WorldWideScience

Sample records for vessel reactor electric

  1. Reactor vessel lower head integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, A.M.

    1997-02-01

    On March 28, 1979, the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) nuclear power plant underwent a prolonged small break loss-of-coolant accident that resulted in severe damage to the reactor core. Post-accident examinations of the TMI-2 reactor core and lower plenum found that approximately 19,000 kg (19 metric tons) of molten material had relocated onto the lower head of the reactor vessel. Results of the OECD TMI-2 Vessel Investigation Project concluded that a localized hot spot of approximately 1 meter diameter had existed on the lower head. The maximum temperature on the inner surface of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) in this region reached 1100{degrees}C and remained at that temperature for approximately 30 minutes before cooling occurred. Even under the combined loads of high temperature and high primary system pressure, the TMI-2 RPV did not fail. (i.e. The pressure varied from about 8.5 to 15 MPa during the four-hour period following the relocation of melt to the lower plenum.) Analyses of RPV failure under these conditions, using state-of-the-art computer codes, predicted that the RPV should have failed via local or global creep rupture. However, the vessel did not fail; and it has been hypothesized that rapid cooling of the debris and the vessel wall by water that was present in the lower plenum played an important role in maintaining RPV integrity during the accident. Although the exact mechanism(s) of how such cooling occurs is not known, it has been speculated that cooling in a small gap between the RPV wall and the crust, and/or in cracks within the debris itself, could result in sufficient cooling to maintain RPV integrity. Experimental data are needed to provide the basis to better understand these phenomena and improve models of RPV failure in severe accident codes.

  2. Nuclear reactor vessel fuel thermal insulating barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, C. Patrick; Scobel, James H.; Wright, Richard F.

    2013-03-19

    The reactor vessel of a nuclear reactor installation which is suspended from the cold leg nozzles in a reactor cavity is provided with a lower thermal insulating barrier spaced from the reactor vessel that has a hemispherical lower section that increases in volume from the center line of the reactor to the outer extent of the diameter of the thermal insulating barrier and smoothly transitions up the side walls of the vessel. The space between the thermal insulating harrier and the reactor vessel forms a chamber which can be flooded with cooling water through passive valving to directly cool the reactor vessel in the event of a severe accident. The passive inlet valve for the cooling water includes a buoyant door that is normally maintained sealed under its own weight and floats open when the cavity is Hooded. Passively opening steam vents are also provided.

  3. Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) Acquisition Strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizia, Ronald Eugene [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2008-04-01

    The Department of Energy has selected the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production. It will have an outlet gas temperature in the range of 900°C and a plant design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Materials Research and Development (R&D) Program is responsible for performing R&D on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. Selection of the technology and design configuration for the NGNP must consider both the cost and risk profiles to ensure that the demonstration plant establishes a sound foundation for future commercial deployments. The NGNP challenge is to achieve a significant advancement in nuclear technology while at the same time setting the stage for an economically viable deployment of the new technology in the commercial sector soon after 2020. The purpose of this report is to address the acquisition strategy for the NGNP Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV). This component will be larger than any nuclear reactor pressure vessel presently in service in the United States. The RPV will be taller, larger in diameter, thicker walled, heavier and most likely fabricated at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) site of multiple subcomponent pieces. The pressure vessel steel can either be a conventional materials already used in the nuclear industry such as listed within ASME A508/A533 specifications or it will be fabricated from newer pressure vessel materials never before used for a nuclear reactor in the US. Each of these characteristics will present a

  4. Nuclear reactor construction with bottom supported reactor vessel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharbaugh, John E.

    1987-01-01

    An improved liquid metal nuclear reactor construction has a reactor core and a generally cylindrical reactor vessel for holding a large pool of low pressure liquid metal coolant and housing the core within the pool. The reactor vessel has an open top end, a closed flat bottom end wall and a continuous cylindrical closed side wall interconnecting the top end and bottom end wall. The reactor also has a generally cylindrical concrete containment structure surrounding the reactor vessel and being formed by a cylindrical side wall spaced outwardly from the reactor vessel side wall and a flat base mat spaced below the reactor vessel bottom end wall. A central support pedestal is anchored to the containment structure base mat and extends upwardly therefrom to the reactor vessel and upwardly therefrom to the reactor core so as to support the bottom end wall of the reactor vessel and the lower end of the reactor core in spaced apart relationship above the containment structure base mat. Also, an annular reinforced support structure is disposed in the reactor vessel on the bottom end wall thereof and extends about the lower end of the core so as to support the periphery thereof. In addition, an annular support ring having a plurality of inward radially extending linear members is disposed between the containment structure base mat and the bottom end of the reactor vessel wall and is connected to and supports the reactor vessel at its bottom end on the containment structure base mat so as to allow the reactor vessel to expand radially but substantially prevent any lateral motions that might be imposed by the occurrence of a seismic event. The reactor construction also includes a bed of insulating material in sand-like granular form, preferably being high density magnesium oxide particles, disposed between the containment structure base mat and the bottom end wall of the reactor vessel and uniformly supporting the reactor vessel at its bottom end wall on the containment

  5. Reactor pressure vessel. Status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliot, B.J.; Hackett, E.M.; Lee, A.D. [and others

    1996-10-01

    This report describes the issues raised as a result of the staffs review of Generic Letter (GL) 92-01, Revision 1, responses and plant-specific reactor pressure vessel (RPV) assessments and the actions taken or work in progress to address these issues. In addition, the report describes actions taken by the staff and the nuclear industry to develop a thermal annealing process for use at U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. This process is intended to be used as a means of mitigating the effects of neutron radiation on the fracture toughness of RPV materials. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued GL 92-01, Revision 1, Supplement 1, to obtain information needed to assess compliance with regulatory requirements and licensee commitments regarding RPV integrity. GL 92-01, Revision 1, Supplement 1, was issued as a result of generic issues that were raised in the NRC staff`s reviews of licensee responses to GL 92-01, Revision 1, and plant-specific RPV evaluations. In particular, an integrated review of all data submitted in response to GL 92-01, Revision 1, indicated that licensees may not have considered all relevant data in their RPV assessments. This report is representative of submittals to and evaluations by the staff as of September 30, 1996. An update of this report will be issued at a later date.

  6. A study of reactor vessel integrity assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Hoon [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong Kyung; Shin, Chang Ho; Seo, Bo Kyun [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-02-15

    The fast neutron fluence at the Reactor Pressure Vessel(RPV) of KNGR designed for 60 years lifetime was calculated by full-scope Monte Carlo simulation for reactor vessel integrity assessment. KNGR core geometry was modeled on a three-dimensional representation of the one-sixteenth of the reactor in-vessel component. Each fuel assemblies were modeled explicitly, and each fuel pins were axially divided into 5 segments. The maximum flux of 4.3 x 10{sup 10} neutrons/cm{sup 2}. sec at the RPV was obtained by tallying neutrons crossing the beltline of inner surface of the RPV.

  7. Structural integrity of nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knott, John F.

    2013-09-01

    The paper starts from concerns expressed by Sir Alan Cottrell, in the early 1970s, related to the safety of the pressurized water reactor (PWR) proposed at that time for the next phase of electrical power generation. It proceeds to describe the design and operation of nuclear generation plant and gives details of the manufacture of PWR reactor pressure vessels (RPVs). Attention is paid to stress-relief cracking and under-clad cracking, experienced with early RPVs, explaining the mechanisms for these forms of cracking and the means taken to avoid them. Particular note is made of the contribution of non-destructive inspection to structural integrity. Factors affecting brittle fracture in RPV steels are described: in particular, effects of neutron irradiation. The use of fracture mechanics to assess defect tolerance is explained, together with the failure assessment diagram embodied in the R6 procedure. There is discussion of the Master Curve and how it incorporates effects of irradiation on fracture toughness. Dangers associated with extrapolation of data to low probabilities are illustrated. The treatment of fatigue-crack growth is described, in the context of transients that may be experienced in the operation of PWR plant. Detailed attention is paid to the thermal shock associated with a large loss-of-coolant accident. The final section reviews the arguments advanced to justify 'Incredibility of Failure' and how these are incorporated in assessments of the integrity of existing plant and proposed 'new build' PWR pressure vessels.

  8. TMI-2 reactor vessel head removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bengel, P.R.; Smith, M.D.; Estabrook, G.A.

    1985-09-01

    This report describes the safe removal and storage of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) reactor vessel head. The head was removed in July 1984 to permit the removal of the plenum and the reactor core, which were damaged during the 1979 accident. From July 1982, plans and preparations were made using a standard head removal procedure modified by the necessary precautions and changes to account for conditions caused by the accident. After data acquisition, equipment and structure modifications, and training, the head was safely removed and stored; and the internals indexing fixture and a work platform were installed on top of the vessel. Dose rates during and after the operation were lower than expected; lessons were learned from the operation which will be applied to the continuing fuel removal operations activities.

  9. TMI-2 reactor vessel head removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bengel, P.R.; Smith, M.D.; Estabrook, G.A.

    1984-12-01

    This report describes the safe removal and storage of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor vessel head. The head was removed in July 1984 to permit the removal of the plenum and the reactor core, which were damaged during the 1979 accident. From July 1982, plans and preparations were made using a standard head removal procedure modified by the necessary precautions and changes to account for conditions caused by the accident. After data acquisition, equipment and structure modifications, and training the head was safely removed and stored and the internals indexing fixture and a work platform were installed on top of the vessel. Dose rates during and after the operation were lower than expected; lessons were learned from the operation which will be applied to the continuing fuel removal operations activities.

  10. Nuclear reactor pressure vessel support system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepelak, George R.

    1978-01-01

    A support system for nuclear reactor pressure vessels which can withstand all possible combinations of stresses caused by a postulated core disrupting accident during reactor operation. The nuclear reactor pressure vessel is provided with a flange around the upper periphery thereof, and the flange includes an annular vertical extension formed integral therewith. A support ring is positioned atop of the support ledge and the flange vertical extension, and is bolted to both members. The plug riser is secured to the flange vertical extension and to the top of a radially outwardly extension of the rotatable plug. This system eliminates one joint through which fluids contained in the vessel could escape by making the fluid flow path through the joint between the flange and the support ring follow the same path through which fluid could escape through the plug risers. In this manner, the sealing means to prohibit the escape of contained fluids through the plug risers can also prohibit the escape of contained fluid through the securing joint.

  11. Radiation effects on reactor pressure vessel supports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, R.E. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Engineering Technology; Lipinski, R.E. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Rockville, MD (United States)

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to present the findings from the work done in accordance with the Task Action Plan developed to resolve the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Generic Safety Issue No. 15, (GSI-15). GSI-15 was established to evaluate the potential for low-temperature, low-flux-level neutron irradiation to embrittle reactor pressure vessel (RPV) supports to the point of compromising plant safety. An evaluation of surveillance samples from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) had suggested that some materials used for RPV supports in pressurized-water reactors could exhibit higher than expected embrittlement rates. However, further tests designed to evaluate the applicability of the HFIR data to reactor RPV supports under operating conditions led to the conclusion that RPV supports could be evaluated using traditional method. It was found that the unique HFIR radiation environment allowed the gamma radiation to contribute significantly to the embrittlement. The shielding provided by the thick steel RPV shell ensures that degradation of RPV supports from gamma irradiation is improbable or minimal. The findings reported herein were used, in part, as the basis for technical resolution of the issue.

  12. Advanced Carbothermal Electric Reactor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ORBITEC proposes to develop the Advanced Carbothermal Electric (ACE) reactor to efficiently extract oxygen from lunar regolith. Unlike state-of-the-art carbothermal...

  13. Advanced Carbothermal Electric Reactor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The overall objective of the Phase 1 effort was to demonstrate the technical feasibility of the Advanced Carbothermal Electric (ACE) Reactor concept. Unlike...

  14. Development of ROV System for FOSAR in Reactor Vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Young Soo; Kim, Tae Won; Lee, Sung Uk; Jeong, Kyung Min [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Nam Kyun [Korea Plant Service and Engineering Co., Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    Foreign object in the reactor vessel is susceptible to damage the fuel. Prior to reloading fuel assemblies into the core, FOSAR(Foreign Object Search And Retrieval) activities were performed on and beneath the lower core plate with conventional equipment. However, the reactor vessel is limited to humans who are susceptible to radiation exposure, and conventional equipment is hard to access because of the complexity of the structure. To improve the convenience of use and retrieval ability in the under-core plate region, we are developing a FOSAR system carried by ROV (Remotely Operated Vehicle). In this paper, we describe a ROV system developed. The ROV system is composed of robot vehicle and remote control unit. The vehicle has 4 thrusters, tilt, camera, light and depth sensor, etc. Considering radiation damage, processors are not equipped on the vehicle. Control signals and sensing signals are transferred through umbilical cable. Remote control unit is composed of electric driving module and two computers which one is for the control and the other is for the detection of robot position. Control computer has a joystick user input and video/signal input, and transmit motor control signal and lens control signal via CAN/RS485 communication. And the other computers transmit information of vehicle position to the control computer via serial communication. Information of vehicle position is obtained through image processing algorithm. The acquiring camera of vehicle is on the flange of reactor vessel. Simulations on the detection of vehicle position are performed at the reactor vessel mockup which scaled down by 6 and verified to use in the control of robot by visual tracking. And functional test has been performed on the air condition. In the future, performance test will be carried out real sized mockup and underwater condition

  15. Electrically conductive containment vessel for molten aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcombe, C.E.; Scott, D.G.

    1984-06-25

    The present invention is directed to a containment vessel which is particularly useful in melting aluminum. The vessel of the present invention is a multilayered vessel characterized by being electrically conductive, essentially nonwettable by and nonreactive with molten aluminum. The vessel is formed by coating a tantalum substrate of a suitable configuration with a mixture of yttria and particulate metal 10 borides. The yttria in the coating inhibits the wetting of the coating while the boride particulate material provides the electrical conductivity through the vessel. The vessel of the present invention is particularly suitable for use in melting aluminum by ion bombardment.

  16. Hygro-Thermo-Mechanical Analysis of a Reactor Vessel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslav Kruis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Determining the durability of a reactor vessel requires a hygro-thermo-mechanical analysis of the vessel throughout its service life. Damage, prestress losses, distribution of heat and moisture and some other quantities are needed for a durability assessment. A coupled analysis was performed on a two-level model because of the huge demands on computer hardware. This paper deals with a hygro-thermo-mechanical analysis of a reactor vessel made of prestressed concrete with a steel inner liner. The reactor vessel is located in Temelín, Czech Republic.

  17. Reactors for nuclear electric propulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buden, D.; Angelo, J.A. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Propulsion is the key to space exploitation and power is the key to propulsion. This paper examines the role of nuclear fission reactors as the primary power source for high specific impulse electric propulsion systems for space missions of the 1980s and 1990s. Particular mission applications include transfer to and a reusable orbital transfer vehicle from low-Earth orbit to geosynchronous orbit, outer planet exploration and reconnaissance missions, and as a versatile space tug supporting lunar resource development. Nuclear electric propulsion is examined as an indispensable component in space activities of the next two decades.

  18. Keeping control when cutting through a reactor vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1997-09-01

    UK Robotics` Advanced Teleoperation Controller (ATC) is a key component of one of the most extensive remote handling operations currently being undertaken - the removal of 165 mm diameter, 90 mm thick samples of carbon-manganese steel from the base of the Trawsfyndd reactor pressure vessel. These will then be used to assess the material properties of the vessel welds. (author).

  19. Design Procedure on Stud Bolt for Reactor Vessel Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong-Wook; Lee, Gyu-Mahn; Jeoung, Kyeong-Hoon; Kim, Tae-Wan; Park, Keun-Bae; Kim, Keung-Koo

    2008-10-15

    The reactor pressure vessel flange is welded to the upper part of reactor pressure vessel, and there are stud holes to mount the closure head with stud bolts. The surface mating the closure head is compressed with O-ring, which acts as a sealing gasket to prevent coolant leakage. Bolted flange connections perform a very important structural role in the design of a reactor pressure vessel. Their importance stems from two important functions: (a) maintenance of the structural integrity of the connection itself, and (b) prevention of leakage through the O-ring preloaded by stud bolts. In the present study, an evaluation procedure for the design of stud bolt is developed to meet ASME code requirements. The developed design procedure could provide typical references in the development of advanced reactor design in the future.

  20. On-line monitoring and analysis of reactor vessel integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackerson, D.S.; Impink, A.J. Jr.; Balkey, K.R.; Andreychek, T.S.

    1989-01-31

    A method is described for on-line monitoring and analysis of nuclear reactor pressure vessel integrity in a unit in which reactor coolant is circulated along the inner wall of the pressure vessel, the method comprising the steps of: generating on an on-line basis, temperature signals representative of the temperature of the reactor coolant circulating along the inner wall of the pressure vessel; generating on an on-line basis, a pressure signal representative of the reactor coolant pressure; generating a signal representative of fast neutron fluence to which the reactor pressure vessel has been subjected; generating as a function of the fluence signal a visual representation of the actual real time reference nil-ductibility transition temperature (RT/sub ndt/) across the entire pressure vessel wall thickness at a preselected critical location in the wall; generating as a function of transients in the reactor coolant temperature and pressur signals, a visual representation of the real time required RT/sub ndt/, across the entire pressure vessel wall thickness at the selected critical location, the required RT/sub ndt/ being the RT/sub ndt/ that would be required in the pressure vessel wall for flaw initiation to occur as a result of stresses set-up by the transients; and superimposing the visual representations of the real-time actual and required RT/sub ndt's/ for flaw initiation across the entire pressure vessel wall thickness for the selected critical location to generate a visual representation of the difference in value between the actual and required RT/sub ndt/ presented as an RT/sub ndt/ margin.

  1. Design and analysis of multicavity prestressed concrete reactor vessels. [HTGR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodpasture, D.W.; Burdette, E.G.; Callahan, J.P.

    1977-01-01

    During the past 25 years, a rather rapid evolution has taken place in the design and use of prestressed concrete reactor vessels (PCRVs). Initially the concrete vessel served as a one-to-one replacement for its steel counterpart. This was followed by the development of the integral design which led eventually to the more recent multicavity vessel concept. Although this evolution has seen problems in construction and operation, a state-of-the-art review which was recently conducted by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory indicated that the PCRV has proven to be a satisfactory and inherently safe type of vessel for containment of gas-cooled reactors from a purely functional standpoint. However, functionalism is not the only consideration in a demanding and highly competitive industry. A summary is presented of the important considerations in the design and analysis of multicavity PCRVs together with overall conclusions concerning the state of the art of these vessels.

  2. Lessons Learned From Developing Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel Embrittlement Database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL

    2010-08-01

    Materials behaviors caused by neutron irradiation under fission and/or fusion environments can be little understood without practical examination. Easily accessible material information system with large material database using effective computers is necessary for design of nuclear materials and analyses or simulations of the phenomena. The developed Embrittlement Data Base (EDB) at ORNL is this comprehensive collection of data. EDB database contains power reactor pressure vessel surveillance data, the material test reactor data, foreign reactor data (through bilateral agreements authorized by NRC), and the fracture toughness data. The lessons learned from building EDB program and the associated database management activity regarding Material Database Design Methodology, Architecture and the Embedded QA Protocol are described in this report. The development of IAEA International Database on Reactor Pressure Vessel Materials (IDRPVM) and the comparison of EDB database and IAEA IDRPVM database are provided in the report. The recommended database QA protocol and database infrastructure are also stated in the report.

  3. Shakedown Analysis for the Hydraulic Nut Device of Reactor Vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyu Wan; Kim, Jong Min; Park, Sung Ho; Choi, Taek Sang [KEPCO Engineering and Construction, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    The hydraulic nut system is a tensioning system that is a direct retrofit for any existing tensioning system currently used on the reactor vessel. The system itself is of a modular design tensioner and integrated mechanical lock ring to retain load generated through the use of hydraulics. The hydraulic nuts allow for 100% tensioning of all studs simultaneously, so reduction in critical path time and radiation exposure for both installation and removal laborers can be achieved by adopting this device. Structural analyses for the hydraulic nut device which will be applied to the Nuclear Power Plant reactor vessel have been performed to evaluate the effect of the replacement on the structural integrity of both the reactor vessel closure head area and the hydraulic nuts. Shakedown analyses have been performed because the primary plus secondary (P+Q) stress intensity limit of the hydraulic nut is exceeded in several locations. It is concluded that shakedown will occur and structural integrity of the reactor vessel closure head area will be maintained with the application of the hydraulic nut system

  4. Nuclear electric propulsion reactor control systems status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferg, D. A.

    1973-01-01

    The thermionic reactor control system design studies conducted over the past several years for a nuclear electric propulsion system are described and summarized. The relevant reactor control system studies are discussed in qualitative terms, pointing out the significant advantages and disadvantages including the impact that the various control systems would have on the nuclear electric propulsion system design. A recommendation for the reference control system is made, and a program for future work leading to an engineering model is described.

  5. Concept of a nuclear powered submersible research vessel and a compact reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusunoki, Tsuyoshi; Odano, Naoteru; Yoritsune, Tsutomu; Ishida, Toshihisa [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Takahashi, Teruo [Energis, Co., Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Nishimura, Hajime [Japan Marine Science and Technology Center, Yokosuka, Kanagawa (Japan); Tokunaga, Sango [Japan Deep Sea Technology Association, Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    A conceptual design study of a submersible research vessel navigating in 600 m depth and a compact nuclear reactor were carried out for the expansion of the nuclear power utilization. The mission of the vessel is the research of mechanism of the climate change to predict the global environment. Through conditions of the Arctic Ocean and the sea at high latitude have significant impacts on the global environmental change, it is difficult to investigate those areas by ordinary ships because of thick ice or storm. Therefore the research vessel is mainly utilized in the Arctic Ocean and the sea at high latitude. By taking account of the research mission, the basic specifications of the vessel are decided; the total weight is 500 t, the submersible depth is 600 m, the maximum speed is 12 knots (22.2 km/h), and the number of crews is 16. Nuclear power has an advantage in supplying large power of electricity in the sea for long period. Based on the requirements, it has been decided that two sets of submersible compact reactor, SCR, which is light-weighted and of enhanced safety characteristics of supply the total electricity of 500 kW. (author)

  6. Nuclear reactor having a polyhedral primary shield and removable vessel insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekeroth, Douglas E.; Orr, Richard

    1993-01-01

    A nuclear reactor is provided having a generally cylindrical reactor vessel disposed within an opening in a primary shield. The opening in the primary shield is defined by a plurality of generally planar side walls forming a generally polyhedral-shaped opening. The reactor vessel is supported within the opening in the primary shield by reactor vessel supports which are in communication and aligned with central portions of some of the side walls. The reactor vessel is connected to the central portions of the reactor vessel supports. A thermal insulation polyhedron formed from a plurality of slidably insertable and removable generally planar insulation panels substantially surrounds at least a portion of the reactor vessel and is disposed between the reactor vessel and the side walls of the primary shield. The shape of the insulation polyhedron generally corresponds to the shape of the opening in the primary shield. Reactor monitoring instrumentation may be mounted in the corners of the opening in the primary shield between the side walls and the reactor vessel such that insulation is not disposed between the instrumentation and the reactor vessel.

  7. Nuclear reactor support and seismic restraint with in-vessel core retention cooling features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, Tyler A.; Edwards, Michael J.

    2018-01-23

    A nuclear reactor including a lateral seismic restraint with a vertically oriented pin attached to the lower vessel head and a mating pin socket attached to the floor. Thermally insulating materials are disposed alongside the exterior surface of a lower portion of the reactor pressure vessel including at least the lower vessel head.

  8. Thermal insulating barrier and neutron shield providing integrated protection for a nuclear reactor vessel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Roger B.; Fero, Arnold H.; Sejvar, James

    1997-01-01

    The reactor vessel of a nuclear reactor installation which is suspended from the cold leg nozzles in a reactor cavity is provided with a lower thermal insulating barrier spaced from the reactor vessel to form a chamber which can be flooded with cooling water through passive valving to directly cool the reactor vessel in the event of a severe accident. The passive valving also includes bistable vents at the upper end of the thermal insulating barrier for releasing steam. A removable, modular neutron shield extending around the upper end of the reactor cavity below the nozzles forms with the upwardly and outwardly tapered transition on the outer surface of the reactor vessel, a labyrinthine channel which reduces neutron streaming while providing a passage for the escape of steam during a severe accident, and for the cooling air which is circulated along the reactor cavity walls outside the thermal insulating barrier during normal operation of the reactor.

  9. Crystal Plasticity Model of Reactor Pressure Vessel Embrittlement in GRIZZLY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, Pritam [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Biner, Suleyman Bulent [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Zhang, Yongfeng [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Spencer, Benjamin Whiting [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-07-01

    The integrity of reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) is of utmost importance to ensure safe operation of nuclear reactors under extended lifetime. Microstructure-scale models at various length and time scales, coupled concurrently or through homogenization methods, can play a crucial role in understanding and quantifying irradiation-induced defect production, growth and their influence on mechanical behavior of RPV steels. A multi-scale approach, involving atomistic, meso- and engineering-scale models, is currently being pursued within the GRIZZLY project to understand and quantify irradiation-induced embrittlement of RPV steels. Within this framework, a dislocation-density based crystal plasticity model has been developed in GRIZZLY that captures the effect of irradiation-induced defects on the flow stress behavior and is presented in this report. The present formulation accounts for the interaction between self-interstitial loops and matrix dislocations. The model predictions have been validated with experiments and dislocation dynamics simulation.

  10. Optimization of reactor pressure vessel internals segmentation in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Byung-Sik [Dankook Univ., Chungnam (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

    2017-11-15

    One of the most challenging tasks during plant decommissioning is the removal of highly radioactive internal components from the reactor pressure vessel (RPV). For RPV internals dismantling, it is essential that all activities are thoroughly planned and discussed in the early stage of the decommissioning project. One of the key activities in the detailed planning is to prepare the segmentation and packaging plan that describes the sequential steps required to segment, separate, and package each individual component of RPV, based on an activation analysis and component characterization study.

  11. Reactor pressure vessel head vents and methods of using the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gels, John L; Keck, David J; Deaver, Gerald A

    2014-10-28

    Internal head vents are usable in nuclear reactors and include piping inside of the reactor pressure vessel with a vent in the reactor upper head. Piping extends downward from the upper head and passes outside of the reactor to permit the gas to escape or be forcibly vented outside of the reactor without external piping on the upper head. The piping may include upper and lowers section that removably mate where the upper head joins to the reactor pressure vessel. The removable mating may include a compressible bellows and corresponding funnel. The piping is fabricated of nuclear-reactor-safe materials, including carbon steel, stainless steel, and/or a Ni--Cr--Fe alloy. Methods install an internal head vent in a nuclear reactor by securing piping to an internal surface of an upper head of the nuclear reactor and/or securing piping to an internal surface of a reactor pressure vessel.

  12. Roadmap for Nondestructive Evaluation of Reactor Pressure Vessel Research and Development by the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Cyrus M [ORNL; Nanstad, Randy K [ORNL; Clayton, Dwight A [ORNL; Matlack, Katie [Georgia Institute of Technology; Ramuhalli, Pradeep [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Light, Glenn [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio

    2012-09-01

    The Department of Energy s (DOE) Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is a five year effort which works to develop the fundamental scientific basis to understand, predict, and measure changes in materials and systems, structure, and components as they age in environments associated with continued long-term operations of existing commercial nuclear power reactors. This year, the Materials Aging and Degradation (MAaD) Pathway of this program has placed emphasis on emerging Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) methods which support these objectives. DOE funded Research and Development (R&D) on emerging NDE techniques to support commercial nuclear reactor sustainability is expected to begin next year. This summer, the MAaD Pathway invited subject matter experts to participate in a series of workshops which developed the basis for the research plan of these DOE R&D NDE activities. This document presents the results of one of these workshops which are the DOE LWRS NDE R&D Roadmap for Reactor Pressure Vessels (RPV). These workshops made a substantial effort to coordinate the DOE NDE R&D with that already underway or planned by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) through their representation at these workshops.

  13. Reactor vessel water level estimation during severe accidents using cascaded fuzzy neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Yeong; Yoo, Kwae Hwan; Choi, Geon Pil; Back, Ju Hyun; Na, Man Gyun [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Global concern and interest in the safety of nuclear power plants have increased considerably since the Fukushima accident. In the event of a severe accident, the reactor vessel water level cannot be measured. The reactor vessel water level has a direct impact on confirming the safety of reactor core cooling. However, in the event of a severe accident, it may be possible to estimate the reactor vessel water level by employing other information. The cascaded fuzzy neural network (CFNN) model can be used to estimate the reactor vessel water level through the process of repeatedly adding fuzzy neural networks. The developed CFNN model was found to be sufficiently accurate for estimating the reactor vessel water level when the sensor performance had deteriorated. Therefore, the developed CFNN model can help provide effective information to operators in the event of a severe accident.

  14. Development of in-vessel type control rod drive mechanism for a innovative small reactor (Contract research)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoritsune, Tsutomu; Ishida, Toshihisa [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    Although the control rod drive mechanism of an existing large scale light water reactor is generally installed outside the reactor vessel, an in-vessel type control rod drive mechanism (INV-CRDM) is installed inside the reactor vessel. The INV-CRDM contributes to compactness and simplicity of the reactor system, and it can eliminate the possibility of a rod ejection accident. Therefore, INV-CRDM is an important technology adopted in an innovative small reactor. Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has developed this type of CRDM driven by an electric motor, which can work under high temperature and high pressure water for the advanced marine reactor. On the basis of this research result, a driving motor coil and a bearing were developed to be used under the high temperature steam, severe condition for an innovative small reactor. About the driving motor, we manufactured the driving motor available for high temperature steam and carried out performance test under room temperature atmosphere to confirm the electric characteristic and coolability of the driving coil. With these test results and the past test results under high temperature water, we analyzed and evaluated the electric performance and coolability of the driving coil under high temperature steam. Concerning bearing, we manufactured the test pieces using some candidate material for material characteristic test and carried out the rolling wear test under high temperature steam to select the material. Consequently, we confirmed that performance of the driving coil for the advanced type driving motor, is enough to be used under high temperature steam. And, we evaluated the performance of the bearing and selected the material of the bearing, which can be used under high temperature steam. From these results, we have obtained the prospect that the INV-CRDM can be used for an innovative small reactor under steam atmosphere could be developed. (author)

  15. Helium Leak Detection of Vessels in Fuel Transfer Cell (FTC) of Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, N. G.

    2012-11-01

    Bharatiya Nabhikiya Vidyut Nigam (BHAVINI) is engaged in construction of 500MW Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) at Kalpak am, Chennai. In this very important and prestigious national programme Special Product Division (SPD) of M/s Kay Bouvet Engg.pvt. ltd. (M/s KBEPL) Satara is contributing in a major way by supplying many important sub-assemblies like- Under Water trolley (UWT), Airlocks (PAL, EAL) Container and Storage Rack (CSR) Vessels in Fuel Transfer Cell (FTC) etc for PFBR. SPD of KBEPL caters to the requirements of Government departments like - Department of Atomic Energy (DAE), BARC, Defense, and Government undertakings like NPCIL, BHAVINI, BHEL etc. and other precision Heavy Engg. Industries. SPD is equipped with large size Horizontal Boring Machines, Vertical Boring Machines, Planno milling, Vertical Turret Lathe (VTL) & Radial drilling Machine, different types of welding machines etc. PFBR is 500 MWE sodium cooled pool type reactor in which energy is produced by fissions of mixed oxides of Uranium and Plutonium pellets by fast neutrons and it also breeds uranium by conversion of thorium, put along with fuel rod in the reactor. In the long run, the breeder reactor produces more fuel then it consumes. India has taken the lead to go ahead with Fast Breeder Reactor Programme to produce electricity primarily because India has large reserve of Thorium. To use Thorium as further fuel in future, thorium has to be converted in Uranium by PFBR Technology.

  16. Low Temperature Irradiation Embrittlement of Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-08-01

    The embrittlement trend curve development project for HFIR reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels was carried out with three major tasks. Which are (1) data collection to match that used in HFIR steel embrittlement trend published in 1994 Journal Nuclear Material by Remec et. al, (2) new embrittlement data of A212B steel that are not included in earlier HFIR RPV trend curve, and (3) the adjustment of nil-ductility-transition temperature (NDTT) shift data with the consideration of the irradiation temperature effect. An updated HFIR RPV steel embrittlement trend curve was developed, as described below. NDTT( C) = 23.85 log(x) + 203.3 log (x) + 434.7, with 2- uncertainty of 34.6 C, where parameter x is referred to total dpa. The developed update HFIR RPV embrittlement trend curve has higher embrittlement rate compared to that of the trend curve developed in 1994.

  17. 77 FR 23513 - Updated Aging Management Criteria for Reactor Vessel Internal Components of Pressurized Water...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-19

    ... COMMISSION Updated Aging Management Criteria for Reactor Vessel Internal Components of Pressurized Water... Management Criteria for PWR Reactor Vessel Internal Components.'' The original notice provided the ADAMS... published a notice requesting public comments on draft LR-ISG-2011-04, ``Updated Aging Management Criteria...

  18. Study of evaluation methods for in-vessel corium retention through external vessel cooling and safety of reactor cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huh, Hoon; Chang, Soon Heung; Kim, Soo Hyung; Kim, Kee Poong; Lee, Hyoung Wook; Jang, Kwang Keol; Jeong, Yong Hoon; Kim, Sang Jin; Lee, Seong Jin [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jae Hong [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-03-15

    In this work, assessment system for methodology for reactor pressure vessel integrity is developed. Assessment system is make up of severe accident assessment code which can calculate the conditions of plant and structural analysis code which can assess the integrity of reactor vessel using given plant conditions. An assessment of cavity flooding using containment spray system has been done. As a result, by the containment spray, cavity can be flooded successfully and CCI can be reduced. The technical backgrounds for external vessel cooling and corium cooling on the cavity are summarized and provided in this report.

  19. Study of evaluation methods for in-vessel corium retention through external vessel cooling and safety of reactor cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huh, Hoon; Chang, Soon Heung; Choi, Tae Hoon; Kim, Hyun Sop; Yang, Soo Hyung; Kim, Soo Hyung; Kim, Seung Hop; An Hyung Taek; Jeong, Yong Hoon; Huh, Gyun Young [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-03-15

    Cooling methodologies for the molten corium resulted from the severe accident of the nuclear power plant is suggested as one of most important items for the safety of the NPP. In this regard, considerable experimental and analytical works have been devoted. In the 1st phase of this project, present status related to the external reactor vessel cooling for the retention of the corium in the reactor vessel and corium at the reactor cavity have been investigated and preliminary studies have been accomplished for the detail evaluation of the each cooling methodology. The preliminary studies include the analysis and detail investigation of the possible phenomena, investigation of the heat transfer correlations and preliminary evaluation of the external reactor vessel cooling using the developed computer code.

  20. Preliminary materials selection issues for the next generation nuclear plant reactor pressure vessel.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K.; Majumdar, S.; Shankar, P. S.; Shah, V. N.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-03-21

    In the coming decades, the United States and the entire world will need energy supplies to meet the growing demands due to population increase and increase in consumption due to global industrialization. One of the reactor system concepts, the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), with helium as the coolant, has been identified as uniquely suited for producing hydrogen without consumption of fossil fuels or the emission of greenhouse gases [Generation IV 2002]. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected this system for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project, to demonstrate emissions-free nuclear-assisted electricity and hydrogen production within the next 15 years. The NGNP reference concepts are helium-cooled, graphite-moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactors with a design goal outlet helium temperature of {approx}1000 C [MacDonald et al. 2004]. The reactor core could be either a prismatic graphite block type core or a pebble bed core. The use of molten salt coolant, especially for the transfer of heat to hydrogen production, is also being considered. The NGNP is expected to produce both electricity and hydrogen. The process heat for hydrogen production will be transferred to the hydrogen plant through an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX). The basic technology for the NGNP has been established in the former high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) and demonstration plants (DRAGON, Peach Bottom, AVR, Fort St. Vrain, and THTR). In addition, the technologies for the NGNP are being advanced in the Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR) project, and the South African state utility ESKOM-sponsored project to develop the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR). Furthermore, the Japanese HTTR and Chinese HTR-10 test reactors are demonstrating the feasibility of some of the planned components and materials. The proposed high operating temperatures in the VHTR place significant constraints on the choice of material selected for the reactor pressure vessel for

  1. Embrittlement recovery due to annealing of reactor pressure vessel steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eason, E.D.; Wright, J.E.; Nelson, E.E. [Modeling and Computing Services, Boulder, CO (United States); Odette, G.R.; Mader, E.V. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

    1996-03-01

    Embrittlement of reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) can be reduced by thermal annealing at temperatures higher than the normal operating conditions. Although such an annealing process has not been applied to any commercial plants in the United States, one US Army reactor, the BR3 plant in Belgium, and several plants in eastern Europe have been successfully annealed. All available Charpy annealing data were collected and analyzed in this project to develop quantitative models for estimating the recovery in 30 ft-lb (41 J) Charpy transition temperature and Charpy upper shelf energy over a range of potential annealing conditions. Pattern recognition, transformation analysis, residual studies, and the current understanding of the mechanisms involved in the annealing process were used to guide the selection of the most sensitive variables and correlating parameters and to determine the optimal functional forms for fitting the data. The resulting models were fitted by nonlinear least squares. The use of advanced tools, the larger data base now available, and insight from surrogate hardness data produced improved models for quantitative evaluation of the effects of annealing. The quality of models fitted in this project was evaluated by considering both the Charpy annealing data used for fitting and the surrogate hardness data base. The standard errors of the resulting recovery models relative to calibration data are comparable to the uncertainty in unirradiated Charpy data. This work also demonstrates that microhardness recovery is a good surrogate for transition temperature shift recovery and that there is a high level of consistency between the observed annealing trends and fundamental models of embrittlement and recovery processes.

  2. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Reactor Pressure Vessel Materials Research and Development Plan (PLN-2803)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. K. Wright; R. N. Wright

    2010-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production, with an outlet gas temperature in the range of 750°C, and a design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite-moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic, or pebble bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, Tri-Isotopic (TRISO)-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. Selection of the technology and design configuration for the NGNP must consider both the cost and risk profiles to ensure that the demonstration plant establishes a sound foundation for future commercial deployments. The NGNP challenge is to achieve a significant advancement in nuclear technology while setting the stage for an economically viable deployment of the new technology in the commercial sector soon after 2020. This technology development plan details the additional research and development (R&D) required to design and license the NGNP RPV, assuming that A 508/A 533 is the material of construction. The majority of additional information that is required is related to long-term aging behavior at NGNP vessel temperatures, which are somewhat above those commonly encountered in the existing database from LWR experience. Additional data are also required for the anticipated NGNP environment. An assessment of required R&D for a Grade 91 vessel has been retained from the first revision of the R&D plan in Appendix B in somewhat less detail. Considerably more development is required for this steel compared to A 508/A 533 including additional irradiation testing for expected NGNP operating temperatures, high-temperature mechanical properties, and extensive studies of long-term microstructural stability.

  3. Current understanding on the neutron irradiation embrittlement of BWR reactor pressure vessel steels in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asano, K.; Nishiyama, T. [TEPCO (Japan); Soneda, N.; Dohi, K.; Nishida, K.; Nomoto, A. [CRIEPI (Japan); Ohta, T. [Japan Atomic Power Co. (Japan); Ishimaru, Y. [Chugoku EPCO (Japan); Yoneda, H. [Hokuriku EPCO (Japan); Lida, J. [Tohoku EPCO (Japan); Yuya, H. [Chubu EPCO (Japan)

    2011-07-01

    Neutron irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels has been of concern primarily for the pressurized water reactors (PWRs). After long operation experiences, we are now becoming aware of the situation that the neutron irradiation embrittlement is also of concern for some of the boiling water reactors (BWRs) particularly with Cu-containing RPV steels. The surveillance data of Cu-containing BWR RPV steels show relatively larger shift in ductile-to-brittle transition temperature of fracture toughness than predicted by the embrittlement correlation method developed in late eighties and early nineties. Accurate evaluation of the amount of embrittlement is now very important for long-term operation of BWRs. In this paper, we will describe the neutron irradiation embrittlement of BWR RPVs in Japan. Some of the materials that show relatively large transition temperature shifts are investigated to understand the causes of embrittlement using state-of-the-art microstructural characterization techniques. Furthermore, some archive materials of such RPVs are irradiated in a material testing reactor with high neutron flux to understand the effect of flux on transition temperature shifts and corresponding microstructural changes. Microstructural evolution under irradiation, solute clustering in particular could explain the differences in transition temperature shift of the analyzed specimens. Larger BWR RPVs, which have larger water gaps, receive less neutron irradiation and harmful impurities in steels such as copper are well controlled since 1980 so irradiation embrittlement in BWR vessels can now be considered a concern only in old and small plants. All the new information obtained through these activities was considered in the development of new embrittlement correlation that is now adopted in JEAC 4201- 2007 of Japan Electric Association

  4. Probabilistic Structural Integrity Analysis of Boiling Water Reactor Pressure Vessel under Low Temperature Overpressure Event

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsoung-Wei Chou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The probabilistic structural integrity of a Taiwan domestic boiling water reactor pressure vessel has been evaluated by the probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis. First, the analysis model was built for the beltline region of the reactor pressure vessel considering the plant specific data. Meanwhile, the flaw models which comprehensively simulate all kinds of preexisting flaws along the vessel wall were employed here. The low temperature overpressure transient which has been concluded to be the severest accident for a boiling water reactor pressure vessel was considered as the loading condition. It is indicated that the fracture mostly happens near the fusion-line area of axial welds but with negligible failure risk. The calculated results indicate that the domestic reactor pressure vessel has sufficient structural integrity until doubling of the present end-of-license operation.

  5. Embrittlement and annealing of reactor pressure vessel steels: comparison of BR3 surveillance and vessel plates to the surrogate plates representative of the Yankee Rowe vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabry, A.; Chaouadi, T.; Puzzolante, J.L.; Van de Velde, J. [Centre de l``Etude de l``Energie Nucleaire, Mol (Belgium); Biemiller, E.C. [Yankee Atomic Electric Company, Bolton (United States); Rossinski, S.T.; Carter, R.G. [Electric Power Research Institute, Charlotte (United States)

    1996-07-01

    The sister pressure vessels at the BR3 and Rowe Yankee PWR plants were operated at a lower-than-usual temperature (260 degrees Celsius) and their plates were austenitized at higher-than-usual temperature (970 degrees Celsius). A heat tratemement leading to a coarser microstructure than typical for the fine grain plates that are considered in development of USNRC Regulatory guide 1.99. This material displayed outlier behaviour charackterized by a 41J CVN-shift significantly larger than predicted by Regulatory Guide 1.99. Because lower radiation temperature and nickell alloying are generally considered detrimental to irradiation sensitivity, there was a major concern that the nickel-modified lower Rowe plate and the nickel-modified BR3 plate may become too embrittled to satisfy the toughness requirements enbodied in the PTS screening criterion. This paper compares three complementary studies undertaken to clarify these uncertainties: 1) the accelerated irradiation and test program launched in 1990 by Yankee Atomic Electric Company using typical vessel plate materials containing 0.24% copper at two nickel levels: YA1, 0.63% (A533-B) and YA9, 0.19% (A302-B). These were heat-treated to produce the coarse and fine grain microstructures representative of the Yankee/BR3 and the Regulatory Guide plates, respectively, 2) the BR3 surveillance and vessel testing program: this vessel was wet-annealed in 1984, relicensed for operation till the plant shutdown in 1987, ANCL was trepanned in early 1995, 3) the accelerated irradiations in the Belgian BR2 test reactor of the Yankee coarse grain plates YA1 and YA9 together with BR3 vessel specimens extracted at nozzle elevation, a location with negligible radiation exposure. It is shown that the PTS screening criterion was never attained by the BR3 and Rowe plates, and that the BR3 vessel anneal was neither necessary nor sufficient. Finally, the sensitivity of embrittlement, annealing and post-annealing reembrittlement to irradiation

  6. Effects of Thermal Aging on Type 316H Stainless Steel for Reactor Vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Ji Hyun; Hong, Seok Min; Lee, Bong Sang; Koo, Gyeong Hoi [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Type 316H stainless steel is a prime candidate for reactor vessel material of sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) which has been developed as one of the Gen IV nuclear reactors in Korea. The reactor vessel steel will be exposed to higher temperature for an extended design life time. It is known that austenitic stainless steel such as Type 316H stainless steel shows excellent toughness and adequate strength at a moderate temperature. However, the previous researches reported the mechanical properties of Type 316H stainless weld would be deteriorated by the aging at the elevated temperature range.

  7. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Reactor Pressure Vessel Materials Research and Development Plan (PLN-2803)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. K. Wright; R. N. Wright

    2008-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy has selected the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production. It will have an outlet gas temperature in the range of 900°C and a plant design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic, or pebble-bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, Tri-Isotopic-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Materials Research and Development Program is responsible for performing research and development on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. Selection of the technology and design configuration for the NGNP must consider both the cost and risk profiles to ensure that the demonstration plant establishes a sound foundation for future commercial deployments. The NGNP challenge is to achieve a significant advancement in nuclear technology while setting the stage for an economically viable deployment of the new technology in the commercial sector soon after 2020. Studies of potential Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) steels have been carried out as part of the pre-conceptual design studies. These design studies generally focus on American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code status of the steels, temperature limits, and allowable stresses. Three realistic candidate materials have been identified by this process: conventional light water reactor RPV steels A508/533, 2¼Cr-1Mo in the annealed condition, and modified 9Cr 1Mo ferritic martenistic steel. Based on superior strength and higher temperature limits, the modified 9Cr-1Mo steel has been identified by the majority of design engineers as the preferred choice for the RPV. All of the vendors have

  8. Modeling Ultraviolet (UV) Light Emitting Diode (LED) Energy Propagation in Reactor Vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    concern is through Advanced Oxidation Processes (AOP). One such process uses ultraviolet (UV) energy to decompose hydrogen peroxide ( H2O2 ) to create...MODELING ULTRAVIOLET (UV) LIGHT EMITTING DIODE (LED) ENERGY PROPAGATION IN REACTOR VESSELS THESIS...

  9. Structure analysis of a reactor pressure vessel by two- and three-dimensional models. [PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sacher, H.; Mayr, M.

    1982-03-01

    This paper investigates the reactor pressure vessel of a 1300 MW pressurised water reactor. In order to determine the stresses and deformations of the vessel, two- and three-dimensional finite element models are used which represent the real structure with different degrees of accuracy. The results achieved by these different models are compared for the case of the transient called ''Start up of the nuclear power plant''. 5 refs.

  10. Control Rod Drive Mechanism Installed in the Internal of Reactor Pressure Vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, M. H.; Choi, S.; Park, J. S.; Lee, J. S.; Kim, D. O.; Hur, N. S.; Hur, H.; Yu, J. Y

    2008-09-15

    This report describes the review results and important technologies related to the in-vessel type control rod drive mechanism. Generally, most of the CRDMs used in the PWR are attached outside of the reactor pressure vessel, and the pernetration of the vessel head can not avoid. However, in-vessel type CRDMs, which are installed inside the reactor vessel, can eliminate the possibility of rod ejection accidents and the penetration of the vessel head, and provide a compact design of the reactor vessel and containment. There are two kinds of in-vessel type CRDM concerning the driving force-driven by a driving motor and by a hydraulic force. Motor driven CRDMs have been mainly investigated in Japan(MRX, IMR, DRX, next generation BWR etc.), and developed the key components such as a canned motor, an integrated rod position indicator, a separating ball-nut and a ball bearing that can operate under the water conditions of a high temperature and pressure. The concept of hydraulically driven CRDMs have been first reported by KWU and Siemens for KWU 200 reactor, and Argentina(CAREM) and China(NHR-5, NHR-200) have been developed the internal CRDM with the piston and cylinder of slightly different geometries. These systems are driven by the hydraulic force which is produced by pumps outside of the reactor vessel and transmitted through a pipe penetrating the reactor vessel, and needs complicated control and piping systems including pumps, valves and pipes etc.. IRIS has been recently decided the internal CRDMs as the reference design, and an analytical and experimental investigations of the hydraulic drive concept are performed by POLIMI in Italy. Also, a small French company, MP98 has been developed a new type of control rods, called 'liquid control rods', where reactivity is controlled by the movement of a liquid absorber in a manometer type device.

  11. Development of automatic reactor vessel inspection systems: development of data acquisition and analysis system for the nuclear vessel weld

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, C. H.; Lim, H. T.; Um, B. G. [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejeon (Korea)

    2001-03-01

    The objective of this project is to develop an automated ultrasonic data acquisition and data analysis system to examine the reactor vessel weldsIn order to examine nuclear vessel welds including reactor pressure vessel(RPV), huge amount of ultrasonic data from 6 channels should be able to be on-line processed. In addition, ultrasonic transducer scanning device should be remotely controlled, because working place is high radiation area. This kind of an automated ultrasonic testing equipment has not been developed domestically yet In order to develop an automated ultrasonic testing system, RPV ultrasonic testing equipments developed in foreign countries were investigated and the capability of high speed ultrasonic signal processing hardwares was analyzed in this study, ultrasonic signal processing system was designed. And also, ultrasonic data acquisition and analysis software was developed. 11 refs., 6 figs., 9 tabs. (Author)

  12. 10 CFR Appendix H to Part 50 - Reactor Vessel Material Surveillance Program Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... vessel. These data will be used as described in section IV of appendix G to part 50. ASTM E 185-73, “Standard Recommended Practice for Surveillance Tests for Nuclear Reactor Vessels”; ASTM E 185-79, “Standard Practice for Conducting Surveillance Tests for Light-Water Cooled Nuclear Power Reactor Vessels”; and ASTM...

  13. 10 CFR 50.66 - Requirements for thermal annealing of the reactor pressure vessel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... reactors where neutron radiation has reduced the fracture toughness of the reactor vessel materials, a... operation using appropriate test data. (iii) The methods, including heat source, instrumentation and... monitoring, inspections, and tests proposed to demonstrate that the limitations on temperatures, times and...

  14. Evaluation of thermal protection structure mechanism of LMR reactor vessels and design improvement for thermal stress reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Young Sang; Koo, Gyeong Hoi; Kim, Jong Bum; Kim, Seok Hun; Lee, Jae Han

    2003-03-01

    LMR reactor vessels operated in high temperature have a severe thermal damage due to the significant temperature gradient in the hot pool free surface regions of reactor vessel. The thermal protection mechanism of LMR reactor vessel should be designed for the structural integrity in high temperature condition. In this study, the thermal protection mechanism of foreign LMR reactor vessels is investigated for the power upgrade of KALIMER and the modified reactor baffle design with a Y-piece type structure is proposed for the reduction of thermal damage for KALIMER reactor vessel. The modified reactor baffle design leads to reduce the thermal damage such as creep-fatigue and ratcheting in the transient operation condition.

  15. Studies of fragileness in steels of vessels of BWR reactors; Estudios de fragilizacion en aceros de vasija de reactores BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robles, E.F.; Balcazar, M.; Alpizar, A.M.; Calderon, B.E. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    The structural materials with those that are manufactured the pressure vessels of the BWR reactors, suffer degradation in its mechanical properties mainly to the damage taken place by the fast neutrons (E > 1 MeV) coming from the reactor core. Its are experimentally studied those mechanisms of neutron damage in this material type, by means of the irradiation of steel vessel in experimental reactors to age them quickly. Alternatively it is simulated the neutron damage by means of irradiation of steel with heavy ions. In this work those are shown first results of the damage induced by irradiation from a similar steel to the vessel of a BWR reactor. The irradiation was carried out with fast neutrons (E > 1 MeV, fluence of 1.45 x 10{sup 18} n/cm{sup 2}) in the TRIGA MARK lll reactor and separately with Ni{sup +3} ions in a Tandetrom accelerator, E = 4.8 MeV and range of the ionic flow of 0.1 to 53 iones/A{sup 2}. (Author)

  16. Consumption of the electric power inside silent discharge reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yehia, Ashraf, E-mail: yehia30161@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Assiut University, Assiut 71516, Arab Republic of Egypt and Department of Physics, College of Science and Humanitarian Studies at Alkharj, Salman bin Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 83, Alkharj 11942 (Saudi Arabia)

    2015-01-15

    An experimental study was made in this paper to investigate the relation between the places of the dielectric barriers, which cover the surfaces of the electrodes in the coaxial cylindrical reactors, and the rate of change of the electric power that is consumed in forming silent discharges. Therefore, silent discharges have been formed inside three coaxial cylindrical reactors. The dielectric barriers in these reactors were pasted on both the internal surface of the outer electrode in the first reactor and the external surface of the inner electrode in the second reactor as well as the surfaces of the two electrodes in the third reactor. The reactor under study has been fed by atmospheric air that flowed inside it with a constant rate at normal temperature and pressure, in parallel with the application of a sinusoidal ac voltage between the electrodes of the reactor. The electric power consumed in forming the silent discharges inside the three reactors was measured as a function of the ac peak voltage. The validity of the experimental results was investigated by applying Manley's equation on the same discharge conditions. The results have shown that the rate of consumption of the electric power relative to the ac peak voltage per unit width of the discharge gap improves by a ratio of either 26.8% or 80% or 128% depending on the places of the dielectric barriers that cover the surfaces of the electrodes inside the three reactors.

  17. Standard Guide for In-Service Annealing of Light-Water Moderated Nuclear Reactor Vessels

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2003-01-01

    1.1 This guide covers the general procedures to be considered for conducting an in-service thermal anneal of a light-water moderated nuclear reactor vessel and demonstrating the effectiveness of the procedure. The purpose of this in-service annealing (heat treatment) is to improve the mechanical properties, especially fracture toughness, of the reactor vessel materials previously degraded by neutron embrittlement. The improvement in mechanical properties generally is assessed using Charpy V-notch impact test results, or alternatively, fracture toughness test results or inferred toughness property changes from tensile, hardness, indentation, or other miniature specimen testing (1). 1.2 This guide is designed to accommodate the variable response of reactor-vessel materials in post-irradiation annealing at various temperatures and different time periods. Certain inherent limiting factors must be considered in developing an annealing procedure. These factors include system-design limitations; physical constrain...

  18. The use of cyclone filters to reduce the foreign matter insertion into the reactor pressure vessel; Einsatz von Zyklonabscheidern zur Verringerung eines Fremdkoerpereintrags in den Reaktordruckbehaelter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widmann, W. [Westinghouse Electric Germany GmbH, Mannheim (Germany)

    2010-05-15

    Fuel element damage can induce a significant disturbance of the normal NPP operation. Foreign matter insertion into the reactor pressure vessel by the feed water pipes is supposed to be the main cause for fuel element damage in boiling water reactors. Vattenfall AB and Westinghouse Electric Sweden AB have developed a cyclone filter for nuclear facilities. The operational experience of cyclone filters in the feedwater line have reduced the fuel element damages significantly. Westinghouse Electric Germany is performing a feasibility study for the implementation of cyclone filter in the NPP Kruemmel.

  19. Prediction of Reactor Vessel Water Level Using Fuzzy Neural Networks in Severe Accidents due to LOCA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Soonho; Kim, Jaehawn; Na, Mangyun [Chosun Univ., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    When the initial events that may lead to the severe accident such as Loss Of Coolant Accident (LOCA) and Steam Generator Tube Rupture (SGTR) occurs at a nuclear power plant, it is most important to check the status of the plant conditions by observing the safety-related parameters such as neutron flux, pressurizer pressure, steam generator pressure and water level. In this paper, we propose a method of predicting the water level of coolant in the reactor vessel that directly affect the important events such as the exposure of the reactor core and the damage of reactor vessel by using a Fuzzy Neural Network (FNN) method. In addition, the data for verifying a proposed model was obtained by simulating the severe accident scenarios for the OPR1000 nuclear power plant using the MAAP4 code. In this paper, a prediction model was developed for predicting the reactor vessel water level using the FNN method. The proposed FNN model was verified based on the simulation data of OPR1000 by using MAAP4 code. As a result of simulation, we could see that the performance of the proposed FNN model is quite satisfactory but some large errors are observed occasionally. If the proposed FNN model is optimized by using a variety of data, it is possible to predict the reactor vessel water level exactly.

  20. In-Vessel Melt Retention of Pressurized Water Reactors: Historical Review and Future Research Needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weimin Ma

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A historical review of in-vessel melt retention (IVR is given, which is a severe accident mitigation measure extensively applied in Generation III pressurized water reactors (PWRs. The idea of IVR actually originated from the back-fitting of the Generation II reactor Loviisa VVER-440 in order to cope with the core-melt risk. It was then employed in the new deigns such as Westinghouse AP1000, the Korean APR1400 as well as Chinese advanced PWR designs HPR1000 and CAP1400. The most influential phenomena on the IVR strategy are in-vessel core melt evolution, the heat fluxes imposed on the vessel by the molten core, and the external cooling of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV. For in-vessel melt evolution, past focus has only been placed on the melt pool convection in the lower plenum of the RPV; however, through our review and analysis, we believe that other in-vessel phenomena, including core degradation and relocation, debris formation, and coolability and melt pool formation, may all contribute to the final state of the melt pool and its thermal loads on the lower head. By looking into previous research on relevant topics, we aim to identify the missing pieces in the picture. Based on the state of the art, we conclude by proposing future research needs.

  1. An evaluation of alternative reactor vessel cutting technologies for the experimental boiling water reactor at Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boing, L.E.; Henley, D.R. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Manion, W.J.; Gordon, J.W. (Nuclear Energy Services, Inc., Danbury, CT (USA))

    1989-12-01

    Metal cutting techniques that can be used to segment the reactor pressure vessel of the Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) have been evaluated by Nuclear Energy Services. Twelve cutting technologies are described in terms of their ability to perform the required task, their performance characteristics, environmental and radiological impacts, and cost and schedule considerations. Specific recommendations regarding which technology should ultimately be used by ANL are included. The selection of a cutting method was the responsibility of the decommissioning staff at ANL, who included a relative weighting of the parameters described in this document in their evaluation process. 73 refs., 26 figs., 69 tabs.

  2. Support device in a pressure vessel, particularly a reactor pressure vessel, to support against horizontal forces. Abstuetzeinrichtung an einem Druckbehaelter, insbesondere einem Reaktordruckbehaelter, gegen Horizontalkraefte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorner, H.; Harand, E.; Scholz, M.; Scheler, R.

    1986-04-17

    In a support device on a reactor pressure vessel of a PWR, a guide leading downwards is provided in the vertical pellet cartridge on the floor side of the reactor pressure vessel, which is located in a fixed support pipe. The support pipe is supported on a concreted baseplate in the horizontal direction, and can be screwed to this. The support pipe has a plate-shaped support foot to support it on the baseplate. The reactor pressure vessel, normally resting on its main coolant duct in the plane normal to the axis, can be effectively supported against horizontal forces by this additional support, without preventing thermal movement in the longitudinal axis.

  3. Boiling water reactor in a prestressed reinforced concrete vessel for an atomic central heating-and-power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokarev, Yu.I.; Sokolov, I.N.; Skvortsov, S.A.; Sidorov, A.M.; Krauze, L.V.

    1978-04-01

    The possibility of using a boiling water reactor in a prestressed reinforced concrete vessel for an atomic central heating-and-power plant (CHPP) was considered, with design features of the reactor intended for a two-purpose plant. A prestressed reinforced concrete vessel and integral arrangement of the primary circuit ensured reliability of the atomic CHPP using various CHPP flowsheets.

  4. Final Report of the 2nd Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry Installation And Evaluations for Kori Unit 1 Reactor Pressure Vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Byoung Chul; Yoo, Choon Sung; Lee, Sam Lai; Chang, Kee Ok; Gong, Un Sik; Choi, Kwon Jae; Chang, Jong Hwa; Kim, Kwan Hyun; Hong, Joon Wha

    2007-02-15

    This report describes a neutron fluence assessment performed for the Kori Unit 1 pressure vessel beltline region based on the guidance specified in Regulatory Guide 1.190. In this assessment, maximum fast neutron exposures expressed in terms of fast neutron fluence (E>1 MeV) and iron atom displacements (dpa) were established for the beltline region of the pressure vessel. After Cycle 22 of reactor operation, 2nd Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry Program was instituted at Kori Unit 1 to provide continuous monitoring of the beltline region of the reactor vessel. The use of the Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry Program coupled with available surveillance capsule measurements provides a plant specific data base that enables the evaluation of the vessel exposure and the uncertainty associated with that exposure over the service life of the unit. Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry has been evaluated at the conclusion of Cycle 23.

  5. Final report for the 2nd Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry Installations and Evaluations for Yonggwang Unit 2 Reactor Pressure Vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Byoung Chul; Yoo, Choon Sung; Lee, Sam Lai; Gong, Un Sik; Choi, Kwon Jae; Chung, Kyoung Ki; Kim, Kwan Hyun; Chang, Jong Hwa; Ha, Jea Ju

    2008-01-15

    This report describes a neutron fluence assessment performed for the Yonggwang Unit 2 pressure vessel beltline region based on the guidance specified in Regulatory Guide 1.190. In this assessment, maximum fast neutron exposures expressed in terms of fast neutron fluence (E>1 MeV) and iron atom displacements (dpa) were established for the beltline region of the pressure vessel. During Cycle 16 of reactor operation, an Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry Program was instituted at Yonggwang Unit 2 to provide continuous monitoring of the beltline region of the reactor vessel. The use of the Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry Program coupled with available surveillance capsule measurements provides a plant specific data base that enables the evaluation of the vessel exposure and the uncertainty associated with that exposure over the service life of the unit. Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry has been evaluated at the conclusion of Cycle 16.

  6. Final report for the 3rd Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry Installations and Evaluations for Kori Unit 1 Reactor Pressure Vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Byoung Chul; Yoo, Choon Sung; Lee, Sam Lai (and others)

    2008-03-15

    This report describes a neutron fluence assessment performed for the Kori Unit 1 pressure vessel belt line region based on the guidance specified in Regulatory Guide 1.190. In this assessment, maximum fast neutron exposures expressed in terms of fast neutron fluence (E>1 MeV) and iron atom displacements (dpa) were established for the belt line region of the pressure vessel. After Cycle 23 of reactor operation, 3rd Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry Program was instituted at Kori Unit 1 to provide continuous monitoring of the belt line region of the reactor vessel. The use of the Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry Program coupled with available surveillance capsule measurements provides a plant specific data base that enables the evaluation of the vessel exposure and the uncertainty associated with that exposure over the service life of the unit. Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry has been evaluated at the conclusion of Cycle 24.

  7. Final report for the 1st ex-vessel neutron dosimetry installations and evaluations for Kori unit 2 reactor pressure vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Byoung Chul; Yoo, Choon Sung; Lee, Sam Lai; Chang, Kee Ok; Gong, Un Sik; Choi, Kwon Jae; Chang, Jong Hwa; Lim, Nam Jin; Hong, Joon Wha; Cheon, Byeong Jin

    2006-11-15

    This report describes a neutron fluence assessment performed for the Kori unit 2 pressure vessel belt line region based on the guidance specified in regulatory guide 1.190. In this assessment, maximum fast neutron exposures expressed in terms of fast neutron fluence (E>1 MeV) and iron atom displacements (dpa) were established for the belt line region of the pressure vessel. During cycle 20 of reactor operation, an ex-vessel neutron dosimetry program was instituted at Kori unit 2 to provide continuous monitoring of the belt line region of the reactor vessel. The use of the ex-vessel neutron dosimetry program coupled with available surveillance capsule measurements provides a plant specific data base that enables the evaluation of the vessel exposure and the uncertainty associated with that exposure over the service life of the unit. Ex-vessel neutron dosimetry has been evaluated at the conclusion of cycle 20.

  8. Final Report of the 2nd Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry Installation And Evaluations for Yonggwang Unit 1 Reactor Pressure Vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Byoung Chul; Yoo, Choon Sung; Lee, Sam Lai; Gong, Un Sik; Choi, Kwon Jae; Chung, Kyoung Ki; Kim, Kwan Hyun; Chang, Jong Hwa; Ha, Jea Ju

    2008-01-15

    This report describes a neutron fluence assessment performed for the Kori Unit 2 pressure vessel belt line region based on the guidance specified in Regulatory Guide 1.190. In this assessment, maximum fast neutron exposures expressed in terms of fast neutron fluence (E>1 MeV) and iron atom displacements (dpa) were established for the belt line region of the pressure vessel. During Cycle 21 of reactor operation, an Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry Program was instituted at Kori Unit 2 to provide continuous monitoring of the belt line region of the reactor vessel. The use of the Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry Program coupled with available surveillance capsule measurements provides a plant specific data base that enables the evaluation of the vessel exposure and the uncertainty associated with that exposure over the service life of the unit. Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry has been evaluated at the conclusion of Cycle 21.

  9. 77 FR 16270 - Updated Aging Management Criteria for Reactor Vessel Internal Components of Pressurized Water...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-20

    ... COMMISSION Updated Aging Management Criteria for Reactor Vessel Internal Components of Pressurized Water... license renewal interim staff guidance (LR-ISG), LR-ISG-2011-04, ``Updated Aging Management Criteria for... Aging Lessons Learned (GALL) Report for the aging management of stainless steel structures and...

  10. Simulation of the Lower Head Boiling Water Reactor Vessel in a Severe Accident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Nuñez-Carrera

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is the simulation and analysis of the BoilingWater Reactor (BWR lower head during a severe accident. The COUPLE computer code was used in this work to model the heatup of the reactor core material that slumps in the lower head of the reactor pressure vessel. The prediction of the lower head failure is an important issue in the severe accidents field, due to the accident progression and the radiological consequences that are completely different with or without the failure of the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV. The release of molten material to the primary containment and the possibility of steam explosion may produce the failure of the primary containment with high radiological consequences. Then, it is important to have a detailed model in order to predict the behavior of the reactor vessel lower head in a severe accident. In this paper, a hypothetical simulation of a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA with simultaneous loss of off-site power and without injection of cooling water is presented with the proposal to evaluate the temperature distribution and heatup of the lower part of the RPV. The SCDAPSIM/RELAP5 3.2 code was used to build the BWR model and conduct the numerical simulation.

  11. Aging of reactor vessels in LWR type reactors; Envejecimiento de la vasija y de los internos del nuclear de los reactores tipo LWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez Briceno, D.; Lapena, J.; Serrano, M.

    2004-07-01

    Most of the degradation mechanisms of nuclear components were not included on the design so they have to be treated a posteriori, and that imply a loss of capacity. In this paper the state of the art on the reactor pressure vessel neutron embrittlement and on the irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking that affects internal components, are explained. Special attention is devoted on the influence of the neutron fluence on IASCC process, on the material alterations promoted by irradiation and their consequences on the susceptibility to this phenomenon. Regarding the reactor pressure vessel degradation, this paper discuss the application of the Master Curve on the structural integrity evaluation of the vessel. Other aspects related to further developments are also mentioned and the importance of a good materials ageing management on the operation of the plant is pointed out. (Author) 12 refs.

  12. Fatigue crack propagation in steels for reactor pressure vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klesnil, M.; Lukas, P.; Kunz, L. (Ceskoslovenska Akademie Ved, Brno. Ustav Fyzikalni Metalurgie); Troshchenko, V.T.; Pokrovskij, V.V.; Yasnij, P.V.; Skorenko, Y.S. (AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kiev. Inst. Problem Prochnosti)

    1983-01-01

    Fatigue crack propagation data were measured on 15Kh2NMFA steel of Czechoslovak and Soviet makes. The results obtained by two laboratories were compared with other available data regarding materials for pressure vessels of nuclear power plants. Crack propagation curves were measured at temperatures -60, 20 and 350 degC and the corresponding parameters of crack growth equation were found. Threshold values of stress intensity factor amplitude, Ksub(apz), and the influence of stress ratio R in the range of small crack rates were determined experimentally. Fractography revealed either transgranular or mixed transgranular and interaranular fracture modes depending on stress intensity amplitude Ksub(a) and the environment.

  13. Stress analyses for reactor pressure vessels by the example of a product line '69 boiling water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mkrtchyan, Lilit; Schau, Henry [TUEV SUED Energietechnik GmbH, Mannheim (Germany). Abt. Strukturverhalten; Wolf, Werner; Holzer, Wieland [TUEV SUED Industrie Service GmbH, Muenchen (Germany). Abt. Behaelter und Turbosatz; Wernicke, Robert; Trieglaff, Ralf [TUEV NORD SysTec GmbH und Co. KG, Hamburg (Germany). Abt. Festigkeit und Konstruktion

    2011-08-15

    The reactor pressure vessels (RPV) of boiling water reactors (BWR) belonging to the product line '69 have unusually designed heads. The spherical cap-shaped bottom head of the vessel is welded directly to the support flange of the lower shell course. This unusual construction has led repeatedly to controversial discussions concerning the limits and admissibility of stress intensities arising in the junction of the bottom head to the cylindrical shell. In the present paper, stress analyses for the design conditions are performed with the finite element method in order to determine and categorize the occurring stresses. The procedure of stress classification in accordance with the guidelines of German KTA 3201.2 and Section III of the ASME Code (Subsection NB) is described and subsequently demonstrated by the example of a typical BWR vessel. The accomplished investigations yield allowable stress intensities in the considered area. Additionally, limit load analyses are carried out to verify the obtained results. Complementary studies, performed for a torispherical head, prove that the determined maximum peak stresses in the junction between the bottom head and the cylindrical shell are not unusual also for pressure vessels with regular bottom head constructions. (orig.)

  14. Standard Guide for Conducting Supplemental Surveillance Tests for Nuclear Power Reactor Vessels, E 706 (IH)

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This guide discusses test procedures that can be used in conjunction with, but not as alternatives to, those required by Practices E185 and E2215 for the surveillance of nuclear reactor vessels. The supplemental mechanical property tests outlined permit the acquisition of additional information on radiation-induced changes in fracture toughness, notch ductility, and yield strength properties of the reactor vessel steels. 1.2 This guide provides recommendations for the preparation of test specimens for irradiation, and identifies special precautions and requirements for reactor surveillance operations and postirradiation test planning. Guidance on data reduction and computational procedures is also given. Reference is made to other ASTM test methods for the physical conduct of specimen tests and for raw data acquisition.

  15. Study on reactor vessel replacement (RVR) for 1100 MW class BWR plants in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizutani, J.; Kawamura, S. [Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc. (Japan); Aoki, M. [Hitachi Ltd., Ibaraki (Japan); Mori, T. [Toshiba Corp., Yokihama (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    Plant Life Management (PLM) is being studied in Japan, and reactor vessel replacement (RVR) is being considered as one option. Since reactor internals, except for reusable parts, and the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) are replaced, the RVR provides an effective technology for extending the service life of nuclear power plants substantially. At ICONE 7, we reported on the technical viability of the RVR for BWR4-type 800 MWe class plants. This time, we rationalized the RVR method through a study for BWR5-type 1100 MWe class plants to reduce the RVR duration and evaluated the technical viability and the economic efficiency of the method. In addition, we discuss how to dispose of the RPV to complete a scenario of the process from the RVR to its final disposal. (author)

  16. Structure analysis of a reactor pressure vessel by two and three-dimensional models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sacher, H.; Mayr, M. (Technischer Ueberwachungs-Verein Bayern e.V., Muenchen (Germany, F.R.))

    1982-03-01

    This paper investigates the reactor pressure vessel of a 1300 MW pressurised water reactor. In order to determine the stresses and deformations of the vessel, two- and three-dimensional finite element models are used which represent the real structure with different degrees of accuracy. The results achieved by these different models are compared for the case of the transient called 'Start up of the nuclear power plant'. It was found that axisymmetric models, which consider non-axisymmetric components by correction factors, together with special attention to holes and other stress concentrations, allow a sufficient computation of stresses and deformations in the vessel, with the exception of the coolant nozzle region. In this latter case a fully three-dimensional analysis may be necessary.

  17. ASSESSMENT OF THE POTENTIAL FOR HYDROGEN GENERATION DURING DEACTIVATION AND DECOMMISSIONING OF REACTOR VESSELS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiersma, B.; Serrato, M.; Langton, C.

    2010-11-10

    The R- and P-reactor vessels at the Savannah River Site (SRS) are being prepared for deactivation and decommissioning (D&D). D&D activities will consist primarily of physically isolating and stabilizing the reactor vessel by filling it with a grout material. The reactor vessels contain aluminum alloy materials, which pose a concern in that aluminum corrodes rapidly when it comes in contact with the alkaline grout. A product of the corrosion reaction is hydrogen gas and therefore potential flammability issues were assessed. A model was developed to calculate the hydrogen generation rate as the reactor is being filled with the grout material. Three options existed for the type of grout material for D&D of the reactor vessels. The grout formulation options included ceramicrete (pH 6-8), a calcium aluminate sulfate (CAS) based cement (pH 10), or Portland cement grout (pH 12.4). Corrosion data for aluminum in concrete were utilized as input for the model. The calculations considered such factors as the surface area of the aluminum components, the open cross-sectional area of the reactor vessel, the rate at which the grout is added to the reactor vessel, and temperature. Given the hydrogen generation rate, the hydrogen concentration in the vapor space of the reactor vessel above the grout was calculated. This concentration was compared to the lower flammability limit for hydrogen. The assessment concluded that either ceramicrete or the CAS grout may be used to safely grout the P-reactor vessel. The risk of accumulation of a flammable mixture of hydrogen between the grout-air interface and the top of the reactor is very low. Portland cement grout, on the other hand, for the same range of process parameters did not provide a margin of safety against the accumulation of flammable gas in the reactor vessel during grouting operations in the P-reactor vessel. Therefore, it was recommended that this grout not be utilized for this task. On the other hand, the R-reactor vessel

  18. In-vessel Retention Strategy for High Power Reactors - K-INERI Final Report (includes SBLB Test Results for Task 3 on External Reactor Vessel Cooling (ERVC) Boiling Data and CHF Enhancement Correlations)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F. B. Cheung; J. Yang; M. B. Dizon; J. Rempe

    2005-01-01

    In-vessel retention (IVR) of core melt is a key severe accident management strategy adopted by some operating nuclear power plants and proposed for some advanced light water reactors (ALWRs). If there were inadequate cooling during a reactor accident, a significant amount of core material could become molten and relocate to the lower head of the reactor vessel, as happened in the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) accident. If it is possible to ensure that the vessel head remains intact so that relocated core materials are retained within the vessel, the enhanced safety associated with these plants can reduce concerns about containment failure and associated risk. For example, the enhanced safety of the Westinghouse Advanced 600 MWe PWR (AP600), which relied upon External Reactor Vessel Cooling (ERVC) for IVR, resulted in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC) approving the design without requiring certain conventional features common to existing LWRs. However, it is not clear that currently proposed external reactor vessel cooling (ERVC) without additional enhancements could provide sufficient heat removal for higher-power reactors (up to 1500 MWe). Hence, a collaborative, three-year, U.S. - Korean International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (INERI) project was completed in which the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Seoul National University (SNU), Pennsylvania State University (PSU), and the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) investigated the performance of ERVC and an in-vessel core catcher (IVCC) to determine if IVR is feasible for reactors up to 1500 MWe.

  19. Correlation between radiation damage and magnetic properties in reactor vessel steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kempf, R.A., E-mail: kempf@cnea.gov.ar [División Caracterización, GCCN, CAC-CNEA (Argentina); Sacanell, J. [Departamento Física de la Materia Condensada, GIyA, CAC-CNEA, CONICET (Argentina); Milano, J. [División Resonancias Magnéticas, CAB-CNEA, CONICET (Argentina); Guerra Méndez, N. [Departamento Física de la Materia Condensada, GIyA, CAC-CNEA, CONICET (Argentina); Winkler, E.; Butera, A. [División Resonancias Magnéticas, CAB-CNEA, CONICET (Argentina); Troiani, H. [División Física de Metales, CAB-CNEA and Instituto Balseiro (UNCU), CONICET (Argentina); Saleta, M.E. [División Resonancias Magnéticas, CAB-CNEA, CONICET (Argentina); Fortis, A.M. [Departamento Estructura y Comportamiento. Gerencia Materiales-GAEN, CAC-CNEA (Argentina)

    2014-02-01

    Since reactor pressure vessel steels are ferromagnetic, provide a convenient means to monitor changes in the mechanical properties of the material upon irradiation with high energy particles, by measuring their magnetic properties. Here, we discuss the correlation between mechanical and magnetic properties and microstructure, by studying the flux effect on the nuclear pressure vessel steel used in reactors currently under construction in Argentina. Charpy-V notched specimens of this steel were irradiated in the RA1 experimental reactor at 275 °C with two lead factors (LFs), 93 and 183. The magnetic properties were studied by means of DC magnetometry and ferromagnetic resonance. The results show that the coercive field and magnetic anisotropy spatial distribution are sensitive to the LF and can be explained by taking into account the evolution of the microstructure with this parameter. The saturation magnetization shows a dominant dependence on the accumulated damage. Consequently, the mentioned techniques are suitable to estimate the degradation of the reactor vessel steel.

  20. MAGNESIUM MONO POTASSIUM PHOSPHATE GROUT FOR P-REACTOR VESSEL IN-SITU DECOMISSIONING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langton, C.; Stefanko, D.

    2011-01-05

    The objective of this report is to document laboratory testing of magnesium mono potassium phosphate grouts for P-Reactor vessel in-situ decommissioning. Magnesium mono potassium phosphate cement-based grout was identified as candidate material for filling (physically stabilizing) the 105-P Reactor vessel (RV) because it is less alkaline than portland cement-based grout (pH of about 12.4). A less alkaline material ({<=} 10.5) was desired to address a potential materials compatibility issue caused by corrosion of aluminum metal in highly alkaline environments such as that encountered in portland cement grouts. Information concerning access points into the P-Reactor vessel and amount of aluminum metal in the vessel is provided elsewhere. Fresh and cured properties were measured for: (1) commercially blended magnesium mono potassium phosphate packaged grouts, (2) commercially available binders blended with inert fillers at SRNL, (3) grouts prepared from technical grade MgO and KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} and inert fillers (quartz sands, Class F fly ash), and (4) Ceramicrete{reg_sign} magnesium mono potassium phosphate-based grouts prepared at Argonne National Laboratory. Boric acid was evaluated as a set retarder in the magnesium mono potassium phosphate mixes.

  1. The 4th surveillance testing for Kori unit 3 reactor vessel materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Kee Ok; Kim, Byoung Chul; Lee, Sam Lai; Choi, Kwun Jae; Gong, Un Sik; Chang, Jong Hwa; Joo, Yong Sun; Ahn, Sang Bok; Hong, Joon Hwa [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2000-10-01

    Surveillance testing for reactor vessel materials is performed in order to evaluate the irradiation embrittlement due to neutrons during operation and set the condition of safe operation of nuclear reactor. The 4th surveillance testing was performed completely by Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute at Taejeon after the capsule was transported from Kori site including its removal from reactor. Fast neutron fluences for capsules were calculated and various testing including mechanical and chemistry analysis were performed in order to evaluate the integrity of Kori unit 3 reactor vessel during the operation until life time. The evaluation results are as follows; Fast neutron fluences for capsules U, V, X and W are 4.983E+18, 1.641E+19, 3.158E+19, and 4.469E+19n/cm{sup 2}, respectively. The bias factor, the ratio of calculation/measurement, was 0.840 for the 1st through 4th testing and the calculational uncertainty, 12% satisfied the requirement of USNRC Reg.Guide DG-1053, 20%. The best estimated neutron fluence for reactor vessel inside surface was 1.362E+19n/cm{sup 2} based on the end of 12th fuel cycle and it was predicted that the fluences of vessel inside surface at 32, 40, 48 and 56EFPY would reach 3.481E+19, 4.209E+19, 5.144E+19 and 5.974E+19n/cm{sup 2} based on the current calculation. The result through this analysis for Kori unit 3 showed that there would be no problem for the pressurized thermal shock(PTS) during the operation until design life. 48 refs., 35 figs., 41 tabs. (Author)

  2. The 5th surveillance testing for Kori unit 2 reactor vessel materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Kee Ok; Kim, Byoung Chul; Lee, Sam Lai; Choi, Kwon Jae; Gong, Un Sik; Chang, Jong Hwa; Joo, Yong Sun; Ahn, Sang Bok; Hong, Joon Hwa [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2001-03-01

    Surveillance testing for reactor vessel materials is performed in order to evaluate the irradiation embrittlement due to neutrons during operation and set the condition of safe operation of nuclear reactor. The 5th surveillance testing was performed completely by Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute at Taejeon after the capsule was transported from Kori site including its removal from reactor. Fast neutron fluences for capsules were calculated and various testing including mechanical and chemistry analysis were performed in order to evaluate the integrity of Kori unit 2 reactor vessel during the operation until life time. The evaluation results are as follows; Fast neutron fluences for capsules V, R, P, T and N are 2.837E+18, 1.105E+19, 2.110E+19, 3.705E+19 and 4.831E+19n/cm{sup 2}, respectively. The bias factor, the ratio of measurement/calculation, was 0.918 for the 1st through 5th testing and the calculational uncertainty, 11.6% satisfied the requirement of USNRC Reg.Guide DG-1053, 20%. The best estimated neutron fluence for reactor vessel inside surface was 1.898E+19n/cm{sup 2} based on the end of 15th fuel cycle and it was predicted that the fluences of vessel inside surface at 32, 40, 48 and 56EFPY would reach 4.203E+19, 5.232E+19, 6.262E+19 and 7.291E+19n/cm{sup 2} based on the current calculation. The result through this analysis for Kori unit 2 showed that there would be no problem for the pressurized thermal shock(PTS) during the operation until design life. 49 refs., 35 figs., 48 tabs. (Author)

  3. Development of advanced design features for KNGR reactor vessel and internals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jong Kyun; Ru, Bong; Lee, Jae Han; Lee, Hyung Yeon; Kim, Jong Bum; Ku, Kyung Heoy; Lee, Ki Young; Lee, Jun; Kim, Young In [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-12-01

    Developments of KNGR design require to enhance the design to implement the design requirements, such as plant life time from 40 years to 60 years, safety, performance and structure and components design. The designs used for existing nuclear power plants should be modified or improved to meet the requirements in KNGR design. The purpose of the task is to develop the Advanced Design Features (ADF) related to mechanical and structural design for KNGR reactor vessel and reactor internals. The structural integrity for the System 80+ reactor vessel, of which design life is 60 years, was reviewed. EPRI-URD, CESSAR-DC, and the present design status and characteristics of System 80+ reactor vessel were comparatively studied and the improvement of reactor vessel surveillance program was investigated. The performance and aseismic characteristics of the CE-type CEDM, which will be used in System 80+, are investigated. The driving cycles of CEDM are evaluated for the load follow operation(LFO), of which Mode K is being developed by KAERI. The position of the USNRC, EPRI, ABB-CE, and industries on the elimination of OBE are reviewed, and especially ABB-CE System 80+ FSER is reviewed in detail. For the pre-stage of the verification of the OBE elimination from the design, the review of the seismic responses, i.e.. shear forces and moments, of YGN 3/4 RI was performed and the ratio of OBE response to SSE response was analysed. The screening criteria were reviewed to evaluate the integrity against pressurized thermal shock (PTS) for RV belt-line of System 80+. The evaluation methods for fracture integrity when screening criteria are not met were reviewed. The structural characteristics of IRWST spargers of System 80+ were investigated and the effect of hydrodynamic loads on NSSS was reviewed. 18 figs., 9 tabs., 40 refs. (Author) .new.

  4. Reactor design for nuclear electric propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, D. R.; Ranken, W. A.

    1979-01-01

    The paper analyzes the consequences of heat pipe failures, that resulted in modifications to the basic design of a heat-pipe cooled, fast spectrum nuclear reactor and led to consideration of an entirely different core design. The new design features an integral laminated core configuration consisting of alternating layers of UO2 and molybdenum sheets that span the diameter of the core. Design characteristics are presented and compared for two reactors. A conceptual design for a heat exchanger between the core and the thermionic converter assembly is described. This heat exchanger would provide design and fabrication decoupling of these two assemblies.

  5. Prediction of the reactor vessel water level using fuzzy neural networks in severe accident circumstance of NPPs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Soon Ho; Kim, Dae Seop; Kim, Jae Hwan; Na, Man Gyun [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    Safety-related parameters are very important for confirming the status of a nuclear power plant. In particular, the reactor vessel water level has a direct impact on the safety fortress by confirming reactor core cooling. In this study, the reactor vessel water level under the condition of a severe accident, where the water level could not be measured, was predicted using a fuzzy neural network (FNN). The prediction model was developed using training data, and validated using independent test data. The data was generated from simulations of the optimized power reactor 1000 (OPR1000) using MAAP4 code. The informative data for training the FNN model was selected using the subtractive clustering method. The prediction performance of the reactor vessel water level was quite satisfactory, but a few large errors were occasionally observed. To check the effect of instrument errors, the prediction model was verified using data containing artificially added errors. The developed FNN model was sufficiently accurate to be used to predict the reactor vessel water level in severe accident situations where the integrity of the reactor vessel water level sensor is compromised. Furthermore, if the developed FNN model can be optimized using a variety of data, it should be possible to predict the reactor vessel water level precisely.

  6. Status report on nuclear reactors for space electric power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buden, D.

    1978-01-01

    The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory is studying reactor power plants for space applications in the late 1980s and 1990s. The study is concentrating on high-temperature, compact, fast reactors that can be coupled with various radiation shielding systems and thermoelectric, dynamic, or thermionic electric power conversion systems, depending on the mission. Increased questions have been raised about safety since the COSMOS 954 incident. High orbits (above 400 to 500 nautical miles) have sufficient lifetimes to allow radioactive elements to decay to safe levels. The major proposed applications for satellites with reactors in Earth orbit are in geosynchronous orbit (19,400 nautical miles). In missions at geosynchronous orbit where orbital lifetimes are practically indefinite, the safety considerations are negligible. The potential missions, why reactors are being considered as a prime power candidate, reactor features, and safety considerations are discussed.

  7. Development of automatic reactor vessel inspection systems; development of data acquisition and analysis system for the nuclear vessel weld

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Po; Park, C. H.; Kim, H. T.; Noh, H. C.; Lee, J. M.; Kim, C. K.; Um, B. G. [Research Institute of KAITEC, Seoul (Korea)

    2002-03-01

    The objective of this project is to develop an automated ultrasonic data acquisition and data analysis system to examine heavy vessel welds. In order to examine nuclear vessel welds including reactor pressure vessel(RPV), huge amount of ultrasonic data from 6 channels should be able to be on-line processed. In addition, ultrasonic transducer scanning device should be remotely controlled, because working place is high radiation area. This kind of an automated ultrasonic testing equipment has not been developed domestically yet. In order to develop an automated ultrasonic testing system, RPV ultrasonic testing equipments developed in foreign countries were investigated and the capability of high speed ultrasonic signal processing hardwares was analyzed. In this study, ultrasonic signal processing system was designed. And also, ultrasonic data acquisition software was developed. The new systems were tested on the RPV welds of Ulchin Unit 6 to confirm their functions and capabilities. They worked very well as designed and the tests were successfully completed. 13 refs., 34 figs., 11 tabs. (Author)

  8. An experimental study on coolability through the external reactor vessel cooling according to RPV insulation design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Kyoung Ho; Koo, Kil Mo; Park, Rae Joon; Cho, Young Ro; Kim, Sang Baik

    2004-01-01

    LAVA-ERVC experiments have been performed to investigate the effect of insulation design features on the water accessibility and coolability in case of the external reactor vessel cooling. Alumina iron thermite melt was used as corium stimulant. And the hemispherical test vessel is linearly scaled-down of RPV lower plenum. 4 tests have been performed varying the melt composition and the configuration of the insulation system. Due to the limited steam venting capacity through the insulation, steam binding occurred inside the annulus in the LAVA- ERVC-1, 2 tests which were performed for simulating the KSNP insulation design. This steam binding brought about incident heat up of the vessel outer surface at the upper part in the LAVA-ERVC-1, 2 tests. On the contrary, in the LAVA-ERVC-3, 4 tests which were performed for simulating the APR1400 insulation design, the temperatures of the vessel outer surface maintained near saturation temperature. Sufficient water ingression and steam venting through the insulation lead to effective cooldown of the vessel characterized by nucleate boiling in the LAVA-ERVC-3, 4 tests. From the LAVA-ERVC experimental results, it could be preliminarily concluded that if pertinent modification of the insulation design focused on the improvement of water ingression and steam venting should be preceded the possibility of in-vessel corium retention through the external vessel cooling could be considerably increased.

  9. In-Vessel Melt Retention of Pressurized Water Reactors: Historical Review and Future Research Needs

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Weimin; Yuan, Yidan; Sehgal, Bal Raj

    2016-01-01

    A historical review of in-vessel melt retention (IVR) is given, which is a severe accident mitigation measure extensively applied in Generation III pressurized water reactors (PWRs). The idea of IVR actually originated from the back-fitting of the Generation II reactor Loviisa VVER-440 in order to cope with the core-melt risk. It was then employed in the new deigns such as Westinghouse AP1000, the Korean APR1400 as well as Chinese advanced PWR designs HPR1000 and CAP1400. The most influential...

  10. Conditioning of waste from the dismantling of reactor pressure vessel components and of core components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cleve, R.; Oldiges, O.; Splittler, U.

    2001-07-01

    When power reactors are shut down, the treatment of the core components and of the reactor pressure vessel components constitutes a particular task. Due to its special radiological characteristics, this waste must basically be handled using remote-control equipment with regard to the treatment. For its conditioning in a manner appropriate for the final storage, the waste must be dried and packed into suitable packing drums. The solution implemented by GNS and DSD in order to treat this waste from the Wuergassen nuclear power plant is described in the present contribution. (orig.)

  11. Collaborative investigations of in-service irradiated material from the Japan Power Demonstration Reactor pressure vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corwin, W.R.; Broadhead, B.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Suzuki, M.; Kohsaka, A. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai (Japan)

    1997-02-01

    There is a need to validate the results of irradiation effects research by the examination of material taken directly from the wall of a pressure vessel that has been irradiated during normal service. Just such an evaluation is currently being conducted on material from the wall of the pressure vessel from the Japan Power Demonstration Reactor (JPDR). The research is being jointly performed at the Tokai Research Establishment of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) and by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-funded Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL).

  12. Cutting and conditioning of the reactor pressure vessel in the NPP Wuergassen; Zerlegung und Konditionierung des Reaktordruckgefaesses im Kernkraftwerk Wuergassen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraps, Uwe [AREVA NP GmbH, Erlangen (Germany); Duwe, Peter [E.ON Kernkraft GmbH, Bewerungen (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    NPP Wuergassen was shutdown in 1995 after 23 years of operation. Since 1997 the nuclear power plant is being dismantled. The cutting of the reactor pressure vessel internals was performed between 2003 and 2008. After decontamination the cylindrical parts of the reactor pressure vessel were dissected, the process was finalized in 2010. AREVA has now a 30 years-experience concerning repair, replacement and dismantling of reactor components. In the contribution the authors describe the process planning, manufacture and testing of appropriate remote handled tools, decontamination, dissection of the pressure vessel (320 t), conditioning, packaging and transport of the radioactive waste including radiation protection monitoring.

  13. Adoption of in-vessel retention concept for VVER-440/V213 reactors in Central European Countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matejovic, Peter, E-mail: peter.matejovic@ivstt.sk [Inzinierska Vypoctova Spolocnost (IVS), Jana Holleho 5, 91701 Trnava (Slovakia); Barnak, Miroslav; Bachraty, Milan; Vranka, Lubomir [Inzinierska Vypoctova Spolocnost (IVS), Jana Holleho 5, 91701 Trnava (Slovakia); Berky, Robert [Integrita a Bezpecnost Ocelovych Konstrukcii, Rybnicna 40, 831 07 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2017-04-01

    Highlights: • Design of in-vessel retention concept for VVER-440/V213 reactors. • Thermal loads acting on the inner reactor surface. • Structural response of reactor pressure vessel. • External reactor vessel cooling. - Abstract: An in-vessel retention (IVR) concept was proposed for standard VVER-440/V213 reactors equipped with confinement made of reinforced concrete and bubbler condenser pressure suppression system. This IVR concept is based on simple modifications of existing plant technology and thus it was attractive for plant operators in Central European Countries. Contrary to the solution that was adopted before at Loviisa NPP in Finland (two units of VVER-440/V213 reactor with steel confinement equipped with ice condenser), the coolant access to the reactor pressure vessel from flooded cavity is enabled via closable hole installed in the centre of thermal shield of the reactor lower head instead of lowering this massive structure in the case of severe accident. As a consequence, the crucial point of this IVR concept is narrow gap between torispherical lower head and thermal and biological shield. Here the highest thermal flux is expected in the case of severe accident. Thus, realistic estimation of thermal load and corresponding deformations of reactor wall and their impact on gap width for coolant flow are of primarily importance. In this contribution the attention is paid especially to the analytical support with emphasis to the following points: 1) {sup ∗}Estimation of thermal loads acting on the inner reactor surface; 2) {sup ∗}Estimation of structural response of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) with emphasis on the deformation of outer reactor surface and its impact on the annular gap between RPV wall and thermal/biological shield; 3) {sup ∗}Analysis of external reactor vessel cooling. For this purpose the ASTEC code was used for performing analysis of core degradation scenarios, the ANSYS code for structural analysis of reactor vessel

  14. Investigation of a Coolant Mixing Phenomena within the Reactor Pressure Vessel of a VVER-1000 Reactor with Different Simulation Tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Sánchez

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Institute of Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology (INR is involved in the qualification of coupled codes for reactor safety evaluations, aiming to improve their prediction capability and acceptability. In the frame of the VVER-1000 Coolant Transient Benchmark Phase 1, RELAP5/PARCS has been extensively assessed. Phase 2 of this benchmark was focused on both multidimensional thermal hydraulic phenomena and core physics. Plant data will be used to qualify the 3D models of TRACE and RELAP5/CFX, which were coupled for this purpose. The developed multidimensional models of the VVER-1000 reactor pressure vessel (RPV as well as the performed calculations will be described in detail. The predicted results are in good agreement with experimental data. It was demonstrated that the chosen 3D nodalization of the RPV is adequate for the description of the coolant mixing phenomena in a VVER-1000 reactor. Even though only a 3D coarse nodalization is used in TRACE, the integral results are comparable to those obtained by RELAP5/CFX.

  15. IAEA international studies on irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brumovsky, M. [Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc (Czech Republic); Steele, L.E. [Chief Scientific Investigator of the Programme, Springfield, VA (United States)

    1997-02-01

    In last 25 years, three phases a Co-operative Research Programme on Irradiation Embrittlement of Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels has been organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency. This programme started with eight countries in 1971 and finally 16 countries took part in phase III of the Programme in 1983. Several main efforts were put into preparation of the programme, but the principal task was concentrated on an international comparison of radiation damage characterization by different laboratories for steels of {open_quotes}old{close_quotes} (with high impurity contents) and {open_quotes}advanced{close_quotes} (with low impurity contents) types as well as on development of small scale fracture mechanics procedures applicable to reactor pressure vessel surveillance programmes. This year, a new programme has been opened, concentrated mostly on small scale fracture mechanics testing.

  16. Lower Length Scale Model Development for Embrittlement of Reactor Presure Vessel Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yongfeng [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Schwen, Daniel [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Chakraborty, Pritam [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bai, Xianming [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This report summarizes the lower-length-scale effort during FY 2016 in developing mesoscale capabilities for microstructure evolution, plasticity and fracture in reactor pressure vessel steels. During operation, reactor pressure vessels are subject to hardening and embrittlement caused by irradiation induced defect accumulation and irradiation enhanced solute precipitation. Both defect production and solute precipitation start from the atomic scale, and manifest their eventual effects as degradation in engineering scale properties. To predict the property degradation, multiscale modeling and simulation are needed to deal with the microstructure evolution, and to link the microstructure feature to material properties. In this report, the development of mesoscale capabilities for defect accumulation and solute precipitation are summarized. A crystal plasticity model to capture defect-dislocation interaction and a damage model for cleavage micro-crack propagation is also provided.

  17. RADIATION DOSIMETRY OF THE PRESSURE VESSEL INTERNALS OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HOLDEN,N.E.; RECINIELLO,R.N.; HU,J.P.; RORER,D.C.

    2002-08-18

    In preparation for the eventual decommissioning of the High Flux Beam Reactor after the permanent removal of its fuel elements from the Brookhaven National Laboratory, both measurements and calculations of the decay gamma-ray dose rate have been performed for the reactor pressure vessel and vessel internal structures which included the upper and lower thermal shields, the transition plate, and the control rod blades. The measurements were made using Red Perspex{trademark} polymethyl methacrylate high-level film dosimeters, a Radcal ''peanut'' ion chamber, and Eberline's high-range ion chamber. To compare with measured gamma-ray dose rate, the Monte Carlo MCNP code and geometric progressive Microshield code were used to model the gamma transport and dose buildup.

  18. Creep crack growth in a reactor pressure vessel steel at 360 deg C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rui Wu; Seitisleam, F.; Sandstroem, R. [Swedish Institute for Metals Research, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1998-12-31

    Plain creep (PC) and creep crack growth (CCG) tests at 360 deg C and post metallography were carried out on a low alloy reactor pressure vessel steel (ASTM A508 class 2) with different microstructures. Lives for the CCG tests were shorter than those for the PC tests and this is more pronounced for simulated heat affected zone microstructure than for the parent metal at longer lives. For the CCG tests, after initiation, the cracks grew constantly and intergranularly before they accelerated to approach rupture. The creep crack growth rate is well described by C*. The relations between reference stress, failure time and steady crack growth rate are presented for the CCG tests. It is demonstrated that the failure stress due to CCG is considerably lower than the yield stress at 360 deg C. Consequently, the CCG will control the static strength of a reactor vessel. (orig.) 17 refs.

  19. Microwave release ofpectin from orange peel albedo using a closed vessel reactor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pectin was extracted from blood Moro orange in a closed vessel reactor heated with microwave irradiation. Time of heating was either 2 minutes at 110 °C or 210 minutes at 75 °C in pH range of 1.7 to 2.8. The run at 75 °C and a pH 1.7 with resistive heating was performed to simulate industrial proces...

  20. Nuclear power station with a water-cooled reactor pressure vessel. Kernkraftwerk mit einem wassergekuehlten Reaktordruckbehaelter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, R.; Brunner, G.; Jost, N.

    1987-10-29

    Nuclear radiation produces radiolysis gases, which are undesirable for corrosion and oxyhydrogen gas reasons. To limit the proportion of this radiolysis gas, the invention provides that catalytic surfaces should be introduced into the primary circuit, to produce recombination of hydrogen and oxygen. These surfaces can be accommodated in the upper part of the reactor pressure vessel. The live steam screen can also have a catalytic surface.

  1. Implementation of 3D-Imaging technique for visual testing in a nuclear reactor pressure vessel

    OpenAIRE

    Tanco, André

    2014-01-01

    This master thesis has been performed by request of Dekra Industrial AB. Dekra Industrial AB is a Swedish subsidiary company of the German company Dekra and works for example with safety inspections within the nuclear power industry. The inspections performed by the company are often non-destructive testing (NDT) such as visual inspections of nuclear reactor pressure vessels. The inspection methods used today are considered to be further developed and there is a strong demand of improving the...

  2. An experimental study of hypervapotron structure in external reactor vessel cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yufeng; Zhang, Ming [State Nuclear Power Technology R& D Center (Beijing), Beijing (China); Hou, Fangxin [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China); Gao, Tianfang [State Nuclear Power Technology R& D Center (Beijing), Beijing (China); Chen, Peipei, E-mail: chenpeipei@snptc.com.cn [State Power Investment Group Corporation, Beijing (China)

    2016-07-15

    Highlights: • Experiments are performed to study the application of hypervapotron in ERVC design. • CHF experiments on two surfaces are conducted under different flow conditions. • Hypervapotron improves CHF performance by 40–60% compared with smooth surface. • Visualization shows fin structure removes vapor mushroom for better liquid supply. - Abstract: In vessel retention (IVR) is one of the key strategies for many advanced LWR designs to mitigate postulated severe accidents. The success of IVR substantially relies on external reactor vessel cooling (ERVC) by which the decay heat is removed from the melt core in the reactor vessel lower head. The main challenge of IVR is to provide an adequate safety margin of ERVC against critical heat flux (CHF) of subcooled flow boiling in the reactor lower head flow channel. Due to uncertainties in corium melt pool configuration, large CHF margin of ERVC is usually required by regulatory authorities to demonstrate reliability of severe accident mitigation methods. Various CHF enhancement designs have been proposed and studied in literature. In this paper, an experimental study of hypervapotron structure as a novel design to improve CHF performance of ERVC is conducted. Hypervapotron is chosen as one of the potential engineering options for International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) program as a divertor structure to remove highly intense heat from fusion chamber. This study is to conduct CHF experiments at typical PWR ERVC working conditions. The CHF experiments are performed in a 30 mm by 61 mm rectangular flow channel with a 200 mm long heated surface along the flow direction. Both smooth and hypervapotron surface are tested at various inclination angles of the test section to simulate various positions of the reactor lower head. The hypervapotron is found to have a 40–60% CHF improvement compared with the smooth surface. The high speed visualization indicates that hypervapotron is able to

  3. Fabrication Flaw Density and Distribution In Repairs to Reactor Pressure Vessel and Piping Welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GJ Schuster, FA Simonen, SR Doctor

    2008-04-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is developing a generalized fabrication flaw distribution for the population of nuclear reactor pressure vessels and for piping welds in U.S. operating reactors. The purpose of the generalized flaw distribution is to predict component-specific flaw densities. The estimates of fabrication flaws are intended for use in fracture mechanics structural integrity assessments. Structural integrity assessments, such as estimating the frequency of loss-of-coolant accidents, are performed by computer codes that require, as input, accurate estimates of flaw densities. Welds from four different reactor pressure vessels and a collection of archived pipes have been studied to develop empirical estimates of fabrication flaw densities. This report describes the fabrication flaw distribution and characterization in the repair weld metal of vessels and piping. This work indicates that large flaws occur in these repairs. These results show that repair flaws are complex in composition and sometimes include cracks on the ends of the repair cavities. Parametric analysis using an exponential fit is performed on the data. The relevance of construction records is established for describing fabrication processes and product forms. An analysis of these records shows there was a significant change in repair frequency over the years when these components were fabricated. A description of repair flaw morphology is provided with a discussion of fracture mechanics significance. Fabrication flaws in repairs are characterized using optimized-access, high-sensitivity nondestructive ultrasonic testing. Flaw characterizations are then validated by other nondestructive evaluation techniques and complemented by destructive testing.

  4. The 5th surveillance testing for Kori unit 1 reactor vessel materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Kee Ok; Kim, Byoung Chul; Lee, Sam Lai; Choi, Kwun Jae; Gong, Un Sik; Chang, Jong Hwa; Joo, Yong Sun; Ahn, Sang Bok; Hong, Joon Hwa [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2000-08-01

    Surveillance testing for reactor vessel materials is performed in order to evaluate the irradiation embrittlement due to neutrons during operation and set the condition of safe operation of nuclear reactor. The 5th surveillance testing was performed primarily by Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute and Westinhouse corporation partially involved in testing and calculation data evaluation in order to obtain reliable test result. Fast neutron fluences for capsule V, T, S, R and P were 5.087E+18, 1.115E+19, 1.228E+19, 2.988E+19, and 3.938E+19n/cm2, respectively. The bias factor, the ratio of calculation/measurement, was 0.940 for the 1st through 5th testing and the calculational uncertainty, 7% satisfied the requirement of USNRC Reg.Guide DG-1053, 20%. The best estimated neutron fluence for reactor vessel inside surface was 1.9846E+19n/cm{sup 2} based on the end of 17th fuel cycle and it was predicted that the fluences of vessel inside surface at 24, 32, 40 and 48EFPY would reach 3.0593E+19, 4.0695E+19, 5.0797E+19 and 6.0900E+19n/cm{sup 2} based on the current calculation. PTS analysis for Kori unit 1 showed that 27.93EFPY was the threshold value for 300 deg F requirement. 71 refs., 33 figs., 52 tabs. (Author)

  5. Insights from Investigations of In-Vessel Retention for High Powered Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joy L. Rempe

    2005-10-01

    In a three-year U.S. - Korean International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (INERI), state-of-the-art analytical tools and key U.S. and Korean experimental facilities were used to explore two options, enhanced ERVC performance and the use of internal core catchers, that have the potential to increase the margin for in-vessel retention (IVR) in high power reactors (up to 1500 MWe). This increased margin has the potential to improve plant economics (owing to reduced regulatory requirements) and increase public acceptance (owing to reduced plant risk). Although this program focused upon the Korean Advanced Power Reactor -- 1400 MWe (APR 1400) design, recommentations were developed so that they can easily be applied to a wide range of existing and advanced reactor designs. This paper summarizes new data gained for evaluating the margin associated with various options investigated in this program. Insights from analyses completed with this data are also highlighted.

  6. Swedish Work on Brittle-Fracture Problems in Nuclear Reactor Pressure Vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grounes, M.

    1966-03-15

    After a short review of the part of the Swedish nuclear energy program that is of interest in this context the Swedish reactor pressure vessels and the reasoning behind the choice of materials are surveyed. Problems and desirable aims for future reactors are discussed. Much work is now being done on new types of pressure vessel steels with high strength, low transition temperature and good corrosion resistance. These steels are of the martensitic austenitic type Bofors 2RMO (13 % Cr, 6 % Ni, 1. 5 % Mo) and of the ferritic martensitic austenitic type Avesta 248 SV (16 % Cr, 5 % Ni, 1 % Mo). An applied philosophy for estimating the brittle-fracture tendency of pressure vessels is described. As a criterion of this tendency we use the crack-propagation transition temperature, e. g. as measured by the Robertson isothermal crack-arrest test. An estimate of this transition temperature at the end of the reactor' s lifetime must take increases due to fabrication, welding, geometry, ageing and irradiation into account. The transition temperature vs. stress curve moves towards higher temperatures during the reactor' s lifetime. As long as this curve does not cross the reactor vessel stress vs. temperature curve the vessel is considered safe. The magnitude of the different factors influencing the final transition temperature are discussed and data for the Marviken reactor's pressure vessel are presented. At the end of the reactor's lifetime the estimated transition temperature is 115 deg C, which is below the maximum permissible value. A program for the study of strain ageing has been initiated owing to the uncertainty as to the extent of strain ageing at low strains. A study of a simple crack-arrest test, developed in Sweden, is in progress. An extensive irradiation-effects program on several steels is in progress. Results from tests on the Swedish carbon-manganese steels 2103/R3, SIS 142103 and SIS 142102, the low-alloy steels Degerfors DE-631A, Bofors NO

  7. Analysis of Air Temperatures around Reactor Vessel in EU-APR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Won Seok; Lee, Keun Sung; Hwang, Do Hyun [KHNP CRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    EU-APR, modified and improved from its original design of APR1400, has been developed to comply with European Utility Requirements (EUR) and nuclear design requirements of the European countries. In EU-APR, the removable concrete shielding blocks is newly adopted to reduce the radioactive dose rate in order to allow personnel access to the containment building during power operation. During plants startup, hot shutdown and power operation, the reactor cavity HVAC system maintains temperature and humidity for the in-core instrument (ICI) chase, ex-core detector spaces, reactor cavity and the hot and cold leg penetration opening. CFD analysis has been performed in order to check if the air temperature in the reactor cavity and concrete in EU-APR are exceeded the temperature limits. Six calculations for EU-APR have been carried out with different opening areas of the relief damper plate and air flow rates sucked out through six ventilation pipes. For the temperature distribution in the reactor cavity, it is found that there are the regions above a temperature of 120℉(48.9℃). However, these regions are relatively small and are observed very near the reactor vessel insulation. Therefore, these high temperature regions do not directly influence on concrete. Furthermore, the heat emission used in the current calculations already includes 20% margin including the conservative margins used for the metal reflective heat losses and the margins used to estimate Gamma and neutron heat into the primary wall. Totally, 10% margin is included.

  8. Correlations of Nucleate Boiling Heat Transfer and Critical Heat Flux for External Reactor Vessel Cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Yang; F. B. Cheung; J. L. Rempe; K. Y. Suh; S. B. Kim

    2005-07-01

    Four types of steady-state boiling experiments were conducted to investigate the efficacy of two distinctly different heat transfer enhancement methods for external reactor vessel cooling under severe accident conditions. One method involved the use of a thin vessel coating and the other involved the use of an enhanced insulation structure. By comparing the results obtained in the four types of experiments, the separate and integral effect of vessel coating and insulation structure were determined. Correlation equations were obtained for the nucleate boiling heat transfer and the critical heat flux. It was found that both enhancement methods were quite effective. Depending on the angular location, the local critical heat flux could be enhanced by 1.4 to 2.5 times using vessel coating alone whereas it could be enhanced by 1.8 to 3.0 times using an enhanced insulation structure alone. When both vessel coating and insulation structure were used simultaneously, the integral effect on the enhancement was found much less than the product of the two separate effects, indicating possible competing mechanisms (i.e., interference) between the two enhancement methods.

  9. Reactor decommissioning at Magnox Electric sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joynson, Dennis [Magnox Electric plc (United Kingdom)

    1997-06-01

    There is almost continuous public debate about the cost-effectiveness of reprocessing spent nuclear fuels, and the practicality, cost and ethics of the final disposal of nuclear wastes. These questions may never be fully resolved but, meanwhile, Magnox Electric is pressing ahead with decommissioning its oldest nuclear power stations. Here, the author describes the work carried out so far at Berkeley, Trawsfynydd and Hunterston A. (Author).

  10. 78 FR 33120 - Final Interim Staff Guidance LR-ISG-2011-04; Updated Aging Management Criteria for Reactor Vessel...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-03

    ... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mr. On Yee, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory... Electric Power Research Institute and the Pressurized Water Reactor Owners Group Materials Subcommittee by..., Director, Division of License Renewal, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation. BILLING CODE 7590-01-P ...

  11. Space-reactor electric systems: subsystem technology assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, R.V.; Bost, D.; Determan, W.R.

    1983-03-29

    This report documents the subsystem technology assessment. For the purpose of this report, five subsystems were defined for a space reactor electric system, and the report is organized around these subsystems: reactor; shielding; primary heat transport; power conversion and processing; and heat rejection. The purpose of the assessment was to determine the current technology status and the technology potentials for different types of the five subsystems. The cost and schedule needed to develop these potentials were estimated, and sets of development-compatible subsystems were identified.

  12. Development of the fast reactor MAUS for space electric generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caira, Marco; Castiglia, Davide; Cumo, Fabrizio; Naviglio, Antonio

    1995-01-01

    The results achieved through the research carried out between July 1992 and June 1994 on the ``MAUS'' project (a nuclear electric generator to be used in space missions) by the University of Rome ``La Sapienza'', are presented. In particular, a detailed description of the reactor core is reported, according to the ``multi-cell'' fuel solution. The characteristics of fuel elements, of the reactor core, the results of the nuclear analyses carried out and the characteristic curves voltage/current of the thermionic generator are presented in the paper.

  13. Effects of irradiation at lower temperature on the microstructure of Cr-Mo-V-alloyed reactor pressure vessel steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grosse, M.; Boehmert, J.; Gilles, R. [Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin GmbH (Germany)

    1998-10-01

    The microstructural damage process due to neutron irradiation [1] proceeds in two stages: - formation of displacement cascades - evolution of the microstructure by defect reactions. Continuing our systematic investigation about the microstructural changes of Russian reactor pressure vessel steel due to neutron irradiation the microstructure of two laboratory heats of the VVER 440-type reactor pressure vessel steel after irradiation at 60 C was studied by small angle neutron scattering (SANS). 60 C-irradiation differently changes the irradiation-induced microstructure in comparison with irradiation at reactor operation temperature and can, thus, provide new insights into the mechanisms of the irradiation damage. (orig.)

  14. The aging of pressurized water nuclear reactor vessels; Le vieillissement des cuves de reacteurs nucleaires a eau sous pression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monin, L. [Autorite de Surete Nucleaire, Dir. des Equipements sous Pression Nucleaires, 75 - Paris (France); Monnot, B. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), Bureau d' Analyse des Materiels Mecaniques, 92 - Clamart (France)

    2009-07-15

    In pressurized water nuclear power plants, heat is produced by the fission of the uranium cores, a constituent of the fuel rods placed in the reactor core. This core formed by the set of fuel assemblies is contained In the reactor vessel. As a part of the second confinement barrier of the radioactive elements, the vessel enables the reactor core to be cooled the primary fluid, to be controlled by the control rods, and to be supervised. Its role is of prime importance for the safety of the plant. Its integrity must therefore be guaranteed and must be demonstrated under all operating conditions and for the entire duration of its operation. Contrary to other devices of the primary circuit, like the steam generators, the replacement of a vessel is not an operation considered by EDF. The working life of the facility is consequently linked to the justification of the suitability of the vessel's use. (author)

  15. Development of Mono-bloc Forging for CAP1400 Reactor Pressure Vessel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao-zhong, Wang; Kai-quan, Liu; Ying, Liu; Wen-hui, Zhang; De-li, Zhao

    With the Development of Larger Output and Longer Plant Life for Advanced Pressurized Water Reactor Pressure Vessel (APWRPV), Larger and Mono-bloc Forgings must be Necessary. In the researching and manufacturing of CAP1400RPV forgings, China First Heavy Industries (CFHI) Manufactured Mono-bloc Upper Head with Quick-loc and Mono-bloc Lower Head (Combined Part of Transition Ring and Lower Head),reducing the welding process and the mechanical property deference comparing with the traditional manufacturing, Comparing with AP1000 forgings, not only Obtained better Mechanical Properties, but also Reduced Manufacturing cycle of RPV and Nondestructive in-service Inspection due to Elimination of Weld Seams. CHFI will Development Mono-bloc Nozzle Shell (Combined Part of Vessel Flange Nozzle Shell and Inlet/Outlet Nozzles) for Future APWRPV.

  16. Safety assessment of in-vessel vapor explosion loads in next generation reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, Kwang Hyun; Cho, Jong Rae; Choi, Byung Uk; Kim, Ki Yong; Lee, Kyung Jung [Korea Maritime University, Busan (Korea); Park, Ik Kyu [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea)

    1998-12-01

    A safety assessment of the reactor vessel lower head integrity under in-vessel vapor explosion loads has been performed. The premixing and explosion calculations were performed using TRACER-II code. Using the calculated explosion pressures imposed on the lower head inner wall, strain calculations were performed using ANSYS code. The explosion analyses show that the explosion impulses are not altered significantly by the uncertain parameters of triggering location and time, fuel and vapor volume fractions in uniform premixture bounding calculations within the conservative ranges. Strain analyses using the calculated pressure loads on the lower head inner wall show that the vapor explosion-induced lower head failure is physically unreasonable. The static analysis using the conservative explosion-end pressure of 7,246 psia shows that the maximum equivalent strain is 4.3% at the bottom of lower head, which is less than the allowable threshold value of 11%. (author). 24 refs., 40 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Influence of fluence rate on radiation-induced mechanical property changes in reactor pressure vessel steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawthorne, J.R.; Hiser, A.L. (Materials Engineering Associates, Inc., Lanham, MD (USA))

    1990-03-01

    This report describes a set of experiments undertaken using a 2 MW test reactor, the UBR, to qualify the significance of fluence rate to the extent of embrittlement produced in reactor pressure vessel steels at their service temperature. The test materials included two reference plates (A 302-B, A 533-B steel) and two submerged arc weld deposits (Linde 80, Linde 0091 welding fluxes). Charpy-V (C{sub v}), tension and 0.5T-CT compact specimens were employed for notch ductility, strength and fracture toughness (J-R curve) determinations, respectively. Target fluence rates were 8 {times} 10{sup 10}, 6 {times} 10{sup 11} and 9 {times} 10{sup 12} n/cm{sup 2} {minus}s{sup {minus}1}. Specimen fluences ranged from 0.5 to 3.8 {times} 10{sup 19} n/cm{sup 2}, E > 1 MeV. The data describe a fluence-rate effect which may extend to power reactor surveillance as well as test reactor facilities now in use. The dependence of embrittlement sensitivity on fluence rate appears to differ for plate and weld deposit materials. Relatively good agreement in fluence-rate effects definition was observed among the three test methods. 52 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Improvement of remote control system of automatic ultrasonic equipment for inspection of reactor pressure vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheong, Yong Moo; Jung, H. K.; Joo, Y. S.; Koo, K. M.; Hyung, H.; Sim, C. M.; Gong, U. S.; Kim, S. H.; Lee, J. P.; Rhoo, H. C.; Kim, M. S.; Ryoo, S. K.; Choi, C. H.; Oh, K. I

    1999-12-01

    One of the important issues related to the nuclear safety is in-service inspection of reactor pressure vessel (RPV). A remote controlled automatic ultrasonic method is applied to the inspection. At present the automatic ultrasonic inspection system owned by KAERI is interrupted due to degradation of parts. In order to resume field inspection new remote control system for the equipment was designed and installed to the existing equipment. New ultrasonic sensors and their modules for RPV inspection were designed and fabricated in accordance with the new requirements of the inspection codes. Ultrasonic sensors were verified for the use in the RPV inspection. (autho0008.

  19. Magnetic non-destructive evaluation of hardening of cold rolled reactor pressure vessel steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuejiao; Qiang, Wenjiang; Shu, Guogang

    2017-08-01

    Non-destructive test (NDT) of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel is urgently required due to the life extension program of nuclear power plant. Here magnetic NDT of cold rolled RPV steel is studied. The strength, hardness and coercivity increase with the increasing deformation, and a good linear correlation between the increment of coercivity, hardness and yield strength is found, which may be helpful to develop magnetic NDT of degradation of RPV steel. It is also found that besides dislocation density, the distribution of dislocations may affect coercivity as well.

  20. Evaluation of dynamic fracture toughness for Yong Gwang unit 5 reactor pressure vessel materials (Baseline Tests)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chi Se Hwan; Kim, Joo Hag; Hong, Jun Hwa; Kwon, Sun Chil; Lee, Bong Sang [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-10-01

    The dynamic fracture toughness (K{sub d}) of intermediate shell and its weld in SA 508 CI. 3 Yong Gwang 5 reactor pressure vessel was determined and evaluated. Precracked thirty six Charpy specimens were tested by using an instrumented impact tester. The purpose of present work is to evaluate and confirm the un-irradiated dynamic fracture toughness and to provide pre-irradiation baseline data for future evaluation on dynamic fracture toughness change during operation. 18 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs. (Author)

  1. Deformation Characteristics and Sealing Performance of Metallic O-rings for a Reactor Pressure Vessel

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Mingxue; PENG, Xudong; Xie, Linjun; Meng, Xiangkai; Li, Xinggen

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides a reference to determine the seal performance of metallic O-rings for a reactor pressure vessel (RPV). A nonlinear elastic-plastic model of an O-ring was constructed by the finite element method to analyze its intrinsic properties. It is also validated by experiments on scaled samples. The effects of the compression ratio, the geometrical parameters of the O-ring, and the structure parameters of the groove on the flange are discussed in detail. The results showed that the ...

  2. Testing of plain and fibrous concrete single cavity prestressed concrete reactor vessel models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oland, C.B.

    1985-01-01

    Two single-cavity prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV) models were fabricated and tested to failure to demonstrate the structural response and ultimate pressure capacity of models cast from high-strength concretes. Concretes with design compressive strengths in excess of 70 MPa (10,000 psi) were developed for this investigation. One model was cast from plain concrete and failed in shear at the head region. The second model was cast from fiber reinforced concrete and failed by rupturing the circumferential prestressing at the sidewall of the structure. The tests also demonstrated the capabilities of the liner system to maintain a leak-tight pressure boundary. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  3. Remote through-wall sampling of the Trawsfynydd reactor pressure vessel: an overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curry, A.; Clayton, R. [Magnox Electric, Berkeley (United Kingdom)

    1997-02-01

    This paper summarizes the application of robotic equipment for gaining access to, and removing through-wall samples, from, welds of the reactor pressure vessel at Trawsfyndd power station. The environment, which presents hazards due to ionising radiation, radioactive contamination and asbestos-bearing materials is described. The means of access, by use of remote vehicles with robotic manipulators supported by additional vehicles, it reviewed. The use of abrasive water jet cutting for sample removal is introduced. The relative advantages and disadvantages of this technique are discussed. (Author).

  4. Remote through-wall sampling of the Trawsfynydd reactor pressure vessel: an overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curry, A.; Clayton, R. [Magnox Electric, Dartford (United Kingdom). Remote Operations

    1996-12-31

    This paper summarises the application of robotic equipment for gaining access to and removing through-wall samples from welds of the reactor pressure vessel at Trawsfynydd power station. The environment, which presents hazards due to ionising radiation, radioactive contamination and asbestos bearing materials is described. The means of access, by use of remote vehicles complete with robotic manipulators supported by additional vehicles, is reviewed. The use of Abrasive Water Jet Cutting for sample removal is introduced. The relative advantages and disadvantages of this technique are discussed. (UK).

  5. Characteristics of Modified 9Cr-1Mo Steel for Reactor Pressure Vessel of Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Ho; Ryu, W. S.; Han, Chang Hee; Yoon, J. H.; Chang, Jong Hwa

    2004-11-15

    Many researches and developments have been progressed for the construction of VHTR by 2020 in Korea. Modified 9Cr-1Mo steel has been receiving attention for the application to the reactor pressure vessel material of VHTR. We collected and analyzed the research data for modified 9Cr-1Mo steel in order to understand the characteristics of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel. The modified 9Cr-1Mo steel is a modified alloy system similar to conventional 9Cr-1Mo grade ferritic steel. Modifications include additions of vanadium, niobium, and nitrogen, as well as lower carbon content. In this report, we summarized the change of microstructure and mechanical properties after tempering, thermal aging, and irradiation. Modified 9Cr-1Mo steel has high strength and thermal conductivity, low thermal expansion, and good resistance to corrosion. But the irradiation embrittlement behavior of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel should be evaluated and the evaluation methodology also should be developed. At the same time, the characteristics of weldment which is the weak part in pressure vessel should be evaluated.

  6. Results of long-term field tests of protective earthing device for vessel electric systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blaginin V.A.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The results of prolonged natural tests of protective neutral earthing device for controlling the fire and electrical safety of vessel electric systems have been shown. The use of such devices provides safe single-phase fault currents and reducing arc overvoltage during the long-term operation of a ship. The results of long-term monitoring of the device operation as part of the existing vessel electric power system have confirmed its effectiveness

  7. Development of High Strength and High Toughness Steels for Reactor Vessel and Surgeline Pipe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, B. S.; Kim, M. C.; Yoon, J. H.; Kim, K. B.; Choi, K. J.; Cho, H. D.

    2010-07-15

    In addition to evaluating the effects of alloying elements, heat treatment conditions, weldability and neutron irradiation behavior were evaluated with 15 types of SA508 Gr.4N model alloys for reactor pressure vessel. The maximum yield strength of 630MPa were obtained by controlling chemical compositions and heat treatment conditions. Model alloys also showed excellent impact toughness and fracture toughness. The microstructure and mechanical properties of weld heat affected zone were evaluated by using simulated specimens and the effects of post weld heat treatment conditions were also investigated. Neutron irradiation behavior at high fluence level were characterized and then compared with commercial reactor pressure vessel steel. The value of transition temperature shift(TTS) was 22 .deg. C at 6.4x10{sup 19} n/cm{sup 2} which is similar to commercial RPV steel. However, its toughness after irradiation is much better than that of unirradiated commercial RPV steel due to the superior initial toughness. Leak-before-break(LBB) properties of type 316 stainless steel model alloys and their welds for surge line were evaluated as well as microstructure and mechanical properties. Tensile tests and J-R fracture resistance tests were carried out at RT and 316 .deg. C. The model alloys showed good tensile strength over standard value, except type 316L which has lower C/N. In the LBB safety analysis result, all of type 316 model alloys have higher allowable load than that of OPR1000 surge line

  8. Probabilistic Fracture Mechanics of Reactor Pressure Vessels with Populations of Flaws

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, Benjamin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Backman, Marie [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Williams, Paul [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hoffman, William [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Alfonsi, Andrea [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Dickson, Terry [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bass, B. Richard [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Klasky, Hilda [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This report documents recent progress in developing a tool that uses the Grizzly and RAVEN codes to perform probabilistic fracture mechanics analyses of reactor pressure vessels in light water reactor nuclear power plants. The Grizzly code is being developed with the goal of creating a general tool that can be applied to study a variety of degradation mechanisms in nuclear power plant components. Because of the central role of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) in a nuclear power plant, particular emphasis is being placed on developing capabilities to model fracture in embrittled RPVs to aid in the process surrounding decision making relating to life extension of existing plants. A typical RPV contains a large population of pre-existing flaws introduced during the manufacturing process. The use of probabilistic techniques is necessary to assess the likelihood of crack initiation at one or more of these flaws during a transient event. This report documents development and initial testing of a capability to perform probabilistic fracture mechanics of large populations of flaws in RPVs using reduced order models to compute fracture parameters. The work documented here builds on prior efforts to perform probabilistic analyses of a single flaw with uncertain parameters, as well as earlier work to develop deterministic capabilities to model the thermo-mechanical response of the RPV under transient events, and compute fracture mechanics parameters at locations of pre-defined flaws. The capabilities developed as part of this work provide a foundation for future work, which will develop a platform that provides the flexibility needed to consider scenarios that cannot be addressed with the tools used in current practice.

  9. Development of Integrated Regulatory Aging Management System related to Reactor Vessel Internals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Hanok; Park, Jeongsoon; Kim, Seonjae; Jhung, Myungjo [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    The primary function of the reactor vessel internals (RVIs) is to support the core, the control rod assemblies, the core support structure and the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) surveillance capsules. The RVIs have the additional function to direct the flow of the reactor coolant and provide shielding for the RPV. Ageing mechanisms are specific processes that gradually change characteristics of a component with time and use. According to the Generic Aging Lessons Learned (GALL) report, aging mechanisms, such as fatigue, embrittlement, corrosion, wear, radiation induced creep, relaxation and swelling, is related to RVIs. Establishing that effects of aging degradation in RVIs are adequately managed is vital for assuring continued functionality of RVIs. To achieve this goal, it is necessary to develop the regulatory standard as well as generic inspection and evaluation guideline for RVIs. In this paper, the Integrated Regulatory Aging Management System (IR-Aging), which efficiently manages key data necessary to the development of regulatory standards and assists effective evaluation of RVIs, is proposed. By using the proposed system, experts in different fields can co-operate to resolve safety issues and all users can share information and create valuable knowledge-base. In this paper, the Integrated Regulatory Aging Management System (IR-Aging) is proposed in order to manage data necessary to the development of regulatory standards and assists effective evaluation of RVIs. The proposed system provides various documents, such as US NRC and domestic regulatory documents, licensee's documents submitted to a regulatory body, and research documents. By using the proposed system, experts in different fields can co-operate to resolve safety issues and all users can share information and create valuable knowledge-base.

  10. Exploratory Study of Irradiation, Annealing, and Reirradiation Effects on American and Russian Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chernobaeva, A.A., Kryukov, A.M., Nikolaev, Y.A., Korolev, Y.N. [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation)], Sokolov, M.A., Nanstad, R.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-12-31

    One of the options to mitigate the effects of irradiation on reactor pressure vessels (RPVS) is to thermally anneal them to restore the toughness properties that have been degraded by neutron irradiation. even though a postirradiation anneal may be deemed successful, a critical aspect of continued RPV operation is the rate of embrittlement upon reirradiation. There are insufficient data available to allow for verification models of reirradiation embrittlement or for the development of a reliable predictive methodology. This is especially true in the case of fracture toughness data. Under the U.S.-Russia Joint Coordinating Committee for Civilian Nuclear Reactor Safety (JCCCNRS), Working Group 3 on Radiation Embrittlement, Structural Integrity, and Life Extension of Reactor Vessels and Supports agreed to conduct a comparative study of annealing and reirradiation effects on RPV steels. The working group agreed that each side would irradiate, anneal, reirradiate (if feasible), and test two materials of the other; so far, only charpy impact and tensile specimens have been included. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ornl) conducted such a program (irradiation and annealing) with two weld metals representative of VVER-440 AND VVER-1000 RPVS, while the Russian Research Center-Kurchatov Institute (RRC-KI) conducted a program (irradiation,annealing, reirradiation, and reannealing) with Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) program plate 02 and Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation (HSSI) program weld 73w. The results for each material from each laboratory are compared with those from the other laboratory. the ORNL experiments with the VVER welds included irradiation to about 1 x 10 (exp 19) N/SQ CM ({gt}1 MeV), while the RRC-KI experiments with the U.S. materials included irradiations from about 2 to 18 X 10 (exp 19) N/SQ CM ({gt}1 MeV).

  11. Effects of Surface Roughness, Oxidation, and Temperature on the Emissivity of Reactor Pressure Vessel Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, J. L. [University of Wisconsin–Madison, Department of Engineering Physics, Madison, Wisconsin; Jo, H. [University of Wisconsin–Madison, Department of Engineering Physics, Madison, Wisconsin; Tirawat, R. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Concentrating Solar Power Group, Golden, Colorado; Blomstrand, K. [University of Wisconsin–Madison, Department of Engineering Physics, Madison, Wisconsin; Sridharan, K. [University of Wisconsin–Madison, Department of Engineering Physics, Madison, Wisconsin

    2017-08-31

    Thermal radiation will be an important mode of heat transfer in future high-temperature reactors and in off-normal high-temperature scenarios in present reactors. In this work, spectral directional emissivities of two reactor pressure vessel (RPV) candidate materials were measured at room temperature after exposure to high-temperature air. In the case of SA508 steel, significant increases in emissivity were observed due to oxidation. In the case of Grade 91 steel, only very small increases were observed under the tested conditions. Effects of roughness were also investigated. To study the effects of roughening, unexposed samples of SA508 and Grade 91 steel were roughened via one of either grinding or shot-peening before being measured. Significant increases were observed only in samples having roughness exceeding the roughness expected of RPV surfaces. While the emissivity increases for SA508 from oxidation were indeed significant, the measured emissivity coefficients were below that of values commonly used in heat transfer models. Based on the observed experimental data, recommendations for emissivity inputs for heat transfer simulations are provided.

  12. The role of water chemistry for environmentally assisted cracking in low-alloy reactor pressure vessel and piping steels under boiling reactor conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seifert, H.-P.; Ritter, S

    2005-07-01

    The environmentally assisted initiation and propagation of cracks in structural materials is one of the most important degradation and ageing mechanisms in light water reactors (LWR) and may seriously affect plant availability and economics. In the first part of this paper a short general introduction on environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) and its significance for LWR is given. Then the important role of water chemistry control in reducing the EAC risk in LWR is illustrated by current research results about the effect of chloride transients and hydrogen water chemistry on the EAC crack growth behaviour of low-alloy reactor pressure vessel and piping steels under boiling water reactor conditions. (author)

  13. 46 CFR 28.345 - Electrical standards for vessels less than 79 feet (24 meters) in length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Electrical standards for vessels less than 79 feet (24... § 28.345 Electrical standards for vessels less than 79 feet (24 meters) in length. (a) A vessel less than 79 feet (24 meters) in length with an alternating current electrical distribution system may...

  14. Nuclear reactor power for an electrically powered orbital transfer vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, L.; Beatty, R.; Bhandari, P.; Chow, E.; Deininger, W.; Ewell, R.; Fujita, T.; Grossman, M.; Kia, T.; Nesmith, B.

    1987-01-01

    To help determine the systems requirements for a 300-kWe space nuclear reactor power system, a mission and spacecraft have been examined which utilize electric propulsion and this nuclear reactor power for multiple transfers of cargo between low earth orbit (LEO) and geosynchronous earth orbit (GEO). A propulsion system employing ion thrusters and xenon propellant was selected. Propellant and thrusters are replaced after each sortie to GEO. The mass of the Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV), empty and dry, is 11,000 kg; nominal propellant load is 5000 kg. The OTV operates between a circular orbit at 925 km altitude, 28.5 deg inclination, and GEO. Cargo is brought to the OTV by Shuttle and an Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV); the OTV then takes it to GEO. The OTV can also bring cargo back from GEO, for transfer by OMV to the Shuttle. OTV propellant is resupplied and the ion thrusters are replaced by the OMV before each trip to GEO. At the end of mission life, the OTV's electric propulsion is used to place it in a heliocentric orbit so that the reactor will not return to earth. The nominal cargo capability to GEO is 6000 kg with a transit time of 120 days; 1350 kg can be transferred in 90 days, and 14,300 kg in 240 days. These capabilities can be considerably increased by using separate Shuttle launches to bring up propellant and cargo, or by changing to mercury propellant.

  15. In-vessel core debris retention through external flooding of the reactor pressure vessel. State-of-the-art report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heel, A.M.J.M. van

    1995-07-01

    An overview of the state-of-the-art knowledge on the ex-vessel flooding accident management strategy for severe accidents in a NPP has been given. The feasibility has been discussed, as well as the in- and ex-vessel phenomena, which influence the structural integrity of the vessel. Finally, some computer codes with the ability to model the phenomena involved in ex-vessel flooding have been discussed. (orig./HP).

  16. Reactor moderator, pressure vessel, and heat rejection system of an open-cycle gas core nuclear rocket concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, M. F.; Whitmarsh, C. L., Jr.; Sirocky, P. J., Jr.; Iwanczyke, L. C.

    1973-01-01

    A preliminary design study of a conceptual 6000-megawatt open-cycle gas-core nuclear rocket engine system was made. The engine has a thrust of 196,600 newtons (44,200 lb) and a specific impulse of 4400 seconds. The nuclear fuel is uranium-235 and the propellant is hydrogen. Critical fuel mass was calculated for several reactor configurations. Major components of the reactor (reflector, pressure vessel, and waste heat rejection system) were considered conceptually and were sized.

  17. Creep-Fatigue Damage Evaluation of a Model Reactor Vessel and Reactor Internals of Sodium Test Facility according to ASME-NH and RCC-MRx Codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Dong-Won; Lee, Hyeong-Yeon; Eoh, Jae-Hyuk; Son, Seok-Kwon; Kim, Jong-Bum; Jeong, Ji-Young [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The objective of the STELLA-2 is to support the specific design approval for PGSFR by synthetic reviews of key safety issues and code validations through the integral effect tests. Due to its high temperature operation in SFRs (and in a testing facility) up to 550 °C, thermally induced creep-fatigue damage is very likely in components including a reactor vessel, reactor internals (interior structures), heat exchangers, pipelines, etc. In this study, structural integrity of the components such as reactor vessel and internals in STELLA-2 has been evaluated against creep-fatigue failures at a concept-design step. As 2D analysis yields far conservative results, a realistic 3D simulation is performed by a commercial software. A design integrity guarding against a creep-fatigue damage failure operating at high temperature was evaluated for the reactor vessel with its internal structure of the STELLA-2. Both the high temperature design codes were used for the evaluation, and results were compared. All the results showed the vessel as a whole is safely designed at the given operating conditions, while the ASME-NH gives a conservative evaluation.

  18. Inspection of dissimilar metal welds in reactor pressure vessels in Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gadea, J.R.; Regidor, J.J.; Pelaez, J.A.; Serrano, P. [Tecnatom, S.A., San Sebastian de los Reyes, Madrid (Spain)

    2011-07-01

    MRP-139 recommendations for inspection of dissimilar metal (DM) welds in PWR vessels were launched in the last years in the USA. Basically, it increases the frequency of the examinations in these type of welds, with major emphasis in the hot loops, adding one intermediate inspection at the ten years interval in outlet nozzles. The spanish nuclear power plants (NPP's) have begun the implementation of this type of inspections on the vessel nozzles DM welds. As this type of inspections could have an impact in the critical path duration of the outage, it is necessary the use of a mechanical equipment able to examine the nozzles DM welds in a short vessel occupation time (VOT) with high quality, qualified techniques and minimum requirements of the refuelling platform. Tecnatom undertook the design and development of a new more advanced equipment, named TENIS-DM, for implementing the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) nozzles examination. This equipment was designed in order to accomplish the stringent requirements and the updated examination techniques; it was used for the inspection of the DM welds of Asco 1 NPP inlet and outlet nozzles in March 2011. Examination techniques and procedures were qualified through the GRUVAL validation program, based on ENIC methodology. Mechanical scanner was equipped with a large number of examination probes, and TV cameras -for visual inspection and also for monitoring the ultrasonic inspections. A remote operated submarine was also used to give support to the operational personnel during the manipulation of the equipment and its movements from one nozzle to the others. During two months before the inspection, tests of the complete inspection system were made on a nozzle mock-up installed in a 4 meters deep well at Tecnatom's facilities; this scenario was also used during the training sessions of the inspection crew. The defined technical and practical objectives were achieved: use of qualified techniques and minimal impact on the

  19. Damage by radiation in structural materials of BWR reactor vessels; Dano por radiacion en materiales estructurales de vasijas de reactores BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robles, E.; Balcazar, M.; Alpizar, A.M.; Calderon, B.E. [Departamento de Sintesis y Caracterizacion de Materiales, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2002-07-01

    The structural materials which are manufactured the pressure vessels of the BWR reactors undergo degradation in their mechanical properties mainly due to the damage produced by the fast neutrons (E> 1 MeV) coming from the reactor core. The mechanisms of neutron damage in this type of materials are experimentally studied, through the irradiation of vessel steel in experimental reactors for a quickly ageing. Alternately the neutron damage through steel irradiation with heavy ions is simulated. In this work the first results of the damage induced by irradiation of a similar steel to the vessel of a BWR reactor are shown. The irradiation was performed with fast neutrons (E> 1 MeV, fluence of 1.45 x 10{sup 18} n/cm{sup 2}) in the TRIGA Mark III Salazar reactor and separately with Ni{sup +3} ions in a Tandetrom accelerator (E= 4.8 MeV and an ion flux rank of 0.1 to 53 ions/A{sup 2}). (Author)

  20. ASSESSMENT OF THE POTENTIAL FOR HYDROGEN GENERATION DURING GROUTING OPERATIONS IN THE R- AND P-REACTOR VESSELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiersma, B.

    2009-12-29

    The R- and P-reactor buildings were retired from service and are now being prepared for deactivation and decommissioning (D&D). D&D activities will consist primarily of immobilizing contaminated components and structures in a grout-like formulation. Aluminum corrodes very rapidly when it comes in contact with the alkaline grout materials and as a result produces hydrogen gas. To address this potential deflagration/explosion hazard, the Materials Science and Technology Directorate (MS&T) of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has been requested to review and evaluate existing experimental and analytical studies of this issue to determine if any process constraints on the chemistry of the fill material and the fill operation are necessary. Various options exist for the type of grout material that may be used for D&D of the reactor vessels. The grout formulation options include ceramicrete (pH 6-8), low pH portland cement + silica fume grout (pH 10.4), or Portland cement grout (pH 12.5). The assessment concluded that either ceramicrete or the silica fume grout may be used to safely grout the P-reactor vessel. The risk of accumulation of a flammable mixture of hydrogen between the grout-air interface and the top of the reactor is very low. Portland cement grout, on the other hand, for the same range of process parameters does not provide a significant margin of safety against the accumulation of flammable gas in the reactor vessel during grouting operations in the P-reactor vessel. It is recommended that this grout not be utilized for this task. The R-reactor vessel contains significantly less aluminum and thus a Portland cement grout may be considered as well. For example, if the grout fill rate is less than 1 inch/min and the grout temperature is maintained at 70 C or less, the risk of hydrogen accumulation in the R-reactor vessel is very low for the Portland cement. Alternatively, if the grout fill rate is less than 0.5 inch/min and the grout is maintained

  1. Pellet bed reactor concept for nuclear electric propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Morley, Nicholas J.; Juhasz, Albert

    1993-01-01

    For Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) applications, gas cooled nuclear reactors with dynamic energy conversion systems offer high specific power and low total mass. This paper describes the Pellet Bed Reactor (PeBR) concept for potential NEP missions to Mars. The helium cooled, 75-80 MWt PeBR, consists of a single annular fuel region filled with a randomly packed bed of spherical fuel pellets, is designed for multiple starts, and offers unique safety and operation features. Each fuel pellet, about 8-10 mm in diameter, is composed of hundreds of TRISO type fuel microspheres embedded in a graphite matrix for a full retention of fission products. To eliminate the likelihood of a single-point failure, the annular core of the PeBR is divided into three 120° sectors. Each sector is self contained and separate and capable of operating and being cooled on its own and in cooperation with either one or two other sectors. Each sector is coupled to a separate, 5 MWe Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) energy conversion unit and is subcritical for safe handling and launching. In the event of a failure of the cooling system of a core sector, the reactor power level may be reduced, allowing adjacent sectors to convect the heat away using their own cooling system, thus maintaining reactor operation. Also, due to the absence of an internal core structure in the PeBR core, fueling of the reactor can easily be performed either at the launch facility or in orbit, and refueling can be accomplished in orbit as needed to extend the power system lifetime

  2. The influence of chemistry concentration on the fracture risk of a reactor pressure vessel subjected to pressurized thermal shocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Pin-Chiun [Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chou, Hsoung-Wei, E-mail: hwchou@iner.gov.tw [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taoyuan 32546, Taiwan, ROC (China); Ferng, Yuh-Ming [Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • Probabilistic fracture mechanics method was used to analyze a reactor pressure vessel. • Effects of copper and nickel contents on RPV fracture probability under PTS were investigated and discussed. • Representative PTS transients of Beaver Valley nuclear power plant were utilized. • The range of copper and nickel contents of the RPV materials were suggested. • With different embrittlement levels the dominated PTS category is different. - Abstract: The radiation embrittlement behavior of reactor pressure vessel shell is influenced by the chemistry concentration of metal materials. This paper aims to study the effects of copper and nickel content variations on the fracture risk of pressurized water reactor (PWR) pressure vessel subjected to pressurized thermal shock (PTS) transients. The probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) code, FAVOR, which was developed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in the United States, is employed to perform the analyses. A Taiwan domestic PWR pressure vessel assumed with varied copper and nickel contents of beltline region welds and plates is investigated in the study. Some PTS transients analyzed from Beaver Valley Unit 1 for establishing the U.S. NRC's new PTS rule are applied as the loading condition. It is found that the content variation of copper and nickel will significantly affect the radiation embrittlement and the fracture probability of PWR pressure vessels. The results can be regarded as the risk incremental factors for comparison with the safety regulation requirements on vessel degradation as well as a reference for the operation of PWR plants in Taiwan.

  3. Ex-Vessel corium coolability and steam explosion energetics in nordic light water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinh, T.N.; Ma, W.M.; Karbojian, A.; Kudinov, P.; Tran, C.T.; Hansson, C.R. [Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), (Sweden)

    2008-03-15

    This report presents advances and insights from the KTH's study on corium pool heat transfer in the BWR lower head; debris bed formation; steam explosion energetics; thermal hydraulics and coolability in bottom-fed and heterogeneous debris beds. Specifically, for analysis of heat transfer in a BWR lower plenum an advanced threedimensional simulation tool was developed and validated, using a so-called effective convectivity approach and Fluent code platform. An assessment of corium retention and coolability in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) lower plenum by means of water supplied through the Control Rod Guide Tube (CRGT) cooling system was performed. Simulant material melt experiments were performed in an intermediate temperature range (1300-1600K) on DEFOR test facility to study formation of debris beds in high and low subcooled water pools characteristic of in-vessel and ex-vessel conditions. Results of the DEFOR-E scoping experiments and related analyses strongly suggest that porous beds formed in ex-vessel from a fragmented high-temperature debris is far from homogeneous. Calculation results of bed thermal hydraulics and dryout heat flux with a two-dimensional thermal-hydraulic code give the first basis to evaluate the extent by which macro and micro inhomogeneity can enhance the bed coolability. The development and validation of a model for two-phase natural circulation through a heated porous medium and its application to the coolability analysis of bottom-fed beds enables quantification of the significant effect of dryout heat flux enhancement (by a factor of 80-160%) due to bottom coolant injection. For a qualitative and quantitative understanding of steam explosion, the SHARP system and its image processing methodology were used to characterize the dynamics of a hot liquid (melt) drop fragmentation and the volatile liquid (coolant) vaporization. The experimental results provide a basis to suggest that the melt drop preconditioning is instrumental to

  4. Innovative microbial fuel cell for electricity production from anaerobic reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Booki; Angelidaki, Irini

    A submersible microbial fuel cell (SMFC) was developed by immersing an anode electrode and a cathode chamber in an anaerobic reactor. Domestic wastewater was used as the medium and the inoculum in the experiments. The SMFC could successfully generate a stable voltage of 0.428 ± 0.003 V with a fixed 470 Ω resistor from acetate. From the polarization test, the maximum power density of 204 mW m -2 was obtained at current density of 595 mA m -2 (external resistance = 180 Ω). The power generation showed a saturation-type relationship as a function of wastewater strength, with a maximum power density (P max) of 218 mW m -2 and a saturation constant (K s) of 244 mg L -1. The main limitations for achieving higher electricity production in the SMFC were identified as the high internal resistance at the electrolyte and the inefficient electron transfer at the cathode electrode. As the current increased, a large portion of voltage drop was caused by the ohmic (electrolyte) resistance of the medium present between two electrodes, although the two electrodes were closely positioned (about 3 cm distance; internal resistance = 35 ± 2 Ω). The open circuit potential (0.393 V vs. a standard hydrogen electrode) of the cathode was much smaller than the theoretical value (0.804 V). Besides, the short circuit potential of the cathode electrode decreased during the power generation in the SMFC. These results demonstrate that the SMFC could successfully generate electricity from wastewater, and has a great potential for electricity production from existing anaerobic reactors or other anaerobic environments such as sediments. The advantage of the SMFC is that no special anaerobic chamber (anode chamber) is needed, as existing anaerobic reactors can be used, where the cathode chamber and anode electrode are immersed.

  5. Environmentally-Assisted Cracking of Low-Alloy Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels under Boiling Water Reactor Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seifert, H.P.; Ritter, S

    2002-02-01

    The present report summarizes the experimental work performed by PSI on the environmentally-assisted cracking (EAC) of low-alloy steels (LAS) in the frame of the RIKORR-project during the period from January 2000 to August 2001. Within this project, the EAC crack growth behaviour of different low-alloy reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels, weld filler and weld heat-affected zone materials is investigated under simulated transient and steady-state BWR/NWC power operation conditions. The EAC crack growth behaviour of different low-alloy RPV steels was characterized by slow rising load (SRL) / low-frequency corrosion fatigue (LFCF) and constant load tests with pre-cracked fracture mechanics specimens in oxygenated high-temperature water at temperatures of either 288, 250, 200 or 150 C. These tests revealed the following important interim results: Under low-flow and highly oxidizing (ECP >= 100 mV SHE) conditions, the ASME XI 'wet' reference fatigue crack growth curve could be significantly exceeded by cyclic fatigue loading at low frequencies (<0.001 Hz), at high and low load-ratios R, and by ripple loading near to DKth fatigue thresholds. The BWR VIP 60 SCC disposition lines may be significantly or slightly exceeded (even in steels with a low sulphur content) in the case of small load fluctuations at high load ratios (ripple loading) or at intermediate temperatures (200 -250 C) in RPV materials, which show a distinct susceptibility to dynamic strain ageing (DSA). (author)

  6. Materials for the very high temperature reactor (VHTR): a versatile nuclear power station for combined cycle electricity and heat production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffelner, W

    2005-07-01

    The International Generation IV Initiative provides a research platform for the development of advanced nuclear plants which are able to produce electricity and heat in a combined cycle. Very high-temperature gas-cooled reactors are considered as near-term deployable plants meeting these requirements. They build on high-temperature gas-cooled reactors which are already in operation. The main parts of such an advanced plant are: reactor pressure vessel, core and close-to-core components, gas turbine, intermediate heat exchanger, and hydrogen production unit. The paper discusses the VHTR concept, materials, fuel and hydrogen production based on discussions on research and development projects addressed within the generation IV community. It is shown that material limitations might restrict the outlet temperature of near-term deployable VHTRs to about 950 {sup o}C. The impact of the high temperatures on fuel development is also discussed. Current status of combined cycle hydrogen production is elaborated on. (author)

  7. Statistical analysis using the Bayesian nonparametric method for irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamizawa, Hisashi; Itoh, Hiroto; Nishiyama, Yutaka

    2016-10-01

    In order to understand neutron irradiation embrittlement in high fluence regions, statistical analysis using the Bayesian nonparametric (BNP) method was performed for the Japanese surveillance and material test reactor irradiation database. The BNP method is essentially expressed as an infinite summation of normal distributions, with input data being subdivided into clusters with identical statistical parameters, such as mean and standard deviation, for each cluster to estimate shifts in ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT). The clusters typically depend on chemical compositions, irradiation conditions, and the irradiation embrittlement. Specific variables contributing to the irradiation embrittlement include the content of Cu, Ni, P, Si, and Mn in the pressure vessel steels, neutron flux, neutron fluence, and irradiation temperatures. It was found that the measured shifts of DBTT correlated well with the calculated ones. Data associated with the same materials were subdivided into the same clusters even if neutron fluences were increased.

  8. Study of a neutron irradiated reactor pressure vessel steel by X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cammelli, S. [LWV, NES, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)], E-mail: sebastiano.cammelli@psi.ch; Degueldre, C.; Kuri, G.; Bertsch, J. [LWV, NES, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2008-11-15

    Reactor pressure vessel (RPV) reference steel samples submitted to neutron irradiations followed by thermal annealing were investigated by X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy. Several studies revealed that Cu and Ni impurities can form nanoclusters. In the unirradiated sample and in the only-irradiated sample no significant clustering is detected. In all irradiated and subsequently annealed samples increases of Cu and Ni atom densities are recorded around the absorber. Furthermore, the density of Cu and Ni atoms determined in the first and second shells around the absorber is found to be affected by the irradiation and annealing treatment. The comparison of the XAFS data at Cu and Ni K-edges shows that these elements reside in arrangements similar to bcc Fe. However, the local irradiation damage yields vacancy fractions which were determined from the analysis of XAFS data with a precision of {approx}5%.

  9. Mechanical spectroscopy of reactor-pressure-vessel steel embrittlement: a progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Ouytsel, K

    1998-08-01

    An enhanced surveillance strategy for testing the fracture toughness of reactor-pressure-vessel steel embrittlement is described. Microstructural investigation in support of damage modelling is an essential element in this enhanced strategy. Temperature-dependent experiments are very sensitive to differences in chemical composition and to effects of neutron irradiation as well as thermal ageing. Amplitude-dependent experiments can be related to tensile test results and correspond to a model for the yield stress. A full range of experiments were carried out on base and weld metal from the Doel-I-II power plants. The results have indicated that internal friction yields information which cannot always be detected by means of standard testing techniques. An inverted torsion pendulum for measuring internal friction has been constructed.

  10. SURROGATE MODEL DEVELOPMENT AND VALIDATION FOR RELIABILITY ANALYSIS OF REACTOR PRESSURE VESSELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, William M.; Riley, Matthew E.; Spencer, Benjamin W.

    2016-07-01

    In nuclear light water reactors (LWRs), the reactor coolant, core and shroud are contained within a massive, thick walled steel vessel known as a reactor pressure vessel (RPV). Given the tremendous size of these structures, RPVs typically contain a large population of pre-existing flaws introduced in the manufacturing process. After many years of operation, irradiation-induced embrittlement makes these vessels increasingly susceptible to fracture initiation at the locations of the pre-existing flaws. Because of the uncertainty in the loading conditions, flaw characteristics and material properties, probabilistic methods are widely accepted and used in assessing RPV integrity. The Fracture Analysis of Vessels – Oak Ridge (FAVOR) computer program developed by researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is widely used for this purpose. This program can be used in order to perform deterministic and probabilistic risk-informed analyses of the structural integrity of an RPV subjected to a range of thermal-hydraulic events. FAVOR uses a one-dimensional representation of the global response of the RPV, which is appropriate for the beltline region, which experiences the most embrittlement, and employs an influence coefficient technique to rapidly compute stress intensity factors for axis-aligned surface-breaking flaws. The Grizzly code is currently under development at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to be used as a general multiphysics simulation tool to study a variety of degradation mechanisms in nuclear power plant components. The first application of Grizzly has been to study fracture in embrittled RPVs. Grizzly can be used to model the thermo-mechanical response of an RPV under transient conditions observed in a pressurized thermal shock (PTS) scenario. The global response of the vessel provides boundary conditions for local 3D models of the material in the vicinity of a flaw. Fracture domain integrals are computed to obtain stress intensity factors, which can in

  11. Stress analysis of the reactor pressure vessel of the high performance light water reactors (HPLWR); Festigkeitsanalyse fuer den Reaktordruckbehaelter des High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guelton, E.; Fischer, K.

    2006-12-15

    The High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR) is one of the concepts of the Generation IV program. The main difference compared to current Light Water Reactors (LWR) results from the supercritical steam condition of the coolant. Due to the supercritical pressure of 25 MPa, water, used as moderator and coolant, flows as a single phase through the core. The temperatures at the outlet are above 500 C. These conditions have a major impact on the design of the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV). For the modelling a RPV concept is proposed, which resembles the design of current LWR and allows the use of approved materials on one side and also meets the additional demands on the other side. A first dimensioning of the RPV wall thicknesses and the geometrical proportions has been performed using the german KTA-guidelines. To verify these results, a stress analysis using the finite element method has been performed with the program ANSYS. The combined mechanical and thermal calculations provide the primary, secondary and peak stresses which are evaluated using the KTA-guidelines design loading (Level 0) and service loading level A for the different components. The results confirm the wall thicknesses estimated by Fischer et al. (2006), but there are peak stresses in the vicinity of the inlet and outlet flanges, which are very close to the allowed design limit. For larger diameters of the RPV those regions will become critical and the stresses might exceed the design limits. Design optimizations for those regions are proposed and evaluated. A readjusted geometry of the inlet flange reduces those stresses by 65%. (orig.)

  12. Effects of thermal annealing and reirradiation on toughness of reactor pressure vessel steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nanstad, R.K.; Iskander, S.K.; Sokolov, M.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1997-02-01

    One of the options to mitigate the effects of irradiation on reactor pressure vessels (RPV) is to thermally anneal them to restore the toughness properties that have been degraded by neutron irradiation. This paper summarizes recent experimental results from work performed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to study the annealing response, or {open_quotes}recovery,{close_quotes} of several irradiated RPV steels; it also includes recent results from both ORNL and the Russian Research Center-Kurchatov Institute (RRC-KI) on a cooperative program of irradiation, annealing and reirradiation of both U.S. and Russian RPV steels. The cooperative program was conducted under the auspices of Working Group 3, U.S./Russia Joint Coordinating Committee for Civilian Nuclear Reactor Safety (JCCCNRS). The materials investigated are an RPV plate and various submerged-arc welds, with tensile, Charpy impact toughness, and fracture toughness results variously determined. Experimental results are compared with applicable prediction guidelines, while observed differences in annealing responses and reirradiation rates are discussed.

  13. Retinal vessel width measurement at branchings using an improved electric field theory-based graph approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiayu Xu

    Full Text Available The retinal vessel width relationship at vessel branch points in fundus images is an important biomarker of retinal and systemic disease. We propose a fully automatic method to measure the vessel widths at branch points in fundus images. The method is a graph-based method, in which a graph construction method based on electric field theory is applied which specifically deals with complex branching patterns. The vessel centerline image is used as the initial segmentation of the graph. Branching points are detected on the vessel centerline image using a set of detection kernels. Crossing points are distinguished from branch points and excluded. The electric field based graph method is applied to construct the graph. This method is inspired by the non-intersecting force lines in an electric field. At last, the method is further improved to give a consistent vessel width measurement for the whole vessel tree. The algorithm was validated on 100 artery branchings and 100 vein branchings selected from 50 fundus images by comparing with vessel width measurements from two human experts.

  14. Retinal vessel width measurement at branchings using an improved electric field theory-based graph approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiayu; Reinhardt, Joseph M; Hu, Qiao; Bakall, Benjamin; Tlucek, Paul S; Bertelsen, Geir; Abràmoff, Michael D

    2012-01-01

    The retinal vessel width relationship at vessel branch points in fundus images is an important biomarker of retinal and systemic disease. We propose a fully automatic method to measure the vessel widths at branch points in fundus images. The method is a graph-based method, in which a graph construction method based on electric field theory is applied which specifically deals with complex branching patterns. The vessel centerline image is used as the initial segmentation of the graph. Branching points are detected on the vessel centerline image using a set of detection kernels. Crossing points are distinguished from branch points and excluded. The electric field based graph method is applied to construct the graph. This method is inspired by the non-intersecting force lines in an electric field. At last, the method is further improved to give a consistent vessel width measurement for the whole vessel tree. The algorithm was validated on 100 artery branchings and 100 vein branchings selected from 50 fundus images by comparing with vessel width measurements from two human experts.

  15. Standard Master Matrix for Light-Water Reactor Pressure Vessel Surveillance Standards, E706(0)

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2002-01-01

    1.1 This master matrix standard describes a series of standard practices, guides, and methods for the prediction of neutron-induced changes in light-water reactor (LWR) pressure vessel (PV) and support structure steels throughout a pressure vessel's service life (Fig. 1). Some of these are existing ASTM standards, some are ASTM standards that have been modified, and some are proposed ASTM standards. General requirements of content and consistency are discussed in Section 6 . More detailed writers' and users' information, justification, and specific requirements for the nine practices, ten guides, and three methods are provided in Sections 3-5. Referenced documents are discussed in Section 2. The summary-type information that is provided in Sections 3 and 4 is essential for establishing proper understanding and communications between the writers and users of this set of matrix standards. It was extracted from the referenced documents, Section 2 and references (1-106) for use by individual writers and users. 1...

  16. Current Status of Development of High Nickel Low Alloy Steels for Commercial Reactor Pressure Vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Chul; Lee, B. S.; Park, S. G.; Lee, K. H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    SA508 Gr.3 Mn-Mo-Ni low alloy steels have been used for nuclear reactor pressure vessel steels up to now. Currently, the design goal of nuclear power plant is focusing at larger capacity and longer lifetime. Requirements of much bigger pressure vessels may cause critical problems in the manufacturing stage as well as for the welding stage. Application of higher strength steel may be required to overcome the technical problems. It is known that a higher strength and fracture toughness of low alloy steels such as SA508 Gr.4N low alloy steel could be achieved by increasing the Ni and Cr contents. Therefore, SA508 Gr.4N low alloy steel is very attractive as eligible RPV steel for the next generation PWR systems. In this report, we propose the possibility of SA508 Gr.4N low alloy steel for an application of next generation commercial RPV, based on the literature research result about development history of the RPV steels and SA508 specification. In addition, we have surveyed the research result of HSLA(High Strength Low Alloy steel), which has similar chemical compositions with SA508 Gr.4N, to understand the problems and the way of improvement of SA508 Gr.4N low alloy steel. And also, we have investigated eastern RPV steel(WWER-1000), which has higher Ni contents compared to western RPV steel.

  17. Design of a supercritical water-cooled reactor. Pressure vessel and internals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Kai

    2008-08-15

    The High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR) is a light water reactor with supercritical steam conditions which has been investigated within the 5th Framework Program of the European Commission. Due to the supercritical pressure of 25 MPa, water, used as moderator and as coolant, flows as a single phase through the core and can be directly fed to the turbine. Using the technology of coal fired power plants with supercritical steam conditions, the heat-up in the core is done in several steps to achieve the targeted high steam outlet temperature of 500.C without exceeding available cladding material limits. Based on a first design of a fuel assembly cluster for a HPLWR with a single pass core, the surrounding internals and the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) are dimensioned for the first time, following the safety standards of the nuclear safety standards commission in Germany. Furthermore, this design is extended to the incorporation of core arrangements with two and three passes. The design of the internals and the RPV are verified using mechanical or, in the case of large thermal deformations, combined mechanical and thermal stress analyses. Additionally, a passive safety component for the feedwater inlet of the RPV of the HPLWR is designed. Its purpose is the reduction of the mass flow rate in case of a LOCA for a feedwater line break until further steps are executed. Starting with a simple vortex diode, several steps are executed to enhance the performance of the diode and adapt it to this application. Then, this first design is further optimized using combined 1D and 3D flow analyses. Parametric studies determine the performance and characteristic for changing mass flow rates for this backflow limiter. (orig.)

  18. Development of Reactor Vessel Bottom Mount Instrumentation Nozzle Routine Inspection Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khaled, Atya Ahmed Abdallah; Ihn, Namgung [KEPCO International Nuclear Graduate School, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The primary coolant water of pressurized water reactors has created cracks in j-weld of penetrations with Alloy 600 through a process called primary water stress corrosion cracking. On October 6, 2013, BMI nozzle number 3 at Palo Verde Unit 3 (PVNGS-3) exhibited small white de-posits around the annulus. Nozzle attachment to the RV lower head is by J-groove weld to the inside penetration of the nozzle and the weld material is of Alloy 600 material. Above two cases clearly show the necessity of routine inspection of RV lower head penetration during refueling outage. Nondestructive inspection is generally performed to detect fine cracks or defects that may develop during operation. Defects usually occur at weld regions, hence most non-destructive inspection is to scan and check any defects or crack in the weld region. BMI nozzles at the bottom head of a nuclear reactor vessel (RV) are one of such area for inspection. But BMI nozzles have not been inspected during regular refuel outage due to the relative small size of BMI nozzle and limited impact of the consequences of BMI leak. However, there is growing concern since there have been leaks at nuclear power plants (NPPs) as well as recent operating experience. In this study, we propose a system that is conveniently used for nondestructive inspection of BMI nozzles during regular refueling outage without removing all the reactor internals. A 3D model of the inspection system was also developed along with the RV and internals which permits a virtual 3D simulation to check the design concept and usability of the system.

  19. Initial Probabilistic Evaluation of Reactor Pressure Vessel Fracture with Grizzly and Raven

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, Benjamin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hoffman, William [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States); Sen, Sonat [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rabiti, Cristian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Dickson, Terry [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bass, Richard [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The Grizzly code is being developed with the goal of creating a general tool that can be applied to study a variety of degradation mechanisms in nuclear power plant components. The first application of Grizzly has been to study fracture in embrittled reactor pressure vessels (RPVs). Grizzly can be used to model the thermal/mechanical response of an RPV under transient conditions that would be observed in a pressurized thermal shock (PTS) scenario. The global response of the vessel provides boundary conditions for local models of the material in the vicinity of a flaw. Fracture domain integrals are computed to obtain stress intensity factors, which can in turn be used to assess whether a fracture would initiate at a pre-existing flaw. These capabilities have been demonstrated previously. A typical RPV is likely to contain a large population of pre-existing flaws introduced during the manufacturing process. This flaw population is characterized stastistically through probability density functions of the flaw distributions. The use of probabilistic techniques is necessary to assess the likelihood of crack initiation during a transient event. This report documents initial work to perform probabilistic analysis of RPV fracture during a PTS event using a combination of the RAVEN risk analysis code and Grizzly. This work is limited in scope, considering only a single flaw with deterministic geometry, but with uncertainty introduced in the parameters that influence fracture toughness. These results are benchmarked against equivalent models run in the FAVOR code. When fully developed, the RAVEN/Grizzly methodology for modeling probabilistic fracture in RPVs will provide a general capability that can be used to consider a wider variety of vessel and flaw conditions that are difficult to consider with current tools. In addition, this will provide access to advanced probabilistic techniques provided by RAVEN, including adaptive sampling and parallelism, which can dramatically

  20. Irradiation, Annealing, and Reirradiation Effects on American and Russian Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chernobaeva, A.A.; Korolev, Y.N.; Nanstad, R.K.; Nikolaev, Y.A.; Sokolov, M.A.

    1998-06-16

    One of the options to mitigate the effects of irradiation on reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) is to thermally anneal them to restore the toughness properties that have been degraded by neutron irradiation. Even though a postirradiation anneal may be deemed successful, a critical aspect of continued RPV operation is the rate of embrittlement upon reirradiation. There are insufficient data available to allow for verification of available models of reirradiation embrittlement or for the development of a reliable predictive methodology. This is especially true in the case of fracture toughness data. Under the U.S.-Russia Joint Coordinating Committee for Civilian Nuclear Reactor Safety (JCCCNRS), Working Group 3 on Radiation Embrittlement, Structural Integrity, and Life Extension of Reactor Vessels and Supports agreed to conduct a comparative study of annealing and reirradiation effects on RPV steels. The Working Group agreed that each side would irradiate, anneal, reirradiate (if feasible ), and test two materials of the other. Charpy V-notch (CVN) and tensile specimens were included. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducted such a program (irradiation and annealing, including static fracture toughness) with two weld metals representative of VVER-440 and VVER-1000 RPVs, while the Russian Research Center-Kurchatov Institute (RRC-KI) conducted a program (irradiation, annealing, reirradiation, and reannealing) with Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program Plate 02 and Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation (HSSI) Program Weld 73W. The results for each material from each laboratory are compared with those from the other laboratory. The ORNL experiments with the VVER welds included irradiation to about 1 x 10{sup 19} n/cm{sup 2} (>1 MeV), while the RRC-KI experiments with the U.S. materials included irradiations from about 2 to 18 x 10{sup 19} n/cm{sup 2} (>l MeV). In both cases, irradiations were conducted at {approximately}290 C and annealing treatments were conducted

  1. Heating of reactor pressure vessel bottom head and penetrations in a severe reactor accident; Reaktoripaineastian pohjan ja laepivientien kuumeneminen sydaemen sulamisonnettomuudessa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikonen, K. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Nuclear Energy

    1997-10-01

    The report describes the fundamentals of heat conductivity and convection and numerical methods like finite difference and control volume method for calculation of the thermal history of a reactor pressure vessel bottom head and penetrations. Phase changes from solids to liquids are considered. Time integration is performed by explicit or implicit method. Developed computer codes for thermal conductivity and convection analyses and codes for graphical visualization are described. The codes are applied to two practical cases. They deal with analyses of Swiss CORVIS-experiments and analyses of control rod and instrument penetrations in a BWR bottom head. A model for calculation of effective thermal conductivity of granular corium is developed. The work is also related to EU MVI-project (Core Melt-Pressure Vessel Interactions During a Light Water Reactor Severe Accident), whose coordinator is Prof. B. R. Sehgal at Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm. (orig.) (11 refs.).

  2. BLENDED CALCIUM ALUMINATE-CALCIUM SULFATE CEMENT-BASED GROUT FOR P-REACTOR VESSEL IN-SITU DECOMMISSIONING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langton, C.; Stefanko, D.

    2011-03-10

    The objective of this report is to document laboratory testing of blended calcium aluminate - calcium hemihydrate grouts for P-Reactor vessel in-situ decommissioning. Blended calcium aluminate - calcium hemihydrate cement-based grout was identified as candidate material for filling (physically stabilizing) the 105-P Reactor vessel (RV) because it is less alkaline than portland cement-based grout which has a pH greater than 12.4. In addition, blended calcium aluminate - calcium hemihydrate cement compositions can be formulated such that the primary cementitious phase is a stable crystalline material. A less alkaline material (pH {<=} 10.5) was desired to address a potential materials compatibility issue caused by corrosion of aluminum metal in highly alkaline environments such as that encountered in portland cement grouts [Wiersma, 2009a and b, Wiersma, 2010, and Serrato and Langton, 2010]. Information concerning access points into the P-Reactor vessel and amount of aluminum metal in the vessel is provided elsewhere [Griffin, 2010, Stefanko, 2009 and Wiersma, 2009 and 2010, Bobbitt, 2010, respectively]. Radiolysis calculations are also provided in a separate document [Reyes-Jimenez, 2010].

  3. Development of Mini-Compact Tension Test Method for Determining Fracture Toughness Master Curves for Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokolov, Mikhail A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Small specimens are playing the key role in evaluating properties of irradiated materials. The use of small specimens provides several advantages. Typically, only a small volume of material can be irradiated in a reactor at desirable conditions in terms of temperature, neutron flux, and neutron dose. A small volume of irradiated material may also allow for easier handling of specimens. Smaller specimens reduce the amount of radioactive material, minimizing personnel exposures and waste disposal. However, use of small specimens imposes a variety of challenges as well. These challenges are associated with proper accounting for size effects and transferability of small specimen data to the real structures of interest. Any fracture toughness specimen that can be made out of the broken halves of standard Charpy specimens may have exceptional utility for evaluation of reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) since it would allow one to determine and monitor directly actual fracture toughness instead of requiring indirect predictions using correlations established with impact data. The Charpy V-notch specimen is the most commonly used specimen geometry in surveillance programs. Validation of the mini compact tension specimen (mini-CT) geometry has been performed on previously well characterized Midland beltline Linde 80 (WF-70) weld in the unirradiated condition. It was shown that the fracture toughness transition temperature, To, measured by these Mini-CT specimens is almost the same as To value that was derived from various larger fracture toughness specimens. Moreover, an International collaborative program has been established to extend the assessment and validation efforts to irradiated Linde 80 weld metal. The program is underway and involves the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Central Research Institute for Electrical Power Industry (CRIEPI), and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The irradiated Mini-CT specimens from broken halves of previously tested Charpy

  4. Reactor Pressure Vessel Integrity Assessments with the Grizzly Aging Simulation Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, Benjamin; Backman, Marie; Hoffman, William; Chakraborty, Pritam

    2015-08-01

    Grizzly is a simulation tool being developed at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) as part of the US Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability program to provide improved safety assessments of systems, components, and structures in nuclear power plants subjected to age-related degradation. Its goal is to provide an improved scientific basis for decisions surrounding license renewal, which would permit operation of commercial nuclear power plants beyond 60 years. Grizzly is based on INL’s MOOSE framework, which enables multiphysics simulations in a parallel computing environment. It will address a wide variety of aging issues in nuclear power plant systems, components, and structures, modelling both the aging processes and the ability of age-degraded components to perform safely. The reactor pressure vessel (RPV) was chosen as the initial application for Grizzly. Grizzly solves tightly coupled equations of heat conduction and solid mechanics to simulate the global response of the RPV to accident conditions, and uses submodels to represent regions with pre-existing flaws. Domain integrals are used to calculate stress intensity factors on those flaws. A physically based empirical model is used to evaluate material embrittlement, and is used to evaluate whether crack growth would occur. Grizzly can represent the RPV in 2D or 3D, allowing it to evaluate effects that require higher dimensionality models to capture. Work is underway to use lower length scale models of material evolution to inform engineering models of embrittlement. This paper demonstrates an application of Grizzly to RPV failure assessment, and summarizes on-going work.

  5. Models for embrittlement recovery due to annealing of reactor pressure vessel steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eason, E.D.; Wright, J.E.; Nelson, E.E. [Modeling and Computing Services, Boulder, CO (United States); Odette, G.R.; Mader, E.V. [California Univ., Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

    1995-05-01

    The reactor pressure vessel (RPV) surrounding the core of a commercial nuclear power plant is subject to embrittlement due to exposure to high energy neutrons. The effects of irradiation embrittlement can be reduced by thermal annealing at temperatures higher than the normal operating conditions. However, a means of quantitatively assessing the effectiveness of annealing for embrittlement recovery is needed. The objective of this work was to analyze the pertinent data on this issue and develop quantitative models for estimating the recovery in 30 ft-lb (41 J) Charpy transition temperature and Charpy upper shelf energy due to annealing. Data were gathered from the Test Reactor Embrittlement Data Base and from various annealing reports. An analysis data base was developed, reviewed for completeness and accuracy, and documented as part of this work. Independent variables considered in the analysis included material chemistries, annealing time and temperature, irradiation time and temperature, fluence, and flux. To identify important variables and functional forms for predicting embrittlement recovery, advanced statistical techniques, including pattern recognition and transformation analysis, were applied together with current understanding of the mechanisms governing embrittlement and recovery. Models were calibrated using multivariable surface-fitting techniques. Several iterations of model calibration, evaluation with respect to mechanistic and statistical considerations, and comparison with the trends in hardness data produced correlation models for estimating Charpy upper shelf energy and transition temperature after irradiation and annealing. This work provides a clear demonstration that (1) microhardness recovery is generally a very good surrogate for shift recovery, and (2) there is a high level of consistency between the observed annealing trends and fundamental models of embrittlement and recovery processes.

  6. Argonne Liquid-Metal Advanced Burner Reactor : components and in-vessel system thermal-hydraulic research and testing experience - pathway forward.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasza, K.; Grandy, C.; Chang, Y.; Khalil, H.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-06-30

    This white paper provides an overview and status report of the thermal-hydraulic nuclear research and development, both experimental and computational, conducted predominantly at Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne from the early 1970s through the early 1990s was the Department of Energy's (DOE's) lead lab for thermal-hydraulic development of Liquid Metal Reactors (LMRs). During the 1970s and into the mid-1980s, Argonne conducted thermal-hydraulic studies and experiments on individual reactor components supporting the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II), Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), and the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR). From the mid-1980s and into the early 1990s, Argonne conducted studies on phenomena related to forced- and natural-convection thermal buoyancy in complete in-vessel models of the General Electric (GE) Prototype Reactor Inherently Safe Module (PRISM) and Rockwell International (RI) Sodium Advanced Fast Reactor (SAFR). These two reactor initiatives involved Argonne working closely with U.S. industry and DOE. This paper describes the very important impact of thermal hydraulics dominated by thermal buoyancy forces on reactor global operation and on the behavior/performance of individual components during postulated off-normal accident events with low flow. Utilizing Argonne's LMR expertise and design knowledge is vital to the further development of safe, reliable, and high-performance LMRs. Argonne believes there remains an important need for continued research and development on thermal-hydraulic design in support of DOE's and the international community's renewed thrust for developing and demonstrating the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) reactor(s) and the associated Argonne Liquid Metal-Advanced Burner Reactor (LM-ABR). This white paper highlights that further understanding is needed regarding reactor design under coolant low-flow events. These safety-related events are associated with the transition

  7. Innovative microbial fuel cell for electricity production from anaerobic reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Min, Booki; Angelidaki, Irini

    2008-01-01

    A submersible microbial fuel cell (SMFC) was developed by immersing an anode electrode and a cathode chamber in an anaerobic reactor. Domestic wastewater was used as the medium and the inoculum in the experiments. The SMFC could successfully generate a stable voltage of 0.428 ± 0.003 V with a fixed...... 470 Ω resistor from acetate. From the polarization test, the maximum power density of 204 mW m−2 was obtained at current density of 595 mA m−2 (external resistance = 180 Ω). The power generation showed a saturation-type relationship as a function of wastewater strength, with a maximum power density...... (Pmax) of 218 mW m−2 and a saturation constant (Ks) of 244 mg L−1. The main limitations for achieving higher electricity production in the SMFC were identified as the high internal resistance at the electrolyte and the inefficient electron transfer at the cathode electrode. As the current increased...

  8. [The application of ultrasonography to estimate blood vessel injury of upper limbs sustaining electric burns].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Jia-ke; Li, Li-gen; Chen, Yue-xiu; Hu, Xiao-juan; Yang, Yong-ming

    2003-12-01

    To explore a new method in estimating extent and degree of arterial injury in upper limbs sustaining high tension electric burns. Eighteen patients (twenty-four upper limbs) with high tension electricity injury were admitted from December 1998 to September 2002, The damaged limbs consisted of four parts: wrist wound part, 5 cm, 10 cm, 15 cm parts around wrist wound, where the radial and ulnar arteries were detected using B ultrasound and color WP Doppler examination. The changes of endangium, vessel diameter, thickness of the vessel wall and volume of blood flow were recorded respectively. The parameters of normal radial and ulnar arteries were also determined as normal control. B ultrasound and color WP Doppler examination showed that the endangium in radial and ulnar arteries become coarse, edema or exfoliation. The vessel wall was thicker than that of the normal control and the thickness was heterogeneity. The vessel wall could be necrosis in severe patient and the vessel cavity was stricture or beaded. Thrombosis or occlusion could occur at the site of severe injury area in vessel. The decrease in volume of blood flow was observed. The condition of the radial and ulnar arteries become well apart from 10 - 15 cm of wrist wound. The ultrasonography can be used to detect the changes in endangium, diameter, thickness of the vessel wall, blood flow volume in injury blood vessel caused by electric burn injury. It is helpful in judging the degree and extent of injury vessel and could be a safe, non-invasive diagnostic method and is worth popularizing.

  9. International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Projects on Structural Integrity of Reactor Pressure Vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Server, W. L. [ATI Consulting, Pinehurst, NC; Nanstad, Randy K [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has conducted a series of Coordinated Research Projects (CRPs) that have focused on irradiated reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel fracture toughness properties and approaches for assuring structural integrity of RPVs throughout operating life. A series of nine CRPs have been sponsored by the IAEA, starting in the early 1970s, focused on neutron radiation effects on RPV steels. The purpose of the CRPs was to develop comparisons and correlations to test the uniformity of irradiated results through coordinated international research studies and data sharing. Consideration of dose rate effects, effects of alloying (nickel, manganese, silicon, etc.) and residual elements (eg., copper and phosphorus), and drop in upper shelf toughness are also important for assessing neutron embrittlement effects. The ultimate use of embrittlement understanding is assuring structural integrity of the RPV under current and future operation and accident conditions. Material fracture toughness is the key ingredient needed for this assessment, and many of the CRPs have focused on measurement and application of irradiated fracture toughness. This paper presents an overview of the progress made since the inception of the CRPs in the early 1970s. The chronology and importance of each CRP have been reviewed and put into context for continued and long-term safe operation of RPVs.

  10. On-Site Oxy-Lance Size Reduction of South Texas Project Reactor Vessel Heads - 12324

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Posivak, Edward [WMG, inc. (United States); Keeney, Gilbert; Wheeler, Dean [Shaw Group (United States)

    2012-07-01

    On-Site Oxy-Lance size reduction of mildly radioactive large components has been accomplished at other operating plants. On-Site Oxy-Lance size reduction of more radioactive components like Reactor Vessel Heads had previously been limited to decommissioning projects. Building on past decommissioning and site experience, subcontractors for South Texas Project Nuclear Operating Company (STPNOC) developed an innovative integrated system to control smoke, radioactive contamination, worker dose, and worker safety. STP's innovative, easy to use CEDM containment that provided oxy lance access, smoke control, and spatter/contamination control was the key to successful segmentation for cost-effective and ALARA packaging and transport for disposal. Relative to CEDM milling, STP oxy-lance segmentation saved approximately 40 person- REM accrued during 9,000 hours logged into the radiological controlled area (RCA) during more than 3,800 separate entries. Furthermore there were no personnel contamination events or respiratory uptakes of radioactive material during the course of the entire project. (authors)

  11. Characterization of Nanostructural Features in Irradiated Reactor Pressure Vessel Model Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wirth, B D; Odette, G R; Asoka-Kumar, P; Howell, R H; Sterne, P A

    2001-08-01

    Irradiation embrittlement in nuclear reactor pressure vessel steels results from the formation of a high number density of nanometer-sized copper rich precipitates and sub-nanometer defect-solute clusters. We present results of small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) characterization of the nanostructural features formed in binary and ternary Fe-Cu-Mn alloys irradiated at {approx}290 C. These complementary techniques provide insight into the composition and character of both types of nanoscale features. The SANS measurements indicate populations of copper-manganese precipitates and smaller vacancy-copper-manganese clusters. The PAS characterization, including both Doppler broadening and positron lifetime measurements, indicates the presence of essentially defect-free Cu precipitates in the Fe-Cu-Mn alloy and vacancy-copper clusters in the Fe-Cu alloy. Thus the SANS and PAS provide a self-consistent picture of nanostructures composed of copper-rich precipitates and vacancy solute cluster complexes and tend to discount high Fe concentrations in the CRPs.

  12. Nondestructive characterization of embrittlement in reactor pressure vessel steels -- A feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McHenry, H.I.; Alers, G.A. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO (United States). Materials Reliability Div.

    1998-03-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission recently initiated a study by NIST to assess the feasibility of using physical-property measurements for evaluating radiation embrittlement in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. Ultrasonic and magnetic measurements provide the most promising approaches for nondestructive characterization of RPV steels because elastic waves and magnetic fields can sense the microstructural changes that embrittle materials. The microstructural changes of particular interest are copper precipitation hardening, which is the likely cause of radiation embrittlement in RPV steels, and the loss of dislocation mobility that is an attribute of the ductile-to-brittle transition. Measurements were made on a 1% copper steel, ASTM grade A710, in the annealed, peak-aged and overaged conditions, and on an RPV steel, ASTM grade A533B. Nonlinear ultrasonic and micromagnetic techniques were the most promising measures of precipitation hardening. Ultrasonic velocity measurements and the magnetic properties associated with hysteresis-loop measurements were not particularly sensitive to either precipitation hardening or the ductile-to-brittle transition. Measurements of internal friction using trapped ultrasonic resonance modes detected energy losses due to the motion of pinned dislocations; however, the ultrasonic attenuation associated with these measurements was small compared to the attenuation caused by beam spreading that would occur in conventional ultrasonic testing of RPVs.

  13. Deformation characteristics and sealing performance of metallic-O-ring for a reactor pressure vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Ming Xue; Peng, Xudong; Xie, Linjun; Meng, Xiang Kai [Engineering Research Center of Process Equipment and Its Remanufacture, Ministry of Education, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou (China); Li, Xing Gen [Ningbo Tiansheng Sealing Packing Co., Ltd., Ningbo (China)

    2016-04-15

    This paper provides a reference to determine the seal performance of metallic O-rings for a reactor pressure vessel (RPV). A nonlinear elastic-plastic model of an O-ring was constructed by the finite element method to analyze its intrinsic properties. It is also validated by experiments on scaled samples. The effects of the compression ratio, the geometrical parameters of the O-ring, and the structure parameters of the groove on the flange are discussed in detail. The results showed that the numerical analysis of the O-ring agrees well with the experimental data, the compression ratio has an important role in the distribution and magnitude of contact stress, and a suitable gap between the sidewall and groove can improve the sealing capability of the O-ring. After the optimization of the sealing structure, some key parameters of the O-ring (i.e., compression ratio, cross-section diameter, wall thickness, sidewall gap) have been recommended for application in megakilowatt class nuclear power plants. Furthermore, air tightness and thermal cycling tests were performed to verify the rationality of the finite element method and to reliably evaluate the sealing performance of a RPV.

  14. Simulation of time of flight defraction signals for reactor vessel head penetrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Tae Hun; Kim, Young Sik; Lee, Jeong Seok [KHNP Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    The simulation of nondestructive testing has been used in the prediction of the signal characteristics of various defects and in the development of the procedures. CIVA, a simulation tool dedicated to nondestructive testing, has good accuracy and speed, and provides a three-dimensional graphical user interface for improved visualization and familiar data displays consistent with an NDE technique. Even though internal validations have been performed by the CIVA software development specialists, an independent validation study is necessary for the assessment of the accuracy of the software prior to practical use. In this study, time of flight diffraction signals of ultrasonic inspection of a calibration block for reactor vessel head penetrations were simulated using CIVA. The results were compared to the experimentally inspected signals. The accuracy of the simulated signals and the possible range for simulation were verified. It was found that, there is a good agreement between the CIVA simulated and experimental results in the A-scan signal, B-scan image, and measurement of depth.

  15. Deformation Characteristics and Sealing Performance of Metallic O-rings for a Reactor Pressure Vessel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingxue Shen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a reference to determine the seal performance of metallic O-rings for a reactor pressure vessel (RPV. A nonlinear elastic-plastic model of an O-ring was constructed by the finite element method to analyze its intrinsic properties. It is also validated by experiments on scaled samples. The effects of the compression ratio, the geometrical parameters of the O-ring, and the structure parameters of the groove on the flange are discussed in detail. The results showed that the numerical analysis of the O-ring agrees well with the experimental data, the compression ratio has an important role in the distribution and magnitude of contact stress, and a suitable gap between the sidewall and groove can improve the sealing capability of the O-ring. After the optimization of the sealing structure, some key parameters of the O-ring (i.e., compression ratio, cross-section diameter, wall thickness, sidewall gap have been recommended for application in megakilowatt class nuclear power plants. Furthermore, air tightness and thermal cycling tests were performed to verify the rationality of the finite element method and to reliably evaluate the sealing performance of a RPV.

  16. Initial Evaluation of the Heat-Affected Zone, Local Embrittlement Phenomenon as it Applies to Nuclear Reactor Vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCabe, D.E.

    1999-09-01

    The objective of this project was to determine if the local brittle zone (LBZ) problem, encountered in the testing of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) part of welds in offshore platform construction, can also be found in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) welds. Both structures have multipass welds and grain coarsening along the fusion line. Literature was obtained that described the metallurgical evidence and the type of research work performed on offshore structure welds.

  17. Dismantling of the reactor pressure vessel internals in the NPP Wuergassen; Zerlegung der RDG- Einbauten im KKW Wuergassen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruhn, Jan Hendrik [AREVA NP GmbH (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    The reactor pressure vessel internals of the NPP Wuergassen were dismantled and dissected in the time period 19-03-2007 to 21-09-2007 and packaged for final disposal. The total amount was about 18 tons of steel. The dissected was performed using specific water-quartz sand-cutting tools within a settling tank. The dismantling concept intended to cut shape-optimized pieces with respect to space saving packaging. The project included a specific water treatment system.

  18. Analysis of dpa Rates in the HFIR Reactor Vessel using a Hybrid Monte Carlo/Deterministic Method*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risner J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Oak Ridge High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR, which began full-power operation in 1966, provides one of the highest steady-state neutron flux levels of any research reactor in the world. An ongoing vessel integrity analysis program to assess radiation-induced embrittlement of the HFIR reactor vessel requires the calculation of neutron and gamma displacements per atom (dpa, particularly at locations near the beam tube nozzles, where radiation streaming effects are most pronounced. In this study we apply the Forward-Weighted Consistent Adjoint Driven Importance Sampling (FW-CADIS technique in the ADVANTG code to develop variance reduction parameters for use in the MCNP radiation transport code. We initially evaluated dpa rates for dosimetry capsule locations, regions in the vicinity of the HB-2 beamline, and the vessel beltline region. We then extended the study to provide dpa rate maps using three-dimensional cylindrical mesh tallies that extend from approximately 12 in. below to approximately 12 in. above the height of the core. The mesh tally structures contain over 15,000 mesh cells, providing a detailed spatial map of neutron and photon dpa rates at all locations of interest. Relative errors in the mesh tally cells are typically less than 1%.

  19. Analysis of dpa rates in the HFIR reactor vessel using a hybrid Monte Carlo/deterministic method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blakeman, Edward [Retired

    2016-01-01

    The Oak Ridge High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), which began full-power operation in 1966, provides one of the highest steady-state neutron flux levels of any research reactor in the world. An ongoing vessel integrity analysis program to assess radiation-induced embrittlement of the HFIR reactor vessel requires the calculation of neutron and gamma displacements per atom (dpa), particularly at locations near the beam tube nozzles, where radiation streaming effects are most pronounced. In this study we apply the Forward-Weighted Consistent Adjoint Driven Importance Sampling (FW-CADIS) technique in the ADVANTG code to develop variance reduction parameters for use in the MCNP radiation transport code. We initially evaluated dpa rates for dosimetry capsule locations, regions in the vicinity of the HB-2 beamline, and the vessel beltline region. We then extended the study to provide dpa rate maps using three-dimensional cylindrical mesh tallies that extend from approximately 12 below to approximately 12 above the axial extent of the core. The mesh tally structures contain over 15,000 mesh cells, providing a detailed spatial map of neutron and photon dpa rates at all locations of interest. Relative errors in the mesh tally cells are typically less than 1%.

  20. Fracture assessment of the Oskarshamn 1 reactor pressure vessel under cold over-pressurization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sattari-Far, I. [DNV Technical Consulting AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2001-03-01

    The major motivation of this study was to develop a methodology for fracture assessment of surface defects in the 01 reactor pressure vessel under cold loading scenarios, particularly the cold over-pressurization event. According to a previous study, the FENIX project, the cold over-pressurization of the O1 reactor is a limiting loading case, as the ductile/brittle transition temperature (RT{sub NDT}) of certain welds in the O1 beltline region may be over 100 deg C at the-end-of-life condition. The FENIX project gave values of the acceptable and critical crack depth to be equal to the thickness of the cladding layer (about 6 mm) under this load case using the ASME K{sub Ic} reference curve methodology. This study is aimed to develop a methodology to give a more precise fracture assessment of the O1 reactor under cold loading scenarios. Some of the main objectives of this study have been as below: To prepare a material which can simulate the mechanical properties and RT{sub NDT} of the O1 reactor at the end-of-life conditions. To conduct a fracture mechanics test program to cover the essential influencing factors, such as crack geometry (shallow and deep cracks) and loading condition (uniaxial and biaxial) on the cleavage fracture toughness. To perform fracture mechanics analyses to identify a suitable methodology for assessment of the experimental results. To study the responses of engineering fracture assessment methods to the experimental results from the clad specimens. To propose a fracture assessment procedure for determination of the acceptable and critical flaw sizes in the 01 reactor under the cold loading events. A test program consisted of experiments on standard SEN(B) specimens and clad beams, containing surface cracks was conducted during the course of this project. A total of nine clad beams and clad cruciform specimens were tested under uniaxial and biaxial loading. The test material is reactor steel of type A 508 Grade B, which is specially heat

  1. The influence of selected containment structures on debris dispersal and transport following high pressure melt ejection from the reactor vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilch, M.; Tarbell, W.W.; Brockmann, J.E.

    1988-09-01

    High pressure expulsion of molten core debris from the reactor pressure vessel may result in dispersal of the debris from the reactor cavity. In most plants, the cavity exits into the containment such that the debris impinges on structures. Retention of the debris on the structures may affect the further transport of the debris throughout the containment. Two tests were done with scaled structural shapes placed at the exit of 1:10 linear scale models of the Zion cavity. The results show that the debris does not adhere significantly to structures. The lack of retention is attributed to splashing from the surface and reentrainment in the gas flowing over the surface. These processes are shown to be applicable to reactor scale. A third experiment was done to simulate the annular gap between the reactor vessel and cavity wall. Debris collection showed that the fraction of debris exiting through the gap was greater than the gap-to-total flow area ratio. Film records indicate that dispersal was primarily by entrainment of the molten debris in the cavity. 29 refs., 36 figs., 11 tabs.

  2. Comparison of applicability of current transition temperature shift models to SA533B-1 reactor pressure vessel steel of Korean nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Ji Hyun; Lee, Bong Sang [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-15

    The precise prediction of radiation embrittlement of aged reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) is a prerequisite for the long-term operation of nuclear power plants beyond their original design life. The expiration of the operation licenses for Korean reactors the RPVs of which are made from SA533B-1 plates and welds is imminent. Korean regulatory rules have adopted the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's transition temperature shift (TTS) models to the prediction of the embrittlement of Korean reactor pressure vessels. The applicability of the TTS model to predict the embrittlement of Korean RPVs made of SA533B-1 plates and welds was investigated in this study. It was concluded that the TTS model of 10 CFR 50.61a matched the trends of the radiation embrittlement in the SA533B-1 plates and welds better than did that of Regulatory Guide (RG) 1.99 Rev. 2. This is attributed to the fact that the prediction performance of 10 CFR 50.61a was enhanced by considering the difference in radiation embrittlement sensitivity among the different types of RPV materials.

  3. ASSESSMENT OF THE POTENTIAL FOR HYDROGEN GENERATION DURING GROUTING OPERATIONS IN THE R AND P REACTOR VESSELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiersma, B.

    2010-05-24

    The R- and P-reactor buildings were retired from service and are now being prepared for deactivation and decommissioning (D and D). D and D activities consist primarily of immobilizing contaminated components and structures in a grout-like formulation. Aluminum corrodes very rapidly when it comes in contact with the alkaline grout materials and as a result produces hydrogen gas. To address this potential deflagration/explosion hazard, the Materials Science and Technology Directorate (MS and T) of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has been requested to review and evaluate existing experimental and analytical studies of this issue to determine if any process constraints on the chemistry of the fill material and the fill operation are necessary. Various options exist for the type of grout material that may be used for D and D of the reactor vessels. The grout formulation options include ceramicrete (pH 6-8), low pH portland cement + silica fume grout (pH 10.4), or Portland cement groupt (pH 12.5). The assessment concluded that either ceramicrete or the silica fume grout may be used to safely grout the P-reactor vessel. The risk of accumulation of a flammable mixture of hydrogen between the grout-air interface and the top of the reactor is very low. Portland cement grout, on the other hand, for the same range of process parameters does not provide a margin of safety against the accumulation of flammable gas in the reactor vessel during grouting operations in the P-reactor vessel. It is recommended that this grout not be utilized for this task. The R-reactor vessel cotnains significantly less aluminum based on current facility process knowledge, surface observations, and drawings. Therefore, a Portland cement grout may be considered for grouting operations as well as the other grout formulations. For example, if the grout fill rate is less than 1 inch/min and the grout temperature is maintained at 70 C or less, the risk of hydrogen accumulation during fill

  4. Effect of tempering temperature on the microstructure and mechanical properties of a reactor pressure vessel steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, C.W.; Han, L.Z.; Luo, X.M.; Liu, Q.D.; Gu, J.F., E-mail: gujf@sjtu.edu.cn

    2016-08-15

    The microstructure and mechanical properties of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel were investigated after tempering at different temperatures ranging from 580 to 700 °C for 5 h. With increasing tempering temperature, the impact toughness, which is qualified by Charpy V-notch total absorbed energy, initially increases from 142 to 252 J, and then decreases to 47 J, with a maximum value at 650 °C, while the ultimate tensile strength varies in exactly the opposite direction. Comparing the microstructure and fracture surfaces of different specimens, the variations in toughness and strength with the tempering temperature were generally attributed to the softening of the bainitic ferrite, the agminated Fe{sub 3}C carbides that resulted from decomposition of martensite/austenite (M/A) constituents, the precipitation of Mo{sub 2}C carbides, and the newly formed M/A constituents at the grain boundaries. Finally, the correlation between the impact toughness and the volume fraction of the M/A constituents was established, and the fracture mechanisms for the different tempering conditions are explained. - Highlights: • The dependence of the deterioration of impact toughness on tempering temperature has been analysed. • The instrumented Charpy V-notch impact test has been employed to study the fracture mechanism. • The influence of M/A constituents on different fracture mechanisms based on the hinge model has been demonstrated. • A correlation between the mechanical properties and the amount of M/A constituents has been established.

  5. Simulation and tests to individual and coupled models of the reactor vessel simulator and the recirculation system for the SUN-RAH; Simulacion y pruebas a modelos individuales y acoplados del simulador de la vasija del reactor y el sistema de recirculacion para el SUN-RAH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez S, R.A. [UNAM, Laboratorio de Analisis de Ingenieria de Reactores Nucleares, DEPFI, Campus Morelos, en IMTA Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)]. e-mail: rsanchez_15@yahoo.com.mx

    2004-07-01

    The present project, is continuation of the project presented in the congress SNM-2003. In this new phase of the project, they were carried out adaptive changes to the modeling and implementation of the module of the full superior of the core of the reactor, they were carried out those modeling of the generation of heat as well as of the energy transfer in the one fuel. These models present the main characteristics of the vessel of the one reactor and of the recirculation system, defined by the main phenomena that they intervene in the physical processes, in the previous version the simulation in real time it required of an extremely quick computer and without executing collateral processes. The tests are presented carried out to the different models belonging to the Simulator of the Reactor Vessel and the Recirculation system for the SUN-RAH (University Simulator of Nucleo electric with Boiling Water Reactor), as well as the results hurtled by this tests. In each section the executions of the tests and the corresponding analyses of results are shown for each pattern. Besides the above mentioned, the advantages presented by the Simulator of the reactor vessel and the recirculation system are pointed. (Author)

  6. Reactor/Brayton power systems for nuclear electric spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layton, J. P.

    1980-01-01

    Studies are currently underway to assess the technological feasibility of a nuclear-reactor-powered spacecraft propelled by electric thrusters. This vehicle would be capable of performing detailed exploration of the outer planets of the solar system during the remainder of this century. The purpose of this study was to provide comparative information on a closed cycle gas turbine power conversion system. The results have shown that the performance is very competitive and that a 400 kWe space power system is dimensionally compatible with a single Space Shuttle launch. Performance parameters of system mass and radiator area were determined for systems from 100 to 1000 kWe. A 400 kWe reference system received primary attention. The components of this system were defined and a conceptual layout was developed with encouraging results. The preliminary mass determination for the complete power system was very close to the desired goal of 20 kg/kWe. Use of more advanced technology (higher turbine inlet temperature) will substantially improve system performance characteristics.

  7. Technical aspects of the process of segmentation and packaging of the reactor vessel of Jose Cabrera NPP; Aspectos tecnicos del proceso de segmentacion y embalaje de la vasija del reactor de la central nuclear Jose Cabrera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valdivieso, J. M.; Garcia Castro, R.

    2015-07-01

    Westinghouse is carrying out the segmentation of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) within the framework of the Dismantling and Decommissioning Project of the Jose Cabrera NPP. The final concept is based on the comprehensive Westinghouse experience in the field of LWR pressure vessel and internals segmentation, and particularly in previous reactor internals segmentation project for Jose Cabrera NPP. This article shows the development of all the activities included: cutting method selection, preparatory works, cutting activities, waste characterization and packaging activities. (Author)

  8. Radiation Damage Assessment in the Reactor Pressure Vessel of the Integral Inherently Safe Light Water Reactor (I2S-LWR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flaspoehler Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the major limiting factors to nuclear reactors lifetime is the radiation-induced material damage in the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV. While older reactors were designed assuming a 40-year operating lifetime, new reactor designs are expected to have lifetimes up to 100 years. For safe operation, the integrity of the RPV must be ensured against significant material property changes. In this work, typical neutron damage indicators are calculated in the RPV of the I2S-LWR (Integral Inherently Safe LWR Power Plant, including DPA (displacements per atom and fast neutron fluence (>1 MeV and >0.1MeV. I2S-LWR is a PWR of integral design, which means that its wider downcomer provides additional shielding to the vessel. However, its higher core power density and longer lifetime may offset this advantage. In order to accurately represent the neutron environment for RPV damage assessment, a detailed model based on the preliminary design specifications of the I2S-LWR was developed to be used in the MAVRIC (Monaco with Automated Variance Reduction using Importance Calculations sequence of the Scale6.1 code package. MAVRIC uses the CADIS (Consistent Adjoint-Driven Importance Sampling methodology to bias a fixed-source MC (Monte Carlo simulation. To establish the upper limit of a bounding envelope, a flat-source distribution was used. For the low limit, a center-peaked source was generated using the KENO-VI criticality sequence assuming uniform fresh fuel core. Results based on the preliminary I2S-LWR model show that DPA rates and fast fluence rates are conservatively 75% lower than in typical PWRs being operated currently in the US.

  9. Radiation Damage Assessment in the Reactor Pressure Vessel of the Integral Inherently Safe Light Water Reactor (I2S-LWR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaspoehler, Timothy; Petrovic, Bojan

    2016-02-01

    One of the major limiting factors to nuclear reactors lifetime is the radiation-induced material damage in the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV). While older reactors were designed assuming a 40-year operating lifetime, new reactor designs are expected to have lifetimes up to 100 years. For safe operation, the integrity of the RPV must be ensured against significant material property changes. In this work, typical neutron damage indicators are calculated in the RPV of the I2S-LWR (Integral Inherently Safe LWR) Power Plant, including DPA (displacements per atom) and fast neutron fluence (>1 MeV and >0.1MeV). I2S-LWR is a PWR of integral design, which means that its wider downcomer provides additional shielding to the vessel. However, its higher core power density and longer lifetime may offset this advantage. In order to accurately represent the neutron environment for RPV damage assessment, a detailed model based on the preliminary design specifications of the I2S-LWR was developed to be used in the MAVRIC (Monaco with Automated Variance Reduction using Importance Calculations) sequence of the Scale6.1 code package. MAVRIC uses the CADIS (Consistent Adjoint-Driven Importance Sampling) methodology to bias a fixed-source MC (Monte Carlo) simulation. To establish the upper limit of a bounding envelope, a flat-source distribution was used. For the low limit, a center-peaked source was generated using the KENO-VI criticality sequence assuming uniform fresh fuel core. Results based on the preliminary I2S-LWR model show that DPA rates and fast fluence rates are conservatively 75% lower than in typical PWRs being operated currently in the US.

  10. Ex-vessel coolability and energetics of steam explosions in nordic light water reactors - EXCOOLSE project report 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, H.S.; Nayak, A.K.; Hansson, R.C.; Sehgal, B.R. [Royal Inst. of Technology, Div. of Nuclear Power Safety (Sweden)

    2005-10-01

    Beyond-the-design-basis accidents, i.e. severe accidents, involve melting of the nuclear reactor core and release of radioactivity. Intensive research has been performed for years to evaluate the consequence of the postulated severe accidents. Severe accidents posed, to the reactor researchers, a most interesting and most difficult set of phenomena to understand, and to predict the consequences, for the various scenarios that could be contemplated. The complexity of the interactions, occurring at such high temperatures ({approx} 2500 deg. C), between different materials, which are changing phases and undergoing chemical reactions, is simply indescribable with the accuracy that one may desire. Thus, it is a wise approach to pursue research on SA phenomena until the remaining uncertainty in the predicted consequence, or the residual risk, can be tolerated. In the PRE-DELI-MELT project at NKS, several critical issues on the core melt loadings in the BWR and PWR reactor containments were identified. Many of Nordic nuclear power plants, particularly in boiling water reactors, adopted the Severe Accident Management Strategy (SAMS) which employed the deep subcooled water pool in lower dry-well. The success of this SAMS largely depends on the issues of steam explosions and formation of debris bed and its coolability. From the suggestions of the PRE-DELI-MELT project, a series of research plan was proposed to investigate the remaining issues specifically on the ex-vessel coolability of corium during severe accidents; (a) ex-vessel coolability of the melt or particulate debris, and (b) energetics and debris characteristics of fuel-coolant interactions endangering the integrity of the reactor containments. (au)

  11. ASSESSMENT OF THE POTENTIAL FOR HYDROGEN GENERATION DURING GROUTING OPERATIONS IN THE R AND P REACTOR VESSELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiersma, B.

    2009-10-29

    The R- and P-reactor buildings were retired from service and are now being prepared for deactivation and decommissioning (D&D). D&D activities will consist primarily of immobilizing contaminated components and structures in a grout-like formulation. Aluminum corrodes very rapidly when it comes in contact with the alkaline grout materials and as a result produces hydrogen gas. To address this potential deflagration/explosion hazard, the Materials Science and Technology Directorate (MS&T) of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has been requested to review and evaluate existing experimental and analytical studies of this issue to determine if any process constraints on the chemistry of the fill material and the fill operation are necessary. Various options exist for the type of grout material that may be used for D&D of the reactor vessels. The grout formulation options include ceramicrete (pH 6-8), low pH portland cement + silica fume grout (pH 10.4), or portland cement grout (pH 12.5). The assessment concluded that either ceramicrete or the silica fume grout may be used to safely grout the R- and P- reactor vessels. The risk of accumulation of a flammable mixture of hydrogen between the grout-air interface and the top of the reactor is very low. Conservative calculations estimate that either ceramicrete or the silica fume grout may be used to safely grout the R- and P- reactor vessels. The risk of accumulation of a flammable mixture of hydrogen between the grout-air interface and the top of the reactor is very low. Although these calculations are conservative, there are some measures that may be taken to further minimize the potential for hydrogen evolution. (1) Minimize the temperature of the grout as much as practical. Lower temperatures will mean lower hydrogen generation rates. Grout temperatures less than 100 C should however, still provide an adequate safety margin for the pH 8 and pH 10.4 grout formulations. (2) Minimize the fill rate as much as

  12. Validation of the inspections with ultrasound of the welds of the reactor of ITER vacuum vessel; Validacion de las inspecciones con ultrasonidos de las soldaduras de la Vasija de Vacio del reactor del ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, A.; Fernandez, F.; Perez, C.; Sillero, J. A.

    2013-07-01

    The ITER fusion reactor vacuum vessel has thousands of welding austenitic with shapes and different manufacturing processes. The RCC-MR code, which is that applied to the manufacture of the fusion reactor, requires a volumetric test all of them. This test should be mainly by x-rays and welds where it was not possible to use this method, ultrasonic.09-06.

  13. Evaluation of J-groove weld residual stress and crack growth rate of PWSCC in reactor pressure vessel closure head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Seung Hyuk; Ryu, Tae Young; Park, Seung Hyun; Won, Min Gu; Kang, Seok Jun; Kim, Moon Ki; Choi, Jae Boong [Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyoung Soo; Lee, Sung Ho [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    Over the last decade, primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) has been frequently found in pressurized water reactor (PWR) applications. Especially, PWSCC has occurred in long-term operated PWRs. As this phenomenon leads to serious accidents, we must be beforehand with the anticipated problems. A typical PWR consists of J-groove welded components such as reactor pressure vessel closure head and nozzles. Reactor pressure vessel closure head is made of SA508 and it is covered by cladding. Alloy 600 is used for nozzles. And J-groove weld is conducted with alloy 82/182. Different material properties of these metals lead to residual stress and PWSCC consequentially. In this study, J-groove weld residual stress was investigated by a three-dimensional finite element analysis with an actual asymmetric J-groove weld model and process of construction. Also crack growth rate of PWSCC was evaluated from cracks applied on the penetration nozzles. Based on these two values, one cannot only improve the structural integrity of PWR, but also explain PWSCC behavior such that high residual stress at the J-groove weld area causes crack initiation and propagation through the surface of nozzles. In addition, crack behavior was predicted at the various points around the nozzle.

  14. Disclosure of the oscillations in kinetics of the reactor pressure vessel steel damage at fast neutron intensity decreasing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasikov, E.; Nikolaenko, V.

    2017-01-01

    Fast neutron intensity influence on reactor materials radiation damage is a critically important question in the problem of the correct use of the accelerated irradiation tests data for substantiation of the materials workability in real irradiation conditions that is low neutron intensity. Investigations of the fast neutron intensity (flux) influence on radiation damage and experimental data scattering reveal the existence of non-monotonous sections in kinetics of the reactor pressure vessels (RPV) steel damage. Discovery of the oscillations as indicator of the self-organization processes presence give reasons for new ways searching on reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel radiation stability increasing and attempt of the self-restoring metal elaboration. Revealing of the wavelike process in the form of non monotonous parts of the kinetics of radiation embrittlement testifies that periodic transformation of the structure take place. This fact actualizes the problem of more precise definition of the RPV materials radiation embrittlement mechanisms and gives reasons for search of the ways to manage the radiation stability (nanostructuring and so on to stimulate the radiation defects annihilation), development of the means for creating of more stableness self recovering smart materials.

  15. The probabilistic structural integrity assessment of reactor pressure vessels under pressurized thermal shock loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Mingya, E-mail: chenmingya@cgnpc.com.cn [Suzhou Nuclear Power Research Institute, 215004 Suzhou, Jiangsu Province (China); Lu, Feng; Wang, Rongshan; Yu, Weiwei [Suzhou Nuclear Power Research Institute, 215004 Suzhou, Jiangsu Province (China); Wang, Donghui [State Nuclear Power Plant Service Company, 200237 Shanghai (China); Zhang, Guodong; Xue, Fei [Suzhou Nuclear Power Research Institute, 215004 Suzhou, Jiangsu Province (China)

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • The methodology and the case study of the FAVOR software were shown. • The over-conservative parameters in the DFM were shown. • The differences between the PFM and the DFM were discussed. • The limits in the current FAVOR were studied. - Abstract: The pressurized thermal shock (PTS) event poses a potentially significant challenge to the structural integrity of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) during the long time operation (LTO). In the USA, the “screening criteria” for maximum allowable embrittlement of RPV material, which forms part of the USA regulations, is based on the probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM). The FAVOR software developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is used to establish the regulation. As the technical basis of FAVOR is not the most widely-used and codified methodologies, such as the ASME and RCC-M codes, in most countries (with exception of the USA), proving RPV integrity under the PTS load is still based on the deterministic fracture mechanics (DFM). As the maximum nil-ductility-transition temperature (RT{sub NDT}) of the beltline material for the 54 French RPVs after 40 years operation is higher than the critical values in the IAEA-TECDOC-1627 and European NEA/CSNI/R(99)3 reports (while still obviously lower than the “screening criteria” of the USA), it may conclude that the RPV will not be able to run in the LTO based on the DFM. In the FAVOR, the newest developments of fracture mechanics are applied, such as the warm pre-stress (WPS) effect, more accurate estimation of the flaw information and less conservation of the toughness (such as the three-parameter Weibull distribution of the fracture toughness). In this paper, the FAVOR software is first applied to show both the methodology and the results of the PFM, and then the limits in the current FAVOR software (Version 6.1, which represents the baseline for re-assessing the regulation of 10 CFR 50.61), lack of the impact of the constraint effect

  16. The deterministic structural integrity assessment of reactor pressure vessels under pressurized thermal shock loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Mingya, E-mail: chenmingya@cgnpc.com.cn; Lu, Feng; Wang, Rongshan; Huang, Ping; Liu, Xiangbin; Zhang, Guodong; Xu, Chaoliang

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • The conservative and non-conservative assumptions in the codes were shown. • The influence of different loads on the SM was given. • The unloading effect of the cladding was studied. • A concentrated reflection of the safety was shown based on 3-D FE analyses. - Abstract: The deterministic structural integrity of a reactor pressure vessel (RPV) related to pressurized thermal shocks (PTSs) has been extensively studied. While the nil-ductility-transition temperature (RT{sub NDT}) parameter is widely used, the influence of fluence and temperature distributions along the thickness of the base metal wall cannot be reflected in the comparative analysis. This paper introduces the method using a structure safety margin (SM) parameter which is based on a comparison between the material toughness (the fracture initiation toughness K{sub IC} or fracture arrest toughness K{sub Ia}) and the stress intensity factor (SIF) along the crack front for the integrity analysis of a RPV subjected to PTS transients. A 3-D finite element model is used to perform fracture mechanics analyses considering both crack initiation assessment and arrest assessment. The results show that the critical part along the crack front is always the clad-base metal interface point (IP) rather than the deepest point (DP) for either crack initiation assessment or crack arrest assessment under the thermal load. It is shown that the requirement in Regulatory Guide 1.154 that ‘axial flaws with depths less than 20% of the wall thickness and all circumferential flaws should be modeled in infinite length’ may be non-conservative. As the assessment result is often poor universal for a given material, crack and transient, caution is recommended in the safety assessment, especially for the IP. The SIF reduces under the thermal or pressure load if the map cracking (MC) effect is considered. Therefore, the assumption in the ASME and RCCM codes that the cladding should be taken into account in

  17. Assessment of Negligible Creep, Off-Normal Welding and Heat Treatment of Gr91 Steel for Nuclear Reactor Pressure Vessel Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Weiju [ORNL; Terry, Totemeier [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

    2006-10-01

    Two different topics of Grade 91 steel are investigated for Gen IV nuclear reactor pressure vessel application. On the first topic, negligible creep of Grade 91 is investigated with the motivation to design the reactor pressure vessel in negligible creep regime and eliminate costly surveillance programs during the reactor operation. Available negligible creep criteria and creep strain laws are reviewed, and new data needs are evaluated. It is concluded that modifications of the existing criteria and laws, together with their associated parameters, are needed before they can be reliably applied to Grade 91 for negligible creep prediction and reactor pressure vessel design. On the second topic, effects of off-normal welding and heat treatment on creep behavior of Grade 91 are studied with the motivation to better define the control over the parameters in welding and heat treatment procedures. The study is focused on off-normal austenitizing temperatures and improper cooling after welding but prior to post-weld heat treatment.

  18. FRACTURE MECHANICS UNCERTAINTY ANALYSIS IN THE RELIABILITY ASSESSMENT OF THE REACTOR PRESSURE VESSEL: (2D SUBJECTED TO INTERNAL PRESSURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Entin Hartini

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT FRACTURE MECHANICS UNCERTAINTY ANALYSIS IN THE RELIABILITY ASSESSMENT OF THE REACTOR PRESSURE VESSEL: (2D SUBJECTED TO INTERNAL PRESSURE. The reactor pressure vessel (RPV is a pressure boundary in the PWR type reactor which serves to confine radioactive material during chain reaction process. The integrity of the RPV must be guaranteed either  in a normal operation or accident conditions. In analyzing the integrity of RPV, especially related to the crack behavior which can introduce break to the reactor pressure vessel, a fracture mechanic approach should be taken for this assessment. The uncertainty of input used in the assessment, such as mechanical properties and physical environment, becomes a reason that the assessment is not sufficient if it is perfomed only by deterministic approach. Therefore, the uncertainty approach should be applied. The aim of this study is to analize the uncertainty of fracture mechanics calculations in evaluating the reliability of PWR`s reactor pressure vessel. Random character of input quantity was generated using probabilistic principles and theories. Fracture mechanics analysis is solved by Finite Element Method (FEM with  MSC MARC software, while uncertainty input analysis is done based on probability density function with Latin Hypercube Sampling (LHS using python script. The output of MSC MARC is a J-integral value, which is converted into stress intensity factor for evaluating the reliability of RPV’s 2D. From the result of the calculation, it can be concluded that the SIF from  probabilistic method, reached the limit value of  fracture toughness earlier than SIF from  deterministic method.  The SIF generated by the probabilistic method is 105.240 MPa m0.5. Meanwhile, the SIF generated by deterministic method is 100.876 MPa m0.5. Keywords: Uncertainty analysis, fracture mechanics, LHS, FEM, reactor pressure vessels   ABSTRAK ANALISIS KETIDAKPASTIAN FRACTURE MECHANIC PADA EVALUASI KEANDALAN

  19. Analysis of the performance of the Westinghouse reactor vessel level indicating system for tests at semiscale. [PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, J.E.; Miller, G.N.

    1982-10-01

    The Westinghouse Reactor Vessel Level Indicating System (RVLIS), a differential pressure level measurement system, was tested at SEMISCALE. This report contains the analyses of these tests and the conclusions of these analyses. The tests performed included small break and intermediate break tests. Also, frequency response and natural circulation tests were run and analyzed. The RVLIS always indicated a level less than the two phase froth level. The RVLIS output in early small break tests indicated a level 200 cm greater than actual collapsed liquid level. This discrepancy was caused by structural differences between SEMISCALE and a Westinghouse reactor. Once modifications were made so that SEMISCALE better simulated a Westinghouse PWR, the maximum difference between RVLIS and SEMISCALE instrumentation was 30 cm or 3% which is less than the stated uncertainty of the Westinghouse RVLIS.

  20. Hot cell examination on the surveillance capsule of SA 533 cl. 1 reactor pressure vessel (1st test report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choo, Yong Sun; Jung, Y. H.; Yoo, B. O.; Baik, S. J.; Oh, W. H.; Soong, W. S.; Hong, K. P

    2000-08-01

    The post-irradiated examinations such as impact test, tensile test, composition analysis and etc. were conducted to monitor and to evaluate the radiation-induced changes, so called radiation embrittlement, in the mechanical properties of ferritic materials. Those data should be applied to confirm safety as well as reliability of reactor pressure vessel. The scopes and contents of hot cell examination on the surveillance capsule are as follows; - Capsule transportation, cutting, dismantling and classification - Shim block and Dosimeter cutting and dismantling - Impact test - Tensile test - Composition analysis by EPMA - SEM observation on the fractured surface - Hardness test - Radwaste treatment.

  1. Study on in-vessel thermohydraulics phenomena of sodium-cooled fast reactors. 3. Numerical investigation for thermal stratification phenomena in the upper plenum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muramatsu, Toshiharu; Yamaguchi, Akira [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center; Wakita, Junichi [Customer System Co. Ltd. (Japan)

    2002-06-01

    A large-scale sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor in the feasibility studies on commercialized fast reactors has a feature of consideration of thorough simplified and compacted systems and components design to realize drastic economical improvements. Therefore, special attentions should be paid to thermohydraulic designs for gas entrainment behavior from free surface, flow-induced vibration of in-vessel components, thermal stratification in the plenum, thermal shock for various structures due to high-speed coolant flows, nonsymmetrical coolant flows, etc. in the reactor vessel. In-vessel thermohydraulic analyses were carried out using a multi-dimensional code AQUA to understand the thermal stratification characteristics in the upper plenum, and to investigate trade-off relations between gas entrainment and thermal stratification phenomena on in-vessel structures for the elimination of gas entrainment possibility. From the analysis, the following results were obtained. (1) Dummy plug insertion to a slit of the upper core structure is one of the effective measures to stabilize the in-vessel flow patterns and to mitigate in-vessel thermal shocks. (2) Though flow guide device such as a baffle ring attached to reactor vessel wall is an effective measure to eliminate impinging jet to dipped plate, rising characteristics of the thermal stratification interface are affected by the baffle ring devise. (3) Thermal stratification characteristics are not influenced very much by the installation of a partial inner barrel to the dipped plate, which is an effective measure to reduce the horizontal flow velocity components at free surface. (4) Labyrinth structures to the gap between the reactor vessel wall and the outer dipped plate have direct effects upon in-vessel thermal shock characteristics including thermal stratification phenomena due to the closing of flow path between the upper plenum and the free surface plenum. (author)

  2. Design and development of in-vessel viewing periscope for ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obara, Kenjiro; Kakudate, Satoshi; Ito, Akira; Shibanuma, Kiyoshi; Tada, Eisuke [Department of Fusion Engineering Research, Naka Fusion Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Naka , Ibaraki (Japan)

    1999-02-01

    An in-vessel viewing system is essential not only to detect and locate damage of components exposed to plasma, but also to monitor and assist in-vessel maintenance operation. In ITER, the in-vessel viewing system must be capable of operating at high temperature (200degC), under intense gamma radiation (30 kGy/h) and high vacuum or 1 bar inert gas. A periscope-type in-vessel viewing system has been chosen as a reference of the ITER in-vessel viewing system due to its wide viewing capability and durability for sever environments. According to the ITER research and development program, a full-scale radiation hard periscope with a length of 15 m has been successfully developed by the Japan Home Team. The performance tests have been shown sufficient capability at high temperature up to 250degC and radiation resistance over 100 MGy. This report describes the design and R and D results of the ITER in-vessel viewing periscope based on the development of 15-m-length radiation hard periscope. (author)

  3. The application of mechanical and thermal cutting tools for the dismantling of activated internals of the reactor pressure vessels in the Versuchsatomkraftwerk, Kahl and the Gundremmingen Unit A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eickelpasch, N. [Versuchsatomkraftwerk GmbH, Kahl am Main (Germany); Kalwa, H. [Versuchsatomkraftwerk GmbH, Kahl am Main (Germany); Steiner, H. [Kernkraftwerke Gundremmingen Betriebsgesellschaft mbH, D-89355 Gundremmingen (Germany); Priesmeyer, U. [Kernkraftwerke Gundremmingen Betriebsgesellschaft mbH, D-89355 Gundremmingen (Germany)

    1997-07-01

    The Gundremmingen Unit A plant (KRB A) and the Versuchsatomkraftwerk Kahl (VAK) plant represent the first generation of nuclear reactors in Germany. The 250 MW{sub e} reactor KRB A was the first commercial reactor in Germany and the 16 MW{sub e} reactor VAK was the pilot nuclear power plant, which had to serve mainly scientific purposes. KRB A is under dismantling since 1983, VAK since 1988. Although they are both of the boiling water type, they are rather different to each other, referring to their size and construction. The actual work is the dismantling of high contaminated components inside the reactor buildings and the underwater cutting of activated internals of the reactor pressure vessels. Several cutting techniques have been developed, tested and applied to respective dismantling tasks in the meantime. The experiences made in both projects are not limited to dismantling work only, but also include know-how on effective decontamination and scrap recycling. (orig.)

  4. Sensitivity coefficients for the stochastic estimation of the radiation damage to the reactor pressure vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez, C.M.; Hernandez Valle, S. [Centro de Investigaciones Tecnologicas, Nucleares y Ambientales, La Habana (Cuba). E-mail: calvarez@ctn.isctn.edu.cu; svalle@ctn.isctn.edu.cu

    2000-07-01

    The construction of the sensitivity matrix in the case of the vessel radiation damage estimation by Monte Carlo techniques poses new problems related to the uncertainties of the obtained responses. In the case of deterministic calculations, the sensitivity coefficient obtention is a straightforward procedure based on the perturbation formalism through the calculation of the adjoint fluxes. In the paper an alternative procedure implementation based on the differential operator method is described with the modifications needed to the used HEXANN-EVALU code for the response estimations in the VVER-440 pressure vessel. (author)

  5. Preliminary Assessment of the Impact on Reactor Vessel dpa Rates Due to Installation of a Proposed Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) Core in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daily, Charles R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-10-01

    An assessment of the impact on the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) reactor vessel (RV) displacements-per-atom (dpa) rates due to operations with the proposed low enriched uranium (LEU) core described by Ilas and Primm has been performed and is presented herein. The analyses documented herein support the conclusion that conversion of HFIR to low-enriched uranium (LEU) core operations using the LEU core design of Ilas and Primm will have no negative impact on HFIR RV dpa rates. Since its inception, HFIR has been operated with highly enriched uranium (HEU) cores. As part of an effort sponsored by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), conversion to LEU cores is being considered for future HFIR operations. The HFIR LEU configurations analyzed are consistent with the LEU core models used by Ilas and Primm and the HEU balance-of-plant models used by Risner and Blakeman in the latest analyses performed to support the HFIR materials surveillance program. The Risner and Blakeman analyses, as well as the studies documented herein, are the first to apply the hybrid transport methods available in the Automated Variance reduction Generator (ADVANTG) code to HFIR RV dpa rate calculations. These calculations have been performed on the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Institutional Cluster (OIC) with version 1.60 of the Monte Carlo N-Particle 5 (MCNP5) computer code.

  6. Final Report for the 1st Surveillance Test of the Reactor Pressure Vessel Material (Capsule 2) of Ulchin Nuclear Power Plant Unit 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Kee Ok; Kim, Byoung Chul; Lee, Sam Lai (and others)

    2007-04-15

    Surveillance testing for reactor vessel materials is performed in order to evaluate the irradiation embrittlement due to neutrons during operation and set the condition of safe operation of nuclear reactor. The 1st surveillance testing was performed completely by Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute at Daejon after the capsule was transported from Ulchin site including its removal from reactor. Fast neutron fluences for capsules were calculated and various testing including mechanical and chemistry analysis were performed in order to evaluate the integrity of Ulchin Unit 4 reactor vessel during the operation until life time. The evaluation results are as follows; Fast neutron fluences for capsule 2 is 4.306E+18n/cm{sup 2}. The bias factor, the ratio of calculation/measurement, was 0.918 for the 1st testing and the calculational uncertainty,7.0% satisfied the requirement of USNRC Reg.Guide 1.190, 20%. The best estimated neutron fluence for reactor vessel inside surface was 3.615E+18n/cm{sup 2} based on the end of 6th fuel cycle and it was predicted that the fluences of vessel inside surface at 16 and 32EFPY would reach 8.478E+18 and 1.673E+19n/cm{sup 2} based on the current calculation. The result through this analysis for Ulchin Unit 4 showed that there would be no problem for the pressurized thermal shock(PTS) during the operation until design life.

  7. Final Report for the 1st Surveillance Test of the Reactor Pressure Vessel Material (CAPSULE 2) of Ulchin Nuclear Power Plant Unit 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Kee Ok; Kim, Byoung Chul; Lee, Sam Lai (and others)

    2006-12-15

    Surveillance testing for reactor vessel materials is performed in order to evaluate the irradiation embrittlement due to neutrons during operation and set the condition of safe operation of nuclear reactor. The 1st surveillance testing was performed completely by Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute at Taejon after the capsule was transported from Ulchin site including its removal from reactor. Fast neutron fluences for capsules were calculated and various testing including mechanical and chemistry analysis were performed in order to evaluate the integrity of Ulchin unit 3 reactor vessel during the operation until life time. The evaluation results are as follows; Fast neutron fluences for capsule 2 is 4.674E 18n/cm{sup 2}. The bias factor, the ratio of calculation/measurement, was 0.920 for the 1st testing and the calculational uncertainty,7.0% satisfied the requirement of USNRC Reg.Guide 1.190, 20%. The best estimated neutron fluence for reactor vessel inside surface was 3.913E 18n/cm{sup 2} based on the end of 6th fuel cycle and it was predicted that the fluences of vessel inside surface at 16 and 32EFPY would reach 9.249E 18 and 1.834E 19n/cm{sup 2} based on the current calculation. The result through this analysis for Ulchin unit 3 showed that there would be no problem for the pressurized thermal shock(PTS) during the operation until design life.

  8. Numerical Simulation of the Pressure Distribution in the Reactor Vessel Downcomer Region Fluctuated by the Reactor Coolant Pump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Dong Hwa; Jung, Byung Ryul; Jang, Ho Cheol; Yune, Seok Jeong; Kim, Eun Kee [KEPCO EnC, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In this study the numerical simulation of the pressure distribution in the downcomer region resulting from the pressure pulsation by the Reactor Coolant Pump (RCP) is performed using the Finite Difference Method (FDM). Simulation is carried out for the cylindrical shaped 2-dimensional model equivalent to the outer surface of the Core Support Barrel (CSB) of APR1400 and a 1/2 model is adopted based on the bilateral symmetry by the inlet nozzle. The fluid temperature is 555 .deg. F and the forcing frequencies are 120Hz, 240Hz, 360Hz and 480Hz. Simulation results of the axial pressure distributions are provided as the Root Mean Square (RMS) values at the five locations of 0°, 45°, 90°, 135° and 180° in the circumferential direction from the inlet nozzle location. In the study, the numerical simulation of pressure distributions in the downcomer region induced by the RCP was performed using FDM and the results were reviewed. The interference of the waves returned from both boundaries in the axial direction and the source of the sinusoidal wave is shown on the inlet nozzle interface pressure point. It seems that the maximum pressures result from the superposition of the waves reflected from the seating surface and the waves newly arrived from the inlet nozzle interface pressure location.

  9. A preliminary assessment of the effects of heat flux distribution and penetration on the creep rupture of a reactor vessel lower head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, T.Y.; Bentz, J.; Simpson, R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Witt, R. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1997-02-01

    The objective of the Lower Head Failure (LHF) Experiment Program is to experimentally investigate and characterize the failure of the reactor vessel lower head due to thermal and pressure loads under severe accident conditions. The experiment is performed using 1/5-scale models of a typical PWR pressure vessel. Experiments are performed for various internal pressure and imposed heat flux distributions with and without instrumentation guide tube penetrations. The experimental program is complemented by a modest modeling program based on the application of vessel creep rupture codes developed in the TMI Vessel Investigation Project. The first three experiments under the LHF program investigated the creep rupture of simulated reactor pressure vessels without penetrations. The heat flux distributions for the three experiments are uniform (LHF-1), center-peaked (LHF-2), and side-peaked (LHF-3), respectively. For all the experiments, appreciable vessel deformation was observed to initiate at vessel wall temperatures above 900K and the vessel typically failed at approximately 1000K. The size of failure was always observed to be smaller than the heated region. For experiments with non-uniform heat flux distributions, failure typically occurs in the region of peak temperature. A brief discussion of the effect of penetration is also presented.

  10. Safe operation of a batch reactor: Safe storage of organic peroxides in supply vessels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steensma, M.; Steensma, Metske; Westerterp, K.R.

    1991-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the limits of safe operation for a cooled reactor, operated batchwise. As an example of a single-phase reaction, we studied the decomposition of t-butyl peroxypivalate, a well-known organic peroxide, undergoing self-heating at relatively low temperatures. If

  11. A study on the irradiation embrittlement and recovery characteristics of light water reactor pressure vessel steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chi, Se Hwan; Hong, Jun Hwa; Lee, Bong Sang; Oh, Jong Myung; Song, Sook Hyang; Milan, Brumovsky [NRI Czech (Czech Republic)

    1999-03-01

    The neutron irradiation embrittlement phenomenon of light water RPV steels greatly affects the life span for safe operation of a reactor. Reliable evaluation and prediction of the embrittlement of RPV steels, especially of aged reactors, are of importance to the safe operation of a reactor. In addition, the thermal recovery of embrittled RPV has been recognized as an option for life extension. This study aimed to tracer/refine available technologies for embrittlement characterization and prediction, to prepare relevant materials for several domestic RPV steels of the embrittlement and recovery, and to find out possible remedy for steel property betterment. Small specimen test techniques, magnetic measurement techniques, and the Meechan and Brinkmann's recovery curve analysis method were examined/applied as the evaluation techniques. Results revealed a high irradiation sensitivity in YG 3 RPV steel. Further extended study may be urgently needed. Both the small specimen test technique for the direct determination of fracture toughness, and the magnetic measurement technique for embrittlement evaluation appeared to be continued for the technical improvement and data base preparation. Manufacturing process relevant to the heat treatment appeared to be improved in lowering the irradiation sensitivity of the steel. Further study is needed especially in applying the present techniques to the new structural materials under new irradiation environment of advanced reactors. (author)

  12. Critical technologies for reactors used in nuclear electric propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, S. K.

    Nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) systems are expected to play a significant role in the exploration and exploitation of space. Unlike nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) systems, NEP systems include electric power generation and conditioning units that in turn are used to drive electric thrusters. These thrusters accelerate subatomic particles to produce thrust. This document provides a quick overview of the technological development needs of NEP systems.

  13. ITER vacuum vessel fabrication plan and cost study (D 68) for the international thermonuclear experimental reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-01-01

    ITER Task No. 8, Vacuum Vessel Fabrication Plan and Cost Study (D68), was initiated to assess ITER vacuum vessel fabrication, assembly, and cost. The industrial team of Raytheon Engineers & Constructors and Chicago Bridge & Iron (Raytheon/CB&I) reviewed the current vessel basis and prepared a manufacturing plan, assembly plan, and cost estimate commensurate with the present design. The guidance for the Raytheon/CB&I assessment activities was prepared by the ITER Garching Work Site. This guidance provided in the form of work descriptions, sketches, drawings, and costing guidelines for each of the presently identified vacuum vessel Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) elements was compiled in ITER Garching Joint Work Site Memo (Draft No. 9 - G 15 MD 01 94-17-05 W 1). A copy of this document is provided as Appendix 1 to this report. Additional information and clarifications required for the Raytheon/CB&I assessments were coordinated through the US Home Team (USHT) and its technical representative. Design details considered essential to the Task 8 assessments but not available from the ITER Joint Central Team (JCT) were generated by Raytheon/CB&I and documented accordingly.

  14. Validation of 3D Code KATRIN For Fast Neutron Fluence Calculation of VVER-1000 Reactor Pressure Vessel by Ex-Vessel Measurements and Surveillance Specimens Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dzhalandinov A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Usually the synthesis of two-dimensional and one-dimensional discrete ordinate calculations is used to evaluate neutron fluence on VVER-1000 reactor pressure vessel (RPV for prognosis of radiation embrittlement. But there are some cases when this approach is not applicable. For example the latest projects of VVER-1000 have upgraded surveillance program. Containers with surveillance specimens are located on the inner surface of RPV with fast neutron flux maximum. Therefore, the synthesis approach is not suitable enough for calculation of local disturbance of neutron field in RPV inner surface behind the surveillance specimens because of their complicated and heterogeneous structure. In some cases the VVER-1000 core loading consists of fuel assemblies with different fuel height and the applicability of synthesis approach is also ambiguous for these fuel cycles. Also, the synthesis approach is not enough correct for the neutron fluence estimation at the RPV area above core top. Because of these reasons only the 3D neutron transport codes seem to be satisfactory for calculation of neutron fluence on the VVER-1000 RPV. The direct 3D calculations are also recommended by modern regulations.

  15. METHODS VERIFICATION FOR ELECTROTHERMAL CALCULATIONS OF ELECTRIC REACTORS WITHOUT STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. F. Ivankov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Based on the example of the reactor without steel, type ROM-510/26 with electromagnetic shields, verification of analytical and numeral finite-element methods is carried out by the calculation results comparison. For the purpose of corrected analytical calculation, horizontal and vertical shields of the reactor are represented by the system of shortcircuited elements to consider their final dimensions. Calculation is performed as to their inductances, distribution of currents and losses in the shields, magnetic-field and losses in winding, calculation of winding heating by means of the «overheating» empirical method. It is illustrated that analytical calculations correspond to the researches using numeral methods of the electromagnetic and thermal CFD-analysis with sufficient accuracy. For the purpose of practical application in industrial designing of the equipment, the methods with approved and checked measurement results are recommended

  16. Standard Guide for Predicting Radiation-Induced Transition Temperature Shift in Reactor Vessel Materials, E706 (IIF)

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2002-01-01

    1.1 This guide presents a method for predicting reference transition temperature adjustments for irradiated light-water cooled power reactor pressure vessel materials based on Charpy V-notch 30-ftlbf (41-J) data. Radiation damage calculative procedures have been developed from a statistical analysis of an irradiated material database that was available as of May 2000. The embrittlement correlation used in this guide was developed using the following variables: copper and nickel contents, irradiation temperature, and neutron fluence. The form of the model was based on current understanding for two mechanisms of embrittlement: stable matrix damage (SMD) and copper-rich precipitation (CRP); saturation of copper effects (for different weld materials) was included. This guide is applicable for the following specific materials, copper, nickel, and phosphorus contents, range of irradiation temperature, and neutron fluence based on the overall database: 1.1.1 MaterialsA 533 Type B Class 1 and 2, A302 Grade B, A302 G...

  17. Status and Perspectives of Nuclear Reactor Pressure Vessel Life Extension up to 60 Years Operation in Belgium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucon, E.; Chaouadi, R.; Scibetta, M.; Van Walle, E.

    2009-09-15

    The scope of this report involves a safety evaluation of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) against neutron embrittlement, in the most severely irradiation region (belt line) and in the event of a pressurized thermal shock. The irreplaceable RPV is considered to be the most critical component for lifetime considerations of the nuclear power plant. However, an application for operation extension will also depend upon a number of additional considerations, including the technical assessment of other plant components, as well as non-technical arguments (e.g. political, environmental, economical, strategical that are outside the scope this report. In the hypothesis of a request for operation extension, it is the responsibility of the utilities to provide the safety authorities with an exhaustive dossier demonstrating that safe extended operation is guaranteed. The role of the safety authorities is to critically evaluate the safety dossier for eventually granting the operation extension.

  18. Flow analyses for the LAVA-ERVC experiment and the KSNP under the external reactor vessel cooling using RELAP5/MOD3 code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Kyoung-Ho; Park, Rae-Joon; Cho, Young-Ro; Kim, Sang-Baik

    2005-01-01

    Flow analyses were performed using RELAP5/MOD3 code to investigate and verify the steam binding phenomena in the LAVA-ERVC experiment and to investigate the occurrence and the effects of steam binding for the KSNP under the external reactor vessel cooling. Flow analyses for the LAVA-ERVC experiments confirmed the steam binding occurrence in case of the limited steam venting and represented the LAVA-ERVC experimental results quite well. The flow analyses results for the KSNP under the external reactor vessel cooling address that water ingression and steam ventilation through the insulator are crucial factors determining the effective cool down via boiling heat removal at the outer surface of the RPV lower plenum. The flow analyses results for the base cases of the SBO and the 9.6 inch LBLOCA imply that the limited steam venting through the insulator induced the steam binding and eventually prevented the effective cooling at the outer surface of the RPV lower plenum. From the sensitivity study on the additional flow area for the steam venting, it could be found that the RPV lower plenum experienced effective cooling by smooth water circulation. The current RELAP5 flow analyses results for the KSNP under the external reactor vessel cooling address that prevention of steam binding phenomena should be settled first for the in-vessel corium retention through the external reactor vessel cooling. Implementation of additional flow path for the effective steam ventilation is highly recommended as one of the most promising countermeasures to enhance the coolability through the external reactor vessel cooling.

  19. Innovative inspection system for reactor pressure vessels; Innovative Pruefsysteme fuer Reaktordruckbehaelter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mertens, K.; Trautmann, H.

    1999-08-01

    The versatile, compact and modern underwater systems described, the DELPHIN manipulators and MIDAS submarines, are innovative systems enabling RPV inspections at considerably reduced efforts and time, thus reducing the total time required for ISI of reactors. (orig./CB) [Deutsch] Die vorgestellten kleinen, flexiblen und modernen Schwimmsysteme (DELPHIN-Manipulatoren und MIDAS-U-Boote) sind innovative Systeme fuer die Reduzierung der Aufwaende und Zeit zur Pruefung des Reaktordruckbehaelters und damit zur Reduktion der Revisionszeiten der Reaktoranlagen. (orig.)

  20. Ex-vessel coolability and energetics of steam explosions in nordic light water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, H.S.; Dinh, T.N. [Royal Institute of Technology (Sweden)

    2007-04-15

    The report summarizes activities conducted at the Division of Nuclear Power Safety, Royal Institute of Technology-Sweden (KTH-NPS) within the ExCoolSe project during the year 2005, which is a transition year for the KTH-NPS program. The ExCoolSe project supported by NKS contributes to the severe accident research at KTH-NPS concurrently supported by APRI, HSK and EU SARNET. The main objective in ExCoolSe project is to scrutinize research on risk-significant safety issues related to severe accident management (SAM) strategy adopted for Nordic BWR plants, namely the Ex-vessel Coolability and Energetic Steam explosion. The work aims to pave way toward building a tangible research framework to tackle these long-standing safety issues. Chapter 1 describes the project objectives and work description. Chapter 2 provides a critical assessment of research results obtained from several past programs at KTH. This includes review of key data, insights and implications from POMECO (Porous Media Coolability) program, COMECO (Corium Melt Coolability) program, SIMECO (Study of In-Vessel Melt Coolability) program, and MISTEE (Micro-Interactions in Steam Explosion Experiments) program. Chapter 3 discusses the rationale of the new research program focusing on the SAM issue resolution. The program emphasizes identification and qualification of physics-based limiting mechanisms for both in-vessel phenomena (melt progression and debris coolability in the lower head, vessel failure), and ex-vessel phenomena. Chapter 4 introduces research results from the newly established DEFOR (Debris Formation) program and the ongoing MISTEE program. The focus of DEFOR is fulfill an apparent gap in the contemporary knowledge of severe accidents, namely mechanisms which govern the debris bed formation and bed characteristics. The later control the debris bed coolability. In the MISTEE program, methods for image synchronization and data processing were developed and tested, which enable processing of

  1. Specific Features of Structural-Phase State and Properties of Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel at Elevated Irradiation Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Kuleshova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers influence of elevated irradiation temperature on structure and properties of 15Kh2NMFAA reactor pressure vessel (RPV steel. The steel is investigated after accelerated irradiation at 300°C (operating temperature of VVER-1000-type RPV and 400°C supposed to be the operating temperature of advanced RPVs. Irradiation at 300°C leads to formation of radiation-induced precipitates and radiation defects-dislocation loops, while no carbide phase transformation is observed. Irradiation at a higher temperature (400°C neither causes formation of radiation-induced precipitates nor provides formation of dislocation loops, but it does increase the number density of the main initial hardening phase—of the carbonitrides. Increase of phosphorus concentration in grain boundaries is more pronounced for irradiation at 400°C as compared to irradiation at 300°C due to influence of thermally enhanced diffusion at a higher temperature. The structural-phase changes determine the changes of mechanical properties: at both irradiation temperatures irradiation embrittlement is mainly due to the hardening mechanism with some contribution of the nonhardening one for irradiation at 400°C. Lack of formation of radiation-induced precipitates at T = 400°C provides a small ΔTK shift (17°C. The obtained results demonstrate that the investigated 15Kh2NMFAA steel may be a promising material for advanced reactors with an elevated operating temperature.

  2. Probabilistic Fracture Mechanics Analysis of Boling Water Reactor Vessel for Cool-Down and Low Temperature Over-Pressurization Transients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong Soon Park

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The failure probabilities of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV for low temperature over-pressurization (LTOP and cool-down transients are calculated in this study. For the cool-down transient, a pressure–temperature limit curve is generated in accordance with Section XI, Appendix G of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME code, from which safety margin factors are deliberately removed for the probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis. Then, sensitivity analyses are conducted to understand the effects of some input parameters. For the LTOP transient, the failure of the RPV mostly occurs during the period of the abrupt pressure rise. For the cool-down transient, the decrease of the fracture toughness with temperature and time plays a main role in RPV failure at the end of the cool-down process. As expected, the failure probability increases with increasing fluence, Cu and Ni contents, and initial reference temperature-nil ductility transition (RTNDT. The effect of warm prestressing on the vessel failure probability for LTOP is not significant because most of the failures happen before the stress intensity factor reaches the peak value while its effect reduces the failure probability by more than one order of magnitude for the cool-down transient.

  3. Study on in-vessel thermohydraulics phenomena of sodium-cooled fast reactors. 2. Numerical investigations on proprieties of R/V upper plenum separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muramatsu, Toshiharu; Yamaguchi, Akira [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center; Murakami, Satoshi [Customer System Co. Ltd., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2002-03-01

    A large-scale sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor investigated in the feasibility studies on commercialized fast reactors has a tendency of consideration of thorough simplified and compacted system designs to realize drastic economical improvements. Therefore, special attention should be paid to thermohydraulic designs for gas entrainment behavior from free surfaces, a flow-induced vibration of in-vessel components, thermal shock for various structures due to high-speed coolant flows, nonsymmetrical coolant flows, etc. in the reactor vessel. In-vessel thermohydraulic analyses were carried out using a multi-dimensional code AQUA to contribute to a planning of water scaled-model experiments for the separated upper plena of the reactor vessel. >From the analysis, the following results were obtained. (1) It can be considered that there is little effect of volumetric flow rate between the upper plenum and the free surface plenum on hydrodynamic characteristics in the whole upper plenum. Because the affected area is limited in the neighborhood of gaps of hot/cold leg pipes. (2) Change in flow velocity components is limited around the outer wall of hot leg pipes if the gap width of the dipped plate and penetrating components changes. From the above results, it was concluded that the assumption seems to be valid that the free surface plenum hydrodynamic characteristics is independent of the upper plenum flows. However it is necessary to consider jet effects due to the hot leg intake flows affecting vortex concentrations in the upper plenum. (author)

  4. Selection of power plant elements for future reactor space electric power systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buden, D.; Bennett, G.A.; Copper, K.

    1979-09-01

    Various types of reactor designs, electric power conversion equipment, and reject-heat systems to be used in nuclear reactor power plants for future space missions were studied. The designs included gas-cooled, liquid-cooled, and heat-pipe reactors. For the power converters, passive types such as thermoelectric and thermionic converters and dynamic types such as Brayton, potassium Rankine, and Stirling cycles were considered. For the radiators, heat pipes for transfer and radiating surface, pumped fluid for heat transfer with fins as the radiating surface, and pumped fluid for heat transfer with heat pipes as the radiating surface were considered. After careful consideration of weights, sizes, reliabilities, safety, and development cost and time, a heat-pipe reactor design, thermoelectric converters, and a heat-pipe radiator for an experimental program were selected.

  5. High-temperature nuclear reactor power plant cycle for hydrogen and electricity production – numerical analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dudek Michał

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available High temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor (called HTR or HTGR for both electricity generation and hydrogen production is analysed. The HTR reactor because of the relatively high temperature of coolant could be combined with a steam or gas turbine, as well as with the system for heat delivery for high-temperature hydrogen production. However, the current development of HTR’s allows us to consider achievable working temperature up to 750°C. Due to this fact, industrial-scale hydrogen production using copper-chlorine (Cu-Cl thermochemical cycle is considered and compared with high-temperature electrolysis. Presented calculations show and confirm the potential of HTR’s as a future solution for hydrogen production without CO2 emission. Furthermore, integration of a hightemperature nuclear reactor with a combined cycle for electricity and hydrogen production may reach very high efficiency and could possibly lead to a significant decrease of hydrogen production costs.

  6. Design and fabrication report on instrumented capsule (99M-01K.02H) for korean reactor pressure vessel material made by HANJUNG (Co)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choo, K. N.; Kang, Y. H.; Kim, B. G.; Cho, M. S.; Son, J. M.; Kim, D. S.; Oh, J. M.; Park, S. J.; Shin, Y. T

    2000-09-01

    The instrumented capsules (99M-01K{center_dot}02H) was designed and fabricated. The purpose of the capsules were to evaluate the nuclear irradiation performance of the Korean nuclear reactor pressure vessel material, SA508 class 3 steel, fabricated by HANJUNG Co for Yonggwang Units 4,5 and Ulchin Unit 4. There are 5 stages having specimens and independent electric heaters in the capsule mainbody. 12 K-type thermocouples and 5 sets of Ni-Ti-Fe and sapphire neutron Fluence Monitors were also inserted in the apsule. Various types of specimens, such as round compact tension, Charpy insert, pre-cracked v-notch (PCVN), tensile, small punch (SP), magnetic Barkhausen effect (MBE), and transmission electron micrograph (TEM) specimens, were inserted in the capsule. The capsule was fabricated at DAEWOO Precision Co. according to KAERI detailed design specifications. This report describes the details of the design, fabrication and inspection of the 99M-01K and 99M-02H capsule. The capsules were irradiated in the IR2 test hole of HANARO at 290{+-}10 deg C up to the fast neutron fluence (E>1.0 MeV) of 3.0x10{sup 19} (n/cm{sup 2})

  7. Understanding the role of defect production in radiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessels.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, D. E.

    1999-08-04

    Comparative experiments using high energy (10 MeV) electrons and test reactor neutrons have been undertaken to understand the role that primary damage state has on hardening (embrittlement) induced by irradiation at 300 C. Electrons produce displacement damage primarily by low energy atomic recoils, while fast neutrons produce displacements from considerably higher energy recoils. Comparison of changes resulting from neutron irradiation, in which nascent point defect clusters can form in dense cascades, with electron irradiation, where cascade formation is minimized, can provide insight into the role that the in-cascade point defect clusters have on the mechanisms of embrittlement. Tensile property changes induced by 10 MeV electrons or test reactor neutron irradiations of unalloyed iron and an Fe-0.9 wt.% Cu-1.0 wt.% Mn alloy were examined in the damage range of 9.0 x 10{sup {minus}5} dpa to 1.5 x 10{sup {minus}2} dpa. The results to date showed the ternary alloy experienced substantially greater embrittlement in both the electron and neutron irradiated samples relative to unalloyed iron. Surprisingly, despite their disparate nature of defect production, similar embrittlement trends with increasing radiation damage were observed for electrons and neutrons in both the ternary and unalloyed iron.

  8. Design of an Actinide-Burning, Lead or Lead-Bismuth Cooled Reactor that Produces Low-Cost Electricity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth; Weaver, Kevan Dean; Davis, Cliff Bybee; MIT folks

    2000-07-01

    The purpose of this Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) University Research Consortium (URC) project is to investigate the suitability of lead or lead-bismuth cooled fast reactors for producing low-cost electricity as well as for actinide burning. The goal is to identify and analyze the key technical issues in core neutronics, materials, thermal-hydraulics, fuels, and economics associated with the development of this reactor concept. Work has been accomplished in four major areas of research: core neutronic design, material compatibility, plant engineering, and coolant activation. In the area of core neutronic design, the reactivity vs. burnup and discharge isotopics of both non-fertile and fertile fuels were evaluated. An innovative core for pure actinide burning that uses streaming, fertile-free fuel assemblies was studied in depth. This particular core exhibits excellent reactivity performance upon coolant voiding, even for voids that occur in the core center, and has a transuranic (TRU) destruction rate that is comparable to the proposed accelerator transmutation of waste (ATW) facility. These studies suggest that a core can be designed to achieve a long life while maintaining safety and minimizing waste. In the area of material compatibility studies, an experimental apparatus for the investigation of the flow-assisted dissolution and precipitation (corrosion) of potential fuel cladding and structural materials has been designed and built at the INEEL. The INEEL forced-convection corrosion cell consists of a small heated vessel with a shroud and gas flow system. The corrosion cell is being used to test steel that is commercially available in the United States to temperatures above 650°C. Progress in plant engineering was made for two reactor concepts, one utilizing an indirect cycle with heat exchangers and the other utilizing a direct-contact steam cycle. The evaluation of the

  9. Modeling flow stress constitutive behavior of SA508-3 steel for nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mingyue; Hao, Luhan; Li, Shijian; Li, Dianzhong; Li, Yiyi

    2011-11-01

    Based on the measured stress-strain curves under different temperatures and strain rates, a series of flow stress constitutive equations for SA508-3 steel were firstly established through the classical theories on work hardening and softening. The comparison between the experimental and modeling results has confirmed that the established constitutive equations can correctly describe the mechanical responses and microstructural evolutions of the steel under various hot deformation conditions. We further represented a successful industrial application of this model to simulate a forging process for a large conical shell used in a nuclear steam generator, which evidences its practical and promising perspective of our model with an aim of widely promoting the hot plasticity processing for heavy nuclear components of fission reactors.

  10. Specialist meeting on leak before break in reactor piping and vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartholome, G.; Bazant, E.; Wellein, R. [Siemens KWU, Stuttgart (Germany)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    A series of research projects sponsored by the Federal Minister for Education, Science, Research and Technology, Bonn are summarized and compared to utility, manufacturer, and vendor tests. The purpose of the evaluation was to experimentally verify Leak-before-Break behavior, confirm the postulation of fracture preclusion for piping (straight pipe, bends and branches), and quantify the safety margin against massive failure. The results are applicable to safety assessment of ferritic and austenitic piping in primary and secondary nuclear power plant circuits. Moreover, because of the wide range of the test parameters, they are also important for the design and assessment of piping in other technical plant. The test results provide justification for ruling out catastrophic fractures, even on pipes of dimensions corresponding to those of a main coolant pipe of a pressurized water reactor plant on the basis of a mechanical deterministic safety analysis in correspondence with the Basis Safety Concept (Principle of Fracture Exclusion).

  11. The 4th surveillance test and evaluation of the reactor pressure vessel material (capsule W) of Yonggwang nuclear power plant unit 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Kee Ok; Kim, Byoung Chul; Lee, Sam Lai; Choi, Kwon Jae; Gong, Un Sik; Chang, Jong Hwa; Joo, Yong Sun; Ahn, Sang Bok; Hong, Joon Hwa [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2001-02-01

    Surveillance testing for reactor vessel materials is performed in order to evaluate the irradiation embrittlement due to neutrons during operation and set the condition of safe operation of nuclear reactor. The 4th surveillance testing was performed completely by Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute at Taejeon after the capsule was transported from Kori site including its removal from reactor. Fast neutron fluences for capsules were calculated and various testing including mechanical and chemistry analysis were performed in order to evaluate the integrity of Yonggwang unit 2 reactor vessel during the operation until life time. The evaluation results are as follows; Fast neutron fluences for capsules U, V, X and W are 5.762E+18, 1.5391E+19, 3.5119E+19, and 4.2610E+19 n/cm{sup 2}, respectively. The bias factor, the ratio of measurement versus calculation, was 0.899 for the 1st through 4th testing and the calculational uncertainty, 12.3% satisfied the requirement of USNRC Reg.Guide DG-1053, 20%. The best estimated neutron fluence for reactor vessel inside surface was 1.357E+19 n/cm{sup 2} based on the end of 11th fuel cycle and it was predicted that the fluences of vessel inside surface at 32, 40, 48 and 56EFPY would reach 3.525E+19, 4.337E+19, 5.148E+19 and 5.960E+19 n/cm{sup 2} based on the current calculation. The result through this analysis for Yonggwang unit 2 showed that there would be no problem for the pressurized thermal shock(PTS) during the operation until design life. 48 refs., 35 figs., 42 tabs. (Author)

  12. The 4th surveillance test and evaluation of the reactor pressure vessel material (capsule W) of Younggwang nuclear power plant unit1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Byoung Chul; Lee, Sam Lai; Choi, Kwon Jae [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2001-08-01

    Surveillance testing for reactor vessel materials is performed in order to evaluate the irradiation embrittlement due to neutrons during operation and set the condition of safe operation of nuclear reactor. The 4th surveillance testing was performed completely by Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute at Taejeon after the capsule was transported from Yonggwang site including its removal from reactor. Fast neutron fluences for capsules were calculated and various testing including mechanical and chemistry analysis were performed in order to evaluate the integrity of Yonggwang unit 1 reactor vessel during the operation until life time. The evaluation results are as follows; Fast neutron fluences for capsules U, V, X and W are 5.555E+18, 1.662E+19, 3.358E+19, and 4.521E+19 n/cm{sup 2}, respectively. The bias factor, the ratio of measurement versus calculation, was 0.859 for the 1st through 4th testing and the calculational uncertainty, 11.80% satisfied the requirement of USNRC Reg.Guide 1.190, 20%. The best estimated neutron fluence for reactor vessel inside surface was 1.551E+19 n/cm{sup 2} based on the end of 12th fuel cycle and it was predicted that the fluences of vessel inside surface at 32, 40, 48 and 56EFPY would reach 3.929E+19, 4.880E+19, 5.831E+19 and 6.782E+19 n/cm{sup 2} based on the current calculation. The result through this analysis for Yonggwang unit 1 showed that there would be no problem for the pressurized thermal shock(PTS) during the operation until design life. 4 refs., 41 figs., 35 tabs. (Author)

  13. Simulation in equivalent beams of reactor vessel internal components 900 MW; Modelisation en poutres equivalentes des internes de cuve 900 MW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metivier, V

    1995-12-31

    The nuclear safety imperatives of PWR type reactors require a good knowledge of the dynamic behaviour of the reactor vessel internal components in case of seism. Indeed, in case of seism, safety and reliability of reactor vessel internal components have to be proved because their size could induce their partial or total damage. It is then indispensable to dispose of a good dynamic simulation of the vessel internal components. In the first part of this work, a model of equivalent beams of the reactor vessel internal components has been carried out in air. In fact, each core structure is simulated by an equivalent beam. These equivalent beams are also subdivided into several beams, identified by their extremities. It is then possible to characterize the section changes and materials for one element, assigning at each of these beams proper characteristics, as its length, its density, its inertial moment...After a validation of this model by a modal calculus, a second step has consisted of taking into account the fluid-structure coupling. Indeed, the vessel internal components lies under a coolant fluid flow, called ``primary fluid``. The effect of this fluid is to add mass, absorption or stiffness to structures with which it is bound. The dynamic behaviour of the structures can then be highly influenced by this coupling. A fluid coupling has then been considered in this work. It is of inertial type because it is proportional to the structures acceleration. The results of the modal calculus has been compared to the experimental ones. Three softwares have been used in this study: GIBI, IDEAS and the Aster code. (O.M.) 11 refs.

  14. Steady-state CFD simulations of an EPR™ reactor pressure vessel: A validation study based on the JULIETTE experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puragliesi, R., E-mail: riccardo.puragliesi@psi.ch [Laboratory for Reactor Physics and Systems Behaviour, PSI, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Zhou, L. [Science and Technology on Reactor System Design Technology Laboratory, NPIC, Chengdu (China); Zerkak, O.; Pautz, A. [Laboratory for Reactor Physics and Systems Behaviour, PSI, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland)

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • CFD validation of k–ε (RANS model of EPR RPV. • Flat inlet velocity profile is not sufficient to correctly predict the pressure drops. • Swirl is responsible for asymmetric loads at the core barrel. • Parametric study to the turbulent Schmidt number for better predictions of passive-scalar transport. • The optimal turbulent Schmidt number was found to be one order of magnitude smaller than the standard value. - Abstract: Validating computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models against experimental measurements is a fundamental step towards a broader acceptance of CFD as a tool for reactor safety analysis when best-estimate one-dimensional thermal-hydraulic codes present strong modelling limitations. In the present paper numerical results of steady-state RANS analyses are compared to pressure, volumetric flow rate and concentration distribution measurements in different locations of an Areva EPR™ reactor pressure vessel (RPV) mock-up named JULIETTE. Several flow configurations are considered: Three different total volumetric flow rates, cold leg velocity field with or without swirl, three or four reactor coolant pumps functioning. Investigations on the influence of two types of inlet boundary profiles (i.e. flat or 1/7th power-law) and the turbulent Schmidt number have shown that the first affects sensibly the pressure loads at the core barrel whereas the latter parameter strongly affects the transport and the mixing of the tracer (passive scalar) and consequently its distribution at the core inlet. Furthermore, the introduction of an integral parameter as the swirl number has helped to decrease the large epistemic uncertainty associated with the swirling device. The swirl is found to be the cause of asymmetric loads on the walls of the core barrel and also asymmetries are enhanced for the tracer concentration distribution at the core inlet. The k–ϵ CFD model developed with the commercial code STAR-CCM+ proves to be able to predict

  15. Fracture mechanics characterisation of the WWER-440 reactor pressure vessel beltline welding seam of Greifswald unit 8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viehrig, Hans-Werner; Schuhknecht, Jan [Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Russian type WWER reactors are operated in Russia and many other European countries like Finland, Czech Republic, Slovak Republic, Hungary, Bulgaria and Ukraine. Surveillance specimen programmes for the inspection of the aging of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) materials were implemented for the second generation of WWER-440/V-213 reactors. The test results and the RPV integrity assessment has been evaluated according to national codes based on the Russian code PNAE G-7-002-86 ''Strength Calculation Norms for Nuclear Power Plant Equipment and Piping'' [1]. This is an indirect and correlative approach of determining the fracture toughness of the RPV steels in the initial and irradiated condition. The Master Curve (MC) approach as adopted in the test procedure ASTM E1921 [2] for assessing the fracture toughness of sampled irradiated materials has been gaining acceptance throughout the world [3]. The MC approach is more naturally suited to probabilistic analyses because it defines both a mean transition toughness value and a distribution around that value. It contains the assumptions of macroscopically homogenous material with uniform distribution of crack initiating defects along the crack front. In contrast to present indirect and correlative approach the specimen orientation and especially the crack extension direction in multilayer weld metal becomes more important for the direct measurement of the fracture toughness with Charpy size SE(B) specimens. The orientation of the Charpy- and SE(B) specimens is different for RPVs manufactured in Russia and by the SKODA company in the former Czechoslovakia [4,5]. Particularly with regard to weld metal it can be expected that the parameters of fracture toughness measured with Charpy-V or SE(B) specimens are strongly influenced by the specimen orientation. It raises the question whether the MC approach is also applicable when the structure varies along the crack front which is happen in TL oriented SE

  16. Multi-reactor power system configurations for multimegawatt nuclear electric propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Jeffrey A.

    1991-01-01

    A modular, multi-reactor power system and vehicle configuration for piloted nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) missions to Mars is presented. Such a design could provide enhanced system and mission reliability, allowing a comfortable safety margin for early manned flights, and would allow a range of piloted and cargo missions to be performed with a single power system design. Early use of common power modules for cargo missions would also provide progressive flight experience and validation of standardized systems for use in later piloted applications. System and mission analysis are presented to compare single and multi-reactor configurations for piloted Mars missions. A conceptual design for the Hydra modular multi-reactor NEP vehicle is presented.

  17. Simulation of the preliminary General Electric SP-100 space reactor concept using the ATHENA computer code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fletcher, C.D.

    1986-01-01

    The capability to perform thermal-hydraulic analyses of a space reactor using the ATHENA computer code is demonstrated. The fast reactor, liquid-lithium coolant loops, and lithium-filled heat pipes of the preliminary General electric SP-100 design were modeled with ATHENA. Two demonstration transient calculations were performed simulating accident conditions. Calculated results are available for display using the Nuclear Plant Analyzer color graphics analysis tool in addition to traditional plots. ATHENA-calculated results appear reasonable, both for steady state full power conditions, and for the two transients. This analysis represents the first known transient thermal-hydraulic simulation using an integral space reactor system model incorporating heat pipes. 6 refs., 17 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Development of High Strength Low Alloy Steel for Nuclear Reactor Vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, B. S.; Kim, M. C.; Yoon, J. H; Choi, K. J.; Kim, J. M.; Hong, J. H.

    2013-11-15

    SA508 Gr. 4N Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel has an improved strength and fracture toughness, compared to commercial low alloy steels such as SA508 Gr. 3 Mn-Mo-Ni low alloy steel. In this study, the microstructural observation and baseline test were carried out using SA508 Gr. 4N model alloy of 1 ton scale. Thermal embrittlement and neutron irradiation embrittlement behaviors of SA508 Gr. 4N model alloy were also evaluated. The yield strength of 540MPa, Charpy transition temperature, T{sub 41J} of -132 .deg. C, Reference temperature, T{sub 0} of -146 .deg. C, and RT{sub NDT} of -105 .deg. C were obtained from large scale SA508 Gr. 3 low alloy steel. Effect of alloy elements on thermal embrittlement was carefully evaluated and embrittlement mechanism was characterized using small scale model alloys with various alloy composition. Neutron irradiation behavior at high fluence level up to 1.5x10{sup 20} n/cm{sup 2} corresponding over 80 years operation of RPV were investigated using irradiated samples from research reactor 'HANARO'. The irradiation embrittlement behavior of SA508 Gr. 4N model alloy was similar to that of commercial RPV steel. However, after neutron irradiation up to 1.3x10{sup 20} n/cm{sup 2}, SA508 Gr. 4N model alloy shows lower transition temperature(T{sub 41J} = -63 .deg. C) than unirradiated commercial RPV steel because it has a superior initial toughness.

  19. Study of reactor Brayton power systems for nuclear electric spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    The feasibility of using Brayton power systems for nuclear electric spacecraft was investigated. The primary performance parameters of systems mass and radiator area were determined for systems from 100 to 1000 kW sub e. Mathematical models of all system components were used to determine masses and volumes. Two completely independent systems provide propulsion power so that no single-point failure can jeopardize a mission. The waste heat radiators utilize armored heat pipes to limit meteorite puncture. The armor thickness was statistically determined to achieve the required probability of survival. A 400 kW sub e reference system received primary attention as required by the contract. The components of this system were defined and a conceptual layout was developed with encouraging results. An arrangement with redundant Brayton power systems having a 1500 K (2240 F) turbine inlet temperature was shown to be compatible with the dimensions of the space shuttle orbiter payload bay.

  20. Microstructural changes of a thermally aged stainless steel submerged arc weld overlay cladding of nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, T.; Kameda, J.; Nagai, Y.; Toyama, T.; Matsukawa, Y.; Nishiyama, Y.; Onizawa, K.

    2012-06-01

    The effect of thermal aging on microstructural changes in stainless steel submerged arc weld-overlay cladding of reactor pressure vessels was investigated using atom probe tomography (APT). In as-received materials subjected to post-welding heat treatments (PWHTs), with a subsequent furnace cooling, a slight fluctuation of the Cr concentration was observed due to spinodal decomposition in the δ-ferrite phase but not in the austenitic phase. Thermal aging at 400 °C for 10,000 h caused not only an increase in the amplitude of spinodal decomposition but also the precipitation of G phases with composition ratios of Ni:Si:Mn = 16:7:6 in the δ-ferrite phase. The degree of the spinodal decomposition in the submerged arc weld sample was similar to that in the electroslag weld one reported previously. We also observed a carbide on the γ-austenite and δ-ferrite interface. There were no Cr depleted zones around the carbide.

  1. Results from the decontamination of and the shielding arrangements in the reactor pressure vessel in Oskarshamn 1-1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowendahl, B. [OKG Aktiebolag, Figeholm (Sweden)

    1995-03-01

    In September 1992 Oskarshamn 1 was shut down in order to carry out measures to correct discovered deficiencies in the emergency cooling systems. Due to the results of a comprehensive non destructive test programme it was decided to perform a major replacement of pipes in the primary systems including a full system decontamination using the Siemens CORD process. The paper briefly presents the satisfying result of the decontamination performed in May-June 1993. When in late June 1993 cracks also were detected in the feed-water pipes situated inside the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) the plans were reconsidered and a large project was formed with the aim, in a first phase, to verify the integrity of the RPV. In order to make it possible to perform work manually inside the RPV special radiation protection measures had to be carried out. In January 1994 the lower region of the RPV was decontaminated, again using the CORD-process, followed by the installation of a special shielding construction in the RPV. The surprisingly good results of these efforts are also briefly described in the paper.

  2. Neutron fluence at the reactor pressure vessel wall - a comparison of French and German procedures and strategies in PWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tricot, N. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, IRSN/DES/SECCA, 92 - Fontenay aux Roses (France); Jendrich, U. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, Garching (Germany)

    2003-01-01

    While the neutrons within the core may take part in the chain reaction, those neutrons emitted from the core are basically lost for the energy production. This 'neutron leakage' represents a loss of fuel efficiency and causes neutron embrittlement of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) wall. The latter raises safety concerns, needs to be monitored closely and may necessitate mitigating measures. There are different strategies to deal with these two undesirable effects: The neutron emission may be reduced to some extent all around the core or just at the 'hot spots' of RPV embrittlement by tailored core loading patterns. A higher absorption rate of neutrons may also be achieved by a larger water gap between the core and the RPV. In this paper the inter-relations between the distribution of neutron flux, core geometry, core loading strategy, RPV embrittlement and its surveillance are discussed at first. Then the different strategies followed by the German and French operators are described. Finally the conclusions will highlight the communalities and differences between these strategies as different approaches to the same problem of safety as well as economy. (authors)

  3. Effect of Heavy Ion Irradiation Dosage on the Hardness of SA508-IV Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Bai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Specimens of the SA508-IV reactor pressure vessel (RPV steel, containing 3.26 wt. % Ni and just 0.041 wt. % Cu, were irradiated at 290 °C to different displacement per atom (dpa with 3.5 MeV Fe ions (Fe2+. Microstructure observation and nano-indentation hardness measurements were carried out. The Continuous Stiffness Measurement (CSM of nano-indentation was used to obtain the indentation depth profile of nano-hardness. The curves showed a maximum nano-hardness and a plateau damage near the surface of the irradiated samples, attributed to different hardening mechanisms. The Nix-Gao model was employed to analyze the nano-indentation test results. It was found that the curves of nano-hardness versus the reciprocal of indentation depth are bilinear. The nano-hardness value corresponding to the inflection point of the bilinear curve may be used as a parameter to describe the ion irradiation effect. The obvious entanglement of the dislocations was observed in the 30 dpa sample. The maximum nano-hardness values show a good linear relationship with the square root of the dpa.

  4. Effects of neutron irradiation on microstructures and hardness of stainless steel weld-overlay cladding of nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, T., E-mail: takeuchi.tomoaki@jaea.go.jp [Oarai Research and Development Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan); Kakubo, Y.; Matsukawa, Y.; Nozawa, Y.; Toyama, T.; Nagai, Y. [The Oarai Center, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Nishiyama, Y.; Katsuyama, J.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Onizawa, K. [Nuclear Safety Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)

    2014-06-01

    The microstructures and the hardness of stainless steel weld overlay cladding of reactor pressure vessels subjected to neutron irradiation at a dose of 7.2 × 10{sup 19} n cm{sup −2} (E > 1 MeV) and a flux of 1.1 × 10{sup 13} n cm{sup −2} s{sup −1} at 290 °C were investigated by atom probe tomography and by a nanoindentation technique. To isolate the effects of the neutron irradiation, we compared the results of the measurements of the neutron-irradiated samples with those from a sample aged at 300 °C for a duration equivalent to that of the irradiation. The Cr concentration fluctuation was enhanced in the δ-ferrite phase of the irradiated sample. In addition, enhancement of the concentration fluctuation of Si, which was not observed in the aged sample, was observed. The hardening in the δ-ferrite phase occurred due to both irradiation and aging; however, the hardening of the irradiated sample was more than that expected from the Cr concentration fluctuation, which suggested that the Si concentration fluctuation and irradiation-induced defects were possible origins of the additional hardening.

  5. Effects of thermal aging on microstructure and hardness of stainless steel weld-overlay claddings of nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, T., E-mail: takeuchi.tomoaki@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan); Kakubo, Y.; Matsukawa, Y.; Nozawa, Y.; Toyama, T.; Nagai, Y. [The Oarai Center, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Nishiyama, Y.; Katsuyama, J.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Onizawa, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Suzuki, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan)

    2014-09-15

    The effects of thermal aging of stainless steel weld-overlay claddings of nuclear reactor pressure vessels on the microstructure and hardness of the claddings were investigated using atom probe tomography and nanoindentation testing. The claddings were aged at 400 °C for periods of 100–10,000 h. The fluctuation in Cr concentration in the δ-ferrite phase, which was caused by spinodal decomposition, progressed rapidly after aging for 100 h, and gradually for aging durations greater than 1000 h. On the other hand, NiSiMn clusters, initially formed after aging for less than 1000 h, had the highest number density after aging for 2000 h, and coarsened after aging for 10,000 h. The hardness of the δ-ferrite phase also increased rapidly for short period of aging, and saturated after aging for longer than 1000 h. This trend was similar to the observed Cr fluctuation concentration, but different from the trend seen in the formation of the NiSiMn clusters. These results strongly suggest that the primary factor responsible for the hardening of the δ-ferrite phase owing to thermal aging is Cr spinodal decomposition.

  6. Neutron radiation embrittlement studies in support of continued operation, and validation by sampling of Magnox reactor steel pressure vessels and components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, R.B.; Bolton, C.J. [Magnox Electric plc, Berkeley Centre, Glos (United Kingdom)

    1997-02-01

    Magnox steel reactor pressure vessels differ significantly from US LWR vessels in terms of the type of steel used, as well as their operating environment (dose level, exposure temperature range, and neutron spectra). The large diameter ferritic steel vessels are constructed from C-Mn steel plates and forgings joined together with manual metal and submerged-arc welds which are stress-relieved. All Magnox vessels are now at least thirty years old and their continued operation is being vigorously pursued. Vessel surveillance and other programmes are summarized which support this objective. The current understanding of the roles of matrix irradiation damage, irradiation-enhanced copper impurity precipitation and intergranular embrittlement effects is described in so far as these influence the form of the embrittlement and hardening trend curves for each material. An update is given on the influence of high temperature exposure, and on the role of differing neutron spectra. Finally, the validation offered by the results of an initial vessel sampling exercise is summarized together with the objectives of a more extensive future sampling programme.

  7. Computational evaluation of the constraint loss on the fracture toughness of reactor pressure vessel steels; Evaluacion computacional del efecto de la perdida de constriccion en la tenacidad de fractura de la vasija de reactores nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serrano Garcia, M.

    2007-07-01

    The Master Curve approach is included on the ASME Code through some Code Cases to assess the reactor pressure vessel integrity. However, the margin definition to be added is not defined as is the margin to be added when the Master Curve reference temperature T{sub 0} is obtained by testing pre-cracked Charpy specimens. The reason is that the T{sub 0} value obtained with this specimen geometry is less conservative than the value obtained by testing compact tension specimens possible due to a loss of constraint. The two parameter fracture mechanics, considered as an extension of the classical fracture mechanics, coupled to a micromechanical fracture models is a valuable tool to assess the effect of constraint loss on fracture toughness. The definition of a parameter able to connect the fracture toughens value to the constraint level on the crack tip will allow to quantify margin to be added to the T{sub 0} value when this value is obtained testing the pre-cracked Charpy specimens included in the surveillance capsule of the reactor pressure vessel. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) define on the To value obtained by testing compact tension specimens and ben specimens (as pre-cracked Charpy are) bias. the NRC do not approved any of the direct applications of the Master Curve the reactor pressure vessel integrity assessment until this bias will be quantified in a reliable way. the inclusion of the bias on the integrity assessment is done through a margin to be added. In this thesis the bias is demonstrated an quantified empirical and numerically and a generic value is suggested for reactor pressure vessel materials, so that it can be used as a margin to be added to the T{sub 0} value obtained by testing the Charpy specimens included in the surveillance capsules. (Author) 111 ref.

  8. Development of a reconstitution system of Charpy probes for the surveillance of vessels in nucleo electric plants; Desarrollo del sistema de reconstitucion de probetas Charpy para la vigilancia de vasijas en nucleoelectricas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero C, J.; Hernandez, R.; Fernandez, F.; Gonzalez M, A. [ININ, Km. 36.5 Carretera Mexico-Toluca, AP.18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)]. e-mail: jrc@nuclear.inin.mx

    2007-07-01

    This work describes the development of a welding system, for the rebuilding of halves of Charpy test tubes, the rebuilding consists on welding two implants in those ends of these halves of test tubes, in these welding the main requirement is not to alter the mechanical properties in a minimum volume of 1 cm{sup 3}, the rebuilding is medullary in the surveillance programs of the reactor vessel. In these programs, the mechanical state of the vessel is evaluated, for it there are surveillance capsules with a Charpy witness test tubes series, subjected to a neutron flow similar or bigger to that of the vessel. The objective is to evaluate in advance on the vessel fragilization grade its life design. However the number of capsules with the witness test tubes it is only for the plant design life and at the moment the nucleo electric, negotiates an extension of life of these, until for 20 more years, of there the importance of this material witness's that stores the information of the damage accumulated by the neutron flow. This material requires to be taken advantage it after being rehearsed and the normative one settles down as obligatory to qualify the rebuilding process with all the requirements settled down in the ASTM Designation: E 1253-99 'Standard Guide for Reconstitution of irradiated Charpy-Sized Specimens', to obtain other reconstituted Charpy test tubes that are again introduced in the reactor. When being reconstituted the halves of the original test tubes it is obtained double reconstituted Charpy test tubes. Half of the test tubes they are used in the surveillance program of the vessel, with the surpluses test tubes, it can determine the fracture toughness, property of the material used in the extension methodology of life of vessel. (Author)

  9. Nanostructure evolution under irradiation of Fe(C)MnNi model alloys for reactor pressure vessel steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiapetto, M., E-mail: mchiapet@sckcen.be [SCK-CEN, Nuclear Materials Science Institute, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Unité Matériaux Et Transformations (UMET), UMR 8207, Université de Lille 1, ENSCL, F-59600 Villeneuve d’Ascq Cedex (France); Becquart, C.S. [Unité Matériaux Et Transformations (UMET), UMR 8207, Université de Lille 1, ENSCL, F-59600 Villeneuve d’Ascq Cedex (France); Laboratoire commun EDF-CNRS Etude et Modélisation des Microstructures pour le Vieillissement des Matériaux (EM2VM) (France); Domain, C. [EDF R& D, Département Matériaux et Mécanique des Composants, Les Renardières, F-77250 Moret sur Loing (France); Laboratoire commun EDF-CNRS Etude et Modélisation des Microstructures pour le Vieillissement des Matériaux (EM2VM) (France); Malerba, L. [SCK-CEN, Nuclear Materials Science Institute, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2015-06-01

    Radiation-induced embrittlement of bainitic steels is one of the most important lifetime limiting factors of existing nuclear light water reactor pressure vessels. The primary mechanism of embrittlement is the obstruction of dislocation motion produced by nanometric defect structures that develop in the bulk of the material due to irradiation. The development of models that describe, based on physical mechanisms, the nanostructural changes in these types of materials due to neutron irradiation are expected to help to better understand which features are mainly responsible for embrittlement. The chemical elements that are thought to influence most the response under irradiation of low-Cu RPV steels, especially at high fluence, are Ni and Mn, hence there is an interest in modelling the nanostructure evolution in irradiated FeMnNi alloys. As a first step in this direction, we developed sets of parameters for object kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) simulations that allow this to be done, under simplifying assumptions, using a “grey alloy” approach that extends the already existing OKMC model for neutron irradiated Fe–C binary alloys [1]. Our model proved to be able to describe the trend in the buildup of irradiation defect populations at the operational temperature of LWR (∼300 °C), in terms of both density and size distribution of the defect cluster populations, in FeMnNi model alloys as compared to Fe–C. In particular, the reduction of the mobility of point-defect clusters as a consequence of the presence of solutes proves to be key to explain the experimentally observed disappearance of detectable point-defect clusters with increasing solute content.

  10. Fracture mechanics characterisation of the WWER-440 reactor pressure vessel beltline welding seam of Greifswald unit 8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viehrig, Hans-Werner; Schuhknecht, Jan [Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    WWER-440 second generation (V-213) reactor pressure vessels (RPV) were produced by IZHORA in Russia and by SKODA in the former Czechoslovakia. The surveillance Charpy-V and fracture mechanics SE(B) specimens of both producers have different orientations. The main difference is the crack extension direction which is through the RPV thickness and circumferential for ISHORA and SKODA RPV, respectively. In particular for the investigation of weld metal from multilayer submerged welding seams the crack extension direction is of importance. Depending on the crack extension direction in the specimen there are different welding beads or a uniform structure along the crack front. The specimen orientation becomes more important when the fracture toughness of the weld metal is directly determined on surveillance specimens according to the Master Curve (MC) approach as standardised in the ASTM Standard Test Method E1921. This approach was applied on weld metal of the RPV beltline welding seam of Greifswald Unit 8 RPV. Charpy size SE(B) specimens from 13 locations equally spaced over the thickness of the welding seam were tested. The specimens are in TL and TS orientation. The fracture toughness values measured on the SE(B) specimens with both orientations follow the course of the MC. Nearly all values lie within the fracture toughness curves for 5% and 95% fracture probability. There is a strong variation of the reference temperature T{sub 0} though the thickness of the welding seam, which can be explained with structural differences. The scatter is more pronounced for the TS SE(B) specimens. It can be shown that specimens with TS and TL orientation in the welding seam have a differentiating and integrating behaviour, respectively. The statistical assumptions behind the MC approach are valid for both specimen orientations even if the structure is not uniform along the crack front. By comparison crack extension, JR, curves measured on SE(B) specimens with TL and TS orientation

  11. Attrition reactor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Charles D.; Davison, Brian H.

    1993-01-01

    A reactor vessel for reacting a solid particulate with a liquid reactant has a centrifugal pump in circulatory flow communication with the reactor vessel for providing particulate attrition, resulting in additional fresh surface where the reaction can occur.

  12. Oxygen transport membrane reactor based method and system for generating electric power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Sean M.; Chakravarti, Shrikar; Li, Juan

    2017-02-07

    A carbon capture enabled system and method for generating electric power and/or fuel from methane containing sources using oxygen transport membranes by first converting the methane containing feed gas into a high pressure synthesis gas. Then, in one configuration the synthesis gas is combusted in oxy-combustion mode in oxygen transport membranes based boiler reactor operating at a pressure at least twice that of ambient pressure and the heat generated heats steam in thermally coupled steam generation tubes within the boiler reactor; the steam is expanded in steam turbine to generate power; and the carbon dioxide rich effluent leaving the boiler reactor is processed to isolate carbon. In another configuration the synthesis gas is further treated in a gas conditioning system configured for carbon capture in a pre-combustion mode using water gas shift reactors and acid gas removal units to produce hydrogen or hydrogen-rich fuel gas that fuels an integrated gas turbine and steam turbine system to generate power. The disclosed method and system can also be adapted to integrate with coal gasification systems to produce power from both coal and methane containing sources with greater than 90% carbon isolation.

  13. Use of small reactors as an alternative to supply electricity to Baja California Sur; Uso de reactores pequenos como alternativa de suministro de electricidad para Baja California Sur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, G.; Portes, E.; Ramirez, J. R. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Ortega, G., E-mail: gustavo.alonso@inin.gob.mx [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Rio Rodano No. 14, 06500 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico)

    2016-09-15

    The state of Baja California Sur (Mexico) does not form part of the national interconnected electrical system of the country, reason why is local its electrical power supply; one of the alternatives to cover future demands is the use of gas-based combined cycles, which presents the additional problem of including a high price for gas transportation in its costs. In order to reduce total costs, including investment, fuels and operation and maintenance in the operation of the Baja California Sur state electricity system in the coming years, mainly due to the estimated natural gas cost order of $11.50 dollars per million BTU, a proposal is presented to reduce the costs of the electrical system by replacing the necessary combined cycles with the new Small Modular Reactor type nuclear reactors, this alternative is economically competitive. (Author)

  14. Study on in-vessel thermohydraulics phenomena of sodium-cooled fast reactors. 1. Numerical investigation for the rationalization of hydrodynamics in the upper plenum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muramatsu, Toshiharu; Yamaguchi, Akira [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center; Murakami, Satoshi [Customer System Co.Ltd. (Japan)

    2002-02-01

    A large-scale sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor in feasibility studies on commercialized fast reactors has a tendency of consideration of thorough simplified and compacted system designs to realize drastic economical improvements. Therefore, special attention should be paid to thermohydraulic designs for a gas entrainment behavior from free surfaces, a flow-induced vibration of in-vessel components, a thermal shock for various structures due to high-speed coolant flows, nonsymmetrical coolant flows, etc. in the reactor vessel. In-vessel thermohydraulic analyses were carried out using a multi-dimensional code AQUA to understand the thermohydraulic characteristics in the upper plenum, and to investigate suitable in-vessel structure for the elimination of gas entrainment possibility. From the analysis, the following results were obtained. (1) It is difficult to rationale in-vessel flow patterns through adjustments of porous ratio and pressure loss for a hold down plate and baffle plates installed in an upper core structure. (2) Dummy plug insertion to a slit of the upper core structure is one of effective measures to stabilize in-vessel flow patterns. (3) Flow guide devices such as a baffle ring and a partial inner barrel are also effective measures to eliminate impinging jet to a dipped plate (D/P) and to reduce horizontal flow velocity components at free surface. (4) Installations of labyrinth structures to a R/V - D/P gap is successful for decreasing of free surface horizontal flows. (5) Gap closing of an in-vessel fuel pot and two cold trap components has the effects of reductions for free surface horizontal flows and for the difference of free surface levels. Following future investigations are important preventive measures against the gas entrainment from the free surface. (1) Flattening of spatial axial velocity distributions at the R/V - D/P gap. (2) Alleviation measures of vortex concentration at free surface. (3) Separation measures of 3-dimensional vortex

  15. Feasibility Study of Supercritical Light Water Cooled Reactors for Electric Power Production, Nuclear Energy Research Initiative Project 2001-001, Westinghouse Electric Co. Grant Number: DE-FG07-02SF22533, Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philip E. MacDonald

    2005-01-01

    The supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR) is one of the six reactor technologies selected for research and development under the Generation IV program. SCWRs are promising advanced nuclear systems because of their high thermal efficiency (i.e., about 45% versus about 33% efficiency for current Light Water Reactors [LWRs]) and considerable plant simplification. SCWRs are basically LWRs operating at higher pressure and temperatures with a direct once-through cycle. Operation above the critical pressure eliminates coolant boiling, so the coolant remains single-phase throughout the system. Thus, the need for a pressurizer, steam generators, steam separators, and dryers is eliminated. The main mission of the SCWR is generation of low-cost electricity. It is built upon two proven technologies: LWRs, which are the most commonly deployed power generating reactors in the world, and supercritical fossil-fired boilers, a large number of which are also in use around the world. The reference SCWR design for the U.S. program is a direct cycle system operating at 25.0 MPa, with core inlet and outlet temperatures of 280 and 500 C, respectively. The coolant density decreases from about 760 kg/m3 at the core inlet to about 90 kg/m3 at the core outlet. The inlet flow splits with about 10% of the inlet flow going down the space between the core barrel and the reactor pressure vessel (the downcomer) and about 90% of the inlet flow going to the plenum at the top of the rector pressure vessel, to then flow down through the core in special water rods to the inlet plenum. Here it mixes with the feedwater from the downcomer and flows upward to remove the heat in the fuel channels. This strategy is employed to provide good moderation at the top of the core. The coolant is heated to about 500 C and delivered to the turbine. The purpose of this NERI project was to assess the reference U.S. Generation IV SCWR design and explore alternatives to determine feasibility. The project was

  16. Laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor with direct electric generation by magnetic flux compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasche, George P.

    1988-01-01

    A high-power-density laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor system maximizes the directed kinetic energy imparted to a large mass of liquid lithium by a centrally located fusion target. A fusion target is embedded in a large mass of lithium, of sufficient radius to act as a tritium breeding blanket, and provided with ports for the access of beam energy to implode the target. The directed kinetic energy is converted directly to electricity with high efficiency by work done against a pulsed magnetic field applied exterior to the lithium. Because the system maximizes the blanket thickness per unit volume of lithium, neutron-induced radioactivities in the reaction chamber wall are several orders of magnitude less than is typical of other fusion reactor systems.

  17. High Fluency Low Flux Embrittlement Models of LWR Reactor Pressure Vessel Embrittlement and a Supporting Database from the UCSB ATR-2 Irradiation Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odette, G. Robert [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

    2017-01-24

    Reactor pressure vessel embrittlement may limit the lifetime of light water reactors (LWR). Embrittlement is primarily caused by formation of nano-scale precipitates, which cause hardening and a subsequent increase in the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature of the steel. While the effect of Cu has historically been the largest research focus of RPV embrittlement, there is increasing evidence that Mn, Ni and Si are likely to have a large effect at higher fluence, where Mn-Ni-Si precipitates can form, even in the absence of Cu. Therefore, extending RPV lifetimes will require a thorough understanding of both precipitation and embrittlement at higher fluences than have ever been observed in a power reactor. To address this issue, test reactors that irradiate materials at higher neutron fluxes than power reactors are used. These experiments at high neutron flux can reach extended life neutron fluences in only months or several years. The drawback of these test irradiations is that they add additional complexity to interpreting the data, as the irradiation flux also plays a role into both precipitate formation and irradiation hardening and embrittlement. This report focuses on developing a database of both microstructure and mechanical property data to better understand the effect of flux. In addition, a previously developed model that enables the comparison of data taken over a range of neutron flux is discussed.

  18. CONVECTION REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, R.P.; King, L.D.P.

    1960-03-22

    An homogeneous nuclear power reactor utilizing convection circulation of the liquid fuel is proposed. The reactor has an internal heat exchanger looated in the same pressure vessel as the critical assembly, thereby eliminating necessity for handling the hot liquid fuel outside the reactor pressure vessel during normal operation. The liquid fuel used in this reactor eliminates the necessity for extensive radiolytic gas rocombination apparatus, and the reactor is resiliently pressurized and, without any movable mechanical apparatus, automatically regulates itself to the condition of criticality during moderate variations in temperature snd pressure and shuts itself down as the pressure exceeds a predetermined safe operating value.

  19. Nuclear reactor neutron shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speaker, Daniel P; Neeley, Gary W; Inman, James B

    2017-09-12

    A nuclear reactor includes a reactor pressure vessel and a nuclear reactor core comprising fissile material disposed in a lower portion of the reactor pressure vessel. The lower portion of the reactor pressure vessel is disposed in a reactor cavity. An annular neutron stop is located at an elevation above the uppermost elevation of the nuclear reactor core. The annular neutron stop comprises neutron absorbing material filling an annular gap between the reactor pressure vessel and the wall of the reactor cavity. The annular neutron stop may comprise an outer neutron stop ring attached to the wall of the reactor cavity, and an inner neutron stop ring attached to the reactor pressure vessel. An excore instrument guide tube penetrates through the annular neutron stop, and a neutron plug comprising neutron absorbing material is disposed in the tube at the penetration through the neutron stop.

  20. Defluoridation of water via electrically controlled anion exchange by polyaniline modified electrode reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Hao; Li, Qin; Qian, Yan; Tang, Rong; An, Hao; Zhai, Jianping

    2011-11-01

    A polyaniline (PANI) modified electrode reactor was designed for fluoride removal from aqueous solutions. The innovative concept behind the reactor design is that the uptake and elute of fluoride could be well controlled by modulating the potential of the PANI film. The maximum fluoride removal capacity of PANI is more than 20 mg/g at a positive voltage based on the electrically controlled anion-exchange mechanism. The results of batch tests showed that terminal potential values had a major impact on fluoride removal by this PANI, with optimal removal occurring at 1.5 V. The fluoride removal capacity (q(e)) increased rapidly within 5 min and reached equilibrium within 10 min, which indicated a rapid removal velocity of fluoride by PANI under this condition. The applicability of defluoridation using the PANI reactor to treat fluoride-contaminated tap water was also tested through flow cell breakthrough studies. At initial fluoride concentrations of 5 mg/L and 10 mg/L, the breakthrough capacities were 20.08 mg/g and 19.24 mg/g, respectively. Moreover, during the first half of the period before the breakthrough point, the fluoride concentration of the treated solution was below the WHO's recommended levels (1.5 mg/L). The results of the five consecutive treatment-regeneration studies also showed that the PANI films could be reused. Taken together, these results implied that the electrically controlled anion exchange by the PANI-modified electrode reactor may be an effective technique for the removal of fluoride from water. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Feasibility Study of Supercritical Light Water Cooled Fast Reactors for Actinide Burning and Electric Power Production, Progress Report for Work Through September 2002, 4th Quarterly Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth

    2002-09-01

    The use of light water at supercritical pressures as the coolant in a nuclear reactor offers the potential for considerable plant simplification and consequent capital and O&M cost reduction compared with current light water reactor (LWR) designs. Also, given the thermodynamic conditions of the coolant at the core outlet (i.e. temperature and pressure beyond the water critical point), very high thermal efficiencies of the power conversion cycle are possible (i.e. up to about 45%). Because no change of phase occurs in the core, the need for steam separators and dryers as well as for BWR-type re-circulation pumps is eliminated, which, for a given reactor power, results in a substantially shorter reactor vessel and smaller containment building than the current BWRs. Furthermore, in a direct cycle the steam generators are not needed. If no additional moderator is added to the fuel rod lattice, it is possible to attain fast neutron energy spectrum conditions in a supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR). This type of core can make use of either fertile or fertile-free fuel and retain a hard spectrum to effectively burn plutonium and minor actinides from LWR spent fuel while efficiently generating electricity. One can also add moderation and design a thermal spectrum SCWR. The Generation IV Roadmap effort has identified the thermal spectrum SCWR (followed by the fast spectrum SCWR) as one of the advanced concepts that should be developed for future use. Therefore, the work in this NERI project is addressing both types of SCWRs.

  2. Feasibility Study of Supercritical Light Water Cooled Fast Reactors for Actinide Burning and Electric Power Production, 3rd Quarterly Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth

    2002-06-01

    The use of light water at supercritical pressures as the coolant in a nuclear reactor offers the potential for considerable plant simplification and consequent capital and O&M cost reduction compared with current light water reactor (LWR) designs. Also, given the thermodynamic conditions of the coolant at the core outlet (i.e. temperature and pressure beyond the water critical point), very high thermal efficiencies of the power conversion cycle are possible (i.e. up to about 45%). Because no change of phase occurs in the core, the need for steam separators and dryers as well as for BWR-type re-circulation pumps is eliminated, which, for a given reactor power, results in a substantially shorter reactor vessel and smaller containment building than the current BWRs. Furthermore, in a direct cycle the steam generators are not needed.

  3. Cogeneration of Electricity and Potable Water Using The International Reactor Innovative And Secure (IRIS) Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ingersoll, D.T.; Binder, J.L.; Kostin, V.I.; Panov, Y.K.; Polunichev, V.; Ricotti, M.E.; Conti, D.; Alonso, G.

    2004-10-06

    The worldwide demand for potable water has been steadily growing and is projected to accelerate, driven by a continued population growth and industrialization of emerging countries. This growth is reflected in a recent market survey by the World Resources Institute, which shows a doubling in the installed capacity of seawater desalination plants every ten years. The production of desalinated water is energy intensive, requiring approximately 3-6 kWh/m3 of produced desalted water. At current U.S. water use rates, a dedicated 1000 MW power plant for every one million people would be required to meet our water needs with desalted water. Nuclear energy plants are attractive for large scale desalination application. The thermal energy produced in a nuclear plant can provide both electricity and desalted water without the production of greenhouse gases. A particularly attractive option for nuclear desalination is to couple a desalination plant with an advanced, modular, passively safe reactor design. The use of small-to-medium sized nuclear power plants allows for countries with smaller electrical grid needs and infrastructure to add new electrical and water capacity in more appropriate increments and allows countries to consider siting plants at a broader number of distributed locations. To meet these needs, a modified version of the International Reactor Innovative and Secure (IRIS) nuclear power plant design has been developed for the cogeneration of electricity and desalted water. The modular, passively safe features of IRIS make it especially well adapted for this application. Furthermore, several design features of the IRIS reactor will ensure a safe and reliable source of energy and water even for countries with limited nuclear power experience and infrastructure. The IRIS-D design utilizes low-quality steam extracted from the low-pressure turbine to boil seawater in a multi-effect distillation desalination plant. The desalination plant is based on the horizontal

  4. Sensitivity of hydrodynamic parameters' distributions in VVER-1000 reactor pressure vessel (RPV) with respect to uncertainty of the local hydraulic resistance coefficients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasichnyk, I.; Velkov, K. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, Garching (Germany); Nikonov, S. [NRC ' ' Kurchatov Institute' ' , Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-08-15

    The paper presents an uncertainty and sensitivity (U and S) study of the VVER-1000 reactor hydraulic properties. It is based on the OECD/NEA coolant transient Benchmark (K-3) on measured data at Kalinin-3 Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). The novelty of the work consists of taking into consideration all hydraulic uncertainty parameters used in the modeling of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) internals. A detailed parallel channel ATHLET model of the RPV is developed. It consists of ca. 26 600 control volumes most of them connected with junctions for cross flows. The specific geometry of the gap between upper part of the baffle and upper part of fuel assembly and also a fuel assembly head is taken explicitly into account The influence of the input parameters on the sensitivity and uncertainty of the RPV outlet and inlet temperatures and mass flows as well assembly-wise mass flow and coolant temperature axial distributions is shown.

  5. Thermal–mechanical stress analysis of pressurized water reactor pressure vessel with/without a preexisting crack under grid load following conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohanty, Subhasish, E-mail: smohanty@anl.gov; Soppet, William K.; Majumdar, Saurin; Natesan, Krishnamurti

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • Use of intermittent renewable-energy source in power grid is becoming a trend. • Gird load-following can leads to variable power demand from Nuclear power plant. • Reactor components can be stressed differently under gird load-following mode. • Estimation of stress–strain state under grid load-following condition is essential. - Abstract: In this paper, we present thermal–mechanical stress analysis of a pressurized water reactor pressure vessel and its hot-leg and cold-leg nozzles. Results are presented from thermal and thermal–mechanical stress analysis under reactor heat-up, cool-down, and grid load-following conditions. Analysis results are given with and without the presence of preexisting crack in the reactor nozzle (axial crack in hot leg nozzle). From the model results it is found that the stress–strain states are significantly higher in case of presence of crack than without crack. The stress–strain state under grid load following condition are more realistic compared to the stress–strain state estimated assuming simplified transients.

  6. ELECTRICAL RESISTANCE HEATING OF SOILS AT C-REACTOR AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blundy, R; Michael Morgenstern, M; Joseph Amari, J; Annamarie MacMurray, A; Mark Farrar, M; Terry Killeen, T

    2007-09-10

    Chlorinated solvent contamination of soils and groundwater is an endemic problem at the Savannah River Site (SRS), and originated as by-products from the nuclear materials manufacturing process. Five nuclear reactors at the SRS produced special nuclear materials for the nation's defense program throughout the cold war era. An important step in the process was thorough degreasing of the fuel and target assemblies prior to irradiation. Discharges from this degreasing process resulted in significant groundwater contamination that would continue well into the future unless a soil remediation action was performed. The largest reactor contamination plume originated from C-Reactor and an interim action was selected in 2004 to remove the residual trichloroethylene (TCE) source material by electrical resistance heating (ERH) technology. This would be followed by monitoring to determine the rate of decrease in concentration in the contaminant plume. Because of the existence of numerous chlorinated solvent sources around SRS, it was elected to generate in-house expertise in the design and operation of ERH, together with the construction of a portable ERH/SVE system that could be deployed at multiple locations around the site. This paper describes the waste unit characteristics, the ERH system design and operation, together with extensive data accumulated from the first deployment adjacent to the C-Reactor building. The installation heated the vadose zone down to 62 feet bgs over a 60 day period during the summer of 2006 and raised soil temperatures to over 200 F. A total of 730 lbs of trichloroethylene (TCE) were removed over this period, and subsequent sampling indicated a removal efficiency of 99.4%.

  7. The non-self-propelled hydropower vessel for electrical energy providing of Arctic and Far East hard-to-reach areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borisova L. F.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The floating tidal unceasing action power plant design based on the non-self-propelled vessel has been proposed. To produce electric energy the renewable energy of wind and tidal waves has been used

  8. Quick and effective hyperpolarization of the membrane potential in intact smooth muscle cells of blood vessels by synchronization modulation electric field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liping; Fang, Zhihui; Chen, Wei

    2012-06-01

    Blood vessel dilation starts from activation of the Na/K pumps and inward rectifier K channels in the vessel smooth muscle cells, which hyperpolarizes the cell membrane potential and closes the Ca channels. As a result, the intracellular Ca concentration reduces, and the smooth muscle cells relax and the blood vessel dilates. Activation of the Na/K pumps and the membrane potential hyperpolarization plays a critical role in blood vessel functions. Previously, we developed a new technique, synchronization modulation, to control the pump functions by electrically entraining the pump molecules. We have applied the synchronization modulation electric field noninvasively to various intact cells and demonstrated the field-induced membrane potential hyperpolarization. We further applied the electric field to blood vessels and investigated the field induced functional changes of the vessels. In this paper, we report the results in a study of the membrane potential change in the smooth muscle cells of mesenteric blood vessels in response to the oscillating electric field. We found that the synchronization modulation electric field can effectively hyperpolarize the muscle membrane potential quickly in seconds under physiological conditions.

  9. Analysis of the micro-structural damages by neutronic irradiation of the steel of reactor vessels of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde. Characterization of the design steel; Analisis de los danos micro-estructurales por irradiacion neutronica del acero de la vasija de los reactores de la Central Nuclear de Laguna Verde. Caracterizacion del acero de diseno

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moranchel y Rodriguez, M.; Garcia B, A. [IPN, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, Departamento de Fisica, Av. Luis Enrique Erro s/n, Unidad Profesional Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Col. Lindavista, 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Longoria G, L. C., E-mail: mmoranchel@ipn.m [ININ, Direccion de Investigacion Cientifica, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2010-09-15

    The vessel of a nuclear reactor is one of the safety barriers more important in the design, construction and operation of the reactor. If the vessel results affected to the grade of to have fracture and/or cracks it is very probable the conclusion of their useful life in order to guarantee the nuclear safety and the radiological protection of the exposure occupational personnel, of the public and the environment avoiding the exposition to radioactive sources. The materials of the vessel of a nuclear reactor are exposed continually to the neutronic irradiation that generates the same nuclear reactor. The neutrons that impact to the vessel have the sufficient energy to penetrate certain depth in function of the energy of the incident neutron until reaching the repose or to be absorbed by some nucleus. In the course of their penetration, the neutrons interact with the nuclei, atoms, molecules and with the same crystalline nets of the vessel material producing vacuums, interstitial, precipitate and segregations among other defects that can modify the mechanical properties of the steel. The steel A533-B is the material with which is manufactured the vessel of the nuclear reactors of nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde, is an alloy that, among other components, it contains atoms of Ni that if they are segregated by the neutrons impact this would favor to the cracking of the same vessel. This work is part of an investigation to analyze the micro-structural damages of the reactor vessels of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde due to the neutronic irradiation which is exposed in a continuous way. We will show the characterization of the design steel of the vessel, what offers a comprehension about their chemical composition, the superficial topography and the crystalline nets of the steel A533-B. It will also allow analyze the existence of precipitates, segregates, the type of crystalline net and the distances inter-plains of the design steel of the vessel. (Author)

  10. Thermal hydraulics characterization of the core and the reactor vessel type BWR; Caracterizacion termohidraulica del nucleo y de la vasija de un reactor tipo BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zapata Y, M.; Lopez H, L.E. [CFE, Carretera Cardel-Nautla Km. 42.5, Municipio Alto Lucero, Veracruz (Mexico)]. e-mail: marxlenin.zapata@cfe.gob.mx

    2008-07-01

    The thermal hydraulics design of a reactor type BWR 5 as the employees in the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde involves the coupling of at least six control volumes: Pumps jet region, Stratification region, Core region, Vapor dryer region, Humidity separator region and Reactor region. Except by the regions of the core and reactor, these control volumes only are used for design considerations and their importance as operative data source is limited. It is for that is fundamental to complement the thermal hydraulics relations to obtain major data that allow to determine the efficiency of internal components, such as pumps jet, humidity separator and vapor dryer. Like example of the previous thing, calculations are realized on the humidity of the principal vapor during starting, comparing it with the values at the moment incorporated in the data banks of the computers of process of both units. (Author)

  11. A scaling law for the local CHF on the external bottom side of a fully submerged reactor vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, F.B.; Haddad, K.H.; Liu, Y.C. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1997-02-01

    A scaling law for estimating the local critical heat flux on the outer surface of a heated hemispherical vessel that is fully submerged in water has been developed from the results of an advanced hydrodynamic CHF model for pool boiling on a downward facing curved heating surface. The scaling law accounts for the effects of the size of the vessel, the level of liquid subcooling, the intrinsic properties of the fluid, and the spatial variation of the local critical heat flux along the heating surface. It is found that for vessels with diameters considerably larger than the characteristic size of the vapor masses, the size effect on the local critical heat flux is limited almost entirely to the effect of subcooling associated with the local liquid head. When the subcooling effect is accounted for separately, the local CHF limit is nearly independent of the vessel size. Based upon the scaling law developed in this work, it is possible to merge, within the experimental uncertainties, all the available local CHF data obtained for various vessel sizes under both saturated and subcooled boiling conditions into a single curve. Applications of the scaling law to commercial-size vessels have been made for various system pressures and water levels above the heated vessel. Over the range of conditions explored in this study, the local CHF limit is found to increase by a factor of two or more from the bottom center to the upper edge of the vessel. Meanwhile, the critical heat flux at a given angular position of the heated vessel is also found to increase appreciably with the system pressure and the water level.

  12. Microstructure and embrittlement of VVER 440 reactor pressure vessel steels; Microstructure et fragilisation des aciers de cuve des reacteurs nucleaires VVER 440

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennion, A

    1999-03-15

    27 VVER 440 pressurised water reactors operate in former Soviet Union and in Eastern Europe. The pressure vessel, is made of Cr-Mo-V steel. It contains a circumferential arc weld in front of the nuclear core. This weld undergoes a high neutron flux and contains large amounts of copper and phosphorus, elements well known for their embrittlement potency under irradiation. The embrittlement kinetic of the steel is accelerated, reducing the lifetime of the reactor. In order to get informations on the microstructure and mechanical properties of these steels, base metals, HAZ, and weld metals have been characterized. The high amount of phosphorus in weld metals promotes the reverse temper embrittlement that occurs during post-weld heat treatment. The radiation damage structure has been identified by small angle neutron scattering, atomic probe, and transmission electron microscopy. Nanometer-sized clusters of solute atoms, rich in copper with almost the same characteristics as in western pressure vessels steels, and an evolution of the size distribution of vanadium carbides, which are present on dislocation structure, are observed. These defects disappear during post-irradiation tempering. As in western steels, the embrittlement is due to both hardening and reduction of interphase cohesion. The radiation damage specificity of VVER steels arises from their high amount of phosphorus and from their significant density of fine vanadium carbides. (author)

  13. Electric field formation in three different plasmas: A fusion reactor, arc discharge, and the ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwan Chul

    2017-11-01

    Three examples of electric field formation in the plasma are analyzed based on a new mechanism driven by ion-neutral collisions. The Gyro-Center Shift analysis uses the iteration of three equations including perpendicular current induced by the momentum exchange between ions and neutrals when there is asymmetry over the gyro-motion. This method includes non-zero divergence of current that leads the solution of time dependent state. The first example is radial electric field formation at the boundary of the nuclear fusion device, which is a key factor in the high-confinement mode operation of future fusion reactors. The second example is the reversed rotation of the arc discharge cathode spot, which has been a mysterious subject for more than one hundred years. The third example is electric field formations in the earth's ionosphere, which are important components of the equatorial electrojet and black aurora. The use of one method that explains various examples from different plasmas is reported, along with a discussion of the applications.

  14. Reactor Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ait Abderrahim, A

    2001-04-01

    The Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Department of SCK-CEN offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutronics calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation, reactor safety and control and non-destructive analysis of reactor fuel. This expertise is applied in the Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments by means of neutron and gamma calculations. The activities of the Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science programme cover several domains outside the department. Progress and achievements in these topical areas in 2000 are summarised.

  15. A design study of reactor core optimization for direct nuclear heat-to-electricity conversion in a space power reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, Hidekazu; Takahashi, Makoto; Shimoda, Hiroshi; Takeoka, Satoshi [Kyoto Univ. (Japan); Nakagawa, Masayuki; Kugo, Teruhiko

    1998-01-01

    To propose a new design concept of a nuclear reactor used in the space, research has been conducted on the conceptual design of a new nuclear reactor on the basis of the following three main concepts: (1) Thermionic generation by thermionic fuel elements (TFE), (2) reactivity control by rotary reflector, and (3) reactor cooling by liquid metal. The outcomes of the research are: (1) A calculation algorithm was derived for obtaining convergent conditions by repeating nuclear characteristic calculation and thermal flow characteristic calculation for the space nuclear reactor. (2) Use of this algorithm and the parametric study established that a space nuclear reactor using 97% enriched uranium nitride as the fuel and lithium as the coolant and having a core with a radius of about 25 cm, a height of about 50 cm and a generation efficiency of about 7% can probably be operated continuously for at least more than ten years at 100 kW only by reactivity control by rotary reflector. (3) A new CAD/CAE system was developed to assist design work to optimize the core characteristics of the space nuclear reactor comprehensively. It is composed of the integrated design support system VINDS using virtual reality and the distributed system WINDS to collaboratively support design work using Internet. (N.H.)

  16. The Effect of Current-Limiting Reactors on the Tripping of Short Circuits in High-Voltage Electrical Equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkov, M. S.; Gusev, Yu. P., E-mail: GusevYP@mpei.ru; Monakov, Yu. V.; Cho, Gvan Chun [National Research University “Moscow Power Engineering Institute,” (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    The insertion of current-limiting reactors into electrical equipment operating at a voltage of 110 and 220 kV produces a change in the parameters of the transient recovery voltages at the contacts of the circuit breakers for disconnecting short circuits, which could be the reason for the increase in the duration of the short circuit, damage to the electrical equipment and losses in the power system. The results of mathematical modeling of the transients, caused by tripping of the short circuit in a reactive electric power transmission line are presented, and data are given on the negative effect of a current-limiting resistor on the rate of increase and peak value of the transient recovery voltages. Methods of ensuring the standard requirements imposed on the parameters of the transient recovery voltages when using current-limiting reactors in the high-voltage electrical equipment of power plants and substations are proposed and analyzed.

  17. Potential of Electric Power Production from Microbial Fuel Cell (MFC in Evapotranspiration Reactor for Leachate Treatment Using Alocasia macrorrhiza Plant and Eleusine indica Grass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaman Badrus

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbial fuel cell is one of attractive electric power generator from nature bacterial activity. While, Evapotranspiration is one of the waste water treatment system which developed to eliminate biological weakness that utilize the natural evaporation process and bacterial activity on plant roots and plant media. This study aims to determine the potential of electrical energy from leachate treatment using evapotranspiration reactor. The study was conducted using local plant, namely Alocasia macrorrhiza and local grass, namely Eleusine Indica. The system was using horizontal MFC by placing the cathodes and anodes at different chamber (i.e. in the leachate reactor and reactor with plant media. Carbon plates was used for chatode-anodes material with size of 40 cm x 10 cm x1 cm. Electrical power production was measure by a digital multimeter for 30 days reactor operation. The result shows electric power production was fluctuated during reactor operation from all reactors. The electric power generated from each reactor was fluctuated, but from the reactor using Alocasia macrorrhiza plant reach to 70 μwatt average. From the reactor using Eleusine Indica grass was reached 60 μwatt average. Electric power production fluctuation is related to the bacterial growth pattern in the soil media and on the plant roots which undergo the adaptation process until the middle of the operational period and then in stable growth condition until the end of the reactor operation. The results indicate that the evapotranspiration reactor using Alocasia macrorrhiza plant was 60-95% higher electric power potential than using Eleusine Indica grass in short-term (30-day operation. Although, MFC system in evapotranspiration reactor system was one of potential system for renewable electric power generation.

  18. Large-scale surface dielectric barrier discharge type reactor : effect of the electric wind on the conversion effectiveness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jolibois, J. [Univ. de Poitiers, Poitiers (France). Centre national de la recherche scientifique, Laboratoire de Catalyse en Chimie Organique; Poitiers Univ., Futuroscope Chasseneuil Cedex (France). Centre national de la recherche scientifique, Inst. Pprime; Zouzou, N.; Moreau, E. [Poitiers Univ., Futuroscope Chasseneuil Cedex (France). Centre national de la recherche scientifique, Inst. Pprime; Tatibouet, J.M. [Univ. de Poitiers, Poitiers (France). Centre national de la recherche scientifique, Laboratoire de Catalyse en Chimie Organique

    2010-07-01

    Non-thermal plasma (NTP) techniques offer an innovative approach for air pollution reduction. Most studies in NTP techniques use volumetric discharge reactors with small dimensions and low flow rates at laboratory scale. The objective of this study was to develop an air pollution control plasma reactor at industrial scale with surface discharge. Propene (C{sub 3}H{sub 6}) was oxidized at high flow rates in a large-scale plasma reactor based on surface dielectric barrier discharge (DBD). Three different configurations of surface discharges were tested with 15 ppm of C{sub 3}H{sub 6} in air at ambient temperature for a flow rate of 50 m{sup 3} per hour. The properties of these different surface discharges were analyzed using chemical measurements and 3 component particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements. PIV measurements were used characterize the effect of the electric wind on the polluted gas airflow inside the reactor and to explain the differences of effectiveness of the three tested plasma generators. For the three plasma generators, a propene oxidation of up to 45 percent was obtained at one J per liter. The electric wind produced by the surface discharge resulted in the formation of vortices inside the plasma reactor. This electric wind can increase gas mixing inside the plasma reactor and therefore plays a key role in conversion efficiency. It was concluded that the electric wind produced by surface discharges enables the use of this type of discharge for VOC elimination at high flow rate, with the same effectiveness of volumetric discharges. 5 refs., 10 figs.

  19. Main results of study on the interaction between the corium melt and steel in the VVER-1000 reactor vessel during a severe accident performed under the MASCA project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmolov, V. G.; Zagryazkin, V. N.; Tsurikov, D. F.; Vishnevsky, V. Yu.; D'Yakov, Ye. K.; Kotov, A. Yu.; Repnikov, V. M.

    2010-12-01

    The interactions that take place in the corium melt in the reactor vessel in the case of a severe accident at a nuclear power plant were investigated in accordance with the MASCA international program. Results of the interaction between the oxide melt and iron (steel), partition of the main components [U, Zr, Fe (stainless steel)] between the oxide and the metal phases of the melt, partition of low-volatile simulators of fission products between the phases of the stratified core melt pool, and impact of the oxidizing atmosphere on the melt stratification are presented. The results obtained were used for prediction of thermodynamic properties of the melts belonging to the U-Zr-Fe-O system.

  20. Development of a methodology for the assessment of shallow-flaw fracture in nuclear reactor pressure vessels: Generation of biaxial shallow-flaw fracture toughness data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McAfee, W.J.; Bass, B.R.; Bryson, J.W.

    1998-07-01

    A technology to determine shallow-flaw fracture toughness of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels is being developed for application to the safety assessment of RPVs containing postulated shallow-surface flaws. Shallow-flaw fracture toughness of RPV material has been shown to be higher than that for deep flaws, because of the relaxation of crack-tip constraint. This report describes the preliminary test results for a series of cruciform specimens with a uniform depth surface flaw. These specimens are all of the same size with the same depth flaw. Temperature and biaxial load ratio are the independent variables. These tests demonstrated that biaxial loading could have a pronounced effect on shallow-flaw fracture toughness in the lower transition temperature region for RPV materials. Through that temperature range, the effect of full biaxial (1:1) loading on uniaxial, shallow-flaw toughness varied from no effect near the lower shelf to a reduction of approximately 58% at higher temperatures.

  1. Experimental and numerical investigation of coolant mixing in a model of reactor pressure vessel down-comer and in cold leg inlets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hutli Ezddin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal fatigue and pressurized thermal shock phenomena are the main problems for the reactor pressure vessel and the T-junctions both of them depend on the mixing of the coolant. The mixing process, flow and temperature distribution has been investigated experimentally using particle image velocimetry, laser induced fluorescence, and simulated by CFD tools. The obtained results showed that the ratio of flow rate between the main pipe and the branch pipe has a big influence on the mixing process. The particle image velocimetry/planar laser-induced fluorescence measurements technologies proved to be suitable for the investigation of turbulent mixing in the complicated flow system: both velocity and temperature distribution are important parameters in the determination of thermal fatigue and pressurized thermal shock. Results of the applied these techniques showed that both of them can be used as a good provider for data base and to validate CFD results.

  2. Study of atomic clusters in neutron irradiated reactor pressure vessel surveillance samples by extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cammelli, S. [LWV, NES, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Fachbereich C - Physik, Bergische Universitaet Wuppertal, Gauss-Str. 20, 42097 Wuppertal (Germany)], E-mail: Sebastiano.cammelli@psi.ch; Degueldre, C.; Kuri, G.; Bertsch, J. [LWV, NES, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Luetzenkirchen-Hecht, D.; Frahm, R. [Fachbereich C - Physik, Bergische Universitaet Wuppertal, Gauss-Str. 20, 42097 Wuppertal (Germany)

    2009-03-31

    Copper and nickel impurities in nuclear reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel can form nano-clusters, which have a strong impact on the ductile-brittle transition temperature of the material. Thus, for control purposes and simulation of long irradiation times, surveillance samples are submitted to enhanced neutron irradiation. In this work, surveillance samples from a Swiss nuclear power plant were investigated by extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS). The density of Cu and Ni atoms determined in the first and second shells around the absorber is affected by the irradiation and temperature. The comparison of the EXAFS data at Cu and Ni K-edges shows that these elements reside in arrangements similar to bcc Fe. However, the EXAFS analysis reveals local irradiation damage in the form of vacancy fractions, which can be determined with a precision of {approx}5%. There are indications that the formation of Cu and Ni clusters differs significantly.

  3. The ageing of electronuclear reactor vessels, its following-up by EDF, and the examination by the ASN of the demonstration of the vessel in-service behaviour; Le vieillissement des cuves des reacteurs electronucleaires, son suivi par EDF et l'examen par l'ASN de la demonstration de tenue en service des cuves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-11-15

    This technical note describes the role of the vessel in an electronuclear reactor, and highlights its importance for matters of safety. It gives a technical description of the vessel with its mains elements, and a brief description of the fabrication process. Then, it describes the causes and effects of ageing, briefly presents the irradiation follow-up plan, and evokes the model used for predicting irradiation effects. It gives an overview of defects related to fabrication process, and of the defect control. It describes the approach used to demonstrate the vessel in-service behaviour, the accidental situations and their impact on the vessel, and the main elements which have been examined during the third decennial inspection of the 900 MWe reactors. Comments are given about the operation for the next period in terms of measures to limit ageing effects, of improvement of control efficiency, of improvement of mechanical investigation methods, and of control by the ASN

  4. The Assessment and Validation of Mini-Compact Tension Test Specimen Geometry and Progress in Establishing Technique for Fracture Toughness Master Curves for Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokolov, Mikhail A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Nanstad, Randy K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Small specimens are playing the key role in evaluating properties of irradiated materials. The use of small specimens provides several advantages. Typically, only a small volume of material can be irradiated in a reactor at desirable conditions in terms of temperature, neutron flux, and neutron dose. A small volume of irradiated material may also allow for easier handling of specimens. Smaller specimens reduce the amount of radioactive material, minimizing personnel exposures and waste disposal. However, use of small specimens imposes a variety of challenges as well. These challenges are associated with proper accounting for size effects and transferability of small specimen data to the real structures of interest. Any fracture toughness specimen that can be made out of the broken halves of standard Charpy specimens may have exceptional utility for evaluation of reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) since it would allow one to determine and monitor directly actual fracture toughness instead of requiring indirect predictions using correlations established with impact data. The Charpy V-notch specimen is the most commonly used specimen geometry in surveillance programs. Assessment and validation of mini-CT specimen geometry has been performed on previously well characterized HSST Plate 13B, an A533B class 1 steel. It was shown that the fracture toughness transition temperature measured by these Mini-CT specimens is within the range of To values that were derived from various large fracture toughness specimens. Moreover, the scatter of the fracture toughness values measured by Mini-CT specimens perfectly follows the Weibull distribution function providing additional proof for validation of this geometry for the Master Curve evaluation of rector pressure vessel steels. Moreover, the International collaborative program has been developed to extend the assessment and validation efforts to irradiated weld metal. The program is underway and involves ORNL, CRIEPI, and EPRI.

  5. Electrical Capacitance Volume Tomography for the Packed Bed Reactor ISS Flight Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marashdeh, Qussai; Motil, Brian; Wang, Aining; Liang-Shih, Fan

    2013-01-01

    Fixed packed bed reactors are compact, require minimum power and maintenance to operate, and are highly reliable. These features make this technology a highly desirable unit operation for long duration life support systems in space. NASA is developing an ISS experiment to address this technology with particular focus on water reclamation and air revitalization. Earlier research and development efforts funded by NASA have resulted in two hydrodynamic models which require validation with appropriate instrumentation in an extended microgravity environment. To validate these models, the instantaneous distribution of the gas and liquid phases must be measured.Electrical Capacitance Volume Tomography (ECVT) is a non-invasive imaging technology recently developed for multi-phase flow applications. It is based on distributing flexible capacitance plates on the peripheral of a flow column and collecting real-time measurements of inter-electrode capacitances. Capacitance measurements here are directly related to dielectric constant distribution, a physical property that is also related to material distribution in the imaging domain. Reconstruction algorithms are employed to map volume images of dielectric distribution in the imaging domain, which is in turn related to phase distribution. ECVT is suitable for imaging interacting materials of different dielectric constants, typical in multi-phase flow systems. ECVT is being used extensively for measuring flow variables in various gas-liquid and gas-solid flow systems. Recent application of ECVT include flows in risers and exit regions of circulating fluidized beds, gas-liquid and gas-solid bubble columns, trickle beds, and slurry bubble columns. ECVT is also used to validate flow models and CFD simulations. The technology is uniquely qualified for imaging phase concentrations in packed bed reactors for the ISS flight experiments as it exhibits favorable features of compact size, low profile sensors, high imaging speed, and

  6. Contributions of Cu-rich clusters, dislocation loops and nanovoids to the irradiation-induced hardening of Cu-bearing low-Ni reactor pressure vessel steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergner, F., E-mail: f.bergner@hzdr.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstr. 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Gillemot, F. [Centre for Energy Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, 29-33 Konkoly-Thege street, 1121 Budapest XII (Hungary); Hernández-Mayoral, M.; Serrano, M. [Division of Materials, CIEMAT, Avenida Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Török, G. [Wigner Research Center for Physics of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, 29-33 Konkoly-Thege street, 1121 Budapest XII (Hungary); Ulbricht, A.; Altstadt, E. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstr. 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • TEM and SANS were applied to estimate mean size and number density of loops, nanovoids and Cu-rich clusters. • A three-feature dispersed-barrier hardening model was applied to estimate the yield stress increase. • The values and errors of the dimensionless obstacle strength were estimated in a consistent way. • Nanovoids are stronger obstacles for dislocation glide than dislocation loops, loops are stronger than Cu-rich clusters. • For reactor-relevant conditions, Cu-rich clusters contribute most to hardening due to their high number density. - Abstract: Dislocation loops, nanovoids and Cu-rich clusters (CRPs) are known to represent obstacles for dislocation glide in neutron-irradiated reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels, but a consistent experimental determination of the respective obstacle strengths is still missing. A set of Cu-bearing low-Ni RPV steels and model alloys was characterized by means of SANS and TEM in order to specify mean size and number density of loops, nanovoids and CRPs. The obstacle strengths of these families were estimated by solving an over-determined set of linear equations. We have found that nanovoids are stronger than loops and loops are stronger than CRPs. Nevertheless, CRPs contribute most to irradiation hardening because of their high number density. Nanovoids were only observed for neutron fluences beyond typical end-of-life conditions of RPVs. The estimates of the obstacle strength are critically compared with reported literature data.

  7. A Review of the Application of Rate Theory to Simulate Vacancy Cluster Formation and Interstitial Defect Formation in Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fallon Laliberte

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The beltline region of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV is subject to an extreme radiation, temperature, and pressure environment over several decades of operation; therefore it is necessary to understand the mechanisms through which radiation damage occurs and how it affects the mechanical and chemical properties of the RPV steel. Chemical rate theory is a mean field rate theory simulation model which applies chemistry to the evaluation of irradiation-induced embrittlement. It presents one method of analysis that may be coupled to other distinct methods, in order to analyze defect formation, ultimately providing useful information on strength, ductility, toughness and dimensional stability changes for effects such as embrittlement, reduction in ductility and toughness, void swelling, hardening, irradiation creep, stress corrosion cracking, etc. over time as materials are subjected to reactor operational irradiation. This paper serves as a brief review of rate theory fundamentals and presents several examples of research that exemplify the application and importance of rate theory in examining the effects of radiation damage on RPV steel.

  8. Influence of Modelling Options in RELAP5/SCDAPSIM and MAAP4 Computer Codes on Core Melt Progression and Reactor Pressure Vessel Integrity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siniša Šadek

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available RELAP5/SCDAPSIM and MAAP4 are two widely used severe accident computer codes for the integral analysis of the core and the reactor pressure vessel behaviour following the core degradation. The objective of the paper is the comparison of code results obtained by application of different modelling options and the evaluation of influence of thermal hydraulic behaviour of the plant on core damage progression. The analysed transient was postulated station blackout in NPP Krško with a leakage from reactor coolant pump seals. Two groups of calculations were performed where each group had a different break area and, thus, a different leakage rate. Analyses have shown that MAAP4 results were more sensitive to varying thermal hydraulic conditions in the primary system. User-defined parameters had to be carefully selected when the MAAP4 model was developed, in contrast to the RELAP5/SCDAPSIM model where those parameters did not have any significant impact on final results.

  9. Master curve analysis of the SA508 Gr. 4N Ni-Mo-Cr low alloy steels for reactor pressure vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ki Hyoung; Wee, Dang Moon [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Min Chul; Lee, Bong Sang [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-10-15

    Low alloy steels used as Reactor Pressure Vessels (RPVs) materials directly relate to the safety margin and the life span of reactors. Currently, SA508 Gr.3 low alloy steel is generally used for RPV material. But, for larger capacity and long-term durability of RPV, materials that have better properties including strength and toughness are needed. Therefore, tempered martensitic SA508 Gr.4N low alloy steel is considered as a candidate material due to excellent mechanical properties. The fracture toughness loss caused by irradiation embrittlement during reactor operation is one of the important issues for ferritic RPV steels, because the decrease of fracture toughness is directly related to the integrity of RPVs. One reliable and efficient concept to evaluate the fracture toughness of ferritic steels is master curve method. In ASTM E1921, it is clearly mentioned the universal shape of the median toughness-temperature curve for ferritic steels including tempered martensitic steels. However, currently, concerns have arisen regarding the appropriateness of the universal shape in ASTM for the tempered martensitic steels such as Eurofer97. Therefore, it may be necessary to assess the master curve applicability for the tempered martensitic SA508 Gr.4N low alloy steel. In this study, the fracture toughness behavior with temperature of the tempered martensitic SA508 Gr.4N low alloy steels was evaluated using the ASTM E1921 master curve method. And the results were compared with those of the bainitic SA508 Gr.3 low alloy steel. Furthermore, the way to define the fracture toughness behavior of Gr.4N steels well is discussed.

  10. Study on operation conditions and an operation system of a nuclear powered submersible research vessel, 'report of working group on application of a very small nuclear reactor to an ocean research'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ura, Tamaki [Tokyo Univ., Tokyo (Japan); Takamasa, Tomoji [Tokyo Univ. of Mercantile Marine, Tokyo (Japan); Nishimura, Hajime [Japan Marine Science and Technology Center, Yokosuka, Kanagawa (JP)] [and others

    2001-07-01

    JAERI has studied on design of a nuclear powered submersible research vessel, which will navigate under sea mainly in the Arctic Ocean, as a part of the design activity of advanced marine reactors. This report describes operation conditions and an operating system of the vessel, which were discussed by the specialists of hull design, sound positioning, ship motions and oceanography, etc. The design conditions on ship motions for submersible vessels were surveyed considering regulations in our country, and ship motions were evaluated in the cases of underwater and surface navigations taking account of observation activities in the Arctic Ocean. The effect of ship motions on the compact nuclear reactor SCR was assessed. A submarine transponder system and an on-ice communication buoy system were examined as a positioning and communication system, supposing the activity under ice. The interval between transponders or communication buoys was recommended as 130 km. Procedures to secure safety of nuclear powered submersible research vessel were discussed according to accidents on the hull or the nuclear reactor. These results were reflected to the concept of the nuclear powered submersible research vessel, and subjects to be settled in the next step were clarified. (author)

  11. Completion of the dismantling, cutting and packaging for final disposal of the MZFR reactor pressure vessel including internals; Abschluss der vollstaendigen Demontage, Zerlegung und endlagergerechten Verpackung des 400 t schweren MZFR-Reaktordruckbehaelters incl. Einbauten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prechtl, E.; Eisenmann, B.; Weis, A. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (DE). Hauptabt. Projekte (HAP-MZFR); Suessdorf, W. [Studsvik GmbH und Co. KG, Pforzheim (Germany); Loeb, A.; Stanke, D.; Thoma, M. [NIS Ingenieurgesellschaft mbH, Alzenau (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    The test reactor 400 tons MZFR reactor pressure vessel has been dismantled, dissected and packaged for final disposal. The authors describe the initial situation of the reactor after 19 years of operation. The dismantling was complicated by the high radioactivity and the high contamination due to the constricted space in the building. In 1995/1996 remote cutting tools for hot components were not yet available. Established techniques were adapted and refined for the special purpose. The dissected vessel was packaged for final disposal in the final repository Konrad. The authors describe the dismantling concept including boundary conditions and general requirements, the implementation of the concept and experiences of the process including qualification and training of the personnel.

  12. Development of a Versatile Ultrasonic Internal Pipe/Vessel Component Monitor for In-Service Inspection of Nuclear Reactor Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Searfass, Clifford T. [Structural Integrity Associates, Inc., State College, PA (United States); Malinowski, Owen M. [Structural Integrity Associates, Inc., State College, PA (United States); Van Velsor, Jason K. [Structural Integrity Associates, Inc., State College, PA (United States)

    2015-03-22

    The stated goal of this work was to develop a versatile system which could accurately measure vessel and valve internal vibrations and cavitation formation under in-service conditions in nuclear power plants, ultrasonically. The developed technology will benefit the nuclear power generation industry by allowing plant operators to monitor valve and vessel internals during operation. This will help reduce planned outages and plant component failures. During the course of this work, Structural Integrity Associates, Inc. gathered information from industry experts that target vibration amplitudes to be detected should be in the range of 0.001-in to 0.005-in (0.025-mm to 0.127-mm) and target vibration frequency ranges which should be detected were found to be between 0-Hz and 300-Hz. During the performed work, an ultrasonic measuring system was developed which utilized ultrasonic pulse-echo time-of-flight measurements to measure vibration frequency and amplitude. The developed system has been shown to be able to measure vibration amplitudes as low as 0.0008-in (0.020-mm) with vibration frequencies in the range of 17-Hz to 1000-Hz. Therefore, the developed system was able to meet the industry needs for vibration measurement. The developed ultrasonic system was also to be able to measure cavitation formation by monitoring the received ultrasonic time- and frequency-domain signals. This work also demonstrated the survivability of commercially available probes at temperatures up to 300-F for several weeks.

  13. An numerical analysis of high-temperature helium reactor power plant for co-production of hydrogen and electricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudek, M.; Podsadna, J.; Jaszczur, M.

    2016-09-01

    In the present work, the feasibility of using a high temperature gas cooled nuclear reactor (HTR) for electricity generation and hydrogen production are analysed. The HTR is combined with a steam and a gas turbine, as well as with the system for heat delivery for medium temperature hydrogen production. Industrial-scale hydrogen production using copper-chlorine (Cu-Cl) thermochemical cycle is considered and compared with high temperature electrolysis. Presented cycle shows a very promising route for continuous, efficient, large-scale and environmentally benign hydrogen production without CO2 emissions. The results show that the integration of a high temperature helium reactor, with a combined cycle for electric power generation and hydrogen production, may reach very high efficiency and could possibly lead to a significant decrease of hydrogen production costs.

  14. Nuclear reactor overflow line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severson, Wayne J.

    1976-01-01

    The overflow line for the reactor vessel of a liquid-metal-cooled nuclear reactor includes means for establishing and maintaining a continuous bleed flow of coolant amounting to 5 to 10% of the total coolant flow through the overflow line to prevent thermal shock to the overflow line when the reactor is restarted following a trip. Preferably a tube is disposed concentrically just inside the overflow line extending from a point just inside the reactor vessel to an overflow tank and a suction line is provided opening into the body of liquid metal in the reactor vessel and into the annulus between the overflow line and the inner tube.

  15. J-R Fracture Resistance of SA533 Gr.B-Cl.1 Steel for Reactor Pressure Vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Ji-Hyun; Hong, Seokmin; Lee, Bong-Sang [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    A rolled plate might show different mechanical behaviors from a forging, even though they contain same chemical compositions. Furthermore, it is known that the fracture behavior of a rolled plate is very sensitive to material orientation comparing to a forging. In this study, the J-R fracture resistances of SA533 Gr.B-Cl.1 plate were measured at reactor operating temperature and the material orientation sensitivity was discussed. The decrease of fracture resistance of this kind of low alloy steel at an elevated temperature is known as the effect of dynamic strain aging (DSA). It was attributed to that the carbides and grains elongated to primary rolling direction, so that the aspect ratio of carbides and grains in the specimen with T-L orientation is larger. Generally, the hard second phase could take a roll of trigger point of unstable fracture. It is needed that the fracture surfaces of the tested specimens to be examined profoundly.

  16. Research on friction coefficient of nuclear Reactor Vessel Internals Hold Down Spring: Stress coefficient test analysis method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linjun, Xie, E-mail: linjunx@zjut.edu.cn [College of Mechanical Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310014 (China); Guohong, Xue; Ming, Zhang [Shanghai Nuclear Engineering Research & Design Institute, Shanghai 200233 (China)

    2016-08-01

    Graphical abstract: HDS stress coefficient test apparatus. - Highlights: • This paper performs mathematic deduction to the physical model of Hold Down Spring (HDS), establishes a mathematic model of axial load P and stress, stress coefficient and friction coefficient and designs a set of test apparatuses for simulating the pretightening process of the HDS for the first time according to a model similarity criterion. • The mathematical relation between the load and the strain is obtained about the HDS, and the mathematical model of the stress coefficient and the friction coefficient is established. So, a set of test apparatuses for obtaining the stress coefficient is designed according to the model scaling criterion and the friction coefficient of the K1000 HDS is calculated to be 0.336 through the obtained stress coefficient. • The relation curve between the theoretical load and the friction coefficient is obtained through analysis and indicates that the change of the friction coefficient f would influence the pretightening load under the condition of designed stress. The necessary pretightening load in the design process is calculated to be 5469 kN according to the obtained friction coefficient. Therefore, the friction coefficient and the pretightening load under the design conditions can provide accurate pretightening data for the analysis and design of the reactor HDS according to the operations. - Abstract: This paper performs mathematic deduction to the physical model of Hold Down Spring (HDS), establishes a mathematic model of axial load P and stress, stress coefficient and friction coefficient and designs a set of test apparatuses for simulating the pretightening process of the HDS for the first time according to a model similarity criterion. By carrying out tests and researches through a stress testing technique, P–σ curves in loading and unloading processes of the HDS are obtained and the stress coefficient k{sub f} of the HDS is obtained. So, the

  17. The influence of biofilm formation on electricity production from tempe wastewater using tubular membraneless microbial fuel cell reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siagian, Nathania Dwi Karina; Arbianti, Rita; Utami, Tania Surya

    2017-05-01

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology can be potentially developed as an alternative energy source since it can convert various substrates from renewable sources into electricity using bacteria as biocatalyst. Tempe wastewater as MFC substrate gives advantages in tempe wastewater treatment and reducing the purchasing cost of bacteria. Currently, the applications of MFCs are still limited due to the relatively low electricity production, so many studies have been conducted to improve the electricity production by MFC. This study focused on investigating the influence of biofilm formation time and the use of macromolecule as additional substrate towards electricity production from MFC system with tubular membranless reactor and tempe wastewater as substrate. This study suggested that biofilm formation on anode could improve the electricity production up to 10-folds while the use of glucose as substrate addition reduce the electricity production up to 60%. The biggest electricity output was obtained from the experiment of biofilm formation for 14 days with EPS content in biofilm 0,13 mg/cm2 where the maximum voltage and power density produced was respectively 34,81 mV and 0,26 mW/m2.

  18. Nuclear Reactors. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogerton, John F.

    This publication is one of a series of information booklets for the general public published by the United States Atomic Energy Commission. Among the topics discussed are: How Reactors Work; Reactor Design; Research, Teaching, and Materials Testing; Reactors (Research, Teaching and Materials); Production Reactors; Reactors for Electric Power…

  19. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, H.I.; Smith, R.C.

    1958-01-21

    This patent relates to nuclear reactors of the type which use a liquid fuel, such as a solution of uranyl sulfate in ordinary water which acts as the moderator. The reactor is comprised of a spherical vessel having a diameter of about 12 inches substantially surrounded by a reflector of beryllium oxide. Conventionnl control rods and safety rods are operated in slots in the reflector outside the vessel to control the operation of the reactor. An additional means for increasing the safety factor of the reactor by raising the ratio of delayed neutrons to prompt neutrons, is provided and consists of a soluble sulfate salt of beryllium dissolved in the liquid fuel in the proper proportion to obtain the result desired.

  20. Sensitivity analysis of the spectra of the core neutronic source in the calculation of radiation damage in internal of PWR reactor vessel. Internal; Analisis de sensibilidad a los espectros de la fuente neutronica del nucleo en el calculo del dano por irradiacion en los internos de la vasija de un reactor PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadenas Mendicoa, A. M.; Benito Hernandez, M.; Barrerira Pereira, P.

    2012-07-01

    This study is to analyze the sensitivity to the expected differences in the energy spectra characterizing the neutron source that radiates the vessel internals of a commercial PWR reactor, in order to quantify their influence in the quantities that determine the damage in materials metal.

  1. The changes of the structural, magnetic, and mechanical properties in a reactor pressure vessel steel neutron-irradiated at 70 .deg. C

    CERN Document Server

    Park, D G; Jang, K S; Jung, M M; Kim, G M

    1999-01-01

    The irradiation embrittlement of reactor-pressure-vessel steel has been one of the main safety concerns in nuclear power plants. In the present study, an SA508-3 RPV steel was irradiated by neutrons with various fluences up to 10 sup 1 sup 8 n/cm sup 2 (E>=1MeV) at a temperature of approximately 70 .deg. C. The irradiation responses of the structural, the magnetic, and the mechanical properties of the steel were investigated by means of X-ray diffraction, Moessbauer spectroscopy, magnetic Barkhausen noise, and micro-Vickers hardness measurements. The transitions of all of these parameters occurred above a neutron does of 10 sup 1 sup 6 n/cm sup 2. The results of the X-ray and the Moessbauer experiments revealed that neutron irradiation led to the possibility of partial amorphization in the investigated RPV steel. The changes of the physical and the mechanical properties were discussed in terms of irradiation-induced cascade damage of crystalline materials.

  2. Analysis of the master curve approach on the fracture toughness properties of SA508 Gr.4N Ni-Mo-Cr low alloy steels for reactor pressure vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ki-Hyoung, E-mail: shirimp@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Min-Chul; Lee, Bong-Sang [Nuclear Materials Research Division, KAERI, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Wee, Dang-Moon [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    This study aims at assessing the fracture toughness behavior of tempered martensitic Ni-Mo-Cr low alloy steels for reactor pressure vessels in a transition temperature region using a master curve approach. The fracture toughness tests for model alloys with various chemical compositions were carried out following ASTM E1921-08. The microstructures, tensile properties, and Charpy impact toughness were also evaluated. Alloying elements such as Ni, Cr, and Mo affected the mechanical properties of alloys from changes in the phase fraction and precipitation behavior. In the fracture toughness test results, the data sets showed a deviation from the median curve and a smaller scatter than that of the prediction of the ASTM standard, especially in the lower transition region. The exponential parameter of the master curve equation was adjusted by an exponential fitting to data sets for expressing well the temperature dependency of the fracture toughness. The adjusted parameter provided good agreement for data distribution and the independence of T{sub 0} from test temperatures through an overall temperature range in contrast with the results from the standard master curve.

  3. Evaluation of Thermodynamic Stable Phase and Microstructure of SA508 Gr.4N Model Alloys for Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel with Variation of Alloying Elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Mim Chul; Lee, B. S

    2009-12-15

    In order to increase the strength and the fracture toughness of RPV(reactor pressure vessel) steels, an effective way is the change of material specification from Mn-Mo-Ni low alloy steel(SA508 Gr.3) into Ni-Mo-Cr low alloy steel(SA508 Gr.4N). In this study, we evaluate the effects of alloying elements on microstructural characteristics in Ni-Mo-Cr low alloy steel. The changes in stable phase of SA508 Gr.4N low alloy steel with alloying elements were evaluated using a thermodynamic calculation by ThermoCalc software, and then compared with its microstructural observation results. From the calculation of Ni-Mo-Cr low alloy steels, ferrite formation temperature were decreased with increasing Ni and Mn contents due to austenite stabilization effect. Consequently, in the microscopic observation, the microstructure became finer with increasing Ni and Mn contents. However, they does not affects the carbide phase such as M{sub 23}C{sub 6} and M{sub 7}C{sub 3}. When the content of Cr is decreased, carbide phases became unstable and carbide coarsening is observed. With increase of Mo content, M{sub 2}C phase become stable instead of M{sub 7}C{sub 3} and it also observed in the TEM.

  4. Ductile-Brittle Transition Behavior in Tempered Martensitic SA508 Gr. 4N Ni-Mo-Cr Low Alloy Steels for Reactor Pressure Vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ki Hyoung; Wee, Dang Moon [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Min Chul; Lee, Bong Sang [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-05-15

    Reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) operate under severe conditions of elevated temperature, high pressure, and irradiation. Therefore, a combination of sufficient strength, toughness, good weldability, and high irradiation resistance are required for RPV materials. SA508 Gr.4N low alloy steel, which has higher Ni and Cr contents than those of commercial RPV steel, Gr.3 steel, is considered as a candidate material due to its excellent mechanical properties from tempered martensitic microstructure. The ferritic steels such as Gr.3 and Gr.4N low alloy steels reveal a ductile-brittle transition and large scatters in the fracture toughness within a small temperature range. Recently, there are some observations of the steeper transition behavior in the tempered martensitic steels, such as Eurofer97 than the transition behavior of commercial RPV steels. It was also reported that the fracture toughness increased discontinuously when the phase fraction of the tempered martensite was over a critical fraction in the heat affected zones of SA508 Gr.3. Therefore, it may be necessary to evaluate the changes of transition behavior with a microstructure for the tempered martensitic SA508 Gr.4N low alloy steel. In this study, the fracture toughness for SA508 Gr.4N low alloy steels was evaluated from a view point of the temperature dependency with phase fraction of tempered martensite controlled by cooling rate. Additionally, a possible modification of the fracture toughness master curve was proposed and discussed

  5. Review of light--water reactor safety studies. Volume 3 of health and safety impacts of nuclear, geothermal, and fossil-fuel electric generation in California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nero, A.V.; Farnaam, M.R.K.

    1977-01-01

    This report summarizes and compares important studies of light-water nuclear reactor safety, emphasizing the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Reactor Safety Study, work on risk assessment funded by the Electric Power Research Institute, and the Report of the American Physical Society study group on light-water reactor safety. These reports treat risk assessment for nuclear power plants and provide an introduction to the basic issues in reactor safety and the needs of the reactor safety research program. Earlier studies are treated more briefly. The report includes comments on the Reactor Safety Study. The manner in which these studies may be used and alterations which would increase their utility are discussed.

  6. FeCrO Nanoparticles as Anode Catalyst for Ethane Proton Conducting Fuel Cell Reactors to Coproduce Ethylene and Electricity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Hui Li

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ethylene and electrical power are cogenerated in fuel cell reactors with FeCr2O4 nanoparticles as anode catalyst, La0.7Sr0.3FeO3- (LSF as cathode material, and BaCe0.7Zr0.1Y0.2O3- (BCZY perovskite oxide as proton-conducting ceramic electrolyte. FeCr2O4, BCZY and LSF are synthesized by a sol-gel combustion method. The power density increases from 70 to 240 mW cm−2, and the ethylene yield increases from about 14.1% to 39.7% when the operating temperature of the proton-conducting fuel cell reactor increases from 650∘C to 750∘C. The FeCr2O4 anode catalyst exhibits better catalytic performance than nanosized Cr2O3 anode catalyst.

  7. Continuous preparation of carbon-nanotube-supported platinum catalysts in a flow reactor directly heated by electric current

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicja Schlange

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In this contribution we present for the first time a continuous process for the production of highly active Pt catalysts supported by carbon nanotubes by use of an electrically heated tubular reactor. The synthesized catalysts show a high degree of dispersion and narrow distributions of cluster sizes. In comparison to catalysts synthesized by the conventional oil-bath method a significantly higher electrocatalytic activity was reached, which can be attributed to the higher metal loading and smaller and more uniformly distributed Pt particles on the carbon support. Our approach introduces a simple, time-saving and cost-efficient method for fuel cell catalyst preparation in a flow reactor which could be used at a large scale.

  8. Capital cost: pressurized water reactor plant. Commercial electric power cost studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-06-01

    The investment cost study for the 1139 MW(e) pressurized water reactor (PWR) central station power plant consists of two volumes. This volume contains the drawings, equipment list and site description.

  9. An analysis of the use of electrical power measurements for process control in large-scale stirred vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hjorth, S.; Karlsson, L. [ABS Pump Peroduction AB SCABA Agitators, Taby (Sweden); Friberg, P. [Telemark Technological Research and Development Centre, Porsgrunn (Norway); Boon, L. [Birmingham Univ., (United Kingdom)

    2000-12-01

    Given that the direct measurement of the power transmitted via an agitator shaft is expensive as well as difficult to carry out, substitute measures such as inferring the transmitted power from a measurement of the electric power needed to operate the agitator motor, are frequently used. Although the accuracy of the measurement is highly inaccurate (less than five per cent accuracy), because of its relative simplicity and low cost, the technique is considered suitable for continuous monitoring of the power used by agitators in large-scale stirred vessels used in industrial processes. This paper describes a measurement method involving the use of a Wattmeter with a magnetic AC current probe fitted to the agitator. The major drawback is that for maximum accuracy the method needs to be calibrated which can be both tricky and cumbersome in all, except new installations. As an alternative, these authors suggest that if the speed control unit is close to being sinusoidal, accuracy levels of up to about 10 per cent can be achieved over a large range of torque and rpm values by accepting the manufacturer's estimate of efficiency. Examples of measurement results using various measurement techniques are discussed. 8 refs., 2 tabs., 6 figs.

  10. Feasibility Study of Supercritical Light Water Cooled Reactors for Electric Power Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philip MacDonald; Jacopo Buongiorno; James Sterbentz; Cliff Davis; Robert Witt; Gary Was; J. McKinley; S. Teysseyre; Luca Oriani; Vefa Kucukboyaci; Lawrence Conway; N. Jonsson: Bin Liu

    2005-02-13

    The supercritical water reactor (SCWR) has been the object of interest throughout the nuclear Generation IV community because of its high potential: a simple, direct cycle, compact configuration; elimination of many traditional LWR components, operation at coolant temperatures much higher than traditional LWRs and thus high thermal efficiency. It could be said that the SWR was viewed as the water counterpart to the high temperature gas reactor.

  11. 76 FR 39922 - Office of New Reactors; Proposed Revision 4 to Standard Review Plan Section 8.1 on Electric Power...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Office of New Reactors; Proposed Revision 4 to Standard Review Plan Section 8.1 on Electric Power... 8.1 on ``Electric Power-- Introduction.'' The notice period for this notice closes on June 30, 2011...

  12. Feasibility Study of Supercritical Light Water Cooled Fast Reactors for Actinide Burning and Electric Power Production Progress Report for Year 1, Quarter 2 (January - March 2002)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Davis, Cliff Bybee; Weaver, Kevan Dean

    2002-03-01

    The use of light water at supercritical pressures as the coolant in a nuclear reactor offers the potential for considerable plant simplification and consequent capital and O&M cost reduction compared with current light water reactor (LWR) designs. Also, given the thermodynamic conditions of the coolant at the core outlet (i.e. temperature and pressure beyond the water critical point), very high thermal efficiencies of the power conversion cycle are possible (i.e. up to about 45%). Because no change of phase occurs in the core, the need for steam separators and dryers as well as for BWR-type re-circulation pumps is eliminated, which, for a given reactor power, results in a substantially shorter reactor vessel and smaller containment building than the current BWRs. Furthermore, in a direct cycle the steam generators are not needed.

  13. Use of Zircaloy 4 material for the pressure vessels of hot and cold neutron sources and beam tubes for research reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutsmiedl, Erwin [Technical University Munich, FRM-II (Germany)

    2001-03-01

    The material Zircaloy 4 can be used for the pressure retaining walls for the cold and hot neutron sources and beam tubes. For the research reactor FRM-II of the Technical University Munich, Germany, the material Zircaloy 4 were chosen for the vessels of the cold and hot neutron source and for the beam tube No. 6. The sheets and forgings of Zircaloy 4 were examinated in the temperature range between -256degC and 250degC. The thickness of the sheets are 3, 4, 5 and 10 mm, the maximum diameter of the forgings was 560 mm. This great forging diameters are not be treated in the ASTM rule B 351 for nuclear material, so a special approval with independent experts was necessary. The requirements for the material examinations were specified in a material specification and material test sheets which based on the ASTM rules B 351 and B 352 with additional restriction and additional requirements of the basic safety concept for nuclear power plants in Germany, which was taken into consideration in the nuclear licensing procedure. Charpy-V samples were carried out in the temperature range between -256degC and 150degC to get more information on the ductile behaviour of the Zircaloy 4. The results of the sheet examination confirm the requirements of the specifications, the results of the forging examination in the tangential testing direction are lower than specified and expected for the tensile strength. The axial and transverse values confirm the specification requirements. For the strength calculation of the pressure retaining wall a reduced material value for the forgings has to taken into consideration. The material behaviour of Zircaloy 4 under irradiation up to a fluence of {approx}1{center_dot}10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2} was investigated. The loss of ductility was determined. As an additional criteria the variation of the fracture toughness was studies. Fracture mechanic calculations of the material were carried out in the licensing procedure with the focus to fulfill the leak

  14. Analysis of the microstructural evolution of the damage by neutron irradiation in the pressure vessel of a nuclear power reactor BWR; Analisis de la evolucion microestructural del dano por irradiacion neutronica en la vasija de presion de un reactor nuclear de potencia BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moranchel y R, M.

    2012-07-01

    Nuclear reactor pressure vessel type BWR, installed in Mexico and in many other countries, are made of an alloy of low carbon steel. The American Society for Testing and Materials (Astm) classifies this alloy as A533-B, class 1. Both the vessel and other internal structures are continuously exposed to the neutron flux from the reactions of fission in nuclear fuel. A large number of neutrons reach the vessel and penetrate certain depth depending on their energy. Its penetration in the neutron collides with the nuclei of the atoms out of their positions in the crystal lattice of steel, producing vacancies, interstitial, segregations, among other defects, capable of affecting its mechanical properties. Analyze the micro-structural damage to the vessel due to neutron irradiation, is essential for reasons of integrity of this enclosure and safety of any nuclear power plant. The objective of this thesis work is theoretical and experimentally determine the microstructural damage of a type nuclear reactor vessel steel BWR, due to neutron radiation from the reactor core, using microscopic and spectroscopic techniques as well as Monte Carlo simulation. Microscopy Optical, Scanning Electron Microscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy, Energy Dispersion of X-rays Spectrometry and X-rays Diffractometry were the techniques used in this research. These techniques helped in the characterization of both the basis of design of pressure vessel steel and steel irradiated, after eight years of neutron irradiation on the vessel, allowing know the surface morphology and crystal structures of the previous steel and post-irradiation, analyze the change in the microstructure of the steel vessel, morphological damage to surface level in an irradiated sample, among which are cavities in the order of microns produced by Atomic displacements due to the impact of neutronic, above all in the first layers of thickness of the vessel, the effect of swelling, regions of greater damage and Atomic

  15. Fluid flow separation in a reactor pressure vessel during an ECC injection. Single phase flow and two phase flow (air-water) experimental results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thierry Bichet; Alain Martin [EDF - Research and Development Division - Fluid Mechanics and Heat Transfert 6, quai Watier - B.P. 49 - 78401 Chatou CEDEX 01 (France); Frederic Beaud [EDF/ Industry - Basic Design Department., 12-14, Avenue Dutrievoz 69628 Villeurbanne CEDEX (France)

    2005-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Within the framework of the nuclear power plant lifetime issue, the assessment of the French 900 MWe (3-loops) series reactor pressure vessel (RPV) integrity has been performed. A simplified analysis has shown that the most severe loading conditions are given by the small break loss of coolant accidents due to the pressurized injection of cold water (9 deg. C) into the cold leg and down comer of the RPV. During these transient scenarios, single or two-phase (uncovered cold leg) flows have been shown in the cold leg, depending on the crack size and RPV model (900 MWe or 1300 MWe). An experimental study has been carried out, on the one hand, to consolidate the numerical results obtained with CFD home code (Code-Saturne) which mainly showed the stratified flow in the cold leg and the fluid flow separation and its oscillations in the down comer during a single phase scenario. These physical phenomena are important for the thermal RPV loading assessment. On the other hand, the absence of experimental two-phase data necessitated to carry out an experimental study around the mixing area behavior (free surface, stratified flow) during an ECC injection with an uncovered cold leg. The new EDF R and D mock up, called HYBISCUS, is a facility which is made out of Plexiglas (atmosphere pressure) and represents a half scale CP0 geometry with one cold leg and part of the down comer. The mock up modularity allows us to insert representative ECC nozzles and a thermal shield. In reference to the reactor scenarios, the experimental operating conditions are derived from the conservation of the density effects (Froude number). For that, a heated salted water flow is used to represent the ECC injection whereas water represents the cold leg fluid. This mock up has been defined in order to represent single phase flow (cold leg and down comer full of water) or two-phase flow (uncovered cold leg) ECC scenarios. This paper reports experimental results

  16. Modelling of the dynamics of the vessel and circuits of recirculation of a BWR type nucleo electric as part of the SUN-RAH university simulator; Modelado de la dinamica de la vasija y circuitos de recirculacion de una nucleoelectrica tipo BWR como parte del simulador universitario SUN-RAH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez S, R.A. [DEPFI, Campus Morelos, en IMTA, Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)]. e-mail: rsanchez_15@yahoo.com.mx

    2003-07-01

    In the present project, the development of a model for the dynamics of the process of energy transport generated in the nuclear fuel until the main steam lines of a nucleo electric central with BWR type nuclear reactor, using mathematical models of reduced order is presented. These models present the main characteristics of the reactor vessel and of the recirculation system, defined by the main phenomena that intervene in those physical processes. Likewise, the objective of the general project of the one University student nucleo electric simulator with Boiling Water Reactor (SUN-RAH) for later on to establish the modeling equations for each part of the nuclear reactor as well as of the load pursuit system. Also, its were described the graphic interfaces implemented in an three layers architecture in which the different measuring variables are presented in the monitor. It fits signalize that the advantage presented by the University student nucleo electric simulator is the possibility to carry out changes in the magnitudes of those different variables that intervene in the physical processes made in the one reactor and in the recirculation system in execution time of the same one. Of same way, the creation of a graphic intuitive interface, friendly, and designed with the same technology with the one that the video games are programmed in the present time. Besides all the above mentioned, the pending goals inside of the project are exposed, as well as the developments in construction process or conceptualized to be included in future versions of the simulator. Finally its are thinking about possible scenarios of applications of SUN-RAH, as well as their reaches. (Author)

  17. Effect of high-temperature water and hydrogen on the fracture behavior of a low-alloy reactor pressure vessel steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roychowdhury, S., E-mail: sroy27@gmail.com [Paul Scherrer Institut, Nuclear Energy and Safety Research Department, Laboratory for Nuclear Materials, 5232 Villigen, PSI (Switzerland); Materials Processing & Corrosion Engineering Division, Mod-Lab, D-Block, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Seifert, H.-P.; Spätig, P.; Que, Z. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Nuclear Energy and Safety Research Department, Laboratory for Nuclear Materials, 5232 Villigen, PSI (Switzerland)

    2016-09-15

    Structural integrity of reactor pressure vessels (RPV) is critical for safety and lifetime. Possible degradation of fracture resistance of RPV steel due to exposure to coolant and hydrogen is a concern. In this study tensile and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics (EPFM) tests in air (hydrogen pre-charged) and EFPM tests in hydrogenated/oxygenated high-temperature water (HTW) was done, using a low-alloy RPV steel. 2–5 wppm hydrogen caused embrittlement in air tensile tests at room temperature (25 °C) and at 288 °C, effects being more significant at 25 °C and in simulated weld coarse grain heat affected zone material. Embrittlement at 288 °C is strain rate dependent and is due to localized plastic deformation. Hydrogen pre-charging/HTW exposure did not deteriorate the fracture resistance at 288 °C in base metal, for investigated loading rate range. Clear change in fracture morphology and deformation structures was observed, similar to that after air tests with hydrogen. - Highlights: • Hydrogen content, microstructure of LAS, and strain rate affects tensile properties at 288 °C. • Strength affects hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility to a greater extent than grain size. • Hydrogen in LAS leads to strain localization and restricts cross-slip at 288 °C. • Possible hydrogen pickup due to exposure to 288 °C water alters fracture surface appearance without affecting fracture toughness in bainitic base material. • Simulated weld heat affected zone microstructure shows unstable crack propagation in 288 °C water.

  18. Seismic attenuation system for a nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liszkai, Tamas; Cadell, Seth

    2018-01-30

    A system for attenuating seismic forces includes a reactor pressure vessel containing nuclear fuel and a containment vessel that houses the reactor pressure vessel. Both the reactor pressure vessel and the containment vessel include a bottom head. Additionally, the system includes a base support to contact a support surface on which the containment vessel is positioned in a substantially vertical orientation. An attenuation device is located between the bottom head of the reactor pressure vessel and the bottom head of the containment vessel. Seismic forces that travel from the base support to the reactor pressure vessel via the containment vessel are attenuated by the attenuation device in a direction that is substantially lateral to the vertical orientation of the containment vessel.

  19. Electrically Heated Testing of the Kilowatt Reactor Using Stirling Technology (KRUSTY) Experiment Using a Depleted Uranium Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Maxwell H.; Gibson, Marc A.; Sanzi, James

    2017-01-01

    The Kilopower project aims to develop and demonstrate scalable fission-based power technology for systems capable of delivering 110 kW of electric power with a specific power ranging from 2.5 - 6.5 Wkg. This technology could enable high power science missions or could be used to provide surface power for manned missions to the Moon or Mars. NASA has partnered with the Department of Energys National Nuclear Security Administration, Los Alamos National Labs, and Y-12 National Security Complex to develop and test a prototypic reactor and power system using existing facilities and infrastructure. This technology demonstration, referred to as the Kilowatt Reactor Using Stirling TechnologY (KRUSTY), will undergo nuclear ground testing in the summer of 2017 at the Nevada Test Site. The 1 kWe variation of the Kilopower system was chosen for the KRUSTY demonstration. The concept for the 1 kWe flight system consist of a 4 kWt highly enriched Uranium-Molybdenum reactor operating at 800 degrees Celsius coupled to sodium heat pipes. The heat pipes deliver heat to the hot ends of eight 125 W Stirling convertors producing a net electrical output of 1 kW. Waste heat is rejected using titanium-water heat pipes coupled to carbon composite radiator panels. The KRUSTY test, based on this design, uses a prototypic highly enriched uranium-molybdenum core coupled to prototypic sodium heat pipes. The heat pipes transfer heat to two Advanced Stirling Convertors (ASC-E2s) and six thermal simulators, which simulate the thermal draw of full scale power conversion units. Thermal simulators and Stirling engines are gas cooled. The most recent project milestone was the completion of non-nuclear system level testing using an electrically heated depleted uranium (non-fissioning) reactor core simulator. System level testing at the Glenn Research Center (GRC) has validated performance predictions and has demonstrated system level operation and control in a test configuration that replicates the one

  20. Electrical stimulation on biodegradation of phenol and responses of microbial communities in conductive carriers supported biofilms of the bioelectrochemical reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ailijiang, Nuerla; Chang, Jiali; Liang, Peng; Li, Peng; Wu, Qing; Zhang, Xiaoyuan; Huang, Xia

    2016-02-01

    Conductive carbon felts (Cf) were used as biofilm carriers in bioelectrochemical reactors to enhance the electrical stimulation on treatment of phenol-containing synthetic wastewater. In batch test, phenol biodegradation was accelerated under an optimum direct current (DC), which was 2mA for Cf biofilm carriers, lower than that for non-conductive white foam carriers. The stimulation effect was consistent with Adenosine Triphosphate contents in biofilms. The long-term operation further demonstrated that a high and stable phenol removal efficiency could be achieved with applied DC of 2mA, and intermittent DC application was better than continuous one, with phenol removal efficiency of over 97%. Although the quantities of whole microbial communities kept at a high level under all conditions, special microorganisms related with genera of Zoogloea and Desulfovibrio were distinctively enriched under intermittent applied DC pattern. This study shows that the electrical stimulation is potentially effective for biofilm reactors treating phenol-containing wastewater. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Estimate of radiation-induced steel embrittlement in the BWR core shroud and vessel wall from reactor-grade MOX/UOX fuel for the nuclear power plant at Laguna Verde, Veracruz, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, Lisa Rene

    The government of Mexico has expressed interest to utilize the Laguna Verde boiling water reactor (BWR) nuclear power plant for the disposition of reprocessed spent uranium oxide (UOX) fuel in the form of reactor-grade mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel. MOX fuel would replace spent UOX fuel as a fraction in the core from 18--30% depending on the fuel loading cycle. MOX fuel is expected to increase the neutron fluence, flux, fuel centerline temperature, reactor core pressure, and yield higher energy neutrons. There is concern that a core with a fraction of MOX fuel (i.e., increased 239Pu wt%) would increase the radiation-induced steel embrittlement within the core shroud and vessel wall as compared to only conventional, enriched UOX fuel in the core. The evaluation of radiation-induced steel embrittlement within the core shroud and vessel wall is a concern because of the potentially adverse affect to plant and public safety, environment, and operating life of the reactor. This dissertation provides computational results of the neutron fluence, flux, energy spectrum, and radiation damage displacements per atom per second (dpa-s-1) in steel within the core shroud and vessel wall of the Laguna Verde Unit 1 BWR. The results were computed using the nuclear data processing code NJOY99 and the continuous energy Monte Carlo Neutral Particle transport code MCNP4B. The MCNP4B model of the reactor core was for maximum core loading fractions of ⅓ MOX and ⅔ UOX reactor-grade fuel in an equilibrium core. The primary conclusion of this dissertation was that the addition of the maximum fraction of ⅓ MOX fuel to the LV1 BWR core did significantly accelerate the radiation-induced steel embrittlement such that without mitigation of steel embrittlement by periodic thermal annealing or reduction in operating parameters such as, neutron fluence, core temperature and pressure, it posed a potentially adverse affect to the plant and public safety, environment, and operating life of the reactor.

  2. Electric-stepping-motor tests for a control-drum actuator of a nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieffer, A. W.

    1972-01-01

    Experimental tests were conducted on two stepping motors for application as reactor control-drum actuators. Various control-drum loads with frictional resistances ranging from approximately zero to 40 N-m and inertias ranging from zero to 0.424 kg-sq m were tested.

  3. Pressure vessel design manual

    CERN Document Server

    Moss, Dennis R

    2013-01-01

    Pressure vessels are closed containers designed to hold gases or liquids at a pressure substantially different from the ambient pressure. They have a variety of applications in industry, including in oil refineries, nuclear reactors, vehicle airbrake reservoirs, and more. The pressure differential with such vessels is dangerous, and due to the risk of accident and fatality around their use, the design, manufacture, operation and inspection of pressure vessels is regulated by engineering authorities and guided by legal codes and standards. Pressure Vessel Design Manual is a solutions-focused guide to the many problems and technical challenges involved in the design of pressure vessels to match stringent standards and codes. It brings together otherwise scattered information and explanations into one easy-to-use resource to minimize research and take readers from problem to solution in the most direct manner possible. * Covers almost all problems that a working pressure vessel designer can expect to face, with ...

  4. Performance and microbial community dynamics of electricity-assisted sequencing batch reactor (SBR) for treatment of saline petrochemical wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiaxin; Shi, Shengnan; Ji, Xiangyu; Jiang, Bei; Xue, Lanlan; Li, Meidi; Tan, Liang

    2017-07-01

    High-salinity wastewater is often difficult to treat by common biological technologies due to salinity stress on the bacterial community. Electricity-assisted anaerobic technologies have significantly enhanced the treatment performance by alleviating the impact of salinity stress on the bacterial community, but electricity-assisted aerobic technologies have less been reported. Herein, a novel bio-electrochemistry system has been designed and operated in which a pair of stainless iron mesh-graphite plate electrodes were installed into a sequencing batch reactor (SBR, designated as S1) to strengthen the performance of saline petrochemical wastewater under aerobic conditions. The removal efficiency of phenol and chemical oxygen demand (COD) in S1 were 94.1 and 91.2%, respectively, on day 45, which was clearly higher than the removal efficiency of a single SBR (S2) and an electrochemical reactor (S3), indicating that a coupling effect existed between the electrochemical process and biodegradation. A certain amount of salinity (≤8000 mg/L) could enhance the treatment performance in S1 but weaken that in S2. Illumina sequencing revealed that microbial communities in S1 on days 45 and 91 were richer and more diverse than in S2, which suggests that electrical stimulation could enhance the diversity and richness of the microbial community, and reduce the negative effect of salinity on the microorganisms and enrich some salt-adapted microorganisms, thus improve the ability of S1 to respond to salinity stress. This novel bio-electrochemistry system was shown to be an alternative technology for the high saline petrochemical wastewater.

  5. NRC review of Electric Power Research Institute's Advanced Light Reactor Utility Requirements Document - Program summary, Project No. 669

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-08-01

    The staff of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has prepared Volume 1 of a safety evaluation report (SER), NRC Review of Electric Power Research Institute's Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document -- Program Summary,'' to document the results of its review of the Electric Power Research Institute's Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document.'' This SER provides a discussion of the overall purpose and scope of the Requirements Document, the background of the staff's review, the review approach used by the staff, and a summary of the policy and technical issues raised by the staff during its review.

  6. Report on emergency electrical power supply systems for nuclear fuel cycle and reactor facilities security systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-01-01

    The report includes information that will be useful to those responsible for the planning, design and implementation of emergency electric power systems for physical security and special nuclear materials accountability systems. Basic considerations for establishing the system requirements for emergency electric power for security and accountability operations are presented. Methods of supplying emergency power that are available at present and methods predicted to be available in the future are discussed. The characteristics of capacity, cost, safety, reliability and environmental and physical facility considerations of emergency electric power techniques are presented. The report includes basic considerations for the development of a system concept and the preparation of a detailed system design.

  7. Electrochemical Recovery of Gold from Waste Electric and Electronic Equipment Using Circulating Particulate Bed Reactor (CPBE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravinder, T.; Ali, U. F. M.; Ridwan, F. M.; Ibrahim, N.; Azmi, N. H.

    2017-06-01

    The utilization of electrochemical process recovery involving low reactant concentrations of metal requires electrodes with high mass transport rates and specific surface areas. This is essential to increase cross-sectional current densities whilst optimizing the capital and operating costs. Experimental results demonstrated that Circulating Particulate Bed Reactor (CPBE) is suitable for the recovery of low concentrations of gold from aqueous chloride solution containing {{AuCl}}4- and {{AuCl}}2- of less than 0.5 mol m-3(deposits were achieved with CPBE for Au deposition under mass transport control at 0.20 V (SCE).

  8. Gaseous Hydrocarbon Synfuels from H2/CO2 based on Renewable Electricity - Kinetics, Selectivity and Fundamentals of Fixed-Bed Reactor Design for Flexible Operation

    OpenAIRE

    Iglesias Gonzalez, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Conversion of electrical energy into chemical energy carriers has the potential to replace fossil fuels and can be attractive as long-term storage. The present work considers different aspects of the electricity-to-fuel process chain using a combination of experimental work and mathematical modelling. This work discusses in detail the production of gaseous hydrocarbons from H2 and CO2 via Fischer-Tropsch synthesis and the potential to operate fixed-bed reactors under flexible conditions.

  9. Vessel Operating Units (Vessels)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains data for vessels that are greater than five net tons and have a current US Coast Guard documentation number. Beginning in1979, the NMFS...

  10. Feasibility Study of Supercritical Light Water Cooled Reactors for Electric Power Production, Progress Report for Work Through September 2003, 2nd Annual/8th Quarterly Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philip E. MacDonald

    2003-09-01

    The supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR) is one of the six reactor technologies selected for research and development under the Generation-IV program. SCWRs are promising advanced nuclear systems because of their high thermal efficiency (i.e., about 45% vs. about 33% efficiency for current Light Water Reactors, LWRs) and considerable plant simplification. SCWRs are basically LWRs operating at higher pressure and temperatures with a direct once-through cycle. Operation above the critical pressure eliminates coolant boiling, so the coolant remains single-phase throughout the system. Thus the need for recirculation and jet pumps, a pressurizer, steam generators, steam separators and dryers is eliminated. The main mission of the SCWR is generation of low-cost electricity. It is built upon two proven technologies, LWRs, which are the most commonly deployed power generating reactors in the world, and supercritical fossil-fired boilers, a large number of which is also in use around the world.

  11. Preliminary Study on the High Efficiency Supercritical Pressure Water-Cooled Reactor for Electricity Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Yoon Yeong; Park, Jong Kyun; Cho, Bong Hyun and others

    2006-01-15

    This research has been performed to introduce a concept of supercritical pressure water cooled reactor(SCWR) in Korea The area of research includes core conceptual design, evaluation of candidate fuel, fluid systems conceptual design with mechanical consideration, preparation of safety analysis code, and construction of supercritical pressure heat transfer test facility, SPHINX, and preliminary test. As a result of the research, a set of tools for the reactor core design has been developed and the conceptual core design with solid moderator was proposed. The direct thermodynamic cycle has been studied to find a optimum design. The safety analysis code has also been adapted to supercritical pressure condition. A supercritical pressure CO2 heat transfer test facility has been constructed and preliminary test proved the facility works as expected. The result of this project will be good basis for the participation in the international collaboration under GIF GEN-IV program and next 5-year mid and long term nuclear research program of MOST. The heat transfer test loop, SPHINX, completed as a result of this project may be used for the power cycle study as well as further heat transfer study for the various geometries.

  12. Neutron activation analysis and activity in the vessel steel of a BWR reactor for their study without radiological risks in microscopy and spectrometry; Analisis de activacion neutronica y actividad en el acero de la vasija de un reactor nuclear tipo BWR para su estudio sin riesgos radiologicos en microscopia y espectrometria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moranchel, M.; Garcia B, A. [IPN, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, Departamento de Fisica, Unidad Profesional Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Zacatenco, 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Longoria G, L. C., E-mail: mmoranchel@ipn.mx [IAEA, Department of Technical Cooperation, Division for Latin America, Room B1109 Wagramerstrasse 5, PO Box 100, A-1400, Vienna (Austria)

    2012-07-01

    The vessel material of nuclear reactors is subject to irradiation damage induced by the bombardment of neutrons coming from the reactor core. Neutrons are classified as fast and thermal, which produce different effects. Fast neutrons cause damage to the material by dislocation or displacement of atoms in the crystal structure, while the effect of thermal neutrons is a nuclear transmutation that can significantly change the properties of the material. The type and intensity of damage is based on the characteristics of the material, the flow of neutrons and the modes of neutrons interaction with the atomic structures of the material, among others. This work, alluding to nuclear transmutation, makes an analysis of neutron activation of all isotopes in a steel boiling water nuclear reactor (BWR) vessel. An analytical expression is obtained in order to model activity of steel, on the basis of the weight percentage of its atomic components. Its activity is theoretically estimated in a witness sample of the same material as that of the vessel, placed within the nuclear reactor since the beginning of its commercial operation in April 1995, up to August 2010. It was theoretically determined that the witness sample, with a 0.56 g mass (1 x 1 x 0.07 cm{sup 3} dimensions or equivalent) does not present a radiological risks during the stage of preparation, observation and analysis of it in electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction equipment s. The theoretical results were checked experimentally by measuring the activity of the sample by means of gamma spectrometry, measurement of the exposure levels around the sample, as well as the induced level to whole body and limbs, using thermo-luminescent dosimetry (TLD). As a result of the theoretical analysis, new chemical elements are predicted, as a result of the activation phenomena and radioactive decay, whose presence can be a fundamental factor of change in the properties of the vessel. This work is a preamble to the

  13. Significance assessment of small-medium sized reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanno, Minoru [Japan Atomic Power Co., Research and Development Dept., Tokyo (Japan)

    2002-12-01

    Preliminary assessment for deployment of small-medium sized reactor (S and M reactor) as a future option has been conducted at the JAPCO (Japan Atomic Power Company) under the cooperation with the CRIERI (Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry). Significance of the S and M reactor introduction is listed as follows; lower investment cost, possible siting near demand side, enlarged freedom of siting, shorter transmission line, good compatibility with slow increase of demand and plain explanation of safety using simpler system such as integral type vessel without piping, natural convection core cooling and passive safety system. The deployment of simpler plant system, modular shop fabrication, ship-shell structured building and longer operation period can assure economics comparable with that of a large sized reactor, coping with scale-demerit. Also the S and M reactor is preferable in size for the nuclear heat utilization such as hydrogen production. (T. Tanaka)

  14. Combustion synthesis continuous flow reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maupin, G.D.; Chick, L.A.; Kurosky, R.P.

    1998-01-06

    The present invention is a reactor for combustion synthesis of inorganic powders. The reactor includes a reaction vessel having a length and a first end and a second end. The reaction vessel further has a solution inlet and a carrier gas inlet. The reactor further has a heater for heating both the solution and the carrier gas. In a preferred embodiment, the reaction vessel is heated and the solution is in contact with the heated reaction vessel. It is further preferred that the reaction vessel be cylindrical and that the carrier gas is introduced tangentially into the reaction vessel so that the solution flows helically along the interior wall of the reaction vessel. As the solution evaporates and combustion produces inorganic material powder, the carrier gas entrains the powder and carries it out of the reactor. 10 figs.

  15. Combustion synthesis continuous flow reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maupin, Gary D. (Richland, WA); Chick, Lawrence A. (West Richland, WA); Kurosky, Randal P. (Maple Valley, WA)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is a reactor for combustion synthesis of inorganic powders. The reactor includes a reaction vessel having a length and a first end and a second end. The reaction vessel further has a solution inlet and a carrier gas inlet. The reactor further has a heater for heating both the solution and the carrier gas. In a preferred embodiment, the reaction vessel is heated and the solution is in contact with the heated reaction vessel. It is further preferred that the reaction vessel be cylindrical and that the carrier gas is introduced tangentially into the reaction vessel so that the solution flows helically along the interior wall of the reaction vessel. As the solution evaporates and combustion produces inorganic material powder, the carrier gas entrains the powder and carries it out of the reactor.

  16. Fuel handling apparatus for a nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawke, Basil C.

    1987-01-01

    Fuel handling apparatus for transporting fuel elements into and out of a nuclear reactor and transporting them within the reactor vessel extends through a penetration in the side of the reactor vessel. A lateral transport device carries the fuel elements laterally within the vessel and through the opening in the side of the vessel, and a reversible lifting device raises and lowers the fuel elements. In the preferred embodiment, the lifting device is supported by a pair of pivot arms.

  17. Design concept of conducting shell and in-vessel components suitable for plasma vertical stability and remote maintenance scheme in DEMO reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Utoh, Hiroyasu, E-mail: uto.hiroyasu@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Obuchi, Rokkasho-mura, Aomori-ken 039-3212 (Japan); International Fusion Energy Research Centre, 2-166, Obuchi, Rokkasho, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Takase, Haruhiko [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Obuchi, Rokkasho-mura, Aomori-ken 039-3212 (Japan); International Fusion Energy Research Centre, 2-166, Obuchi, Rokkasho, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Sakamoto, Yoshiteru; Tobita, Kenji [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Obuchi, Rokkasho-mura, Aomori-ken 039-3212 (Japan); Mori, Kazuo; Kudo, Tatsuya [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Obuchi, Rokkasho-mura, Aomori-ken 039-3212 (Japan); International Fusion Energy Research Centre, 2-166, Obuchi, Rokkasho, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Someya, Youji; Asakura, Nobuyuki; Hoshino, Kazuo; Nakamura, Makoto; Tokunaga, Shinsuke [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Obuchi, Rokkasho-mura, Aomori-ken 039-3212 (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • Conceptual design of in-vessel component including conducting shell has been investigated. • The conducting shell design for plasma vertical stability was clarified from the plasma vertical stability analysis. • The calculation results showed that the double-loop shell has the most effect on plasma vertical stability. - Abstract: In order to realize a feasible DEMO, we designed an in-vessel component including the conducting shell. The project is affiliated with the broader approach DEMO design activities and is conceptualized from a plasma vertical stability and engineering viewpoint. The dependence of the plasma vertical stability on the conducing shell parameters and the electromagnetic force at plasma disruption were investigated in numerical simulations (programmed in the 3D eddy current analysis code and a plasma position control code). The simulations assumed the actual shape and position of the vacuum vessel and in-vessel components. The plasma vertical stability was most effectively maintained by the double-loop shell.

  18. Hazard of underclad cracks and aging in pressurized water reactor vessels; Nocivite des defauts sous revetement et vieillissement dans les cuves de reacteur a eau sous pression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piques, R.; Saintier, N. [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines, 75 - Paris (France). Centre des Materiaux

    2001-04-01

    The following topics are dealt with: hazards due to underclad cracks, carbon rich impurity segregation and embrittlement, corrosion protection by austenitic vessel cladding, aging influence, quenching and thermal treatments, Beremin-type statistical model of ruptures, rupture probability.

  19. Calculation of the neutron flux and fluence in the covering of the nucleus and the vessel of a BWR; Calculo del flujo neutronico y fluencia en la envolvente del nucleo y la vasija de un reactor nuclear BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez C, E.; Del Valle G, E. [IPN, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, U. P. Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Col. Lindavista, 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Longoria G, L. C., E-mail: evalle@esfm.ipn.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2011-11-15

    One of the main objectives related with the safety in any nuclear power plant, including the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde, is to guarantee the structural integrity of the pressure vessel of the reactor. To identify and quantifying the damage caused be neutron irradiation in the vessel of any nuclear reactor, is necessary to know as much the neutron flux as the fluence that it has been receiving during their time of operation life, since the observables damages by means of tests mechanics are products of micro-structural effects, induced by neutron irradiation, therefore, is important the study and prediction of the neutron flux to have a better knowledge of the damage that are receiving these materials. In our calculation the code DORT was used, which solves the transport equation in discreet coordinates and in two dimensions (x-y, r-{theta} and r-z), in accord to the regulator guide, it requires to make and approach of the neutron flux in three dimensions by means of the Synthesis Method. Whit this method is possible to achieve a representation of the flux in 3D combining or synthesizing the calculated fluxes by DORT code in r-{theta}, r-z and r. In this work the application of the Synthesis Method is presented, according to the Regulator Guide 1.190, to determine the fluxes 3D in the interns of a BWR using three different space meshes. (Author)

  20. Evaluation on the Feasibility of Using Ultrasonic Testing of Reactor Pressure Vessel Welds for Assessing Flaw Density/Distribution per 10 CFR 50.61a, Alternate Fracture Toughness Requirements for Protection Against Pressurized Thermal Shock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, Edmund J.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2014-06-10

    This technical letter report provides the status of an assessment undertaken by PNNL at the request of the NRC to verify the capability of periodic ASME-required volumetric examinations of reactor vessels to characterize the density and distribution of flaws of interest for applying §50.61a on a plant-by-plant basis. The PTS rule, described in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Section 50.61 (§50.61), "Fracture Toughness Requirements for Protection against Pressurized Thermal Shock Events," establishes screening criteria to ensure that the potential for a reactor vessel to fail due to a PTS event is deemed to be acceptably low. Recently, the NRC completed a research program that concluded that the risk of through-wall cracking due to a PTS event is much lower than previously estimated. The NRC subsequently developed and promulgated an alternate PTS rule, §50.61a, that can be implemented by PWR licensees. The §50.61a rule differs from §50.61 in that it requires licensees who choose to follow this alternate method to analyze the results from periodic volumetric examinations required by the ASME Code, Section XI, Rules for Inservice Inspection (ISI) of Nuclear Power Plants.

  1. The vessel fluence; Fluence cuve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    This book presents the proceedings of the technical meeting on the reactors vessels fluence. They are grouped in eight sessions: the industrial context and the stakes of the vessels control; the organization and the methodology for the fluence computation; the concerned physical properties; the reference computation methods; the fluence monitoring in an industrial context; vessels monitoring under irradiation; others methods in the world; the research and development programs. (A.L.B.)

  2. Comparison of the PLTEMP code flow instability predictions with measurements made with electrically heated channels for the advanced test reactor.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldman, E. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2011-06-09

    When the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) was designed in the 1960s the potential for fuel element burnout by a phenomenon referred to at that time as 'autocatalytic vapor binding' was of serious concern. This type of burnout was observed to occur at power levels considerably lower than those that were known to cause critical heat flux. The conversion of the MURR from HEU fuel to LEU fuel will probably require significant design changes, such as changes in coolant channel thicknesses, that could affect the thermal-hydraulic behavior of the reactor core. Therefore, the redesign of the MURR to accommodate an LEU core must address the same issues of fuel element burnout that were of concern in the 1960s. The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) was designed at about the same time as the MURR and had similar concerns with regard to fuel element burnout. These concerns were addressed in the ATR by two groups of thermal-hydraulic tests that employed electrically heated simulated fuel channels. The Croft (1964), Reference 1, tests were performed at ANL. The Waters (1966), Reference 2, tests were performed at Hanford Laboratories in Richland Washington. Since fuel element surface temperatures rise rapidly as burnout conditions are approached, channel surface temperatures were carefully monitored in these experiments. For self-protection, the experimental facilities were designed to cut off the electric power when rapidly increasing surface temperatures were detected. In both the ATR reactor and in the tests with electrically heated channels, the heated length of the fuel plate was 48 inches, which is about twice that of the MURR. Whittle and Forgan (1967) independently conducted tests with electrically heated rectangular channels that were similar to the tests by Croft and by Walters. In the Whittle and Forgan tests the heated length of the channel varied among the tests and was between 16 and 24 inches. Both Waters and Whittle and Forgan show that the cause

  3. Stress analysis in a non axisymmetric loaded reactor pressure vessel; Verificacao de tensoes em um vaso de pressao nuclear com carregamentos nao-axissimetricos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albuquerque, Levi Barcelos; Assis, Gracia Menezes V. de [Coordenadoria para Projetos Especiais (COPESP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Miranda, Carlos Alexandre J.; Cruz, Julio Ricardo B.; Mattar Neto, Miguel [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    1995-12-31

    In this work we intend to present the stress analysis of a PWR vessel under postulated concentrated loads. The vessel was modeled with Axisymmetric solid 4 nodes harmonic finite elements with the use of the ANSYS program, version 5.0. The bolts connecting the vessel flanges were modeled with beam elements. Some considerations were made to model the contact between the flanges. The perforated part of the vessel tori spherical head was modeled (with reduced properties due to its holes) to introduce its stiffness and loads but was not within the scope of this work. The loading consists of some usual ones, as pressure, dead weight, bolts preload, seismic load and some postulated ones as concentrated loads, over the vessel, modeled by Fourier Series. The results in the axisymmetric model are taken in terms of linearized stresses, obtained in some circumferential positions and for each position, in some sections along the vessel. Using the ASME Code (Section III, Division 1, Sub-section NB) the stresses are within the allowable limits. In order to draw some conclusions about stress linearization, the membrane plus bending stresses (Pl + Pb) are obtained and compared in some sections, using three different methods. (author) 4 refs., 15 figs., 7 tabs.

  4. Propellant actuated nuclear reactor steam depressurization valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrke, Alan C.; Knepp, John B.; Skoda, George I.

    1992-01-01

    A nuclear fission reactor combined with a propellant actuated depressurization and/or water injection valve is disclosed. The depressurization valve releases pressure from a water cooled, steam producing nuclear reactor when required to insure the safety of the reactor. Depressurization of the reactor pressure vessel enables gravity feeding of supplementary coolant water through the water injection valve to the reactor pressure vessel to prevent damage to the fuel core.

  5. Heat dissipating nuclear reactor with metal liner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluekler, E.L.; Hunsbedt, A.; Lazarus, J.D.

    1985-11-21

    A nuclear reactor containment including a reactor vessel disposed within a cavity with capability for complete inherent decay heat removal in the earth and surrounded by a cast steel containment member which surrounds the vessel is described in this disclosure. The member has a thick basemat in contact with metal pilings. The basemat rests on a bed of porous particulate material, into which water is fed to produce steam which is vented to the atmosphere. There is a gap between the reactor vessel and the steel containment member. The containment member holds any sodium or core debris escaping from the reactor vessel if the core melts and breaches the vessel.

  6. The outlook for application of powerful nuclear thermionic reactor - powered space electric jet propulsion engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semyonov, Y.P.; Bakanov, Y.A.; Synyavsky, V.V.; Yuditsky, V.D. [Rocket-Space Corp. `Energia`, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    This paper summarizes main study results for application of powerful space electric jet propulsion unit (EJPUs) which is powered by Nuclear Thermionic Power Unit (NTPU). They are combined in Nuclear Power/Propulsion Unit (NPPU) which serves as means of spacecraft equipment power supply and spacecraft movement. Problems the paper deals with are the following: information satellites delivery and their on-orbit power supply during 10-15 years, removal of especially hazardous nuclear wastes, mining of asteroid resources and others. Evaluations on power/time/mass relationship for this type of mission are given. EJPU parameters are compatible with Russian existent or being under development launch vehicle. (author)

  7. Reactor Materials Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Walle, E

    2001-04-01

    The activities of the Reactor Materials Research Department of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN in 2000 are summarised. The programmes within the department are focussed on studies concerning (1) fusion, in particular mechanical testing; (2) Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC); (3) nuclear fuel; and (4) Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel (RPVS)

  8. The ARCHER project (Advanced High-Temperature Reactors for Cogeneration of Heat and Electricity R&D)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knol, S., E-mail: knol@nrg.eu [Nuclear Research and consultancy Group (NRG), PO Box 25, NL-1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Fütterer, M.A. [Joint Research Centre, Institute for Energy, Petten (Netherlands); Roelofs, F. [Nuclear Research and consultancy Group (NRG), PO Box 25, NL-1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Kohtz, N. [TÜV Rheinland, Köln (Germany); Laurie, M. [Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium elements, Karlsruhe (Germany); Buckthorpe, D. [UMAN, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Scheuermann, W. [IKE, Stuttgart University, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2016-09-15

    The European HTR R&D project ARCHER (Advanced High-Temperature Reactors for Cogeneration of Heat and Electricity R&D) builds on a solid HTR technology foundation in Europe, established through former national UK and German HTR programs and in European framework programs. ARCHER runs from 2011 to 2015 and targets selected HTR R&D subjects that would specifically support demonstration, with a focus on experimental effort. In line with the R&D and deployment strategy of the European Sustainable Nuclear Energy Technology Platform (SNETP) ARCHER contributes to maintaining, strengthening and expanding the HTR knowledge base in Europe to lay the foundations for demonstration of nuclear cogeneration with HTR systems. The project consortium encompasses conventional and nuclear industry, utilities, Technical Support Organizations, R&D organizations and academia. ARCHER shares results with international partners in the Generation IV International Forum and collaborates directly with related projects in the US, China, Japan, the Republic of Korea and South Africa. The ARCHER project has finished, and the paper comprises an overview of the achievements of the project.

  9. Quantification of the ex-vessel severe accident risks for the Swedish boiling water reactors. A scoping study performed for the APRI project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okkonen, T.; Dinh, T.N.; Bui, V.A.; Sehgal, B.R. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Energy Systems Technology

    1995-07-01

    Results of a scoping study to quantify the ex-vessel severe accident risks for the Swedish BWRs are reported. The study considers that a pool of water is established in the containment prior to vessel failure, as prescribed by the accident management scheme for the newer Swedish BWRs. The integrated methodology developed and employed combines probabilistic and deterministic treatment of the various melt-structure-water interaction processes occurring in sequence. The potential steam explosion, and the melt attack on the containment basemat, are treated with enveloping analyses. Uncertain parameters in the models and the initial conditions are treated with Monte Carlo simulations. Independent models are developed for melt coolability and possible attack on the concrete basemat. It is found that, with current models, the melt discharge scenarios, in which a large amount of accumulated melt may be released from the vessel, could subject the containment to large steam explosion loads. However, the uncertainties are so large that no definite conclusion can be drawn. The assessment of ex-vessel core debris coolability is disturbed by similar phenomenological uncertainties. Presently, coolability of the core debris can not be demonstrated. 133 refs.

  10. Simplified 3D model of a PWR reactor vessel using fluid dynamics code ANSYS CFX computational; Modelo simplificado 3D de la vasija de un reactor PWR mediante el codigo de dinamica de fluidos computacional ANSYS CFX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, M.; Miro, R.; Barrachina, T.; Verdu, G.

    2011-07-01

    This paper presents the results from the calculation of the steady state simulation with model of CFD (computational fluid dynamic) operating under conditions of operation at full power (Hot Full Power). Development and the CFD model results show the usefulness of these codes for calculating 3D of the variable thermohydraulics of these reactors.

  11. High gamma-rays irradiation tests of critical components for ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) in-vessel remote handling system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obara, Kenjiro; Kakudate, Satoshi; Oka, Kiyoshi [Department of Fusion Engineering Research, Naka Fusion Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Naka, Ibaraki (Japan)] [and others

    1999-02-01

    In ITER, the in-vessel remote handling is inevitably required to assemble and maintain the activated in-vessel components due to deuterium and tritium operation. Since the in-vessel remote handling system has to be operated under the intense of gamma ray irradiation, the components of the remote handling system are required to have radiation hardness so as to allow maintenance operation for a sufficient length of time under the ITER in-vessel environments. For this, the Japan, European and Russian Home Teams have extensively conducted gamma ray irradiation tests and quality improvements including optimization of material composition through ITER R and D program in order to develop radiation hard components which satisfy the doses from 10 MGy to 100 MGy at a dose rate of 1 x 10{sup 6} R/h (ITER R and D Task: T252). This report describes the latest status of radiation hard component development which has been conducted by the Japan Home Team in the ITER R and D program. The number of remote handling components tested is about seventy and these are categorized into robotics (Subtask 1), viewing system (Subtask 2) and common components (Subtask 3). The irradiation tests, including commercial base products for screening, modified products and newly developed products to improve the radiation hardness, were carried out using the gamma ray irradiation cells in Takasaki Establishment, JAERI. As a result, the development of the radiation hard components which can be tolerable for high temperature and gamma radiation has been well progressed, and many components, such as AC servo motor with ceramics insulated wire, optical periscope and CCD camera, have been newly developed. (author)

  12. Gas-cooled fast breeder reactor. Quarterly progress report, February 1-April 30, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-05-01

    Information is presented concerning the reactor vessel; reactivity control mechanisms and instrumentation; reactor internals; primary coolant circuits;core auxiliary cooling system; reactor core; systems engineering; and reactor safety and reliability;

  13. A novel condensation reactor for efficient CO2 to methanol conversion for storage of renewable electric energy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, Martin Johan; Brilman, Derk Willem Frederik

    2015-01-01

    A novel reactor design for the conversion of CO2 and H2 to methanol is developed. The conversion limitations because of thermodynamic equilibrium are bypassed via in situ condensation of a water/methanol mixture. Two temperatures zones inside the reactor ensure optimal catalyst activity (high

  14. High-Voltage Thermionic Reactor Using Double-Sheath Fuel Elements, 3rd Interational Electrical Power Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schock, Alfred

    1972-06-01

    A novel design concept for a "flashlight-type" in-core thermionic reactor is described. This concept, called the "double-sheath" design in contrast to the previously considered "wet-sheath" and "dry-sheath" concepts, permits the build-up of high reactor output voltages, without the danger of cesium breakdown and shorts-to-ground. In addition to a description of the design and its functional components, a brief discussion of suggested fuel element fabrication and reactor assembly techniques is presented. The proposed design offers the potential of high reliability because only insulators at very low potentials (e.g.<3 volts) are in contact with cesium vapor; because there are no ceramic or cermet seals within the reactor (all are outside, beyond the reflectors); and because all vacuum-tight joints in the reactor are between ductile niobium components.

  15. HOMOGENEOUS NUCLEAR POWER REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, L.D.P.

    1959-09-01

    A homogeneous nuclear power reactor utilizing forced circulation of the liquid fuel is described. The reactor does not require fuel handling outside of the reactor vessel during any normal operation including complete shutdown to room temperature, the reactor being selfregulating under extreme operating conditions and controlled by the thermal expansion of the liquid fuel. The liquid fuel utilized is a uranium, phosphoric acid, and water solution which requires no gus exhaust system or independent gas recombining system, thereby eliminating the handling of radioiytic gas.

  16. Reference design for the standard mirror hybrid reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, D.J.; Fink, J.H.; Galloway, T.R.; Kastenberg, W.E.; Lee, J.D.; Devoto, R.S.; Neef, W.S. Jr.; Schultz, K.R.; Culver, D.W.; Rao, S.B.; Rao, S.R.

    1978-05-22

    This report describes the results of a two-year study by Lawrence Livermore Laboratory and General Atomic Co. to develop a conceptual design for the standard (minimum-B) mirror hybrid reactor. The reactor parameters have been chosen to minimize the cost of producing nuclear fuel (/sup 239/Pu) for consumption in fission power reactors (light water reactors). The deuterium-tritium plasma produces approximately 400 MW of fusion power with a plasma Q of 0.64. The fast-fission blanket, which is fueled with depleted uranium and lithium, generates sufficient tritium to run the reactor, has a blanket energy multiplication of M = 10.4, and has a net fissile breeding ratio of Pu/n = 1.51. The reactor has a net electrical output of 600 MWe, a fissile production of 2000 kg of plutonium per year (at a capacity factor of 0.74), and a net plant efficiency of 0.18. The plasma-containment field is generated by a Yin-Yang magnet using NbTi superconductor, and the neutral beam system uses positive-ion acceleration with beam direct conversion. The spherical blanket is based on gas-cooled fast reactor technology. The fusion components, blanket, and primary heat-transfer loop components are all contained within a prestressed-concrete reactor vessel, which provides magnet restraint and supports the primary heat-transfer loop and the blanket.

  17. Interaction of atomized colloid with an ac electric field in a dielectric barrier discharge reactor used for deposition of nanocomposite coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Profili, Jacopo; Dap, Simon; Levasseur, Olivier; Naude, Nicolas; Belinger, Antoine; Stafford, Luc; Gherardi, Nicolas

    2017-02-01

    Nanocomposite thin films can be obtained by polymerization of a colloidal solution in a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) at atmospheric pressure. In such a process, the dispersion of nanoparticles into the matrix is driven by the charging, transport, and deposition dynamics of the atomized colloid. This work examines the interaction of atomized TiO2 nanoparticles with ac electric fields in a plane-to-plane dielectric barrier discharge reactor. Experiments are performed with the discharge off to examine transport and deposition phenomena over a wide range of experimental conditions with a fixed particle charge distribution. Scanning electron microscopy reveals that the size distribution of TiO2 nanoparticles collected at different locations along the substrate surface placed on the bottom electrode of the DBD reactor can judiciously be controlled by varying the amplitude and frequency of the ac electric field. These results are also compared to the predictions of a simple particle motion model accounting for the electrostatic force, the gravitational force, and the neutral drag force in the laminar flow. It is found that while the initial charge distribution of atomized particles strongly influences the total deposition yield, its maximal position on the substrate, and the width of the deposited area, the initial size distribution of the particles at the entrance of the reactor mostly changes the size distribution at each position along the substrate surface.

  18. Evaluation of defects induced by neutron radiation in reactor pressure vessels steels; Evaluacion de los defectos inducidos por la radiacion neutronica en los aceros de vasijas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez Jimenez, J.

    1978-07-01

    We have developed a method for calculating the production of neutron induced defects (depleted zone and crowdions) in ferritic pressure vessel steels for different neutron spectra. They have been analysed both the recoil primary atoms produced by elastic and inelastic collisions with fast neutrons and the ones produced by gamma-ray emission by thermal neutron absorption. Theoretical modelling of increasing in the ductile-brittle transition temperature of ferritic steels has been correlated with experimental data at irradiation temperature up to 400 degree centigree (Author) 15 refs.

  19. Fracture mechanics applied to the evaluation of a nuclear reactor vessel structural integrity; Aplicacao da mecanica da fratura na avaliacao da integridade estrutural de um componente nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarpani, Jose Ricardo; Spinelli, Dirceu [Sao Paulo Univ., Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia. Dept. de Engenharia de Materiais

    1995-12-31

    Analytical predictions of PWR vessel instability were made based upon Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics criterion Kl C and on Elastic-Plastic Fracture Mechanics Ji and J50. special attention was given to the influence of crack depth and aspect ratio for both approaches, as well as to the data extrapolation procedures in the latest. Simple and didactic format is supplied for the evaluation of the final results in terms of internal pressure, strain gradient and ductile crack extension. (author) 7 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs.

  20. Conceptual design of a nucleo electric simulator with PBMR reactor based in Reduced order models; Diseno conceptual de un simulador de nucleo electrica con reactor PBMR basado en modelos de orden reducido

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valle H, J.; Morales S, J.B. [UNAM, DEPFI, Campus Morelos, en IMTA Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)]. e-mail: jms0620@yahoo.com

    2005-07-01

    This project has as purpose to know to depth the operation of a PBMR nucleo electric type (Pebble Bed Modular Reactor), which has a reactor of moderate graphite spheres and fuel of uranium dioxide cooled with Helium and Brayton thermodynamic cycle. The simulator seeks to describe the dynamics of the one process of energy generation in the nuclear fuel, the process of transport toward the coolant one and the conversion to mechanical energy in the turbo-generators as well as in the heat exchangers indispensable for the process. The dynamics of reload of the fuel elements it is not modeled in detail but their effects are represented in the parameters of the pattern. They are modeled also the turbo-compressors of the primary circuit of the work fluid. The control of the power of the nuclear reactor is modeled by means of reactivity functions specified in the simulation platform. The proposed mathematical models will be settled in the platform of simulation of Simulink-Mat Lab. The proposed control panels for this simulator can be designed and to implement using the box of tools of Simulink that facilitates this process. The work presents the mathematical models more important used for their future implementation in Simulink. (Author)

  1. Fossil fuel furnace reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, William J.

    1987-01-01

    A fossil fuel furnace reactor is provided for simulating a continuous processing plant with a batch reactor. An internal reaction vessel contains a batch of shale oil, with the vessel having a relatively thin wall thickness for a heat transfer rate effective to simulate a process temperature history in the selected continuous processing plant. A heater jacket is disposed about the reactor vessel and defines a number of independent controllable temperature zones axially spaced along the reaction vessel. Each temperature zone can be energized to simulate a time-temperature history of process material through the continuous plant. A pressure vessel contains both the heater jacket and the reaction vessel at an operating pressure functionally selected to simulate the continuous processing plant. The process yield from the oil shale may be used as feedback information to software simulating operation of the continuous plant to provide operating parameters, i.e., temperature profiles, ambient atmosphere, operating pressure, material feed rates, etc., for simulation in the batch reactor.

  2. Design of an Actinide Burning, Lead or Lead-Bismuth Cooled Reactor that Produces Low Cost Electricity FY-01 Annual Report, October 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Davis, Cliff Bybee; Herring, James Stephen; Loewen, Eric Paul; Smolik, Galen Richard; Weaver, Kevan Dean; Todreas, N.

    2001-10-01

    The purpose of this collaborative Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project is to investigate the suitability of lead or lead-bismuth cooled fast reactors for producing low-cost electricity as well as for actinide burning. The goal is to identify and analyze the key technical issues in core neutronics, materials, thermal-hydraulics, fuels, and economics associated with the development of this reactor concept. Work has been accomplished in four major areas of research: core neutronic design, plant engineering, material compatibility studies, and coolant activation. The publications derived from work on this project (since project inception) are listed in Appendix A.

  3. Decontamination of the reactor pressure vessel and further internals and auxiliary systems in the German boiling water reactor Isar-1; Dekontamination des RDB inkl. der Einbauten wie Dampftrockner und Wasserabscheider sowie der angeschlossenen Hilfssysteme im deutschen Siedewasserreaktor ISAR 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Michael; Sempere Belda, Luis; Basu, Ashim; Topf, Christian [AREVA GmbH, Erlangen (Germany). Abt. Chemistry Services; Erbacher, Thomas; Hiermer, Thomas; Schnurr, Bernhard; Appeldorn, Thomas van [E.ON Kernkraft GmbH, Kernkraftwerk ISAR, Essenbach (Germany). Abt. Maschinentechnik; Volkmann, Christian [ESG Engineering Services GmbH, Greifswald (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    The German nuclear power plant ISAR 1 (KKI 1), a 878 MWe boiling water reactor of KWU design, was shut down on March 17{sup th}, 2011. With the objective to minimize the plants activity inventory accompanied by the reduction of contact dose rates of systems and components the project 'decontamination of the RPV incl. steam dryer and water separator and the connected auxiliary systems' was implemented in the first quarter of 2015. One major focus within the project was the specific in-situ decontamination of the steam dryer.

  4. Reactor lifetime under control: the contribution of the VENUS neutron dosimetry programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ait Abderrahim, H.; Minsart, G.; Dhondt, P. [SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium)

    1998-07-01

    Lifetime management of PWR reactors is an important stake concerning safety and competitiveness of these electricity production systems. The embrittlement of the pressure vessel is due to neutron exposure is the main limiting phenomenon of the PWR lifetime. Therefore, an accurate assessment of the pressure vessel fast fluency contributes deeply to a better management of the reactor lifetime. The Light Water Reactor Pressure Vessel Surveillance Dosimetry Improvement Program (LWR-PV-SDIP) was established in 1977 and sponsored by the US NRC. Its objectives were: improve, maintain and standardize neutron dosimetry, damage correlation and associated reactor analysis procedures used for predicting integrated effects of neutron exposure on LWR-PV. The VENUS PWR-Engineering Mock-up Experiment is part of the Belgian PWR- Pressure Vessel Surveillance Programme sponsored by the Belgian utilities. It contributed also, as one of the benchmark fields to the LWR-PV-SDIP, the VENUS mock-ups simulate the reflector geometry and the core boundary shape of a generic 3-loop PWR reactor. In this paper we will report on the three configurations considered in this programme namely: VENUS-1 simulating a PWR fresh core loading, VENUS-2 simulating a low-Ieakage core loading, and VENUS-3 simulating the PLSA (Partial Length Shielded Assembly) concept. Thanks to this programme, the PWR PV fast fluency can be assessed with an uncertainty ranging between 15 and 20%. (author)

  5. Experience gathered in dismounting pressure vessel internals of the Kahl experimental reactor (VAK Kahl); Erfahrungen bei der Zerlegung der Druckgefaesseinbauten im VAK Kahl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalwa, H. [Versuchsatomkraftwerk Kahl GmbH, Karlstein am Main (Germany); Eickelpasch, N. [Versuchsatomkraftwerk Kahl GmbH, Karlstein am Main (Germany); Reiter, W. [Versuchsatomkraftwerk Kahl GmbH, Karlstein am Main (Germany)

    1995-11-01

    Mechanical cutting processes are preferred for dismantling of activated pressure vessel internals in the VAK Kahl. Up to now, sawing, nibbling, grinding and electroeroding have been tried. For a realistic under-water trial run on a scale of 1:1, an inactive experimental facility was erected in the empty turbine building of the VAK. (orig./DG) [Deutsch] Bei der Zerlegung der aktivierten RDB-Einbauten im Versuchsatomkraftwerk Kahl werden bevorzugt mechanische Trennverfahren angewendet. Erprobt und eingesetzt wurden bisher das Saegen, das Knabbern, das Schleifen und das Elektroerodieren. Fuer eine realitaetsnahe Erprobung unter Wasser im Massstab 1:1 wurde in VAK ein inaktiver Versuchsstand im bereits leergeraeumten Maschinenhaus erstellt. (orig./DG)

  6. Nuclear reactor physics

    CERN Document Server

    Stacey, Weston M

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear reactor physics is the core discipline of nuclear engineering. Nuclear reactors now account for a significant portion of the electrical power generated worldwide, and new power reactors with improved fuel cycles are being developed. At the same time, the past few decades have seen an ever-increasing number of industrial, medical, military, and research applications for nuclear reactors. The second edition of this successful comprehensive textbook and reference on basic and advanced nuclear reactor physics has been completely updated, revised and enlarged to include the latest developme

  7. HORIZONTAL BOILING REACTOR SYSTEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treshow, M.

    1958-11-18

    Reactors of the boiling water type are described wherein water serves both as the moderator and coolant. The reactor system consists essentially of a horizontal pressure vessel divided into two compartments by a weir, a thermal neutronic reactor core having vertical coolant passages and designed to use water as a moderator-coolant posltioned in one compartment, means for removing live steam from the other compartment and means for conveying feed-water and water from the steam compartment to the reactor compartment. The system further includes auxiliary apparatus to utilize the steam for driving a turbine and returning the condensate to the feed-water inlet of the reactor. The entire system is designed so that the reactor is self-regulating and has self-limiting power and self-limiting pressure features.

  8. NRC review of Electric Power Research Institute`s advanced light water reactor utility requirements document. Passive plant designs, chapters 2-13, project number 669

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is preparing a compendium of technical requirements, referred to as the {open_quotes}Advanced Light Water Reactor [ALWR] Utility Requirements Document{close_quotes}, that is acceptable to the design of an ALWR power plant. When completed, this document is intended to be a comprehensive statement of utility requirements for the design, construction, and performance of an ALWR power plant for the 1990s and beyond. The Requirements Document consists of three volumes. Volume I, {open_quotes}ALWR Policy and Summary of Top-Tier Requirements{close_quotes}, is a management-level synopsis of the Requirements Document, including the design objectives and philosophy, the overall physical configuration and features of a future nuclear plant design, and the steps necessary to take the proposed ALWR design criteria beyond the conceptual design state to a completed, functioning power plant. Volume II consists of 13 chapters and contains utility design requirements for an evolutionary nuclear power plant [approximately 1350 megawatts-electric (MWe)]. Volume III contains utility design requirements for nuclear plants for which passive features will be used in their designs (approximately 600 MWe). In April 1992, the staff of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, issued Volume 1 and Volume 2 (Parts 1 and 2) of its safety evaluation report (SER) to document the results of its review of Volumes 1 and 2 of the Requirements Document. Volume 1, {open_quotes}NRC Review of Electric Power Research Institute`s Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document - Program Summary{close_quotes}, provided a discussion of the overall purpose and scope of the Requirements Document, the background of the staff`s review, the review approach used by the staff, and a summary of the policy and technical issues raised by the staff during its review.

  9. NRC review of Electric Power Research Institute`s advanced light water reactor utility requirements document. Passive plant designs, chapter 1, project number 669

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is preparing a compendium of technical requirements, referred to as the {open_quotes}Advanced Light Water Reactor [ALWR] Utility Requirements Document{close_quotes}, that is acceptable to the design of an ALWR power plant. When completed, this document is intended to be a comprehensive statement of utility requirements for the design, construction, and performance of an ALWR power plant for the 1990s and beyond. The Requirements Document consists of three volumes. Volume 1, {open_quotes}ALWR Policy and Summary of Top-Tier Requirements{close_quotes}, is a management-level synopsis of the Requirements Document, including the design objectives and philosophy, the overall physical configuration and features of a future nuclear plant design, and the steps necessary to take the proposed ALWR design criteria beyond the conceptual design state to a completed, functioning power plant. Volume II consists of 13 chapters and contains utility design requirements for an evolutionary nuclear power plant [approximately 1350 megawatts-electric (MWe)]. Volume III contains utility design requirements for nuclear plants for which passive features will be used in their designs (approximately 600 MWe). In April 1992, the staff of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, issued Volume 1 and Volume 2 (Parts 1 and 2) of its safety evaluation report (SER) to document the results of its review of Volumes 1 and 2 of the Requirements Document. Volume 1, {open_quotes}NRC Review of Electric Power Research Institute`s Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document - Program Summary{close_quotes}, provided a discussion of the overall purpose and scope of the Requirements Document, the background of the staff`s review, the review approach used by the staff, and a summary of the policy and technical issues raised by the staff during its review.

  10. In-situ Condition Monitoring of Components in Small Modular Reactors Using Process and Electrical Signature Analysis. Final report, volume 1. Development of experimental flow control loop, data analysis and plant monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upadhyaya, Belle [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Hines, J. Wesley [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Damiano, Brian [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mehta, Chaitanya [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Collins, Price [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Lish, Matthew [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Cady, Brian [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Lollar, Victor [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); de Wet, Dane [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Bayram, Duygu [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2015-12-15

    The research and development under this project was focused on the following three major objectives: Objective 1: Identification of critical in-vessel SMR components for remote monitoring and development of their low-order dynamic models, along with a simulation model of an integral pressurized water reactor (iPWR). Objective 2: Development of an experimental flow control loop with motor-driven valves and pumps, incorporating data acquisition and on-line monitoring interface. Objective 3: Development of stationary and transient signal processing methods for electrical signatures, machinery vibration, and for characterizing process variables for equipment monitoring. This objective includes the development of a data analysis toolbox. The following is a summary of the technical accomplishments under this project: - A detailed literature review of various SMR types and electrical signature analysis of motor-driven systems was completed. A bibliography of literature is provided at the end of this report. Assistance was provided by ORNL in identifying some key references. - A review of literature on pump-motor modeling and digital signal processing methods was performed. - An existing flow control loop was upgraded with new instrumentation, data acquisition hardware and software. The upgrading of the experimental loop included the installation of a new submersible pump driven by a three-phase induction motor. All the sensors were calibrated before full-scale experimental runs were performed. - MATLAB-Simulink model of a three-phase induction motor and pump system was completed. The model was used to simulate normal operation and fault conditions in the motor-pump system, and to identify changes in the electrical signatures. - A simulation model of an integral PWR (iPWR) was updated and the MATLAB-Simulink model was validated for known transients. The pump-motor model was interfaced with the iPWR model for testing the impact of primary flow perturbations (upsets) on

  11. Friction coefficient and limiter load test analysis by flexibility coefficient model of Hold-Down Spring of nuclear reactor vessel internals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Linjun [Zhejiang Univ. of Technology, Hangzhou (China). College of Mechanical Engineering; Xue, Guohong; Zhang, Ming [Shanghai Nuclear Engineering Research and Design Institute, Shanghai (China)

    2017-11-15

    The friction force between the contact surfaces of a reactor internal hold-down spring (HDS) and core barrel flanges can directly influence the axial stiffness of an HDS. However, friction coefficient cannot be obtained through theoretical analysis. This study performs a mathematical deduction of the physical model of an HDS. Moreover, a mathematical model of axial load P, displacement δ, and flexibility coefficient is established, and a set of test apparatuses is designed to simulate the preloading process of the HDS. According to the experimental research and theoretical analysis, P-δ curves and the flexibility coefficient λ are obtained in the loading processes of the HDS. The friction coefficient f of the M1000 HDS is further calculated as 0.224. The displacement limit load value (4,638 kN) can be obtained through a displacement limit experiment. With the friction coefficient considered, the theoretical load is 4,271 kN, which is relatively close to the experimental result. Thus, the friction coefficient exerts an influence on the displacement limit load P. The friction coefficient should be considered in the design analysis for HDS.

  12. 10-75-kWe-reactor-powered organic Rankine-cycle electric power systems (ORCEPS) study. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-03-30

    This 10-75 kW(e) Reactor-ORCEPS study was concerned with the evaluation of several organic Rankine cycle energy conversion systems which utilized a /sup 235/U-ZrH reactor as a heat source. A liquid metal (NaK) loop employing a thermoelectric converter-powered EM pump was used to transfer the reactor energy to the organic working fluid. At moderate peak cycle temperatures (750/sup 0/F), power conversion unit cycle efficiencies of up to 25% and overall efficiencies of 20% can be obtained. The required operating life of seven years should be readily achievable. The CP-25 (toluene) working fluid cycle was found to provide the highest performance levels at the lowest system weights. Specific weights varies from 100 to 50 lb/kW(e) over the power level range 10 to 75 kW(e). (DLC)

  13. Evaluation of In-Vessel Corium Retention under a Severe Accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Rae-Joon; Kang, Kyung-Ho; Ha, Kwang-Soon; Kim, Jong-Tae; Koo, Kil-Mo; Cho, Young-Ro; Hong, Seong-Wan; Kim, Sang-Baik; Kim, Hee-Dong

    2008-02-15

    The current study on In-Vessel corium Retention and its application activities to the actual nuclear power plant have been reviewed and discussed in this study. Severe accident sequence which determines an initial condition of the IVR has been evaluated and late phase melt progression, heat transfer on the outer reactor vessel, and in-vessel corium cooling mechanism have been estimated in detail. During the high pressure sequence of the reactor coolant system, a natural circulation flow of the hot steam leads to a failure of the pressurizer surge line before the reactor vessel failure, which leads to a rapid decrease of the reactor coolant system pressure. The results of RASPLAV/MASCA study by OECD/NEA have shown that a melt stratification has occurred in the lower plenum of the reactor vessel. In particular, laver inversion has occurred, which is that a high density of the metal melt moves to the lower part of the oxidic melt layer. A method of heat transfer enhancement on the outer reactor vessel is an optimal design of the reactor vessel insulation for an increase of the natural circulation flow between the outer reactor vessel and the its insulation, and an increase of the critical Heat flux on the outer reactor vessel by using various method, such as Nono fluid, coated reactor vessel, and so on. An increase method of the in-vessel melt cooling is a development of the In-vessel core catcher and a decrease of focusing effect in the metal layer.

  14. Influence of reactor neutrons irradiation on electrical, optical and structural properties of SnO{sub 2} film prepared by sol-gel method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izerrouken, M., E-mail: izerrouken@yahoo.co [Centre de Recherche Nucleaire de Draria, BP 43, Sebbala, Draria, Algiers (Algeria); Kermadi, S. [Unite de Developpement de la Technologie du Silicium, 2 Bd Frantz Fanon, BP 399, Alger gare (Algeria); Souami, N. [Centre de Recherche Nucleaire d' Alger, 2 Bd Frantz Fanon, BP 399, Alger gare (Algeria); Sari, A. [Centre de Recherche Nucleaire de Berine, BP 108, Ain-Oussara, Djelfa (Algeria); Boumaour, M. [Unite de Developpement de la Technologie du Silicium, 2 Bd Frantz Fanon, BP 399, Alger gare (Algeria)

    2009-11-21

    SnO{sub 2} films elaborated by sol-gel method were irradiated with reactor neutron. The irradiations were made at a temperature of about 40 deg. C, with fast neutron fluences (E{sub n}>1.2 MeV) up to 9.6x10{sup 17} n cm{sup -2}. The induced defect has been studied by electrical, optical and structural measurements. The electrical measurements show that the resistivity rapidly increases with increasing fluences up to 3.2x10{sup 17} n cm{sup -2} and remains constant for higher fluence (>6.4x10{sup 17} n cm{sup -2}). The optical measurements show a small decrease of the optical band gap with increasing fluences. From the X-ray diffraction patterns, it was found that the crystallinity and grain size are reduced.

  15. SELF-REGULATING BOILING-WATER NUCLEAR REACTORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransohoff, J.A.; Plawchan, J.D.

    1960-08-16

    A boiling-water reactor was designed which comprises a pressure vessel containing a mass of water, a reactor core submerged within the water, a reflector tank disposed within the reactor, the reflector tank being open at the top to the interior of the pressure vessel, and a surge tank connected to the reflector tank. In operation the reflector level changes as a function of the pressure witoin the reactor so that the reactivity of the reactor is automatically controlled.

  16. Submersible microbial desalination cell for simultaneous ammonia recovery and electricity production from anaerobic reactors containing high levels of ammonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yifeng; Angelidaki, Irini

    2015-01-01

    High ammonia concentration in anaerobic reactors can seriously inhibit the anaerobic digestion process. In this study, a submersible microbial desalination cell (SMDC) was developed as an innovative method to lower the ammonia level in a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) by in situ ammonia...... and free NH3 diffusion were identified as the mechanisms responsible for the ammonia transportation. With an increase in initial ammonia concentration and a decrease in external resistance, the SMDC performance was enhanced. In addition, the coexistence of other cations in CSTR or cathode had no negative...

  17. Visual interface for the automation of the instrumented pendulum of Charpy tests used in the surveillance program of reactors vessel of nuclear power plants; Interfase visual para la automatizacion del pendulo instrumentado de pruebas Charpy utilizado en el programa de vigilancia de la vasija de reactores de centrales nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rojas S, A.S.; Sainz M, E.; Ruiz E, J.A. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca Km.36.5, Mpio. de Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. E-mail: asrs@nuclear.inin.mx; esm@nuclear.inin.mx; jare@nuclear.inin.mx

    2004-07-01

    Inside the Programs of Surveillance of the nuclear power stations periodic information is required on the state that keep the materials with those that builds the vessel of the reactor. This information is obtained through some samples or test tubes that are introduced inside the core of the reactor and it is observed if its physical characteristics remain after having been subjected to the radiation changes and temperature. The rehearsal with the instrumented Charpy pendulum offers information on the behavior of fracture dynamics of a material. In the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ) it has an instrumented Charpy pendulum. The operation of this instrument is manual, having inconveniences to carry out rehearsals with radioactive material, handling of high and low temperatures, to fulfill the normative ones for the realization of the rehearsals, etc. In this work the development of a computational program is presented (virtual instrument), for the automation of the instrumented pendulum. The system has modules like: Card of data acquisition, signal processing, positioning system, tempered system, pneumatic system, compute programs like it is the visual interface for the operation of the instrumented Charpy pendulum and the acquisition of impact signals. This system shows that given the characteristics of the nuclear industry with radioactive environments, the virtual instrumentation and the automation of processes can contribute to diminish the risks to the personnel occupationally exposed. (Author)

  18. RPV-1: a first virtual reactor to simulate irradiation effects in light water reactor pressure vessel steels; RPV-1: un premier reacteur virtuel pour simuler les effets d'irradiation dans les aciers de cuve des reacteurs a eau legere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jumel, St

    2005-01-15

    The presented work was aimed at building a first VTR (virtual test reactor) to simulate irradiation effects in pressure vessel steels of nuclear reactor. It mainly consisted in: - modeling the formation of the irradiation induced damage in such steels, as well as their plasticity behavior - selecting codes and models to carry out the simulations of the involved mechanisms. Since the main focus was to build a first tool (rather than a perfect tool), it was decided to use, as much as possible, existing codes and models in spite of their imperfections. - developing and parameterizing two missing codes: INCAS and DUPAIR. - proposing an architecture to link the selected codes and models. - constructing and validating the tool. RPV-1 is made of five codes and two databases which are linked up so as to receive, treat and/or transmit data. A user friendly Python interface facilitates the running of the simulations and the visualization of the results. RPV-1 relies on many simplifications and approximations and has to be considered as a prototype aimed at clearing the way. According to the functionalities targeted for RPV-1, the main weakness is a bad Ni and Mn sensitivity. However, the tool can already be used for many applications (understanding of experimental results, assessment of effects of material and irradiation conditions,....). (O.M.)

  19. The development of ex-core neutron flux monitoring system for integral reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. K.; Kwon, H. J.; Park, H. Y.; Koo, I. S

    2004-12-01

    Due to the arrangement of major components within the reactor vessel, the integral reactor has relatively long distance between the core support barrel and the reactor vessel when compared with the currently operating plants. So, a neutron flux leakage at the ex-vessel represents a relatively low flux level which may generate some difficulties in obtaining a wide range of neutron flux information including the source range one. This fact may have an impact upon the design and fabrication of an ex-core neutron flux detector. Therefore, it is required to study neutron flux detectors that are suitable for the installation location and characteristics of an integral reactor. The physical constraints of an integral reactor should be considered when one designs and develops the ex-core neutron flux monitoring detectors and their systems. As a possible installation location of the integral reactor ex-core neutron flux detector assembly, two candidate locations are considered, that is, one is between the core support barrel and the reactor vessel and the other is within the Internal Shielding Tank(IST). And, for these locations, some factors such as the environmental requirements and geometrical restrictions are investigated In the case of considering the inside of the IST as a ex-core neutron flux detector installation position, an electrical insulation problem and a low neutron flux measurement problem arose and when considering the inside of the reactor vessel, a detector's sensitivity variation problem, an electrical insulation problem, a detector's insertion and withdrawal problem, and a high neutron flux measurement problem were encountered. Through a survey of the detector installation of the currently operating plants and detector manufacturer's products, the proposed structure and specifications of an ex-core neutron flux detector are suggested. And, the joint ownership strategy for a proposed detector model is also depicted. At the end, by studying

  20. Plasma nitriding monitoring reactor: A model reactor for studying plasma nitriding processes using an active screen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, S.; Börner, K.; Burlacov, I.; Spies, H.-J.; Strämke, M.; Strämke, S.; Röpcke, J.

    2015-12-01

    A laboratory scale plasma nitriding monitoring reactor (PLANIMOR) has been designed to study the basics of active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) processes. PLANIMOR consists of a tube reactor vessel, made of borosilicate glass, enabling optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and infrared absorption spectroscopy. The linear setup of the electrode system of the reactor has the advantages to apply the diagnostic approaches on each part of the plasma process, separately. Furthermore, possible changes of the electrical field and of the heat generation, as they could appear in down-scaled cylindrical ASPN reactors, are avoided. PLANIMOR has been used for the nitriding of steel samples, achieving similar results as in an industrial scale ASPN reactor. A compact spectrometer using an external cavity quantum cascade laser combined with an optical multi-pass cell has been applied for the detection of molecular reaction products. This allowed the determination of the concentrations of four stable molecular species (CH4, C2H2, HCN, and NH3). With the help of OES, the rotational temperature of the screen plasma could be determined.

  1. Discontinuous finite element formulation for bodies of revolution with application in the prevention of fragile fracture in pressure vessel of PWR reactors; Formulacao de elementos finitos descontinuos para corpos de revolucao com aplicacao na prevencao de fratura fragil em vaso de pressao de reatores PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benitez Alvarez, Gustavo

    1999-08-15

    In this work, a hybrid formulation is established for bodies of revolution, based on the equation of Fourier series for the discontinuous finite element method, analogous to the one that exists in the classical finite element method. Furthermore, a methodology to analyse the prevention of fragile fracture in pressure vessel of pressurized water reactors is presented. The results obtained suggest that careful analysis must be made for non symmetric refrigeration. (author)

  2. Research vessels

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, P.S.

    by the research vessels RV Gaveshani and ORV Sagar Kanya are reported. The work carried out by the three charted ships is also recorded. A short note on cruise plans for the study of ferromanganese nodules is added...

  3. Complex risk analysis for loss of electric power in liquid metal nuclear reactor by system dynamics (SD) method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, Tae Ho [Seoul National Univ. (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

    2012-07-15

    The power stabilization of the nuclear power plants (NPPs) is investigated in the aspect of the liquid metal coolant. The quantification of the risk analysis is performed by the system dynamics (SD) method which is processed by the feedback and accumulation complex algorithms. The Vensim software package is used for the simulations, which is supported by the Monte-Carlo method. There are 2 kinds of considerations as the economic and safety properties. The result shows the stability of the operations when the power can be decided. This shows the higher efficiency of the reactor. The failure frequency is 16/60 = 27%. In the event of Power Stabilized, the failure event is in the quite lower frequency rate. The commercial use of the reactor is important in the operations. (orig.)

  4. Assessment of released heavy metals from electrical and electronic equipment (EEE) existing in shipwrecks through laboratory-scale simulation reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahladakis, John N., E-mail: john_chach@yahoo.gr [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Crete, Politechnioupolis, Chania 73100 (Greece); Stylianos, Michailakis [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Crete, Politechnioupolis, Chania 73100 (Greece); Gidarakos, Evangelos, E-mail: gidarako@mred.tuc.gr [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Crete, Politechnioupolis, Chania 73100 (Greece)

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ► A laboratory-scale reactor was built to simulate the “Sea Diamond” shipwreck. ► EEE was thrown into the reactor for heavy metal release rate assessment. ► 15 seawater samples were taken and analyzed in a nine month experimental period. ► Zinc, mercury and copper were found in concentrations above the CMC criterion. ► Nickel and lead were found in concentrations higher than the CCC criterion. -- Abstract: In a passenger ship, the existence of EEE is obvious. In time, under shipwreck's conditions, all these materials will undergo an accelerated severe corrosion, due to salt water, releasing, consequently, heavy metals and other hazardous substances in the aquatic environment. In this study, a laboratory-scale reactor was manufactured in order to simulate the conditions under which the “Sea Diamond” shipwreck lies (14 bars of pressure and 16 °C of temperature) and remotely observe and assess any heavy metal release that would occur, from part of the EEE present in the ship, into the sea. Ten metals were examined and the results showed that zinc, mercury and copper were abundant in the water samples taken from the reactor and in significantly higher concentrations compared to the US EPA CMC (criterion maximum concentration) criterion. Moreover, nickel and lead were found in concentrations higher than the CCC (criterion constant concentration) criterion set by the US EPA for clean seawater. The rest of the elements were measured in concentrations within the permissible limits. It is therefore of environmental benefit to salvage the wreck and recycle all the WEEE found in it.

  5. Nuclear reactor sealing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEdwards, James A.

    1983-01-01

    A liquid metal-cooled nuclear reactor sealing system. The nuclear reactor includes a vessel sealed at its upper end by a closure head. The closure head comprises at least two components, one of which is rotatable; and the two components define an annulus therebetween. The sealing system includes at least a first and second inflatable seal disposed in series in an upper portion of the annulus. The system further includes a dip seal extending into a body of insulation located adjacent a bottom portion of the closure head. The dip seal comprises a trough formed by a lower portion of one of the components, and a seal blade pendently supported from the other component and extending downwardly into the trough. A body of liquid metal is contained in the trough which submerges a portion of the seal blade. The seal blade is provided with at least one aperture located above the body of liquid metal for providing fluid communication between the annulus intermediate the dip seal and the inflatable seals, and a body of cover gas located inside the vessel. There also is provided means for introducing a purge gas into the annulus intermediate the inflatable seals and the seal blade. The purge gas is introduced in an amount sufficient to substantially reduce diffusion of radioactive cover gas or sodium vapor up to the inflatable seals. The purge gas mixes with the cover gas in the reactor vessel where it can be withdrawn from the vessel for treatment and recycle to the vessel.

  6. Heat dissipating nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunsbedt, A.; Lazarus, J.D.

    1985-11-21

    Disclosed is a nuclear reactor containment adapted to retain and cool core debris in the unlikely event of a core meltdown and subsequent breach in the reactor vessel. The reactor vessel is seated in a cavity which has a thick metal sidewall that is integral with a thick metal basemat at the bottom of the cavity. The basemat extends beyond the perimeter of the cavity sidewall. Underneath the basemat is a porous bed with water pipes and steam pipes running into it. Water is introduced into the bed and converted into steam which is vented to the atmosphere. A plurality of metal pilings in the form of H-beams extend from the metal base plate downwardly and outwardly into the earth.

  7. Enhanced electricity generation by triclosan and iron anodes in the three-chambered membrane bio-chemical reactor (TC-MBCR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jing; Liu, Lifen; Yang, Fenglin; Ren, Nanqi; Crittenden, John

    2013-11-01

    A three-chambered membrane bio-chemical reactor (TC-MBCR) was developed. The stainless steel membrane modules were used as cathodes and iron plates in the middle chamber served as the anode. The TC-MBCR was able to reduce fouling, remove triclosan (TCS) from a synthetic wastewater treatment and enhance electricity generation by ~60% compared with the cell voltage before TCS addition. The TC-MBCR system generated a relatively stable power output (cell voltage ~0.2V) and the corrosion of iron plates contributed to electricity generation together with microbes on iron anode. The permeation flow from anode to cathode chamber was considered important in electricity generation. In addition, the negatively charged cathode membrane and Fe(2+)/Fe(3+) released by iron plates mitigated membrane fouling by approximately 30%, as compared with the control. The removal of COD and total phosphorus was approximately 99% and 90%. The highest triclosan removal rate reached 97.9%. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Conversion of activated-sludge reactors to microbial fuel cells for wastewater treatment coupled to electricity generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizawa, Tomoya; Miyahara, Morio; Kouzuma, Atsushi; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2014-11-01

    Wastewater can be treated in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) with the aid of microbes that oxidize organic compounds using anodes as electron acceptors. Previous studies have suggested the utility of cassette-electrode (CE) MFCs for wastewater treatment, in which rice paddy-field soil was used as the inoculum. The present study attempted to convert an activated-sludge (AS) reactor to CE-MFC and use aerobic sludge in the tank as the source of microbes. We used laboratory-scale (1 L in capacity) reactors that were initially operated in an AS mode to treat synthetic wastewater, containing starch, yeast extract, peptone, plant oil, and detergents. After the organics removal became stable, the aeration was terminated, and CEs were inserted to initiate an MFC-mode operation. It was demonstrated that the MFC-mode operation treated the wastewater at similar efficiencies to those observed in the AS-mode operation with COD-removal efficiencies of 75-80%, maximum power densities of 150-200 mW m(-2) and Coulombic efficiencies of 20-30%. These values were similar to those of CE-MFC inoculated with the soil. Anode microbial communities were analyzed by pyrotag sequencing of 16S rRNA gene PCR amplicons. Comparative analyses revealed that anode communities enriched from the aerobic sludge were largely different from those from the soil, suggesting that similar reactor performances can be supported by different community structures. The study demonstrates that it is possible to construct wastewater-treatment MFCs by inserting CEs into water-treatment tanks. Copyright © 2014 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Transient evolution of inter vessel gap pressure due to relative thermal expansion between two vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natesan, K.; Selvaraj, P.; Chellapandi, P.; Chetal, S. C.

    2002-08-01

    In a typical liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactor (LMFBR), a cylindrical sodium filled main vessel, which carries the internals such as reactor core, pumps, intermediate heat exchangers etc. is surrounded by another vessel called safety vessel. The inter vessel gap is filled with nitrogen. During a thermal transient in the pool sodium, because of the relative delay involved in the thermal diffusion between MV and SV, they are subjected to relative thermal expansion or contraction between them. This in turn results in pressurisation and depressurisation of inter vessel gap nitrogen respectively. In order to obtain the external pressurization for the buckling design of MV, transient thermal models for obtaining the evolutions of MV, SV and inter gap nitrogen temperatures and hence their relative thermal expansion and inter vessel gap pressure have been developed. This paper gives the details of the mathematical model, assumptions made in the calculation and the results of the analysis.

  10. Assessment of released heavy metals from electrical and electronic equipment (EEE) existing in shipwrecks through laboratory-scale simulation reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahladakis, John N; Stylianos, Michailakis; Gidarakos, Evangelos

    2013-04-15

    In a passenger ship, the existence of EEE is obvious. In time, under shipwreck's conditions, all these materials will undergo an accelerated severe corrosion, due to salt water, releasing, consequently, heavy metals and other hazardous substances in the aquatic environment. In this study, a laboratory-scale reactor was manufactured in order to simulate the conditions under which the "Sea Diamond" shipwreck lies (14 bars of pressure and 16°C of temperature) and remotely observe and assess any heavy metal release that would occur, from part of the EEE present in the ship, into the sea. Ten metals were examined and the results showed that zinc, mercury and copper were abundant in the water samples taken from the reactor and in significantly higher concentrations compared to the US EPA CMC (criterion maximum concentration) criterion. Moreover, nickel and lead were found in concentrations higher than the CCC (criterion constant concentration) criterion set by the US EPA for clean seawater. The rest of the elements were measured in concentrations within the permissible limits. It is therefore of environmental benefit to salvage the wreck and recycle all the WEEE found in it. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Development of Electrical Capacitance Sensors for Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) Testing at the Transient Reactor Test (TREAT) Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Maolong; Ryals, Matthew; Ali, Amir; Blandford, Edward; Jensen, Colby; Condie, Keith; Svoboda, John; O' Brien, Robert

    2016-08-01

    A variety of instruments are being developed and qualified to support the Accident Tolerant Fuels (ATF) program and future transient irradiations at the Transient Reactor Test (TREAT) facility at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The University of New Mexico (UNM) is working with INL to develop capacitance-based void sensors for determining the timing of critical boiling phenomena in static capsule fuel testing and the volume-averaged void fraction in flow-boiling in-pile water loop fuel testing. The static capsule sensor developed at INL is a plate-type configuration, while UNM is utilizing a ring-type capacitance sensor. Each sensor design has been theoretically and experimentally investigated at INL and UNM. Experiments are being performed at INL in an autoclave to investigate the performance of these sensors under representative Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) conditions in a static capsule. Experiments have been performed at UNM using air-water two-phase flow to determine the sensitivity and time response of the capacitance sensor under a flow boiling configuration. Initial measurements from the capacitance sensor have demonstrated the validity of the concept to enable real-time measurement of void fraction. The next steps include designing the cabling interface with the flow loop at UNM for Reactivity Initiated Accident (RIA) ATF testing at TREAT and further characterization of the measurement response for each sensor under varying conditions by experiments and modeling.

  12. FASTER test reactor preconceptual design report summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grandy, C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Belch, H. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Brunett, A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Heidet, F. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hill, R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hoffman, E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Jin, E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Mohamed, W. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Moisseytsev, A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Passerini, S. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sienicki, J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sumner, T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Vilim, R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hayes, Steven [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-02-29

    The FASTER reactor plant is a sodium-cooled fast spectrum test reactor that provides high levels of fast and thermal neutron flux for scientific research and development. The 120MWe FASTER reactor plant has a superheated steam power conversion system which provides electrical power to a local grid allowing for recovery of operating costs for the reactor plant.

  13. FASTER Test Reactor Preconceptual Design Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grandy, C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Belch, H. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Brunett, A. J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Heidet, F. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hill, R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hoffman, E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Jin, E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Mohamed, W. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Moisseytsev, A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Passerini, S. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sienicki, J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sumner, T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Vilim, R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hayes, S. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-03-31

    The FASTER test reactor plant is a sodium-cooled fast spectrum test reactor that provides high levels of fast and thermal neutron flux for scientific research and development. The 120MWe FASTER reactor plant has a superheated steam power conversion system which provides electrical power to a local grid allowing for recovery of operating costs for the reactor plant.

  14. Liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor plant system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunsbedt, Anstein; Boardman, Charles E.

    1993-01-01

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting for fuel decay during reactor shutdown, or heat produced during a mishap. The reactor system is enhanced with sealing means for excluding external air from contact with the liquid metal coolant leaking from the reactor vessel during an accident. The invention also includes a silo structure which resists attack by leaking liquid metal coolant, and an added unique cooling means.

  15. Thermal energy storage using Prestressed Cast Iron Vessels (PCIV). Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilli, P.V.; Beckmann, G.; Schilling, F.E.

    1977-06-01

    The wide-spread application of thermal energy and high-pressure air storage to electric power generation has so far been hampered by the lack of large high-pressure storage vessels of reasonable cost. Welded steel vessels are too expensive for this purpose. However, the Prestressed Cast Iron Vessel (PCIV), developed as a nuclear reactor pressure vessel by Siempelkamp Giesserei KG of Krefeld, FRG, has the potential of complying with these requirements. Applications of the PCIV include: high-pressure air storage for the quick start-up of open cycle gas turbines; pressurized high-temperature sensible heat storage by means of solids with a gaseous heat transfer medium for closed cycle gas turbines of future solar power stations; and pressurized hot water storage for nuclear, solar, or coal-fired steam power plants, employing either separate peaking turbines or overloadable main turbine sets. A reference PCIV of 8000 m/sup 3/, 275/sup 0/C, with hot going walls and cold going tendons was developed, designed, and stress-analysed. A parametric study showed that pressures between 4 and 8 MPa and L/D ratios larger than 4 should be optimal. Cost of the reference vessel is about $10,000,000 or 33 to 50 $/kWh electric energy stored. Cost of peak power will be from 30 to 100 mills/kWh, depending on many parameters.

  16. WATER BOILER REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, L.D.P.

    1960-11-22

    As its name implies, this reactor utilizes an aqueous solution of a fissionable element salt, and is also conventional in that it contains a heat exchanger cooling coil immersed in the fuel. Its novelty lies in the utilization of a cylindrical reactor vessel to provide a critical region having a large and constant interface with a supernatant vapor region, and the use of a hollow sleeve coolant member suspended from the cover assembly in coaxial relation with the reactor vessel. Cool water is circulated inside this hollow coolant member, and a gap between its outer wall and the reactor vessel is used to carry off radiolytic gases for recombination in an external catalyst chamber. The central passage of the coolant member defines a reflux condenser passage into which the externally recombined gases are returned and condensed. The large and constant interface between fuel solution and vapor region prevents the formation of large bubbles and minimizes the amount of fuel salt carried off by water vapor, thus making possible higher flux densities, specific powers and power densities.

  17. Pressure Vessel Calculations for VVER-440 Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hordósy, G.; Hegyi, Gy.; Keresztúri, A.; Maráczy, Cs.; Temesvári, E.; Vértes, P.; Zsolnay, É.

    2003-06-01

    Monte Carlo calculations were performed for a selected cycle of the Paks NPP Unit II to test a computational model. In the model the source term was calculated by the core design code KARATE and the neutron transport calculations were performed by the MCNP. Different forms of the source specification were examined. The calculated results were compared with measurements and in most cases fairly good agreement was found.

  18. Economic aspects of electricity and industrial heat generating reactors; Aspect economique des reacteurs produisant de l'electricite et de la chaleur industrielle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaussens, J.; Moulle, N.; Dutheil, F. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Aldebert, J. [Institut National des Sciences et Techniques Nucleaires (INSTN), CEA Saclay, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France)

    1964-07-01

    The economic advantage of electricity-generating nuclear stations decreases when their size decreases. However, when a counter-pressure turbine is joined on to a reactor and the residual heat can be properly used, it can be shown that fairly low capacity nuclear equipment may compete with conventional equipment under certain realistic enough conditions. The aim of this paper is to define these special conditions under which nuclear energy can be profitable. They are connected with the location and the general economic environment of the station, the pattern of the electricity and heat demands it must meet, the level of fuel and specific capital costs, nuclear and conventional. These conditions entail certain technical and economic specifications for the reactors used in this way otherwise they are unlikely to be competitive. In addition, these results are referred to the potential steam and electricity market, which leads us to examine certain uses for the heat generated by double purpose power stations; for example, to supply combined industrial plants, various types of town heating and for removal of salt from sea water. (authors) [French] L'interet economique de centrales nucleaires productrices d'electricite decroit lorsque la puissance decroit. Cependant, lorsqu'on associe une turbine a contrepression a un reacteur et qu'il est possible d'utiliser dans de bonnes conditions la chaleur residuelle, on peut montrer que dans certaines conditions assez realistes, des equipements nucleaires d'une puissance unitaire peu elevee peuvent etre competitifs avec des equipements conventionnels. Cette communication a donc pour but de mettre en evidence quelles sont ces conditions particulieres de rentabilite de l'energie nucleaire. Elles sont liees a la localisation de la centrale et a son contexte economique general, a la structure de la demande d'energie electrique et thermique a laquelle elle doit satisfaire, au niveau des couts des

  19. H Reactor

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The H Reactor was the first reactor to be built at Hanford after World War II.It became operational in October of 1949, and represented the fourth nuclear reactor on...

  20. Reactor Materials Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Walle, E

    2002-04-01

    The activities of SCK-CEN's Reactor Materials Research Department for 2001 are summarised. The objectives of the department are: (1) to evaluate the integrity and behaviour of structural materials used in nuclear power industry; (2) to conduct research to unravel and understand the parameters that determine the material behaviour under or after irradiation; (3) to contribute to the interpretation, the modelling of the material behaviour and to develop and assess strategies for optimum life management of nuclear power plant components. The programmes within the department are focussed on studies concerning (1) Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC); (2) nuclear fuel; and (3) Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel.

  1. Perspectives on reactor safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haskin, F.E. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering; Camp, A.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-03-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) maintains a technical training center at Chattanooga, Tennessee to provide appropriate training to both new and experienced NRC employees. This document describes a one-week course in reactor, safety concepts. The course consists of five modules: (1) historical perspective; (2) accident sequences; (3) accident progression in the reactor vessel; (4) containment characteristics and design bases; and (5) source terms and offsite consequences. The course text is accompanied by slides and videos during the actual presentation of the course.

  2. Bio-oil production from dry sewage sludge by fast pyrolysis in an electrically-heated fluidized bed reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato O. Arazo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The optimization of bio-oil produced from sewage sludge using fast pyrolysis in a fluidized bed reactor was investigated. Effects of temperature, sludge particle size and vapor residence time on bio-oil properties, such as yield, high heating value (HHV and moisture content were evaluated through experimental and statistical analyses. Characterization of the pyrolysis products (bio-oil and biogas was also done. Optimum conditions produced a bio-oil product with an HHV that is nearly twice as much as lignocellulosic-derived bio-oil, and with properties comparable to heavy fuel oil. Contrary to generally acidic bio-oil, the sludge-derived bio-oil has almost neutral pH which could minimize the pipeline and engine corrosions. The Fourier Transform Infrared and gas-chromatography and mass spectrometry analyses of bio-oil showed a dominant presence of gasoline-like compounds. These results demonstrate that fast pyrolysis of sewage sludge from domestic wastewater treatment plant is a favorable technology to produce biofuels for various applications.

  3. Effects of Electrical Stimulation on the Degradation of Azo Dye in Three-Dimensional Biofilm Electrode Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian Cao

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional biofilm electrode reactors (3D-BERs were constructed to degrade the azo dye Reactive Brilliant Red (RBR X-3B. The 3D-BERs with different influent concentrations and external voltages were individually studied to investigate their influence on the removal of X-3B. Experimental results showed that 3D-BERs have good X-3B removal efficiency; even when the influent concentration was 800 mg/L, removal efficiency of 73.4% was still achieved. In addition, the X-3B removal efficiency stabilized shortly after the influent concentration increased. In 3D-BERs, the average X-3B removal efficiency increased from 52.8% to 85.4% when the external voltage rose from 0 to 2 V. We further identified the intermediate products via UV-Vis and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS analyses, and discussed the potential mechanism of degradation. After the conjugate structure of X-3B was destroyed, all of the substances generated mainly consisted of lower-molecular-weight organics.

  4. Weld monitor and failure detector for nuclear reactor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Jr., Harry G.

    1987-01-01

    Critical but inaccessible welds in a nuclear reactor system are monitored throughout the life of the reactor by providing small aperture means projecting completely through the reactor vessel wall and also through the weld or welds to be monitored. The aperture means is normally sealed from the atmosphere within the reactor. Any incipient failure or cracking of the weld will cause the environment contained within the reactor to pass into the aperture means and thence to the outer surface of the reactor vessel where its presence is readily detected.

  5. Conceptual design of inherently safe integral reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J. I.; Chang, M. H.; Lee, D. J. and others

    1999-03-01

    The design concept of a 300 MWt inherently safe integral reactor(ISIR) for the propulsion of extra large and superhigh speed container ship was developed in this report. The scope and contents of this report are as follows : 1. The state of the art of the technology for ship-mounted reactor 2. Design requirements for ISIR 3. Fuel and core design 4. Conceptual design of fluid system 5. Conceptual design of reactor vessel assembly and primary components 6. Performance analyses and safety analyses. Installation of two ISIRs with total thermal power of 600MWt and efficiency of 21% is capable of generating shaft power of 126,000kW which is sufficient to power a container ship of 8,000TEU with 30knot cruise speed. Larger and speedier ship can be considered by installing 4 ISIRs. Even though the ISIR was developed for ship propulsion, it can be used also for a multi-purpose nuclear power plant for electricity generation, local heating, or seawater desalination by mounting on a movable floating barge. (author)

  6. 10 CFR 50.46a - Acceptance criteria for reactor coolant system venting systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Acceptance criteria for reactor coolant system venting... criteria for reactor coolant system venting systems. Each nuclear power reactor must be provided with high point vents for the reactor coolant system, for the reactor vessel head, and for other systems required...

  7. Formation mechanism of solute clusters under neutron irradiation in ferritic model alloys and in a reactor pressure vessel steel: clusters of defects; Mecanismes de fragilisation sous irradiation aux neutrons d'alliages modeles ferritiques et d'un acier de cuve: amas de defauts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meslin-Chiffon, E

    2007-11-15

    The embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) under irradiation is partly due to the formation of point defects (PD) and solute clusters. The aim of this work was to gain more insight into the formation mechanisms of solute clusters in low copper ([Cu] = 0.1 wt%) FeCu and FeCuMnNi model alloys, in a copper free FeMnNi model alloy and in a low copper French RPV steel (16MND5). These materials were neutron-irradiated around 300 C in a test reactor. Solute clusters were characterized by tomographic atom probe whereas PD clusters were simulated with a rate theory numerical code calibrated under cascade damage conditions using transmission electron microscopy analysis. The confrontation between experiments and simulation reveals that a heterogeneous irradiation-induced solute precipitation/segregation probably occurs on PD clusters. (author)

  8. Small nuclear power reactor emergency electric power supply system reliability comparative analysis; Analise da confiabilidade do sistema de suprimento de energia eletrica de emergencia de um reator nuclear de pequeno porte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonfietti, Gerson

    2003-07-01

    This work presents an analysis of the reliability of the emergency power supply system, of a small size nuclear power reactor. Three different configurations are investigated and their reliability analyzed. The fault tree method is used as the main tool of analysis. The work includes a bibliographic review of emergency diesel generator reliability and a discussion of the design requirements applicable to emergency electrical systems. The influence of common cause failure influences is considered using the beta factor model. The operator action is considered using human failure probabilities. A parametric analysis shows the strong dependence between the reactor safety and the loss of offsite electric power supply. It is also shown that common cause failures can be a major contributor to the system reliability. (author)

  9. Comparison of pressure vessel neutron fluences for the Balakovo-3 reactor with measurements and investigation of the influence of neutron cross sections and number of groups on the results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barz, H.U.; Boehmer, B.; Konheiser, J.; Stephan, I.

    1998-10-01

    The general methodical questions of experimental and theoretical determination of neutron fluences have been described in connection with the measurements and 3-D Monte Carlo calculation for the Rovno-3 reactor. The same calculation and measurement methods were applied for the Balakovo-3 reactor. In the first part, the results of the comparison for Balakovo will be given and discussed. However, for this reactor the main attention was focussed on investigations of the accuracy of the calculation. In this connection an important question is the influence of neutron data on the results. With this respect not only the source of the data but also the number of energy groups is important. (orig.)

  10. Retrieval of Au, Ag, Cu precious metals coupled with electric energy production via an unconventional coupled redox fuel cell reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui-Min; Fan, Zheng; Xu, Wei; Feng, Xiao; Wu, Zu-Cheng

    2017-09-15

    The recovery of heavy metals from aqueous solutions or e-wastes is of upmost importance. Retrieval of Au, Ag, and Cu with electricity generation through building an ethanol-metal coupled redox fuel cells (CRFCs) is demonstrated. The cell was uniquely assembled on PdNi/C anode the electro-oxidation of ethanol takes place to give electrons and then go through the external circuit reducing metal ions to metallic on the cathode, metals are recovered. Taking an example of removal of 100mgL-1 gold in 0.5M HAc-NaAc buffer solution as the catholyte, 2.0M ethanol in 1.0M alkaline solution as the anolyte, an open circuit voltage of 1.4V, more than 96% of gold removal efficiency in 20h, and equivalent energy production of 2.0kWhkg-1 of gold can be readily achieved in this system. When gold and copper ions coexist, it was confirmed that metallic Cu is formed on the cathodic electrode later than metallic Au formation by XPS analysis. Thus, this system can achieve step by step electrodeposition of gold and copper while the two metal ions coexisting. This work develops a new approach to retrieve valuable metals from aqueous solution or e-wastes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Nuclear reactor building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, P.F.; Townsend, H.E.; Barbanti, G.

    1994-04-05

    A reactor building for enclosing a nuclear reactor includes a containment vessel having a wetwell disposed therein. The wetwell includes inner and outer walls, a floor, and a roof defining a wetwell pool and a suppression chamber disposed there above. The wetwell and containment vessel define a drywell surrounding the reactor. A plurality of vents are disposed in the wetwell pool in flow communication with the drywell for channeling into the wetwell pool steam released in the drywell from the reactor during a LOCA for example, for condensing the steam. A shell is disposed inside the wetwell and extends into the wetwell pool to define a dry gap devoid of wetwell water and disposed in flow communication with the suppression chamber. In a preferred embodiment, the wetwell roof is in the form of a slab disposed on spaced apart support beams which define there between an auxiliary chamber. The dry gap, and additionally the auxiliary chamber, provide increased volume to the suppression chamber for improving pressure margin. 4 figures.

  12. Using SA508/533 for the HTGR Vessel Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larry Demick

    2012-06-01

    This paper examines the influence of High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) module power rating and normal operating temperatures on the use of SA508/533 material for the HTGR vessel system with emphasis on the calculated times at elevated temperatures approaching or exceeding ASME Code Service Limits (Levels B&C) to which the reactor pressure vessel could be exposed during postulated pressurized and depressurized conduction cooldown events over its design lifetime.

  13. Nuclear reactor downcomer flow deflector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Charles B [Greensburg, PA; Altman, David A [Pittsburgh, PA; Singleton, Norman R [Murrysville, PA

    2011-02-15

    A nuclear reactor having a coolant flow deflector secured to a reactor core barrel in line with a coolant inlet nozzle. The flow deflector redirects incoming coolant down an annulus between the core barrel and the reactor vessel. The deflector has a main body with a front side facing the fluid inlet nozzle and a rear side facing the core barrel. The rear side of the main body has at least one protrusion secured to the core barrel so that a gap exists between the rear side of the main body adjacent the protrusion and the core barrel. Preferably, the protrusion is a relief that circumscribes the rear side of the main body.

  14. STEAM STIRRED HOMOGENEOUS NUCLEAR REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busey, H.M.

    1958-06-01

    A homogeneous nuclear reactor utilizing a selfcirculating liquid fuel is described. The reactor vessel is in the form of a vertically disposed tubular member having the lower end closed by the tube walls and the upper end closed by a removal fianged assembly. A spherical reaction shell is located in the lower end of the vessel and spaced from the inside walls. The reaction shell is perforated on its lower surface and is provided with a bundle of small-diameter tubes extending vertically upward from its top central portion. The reactor vessel is surrounded in the region of the reaction shell by a neutron reflector. The liquid fuel, which may be a solution of enriched uranyl sulfate in ordinary or heavy water, is mainiained at a level within the reactor vessel of approximately the top of the tubes. The heat of the reaction which is created in the critical region within the spherical reaction shell forms steam bubbles which more upwardly through the tubes. The upward movement of these bubbles results in the forcing of the liquid fuel out of the top of these tubes, from where the fuel passes downwardly in the space between the tubes and the vessel wall where it is cooled by heat exchangers. The fuel then re-enters the critical region in the reaction shell through the perforations in the bottom. The upper portion of the reactor vessel is provided with baffles to prevent the liquid fuel from splashing into this region which is also provided with a recombiner apparatus for recombining the radiolytically dissociated moderator vapor and a control means.

  15. Reactor safeguards

    CERN Document Server

    Russell, Charles R

    1962-01-01

    Reactor Safeguards provides information for all who are interested in the subject of reactor safeguards. Much of the material is descriptive although some sections are written for the engineer or physicist directly concerned with hazards analysis or site selection problems. The book opens with an introductory chapter on radiation hazards, the construction of nuclear reactors, safety issues, and the operation of nuclear reactors. This is followed by separate chapters that discuss radioactive materials, reactor kinetics, control and safety systems, containment, safety features for water reactor

  16. Reactor operation

    CERN Document Server

    Shaw, J

    2013-01-01

    Reactor Operation covers the theoretical aspects and design information of nuclear reactors. This book is composed of nine chapters that also consider their control, calibration, and experimentation.The opening chapters present the general problems of reactor operation and the principles of reactor control and operation. The succeeding chapters deal with the instrumentation, start-up, pre-commissioning, and physical experiments of nuclear reactors. The remaining chapters are devoted to the control rod calibrations and temperature coefficient measurements in the reactor. These chapters also exp

  17. Thermal Reactor Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-06-01

    Information is presented concerning fire risk and protection; transient thermal-hydraulic analysis and experiments; class 9 accidents and containment; diagnostics and in-service inspection; risk and cost comparison of alternative electric energy sources; fuel behavior and experiments on core cooling in LOCAs; reactor event reporting analysis; equipment qualification; post facts analysis of the TMI-2 accident; and computational methods.

  18. Research Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martens, Frederick H. [Argonne National Laboratory; Jacobson, Norman H.

    1968-09-01

    This booklet discusses research reactors - reactors designed to provide a source of neutrons and/or gamma radiation for research, or to aid in the investigation of the effects of radiation on any type of material.

  19. Development of the radiation models of a BWR type reactor and it facility in the SUN-RAH; Desarrollo de modelos de radiacion de un reactor tipo BWR y su instalacion en el SUN-RAH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barron A, I. [Facultad de Ingenieria, UNAM, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)]. e-mail: isbarron@yahoo.com.mx

    2005-07-01

    This work about generation models, transport in processes and radioactive contamination of areas of a BWR central, is an amplification to the project developed in the UNAM to have a support tool in subjects or electric generation courses. It is planned about the implementation of models of radiation generation in a BWR type reactor for complement the functions developed in the University Simulator of Nucleo electric- Boiling water reactor (SUN-RAH) which it has been implemented in Simulink of MatLab and it has a model for the dynamics of one nucleo electric central that presents the main characteristics of the reactor vessel, the recirculation system, steam lines, turbines, generator, condensers and feeding water, defined by the main processes that intervene in the generation of energy of these plants. By this way the radiation monitoring systems for area and process, operate simultaneously with the processes of energy generation, with that is possible to observe the changes that present with respect to the operation conditions of the plant, and likewise to appreciate the radiation transport process through the components of the reactor, steam lines and turbines, for different operation conditions and possible faults that they could be presented during the reactor operation. (Author)

  20. The simulation of thermohydraulic phenomena in a pressurized water reactor primary loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popp, M

    1987-01-01

    Several important fluid flow and heat transfer phenomena essential to nuclear power reactor safety were investigated. Scaling and modeling laws for pressurized water reactors are reviewed and a new scaling approach focusing on the overall loop behavior is presented. Scaling criteria for one- and two-phase natural circulation are developed, as well as a simplified model describing the first phase of a small break loss of coolant accident. Reactor vessel vent valve effects are included in the analysis of steady one-phase natural circulation flow. Two new dimensionless numbers, which uniquely describe one-phase flow in natural circulation loops, were deduced and are discussed. A scaled model of the primary loop of a typical Babcock and Wilcox reactor was designed, built, and tested. The particular prototype modeled was the TMI unit 2 reactor. The electrically heated, stainless steel model operates at a maximum pressure of 300 psig and has a maximum heat input of 188 kW. The model is about 4 times smaller in height than the prototype reactor, with a nominal volume scale of 1:500. Experiments were conducted establishing subcooled natural circulation in the model loop. Both steady flow and power transients were investigated.

  1. Comparison of BR3 Surveillance and Vessel Plates to the Surrogate Plates Representative of the Yankee Rowe PWR Vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabry, A.; Chaouadi, R.; Puzzolante, J.L.; Van de Velde, J.; Biemiller, E.C.; Rosinski, S.T.; Carter, R.G

    1998-07-01

    The sister pressure vessels at the BR3 and Yankee Rowe PWR plants were operated at lower-than-usual temperature ( 260 degrees Celsius) and their plates were austenitized a higher-than-usual temperature (970 degrees Celsius) - a heat treatment leading to a coarser microstructure than is typical for the fine grain plates considered in development of USNRC Regulatory Guide 1.99. The surveillance programs provided by Westinghouse for the two plants were limited to the same A302-B plate representative of the Rowe vessel upper shell plate; this material displayed outlier behaviour characterized by a 41 J Charpy-V Notch shift significantly larger than predicted by Regulatory Guide 1.99. Because lower irradiation temperature and nickel alloying are generally considered detrimental to irradiation sensitivity, there was a major concern that the nickel-modified lower Rate plate and the nickel-modified BR3 plate may become too embrittled to satisfy the toughness requirements embodied in the PTS screening criterion. This paper compares free complementary studies undertaken to clarify these uncertainties: (1) The accelerated irradiation and test program launched in 1990 by Yankee Atomic Electric Company using typical vessel plate materials containing 0.24% copper at two nickel levels: YA1, 0.63 % (A533-B) and YA9, 0.19 (A302-B). These were heat-treated to produce the coarse and fine grain microstructures representative of the Yankee/BR3 and the Regulatory Guide plates, respectively; (2) The BR3 surveillance and vessel testing program: this vessel was wet-annealed in 1984, relicensed for operation till the plant shutdown in 1987, and was trepanned in early 1995; (3) The accelerated irradiations in the Belgian test reactor BR2 of the Yankee coarse grain plates YA1 and YA9 together with BR3 vessel specimens extracted at nozzle elevation, a location with negligible radiation exposure. It is contended that the PTS screening criterion was never attained by the BR3 and Rowe plates, and

  2. Vessel Operator System

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Operator cards are required for any operator of a charter/party boat and or a commercial vessel (including carrier and processor vessels) issued a vessel permit from...

  3. Radiation Shielding for Fusion Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santoro, R.T.

    1999-10-01

    Radiation shielding requirements for fusion reactors present different problems than those for fission reactors and accelerators. Fusion devices, particularly tokamak reactors, are complicated by geometry constraints that complicate disposition of fully effective shielding. This paper reviews some of these shielding issues and suggested solutions for optimizing the machine and biological shielding. Radiation transport calculations are essential for predicting and confirming the nuclear performance of the reactor and, as such, must be an essential part of the reactor design process. Development and optimization of reactor components from the first wall and primary shielding to the penetrations and containment shielding must be carried out in a sensible progression. Initial results from one-dimensional transport calculations are used for scoping studies and are followed by detailed two- and three-dimensional analyses to effectively characterize the overall radiation environment. These detail model calculations are essential for accounting for the radiation leakage through ports and other penetrations in the bulk shield. Careful analysis of component activation and radiation damage is cardinal for defining remote handling requirements, in-situ replacement of components, and personnel access at specific locations inside the reactor containment vessel. Radiation shielding requirements for fusion reactors present different problems than those for fission reactors and accelerators. Fusion devices, particularly tokamak reactors, are complicated by geometry constraints that complicate disposition of fully effective shielding. This paper reviews some of these shielding issues and suggested solutions for optimizing the machine and biological shielding. Radiation transport calculations are essential for predicting and confirming the nuclear performance of the reactor and, as such, must be an essential part of the reactor design process. Development and optimization of reactor

  4. Nuclear modules for space electric propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Difilippo, F. C.

    1998-01-01

    Analysis of interplanetary cargo and piloted missions requires calculations of the performances and masses of subsystems to be integrated in a final design. In a preliminary and scoping stage the designer needs to evaluate options iteratively by using fast computer simulations. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in the development of models and calculational procedures for the analysis (neutronic and thermal hydraulic) of power sources for nuclear electric propulsion. The nuclear modules will be integrated into the whole simulation of the nuclear electric propulsion system. The vehicles use either a Brayton direct-conversion cycle, using the heated helium from a NERVA-type reactor, or a potassium Rankine cycle, with the working fluid heated on the secondary side of a heat exchanger and lithium on the primary side coming from a fast reactor. Given a set of input conditions, the codes calculate composition. dimensions, volumes, and masses of the core, reflector, control system, pressure vessel, neutron and gamma shields, as well as the thermal hydraulic conditions of the coolant, clad and fuel. Input conditions are power, core life, pressure and temperature of the coolant at the inlet of the core, either the temperature of the coolant at the outlet of the core or the coolant mass flow and the fluences and integrated doses at the cargo area. Using state-of-the-art neutron cross sections and transport codes, a database was created for the neutronic performance of both reactor designs. The free parameters of the models are the moderator/fuel mass ratio for the NERVA reactor and the enrichment and the pitch of the lattice for the fast reactor. Reactivity and energy balance equations are simultaneously solved to find the reactor design. Thermalhydraulic conditions are calculated by solving the one-dimensional versions of the equations of conservation of mass, energy, and momentum with compressible flow.

  5. The siting of UK nuclear reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimston, Malcolm; Nuttall, William J; Vaughan, Geoff

    2014-06-01

    Choosing a suitable site for a nuclear power station requires the consideration and balancing of several factors. Some 'physical' site characteristics, such as the local climate and the potential for seismic activity, will be generic to all reactors designs, while others, such as the availability of cooling water, the area of land required and geological conditions capable of sustaining the weight of the reactor and other buildings will to an extent be dependent on the particular design of reactor chosen (or alternatively the reactor design chosen may to an extent be dependent on the characteristics of an available site). However, one particularly interesting tension is a human and demographic one. On the one hand it is beneficial to place nuclear stations close to centres of population, to reduce transmission losses and other costs (including to the local environment) of transporting electricity over large distances from generator to consumer. On the other it is advantageous to place nuclear stations some distance away from such population centres in order to minimise the potential human consequences of a major release of radioactive materials in the (extremely unlikely) event of a major nuclear accident, not only in terms of direct exposure but also concerning the management of emergency planning, notably evacuation.This paper considers the emergence of policies aimed at managing this tension in the UK. In the first phase of nuclear development (roughly speaking 1945-1965) there was a highly cautious attitude, with installations being placed in remote rural locations with very low population density. The second phase (1965-1985) saw a more relaxed approach, allowing the development of AGR nuclear power stations (which with concrete pressure vessels were regarded as significantly safer) closer to population centres (in 'semi-urban' locations, notably at Hartlepool and Heysham). In the third phase (1985-2005) there was very little new nuclear development, Sizewell

  6. Maintenance of fission and fusion reactors. 10. workshop on fusion reactor engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    This report contains copies of OHP presented at the title meeting. The presented topics are as follows, maintenance of nuclear power plants and ITER, exchange of shroud in BWR type reactors, deterioration of fission and fusion reactor materials, standards of pressure vessels, malfunction diagnosis method with neural network. (J.P.N.)

  7. Scanning tunneling microscope assembly, reactor, and system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Feng; Salmeron, Miquel; Somorjai, Gabor A

    2014-11-18

    An embodiment of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) reactor includes a pressure vessel, an STM assembly, and three spring coupling objects. The pressure vessel includes a sealable port, an interior, and an exterior. An embodiment of an STM system includes a vacuum chamber, an STM reactor, and three springs. The three springs couple the STM reactor to the vacuum chamber and are operable to suspend the scanning tunneling microscope reactor within the interior of the vacuum chamber during operation of the STM reactor. An embodiment of an STM assembly includes a coarse displacement arrangement, a piezoelectric fine displacement scanning tube coupled to the coarse displacement arrangement, and a receiver. The piezoelectric fine displacement scanning tube is coupled to the coarse displacement arrangement. The receiver is coupled to the piezoelectric scanning tube and is operable to receive a tip holder, and the tip holder is operable to receive a tip.

  8. Structural, electrical and thermodynamical aspects of hydrogenated ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    situ resistance with change in hydrogen pressure, a modi- fied reactor vessel was used for containing the material having an electrode with ceramic insulation. 10 g of alloy was kept in the reactor vessel, which also had a provision for heating and for measuring temperature and hydrogen pressure. Prior to an absorption run ...

  9. Heat barrier for use in a nuclear reactor facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, Charles P.

    1988-01-01

    A thermal barrier for use in a nuclear reactor facility is disclosed herein. Generally, the thermal barrier comprises a flexible, heat-resistant web mounted over the annular space between the reactor vessel and the guard vessel in order to prevent convection currents generated in the nitrogen atmosphere in this space from entering the relatively cooler atmosphere of the reactor cavity which surrounds these vessels. Preferably, the flexible web includes a blanket of heat-insulating material formed from fibers of a refractory material, such as alumina and silica, sandwiched between a heat-resistant, metallic cloth made from stainless steel wire. In use, the web is mounted between the upper edges of the guard vessel and the flange of a sealing ring which surrounds the reactor vessel with a sufficient enough slack to avoid being pulled taut as a result of thermal differential expansion between the two vessels. The flexible web replaces the rigid and relatively complicated structures employed in the prior art for insulating the reactor cavity from the convection currents generated between the reactor vessel and the guard vessel.

  10. Ion transport membrane module and vessel system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stein, VanEric Edward [Allentown, PA; Carolan, Michael Francis [Allentown, PA; Chen, Christopher M [Allentown, PA; Armstrong, Phillip Andrew [Orefield, PA; Wahle, Harold W [North Canton, OH; Ohrn, Theodore R [Alliance, OH; Kneidel, Kurt E [Alliance, OH; Rackers, Keith Gerard [Louisville, OH; Blake, James Erik [Uniontown, OH; Nataraj, Shankar [Allentown, PA; van Doorn, Rene Hendrik Elias (Obersulm-Willsbach, DE); Wilson, Merrill Anderson [West Jordan, UT

    2008-02-26

    An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an exterior, an inlet, and an outlet; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein any inlet and any outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; and (c) one or more gas manifolds in flow communication with interior regions of the membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel.The ion transport membrane system may be utilized in a gas separation device to recover oxygen from an oxygen-containing gas or as an oxidation reactor to oxidize compounds in a feed gas stream by oxygen permeated through the mixed metal oxide ceramic material of the membrane modules.

  11. Ion transport membrane module and vessel system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stein, VanEric Edward; Carolan, Michael Francis; Chen, Christopher M.; Armstrong, Phillip Andrew; Wahle, Harold W.; Ohrn, Theodore R.; Kneidel, Kurt E.; Rackers, Keith Gerard; Blake, James Erik; Nataraj, Shankar; van Doorn, Rene Hendrik Elias; Wilson, Merrill Anderson

    2007-02-20

    An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an exterior, an inlet, and an outlet; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein any inlet and any outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; and (c) one or more gas manifolds in flow communication with interior regions of the membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel. The ion transport membrane system may be utilized in a gas separation device to recover oxygen from an oxygen-containing gas or as an oxidation reactor to oxidize compounds in a feed gas stream by oxygen permeated through the mixed metal oxide ceramic material of the membrane modules.

  12. Ion transport membrane module and vessel system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stein, VanEric Edward [Allentown, PA; Carolan, Michael Francis [Allentown, PA; Chen, Christopher M [Allentown, PA; Armstrong, Phillip Andrew [Orefield, PA; Wahle, Harold W [North Canton, OH; Ohrn, Theodore R [Alliance, OH; Kneidel, Kurt E [Alliance, OH; Rackers, Keith Gerard [Louisville, OH; Blake, James Erik [Uniontown, OH; Nataraj, Shankar [Allentown, PA; Van Doorn, Rene Hendrik Elias (Obersulm-Willsbach, DE); Wilson, Merrill Anderson [West Jordan, UT

    2012-02-14

    An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an exterior, an inlet, and an outlet; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein any inlet and any outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; and (c) one or more gas manifolds in flow communication with interior regions of the membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel. The ion transport membrane system may be utilized in a gas separation device to recover oxygen from an oxygen-containing gas or as an oxidation reactor to oxidize compounds in a feed gas stream by oxygen permeated through the mixed metal oxide ceramic material of the membrane modules.

  13. Mitigate Strategy of Very High Temperature Reactor Air-ingress Accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ham, Tae Kyu [KHNP CRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Arcilesi, David J.; Sun, Xiaodong; Christensen, Richard N. [The Ohio State University, Columbus (United States); Oh, Chang H.; Kim, Eung S. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho (United States)

    2016-10-15

    A critical safety event of the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). Since a VHTR uses graphite as a core structure, if there is a break on the pressure vessel, the air in the reactor cavity could ingress into the reactor core. The worst case scenario of the accident is initiated by a double-ended guillotine break of the cross vessel that connects the reactor vessel and the power conversion unit. The operating pressures in the vessel and containment are about 7 and 0.1 MPa, respectively. In the VHTR, the reactor pressure vessel is located within a reactor cavity which is filled with air during normal operation. Therefore, the air-helium mixture in the cavity may ingress into the reactor pressure vessel after the depressurization process. In this paper, a commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tool, FLUENT, was used to figure out air-ingress mitigation strategies in the gas-turbine modular helium reactor (GT-MHR) designed by General Atomics, Inc. After depressurization, there is almost no air in the reactor cavity; however, the air could flow back to the reactor cavity since the reactor cavity is placed in the lowest place in the reactor building. The heavier air could flow to the reactor cavity through free surface areas in the reactor building. Therefore, Argon gas injection in the reactor cavity is introduced. The injected argon would prevent the flow by pressurizing the reactor cavity initially, and eventually it prevents the flow by making the gas a heavier density than air in the reactor cavity. The gate opens when the reactor cavity is pressurized during the depressurization and it closes by gravity when the depressurization is terminated so that it can slow down the air flow to the reactor cavity.

  14. Studies on formation and structures of ultrafine Cu precipitates in Fe-Cu model alloys for reactor pressure vessel steels using positron quantum dot confinement in the precipitates by their positron affinity. JAERI's nuclear research promotion program, H11-034 (Contract research)

    CERN Document Server

    Hasegawa, M; Suzuki, M; Tang, Z; Yubuta, K

    2003-01-01

    Positron annihilation experiments on Fe-Cu model dilute alloys of nuclear reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels have been performed after neutron irradiation in JMTR. Nanovoids whose inner surfaces were covered by Cu atoms were clearly observed. The nanovoids transformed to ultrafine Cu precipitates by dissociating their vacancies after annealing at around 400degC. The nanovoids and the ultrafine Cu precipitates are strongly suggested to be responsible for irradiation-induced embrittlement of RPV steels. Effects of Ni, Mn and P addition on the nanovoid and Cu precipitate formations were also studied. The nanovoid formation was enhanced by Ni and P, but suppressed by Mn. The Cu precipitates after annealing around 400degC were almost free from these doping elements and hence were pure Cu in the chemical composition. Furthermore the Fermi surface of the 'embedded' Cu precipitates with a body centered cubic crystal structure was obtained from two dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR) ...

  15. HOMOGENEOUS NUCLEAR REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, R.P.; Busey, H.M.

    1959-02-17

    Nuclear reactors of the homogeneous liquid fuel type are discussed. The reactor is comprised of an elongated closed vessel, vertically oriented, having a critical region at the bottom, a lower chimney structure extending from the critical region vertically upwardly and surrounded by heat exchanger coils, to a baffle region above which is located an upper chimney structure containing a catalyst functioning to recombine radiolyticallydissociated moderator gages. In operation the liquid fuel circulates solely by convection from the critical region upwardly through the lower chimney and then downwardly through the heat exchanger to return to the critical region. The gases formed by radiolytic- dissociation of the moderator are carried upwardly with the circulating liquid fuel and past the baffle into the region of the upper chimney where they are recombined by the catalyst and condensed, thence returning through the heat exchanger to the critical region.

  16. Iris reactor development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paramonov, D.V.; Carelli, M.D. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Baltimore, MD (United States); Miller, K. [BNFL, Inc., (United Kingdom); Lombardi, C.V.; Ricotti, M.E. [Polytechnic of Milan, Polimi (Italy); Todreas, N.E. [Masachussets Institute of Technology, MIT (United States); Greenspan, E. [University of California at Berkeley, UCB (United States); Yamamoto, K. [JAPC Japan Atomic Power Co., Tokyo (Japan); Nagano, A. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Ninokata, H. [Tokyo Institut of Technology, TIT (Japan); Robertson, J. [Westinghouse and bechtel (United States); Oriolo, F. [Pisa Univ. (Italy)

    2001-07-01

    The development progress of the IRIS (International Reactor Innovative and Secure) nuclear power system is presented. IRIS is currently being developed by an international consortium of industry, laboratory, university and utility establishments, led by Westinghouse. It is aimed at achieving the four major objectives of the Generation IV nuclear systems, i.e., proliferation resistance, enhanced safety, economic competitiveness and reduced waste. The project first year activities, which are summarized here, were focused on core neutronics, in-vessel configuration, steam generator and containment design, safety approach and economic performance. Details of these studies are provided in parallel papers in these proceedings. (author)

  17. REACTOR COOLING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quackenbush, C.F.

    1959-09-29

    A nuclear reactor with provisions for selectively cooling the fuel elements is described. The reactor has a plurality of tubes extending throughout. Cylindrical fuel elements are disposed within the tubes and the coolant flows through the tubes and around the fuel elements. The fuel elements within the central portion of the reactor are provided with roughened surfaces of material. The fuel elements in the end portions of the tubes within the reactor are provlded with low conduction jackets and the fuel elements in the region between the central portion and the end portions are provided with smooth surfaces of high heat conduction material.

  18. Behavior of underclad cracks in reactor pressure vessels - evaluation of mechanical analyses with tests on cladded mock-ups; Comportement des defauts sous revetement dans les cuves REP - evaluation des methodes d`analyse a partir d`essais de maquettes revetues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moinereau, D.; Rousselier, G.; Bethmont, M.

    1993-12-31

    Innocuity of underclad flaws in the reactor pressure vessels must be demonstrated in the French safety analyses, particularly in the case of a severe transient at the end of the pressure vessel lifetime, because of the radiation embrittlement of the vessel material. Safety analyses are usually performed with elastic and elasto-plastic analyses taking into account the effect of the stainless steel cladding. EDF has started a program including experiments on large size cladded specimens and their interpretations. The purpose of this program is to evaluate the different methods of fracture analysis used in safety studies. Several specimens made of ferritic steel A508 C1 3 with stainless steel cladding, containing small artificial defects, are loaded in four-point bending. Experiments are performed at very low temperature to simulate radiation embrittlement and to obtain crack instability by cleavage fracture. Three tests have been performed on mock-ups containing a small underclad crack (with depth about 5 mn) and a fourth test has been performed on one mock-up with a larger crack (depth about 13 mn). In each case, crack instability occurred by cleavage fracture in the base metal, without crack arrest, at a temperature of about - 170 deg C. Each test is interpreted using linear elastic analysis and elastic-plastic analysis by two-dimensional finite element computations. The fracture are conservatively predicted: the stress intensity factors deduced from the computations (K{sub cp} or K{sub j}) are always greater than the base metal toughness. The comparison between the elastic analyses (including two plasticity corrections) and the elastic-plastic analyses shows that the elastic analyses are often conservative. The beneficial effect of the cladding in the analyses is also shown : the analyses are too conservative if the cladding effects is not taken into account. (authors). 9 figs., 6 tabs., 10 refs.

  19. BIOASSAY VESSEL FAILURE ANALYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vormelker, P

    2008-09-22

    Two high-pressure bioassay vessels failed at the Savannah River Site during a microwave heating process for biosample testing. Improper installation of the thermal shield in the first failure caused the vessel to burst during microwave heating. The second vessel failure is attributed to overpressurization during a test run. Vessel failure appeared to initiate in the mold parting line, the thinnest cross-section of the octagonal vessel. No material flaws were found in the vessel that would impair its structural performance. Content weight should be minimized to reduce operating temperature and pressure. Outer vessel life is dependent on actual temperature exposure. Since thermal aging of the vessels can be detrimental to their performance, it was recommended that the vessels be used for a limited number of cycles to be determined by additional testing.

  20. Multifunctional reactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerterp, K.R.

    1992-01-01

    Multifunctional reactors are single pieces of equipment in which, besides the reaction, other functions are carried out simultaneously. The other functions can be a heat, mass or momentum transfer operation and even another reaction. Multifunctional reactors are not new, but they have received much

  1. Fast-acting nuclear reactor control device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotlyar, Oleg M.; West, Phillip B.

    1993-01-01

    A fast-acting nuclear reactor control device for moving and positioning a fety control rod to desired positions within the core of the reactor between a run position in which the safety control rod is outside the reactor core, and a shutdown position in which the rod is fully inserted in the reactor core. The device employs a hydraulic pump/motor, an electric gear motor, and solenoid valve to drive the safety control rod into the reactor core through the entire stroke of the safety control rod. An overrunning clutch allows the safety control rod to freely travel toward a safe position in the event of a partial drive system failure.

  2. Mechanical systems development of integral reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Keun Bae; Chang, M. H.; Kim, J. I.; Choi, S.; Kim, K. S.; Kim, T. W.; Jeong, K. H.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, Y. W.; Lee, G. M.

    1997-07-01

    While Korean nuclear reactor strategy seems to remain focused on the large capacity power generation, it is expected that demand of small and medium size reactor will arise for multi-purpose applications such as small capacity power generation, co-generation and sea water desalination. This in mind, survey has been made on the worldwide small and medium integral reactors under development. Reviewed are their technical characteristics, development status, design features, application plans, etc. For the mechanical design scope of work, the structural concept compatible with the characteristics and requirements of integral reactor has been established. Types of major components were evaluated and selected. Functional and structural concept, equipment layout and supporting concept within the reactor pressure vessel have also been established. Preliminary mechanical design requirements were developed considering the reactor lifetime, operation conditions, and the expected loading combinations. To embody the concurrent design approach, recent CAD technology and team engineering concept were evaluated. (author). 31 refs.,16 tabs., 35 figs.

  3. Profiling a reactor component using ultrasonics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pathak, L.; Seshadri, V.R.; Kumaravadivelu, C.; Sreenivasan, G.; Raghunathan, V.S. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)

    1995-04-01

    Nuclear reactors have many components within the reactor vessel. During the life of a reactor it is possible for these components to be displaced or deformed because of the thermal cycles to which they are subject. Also, these components in situ therefore becomes important for the upkeep of the reactor. However, high radiation levels make it difficult to monitor using optical methods. This paper describes an ultrasonic method which was successfully employed in profiling a deformed guide tube of a reactor. The method uses the well-known ultrasonic ranging technique. However, the specialty of the method is the use of air transducers at 40 kHz to overcome the inherent divergence problems and the difficulties associated with high temperatures inherent in a sodium cooled reactor.

  4. Verification of Remote Inspection Techniques for Reactor Internal Structures of Liquid Metal Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Young Sang; Lee, Jae Han

    2007-02-15

    The reactor internal structures and components of a liquid metal reactor (LMR) are submerged in hot sodium of reactor vessel. The division 3 of ASME code section XI specifies the visual inspection as major in-service inspection (ISI) methods of reactor internal structures and components. Reactor internals of LMR can not be visually examined due to opaque liquid sodium. The under-sodium viewing techniques using an ultrasonic wave should be applied for the visual inspection of reactor internals. Recently, an ultrasonic waveguide sensor with a strip plate has been developed for an application to the under-sodium inspection. In this study, visualization technique, ranging technique and monitoring technique have been suggested for the remote inspection of reactor internals by using the waveguide sensor. The feasibility of these remote inspection techniques using ultrasonic waveguide sensor has been evaluated by an experimental verification.

  5. Guam Abandoned Vessel Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Abandoned Vessel Project Data for Guam. Abandoned vessels pose a significant threat to the NOAA Trust resources through physical destruction of coral habitats...

  6. Florida Abandoned Vessel Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Abandoned Vessel Project Data for Florida. Abandoned vessels pose a significant threat to the NOAA Trust resources through physical destruction of coral...

  7. Vessel Arrival Info - Legacy

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Vessel Arrival Info is a spreadsheet that gets filled out during the initial stage of the debriefing process by the debriefer. It contains vessel name, trip...

  8. ALICE HMPID Radiator Vessel

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    View of the radiator vessels of the ALICE/HMPID mounted on the support frame. Each HMPID module is equipped with 3 indipendent radiator vessels made out of neoceram and fused silica (quartz) windows glued together. The spacers inside the vessel are needed to stand the hydrostatic pressure. http://alice-hmpid.web.cern.ch/alice-hmpid

  9. Experimental Study of the Effect of Graphite Dispersion on the Heat Transfer Phenomena in a Reactor Cavity Cooling System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaghetto, Rodolfo; Capone, Luigi; Hassan, Yassin A

    2011-05-31

    An experimental activity was performed to observe and study the effects of graphite dispersion and deposition on thermal-hydraulic phenomena in a reactor cavity cooling system (RCCS). The small-scale RCCS experimental facility (16.5 x 16.5 x 30.4 cm) used for this activity represents half of the reactor cavity with an electrically heated vessel. Water flowing through five vertical pipes removes the heat produced in the vessel and releases it into the environment by mixing with cold water in a large tank. The particle image velocimetry technique was used to study the velocity field of the air inside the cavity. A set of 52 thermocouples was installed in the facility to monitor the temperature profiles of the vessel, pipe walls, and air. Ten grams of a fine graphite powder (average particle size 2 m) was injected into the cavity through a spraying nozzle placed at the bottom of the vessel. The temperatures and air velocity field were recorded and compared with the measurements obtained before the graphite dispersion, showing a decrease of the temperature surfaces that was related to an increase in their emissivity. The results contribute to the understanding of RCCS capability in an accident scenario.

  10. Liquid immersion blanket design for use in a compact modular fusion reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorbom, Brandon; Ball, Justin; Barnard, Harold; Haakonsen, Christian; Hartwig, Zachary; Olynyk, Geoffrey; Sierchio, Jennifer; Whyte, Dennis

    2012-10-01

    Traditional tritium breeding blankets in fusion reactor designs include a large amount of structural material. This results in complex engineering requirements, complicated sector maintenance, and marginal tritium breeding ratios (TBR). We present a conceptual design of a fully liquid blanket. To maximize tritium breeding volume, the vacuum vessel is completely immersed in a continuously recycled FLiBe blanket, with the exception of small support posts. FLiBe has a wide liquid temperature window (459 C to 1430 C), low electrical conductivity to minimize MHD effects, similar thermal/fluid characteristics to water, and is chemically inert. While tritium breeding with FLiBe in traditional blankets is poor, we use MCNP neutronics analysis to show that the immersion blanket design coupled with a beryllium neutron multiplier results in TBR > 1. FLiBe is shown to be a sufficient radiation shield for the toroidal field magnets and can be used as a coolant for the vacuum vessel and divertor, allowing for a simplified single-phase, low-pressure, single-fluid cooling scheme. When coupled with a high-field compact reactor design, the immersion blanket eliminates the need for complex sector maintenance, allows the vacuum vessel to be a replaceable component, and reduces financial cost.

  11. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebe, J.J.

    1959-07-14

    High temperature reactors which are uniquely adapted to serve as the heat source for nuclear pcwered rockets are described. The reactor is comprised essentially of an outer tubular heat resistant casing which provides the main coolant passageway to and away from the reactor core within the casing and in which the working fluid is preferably hydrogen or helium gas which is permitted to vaporize from a liquid storage tank. The reactor core has a generally spherical shape formed entirely of an active material comprised of fissile material and a moderator material which serves as a diluent. The active material is fabricated as a gas permeable porous material and is interlaced in a random manner with very small inter-connecting bores or capillary tubes through which the coolant gas may flow. The entire reactor is divided into successive sections along the direction of the temperature gradient or coolant flow, each section utilizing materials of construction which are most advantageous from a nuclear standpoint and which at the same time can withstand the operating temperature of that particular zone. This design results in a nuclear reactor characterized simultaneously by a minimum critiral size and mass and by the ability to heat a working fluid to an extremely high temperature.

  12. Nuclear reactor PBMR and cogeneration; Reactor nuclear PBMR y cogeneracion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez S, J. R.; Alonso V, G., E-mail: ramon.ramirez@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2013-10-15

    In recent years the nuclear reactor designs for the electricity generation have increased their costs, so that at the moment costs are managed of around the 5000 US D for installed kw, reason for which a big nuclear plant requires of investments of the order of billions of dollars, the designed reactors as modular of low power seek to lighten the initial investment of a big reactor dividing the power in parts and dividing in modules the components to lower the production costs, this way it can begin to build a module and finished this to build other, differing the long term investment, getting less risk therefore in the investment. On the other hand the reactors of low power can be very useful in regions where is difficult to have access to the electric net being able to take advantage of the thermal energy of the reactor to feed other processes like the water desalination or the vapor generation for the processes industry like the petrochemical, or even more the possible hydrogen production to be used as fuel. In this work the possibility to generate vapor of high quality for the petrochemical industry is described using a spheres bed reactor of high temperature. (Author)

  13. Simple evaluations of fluid-induced vibrations for steam generator tube arrays in advanced marine reactors (MRX, DRX)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Kazuo [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Ishida, Toshihisa [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-06-01

    Advanced Marine Reactor (MRX) and Deep Sea Research Reactor (DRX) are the integral-type PWR, and the steam generators are installed in the reactor vessels. Steam generators are of the once-through, helical-coil tube types. Heat transfer tubes surround inner shroud in annular space of the reactor vessel. Flow-induced vibrations are calculated by simple methods, and the arrangement of tube support structures are evaluated. (author)

  14. A review on patents for hydrogen production using membrane reactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gallucci, F.; Basile, Angelo; Iulianelli, Adolfo; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Membrane reactors are a modern configuration which integrates reaction and separation units in one vessel and results in a tremendous degree of process intensification. Application of membrane reactors for hydrogen production has been widely studied in literature because membranes with infinite

  15. Containment for the low temperature district nuclear-heating reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He Shuyan (Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology, Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China)); Dong Duo (Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology, Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China))

    1993-04-01

    An integral arrangement is adopted for the Low Temperature District Nuclear-Heating Reactor. The primary heat exchangers, control rod drives and spent fuel elements are put in the reactor pressure vessel together with the reactor core. The primary coolant flows in natural circulation through the reactor core and the primary heat exchangers. The primary coolant pipes penetrating the wall of the reactor pressure vessel are all of small diameters. The reactor vessel constitutes the main part of the pressure boundary of the primary coolant. Therefore a small sized metallic containment closed to the wall of the reactor vessel can be used for the reactor. Design principles and functions of the containment are the same as for the containment of a PWR. But the adoption of a small sized containment brings about some benefits such as a short period of manufacturing, relatively low cost, and ease for sealing. A loss of primary coolant accident would not be happening during a rupture accident of the primary coolant pressure boundary inside the containment owing to its intrinsic safety. (orig.).

  16. Qualification according to PDI's techniques UT EPRI methodology Phased Array for the inspection of vessels of PWR reactor with advanced robotic equipment; Cualificacion segun metodologia PDI de EPRI de te cnicas UT Phased Array para la inspeccion de vasijas de reactor PWR con eq uipos roboticos avanzados

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gadea, J. R.; Gonzalez, P.; Fernandez, F.

    2014-07-01

    The techniques and procedures qualified in the program EPRI PDI are directly applicable in plants whose reference code is ASME XI - specifically the Appendix VIII-, mainly USA and countries in which it is established American PWR technology. While countries with reactors in operation technology ABB (Sweden) or type VVER (Finland and Eastern countries) requires a qualification of specific technical type ENIQ, PDI qualification is a valuable reference since it allows to deal with such qualifications with guarantees. (Author)

  17. Instrumentation and control strategies for an integral pressurized water reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belle R. Upadhyaya

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Several vendors have recently been actively pursuing the development of integral pressurized water reactors (iPWRs that range in power levels from small to large reactors. Integral reactors have the features of minimum vessel penetrations, passive heat removal after reactor shutdown, and modular construction that allow fast plant integration and a secure fuel cycle. The features of an integral reactor limit the options for placing control and safety system instruments. The development of instrumentation and control (I&C strategies for a large 1,000 MWe iPWR is described. Reactor system modeling—which includes reactor core dynamics, primary heat exchanger, and the steam flashing drum—is an important part of I&C development and validation, and thereby consolidates the overall implementation for a large iPWR. The results of simulation models, control development, and instrumentation features illustrate the systematic approach that is applicable to integral light water reactors.

  18. Flexible Conversion Ratio Fast Reactor Systems Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neil Todreas; Pavel Hejzlar

    2008-06-30

    Conceptual designs of lead-cooled and liquid salt-cooled fast flexible conversion ratio reactors were developed. Both concepts have cores reated at 2400 MWt placed in a large-pool-type vessel with dual-free level, which also contains four intermediate heat exchanges coupling a primary coolant to a compact and efficient supercritical CO2 Brayton cycle power conversion system. Decay heat is removed passively using an enhanced Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System and a Passive Secondary Auxiliary Cooling System. The most important findings were that (1) it is feasible to design the lead-cooled and salt-cooled reactor with the flexible conversion ratio (CR) in the range of CR=0 and CR=1 n a manner that achieves inherent reactor shutdown in unprotected accidents, (2) the salt-cooled reactor requires Lithium thermal Expansion Modules to overcme the inherent salt coolant's large positive coolant temperature reactivity coefficient, (3) the preferable salt for fast spectrum high power density cores is NaCl-Kcl-MgCl2 as opposed to fluoride salts due to its better themal-hydraulic and neutronic characteristics, and (4) both reactor, but attain power density 3 times smaller than that of the sodium-cooled reactor.

  19. Cooling system for a nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amtmann, Hans H.

    1982-01-01

    A cooling system for a gas-cooled nuclear reactor is disclosed which includes at least one primary cooling loop adapted to pass coolant gas from the reactor core and an associated steam generator through a duct system having a main circulator therein, and at least one auxiliary cooling loop having communication with the reactor core and adapted to selectively pass coolant gas through an auxiliary heat exchanger and circulator. The main and auxiliary circulators are installed in a common vertical cavity in the reactor vessel, and a common return duct communicates with the reactor core and intersects the common cavity at a junction at which is located a flow diverter valve operative to effect coolant flow through either the primary or auxiliary cooling loops.

  20. Development of a Remote Handling Robot for the Maintenance of an ITER-Like D-Shaped Vessel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peihua Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Robotic operation is one of the major challenges in the remote maintenance of ITER vacuum vessel (VV and future fusion reactors as inner operations of Tokamak have to be done by robots due to the internal adverse conditions. This paper introduces a novel remote handling robot (RHR for the maintenance of ITER-like D-shaped vessel. The modular designed RHR, which is an important part of the remote handling system for ITER, consists of three parts: an omnidirectional transfer vehicle (OTV, a planar articulated arm (PAA, and an articulated teleoperated manipulator (ATM. The task of RHR is to carry processing tools, such as the viewing system, leakage detector, and electric screwdriver, to inspect and maintain the components installed inside the D-shaped vessel. The kinematics of the OTV, as well as the kinematic analyses of the PAA and ATM, is studied in this paper. Because of its special length and heavy payload, the dynamics of the PAA is also investigated through a dynamic simulation system based on robot technology middleware (RTM. The results of the path planning, workspace simulations, and dynamic simulation indicate that the RHR has good mobility together with satisfying kinematic and dynamic performances and can well accomplish its maintenance tasks in the ITER-like D-shaped vessel.

  1. Reactor Neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Lasserre, T; Lasserre, Thierry; Sobel, Henry W.

    2005-01-01

    We review the status and the results of reactor neutrino experiments, that toe the cutting edge of neutrino research. Short baseline experiments have provided the measurement of the reactor neutrino spectrum, and are still searching for important phenomena such as the neutrino magnetic moment. They could open the door to the measurement of coherent neutrino scattering in a near future. Middle and long baseline oscillation experiments at Chooz and KamLAND have played a relevant role in neutrino oscillation physics in the last years. It is now widely accepted that a new middle baseline disappearance reactor neutrino experiment with multiple detectors could provide a clean measurement of the last undetermined neutrino mixing angle theta13. We conclude by opening on possible use of neutrinos for Society: NonProliferation of Nuclear materials and Geophysics.

  2. NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigner, E.P.; Young, G.J.

    1958-10-14

    A method is presented for loading and unloading rod type fuel elements of a neutronic reactor of the heterogeneous, solld moderator, liquid cooled type. In the embodiment illustrated, the fuel rods are disposed in vertical coolant channels in the reactor core. The fuel rods are loaded and unloaded through the upper openings of the channels which are immersed in the coolant liquid, such as water. Unloading is accomplished by means of a coffer dam assembly having an outer sleeve which is placed in sealing relation around the upper opening. A radiation shield sleeve is disposed in and reciprocable through the coffer dam sleeve. A fuel rod engaging member operates through the axial bore in the radiation shield sleeve to withdraw the fuel rod from its position in the reactor coolant channel into the shield, the shield snd rod then being removed. Loading is accomplished in the reverse procedure.

  3. Boiling water neutronic reactor incorporating a process inherent safety design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1985-02-19

    A boiling-water reactor core is positioned within a prestressed concrete reactor vessel of a size which will hold a supply of coolant water sufficient to submerge and cool the reactor core by boiling for a period of at least one week after shutdown. Separate volumes of hot, clean (nonborated) water for cooling during normal operation and cool highly borated water for emergency cooling and reactor shutdown are separated by an insulated wall during normal reactor operation with contact between the two water volumes being maintained at interfaces near the top and bottom ends of the reactor vessel. Means are provided for balancing the pressure of the two water volumes at the lower interface zone during normal operation to prevent entry of the cool borated water into the reactor core region, for detecting the onset of excessive power to coolant flow conditions in the reactor core and for detecting low water levels of reactor coolant. Cool borated water is permitted to flow into the reactor core when low reactor coolant levels or excessive power to coolant flow conditions are encountered.

  4. Proposal to negotiate an amendment to an existing contract for the supply of four additional low-noise Thyristor-Controlled Reactor coils for a new Static VAR Compensator on the 18 kV electrical network on the Meyrin site

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    Proposal to negotiate an amendment to an existing contract for the supply of four additional low-noise Thyristor-Controlled Reactor coils for a new Static VAR Compensator on the 18 kV electrical network on the Meyrin site

  5. Maury Journals - German Vessels

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — German vessels observations, after the 1853 Brussels Conference that set International Maritime Standards, modeled after Maury Marine Standard Observations.

  6. Advanced Demonstration and Test Reactor Options Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petti, David Andrew [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hill, R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gehin, J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gougar, Hans David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Strydom, Gerhard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Heidet, F. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Kinsey, J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Grandy, Christopher [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Qualls, A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Brown, Nicholas [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Powers, J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hoffman, E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Croson, D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Global efforts to address climate change will require large-scale decarbonization of energy production in the United States and elsewhere. Nuclear power already provides 20% of electricity production in the United States (U.S.) and is increasing in countries undergoing rapid growth around the world. Because reliable, grid-stabilizing, low emission electricity generation, energy security, and energy resource diversity will be increasingly valued, nuclear power’s share of electricity production has a potential to grow. In addition, there are non electricity applications (e.g., process heat, desalination, hydrogen production) that could be better served by advanced nuclear systems. Thus, the timely development, demonstration, and commercialization of advanced nuclear reactors could diversify the nuclear technologies available and offer attractive technology options to expand the impact of nuclear energy for electricity generation and non-electricity missions. The purpose of this planning study is to provide transparent and defensible technology options for a test and/or demonstration reactor(s) to be built to support public policy, innovation and long term commercialization within the context of the Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) broader commitment to pursuing an “all of the above” clean energy strategy and associated time lines. This planning study includes identification of the key features and timing needed for advanced test or demonstration reactors to support research, development, and technology demonstration leading to the commercialization of power plants built upon these advanced reactor platforms. This planning study is consistent with the Congressional language contained within the fiscal year 2015 appropriation that directed the DOE to conduct a planning study to evaluate “advanced reactor technology options, capabilities, and requirements within the context of national needs and public policy to support innovation in nuclear energy

  7. Studies on formation and structures of ultrafine Cu precipitates in Fe-Cu model alloys for reactor pressure vessel steels using positron quantum dot confinement in the precipitates by their positron affinity. JAERI's nuclear research promotion program, H11-034 (Contract research)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, Masayuki; Nagai, Yasuyoshi; Tang, Zheng; Yubuta, Kunio [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Inst. for Materials Research; Suzuki, Masahide [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    Positron annihilation experiments on Fe-Cu model dilute alloys of nuclear reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels have been performed after neutron irradiation in JMTR. Nanovoids whose inner surfaces were covered by Cu atoms were clearly observed. The nanovoids transformed to ultrafine Cu precipitates by dissociating their vacancies after annealing at around 400degC. The nanovoids and the ultrafine Cu precipitates are strongly suggested to be responsible for irradiation-induced embrittlement of RPV steels. Effects of Ni, Mn and P addition on the nanovoid and Cu precipitate formations were also studied. The nanovoid formation was enhanced by Ni and P, but suppressed by Mn. The Cu precipitates after annealing around 400degC were almost free from these doping elements and hence were pure Cu in the chemical composition. Furthermore the Fermi surface of the 'embedded' Cu precipitates with a body centered cubic crystal structure was obtained from two dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR) in a Fe-Cu single crystal and was agreed well with that from a band structure calculation. Theoretical calculation of positron confinement in Fe-Cu model alloys showed that a positron quantum dot state induced by positron affinity is attained for the embedded precipitates larger than 1 nm. A new position sensitive detector with a function of one dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation (1D-ACAR) has been developed that enables high resolution experiments over wide ranges of momentum distribution. (author)

  8. Emergency heat removal system for a nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunckel, Thomas L.

    1976-01-01

    A heat removal system for nuclear reactors serving as a supplement to an Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS) during a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) comprises a plurality of heat pipes having one end in heat transfer relationship with either the reactor pressure vessel, the core support grid structure or other in-core components and the opposite end located in heat transfer relationship with a heat exchanger having heat transfer fluid therein. The heat exchanger is located external to the pressure vessel whereby excessive core heat is transferred from the above reactor components and dissipated within the heat exchanger fluid.

  9. Lateral restraint assembly for reactor core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorholt, Wilhelm; Luci, Raymond K.

    1986-01-01

    A restraint assembly for use in restraining lateral movement of a reactor core relative to a reactor vessel wherein a plurality of restraint assemblies are interposed between the reactor core and the reactor vessel in circumferentially spaced relation about the core. Each lateral restraint assembly includes a face plate urged against the outer periphery of the core by a plurality of compression springs which enable radial preloading of outer reflector blocks about the core and resist low-level lateral motion of the core. A fixed radial key member cooperates with each face plate in a manner enabling vertical movement of the face plate relative to the key member but restraining movement of the face plate transverse to the key member in a plane transverse to the center axis of the core. In this manner, the key members which have their axes transverse to or subtending acute angles with the direction of a high energy force tending to move the core laterally relative to the reactor vessel restrain such lateral movement.

  10. 46 CFR 28.850 - Main source of electrical power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Main source of electrical power. 28.850 Section 28.850... FISHING INDUSTRY VESSELS Aleutian Trade Act Vessels § 28.850 Main source of electrical power. (a) Applicability: Each vessel that relies on electricity to power any of the following essential loads must have at...

  11. Neutronic reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wende, Charles W. J.; Babcock, Dale F.; Menegus, Robert L.

    1983-01-01

    A nuclear reactor includes an active portion with fissionable fuel and neutron moderating material surrounded by neutron reflecting material. A control element in the active portion includes a group of movable rods constructed of neutron-absorbing material. Each rod is movable with respect to the other rods to vary the absorption of neutrons and effect control over neutron flux.

  12. Neutronic reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babcock, D.F.; Menegus, R.L.; Wende, C.W.

    1983-01-04

    A nuclear reactor includes an active portion with fissionable fuel and neutron moderating material surrounded by neutron reflecting material. A control element in the active portion includes a group of movable rods constructed of neutron-absorbing material. Each rod is movable with respect to the other rods to vary the absorption of neutrons and effect control over neutron flux.

  13. PRESSURE-RESISTANT VESSEL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beukers, A.; De Jong, T.

    1997-01-01

    Abstract of WO 9717570 (A1) The invention is directed to a wheel-shaped pressure-resistant vessel for gaseous, liquid or liquefied material having a substantially rigid shape, said vessel comprising a substantially continuous shell of a fiber-reinforced resin having a central opening, an inner

  14. Containment vessel drain system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Scott G.

    2018-01-30

    A system for draining a containment vessel may include a drain inlet located in a lower portion of the containment vessel. The containment vessel may be at least partially filled with a liquid, and the drain inlet may be located below a surface of the liquid. The system may further comprise an inlet located in an upper portion of the containment vessel. The inlet may be configured to insert pressurized gas into the containment vessel to form a pressurized region above the surface of the liquid, and the pressurized region may operate to apply a surface pressure that forces the liquid into the drain inlet. Additionally, a fluid separation device may be operatively connected to the drain inlet. The fluid separation device may be configured to separate the liquid from the pressurized gas that enters the drain inlet after the surface of the liquid falls below the drain inlet.

  15. Inherently safe reactors and a second nuclear era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, A M; Spiewak, I

    1984-06-29

    The Swedish PIUS reactor and the German-American small modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor are inherently safe-that is, their safety relies not upon intervention of humans or of electromechanical devices but on immutable principles of physics and chemistry. A second nuclear era may require commercialization and deployment of such inherently safe reactors, even though existing light-water reactors appear to be as safe as other well-accepted sources of central electricity, particularly hydroelectric dams.

  16. Advanced High Temperature Reactor Systems and Economic Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Peretz, Fred J [ORNL; Qualls, A L [ORNL

    2011-09-01

    The Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR) is a design concept for a large-output [3400 MW(t)] fluoride-salt-cooled high-temperature reactor (FHR). FHRs, by definition, feature low-pressure liquid fluoride salt cooling, coated-particle fuel, a high-temperature power cycle, and fully passive decay heat rejection. The AHTR's large thermal output enables direct comparison of its performance and requirements with other high output reactor concepts. As high-temperature plants, FHRs can support either high-efficiency electricity generation or industrial process heat production. The AHTR analysis presented in this report is limited to the electricity generation mission. FHRs, in principle, have the potential to be low-cost electricity producers while maintaining full passive safety. However, no FHR has been built, and no FHR design has reached the stage of maturity where realistic economic analysis can be performed. The system design effort described in this report represents early steps along the design path toward being able to predict the cost and performance characteristics of the AHTR as well as toward being able to identify the technology developments necessary to build an FHR power plant. While FHRs represent a distinct reactor class, they inherit desirable attributes from other thermal power plants whose characteristics can be studied to provide general guidance on plant configuration, anticipated performance, and costs. Molten salt reactors provide experience on the materials, procedures, and components necessary to use liquid fluoride salts. Liquid metal reactors provide design experience on using low-pressure liquid coolants, passive decay heat removal, and hot refueling. High temperature gas-cooled reactors provide experience with coated particle fuel and graphite components. Light water reactors (LWRs) show the potentials of transparent, high-heat capacity coolants with low chemical reactivity. Modern coal-fired power plants provide design experience

  17. 46 CFR 115.806 - Electrical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Electrical. 115.806 Section 115.806 Shipping COAST GUARD....806 Electrical. At each initial and subsequent inspection for certification of a vessel, the owner or managing operator shall be prepared to conduct tests and have the vessel ready for inspection of electrical...

  18. Active cooling system for Tokamak in-vessel operation manipulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Jianjun, E-mail: yuanjj@sjtu.edu.cn; Chen, Tan; Li, Fashe; Zhang, Weijun; Du, Liang

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • We summarized most of the challenges of fusion devices to robot systems. • Propose an active cooling system to protect all of the necessary components. • Trial design test and theoretical analysis were conducted. • Overall implementation of the active cooling system was demonstrated. - Abstract: In-vessel operation/inspection is an indispensable task for Tokamak experimental reactor, for a robot/manipulator is more capable in doing this than human being with more precise motion and less risk of damaging the ambient equipment. Considering the demanding conditions of Tokamak, the manipulator should be adaptable to rapid response in the extreme conditions such as high temperature, vacuum and so on. In this paper, we propose an active cooling system embedded into such manipulator. Cameras, motors, gearboxes, sensors, and other mechanical/electrical components could then be designed under ordinary conditions. The cooling system cannot only be a thermal shield since the components are also heat sources in dynamics. We carry out a trial test to verify our proposal, and analyze the active cooling system theoretically, which gives a direction on the optimization by varying design parameters, components and distribution. And based on thermal sensors monitoring and water flow adjusting a closed-loop feedback control of temperature is added to the system. With the preliminary results, we believe that the proposal gives a way to robust and inexpensive design in extreme environment. Further work will concentrate on overall implementation and evaluation of this cooling system with the whole inspection manipulator.

  19. Sustainable Oceanographic Vessels - Setting an Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leer, J. C.

    2009-12-01

    In response to climate change, global warming and post “peak oil” fuel scarcity, the oceanographic community should consider reducing its carbon foot print. Why should scientists operate inefficient vessels while lecturing the general public on the need to reduce CO2 emissions? We have already seen curtailment of ship schedules and ship lay-ups, due in part to rising fuel costs, following $140/barrel crude oil. When the global recession ends, upward pressure on oil prices will again commence. Who can forecast how high fuel prices may ultimately rise during the typical 25-30 year lifetime of a research vessel? Are we to curtail future work at sea when oceanic climate research is becoming ever more important? A catamaran research vessel has been designed which can be electrically propelled from by a combination of high efficiency generators, photovoltaic panels and/or sails. Sail produced power is transformed with propellers and motor/generators into electric power which is stored in battery banks. This vessel could operate as the first true hybrid oceanographic research vessel. It could even continue operations without fuel in cases of a severe fuel shortage or fueling denial. Since the power produced by any water turbine increases with the cube of the velocity flowing over its propeller, the low fluid friction and high stability of a catamaran, with reasonably slender hulls, provide an important boost to efficient hybrid operation. The author has chartered a 42’ hybrid catamaran sailboat and found it efficient and extremely easy to operate and control. A 79’ motor sailing catamaran research vessel by Lock Crowther Designs will be presented as one example of a sustainable research vessel with excellent speed and sea-keeping. A center well makes operation as a small drilling/coring ship for coastal climate investigation possible. The center well also supports a host of remote sensing and robotic gear handling capabilities.

  20. A state of the art on penetration failure estimation under external vessel cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, B. T.; Park, R. J.; Kang, K. H.; Cho, Y. R.; Kim, J. W.; Kim, S. B.; Park, S. Y.; Lee, K. Y

    2000-04-01

    A state of the art on penetration failure was reviewed and analyzed to establish the direction of the experimental program in the KNGR and to decide the test section design. The interaction between the corium and the reactor vessel and the corium behavior in the lower plenum of the reactor vessel were analyzed to investigate the penetration effect on severe accident progression, and the TMI-2 accident was investigated in the point of penetration failure. Theoretical model and experiment results on penetration failure under the severe accident were investigated and reviewed to establish the direction of the experimental program on the estimation of the penetration failure in the KNGR. These results were compared with the TMI-2 results. The existing test facilities on penetration failure were investigated and reviewed to decide the test section design. It can be said from the state of the art review that penetration in the lower plenum of the reactor vessel is a week point in the reactor vessel failure under the severe accident, but the reactor vessel may not be failed by penetration failure in condition with the coolant supply to the penetration. Since the penetration is different with reactor types and there is no study on estimation of the penetration welding, it is necessary to investigate failure or not of the penetration in condition with external vessel cooling to maintain the reactor vessel integrity in KNGR. In the present experimental program on the integrity estimation of the KNGR penetration, the aluminum oxide melt by thermite reaction and the test section with one penetration of the real size and real material were selected. The melt mass, the pressure of the system, and the vessel geometry were selected as an experimental parameter. (author)

  1. Stability analysis on natural circulation boiling water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metz, Peter

    1999-05-01

    The purpose of the study is a stability analysis of the simplified boiling water reactor concept. A fluid dynamics code, DYNOS, was developed and successfully validated against FRIGG and DESIRE data and a stability benchmark on the Ringhals 1 forced circulation BWR. Three simplified desings were considered in the analysis: The SWRIOOO by Siemens and the SBWR and ESBWR from the General Electric Co. For all three design operational characteristics, i.e. power versus flow rate maps, were calculated. The effects which different geometric and operational parameters, such as the riser height, inlet subcooling etc., have on the characteristics have been investigated. Dynamic simulations on the three simplified design revealed the geysering and the natural circulation oscillations modes only. They were, however, only encountered at pressure below 0.6 MPa. Stability maps for all tree simplified BWRs were calculated and plotted. The study concluded that a fast pressurisation of the reactor vessel is necessary to eliminate the possibility of geysering or natural circulation oscillations mode instability. (au) 26 tabs., 88 ills.

  2. Advanced in-vessel retention design for next generation risk management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Kune Y.; Hwang, Il Soon [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    In the TMI-2 accident, approximately twenty (20) tons of molten core material drained into the lower plenum. Early advanced light water reactor (LWR) designs assumed a lower head failure and incorporated various measures for ex-vessel accident mitigation. However,one of the major findings from the TMI-2 Vessel Investigation Project was that one part of the reactor lower head wall estimated to have attained a temperature of 1100 deg C for about 30 minutes has seemingly experienced a comparatively rapid cooldown with no major threat to the vessel integrity. In this regard, recent empirical and analytical studies have shifted interests to such in-vessel retention designs or strategies as reactor cavity flooding, in-vessel flooding and engineered gap cooling of the vessel. Accurate thermohydrodynamic and creep deformation modeling and rupture prediction are the key to the success in developing practically useful in-vessel accident/risk management strategies. As an advanced in-vessel design concept, this work presents the COrium Attack Syndrome Immunization Structures (COASIS) that are being developed as prospective in-vessel retention devices for a next-generation LWR in concert with existing ex-vessel management measures. Both the engineered gap structures in-vessel (COASISI) and ex-vessel (COASISO) are demonstrated to maintain effective heat transfer geometry during molten core debris attack when applied to the Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plant (KSNPP) reactor. The likelihood of lower head creep rupture during a severe accident is found to be significantly suppressed by the COASIS options. 15 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab. (Author)

  3. STARFIRE: a commercial tokamak reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-12-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide an interim status report on the STARFIRE project for the period of May to September 1979. The basic objective of the STARFIRE project is to develop a design concept for a commercial tokamak fusion electric power plant based on the deuterium/tritium/lithium fuel cycle. The key technical objective is to develop the best embodiment of the tokamak as a power reactor consistent with credible engineering solutions to design problems. Another key goal of the project is to give careful attention to the safety and environmental features of a commercial fusion reactor.

  4. Assessing the project to stop 24 nuclear reactors out of 58 by 2025 and to reduce from 75 to 50% the share of nuclear electricity production; Chiffrage du projet de mise a l'arret de 24 reacteurs nucleaires sur 58 d'ici 2025 et de reduction de 75 a 50%

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perves, Jean-Pierre

    2011-12-20

    The author proposes an assessment of the agreement between the French socialist and ecologist parties which specifies the closing down of 24 nuclear reactors by 2025, the stopping of spent fuel processing and of the MOX process, and other objectives regarding energy efficiency and the development of renewable energies. The author takes lifetime into account for the different concerned reactors. He discusses the impact of the loss of production on the nuclear production turnover, the impact on exports, the mobilisation of investments in renewable energies, the impact on the balance of payments, and on the electricity price. He also briefly mentions induced effects

  5. Evolving the SP-100 reactor in order to boost large payloads to GEO and to low lunar orbit via nuclear-electric propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Robert E.

    1991-01-01

    In striving to reduce exploration cost and exploration risks, a crucial aspect of the plans is program continuity, i.e., the continuing application of a given technology over a long period so that experience will accumulate from extended testing here on earth and from a diversity of applications in space. An integrated view needs to be formed of the missions SEI will carry out, near term as well as far, and of the ways in which these missions can mutually support one another. Near term programs should be so constituted as to provide for the long term missions both the enabling technologies and the accumulation of experience they need. In achieving this, missions in earth orbit should both evolve and show the technologies crucial to long term missions on the lunar surfaces, and the program for the lunar labs should evolve and show the enabling technologies for exploration of the surface of Mars and for flights of human beings to Mars and return. In the near term, the program for the Space Station should be directed and funded to develop and demonstrate the solar Brayton power plant that will be most useful as the power generator for the SP-100 nuclear reactor.

  6. Investigation of molten salt fast breeder reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubota, Kenichi; Enuma, Yasuhiro; Tanaka, Yoshihiko; Konomura, Mamoru; Ichimiya, Masakazu [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    2000-06-01

    Phase I of Feasibility Studies on Commercialized Fast Reactor System is being performed for two years from Japanese Fiscal Year 1999. In this report, results of the study on fluid fuel reactors (especially a molten salt fast breeder reactor concept) are described from the viewpoint of technical and economical concerns of the plant system design. In JFY1999, we have started to investigate the fluid fuel reactors as alternative concepts of sodium cooled FBR systems with MOX fuel, and selected the unique concept of a molten chloride fast breeder reactor, whose U-Pu fuel cycle can be related to both light water reactors and fast breeder reactors on the basis of present technical data and design experiences. We selected a preliminary composition of molten fuel and conceptual plant design through evaluation of technical and economical issues essential for the molten salt reactors and then compared them with reference design concepts of sodium cooled FBR systems under limited information on the molten chloride fast breeder reactors. The following results were obtained. (1) The molten chloride fast breeder reactors have inherent safety features in the core and plant performances, ad the fluid fuel is quite promising for cost reduction of the fuel fabrication and reprocessing. (2) On the other hand, the inventory of the molten chloride fuel becomes high and thermal conductivity of the coolant is inferior compared to those of sodium cooled FBR systems, then, the size of main components such as IHX's becomes larger and the amount of construction materials is seems to be increased. (3) Furthermore economical vessel and piping materials which contact with the molten chloride salts are required to be developed. From the results, it is concluded that further steps to investigate the molten chloride fast breeder reactor concepts are too early to be conducted. (author)

  7. Generation IV Reactors Integrated Materials Technology Program Plan: Focus on Very High Temperature Reactor Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corwin, William R [ORNL; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL; Katoh, Yutai [ORNL; McGreevy, Timothy E [ORNL; Nanstad, Randy K [ORNL; Ren, Weiju [ORNL; Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL

    2008-08-01

    Since 2002, the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems (Gen IV) Program has addressed the research and development (R&D) necessary to support next-generation nuclear energy systems. The six most promising systems identified for next-generation nuclear energy are described within this roadmap. Two employ a thermal neutron spectrum with coolants and temperatures that enable hydrogen or electricity production with high efficiency (the Supercritical Water Reactor-SCWR and the Very High Temperature Reactor-VHTR). Three employ a fast neutron spectrum to enable more effective management of actinides through recycling of most components in the discharged fuel (the Gas-cooled Fast Reactor-GFR, the Lead-cooled Fast Reactor-LFR, and the Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor-SFR). The Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) employs a circulating liquid fuel mixture that offers considerable flexibility for recycling actinides and may provide an alternative to accelerator-driven systems. At the inception of DOE's Gen IV program, it was decided to significantly pursue five of the six concepts identified in the Gen IV roadmap to determine which of them was most appropriate to meet the needs of future U.S. nuclear power generation. In particular, evaluation of the highly efficient thermal SCWR and VHTR reactors was initiated primarily for energy production, and evaluation of the three fast reactor concepts, SFR, LFR, and GFR, was begun to assess viability for both energy production and their potential contribution to closing the fuel cycle. Within the Gen IV Program itself, only the VHTR class of reactors was selected for continued development. Hence, this document will address the multiple activities under the Gen IV program that contribute to the development of the VHTR. A few major technologies have been recognized by DOE as necessary to enable the deployment of the next generation of advanced nuclear reactors, including the development and qualification of

  8. Comparison of simulated and measured quantities of a duplex reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koskela, M.; Kajava, M. [ABB Marine, Helsinki (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    The purpose of this article is to illustrate the use of an analog simulator as a design tool when designing new power electric equipment. The purpose of simulation is to predict the functionality of electrical equipment to be constructed. Duplex reactor is an electromagnetic device designed to reduce voltage harmonics and short circuit currents in the ship electrical network. In this report a comparison between simulated and measured electrical quantities of a duplex reactor has been made. The purpose of the measurements was to show the correct functioning of the reactor. The simulation results and the measured waveforms corresponds well to each other. (orig.) 4 refs.

  9. Pebble Bed Reactors Design Optimization Methods and their Application to the Pebble Bed Fluoride Salt Cooled High Temperature Reactor (PB-FHR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisneros, Anselmo Tomas, Jr.

    The Fluoride salt cooled High temperature Reactor (FHR) is a class of advanced nuclear reactors that combine the robust coated particle fuel form from high temperature gas cooled reactors, direct reactor auxillary cooling system (DRACS) passive decay removal of liquid metal fast reactors, and the transparent, high volumetric heat capacitance liquid fluoride salt working fluids---flibe (33%7Li2F-67%BeF)---from molten salt reactors. This combination of fuel and coolant enables FHRs to operate in a high-temperature low-pressure design space that has beneficial safety and economic implications. In 2012, UC Berkeley was charged with developing a pre-conceptual design of a commercial prototype FHR---the Pebble Bed- Fluoride Salt Cooled High Temperature Reactor (PB-FHR)---as part of the Nuclear Energy University Programs' (NEUP) integrated research project. The Mark 1 design of the PB-FHR (Mk1 PB-FHR) is 236 MWt flibe cooled pebble bed nuclear heat source that drives an open-air Brayton combine-cycle power conversion system. The PB-FHR's pebble bed consists of a 19.8% enriched uranium fuel core surrounded by an inert graphite pebble reflector that shields the outer solid graphite reflector, core barrel and reactor vessel. The fuel reaches an average burnup of 178000 MWt-d/MT. The Mk1 PB-FHR exhibits strong negative temperature reactivity feedback from the fuel, graphite moderator and the flibe coolant but a small positive temperature reactivity feedback of the inner reflector and from the outer graphite pebble reflector. A novel neutronics and depletion methodology---the multiple burnup state methodology was developed for an accurate and efficient search for the equilibrium composition of an arbitrary continuously refueled pebble bed reactor core. The Burnup Equilibrium Analysis Utility (BEAU) computer program was developed to implement this methodology. BEAU was successfully benchmarked against published results generated with existing equilibrium depletion codes VSOP

  10. NEUTRONIC REACTOR FUEL ELEMENT AND CORE SYSTEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, W.T.

    1958-09-01

    This patent relates to neutronic reactors and in particular to an improved fuel element and a novel reactor core system for facilitating removal of contaminating fission products, as they are fermed, from association with the flssionable fuel, so as to mitigate the interferent effects of such fission products during reactor operation. The fuel elements are comprised of tubular members impervious to fluid and contatning on their interior surfaces a thin layer of fissionable material providing a central void. The core structure is comprised of a plurality of the tubular fuel elements arranged in parallel and a closed manifold connected to their ends. In the reactor the core structure is dispersed in a water moderator and coolant within a pressure vessel, and a means connected to said manifuld is provided for withdrawing and disposing of mobile fission product contamination from the interior of the feel tubes and manifold.

  11. 2013 Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  12. 2011 Passenger Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  13. 2011 Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  14. 2013 Passenger Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  15. 2013 Tanker Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  16. 2013 Cargo Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  17. High Performance Marine Vessels

    CERN Document Server

    Yun, Liang

    2012-01-01

    High Performance Marine Vessels (HPMVs) range from the Fast Ferries to the latest high speed Navy Craft, including competition power boats and hydroplanes, hydrofoils, hovercraft, catamarans and other multi-hull craft. High Performance Marine Vessels covers the main concepts of HPMVs and discusses historical background, design features, services that have been successful and not so successful, and some sample data of the range of HPMVs to date. Included is a comparison of all HPMVs craft and the differences between them and descriptions of performance (hydrodynamics and aerodynamics). Readers will find a comprehensive overview of the design, development and building of HPMVs. In summary, this book: Focuses on technology at the aero-marine interface Covers the full range of high performance marine vessel concepts Explains the historical development of various HPMVs Discusses ferries, racing and pleasure craft, as well as utility and military missions High Perfor