that AuNPs attached to extracellular matrix and moved towards center of the cell. Most 75-nm-AuNPs moved to the top of cells, while many 45-nm-AuNPs entered cells through endocytosis and accumulated in endocytic vesicles. The amounts of cellular uptake decreased with the increase of particle size. Conclusions We quantitatively studied the endocytosis of AuNPs with different sizes in various cancer cells. The plasmonic scattering images confirm the size-dependent endocytosis of AuNPs. The 45-nm-AuNP is better for drug delivery due to its higher uptake rate. On the other hand, large AuNPs are immobilized on the cell membrane. They can be used to reconstruct the cell morphology.

  11. Exploring the Effects of Brand Promotion and Brand Image Perception on Business Outcomes of Small-sized Agribusiness Firms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chux Gervase Iwu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To date there is hardly any empirical evidence in academic literature that branding, particularly brand promotion and brand image perception, plays any significant role in the performance of small-sized agribusiness, especially those in the Sub-Saharan (SSA region. This study was triggered by the need to fill this vacuum. Survey data were collected from small-sized agribusiness firms in one of the SSA economic ‘powerhouses’, which is Nigeria. Employing a contemporary research technique, specifically the Consistent Partial Least Square Structural Equation Modeling (denoted as PLSc, the study found that both brand promotion and brand image perception are instrumental for enhancing the organizational performance of small agribusinesses. In sum, the findings lend empirical support to the extant literature on brand promotion and brand image perception as precursors to the performance of firms regardless of a its size and business location. The implications of study, limitation and future research directions are further highlighted in the concluding section of the paper.

  12. Three-dimensional reconstruction of the size and shape of protein microcrystals using Bragg coherent diffractive imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coughlan, H. D.; Darmanin, C.; Kirkwood, H. J.; Phillips, N. W.; Hoxley, D.; Clark, J. N.; Harder, R. J.; Maxey, E.; Abbey, B.

    2016-03-14

    Three-dimensional imaging of protein crystals during X-ray diffraction experiments opens up a range of possibilities for optimising crystal quality and gaining new insights into the fundamental processes that drive radiation damage. Obtaining this information at the appropriate lengthscales however is extremely challenging. One approach that has been recently demonstrated as a promising avenue for charactering the size and shape of protein crystals at nanometre lengthscales is Bragg Coherent Diffractive Imaging (BCDI). BCDI is a recently developed technique that is able to recover the phase of the continuous diffraction intensity signal around individual Bragg peaks. When data is collected at multiple points on a rocking curve a Reciprocal Space Map (RSM) can be assembled and then inverted using BCDI to obtain a three-dimensional image of the crystal. The first demonstration of two-dimensional BCDI of protein crystals was reported by Boutet at al., recently this work was extended to the study of radiation damage of micron-sized crystals. Here we present the first three-dimensional reconstructions of a Lysozyme protein crystal using BDI. The results are validated against RSM and TEM data and have implications for both radiation damage studies and for developing new approaches to structure retrieval from micron-sized protein crystals.

  13. Small-size, high-resolution angular displacement measurement technology based on an imaging detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hai; Wan, Qiuhua; Lu, Xinran; Du, Yingcai; Yang, Shouwang

    2017-01-20

    It is challenging to design a photoelectric encoder that is small in size while ensuring it has sufficiently high resolution and accuracy. Traditional displacement measurement via the moiré fringe signal does not facilitate high resolution at small grate sizes; photoelectric and digital photo processing can significantly improve the angle measurement resolution over traditional techniques. The primary focus of this paper includes grating displacement coding and decoding, as well as the corresponding high-resolution subdivision and measurement error factors. A small-size absolute photographic encoder was designed (50 mm diameter) that exhibits resolution of 1.24'' (20 bit) with a standard deviation of error of 14.3''. The results presented here may provide a theoretical and technological foundation for further research on small-size, high-resolution photographic rotary encoders.

  14. Guam Abandoned Vessel Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Abandoned Vessel Project Data for Guam. Abandoned vessels pose a significant threat to the NOAA Trust resources through physical destruction of coral habitats...

  15. Florida Abandoned Vessel Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Abandoned Vessel Project Data for Florida. Abandoned vessels pose a significant threat to the NOAA Trust resources through physical destruction of coral...

  16. Vessel Arrival Info - Legacy

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Vessel Arrival Info is a spreadsheet that gets filled out during the initial stage of the debriefing process by the debriefer. It contains vessel name, trip...

  17. Design and application of a small size SAFT imaging system for concrete structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Zhixue; Shi, Lihua; Shao, Zhe; Cai, Jian

    2011-07-01

    A method of ultrasonic imaging detection is presented for quick non-destructive testing (NDT) of concrete structures using synthesized aperture focusing technology (SAFT). A low cost ultrasonic sensor array consisting of 12 market available low frequency ultrasonic transducers is designed and manufactured. A channel compensation method is proposed to improve the consistency of different transducers. The controlling devices for array scan as well as the virtual instrument for SAFT imaging are designed. In the coarse scan mode with the scan step of 50 mm, the system can quickly give an image display of a cross section of 600 mm (L) × 300 mm (D) by one measurement. In the refined scan model, the system can reduce the scan step and give an image display of the same cross section by moving the sensor array several times. Experiments on staircase specimen, concrete slab with embedded target, and building floor with underground pipe line all verify the efficiency of the proposed method.

  18. Review of Synthetically Focused Guided Wave Imaging Techniques With Application to Defect Sizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, J.; Simonetti, F.; Lowe, M.; Cawley, P.

    2006-03-01

    Synthetically focused imaging has been used for some time in the NDE community. The techniques have primarily been directed towards imaging using bulk waves. There has recently been use of SAFT (Synthetic Aperture Focusing Technique) using guided waves in plates. Here, we review three different synthetically focused imaging algorithms for a linear array aperture: CSM (Common Source Method), SAFT and TFM (Total Focusing Method). The resolution of the different techniques is obtained from scalar diffraction theory and then validated by means of a low frequency (50kHz) steel plate experiment using PZT excitation and laser reception of the A0 mode. Imaging of through thickness slits parallel to the array is then discussed.

  19. Model-based measurement of food portion size for image-based dietary assessment using 3D/2D registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsin-Chen; Jia, Wenyan; Yue, Yaofeng; Li, Zhaoxin; Sun, Yung-Nien; Fernstrom, John D.; Sun, Mingui

    2013-10-01

    Dietary assessment is important in health maintenance and intervention in many chronic conditions, such as obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. However, there is currently a lack of convenient methods for measuring the volume of food (portion size) in real-life settings. We present a computational method to estimate food volume from a single photographic image of food contained on a typical dining plate. First, we calculate the food location with respect to a 3D camera coordinate system using the plate as a scale reference. Then, the food is segmented automatically from the background in the image. Adaptive thresholding and snake modeling are implemented based on several image features, such as color contrast, regional color homogeneity and curve bending degree. Next, a 3D model representing the general shape of the food (e.g., a cylinder, a sphere, etc) is selected from a pre-constructed shape model library. The position, orientation and scale of the selected shape model are determined by registering the projected 3D model and the food contour in the image, where the properties of the reference are used as constraints. Experimental results using various realistically shaped foods with known volumes demonstrated satisfactory performance of our image-based food volume measurement method even if the 3D geometric surface of the food is not completely represented in the input image.

  20. Application of image-based particle size and shape characterization systems in the development of small molecule pharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamble, John F; Tobyn, Mike; Hamey, Rhye

    2015-05-01

    With the introduction of Quality by Design (QbD) to the pharmaceutical industry, there has been an increased focus on understanding the nature of particles and composites, with the aim of understanding and modeling how they interact in complex systems, leading to robust dosage forms. Particle characterization tools have evolved and now enable a greater level of understanding of powder systems and blends. Tools that can elucidate the size and shape of particulate systems can provide significantly more information about the nature of the particles being analyzed, than a conventional particle size measurement. Although accurate size and shape analysis has always been regarded as the "gold standard" in understanding the nature of particulate systems, neither imaging systems nor IT infrastructure was sufficiently developed to allow this to be performed with sufficient accuracy in a timely manner. The aim of this review is to provide an insight into developments in the field of size and shape analysis of pharmaceutical systems, and how these can now realistically be used as robust development tools. Examples of current uses of such technologies will be explored as well as investigating future applications such as combined image/spectroscopic analyses to track single components within blended systems. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  1. Early microvascular dysfunction in cerebral small vessel disease is not detectable on 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging: a longitudinal study in spontaneously hypertensive stroke-prone rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mencl, Stine; Garz, Cornelia; Niklass, Solveig; Braun, Holger; Göb, Eva; Homola, György; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Reymann, Klaus G; Kleinschnitz, Christoph; Schreiber, Stefanie

    2013-01-01

    Human cerebral small vessel disease (CSVD) has distinct histopathologic and imaging findings in its advanced stages. In spontaneously hypertensive stroke-prone rats (SHRSP), a well-established animal model of CSVD, we recently demonstrated that cerebral microangiopathy is initiated by early microvascular dysfunction leading to the breakdown of the blood-brain barrier and an activated coagulatory state resulting in capillary and arteriolar erythrocyte accumulations (stases). In the present study, we investigated whether initial microvascular dysfunction and other stages of the pathologic CSVD cascade can be detected by serial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Fourteen SHRSP and three control (Wistar) rats (aged 26-44 weeks) were investigated biweekly by 3.0 Tesla (3 T) MRI. After perfusion, brains were stained with hematoxylin-eosin and histology was correlated with MRI data. Three SHRSP developed terminal CSVD stages including cortical, hippocampal, and striatal infarcts and macrohemorrhages, which could be detected consistently by MRI. Corresponding histology showed small vessel thromboses and increased numbers of small perivascular bleeds in the infarcted areas. However, 3 T MRI failed to visualize intravascular erythrocyte accumulations, even in those brain regions with the highest densities of affected vessels and the largest vessels affected by stases, as well as failing to detect small perivascular bleeds. Serial MRI at a field strength of 3 T failed to detect the initial microvascular dysfunction and subsequent small perivascular bleeds in SHRSP; only terminal stages of cerebral microangiopathy were reliably detected. Further investigations at higher magnetic field strengths (7 T) using blood- and flow-sensitive sequences are currently underway.

  2. ALICE HMPID Radiator Vessel

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    View of the radiator vessels of the ALICE/HMPID mounted on the support frame. Each HMPID module is equipped with 3 indipendent radiator vessels made out of neoceram and fused silica (quartz) windows glued together. The spacers inside the vessel are needed to stand the hydrostatic pressure. http://alice-hmpid.web.cern.ch/alice-hmpid

  3. How do you tell how big something is without direct measurement? Estimating grain size using an image's spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscombe, D.; Rubin, D. M.

    2011-12-01

    It is possible to estimate geometric properties of objects in an image without directly measuring any part of those object's geometries, using the stochastic properties of the image as revealed by its Fourier transform. The caveats are: a) there must be a sufficient number of those objects; b) there must only be one type of object (and not some other type of object as well); and c) the required attribute of those objects (for example, size) is fairly homogeneous in space. It also helps if those objects have no preferred orientation, although this is not a strict requirement. This approach is emerging as a viable alternative to thresholding-based techniques for uncovering the two-dimensional outlines of objects, from which geometrical attributes can be measured directly. These direct measurements often require operator-defined coefficients, or even an approximate idea of the size of an object in advance in order to scale filters, and they are often very sensitive to the sequence of operations performed. Individually and collectively, these make thresholding-based methods relatively inflexible. One example where direct reliable statistical estimates of geometrical form have been possible from images is in estimating mean and standard deviation of particle sizes from images of sediment. This is done by uncovering typical length scales of the particles from the image's two-dimensional power spectrum, without the need for tunable parameters. The mean and standard deviation of sizes are accurately estimated without having to measure each grain directly and compile a particle size-distribution. Simple methods have been developed for the cases of: a) images composed of a sediment surface, where the entire image is composed of irregularly shaped touching particles and there is no apparent void fraction; and b) images of irregularly shaped dilute (spatially distributed and non-touching) particles. The process of developing and testing these techniques has been hampered by: a

  4. Liver vessel segmentation based on extreme learning machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Ye Zhan; Zhao, Yu Qian; Liao, Miao; Zou, Bei Ji; Wang, Xiao Fang; Wang, Wei

    2016-05-01

    Liver-vessel segmentation plays an important role in vessel structure analysis for liver surgical planning. This paper presents a liver-vessel segmentation method based on extreme learning machine (ELM). Firstly, an anisotropic filter is used to remove noise while preserving vessel boundaries from the original computer tomography (CT) images. Then, based on the knowledge of prior shapes and geometrical structures, three classical vessel filters including Sato, Frangi and offset medialness filters together with the strain energy filter are used to extract vessel structure features. Finally, the ELM is applied to segment liver vessels from background voxels. Experimental results show that the proposed method can effectively segment liver vessels from abdominal CT images, and achieves good accuracy, sensitivity and specificity. Copyright © 2016 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Image size invariant visual cryptography for general access structures subject to display quality constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kai-Hui; Chiu, Pei-Ling

    2013-10-01

    Conventional visual cryptography (VC) suffers from a pixel-expansion problem, or an uncontrollable display quality problem for recovered images, and lacks a general approach to construct visual secret sharing schemes for general access structures. We propose a general and systematic approach to address these issues without sophisticated codebook design. This approach can be used for binary secret images in non-computer-aided decryption environments. To avoid pixel expansion, we design a set of column vectors to encrypt secret pixels rather than using the conventional VC-based approach. We begin by formulating a mathematic model for the VC construction problem to find the column vectors for the optimal VC construction, after which we develop a simulated-annealing-based algorithm to solve the problem. The experimental results show that the display quality of the recovered image is superior to that of previous papers.

  6. Ultrafast high-resolution in vivo volume-CTA of mice cerebral vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schambach, Sebastian J; Bag, Simona; Steil, Volker; Isaza, Cristina; Schilling, Lothar; Groden, Christoph; Brockmann, Marc A

    2009-04-01

    Animal models developed in rats and mice have become indispensable in preclinical cerebrovascular research. Points of interest include the investigation of the vascular bed and the morphology and function of the arterial, capillary, and venous vessels. Because of their extremely small caliber, in vivo examination of these vessels is extremely difficult. In the present study we have developed a method to provide fast 3D in vivo analysis of cerebral murine vessels using volume computed tomography-angiography (vCTA). Using an industrial X-ray inspection system equipped with a multifocus cone beam X-ray source and a 12-bit direct digital flatbed detector, high-speed vCTA (180 degrees rotation in 40 s. at 30 fps) was performed in anesthetized mice. During the scan an iodinated contrast agent was infused via a tail vein. Images were reconstructed using a filtered backprojection algorithm. Image analysis was performed by maximum intensity projection (MIP) and 3D volume reconstruction. All mice tolerated i.v. injection of the iodinated contrast agent well. Smallest achievable voxel size of raw data while scanning the whole neurocranium was 16 mum. Anatomy of cerebral vessels was assessable in all animals, and anatomic differences between mouse strains could easily be detected. Mean vessel diameter was measured in C57BL/6 and BALBc mice. Changes of vessel caliber were assessable by repeated vCTA. Ultra fast in vivo vCTA of murine cerebral vasculature is feasible at resolutions down to 16 mum. The technique allows the assessment of vessel caliber changes in living mice, thus providing an interesting tool to monitor different features such as vasospasm or vessel patency.

  7. Determination of the Size of Irregular Particles Using Interferometric Out-of-Focus Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Brunel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a mathematical formalism to predict speckle-like interferometric out-of-focus patterns created by irregular scattering objects. We describe the objects by an ensemble of Dirac emitters. We show that it is not necessary to describe rigorously the scattering properties of an elliptical irregular object to predict some physical properties of the interferometric out-of-focus pattern. The fit of the central peak of the 2D autocorrelation of the pattern allows the prediction of the size of the scattering element. The method can be applied to particles in a size range from a tenth of micrometers to the millimeter.

  8. Segmenting Retinal Blood Vessels With Deep Neural Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liskowski, Pawel; Krawiec, Krzysztof

    2016-11-01

    The condition of the vascular network of human eye is an important diagnostic factor in ophthalmology. Its segmentation in fundus imaging is a nontrivial task due to variable size of vessels, relatively low contrast, and potential presence of pathologies like microaneurysms and hemorrhages. Many algorithms, both unsupervised and supervised, have been proposed for this purpose in the past. We propose a supervised segmentation technique that uses a deep neural network trained on a large (up to 400[Formula: see text]000) sample of examples preprocessed with global contrast normalization, zero-phase whitening, and augmented using geometric transformations and gamma corrections. Several variants of the method are considered, including structured prediction, where a network classifies multiple pixels simultaneously. When applied to standard benchmarks of fundus imaging, the DRIVE, STARE, and CHASE databases, the networks significantly outperform the previous algorithms on the area under ROC curve measure (up to > 0.99) and accuracy of classification (up to > 0.97 ). The method is also resistant to the phenomenon of central vessel reflex, sensitive in detection of fine vessels ( sensitivity > 0.87 ), and fares well on pathological cases.

  9. 3D printing for orthopedic applications: from high resolution cone beam CT images to life size physical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Amiee; Ray, Lawrence A.; Dangi, Shusil; Ben-Zikri, Yehuda K.; Linte, Cristian A.

    2017-03-01

    With increasing resolution in image acquisition, the project explores capabilities of printing toward faithfully reflecting detail and features depicted in medical images. To improve safety and efficiency of orthopedic surgery and spatial conceptualization in training and education, this project focused on generating virtual models of orthopedic anatomy from clinical quality computed tomography (CT) image datasets and manufacturing life-size physical models of the anatomy using 3D printing tools. Beginning with raw micro CT data, several image segmentation techniques including thresholding, edge recognition, and region-growing algorithms available in packages such as ITK-SNAP, MITK, or Mimics, were utilized to separate bone from surrounding soft tissue. After converting the resulting data to a standard 3D printing format, stereolithography (STL), the STL file was edited using Meshlab, Netfabb, and Meshmixer. The editing process was necessary to ensure a fully connected surface (no loose elements), positive volume with manifold geometry (geometry possible in the 3D physical world), and a single, closed shell. The resulting surface was then imported into a "slicing" software to scale and orient for printing on a Flashforge Creator Pro. In printing, relationships between orientation, print bed volume, model quality, material use and cost, and print time were considered. We generated anatomical models of the hand, elbow, knee, ankle, and foot from both low-dose high-resolution cone-beam CT images acquired using the soon to be released scanner developed by Carestream, as well as scaled models of the skeletal anatomy of the arm and leg, together with life-size models of the hand and foot.

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... medicine, ultrasound is used to detect changes in appearance, size or contour of organs, tissues, and vessels ... either side to improve the quality of the images. A clear water-based gel is applied to the area of the body being studied to help the transducer make secure ...

  11. Multi-modal imaging for assessment of tissue-engineered bone in a critical-sized calvarial defect mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wartella, K A; Khalilzad-Sharghi, V; Kelso, M L; Kovar, J L; Kaplan, D L; Xu, H; Othman, S F

    2017-06-01

    Tissue-engineered bone (TEB) analysis in vivo relies heavily on tissue histological and end-point evaluations requiring the sacrifice of animals at specific time points. Due to differences in animal response to implanted tissues, the conventional analytical methods to evaluate TEB can introduce data inconsistencies. Additionally, the conventional methods increase the number of animals required to provide an acceptable statistical power for hypothesis testing. Alternatively, our non-invasive optical imaging allows for the longitudinal analysis of regenerating tissue, where each animal acts as its own control, thus reducing overall animal numbers. In our 6 month feasibility study, TEB, consisting of a silk protein scaffold with or without differentiated mesenchymal stem cells, was implanted in a critical-sized calvarial defect mouse model. Osteogenesis of the TEB was monitored through signal variation, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and near-infrared (NIR) optical imaging with IRDye® 800CW BoneTag(TM) (800CW BT, a bone-specific marker used to label osteogenically differentiated mesenchymal stem cells and mineralization). Histological endpoint measurements and computed tomography (CT) were used to confirm imaging findings. Anatomical MRI revealed decreased signal intensity, indicating mineralization, in the TEB compared to the control (i.e. silk scaffold only) at various growth stages. NIR optical imaging results demonstrated a signal intensity increase of the TEB compared to control. Interpretation of the imaging results were confirmed by histological analysis. Specifically, haematoxylin and eosin staining revealing de novo bone in TEB showed that 80% of the defect was covered by TEB, while only 40% was covered for the control. Taken together, these results demonstrate the potential of multi-modal non-invasive imaging to visualize and quantify TEB for the assessment of regenerative medicine strategies. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright

  12. Relationship between x-ray illumination field size and flat field intensity and its impacts on x-ray imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xue; Niu, Tianye; Jia, Xun; Zhu, Lei

    2012-10-01

    X-ray cone-beam CT (CBCT) is being increasingly used for various clinical applications, while its performance is still hindered by image artifacts. This work investigates a new source of reconstruction error, which is often overlooked in the current CBCT imaging. The authors find that the x-ray flat field intensity (I(0)) varies significantly as the illumination volume size changes at different collimator settings. A wrong I(0) value leads to inaccurate CT numbers of reconstructed images as well as wrong scatter measurements in the CBCT research. The authors argue that the finite size of x-ray focal spot together with the detector glare effect cause the I(0) variation at different illumination sizes. Although the focal spot of commercial x-ray tubes typically has a nominal size of less than 1 mm, the off-focal-spot radiation covers an area of several millimeters on the tungsten target. Due to the large magnification factor from the field collimator to the detector, the penumbra effects of the collimator blades result in different I(0) values for different illumination field sizes. Detector glare further increases the variation, since one pencil beam of incident x-ray is scattered into an area of several centimeters on the detector. In this paper, the authors study these two effects by measuring the focal spot distribution with a pinhole assembly and the detector point spread function (PSF) with an edge-spread function method. The authors then derive a formula to estimate the I(0) value for different illumination field sizes, using the measured focal spot distribution and the detector PSF. Phantom studies are carried out to investigate the accuracy of scatter measurements and CT images with and without considering the I(0) variation effects. On our tabletop system with a Varian Paxscan 4030CB flat-panel detector and a Varian RAD-94 x-ray tube as used on a clinical CBCT system, the focal spot distribution has a measured full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM) of around 0

  13. Prospective assessment of pituitary size and shape on MR imaging after suppressive hormonal therapy in central precocious puberty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beek, J.T. van; Sharafuddin, M.J.A.; Kao, S.C.S. [Department of Radiology-JPP 3889, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, IA 52246 (United States); Luisiri, A. [Cardinal Glennon Children' s Hospital, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Garibaldi, L.R. [Children' s Hospital of New Jersey, Newark Beth Israel Medical Center, Newark, New Jersey (United States); St. Barnabas Medical Center, Livingston, New Jersey (United States)

    2000-07-01

    Objective. The diagnostic significance of an enlarged pituitary gland regarding both shape and size parameters on MR imaging has previously been demonstrated in children with central precocious puberty. This study was designed to assess changes in these parameters following successful suppressive therapy of central precocious puberty with the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analogue. Materials and methods. Twelve girls (mean age 7.3 years) with central precocious puberty were prospectively enrolled in our study protocol. Sagittal and coronal MR images of the pituitary region were obtained in all patients before treatment and after at least 6 months of GnRH analogue therapy (mean 18.0 months). Parameters measured included pituitary gland height, length, width, sagittal cross-sectional area, and volume. Results. All patients had excellent clinical response to treatment with arrest of secondary sexual development, normalization of serum estradiol levels, and complete obliteration of the LH response to diagnostic GnRH stimulation. No significant change occurred in any pituitary size or shape parameter following GnRH analogue therapy. Conclusion. Favorable clinical response to GnRH analogue therapy in central precocious puberty is not accompanied by significant a change in pituitary gland size and shape. (orig.)

  14. Fat is fashionable and fit: A comparative content analysis of Fatspiration and Health at Every Size®Instagram images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Jennifer B; Vinoski, Erin R; Bonar, Adrienne S; Davies, Alexandria E; Etzel, Lena

    2017-09-01

    In step with the proliferation of Thinspiration and Fitspiration content disseminated in popular web-based media, the fat acceptance movement has garnered heightened visibility within mainstream culture via the burgeoning Fatosphere weblog community. The present study extended previous Fatosphere research by comparing the shared and distinct strategies used to represent and motivate a fat-accepting lifestyle among 400 images sourced from Fatspiration- and Health at Every Size ® -themed hashtags on Instagram. Images were systematically analyzed for the socio-demographic and body size attributes of the individuals portrayed alongside content reflecting dimensions of general fat acceptance, physical appearance pride, physical activity and health, fat shaming, and eating and weight loss-related themes. #fatspiration/#fatspo-tagged images more frequently promoted fat acceptance through fashion and beauty-related activism; #healthateverysize/#haes posts more often featured physically-active portrayals, holistic well-being, and weight stigma. Findings provide insight into the common and unique motivational factors and contradictory messages encountered in these fat-accepting social media communities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Size selectivity of magnetite core- (Ag/Au) shell nanoparticles for multimodal imaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Pinki; Upadhyay, Chandan

    2017-10-01

    The magnetic and optical properties of nanomaterials play a significant role in the selection of the materials to be used for contrast enhancement in different biological and cell imaging techniques. These nanoparticles can also be used as drug delivery agents. The calculation of absorption efficiency and surface plasmon resonance wavelength has been performed using Mie theory and MATLAB programs. The study of spectrum calculated indicates the dependence of several optical properties such as resonance and absorption efficiency peak on ratio of core radius to the thickness of shell. A systematic study on the effect of nanoparticle dimension has been presented which clearly indicates that the optical properties can be modulated across the visible and near infrared range by changing these parameters. These properties of nanomaterials make them suitable for their application as multimodal imaging agents as they are also magnetically active and biocompatible.

  16. Application of digital image correlation to size effect tests of concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Alam, Syed Yasir; Loukili, Ahmed

    2010-01-01

    International audience; The structural size effect on mechanical response of quasi-brittle materials is generally attributed to the stable growth of fracture process zone or microcracking ahead of the propagating crack before maximum load is reached. The process of microcracking essentially depends on the heterogeneity of material microstructure and its presence reduces the speed of the propagating crack. The purpose of this study is to identify the cracking phenomenon and the process of crac...

  17. Testing the Forensic Interestingness of Image Files Based on Size and Type

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    interestingness of a file, its type, and its size. 14. SUBJECT TERMS Real Drive Corpus, scanning, white listing, known files database 15. NUMBER OF...on a scale of 0–100. Later, Long and Guoyin (2008) modified ssdeep to be more accurate at finding similar files. White -listing to eliminate...formats like JPEG and PNG. The Portable Network Graphic (PNG) format was developed to improve color support over the older GIF format, and also to get

  18. 2D size, position and shape definition of defects by B-scan image analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Michele Scafidi; Donatella Cerniglia; Tommaso Ingrassia

    2015-01-01

    The non-destructive evaluation of defects by automatic procedures is of great importance for structural components. Thanks to the developments of the non-contact ultrasonic techniques, the automation of the inspections is gaining a progressively important role. In this work, an automatic inspection technique for the evaluation of defects by the analysis of B-scan images obtained by a laser ultrasonic system is presented. The data are extracted directly from a B-scan map obtained f...

  19. Lesion size on prostate magnetic resonance imaging predicts adverse radical prostatectomy pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonttila, Panu P; Kuisma, Mari; Pääkkö, Eija; Hirvikoski, Pasi; Vaarala, Markku H

    2018-01-01

    To investigate the value of the maximal lesion diameter on preoperative multiparametric/bi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging for estimating the risk of adverse radical prostatectomy pathology. Consecutive patients (n = 162) with prostate multiparametric or biparametric magnetic resonance images acquired before prostatectomy were retrospectively stratified into two groups: 65 patients with normal MRI (n = 18) or a suspicious lesion lesion diameter ≥15 mm. The presence of extraprostatic extension, margin positivity, seminal vesicle invasion, and lymph node metastasis was examined in these groups using logistic regression analysis, including preoperative clinical parameters (prostate-specific antigen concentration, biopsy Gleason grade group, clinical T-stage, and D'Amico risk group). The prevalence of extraprostatic extension, margin positivity, and seminal vesicle invasion was 53.1% (86/162), 22.8% (37/162), and 17.9% (29/162), respectively. Lymphadenectomy was performed in 64 men, of whom 14 had lymph node metastasis. Lesion diameter ≥15 mm strongly predicted extraprostatic extension (Odds ratio: 7.94, 95% confidence interval: 3.87-16.28, p Lesion diameter ≥15 mm was an independent risk factor for adverse prostatectomy pathology. Lesion diameter ≥20 mm, but not ≥15 mm, was a significant risk factor for lymph node metastasis. Magnetic resonance imaging lesion diameter ≥15 mm is an independent risk factor for extraprostatic extension, margin positivity and seminal vesicle invasion.

  20. Early Diffusion Weighted Imaging and Perfusion Weighted Imaging Lesion Volumes Forecast Final Infarct Size in DEFUSE 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Hayley M.; Mlynash, Michael; Inoue, Manabu; Tipirneni, Aaryani; Liggins, John; Zaharchuk, Greg; Straka, Matus; Kemp, Stephanie; Bammer, Roland; Lansberg, Maarten G; Albers, Gregory W

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose It is hypothesized that early DWI lesions accurately estimate the size of the irreversibly injured core and thresholded PWI lesions (Tmax > 6 seconds) approximate the volume of critically hypoperfused tissue. With incomplete reperfusion, the union of baseline DWI and post-treatment PWI is hypothesized to predict infarct volume. Methods This is a substudy of DEFUSE 2; all patients with technically adequate MRI scans at three time points were included. Baseline DWI and early follow-up PWI lesion volumes were determined by the RAPID software program. Final infarct volumes were assessed with Day 5 FLAIR and corrected for edema. Reperfusion was defined based on the reduction in PWI lesion volume between baseline and early follow-up MRI. DWI and PWI volumes were correlated with final infarct volumes. Results 73 patients were eligible. 26 patients with >90% reperfusion show a high correlation between early DWI volume and final infarct volume (r = 0.95, p PWI (Tmax >6 sec) volume and final infarct volume (r = 0.86, p = 0.002). Using all 73 patients, the union of baseline DWI and early follow-up PWI is highly correlated with final infarct volume (r = 0.94, p PWI (Tmax > 6 sec) volumes provide a reasonable approximation of final infarct volume following endovascular therapy. PMID:23390119

  1. Acute Infarct Extracellular Volume Mapping to Quantify Myocardial Area at Risk and Chronic Infarct Size on Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Pankaj; Broadbent, David A; Swoboda, Peter P; Foley, James R J; Fent, Graham J; Musa, Tarique A; Ripley, David P; Erhayiem, Bara; Dobson, Laura E; McDiarmid, Adam K; Haaf, Philip; Kidambi, Ananth; van der Geest, Rob J; Greenwood, John P; Plein, Sven

    2017-07-01

    Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) imaging overestimates acute infarct size. The main aim of this study was to investigate whether acute extracellular volume (ECV) maps can reliably quantify myocardial area at risk (AAR) and final infarct size (IS). Fifty patients underwent cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging acutely (24-72 hours) and at convalescence (3 months). The cardiovascular magnetic resonance protocol included cines, T2-weighted imaging, native T1 maps, 15-minute post-contrast T1 maps, and LGE. Optimal AAR and IS ECV thresholds were derived in a validation group of 10 cases (160 segments). Eight hundred segments (16 per patient) were analyzed to quantify AAR/IS by ECV maps (ECV thresholds for AAR is 33% and IS is 46%), T2-weighted imaging, T1 maps, and acute LGE. Follow-up LGE imaging was used as the reference standard for final IS and viability assessment. The AAR derived from ECV maps (threshold of >33) demonstrated good agreement with T2-weighted imaging-derived AAR (bias, 0.18; 95% confidence interval [CI], -1.6 to 1.3) and AAR derived from native T1 maps (bias=1; 95% CI, -0.37 to 2.4). ECV demonstrated the best linear correlation to final IS at a threshold of >46% (R=0.96; 95% CI, 0.92-0.98; Pmaps demonstrated better agreement with final IS than acute IS on LGE (ECV maps: bias, 1.9; 95% CI, 0.4-3.4 versus LGE imaging: bias, 10; 95% CI, 7.7-12.4). On multiple variable regression analysis, the number of nonviable segments was independently associated with IS by ECV maps (β=0.86; Pmaps can reliably quantify AAR and final IS in reperfused acute myocardial infarction. Acute ECV maps were superior to acute LGE in terms of agreement with final IS. IS quantified by ECV maps are independently associated with viability at follow-up. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Digital Image Collections for Asian Religion and Art History in a Small-Sized Liberal Arts College

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    May Chang

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available

    頁次:6-15

    size: small;">This paper reviews the establishment of a digital image library from 35mm slides to support faculty and student needs in a small-sized liberal arts college. The framework consists of central local resources, distributed faculty collections, and external resources. Standards and guidelines for digital preservation and access are also discussed. The pilot collections were multi-disciplinary resources in Middle East art and architecture and faculty slide collections in East Asian religions and Asian art history. Technical and management issues of integrating digital technology in the traditional slide library are also discussed.

  3. Estimating the surface relaxivity as a function of pore size from NMR T2 distributions and micro-tomographic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benavides, Francisco; Leiderman, Ricardo; Souza, Andre; Carneiro, Giovanna; Bagueira, Rodrigo

    2017-09-01

    In the present work, we formulate and solve an inverse problem to recover the surface relaxivity as a function of pore size. The input data for our technique are the T2 distribution measurement and the micro-tomographic image of the rock sample under investigation. We simulate the NMR relaxation signal for a given surface relaxivity function using the random walk method and rank different surface relaxivity functions according to the correlation of the resulting simulated T2 distributions with the measured T2 distribution. The optimization is performed using genetic algorithms and determines the surface relaxivity function whose corresponding simulated T2 distribution best matches the measured T2 distribution. In the proposed methodology, pore size is associated with a number of collisions in the random walk simulations. We illustrate the application of the proposed method by performing inversions from synthetic and laboratory input data and compare the obtained results with those obtained using the uniform relaxivity assumption.

  4. Deep learning in the small sample size setting: cascaded feed forward neural networks for medical image segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaonkar, Bilwaj; Hovda, David; Martin, Neil; Macyszyn, Luke

    2016-03-01

    Deep Learning, refers to large set of neural network based algorithms, have emerged as promising machine- learning tools in the general imaging and computer vision domains. Convolutional neural networks (CNNs), a specific class of deep learning algorithms, have been extremely effective in object recognition and localization in natural images. A characteristic feature of CNNs, is the use of a locally connected multi layer topology that is inspired by the animal visual cortex (the most powerful vision system in existence). While CNNs, perform admirably in object identification and localization tasks, typically require training on extremely large datasets. Unfortunately, in medical image analysis, large datasets are either unavailable or are extremely expensive to obtain. Further, the primary tasks in medical imaging are organ identification and segmentation from 3D scans, which are different from the standard computer vision tasks of object recognition. Thus, in order to translate the advantages of deep learning to medical image analysis, there is a need to develop deep network topologies and training methodologies, that are geared towards medical imaging related tasks and can work in a setting where dataset sizes are relatively small. In this paper, we present a technique for stacked supervised training of deep feed forward neural networks for segmenting organs from medical scans. Each `neural network layer' in the stack is trained to identify a sub region of the original image, that contains the organ of interest. By layering several such stacks together a very deep neural network is constructed. Such a network can be used to identify extremely small regions of interest in extremely large images, inspite of a lack of clear contrast in the signal or easily identifiable shape characteristics. What is even more intriguing is that the network stack achieves accurate segmentation even when it is trained on a single image with manually labelled ground truth. We validate

  5. Super-resolution Imaging Reveals the Internal Architecture of Nano-sized Syntaxin Clusters*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-On, Dana; Wolter, Steve; van de Linde, Sebastian; Heilemann, Mike; Nudelman, German; Nachliel, Esther; Gutman, Menachem; Sauer, Markus; Ashery, Uri

    2012-01-01

    Key synaptic proteins from the soluble SNARE (N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) family, among many others, are organized at the plasma membrane of cells as clusters containing dozens to hundreds of protein copies. However, the exact membranal distribution of proteins into clusters or as single molecules, the organization of molecules inside the clusters, and the clustering mechanisms are unclear due to limitations of the imaging and analytical tools. Focusing on syntaxin 1 and SNAP-25, we implemented direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy together with quantitative clustering algorithms to demonstrate a novel approach to explore the distribution of clustered and nonclustered molecules at the membrane of PC12 cells with single-molecule precision. Direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy images reveal, for the first time, solitary syntaxin/SNAP-25 molecules and small clusters as well as larger clusters. The nonclustered syntaxin or SNAP-25 molecules are mostly concentrated in areas adjacent to their own clusters. In the clusters, the density of the molecules gradually decreases from the dense cluster core to the periphery. We further detected large clusters that contain several density gradients. This suggests that some of the clusters are formed by unification of several clusters that preserve their original organization or reorganize into a single unit. Although syntaxin and SNAP-25 share some common distributional features, their clusters differ markedly from each other. SNAP-25 clusters are significantly larger, more elliptical, and less dense. Finally, this study establishes methodological tools for the analysis of single-molecule-based super-resolution imaging data and paves the way for revealing new levels of membranal protein organization. PMID:22700970

  6. Super-resolution imaging reveals the internal architecture of nano-sized syntaxin clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-On, Dana; Wolter, Steve; van de Linde, Sebastian; Heilemann, Mike; Nudelman, German; Nachliel, Esther; Gutman, Menachem; Sauer, Markus; Ashery, Uri

    2012-08-03

    Key synaptic proteins from the soluble SNARE (N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) family, among many others, are organized at the plasma membrane of cells as clusters containing dozens to hundreds of protein copies. However, the exact membranal distribution of proteins into clusters or as single molecules, the organization of molecules inside the clusters, and the clustering mechanisms are unclear due to limitations of the imaging and analytical tools. Focusing on syntaxin 1 and SNAP-25, we implemented direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy together with quantitative clustering algorithms to demonstrate a novel approach to explore the distribution of clustered and nonclustered molecules at the membrane of PC12 cells with single-molecule precision. Direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy images reveal, for the first time, solitary syntaxin/SNAP-25 molecules and small clusters as well as larger clusters. The nonclustered syntaxin or SNAP-25 molecules are mostly concentrated in areas adjacent to their own clusters. In the clusters, the density of the molecules gradually decreases from the dense cluster core to the periphery. We further detected large clusters that contain several density gradients. This suggests that some of the clusters are formed by unification of several clusters that preserve their original organization or reorganize into a single unit. Although syntaxin and SNAP-25 share some common distributional features, their clusters differ markedly from each other. SNAP-25 clusters are significantly larger, more elliptical, and less dense. Finally, this study establishes methodological tools for the analysis of single-molecule-based super-resolution imaging data and paves the way for revealing new levels of membranal protein organization.

  7. Pressure vessel design manual

    CERN Document Server

    Moss, Dennis R

    2013-01-01

    Pressure vessels are closed containers designed to hold gases or liquids at a pressure substantially different from the ambient pressure. They have a variety of applications in industry, including in oil refineries, nuclear reactors, vehicle airbrake reservoirs, and more. The pressure differential with such vessels is dangerous, and due to the risk of accident and fatality around their use, the design, manufacture, operation and inspection of pressure vessels is regulated by engineering authorities and guided by legal codes and standards. Pressure Vessel Design Manual is a solutions-focused guide to the many problems and technical challenges involved in the design of pressure vessels to match stringent standards and codes. It brings together otherwise scattered information and explanations into one easy-to-use resource to minimize research and take readers from problem to solution in the most direct manner possible. * Covers almost all problems that a working pressure vessel designer can expect to face, with ...

  8. Inspection of the interior surface of cylindrical vessels using optic fiber shearography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bin; Wei, Quan; Tu, Jun; Arola, Dwayne D.; Zhang, Dongsheng

    2017-09-01

    In this study, a shearography system integrated with a coherent fiber-optic illumination and a fiber-optic imaging bundle is presented to inspect the quality of the interior surface of a cylindrical vessel for safety purposes. The specific optical arrangement is designed for the inspection of a certain area at a small working distance. The optical arrangement of the system was assembled and an aluminum honeycomb sample was evaluated to demonstrate the capability of the system. The important relationship between the image quality and the working distance, as well as the field of view, is discussed. The system has been applied for the inspection of the interior surface of a cylindrical vessel. The experimental results suggest that the shearography system integrated with optical and image fibers can effectively minimize the size of the inspection device and be capable of evaluating the interior surface of cylindrical structures.

  9. Automatic segmentation of abdominal vessels for improved pancreas localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farag, Amal; Liu, Jiamin; Summers, Ronald M.

    2014-03-01

    Accurate automatic detection and segmentation of abdominal organs from CT images is important for quantitative and qualitative organ tissue analysis as well as computer-aided diagnosis. The large variability of organ locations, the spatial interaction between organs that appear similar in medical scans and orientation and size variations are among the major challenges making the task very difficult. The pancreas poses these challenges in addition to its flexibility which allows for the shape of the tissue to vastly change. Due to the close proximity of the pancreas to numerous surrounding organs within the abdominal cavity the organ shifts according to the conditions of the organs within the abdomen, as such the pancreas is constantly changing. Combining these challenges with typically found patient-to-patient variations and scanning conditions the pancreas becomes harder to localize. In this paper we focus on three abdominal vessels that almost always abut the pancreas tissue and as such useful landmarks to identify the relative location of the pancreas. The splenic and portal veins extend from the hila of the spleen and liver, respectively, travel through the abdominal cavity and join at a position close to the head of the pancreas known as the portal confluence. A third vein, the superior mesenteric vein, anastomoses with the other two veins at the portal confluence. An automatic segmentation framework for obtaining the splenic vein, portal confluence and superior mesenteric vein is proposed using 17 contrast enhanced computed-tomography datasets. The proposed method uses outputs from the multi-organ multi-atlas label fusion and Frangi vesselness filter to obtain automatic seed points for vessel tracking and generation of statistical models of the desired vessels. The approach shows ability to identify the vessels and improve localization of the pancreas within the abdomen.

  10. GI Joe or Average Joe? The impact of average-size and muscular male fashion models on men's and women's body image and advertising effectiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Diedrichs, P. C.; Lee, C.

    2010-01-01

    Increasing body size and shape diversity in media imagery may promote positive body image. While research has largely focused on female models and women’s body image, men may also be affected by unrealistic images. We examined the impact of average-size and muscular male fashion models on men’s and women’s body image and perceived advertisement effectiveness. A sample of 330 men and 289 women viewed one of four advertisement conditions: no models, muscular, average-slim or average-large model...

  11. A model based method for retinal blood vessel detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeer, K. A.; Vos, F. M.; Lemij, H. G.; Vossepoel, A. M.

    2004-01-01

    Retinal blood vessels are important structures in ophthalmological images. Many detection methods are available, but the results are not always satisfactory. In this paper, we present a novel model based method for blood vessel detection in retinal images. It is based on a Laplace and thresholding

  12. Maury Journals - German Vessels

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — German vessels observations, after the 1853 Brussels Conference that set International Maritime Standards, modeled after Maury Marine Standard Observations.

  13. Fully Automated Islet Cell Counter (ICC) for the Assessment of Islet Mass, Purity, and Size Distribution by Digital Image Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchwald, Peter; Bernal, Andres; Echeverri, Felipe; Tamayo-Garcia, Alejandro; Linetsky, Elina; Ricordi, Camillo

    2016-10-01

    For isolated pancreatic islet cell preparations, it is important to be able to reliably assess their mass and quality, and for clinical applications, it is part of the regulatory requirement. Accurate assessment, however, is difficult because islets are spheroid-like cell aggregates of different sizes (<50 to 500 μm) resulting in possible thousandfold differences between the mass contribution of individual particles. The current standard manual counting method that uses size-based group classification is known to be error prone and operator dependent. Digital image analysis (DIA)-based methods can provide less subjective, more reproducible, and better-documented islet cell mass (IEQ) estimates; however, so far, none has become widely accepted or used. Here we present results obtained using a compact, self-contained islet cell counter (ICC3) that includes both the hardware and software needed for automated islet counting and requires minimal operator training and input; hence, it can be easily adapted at any center and could provide a convenient standardized cGMP-compliant IEQ assessment. Using cross-validated sample counting, we found that for most human islet cell preparations, ICC3 provides islet mass (IEQ) estimates that correlate well with those obtained by trained operators using the current manual SOP method ( r2 = 0.78, slope = 1.02). Variability and reproducibility are also improved compared to the manual method, and most of the remaining variability (CV = 8.9%) results from the rearrangement of the islet particles due to movement of the sample between counts. Characterization of the size distribution is also important, and the present digitally collected data allow more detailed analysis and coverage of a wider size range. We found again that for human islet cell preparations, a Weibull distribution function provides good description of the particle size.

  14. Efficient modeling of flat and homogeneous acoustic treatments for vibroacoustic finite element analysis. Finite size correction by image sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimonti, L.; Atalla, N.

    2017-02-01

    This work is concerned with the hybrid finite element-transfer matrix methodology recently proposed by the authors. The main assumption behind this hybrid method consists in neglecting the actual finite lateral extent of the acoustic treatment. Although a substantial increase of the computational efficiency can be achieved, the effect of the reflected field (i.e. finite size effects) may be sometimes important, preventing the hybrid model from giving quantitative meaningful results. For this reason, a correction to account for wave reflections at the lateral boundaries of the acoustic treatment is sought. It is shown in the present paper that the image source method can be successfully employed to retrieve such finite size effects. Indeed, such methodology is known to be effective when the response of the system is a smooth function of the frequency, like in the case of highly dissipative acoustic treatments. The main concern of this paper is to assess accuracy and feasibility of the image source method in the context of acoustic treatments modeling. Numerical examples show that the performance of the standard hybrid model can be substantially improved by the proposed correction without deteriorating excessively the computational efficiency.

  15. Image processing enhancement of high-resolution TEM micrographs of nanometer-size metal particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artal, P.; Avalos-Borja, M.; Soria, F.; Poppa, H.; Heinemann, K.

    1989-01-01

    The high-resolution TEM detectability of lattice fringes from metal particles supported on substrates is impeded by the substrate itself. Single value decomposition (SVD) and Fourier filtering (FFT) methods were applied to standard high resolution micrographs to enhance lattice resolution from particles as well as from crystalline substrates. SVD produced good results for one direction of fringes, and it can be implemented as a real-time process. Fourier methods are independent of azimuthal directions and allow separation of particle lattice planes from those pertaining to the substrate, which makes it feasible to detect possible substrate distortions produced by the supported particle. This method, on the other hand, is more elaborate, requires more computer time than SVD and is, therefore, less likely to be used in real-time image processing applications.

  16. NOAA JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Aerosol Optical Depth and Aerosol Particle Size Distribution Environmental Data Record (EDR) from NDE

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a high quality operational Environmental Data Record (EDR) of aerosol optical depth (AOD) and particle size from the Visible Infrared Imaging...

  17. Reperfusion ventricular arrhythmia bursts identify larger infarct size in spite of optimal epicardial and microvascular reperfusion using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Weg, Kirian; Kuijt, Wichert J.; Bekkers, Sebastiaan C. A. M.; Tijssen, Jan G. P.; Green, Cynthia L.; Lemmert, Miguel E.; Krucoff, Mitchell W.; Gorgels, Anton P. M.

    2017-01-01

    Ventricular arrhythmia (VA) bursts following recanalisation in acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) are related to larger infarct size (IS). Inadequate microvascular reperfusion, as determined by microvascular obstruction (MVO) using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR), is also

  18. Interpretation of remotely downloaded pocket-size cardiac ultrasound images on a web-enabled smartphone: validation against workstation evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Brian G; Mukherjee, Monica; Dala, Praveen; Young, Heather A; Tracy, Cynthia M; Katz, Richard J; Lewis, Jannet F

    2011-12-01

    Pocket-size ultrasound has increased echocardiographic portability, but expert point-of-care interpretation may not be readily available. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that remote interpretation on a smartphone with dedicated medical imaging software can be as accurate as on a workstation. Eighty-nine patients in a remote Honduran village underwent echocardiography by a nonexpert using a pocket-size ultrasound device. Images were sent for verification of point-of-care diagnosis to two expert echocardiographers in the United States reading on a workstation. Studies were then anonymized, randomly ordered, and reinterpreted on a smartphone with a dedicated, Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant application. Point-of-care diagnosis was considered accurate if any abnormal finding was matched and categorized at the same level of severity (mild, moderate, or severe) by either expert interpretation. The mean age was 54 ± 23 years, and 57% of patients were women. The most common indications for echocardiography were arrhythmia (33%), cardiomyopathy (28%), and syncope (15%). Using the workstation, point-of-care diagnoses were changed in 38% of cases by expert overread (41% left ventricular function correction, 38% valvulopathy correction, 18% poor image quality). Expert interobserver agreement was excellent at 82%, with a Cohen's κ value of 0.82 (95% confidence interval, 0.70-0.94). Intraobserver agreement comparing interpretations on workstations and smartphones was 90%, with a Cohen's κ value of 0.86 (95% confidence interval, 0.76-0.97), signifying excellent intertechnology agreement. Remote expert echocardiographic interpretation can provide backup support to point-of-care diagnosis by nonexperts when read on a dedicated smartphone-based application. Mobile-to-mobile consultation may improve access in previously inaccessible locations to accurate echocardiographic interpretation by experienced cardiologists. Copyright © 2011

  19. Technical Note: Improved CT number stability across patient size using dual-energy CT virtual monoenergetic imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michalak, Gregory; Grimes, Joshua; Fletcher, Joel; Yu, Lifeng; Leng, Shuai; McCollough, Cynthia, E-mail: mccollough.cynthia@mayo.edu [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States); Halaweish, Ahmed [Siemens Medical Solutions, Malvern, Pennsylvania 19355 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate, over a wide range of phantom sizes, CT number stability achieved using two techniques for generating dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) virtual monoenergetic images. Methods: Water phantoms ranging in lateral diameter from 15 to 50 cm and containing a CT number test object were scanned on a DSCT scanner using both single-energy (SE) and dual-energy (DE) techniques. The SE tube potentials were 70, 80, 90, 100, 110, 120, 130, 140, and 150 kV; the DE tube potential pairs were 80/140, 70/150Sn, 80/150Sn, 90/150Sn, and 100/150Sn kV (Sn denotes that the 150 kV beam was filtered with a 0.6 mm tin filter). Virtual monoenergetic images at energies ranging from 40 to 140 keV were produced from the DECT data using two algorithms, monoenergetic (mono) and monoenergetic plus (mono+). Particularly in large phantoms, water CT number errors and/or artifacts were observed; thus, datasets with water CT numbers outside ±10 HU or with noticeable artifacts were excluded from the study. CT numbers were measured to determine CT number stability across all phantom sizes. Results: Data exclusions were generally limited to cases when a SE or DE technique with a tube potential of less than 90 kV was used to scan a phantom larger than 30 cm. The 90/150Sn DE technique provided the most accurate water background over the large range of phantom sizes evaluated. Mono and mono+ provided equally improved CT number stability as a function of phantom size compared to SE; the average deviation in CT number was only 1.4% using 40 keV and 1.8% using 70 keV, while SE had an average deviation of 11.8%. Conclusions: The authors’ report demonstrates, across all phantom sizes, the improvement in CT number stability achieved with mono and mono+ relative to SE.

  20. Quality assessment for recycling aggregates from construction and demolition waste: An image-based approach for particle size estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Maria, Francesco; Bianconi, Francesco; Micale, Caterina; Baglioni, Stefano; Marionni, Moreno

    2016-02-01

    The size distribution of aggregates has direct and important effects on fundamental properties of construction materials such as workability, strength and durability. The size distribution of aggregates from construction and demolition waste (C&D) is one of the parameters which determine the degree of recyclability and therefore the quality of such materials. Unfortunately, standard methods like sieving or laser diffraction can be either very time consuming (sieving) or possible only in laboratory conditions (laser diffraction). As an alternative we propose and evaluate the use of image analysis to estimate the size distribution of aggregates from C&D in a fast yet accurate manner. The effectiveness of the procedure was tested on aggregates generated by an existing C&D mechanical treatment plant. Experimental comparison with manual sieving showed agreement in the range 81-85%. The proposed technique demonstrated potential for being used on on-line systems within mechanical treatment plants of C&D. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Inflow hemodynamics evaluated by using four-dimensional flow magnetic resonance imaging and the size ratio of unruptured cerebral aneurysms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Futami, Kazuya [Matto-Ishikawa Central Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Hakusan, Ishikawa (Japan); Nambu, Iku; Kitabayashi, Tomohiro; Sano, Hiroki; Misaki, Kouichi; Uchiyama, Naoyuki; Nakada, Mitsutoshi [Kanazawa University School of Medicine, Department of Neurosurgery, Kanazawa, Ishikawa (Japan)

    2017-04-15

    Prediction of the rupture risk is critical for the identification of unruptured cerebral aneurysms (UCAs) eligible for invasive treatments. The size ratio (SR) is a strong morphological predictor for rupture. We investigated the relationship between the inflow hemodynamics evaluated on four-dimensional (4D) flow magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and the SR to identify specific characteristics related to UCA rupture. We evaluated the inflow jet patterns and inflow hemodynamic parameters of 70 UCAs on 4D flow MR imaging and compared them among 23 aneurysms with an SR ≥2.1 and 47 aneurysms with an SR ≤2.0. Based on the shape of inflow streamline bundles with a velocity ≥75% of the maximum flow velocity in the parent artery, the inflow jet patterns were classified as concentrated (C), diffuse (D), neck-limited (N), and unvisualized (U). The incidence of patterns C and N was significantly higher in aneurysms with an SR ≥2.1. The rate of pattern U was significantly higher in aneurysms with an SR ≤2.0. The maximum inflow rate and the inflow rate ratio were significantly higher in aneurysms with an SR ≥2.1. The SR affected the inflow jet pattern, the maximum inflow rate, and the inflow rate ratio of UCAs. In conjunction with the SR, inflow hemodynamic analysis using 4D flow MR imaging may contribute to the risk stratification for aneurysmal rupture. (orig.)

  2. Comparison Of Processing Time Of Different Size Of Images And Video Resolutions For Object Detection Using Fuzzy Inference System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogesh Yadav

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Object Detection with small computation cost and processing time is a necessity in diverse domains such as traffic analysis security cameras video surveillance etc .With current advances in technology and decrease in prices of image sensors and video cameras the resolution of captured images is more than 1MP and has higher frame rates. This implies a considerable data size that needs to be processed in a very short period of time when real-time operations and data processing is needed. Real time video processing with high performance can be achieved with GPU technology. The aim of this study is to evaluate the influence of different image and video resolutions on the processing time number of objects detections and accuracy of the detected object. MOG2 algorithm is used for processing video input data with GPU module. Fuzzy interference system is used to evaluate the accuracy of number of detected object and to show the difference between CPU and GPU computing methods.

  3. Model Of Navigational Safety Of Fishing Vessels In Polish EEZ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Przywarty Marcin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the assumptions of a simulation model for assessing the navigational safety of fishing vessels. The model consist of submodels of merchant and fishing vessels traffic, submodel of external condition and submodel of accident consequences. Paper present also a results of simulation experiment which was carried out for Polish EEZ. Model takes into account all Polish fishing vessels operating in the Polish EEZ with length more than 15 meters and the merchant vessels traffic in South Baltic Sea area. As a results positions of simulated collisions of fishing and merchant vessels, positions and sizes of simulated bunker spills and the positions of losses of fishing equipment were achieved.

  4. A simultaneous charge and size measurement method for individual airborne particles using digital holographic particle imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Adam; Dou, Zhongwang; Liang, Zach; Meng, Hui

    2016-11-01

    Recently, significant inquiry to understand the effects of particle charge on particle laden flow have been made, particularly in the study of Lagrangian particle-pair statistics. Quantification of individual particle charge allows relation of inter-particle electric forces and turbulence-induced forces. Here we offer a simultaneous, individual particle charge and size measurement technique utilizing in-line digital holographic Particle Tracking Velocimetry (hPTV). The method measures particle electric mobility through its velocity response within a uniform electric field using a sequence of holograms, next the particle diameter is measured with the same holograms using a matched-filter developed by Lu et al. (2012) as an input for calculation of charge. Consequently, a benefit of this method is that particle charge is calculated on the individual level, versus a mean charge calculated from a group of particles, offering improved estimations of charge distributions for studies of particle laden flow. This work was supported by NSF CBET-0967407 and CBET-0967349.

  5. Quantification of Tumor Vessels in Glioblastoma Patients Using Time-of-Flight Angiography at 7 Tesla: A Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radbruch, Alexander; Eidel, Oliver; Wiestler, Benedikt; Paech, Daniel; Burth, Sina; Kickingereder, Philipp; Nowosielski, Martha; Bäumer, Philipp; Wick, Wolfgang; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter; Bendszus, Martin; Ladd, Mark; Nagel, Armin Michael; Heiland, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To analyze if tumor vessels can be visualized, segmented and quantified in glioblastoma patients with time of flight (ToF) angiography at 7 Tesla and multiscale vessel enhancement filtering. Materials and Methods Twelve patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma were examined with ToF angiography (TR = 15 ms, TE = 4.8 ms, flip angle = 15°, FOV = 160×210 mm2, voxel size: 0.31×0.31×0.40 mm3) on a whole-body 7 T MR system. A volume of interest (VOI) was placed within the border of the contrast enhancing part on T1-weighted images of the glioblastoma and a reference VOI was placed in the non-affected contralateral white matter. Automated segmentation and quantification of vessels within the two VOIs was achieved using multiscale vessel enhancement filtering in ImageJ. Results Tumor vessels were clearly visible in all patients. When comparing tumor and the reference VOI, total vessel surface (45.3±13.9 mm2 vs. 29.0±21.0 mm2 (pTesla MRI enables characterization and quantification of the internal vascular morphology of glioblastoma and may be used for the evaluation of therapy response within future studies. PMID:25415327

  6. PRESSURE-RESISTANT VESSEL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beukers, A.; De Jong, T.

    1997-01-01

    Abstract of WO 9717570 (A1) The invention is directed to a wheel-shaped pressure-resistant vessel for gaseous, liquid or liquefied material having a substantially rigid shape, said vessel comprising a substantially continuous shell of a fiber-reinforced resin having a central opening, an inner

  7. Containment vessel drain system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Scott G.

    2018-01-30

    A system for draining a containment vessel may include a drain inlet located in a lower portion of the containment vessel. The containment vessel may be at least partially filled with a liquid, and the drain inlet may be located below a surface of the liquid. The system may further comprise an inlet located in an upper portion of the containment vessel. The inlet may be configured to insert pressurized gas into the containment vessel to form a pressurized region above the surface of the liquid, and the pressurized region may operate to apply a surface pressure that forces the liquid into the drain inlet. Additionally, a fluid separation device may be operatively connected to the drain inlet. The fluid separation device may be configured to separate the liquid from the pressurized gas that enters the drain inlet after the surface of the liquid falls below the drain inlet.

  8. Riociguat reduces infarct size and post-infarct heart failure in mouse hearts: insights from MRI/PET imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Methner

    Full Text Available Stimulation of the nitric oxide (NO--soluble guanylate (sGC--protein kinase G (PKG pathway confers protection against acute ischaemia/reperfusion injury, but more chronic effects in reducing post-myocardial infarction (MI heart failure are less defined. The aim of this study was to not only determine whether the sGC stimulator riociguat reduces infarct size but also whether it protects against the development of post-MI heart failure.Mice were subjected to 30 min ischaemia via ligation of the left main coronary artery to induce MI and either placebo or riociguat (1.2 µmol/l were given as a bolus 5 min before and 5 min after onset of reperfusion. After 24 hours, both, late gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (LGE-MRI and (18F-FDG-positron emission tomography (PET were performed to determine infarct size. In the riociguat-treated mice, the resulting infarct size was smaller (8.5 ± 2.5% of total LV mass vs. 21.8% ± 1.7%. in controls, p = 0.005 and LV systolic function analysed by MRI was better preserved (60.1% ± 3.4% of preischaemic vs. 44.2% ± 3.1% in controls, p = 0.005. After 28 days, LV systolic function by echocardiography treated group was still better preserved (63.5% ± 3.2% vs. 48.2% ± 2.2% in control, p = 0.004.Taken together, mice treated acutely at the onset of reperfusion with the sGC stimulator riociguat have smaller infarct size and better long-term preservation of LV systolic function. These findings suggest that sGC stimulation during reperfusion therapy may be a powerful therapeutic treatment strategy for preventing post-MI heart failure.

  9. Relationships between body size attitudes and body image of 4-year-old boys and girls, and attitudes of their fathers and mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiano, Stephanie R; Gregg, Karen J; Spiel, Emma C; McLean, Siân A; Wertheim, Eleanor H; Paxton, Susan J

    2015-01-01

    Body size attitudes and body image form early in life, and understanding the factors that may be related to the development of such attitudes is important to design effective body dissatisfaction and disordered eating prevention interventions. This study explored how fathers' and mothers' body size attitudes, body dissatisfaction, and dietary restraint are associated with the body size attitudes and body image of their 4-year-old sons and daughters. Participants were 279 4-year-old children (46% boys) and their parents. Children were interviewed and parents completed questionnaires assessing their body size attitudes and related behaviours. Socially prescribed stereotypical body size attitudes were evident in 4-year-old boys and girls; however, prevalence of body dissatisfaction was low in this sample. Correlation analyses revealed that boys' body size attitudes were associated with a number of paternal body image variables. In boys, attributing negative characteristics to larger figures and positive characteristics to thinner figures were associated with fathers having more negative attitudes towards obese persons. Attributing positive characteristics to larger figures by boys was associated with greater levels of paternal dietary restraint. In girls, attributing positive characteristics to thinner figures was only associated with greater maternal dietary restraint. Findings suggest the possibility that fathers' body size attitudes may be particularly important in establishing body size attitudes in their sons. Further research is necessary to better understand the role of fathers in the development of children's body size attitudes.

  10. Plastic deformation of submicron-sized crystals studied by in-situ Kikuchi diffraction and dislocation imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Xiaodan; Godfrey, Andrew; Winther, Grethe

    2012-01-01

    confirms that the active dislocations are from slip systems with the highest Schmid factors. These results from testing of micropillars are in good agreement with the deformation behaviour previously reported for both single- and poly-crystal samples with dimensions in the millimetre range. © 2012 Elsevier......The plastic deformation of submicron-size copper single crystals in the form of pillars has been characterized during in-situ compression in the transmission electron microscope up to strains of 28–33% using a state-of-the-art holder (PI-95 PicoIndenter). The dimensions of the crystals used were...... approx. 500×250×200 nm3 with the compression axis oriented 1.6° from [110]. Local crystallographic orientations have been determined with high accuracy using a Kikuchi diffraction method and glide of dislocations over a pillar has also been observed directly by dark field imaging. The variation...

  11. Image - Rice Grain Scanner: a three-dimensional fully automated assessment of grain size and quality traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubens Marschalek

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The Image is a scanner developed as a grain classifier for quality control at the rice industry based on Brazilian official norms. It orders the dehulled grains ensuring that each grain would pass individually, in free fall, while the grain is analysed from different sides, covering its whole surface. It ensures a precise three-dimensional measurement of grain size, chalkiness, defects of the grain, milling quality, given out a total of 39 traits/classes/defects/values, which are sent to a excel Microsoft spreadsheet. This is managed through a digital platform which analysis routine and layout were developed and designed by Selgron and Epagri to fit the needs of research. The scanner and its software reach outputs that enhance rice breeding efficiency for grain quality, performing it faster, precisely and with a high-throughput phenotyping than ever before, especially interesting in very early breeding generations.

  12. GI Joe or Average Joe? The impact of average-size and muscular male fashion models on men's and women's body image and advertisement effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diedrichs, Phillippa C; Lee, Christina

    2010-06-01

    Increasing body size and shape diversity in media imagery may promote positive body image. While research has largely focused on female models and women's body image, men may also be affected by unrealistic images. We examined the impact of average-size and muscular male fashion models on men's and women's body image and perceived advertisement effectiveness. A sample of 330 men and 289 women viewed one of four advertisement conditions: no models, muscular, average-slim or average-large models. Men and women rated average-size models as equally effective in advertisements as muscular models. For men, exposure to average-size models was associated with more positive body image in comparison to viewing no models, but no difference was found in comparison to muscular models. Similar results were found for women. Internalisation of beauty ideals did not moderate these effects. These findings suggest that average-size male models can promote positive body image and appeal to consumers. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Size of the intracranial optic nerve and optic tract in neonates at term-equivalent age at magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oyama, Jun; Mori, Kouichi [Tsuchiura Kyodo General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Tsuchiura, Ibaraki (Japan); Imamura, Masatoshi [Tsuchiura Kyodo General Hospital, Department of Neonatology, Tsuchiura, Ibaraki (Japan); Mizushima, Yukiko [Tsuchiura Kyodo General Hospital, Department of Ophthalmology, Tsuchiura, Ibaraki (Japan); Tateishi, Ukihide [Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Departments of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)

    2016-04-15

    The expected MRI-based dimensions of the intracranial optic nerve and optic tract in neonates are unknown. To evaluate the sizes of the intracranial optic nerve and optic tract in neonates at term-equivalent age using MRI. We retrospectively analyzed brain MRI examinations in 62 infants (28 boys) without intracranial abnormalities. The images were obtained in infants at term-equivalent age with a 1.5-tesla MRI scanner. We measured the widths and heights of the intracranial optic nerve and optic tract and calculated the cross-sectional areas using the formula for an ellipse. The means ± standard deviation of the width, height and cross-sectional area of the intracranial optic nerve were 2.7 ± 0.2 mm, 1.7 ± 0.2 mm and 3.5 ± 0.5 mm{sup 2}, respectively. The width, height and cross-sectional area of the optic tract were 1.5 ± 0.1 mm, 1.6 ± 0.1 mm and 2.0 ± 0.2 mm{sup 2}, respectively. Using univariate and multivariate analyses, we found that postmenstrual age showed independent intermediate positive correlations with the width (r = 0.48, P < 0.01) and cross-sectional area (r = 0.40, P < 0.01) of the intracranial optic nerve. The lower bounds of the 95% prediction intervals for the width and cross-sectional area of the intracranial optic nerve were 0.07 x (postmenstrual age in weeks) - 0.46 mm, and 0.17 x (postmenstrual age in weeks) - 4.0 mm{sup 2}, respectively. We identified the sizes of the intracranial optic nerve and optic tract in neonates at term-equivalent age. The postmenstrual age at MRI independently positively correlated with the sizes. (orig.)

  14. A fast analysis method for non-invasive imaging of blood flow in individual cerebral arteries using vessel-encoded arterial spin labelling angiography

    OpenAIRE

    Chappell, Michael A.; Okell, Thomas W.; Payne, Stephen J.; Jezzard, Peter; Woolrich, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    Arterial spin labelling (ASL) MRI offers a non-invasive means to create blood-borne contrast in vivo for dynamic angiographic imaging. By spatial modulation of the ASL process it is possible to uniquely label individual arteries over a series of measurements, allowing each to be separately identified in the resulting angiographic images. This separation requires appropriate analysis for which a general Bayesian framework has previously been proposed. Here this framework is adapted for clinica...

  15. Distribution of the In-Vessel Diagnostics in ITER Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    González, Jorge, E-mail: Jorge.Gonzalez@iter.org [Rüecker Lypsa, Carretera del Prat, 65, Cornellá de Llobregat (Spain); Clough, Matthew; Martin, Alex; Woods, Nick; Suarez, Alejandro [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon-CS 90 046 13067 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Martinez, Gonzalo [Technical University Of Catalonia (UPC), Barcelona-Tech, Barcelona (Spain); Stefan, Gicquel; Yunxing, Ma [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon-CS 90 046 13067 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2017-01-15

    The ITER In-Vessel Diagnostics have been distributed around the In-Vessel shell to understand burning plasma physics and assist in machine operation. Each diagnostics component has its own requirements, constraints, and even exclusion among them for the highly complex In-Vessel environment. The size of the plasma, the requirement to be able to align the blanket system to the magnetic centre of the machine, the cooling requirements of the blanket system and the size of the pressure vessel itself all add to the difficulties of integrating these systems into the remaining space available. The available space for the cables inside the special trays (in-Vessel looms) is another constraint to allocate In-Vessel electrical sensors. Besides this, there are issues with the Assembly sequences and surface & volumetric neutron heating considerations that have imposed several additional restrictions.

  16. Investigation of optimal display size for viewing T1-weighted MR images of the brain using a digital contrast-detail phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Hideki; Kuwahata, Nao; Hattori, Hiroyuki; Kinoshita, Hiroshi; Fukuda, Haruyuki

    2016-01-08

    We clarified the relationship between the display size of MRI images and observer performance using a digital contrast-detail (d-CD) phantom. The d-CD phantom was developed using Microsoft Visual Basic 2010 Express. It had a 512 × 512 matrix in size and a total of 100 holes, whose diameter increased stepwise from 4 to 40 pixels with a 4-pixel interval in the vertical direction; the contrast varied stepwise in the horizontal direction. The digital driving level (DDL) of the back-ground, the width of the DDL, and the contrast were adjustable. These parameters were determined on the basis of the actual T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images of the brain. In this study, the DDL, width, and contrast were set to 85, 20, and 1, respectively. The observer performance study was performed for three different display sizes (30 cm × 30 cm as the enlarged size, 16 cm × 16 cm as the original size, and 10 cm × 10 cm as the reduced size) using a 2-megapixel color liquid crystal display monitor, and it was analyzed using Friedman and Wilcoxon statistical tests. The observer performances for the original display (p < 0.01) and the reduced display sizes (p < 0.01) were superior to that observed for the enlarged size, whereas there was no significant difference between the original display and reduced display sizes (p = 0.31). Evaluation with the digital phantom simulating MR imaging also revealed that the original and reduced display sizes were superior to the enlarged display size in observer performance. The d-CD phantom enables a short-term evaluation of observer performance and is useful in analyzing relation-ship between display size and observer performance.

  17. 2013 Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  18. 2011 Passenger Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  19. 2011 Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  20. 2013 Passenger Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  1. 2013 Tanker Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  2. 2013 Cargo Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  3. High Performance Marine Vessels

    CERN Document Server

    Yun, Liang

    2012-01-01

    High Performance Marine Vessels (HPMVs) range from the Fast Ferries to the latest high speed Navy Craft, including competition power boats and hydroplanes, hydrofoils, hovercraft, catamarans and other multi-hull craft. High Performance Marine Vessels covers the main concepts of HPMVs and discusses historical background, design features, services that have been successful and not so successful, and some sample data of the range of HPMVs to date. Included is a comparison of all HPMVs craft and the differences between them and descriptions of performance (hydrodynamics and aerodynamics). Readers will find a comprehensive overview of the design, development and building of HPMVs. In summary, this book: Focuses on technology at the aero-marine interface Covers the full range of high performance marine vessel concepts Explains the historical development of various HPMVs Discusses ferries, racing and pleasure craft, as well as utility and military missions High Performance Marine Vessels is an ideal book for student...

  4. Cheboygan Vessel Base

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Cheboygan Vessel Base (CVB), located in Cheboygan, Michigan, is a field station of the USGS Great Lakes Science Center (GLSC). CVB was established by congressional...

  5. Maury Journals - US Vessels

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — U.S. vessels observations, after the 1853 Brussels Conference that set International Maritime Standards, modeled after Maury Marine Standard Observations.

  6. 2011 Cargo Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  7. 2011 Tanker Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  8. 2013 Fishing Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  9. Coastal Logbook Survey (Vessels)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains catch (landed catch) and effort for fishing trips made by vessels that have been issued a Federal permit for the Gulf of Mexico reef fish,...

  10. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Conventional ultrasound displays the images in thin, ...

  11. Hypofractionated Image-Guided IMRT in Advanced Pancreatic Cancer With Simultaneous Integrated Boost to Infiltrated Vessels Concomitant With Capecitabine: A Phase I Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Passoni, Paolo, E-mail: passoni.paolo@hsr.it [Department of Radiation Oncology, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Reni, Michele [Department of Medical Oncology, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Cattaneo, Giovanni M. [Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Slim, Najla [Department of Radiation Oncology, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Cereda, Stefano [Department of Medical Oncology, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Balzano, Gianpaolo; Castoldi, Renato [Department of Surgery, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Longobardi, Barbara [Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Bettinardi, Valentino; Gianolli, Luigi [Department of Nuclear Medicine, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Gusmini, Simone [Department of Radiology, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Staudacher, Carlo [Department of Surgery, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Calandrino, Riccardo [Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Di Muzio, Nadia [Department of Radiation Oncology, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To determine the maximum tolerated radiation dose (MTD) of an integrated boost to the tumor subvolume infiltrating vessels, delivered simultaneously with radical dose to the whole tumor and concomitant capecitabine in patients with pretreated advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: Patients with stage III or IV pancreatic adenocarcinoma without progressive disease after induction chemotherapy were eligible. Patients underwent simulated contrast-enhanced four-dimensional computed tomography and fluorodeoxyglucose-labeled positron emission tomography. Gross tumor volume 1 (GTV1), the tumor, and GTV2, the tumor subvolume 1 cm around the infiltrated vessels, were contoured. GTVs were fused to generate Internal Target Volume (ITV)1 and ITV2. Biological tumor volume (BTV) was fused with ITV1 to create the BTV+Internal Target Volume (ITV) 1. A margin of 5/5/7 mm (7 mm in cranium-caudal) was added to BTV+ITV1 and to ITV2 to create Planning Target Volume (PTV) 1 and PTV2, respectively. Radiation therapy was delivered with tomotherapy. PTV1 received a fixed dose of 44.25 Gy in 15 fractions, and PTV2 received a dose escalation from 48 to 58 Gy as simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) in consecutive groups of at least 3 patients. Concomitant chemotherapy was capecitabine, 1250 mg/m{sup 2} daily. Dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was defined as any treatment-related G3 nonhematological or G4 hematological toxicity occurring during the treatment or within 90 days from its completion. Results: From June 2005 to February 2010, 25 patients were enrolled. The dose escalation on the SIB was stopped at 58 Gy without reaching the MTD. One patient in the 2{sup nd} dose level (50 Gy) had a DLT: G3 acute gastric ulcer. Three patients had G3 late adverse effects associated with gastric and/or duodenal mucosal damage. All patients received the planned dose of radiation. Conclusions: A dose of 44.25 Gy in 15 fractions to the whole tumor with an SIB of 58 Gy to small

  12. Development of ROV System for FOSAR in Reactor Vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Young Soo; Kim, Tae Won; Lee, Sung Uk; Jeong, Kyung Min [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Nam Kyun [Korea Plant Service and Engineering Co., Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    Foreign object in the reactor vessel is susceptible to damage the fuel. Prior to reloading fuel assemblies into the core, FOSAR(Foreign Object Search And Retrieval) activities were performed on and beneath the lower core plate with conventional equipment. However, the reactor vessel is limited to humans who are susceptible to radiation exposure, and conventional equipment is hard to access because of the complexity of the structure. To improve the convenience of use and retrieval ability in the under-core plate region, we are developing a FOSAR system carried by ROV (Remotely Operated Vehicle). In this paper, we describe a ROV system developed. The ROV system is composed of robot vehicle and remote control unit. The vehicle has 4 thrusters, tilt, camera, light and depth sensor, etc. Considering radiation damage, processors are not equipped on the vehicle. Control signals and sensing signals are transferred through umbilical cable. Remote control unit is composed of electric driving module and two computers which one is for the control and the other is for the detection of robot position. Control computer has a joystick user input and video/signal input, and transmit motor control signal and lens control signal via CAN/RS485 communication. And the other computers transmit information of vehicle position to the control computer via serial communication. Information of vehicle position is obtained through image processing algorithm. The acquiring camera of vehicle is on the flange of reactor vessel. Simulations on the detection of vehicle position are performed at the reactor vessel mockup which scaled down by 6 and verified to use in the control of robot by visual tracking. And functional test has been performed on the air condition. In the future, performance test will be carried out real sized mockup and underwater condition

  13. The difference of canine, first and second premolar tooth size resulted from cone beam computed tomography imaging with Moyers Prediction Table on the working study model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julies Hariani Sugiaman

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Model study is one of the standard orthodontic components which is important for diagnosis and treatment plan, but in some patients with the high gag reflex, it will be difficult to get this kind of study models. The existence of a new device which is able to show the condition of patients' mouth in three space areas (axial, sagittal, and coronal is expected to be an alternative when a study model is difficult to get. The purpose of this study is to find out whether or not there are any differences on the size of canine's mesiodistal, first and second premolar resulted from CBCT imaging with Moyers analysis on the study models. The method of the research is comparative descriptive. Measurements are made on 10 CBCT imaging results and 10 study models. The mesiodistal size, the result of CBCT imaging is measured by the available computer program and also the mesiodistal size of the study models is measured using a sliding compass, and then the size of canines, first and second premolar teeth resulted from CBCT imaging are compared to the result of Moyers method analysis on the study models. The t-test is used to find out if there is a difference between teeth size value between the CBCT imaging with the study models. The significance is determined based on the p-value t table.

  14. Accounting for patient size in the optimization of dose and image quality of pelvis cone beam CT protocols on the Varian OBI system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Craig S; Horsfield, Carl J; Saunderson, John R; Beavis, Andrew W

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to develop size-based radiotherapy kilovoltage cone beam CT (CBCT) protocols for the pelvis. Methods: Image noise was measured in an elliptical phantom of varying size for a range of exposure factors. Based on a previously defined “small pelvis” reference patient and CBCT protocol, appropriate exposure factors for small, medium, large and extra-large patients were derived which approximate the image noise behaviour observed on a Philips CT scanner (Philips Medical Systems, Best, Netherlands) with automatic exposure control (AEC). Selection criteria, based on maximum tube current–time product per rotation selected during the radiotherapy treatment planning scan, were derived based on an audit of patient size. Results: It has been demonstrated that 110 kVp yields acceptable image noise for reduced patient dose in pelvic CBCT scans of small, medium and large patients, when compared with manufacturer's default settings (125 kVp). Conversely, extra-large patients require increased exposure factors to give acceptable images. 57% of patients in the local population now receive much lower radiation doses, whereas 13% require higher doses (but now yield acceptable images). Conclusion: The implementation of size-based exposure protocols has significantly reduced radiation dose to the majority of patients with no negative impact on image quality. Increased doses are required on the largest patients to give adequate image quality. Advances in knowledge: The development of size-based CBCT protocols that use the planning CT scan (with AEC) to determine which protocol is appropriate ensures adequate image quality whilst minimizing patient radiation dose. PMID:26419892

  15. Improved cardiovascular diagnostic accuracy by pocket size imaging device in non-cardiologic outpatients: the NaUSiCa (Naples Ultrasound Stethoscope in Cardiology study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schiattarella Pier

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Miniaturization has evolved in the creation of a pocket-size imaging device which can be utilized as an ultrasound stethoscope. This study assessed the additional diagnostic power of pocket size device by both experts operators and trainees in comparison with physical examination and its appropriateness of use in comparison with standard echo machine in a non-cardiologic population. Three hundred four consecutive non cardiologic outpatients underwent a sequential assessment including physical examination, pocket size imaging device and standard Doppler-echo exam. Pocket size device was used by both expert operators and trainees (who received specific training before the beginning of the study. All the operators were requested to give only visual, qualitative insights on specific issues. All standard Doppler-echo exams were performed by expert operators. One hundred two pocket size device exams were performed by experts and two hundred two by trainees. The time duration of the pocket size device exam was 304 ± 117 sec. Diagnosis of cardiac abnormalities was made in 38.2% of cases by physical examination and in 69.7% of cases by physical examination + pocket size device (additional diagnostic power = 31.5%, p In conclusion, pocket size device showed a relevant additional diagnostic value in comparison with physical examination. Sensitivity and specificity were good in experts and suboptimal in trainees. Specificity was particularly influenced by the level of experience. Training programs are needed for pocket size device users.

  16. 76 FR 49975 - Inspection of Towing Vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-11

    ... related materials. All comments received will be posted, without change, to http://www.regulations.gov and... comments and material received during the comment period and may change this proposed rule based on your... consideration its size, organizational structure, and vessel types and services. Towing Safety Management System...

  17. Vessel wall characterization using quantitative MRI: what's in a number?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coolen, Bram F; Calcagno, Claudia; van Ooij, Pim; Fayad, Zahi A; Strijkers, Gustav J; Nederveen, Aart J

    2018-02-01

    The past decade has witnessed the rapid development of new MRI technology for vessel wall imaging. Today, with advances in MRI hardware and pulse sequences, quantitative MRI of the vessel wall represents a real alternative to conventional qualitative imaging, which is hindered by significant intra- and inter-observer variability. Quantitative MRI can measure several important morphological and functional characteristics of the vessel wall. This review provides a detailed introduction to novel quantitative MRI methods for measuring vessel wall dimensions, plaque composition and permeability, endothelial shear stress and wall stiffness. Together, these methods show the versatility of non-invasive quantitative MRI for probing vascular disease at several stages. These quantitative MRI biomarkers can play an important role in the context of both treatment response monitoring and risk prediction. Given the rapid developments in scan acceleration techniques and novel image reconstruction, we foresee the possibility of integrating the acquisition of multiple quantitative vessel wall parameters within a single scan session.

  18. Influence of the Pixel Sizes of Reference Computed Tomography on Single-photon Emission Computed Tomography Image Reconstruction Using Conjugate-gradient Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuda, Kyohei; Sakimoto, Shota; Fujii, Susumu; Ida, Tomonobu; Moriyama, Shigeru

    The frame-of-reference using computed-tomography (CT) coordinate system on single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) reconstruction is one of the advanced characteristics of the xSPECT reconstruction system. The aim of this study was to reveal the influence of the high-resolution frame-of-reference on the xSPECT reconstruction. 99mTc line-source phantom and National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) image quality phantom were scanned using the SPECT/CT system. xSPECT reconstructions were performed with the reference CT images in different sizes of the display field-of-view (DFOV) and pixel. The pixel sizes of the reconstructed xSPECT images were close to 2.4 mm, which is acquired as originally projection data, even if the reference CT resolution was varied. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the line-source, absolute recovery coefficient, and background variability of image quality phantom were independent on the sizes of DFOV in the reference CT images. The results of this study revealed that the image quality of the reconstructed xSPECT images is not influenced by the resolution of frame-of-reference on SPECT reconstruction.

  19. Task-specific enhancement filters in storage phosphor images from the Vistascan system for detection of proximal caries lesions of known size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haiter-Neto, Francisco; Casanova, Marcia Spinelli; Frydenberg, Morten; Wenzel, Ann

    2009-01-01

    The aim was to compare original 8-bit images from the Vistascan storage phosphor plate system with images enhanced with specific filters for detection of proximal caries lesions and, further, to analyze the mutual sensitivity of the filtered images for different lesion sizes. One hundred sixty approximal noncavitated surfaces were radiographed using the Vistascan storage phosphor plate system. Original and enhanced (Fine, Caries1, and Caries2 filters) images were assessed by 6 observers who recorded the presence/absence of proximal carious lesions. Microscopy served to detect and measure true lesion size. One hundred one surfaces were sound, and 59 had lesions. The sensitivity of the Fine filter images was significantly higher than the Caries1 and Caries2 filter modalities (P Caries1 and Caries2 modalities. Both the Fine filter and the original images had a significantly higher specificity than the Caries2 modality (P Caries2 modality (P Caries1 modality (P detection of shallow carious lesion, because it showed less observer variability. The task-specific enhancement filters, Caries1 and Caries2, were less accurate than the original and Fine filter images and cannot be recommended for detection of the lesion sizes included in this study.

  20. Imaging dose in breast radiotherapy: does breast size affect the dose to the organs at risk and the risk of secondary cancer to the contralateral breast?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batumalai, Vikneswary, E-mail: vikneswary.batumalai@sswahs.nsw.gov.au [Liverpool Cancer Therapy Centre and Ingham Institute, Liverpool, New South Wales (Australia); South Western Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Quinn, Alexandra; Jameson, Michael [Liverpool Cancer Therapy Centre and Ingham Institute, Liverpool, New South Wales (Australia); Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales (Australia); Delaney, Geoff [Liverpool Cancer Therapy Centre and Ingham Institute, Liverpool, New South Wales (Australia); South Western Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Collaboration for Cancer Outcomes Research and Evaluation, Liverpool Hospital, Liverpool, New South Wales (Australia); School of Medicine, University of Western Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Holloway, Lois [Liverpool Cancer Therapy Centre and Ingham Institute, Liverpool, New South Wales (Australia); South Western Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales (Australia); School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia)

    2015-03-15

    Correct target positioning is crucial for accurate dose delivery in breast radiotherapy resulting in utilisation of daily imaging. However, the radiation dose from daily imaging is associated with increased probability of secondary induced cancer. The aim of this study was to quantify doses associated with three imaging modalities and investigate the correlation of dose and varying breast size in breast radiotherapy. Planning computed tomography (CT) data sets of 30 breast cancer patients were utilised to simulate the dose received by various organs from a megavoltage computed tomography (MV-CT), megavoltage electronic portal image (MV-EPI) and megavoltage cone-beam computed tomography (MV-CBCT). The mean dose to organs adjacent to the target volume (contralateral breast, lungs, spinal cord and heart) were analysed. Pearson correlation analysis was performed to determine the relationship between imaging dose and primary breast volume and the lifetime attributable risk (LAR) of induced secondary cancer was calculated for the contralateral breast. The highest contralateral breast mean dose was from the MV-CBCT (1.79 Gy), followed by MV-EPI (0.22 Gy) and MV-CT (0.11 Gy). A similar trend was found for all organs at risk (OAR) analysed. The primary breast volume inversely correlated with the contralateral breast dose for all three imaging modalities. As the primary breast volume increases, the likelihood of a patient developing a radiation-induced secondary cancer to the contralateral breast decreases. MV-CBCT showed a stronger relationship between breast size and LAR of developing a radiation-induced contralateral breast cancer in comparison with the MV-CT and MV-EPI. For breast patients, imaging dose to OAR depends on imaging modality and treated breast size. When considering the use of imaging during breast radiotherapy, the patient's breast size and contralateral breast dose should be taken into account.

  1. Adaptive iterative dose reduction algorithm in CT: Effect on image quality compared with filtered back projection in body phantoms of different sizes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Milim; Lee, Jeong Min; Son, Hyo Shin; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn [College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Jeong Hee; Choi, Jin Woo [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    To evaluate the impact of the adaptive iterative dose reduction (AIDR) three-dimensional (3D) algorithm in CT on noise reduction and the image quality compared to the filtered back projection (FBP) algorithm and to compare the effectiveness of AIDR 3D on noise reduction according to the body habitus using phantoms with different sizes. Three different-sized phantoms with diameters of 24 cm, 30 cm, and 40 cm were built up using the American College of Radiology CT accreditation phantom and layers of pork belly fat. Each phantom was scanned eight times using different mAs. Images were reconstructed using the FBP and three different strengths of the AIDR 3D. The image noise, the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the phantom were assessed. Two radiologists assessed the image quality of the 4 image sets in consensus. The effectiveness of AIDR 3D on noise reduction compared with FBP were also compared according to the phantom sizes. Adaptive iterative dose reduction 3D significantly reduced the image noise compared with FBP and enhanced the SNR and CNR (p < 0.05) with improved image quality (p < 0.05). When a stronger reconstruction algorithm was used, greater increase of SNR and CNR as well as noise reduction was achieved (p < 0.05). The noise reduction effect of AIDR 3D was significantly greater in the 40-cm phantom than in the 24-cm or 30-cm phantoms (p < 0.05). The AIDR 3D algorithm is effective to reduce the image noise as well as to improve the image-quality parameters compared by FBP algorithm, and its effectiveness may increase as the phantom size increases.

  2. Laboratory measurements to determine the grain size distribution of a sand-gravel bed surface and substrate: image analysis and CT scanner analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orru, C.; Blom, A.; Uijttewaal, W.

    2012-12-01

    Spatial and temporal changes in the grain size distribution are crucial to describe sediment transport and the related grain size selective processes. Two complimentary laboratory techniques are presented to determine such variations of the grain size distribution of the bed surface and substrate: (1) particle coloring in combination with photogrammetric analysis, and (2) core sampling combined with three-dimensional imaging. The two techniques will be used in later flume experiments that are aimed at studying the response of the river bed to nonsteady boundary conditions. In these flume experiments, the bed surface and substrate grain size distribution needs to be measured using reliable and preferentially rapid techniques. The techniques were evaluated conducting an experiment that partially reproduced the conditions of the later flume experiments. Three nonoverlapping grain size fractions (i.e. within the range of coarse sand to fine gravel) were used and they were painted in different colors. Various mixtures of the three grain size fractions were composed of various color combinations. Patches of the mixtures were installed in a pool. Images were taken of the bed surface and the images were analyzed using an algorithm based on color segmentation. The algorithm provides values of the surface fraction of the bed covered by a certain color (i.e. a size fraction). The influence of water depth on the results of the image analysis was studied. To this end pictures were taken without water and for three water depths. The image analysis results shows that the technique can be used effectively for images of the bed in a flume filled with water. This is beneficiary in applying the technique in the later flume experiments. The second technique comprises core sampling in combination with three-dimensional imaging. Samples taken with tube cores were fixed with wallpaper glue and analyzed using a micro computed tomography scanner (micro CT scanner). The scans provide a

  3. An image-segmentation-based framework to detect oil slicks from moving vessels in the Southern African oceans using SAR imagery

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mdakane, Lizwe W

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Oil slick events caused due to bilge leakage/dumps from ships and from other anthropogenic sources pose a threat to the aquatic ecosystem and need to be monitored on a regular basis. An automatic image-segmentation-based framework to detect oil...

  4. Osteoid osteoma - the CT vessel sign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaniv, Gal; Shabshin, Noga; Sharon, Michal; Garniack, Alex [Sheba Medical Center, Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Tel Hashomer (Israel); Liberman, Boaz [Sheba Medical Center, Division of Orthopedics, Tel Hashomer, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv (Israel); Rimon, Uri [Sheba Medical Center, Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Tel Hashomer, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv (Israel); Eshed, Iris [Sheba Medical Center, Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Tel Hashomer, Tel Aviv University Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2011-10-15

    To evaluate whether the presence of a feeding vessel in proximity to osteoid osteomas of long bones on multidetector CT (MDCT) can be an adjuvant clue for the diagnosis of osteoid osteoma. Forty-nine CT scans of patients with radiological and clinical diagnosis of osteoid osteoma of long bones and a control group of 20 CT scans of patients with cortical-based lesions other then osteoid osteoma were analyzed. Two radiologists evaluated the CT images in consensus for the presence of a blood vessel in the same axial slices in which the nidus of osteoid osteoma was seen and to determine the incidence. In 39 cases (79.6%) of osteoid osteoma, a blood vessel either entered the nidus (23 patients) or was seen in proximity to it (16 patients). This was significantly different (P<0.05) from the cortical-based lesions, in which only two CT scans (10%) showed a blood vessel in the lesion's proximity. In the majority of osteoid osteoma lesions in long bones, a blood vessel can be seen on MDCT either entering the nidus itself or in its proximity. The role of this vessel in the lesion pathogenesis and whether it improves diagnostic accuracy need further evaluation. (orig.)

  5. The passive biomechanics of human pelvic collecting lymphatic vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanasiou, Dimitrios; Edgar, Lowell T; Jafarnejad, Mohammad; Nixon, Katherine; Duarte, Delfim; Hawkins, Edwin D; Jamalian, Samira; Cunnea, Paula; Lo Celso, Cristina; Kobayashi, Shunichi; Fotopoulou, Christina; Moore, James E

    2017-01-01

    The lymphatic system has a major significance in the metastatic pathways in women's cancers. Lymphatic pumping depends on both extrinsic and intrinsic mechanisms, and the mechanical behavior of lymphatic vessels regulates the function of the system. However, data on the mechanical properties and function of human lymphatics are lacking. Our aim is to characterize, for the first time, the passive biomechanical behavior of human collecting lymphatic vessels removed at pelvic lymph node dissection during primary debulking surgeries for epithelial ovarian cancer. Isolated vessels were cannulated and then pressurized at varying levels of applied axial stretch in a calcium-free Krebs buffer. Pressurized vessels were then imaged using multi-photon microscopy for collagen-elastin structural composition and fiber orientation. Both pressure-diameter and force-elongation responses were highly nonlinear, and axial stretching of the vessel served to decrease diameter at constant pressure. Pressure-diameter behavior for the human vessels is very similar to data from rat mesenteric vessels, though the human vessels were approximately 10× larger than those from rats. Multiphoton microscopy revealed the vessels to be composed of an inner layer of elastin with an outer layer of aligned collagen fibers. This is the first study that successfully described the passive biomechanical response and composition of human lymphatic vessels in patients with ovarian cancer. Future work should expand on this knowledge base with investigations of vessels from other anatomical locations, contractile behavior, and the implications on metastatic cell transport.

  6. Lymphatic vessel density and function in experimental bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maier Julie

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The lymphatics form a second circulatory system that drains the extracellular fluid and proteins from the tumor microenvironment, and provides an exclusive environment in which immune cells interact and respond to foreign antigen. Both cancer and inflammation are known to induce lymphangiogenesis. However, little is known about bladder lymphatic vessels and their involvement in cancer formation and progression. Methods A double transgenic mouse model was generated by crossing a bladder cancer-induced transgenic, in which SV40 large T antigen was under the control of uroplakin II promoter, with another transgenic mouse harboring a lacZ reporter gene under the control of an NF-κB-responsive promoter (κB-lacZ exhibiting constitutive activity of β-galactosidase in lymphatic endothelial cells. In this new mouse model (SV40-lacZ, we examined the lymphatic vessel density (LVD and function (LVF during bladder cancer progression. LVD was performed in bladder whole mounts and cross-sections by fluorescent immunohistochemistry (IHC using LYVE-1 antibody. LVF was assessed by real-time in vivo imaging techniques using a contrast agent (biotin-BSA-Gd-DTPA-Cy5.5; Gd-Cy5.5 suitable for both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and near infrared fluorescence (NIRF. In addition, IHC of Cy5.5 was used for time-course analysis of co-localization of Gd-Cy5.5 with LYVE-1-positive lymphatics and CD31-positive blood vessels. Results SV40-lacZ mice develop bladder cancer and permitted visualization of lymphatics. A significant increase in LVD was found concomitantly with bladder cancer progression. Double labeling of the bladder cross-sections with LYVE-1 and Ki-67 antibodies indicated cancer-induced lymphangiogenesis. MRI detected mouse bladder cancer, as early as 4 months, and permitted to follow tumor sizes during cancer progression. Using Gd-Cy5.5 as a contrast agent for MRI-guided lymphangiography, we determined a possible reduction of lymphatic

  7. MR Imaging of Pulmonary Nodules: Detection Rate and Accuracy of Size Estimation in Comparison to Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieszanowski, Andrzej; Lisowska, Antonina; Dabrowska, Marta; Korczynski, Piotr; Zukowska, Malgorzata; Grudzinski, Ireneusz P; Pacho, Ryszard; Rowinski, Olgierd; Krenke, Rafal

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study were to assess the sensitivity of various magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences for the diagnosis of pulmonary nodules and to estimate the accuracy of MRI for the measurement of lesion size, as compared to computed tomography (CT). Fifty patients with 113 pulmonary nodules diagnosed by CT underwent lung MRI and CT. MRI studies were performed on 1.5T scanner using the following sequences: T2-TSE, T2-SPIR, T2-STIR, T2-HASTE, T1-VIBE, and T1-out-of-phase. CT and MRI data were analyzed independently by two radiologists. The overall sensitivity of MRI for the detection of pulmonary nodules was 80.5% and according to nodule size: 57.1% for nodules ≤4mm, 75% for nodules >4-6mm, 87.5% for nodules >6-8mm and 100% for nodules >8mm. MRI sequences yielded following sensitivities: 69% (T1-VIBE), 54.9% (T2-SPIR), 48.7% (T2-TSE), 48.7% (T1-out-of-phase), 45.1% (T2-STIR), 25.7% (T2-HASTE), respectively. There was very strong agreement between the maximum diameter of pulmonary nodules measured by CT and MRI (mean difference -0.02 mm; 95% CI -1.6-1.57 mm; Bland-Altman analysis). MRI yielded high sensitivity for the detection of pulmonary nodules and enabled accurate assessment of their diameter. Therefore it may be considered an alternative to CT for follow-up of some lung lesions. However, due to significant number of false positive diagnoses, it is not ready to replace CT as a tool for lung nodule detection.

  8. MR Imaging of Pulmonary Nodules: Detection Rate and Accuracy of Size Estimation in Comparison to Computed Tomography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Cieszanowski

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were to assess the sensitivity of various magnetic resonance imaging (MRI sequences for the diagnosis of pulmonary nodules and to estimate the accuracy of MRI for the measurement of lesion size, as compared to computed tomography (CT.Fifty patients with 113 pulmonary nodules diagnosed by CT underwent lung MRI and CT. MRI studies were performed on 1.5T scanner using the following sequences: T2-TSE, T2-SPIR, T2-STIR, T2-HASTE, T1-VIBE, and T1-out-of-phase. CT and MRI data were analyzed independently by two radiologists.The overall sensitivity of MRI for the detection of pulmonary nodules was 80.5% and according to nodule size: 57.1% for nodules ≤4mm, 75% for nodules >4-6mm, 87.5% for nodules >6-8mm and 100% for nodules >8mm. MRI sequences yielded following sensitivities: 69% (T1-VIBE, 54.9% (T2-SPIR, 48.7% (T2-TSE, 48.7% (T1-out-of-phase, 45.1% (T2-STIR, 25.7% (T2-HASTE, respectively. There was very strong agreement between the maximum diameter of pulmonary nodules measured by CT and MRI (mean difference -0.02 mm; 95% CI -1.6-1.57 mm; Bland-Altman analysis.MRI yielded high sensitivity for the detection of pulmonary nodules and enabled accurate assessment of their diameter. Therefore it may be considered an alternative to CT for follow-up of some lung lesions. However, due to significant number of false positive diagnoses, it is not ready to replace CT as a tool for lung nodule detection.

  9. Vessel discoloration detection in malarial retinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agurto, C.; Nemeth, S.; Barriga, S.; Soliz, P.; MacCormick, I.; Taylor, T.; Harding, S.; Lewallen, S.; Joshi, V.

    2016-03-01

    Cerebral malaria (CM) is a life-threatening clinical syndrome associated with malarial infection. It affects approximately 200 million people, mostly sub-Saharan African children under five years of age. Malarial retinopathy (MR) is a condition in which lesions such as whitening and vessel discoloration that are highly specific to CM appear in the retina. Other unrelated diseases can present with symptoms similar to CM, therefore the exact nature of the clinical symptoms must be ascertained in order to avoid misdiagnosis, which can lead to inappropriate treatment and, potentially, death. In this paper we outline the first system to detect the presence of discolored vessels associated with MR as a means to improve the CM diagnosis. We modified and improved our previous vessel segmentation algorithm by incorporating the `a' channel of the CIELab color space and noise reduction. We then divided the segmented vasculature into vessel segments and extracted features at the wall and in the centerline of the segment. Finally, we used a regression classifier to sort the segments into discolored and not-discolored vessel classes. By counting the abnormal vessel segments in each image, we were able to divide the analyzed images into two groups: normal and presence of vessel discoloration due to MR. We achieved an accuracy of 85% with sensitivity of 94% and specificity of 67%. In clinical practice, this algorithm would be combined with other MR retinal pathology detection algorithms. Therefore, a high specificity can be achieved. By choosing a different operating point in the ROC curve, our system achieved sensitivity of 67% with specificity of 100%.

  10. T1 weighted brain images at 7 Tesla unbiased for Proton Density, T2* contrast and RF coil receive B1 sensitivity with simultaneous vessel visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Moortele, Pierre-François; Auerbach, Edwards J; Olman, Cheryl; Yacoub, Essa; Uğurbil, Kâmil; Moeller, Steen

    2009-06-01

    At high magnetic field, MR images exhibit large, undesirable signal intensity variations commonly referred to as "intensity field bias". Such inhomogeneities mostly originate from heterogeneous RF coil B(1) profiles and, with no appropriate correction, are further pronounced when utilizing rooted sum of square reconstruction with receive coil arrays. These artifacts can significantly alter whole brain high resolution T(1)-weighted (T(1)w) images that are extensively utilized for clinical diagnosis, for gray/white matter segmentation as well as for coregistration with functional time series. In T(1) weighted 3D-MPRAGE sequences, it is possible to preserve a bulk amount of T(1) contrast through space by using adiabatic inversion RF pulses that are insensitive to transmit B(1) variations above a minimum threshold. However, large intensity variations persist in the images, which are significantly more difficult to address at very high field where RF coil B(1) profiles become more heterogeneous. Another characteristic of T(1)w MPRAGE sequences is their intrinsic sensitivity to Proton Density and T(2)(*) contrast, which cannot be removed with post-processing algorithms utilized to correct for receive coil sensitivity. In this paper, we demonstrate a simple technique capable of producing normalized, high resolution T(1)w 3D-MPRAGE images that are devoid of receive coil sensitivity, Proton Density and T(2)(*) contrast. These images, which are suitable for routinely obtaining whole brain tissue segmentation at 7 T, provide higher T(1) contrast specificity than standard MPRAGE acquisitions. Our results show that removing the Proton Density component can help in identifying small brain structures and that T(2)(*) induced artifacts can be removed from the images. The resulting unbiased T(1)w images can also be used to generate Maximum Intensity Projection angiograms, without additional data acquisition, that are inherently registered with T(1)w structural images. In addition

  11. T1 weighted Brain Images at 7 Tesla Unbiased for Proton Density, T2* contrast and RF Coil Receive B1 Sensitivity with Simultaneous Vessel Visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Moortele, Pierre-François; Auerbach, Edwards J.; Olman, Cheryl; Yacoub, Essa; Uğurbil, Kâmil; Moeller, Steen

    2009-01-01

    At high magnetic field, MR images exhibit large, undesirable signal intensity variations commonly referred to as “intensity field bias”. Such inhomogeneities mostly originate from heterogeneous RF coil B1 profiles and, with no appropriate correction, are further pronounced when utilizing rooted sum of square reconstruction with receive coil arrays. These artifacts can significantly alter whole brain high resolution T1-weighted (T1w) images that are extensively utilized for clinical diagnosis, for gray/white matter segmentation as well as for coregistration with functional time series. In T1 weighted 3D-MPRAGE sequences, it is possible to preserve a bulk amount of T1 contrast through space by using adiabatic inversion RF pulses that are insensitive to transmit B1 variations above a minimum threshold. However, large intensity variations persist in the images, which are significantly more difficult to address at very high field where RF coil B1 profiles become more heterogeneous. Another characteristic of T1w MPRAGE sequences is their intrinsic sensitivity to Proton Density and T2* contrast, which cannot be removed with post-processing algorithms utilized to correct for receive coil sensitivity. In this paper, we demonstrate a simple technique capable of producing normalized, high resolution T1w 3D-MPRAGE images that are devoid of receive coil sensitivity, Proton Density and T2* contrast. These images, which are suitable for routinely obtaining whole brain tissue segmentation at 7 Tesla, provide higher T1 contrast specificity than standard MPRAGE acquisitions. Our results show that removing the Proton Density component can help identifying small brain structures and that T2* induced artifacts can be removed from the images. The resulting unbiased T1w images can also be used to generate Maximum Intensity Projection angiograms, without additional data acquisition, that are inherently registered with T1w structural images. In addition, we introduce a simple technique

  12. Grain size determination in nano-scale polycrystalline aggregates by precession illumination-hollow cone dark field imaging in the transmission electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulovits, A.K., E-mail: akk8@pitt.edu; Facco, G.; Wiezorek, J.M.K.

    2012-01-15

    Precession illumination hollow cone dark field (PI-HCDF) transmission electron microscopy (TEM) provides high contrast multi-beam dark field images, which are suitable for effective and robust grain size measurements in nano-scale polycrystalline aggregates. Precession illumination with slightly converged electron beam probes and precession angles up to 3 Degree-Sign has been produced using a computer-controlled system using a JEOL JEM 2000FX TEM instrument. Theoretical and practical aspects of the experimental technique are discussed using example precession illumination hollow cone diffraction patterns from single crystalline NiAl and the importance of selecting the appropriate precession angle for PI-HCDF image formation and interpretation is described. Results obtained for precession illumination are compared with those of conventional parallel beam illumination experiments. Nanocrystalline Al has been used to evaluate the influence of the precession angle on PI-HCDF image contrast with a focus on grain size analysis. PI-HCDF imaging has been applied for grain size measurements in regions of a nanocrystalline Al thin film adjacent to the edge of a pulsed laser melted and rapidly solidified region and determined the dimensions of a heat-affected zone. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New TEM method for grain size measurements combines TEM resolution with obtainability of statistically significant data sets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We use precession illumination to produce time precession illumination hollow cone diffraction patterns PI-HCDP. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Contrast in dark field images (PI-HCDF) formed from PI-HCDP is easy to interpret as dynamical effects are reduced. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PI-HCDFs use several time-averaged g-rings simultaneously and contain more information than conventional DF-images. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Easy contrast interpretation and less dark field images required, allows fast, robust and

  13. Ultrasound is at least as good as magnetic resonance imaging in predicting tumour size post-neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vriens, Birgit E P J; de Vries, Bart; Lobbes, Marc B I; van Gastel, Saskia M; van den Berkmortel, Franchette W P J; Smilde, Tineke J; van Warmerdam, Laurence J C; de Boer, Maaike; van Spronsen, Dick Johan; Smidt, Marjolein L; Peer, Petronella G M; Aarts, Maureen J; Tjan-Heijnen, Vivianne C G

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of clinical imaging of the primary breast tumour post-neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) related to the post-neoadjuvant histological tumour size (gold standard) and whether this varies with breast cancer subtype. In this study, results of both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound (US) were reported. Patients with invasive breast cancer were enrolled in the INTENS study between 2006 and 2009. We included 182 patients, of whom data were available for post-NAC MRI (n=155), US (n=123), and histopathological tumour size. MRI estimated residual tumour size with <10-mm discordance in 54% of patients, overestimated size in 28% and underestimated size in 18% of patients. With US, this was 63%, 20% and 17%, respectively. The negative predictive value in hormone receptor-positive tumours for both MRI and US was low, 26% and 33%, respectively. The median deviation in clinical tumour size as percentage of pathological tumour was 63% (P25=26, P75=100) and 49% (P25=22, P75=100) for MRI and US, respectively (P=0.06). In this study, US was at least as good as breast MRI in providing information on residual tumour size post-neoadjuvant chemotherapy. However, both modalities suffered from a substantial percentage of over- and underestimation of tumour size and in addition both showed a low negative predictive value of pathologic complete remission (Gov nr: NCT00314977). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Enhancing supply vessel safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    A supply-vessel bridge installation consists of a navigating bridge and a control position aft, from which operators control the ship when close to rigs or platforms, and operate winches and other loading equipment. The international Convention for Safety of I Ale at Sea (SOLAS) does not regulate the layout, so design varies to a large degree, often causing an imperfect working environment. As for other types of ships, more than half the offshore service vessel accidents at sea are caused by bridge system failures. A majority can be traced back to technical design, and operational errors. The research and development project NAUT-OSV is a response to the offshore industry's safety concerns. Analysis of 24 incidents involving contact or collision between supply vessels and offshore installations owned or operated by Norwegian companies indicated that failures in the bridge system were often the cause.

  15. Blood vessel segmentation in magnetic resonance angiography imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozaitis, S. P.; Chandramohan, R.

    2011-06-01

    Small blood vessels may be difficult to detect in magnetic resonance angiography due to the lack of blood flow caused by disease or injury. Our method, which uses a block-matching denoising approach to segment blood vessels, works well in the presence of noise. We examined extended regions of an image to determine whether they contained blood vessels by fitting a Gaussian mixture model to a region's histogram. Then, dissimilar regions were denoised separately. This approach was beneficial in low-contrast settings. It can be used to detect higher-order blood vessels that may be difficult to detect under normal conditions.

  16. Feasibility and Diagnostic Accuracy of Point-of-Care Abdominal Sonography by Pocket-Sized Imaging Devices, Performed by Medical Residents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjesbu, Ingunn E.; Laursen, Christian Borbjerg; Graven, Torbjørn

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We aimed to study the feasibility and diagnostic performance of bedside ultrasound by examination of the liver, gallbladder, kidneys, and abdominal aorta performed by medical residents with limited experience in ultrasound, on emergency admissions using pocket-sized imaging devices....... Reference imaging was performed and/or judged at the Department of Radiology. RESULTS: Each resident performed a median of 28 examinations (interquartile range 24-46). Imaging of the kidneys and liver were feasible in 85 and 82% of the cases, and the corresponding values for the gallbladder and abdominal...

  17. Relationship between the Size of Magnetic Nanoparticles and Efficiency of MRT Imaging of Cerebral Glioma in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semkina, A S; Abakumov, M A; Abakumov, A M; Nukolova, N V; Chekhonin, V P

    2016-06-01

    BSA-coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles with different hydrodynamic diameters (36±4 and 85±10 nm) were synthesized, zeta potential and T2 relaxivity were determined, and their morphology was studied by transmission electron microscopy. Studies on rats with experimental glioma C6 showed that smaller nanoparticles more effectively accumulated in the tumor and circulated longer in brain vessels. Optimization of the hydrodynamic diameter improves the efficiency of MRT contrast agent.

  18. Localization and proliferation of lymphatic vessels in the tympanic membrane in normal state and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyashita, Takenori; Burford, James L; Hong, Young-Kwon; Gevorgyan, Haykanush; Lam, Lisa; Mori, Nozomu; Peti-Peterdi, Janos

    2013-10-25

    We clarified the localization of lymphatic vessels in the tympanic membrane and proliferation of lymphatic vessels during regeneration after perforation of the tympanic membrane by using whole-mount imaging of the tympanic membrane of Prox1 GFP mice. In the pars tensa, lymphatic vessel loops surrounded the malleus handle and annulus tympanicus. Apart from these locations, lymphatic vessel loops were not observed in the pars tensa in the normal tympanic membrane. Lymphatic vessel loops surrounding the malleus handle were connected to the lymphatic vessel loops in the pars flaccida and around the tensor tympani muscle. Many lymphatic vessel loops were detected in the pars flaccida. After perforation of the tympanic membrane, abundant lymphatic regeneration was observed in the pars tensa, and these regenerated lymphatic vessels extended from the lymphatic vessels surrounding the malleus at day 7. These results suggest that site-specific lymphatic vessels play an important role in the tympanic membrane. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Silole-Based Red Fluorescent Organic Dots for Bright Two-Photon Fluorescence In vitro Cell and In vivo Blood Vessel Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bin; Feng, Guangxue; He, Bairong; Goh, Chiching; Xu, Shidang; Ramos-Ortiz, Gabriel; Aparicio-Ixta, Laura; Zhou, Jian; Ng, Laiguan; Zhao, Zujin; Liu, Bin; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2016-02-10

    Robust luminescent dyes with efficient two-photon fluorescence are highly desirable for biological imaging applications, but those suitable for organic dots fabrication are still rare because of aggregation-caused quenching. In this work, a red fluorescent silole, 2,5-bis[5-(dimesitylboranyl)thiophen-2-yl]-1-methyl-1,3,4-triphenylsilole ((MesB)2 DTTPS), is synthesized and characterized. (MesB)2 DTTPS exhibits enhanced fluorescence efficiency in nanoaggregates, indicative of aggregation-enhanced emission (AEE). The organic dots fabricated by encapsulating (MesB)2 DTTPS within lipid-PEG show red fluorescence peaking at 598 nm and a high fluorescence quantum yield of 32%. Upon excitation at 820 nm, the dots show a large two-photon absorption cross section of 3.43 × 10(5) GM, which yields a two-photon action cross section of 1.09 × 10(5) GM. These (MesB)2 DTTPS dots show good biocompatibility and are successfully applied to one-photon and two-photon fluorescence imaging of MCF-7 cells and two-photon in vivo visualization of the blood vascular of mouse muscle in a high-contrast and noninvasive manner. Moreover, the 3D blood vasculature located at the mouse ear skin with a depth of over 100 μm can also be visualized clearly, providing the spatiotemporal information about the whole blood vascular network. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Freehand diffuse optical spectroscopy imaging for intraoperative identification of major venous and arterial vessels underlying peritoneal fat: an in vivo demonstration in a pig model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, Daqing; Ramadan, Mohammad; Park, Aaron; Bartels, Kenneth E.; Patel, Sanjay G.

    2017-10-01

    Inadvertent injury to important anatomic structures is a significant risk in minimally invasive surgery (MIS) that potentially requires conversion to an open procedure, which results in increased morbidity and mortality. Surgeons operating minimal-invasively currently do not have an easy-to-use, real-time device to aid in intraoperative identification of important anatomic structures that underlie tissue planes. We demonstrate freehand diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS) imaging for intraoperatively identifying major underlying veins and arteries. An applicator probe that can be affixed to and detached from an 8-mm laparoscopic instrument has been developed. The 10-mm DOS source-detector separation renders sampling of tissue heterogeneities a few millimeters deep. DOS spectra acquired consecutively during freehand movement of the applicator probe on the tissue surface are displayed as a temporal and spectral image to assist in spatially resolved identification of the underlying structures. Open surgery identifications of the vena cava and aorta underlying peritoneal fat of ˜4 mm in thickness using the applicator probe under room light were demonstrated repeatedly in multiple pigs in vivo.

  1. Quantification of tumor vessels in glioblastoma patients using time-of-flight angiography at 7 Tesla: a feasibility study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Radbruch

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To analyze if tumor vessels can be visualized, segmented and quantified in glioblastoma patients with time of flight (ToF angiography at 7 Tesla and multiscale vessel enhancement filtering. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twelve patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma were examined with ToF angiography (TR = 15 ms, TE = 4.8 ms, flip angle = 15°, FOV = 160 × 210 mm(2, voxel size: 0.31 × 0.31 × 0.40 mm(3 on a whole-body 7 T MR system. A volume of interest (VOI was placed within the border of the contrast enhancing part on T1-weighted images of the glioblastoma and a reference VOI was placed in the non-affected contralateral white matter. Automated segmentation and quantification of vessels within the two VOIs was achieved using multiscale vessel enhancement filtering in ImageJ. RESULTS: Tumor vessels were clearly visible in all patients. When comparing tumor and the reference VOI, total vessel surface (45.3 ± 13.9 mm(2 vs. 29.0 ± 21.0 mm(2 (p<0.035 and number of branches (3.5 ± 1.8 vs. 1.0 ± 0.6 (p<0.001 per cubic centimeter were significantly higher, while mean vessel branch length was significantly lower (3.8 ± 1.5 mm vs 7.2 ± 2.8 mm (p<0.001 in the tumor. DISCUSSION: ToF angiography at 7-Tesla MRI enables characterization and quantification of the internal vascular morphology of glioblastoma and may be used for the evaluation of therapy response within future studies.

  2. GOLD PRESSURE VESSEL SEAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A.E.

    1963-11-26

    An improved seal between the piston and die member of a piston-cylinder type pressure vessel is presented. A layer of gold, of sufficient thickness to provide an interference fit between the piston and die member, is plated on the contacting surface of at least one of the members. (AEC)

  3. Network of endocardial vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byung-Cheon; Kim, Hong Bae; Sung, Baeckkyoung; Kim, Ki Woo; Sohn, Jamin; Son, Boram; Chang, Byung-Joon; Soh, Kwang-Sup

    2011-01-01

    Although there have been reports on threadlike structures inside the heart, they have received little attention. We aimed to develop a method for observing such structures and to reveal their ultrastructures. An in situ staining method, which uses a series of procedures of 0.2-0.4% trypan blue spraying and washing, was applied to observe threadlike structures on the surfaces of endocardia. The threadlike structures were isolated and observed by using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Networks of endocardial vessels (20 μm in thickness) with expansions (40-100 μm in diameter) were visualized; they were movable on the endocardium of the bovine atrium and ventricle. CLSM showed that (1) rod-shaped nuclei were aligned along the longitudinal direction of the endocardial vessel and (2) there were many cells inside the expansion. TEM on the endocardial vessel revealed that (1) there existed multiple lumens (1-7 μm in diameter) and (2) the extracellular matrices mostly consisted of collagen fibers, which were aligned along the longitudinal direction of the endocardial vessel or were locally organized in reticular structures. We investigated the endocardial circulatory system in bovine cardiac chambers and its ultrastructures, such as nucleic distributions, microlumens, and collagenous extracellular matrices. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Pressurized Vessel Slurry Pumping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pound, C.R.

    2001-09-17

    This report summarizes testing of an alternate ''pressurized vessel slurry pumping'' apparatus. The principle is similar to rural domestic water systems and ''acid eggs'' used in chemical laboratories in that material is extruded by displacement with compressed air.

  5. Accurate image analysis of the retina using hessian matrix and binarisation of thresholded entropy with application of texture mapping.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxia Yin

    Full Text Available In this paper, we demonstrate a comprehensive method for segmenting the retinal vasculature in camera images of the fundus. This is of interest in the area of diagnostics for eye diseases that affect the blood vessels in the eye. In a departure from other state-of-the-art methods, vessels are first pre-grouped together with graph partitioning, using a spectral clustering technique based on morphological features. Local curvature is estimated over the whole image using eigenvalues of Hessian matrix in order to enhance the vessels, which appear as ridges in images of the retina. The result is combined with a binarized image, obtained using a threshold that maximizes entropy, to extract the retinal vessels from the background. Speckle type noise is reduced by applying a connectivity constraint on the extracted curvature based enhanced image. This constraint is varied over the image according to each region's predominant blood vessel size. The resultant image exhibits the central light reflex of retinal arteries and veins, which prevents the segmentation of whole vessels. To address this, the earlier entropy-based binarization technique is repeated on the original image, but crucially, with a different threshold to incorporate the central reflex vessels. The final segmentation is achieved by combining the segmented vessels with and without central light reflex. We carry out our approach on DRIVE and REVIEW, two publicly available collections of retinal images for research purposes. The obtained results are compared with state-of-the-art methods in the literature using metrics such as sensitivity (true positive rate, selectivity (false positive rate and accuracy rates for the DRIVE images and measured vessel widths for the REVIEW images. Our approach out-performs the methods in the literature.

  6. Earlywood vessels of Castanea sativa record temperature before their formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonti, Patrick; Solomonoff, Natalie; García-González, Ignacio

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the climatic signal contained in the earlywood vessel size of the ring-porous chestnut (Castanea sativa) and the physiological processes involved in the underlying mechanisms. In order to assign the encoded signal to a specific physiological process, bud phenology and vessel formation were monitored along an elevation transect and chronologies of the size of the first row of earlywood vessels were retrospectively correlated with 40 yr of early spring temperatures. The first vessels appeared in late April to early May, after encoding both a negative temperature signal in February-March (during tree quiescence) and a positive temperature signal in early April (at the time of resumption of shoot growth). We hypothesize that February and March temperatures affect cambial sensitivity to auxin, preconditioning tree responses later in the season. Furthermore, April temperature is related to tree activation whereby new hormone production fosters vessel expansion.

  7. On the potential of a new IVUS elasticity modulus imaging approach for detecting vulnerable atherosclerotic coronary plaques: in vitro vessel phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Floc'h, Simon; Cloutier, Guy; Finet, Gérard; Tracqui, Philippe; Pettigrew, Roderic I; Ohayon, Jacques

    2010-10-07

    Peak cap stress amplitude is recognized as a good indicator of vulnerable plaque (VP) rupture. However, such stress evaluation strongly relies on a precise, but still lacking, knowledge of the mechanical properties exhibited by the plaque components. As a first response to this limitation, our group recently developed, in a previous theoretical study, an original approach, called iMOD (imaging modulography), which reconstructs elasticity maps (or modulograms) of atheroma plaques from the estimation of strain fields. In the present in vitro experimental study, conducted on polyvinyl alcohol cryogel arterial phantoms, we investigate the benefit of coupling the iMOD procedure with the acquisition of intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) measurements for detection of VP. Our results show that the combined iMOD-IVUS strategy: (1) successfully detected and quantified soft inclusion contours with high positive predictive and sensitivity values of 89.7 ± 3.9% and 81.5 ± 8.8%, respectively, (2) estimated reasonably cap thicknesses larger than ∼300 µm, but underestimated thinner caps, and (3) quantified satisfactorily Young's modulus of hard medium (mean value of 109.7 ± 23.7 kPa instead of 145.4 ± 31.8 kPa), but overestimated the stiffness of soft inclusions (mean Young`s moduli of 31.4 ± 9.7 kPa instead of 17.6 ± 3.4 kPa). All together, these results demonstrate a promising benefit of the new iMOD-IVUS clinical imaging method for in vivo VP detection.