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Sample records for vessel head models

  1. Rupture tests with reactor pressure vessel head models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talja, H.; Keinaenen, H.; Hosio, E.; Pankakoski, P.H.; Rahka, K.

    2003-01-01

    In the LISSAC project (LImit Strains in Severe ACcidents), partly funded by the EC Nuclear Fission and Safety Programme within the 5th Framework programme, an extensive experimental and computational research programme is conducted to study the stress state and size dependence of ultimate failure strains. The results are aimed especially to make the assessment of severe accident cases more realistic. For the experiments in the LISSAC project a block of material of the German Biblis C reactor pressure vessel was available. As part of the project, eight reactor pressure vessel head models from this material (22 NiMoCr 3 7) were tested up to rupture at VTT. The specimens were provided by Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (FzK). These tests were performed under quasistatic pressure load at room temperature. Two specimens sizes were tested and in half of the tests the specimens contain holes describing the control rod penetrations of an actual reactor pressure vessel head. These specimens were equipped with an aluminium liner. All six tests with the smaller specimen size were conducted successfully. In the test with the large specimen with holes, the behaviour of the aluminium liner material proved to differ from those of the smaller ones. As a consequence the experiment ended at the failure of the liner. The specimen without holes yielded results that were in very good agreement with those from the small specimens. (author)

  2. Transient stratification modelling of a corium pool in a LWR vessel lower head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Tellier, R.; Saas, L.; Bajard, S.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A kinetic stratification model is proposed for the simulation of the in-vessel corium behaviour during a LWR severe accident. • The different associated “modes” of vessel failure by thermal focusing effect are highlighted and discussed. • A sensitivity study for a 1650 MWe GenIII PWR is presented with this model in order to illustrate the associated R&D issues. - Abstract: In the context of light water reactor severe accidents analysis, this paper is focused on one key parameter of in-vessel corium phenomenology: the immiscible phases stratification and its impact on the heat flux distribution at the corium pool lateral boundary with the so-called focusing effect related to a “thin” top metal phase and the potential vessel failure at that point. More particularly, based on the limited knowledge of the stratification transient phenomenon derived from the MASCA-RCW experiment, a basic model is proposed that can be used for corium in lower head sensitivity analyses. It has been implemented in the PROCOR platform developed at CEA Cadarache. A short parametric study on a simple hypothetical transient is presented in order to highlight the different focusing effect “modes” that can be encountered based on this in-vessel corium pool model. An early mode may occur during the formation of the top metal layer while two other modes may appear later during the thinning of this top metal layer because of thermochemically induced mass transfers. Some associated relevant parameters (model or scenario-dependent) and modelling issues are mentioned and illustrated with some results of a Monte-Carlo based sensitivity calculation on the transient behaviour of the corium in the lower head of a 1650 MWe GenIII PWR. Within the limiting modelling hypotheses, the thermal modelling of the steel layer for small (centimetre) heights and the mass diffusivity (limited in this case to the uranium diffusivity in the oxidic layer) are main sensitive parameters

  3. Reactor vessel head permanent shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hankinson, M.F.; Leduc, R.J.; Richard, J.W.; Malandra, L.J.

    1989-01-01

    A nuclear reactor is described comprising: a nuclear reactor pressure vessel closure head; control rod drive mechanisms (CRDMs) disposed within the closure head so as to project vertically above the closure head; cooling air baffle means surrounding the control rod drive mechanisms for defining cooling air paths relative to the control rod drive mechanisms; means defined within the periphery of the closure head for accommodating fastening means for securing the closure head to its associated pressure vessel; lifting lugs fixedly secured to the closure head for facilitating lifting and lowering movements of the closure head relative to the pressure vessel; lift rods respectively operatively associated with the plurality of lifting lugs for transmitting load forces, developed during the lifting and lowering movements of the closure head, to the lifting lugs; upstanding radiation shield means interposed between the cooling air baffle means and the periphery of the enclosure head of shielding maintenance personnel operatively working upon the closure head fastening means from the effects of radiation which may emanate from the control rod drive mechanisms and the cooling air baffle means; and connecting systems respectively associated with each one of the lifting lugs and each one of the lifting rods for connecting each one of the lifting rods to a respective one of each one of the lifting lugs, and for simultaneously connecting a lower end portion of the upstanding radiation shield means to each one of the respective lifting lugs

  4. Validation of ASTEC V2 models for the behaviour of corium in the vessel lower head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carénini, L.; Fleurot, J.; Fichot, F.

    2014-01-01

    The paper is devoted to the presentation of validation cases carried out for the models describing the corium behaviour in the “lower plenum” of the reactor vessel implemented in the V2.0 version of the ASTEC integral code, jointly developed by IRSN (France) and GRS (Germany). In the ASTEC architecture, these models are grouped within the single ICARE module and they are all activated in typical accident scenarios. Therefore, it is important to check the validity of each individual model, as long as experiments are available for which a single physical process is involved. The results of ASTEC applications against the following experiments are presented: FARO (corium jet fragmentation), LIVE (heat transfer between a molten pool and the vessel), MASCA (separation and stratification of corium non miscible phases) and OLHF (mechanical failure of the vessel). Compared to the previous ASTEC V1.3 version, the validation matrix is extended. This work allows determining recommended values for some model parameters (e.g. debris particle size in the fragmentation model and criterion for debris bed liquefaction). Almost all the processes governing the corium behaviour, its thermal interaction with the vessel wall and the vessel failure are modelled in ASTEC and these models have been assessed individually with satisfactory results. The main uncertainties appear to be related to the calculation of transient evolutions

  5. Elastic plastic buckling of elliptical vessel heads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alix, M.; Roche, R.L.

    1981-08-01

    The risks of buckling of dished vessel head increase when the vessel is thin walled. This paper gives the last results on experimental tests of 3 elliptical heads and compares all the results with some empirical formula dealing with elastic and plastic buckling

  6. Experimental investigation of creep behavior of reactor vessel lower head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, T.Y.; Pilch, M.; Bentz, J.H.; Behbahani, A.

    1998-03-01

    The objective of the USNRC supported Lower Head Failure (LHF) Experiment Program at Sandia National Laboratories is to experimentally investigate and characterize the failure of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) lower head due to the thermal and pressure loads of a severe accident. The experimental program is complemented by a modeling program focused on the development of a constitutive formulation for use in standard finite element structure mechanics codes. The problem is of importance because: lower head failure defines the initial conditions of all ex-vessel events; the inability of state-of-the-art models to simulate the result of the TMI-II accident (Stickler, et al. 1993); and TMI-II results suggest the possibility of in-vessel cooling, and creep deformation may be a precursor to water ingression leading to in-vessel cooling

  7. TMI-2 reactor vessel head removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bengel, P.R.; Smith, M.D.; Estabrook, G.A.

    1984-12-01

    This report describes the safe removal and storage of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor vessel head. The head was removed in July 1984 to permit the removal of the plenum and the reactor core, which were damaged during the 1979 accident. From July 1982, plans and preparations were made using a standard head removal procedure modified by the necessary precautions and changes to account for conditions caused by the accident. After data acquisition, equipment and structure modifications, and training the head was safely removed and stored and the internals indexing fixture and a work platform were installed on top of the vessel. Dose rates during and after the operation were lower than expected; lessons were learned from the operation which will be applied to the continuing fuel removal operations activities

  8. TMI-2 reactor vessel head removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bengel, P.R.; Smith, M.D.; Estabrook, G.A.

    1985-09-01

    This report describes the safe removal and storage of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) reactor vessel head. The head was removed in July 1984 to permit the removal of the plenum and the reactor core, which were damaged during the 1979 accident. From July 1982, plans and preparations were made using a standard head removal procedure modified by the necessary precautions and changes to account for conditions caused by the accident. After data acquisition, equipment and structure modifications, and training, the head was safely removed and stored; and the internals indexing fixture and a work platform were installed on top of the vessel. Dose rates during and after the operation were lower than expected; lessons were learned from the operation which will be applied to the continuing fuel removal operations activities

  9. Head spray nozzle in reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatano, Shun-ichi.

    1990-01-01

    In a reactor pressure vessel of a BWR type reactor, a head spray nozzle is used for cooling the head of the pressure vessel and, in view of the thermal stresses, it is desirable that cooling is applied as uniformly as possible. A conventional head spray is constituted by combining full cone type nozzles. Since the sprayed water is flown down upon water spraying and the sprayed water in the vertical direction is overlapped, the flow rate distribution has a high sharpness to form a shape as having a maximum value near the center and it is difficult to obtain a uniform flow rate distribution in the circumferential direction. Then, in the present invention, flat nozzles each having a spray water cross section of laterally long shape, having less sharpness in the circumferential distribution upon spraying water to the inner wall of the pressure vessel and having a wide angle of water spray are combined, to make the flow rate distribution of spray water uniform in the inner wall of the pressure vessel. Accordingly, the pressure vessel can be cooled uniformly and thermal stresses upon cooling can be decreased. (N.H.)

  10. Reactor vessel closure head replacements in 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1997-01-01

    The Framatome-Jeumont Industrie consortium have completed in 1997 28 reactor vessel (RV) closure head replacements, including five on 1300 MWe class PWR units. Framatome manages the operations and handles removal and reinstallation of equipment (not including the control rod drive mechanisms (CRDM)) and the requalification tests, while JI, which manufactures the CRDMs, is involved in the CRDM cutting, re-machining and welding operations, using tools of original design, in order to optimize the RV closure head operation in terms of costs, schedule and dosage

  11. Galectin-1 Inhibitor OTX008 Induces Tumor Vessel Normalization and Tumor Growth Inhibition in Human Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koonce, Nathan A; Griffin, Robert J; Dings, Ruud P M

    2017-12-09

    Galectin-1 is a hypoxia-regulated protein and a prognostic marker in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC). Here we assessed the ability of non-peptidic galectin-1 inhibitor OTX008 to improve tumor oxygenation levels via tumor vessel normalization as well as tumor growth inhibition in two human HNSCC tumor models, the human laryngeal squamous carcinoma SQ20B and the human epithelial type 2 HEp-2. Tumor-bearing mice were treated with OTX008, Anginex, or Avastin and oxygen levels were determined by fiber-optics and molecular marker pimonidazole binding. Immuno-fluorescence was used to determine vessel normalization status. Continued OTX008 treatment caused a transient reoxygenation in SQ20B tumors peaking on day 14, while a steady increase in tumor oxygenation was observed over 21 days in the HEp-2 model. A >50% decrease in immunohistochemical staining for tumor hypoxia verified the oxygenation data measured using a partial pressure of oxygen (pO₂) probe. Additionally, OTX008 induced tumor vessel normalization as tumor pericyte coverage increased by approximately 40% without inducing any toxicity. Moreover, OTX008 inhibited tumor growth as effectively as Anginex and Avastin, except in the HEp-2 model where Avastin was found to suspend tumor growth. Galectin-1 inhibitor OTX008 transiently increased overall tumor oxygenation via vessel normalization to various degrees in both HNSCC models. These findings suggest that targeting galectin-1-e.g., by OTX008-may be an effective approach to treat cancer patients as stand-alone therapy or in combination with other standards of care.

  12. Crack growth rates in vessel head penetration materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez Briceno, D.; Lapena, J.; Blazquez, F.

    1994-01-01

    The cracks detected in reactor vessel head penetrations in certain European plants have been attributed to Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking (PWSCC). The penetrations in question are made from Inconel 600. The susceptibility of this alloy to PWSCC has been widely studied in relation to use of this material for steam generator tubes. When the first reactor vessel head penetration cracks were detected, most of the available data on crack propagation rates were from test specimens made from steam generator tubes and tested under conditions that questioned the validity of these data for assessment of the evolution of cracks in penetrations. For this reason, the scope of the Spanish Research Project on the Inspection and Repair of PWR reactor vessel head penetrations included the acquisition of data on crack propagation rates in Inconel 600, representative of the materials used for vessel head penetrations. (authors). 1 fig., 2 tabs., 6 refs

  13. The Effective Convectivity Model for Simulation and Analysis of Melt Pool Heat Transfer in a Light Water Reactor Pressure Vessel Lower Head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran, Chi Thanh

    2009-09-01

    Severe accidents in a Light Water Reactor (LWR) have been a subject of intense research for the last three decades. The research in this area aims to reach understanding of the inherent physical phenomena and reduce the uncertainties in their quantification, with the ultimate goal of developing models that can be applied to safety analysis of nuclear reactors, and to evaluation of the proposed accident management schemes for mitigating the consequences of severe accidents. In a hypothetical severe accident there is likelihood that the core materials will be relocated to the lower plenum and form a decay-heated debris bed (debris cake) or a melt pool. Interactions of core debris or melt with the reactor structures depend to a large extent on the debris bed or melt pool thermal hydraulics. In case of inadequate cooling, the excessive heat would drive the structures' overheating and ablation, and hence govern the vessel failure mode and timing. In turn, threats to containment integrity associated with potential ex-vessel steam explosions and ex-vessel debris uncoolability depend on the composition, superheat, and amount of molten corium available for discharge upon the vessel failure. That is why predictions of transient melt pool heat transfer in the reactor lower head, subsequent vessel failure modes and melt characteristics upon the discharge are of paramount importance for plant safety assessment. The main purpose of the present study is to develop a method for reliable prediction of melt pool thermal hydraulics, namely to establish a computational platform for cost-effective, sufficiently-accurate numerical simulations and analyses of core Melt-Structure-Water Interactions in the LWR lower head during a postulated severe core-melting accident. To achieve the goal, an approach to efficient use of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) has been proposed to guide and support the development of models suitable for accident analysis. The CFD method, on the one hand, is

  14. The coolability limits of a reactor pressure vessel lower head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theofanous, T.G.; Syri, S. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Configuration II of the ULPU experimental facility is described, and from a comprehensive set of experiments are provided. The facility affords full-scale simulations of the boiling crisis phenomenon on the hemispherical lower head of a reactor pressure vessel submerged in water, and heated internally. Whereas Configuration I experiments (published previously) established the lower limits of coolability under low submergence, pool-boiling conditions, with Configuration II we investigate coolability under conditions more appropriate to practical interest in severe accident management; that is, heat flux shapes (as functions of angular position) representative of a core melt contained by the lower head, full submergence of the reactor pressure vessel, and natural circulation. Critical heat fluxes as a function of the angular position on the lower head are reported and related the observed two-phase flow regimes.

  15. Estimation of center line and diameter of brain blood vessel using three-dimensional blood vessel matching method with head three-dimensional CTA image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maekawa, Masashi; Shinohara, Toshihiro; Nakayama, Masato; Nakasako, Noboru

    2010-01-01

    To support and automate the brain blood vessel disease diagnosis, a novel method to obtain the center line and the diameter of a blood vessel is proposed with a three-dimensional head computed tomographic angiography (CTA) image. Although the line thinning processing with distance transform or gray information is generally used to obtain the blood vessel center line, this method is not essentially one to obtain the center line and tends to yield extra lines depending on CTA images. In this study, the center line of the blood vessel is obtained by tracing the vessel. The blood vessel is traced by sequentially estimating the center point and direction of the blood vessel. The center point and direction of the blood vessel are estimated by taking the correlation between the blood vessel and a solid model of the blood vessel that is designed by considering noise influence. In addition, the vessel diameter is also estimated by correlating the blood vessel and the blood vessel model of which the diameter is variable. The validity of the proposed method is confirmed by experimentally applied the proposed method to an actual three-dimensional head CTA image. (author)

  16. Prediction of thermal margin for external cooling of reactor vessel lower head during a severe accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Ho Jun; Suh, Kune Y.

    1998-01-01

    In the TMI-2 accident, approximately nineteen (19) tons of molten core material drained into the lower plenum. One of the major findings from the TMI-2 Vessel Investigation Project was that one part of the reactor lower head wall estimated to have attained a temperature of 1100 .deg. C for about 30 minutes has seemingly experienced a comparatively rapid cooldown with no major threat to the vessel integrity. In this regard, recent empirical and analytical studies have shifted interests to such in-vessel retention designs or strategies as reactor cavity flooding, in-vessel flooding and engineered gap cooling of the vessel. Accurate thermohydrodynamic and creep deformation modeling and rupture prediction are the key to the success in developing practically useful in-vessel accident management strategies. As an advanced in-vessel design concept, the COrium Attak Syndrome Immunization Structures (COASIS) are being developed as prospective in-vessel retention devices for a next-generation LWR in concert with existing ex-vessel management measures. Both the engineered gap structures in -vessel (COASISI) and ex-vessel (COASISO) were demonstrated to maintain effective heat transfer geometry during molten core debris attack when applied to the TMI-2 and the Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plant (KSNPP) reactors. The likelihood of lower head creep rupture during a severe accident is found to be significantly suppressed by the COASIS options. In studying the in-vessel severe accident phenomena, one of the main goals is to verify the cooling mechanism in the reactor vessel lower plenum and thereby to prevent the vessel failure from thermal attack by the molten debris. This paper presents the first-principle calculation results for the thermal margin for the case of external cooling of the reactor vessel lower head. Adopting the method presented by F.B. Cheung, et al., we calculated the departure from nucleate boiling ratio (DNBR) for the three cases of pool boiling, flow boiling

  17. Experimental Investigation of Creep Behavior of Reactor Vessel Lower Head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, T.Y.; Pilch, M.; Bentz, J.H.; Behbahani, A.

    1999-01-01

    The authors report a study which aimed at experimentally and numerically investigating and characterizing the failure of a reactor pressure vessel (RPV) lower head due to thermal and pressure loads generated by a severe accident. They present the experimental apparatus which is based on a scaled version of the lower part of a TMI-like reactor pressure vessel without vessel skirt. They report and comment the results obtained during the first five experiments: uniform heating and non penetrations, centre-peaked heat flux and no penetrations, edge-peaked heat flux and no penetrations, uniform heating with penetrations, edge-peaked heat flux with penetrations. They compare the third and fifth experience (those with edge-peaked heat flux)

  18. Real-time sail and heading optimization for a surface sailing vessel by extremum seeking control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Treichel, Kai; Jouffroy, Jerome

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we develop a simplified mathematical model representing the main elements of the behaviour of sailing vessels as a basis for simulation and controller design. For adaptive real-time optimization of the sail and heading angle we then apply extremum seeking control (which is a gradient...

  19. Residual stresses of manufacture on the PWR vessel head penetrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Hong, S.; Todeschini, P.; Ternon, F.; Cipiere, M.F.; Gimond, C.; Faure, F.

    1997-01-01

    Since the detection in September 1991 of a leakage on a vessel head adapter of Bugey 3 during the decadal hydro-test, a study has been led by Framatome and EDF on the phenomenon, which has been identified as a stress corrosion cracking. The stress parameter particularly is an important factor in regard to the behaviour of the Alloy 600 in primary water. It has been the subject of a calculation program, which is not presented here, and of an experimental program which contents: 1 - the determination of residual stresses on the inner surface of the adapter and on the weld metal by the hole method and the diffraction of X-Rays on representative mock-ups and on a vessel head during manufacturing; 2 - the visualization of the stress field at the surface by corrosion tests on representative mock-ups in sodium hydroxide at 350 o C. The results are globally consistent with each other and give an important contribution to the interpretation of the results of the controls on site. (authors)

  20. Containment vessel bottom head transport and lifting technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Donghong; Tian Shiyong; Hu Dequan; Xiao Hongtao

    2013-01-01

    The challengeable transport and lifting techniques and high safety assurance measures are needed for the onsite construction of the AP1000 containment vessel bottom head (CVBH), which is a large component with heavy weight, big size, high center of gravity, and easy to deformation. During transport, the infra structural road foundation is heavily loaded with big turning radius, and the requirement for synchronization of transport vehicles is strict. During lifting, the crane lifting capacities are high, requirement for the lifting and rigging tools is strict, nuclear island being put into place is difficult, and the crane operating foundation is heavily loaded. The transport and lifting techniques and safety assurance measures for CVBH are elaborated in detail, so as to provide a reference for the follow-up transport and lifting of large components of nuclear island. (authors)

  1. Investigation of a weld defect, reactor vessel head Ringhals 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Embring, G.; Pers-Anderson, E.B.

    1994-01-01

    During the summer-outage 1993 Ringhals unit 2 vessel head was inspected at weld-area of Alloy 182. One major defect was found Two plus two ''boat-samples'' were taken out from the zone between the weld and the stainless cladding. All samples were sent to Studsviks laboratories for detailed investigations. The metallographic and fractographic investigations revealed that the major weld-defect had been there from manufacturing. The defect was located between the Alloy 182-buttering and the pressure vessel steel SA 533 grB cl 1. No indications of PWSCC or IDSCC were found. An inspection programme was defined. Different types of reference blocks were provided by Ringhals in cooperation with ABB TRC. Reference reflectors of type flat bottom hole (FBH) and eroded notches (EDM), with different sizes and separation were manufactured. One weld sample with manufacturing defects -lack of fusion and slag was inclusions- was present. ABB TRC performed UT inspection in the gap between the penetration and the thermal sleeve. Inspection results like defect identification, defect separation and defect sizing accuracy were compared with result from the destructive inspection. No relevant additional defects were found. An analysing and repair program was performed. A special designed disc sealed off the defect area. (authors). 5 figs., 3 refs

  2. Investigating the cooling ability of reactor vessel head injection in the Maanshan PWR using CFD simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tseng Yungshin; Lin Chihhung; Wan Jongrong; Shih Chunkuan; Tsai, F. Peter

    2011-01-01

    In order to reduce the crack growth rate on the welding of penetration pipe, Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) of Maanshan nuclear power plant (NPP) uses vessel head injection to cool vessel lid and control rod driving components. The injection flow from the cold leg is drained by the pressure difference between cold leg and upper internal components. In this study, 10 million meshes model with 4 sub-models have been developed to simulate the thermal-hydraulic behavior by commercial CFD program FLUENT. The results indicate that the injection nozzles can provide good cooling ability to reduce the maximum temperature for lid on the vessel head. The maximum temperature of vessel lid is about 293.81degC. Based on the simulated temperature, ASME CODE N-729-1 was further used to recount the effective degradation years (EDY) and reinspection years (RIY) factors. It demonstrates that the EDY and RIY factors are still less than 1.0. Therefore, the re-inspection period for Maanshan PWR would not be significantly affected by the miner temperature difference. (author)

  3. 3 D flow computations under a reactor vessel closure head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daubert, O.; Bonnin, O.; Hofmann, F.; Hecker, M.

    1995-12-01

    The flow under a vessel cover of a pressurised water reactor is investigated by using several computations and a physical model. The case presented here is turbulent, isothermal and incompressible. Computations are made with N3S code using a k-epsilon model. Comparisons between numerical and experimental results are on the whole satisfying. Some local improvements are expected either with more sophisticated turbulence models or with mesh refinements automatically computed by using the adaptive meshing technique which has been just implemented in N3S for 3D cases. (authors). 6 refs., 7 figs

  4. Model tests for prestressed concrete pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoever, R.

    1975-01-01

    Investigations with models of reactor pressure vessels are used to check results of three dimensional calculation methods and to predict the behaviour of the prototype. Model tests with 1:50 elastic pressure vessel models and with a 1:5 prestressed concrete pressure vessel are described and experimental results are presented. (orig.) [de

  5. Vessel head penetrations: French approach for maintenance in the PLIM program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Champigny, F.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: In 1991, in the Bugey nuclear power plant, for the first time a leak occurred at the level of a vessel head penetration made with base nickel alloy (Inconel 600). This leak was caused by a primary stress corrosion cracking coming from inside the penetration tube. The crack was trough wall extent and primary fluid went out from the top of the vessel head. Immediately, Electricite de France launched important research programs and expertise in order to understand the root causes and propose solutions to this problem. The root causes confirmed PWSCC, and in the same time solutions for repair were studied and an inspection program was established to check the base metal of other vessel head penetrations. After several tests, repair solutions were abandoned because of their high costs (financial and dosimetry). EDF decided to replace all the vessel heads with Inconel 600 penetrations. Non destructive developments leaded to use eddy currents for detection and characterization but also televisual techniques to confirm. In a second step, in order to inspect without removing the inside thermal sleeve, eddy current and ultrasonic sword probes were achieved and used to inspect all vessel heads penetrations. Up to now, 75% of the vessel head have been replaced on the 900 MW and 1300 MW fleets but to replace wisely the last vessel heads EDF continues to perform NDE of the penetrations on the basis of safety criteria. This paper describes the different steps of the applied policy in France, NDE methods, criteria and the results obtained. (author)

  6. Coupled thermo-mechanical analysis of corium-loaded lower head of pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, J.; Balasubramaniyan, V.

    2016-01-01

    A severe accident in the pressurised water reactor may lead to the relocation of core materials to the lower head of Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV). The core debris at the bottom of RPV forms a melt pool of corium due to decay heat. The understanding of behaviour of pressure vessel, characterised by failure mode and time to failure, in this scenario is one of the important steps in predicting the accident progression. The most predominant failure mode is multi-axial creep deformation of the vessel with a non-uniform temperature field. Towards this, a numerical analysis methodology is developed for the prediction of pressure vessel deformation during the severe accidents. The methodology involves 2-D finite element modelling under multi-physics environment, which account the creep phenomena using Norton-Bailey creep law with a typical damage model of RPV material. The validation of the methodology is carried out using the results from OLHF experiment carried out in Sandia National Laboratory (SNL), USA, within the framework of an OECD. (author)

  7. Vitamin K2 Ameliorates Damage of Blood Vessels by Glucocorticoid: a Potential Mechanism for Its Protective Effects in Glucocorticoid-induced Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head in a Rat Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuelei; Yin, Junhui; Ding, Hao; Zhang, Changqing; Gao, You-Shui

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoid has been reported to decrease blood vessel number and harm the blood supply in the femoral head, which is recognized to be an important mechanism of glucocorticoid-induced osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH). To prevent glucocorticoid-induced ONFH, medication that promotes both bone formation and angiogenesis would be ideal. Vitamin K2 has been revealed to play an important role in bone metabolism; however, few studies have focused on the effect of Vitamin K2 on new vascular formation. Thus, this study aimed to investigate whether Vitamin K2 promoted new blood vessel formation in the presence of glucocorticoids, both in vitro and in vivo. The effect of Vitamin K2 on viability, migration, in vitro tube formation, and VEGF, vWF, CD31, KDR, Flt and PDGFB in EAhy926 incubated with or without dexamethasone were elucidated. VEGF, TGF-β and BMP-2, angiogenesis-related proteins secreted by osteoblasts, were also detected in the osteoblast-like cell line of MG63. In addition, blood vessels of the femoral head in rats administered with or without methylprednisolone and Vitamin K2 were evaluated using angiography and CD31 staining. In vitro studies showed that Vitamin K2 significantly protected endothelial cells from dexamethasone-induced apoptosis, promoted endothelial cell migration and in vitro tube formation. Angiogenesis-related proteins both in EAhy926 and MG63 were also upregulated by Vitamin K2 when cotreated with dexamethasone. In vivo studies showed enhanced blood vessel volume and CD31-positive staining cells in rats cotreated with VK2 and methylprednisolone compared to rats treated with methylprednisolone only. Collectively, Vitamin K2 has the ability to promote angiogenesis in vitro and to ameliorate vessels of the femoral head in glucocorticoid-treated rats in vivo, indicating that Vitamin K2 is a promising drug that may be used to prevent steroid-induced ONFH.

  8. Primary circuit leak detection an application on PWR vessel head penetrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loisy, F.; Germain, J.L.; Chauvel, L.

    1996-01-01

    In 1991, cracks were discovered and localized in the lower part of certain vessel head adapters in EDF PWR units. While awaiting the replacement of the vessel heads in question, EDF developed systems to enable continuous monitoring of vessel head penetration, by means of early detection of leaks. One of these systems in based on detection of water vapour in a confined space above the vessel head. The efficiency of the measurement chain is particularly dependent on dilution of the leakage in the confined space prior TO entry in the sampling circuit. The detection threshold for this method is on the order of 1.2 liters/hour for a dilution rate of 1500 rate of 1500 m 3 /h and a dew point of 22 deg C. This system has now been in operation on three 1300-MW PWR units for three years, and has proved to function satisfactorily. (authors)

  9. Short and long term maintenance strategy for reactor vessel head penetrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teissier, A.; Heuze, A.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents elements based on : surveys, operating inspection, theoretical studies, safety analysis, laboratory results, that enabled to determine maintenance options and short and long term strategies for processing on reactor vessel head leaks. (TEC). 1 tab

  10. Evaluation of the stress distribution on the pressure vessel head with multi-openings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, K.S.; Kim, T.W.; Jeong, K.H.; Lee, G.M. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1998-06-01

    This report discusses and analyzes the stress distribution on the pressure vessel head with multi-openings(3 PSV nozzles, 2 SDS nozzles and 1 Man Way) according to patterns of the opening distance. The pressurizer of Korea Standardized Nuclear Power Plant(Ulchin 3 and 4), which meets requirements of the cyclic operation and opening design defined by ASME code, was used as the basic model for that. Stress changes according to the distance between openings were investigated and the factors which should be considered for the opening design were analyzed. Also, the nozzle loads at Level A, B conditions and internal pressure were applied in order to evaluate changes of head stress distributions due to nozzle loads. (author). 6 refs., 29 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Evaluation of a pig femoral head osteonecrosis model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Harry

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A major cause of osteonecrosis of the femoral head is interruption of a blood supply to the proximal femur. In order to evaluate blood circulation and pathogenetic alterations, a pig femoral head osteonecrosis model was examined to address whether ligature of the femoral neck (vasculature deprivation induces a reduction of blood circulation in the femoral head, and whether transphyseal vessels exist for communications between the epiphysis and the metaphysis. We also tested the hypothesis that the vessels surrounding the femoral neck and the ligamentum teres represent the primary source of blood flow to the femoral head. Methods Avascular osteonecrosis of the femoral head was induced in Yorkshire pigs by transecting the ligamentum teres and placing two ligatures around the femoral neck. After heparinized saline infusion and microfil perfusion via the abdominal aorta, blood circulation in the femoral head was evaluated by optical and CT imaging. Results An angiogram of the microfil casted sample allowed identification of the major blood vessels to the proximal femur including the iliac, common femoral, superficial femoral, deep femoral and circumflex arteries. Optical imaging in the femoral neck showed that a microfil stained vessel network was visible in control sections but less noticeable in necrotic sections. CT images showed a lack of microfil staining in the epiphysis. Furthermore, no transphyseal vessels were observed to link the epiphysis to the metaphysis. Conclusion Optical and CT imaging analyses revealed that in this present pig model the ligatures around the femoral neck were the primary cause of induction of avascular osteonecrosis. Since the vessels surrounding the femoral neck are comprised of the branches of the medial and the lateral femoral circumflex vessels, together with the extracapsular arterial ring and the lateral epiphyseal arteries, augmentation of blood circulation in those arteries will improve

  12. Replacement of a vessel head, an operation which today gets easily into its stride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mardon, P.; Chaumont, J.C.; Lambiotte, P.

    1995-01-01

    In 1992, one year after the detection of a leak in a vessel head of the Electricite de France (EDF) Bugey 4 reactor, the head was replaced by the Framatome-Jeumont Industrie Group. Today, this group, which has developed new methods and new tools to optimize the cost, the time-delay and the dosimetry of this kind of intervention, has performed 11 additional replacements, two of which on 1300 MWe power units. This paper describes step by step the successive operations required for a complete vessel head replacement, including the testing of safety systems before starting up the reactor. (J.S.). 7 photos

  13. Effects of air vessel on water hammer in high-head pumping station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, L; Wang, F J; Zou, Z C; Li, X N; Zhang, J C

    2013-01-01

    Effects of air vessel on water hammer process in a pumping station with high-head were analyzed by using the characteristics method. The results show that the air vessel volume is the key parameter that determines the protective effect on water hammer pressure. The maximum pressure in the system declines with increasing air vessel volume. For a fixed volume of air vessel, the shape of air vessel and mounting style, such as horizontal or vertical mounting, have little effect on the water hammer. In order to obtain good protection effects, the position of air vessel should be close to the outlet of the pump. Generally, once the volume of air vessel is guaranteed, the water hammer of a entire pipeline is effectively controlled

  14. Effects of air vessel on water hammer in high-head pumping station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L.; Wang, F. J.; Zou, Z. C.; Li, X. N.; Zhang, J. C.

    2013-12-01

    Effects of air vessel on water hammer process in a pumping station with high-head were analyzed by using the characteristics method. The results show that the air vessel volume is the key parameter that determines the protective effect on water hammer pressure. The maximum pressure in the system declines with increasing air vessel volume. For a fixed volume of air vessel, the shape of air vessel and mounting style, such as horizontal or vertical mounting, have little effect on the water hammer. In order to obtain good protection effects, the position of air vessel should be close to the outlet of the pump. Generally, once the volume of air vessel is guaranteed, the water hammer of a entire pipeline is effectively controlled.

  15. Residual life assessment of French PWR vessel head penetrations through metallurgical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pichon, C.; Boudot, R.; Benhamou, C.; Gelpi, A.

    1994-01-01

    In September 1991, a vessel head penetration was found leaking at Bugey 3 plant during the hydrotest included in the framework of decennial In Service Inspections. Non destructive examinations performed afterwards on several other plants have shown some cracked penetrations. Destructive expertise confirmed quickly that again this new problem is related to stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 used as base material. During the last 15 years, similar cracking have been met in steam generator tubes and secondly in pressurizer instrumentation tubes. In spite of all the work performed since that time an extension appears to be necessary for explaining the features of this new event; however material sensitivity, stress and temperature still remain the key parameters governing the behavior of Alloy 600 in PWR environment. In this paper, only the material sensitivity of vessel head penetrations is examined through metallurgical analysis in relation with SCC tests. On the basis of vessel head field experience in combination with thermomechanical process used for fabrication of original bars criteria for a sensitivity ranking of penetrations are proposed. Metallurgical investigations and SCC tests were carried out to support this sensitivity ranking. The final aim is to use such information among those quoted above for assessment of vessel heads residual life. This document is an overview of the work performed in France concerning the material sensitivity of forged Alloy 600. It represents an important part of the assessments and investigations undertaken in France on the stress corrosion cracking phenomenon affecting the reactor vessel head penetrations in PWR's

  16. Analysis of Reactor Vessel Lower Head Penetration Tube Failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stempniewicz, Marek

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents results of two studies, performed to investigate the behavior of the reactor vessel penetration tubes in case of relocation of molten material into the tubes. The first study is on the CORVIS drain line experiment 03/1. Results of pre-test calculations are presented, and compared to the later obtained experimental data. The timing of the drain line melting and the velocity of the debris flowing inside the drain line were predicted correctly, but the penetration depth was clearly underestimated. If the calculations are done using different correlation for the melt-to-wall convective heat transfer, the results are closer to the experiment. It cannot however be concluded that the alternative correlation is more appropriate until other uncertainties are clarified. The second study presents calculations performed for GKN Dodewaard CRD, instrument tubes and drain line. Calculations were performed to estimate whether the tubes have a chance to withstand the first attack of the melt and thus postpone vessel failure until the water in the lower plenum evaporates. Calculations were performed assuming that the melt can move into the tubes without any resistance, e.g. presence of water in the tubes was not taken into account. The results indicate that the critical penetration of the GKN vessel, which is most likely to fail, is the drain line. Results also indicate that external flooding should prevent early tube failure, at least in case of low vessel pressure. (author)

  17. 1D/2D analyses of the lower head vessel in contact with high temperature melt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Jong Eun; Cho, Jae Seon; Suh, Kune Y.; Chung, Chang H.

    1998-01-01

    One- and two-dimensional analyses were performed for the ceramic/metal melt and the vessel to interpret the temperature history of the outer surface of the vessel wall measured from typical Al 2 O 3 /Fe thermite melt tests LAVA (Lower-plenum Arrested Vessel Attack) spanning heatup and cooldown periods. The LAVA tests were conducted at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) during the process of high temperature molten material relocation from the delivery duct down into the water in the test vessel pressurized to 2.0 MPa. Both analyses demonstrated reasonable predictions of the temperature history of the LHV (Lower Head Vessel). The comparison sheds light on the thermal hydraulic and material behavior of the high temperature melt within the hemispherical vessel

  18. Coupled thermo-mechanical creep analysis for boiling water reactor pressure vessel lower head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villanueva, Walter; Tran, Chi-Thanh; Kudinov, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We consider a severe accident in a BWR with melt pool formation in the lower head. ► We study the influence of pool depth on vessel failure mode with creep analysis. ► There are two modes of failure; ballooning of vessel bottom and a localized creep. ► External vessel cooling can suppress creep and subsequently prevent vessel failure. - Abstract: In this paper we consider a hypothetical severe accident in a Nordic-type boiling water reactor (BWR) at the stage of relocation of molten core materials to the lower head and subsequent debris bed and then melt pool formation. Nordic BWRs rely on reactor cavity flooding as a means for ex-vessel melt coolability and ultimate termination of the accident progression. However, different modes of vessel failure may result in different regimes of melt release from the vessel, which determine initial conditions for melt coolant interaction and eventually coolability of the debris bed. The goal of this study is to define if retention of decay-heated melt inside the reactor pressure vessel is possible and investigate modes of the vessel wall failure otherwise. The mode of failure is contingent upon the ultimate mechanical strength of the vessel structures under given mechanical and thermal loads and applied cooling measures. The influence of pool depth and respective transient thermal loads on the reactor vessel failure mode is studied with coupled thermo-mechanical creep analysis. Efficacy of control rod guide tube (CRGT) cooling and external vessel wall cooling as potential severe accident management measures is investigated. First, only CRGT cooling is considered in simulations revealing two different modes of vessel failure: (i) a ‘ballooning’ of the vessel bottom and (ii) a ‘localized creep’ concentrated within the vicinity of the top surface of the melt pool. Second, possibility of in-vessel retention with CRGT and external vessel cooling is investigated. We found that the external vessel

  19. TMI-2 reactor-vessel head removal and damaged-core-removal planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logan, J.A.; Hultman, C.W.; Lewis, T.J.

    1982-01-01

    A major milestone in the cleanup and recovery effort at TMI-2 will be the removal of the reactor vessel closure head, planum, and damaged core fuel material. The data collected during these operations will provide the nuclear power industry with valuable information on the effects of high-temperature-dissociated coolant on fuel cladding, fuel materials, fuel support structural materials, neutron absorber material, and other materials used in reactor structural support components and drive mechanisms. In addition, examination of these materials will also be used to determine accident time-temperature histories in various regions of the core. Procedures for removing the reactor vessel head and reactor core are presented

  20. Histomorphological changes of vessel structure in head and neck vessels following preoperative or postoperative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultze-Mosgau, S.; Wehrhan, F.; Wiltfang, J.; Grabenbauer, G.G.; Sauer, R.; Roedel, F.; Radespiel-Troeger, M.

    2002-01-01

    Patients and Methods: In 348 patients (October 1995-March 2002) receiving primarly or secondarily 356 microvascular hard- and soft tissue reconstruction, a total of 209 vessels were obtained from neck recipient vessels and transplant vessels during anastomosis. Three groups were analysed: group 1 (27 patients) treated with no radiotherapy or chemotherapy; group 2 (29 patients) treated with preoperative irradiation (40-50 Gy) and chemotherapy (800 mg/m 2 /day 5-FU and 20 mg/m 2 /day cisplatin) 1.5 months prior to surgery; group 3 (20 patients) treated with radiotherapy (60-70 Gy) (median interval 78.7 months; IQR: 31.3 months) prior to surgery. From each of the 209 vessel specimens, 3 sections were investigated histomorphometrically, qualitatively and quantitatively (ratio media area/total vessel area) by NIH-Image-digitized measurements. To evaluate these changes as a function of age, radiation dose and chemotherapy, a statistical analysis was performed using an analysis of covariance and χ 2 tests (p > 0.05, SPSS V10). Results: In group 3, qualitative changes (intima dehiscence, hyalinosis) were found in recipient arteries significantly more frequently than in groups 1 and 2. For group 3 recipient arteries, histomorphometry revealed a significant decrease in the ratio media area/total vessel area (median 0.51, IQR 0.10) in comparison with groups 1 (p = 0.02) (median 0.61, IQR 0.29) and 2 (p = 0.046) (median 0.58, IQR 0.19). No significant difference was found between the vessels of groups 1 and 2 (p = 0.48). There were no significant differences in transplant arteries and recipient or transplant veins between the groups. Age and chemotherapy did not appear to have a significant influence on vessel changes in this study (p > 0.05). Conclusions: Following irradiation with 60-70 Gy, significant qualitative and quantitative histological changes to the recipient arteries, but not to the recipient veins, could be observed. In contrast, irradiation at a dose of 40-50 Gy

  1. Feasibility study for CPR1000 incore measurement instrumentation educed from the reactor pressure vessel upper head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guang Jianwei; Liu Qian; Li Wenhong; Duan Yuangang

    2010-01-01

    The article discusses about the feasibility of in-core measurement instrumentation educed from the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) upper head. Incore instrumentation educed from the reactor pressure vessel upper head is one of advanced technology in the third generation nuclear power plant. This technology can reduce the manufacture problem of RPV; decrease the manufacture time effectively. Furthermore, this technology can get rid of the trouble for loss of water caused by many penetrations in the RPV bottom head, can increase security of nuclear power plant. By the description of structure analysis, comparison, maturity for four type incore instrumentation detectors, the incore instrumentation can be educed from RPV upper head, which can increase reactor's security, reduce the manufacture time, decrease group dose in refueling period. The core design ability can be enhanced through this study. (authors)

  2. Structural criteria for extreme dynamic internal pressure loadings of vessels and closure heads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bitner, J.L.

    1985-01-01

    The criteria protect against tensile plastic instability and local ductile rupture failure modes. To minimize the number of critical areas that may need more rigorous analytical methods, a screening criterion for limiting the membrane, bending and local stresses is defined. The stresses for this criterion are calculated from either simple and economical elastic dynamic or equivalent static methods. For the critical areas that remain, a strain-based criterion for strains derived from dynamic, inelastic methods is given. To assure that the criteria are properly applied, guidelines are outlined for controlling methods for deriving stresses and strains, for selecting appropriate material properties and for addressing specific dominating parameters that affect the validity of the analysis. The application of the criteria to a complex liquid metal fast breeder reactor vessel and closure head and the subsequent experimental verification of the results by several scale model experiments are summarized. (orig./HP)

  3. Manufacturing and properties of closure head forging integrated with flange for PWR reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomoharu Sasaki; Iku Kurihara; Etsuo Murai; Yasuhiko Tanaka; Koumei Suzuki

    2003-01-01

    Closure head forging (SA508, Gr.3 Cl.1) integrated with flange for PWR reactor pressure vessel has been developed. This is intended to enhance structural integrity of closure head resulted in elimination of ISI, by eliminating weld joint between closure head and flange in the conventional design. Manufacturing procedures have been established so that homogeneity and isotropy of the material properties can be assured in the closure head forging integrated with flange. Acceptance tensile and impact test specimens are taken and tested regarding the closure head forging integrated with flange as very thick and complex forgings. This paper describes the manufacturing technologies and material properties of the closure head forging integrated with flange. (orig.)

  4. Studies on core melt behaviour in a BWR pressure vessel lower head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindholm, I.; Ikonen, K.; Hedberg, K.

    1999-01-01

    Core debris behaviour in the Nordic BWR lower head was investigated numerically using MELCOR and MAAP4 codes. Lower head failure due to penetration failure was studied with more detailed PASULA code taking thermal boundary conditions from MELCOR calculations. Creep rupture failure mode was examined with the two integral codes. Also, the possibility to prevent vessel failure by late reflooding was assessed in this study. (authors)

  5. Mechanical properties and examination of cracking in TMI-2 pressure vessel lower head material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diercks, D.R.; Neimark, L.A.

    1993-09-01

    Mechanical tests have been conducted on material from 15 samples removed from the lower head of the Three Mile Island unit 2 nuclear reactor pressure vessel. Measured properties include tensile properties and hardness profiles at room temperature, tensile and creep properties at temperatures of 600 to 1200 degrees C, and Charpy V-notch impact properties at -20 to +300 degrees C. These data, which were used in the subsequent analyses of the margin-to-failure of the lower head during the accident, are presented here. In addition, the results of metallographic and scanning electron microscope examinations of cladding cracking in three of the lower head samples are discussed

  6. A Basic Study on the Failure of Lower Head of Nuclear Reactor Vessel by Molten Core in Severe Accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Jongrea; Bang, Kwanghyun; Bae, Jihoon; Kim, Changsung; Jeon, Jongwon

    2013-01-01

    This paper is analyzed by transient analysis for eight hours. Thermal conditions were carried out to interpret the data obtained from the existing experiment, and the pressures analyses were conducted considering pressure drop by applying the 1MPa. According to the analysis, a portion of the nozzle and the head is soluble, while nozzles and heads were not separated. This structural analysis has a comparative analysis of strain and displacement due to the existence of creep. Without the creep effect, strain shows 2.7% in 2D model and 4.6 % in 3D model. And, strain shows 2.9% in 2D model and 4.7 % in 3D model, in creep effect condition. Both case is satisfied to allowable strain. When comparing both analyses about creep effect, strain differences are 0.2% in 2D model and 0.1% in 3D model. Thus, it can be seen that in these analyses, the effect that creep has is minor. The purpose of this study is to develop the analysis techniques of the reactor vessel lower head under in-vessel pressure loads and thermal loads in severe accident. First, the temperature distribution in accordance with time using the thermal loads imposed on the lower head inner wall for simplified 2D model and 3D model respectively was analyzed. Second, the pressure applied on the lower head inner wall, was calculated by using the simplified 2D model and 3D model respectively. And The results of the analysis are indicated by equivalent von-mises stress and sum of the displacement, respectively. Third, the creep model and parameters used in the calculation were selected as well as the curve fitting of the experimental creep data. The plastic strain is the major cause of failure of the reactor pressure vessel. However, it can be calculated in this study that creep is not an important factor of failure of the reactor pressure vessel given the above mechanical and thermal loads

  7. 3-D segmentation of retinal blood vessels in spectral-domain OCT volumes of the optic nerve head

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyungmoo; Abràmoff, Michael D.; Niemeijer, Meindert; Garvin, Mona K.; Sonka, Milan

    2010-03-01

    Segmentation of retinal blood vessels can provide important information for detecting and tracking retinal vascular diseases including diabetic retinopathy, arterial hypertension, arteriosclerosis and retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). Many studies on 2-D segmentation of retinal blood vessels from a variety of medical images have been performed. However, 3-D segmentation of retinal blood vessels from spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) volumes, which is capable of providing geometrically accurate vessel models, to the best of our knowledge, has not been previously studied. The purpose of this study is to develop and evaluate a method that can automatically detect 3-D retinal blood vessels from spectral-domain OCT scans centered on the optic nerve head (ONH). The proposed method utilized a fast multiscale 3-D graph search to segment retinal surfaces as well as a triangular mesh-based 3-D graph search to detect retinal blood vessels. An experiment on 30 ONH-centered OCT scans (15 right eye scans and 15 left eye scans) from 15 subjects was performed, and the mean unsigned error in 3-D of the computer segmentations compared with the independent standard obtained from a retinal specialist was 3.4 +/- 2.5 voxels (0.10 +/- 0.07 mm).

  8. Experimental tests on buckling of ellipsoidal vessel heads subjected to internal pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, R.L.; Alix, M.

    1980-05-01

    Tests were performed on 17 ellipsoidal vessel heads of three different materials and different geometries. The results include the following: 1) Accurate definition of the geometry and particularly a direct measurement of the thickness along the meridian. 2) The properties of the material of each head, obtained from test specimens cut from the head itself after the test. 3) The recording of deflection/pressure curves with indication of the pressure at which buckling occurred. These results can be used for validation and qualification of methods for calculating the buckling load when plasticity occurs before buckling. It was possible to develop an empirical equation representing the experimental results obtained with satisfactory accuracy. This equation may be useful in pressure vessel design

  9. Minimization of stress concentration factor in cylindrical pressure vessels with ellipsoidal heads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnucki, K.; Szyc, W.; Lewinski, J.

    2002-01-01

    The paper presents the problem of stress concentration in a cylindrical pressure vessel with ellipsoidal heads subject to internal pressure. At the line, where the ellipsoidal head is adjacent to the circular cylindrical shell, a shear force and bending moment occur, disturbing the membrane stress state in the vessel. The degree of stress concentration depends on the ratio of thicknesses of both the adjacent parts of the shells and on the relative convexity of the ellipsoidal head, with the range for radius-to-thickness ratio between 75 and 125. The stress concentration was analytically described and, afterwards, the effect of these values on the stress concentration ratio was numerically examined. Results of the analysis are shown on charts

  10. Learning from EDF investigations on SG divider plates and vessel head nozzles. Evidence of prior deformation effect on stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deforge, D.; Duisabeau, L.; Miloudi, S.; Thebault, Y.; Couvant, T.; Vaillant, F.; Lemaire, E.

    2011-01-01

    Nickel Based alloys Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) has been a major concern for all the Nuclear Power Plants (NPP) utilities since the beginning of the seventies. At EDF, the nineties were marked by the occurrence of cracks on vessel head nozzles. These cracks were responsible for a leak at Bugey 3 vessel head, which was the precursor leading to the replacement of all vessel heads. From 2002, new cases of Stress Corrosion Cracking were reported on Steam Generator (SG) Divider Plates (SGDP) welded junctions. These cracks are periodically inspected inservice and reparations could be performed in case of a significant evolution of the phenomenon even if the safety issue is less relevant than for the vessel head nozzles. Both issues have led to an important non-destructive testing (NDT) program and to destructive investigations campaigns. NDT were performed on an exhaustive basis for all vessel head nozzles and for all the divider plates of 900 MWe plants. Destructive investigations were performed on more than 30 vessel head nozzles and on 6 divider plates. The last investigations were performed on samples from two decommissioned Steam Generators of Chinon B1 which present SCC cracks. In this paper, the main conclusions driven from the analysis of both NDT and destructive investigation results are reported and a comparison of the behaviours of divider plates and vessel head nozzles is given. Results give evidence that prior plastic deformation of the components before operation is fundamental for the further environmental behaviour of the material. Analysis of field experience based on parameters characteristics of prior deformation and parameters characteristics of material microstructure can be used to account for the components which are the most sensitive to SCC cracking. Some perspectives on SCC predictive models are also presented. (authors)

  11. In-vessel retention modeling capabilities in MAAP5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paik, Chan Y.; Lee, Sung Jin; Zhou, Quan; Luangdilok, W.; Reeves, R.W.; Henry, R.E.; Plys, M.; Scobel, J.H.

    2012-01-01

    Modular Accident Analysis Program (MAAP) is an integrated severe accident analysis code for both light water and heavy water reactors. New and improved models to address the complex phenomena associated with in-vessel retention (IVR) were incorporated into MAAP5.01. They include: -a) time-dependent volatile and non-volatile decay heat, -b) material properties at high temperatures, -c) finer vessel wall nodalization, -d) new correlations for natural convection heat transfer in the oxidic pool, -e) refined metal layer heat transfer to the reactor vessel wall and surroundings, -f) formation of a heavy metal layer, and -g) insulation cooling channel model and associated ex-vessel heat transfer and critical heat flux correlations. In this paper, the new and improved models in MAAP5.01 are described and sample calculation results are presented for the AP1000 passive plant. For the IVR evaluation, a transient calculation is useful because the timing of corium relocation, decaying heat load, and formation of separate layers in the lower plenum all affect integrity of the lower head. The key parameters affecting the IVR success are the metal layer emissivity and thickness of the top metal layer, which depends on the amount of steel in the oxidic pool and in the heavy metal layer. With the best estimate inputs for the debris mixing parameters in a conservative IVR scenario, the AP1000 plant results show that the maximum ex-vessel heat flux to CHF ratio is about 0.7, which occurs before 10.000 seconds when the decay heat is high. The AP1000 plant results demonstrate how MAAP5.01 can be used to evaluate IVR and to gain insight into responses of the lower head during a severe accident

  12. An analysis of critical heat flux on the external surface of the reactor vessel lower head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Soo Hyung; Baek, Won Pil; Chang, Soon Heung

    1999-01-01

    CHF (Critical heat flux) on the external surface of the reactor vessel lower head is major key in the evaluation on the feasibility of IVR-EVC (In-Vessel Retention through External Vessel Cooling) concept. To identify the CHF on the external surface, considerable works have been performed. Through the review on the previous works related to the CHF on the external surface, liquid subcooling, induced flow along the external surface, ICI (In-Core Instrument) nozzle and minimum gap are identified as major parameters. According to the present analysis, the effects of the ICI nozzle and minimum gap on CHF are pronounced at the upstream of test vessel: on the other hand, the induced flow considerably affects the CHF at downstream of test vessel. In addition, the subcooling effect is shown at all of test vessel, and decreases with the increase in the elevation of test vessel. In the real application of the IVR-EVC concept, vertical position is known as a limiting position, at which thermal margin is the minimum. So, it is very important to precisely predict the CHF at vertical position in a viewpoint of gaining more thermal margins. However, the effects of the liquid subcooling and induced flow do not seem to be adequately included in the CHF correlations suggested by previous works, especially at the downstream positions

  13. Testing of a steel containment vessel model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luk, V.K.; Hessheimer, M.F.; Matsumoto, T.; Komine, K.; Costello, J.F.

    1997-01-01

    A mixed-scale containment vessel model, with 1:10 in containment geometry and 1:4 in shell thickness, was fabricated to represent an improved, boiling water reactor (BWR) Mark II containment vessel. A contact structure, installed over the model and separated at a nominally uniform distance from it, provided a simplified representation of a reactor shield building in the actual plant. This paper describes the pretest preparations and the conduct of the high pressure test of the model performed on December 11-12, 1996. 4 refs., 2 figs

  14. In-vessel inspection before head removal: TMI II: Phase I. (Conceptual development)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calloway, N.E.; Greenlee, D.W.; Lawrence, G.R.; Paglia, A.L.; Piatt, T.D.; Tucker, B.A.

    1981-08-01

    The objective of the task is to provide for an internal inspection of the reactor vessel and the fuel assemblies prior to reactor vessel head removal. Because the degree of damage to equipment and fuel in the TMI-II reactor is not precisely known, it is important that as much information as possible be obtained on present conditions inside the reactor. This information will serve to benchmark the various analyses already completed or underway and will also guide the development of programs to obtain more information on the TMI-II core damage. In addition, the early look will provide data for planning the reactor disassembly program

  15. A preliminary assessment of the effects of heat flux distribution and penetration on the creep rupture of a reactor vessel lower head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, T.Y.; Bentz, J.; Simpson, R.; Witt, R.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of the Lower Head Failure (LHF) Experiment Program is to experimentally investigate and characterize the failure of the reactor vessel lower head due to thermal and pressure loads under severe accident conditions. The experiment is performed using 1/5-scale models of a typical PWR pressure vessel. Experiments are performed for various internal pressure and imposed heat flux distributions with and without instrumentation guide tube penetrations. The experimental program is complemented by a modest modeling program based on the application of vessel creep rupture codes developed in the TMI Vessel Investigation Project. The first three experiments under the LHF program investigated the creep rupture of simulated reactor pressure vessels without penetrations. The heat flux distributions for the three experiments are uniform (LHF-1), center-peaked (LHF-2), and side-peaked (LHF-3), respectively. For all the experiments, appreciable vessel deformation was observed to initiate at vessel wall temperatures above 900K and the vessel typically failed at approximately 1000K. The size of failure was always observed to be smaller than the heated region. For experiments with non-uniform heat flux distributions, failure typically occurs in the region of peak temperature. A brief discussion of the effect of penetration is also presented

  16. Application of directional solidification ingot (LSD) in forging of PWR reactor vessel heads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benhamou, C.; Poitrault, I.

    1985-09-01

    Creusot-Loire Industrie uses this type of ingot for manufacture of Framatome 1300 and 1450 MW 4-loop PWR reactor vessel heads. This type of ingot offers a number advantages: improved internal soundness; greater chemical, structural and mechanical homogeneity of the finished part; simplified forging process. After a brief description of the pouring and solidification processes, this paper presents an analysis of the results of examinations performed on the prototype forging, as well as review of results obtained during industrial fabrication of dished heads from LSD ingots. The advantages of the LSD ingot over conventional ingots are discussed in conclusion

  17. INETEC new system for inspection of PWR reactor pressure vessel head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadinic, B.; Postruzin, Z.

    2004-01-01

    INETEC Institute for Nuclear Technology developed new equipment for inspection of PWR and VVER reactor pressure vessel head. The new advances in inspection technology are presented in this article, as the following: New advance manipulator for inspection of RPVH with high speed of inspection possibilities and total automated work; New sophisticated software for manipulator driving which includes 3D virtual presentation of manipulator movement and collision detection possibilities; New multi axis controller MAC-8; New end effector system for inspection of penetration tube and G weld; New eddy current and ultrasonic probes for inspection of G weld and penetration tube; New Eddy One Raster scan software for analysis of eddy current data with mant advanced features which allows easy and quick data analysis. Also the results of laboratory testing and laboratory qualification are presented on reactor pressure vessel head mock, as well as obtained speed of inspection and quality of collected data.(author)

  18. Hygrometric measurement for on-line monitoring of PWR vessel head penetrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Germain, J.L.; Loisy, F.; Apolzan, S.

    1994-06-01

    In September 1991, a small leak was found on one of the reactor's upper vessel head penetrations. After inspection, other non-throughwall cracks were localized in the lower part of the vessel head adapter in questions. The same type of crack was later found inside some adapters on other French PWR units. After repairs, the safety authorities granted approval to continue unit operation, with the specific provision that a system for ongoing monitoring of the penetrations be set up. Two types of system were selected to detect leaks through any potential cracks: the first is based on nitrogen-13 detection and the second on steam detection. Both systems call for sampling the air in a confined space above the vessel head. The number and distribution of sampling taps in the circuit, and the balancing of their respective flow rates, are factors in proper monitoring of all vessel head penetrations. Gas-injection holes are also installed in the confined space. These holes are used during the sampling system qualification tests to simulate leaks in various positions and calculate the effective performance of the sampling system. Leaks are simulated using a helium-base gas tracer and measuring tracer concentrations in the sampling system. The system for measuring steam levels in air samples uses chilled-mirror hygrometers. A microcomputer takes regular readings, drives the various automatic functions of the measurement system and automatically analyses the readings so as to monitor operations and trigger an alarm at the first sign of a leak. This system has now been installed for a year and a half on three French PWR units and is functioning satisfactorily. (authors). 5 figs

  19. Stress corrosion cracking in the vessel closure head penetrations of French PWR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buisine, D.; Cattant, F.; Champredonde, J.; Pichon, C.; Benhamou, C.; Gelpi, A.; Vaindirlis, M.

    1994-01-01

    During a hydrotest in September 1991, part of the statutory decennial in-service inspection, a leak was detected on the vessel head of Bugey 3, which is one of the first 900 MW 3-loop PWR's in France. This leak was due to a cracked penetration used for a control rod drive mechanism. The investigations performed identified Primary Stress Corrosion Cracking of Alloy 600 as being the origin of this degradation. So a lot of the same design PWR's are a concern due to this generic problem. In this case, PWSCC was linked to: - hot temperature of the vessel head; - high residual stresses due to the welding process between peripherical penetrations and the vessel head; - sensitivity of forged Alloy 600 used for penetration manufacturing. This following paper will present the cracked analysis based, in particular, on the main results obtained in France on each of these items. These results come from the operating experience, the destructive examinations and the programs which are running on stress analysis and metallurgical characterizations. (authors). 9 figs., 2 tabs

  20. Development of automated ultrasonic device for in-service inspection of ABWR pressure vessel bottom head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Y.; Matsuyama, A.

    1995-01-01

    An automated device and its controller have been developed for the bottom head weld examination of pressure vessel of Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR). The internal pump casings and the housings of control rod prevent a conventional ultrasonic device from scanning the required inspection zone. With this reason, it is required to develop a new device to examine the bottom head area of ABWR. The developed device is characterized by the following features. (1) Composed of a mother vehicle and a compact inspection vehicle. They are connected only by an electric wire without using the conventional arm mechanism. (2) The mother vehicle travels on a track and lift up the inspection vehicle to the vessel. (3) The mother vehicle can automatically attach the inspection vehicle to the bottom head, and detach the inspection vehicle from it. (4) Collision avoidance control function with a touch sensor is installed at the front of the inspection vehicle. The device was successfully demonstrated using a mock-up of reactor pressure vessel

  1. Results of steel containment vessel model test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luk, V.K.; Ludwigsen, J.S.; Hessheimer, M.F.; Komine, Kuniaki; Matsumoto, Tomoyuki; Costello, J.F.

    1998-05-01

    A series of static overpressurization tests of scale models of nuclear containment structures is being conducted by Sandia National Laboratories for the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation of Japan and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Two tests are being conducted: (1) a test of a model of a steel containment vessel (SCV) and (2) a test of a model of a prestressed concrete containment vessel (PCCV). This paper summarizes the conduct of the high pressure pneumatic test of the SCV model and the results of that test. Results of this test are summarized and are compared with pretest predictions performed by the sponsoring organizations and others who participated in a blind pretest prediction effort. Questions raised by this comparison are identified and plans for posttest analysis are discussed

  2. Critical heat flux for APR1400 lower head vessel during a severe accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noh, Sang W.; Suh, Kune Y.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Studied boiling on downward-facing hemispherical vessel with asymmetric thermal insulator. ► Scaled the APR1400 lower head linearly down by 1/10 including ICI tubes and shear keys. ► Performed thermal analysis using ANSYS V11.0 to determine the internal temperature and heat flux. ► Performed tests to obtain the CHF with saturated demineralized water at atmospheric pressure. ► Measured CHF accounting for 3D random flow effect expected in the APR1400 application. -- Abstract: Corium Ablation Stopper Apparatus (CASA) has a downward-facing hemispherical vessel and geometrically asymmetric thermal insulator of the Advanced Power Reactor 1400 MWe (APR1400) scaled linearly down by 1/10, as well as sixty-one in-core instrumentation (ICI) tubes and four shear keys. The heated vessel plays a pivotal role in CASA depending on the configuration of the oxide pool and metal layer to bring about the focusing effect expected of a molten pool in the lower head during a severe accident. The heated vessel was designed through a trial-and-error method and thermal analysis. Thermal analysis was performed using ANSYS V11.0 to investigate the effect of the internal temperature and heat flux on the integral hemispherical copper vessel. The CASA tests were carried out to obtain the critical heat flux (CHF) with saturated and demineralized water at the atmospheric pressure (0.1 MPa). The CHF in the metal layer through the hemispherical channel was found to be lower than that in the ULPU-2400 configuration V data through the streamlined thermal insulator. The experimental CHF was measured and obtained through the CASA hemispherical heated surface accounting for the three-dimensional random flow effect expected in the APR1400 application

  3. Evaluation of Thermal Load to the Lower Head Vessel Using the ASTEC Computer Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Raejoon; Ahn, Kwangil

    2013-01-01

    The thermal load from the corium to the lower head vessel in the APR (Advanced Power reactor) 1400 during a small break loss of coolant accident (SBLOCA) without a safety injection (SI) has been evaluated using the ASTEC (Accident Source Term Evaluation Code) computer code, which has been developed as a part of the EU (European Union)-SARNET (Severe Accident Research NET work) program. The ASTEC results predict that the reactor vessel did not fail by using an ERVC, in spite of the large melting of the reactor vessel wall in a two-layer formation case of the SBLOCA in the APR1400. The outer surface conditions of the temperature and heat transfer coefficient are not effective on the vessel geometry change, which are preliminary results. A more detailed analysis of the main parameter effects on the corium behavior in the lower plenum is necessary to evaluate the IVR-ERVC in the APR1400, in particular, for a three-layer formation of the TLFW. Comparisons of the present results with others are necessary to verify and apply them to the actual IVR-ERVC evaluation in the APR1400

  4. Advanced nondestructive examination of the reactor vessel head penetration tube welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cvitanovic, M.; Zado, V.

    1996-01-01

    Beside a referent code examination requirements, appearance of the service induced flaws on the Reactor Vessel Head (RVH) penetration tube welds forced development of remotely operated examination tools and techniques. Several systems were developed for examination of RVH PWR type while only one system for examination of VVER - 440 type RVH has been developed by Inetec. In this article the most advanced RVH VVER - 440 type examination techniques such as ultrasonic, eddy current and visual testing techniques as well as remotely operated tool are described. (author)

  5. Experiences concerning reactor pressure vessel head penetration inspections; Erfahrungen mit Pruefungen von Reaktordruckbehaelter-Deckeldurchfuehrungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debnar, Angelika [Westinghouse Electric Germany GmbH, Mannheim (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Globally observed damage at the control rod drive mechanism nozzles in PWR-type reactors (Bugey-3, Oconee 1,2,3 and ANO-1, David Besse) have triggered enhanced inspection of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) head penetrations. In Germany the regulations require a periodic inspection especially of dissimilar welds. Westinghouse has developed an automated measuring system for RPV heads aimed to inspect welded joints at open nozzles of nozzles with thermosleeves. The testing technology with remote controlled robotics is supposed to perform a weld inspection as complete as possible, restraints result from constructive difficulties for the accessibility. The new gap-scanner DE2008 was qualified at the mock-up and was implemented into the periodic in-service inspection of Neckarwestheim-1.

  6. Evaluation of J-groove weld residual stress and crack growth rate of PWSCC in reactor pressure vessel closure head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Seung Hyuk; Ryu, Tae Young; Park, Seung Hyun; Won, Min Gu; Kang, Seok Jun; Kim, Moon Ki; Choi, Jae Boong [Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyoung Soo; Lee, Sung Ho [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    Over the last decade, primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) has been frequently found in pressurized water reactor (PWR) applications. Especially, PWSCC has occurred in long-term operated PWRs. As this phenomenon leads to serious accidents, we must be beforehand with the anticipated problems. A typical PWR consists of J-groove welded components such as reactor pressure vessel closure head and nozzles. Reactor pressure vessel closure head is made of SA508 and it is covered by cladding. Alloy 600 is used for nozzles. And J-groove weld is conducted with alloy 82/182. Different material properties of these metals lead to residual stress and PWSCC consequentially. In this study, J-groove weld residual stress was investigated by a three-dimensional finite element analysis with an actual asymmetric J-groove weld model and process of construction. Also crack growth rate of PWSCC was evaluated from cracks applied on the penetration nozzles. Based on these two values, one cannot only improve the structural integrity of PWR, but also explain PWSCC behavior such that high residual stress at the J-groove weld area causes crack initiation and propagation through the surface of nozzles. In addition, crack behavior was predicted at the various points around the nozzle.

  7. Evaluation of J-groove weld residual stress and crack growth rate of PWSCC in reactor pressure vessel closure head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Seung Hyuk; Ryu, Tae Young; Park, Seung Hyun; Won, Min Gu; Kang, Seok Jun; Kim, Moon Ki; Choi, Jae Boong; Lee, Kyoung Soo; Lee, Sung Ho

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decade, primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) has been frequently found in pressurized water reactor (PWR) applications. Especially, PWSCC has occurred in long-term operated PWRs. As this phenomenon leads to serious accidents, we must be beforehand with the anticipated problems. A typical PWR consists of J-groove welded components such as reactor pressure vessel closure head and nozzles. Reactor pressure vessel closure head is made of SA508 and it is covered by cladding. Alloy 600 is used for nozzles. And J-groove weld is conducted with alloy 82/182. Different material properties of these metals lead to residual stress and PWSCC consequentially. In this study, J-groove weld residual stress was investigated by a three-dimensional finite element analysis with an actual asymmetric J-groove weld model and process of construction. Also crack growth rate of PWSCC was evaluated from cracks applied on the penetration nozzles. Based on these two values, one cannot only improve the structural integrity of PWR, but also explain PWSCC behavior such that high residual stress at the J-groove weld area causes crack initiation and propagation through the surface of nozzles. In addition, crack behavior was predicted at the various points around the nozzle.

  8. Blood Vessel Normalization in the Hamster Oral Cancer Model for Experimental Cancer Therapy Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ana J. Molinari; Romina F. Aromando; Maria E. Itoiz; Marcela A. Garabalino; Andrea Monti Hughes; Elisa M. Heber; Emiliano C. C. Pozzi; David W. Nigg; Veronica A. Trivillin; Amanda E. Schwint

    2012-07-01

    Normalization of tumor blood vessels improves drug and oxygen delivery to cancer cells. The aim of this study was to develop a technique to normalize blood vessels in the hamster cheek pouch model of oral cancer. Materials and Methods: Tumor-bearing hamsters were treated with thalidomide and were compared with controls. Results: Twenty eight hours after treatment with thalidomide, the blood vessels of premalignant tissue observable in vivo became narrower and less tortuous than those of controls; Evans Blue Dye extravasation in tumor was significantly reduced (indicating a reduction in aberrant tumor vascular hyperpermeability that compromises blood flow), and tumor blood vessel morphology in histological sections, labeled for Factor VIII, revealed a significant reduction in compressive forces. These findings indicated blood vessel normalization with a window of 48 h. Conclusion: The technique developed herein has rendered the hamster oral cancer model amenable to research, with the potential benefit of vascular normalization in head and neck cancer therapy.

  9. The retrograde transverse cervical artery as a recipient vessel for free tissue transfer in complex head and neck reconstruction with a vessel-depleted neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciudad, Pedro; Agko, Mouchammed; Manrique, Oscar J; Date, Shivprasad; Kiranantawat, Kidakorn; Chang, Wei Ling; Nicoli, Fabio; Lo Torto, Federico; Maruccia, Michele; Orfaniotis, Georgios; Chen, Hung-Chi

    2017-11-01

    Reconstruction in a vessel-depleted neck is challenging. The success rates can be markedly decreased because of unavailability of suitable recipient vessels. In order to obtain a reliable flow, recipient vessels away from the zone of fibrosis, radiation, or infection need to be explored. The aim of this report is to present our experience and clinical outcomes using the retrograde flow coming from the distal transverse cervical artery (TCA) as a source for arterial inflow for complex head and neck reconstruction in patients with a vessel-depleted neck. Between July 2010 and June 2016, nine patients with a vessel-depleted neck underwent secondary head and neck reconstruction using the retrograde TCA as recipient vessel for microanastomosis. The mean age was 49.6 years (range, 36 to 68 years). All patients had previous bilateral neck dissections and all, except one, had also received radiotherapy. Indications included neck contracture release (n = 3), oral (n = 1), mandibular (n = 3) and pharyngoesophageal (n = 2) reconstruction necessitating free anterolateral thigh (n = 3) and medial sural artery (n = 1) perforator flaps, fibula (n = 3) and ileocolon (n = 2) flaps respectively. There was 100% flap survival rate with no re-exploration or any partial flap loss. One case of intra-operative arterial vasospasm at the anastomotic suture line was managed intra-operatively with vein graft interposition. There were no other complications or donor site morbidity during the follow-up period. In a vessel-depleted neck, the reverse flow of the TCA may be a reliable option for complex secondary head and neck reconstruction in selected patients. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. In-vessel core debris retention through external flooding of the reactor pressure vessel. SCDAP/RELAP5 assessment for the SBWR lower head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heel, A.M.J.M. van.

    1995-09-01

    In this report the results are discussed from various analyses on the feasibility and phenomenology of the External Flooding (EF) concept for an SBWR lower head, filled with a large heat generating corium mass. In applying External Flooding as an accident management strategy after or during core melt down, the lower drywell is filled with water up to a level where a large portion of the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) is flooded. The purpose of this method is to establish cooling of the vessel wall, that is challenged by the heat load resulting from the corium, in such a way that its structural integrity if not endangered. The analysis discussed in this report focus on the thermal response of the vessel wall and the ex-vessel boiling processes under the conditions described above. For these analyses the SCDAP/REALP5 MOD 3.1 code was used. The major outcome of the calculations is, that a major part of the vessel wall remains well below themelting temperature of carbon steel, as long as flooding of the external surface of the lower head is established. The SCDAP/RELAP5 analyses indicated that low-quality Critical Heat Flux (CHF) was not exceeded, under all the conditions that had been tested. However, a comaprison of the heat fluxes, as calculated in RELAP5, with the CHF values obtained from the Zuber correlation and the Vishnev correction factor (for boiling at inclined surfaces) proved that CHF values, based on these criteria, were exceeded in several surface points of the lower head mesh. The correlations, as resident in the current version of RELAP5 MOD 3.1, might lead to over-estimation of CHF for the EF analyses discussed in this report. The use of the more conservative Zuber correlation with the Vishnev correction factor is recommended for EF analyses. (orig.)

  11. Thermal and stress analyses of the reactor pressure vessel lower head of the Three Mile Island Unit 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, K.; Onizawa, K.; Kurihara, R.; Kawasaki, S.; Soda, K.

    1992-01-01

    Thermal and stress analyses were performed using the finite element analysis code ABAQUS to clarify the factors which caused tears in the stainless steel liner of the reactor pressure vessel lower head of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) reactor pressure vessel during the accident on 28 March 1979. The present analyses covered the events which occurred after approximately 20 tons of molten core material were relocated to the lower head of the reactor pressure vessel. They showed that the tensile stress was highest in the case where the relocated core material consisting of homogeneous UO 2 debris was assumed to attack the lower head and the debris was then quenched. The peak tensile stress was in the vicinity of the welded zone of the penetration nozzle. This result agrees with the findings from the examination of the TMI-2 reactor pressure vessel that major tears in the stainless steel liner were observed around two penetration nozzles of the lower head. (author)

  12. Analytical modelling of soccer heading

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... game is that the players are permitted to use their head to direct the ball during ... method in assessing the cognitive functions that can be applied not only to ... It is attached to a spring (stiffness, k1) and a dashpot (damping coefficient, c1).

  13. Modeling Scala Media as a Pressure Vessel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepage, Eric; Olofsson, A.˚Ke

    2011-11-01

    The clinical condition known as endolymphatic hydrops is the swelling of scala media and may result in loss in hearing sensitivity consistent with other forms of low-frequency biasing. Because outer hair cells (OHCs) are displacement-sensitive and hearing levels tend to be preserved despite large changes in blood pressure and CSF pressure, it seems unlikely that the OHC respond passively to changes in static pressures in the chambers. This suggests the operation of a major feedback control loop which jointly regulates homeostasis and hearing sensitivity. Therefore the internal forces affecting the cochlear signal processing amplifier cannot be just motile responses. A complete account of the cochlear amplifier must include static pressures. To this end we have added a third, pressure vessel to our 1-D 140-segment, wave-digital filter active model of cochlear mechanics, incorporating the usual nonlinear forward transduction. In each segment the instantaneous pressure is the sum of acoustic pressure and global static pressure. The object of the model is to maintain stable OHC operating point despite any global rise in pressure in the third chamber. Such accumulated pressure is allowed to dissipate exponentially. In this first 3-chamber implementation we explore the possibility that acoustic pressures are rectified. The behavior of the model is critically dependent upon scaling factors and time-constants, yet by initial assumption, the pressure tends to accumulate in proportion to sound level. We further explore setting of the control parameters so that the accumulated pressure either stays within limits or may rise without bound.

  14. Crack of reactor vessel upper head penetration nozzles in Korean nuclear plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doh, E.; Lee, T-S.; Kim, J-Y.; Lee, C-H. [KEPCO Plant Service and Engineering Co., Ltd., Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-01

    Since the first CRDM nozzles of reactor vessel head at Kori unit 1 in Korea were inspected in 2003, no CRDM nozzle cracks had been revealed prior to the inspection at Hanbit unit 3 in October 2012, even though many foreign plants had been reporting PWSCC cracks. In October 2012, seven axial cracks from 6 CRDM nozzles at Hanbit unit 3, and in November 2013, six axial cracks from 6 CRDM nozzles at Hanbit unit 4 were detected by TOFD Ultrasonic testing from ID of nozzles. There were confirmed to be PWSCC by Dye penetrant testing and Replica on the surface of J-groove weld of CRDM nozzles. Both plants are OPR-1000 types. All flaws started from the surface of J-groove weld at interface with OD of nozzle, but did not grow up to the top of J-groove weld, and did not make any Leak path up to head outside. The Performance Demonstration Initiative (PDI) system of CRDM nozzle inspection for Westinghouse type plants has been applied in Korea since July 2011. However, its application for OPR-1000 is still under development in Korea. The experience of PDI inspection for Westinghouse type plant contributed greatly to the detection and evaluation of PWSCC of CRDM nozzles at OPR- 1000 of Hanbit unit 3 & 4. The experimentally based procedure of flaw detection and the enhanced detection technique of examiners made it possible to detect and to determine the PWSCC indications. Embedded Flaw Repair process was approved by government authority, and the repair of the 6 CRDM nozzles in each plant was conducted by a consortium of Westinghouse and KPS. (author)

  15. Simulation of time of flight defraction signals for reactor vessel head penetrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Tae Hun; Kim, Young Sik; Lee, Jeong Seok [KHNP Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    The simulation of nondestructive testing has been used in the prediction of the signal characteristics of various defects and in the development of the procedures. CIVA, a simulation tool dedicated to nondestructive testing, has good accuracy and speed, and provides a three-dimensional graphical user interface for improved visualization and familiar data displays consistent with an NDE technique. Even though internal validations have been performed by the CIVA software development specialists, an independent validation study is necessary for the assessment of the accuracy of the software prior to practical use. In this study, time of flight diffraction signals of ultrasonic inspection of a calibration block for reactor vessel head penetrations were simulated using CIVA. The results were compared to the experimentally inspected signals. The accuracy of the simulated signals and the possible range for simulation were verified. It was found that, there is a good agreement between the CIVA simulated and experimental results in the A-scan signal, B-scan image, and measurement of depth.

  16. Simulation of time of flight defraction signals for reactor vessel head penetrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Tae Hun; Kim, Young Sik; Lee, Jeong Seok

    2016-01-01

    The simulation of nondestructive testing has been used in the prediction of the signal characteristics of various defects and in the development of the procedures. CIVA, a simulation tool dedicated to nondestructive testing, has good accuracy and speed, and provides a three-dimensional graphical user interface for improved visualization and familiar data displays consistent with an NDE technique. Even though internal validations have been performed by the CIVA software development specialists, an independent validation study is necessary for the assessment of the accuracy of the software prior to practical use. In this study, time of flight diffraction signals of ultrasonic inspection of a calibration block for reactor vessel head penetrations were simulated using CIVA. The results were compared to the experimentally inspected signals. The accuracy of the simulated signals and the possible range for simulation were verified. It was found that, there is a good agreement between the CIVA simulated and experimental results in the A-scan signal, B-scan image, and measurement of depth

  17. Corrosion Damage in Penetration Nozzle and Its Weldment of Reactor Pressure Vessel Head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Yun Soo; Kim, Joung Soo; Kim, Hong Pyo; Hwang, Seong Sik; Yi, Young Sun; Kim, Dong Jin; Jung, Man Kyo

    2003-07-01

    The recent status on corrosion damage of reactor vessel head (RVH) penetration nozzles at primary water reactors (PWRs), including control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) and thermocouple nozzles, was investigated. The studies for primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) characteristics of Alloy 600 and Alloy 182/82 were reviewed and summarized in terms of the crack initiation and crack growth rate. The studies on the boric acid corrosion (BAC) of low alloy steels were also included in this report. PWSCC was found to be the main failure mechanism of RVH CRDM nozzles, which are constituted with Alloy 600 base metal and Alloy 182 weld filler materials. Alloy 600 and Alloy 182/82 are very susceptible to intergranular SCC in the PWR environments. The PWSCC crack initiation and growth features in the fusion zone of Alloy 182/82 were strongly dependant on solidification anisotropy during welding, test temperature, weld heat, mechanical loading, stress relief heat treatment, cold work and so on. BAC of low alloy steels is a wastage phenomenon due to general corrosion occurring on the over-all surface area of material. Systematic studies, concerned with structural integrity of RVH penetration nozzles as well as improvement of PWSCC resistance of nickel-based weld metals in the simulated PWR environment, are needed

  18. Models and Algorithms for Container Vessel Stowage Optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Delgado-Ortegon, Alberto

    .g., selection of vessels to buy that satisfy specific demands), through to operational decisions (e.g., selection of containers that optimize revenue, and stowing those containers into a vessel). This thesis addresses the question of whether it is possible to formulate stowage optimization models...... container of those to be loaded in a port should be placed in a vessel, i.e., to generate stowage plans. This thesis explores two different approaches to solve this problem, both follow a 2-phase decomposition that assigns containers to vessel sections in the first phase, i.e., master planning...

  19. A model for ultrasound contrast agent in a phantom vessel

    KAUST Repository

    Qamar, Adnan; Samtaney, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    A theoretical framework to model the dynamics of Ultrasound Contrast Agent (UCA) inside a phantom vessel is presented. The model is derived from the reduced Navier-Stokes equation and is coupled with the evolving flow field solution inside

  20. Computational simulation of natural convection of a molten core in lower head of a PWR pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, Camila Braga; Romero, Gabriel Alves; Jian Su

    2010-01-01

    Computational simulation of natural convection in a molten core during a hypothetical severe accident in the lower head of a typical PWR pressure vessel was performed for two-dimensional semi-circular geometry with isothermal walls. Transient turbulent natural convection heat transfer of a fluid with uniformly distributed volumetric heat generation rate was simulated by using a commercial computational fluid dynamics software ANSYS CFX 12.0. The Boussinesq model was used for the buoyancy effect generated by the internal heat source in the flow field. The two-equation k-ω based SST (Shear Stress Transport) turbulence model was used to mould the turbulent stresses in the Reynolds-Average Navier-Stokes equations (RANS). Two Prandtl numbers, 6:13 and 7:0, were considered. Five Rayleigh numbers were simulated for each Prandtl number used (109, 1010, 1011, 1012, and 1013). The average Nusselt numbers on the bottom surface of the semicircular cavity were in excellent agreement with Mayinger et al. (1976) correlation and only at Ra = 109 the average Nusselt number on the top flat surface was in agreement with Mayinger et al. (1976) and Kulacki and Emara (1975) correlations. (author)

  1. In-vessel inspection before head removal: TMI II, Phase III (tooling and systems design and verification)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, G.S.; Ryan, R.F.; Pieleck, A.W.; Bibb, H.Q.

    1982-09-01

    Under EG and G contract K-9003 to General Public Utilities Corporation, a Task Order was assigned to Babcock and Wilcox to develop and provide equipment to facilitate early assessment of core damage in the Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor vessel head. Described is the work performed, the equipment developed, and the tests conducted with this equipment on various mockups used to simulate the constraints inside and outside the reactor vessel that affect the performance of the inspection. The tooling developed provides several methods of removing a few control rod drive leadscrews from the reactor, thereby providing paths into which cameras and lights may be inserted to permit video viewing of many potentially damaged areas in the reactor vessel. The tools, equipment, and cameras demonstrated that these tasks could be accomplished

  2. Non-destructive and destructive examination of the retired North Anna 2 Reactor Pressure Vessel Head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahluwalia, Kawaljit; Barnes, Robert; Rao, Gutti; Cattant, Francois; Peat, Noel

    2006-09-01

    Stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 and nickel-based weld materials has been the single biggest challenge facing the PWR industry. A fundamental and thorough knowledge was needed to properly explain this phenomenon and develop appropriate mitigation strategies. Non Destructive Examination (NDE) of the North Anna Unit 2 Reactor Vessel Head (RVH) during the 2002 fall outage identified widespread crack indications in the Alloy 600 CRDM penetrations and associated Alloy 182 and 82 J-groove attachment welds. When the Utility decided to replace the RVH, a rare opportunity was provided to the industry to undertake in-depth studies of representative defective CRDM penetrations from a retired RVH. Accordingly, the Materials Reliability Program, undertook a two-phase program on the retired North Anna 2 Alloy 600 RVH. The first phase involved selection and removal of six penetrations from the RVH and penetration decontamination, replication and laboratory NDE. The second phase consisted of a detailed destructive examination of penetration number 54. This paper provides a summary of work undertaken during this program. Criteria for selection of penetrations for removal and procedures used in removal of the penetrations are described. Extreme care was undertaken in decontamination of the penetrations to facilitate laboratory NDE. Penetration number 54 was then subjected to destructive examination to establish a correlation between NDE findings (from both field and laboratory inspections) and actual flaws. Additional objectives of the destructive examination included mechanistic assessment of defect formation and investigation of the annulus environment and wastage characterization. Data obtained from these studies is invaluable in validating safety assessment statements by developing the correlation between field NDE and actual defects. In addition, information gathered from non-destructive and destructive examinations is used to assess accuracy of the NDE techniques

  3. A model for ultrasound contrast agent in a phantom vessel

    KAUST Repository

    Qamar, Adnan

    2014-02-01

    A theoretical framework to model the dynamics of Ultrasound Contrast Agent (UCA) inside a phantom vessel is presented. The model is derived from the reduced Navier-Stokes equation and is coupled with the evolving flow field solution inside the vessel by a similarity transformation approach. The results are computed, and compared with experiments available in literature, for the initial UCA radius of Ro=1.5 μm and 2 μm for the vessel diameter of D=12 μm and 200 μm with the acoustic parameters as utilized in the experiments. When compared to other models, better agreement on smaller vessel diameter is obtained with the proposed coupled model. The model also predicts, quite accurately, bubble fragmentation in terms of acoustic and geometric parameters. © 2014 IEEE.

  4. Modeling of heat and mass transfer processes during core melt discharge from a reactor pressure vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinh, T.N.; Bui, V.A.; Nourgaliev, R.R. [Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    The objective of the paper is to study heat and mass transfer processes related to core melt discharge from a reactor vessel is a severe light water reactor accident. The phenomenology of the issue includes (1) melt convection in and heat transfer from the melt pool in contact with the vessel lower head wall; (2) fluid dynamics and heat transfer of the melt flow in the growing discharge hole; and (3) multi-dimensional heat conduction in the ablating lower head wall. A program of model development, validation and application is underway (i) to analyse the dominant physical mechanisms determining characteristics of the lower head ablation process; (ii) to develop and validate efficient analytic/computational methods for estimating heat and mass transfer under phase-change conditions in irregular moving-boundary domains; and (iii) to investigate numerically the melt discharge phenomena in a reactor-scale situation, and, in particular, the sensitivity of the melt discharge transient to structural differences and various in-vessel melt progression scenarios. The paper presents recent results of the analysis and model development work supporting the simulant melt-structure interaction experiments.

  5. Ex-Vessel Core Melt Modeling Comparison between MELTSPREAD-CORQUENCH and MELCOR 2.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robb, Kevin R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Farmer, Mitchell [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Francis, Matthew W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-03-01

    System-level code analyses by both United States and international researchers predict major core melting, bottom head failure, and corium-concrete interaction for Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1 (1F1). Although system codes such as MELCOR and MAAP are capable of capturing a wide range of accident phenomena, they currently do not contain detailed models for evaluating some ex-vessel core melt behavior. However, specialized codes containing more detailed modeling are available for melt spreading such as MELTSPREAD as well as long-term molten corium-concrete interaction (MCCI) and debris coolability such as CORQUENCH. In a preceding study, Enhanced Ex-Vessel Analysis for Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1: Melt Spreading and Core-Concrete Interaction Analyses with MELTSPREAD and CORQUENCH, the MELTSPREAD-CORQUENCH codes predicted the 1F1 core melt readily cooled in contrast to predictions by MELCOR. The user community has taken notice and is in the process of updating their systems codes; specifically MAAP and MELCOR, to improve and reduce conservatism in their ex-vessel core melt models. This report investigates why the MELCOR v2.1 code, compared to the MELTSPREAD and CORQUENCH 3.03 codes, yield differing predictions of ex-vessel melt progression. To accomplish this, the differences in the treatment of the ex-vessel melt with respect to melt spreading and long-term coolability are examined. The differences in modeling approaches are summarized, and a comparison of example code predictions is provided.

  6. Instrumentation and testing of a prestressed concrete containment vessel model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hessheimer, M.F.; Pace, D.W.; Klamerus, E.W.

    1997-01-01

    Static overpressurization tests of two scale models of nuclear containment structures - a steel containment vessel (SCV) representative of an improved, boiling water reactor (BWR) Mark II design and a prestressed concrete containment vessel (PCCV) for pressurized water reactors (PWR) - are being conducted by Sandia National Laboratories for the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation of Japan and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This paper discusses plans for instrumentation and testing of the PCCV model. 6 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  7. Testing of plain and fibrous concrete single cavity prestressed concrete reactor vessel models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oland, C.B.

    1985-01-01

    Two single-cavity prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV) models were fabricated and tested to failure to demonstrate the structural response and ultimate pressure capacity of models cast from high-strength concretes. Concretes with design compressive strengths in excess of 70 MPa (10,000 psi) were developed for this investigation. One model was cast from plain concrete and failed in shear at the head region. The second model was cast from fiber reinforced concrete and failed by rupturing the circumferential prestressing at the sidewall of the structure. The tests also demonstrated the capabilities of the liner system to maintain a leak-tight pressure boundary. 3 refs., 4 figs

  8. Re-expression of pro-fibrotic, embryonic preserved mediators in irradiated arterial vessels of the head and neck region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möbius, Patrick; Preidl, Raimund H M; Weber, Manuel; Amann, Kerstin; Neukam, Friedrich W; Wehrhan, Falk

    2017-11-01

    Surgical treatment of head and neck malignancies frequently includes microvascular free tissue transfer. Preoperative radiotherapy increases postoperative fibrosis-related complications up to transplant loss. Fibrogenesis is associated with re-expression of embryonic preserved tissue developmental mediators: osteopontin (OPN), regulated by sex-determining region Y‑box 9 (Sox9), and homeobox A9 (HoxA9) play important roles in pathologic tissue remodeling and are upregulated in atherosclerotic vascular lesions; dickkopf-1 (DKK1) inhibits pro-fibrotic and atherogenic Wnt signaling. We evaluated the influence of irradiation on expression of these mediators in arteries of the head and neck region. DKK1, HoxA9, OPN, and Sox9 expression was examined immunohistochemically in 24 irradiated and 24 nonirradiated arteries of the lower head and neck region. The ratio of positive cells to total cell number (labeling index) in the investigated vessel walls was assessed semiquantitatively. DKK1 expression was significantly decreased, whereas HoxA9, OPN, and Sox9 expression were significantly increased in irradiated compared to nonirradiated arterial vessels. Preoperative radiotherapy induces re-expression of embryonic preserved mediators in arterial vessels and may thus contribute to enhanced activation of pro-fibrotic downstream signaling leading to media hypertrophy and intima degeneration comparable to fibrotic development steps in atherosclerosis. These histopathological changes may be promoted by HoxA9-, OPN-, and Sox9-related inflammation and vascular remodeling, supported by downregulation of anti-fibrotic DKK1. Future pharmaceutical strategies targeting these vessel alterations, e. g., bisphosphonates, might reduce postoperative complications in free tissue transfer.

  9. Hierarchical and coupling model of factors influencing vessel traffic flow.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Liu

    Full Text Available Understanding the characteristics of vessel traffic flow is crucial in maintaining navigation safety, efficiency, and overall waterway transportation management. Factors influencing vessel traffic flow possess diverse features such as hierarchy, uncertainty, nonlinearity, complexity, and interdependency. To reveal the impact mechanism of the factors influencing vessel traffic flow, a hierarchical model and a coupling model are proposed in this study based on the interpretative structural modeling method. The hierarchical model explains the hierarchies and relationships of the factors using a graph. The coupling model provides a quantitative method that explores interaction effects of factors using a coupling coefficient. The coupling coefficient is obtained by determining the quantitative indicators of the factors and their weights. Thereafter, the data obtained from Port of Tianjin is used to verify the proposed coupling model. The results show that the hierarchical model of the factors influencing vessel traffic flow can explain the level, structure, and interaction effect of the factors; the coupling model is efficient in analyzing factors influencing traffic volumes. The proposed method can be used for analyzing increases in vessel traffic flow in waterway transportation system.

  10. Hierarchical and coupling model of factors influencing vessel traffic flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhao; Liu, Jingxian; Li, Huanhuan; Li, Zongzhi; Tan, Zhirong; Liu, Ryan Wen; Liu, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the characteristics of vessel traffic flow is crucial in maintaining navigation safety, efficiency, and overall waterway transportation management. Factors influencing vessel traffic flow possess diverse features such as hierarchy, uncertainty, nonlinearity, complexity, and interdependency. To reveal the impact mechanism of the factors influencing vessel traffic flow, a hierarchical model and a coupling model are proposed in this study based on the interpretative structural modeling method. The hierarchical model explains the hierarchies and relationships of the factors using a graph. The coupling model provides a quantitative method that explores interaction effects of factors using a coupling coefficient. The coupling coefficient is obtained by determining the quantitative indicators of the factors and their weights. Thereafter, the data obtained from Port of Tianjin is used to verify the proposed coupling model. The results show that the hierarchical model of the factors influencing vessel traffic flow can explain the level, structure, and interaction effect of the factors; the coupling model is efficient in analyzing factors influencing traffic volumes. The proposed method can be used for analyzing increases in vessel traffic flow in waterway transportation system.

  11. The modeling and analysis of in-vessel corium/structure interaction in boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podowski, M.Z.; Kurul, N.; Kim, S.-W.; Baltyn, W.; Frid, W.

    1997-01-01

    A complete stand-alone state-of-the-art model has been developed of the interaction between corium debris in the lower plenum and the RPV walls and internal structures, including the vessel failure mechanisms. This new model has been formulated as a set of consistent computer modules which could be linked with other existing models and/or computer codes. The combined lower head and lower plenum modules were parametrically tested and applied to predict the consequences of a hypothetical station blackout in a Swedish BWR. (author)

  12. Modeling for evaluation of debris coolability in lower plenum of reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Yu; Moriyama, Kiyofumi; Nakamura, Hideo; Hirano, Masashi

    2003-01-01

    Effectiveness of debris cooling by water that fills a gap between the debris and the lower head wall was estimated through steady calculations in reactor scale. In those calculations, the maximum coolable debris depth was assessed as a function of gap width with combination of correlations for critical heat flux and turbulent natural convection of a volumetrically heated pool. The results indicated that the gap with a width of 1 to 2 mm was capable of cooling the debris under the conditions of the TMI-2 accident, and that a significantly larger gap width was needed to retain a larger amount of debris within the lower plenum. Transient models on gap growth and water penetration into the gap were developed and incorporated into CAMP code along with turbulent natural convection model developed by Yin, Nagano and Tsuji, categorized in low Reynolds number type two-equation model. The validation of the turbulent model was made with the UCLA experiment on natural convection of a volumetrically heated pool. It was confirmed that CAMP code predicted well the distribution of local heat transfer coefficients along the vessel inner surface. The gap cooling model was validated by analyzing the in-vessel debris coolability experiments at JAERI, where molten Al 2 O 3 was poured into a water-filled hemispherical vessel. The temperature history measured on the vessel outer surface was satisfactorily reproduced by CAMP code. (author)

  13. Marine Vessel Models in Changing Operational Conditions - A Tutorial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perez, Tristan; Sørensen, Asgeir; Blanke, Mogens

    2006-01-01

    conditions (VOC). However, since marine systems operate in changing VOCs, there is a need to adapt the models. To date, there is no theory available to describe a general model valid across different VOCs due to the complexity of the hydrodynamic involved. It is believed that system identification could......This tutorial paper provides an introduction, from a systems perspective, to the topic of ship motion dynamics of surface ships. It presents a classification of parametric models currently used for monitoring and control of marine vessels. These models are valid for certain vessel operational...

  14. Kinematics of a Head-Neck Model Simulating Whiplash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colicchia, Giuseppe; Zollman, Dean; Wiesner, Hartmut; Sen, Ahmet Ilhan

    2008-01-01

    A whiplash event is a relative motion between the head and torso that occurs in rear-end automobile collisions. In particular, the large inertia of the head results in a horizontal translation relative to the thorax. This paper describes a simulation of the motion of the head and neck during a rear-end (whiplash) collision. A head-neck model that…

  15. Movement of retinal vessels toward the optic nerve head after increasing intraocular pressure in monkey eyes with experimental glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Atsumi; Enomoto, Nobuko; Ishida, Kyoko; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Noguchi, Tetsuro; Horai, Naoto; Onoe, Hirotaka; Hara, Hideaki; Tomita, Goji

    2017-09-01

    A shift or displacement of the retinal blood vessels (RBVs) with neuroretinal rim thinning indicates the progression of glaucomatous optic neuropathy. In chronic open angle glaucoma, individuals with RBV positional shifts exhibit more rapid visual field loss than those without RBV shifts. The retinal vessels reportedly move onto the optic nerve head (ONH) in response to glaucoma damage, suggesting that RBVs are pulled toward the ONH in response to increased cupping. Whether this phenomenon only applies to RVBs located in the vicinity or inside the ONH or, more generally, to RBVs also located far from the ONH, however, is unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the movement of RBVs located relatively far from the ONH edge after increasing intraocular pressure (IOP) in an experimental monkey model of glaucoma. Fundus photographs were obtained in 17 monkeys. High IOP was induced in the monkeys by laser photocoagulation burns applied uniformly with 360° irradiation around the trabecular meshwork of the left eye. The right eye was left intact and used as a non-treated control. Considering the circadian rhythm of IOP, it was measured in both eyes of each animal at around the same time-points. Then, fundus photographs were obtained. Using Image J image analysis software, an examiner (N.E.) measured the fundus photographs at two time-points, i.e. before laser treatment (time 1) and the last fundus photography after IOP elevation (time 2). The following parameters were measured (in pixels): 1) vertical diameter of the ONH (DD), 2) distance from the ONH edge to the first bifurcation point of the superior branch of the central retinal vein (UV), 3) distance from the ONH edge to the first bifurcation point of the inferior branch of the central retinal vein (LV), 4) ONH area, and 5) surface area of the cup of the ONH. We calculated the ratios of UV to DD (UV/DD), LV to DD (LV/DD), and the cup area to disc area ratio (C/D). The mean UV/DD at time 1 (0.656 ± 0.233) was

  16. Thermal Load Analysis of Multilayered Corium in the Lower Head of Reactor Pressure Vessel during Severe Accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whang, Seok Won; Park, Hyun Sun [POSTECH, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Tae Suk [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    In-Vessel Retention (IVR) is one of the severe accident management strategies to terminate or mitigate the severe accident which is also called 'core-melt accident'. The reactor vessel would be cooled by flooding the cavity with water. The molten core mixture is divided into two or three layers due to the density difference. Light metal layer which contains Fe and Zr is on the oxide layer which is consist of UO{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2}. Heavy metal layer which contains U, Fe and Zr is located under the oxide layer. In oxide layer, the crust which is solidified material is formed along the boundary. The assessment of IVR for nuclear power plant has been conducted with lumped parameter method by Theofanous, Rempe and Esmaili. In this paper, the numerical analysis was performed and verified with the Esmaili's work to analyze thermal load of multilayered corium in pressurized reactor vessel and also to examine the condition of in-vessel corium characteristic before the vessel failure that lead to ex-vessel severe accident progression for example, ex-vessel debris bed cooling. The in-vessel coolability analysis for several scenarios is conducted for the plant which has higher power than AP1000. Two sensitivity analyses are conducted, the first is emissivity of light metal layer and the second is the heat transfer coefficient correlations of oxide layer. The effect of three layered system also investigated. In this paper, the numerical analysis was performed and verified with Esmaili's model to analyze thermal load of multilayered corium in pressurized reactor vessel. For two layered system, thermal load was analyzed according to the severe accident scenarios, emissivity of the light metal layer and heat transfer correlations of the.

  17. Experiments on melt dispersion with lateral failure in the bottom head of the pressure vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, L.; Gargallo, M. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institut fur Kern-und Energietechnik, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    Melt dispersion experiments with lateral failure in the bottom head were carried out in a 1:18 scaled annular cavity design under low pressure conditions. Water and a bismuth alloy were used as melt simulant material and nitrogen as driving gas. With lateral breaches the liquid height in the lower head relative to the upper and lower edge of the breach is an additional parameter for the dispersion process. Shifting the break from the central position towards the side of the lower head leads to smaller melt dispersion, and a larger breach size does not necessarily lead to a larger dispersed melt fraction. (author)

  18. Modeling irradiation embrittlement in reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odette, G.R.

    1998-01-01

    As a result of the popularity of the Agencies report 'Neutron Irradiation Embrittlement of Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels' of 1975, it was decided that another report on this broad subject would be of use. In this report, background and contemporary views on specially identified areas of the subject are considered as self-contained chapters, written by experts. In chapter 10, numerical modeling of irradiation embrittlement in reactor vessel steels are introduced. Physically-based models are developed and their role in advancing the state-of-the-art of predicting irradiation embrittlement of RPV steels is stressed

  19. Experimental tests on buckling of ellipsoidal vessel heads under internal pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alix, Michel; Roche, Roland.

    1979-01-01

    Seventeen heads made out of metal sheets -by cold working- were tested. Three different metals were used - carbon steel, austenitic steel, and aluminium alloy. Nominal dimensions were: diameter D 500 mm height H 50 and 100 mm thickness to diameter ratio t/D in the range 0.001-0.005. The heads had a good axisymmetric shape, but that the thickness was varying along the ellipse. Material characteristic of each head was given by a tensile test (strain-stress curve). The obtained results are mainly the pressure deflexion recordings, strain measurements and visual observations of the geometrical changes. For thin heads, buckling is a very fast event and the first folding occurs sudently, with a strong perturbation on the pressure-deflexion curve. For the thickest heads, circular waves are slowly forming. In all of these tests, yielding occured before buckling and it was possible to increase the pressure beyond the first buckling pressure without failure. The experimental results agree very well (+-5% except one head) with the empirical formula Psub(c)=70000.(sigma y+sigma u/2)(t/D)sup(5/3)((D/H) 2 -8)sup(-2/3). The following notations being used: Psub(c): critical buckling pressure; sigma y: yield strength; sigma u: ultimate stress (same unit); t: knuckle thickness; D: mean diameter; H: height (same unit) [fr

  20. Walking Ahead: The Headed Social Force Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Farina

    Full Text Available Human motion models are finding an increasing number of novel applications in many different fields, such as building design, computer graphics and robot motion planning. The Social Force Model is one of the most popular alternatives to describe the motion of pedestrians. By resorting to a physical analogy, individuals are assimilated to point-wise particles subject to social forces which drive their dynamics. Such a model implicitly assumes that humans move isotropically. On the contrary, empirical evidence shows that people do have a preferred direction of motion, walking forward most of the time. Lateral motions are observed only in specific circumstances, such as when navigating in overcrowded environments or avoiding unexpected obstacles. In this paper, the Headed Social Force Model is introduced in order to improve the realism of the trajectories generated by the classical Social Force Model. The key feature of the proposed approach is the inclusion of the pedestrians' heading into the dynamic model used to describe the motion of each individual. The force and torque representing the model inputs are computed as suitable functions of the force terms resulting from the traditional Social Force Model. Moreover, a new force contribution is introduced in order to model the behavior of people walking together as a single group. The proposed model features high versatility, being able to reproduce both the unicycle-like trajectories typical of people moving in open spaces and the point-wise motion patterns occurring in high density scenarios. Extensive numerical simulations show an increased regularity of the resulting trajectories and confirm a general improvement of the model realism.

  1. Different Recipient Vessels for Free Microsurgical Fibula Flaps in the Treatment of Avascular Necrosis of the Femoral Head: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Yiji; Chen, Zenggan; Lineaweaver, William Charles; Zhang, Feng

    2017-12-01

    Several recipient vessels can be used in free microsurgical fibula flaps (MFFs) for the treatment of avascular necrosis of the femoral head (ANFH). Few articles investigate the influence of different recipient vessels on outcomes of MFF for ANFH. A comprehensive literature search of databases including PubMed-Medline, Ovid-Embase, and Cochrane Library was performed to collect the related studies. The Medical Subject Headings used were "femur head necrosis" and "bone transplantation." The relevant words in title or abstract included but not limited to "fibula flap," "fibular flap," "vascularized fibula," "vascularized fibular," "free fibula," "free fibular," "femoral head necrosis," "avascular necrosis of femoral head," and "ischemic necrosis of femoral head." The methodological index for nonrandomized studies was adopted for assessing the studies included in this review. Finally, 15 studies encompassing a total of 1267 patients (1603 hips) with ANFH were pooled in the overall analysis. Recipient vessels for MFF included the ascending branch of the lateral circumflex femoral artery and vein in 8 studies, descending branch of the lateral circumflex femoral artery and vein in 2 studies, second perforating branch of the deep femoral artery and vein in 4 studies, and inferior gluteal artery and vein in 1 study. Preoperative and postoperative average Harris hip score and pooled analyses of the rate of conversion, radiographic progression, and hip surgery-related complications showed no significant difference on the outcomes of MFF on ANFH between using different recipient vessels. Different recipient vessels did not affect outcomes in MFF procedures for ANFH. High-quality randomized controlled trials and prospective studies would be necessary to clarify reliable advantages and disadvantages between different recipient vessels. Until then, surgeons are justified in using ascending branch of the lateral circumflex femoral artery and vein, descending branch of the lateral

  2. Modelling of hydrogen deflagration in vessels using GOTHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, L.L.; Wong, R.C.; Fluke, R.J.

    1997-01-01

    Simulations of hydrogen deflagration tests were performed using the discrete lumpedparameter bum model of the computer code GOTHIC. The tests were performed in small and large scale spherical vessels and a cylindrical vessel. The small vessel cases included the effects of venting, and the cylindrical tests included the effects of obstacles. The simulations were performed by sub-dividing the volumes into either five or ten 'cells', and parameters such as flame speed and hydrogen concentration were varied. Measured flame speeds were used in the simulations and the results were compared to simulations using the code 'default' flame speed. The calculated pressure transients compared well with the experimental results using the measured flame speeds in the simulations of unvented cases, whereas for vented cases, the predicted peak pressures were generally less than the measurements. However, when the code default flame speed is used, the predicted peak pressures were more consistent and generally conservative when compared with the measurements. When the default flame speeds were used for vessels without obstacles, the peak pressures obtained were higher and the bum times were shorter than the experimental measurements. This was probably due to the basis for the correlations used for default flame speed in the bum model. These correlations were derived from intermediate-scale experiments for hydrogen combustion in relatively turbulent (fans on) environments. For vessels without obstacles, laminar flame speeds were more likely. Hence, the predicted peak pressures would be expected to be higher than the experimental results. In order to account for the degree of turbulence and flame acceleration caused by the presence of obstacles, higher than default flame speeds were used in the simulation of the vessel with obstacles. It was found that twice the default flame speed provided predictions of peak pressures comparable to the measurements. Based on the simulations conducted

  3. Continuum mathematical modelling of pathological growth of blood vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadnik, N. E.; Dats, E. P.

    2018-04-01

    The present study is devoted to the mathematical modelling of a human blood vessel pathological growth. The vessels are simulated as the thin-walled circular tube. The boundary value problem of the surface growth of an elastic thin-walled cylinder is solved. The analytical solution is obtained in terms of velocities of stress strain state parameters. The condition of thinness allows us to study finite displacements of cylinder surfaces by means of infinitesimal deformations. The stress-strain state characteristics, which depend on the mechanical parameters of the biological processes, are numerically computed and graphically analysed.

  4. Electromechanical Model of Blood Flow in Vessels

    OpenAIRE

    Ivo Cap; Barbora Czippelova

    2008-01-01

    The present paper deals with some theoretical derivations connected with very efficient method of solution of hydrodynamic problems of blood flow in human cardiovascular system. The electromechanical analogy of liquid flow in a tube and electromagnetic wave propagating along an electric transmission line is discussed. We have derived a detailed circuit-like model of an elementary section of the elastic tube with viscose Newtonian liquid. The analogy harmonic current electrical cir...

  5. Electromechanical Model of Blood Flow in Vessels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo Cap

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper deals with some theoretical derivations connected with very efficient method of solution of hydrodynamic problems of blood flow in human cardiovascular system. The electromechanical analogy of liquid flow in a tube and electromagnetic wave propagating along an electric transmission line is discussed. We have derived a detailed circuit-like model of an elementary section of the elastic tube with viscose Newtonian liquid. The analogy harmonic current electrical circuit has been designed

  6. Improved Wave-vessel Transfer Functions by Uncertainty Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ulrik Dam; Fønss Bach, Kasper; Iseki, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with uncertainty modelling of wave-vessel transfer functions used to calculate or predict wave-induced responses of a ship in a seaway. Although transfer functions, in theory, can be calculated to exactly reflect the behaviour of the ship when exposed to waves, uncertainty in inp...

  7. Tightening unit EZ 250 for VVER 1000 type reactor pressure vessel head flange joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruchar, Miloslav; Nadenik, Tomas; Kroj, Ludek

    2010-01-01

    The programme of flange joints tightening by seals made of expanded graphite for VVER 440 and VVER 1000 reactor head flange joints is highlighted, and tightening units of row EZ 650 and EZ 650 TK and KNI for VVER 440 reactor head flange joints and EZ 250 tightening unit for VVER 1000 reactor head flange joints are described in detail. The main advantages of electronically controlled tightening units include: Precise and uniform compression of the gasket during the tightening procedure; Automated solution to the graphite relaxing problem during tightening; Possibility of diagnosis of the thread status of the joints being tightened; Alleviation of operator's tough work; Shorter time of tensioning associated with a lower collective doses; Quick preparation of tightening procedure report from the data measured; Calibration renewal is possible in advance at time of unit storage without the need to place it on a real joint. (P.A.)

  8. Vascular patterns in the heads of crocodilians: blood vessels and sites of thermal exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, William Ruger; Sedlmayr, Jayc C; Witmer, Lawrence M

    2016-12-01

    Extant crocodilians are a highly apomorphic archosaur clade that is ectothermic, yet often achieve large body sizes that can be subject to higher heat loads. Therefore, the anatomical and physiological roles that blood vessels play in crocodilian thermoregulation need further investigation to better understand how crocodilians establish and maintain cephalic temperatures and regulate neurosensory tissue temperatures during basking and normal activities. The cephalic vascular anatomy of extant crocodilians, particularly American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) was investigated using a differential-contrast, dual-vascular injection technique and high resolution X-ray micro-computed tomography (μCT). Blood vessels were digitally isolated to create representations of vascular pathways. The specimens were then dissected to confirm CT results. Sites of thermal exchange, consisting of the oral, nasal, and orbital regions, were given special attention due to their role in evaporative cooling and cephalic thermoregulation in other diapsids. Blood vessels to and from sites of thermal exchange were studied to detect conserved vascular patterns and to assess their ability to deliver cooled blood to neurosensory tissues. Within the orbital region, both the arteries and veins demonstrated consistent branching patterns, with the supraorbital, infraorbital, and ophthalmotemporal vessels supplying and draining the orbit. The venous drainage of the orbital region showed connections to the dural sinuses via the orbital veins and cavernous sinus. The palatal region demonstrated a vast plexus that comprised both arteries and veins. The most direct route of venous drainage of the palatal plexus was through the palatomaxillary veins, essentially bypassing neurosensory tissues. Anastomotic connections with the nasal region, however, may provide an alternative route for palatal venous blood to reach neurosensory tissues. The nasal region in crocodilians is probably the most

  9. In-Vessel Retention Modeling Capabilities of SCDAP/RELAP5-3DC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knudson, D.L.; Rempe, J.L.

    2002-01-01

    Molten core materials may relocate to the lower head of a reactor vessel in the latter stages of a severe accident. Under such circumstances, in-vessel retention (IVR) of the molten materials is a vital step in mitigating potential severe accident consequences. Whether IVR occurs depends on the interactions of a number of complex processes including heat transfer inside the accumulated molten pool, heat transfer from the molten pool to the reactor vessel (and to overlying fluids), and heat transfer from exterior vessel surfaces. SCDAP/RELAP5-3D C has been developed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory to facilitate simulation of the processes affecting the potential for IVR, as well as processes involved in a wide variety of other reactor transients. In this paper, current capabilities of SCDAP/RELAP5-3D C relative to IVR modeling are described and results from typical applications are provided. In addition, anticipated developments to enhance IVR simulation with SCDAP/RELAP5-3D C are outlined. (authors)

  10. Flow model study of 'Monju' reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyaguchi, Kimihide

    1980-01-01

    In the case of designing the structures in nuclear reactors, various problems to be considered regarding thermo-hydrodynamics exist, such as the distribution of flow quantity and the pressure loss in reactors and the thermal shock to inlet and outlet nozzles. In order to grasp the flow characteristics of coolant in reactors, the 1/2 scale model of the reactor structure of ''Monju'' was attached to the water flow testing facility in the Oarai Engineering Center, and the simulation experiment has been carried out. The flow characteristics in reactors clarified by experiment and analysis so far are the distribution of flow quantity between high and low pressure regions in reactors, the distribution of flow quantity among flow zones in respective regions of high and low pressure, the pressure loss in respective parts in reactors, the flow pattern and the mixing effect of coolant in upper and lower plenums, the effect of the twisting angle of inlet nozzles on the flow characteristics in lower plenums, the effect of internal cylinders on the flow characteristics in upper plenums and so on. On the basis of these test results, the improvement of the design of structures in reactors was made, and the confirmation test on the improved structures was carried out. The testing method, the calculation method, the test results and the reflection to the design of actual machines are described. (Kako, I.)

  11. Msx genes define a population of mural cell precursors required for head blood vessel maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Miguel; Goupille, Olivier; Saint Cloment, Cécile; Lallemand, Yvan; Cumano, Ana; Robert, Benoît

    2011-07-01

    Vessels are primarily formed from an inner endothelial layer that is secondarily covered by mural cells, namely vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in arteries and veins and pericytes in capillaries and veinules. We previously showed that, in the mouse embryo, Msx1(lacZ) and Msx2(lacZ) are expressed in mural cells and in a few endothelial cells. To unravel the role of Msx genes in vascular development, we have inactivated the two Msx genes specifically in mural cells by combining the Msx1(lacZ), Msx2(lox) and Sm22α-Cre alleles. Optical projection tomography demonstrated abnormal branching of the cephalic vessels in E11.5 mutant embryos. The carotid and vertebral arteries showed an increase in caliber that was related to reduced vascular smooth muscle coverage. Taking advantage of a newly constructed Msx1(CreERT2) allele, we demonstrated by lineage tracing that the primary defect lies in a population of VSMC precursors. The abnormal phenotype that ensues is a consequence of impaired BMP signaling in the VSMC precursors that leads to downregulation of the metalloprotease 2 (Mmp2) and Mmp9 genes, which are essential for cell migration and integration into the mural layer. Improper coverage by VSMCs secondarily leads to incomplete maturation of the endothelial layer. Our results demonstrate that both Msx1 and Msx2 are required for the recruitment of a population of neural crest-derived VSMCs.

  12. Re-expression of pro-fibrotic, embryonic preserved mediators in irradiated arterial vessels of the head and neck region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moebius, Patrick; Preidl, Raimund H.M.; Weber, Manuel; Neukam, Friedrich W.; Wehrhan, Falk [Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg (FAU), Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University Hospital of Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Amann, Kerstin [Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg (FAU), Department of Nephropathology, Institute of Pathology, University Hospital of Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    Surgical treatment of head and neck malignancies frequently includes microvascular free tissue transfer. Preoperative radiotherapy increases postoperative fibrosis-related complications up to transplant loss. Fibrogenesis is associated with re-expression of embryonic preserved tissue developmental mediators: osteopontin (OPN), regulated by sex-determining region Y-box 9 (Sox9), and homeobox A9 (HoxA9) play important roles in pathologic tissue remodeling and are upregulated in atherosclerotic vascular lesions; dickkopf-1 (DKK1) inhibits pro-fibrotic and atherogenic Wnt signaling. We evaluated the influence of irradiation on expression of these mediators in arteries of the head and neck region. DKK1, HoxA9, OPN, and Sox9 expression was examined immunohistochemically in 24 irradiated and 24 nonirradiated arteries of the lower head and neck region. The ratio of positive cells to total cell number (labeling index) in the investigated vessel walls was assessed semiquantitatively. DKK1 expression was significantly decreased, whereas HoxA9, OPN, and Sox9 expression were significantly increased in irradiated compared to nonirradiated arterial vessels. Preoperative radiotherapy induces re-expression of embryonic preserved mediators in arterial vessels and may thus contribute to enhanced activation of pro-fibrotic downstream signaling leading to media hypertrophy and intima degeneration comparable to fibrotic development steps in atherosclerosis. These histopathological changes may be promoted by HoxA9-, OPN-, and Sox9-related inflammation and vascular remodeling, supported by downregulation of anti-fibrotic DKK1. Future pharmaceutical strategies targeting these vessel alterations, e. g., bisphosphonates, might reduce postoperative complications in free tissue transfer. (orig.) [German] Die operative Behandlung von Tumoren im Kopf- und Halsbereich umfasst den Transfer mikrovaskulaerer Gewebetransplantate. Praeoperative Bestrahlung verursacht eine erhoehte Inzidenz

  13. Reactor pressure vessel embrittlement: Insights from neural network modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, J.; Parfitt, D.; Wilford, K.; Riddle, N.; Alamaniotis, M.; Chroneos, A.; Fitzpatrick, M. E.

    2018-04-01

    Irradiation embrittlement of steel pressure vessels is an important consideration for the operation of current and future light water nuclear reactors. In this study we employ an ensemble of artificial neural networks in order to provide predictions of the embrittlement using two literature datasets, one based on US surveillance data and the second from the IVAR experiment. We use these networks to examine trends with input variables and to assess various literature models including compositional effects and the role of flux and temperature. Overall, the networks agree with the existing literature models and we comment on their more general use in predicting irradiation embrittlement.

  14. A Study on the Coupled FEM-Analysis for Reactor Vessel Lower Head of APR1400 under the Severe Accident Scenario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyonam; Namgung, Ihn [KEPCO International Nuclear Graduate School, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    For the stabilization of the RPV the in-vessel retention strategy with external reactor vessel cooling (IVR-ERVC) is adopted in APR1400. Under this severe accident condition, a good understanding of the mechanical behavior of the reactor vessel lower head (RVLH) is necessary both for verification of structural integrity and for improving the design applying appropriate accident mitigation strategies. The purpose of this study is to develop the analysis method of the RVLH with thermo-mechanical analysis using FEM tool (ANSYS v.15) in case of core-melting severe accident condition, and then analyze the RVLH of APR1400 including creep behavior. The plastic strain can be the major cause of lower head failure on the reactor vessel, and the creep cannot be not negligible factor of the failure under the severe accident condition. In the study, we applied constant convection coefficient at assumed temperature on the outside wall of RPV and substitute creep data of SA-508. In addition, it was found that the steel ablation at the interface between corium and vessel steel is not only a thermal phenomenon in the METCOR experiments. Corrosion processes and the formation of eutectics lead to the erosion of the vessel steel at temperatures that are significantly lower than the melting temperature of steel. It called thermo-chemical attack of the corium (corrosion). Reduced wall thickness because of the thermo-chemical effect by corium increase the equivalent plastic strain, and decrease the minimum time to reach 20% creep strain.

  15. Describable ability of blood vessels in head and neck by intravenous digital subtraction angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minakuchi, Kazuo; Takada, Keiji; Nakamura, Kenji

    1989-01-01

    Ninety-four patients with various symptoms of the head and neck were studied by intravenous digital subtraction angiography (IV-DSA). Abnormal findings were obesrved in 12 patients; one with aneurysm in the left internal carotid artery, and 11 with obstruction in the right middle cerebral artery (2), the right internal carotid artery (one), the left subclavian artery (one), the right vertebral artery (6), and the left vertebral artery (one). Motion artifacts were observed in 2 patients. The vertebral arteries were bilaterally equal in size in 42%, and the left vertebral artery was bigger than the right one in 38%. The superior sagittal dural sinus was clearly imaged in 94%. The incidence of excellent images was higher in the right sided than the left sided vein -- 85% vs 50% for the transverse dural sinus, 84% vs 54% for the sigmoid dural sinus, and 88% vs 57% for the jugular vein. Sites of excellent images were all of the dural sinuses and veins (37 cases), confined to the right side (37), confined to the left side (8), and undefined (12). (N.K.)

  16. Development of a master model concept for DEMO vacuum vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mozzillo, Rocco; Marzullo, Domenico; Tarallo, Andrea [CREATE, University of Naples Federico II, DII, P.le Tecchio 80, 80125, Naples (Italy); Bachmann, Christian [EUROfusion PMU, Boltzmannstraße 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Di Gironimo, Giuseppe, E-mail: peppe.digironimo@gmail.com [CREATE, University of Naples Federico II, DII, P.le Tecchio 80, 80125, Naples (Italy)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • The present work concerns the development of a first master concept model for DEMO vacuum vessel. • A parametric-associative CAD master model concept of a DEMO VV sector has been developed in accordance with DEMO design guidelines. • A proper CAD design methodology has been implemented in view of the later FEM analyses based on “shell elements”. - Abstract: This paper describes the development of a master model concept of the DEMO vacuum vessel (VV) conducted within the framework of the EUROfusion Consortium. Starting from the VV space envelope defined in the DEMO baseline design 2014, the layout of the VV structure was preliminarily defined according to the design criteria provided in RCC-MRx. A surface modelling technique was adopted and efficiently linked to the finite element (FE) code to simplify future FE analyses. In view of possible changes to shape and structure during the conceptual design activities, a parametric design approach allows incorporating modifications to the model efficiently.

  17. Development of a master model concept for DEMO vacuum vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mozzillo, Rocco; Marzullo, Domenico; Tarallo, Andrea; Bachmann, Christian; Di Gironimo, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The present work concerns the development of a first master concept model for DEMO vacuum vessel. • A parametric-associative CAD master model concept of a DEMO VV sector has been developed in accordance with DEMO design guidelines. • A proper CAD design methodology has been implemented in view of the later FEM analyses based on “shell elements”. - Abstract: This paper describes the development of a master model concept of the DEMO vacuum vessel (VV) conducted within the framework of the EUROfusion Consortium. Starting from the VV space envelope defined in the DEMO baseline design 2014, the layout of the VV structure was preliminarily defined according to the design criteria provided in RCC-MRx. A surface modelling technique was adopted and efficiently linked to the finite element (FE) code to simplify future FE analyses. In view of possible changes to shape and structure during the conceptual design activities, a parametric design approach allows incorporating modifications to the model efficiently.

  18. Polynomial fuzzy model-based approach for underactuated surface vessels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khooban, Mohammad Hassan; Vafamand, Navid; Dragicevic, Tomislav

    2018-01-01

    The main goal of this study is to introduce a new polynomial fuzzy model-based structure for a class of marine systems with non-linear and polynomial dynamics. The suggested technique relies on a polynomial Takagi–Sugeno (T–S) fuzzy modelling, a polynomial dynamic parallel distributed compensation...... surface vessel (USV). Additionally, in order to overcome the USV control challenges, including the USV un-modelled dynamics, complex nonlinear dynamics, external disturbances and parameter uncertainties, the polynomial fuzzy model representation is adopted. Moreover, the USV-based control structure...... and a sum-of-squares (SOS) decomposition. The new proposed approach is a generalisation of the standard T–S fuzzy models and linear matrix inequality which indicated its effectiveness in decreasing the tracking time and increasing the efficiency of the robust tracking control problem for an underactuated...

  19. Comparison of elastic--plastic and variable modulus-cracking constitutive models for prestressed concrete reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, C.A.; Smith, P.D.

    1978-01-01

    The variable modulus-cracking model is capable of predicting the behavior of reinforced concrete structures (such as the reinforced plate under transverse pressure described previously) well into the range of nonlinear behavior including the prediction of the ultimate load. For unreinforced thick-walled concrete vessels under internal pressure the use of elastic--plastic concrete models in finite element codes enhances the apparent ductility of the vessels in contrast to variable modulus-cracking models that predict nearly instantaneous rupture whenever the tensile strength at the inner wall is exceeded. For unreinforced thick-walled end slabs representative of PCRV heads, the behavior predicted by finite element codes using variable modulus-cracking models is much stiffer in the nonlinear range than that observed experimentally. Although the shear type failures and crack patterns that are observed experimentally are predicted by such concrete models, the ultimate load carrying capacity and vessel-ductility are significantly underestimated. It appears that such models do not adequately model such features as aggregate interlock that could lead to an enhanced vessel reserve strength and ductility

  20. Accuracy of geometrical modelling of heat transfer from tissue to blood vessels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, van G.M.J.; Kotte, A.N.T.J.; Bree, de J.; Koijk, van der J.F.; Crezee, J.; Lagendijk, J.J.W.

    1997-01-01

    We have developed a thermal model in which blood vessels are described as geometrical objects, 3D curves with associated diameters. Here the behaviour of the model is examined for low resolutions compared with the vessel diameter and for strongly curved vessels. The tests include a single straight

  1. Instrumentation of a prestressed concrete containment vessel model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hessheimer, M.F.; Rightley, M.J.; Matsumoto, T.

    1995-01-01

    A series of static overpressurization tests of scale models of nuclear containment structures is being conducted by Sandia National Laboratories for the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation of Japan and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. At present, two tests are being planned: a test of a model of a steel containment vessel (SCV) that is representative of an improved, boiling water reactor (BWR) Mark II design; and a test of a model of a prestressed concrete containment vessel (PCCV). This paper discusses plans and the results of a preliminary investigation of the instrumentation of the PCCV model. The instrumentation suite for this model will consist of approximately 2000 channels of data to record displacements, strains in the reinforcing steel, prestressing tendons, concrete, steel liner and liner anchors, as well as pressure and temperature. The instrumentation is being designed to monitor the response of the model during prestressing operations, during Structural Integrity and Integrated Leak Rate testing, and during test to failure of the model. Particular emphasis has been placed on instrumentation of the prestressing system in order to understand the behavior of the prestressing strands at design and beyond design pressure levels. Current plans are to place load cells at both ends of one third of the tendons in addition to placing strain measurement devices along the length of selected tendons. Strain measurements will be made using conventional bonded foil resistance gages and a wire resistance gage, known as a open-quotes Tensmegclose quotes reg-sign gage, specifically designed for use with seven-wire strand. The results of preliminary tests of both types of gages, in the laboratory and in a simulated model configuration, are reported and plans for instrumentation of the model are discussed

  2. CFD Modeling of a Multiphase Gravity Separator Vessel

    KAUST Repository

    Narayan, Gautham

    2017-05-23

    The poster highlights a CFD study that incorporates a combined Eulerian multi-fluid multiphase and a Population Balance Model (PBM) to study the flow inside a typical multiphase gravity separator vessel (GSV) found in oil and gas industry. The simulations were performed using Ansys Fluent CFD package running on KAUST supercomputer, Shaheen. Also, a highlight of a scalability study is presented. The effect of I/O bottlenecks and using Hierarchical Data Format (HDF5) for collective and independent parallel reading of case file is presented. This work is an outcome of a research collaboration on an Aramco project on Shaheen.

  3. CFD Modeling of a Multiphase Gravity Separator Vessel

    KAUST Repository

    Narayan, Gautham; Khurram, Rooh Ul Amin; Elsaadawy, Ehab

    2017-01-01

    The poster highlights a CFD study that incorporates a combined Eulerian multi-fluid multiphase and a Population Balance Model (PBM) to study the flow inside a typical multiphase gravity separator vessel (GSV) found in oil and gas industry. The simulations were performed using Ansys Fluent CFD package running on KAUST supercomputer, Shaheen. Also, a highlight of a scalability study is presented. The effect of I/O bottlenecks and using Hierarchical Data Format (HDF5) for collective and independent parallel reading of case file is presented. This work is an outcome of a research collaboration on an Aramco project on Shaheen.

  4. Preliminary results of steel containment vessel model test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, T.; Komine, K.; Arai, S.

    1997-01-01

    A high pressure test of a mixed-scaled model (1:10 in geometry and 1:4 in shell thickness) of a steel containment vessel (SCV), representing an improved boiling water reactor (BWR) Mark II containment, was conducted on December 11-12, 1996 at Sandia National Laboratories. This paper describes the preliminary results of the high pressure test. In addition, the preliminary post-test measurement data and the preliminary comparison of test data with pretest analysis predictions are also presented

  5. Crystal Plasticity Model of Reactor Pressure Vessel Embrittlement in GRIZZLY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, Pritam [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Biner, Suleyman Bulent [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Zhang, Yongfeng [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Spencer, Benjamin Whiting [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-07-01

    The integrity of reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) is of utmost importance to ensure safe operation of nuclear reactors under extended lifetime. Microstructure-scale models at various length and time scales, coupled concurrently or through homogenization methods, can play a crucial role in understanding and quantifying irradiation-induced defect production, growth and their influence on mechanical behavior of RPV steels. A multi-scale approach, involving atomistic, meso- and engineering-scale models, is currently being pursued within the GRIZZLY project to understand and quantify irradiation-induced embrittlement of RPV steels. Within this framework, a dislocation-density based crystal plasticity model has been developed in GRIZZLY that captures the effect of irradiation-induced defects on the flow stress behavior and is presented in this report. The present formulation accounts for the interaction between self-interstitial loops and matrix dislocations. The model predictions have been validated with experiments and dislocation dynamics simulation.

  6. Crystal Plasticity Model of Reactor Pressure Vessel Embrittlement in GRIZZLY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, Pritam; Biner, Suleyman Bulent; Zhang, Yongfeng; Spencer, Benjamin Whiting

    2015-01-01

    The integrity of reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) is of utmost importance to ensure safe operation of nuclear reactors under extended lifetime. Microstructure-scale models at various length and time scales, coupled concurrently or through homogenization methods, can play a crucial role in understanding and quantifying irradiation-induced defect production, growth and their influence on mechanical behavior of RPV steels. A multi-scale approach, involving atomistic, meso- and engineering-scale models, is currently being pursued within the GRIZZLY project to understand and quantify irradiation-induced embrittlement of RPV steels. Within this framework, a dislocation-density based crystal plasticity model has been developed in GRIZZLY that captures the effect of irradiation-induced defects on the flow stress behavior and is presented in this report. The present formulation accounts for the interaction between self-interstitial loops and matrix dislocations. The model predictions have been validated with experiments and dislocation dynamics simulation.

  7. Hydrodynamic model of hydrogen-flame propagation in reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baer, M.R.; Ratzel, A.C.

    1982-01-01

    A hydrodynamic model for hydrogen flame propagation in reactor geometries is presented. This model is consistent with the theory of slow combustion in which the gasdynamic field equations are treated in the limit of small Mach numbers. To the lowest order, pressure is spatially uniform. The flame is treated as a density and entropy discontinuity which propagates at prescribed burning velocities, corresponding to laminar or turbulent flames. Radiation cooling of the burned combustion gases and possible preheating of the unburned gases during propagation of the flame is included using a molecular gas-band thermal radiation model. Application of this model has been developed for 1-D variable area flame propagation. Multidimensional effects induced by hydrodynamics and buoyancy are introduced as a correction to the burn velocity (which reflects a modification of planar flame surface to a distorted surface) using experimentally measured pressure-rise time data for hydrogen/air deflagrations in cylindrical vessels

  8. Modeling and measurement of the motion of the DIII-D vacuum vessel during vertical instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reis, E.; Blevins, R.D.; Jensen, T.H.; Luxon, J.L.; Petersen, P.I.; Strait, E.J.

    1991-11-01

    The motions of the D3-D vacuum vessel during vertical instabilities of elongated plasmas have been measured and studied over the past five years. The currents flowing in the vessel wall and the plasma scrapeoff layer were also measured and correlated to a physics model. These results provide a time history load distribution on the vessel which were input to a dynamic analysis for correlation to the measured motions. The structural model of the vessel using the loads developed from the measured vessel currents showed that the calculated displacement history correlated well with the measured values. The dynamic analysis provides a good estimate of the stresses and the maximum allowable deflection of the vessel. In addition, the vessel motions produce acoustic emissions at 21 Hertz that are sufficiently loud to be felt as well as heard by the D3-D operators. Time history measurements of the sounds were correlated to the vessel displacements. An analytical model of an oscillating sphere provided a reasonable correlation to the amplitude of the measured sounds. The correlation of the theoretical and measured vessel currents, the dynamic measurements and analysis, and the acoustic measurements and analysis show that: (1) The physics model can predict vessel forces for selected values of plasma resistivity. The model also predicts poloidal and toroidal wall currents which agree with measured values; (2) The force-time history from the above model, used in conjunction with an axisymmetric structural model of the vessel, predicts vessel motions which agree well with measured values; (3) The above results, input to a simple acoustic model predicts the magnitude of sounds emitted from the vessel during disruptions which agree with acoustic measurements; (4) Correlation of measured vessel motions with structural analysis shows that a maximum vertical motion of the vessel up to 0.24 in will not overstress the vessel or its supports. 11 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab

  9. Modelling of RPV lower head under core melt severe accident condition using OpenFOAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madokoro, Hiroshi; Kretzschmar, Frank; Miassoedov, Alexei

    2017-01-01

    Although six years have been passed since the tragic severe accident at Fukushima Daiichi, still large uncertainties exist in modeling of core degradation and reactor pressure vessel (RPV) failure. It is extremely important to obtain a better understanding of complex phenomena in the lower head in order to improve accident management measures. The possible failure mode of reactor pressure vessel and its failure time are especially a matter of importance. Thermal behavior of the molten pool can be simulated by the Phase-change Effective Convectivity Model (PECM), which is a distributed-parameter model developed in the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Sweden. The model calculates convective currents not using a pure CFD approach but based on so called “characteristic velocities” that are determined by empirical correlations depending on the geometry and physical properties of the molten pool. At the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), the PECM has been implemented in the open-source CFD software OpenFOAM in order to receive detailed predictions of a core melt behavior in the RPV lower head under severe accident conditions. An advantage of using OpenFOAM is that it is very flexible to add and modify models and physical properties. In the current work, the solver is extended to couple PECM with a structure analysis model of the vessel wall. The model considers thermal expansion, plasticity, creep and damage. The model and physical properties are based on those implemented in ANSYS. Although the previous implementation had restriction that the amount of and geometry of the melt cannot be changed, our coupled model allows flexibility of the melt amount and geometry. The extended solver was used to simulate the LIVE-L1 and -L7V experiments and has demonstrated good prediction of the temperature distribution in the molten pool and heat flux distribution through the vessel wall. Regarding the vessel failure the model was applied to one of the FOREVER tests

  10. Effect on temperature of output of the core of the size of the break in the Upper Head of the vessel using TRACE5; Efecto sobre la Temperatura de Salida del Nucleo del Tamano de la Rotura en el Upper Head de la Vasija utilizando TRACE5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Querol, A.; Gallardo, S.; Verdu, G.

    2013-07-01

    Most (PWR) pressurized water reactors have thermocouples to detect overheating of the core since they are used to measure the temperature of exit of the nucleus (CET). However, it was found that in a small break (SBLOCA) located in the upper head of the vessel there is a delay between the measure of thermocouples and overheating of the core. This work is based on the simulation, using the code Thermo-hydraulic TRACE5, of the Test 6 - 1 the OECD/NEA rose project carried out in the experimental facility LSTF (Large Scale Test Facility). There have been different analyses in which geometric variables that can influence the model such as the size and location of the break, possible flow towards the break and the nodalization of the upper head of the vessel have been studied.

  11. Prestressed concrete reactor vessel thermal cylinder model study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callahan, J.P.; Canonico, D.A.; Richardson, M.; Corum, J.M.; Dodge, W.G.; Robinson, G.C.; Whitman, G.D.

    1977-01-01

    The thermal cylinder experiment was designed both to provide information for evaluating the capability of analytical methods to predict the time-dependent stress-strain behavior of a 1 / 6 -scale model of the barrel section of a single-cavity prestressed concrete reactor vessel and to demonstrate the structural behavior under design and off-design thermal conditions. The model was a thick-walled cylinder having a height of 1.22 m, a thickness of 0.46 m, and an outer diameter of 2.06 m. It was prestressed both axially and circumferentially and subjected to 4.83 MPa internal pressure together with a thermal crossfall imposed by heating the inner surface to 338.8 K and cooling the outer surface to 297.1 K. The initial 460 days of testing were divided into time periods that simulated prestressing, heatup, reactor operation, and shutdown. At the conclusion of the simulated operating period, the model was repressurized and subjected to localized heating at 505.4 K for 84 days to produce an off-design hot-spot condition. Comparisons of experimental data with calculated values obtained using the SAFE-CRACK finite-element computer program showed that the program was capable of predicting time-dependent behavior in a vessel subjected to normal operating conditions, but that it was unable to accurately predict the behavior during off-design hot-spot heating. Readings made using a neutron and gamma-ray backscattering moisture probe showed little, if any, migration of moisture in the concrete cross section. Destructive examination indicated that the model maintained its basic structural integrity during localized hot-spot heating

  12. Persistent trigeminal artery/persistent trigeminal artery variant and coexisting variants of the head and neck vessels diagnosed using 3 T MRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, M.; Guo, Q.; Li, S.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To report the prevalence and characteristic features of persistent trigeminal artery (PTA), PTA variant (PTAV), and other variants of the head and neck vessels, identified using magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). Materials and methods: The three-dimensional (3D) time of flight (TOF) MRA and 3D contrast-enhanced (CE) MRA images of 6095 consecutive patients who underwent 3 T MRA at Liaocheng People's Hospital from 1 September 2008 through 31 May 2012 were retrospectively reviewed and analysed. Thirty-two patients were excluded because of suboptimal image quality or internal carotid artery (ICA) occlusion. Results: The prevalence of both PTA and PTAV was 0.63% (PTA, 26 cases; PTAV, 12 cases). The prevalence of coexisting variants of the head and neck vessels in cases of PTA/PTAV was 52.6% (20 of 38 cases). The vascular variants that coexisted with cases of PTA/PTAV were as follows: the intracranial arteries varied in 10 cases, the origin of the supra-aortic arteries varied in nine cases, the vertebral artery (VA) varied in 14 cases, and six cases displayed fenestrations. Fifteen of the 20 cases contained more than two types of variants. Conclusion: The prevalence of both PTA and PTAV was 0.63%. Although PTA and PTAV are rare vascular variants, they frequently coexist with other variants of the head and neck vessels. Multiple vascular variations can coexist in a single patient. Recognizing PTA, PTAV, and other variants of the head and neck vessels is crucial when planning a neuroradiological intervention or surgery. Recognizing the medial PTA is very important in clinical practice when performing trans-sphenoidal surgery on the pituitary as failure to do so could result in massive haemorrhage

  13. Design and Computational Fluid Dynamics Optimization of the Tube End Effector for Reactor Pressure Vessel Head Type VVER-1000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novosel, D.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper is presented development and optimization of the tube end effector design which should consist of 4 ultrasonic transducers, 4 Eddy Current's transducers and Radiation Proof Dot Camera. Basically, designing was conducted by main input requests, such as: inner diameter of a tested reactor pressure vessel head penetration tube, dimensions of a transducers and maximum allowable vertical movement of a manipulator connection rod in order to cover all inner tube surface. As is obvious, for ultrasonic testing should be provided the thin layer of liquid material (in our case water was chosen) which is necessary to make physical contact between transducer surface and investigated inner tube surface. By help of Computational Fluid Dynamics, determined were parameters of geometry, as the most important factor of transducer housing, hydraulically parameters for water supply and primary drain together implemented into this housing, movement of the end effectors (vertical and cylindrical) and finally, necessary equipment which has to provide all hydraulically and pneumatic requirements. As the cylindrical surface of the inner tube diameter was liquefied and contact between transducer housing and tested tube wasn't ideally covered, water leakage could occur in downstream direction. To reduce water leakage, which is highly contaminated, developed was second water drain by diffuser assembly which is driven by Venturi pipe, commercially called vacuum generator. Using the Computational Fluid Dynamic, obtained was optimized geometry of diffuser control volume with the highest efficiency, in other words, unobstructed fluid flux. Afterwards, the end effectors system was synchronized to the existing operable system for NDT methods all invented and designed by INETEC. (author)

  14. Meteor head echoes - observations and models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pellinen-Wannberg

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Meteor head echoes - instantaneous echoes moving with the velocities of the meteors - have been recorded since 1947. Despite many attempts, this phenomenon did not receive a comprehensive theory for over 4 decades. The High Power and Large Aperture (HPLA features, combined with present signal processing and data storage capabilities of incoherent scatter radars, may give an explanation for the old riddle. The meteoroid passage through the radar beam can be followed with simultaneous spatial-time resolution of about 100m-ms class. The current views of the meteor head echo process will be presented and discussed. These will be related to various EISCAT observations, such as dual-frequency target sizes, altitude distributions and vector velocities.

  15. Modelling Vessel Traffic Service to understand resilience in everyday operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Praetorius, Gesa; Hollnagel, Erik; Dahlman, Joakim

    2015-01-01

    Vessel Traffic Service (VTS) is a service to promote traffic fluency and safety in the entrance to ports. This article's purpose has been to explore everyday operations of the VTS system to gain insights in how it contributes to safe and efficient traffic movements. Interviews, focus groups and an observation have been conducted to collect data about everyday operations, as well as to grasp how the VTS system adapts to changing operational conditions. The results show that work within the VTS domain is highly complex and that the two systems modelled realise their services vastly differently, which in turn affects the systems' ability to monitor, respond and anticipate. This is of great importance to consider whenever changes are planned and implemented within the VTS domain. Only if everyday operations are properly analysed and understood, it can be estimated how alterations to technology and organisation will affect the overall system performance

  16. SCDAP/RELAP5 Modeling of Heat Transfer and Flow Losses in Lower Head Porous Debris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coryell, E.W.; Siefken, L.J.; Paik, S.

    1998-01-01

    Designs are described for implementing models for calculating the heat transfer and flow losses in porous debris in the lower head of a reactor vessel. The COUPLE model in SCDAP/RELAP5 represents both the porous and non-porous debris that results from core material slumping into the lower head. Currently, the COUPLE model has the capability to model convective and radiative heat transfer from the surfaces of non-porous debris in a detailed manner and to model only in a simplistic manner the heat transfer from porous debris. In order to advance beyond the simplistic modeling for porous debris, designs are developed for detailed calculations of heat transfer and flow losses in porous debris. Correlations are identified for convective heat transfer in porous debris for the following modes of heat transfer; (1) forced convection to liquid, (2) forced convection to gas, (3) nucleate boiling, (4) transition boiling, and (5) film boiling. Interphase heat transfer is modeled in an approximate manner. A design is also described for implementing a model of heat transfer by radiation from debris to the interstitial fluid. A design is described for implementation of models for flow losses and interphase drag in porous debris. Since the models for heat transfer and flow losses in porous debris in the lower head are designed for general application, a design is also described for implementation of these models to the analysis of porous debris in the core region. A test matrix is proposed for assessing the capability of the implemented models to calculate the heat transfer and flow losses in porous debris. The implementation of the models described in this report is expected to improve the COUPLE code calculation of the temperature distribution in porous debris and in the lower head that supports the debris. The implementation of these models is also expected to improve the calculation of the temperature and flow distribution in porous debris in the core region

  17. A computational model predicting disruption of blood vessel development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Kleinstreuer

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Vascular development is a complex process regulated by dynamic biological networks that vary in topology and state across different tissues and developmental stages. Signals regulating de novo blood vessel formation (vasculogenesis and remodeling (angiogenesis come from a variety of biological pathways linked to endothelial cell (EC behavior, extracellular matrix (ECM remodeling and the local generation of chemokines and growth factors. Simulating these interactions at a systems level requires sufficient biological detail about the relevant molecular pathways and associated cellular behaviors, and tractable computational models that offset mathematical and biological complexity. Here, we describe a novel multicellular agent-based model of vasculogenesis using the CompuCell3D (http://www.compucell3d.org/ modeling environment supplemented with semi-automatic knowledgebase creation. The model incorporates vascular endothelial growth factor signals, pro- and anti-angiogenic inflammatory chemokine signals, and the plasminogen activating system of enzymes and proteases linked to ECM interactions, to simulate nascent EC organization, growth and remodeling. The model was shown to recapitulate stereotypical capillary plexus formation and structural emergence of non-coded cellular behaviors, such as a heterologous bridging phenomenon linking endothelial tip cells together during formation of polygonal endothelial cords. Molecular targets in the computational model were mapped to signatures of vascular disruption derived from in vitro chemical profiling using the EPA's ToxCast high-throughput screening (HTS dataset. Simulating the HTS data with the cell-agent based model of vascular development predicted adverse effects of a reference anti-angiogenic thalidomide analog, 5HPP-33, on in vitro angiogenesis with respect to both concentration-response and morphological consequences. These findings support the utility of cell agent-based models for simulating a

  18. SCDAP/RELAP5 Modeling of Heat Transfer and Flow Losses in Lower Head Porous Debris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siefken, Larry James; Coryell, Eric Wesley; Paik, Seungho; Kuo, Han Hsiung

    1999-01-01

    Designs are described for implementing models for calculating the heat transfer and flow losses in porous debris in the lower head of a reactor vessel. The COUPLE model in SCDAP/RELAP5 represents both the porous and nonporous debris that results from core material slumping into the lower head. Currently, the COUPLE model has the capability to model convective and radiative heat transfer from the surfaces of nonporous debris in a detailed manner and to model only in a simplistic manner the heat transfer from porous debris. In order to advance beyond the simplistic modeling for porous debris, designs are developed for detailed calculations of heat transfer and flow losses in porous debris. Correlations are identified for convective heat transfer in porous debris for the following modes of heat transfer; (1) forced convection to liquid, (2) forced convection to gas, (3) nucleate boiling, (4) transition boiling, and (5) film boiling. Interphase heat transfer is modeled in an approximate manner. Designs are described for models to calculate the flow losses and interphase drag of fluid flowing through the interstices of the porous debris, and to apply these variables in the momentum equations in the RELAP5 part of the code. Since the models for heat transfer and flow losses in porous debris in the lower head are designed for general application, a design is also described for implementation of these models to the analysis of porous debris in the core region. A test matrix is proposed for assessing the capability of the implemented models to calculate the heat transfer and flow losses in porous debris. The implementation of the models described in this report is expected to improve the COUPLE code calculation of the temperature distribution in porous debris and in the lower head that supports the debris. The implementation of these models is also expected to improve the calculation of the temperature and flow distribution in porous debris in the core region

  19. A contrast enhancement and scanning techniques for CT angiography of head and neck. One phase injection method for simultaneous imaging of vessels and tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Yasuhiko; Indo, Hiroko; Noikura, Takenori

    1999-01-01

    We report on a method of CT-Angiography useful for examining lesion of the head and neck using three-dimensional images and measured CT value. This study focused on some of the important blood vessels in the head and neck. The aim of this method was to obtain high-contrast enhancement for both vessels and tumors at same time. A total amount of 100 ml nonionic contrast media (Omnipaque 240, 240 mg iodine per milliliter, Daiichi seiyaku, Tokyo, Japan) was injected intravenously with a flow of 1.5 ml/sec. Spiral scans, 24 rotations with 24 seconds, were started at a time when remaining amount of contrast media had become 30 to 20 ml. All CT scans were performed using double speed spiral scan technique with a slice thickness of 2 to 3 mm and table speeds from 3 to 5 mm/rotation. The patients populations consisted of 9 men and 6 women who ranged in age from 37 to 85 years. Sixteen CT-angiography were performed according to this method. Mean CT values of major blood vessels were measured in order to find out threshold at the level of submandibular gland in 13 examinations for 12 subjects. Important vessels like the common, internal, and the external artery, internal and external jugular vein were clearly visible in all subjects. Three dimensional images of these vessels could also be reconstructed for 15 of the subjects. Mean CT values were 211 Hounsfield units (HU) and 209 HU for the right and left internal carotid artery, respectively, and 204 HU and 206 HU for the right and left external carotid artery, respectively. Mean CT values for right and left internal jugular vein were 195 HU and 194 HU respectively. Measured CT values at each important blood vessels showed this method could yields acceptable enhancements. Good enhancement effect of tumor and blood vessels in the same scan seems to be mutually incompatible. One very important trade-off is the early enhancement effect at blood vessels versus the late enhancement effect at tumors. The other important trade

  20. Modelling of hydrogen deflagration in a vented vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, L.L.; Wong, R.C.

    1995-01-01

    Hydrogen Deflagration inside closed and vented 2.3 m diameter vessels were simulated by using the GOTHIC lumped-parameter computer code. Different cell arrangements were used in the modelling. Other parameters such as flame speed and hydrogen concentration were studied. It was found that the calculated peak pressures for cases using the experimental measured burn durations were close to the pressures measured from the experiments. When the default flame speed was used, higher peak pressure was predicted by GOTHIC. This could be explained by the the fact that the default flame speed used in the GOTHIC burn model was based on the results of a large scale test with moderate turbulence level. However, the overall results of the pressure transients were comparable with the experimental data. In addition, time and spatial convergencies of the model were also studied. The peak pressure estimated by modelling the sphere as five or more spherical cells was shown to converge to within +/- 3 percent. (author). 8 refs., 6 tabs., 9 figs

  1. Modeling transient streaming potentials in falling-head permeameter tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malama, Bwalya; Revil, André

    2014-01-01

    We present transient streaming potential data collected during falling-head permeameter tests performed on samples of two sands with different physical and chemical properties. The objective of the work is to estimate hydraulic conductivity (K) and the electrokinetic coupling coefficient (Cl ) of the sand samples. A semi-empirical model based on the falling-head permeameter flow model and electrokinetic coupling is used to analyze the streaming potential data and to estimate K and Cl . The values of K estimated from head data are used to validate the streaming potential method. Estimates of K from streaming potential data closely match those obtained from the associated head data, with less than 10% deviation. The electrokinetic coupling coefficient was estimated from streaming potential vs. (1) time and (2) head data for both sands. The results indicate that, within limits of experimental error, the values of Cl estimated by the two methods are essentially the same. The results of this work demonstrate that a temporal record of the streaming potential response in falling-head permeameter tests can be used to estimate both K and Cl . They further indicate the potential for using transient streaming potential data as a proxy for hydraulic head in hydrogeology applications. © 2013, National Ground Water Association.

  2. Reactor Vessel External Cooling for Corium Retention SULTAN Experimental Program and Modelling with CATHARE Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouge, S.; Dor, I.; Geffraye, G.

    1999-01-01

    In case of severe accident, a molten pool may form at the bottom of the lower head, and some pessimistic scenarios estimate that heat fluxes up to 1.5 MW/m 2 should be transferred through the vessel wall. An efficient, though completely passive, removal of heat flux during a long time is necessary to prevent total wall ablation, and a possible solution is to flood the cavity with water and establish boiling in natural convection. High heat exchanges are expected, especially if the system design (deflector along the vessel, riser...) emphasize water natural circulation, but are unfortunately limited by the critical heat flux phenomena (CHF). CHF data are very scarce in the adequate range of hydraulic and geometric parameters and are clearly dependent of the system effect in natural convection. The system effect can both modify flow velocity and two phase flow regimes, counter-current phenomena and flow static or dynamic instabilities. The SULTAN experimental program purpose was of two kinds, increasing CHF data for realistic situations, and improving the modeling of large 3D two phase flow circuits in natural convection. The CATHARE thermal-hydraulic code is used for interpreting the data and for extrapolation to real geometry. As a first step, a one-dimensional model is used. It is shown that some closure laws have to be improved. Reasonable predictions may be obtained but, for some test conditions, multi-dimensional effects such as recirculation appear to be dominant. Therefore the 3-dimensional module of CATHARE is also used to investigate these effects. This model well predicts qualitatively the existence and the development of a 2-phase layer along the heated wall as well as the existence of a recirculation zone. But modelling problems still require further development as part of a long term program for a better prediction of multi-dimensional two-phase flows

  3. Proceedings of the twenty-fourth water reactor safety information meeting. Volume 2: Reactor pressure vessel embrittlement and thermal annealing; Reactor vessel lower head integrity; Evaluation and projection of steam generator tube condition and integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monteleone, S. [comp.] [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1997-02-01

    This three-volume report contains papers presented at the Twenty-Fourth Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, October 21--23, 1996. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included papers presented by researchers from Czech Republic, Finland, France, Japan, Norway, Russia and United Kingdom. This volume is divided into the following sections: reactor pressure vessel embrittlement and thermal annealing; reactor vessel lower head integrity; and evaluation and projection of steam generator tube condition and integrity. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  4. Proceedings of the twenty-fourth water reactor safety information meeting. Volume 2: Reactor pressure vessel embrittlement and thermal annealing; Reactor vessel lower head integrity; Evaluation and projection of steam generator tube condition and integrity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteleone, S.

    1997-02-01

    This three-volume report contains papers presented at the Twenty-Fourth Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, October 21--23, 1996. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included papers presented by researchers from Czech Republic, Finland, France, Japan, Norway, Russia and United Kingdom. This volume is divided into the following sections: reactor pressure vessel embrittlement and thermal annealing; reactor vessel lower head integrity; and evaluation and projection of steam generator tube condition and integrity. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database

  5. On the state of acoustic emission analysis in pressure vessel and model vessel testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgner, W.; Theis, K.; Henke, F.; Imhof, D.

    1985-01-01

    In the GDR acoustic emission analysis is being applied primarily in connection with hydraulic pressure testing of vessels in chemical industry. It is, however, also used for testing and monitoring of equipment and components in other branches of industry. The state-of-the-art is presented with regard to equipment needed, training of personnel, licensing of testing methods and appropriate testing procedures. In particular, the evaluation of the sum curves and amplitude distributions is explained, using rupture tests of two oxygen cylinders and a compressed-air bottle as examples. (author)

  6. Modeling and nonlinear heading control for sailing yachts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Lin; Jouffroy, Jerome

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a study on the development and testing of a model-based heading controller for a sailing yacht. Using Fossen’s compact notation for marine vehicles, we first describe a nonlinear four-degree-of-freedom (DOF) dynamic model for a sailing yacht, including roll. Our model also...

  7. Modeling and nonlinear heading control for sailing yachts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Lin; Jouffroy, Jerome

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a study on the development and testing of a model-based heading controller for a sailing yacht. Using Fossen's compact notation for marine vehicles, we first describe a nonlinear 4-DOF dynamic model for a sailing yacht, including roll. Starting from this model, we then design...

  8. A Computational Model Predicting Disruption of Blood Vessel Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vascular development is a complex process regulated by dynamic biological networks that vary in topology and state across different tissues and developmental stages. Signals regulating de novo blood vessel formation (vasculogenesis) and remodeling (angiogenesis) come from a varie...

  9. SCDAP/RELAP5 Modeling of Movement of Melted Material Through Porous Debris in Lower Head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siefken, L. J.

    1998-01-01

    Designs are described for implementing models for calculating the movement of melted material through the interstices in a matrix of porous debris in the lower head of a reactor vessel. The COUPLE model in SCDAP/RELAP5 represents both the porous and nonporous debris that results from core material slumping into the lower head during a severe accident in a Light Water Reactor. Currently, the COUPLE model has no capability to model the movement of material that melts within a matrix of porous material. The COUPLE model also does not have the capability to model the movement of liquefied core plate material that slumps onto a porous debris bed in the lower head. In order to advance beyond the assumption the liquefied material always remains stationary, designs are developed for calculations of the movement of liquefied material through the interstices in a matrix of porous material. Correlations are identified for calculating the permeability of the porous debris and for calculating the rate of flow of liquefied material through the interstices in the debris bed. Correlations are also identified for calculating the relocation of solid debris that has a large amount of cavities due to the flowing away of melted material. Equations are defined for calculating the effect on the temperature distribution in the debris bed of heat transported by moving material and for changes in effective thermal conductivity and heat capacity due to the movement of material. The implementation of these models is expected to improve the calculation of the material distribution and temperature distribution of debris in the lower head for cases in which the debris is porous and liquefied material is present within the porous debris

  10. Seismic analysis of a reinforced concrete containment vessel model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randy, James J.; Cherry, Jeffery L.; Rashid, Yusef R.; Chokshi, Nilesh

    2000-01-01

    Pre-and post-test analytical predictions of the dynamic behavior of a 1:10 scale model Reinforced Concrete Containment Vessel are presented. This model, designed and constructed by the Nuclear Power Engineering Corp., was subjected to seismic simulation tests using the high-performance shaking table at the Tadotsu Engineering Laboratory in Japan. A group of tests representing design-level and beyond-design-level ground motions were first conducted to verify design safety margins. These were followed by a series of tests in which progressively larger base motions were applied until structural failure was induced. The analysis was performed by ANATECH Corp. and Sandia National Laboratories for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, employing state-of-the-art finite-element software specifically developed for concrete structures. Three-dimensional time-history analyses were performed, first as pre-test blind predictions to evaluate the general capabilities of the analytical methods, and second as post-test validation of the methods and interpretation of the test result. The input data consisted of acceleration time histories for the horizontal, vertical and rotational (rocking) components, as measured by accelerometers mounted on the structure's basemat. The response data consisted of acceleration and displacement records for various points on the structure, as well as time-history records of strain gages mounted on the reinforcement. This paper reports on work in progress and presents pre-test predictions and post-test comparisons to measured data for tests simulating maximum design basis and extreme design basis earthquakes. The pre-test analyses predict the failure earthquake of the test structure to have an energy level in the range of four to five times the energy level of the safe shutdown earthquake. The post-test calculations completed so far show good agreement with measured data

  11. A concern about the crack propagation rate of PWSCC which obtained from the investigation on primary coolant leakage portion of the reactor vessel head in Ohi 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Totsuka, Nobuo; Fukumura, Takuya

    2010-01-01

    There will be some concern about the content presented in the paper entitled 'Primary Coolant Leakage Path Research of Reactor Vessel Head Penetration' published in INSS JOURNAL of 2008, which may lead to misunderstanding about the PWSCC crack propagation rate, that is, the rate written in the paper seems to be faster than those reported by the previous studies. It is considered that such misunderstanding will be due to a sentence in the abstract of the paper. Therefore, we will revise a part of the abstract and explain about the outline of the paper again. (author)

  12. Predictive simulation of bidirectional Glenn shunt using a hybrid blood vessel model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao; Leow, Wee Kheng; Chiu, Ing-Sh

    2009-01-01

    This paper proposes a method for performing predictive simulation of cardiac surgery. It applies a hybrid approach to model the deformation of blood vessels. The hybrid blood vessel model consists of a reference Cosserat rod and a surface mesh. The reference Cosserat rod models the blood vessel's global bending, stretching, twisting and shearing in a physically correct manner, and the surface mesh models the surface details of the blood vessel. In this way, the deformation of blood vessels can be computed efficiently and accurately. Our predictive simulation system can produce complex surgical results given a small amount of user inputs. It allows the surgeon to easily explore various surgical options and evaluate them. Tests of the system using bidirectional Glenn shunt (BDG) as an application example show that the results produc by the system are similar to real surgical results.

  13. Combining endoscopes with PIV and digital holography for the study of vessel model mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arévalo, Laura; Palero, Virginia; Andrés, Nieves; Arroyo, M P; Lobera, Julia

    2015-01-01

    In this work traditional fluid and solid mechanics measurement techniques have been combined with endoscopes for the study of blood vessel models’ mechanical properties. Endoscopes have been used as the imaging part of a high-speed PIV system to obtain the velocity field in a vessel model immersed in a container with a refractive index-matching liquid. In this way, we take advantage of the fact that the endoscope tip can be immersed in liquid. Endoscopes have also been used as the imaging and illuminating part of a digital holographic set-up for wall deformation measurement. The novelty of this work is that only one endoscope was used for illuminating and observing the vessel model, using the endoscope’s own illuminating system as the illumination source. The performance of endoscopes in different vessel models has been tested. The results of flow velocity and wall deformation in the different blood vessel models are presented. (paper)

  14. A revised dosimetric model of the adult head and brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchet, L.G.; Bolch, W.E.; Weber, D.A.

    1996-01-01

    During the last decade, new radiopharmaceutical have been introduced for brain imaging. The marked differences of these tracers in tissue specificity within the brain and their increasing use for diagnostic studies support the need for a more anthropomorphic model of the human brain and head. Brain and head models developed in the past have been only simplistic representations of this anatomic region. For example, the brain within the phantom of MIRD Pamphlet No. 5 Revised is modeled simply as a single ellipsoid of tissue With no differentiation of its internal structures. To address this need, the MIRD Committee established a Task Group in 1992 to construct a more detailed brain model to include the cerebral cortex, the white matter, the cerebellum, the thalamus, the caudate nucleus, the lentiform nucleus, the cerebral spinal fluid, the lateral ventricles, and the third ventricle. This brain model has been included within a slightly modified version of the head model developed by Poston et al. in 1984. This model has been incorporated into the radiation transport code EGS4 so as to calculate photon and electron absorbed fractions in the energy range 10 keV to 4 MeV for each of thirteen sources in the brain. Furthermore, explicit positron transport have been considered, separating the contribution by the positron itself and its associated annihilations photons. No differences are found between the electron and positron absorbed fractions; however, for initial energies of positrons greater than ∼0.5 MeV, significant differences are found between absorbed fractions from explicit transport of annihilation photons and those from an assumed uniform distribution of 0.511-MeV photons. Subsequently, S values were calculated for a variety of beta-particle and positron emitters brain imaging agents. Moreover, pediatric head and brain dosimetric models are currently being developed based on this adult head model

  15. A correction on coastal heads for groundwater flow models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chunhui; Werner, Adrian D; Simmons, Craig T; Luo, Jian

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a simple correction to coastal heads for constant-density groundwater flow models that contain a coastal boundary, based on previous analytical solutions for interface flow. The results demonstrate that accurate discharge to the sea in confined aquifers can be obtained by direct application of Darcy's law (for constant-density flow) if the coastal heads are corrected to ((α + 1)/α)hs  - B/2α, in which hs is the mean sea level above the aquifer base, B is the aquifer thickness, and α is the density factor. For unconfined aquifers, the coastal head should be assigned the value hs1+α/α. The accuracy of using these corrections is demonstrated by consistency between constant-density Darcy's solution and variable-density flow numerical simulations. The errors introduced by adopting two previous approaches (i.e., no correction and using the equivalent fresh water head at the middle position of the aquifer to represent the hydraulic head at the coastal boundary) are evaluated. Sensitivity analysis shows that errors in discharge to the sea could be larger than 100% for typical coastal aquifer parameter ranges. The location of observation wells relative to the toe is a key factor controlling the estimation error, as it determines the relative aquifer length of constant-density flow relative to variable-density flow. The coastal head correction method introduced in this study facilitates the rapid and accurate estimation of the fresh water flux from a given hydraulic head measurement and allows for an improved representation of the coastal boundary condition in regional constant-density groundwater flow models. © 2014, National Ground Water Association.

  16. Mechanical modelling of a structural performance of a pressure vessel submitted to the creep phenomenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taroco, E.; Feijoo, R.A.; Monteiro, Edson; Freire, J.L.F.; Bevilacqua, L.; Miranda, P.E.V. de; Silveira, T.L. da

    1982-01-01

    A pressure vessel is analized using different mechanical models for the creep phenomenon. The numerical results obtained through these models enable us to recommend on the way verifications of creep damage accumulation is structures should be made. (Author) [pt

  17. Biomechanical Modeling of the Human Head

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-03

    Naval Research Laboratory Washington, DC 20375-5320 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. October 3...Laboratory 4555 Overlook Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20375-5320 NRL/FR/6350--17-10,304 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A: Approved for public release; distribution is... generating a calibrated constitutive model. First, a constitutive model form that can sufficiently capture the phenomena that occur in the experimental data is

  18. Discrete vessel heat transfer in perfused tissue - model comparison

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stanczyk, M.; Leeuwen, van G.M.J.; Steenhoven, van A.A.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to compare two methods of calculating heat transfer in perfused biological tissue using a discrete vessel description. The methods differ in two important aspects: the representation of the vascular system and the algorithm for calculating the heat flux between tissue and

  19. Patient Specific Modeling of Head-Up Tilt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, Nakeya; Wright, Andrew; Mehlsen, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    Short term cardiovascular responses to head-up tilt (HUT) experiments involve complex cardiovascular regulation in order to maintain blood pressure at homeostatic levels. This manuscript presents a patient specific compartmental model developed to predict dynamic changes in heart rate and arterial...

  20. Analysis of the consequences of the anomaly in the Flamanville EPR reactor pressure vessel head domes on their serviceability. Report to the Advisory Committee of Experts for Nuclear Pressure Equipment. Public version. Session of 26 and 27 June 2017

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CATTEAU, R.; HERVIOU, K.

    2017-06-01

    substantiating the fact that the material of the Flamanville EPR reactor pressure vessel head closure and bottom head domes is ductile and tough enough to deal with the operating conditions of this equipment. This file more particularly draws on the results of the mechanical tests and concludes that the domes are serviceable. In its letter in reference, ASN informed Areva NP that it considered that the technical qualification requirement of the ESPN order in reference was not met for the domes, because the heterogeneity risk had been poorly assessed and the characteristics of the material were not as expected. Areva NP thus envisages sending ASN a commissioning authorisation application for the Flamanville EPR reactor pressure vessel, even though it has not met all the regulatory requirements, pursuant to article 93 of the ESPN order in reference. This report is a part of the advance technical examination of this authorisation application. In its letter in reference, ASN informed Areva NP that such an application needed to be substantiated with regard to the advantages and drawbacks of alternative solutions, notably repair of the reactor pressure vessel and replacement of the closure head. Areva NP considers that procurement of a new closure head and replacement of the existing one, an operation that has already been carried out on several reactors, would take at least 75 months. Areva NP and EDF also examined the possibility of repairing the reactor pressure vessel bottom head and consider that the consequences would be disproportionate in terms of cost, lead-time and consequences for the EPR reactor model and the nuclear reactor system. Repair would entail extracting the reactor pressure vessel from its cavity, replacing its bottom head, reinstalling it and rebuilding a part of the surrounding civil engineering structures. These operations are estimated to take 86 months. These various aspects, which are not examined within the framework of this report, are detailed in

  1. Establishment of an animal model of mice with radiation- injured soft tissue blood vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Daiyou; Yu Dahai; Wu Jiaxiao; Wei Shanliang; Wen Yuming

    2004-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to establish an animal model of mice with radiation-injured soft tissue blood vessels. Methods: Forty male mice were irradiated with 30 Gy on the right leg. After the irradiation was finished each of the 40 male mice was tested with angiography, and its muscle tissues on the bilateral legs were examined with vessel staining assay and electron microscopy. Results: The results showed that the number of vessels on the right leg was less than that on the left leg, the microvessel density, average diameter and average sectional area of the right leg were all lower than those of the left, and the configuration and ultra-structure of vessels were also different between both sides of legs. Conclusion: In the study authors successfully established an animal model of mice with radiation-injured soft tissue blood vessels

  2. Animation of 3D Model of Human Head

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Michalcin

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the new algorithm of animation of 3D model of the human head in combination with its global motion. The designed algorithm is very fast and with low calculation requirements, because it does not need the synthesis of the input videosequence for estimation of the animation parameters as well as the parameters of global motion. The used 3D model Candide generates different expressions using its animation units which are controlled by the animation parameters. These ones are estimated on the basis of optical flow without the need of extracting of the feature points in the frames of the input videosequence because they are given by the selected vertices of the animation units of the calibrated 3D model Candide. The established multiple iterations inside the designed animation algorithm of 3D model of the human head between two successive frames significantly improved its accuracy above all for the large motion.

  3. Habitat Suitability Index Models: Yellow-headed blackbird

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Richard L.

    1982-01-01

    Habitat preferences of the yellow-headed blackbird (Xanthocephalus xanthocephalus) are described in this publication. It is one of a series of Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) models and was developed through an analysis of available infomration on the species-habitat requirements of the species. Habitat use information is presented in a review of the literature, followed by the development of an HSI model, designed for use in impact assessment and habitat management activities.

  4. Dynamic analysis of the PEC fast reactor vessel: on-site tests and mathematical models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zola, Maurizio; Martelli, Alessandro; Maresca, Giuseppe; Masoni, Paolo; Scandola, Giani; Descleves, Pierre

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents the main features and results of the on-site dynamic tests and the related numerical analysis carried out for the PEC reactor vessel. The purpose is to provide an example of on-site testing of large components, stressing the problems encountered during the experiments, as well as in the processing phase of the test results and for the comparisons between calculations and measurements. Tests, performed by ISMES on behalf of ENEA, allowed the dynamic response of the empty vessel to be measured, thus providing data for the verification of the numerical models of the vessel supporting structure adopted in the PEC reactor-block seismic analysis. An axisymmetric model of the vessel, implemented in the vessel, implemented in the NOVAK code, had been developed in the framework of the detailed numerical studies performed by NOVATOME (again on behalf of ENEA), to check the beam schematization with fluid added mass model adopted by ANSALDO in SAP-IV and ANSYS for the reactor-block design calculations. Furthermore, a numerical model, describing vessel supporting structure in detail, was also developed by ANSALDO and implemented in the SAP-IV code. The test conditions were analysed by use of these and the design models. Comparisons between calculations and measurements showed particularly good agreement with regard to first natural frequency of the vessel and rocking stiffness of the vessel supporting structure, i.e. those parameters on which vessel seismic amplification mainly depends: this demonstrated the adequacy of the design analysis to correctly calculate the seismic motion at the PEC core diagrid. (author)

  5. NDE and fracture mechanics evaluation of bottom-head weld indications in a BWR reactor pressure vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brickstad, B [Swedish Plant Inspectorate, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1988-12-31

    This document deals with the Non Destructive Examination (NDE) and the fracture mechanics evaluation of bottom head welds in a BWR. The NDE equipment is presented, together with the geometry of evaluated flaw regions. After the fracture mechanics evaluation, it appeared that the plant results fulfilled the usual conditions, and the plant was allowed to operate one more year. (TEC).

  6. Parametric model to estimate containment loads following an ex-vessel steam spike

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, R.; Hernandez, J.; Huerta, A.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the use of a relatively simple parametric model to estimate containment loads following an ex-vessel steam spike. The study was motivated because several PSAs have identified containment loads accompanying reactor vessel failures as a major contributor to early containment failure. The paper includes a detailed description of the simple but physically sound parametric model which was adopted to estimate containment loads following a steam spike into the reactor cavity. (author)

  7. Computed tomography depiction of small pediatric vessels with model-based iterative reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koc, Gonca; Courtier, Jesse L.; Phelps, Andrew; Marcovici, Peter A.; MacKenzie, John D. [UCSF Benioff Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Computed tomography (CT) is extremely important in characterizing blood vessel anatomy and vascular lesions in children. Recent advances in CT reconstruction technology hold promise for improved image quality and also reductions in radiation dose. This report evaluates potential improvements in image quality for the depiction of small pediatric vessels with model-based iterative reconstruction (Veo trademark), a technique developed to improve image quality and reduce noise. To evaluate Veo trademark as an improved method when compared to adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR trademark) for the depiction of small vessels on pediatric CT. Seventeen patients (mean age: 3.4 years, range: 2 days to 10.0 years; 6 girls, 11 boys) underwent contrast-enhanced CT examinations of the chest and abdomen in this HIPAA compliant and institutional review board approved study. Raw data were reconstructed into separate image datasets using Veo trademark and ASIR trademark algorithms (GE Medical Systems, Milwaukee, WI). Four blinded radiologists subjectively evaluated image quality. The pulmonary, hepatic, splenic and renal arteries were evaluated for the length and number of branches depicted. Datasets were compared with parametric and non-parametric statistical tests. Readers stated a preference for Veo trademark over ASIR trademark images when subjectively evaluating image quality criteria for vessel definition, image noise and resolution of small anatomical structures. The mean image noise in the aorta and fat was significantly less for Veo trademark vs. ASIR trademark reconstructed images. Quantitative measurements of mean vessel lengths and number of branches vessels delineated were significantly different for Veo trademark and ASIR trademark images. Veo trademark consistently showed more of the vessel anatomy: longer vessel length and more branching vessels. When compared to the more established adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm, model

  8. Computed tomography depiction of small pediatric vessels with model-based iterative reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koc, Gonca; Courtier, Jesse L.; Phelps, Andrew; Marcovici, Peter A.; MacKenzie, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is extremely important in characterizing blood vessel anatomy and vascular lesions in children. Recent advances in CT reconstruction technology hold promise for improved image quality and also reductions in radiation dose. This report evaluates potential improvements in image quality for the depiction of small pediatric vessels with model-based iterative reconstruction (Veo trademark), a technique developed to improve image quality and reduce noise. To evaluate Veo trademark as an improved method when compared to adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR trademark) for the depiction of small vessels on pediatric CT. Seventeen patients (mean age: 3.4 years, range: 2 days to 10.0 years; 6 girls, 11 boys) underwent contrast-enhanced CT examinations of the chest and abdomen in this HIPAA compliant and institutional review board approved study. Raw data were reconstructed into separate image datasets using Veo trademark and ASIR trademark algorithms (GE Medical Systems, Milwaukee, WI). Four blinded radiologists subjectively evaluated image quality. The pulmonary, hepatic, splenic and renal arteries were evaluated for the length and number of branches depicted. Datasets were compared with parametric and non-parametric statistical tests. Readers stated a preference for Veo trademark over ASIR trademark images when subjectively evaluating image quality criteria for vessel definition, image noise and resolution of small anatomical structures. The mean image noise in the aorta and fat was significantly less for Veo trademark vs. ASIR trademark reconstructed images. Quantitative measurements of mean vessel lengths and number of branches vessels delineated were significantly different for Veo trademark and ASIR trademark images. Veo trademark consistently showed more of the vessel anatomy: longer vessel length and more branching vessels. When compared to the more established adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm, model

  9. Theoretical modelling of physiologically stretched vessel in magnetisable stent assisted magnetic drug targeting application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mardinoglu, Adil; Cregg, P.J.; Murphy, Kieran; Curtin, Maurice; Prina-Mello, Adriele

    2011-01-01

    The magnetisable stent assisted magnetic targeted drug delivery system in a physiologically stretched vessel is considered theoretically. The changes in the mechanical behaviour of the vessel are analysed under the influence of mechanical forces generated by blood pressure. In this 2D mathematical model a ferromagnetic, coiled wire stent is implanted to aid collection of magnetic drug carrier particles in an elastic tube, which has similar mechanical properties to the blood vessel. A cyclic mechanical force is applied to the elastic tube to mimic the mechanical stress and strain of both the stent and vessel while in the body due to pulsatile blood circulation. The magnetic dipole-dipole and hydrodynamic interactions for multiple particles are included and agglomeration of particles is also modelled. The resulting collection efficiency of the mathematical model shows that the system performance can decrease by as much as 10% due to the effects of the pulsatile blood circulation. - Research highlights: →Theoretical modelling of magnetic drug targeting on a physiologically stretched stent-vessel system. →Cyclic mechanical force applied to mimic the mechanical stress and strain of both stent and vessel. →The magnetic dipole-dipole and hydrodynamic interactions for multiple particles is modelled. →Collection efficiency of the mathematical model is calculated for different physiological blood flow and magnetic field strength.

  10. Corrected Four-Sphere Head Model for EEG Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Næss, Solveig; Chintaluri, Chaitanya; Ness, Torbjørn V; Dale, Anders M; Einevoll, Gaute T; Wójcik, Daniel K

    2017-01-01

    The EEG signal is generated by electrical brain cell activity, often described in terms of current dipoles. By applying EEG forward models we can compute the contribution from such dipoles to the electrical potential recorded by EEG electrodes. Forward models are key both for generating understanding and intuition about the neural origin of EEG signals as well as inverse modeling, i.e., the estimation of the underlying dipole sources from recorded EEG signals. Different models of varying complexity and biological detail are used in the field. One such analytical model is the four-sphere model which assumes a four-layered spherical head where the layers represent brain tissue, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), skull, and scalp, respectively. While conceptually clear, the mathematical expression for the electric potentials in the four-sphere model is cumbersome, and we observed that the formulas presented in the literature contain errors. Here, we derive and present the correct analytical formulas with a detailed derivation. A useful application of the analytical four-sphere model is that it can serve as ground truth to test the accuracy of numerical schemes such as the Finite Element Method (FEM). We performed FEM simulations of the four-sphere head model and showed that they were consistent with the corrected analytical formulas. For future reference we provide scripts for computing EEG potentials with the four-sphere model, both by means of the correct analytical formulas and numerical FEM simulations.

  11. Corrected Four-Sphere Head Model for EEG Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solveig Næss

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The EEG signal is generated by electrical brain cell activity, often described in terms of current dipoles. By applying EEG forward models we can compute the contribution from such dipoles to the electrical potential recorded by EEG electrodes. Forward models are key both for generating understanding and intuition about the neural origin of EEG signals as well as inverse modeling, i.e., the estimation of the underlying dipole sources from recorded EEG signals. Different models of varying complexity and biological detail are used in the field. One such analytical model is the four-sphere model which assumes a four-layered spherical head where the layers represent brain tissue, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, skull, and scalp, respectively. While conceptually clear, the mathematical expression for the electric potentials in the four-sphere model is cumbersome, and we observed that the formulas presented in the literature contain errors. Here, we derive and present the correct analytical formulas with a detailed derivation. A useful application of the analytical four-sphere model is that it can serve as ground truth to test the accuracy of numerical schemes such as the Finite Element Method (FEM. We performed FEM simulations of the four-sphere head model and showed that they were consistent with the corrected analytical formulas. For future reference we provide scripts for computing EEG potentials with the four-sphere model, both by means of the correct analytical formulas and numerical FEM simulations.

  12. Analyses and testing of model prestressed concrete reactor vessels with built-in planes of weakness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawson, P.; Paton, A.A.; Fleischer, C.C.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the design, construction, analyses and testing of two small scale, single cavity prestressed concrete reactor vessel models, one without planes of weakness and one with planes of weakness immediately behind the cavity liner. This work was carried out to extend a previous study which had suggested the likely feasibility of constructing regions of prestressed concrete reactor vessels and biological shields, which become activated, using easily removable blocks, separated by a suitable membrane. The paper describes the results obtained and concludes that the planes of weakness concept could offer a means of facilitating the dismantling of activated regions of prestressed concrete reactor vessels, biological shields and similar types of structure. (author)

  13. Dynamic analysis of the PEC fast reactor vessel: On-site tests and mathematical models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zola, M.; Martelli, A.; Masoni, P.; Scandola, G.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents the main features and results of the on-site dynamic tests and the related numerical analyses carried out for the PEC reactor vessel. The purpose is to provide an example of on-site testing of large components, stressing the problems encountered during the experiments, as well as in the processing phase of the test results and for the comparisons between calculations and measurements. Tests, performed by ISMES on behalf of ENEA, allowed the dynamic response of the empty vessel to be measured, thus providing data for the verification of the numerical models of the vessel supporting structure adopted in the PEC reactor-block seismic analysis. An axisymmetric model of the vessel, implemented in the NOVAX code, had been developed in the framework of the detailed numerical studies performed by NOVATOME (again on behalf of ENEA), to check the beam schematization with fluid added mass model adopted by ANSALDO in SAP-IV and ANSYS for the reactor-block design calculations. Furthermore, a numerical model, describing vessel supporting structure in detail, was also developed by ANSALDO and implemented in the SAP-IV code. The test conditions were analysed by use of these and the design models. Comparisons between calculations and measurements showed particularly good agreement with regard to first natural frequency of the vessel and rocking stiffness of the vessel supporting structure, i.e. those parameters on which vessel seismic amplification mainly depends: this demonstrated the adequacy of the design analysis to correctly calculate the seismic motion at the PEC core diagrid. (author). 5 refs, 23 figs, 4 tabs

  14. Analytical model for shear strength of end slabs of prestressed concrete nuclear reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdulrahman, H.O.; Sozen, M.A.; Schnobrich, W.C.

    1979-04-01

    The results are presented of an investigation of the behavior and strength of flat end slabs of cylindrical prestressed concrete nuclear reactor vessels. The investigation included tests of ten small-scale pressure vessels and development of a nonlinear finite-element model to simulate the deformation response and strength of the end slabs. Because earlier experimental studies had shown that the flexural strength of the end slab could be calculated using intelligible procedures, the emphasis of this investigation was on shear strength

  15. Analysis of the procedure proposed by AREVA to prove adequate toughness of the domes of the Flamanville 3 EPR reactor pressure vessel (RPV) lower head and closure head. Session of 30 September 2015. Public version

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catteau, R.; Cadet-Mercier, S.

    2015-01-01

    AREVA has asked ASN to evaluate the conformity of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) for the Flamanville 3 EPR in application of the order reference [6]. The domes of the Flamanville 3 RPV closure head and lower head were manufactured in 2006 and 2007. AREVA identified that these components displayed a risk of heterogeneity of their characteristics and therefore carried out a technical qualification. At the end of 2014, AREVA informed ASN of lower-than-expected results of impact tests conducted as part of this technical qualification on test specimens taken from a dome representative of those intended for Flamanville 3. The values measured on two series of three test specimens give a mean value of 52 joules which does not attain the quality standard expected by AREVA. This mean value is also lower than the bending rupture energy value of 60 joules mentioned in point 4 of appendix 1 of the order reference [6], with which compliance would have been sufficient to prove the toughness of the material. AREVA carried out investigations to determine the origin of these noncompliant values. The carbon concentration measurements taken at the surface of the representative dome by portable spectrometry revealed the presence of a zone of major positive segregation (high concentration of carbon) over a diameter of about one meter. Furthermore, the examinations show that the segregation extends to a depth exceeding a quarter of the thickness of the dome. AREVA explains the non-compliance with the bending rupture energy criterion by the presence of this major positive segregation which came from the ingot used for the forging and was not completely eliminated by the cropping operations. To deal with this deviation, AREVA plans proving that the material is sufficiently tough by conducting new tests on a material that is representative of the lower and upper domes of the Flamanville EPR reactor. The body of the Flamanville 3 RPV, of which the lower dome is a part, has already

  16. 3D Dynamic Modeling of the Head-Neck Complex for Fast Eye and Head Orientation Movements Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A. Sierra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 3D dynamic computer model for the movement of the head-neck complex is presented. It incorporates anatomically correct information about the diverse elements forming the system. The skeleton is considered as a set of interconnected rigid 3D bodies following the Newton-Euler laws of movement. The muscles are modeled using Enderle's linear model, which shows equivalent dynamic characteristics to Loeb's virtual muscle model. The soft tissues, namely, the ligaments, intervertebral disks, and facet joints, are modeled considering their physiological roles and dynamics. In contrast with other head and neck models developed for safety research, the model is aimed to study the neural control of the complex during fast eye and head movements, such as saccades and gaze shifts. In particular, the time-optimal hypothesis and the feedback control ones are discussed.

  17. A wave propagation model of blood flow in large vessels using an approximate velocity profile function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bessems, D.; Rutten, M.C.M.; Vosse, van de F.N.

    2007-01-01

    Lumped-parameter models (zero-dimensional) and wave-propagation models (one-dimensional) for pressure and flow in large vessels, as well as fully three-dimensional fluid–structure interaction models for pressure and velocity, can contribute valuably to answering physiological and patho-physiological

  18. A mathematical model for batch and continuous thickening of flocculent suspensions in vessels with varying section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buerger, R.; Damasceno, J.J.R.; Karlesen, K.H.

    2001-10-01

    The phenomenological theory of continuous thickening of flocculated suspensions in an ideal cylindrical thickener is extended to vessels having varying cross-section, including divergent or convergent conical vessels. The purpose of this contribution is to draw attention to the corresponding mathematical model, whose key ingredient is a strongly degenerate parabolic partial differential equation. For ideal (non-flocculated) suspensions, which do not form co compressible sediments, the mathematical model reduces to the kinematic approach by Anestis, who developed a method of construction of exact solution by the method of characteristics. The difficulty lies in the fact that characteristics and iso-concentration lines, unlike the conventional Kynch model for cylindrical vessels, do not coincide, and one has to resort to numerical methods to simulate the thickening process. A numerical algorithm is presented and employed for simulations of continuous thickening. Implications of the mathematical model are also demonstrated by steady-state calculations, which lead to new possibilities in thickener design. (author)

  19. SCDAP/RELAP5 modeling of heat transfer and flow losses in lower head porous debris. Rev. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siefken, L.J.; Coryell, E.W.; Paik, S.; Kuo, H.

    1999-01-01

    Designs are described for implementing models for calculating the heat transfer and flow losses in porous debris in the lower head of a reactor vessel. The COUPLE model in SCDAP/RELAP5 represents both the porous and nonporous debris that results from core material slumping into the lower head. Currently, the COUPLE model has the capability to model convective and radiative heat transfer from the surfaces of nonporous debris in a detailed manner and to model only in a simplistic manner the heat transfer from porous debris. In order to advance beyond the simplistic modeling for porous debris, designs are developed for detailed calculations of heat transfer and flow losses in porous debris. Correlations are identified for convective heat transfer in porous debris for the following modes of heat transfer; (1) forced convection to liquid, (2) forced convection to gas, (3) nucleate boiling, (4) transition boiling, and (5) film boiling. Interphase heat transfer is modeled in an approximate ma nner. Designs are described for models to calculate the flow losses and interphase drag of fluid flowing through the interstices of the porous debris, and to apply these variables in the momentum equations in the RELAP5 part of the code. Since the models for heat transfer and flow losses in porous debris in the lower head are designed for general application, a design is also described for implementation of these models to the analysis of porous debris in the core region. A test matrix is proposed for assessing the capability of the implemented models to calculate the heat transfer and flow losses in porous debris. The implementation of the models described in this report is expected to improve the COUPLE code calculation of the temperature distribution in porous debris and in the lower head that supports the debris. The implementation of these models is also expected to improve the calculation of the temperature and flow distribution in porous debris in the core region

  20. [Virtual audiovisual talking heads: articulatory data and models--applications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badin, P; Elisei, F; Bailly, G; Savariaux, C; Serrurier, A; Tarabalka, Y

    2007-01-01

    In the framework of experimental phonetics, our approach to the study of speech production is based on the measurement, the analysis and the modeling of orofacial articulators such as the jaw, the face and the lips, the tongue or the velum. Therefore, we present in this article experimental techniques that allow characterising the shape and movement of speech articulators (static and dynamic MRI, computed tomodensitometry, electromagnetic articulography, video recording). We then describe the linear models of the various organs that we can elaborate from speaker-specific articulatory data. We show that these models, that exhibit a good geometrical resolution, can be controlled from articulatory data with a good temporal resolution and can thus permit the reconstruction of high quality animation of the articulators. These models, that we have integrated in a virtual talking head, can produce augmented audiovisual speech. In this framework, we have assessed the natural tongue reading capabilities of human subjects by means of audiovisual perception tests. We conclude by suggesting a number of other applications of talking heads.

  1. MATHEMATICAL MODEL OF TRIAXIAL MULTIMODE ATTITUDE AND HEADING REFERENCE SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olha Sushchenko

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The paper deals with the mathematical description of the gimballed attitude and heading reference systems, which can be applied in design of strategic precision navigation systems. The main goal is to created mathematical description taking into consideration the necessity to use different navigations operating modes of this class of navigation systems. To provide the high accuracy the indirect control is used when the position of the gimballed platform is controlled by signals of gyroscopic devices, which are corrected using accelerometer’s signals. Methods: To solve the given problem the methods of the classical theoretical mechanics, gyro theory, and inertial navigation are used. Results: The full mathematical model of the gimballed attitude and heading reference system is derived including descriptions of different operating modes. The mathematical models of the system Expressions for control and correction moments in the different modes are represented. The simulation results are given. Conclusions: The represented results prove efficiency of the proposed models. Developed mathematical models can be useful for design of navigation systems of the wide class of moving vehicles.

  2. Realistic Avatar Eye and Head Animation Using a Neurobiological Model of Visual Attention

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Itti, L; Dhavale, N; Pighin, F

    2003-01-01

    We describe a neurobiological model of visual attention and eye/head movements in primates, and its application to the automatic animation of a realistic virtual human head watching an unconstrained...

  3. Development of Realistic Head Models for Electromagnetic Source Imaging of the Human Brain

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Akalin, Z

    2001-01-01

    In this work, a methodology is developed to solve the forward problem of electromagnetic source imaging using realistic head models, For this purpose, first segmentation of the 3 dimensional MR head...

  4. Assessing women's lacrosse head impacts using finite element modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, J Michio; Hoshizaki, T Blaine; Gilchrist, Michael D

    2018-04-01

    Recently studies have assessed the ability of helmets to reduce peak linear and rotational acceleration for women's lacrosse head impacts. However, such measures have had low correlation with injury. Maximum principal strain interprets loading curves which provide better injury prediction than peak linear and rotational acceleration, especially in compliant situations which create low magnitude accelerations but long impact durations. The purpose of this study was to assess head and helmet impacts in women's lacrosse using finite element modelling. Linear and rotational acceleration loading curves from women's lacrosse impacts to a helmeted and an unhelmeted Hybrid III headform were input into the University College Dublin Brain Trauma Model. The finite element model was used to calculate maximum principal strain in the cerebrum. The results demonstrated for unhelmeted impacts, falls and ball impacts produce higher maximum principal strain values than stick and shoulder collisions. The strain values for falls and ball impacts were found to be within the range of concussion and traumatic brain injury. The results also showed that men's lacrosse helmets reduced maximum principal strain for follow-through slashing, falls and ball impacts. These findings are novel and demonstrate that for high risk events, maximum principal strain can be reduced by implementing the use of helmets if the rules of the sport do not effectively manage such situations. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. An Approach for Selection of Flow Regime and Models for Conservative Evaluation of a Vessel Integrity Monitoring System for Water-Cooled Vacuum Vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pointer, W. David; Ruggles, Arthur E.

    2003-01-01

    Thin-walled vacuum containment vessels cooled by circulating water jackets are often utilized in research and industrial applications where isolation of equipment or experiments from the influences of the surrounding environment is desirable. The development of leaks in these vessels can result in costly downtime for the facility. A Vessel Integrity Monitoring System (VIMS) is developed to detect leak formation and estimate the size of the leak to allow evaluation of the risk associated with continued operation. A wide range of leak configurations and fluid flow phenomena are considered in the evaluation of the rate at which a tracer gas dissolved in the cooling jacket water is transported into the vacuum vessel. A methodology is presented that uses basic fluid flow models and careful evaluation of their ranges of applicability to provide a conservative estimate of the transport rates for the tracer gas and hence the time required for the VIMS to detect a leak of a given size

  6. Polymer-based blood vessel models with micro-temperature sensors in EVE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizoshiri, Mizue; Ito, Yasuaki; Hayakawa, Takeshi; Maruyama, Hisataka; Sakurai, Junpei; Ikeda, Seiichi; Arai, Fumihito; Hata, Seiichi

    2017-04-01

    Cu-based micro-temperature sensors were directly fabricated on poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) blood vessel models in EVE using a combined process of spray coating and femtosecond laser reduction of CuO nanoparticles. CuO nanoparticle solution coated on a PDMS blood vessel model are thermally reduced and sintered by focused femtosecond laser pulses in atmosphere to write the sensors. After removing the non-irradiated CuO nanoparticles, Cu-based microtemperature sensors are formed. The sensors are thermistor-type ones whose temperature dependences of the resistance are used for measuring temperature inside the blood vessel model. This fabrication technique is useful for direct-writing of Cu-based microsensors and actuators on arbitrary nonplanar substrates.

  7. Experimental modelling of core debris dispersion from the vault under a PWR pressure vessel: Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macbeth, R.V.; Trenberth, R.

    1987-12-01

    Modelling experiments have been done on a 1/25 scale model in Perspex of the vault under a PWR pressure vessel. Various liquids have been used to simulate molten core debris assumed to have fallen on to the vault floor from a breach at the bottom of the pressure vessel. High pressure air and helium have been used to simulate the discharge of steam and gas from the breach. The dispersion of liquid via the vault access shafts has been measured. Photographs have been taken of fluid flow patterns and velocity profiles have been obtained. The requirements for further experiments are indicated. (author)

  8. Improved transcranial magnetic stimulation coil design with realistic head modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowther, Lawrence; Hadimani, Ravi; Jiles, David

    2013-03-01

    We are investigating Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) as a noninvasive technique based on electromagnetic induction which causes stimulation of the neurons in the brain. TMS can be used as a pain-free alternative to conventional electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) which is still widely implemented for treatment of major depression. Development of improved TMS coils capable of stimulating subcortical regions could also allow TMS to replace invasive deep brain stimulation (DBS) which requires surgical implantation of electrodes in the brain. Our new designs allow new applications of the technique to be established for a variety of diagnostic and therapeutic applications of psychiatric disorders and neurological diseases. Calculation of the fields generated inside the head is vital for the use of this method for treatment. In prior work we have implemented a realistic head model, incorporating inhomogeneous tissue structures and electrical conductivities, allowing the site of neuronal activation to be accurately calculated. We will show how we utilize this model in the development of novel TMS coil designs to improve the depth of penetration and localization of stimulation produced by stimulator coils.

  9. The modeling of core melting and in-vessel corium relocation in the APRIL code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim. S.W.; Podowski, M.Z.; Lahey, R.T. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    This paper is concerned with the modeling of severe accident phenomena in boiling water reactors (BWR). New models of core melting and in-vessel corium debris relocation are presented, developed for implementation in the APRIL computer code. The results of model testing and validations are given, including comparisons against available experimental data and parametric/sensitivity studies. Also, the application of these models, as parts of the APRIL code, is presented to simulate accident progression in a typical BWR reactor.

  10. Study on prediction model of irradiation embrittlement for reactor pressure vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Rongshan; Xu Chaoliang; Huang Ping; Liu Xiangbing; Ren Ai; Chen Jun; Li Chengliang

    2014-01-01

    The study on prediction model of irradiation embrittlement for reactor pres- sure vessel (RPV) steel is an important method for long term operation. According to the deep analysis of the previous prediction models developed worldwide, the drawbacks of these models were given and a new irradiation embrittlement prediction model PMIE-2012 was developed. A corresponding reliability assessment was carried out by irradiation surveillance data. The assessment results show that the PMIE-2012 have a high reliability and accuracy on irradiation embrittlement prediction. (authors)

  11. The Sensitivity of State Differential Game Vessel Traffic Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisowski Józef

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the application of the theory of deterministic sensitivity control systems for sensitivity analysis implemented to game control systems of moving objects, such as ships, airplanes and cars. The sensitivity of parametric model of game ship control process in collision situations have been presented. First-order and k-th order sensitivity functions of parametric model of process control are described. The structure of the game ship control system in collision situations and the mathematical model of game control process in the form of state equations, are given. Characteristics of sensitivity functions of the game ship control process model on the basis of computer simulation in Matlab/Simulink software have been presented. In the end, have been given proposals regarding the use of sensitivity analysis to practical synthesis of computer-aided system navigator in potential collision situations.

  12. Combining operational models and data into a dynamic vessel risk assessment tool for coastal regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, R.; Braunschweig, F.; Lourenço, F.; Neves, R.

    2016-02-01

    The technological evolution in terms of computational capacity, data acquisition systems, numerical modelling and operational oceanography is supplying opportunities for designing and building holistic approaches and complex tools for newer and more efficient management (planning, prevention and response) of coastal water pollution risk events. A combined methodology to dynamically estimate time and space variable individual vessel accident risk levels and shoreline contamination risk from ships has been developed, integrating numerical metocean forecasts and oil spill simulations with vessel tracking automatic identification systems (AIS). The risk rating combines the likelihood of an oil spill occurring from a vessel navigating in a study area - the Portuguese continental shelf - with the assessed consequences to the shoreline. The spill likelihood is based on dynamic marine weather conditions and statistical information from previous accidents. The shoreline consequences reflect the virtual spilled oil amount reaching shoreline and its environmental and socio-economic vulnerabilities. The oil reaching shoreline is quantified with an oil spill fate and behaviour model running multiple virtual spills from vessels along time, or as an alternative, a correction factor based on vessel distance from coast. Shoreline risks can be computed in real time or from previously obtained data. Results show the ability of the proposed methodology to estimate the risk properly sensitive to dynamic metocean conditions and to oil transport behaviour. The integration of meteo-oceanic + oil spill models with coastal vulnerability and AIS data in the quantification of risk enhances the maritime situational awareness and the decision support model, providing a more realistic approach in the assessment of shoreline impacts. The risk assessment from historical data can help finding typical risk patterns ("hot spots") or developing sensitivity analysis to specific conditions, whereas real

  13. Mathematical modelling for trajectories of magnetic nanoparticles in a blood vessel under magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Shashi; Katiyar, V.K.; Singh, Uaday

    2015-01-01

    A mathematical model is developed to describe the trajectories of a cluster of magnetic nanoparticles in a blood vessel for the application of magnetic drug targeting (MDT). The magnetic nanoparticles are injected into a blood vessel upstream from a malignant tissue and are captured at the tumour site with help of an applied magnetic field. The applied field is produced by a rare earth cylindrical magnet positioned outside the body. All forces expected to significantly affect the transport of nanoparticles were incorporated, including magnetization force, drag force and buoyancy force. The results show that particles are slow down and captured under the influence of magnetic force, which is responsible to attract the magnetic particles towards the magnet. It is optimized that all particles are captured either before or at the centre of the magnet (z≤0) when blood vessel is very close proximity to the magnet (d=2.5 cm). However, as the distance between blood vessel and magnet (d) increases (above 4.5 cm), the magnetic nanoparticles particles become free and they flow away down the blood vessel. Further, the present model results are validated by the simulations performed using the finite element based COMSOL software. - Highlights: • A mathematical model is developed to describe the trajectories of magnetic nanoparticles. • The dominant magnetic, drag and buoyancy forces are considered. • All particles are captured when distance between blood vessel and magnet (d) is up to 4.5 cm. • Further increase in d value (above 4.5 cm) results the free movement of magnetic particles

  14. Constitutive models for concrete and finite element analysis of prestressed concrete reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, P.D.; Anderson, C.A.

    1977-01-01

    Two constitutive models for concrete are discussed. For short-term loads, the orthotropic variable modulus model is described, and for long-term loads a viscoelastic model utilizing a Dirichlet series approximation for the creep compliance function is summarized. The orthotropic variable modulus model is demonstrated in an analysis of a PCRV head with penetrations. The viscoelastic model is illustrated with a simulation of a prestressed concrete cylinder subject to non-uniform temperatures

  15. Stress categorization in nozzle to pressure vessel connections finite elements models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albuquerque, Levi Barcelos de

    1999-01-01

    The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section III , is the most important code for nuclear pressure vessels design. Its design criteria were developed to preclude the various pressure vessel failure modes throughout the so-called 'Design by Analysis', some of them by imposing stress limits. Thus, failure modes such as plastic collapse, excessive plastic deformation and incremental plastic deformation under cyclic loading (ratchetting) may be avoided by limiting the so-called primary and secondary stresses. At the time 'Design by Analysis' was developed (early 60's) the main tool for pressure vessel design was the shell discontinuity analysis, in which the results were given in membrane and bending stress distributions along shell sections. From that time, the Finite Element Method (FEM) has had a growing use in pressure vessels design. In this case, the stress results are neither normally separated in membrane and bending stress nor classified in primary and secondary stresses. This process of stress separation and classification in Finite Element (FE) results is what is called stress categorization. In order to perform the stress categorization to check results from FE models against the ASME Code stress limits, mainly from 3D solid FE models, several research works have been conducted. This work is included in this effort. First, a description of the ASME Code design criteria is presented. After that, a brief description of how the FEM can be used in pressure vessel design is showed. Several studies found in the literature on stress categorization for pressure vessel FE models are reviewed and commented. Then, the analyses done in this work are presented in which some typical nozzle to pressure vessel connections subjected to internal pressure and concentrated loads were modeled with solid finite elements. The results from linear elastic and limit load analyses are compared to each other and also with the results obtained by formulae for simple shell

  16. Model of large scale man-machine systems with an application to vessel traffic control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wewerinke, P.H.; van der Ent, W.I.; ten Hove, D.

    1989-01-01

    Mathematical models are discussed to deal with complex large-scale man-machine systems such as vessel (air, road) traffic and process control systems. Only interrelationships between subsystems are assumed. Each subsystem is controlled by a corresponding human operator (HO). Because of the

  17. Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis of Pulsatile Blood Flow Behavior in Modelled Stenosed Vessels with Different Severities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Mehrabi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the behavior of blood flow in the stenosed vessels. Blood is modelled as an incompressible non-Newtonian fluid which is based on the power law viscosity model. A numerical technique based on the finite difference method is developed to simulate the blood flow taking into account the transient periodic behaviour of the blood flow in cardiac cycles. Also, pulsatile blood flow in the stenosed vessel is based on the Womersley model, and fluid flow in the lumen region is governed by the continuity equation and the Navier-Stokes equations. In this study, the stenosis shape is cosine by using Tu and Devil model. Comparing the results obtained from three stenosed vessels with 30%, 50%, and 75% area severity, we find that higher percent-area severity of stenosis leads to higher extrapressure jumps and higher blood speeds around the stenosis site. Also, we observe that the size of the stenosis in stenosed vessels does influence the blood flow. A little change on the cross-sectional value makes vast change on the blood flow rate. This simulation helps the people working in the field of physiological fluid dynamics as well as the medical practitioners.

  18. A mathematical model for cost of maritime transport. Application to competitiveness of nuclear vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorval, C.

    1966-05-01

    In studying the competitiveness of a nuclear merchant vessel, economic assessments in terms of figures were discarded in favor of a simplified model, which gives a clearer idea of the mechanism of the comparison between alternative vessels and the particular influence of each parameter. An expression is formulated for the unit cost per ton carried over a given distance as a function of the variables (speed and deadweight tonnage) and is used to determine the optima for conventional and nuclear vessels. To represent the freight market involved in the optimization studies, and thus in the competitiveness computation, two cases are taken into account: the tonnage to be carried annually is limited, and the tonnage to be carried annually is not limited. In both cases the optima are calculated and compared for a conventional and a nuclear vessel. Competitiveness curves are plotted as a function of the ratios of nuclear and conventional fuel costs and nuclear and conventional marginal power costs. These curves express the limiting values of the above two ratios for which the transport costs of the nuclear and conventional vessels are equal. The competitiveness curves vary considerably according to the hypothesis adopted for the freight market and the limit of tonnage carried annually. (author) [fr

  19. Does Head Start differentially benefit children with risks targeted by the program's service model?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Elizabeth B; Farkas, George; Duncan, Greg J

    Data from the Head Start Impact Study ( N = 3540) were used to test for differential benefits of Head Start after one program year and after kindergarten on pre-academic and behavior outcomes for children at risk in the domains targeted by the program's comprehensive services. Although random assignment to Head Start produced positive treatment main effects on children's pre-academic skills and behavior problems, residualized growth models showed that random assignment to Head Start did not differentially benefit the pre-academic skills of children with risk factors targeted by the Head Start service model. The models showed detrimental impacts of Head Start for maternal-reported behavior problems of high-risk children, but slightly more positive impacts for teacher-reported behavior. Policy implications for Head Start are discussed.

  20. Comparison of inverse modeling results with measured and interpolated hydraulic head data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, E.A.

    1986-12-01

    Inverse modeling of aquifers involves identification of effective parameters, such as transmissivities, based on hydraulic head data. The result of inverse modeling is a calibrated ground water flow model that reproduces the measured hydraulic head data as closely as is statistically possible. An inverse method that includes prior information about the parameters (i.e., kriged log transmissivity) was applied to the Avra Valley aquifer of southern Arizona using hydraulic heads obtained in three ways: measured at well locations, estimated at nodes by hand contouring, and estimated at nodes by kriging. Hand contouring yields only estimates of hydraulic head at node points, whereas kriging yields hydraulic head estimates at node points and their corresponding estimation errors. A comparison of the three inverse applications indicates the variations in the ground water flow model caused by the different treatments of the hydraulic head data. Estimates of hydraulic head computed by all three inverse models were more representative of the measured or interpolated hydraulic heads than those computed using the kriged estimates of log transmissivity. The large-scale trends in the estimates of log transmissivity determined by the three inverse models were generally similar except in the southern portion of the study area. The hydraulic head values and gradients produced by the three inverse models were similar in the interior of the study area, while the major differences between the inverse models occurred along the boundaries. 17 refs., 18 figs., 1 tab

  1. Lower Length Scale Model Development for Embrittlement of Reactor Presure Vessel Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yongfeng [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Schwen, Daniel [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Chakraborty, Pritam [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bai, Xianming [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This report summarizes the lower-length-scale effort during FY 2016 in developing mesoscale capabilities for microstructure evolution, plasticity and fracture in reactor pressure vessel steels. During operation, reactor pressure vessels are subject to hardening and embrittlement caused by irradiation induced defect accumulation and irradiation enhanced solute precipitation. Both defect production and solute precipitation start from the atomic scale, and manifest their eventual effects as degradation in engineering scale properties. To predict the property degradation, multiscale modeling and simulation are needed to deal with the microstructure evolution, and to link the microstructure feature to material properties. In this report, the development of mesoscale capabilities for defect accumulation and solute precipitation are summarized. A crystal plasticity model to capture defect-dislocation interaction and a damage model for cleavage micro-crack propagation is also provided.

  2. Applied model of through-wall crack of coolant vessels of WWER-type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrosyan, V.; Hovakimyan, T.; Vardanyan, M.; Khachatryan, A.; Minasyan, K.

    2010-01-01

    We propose an applied-model of Through-Wall Crack (TWC) for WWER-type units primary vessels. The model allows to simulate the main morphological parameters of real TWC, i.e. length, area of inlet and outlet openings, channel depth and small and large size unevenness of the crack surface. The model can be used for developing and improving the coolant-leak detectors for the primary circuit vessels of WWER-units. Also, it can be used for research of the coolant two-phase leakage phenomenon through narrow cracks/channels and thermo-physical processes in heat-insulation layer of the Main Coolant Piping (MCP) during the leak

  3. An Aggregated Optimization Model for Multi-Head SMD Placements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ashayeri, J.; Ma, N.; Sotirov, R.

    2010-01-01

    In this article we propose an aggregate optimization approach by formulating the multi-head SMD placement optimization problem into a mixed integer program (MIP) with the variables based on batches of components. This MIP is tractable and effective in balancing workload among placement heads,

  4. An aggregated optimization model for multi-head SMD placements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ashayeri, J.; Ma, N.; Sotirov, R.

    2011-01-01

    In this article we propose an aggregate optimization approach by formulating the multi-head SMD placement optimization problem into a mixed integer program (MIP) with the variables based on batches of components. This MIP is tractable and effective in balancing workload among placement heads,

  5. Development of simplified 1D and 2D models for studying a PWR lower head failure under severe accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koundy, V.; Dupas, J.; Bonneville, H.; Cormeau, I.

    2005-01-01

    In the study of severe accidents of nuclear pressurized water reactors, the scenarios that describe the relocation of significant quantities of liquid corium at the bottom of the lower head are investigated from the mechanical point of view. In these scenarios, the risk of a breach and the possibility of a large quantity of corium being released from the lower head exist. This may lead to direct heating of the containment or outer vessel steam explosion. These issues are important due to their early containment failure potential. Since the TMI-2 accident, many theoretical and experimental investigations, relating to lower head mechanical behaviour under severe thermo-mechanical loading in the event of a core meltdown accident have been performed. IRSN participated actively in the one-fifth scale USNRC/SNL LHF and OECD LHF (OLHF) programs. Within the framework of these programs, two simplified models were developed by IRSN: the first is a simplified 1D approach based on the theory of pressurized spherical shells and the second is a simplified 2D model based on the theory of shells of revolution under symmetric loading. The mathematical formulation of both models and the creep constitutive equations used are presented in detail in this paper. The corresponding models were used to interpret some of the OLHF program experiments and the calculation results were quite consistent with the experimental data. The two simplified models have been used to simulate the thermo-mechanical behaviour of a 900 MWe pressurized water reactor lower head under severe accident conditions leading to failure. The average transient heat flux produced by the corium relocated at the bottom of the lower head has been determined using the IRSN HARAR code. Two different methods, both taking into account the ablation of the internal surface, are used to determine the temperature profiles across the lower head wall and their effect on the time to failure is discussed. Using these simplified models

  6. FFTF and CRBRP reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, R.E.

    1977-01-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) reactor vessel and the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) reactor vessel each serve to enclose a fast spectrum reactor core, contain the sodium coolant, and provide support and positioning for the closure head and internal structure. Each vessel is located in its reactor cavity and is protected by a guard vessel which would ensure continued decay heat removal capability should a major system leak develop. Although the two plants have significantly different thermal power ratings, 400 megawatts for FFTF and 975 megawatts for CRBRP, the two reactor vessels are comparable in size, the CRBRP vessel being approximately 28% longer than the FFTF vessel. The FFTF vessel diameter was controlled by the space required for the three individual In-Vessel Handling Machines and Instrument Trees. Utilization of the triple rotating plug scheme for CRBRP refueling enables packaging of the larger CRBRP core in a vessel the same diameter as the FFTF vessel

  7. Effort dynamics in a fisheries bioeconomic model: A vessel level approach through Game Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorka Merino

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Red shrimp, Aristeus antennatus (Risso, 1816 is one of the most important resources for the bottom-trawl fleets in the northwestern Mediterranean, in terms of both landings and economic value. A simple bioeconomic model introducing Game Theory for the prediction of effort dynamics at vessel level is proposed. The game is performed by the twelve vessels exploiting red shrimp in Blanes. Within the game, two solutions are performed: non-cooperation and cooperation. The first is proposed as a realistic method for the prediction of individual effort strategies and the second is used to illustrate the potential profitability of the analysed fishery. The effort strategy for each vessel is the number of fishing days per year and their objective is profit maximisation, individual profits for the non-cooperative solution and total profits for the cooperative one. In the present analysis, strategic conflicts arise from the differences between vessels in technical efficiency (catchability coefficient and economic efficiency (defined here. The ten-year and 1000-iteration stochastic simulations performed for the two effort solutions show that the best strategy from both an economic and a conservationist perspective is homogeneous effort cooperation. However, the results under non-cooperation are more similar to the observed data on effort strategies and landings.

  8. Stress corrosion cracking in the vessel closure head penetrations of French PWR`s; Fissuration par corrosion sous contrainte de penetrations de couvercle de cuve de reacteur nucleaire francais a eau pressurisee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buisine, D.; Cattant, F.; Champredonde, J.; Pichon, C.; Benhamou, C.; Gelpi, A.; Vaindirlis, M.

    1994-01-01

    During a hydrotest in September 1991, part of the statutory decennial in-service inspection, a leak was detected on the vessel head of Bugey 3, which is one of the first 900 MW 3-loop PWR`s in France. This leak was due to a cracked penetration used for a control rod drive mechanism. The investigations performed identified Primary Stress Corrosion Cracking of Alloy 600 as being the origin of this degradation. So a lot of the same design PWR`s are a concern due to this generic problem. In this case, PWSCC was linked to: - hot temperature of the vessel head; - high residual stresses due to the welding process between peripherical penetrations and the vessel head; - sensitivity of forged Alloy 600 used for penetration manufacturing. This following paper will present the cracked analysis based, in particular, on the main results obtained in France on each of these items. These results come from the operating experience, the destructive examinations and the programs which are running on stress analysis and metallurgical characterizations. (authors). 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Experimental modelling of core debris dispersion from the vault under a PWR pressure vessel. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, P.W.

    1987-12-01

    In previous experiments, done on a 1/25 scale model in Perspex of the vault under a PWR pressure vessel, the instrument tubes support structure built into the vault was not included. It consists of a number of grids made up of fairly massive steel girders. These have now been added to the model and experiments performed using water to simulate molten core debris assumed to have fallen on to the vault floor and high-pressure air to simulate the discharge of steam or gas from the assumed breach at the bottom of the pressure vessel. The results show that the tubes support structure considerably reduces the carry-over of liquid via the vault access shafts. (author)

  10. A Constraint Programming Model for Fast Optimal Stowage of Container Vessel Bays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Delgado-Ortegon, Alberto; Jensen, Rune Møller; Janstrup, Kira

    2012-01-01

    Container vessel stowage planning is a hard combinatorial optimization problem with both high economic and environmental impact. We have developed an approach that often is able to generate near-optimal plans for large container vessels within a few minutes. It decomposes the problem into a master...... planning phase that distributes the containers to bay sections and a slot planning phase that assigns containers of each bay section to slots. In this paper, we focus on the slot planning phase of this approach and present a constraint programming and integer programming model for stowing a set...... of containers in a single bay section. This so-called slot planning problem is NP-hard and often involves stowing several hundred containers. Using state-of-the-art constraint solvers and modeling techniques, however, we were able to solve 90% of 236 real instances from our industrial collaborator to optimality...

  11. Computations for the 1:5 model of the THTR pressure vessel compared with experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stangenberg, F.

    1972-01-01

    In this report experimental results measured at the 1:5-model of the prestressed concrete pressure vessel of the THTR-nuclear power station Schmehausen in 1971, are compared with the results of axis-symmetrical computations. Linear-elastic computations were performed as well as approximate computations for overload pressures taking into consideration the influences of the load history (prestressing, temperature, creep) and the effects of the steel components. (orig.) [de

  12. Development of FB-MultiPier dynamic vessel-collision analysis models, phase 2 : [summary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    When collisions between large vessels and bridge : supports occur, they can result in significant : damage to bridge and vessel. These collisions : are extremely hazardous, often taking lives on : the vessel and the bridge. Direct costs of repair : a...

  13. Development of FB-MultiPier dynamic vessel-collision analysis models, phase 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Massive waterway vessels such as barges regularly transit navigable waterways in the U.S. During passages that fall within : the vicinity of bridge structures, vessels may (under extreme circumstances) deviate from the intended vessel transit path. A...

  14. Modeling the Role of the Glymphatic Pathway and Cerebral Blood Vessel Properties in Alzheimer's Disease Pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Rose Kyrtsos

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is the most common cause of dementia in the elderly, affecting over 10% population over the age of 65 years. Clinically, AD is described by the symptom set of short term memory loss and cognitive decline, changes in mentation and behavior, and eventually long-term memory deficit as the disease progresses. On imaging studies, significant atrophy with subsequent increase in ventricular volume have been observed. Pathology on post-mortem brain specimens demonstrates the classic findings of increased beta amyloid (Aβ deposition and the presence of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs within affected neurons. Neuroinflammation, dysregulation of blood-brain barrier transport and clearance, deposition of Aβ in cerebral blood vessels, vascular risk factors such as atherosclerosis and diabetes, and the presence of the apolipoprotein E4 allele have all been identified as playing possible roles in AD pathogenesis. Recent research has demonstrated the importance of the glymphatic system in the clearance of Aβ from the brain via the perivascular space surrounding cerebral blood vessels. Given the variety of hypotheses that have been proposed for AD pathogenesis, an interconnected, multilayer model offers a unique opportunity to combine these ideas into a single unifying model. Results of this model demonstrate the importance of vessel stiffness and heart rate in maintaining adequate clearance of Aβ from the brain.

  15. Modeling the Role of the Glymphatic Pathway and Cerebral Blood Vessel Properties in Alzheimer's Disease Pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyrtsos, Christina Rose; Baras, John S

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia in the elderly, affecting over 10% population over the age of 65 years. Clinically, AD is described by the symptom set of short term memory loss and cognitive decline, changes in mentation and behavior, and eventually long-term memory deficit as the disease progresses. On imaging studies, significant atrophy with subsequent increase in ventricular volume have been observed. Pathology on post-mortem brain specimens demonstrates the classic findings of increased beta amyloid (Aβ) deposition and the presence of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) within affected neurons. Neuroinflammation, dysregulation of blood-brain barrier transport and clearance, deposition of Aβ in cerebral blood vessels, vascular risk factors such as atherosclerosis and diabetes, and the presence of the apolipoprotein E4 allele have all been identified as playing possible roles in AD pathogenesis. Recent research has demonstrated the importance of the glymphatic system in the clearance of Aβ from the brain via the perivascular space surrounding cerebral blood vessels. Given the variety of hypotheses that have been proposed for AD pathogenesis, an interconnected, multilayer model offers a unique opportunity to combine these ideas into a single unifying model. Results of this model demonstrate the importance of vessel stiffness and heart rate in maintaining adequate clearance of Aβ from the brain.

  16. Thermal mathematical modeling of a multicell common pressure vessel nickel-hydrogen battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Junbom; Nguyen, T. V.; White, R. E.

    1992-01-01

    A two-dimensional and time-dependent thermal model of a multicell common pressure vessel (CPV) nickel-hydrogen battery was developed. A finite element solver called PDE/Protran was used to solve this model. The model was used to investigate the effects of various design parameters on the temperature profile within the cell. The results were used to help find a design that will yield an acceptable temperature gradient inside a multicell CPV nickel-hydrogen battery. Steady-state and unsteady-state cases with a constant heat generation rate and a time-dependent heat generation rate were solved.

  17. Thrust and torque characteristics based on a new cutter-head load model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianqin; Ren, Jiabao; Guo, Wei

    2015-07-01

    Full face rock tunnel boring machine(TBM) has been widely used in hard rock tunnels, however, there are few published theory about cutter-head design, and the design criteria of cutter-head under complex geological is not clear yet. To deal with the complex relationship among geological parameters, cutter parameters, and operating parameters during tunneling processes, a cutter-head load model is established by using CSM(Colorado school of mines) prediction model. Force distribution on cutter-head under a certain geology is calculated with the new established load model, and result shows that inner cutters bear more force than outer cutters, combining with disc cutters abrasion; a general principle of disc cutters' layout design is proposed. Within the model, the relationship among rock uniaxial compressive strength(UCS), penetration and thrust on cutter-head are analyzed, and the results shows that with increasing penetration, cutter thrust increases, but the growth rate slows and higher penetration makes lower special energy(SE). Finally, a fitting mathematical model of ZT(ratio of cutter-head torque and thrust) and penetration is established, and verified by TB880E, which can be used to direct how to set thrust and torque on cutter-head. When penetration is small, the cutter-head thrust is the main limiting factor in tunneling; when the penetration is large, cutter-head torque is the major limiting factor in tunneling. Based on the new cutter-head load model, thrust and torque characteristics of TBM further are researched and a new way for cutter-head layout design and TBM tunneling operations is proposed.

  18. Modeling of melt retention in EU-APR1400 ex-vessel core catcher

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granovsky, V. S.; Sulatsky, A. A.; Khabensky, V. B.; Sulatskaya, M. B. [Alexandrov Research Inst. of Technology NITI, Sosnovy Bor (Russian Federation); Gusarov, V. V.; Almyashev, V. I.; Komlev, A. A. [Saint Petersburg State Technological Univ. SPbSTU, St.Petersburg (Russian Federation); Bechta, S. [KTH, Stockholm (Sweden); Kim, Y. S. [KHNP, 1312 Gil 70, Yuseongdaero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, R. J.; Kim, H. Y.; Song, J. H. [KAERI, 989 Gil 111, Daedeokdaero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-01

    A core catcher is adopted in the EU-APR1400 reactor design for management and mitigation of severe accidents with reactor core melting. The core catcher concept incorporates a number of engineering solutions used in the catcher designs of European EPR and Russian WER-1000 reactors, such as thin-layer corium spreading for better cooling, retention of the melt in a water-cooled steel vessel, and use of sacrificial material (SM) to control the melt properties. SM is one of the key elements of the catcher design and its performance is critical for melt retention efficiency. This SM consists of oxide components, but the core catcher also includes sacrificial steel which reacts with the metal melt of the molten corium to reduce its temperature. The paper describes the required properties of SM. The melt retention capability of the core catcher can be confirmed by modeling the heat fluxes to the catcher vessel to show that it will not fail. The fulfillment of this requirement is demonstrated on the example of LBLOCA severe accident. Thermal and physicochemical interactions between the oxide and metal melts, interactions of the melts with SM, sacrificial steel and vessel, core catcher external cooling by water and release of non-condensable gases are modeled. (authors)

  19. A Fovea Localization Scheme Using Vessel Origin-Based Parabolic Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Yuan Yu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available At the center of the macula, fovea plays an important role in computer-aided diagnosis. To locate the fovea, this paper proposes a vessel origin (VO-based parabolic model, which takes the VO as the vertex of the parabola-like vasculature. Image processing steps are applied to accurately locate the fovea on retinal images. Firstly, morphological gradient and the circular Hough transform are used to find the optic disc. The structure of the vessel is then segmented with the line detector. Based on the characteristics of the VO, four features of VO are extracted, following the Bayesian classification procedure. Once the VO is identified, the VO-based parabolic model will locate the fovea. To find the fittest parabola and the symmetry axis of the retinal vessel, an Shift and Rotation (SR-Hough transform that combines the Hough transform with the shift and rotation of coordinates is presented. Two public databases of retinal images, DRIVE and STARE, are used to evaluate the proposed method. The experiment results show that the average Euclidean distances between the located fovea and the fovea marked by experts in two databases are 9.8 pixels and 30.7 pixels, respectively. The results are stronger than other methods and thus provide a better macular detection for further disease discovery.

  20. Adaptable three-dimensional Monte Carlo modeling of imaged blood vessels in skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfefer, T. Joshua; Barton, Jennifer K.; Chan, Eric K.; Ducros, Mathieu G.; Sorg, Brian S.; Milner, Thomas E.; Nelson, J. Stuart; Welch, Ashley J.

    1997-06-01

    In order to reach a higher level of accuracy in simulation of port wine stain treatment, we propose to discard the typical layered geometry and cylindrical blood vessel assumptions made in optical models and use imaging techniques to define actual tissue geometry. Two main additions to the typical 3D, weighted photon, variable step size Monte Carlo routine were necessary to achieve this goal. First, optical low coherence reflectometry (OLCR) images of rat skin were used to specify a 3D material array, with each entry assigned a label to represent the type of tissue in that particular voxel. Second, the Monte Carlo algorithm was altered so that when a photon crosses into a new voxel, the remaining path length is recalculated using the new optical properties, as specified by the material array. The model has shown good agreement with data from the literature. Monte Carlo simulations using OLCR images of asymmetrically curved blood vessels show various effects such as shading, scattering-induced peaks at vessel surfaces, and directionality-induced gradients in energy deposition. In conclusion, this augmentation of the Monte Carlo method can accurately simulate light transport for a wide variety of nonhomogeneous tissue geometries.

  1. Correcting electrode modelling errors in EIT on realistic 3D head models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jehl, Markus; Avery, James; Malone, Emma; Holder, David; Betcke, Timo

    2015-12-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is a promising medical imaging technique which could aid differentiation of haemorrhagic from ischaemic stroke in an ambulance. One challenge in EIT is the ill-posed nature of the image reconstruction, i.e., that small measurement or modelling errors can result in large image artefacts. It is therefore important that reconstruction algorithms are improved with regard to stability to modelling errors. We identify that wrongly modelled electrode positions constitute one of the biggest sources of image artefacts in head EIT. Therefore, the use of the Fréchet derivative on the electrode boundaries in a realistic three-dimensional head model is investigated, in order to reconstruct electrode movements simultaneously to conductivity changes. We show a fast implementation and analyse the performance of electrode position reconstructions in time-difference and absolute imaging for simulated and experimental voltages. Reconstructing the electrode positions and conductivities simultaneously increased the image quality significantly in the presence of electrode movement.

  2. Nuclear reactor vessel inspection apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackstone, E.G.; Lofy, R.A.; Williams, L.P.

    1979-01-01

    Apparatus for the in situ inspection of a nuclear reactor vessel to detect the location and character of flaws in the walls of the vessel, in the welds joining the various sections of the vessel, in the welds joining attachments such as nozzles, elbows and the like to the reactor vessel and in such attachments wherein an inspection head carrying one or more ultrasonic transducers follows predetermined paths in scanning the various reactor sections, welds and attachments

  3. Revision of the fracture models in steels for nuclear pressure vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darwish, F A.I. [Pontificia Univ. Catolica do Rio de Janeiro (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencia dos Materiais e Metalurgia

    1981-01-01

    The variation of toughness with the temperature of steels used in the fabrication of nuclear pressure vessels is presented and discuted by mathematical models aiming to reach a critical value of stress or deformation at the moment of the fracture. The mathematical model considered are compatible with the fracture micromechanisms in action and they are capable of foreseeing the variations in the toughness from the mechanical properties evaluated in the tension test. The neutron irradiation effects in the toughness as well as in the variation of this toughness with the operating temperature are still described.

  4. Comparison study of different head model structures with homogeneous/inhomogeneous conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen, P.; Li, Y.

    2001-01-01

    Most of the human head models used in dipole localisation research, which have been reported in the literature to date, assume a simplified cranial structure wherein the head is modelled as a set of distinct homogenous tissue compartments. The inherent inhomogeneity of the tissues has so far been ignored in these models due to the difficulties involved in obtaining the conductivity characteristics with sufficiently high enough spatial resolution throughout the head. A technique for developing an inhomogeneous head model based on the generation of pseudo-conductivity values from the existing but sparse conductivity values is proposed in this paper. Comparative studies are conducted on different model structures and different mechanisms for generating the pseudo conductivities. An evaluation of the results of these studies as reported in this paper, shows that contrary to current simplifying assumptions, tissue inhomogeneity has a major influence on the computation of electrical potential distributions in the head. Brain electrical activity is spatially distributed in three dimensions in the head and evolves with time. Electroencephalography (EEG) is a widely used noninvasive technique which measures the potential distribution on the scalp caused by the brain electrical activity. A number of interesting correlations between features of the recorded EEG waveforms and various aspects of attention memory and linguistic tAS/Ks have been discovered. These correlations are estimated by comparing, for a given brain function, the recorded EEGs against the scalp potentials obtained from the computation of an electric field model of the head. The accuracy of these estimates depends not only on such factors as EEG measured errors but also, more importantly, on how closely the head model approximates the physiological head. This has spurred interest in the use of a more realistic head geometry with more accurate conductivity values which would use the detailed anatomical

  5. MO-F-CAMPUS-J-01: Effect of Iodine Contrast Agent Concentration On Cerebrovascular Dose for Synchrotron Radiation Microangiography Based On a Simple Mouse Head Model and a Voxel Mouse Head Phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, H; Jing, J; Xie, C [Hefei University of Technology, Hefei (China); Lu, Y [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To find effective setting methods to mitigate the irradiation injure in synchrotron radiation microangiography(SRA) by Monte Carlo simulation. Methods: A mouse 1-D head model and a segmented voxel mouse head phantom were simulated by EGSnrc/Dosxyznrc code to investigate the dose enhancement effect of the iodine contrast agent irradiated by a monochromatic synchrotron radiation(SR) source. The influence of, like iodine concentration (IC), vessel width and depth, with and without skull layer protection and the various incident X ray energies, were simulated. The dose enhancement effect and the absolute dose based on the segmented voxel mouse head phantom were evaluated. Results: The dose enhancement ratio depends little on the irradiation depth, but strongly on the IC, which is linearly increases with IC. The skull layer protection cannot be ignored in SRA, the 700µm thick skull could decrease 10% of the dose. The incident X-ray energy can significantly affact the dose. E.g. compared to the dose of 33.2keV for 50mgI/ml, the 32.7keV dose decreases 38%, whereas the dose of 33.7 keV increases 69.2%, and the variation will strengthen more with enhanced IC. The segmented voxel mouse head phantom also showed that the average dose enhancement effect and the maximal voxel dose per photon depends little on the iodine voxel volume ratio, but strongly on IC. Conclusion: To decrease dose damage in SRA, the high-Z contrast agent should be used as little as possible, and try to avoid radiating locally the injected position immediately after the contrast agent injection. The fragile vessel containing iodine should avoid closely irradiating. Avoiding irradiating through the no or thin skull region, or appending thin equivalent material from outside to protect is also a better method. As long as SRA image quality is ensured, using incident X-ray energy as low as possible.

  6. PDX vacuum vessel stress analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikodem, Z.D.

    1975-01-01

    A stress analysis of PDX vacuum vessel is described and the summary of results is presented. The vacuum vessel is treated as a toroidal shell of revolution subjected to an internal vacuum. The critical buckling pressure is calculated. The effects of the geometrical discontinuity at the juncture of toroidal shell head and cylindrical outside wall, and the concavity of the cylindrical wall are examined. An effect of the poloidal field coil supports and the vessel outside supports on the stress distribution in the vacuum vessel is determined. A method evaluating the influence of circular ports in the vessel wall on the stress level in the vessel is outlined

  7. Vessel Operating Units (Vessels)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains data for vessels that are greater than five net tons and have a current US Coast Guard documentation number. Beginning in1979, the NMFS...

  8. Matching the results of a theoretical model with failure rates obtained from a population of non-nuclear pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrop, L.P.

    1982-02-01

    Failure rates for non-nuclear pressure vessel populations are often regarded as showing a decrease with time. Empirical evidence can be cited which supports this view. On the other hand theoretical predictions of PWR type reactor pressure vessel failure rates have shown an increasing failure rate with time. It is shown that these two situations are not necessarily incompatible. If adjustments are made to the input data of the theoretical model to treat a non-nuclear pressure vessel population, the model can produce a failure rate which decreases with time. These adjustments are explained and the results obtained are shown. (author)

  9. The Realistic Versus the Spherical Head Model in EEG Dipole Source Analysis in the Presence of Noise

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vanrumste, Bart

    2001-01-01

    .... For 27 electrodes, an EEG epoch of one time sample and spatially white Gaussian noise we found that the importance of the realistic head model over the spherical head model reduces by increasing the noise level.

  10. Modeling of in-vessel fission product release including fuel morphology effects for severe accident analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, K.Y.

    1989-10-01

    A new in-vessel fission product release model has been developed and implemented to perform best-estimate calculations of realistic source terms including fuel morphology effects. The proposed bulk mass transfer correlation determines the product of fission product release and equiaxed grain size as a function of the inverse fuel temperature. The model accounts for the fuel-cladding interaction over the temperature range between 770 K and 3000 K in the steam environment. A separate driver has been developed for the in-vessel thermal hydraulic and fission product behavior models that were developed by the Department of Energy for the Modular Accident Analysis Package (MAAP). Calculational results of these models have been compared to the results of the Power Burst Facility Severe Fuel Damage tests. The code predictions utilizing the mass transfer correlation agreed with the experimentally determined fractional release rates during the course of the heatup, power hold, and cooldown phases of the high temperature transients. Compared to such conventional literature correlations as the steam oxidation model and the NUREG-0956 correlation, the mass transfer correlation resulted in lower and less rapid releases in closer agreement with the on-line and grab sample data from the Severe Fuel Damage tests. The proposed mass transfer correlation can be applied for best-estimate calculations of fission products release from the UO 2 fuel in both nominal and severe accident conditions. 15 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs

  11. Models for ductile crack initiation and tearing resistance under mode 1 loading in pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, M.R.

    1988-06-01

    Micromechanistic models are presented which aim to predict plane strain ductile initiation toughness, tearing resistance and notched bar fracture strains in pressure vessel steels under monotonically increasing tensile (mode 1) loading. The models for initiation toughness and tearing resistance recognize that ductile fracture proceeds by the growth and linkage of voids with the crack-tip. The models are shown to predict the trend of initiation toughness with inclusion spacing/size ratio and can bound the available experimental data. The model for crack growth can reproduce the tearing resistance of a pressure vessel steel up to and just beyond crack growth initiation. The fracture strains of notched bars pulled in tension are shown to correspond to the achievement of a critical volume fraction of voids. This criterion is combined with the true stress - true strain history of a material point ahead of a blunting crack-tip to predict the initiation toughness. An attempt was made to predict the fracture strains of notched tensile bars by adopting a model which predicts the onset of a shear localization phenomenon. Fracture strains of the correct order are computed only if a ''secondary'' void nucleation event at carbide precipitates is taken into account. (author)

  12. Cyclic loading of thick vessels based on the Prager and Armstrong-Frederick kinematic hardening models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahbadi, H.; Eslami, M.R.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to relate the type of stress category in cyclic loading to ratcheting or shakedown behaviour of the structure. The kinematic hardening theory of plasticity based on the Prager and Armstrong-Frederick models is used to evaluate the cyclic loading behaviour of thick spherical and cylindrical vessels under load and deformation controlled stresses. It is concluded that kinematic hardening based on the Prager model under load and deformation controlled conditions, excluding creep, results in shakedown or reversed plasticity for spherical and cylindrical vessels with the isotropy assumption of the tension/compression curve. Under an anisotropy assumption of the tension/compression curve, this model predicts ratcheting. On the other hand, the Armstrong-Frederick model predicts ratcheting under load controlled cyclic loading and reversed plasticity for deformation controlled stress. The interesting conclusion is that the Armstrong-Frederick model is well capable to predict the experimental data under the assumed type of stresses, wherever experimental data are available

  13. Preliminary analysis of a 1:4 scale prestressed concrete containment vessel model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dameron, R.A.; Rashid, Y.R.; Luk, V.K.; Hessheimer, M.F.

    1997-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is conducting a research program to investigate the integrity of nuclear containment structures. As part of the program Sandia will construct an instrumented 1:4 scale model of a prestressed concrete containment vessel (PCCV) for pressurized water reactors (PWR), which will be pressure tested up to its ultimate capacity. One of the key program objectives is to develop validated methods to predict the structural performance of containment vessels when subjected to beyond design basis loadings. Analytical prediction of structural performance requires a stepwise, systematic approach that addresses all potential failure modes. The analysis effort includes two and three-dimensional nonlinear finite element analyses of the PCCV test model to evaluate its structural performance under very high internal pressurization. Such analyses have been performed using the nonlinear concrete constitutive model, ANACAP-U, in conjunction with the ABAQUS general purpose finite element code. The analysis effort is carried out in three phases: preliminary analysis; pretest prediction; and post-test data interpretation and analysis evaluation. The preliminary analysis phase serves to provide instrumentation support and identify candidate failure modes. The associated tasks include the preliminary prediction of failure pressure and probable failure locations and the development of models to be used in the detailed failure analyses. This paper describes the modeling approaches and some of the results obtained in the first phase of the analysis effort

  14. A simplified hydrodynamic model of hydrogen flame propagation in reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baer, M.; Ratzel, A.

    1983-01-01

    A hydrodynamic model for hydrogen flame propagation in reactor geometries is presented. This model is consistent with the theory of slow combustion in which the gasdynamic field equations are treated in the limit of small Mach numbers. To the lowest order, pressure is spatially uniform. The flame is treated as a density and entropy discontinuity which propagates at prescribed burning velocities, corresponding to laminar or turbulent flames. Radiation cooling of the burned combustion gases and possible preheating of the unburned gases during propagation of the flame is included using a molecular gas-band thermal radiation model. Application of this model has been developed for 1-D variable area flame propagation. Multidimensional effects induced by hydrodynamics and buoyancy are introduced as a correction to the burn velocity (which reflects a modification of planar flame surface to a distorted surface) using experimentally measured pressure-rise time data for hydrogen/air deflagrations in cylindrical vessels. This semianalytical model of flame propagation reduces to a set of ordinary differential equations which describes the temporal variations of vessel pressure, burned volume and gas entropy. The thermodynamic state of the burned gas immediately following the flame is determined using an isobaric Hugoniot relationship. At other locations the burned gas thermodynamic states are determined using a Lagrangian particle tracking method. Results of a computer code using the method are presented

  15. [RESEARCH PROGRESS OF EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODELS OF AVASCULAR NECROSIS OF FEMORAL HEAD].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kaifu; Tan, Hongbo; Xu, Yongqing

    2015-12-01

    To summarize the current researches and progress on experimental animal models of avascular necrosis of the femoral head. Domestic and internation literature concerning experimental animal models of avascular necrosis of the femoral head was reviewed and analyzed. The methods to prepare the experimental animal models of avascular necrosis of the femoral head can be mainly concluded as traumatic methods (including surgical, physical, and chemical insult), and non-traumatic methods (including steroid, lipopolysaccharide, steroid combined with lipopolysaccharide, steroid combined with horse serum, etc). Each method has both merits and demerits, yet no ideal methods have been developed. There are many methods to prepare the experimental animal models of avascular necrosis of the femoral head, but proper model should be selected based on the aim of research. The establishment of ideal experimental animal models needs further research in future.

  16. Development, Validation and Parametric study of a 3-Year-Old Child Head Finite Element Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Shihai; Chen, Yue; Li, Haiyan; Ruan, ShiJie

    2015-12-01

    Traumatic brain injury caused by drop and traffic accidents is an important reason for children's death and disability. Recently, the computer finite element (FE) head model has been developed to investigate brain injury mechanism and biomechanical responses. Based on CT data of a healthy 3-year-old child head, the FE head model with detailed anatomical structure was developed. The deep brain structures such as white matter, gray matter, cerebral ventricle, hippocampus, were firstly created in this FE model. The FE model was validated by comparing the simulation results with that of cadaver experiments based on reconstructing the child and adult cadaver experiments. In addition, the effects of skull stiffness on the child head dynamic responses were further investigated. All the simulation results confirmed the good biofidelity of the FE model.

  17. Investigation of the Potential for In-Vessel Melt Retention in the Lower Head of a BWR by Cooling through the Control Rod Guide Tubes. APRl 4, Stage 2 Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sehgal, B.R.; Jasiulevicius, A.; Konovalikhin, M.

    2004-01-01

    recommended that further investigations, both experimental and model development, be conducted to (a) check reproducibility of data (b) employ different flow rates (c) employ different simulant materials and (d) develop a comprehensive model, in order to certify that the coolability that can be achieved with establishing a water flow in the CRGTs will be able to retain the melt in the lower head of a BWR. We believe it will be an extremely important accident management strategy for a Swedish BWR since it will obviate the consideration of the prime licensing issue of ex-vessel steam explosion induced containment failure associated with the present scheme of establishing a water pool in the lower drywell of all the Swedish BWRs

  18. Preliminary calculation with code CONTEMPT-LT for spray cooling tests with JAERI model containment vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Mitsugu

    1978-01-01

    LWR plants have a containment spray system to reduce the escape of radioactive material to the environment in a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) by washing out fission products, especially radioiodine, and condensing the steam to lower the pressure. For carrying out the containment spray tests, pressure and temperature behaviour of the JAERI Model Containment Vessel in spray cooling has been calculated with computer program CONTEMPT-LT. The following could be studied quantitatively: (1) pressure and temperature raise rates for steam addition rate and (2) pressure fall rate for spray flow rate and spray heat transfer efficiency. (auth.)

  19. Pretest round robin analysis of 1:4-scale prestressed concrete containment vessel model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hessheimer, M.F.; Luk, V.K.; Klamerus, E.W.; Shibata, S.; Mitsugi, S.; Costello, J.F.

    2001-01-01

    The work reported herein represents, arguably, the state of the art in the numerical simulation of the response of a prestressed concrete containment vessel (PCCV) model to pressure loads up to failure. A significant expenditure of time and money on the part of the sponsors, contractors, and Round Robin participants was required to meet the objectives. While it is difficult to summarize the results of this extraordinary effort in a few paragraphs, the following observations are offered for the reader's consideration: almost half the participants used ABAQUS as the primary computational tool for performing the pretest analyses. The other participants used a variety of codes, most of which were developed ''in house''. (author)

  20. A Novel Through Capacity Model for One-way Channel Based on Characteristics of the Vessel Traffic Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanyuan Nie

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Vessel traffic flow is a key parameter for channel-through capacity and is of great significance to vessel traffic management, channel and port design and navigational risk evaluation. Based on the study of parameters of characteristics of vessel traffic flow related to channel-through capacity, this paper puts forward a brand-new mathematical model for one-way channel-through capacity in which parameters of channel length, vessel arrival rate and velocity difference in different vessels are involved and a theoretical calculating mechanism for the channel-through capacity is provided. In order to verify availability and reliability of the model, extensive simulation studies have been carried out and based on the historical AIS data, an analytical case study on the Xiazhimen Channel validating the proposed model is presented. Both simulation studies and the case study show that the proposed model is valid and all relative parameters can be readjusted and optimized to further improve the channel-through capacity. Thus, all studies demonstrate that the model is valuable for channel design and vessel management.

  1. Plan on test to failure of a prestressed concrete containment vessel model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takumi, K.; Nonaka, A.; Umeki, K.; Nagata, K.; Soejima, M.; Yamaura, Y.; Costello, J.F.; Riesemann, W.A. von.; Parks, M.B.; Horschel, D.S.

    1992-01-01

    A summary of the plans to test a prestressed concrete containment vessel (PCCV) model to failure is provided in this paper. The test will be conducted as a part of a joint research program between the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC), the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The containment model will be a scaled representation of a PCCV for a pressurized water reactor (PWR). During the test, the model will be slowly pressurized internally until failure of the containment pressure boundary occurs. The objectives of the test are to measure the failure pressure, to observe the mode of failure, and to record the containment structural response up to failure. Pre- and posttest analyses will be conducted to forecast and evaluate the test results. Based on these results, a validated method for evaluating the structural behavior of an actual PWR PCCV will be developed. The concepts to design the PCCV model are also described in the paper

  2. A stochastic-bayesian model for the fracture probability of PWR pressure vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francisco, Alexandre S.; Duran, Jorge Alberto R., E-mail: afrancisco@metal.eeimvr.uff.br, E-mail: duran@metal.eeimvr.uff.br [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Volta Redonda, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica

    2013-07-01

    Fracture probability of pressure vessels containing cracks can be obtained by methodologies of easy understanding, which require a deterministic treatment, complemented by statistical methods. However, more accurate results are required, methodologies need to be better formulated. This paper presents a new methodology to address this problem. First, a more rigorous methodology is obtained by means of the relationship of probability distributions that model crack incidence and nondestructive inspection efficiency using the Bayes' theorem. The result is an updated crack incidence distribution. Further, the accuracy of the methodology is improved by using a stochastic model for the crack growth. The stochastic model incorporates the statistical variability of the crack growth process, combining the stochastic theory with experimental data. Stochastic differential equations are derived by the randomization of empirical equations. From the solution of this equation, a distribution function related to the crack growth is derived. The fracture probability using both probability distribution functions is in agreement with theory, and presents realistic value for pressure vessels. (author)

  3. A stochastic-bayesian model for the fracture probability of PWR pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francisco, Alexandre S.; Duran, Jorge Alberto R.

    2013-01-01

    Fracture probability of pressure vessels containing cracks can be obtained by methodologies of easy understanding, which require a deterministic treatment, complemented by statistical methods. However, more accurate results are required, methodologies need to be better formulated. This paper presents a new methodology to address this problem. First, a more rigorous methodology is obtained by means of the relationship of probability distributions that model crack incidence and nondestructive inspection efficiency using the Bayes' theorem. The result is an updated crack incidence distribution. Further, the accuracy of the methodology is improved by using a stochastic model for the crack growth. The stochastic model incorporates the statistical variability of the crack growth process, combining the stochastic theory with experimental data. Stochastic differential equations are derived by the randomization of empirical equations. From the solution of this equation, a distribution function related to the crack growth is derived. The fracture probability using both probability distribution functions is in agreement with theory, and presents realistic value for pressure vessels. (author)

  4. Comparison of a layered slab and an atlas head model for Monte Carlo fitting of time-domain near-infrared spectroscopy data of the adult head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selb, Juliette; Ogden, Tyler M; Dubb, Jay; Fang, Qianqian; Boas, David A

    2014-01-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) estimations of the adult brain baseline optical properties based on a homogeneous model of the head are known to introduce significant contamination from extracerebral layers. More complex models have been proposed and occasionally applied to in vivo data, but their performances have never been characterized on realistic head structures. Here we implement a flexible fitting routine of time-domain NIRS data using graphics processing unit based Monte Carlo simulations. We compare the results for two different geometries: a two-layer slab with variable thickness of the first layer and a template atlas head registered to the subject's head surface. We characterize the performance of the Monte Carlo approaches for fitting the optical properties from simulated time-resolved data of the adult head. We show that both geometries provide better results than the commonly used homogeneous model, and we quantify the improvement in terms of accuracy, linearity, and cross-talk from extracerebral layers.

  5. Diffusive oxygen shunting between vessels in the preglomerular renal vasculature: anatomic observations and computational modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, Bruce S; Thompson, Sarah L; Ngo, Jennifer P; Smith, David W; Abdelkader, Amany; Broughton, Brad R S; Bertram, John F; Evans, Roger G

    2012-09-01

    To understand how geometric factors affect arterial-to-venous (AV) oxygen shunting, a mathematical model of diffusive oxygen transport in the renal cortex was developed. Preglomerular vascular geometry was investigated using light microscopy (providing vein shape, AV separation, and capillary density near arteries) and published micro-computed tomography (CT) data (providing vessel size and AV separation; Nordsletten DA, Blackett S, Bentley MD, Ritman EL, Smith NP. IUPS Physiome Project. http://www.physiome.org.nz/publications/nordsletten_blackett_ritman_bentley_smith_2005/folder_contents). A "U-shaped" relationship was observed between the arterial radius and the distance between the arterial and venous lumens. Veins were found to partially wrap around the artery more consistently for larger rather than smaller arteries. Intrarenal arteries were surrounded by an area of fibrous tissue, lacking capillaries, the thickness of which increased from ∼5 μm for the smallest arteries (200-μm diameter). Capillary density was greater near smaller arteries than larger arteries. No capillaries were observed between wrapped AV vessel pairs. The computational model comprised a single AV pair in cross section. Geometric parameters critical in renal oxygen transport were altered according to variations observed by CT and light microscopy. Lumen separation and wrapping of the vein around the artery were found to be the critical geometric factors determining the amount of oxygen shunted between AV pairs. AV oxygen shunting increases both as lumen separation decreases and as the degree of wrapping increases. The model also predicts that capillaries not only deliver oxygen, but can also remove oxygen from the cortical parenchyma close to an AV pair. Thus the presence of oxygen sinks (capillaries or tubules) near arteries would reduce the effectiveness of AV oxygen shunting. Collectively, these data suggest that AV oxygen shunting would be favored in larger vessels common to the

  6. A structurally detailed finite element human head model for simulation of transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming; Mogul, David Jeffery

    2009-04-30

    Computational studies of the head utilizing finite element models (FEMs) have been used to investigate a wide variety of brain-electromagnetic (EM) field interaction phenomena including magnetic stimulation of the head using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), direct electric stimulation of the brain for electroconvulsive therapy, and electroencephalography source localization. However, no human head model of sufficient complexity for studying the biophysics under these circumstances has been developed which utilizes structures at both the regional and cellular levels and provides well-defined smooth boundaries between tissues of different conductivities and orientations. The main barrier for building such accurate head models is the complex modeling procedures that include 3D object reconstruction and optimized meshing. In this study, a structurally detailed finite element model of the human head was generated that includes details to the level of cerebral gyri and sulci by combining computed tomography and magnetic resonance images. Furthermore, cortical columns that contain conductive processes of pyramidal neurons traversing the neocortical layers were included in the head model thus providing structure at or near the cellular level. These refinements provide a much more realistic model to investigate the effects of TMS on brain electrophysiology in the neocortex.

  7. Bottom head failure program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, R.O.

    1989-01-01

    Earlier this year the NRC staff presented a Revised Severe Accident Research Program Plan (SECY-89-123) to the Commission and initiated work on that plan. Two of the near-term issues in that plan involve failure of the bottom head of the reactor pressure vessel. These two issues are (1) depressurization and DCH and (2) BWR Mark I Containment Shell Meltthrough. ORNL has developed models for several competing failure mechanisms for BWRs. INEL has performed analytical and experimental work directly related to bottom head failure in connection with several programs. SNL has conducted a number of analyses and experimental activities to examine the failure of LWR vessels. In addition to the government-sponsored work mentioned above, EPRI and FAI performed studies on vessel failure for the Industry Degraded Core Rulemaking Program (IDCOR). EPRI examined the failure of a PWR vessel bottom head without penetrations, as found in some Combustion Engineering reactors. To give more attention to this subject as called for by the revised Severe Accident Research Plan, two things are being done. First, work previously done is being reviewed carefully to develop an overall picture and to determine the reliability of assumptions used in those studies. Second, new work is being planned for FY90 to try to complete a reasonable understanding of the failure process. The review and planning are being done in close cooperation with the ACRS. Results of this exercise will be presented in this paper

  8. Mathematical Modeling of Bingham Plastic Model of Blood Flow Through Stenotic Vessel

    OpenAIRE

    S.R. Verma

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present paper is to study the axially symmetric, laminar, steady, one-dimensional flow of blood through narrow stenotic vessel. Blood is considered as Bingham plastic fluid. The analytical results such as pressure drop, resistance to flow and wall shear stress have been obtained. Effect of yield stress and shape of stenosis on resistance to flow and wall shear stress have been discussed through tables and graphically. It has been shown that resistance to flow and th...

  9. Round Robin Posttest analysis of a 1/10-scale Steel Containment Vessel Model Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komine, Kuniaki; Konno, Mutsuo

    1999-01-01

    NUPEC and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) have been jointly sponsoring 'Structural Behavior Test' at Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) in Cooperative Containment Research Program'. As one of the test, a test of a mixed scaled SCV model with 1/10 in the geometry and 1/4 in the shell thickness. Round Robin analyses of a 1/10-scale Steel Containment Vessel (SCV) Model Test were carried out to obtain an adequate analytical method among seven organizations belonged to five countries in the world. As one of sponsor, Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) filled the important role of a posttest analysis of SCV model. This paper describes NUPEC's analytical results in the round robin posttest analysis. (author)

  10. Round Robin Posttest analysis of a 1/10-scale Steel Containment Vessel Model Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komine, Kuniaki [Nuclear Power Engineering Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Konno, Mutsuo

    1999-07-01

    NUPEC and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) have been jointly sponsoring 'Structural Behavior Test' at Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) in Cooperative Containment Research Program'. As one of the test, a test of a mixed scaled SCV model with 1/10 in the geometry and 1/4 in the shell thickness. Round Robin analyses of a 1/10-scale Steel Containment Vessel (SCV) Model Test were carried out to obtain an adequate analytical method among seven organizations belonged to five countries in the world. As one of sponsor, Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) filled the important role of a posttest analysis of SCV model. This paper describes NUPEC's analytical results in the round robin posttest analysis. (author)

  11. Experimental analysis of a nuclear reactor prestressed concrete pressure vessels model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallin, C.

    1980-01-01

    A comprehensible analysis was made of the performance of each set of sensors used to measure the strain and displacement of a 1/20 scale Prestressed Concrete Pressure Vessel (PCPV) model tested at the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN). Among the three Kinds of sensors used (strain gage, displacement transducers and load cells) the displacement transducers showed the best behavior. The displacemente transducers data was statistically analysed and a linear behavior of the model was observed during the first pressurizations tests. By means of a linear statistical correlation between experimental and expected theoretical data it was found that the model looses the linearity at a pressure between 110-125 atm. (Author) [pt

  12. Principle Study of Head Meridian Acupoint Massage to Stress Release via Grey Data Model Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ya-Ting

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the scientific study of the effectiveness and action principle of head meridian acupoint massage by applying the grey data model analysis approach. First, the head massage procedure for massaging the important head meridian acupuncture points including Taiyang, Fengfu, Tianzhu, Fengqi, and Jianjing is formulated in a standard manner. Second, the status of the autonomic nervous system of each subject is evaluated by using the heart rate variability analyzer before and after the head massage following four weeks. Afterward, the physiological factors of autonomic nerves are quantitatively analyzed by using the grey data modeling theory. The grey data analysis can point out that the status of autonomic nervous system is greatly improved after the massage. The order change of the grey relationship weighting of physiological factors shows the action principle of the sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves when performing head massage. In other words, the grey data model is able to distinguish the detailed interaction of the autonomic nervous system and the head meridian acupoint massage. Thus, the stress relaxing effect of massaging head meridian acupoints is proved, which is lacked in literature. The results can be a reference principle for massage health care in practice.

  13. Multivariable modeling of pressure vessel and piping J-R data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eason, E.D.; Wright, J.E.; Nelson, E.E.

    1991-05-01

    Multivariable models were developed for predicting J-R curves from available data, such as material chemistry, radiation exposure, temperature, and Charpy V-notch energy. The present work involved collection of public test data, application of advanced pattern recognition tools, and calibration of improved multivariable models. Separate models were fitted for different material groups, including RPV welds, Linde 80 welds, RPV base metals, piping welds, piping base metals, and the combined database. Three different types of models were developed, involving different combinations of variables that might be available for applications: a Charpy model, a preirradiation Charpy model, and a copper-fluence model. In general, the best results were obtained with the preirradiation Charpy model. The copper-fluence model is recommended only if Charpy data are unavailable, and then only for Linde 80 welds. Relatively good fits were obtained, capable of predicting the values of J for pressure vessel steels to with a standard deviation of 13--18% over the range of test data. The models were qualified for predictive purposes by demonstrating their ability to predict validation data not used for fitting. 20 refs., 45 figs., 16 tabs

  14. A mathematical model for pressure-based organs behaving as biological pressure vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casha, Aaron R; Camilleri, Liberato; Gauci, Marilyn; Gatt, Ruben; Sladden, David; Chetcuti, Stanley; Grima, Joseph N

    2018-04-26

    We introduce a mathematical model that describes the allometry of physical characteristics of hollow organs behaving as pressure vessels based on the physics of ideal pressure vessels. The model was validated by studying parameters such as body and organ mass, systolic and diastolic pressures, internal and external dimensions, pressurization energy and organ energy output measurements of pressure-based organs in a wide range of mammals and birds. Seven rules were derived that govern amongst others, lack of size efficiency on scaling to larger organ sizes, matching organ size in the same species, equal relative efficiency in pressurization energy across species and direct size matching between organ mass and mass of contents. The lung, heart and bladder follow these predicted theoretical relationships with a similar relative efficiency across various mammalian and avian species; an exception is cardiac output in mammals with a mass exceeding 10kg. This may limit massive body size in mammals, breaking Cope's rule that populations evolve to increase in body size over time. Such a limit was not found in large flightless birds exceeding 100kg, leading to speculation about unlimited dinosaur size should dinosaurs carry avian-like cardiac characteristics. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Scatter modelling of fracture toughness data for reactor pressure vessel structural integrity assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesoz, M.

    1997-01-01

    In the last decade, there has been an increasing interest at EDF in developing and applying probabilistic methods for a variety of purposes. In the field of structural integrity and reliability they are used to evaluate the effect of deterioration due to ageing mechanisms, mainly on major passive structural components such as reactor pressure vessel, steam generator and piping in nuclear plants. Such approaches provide an attractive supplement to the more conventional deterministic method, based upon pessimistic assumptions, that give results too far from reality to support effective decisions. In addition to deterministic calculations, a Probabilistic Fracture Mechanics model has been developed in order to analyse the risk of brittle failure of the reactor pressure vessel and to perform sensitivity studies. The material fracture toughness (K IC ) uncertainty appears to be strongly influencing the probability of failure under accidental conditions. Up to now, this parameter is determined from the RCC-M code reference curve, which is the same as the ASME reference curve. But an important issue when performing probabilistic analysis is the correct statistical modelling of input parameters. That's why modelling works have been carried out using results of fracture toughness tests performed for demonstrating the validity of the reference curve. This paper presents the statistical treatments that have been performed to model the scatter of temperature dependent parameter (K IC (T). A specific data base containing a few hundreds of French and US results have been carried and Weibull models have been fitted, based on various master curve equations (K. Wallin (Senior Adviser at the Technical Research Centre of Finland) or RCC-M types). (author)

  16. Assessment of reactor vessel integrity (ARVI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sehgal, B.R. [Division of Nuclear Power Safety (NPS), Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Drottning Kristinas Vaeg 33A, 10044 Stockholm (Sweden)]. E-mail: sehgal@ne.kth.se; Karbojian, A. [Division of Nuclear Power Safety (NPS), Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Drottning Kristinas Vaeg 33A, 10044 Stockholm (Sweden); Giri, A. [Division of Nuclear Power Safety (NPS), Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Drottning Kristinas Vaeg 33A, 10044 Stockholm (Sweden); Kymaelaeinen, O. [FortumEngNP (Finland); Bonnet, J.M. [CEA (France); Ikkonen, K. [Division of Nuclear Power Safety (NPS), Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Drottning Kristinas Vaeg 33A, 10044 Stockholm (Sweden); Sairanen, R. [VTT (Finland); Bhandari, S. [FRAMATOME (France); Buerger, M. [USTUTT (Germany); Dienstbier, J. [NRI Rez (Czech Republic); Techy, Z. [VEIKI (Hungary); Theofanous, T. [UCSB (United States)

    2005-02-01

    The assessment of reactor vessel integrity (ARVI) project involved a total of nine organizations from Europe and USA. The work consisted of experiments and analysis development. The modeling activities in the area of structural analyses were focused on the support of EC-FOREVER experiments as well as on the exploitation of the data obtained from those experiments for modeling of creep deformation and the validation of the industry structural codes. Work was also performed for extension of melt natural convection analyses to consideration of stratification, and mixing (in the CFD codes). Other modeling activities were for (1) gap cooling CHF and (2) developing simple models for system code. Finally, the methodology and data was applied for the design of IVMR severe accident management scheme for VVER-440/213 plants. The work was broken up into five packages. They were divided into tasks, which were performed by different partners. The major experimental project continued was EC-FOREVER in which data was obtained on in-vessel melt pool coolability. In previous EC-FOREVER experiments data was obtained on melt pool natural convection and lower head creep failure and rupture. Those results obtained were related to the following issues: (1) multiaxial creep laws for different vessel steels (2) effects of penetrations, and (3) mode and location of lower head failure. The two EC-FOREVER tests reported here are related to (a) the effectiveness of gap cooling and (b) water ingression for in vessel melt coolability. Two other experimental projects were also conducted. One was the COPO experiments, which was concerned with the effects of stratification and metal layer on the thermal loads on the lower head wall during melt pool convection. The second experimental project was conducted at ULPU facility, which provided data and correlations of CHF due to the external cooling of the lower head.

  17. Integral experiments on in-vessel coolability and vessel creep: results and analysis of the FOREVER-C1 test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sehgal, B.R.; Nourgaliev, R.R.; Dinh, T.N.; Karbojian, A. [Division of Nuclear Power Safety, Royal Institute of Technology, Drottning Kristinas Vaeg., Stockholm (Sweden)

    1999-07-01

    This paper describes the FOREVER (Failure Of REactor VEssel Retention) experimental program, which is currently underway at the Division of Nuclear Power Safety, Royal Institute of Technology (RIT/NPS). The objectives of the FOREVER experiments are to obtain data and develop validated models (i) on the melt coolability process inside the vessel, in the presence of water (in particular, on the efficacy of the postulated gap cooling to preclude vessel failure); and (ii) on the lower head failure due to the creep process in the absence of water inside and/or outside the lower head. The paper presents the experimental results and analysis of the first FOREVER-C1 test. During this experiment, the 1/10th scale pressure vessel, heated to about 900degC and pressurized to 26 bars, was subjected to creep deformation in a non-stop 24-hours test. The vessel wall displacement data clearly shows different stages of the vessel deformation due to thermal expansion, elastic, plastic and creep processes. The maximum displacement was observed at the lowermost region of the vessel lower plenum. Information on the FOREVER-C1 measured thermal characteristics and analysis of the observed thermal and structural behavior is presented. The coupled nature of thermal and mechanical processes, as well as the effect of other system conditions (such as depressurization) on the melt pool and vessel temperature responses are analyzed. (author)

  18. Probabilistic retinal vessel segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chang-Hua; Agam, Gady

    2007-03-01

    Optic fundus assessment is widely used for diagnosing vascular and non-vascular pathology. Inspection of the retinal vasculature may reveal hypertension, diabetes, arteriosclerosis, cardiovascular disease and stroke. Due to various imaging conditions retinal images may be degraded. Consequently, the enhancement of such images and vessels in them is an important task with direct clinical applications. We propose a novel technique for vessel enhancement in retinal images that is capable of enhancing vessel junctions in addition to linear vessel segments. This is an extension of vessel filters we have previously developed for vessel enhancement in thoracic CT scans. The proposed approach is based on probabilistic models which can discern vessels and junctions. Evaluation shows the proposed filter is better than several known techniques and is comparable to the state of the art when evaluated on a standard dataset. A ridge-based vessel tracking process is applied on the enhanced image to demonstrate the effectiveness of the enhancement filter.

  19. Comparisons with measured data of the simulated local core parameters by the coupled code ATHLET-BIPR-VVER applying a new enhanced model of the reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikonov, S.; Pasichnyk, I.; Velkov, K.; Pautz, A.

    2011-01-01

    The paper describes the performed comparisons of measured and simulated local core data based on the OECD/NEA Benchmark on Kalinin-3 NPP: 'Switching off of one of the four operating main circulation pumps at nominal reactor power'. The local measurements of in core self-powered neutron detectors (SPND) in 64 fuel assemblies on 7 axial levels are used for the comparisons of the assemblies axial power distributions and the thermocouples readings at 93 fuel assembly heads are applied for the fuel assembly coolant temperature comparisons. The analyses are done on the base of benchmark transient calculations performed with the coupled system code ATHLET/BIPR-VVER. In order to describe more realistically the fluid mixing phenomena in a reactor pressure vessel a new enhanced nodalization scheme is being developed. It could take into account asymmetric flow behaviour in the reactor pressure vessel structures like downcomer, reactor core inlet and outlet, control rods' guided tubes, support grids etc. For this purpose details of the core geometry are modelled. About 58000 control volumes and junctions are applied. Cross connection are used to describe the interaction between the fluid objects. The performed comparisons are of great interest because they show some advantages by performing coupled code production pseudo-3D analysis of NPPs applying the parallel thermo-hydraulic channel methodology (or 1D thermo-hydraulic system code modeling). (Authors)

  20. Comparison of analytic source models for head scatter factor calculation and planar dose calculation for IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Guanghua; Liu, Chihray; Lu Bo; Palta, Jatinder R; Li, Jonathan G

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to choose an appropriate head scatter source model for the fast and accurate independent planar dose calculation for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with MLC. The performance of three different head scatter source models regarding their ability to model head scatter and facilitate planar dose calculation was evaluated. A three-source model, a two-source model and a single-source model were compared in this study. In the planar dose calculation algorithm, in-air fluence distribution was derived from each of the head scatter source models while considering the combination of Jaw and MLC opening. Fluence perturbations due to tongue-and-groove effect, rounded leaf end and leaf transmission were taken into account explicitly. The dose distribution was calculated by convolving the in-air fluence distribution with an experimentally determined pencil-beam kernel. The results were compared with measurements using a diode array and passing rates with 2%/2 mm and 3%/3 mm criteria were reported. It was found that the two-source model achieved the best agreement on head scatter factor calculation. The three-source model and single-source model underestimated head scatter factors for certain symmetric rectangular fields and asymmetric fields, but similar good agreement could be achieved when monitor back scatter effect was incorporated explicitly. All the three source models resulted in comparable average passing rates (>97%) when the 3%/3 mm criterion was selected. The calculation with the single-source model and two-source model was slightly faster than the three-source model due to their simplicity

  1. Comparison of analytic source models for head scatter factor calculation and planar dose calculation for IMRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan Guanghua [Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Liu, Chihray; Lu Bo; Palta, Jatinder R; Li, Jonathan G [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610-0385 (United States)

    2008-04-21

    The purpose of this study was to choose an appropriate head scatter source model for the fast and accurate independent planar dose calculation for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with MLC. The performance of three different head scatter source models regarding their ability to model head scatter and facilitate planar dose calculation was evaluated. A three-source model, a two-source model and a single-source model were compared in this study. In the planar dose calculation algorithm, in-air fluence distribution was derived from each of the head scatter source models while considering the combination of Jaw and MLC opening. Fluence perturbations due to tongue-and-groove effect, rounded leaf end and leaf transmission were taken into account explicitly. The dose distribution was calculated by convolving the in-air fluence distribution with an experimentally determined pencil-beam kernel. The results were compared with measurements using a diode array and passing rates with 2%/2 mm and 3%/3 mm criteria were reported. It was found that the two-source model achieved the best agreement on head scatter factor calculation. The three-source model and single-source model underestimated head scatter factors for certain symmetric rectangular fields and asymmetric fields, but similar good agreement could be achieved when monitor back scatter effect was incorporated explicitly. All the three source models resulted in comparable average passing rates (>97%) when the 3%/3 mm criterion was selected. The calculation with the single-source model and two-source model was slightly faster than the three-source model due to their simplicity.

  2. Light water reactor lower head failure analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rempe, J.L.; Chavez, S.A.; Thinnes, G.L.

    1993-10-01

    This document presents the results from a US Nuclear Regulatory Commission-sponsored research program to investigate the mode and timing of vessel lower head failure. Major objectives of the analysis were to identify plausible failure mechanisms and to develop a method for determining which failure mode would occur first in different light water reactor designs and accident conditions. Failure mechanisms, such as tube ejection, tube rupture, global vessel failure, and localized vessel creep rupture, were studied. Newly developed models and existing models were applied to predict which failure mechanism would occur first in various severe accident scenarios. So that a broader range of conditions could be considered simultaneously, calculations relied heavily on models with closed-form or simplified numerical solution techniques. Finite element techniques-were employed for analytical model verification and examining more detailed phenomena. High-temperature creep and tensile data were obtained for predicting vessel and penetration structural response

  3. Light water reactor lower head failure analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rempe, J.L.; Chavez, S.A.; Thinnes, G.L. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)] [and others

    1993-10-01

    This document presents the results from a US Nuclear Regulatory Commission-sponsored research program to investigate the mode and timing of vessel lower head failure. Major objectives of the analysis were to identify plausible failure mechanisms and to develop a method for determining which failure mode would occur first in different light water reactor designs and accident conditions. Failure mechanisms, such as tube ejection, tube rupture, global vessel failure, and localized vessel creep rupture, were studied. Newly developed models and existing models were applied to predict which failure mechanism would occur first in various severe accident scenarios. So that a broader range of conditions could be considered simultaneously, calculations relied heavily on models with closed-form or simplified numerical solution techniques. Finite element techniques-were employed for analytical model verification and examining more detailed phenomena. High-temperature creep and tensile data were obtained for predicting vessel and penetration structural response.

  4. Microstructural characterization of atom clusters in irradiated pressure vessel steels and model alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auger, P.; Pareige, P.; Akamatsu, M.; Van Duysen, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    In order to characterize the microstructural evolution of iron solid solution under irradiation, two pressure vessel steels irradiated in service conditions, and, for comparison, low copper model alloys irradiated with neutrons and electrons, have been studied through small angle neutron scattering and atom probe experiments. In Fe-Cu model alloys, copper clusters are formed containing uncertain proportions of iron. In the low copper industrial steels, the feature is more complex; solute atoms such as Ni, Mn and Si, sometimes associated with Cu, segregate as ''clouds'' more or less condensed in the iron solid solution. These silicides, or at least Si, Ni, Mn association, may facilitate the copper segregation although the initial iron matrix contains a low copper concentration. (authors). 24 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  5. Microstructural characterization of atom clusters in irradiated pressure vessel steels and model alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auger, P; Pareige, P [Rouen Univ., 76 - Mont-Saint-Aignan (France); Akamatsu, M; Van Duysen, J C [Electricite de France (EDF), 77 - Ecuelles (France)

    1994-12-31

    In order to characterize the microstructural evolution of iron solid solution under irradiation, two pressure vessel steels irradiated in service conditions, and, for comparison, low copper model alloys irradiated with neutrons and electrons, have been studied through small angle neutron scattering and atom probe experiments. In Fe-Cu model alloys, copper clusters are formed containing uncertain proportions of iron. In the low copper industrial steels, the feature is more complex; solute atoms such as Ni, Mn and Si, sometimes associated with Cu, segregate as ``clouds`` more or less condensed in the iron solid solution. These silicides, or at least Si, Ni, Mn association, may facilitate the copper segregation although the initial iron matrix contains a low copper concentration. (authors). 24 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Characterization of atom clusters in irradiated pressure vessel steels and model alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auger, P.; Pareige, P.; Akamatsu, M.; Van Duysen, J.C.

    1993-12-01

    In order to characterize the microstructural evolution of the iron solid solution under irradiation, two pressure vessel steels irradiated in service conditions and, for comparison, low copper model alloys irradiated with neutrons and electrons have been studied. The characterization has been carried out mainly thanks to small angle neutron scattering and atom probe experiments. Both techniques lead to the conclusion that clusters develop with irradiations. In Fe-Cu model alloys, copper clusters are formed containing uncertain proportions of iron. In the low copper industrial steels, the feature is more complex. Solute atoms like Ni, Mn and Si, sometimes associated with Cu, segregate as ''clouds'' more or less condensed in the iron solid solution. These silicides, or at least Si, Ni, Mn association, may facilitate the copper segregation although the initial iron matrix contains a low copper concentration. (authors). 24 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  7. Sodium oxide aerosol behavior in a closed vessel. Comparison of computer modeling with aerosol experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fermandjian, Jean.

    1979-08-01

    Fast breeder reactor safety needs models validated to predict the behavior of sodium aerosols in the different reactor compartments during hypothetical sodium accident. Besides their chemical toxicity, the sodium aerosols are a transfer vector of radioactivity during a contaminated sodium fire. The purpose of this work is to validate models (HAARM 2 and PARDISEKO 3) with tests of sodium pool fires in a 400 m 3 concrete vessel in a confined atmosphere (CASSANDRE tests). The comparison between calculations and experimental results reveals that difficulties still exist, especially as to the selection of the values to be given to some input parameters (physical data of experimental origin, in particular the aerosols source function, the characteristics of the distribution of the emitted particles and the form factor of the agglomerated particles) [fr

  8. 3D realistic head model simulation based on transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuo; Xu, Guizhi; Wang, Lei; Chen, Yong; Wu, Huanli; Li, Ying; Yang, Qingxin

    2006-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a powerful non-invasive tool for investigating functions in the brain. The target inside the head is stimulated with eddy currents induced in the tissue by the time-varying magnetic field. Precise spatial localization of stimulation sites is the key of efficient functional magnetic stimulations. Many researchers devote to magnetic field analysis in empty free space. In this paper, a realistic head model used in Finite Element Method has been developed. The magnetic field inducted in the head bt TMS has been analysed. This three-dimensional simulation is useful for spatial localization of stimulation.

  9. A unified model of heading and path perception in primate MSTd.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver W Layton

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Self-motion, steering, and obstacle avoidance during navigation in the real world require humans to travel along curved paths. Many perceptual models have been proposed that focus on heading, which specifies the direction of travel along straight paths, but not on path curvature, which humans accurately perceive and is critical to everyday locomotion. In primates, including humans, dorsal medial superior temporal area (MSTd has been implicated in heading perception. However, the majority of MSTd neurons respond optimally to spiral patterns, rather than to the radial expansion patterns associated with heading. No existing theory of curved path perception explains the neural mechanisms by which humans accurately assess path and no functional role for spiral-tuned cells has yet been proposed. Here we present a computational model that demonstrates how the continuum of observed cells (radial to circular in MSTd can simultaneously code curvature and heading across the neural population. Curvature is encoded through the spirality of the most active cell, and heading is encoded through the visuotopic location of the center of the most active cell's receptive field. Model curvature and heading errors fit those made by humans. Our model challenges the view that the function of MSTd is heading estimation, based on our analysis we claim that it is primarily concerned with trajectory estimation and the simultaneous representation of both curvature and heading. In our model, temporal dynamics afford time-history in the neural representation of optic flow, which may modulate its structure. This has far-reaching implications for the interpretation of studies that assume that optic flow is, and should be, represented as an instantaneous vector field. Our results suggest that spiral motion patterns that emerge in spatio-temporal optic flow are essential for guiding self-motion along complex trajectories, and that cells in MSTd are specifically tuned to extract

  10. A Unified Model of Heading and Path Perception in Primate MSTd

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layton, Oliver W.; Browning, N. Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Self-motion, steering, and obstacle avoidance during navigation in the real world require humans to travel along curved paths. Many perceptual models have been proposed that focus on heading, which specifies the direction of travel along straight paths, but not on path curvature, which humans accurately perceive and is critical to everyday locomotion. In primates, including humans, dorsal medial superior temporal area (MSTd) has been implicated in heading perception. However, the majority of MSTd neurons respond optimally to spiral patterns, rather than to the radial expansion patterns associated with heading. No existing theory of curved path perception explains the neural mechanisms by which humans accurately assess path and no functional role for spiral-tuned cells has yet been proposed. Here we present a computational model that demonstrates how the continuum of observed cells (radial to circular) in MSTd can simultaneously code curvature and heading across the neural population. Curvature is encoded through the spirality of the most active cell, and heading is encoded through the visuotopic location of the center of the most active cell's receptive field. Model curvature and heading errors fit those made by humans. Our model challenges the view that the function of MSTd is heading estimation, based on our analysis we claim that it is primarily concerned with trajectory estimation and the simultaneous representation of both curvature and heading. In our model, temporal dynamics afford time-history in the neural representation of optic flow, which may modulate its structure. This has far-reaching implications for the interpretation of studies that assume that optic flow is, and should be, represented as an instantaneous vector field. Our results suggest that spiral motion patterns that emerge in spatio-temporal optic flow are essential for guiding self-motion along complex trajectories, and that cells in MSTd are specifically tuned to extract complex trajectory

  11. Tests on model of a prestressed concrete nuclear pressure vessel with multiple cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Favre, R.; Koprna, M.; Jaccoud, J.P.

    1977-01-01

    The prestressed concrete pressure vessel (prototype) is a cylinder having a diameter of 48 m and a height of 39 m. It has 25 vertical cavities (reactor, heat exchangers, heat recuperators) and 3 horizontal cavities (gas turbines of 500 kw). The cavities are closed by plugs, and their tightness is ensured by a steel lining. A model, on a scale of 1/20, made of microconcrete, was loaded in several cycles, by a uniform inner pressure in the cavities, increasing to the point of failure. The three successive stages were examined: stage of globally elastic behavior, cracking stage, ultimate stage. The behavior of the model is globally elastic up to an inner pressure of 120 to 130 kp/cm 2 , corresponding to about twice the maximum pressure of service, equal to 65 kp/cm 2 . The prestressed tendons at this stage show practically no stress increase. The first detectable cracks appear on the lateral side half-way up the model, as soon as the pressure exceeded 120 kp/cm 2 . From 150-165 kp/cm 2 , the cracking stage can be considered as achieved and the main crack pattern entirely formed. A horizontal crack continues in the middle of the barrel, as well as vertical cracks at each outer cavity. Beyond a pressure of 150-165 kp/cm 2 the ultimate stage begins. The strains of the stresses in the tendons grow more rapidly. The steel lining is highly solicited. Above about 210 kp/cm 2 the model behaves like a structure composed of a group of concrete blocks bound by the tendons and the lining. The failure (240 kp/cm 2 ) occurred through a mechanism of ejection and bending of the concrete ring at the periphery of the barrel of the vessel, which was solicited mainly in tension

  12. Demarcation of inland vessels' limit off Mormugao port region, India: A pilot study for the safety of inland vessels using wave modelling

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Vethamony, P.; Aboobacker, V.M.; Sudheesh, K.; Babu, M.T.; AshokKumar, A.

    The Ministry of Shipping desires to revise the inland vessels' limit (IVL) notification based on scientific rationale to improve the safety of vessels and onboard personnel. The Mormugao port region extending up to the Panaji was considered...

  13. Streaming flow from ultrasound contrast agents by acoustic waves in a blood vessel model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Eunjin; Chung, Sang Kug; Rhee, Kyehan

    2015-09-01

    To elucidate the effects of streaming flow on ultrasound contrast agent (UCA)-assisted drug delivery, streaming velocity fields from sonicated UCA microbubbles were measured using particle image velocimetry (PIV) in a blood vessel model. At the beginning of ultrasound sonication, the UCA bubbles formed clusters and translated in the direction of the ultrasound field. Bubble cluster formation and translation were faster with 2.25MHz sonication, a frequency close to the resonance frequency of the UCA. Translation of bubble clusters induced streaming jet flow that impinged on the vessel wall, forming symmetric vortices. The maximum streaming velocity was about 60mm/s at 2.25MHz and decreased to 15mm/s at 1.0MHz for the same acoustic pressure amplitude. The effect of the ultrasound frequency on wall shear stress was more noticeable. Maximum wall shear stress decreased from 0.84 to 0.1Pa as the ultrasound frequency decreased from 2.25 to 1.0MHz. The maximum spatial gradient of the wall shear stress also decreased from 1.0 to 0.1Pa/mm. This study showed that streaming flow was induced by bubble cluster formation and translation and was stronger upon sonication by an acoustic wave with a frequency near the UCA resonance frequency. Therefore, the secondary radiant force, which is much stronger at the resonance frequency, should play an important role in UCA-assisted drug delivery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Decay model for biocide treatment of unballasted vessels: application for the Laurentian Great Lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Larissa L; Bartell, Steven M; Landrum, Peter F

    2005-10-01

    A biocide decay model was developed to assess the potential efficacy and environmental impacts associated with using glutaraldehyde to treat unballasted overseas vessels trading on the Laurentian Great Lakes. The results of Monte Carlo simulations indicate that effective glutaraldehyde concentrations can be maintained for the duration of a vessel's oceanic transit (approximately 9-12 days): During this transit, glutaraldehyde concentrations were predicted to decrease by approximately 10% from initial treatment levels (e.g., 500 mgL(-1)). In terms of environmental impacts, mean glutaraldehyde concentrations released at Duluth-Superior Harbor, MN were predicted to be 100-fold lower than initial treatment concentrations, and ranged from 3.2 mgL(-1) (2 SD: 2.74) in April to 0.7 mgL(-1) (2 SD: 1.28) in August. Sensitivity analyses indicated that the re-ballasting dilution factor was the major variable governing final glutaraldehyde concentrations; however, lake surface temperatures became increasingly important during the warmer summer months.

  15. Failure prediction of low-carbon steel pressure vessel and cylindrical models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, K.D.; Wang, W.

    1987-01-01

    The failure loads predicted by failure assessment methods (namely the net-section stress criterion; the EPRI engineering approach for elastic-plastic analysis; the CEGB failure assessment route; the modified R6 curve by Milne for strain hardening; and the failure assessment curve based on J estimation by Ainsworth) have been compared with burst test results on externally, axially sharp notched pressure vessel and open-ended cylinder models made from typical low-carbon steel St45 seamless tube which has a transverse true stress-strain curve of straight-line and parabola type and a high value of ultimate strength to yield. It was concluded from the comparison that whilst the net-section stress criterion and the CEGB route did not give conservative predictions, Milne's modified curve did give a conservative and good prediction; Ainsworth's curve gave a fairly conservative prediction; and EPRI solutions also could conditionally give a good prediction but the conditions are still somewhat uncertain. It is suggested that Milne's modified R6 curve is used in failure assessment of low-carbon steel pressure vessels. (author)

  16. Modeling heading and path perception from optic flow in the case of independently moving objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raudies, Florian; Neumann, Heiko

    2013-01-01

    Humans are usually accurate when estimating heading or path from optic flow, even in the presence of independently moving objects (IMOs) in an otherwise rigid scene. To invoke significant biases in perceived heading, IMOs have to be large and obscure the focus of expansion (FOE) in the image plane, which is the point of approach. For the estimation of path during curvilinear self-motion no significant biases were found in the presence of IMOs. What makes humans robust in their estimation of heading or path using optic flow? We derive analytical models of optic flow for linear and curvilinear self-motion using geometric scene models. Heading biases of a linear least squares method, which builds upon these analytical models, are large, larger than those reported for humans. This motivated us to study segmentation cues that are available from optic flow. We derive models of accretion/deletion, expansion/contraction, acceleration/deceleration, local spatial curvature, and local temporal curvature, to be used as cues to segment an IMO from the background. Integrating these segmentation cues into our method of estimating heading or path now explains human psychophysical data and extends, as well as unifies, previous investigations. Our analysis suggests that various cues available from optic flow help to segment IMOs and, thus, make humans' heading and path perception robust in the presence of such IMOs. PMID:23554589

  17. Modeling Heading and Path Perception from Optic Flow in the Case of Independently Moving Objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian eRaudies

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Humans are usually accurate when estimating heading or path from optic flow, even in the presence of independently moving objects (IMO in an otherwise rigid scene. To invoke significant biases in perceived heading, IMOs have to be large and obscure the focus of expansion (FOE in the image plane, which is the point of approach. For the estimation of path during curvilinear self-motion no significant biases were found in the presence of IMOs. What makes humans robust in their estimation of heading or path using optic flow? We derive analytical models of optic flow for linear and curvilinear self-motion using geometric scene models. Heading biases of a linear least squares method, which builds upon these analytical models, are large, larger than those reported for humans. This motivated us to study segmentation cues that are available from optic flow. We derive models of accretion / deletion, expansion / contraction, acceleration / deceleration, local spatial curvature, and local temporal curvature, to be used as cues to segment an IMO from the background. Integrating these segmentation cues into our method of estimating heading or path now explains human psychophysical data and extends, as well as unifies, previous investigations. Our analysis suggests that various cues available from optic flow help to segment IMOs and, thus, make humans’ heading and path perception robust in the presence of such IMOs.

  18. Simplified realistic human head model for simulating Tumor Treating Fields (TTFields).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, Cornelia; Bomzon, Ze'ev; Salvador, Ricardo; Basser, Peter J; Miranda, Pedro C

    2016-08-01

    Tumor Treating Fields (TTFields) are alternating electric fields in the intermediate frequency range (100-300 kHz) of low-intensity (1-3 V/cm). TTFields are an anti-mitotic treatment against solid tumors, which are approved for Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) patients. These electric fields are induced non-invasively by transducer arrays placed directly on the patient's scalp. Cell culture experiments showed that treatment efficacy is dependent on the induced field intensity. In clinical practice, a software called NovoTalTM uses head measurements to estimate the optimal array placement to maximize the electric field delivery to the tumor. Computational studies predict an increase in the tumor's electric field strength when adapting transducer arrays to its location. Ideally, a personalized head model could be created for each patient, to calculate the electric field distribution for the specific situation. Thus, the optimal transducer layout could be inferred from field calculation rather than distance measurements. Nonetheless, creating realistic head models of patients is time-consuming and often needs user interaction, because automated image segmentation is prone to failure. This study presents a first approach to creating simplified head models consisting of convex hulls of the tissue layers. The model is able to account for anisotropic conductivity in the cortical tissues by using a tensor representation estimated from Diffusion Tensor Imaging. The induced electric field distribution is compared in the simplified and realistic head models. The average field intensities in the brain and tumor are generally slightly higher in the realistic head model, with a maximal ratio of 114% for a simplified model with reasonable layer thicknesses. Thus, the present pipeline is a fast and efficient means towards personalized head models with less complexity involved in characterizing tissue interfaces, while enabling accurate predictions of electric field distribution.

  19. Experimental test of spatial updating models for monkey eye-head gaze shifts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom J Van Grootel

    Full Text Available How the brain maintains an accurate and stable representation of visual target locations despite the occurrence of saccadic gaze shifts is a classical problem in oculomotor research. Here we test and dissociate the predictions of different conceptual models for head-unrestrained gaze-localization behavior of macaque monkeys. We adopted the double-step paradigm with rapid eye-head gaze shifts to measure localization accuracy in response to flashed visual stimuli in darkness. We presented the second target flash either before (static, or during (dynamic the first gaze displacement. In the dynamic case the brief visual flash induced a small retinal streak of up to about 20 deg at an unpredictable moment and retinal location during the eye-head gaze shift, which provides serious challenges for the gaze-control system. However, for both stimulus conditions, monkeys localized the flashed targets with accurate gaze shifts, which rules out several models of visuomotor control. First, these findings exclude the possibility that gaze-shift programming relies on retinal inputs only. Instead, they support the notion that accurate eye-head motor feedback updates the gaze-saccade coordinates. Second, in dynamic trials the visuomotor system cannot rely on the coordinates of the planned first eye-head saccade either, which rules out remapping on the basis of a predictive corollary gaze-displacement signal. Finally, because gaze-related head movements were also goal-directed, requiring continuous access to eye-in-head position, we propose that our results best support a dynamic feedback scheme for spatial updating in which visuomotor control incorporates accurate signals about instantaneous eye- and head positions rather than relative eye- and head displacements.

  20. Skull Defects in Finite Element Head Models for Source Reconstruction from Magnetoencephalography Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Stephan; Güllmar, Daniel; Flemming, Lars; Grayden, David B.; Cook, Mark J.; Wolters, Carsten H.; Haueisen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) signals are influenced by skull defects. However, there is a lack of evidence of this influence during source reconstruction. Our objectives are to characterize errors in source reconstruction from MEG signals due to ignoring skull defects and to assess the ability of an exact finite element head model to eliminate such errors. A detailed finite element model of the head of a rabbit used in a physical experiment was constructed from magnetic resonance and co-registered computer tomography imaging that differentiated nine tissue types. Sources of the MEG measurements above intact skull and above skull defects respectively were reconstructed using a finite element model with the intact skull and one incorporating the skull defects. The forward simulation of the MEG signals reproduced the experimentally observed characteristic magnitude and topography changes due to skull defects. Sources reconstructed from measured MEG signals above intact skull matched the known physical locations and orientations. Ignoring skull defects in the head model during reconstruction displaced sources under a skull defect away from that defect. Sources next to a defect were reoriented. When skull defects, with their physical conductivity, were incorporated in the head model, the location and orientation errors were mostly eliminated. The conductivity of the skull defect material non-uniformly modulated the influence on MEG signals. We propose concrete guidelines for taking into account conducting skull defects during MEG coil placement and modeling. Exact finite element head models can improve localization of brain function, specifically after surgery. PMID:27092044

  1. The preparation of aneurysm model in rabbits by vessel ligation and elastase-induced technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Chuan; Xie Qianyu; Liu Linxiang

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To establish an aneurysm model, which is quite similar to the human intracranial aneurysm in morphology, in rabbits by means of vessel ligation together with elastase-induced technique. Methods: Sixteen New Zealand white rabbits were used in this study. Distal carotid ligation and intraluminal elastase incubation was employed in ten rabbits (study group) to create aneurysm on the right common carotid artery. And surgical suture of a segment of the left carotid common artery was carried out in six rabbits (used as control group) to establish the aneurysm model. DSA exam of the created aneurysms by using catheterization via femoral artery was performed at one week and at one month after surgery. The patency, morphology and pathology of the aneurysms were observed. The results were statistically analyzed. Results: The aneurysms in both groups remained patent after they were created. Angiography one week after the surgery showed that all the aneurysms in study group were patent, while in control group only two aneurysms showed opacification with contrast medium and the remaining four aneurysms were all occluded. DSA at one month after the procedure demonstrated that all the aneurysms in study group remained patent, and the previous two patent aneurysms in control group became occluded. The mean width and length of the aneurysmal cavity in study group immediately after the procedure were (3.70 ± 0.16) mm and (6.53 ± 0.65) mm respectively, which enlarged to (5.06 ± 0.31) mm and (9.0 ± 0.52) mm respectively one month after the surgery. The difference in size changes was statistically significant (P < 0.05). Pathologically, almost complete absence of the internal elastic lamina and medial wall elastin of the aneurysms was observed. Conclusion: The aneurysm model prepared with vessel ligation together with elastase-induced technique carries high patent rate and possesses the feature of spontaneous growing, moreover, its morphology is quite similar to the

  2. 3D modeling of the primary circuit in the reactor pressure vessel of a PHWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramajo, Damian, E-mail: dramajo@santafe-conicet.gov.ar; Corzo, Santiago; Schiliuk, Nicolas; Nigro, Norberto

    2013-12-15

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) of the pressurized heavy water reactor (PHWR) of 745 electrical MW Atucha II nuclear power plant was carried out. A three dimensional (3D) detailed model was employed to simulate coolant circuit considering the upper and lower plenums, the downcomer and the hot and cold legs. Control rods and coolant channel tubes at the upper plenum were included to quantify the mixing flow with more realism. The whole set of 451 coolant channels were modeled by means of a zero dimensional methodology. That is, the effect of each coolant channel was modeled through the introduction of a source point at the upper plenum and a sink point at the lower plenum. For each coupled sink/source points (SSP) the mass, momentum and energy balance were solved considering the local pressure difference and the temperature between the corresponding points where sinks and sources were placed. Based on this strategy, three models with increasingly level of approximation were implemented. For the first model the 451 coolant channels were reduced to only 57 pairs of SSP to represent all the coolant channels, concentrating the effect of several coolant channels in a unique pair of sink and source while taking into account geometric design details. For the second model, 225 pairs of SSP were introduced. Finally, for the third model each one of the 451 coolant channels were modeled by means of one pair of SSP. Depending on the coolant channel location, the radial power distribution and the pressure loss caused by the corresponding flow restrictor present by design were considered. Simulations carried out give insight in the complexity of the flow. As expected, the greater the details of the model the better the accuracy reached in the representation of the RPV behavior. In addition, the flow distributor located at the lower plenum showed to be very efficient since, the mass flow at each channel was found to be fairly

  3. Maury Journals - German Vessels

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — German vessels observations, after the 1853 Brussels Conference that set International Maritime Standards, modeled after Maury Marine Standard Observations.

  4. Comparison of a networks-of-zones fluid mixing model for a baffled stirred vessel with three-dimensional electrical resistance tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodgers, T L; Siperstein, F R; Mann, R; York, T A; Kowalski, A

    2011-01-01

    Reliable models for the simulation of mixing vessels are important for the understanding of real-life mixing problems. To achieve these models, information about the mixing in the system must be measured to compare with the predicted values. Electrical resistance tomography has the capability to measure spatial and temporal changes within a vessel in three dimensions even in optically inaccessible environments. This paper discusses the creation of a network-of-zones model for the prediction of mixing within a vessel with a Cowles disc-type agitator. Solving of the network-of-zones simplified transport equations for the vessel predicts the concentration distribution of an inert tracer added to the vessel. The change in this distribution with time is calculated and compared with visual inspection of the vessel. The concentration distribution inside the vessel is also measured using electrical resistance tomography and shows good agreement with the predicted values

  5. Stress corrosion cracking studies on ferritic low alloy pressure vessel steel - water chemistry and modelling aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tipping, P.; Ineichen, U.; Cripps, R.

    1994-01-01

    The susceptibility of low alloy ferritic pressure vessel steels (A533-B type) to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) degradation has been examined using various BWR type coolant chemistries. Fatigue pre-cracked wedge-loaded double cantilever beams and also constantly loaded 25 mm thick compact tension specimens have shown classical SCC attack. The influence of parameters such as dissolved oxygen content, water impurity level and conductivity, material chemical composition (sulphur content) and stress intensity level are discussed. The relevance of SCC as a life-limiting degradation mechanism for low alloy ferritic nuclear power plant PV steel is examined. Some parameters, thought to be relevant for modelling SCC processes in low alloy steels in simulated BWR-type coolant, are discussed. 8 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs

  6. The Vessel Schedule Recovery Problem (VSRP) – A MIP model for handling disruptions in liner shipping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brouer, Berit Dangaard; Dirksen, Jakob; Pisinger, David

    2013-01-01

    or even omitting one. We present the Vessel Schedule Recovery Problem (VSRP) to evaluate a given disruption scenario and to select a recovery action balancing the trade off between increased bunker consumption and the impact on cargo in the remaining network and the customer service level. It is proven...... due to adverse weather conditions, port contingencies, and many other issues. A common scenario for recovering a schedule is to either increase the speed at the cost of a significant increase in the fuel consumption or delaying cargo. Advanced recovery options might exist by swapping two port calls...... that the VSRP is NP-hard. The model is applied to four real life cases from Maersk Line and results are achieved in less than 5seconds with solutions comparable or superior to those chosen by operations managers in real life. Cost savings of up to 58% may be achieved by the suggested solutions compared...

  7. Assessment of models predicting irradiation effects on tensile properties of reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pineau, L.; Landron, C.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, an analysis of tensile data acquired as part of the French Reactor Vessel Surveillance Program (RVSP) is produced. This program contains amongst other mechanical tests, tensile tests at 20 and 300 C degrees on non irradiated base metals and at 300 C degrees only on irradiated materials. It shows that irradiation leads to an increase in the yield strength and a decrease in the strain hardening. The exploitation of tensile results has permitted to express a relationship between yield strength increase measured and fluence value, as well as between strain hardening decrease and yield strength evolution. The use of these relations in the aim at predicting evolution of tensile properties with irradiation has then permitted to propose a methodology to model entire stress-strain curves of irradiated base metal only based on the non irradiated stress-strain curve. These predictions were successfully compared with an experimental standard case. (authors)

  8. Prefabrication of a vascularized nerve graft by vessel implantation: preliminary report of an experimental model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavadas, P C; Vera-Sempere, F J

    1994-01-01

    Regeneration through vascularized nerve grafts (VNG) seems to be better than nonvascularized nerve grafts (NVNG), especially in hostile beds. We report on an experimental technique of prefabrication of VNG by direct vessel implantation. An arteriovenous fistula was created in the groin region with autologous vein grafts in the Wistar rat model, and implanted into the sciatic nerve. Five weeks later the sciatic VNG was elevated on the prefabricated pedicle. The flap was free-transferred orthotopically over a silicone sheet to impede plasmatic imbibition. Flap viability at 3 days was complete. India ink injection of the AV fistula resulted in capillary ink filling within the nerve and surrounding tissues. Histologic sections of the flap were examined, revealing its neovascularity. In an ongoing study, the regeneration through this prefabricated VNG is being compared to native VNG.

  9. A Model of Self-Organizing Head-Centered Visual Responses in Primate Parietal Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mender, Bedeho M. W.; Stringer, Simon M.

    2013-01-01

    We present a hypothesis for how head-centered visual representations in primate parietal areas could self-organize through visually-guided learning, and test this hypothesis using a neural network model. The model consists of a competitive output layer of neurons that receives afferent synaptic connections from a population of input neurons with eye position gain modulated retinal receptive fields. The synaptic connections in the model are trained with an associative trace learning rule which has the effect of encouraging output neurons to learn to respond to subsets of input patterns that tend to occur close together in time. This network architecture and synaptic learning rule is hypothesized to promote the development of head-centered output neurons during periods of time when the head remains fixed while the eyes move. This hypothesis is demonstrated to be feasible, and each of the core model components described is tested and found to be individually necessary for successful self-organization. PMID:24349064

  10. Segmentation of vessels cluttered with cells using a physics based model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmugge, Stephen J; Keller, Steve; Nguyen, Nhat; Souvenir, Richard; Huynh, Toan; Clemens, Mark; Shin, Min C

    2008-01-01

    Segmentation of vessels in biomedical images is important as it can provide insight into analysis of vascular morphology, topology and is required for kinetic analysis of flow velocity and vessel permeability. Intravital microscopy is a powerful tool as it enables in vivo imaging of both vasculature and circulating cells. However, the analysis of vasculature in those images is difficult due to the presence of cells and their image gradient. In this paper, we provide a novel method of segmenting vessels with a high level of cell related clutter. A set of virtual point pairs ("vessel probes") are moved reacting to forces including Vessel Vector Flow (VVF) and Vessel Boundary Vector Flow (VBVF) forces. Incorporating the cell detection, the VVF force attracts the probes toward the vessel, while the VBVF force attracts the virtual points of the probes to localize the vessel boundary without being distracted by the image features of the cells. The vessel probes are moved according to Newtonian Physics reacting to the net of forces applied on them. We demonstrate the results on a set of five real in vivo images of liver vasculature cluttered by white blood cells. When compared against the ground truth prepared by the technician, the Root Mean Squared Error (RMSE) of segmentation with VVF and VBVF was 55% lower than the method without VVF and VBVF.

  11. Computational models for electromagnetic transients in ITER vacuum vessel, cryostat and thermal shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alekseev, A.; Arslanova, D.; Belov, A.; Belyakov, V.; Gapionok, E.; Gornikel, I.; Gribov, Y.; Ioki, K.; Kukhtin, V.; Lamzin, E.; Sugihara, M.; Sychevsky, S.; Terasawa, A.; Utin, Y.

    2013-01-01

    A set of detailed computational models are reviewed that covers integrally the system “vacuum vessel (VV), cryostat, and thermal shields (TS)” to study transient electromagnetics (EMs) in the ITER machine. The models have been developed in the course of activities requested and supervised by the ITER Organization. EM analysis is enabled for all ITER operational scenarios. The input data are derived from results of DINA code simulations. The external EM fields are modeled accurate to the input data description. The known magnetic shell approach can be effectively applied to simulate thin-walled structures of the ITER machine. Using an integral–differential formulation, a single unknown is determined within the shells in terms of the vector electric potential taken only at the nodes of a finite-element (FE) mesh of the conducting structures. As a result, the FE mesh encompasses only the system “VV + Cryostat + TS”. The 3D model requires much higher computational resources as compared to a shell model based on the equivalent approximation. The shell models have been developed for all principal conducting structures in the system “VV + Cryostat + TS” including regular ports and neutral beam ports. The structures are described in details in accordance with the latest design. The models have also been applied for simulations of EM transients in components of diagnostic systems and cryopumps and estimation of the 3D effects of the ITER structures on the plasma performance. The developed models have been elaborated and applied for the last 15 years to support the ITER design activities. The finalization of the ITER VV design enables this set of models to be considered ready to use in plasma-physics computations and the development of ITER simulators

  12. Physical scale modeling of single free head piles under lateral loading in cohesive soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar Leonardo Salamanca-Medina

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of the small scale modeling of free head wood piles under horizontal loading in cohesive soils, tested in order to compare the results with analytical models proposed by various authors. Characteristic Load (CLM and P-Y Curves methods were used for the prediction of lateral deflections at the head of the piles and the method proposed by Broms for estimating the ultimate lateral load. These predictions were compared with the results of the physical modeling, obtaining a good approximation between them.

  13. Development of Head Injury Assessment Reference Values Based on NASA Injury Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somers, Jeffrey T.; Melvin, John W.; Tabiei, Ala; Lawrence, Charles; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Granderson, Bradley; Feiveson, Alan; Gernhardt, Michael; Patalak, John

    2011-01-01

    NASA is developing a new capsule-based, crewed vehicle that will land in the ocean, and the space agency desires to reduce the risk of injury from impact during these landings. Because landing impact occurs for each flight and the crew might need to perform egress tasks, current injury assessment reference values (IARV) were deemed insufficient. Because NASCAR occupant restraint systems are more effective than the systems used to determine the current IARVs and are similar to NASA s proposed restraint system, an analysis of NASCAR impacts was performed to develop new IARVs that may be more relevant to NASA s context of vehicle landing operations. Head IARVs associated with race car impacts were investigated by completing a detailed analysis of all of the 2002-2008 NASCAR impact data. Specific inclusion and exclusion criteria were used to select 4071 impacts from the 4015 recorder files provided (each file could contain multiple impact events). Of the 4071 accepted impacts, 274 were selected for numerical simulation using a custom NASCAR restraint system and Humanetics Hybrid-III 50th percentile numerical dummy model in LS-DYNA. Injury had occurred in 32 of the 274 selected impacts, and 27 of those injuries involved the head. A majority of the head injuries were mild concussions with or without brief loss of consciousness. The 242 non-injury impacts were randomly selected and representative of the range of crash dynamics present in the total set of 4071 impacts. Head dynamics data (head translational acceleration, translational change in velocity, rotational acceleration, rotational velocity, HIC-15, HIC-36, and the Head 3ms clip) were filtered according to SAE J211 specifications and then transformed to a log scale. The probability of head injury was estimated using a separate logistic regression analysis for each log-transformed predictor candidate. Using the log transformation constrains the estimated probability of injury to become negligible as IARVs approach

  14. ROSA-V/LSTF vessel top head LOCA tests SB-PV-07 and SB-PV-08 with break sizes of 1.0 and 0.1% and operator recovery actions for core cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Mitsuhiro; Takeda, Takeshi; Nakamura, Hideo

    2010-02-01

    A series of break size parameter tests (SB-PV-07 and SB-PV-08) were conducted at the Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF) of ROSA-V Program by simulating a vessel top small break loss-of-coolant accident (SBLOCA) at a pressurized water reactor (PWR). Typical phenomena to the vessel top break LOCA and effectiveness of operator recovery actions on core cooling were studied under an assumption of total failure of high pressure injection (HPI) system. The LSTF simulates a 4-loop 3423 MWt PWR by a full-height, full-pressure and 1/48 volume scaling two-loop system. Typical phenomena of vessel top break LOCA are clarified for the cases with break sizes of 1.0 and 0.1% cold leg break equivalent. The results from a 0.5% top break LOCA test (SB-PV-02) in the early ROSA-IV Program was referred during discussion. Operator actions of HPI recovery in the 1.0% top break test and steam generator (SG) depressurization in the 0.1% top break test were initiated when temperature at core exit thermocouple (CET) reached 623 K during core boil-off. Both operator actions resulted in immediate recovery of core cooling. Based on the obtained data, several thermal-hydraulic phenomena were discussed further such as relations between vessel top head water level and steam discharge at the break, and between coolant mass inventory transient and core heat-up and quench behavior, and CET performances to detect core heat-up under influences of three-dimensional (3D) steam flows in the core and core exit. (author)

  15. Simplified hydrodynamic model of hydrogen-flame propagation in reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baer, M.R.; Ratzel, A.C.

    1983-01-01

    The model is consistent with the theory of slow combustion in which the gasdynamic field equations are treated in the limit of small Mach numbers. To the lowest order, pressure is spatially uniform. The flame is treated as a density and entropy discontinuity which propagates at prescribed burning velocities, corresponding to laminar or turbulent flames. Radiation cooling of the burned combustion gases and possible preheating of the unburned gases during propagation of the flame is included using a molecular gas-band thermal radiation model. Application of this model has been developed for 1-D variable-area flame propagation. Multidimensional effects induced by hydrodynamics and buoyancy are corrected for. This model of flame propagation reduces to differential equations which describes the temporal variations of vessel pressure, burned volume and gas entropy. The thermodynamic state of the burned gas immediately following the flame is determined using an isobaric Hugoniot relation. At other locations the burned-gas thermodynamic states are determined using a Lagrangian particle tracking method. Results of a computer code using the method are presented. 11 figures

  16. The impact of mobile point defect clusters in a kinetic model of pressure vessel embrittlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoller, R.E.

    1998-05-01

    The results of recent molecular dynamics simulations of displacement cascades in iron indicate that small interstitial clusters may have a very low activation energy for migration, and that their migration is 1-dimensional, rather than 3-dimensional. The mobility of these clusters can have a significant impact on the predictions of radiation damage models, particularly at the relatively low temperatures typical of commercial, light water reactor pressure vessels (RPV) and other out-of-core components. A previously-developed kinetic model used to investigate RPV embrittlement has been modified to permit an evaluation of the mobile interstitial clusters. Sink strengths appropriate to both 1- and 3-dimensional motion of the clusters were evaluated. High cluster mobility leads to a reduction in the amount of predicted embrittlement due to interstitial clusters since they are lost to sinks rather than building up in the microstructure. The sensitivity of the predictions to displacement rate also increases. The magnitude of this effect is somewhat reduced if the migration is 1-dimensional since the corresponding sink strengths are lower than those for 3-dimensional diffusion. The cluster mobility can also affect the evolution of copper-rich precipitates in the model since the radiation-enhanced diffusion coefficient increases due to the lower interstitial cluster sink strength. The overall impact of the modifications to the model is discussed in terms of the major irradiation variables and material parameter uncertainties

  17. Beam testing of the lab model 2700 head magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutcheon, R.M.; Gillies, B.A.

    1981-07-01

    A modern cancer therapy electron accelerator unit must satisfy many design constraints, one of which is the isocentric height above floor level. Usually 130 cm is considered the maximum height at which a nurse can work with a patient. The advent of higher energy machines has increasingly made this more difficult to achieve, as higher magnetic fields are required in the magnet that directs the beam onto the patient. A new 270 0 doubly achromatic magnet configuration has been developed which minimizes the isocentre height for a given maximum energy and maximum magnetic field. The system is an asymmetric two magnet configuration, with zero field index, equal fields and a bend of greater than 180 0 in the first magnet. It is compact, easy to manufacture and relatively insensitive to assembly tolerances. Energy defining slits are easily incorporated in the design and can readily be radiation shielded. Input and output beam matching and steering is easily accomplished with a compact input quadrupole doublet and small steering windings. The design and bench testing of such a head magnet for a 25 MeV electron accelerator is described in report AECL-7057. The present report details the testing of the magnet at both 10 and 21 MeV using the variable energy electron beam from the Therac 25 cancer therapy accelerator

  18. Proceedings of the Workshop on in-vessel core debris retention and coolability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    This conference on in-vessel core debris retention and coolability is composed of 37 papers grouped in three sessions: session 1 (Keynote papers: Key phenomena of late phase core melt progression, accident management strategies and status quo of severe fuel damage codes, In-vessel retention as a severe accident management scheme, GAREC analyses in support of in-vessel retention concept, Latest findings of RASPLAV project); session 2 - Experiments and model development with five sub-sessions: sub-session 1 (Debris bed heat transfer: Debris and Pool Formation/Heat Transfer in FARO-LWR: Experiments and Analyses, Evaporation and Flow of Coolant at the Bottom of a Particle-Bed modelling Relocated Debris, Investigations on the Coolability of Debris in the Lower Head with WABE-2D and MESOCO-2D, Uncertainty and Sensitivity Analysis of the Heat Transfer Mechanisms in the Lower Head, Simulation of the Arrival and Evolution of Debris in a PWR Lower Head with the SFD ICARE2 code), sub-session 2 (Corium properties, molten pool natural convection, and crust formation: Physico-chemistry and corium properties for in-vessel retention, Experimental data on heat flux distribution from volumetrically heated pool with frozen boundaries, Thermal hydraulic phenomena in corium pools - numerical simulation with TOLBIAC and experimental validation with BALI, TOLBIAC code simulations of some molten salt RASPLAV experiments, SIMECO experiments on in-vessel melt pool formation and heat transfer with and without a metallic layer, Numerical investigation of turbulent natural convection heat transfer in an internally-heated melt pool and metallic layer, Current status and validation of CON2D and 3D code, Free convection of heat-generating fluid in a constrained during experimental simulation of heat transfer in slice geometry), sub-session 3 (Gap formation and gap cooling: Quench of molten aluminum oxide associated with in-vessel debris retention by RPV internal water, Experimental investigations

  19. Anti-lymphangiogenic properties of mTOR inhibitors in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma experimental models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekshyyan, Oleksandr; Moore-Medlin, Tara N; Raley, Matthew C; Sonavane, Kunal; Rong, Xiaohua; Brodt, Michael A; Abreo, Fleurette; Alexander, Jonathan Steven; Nathan, Cherie-Ann O

    2013-01-01

    Tumor dissemination to cervical lymph nodes via lymphatics represents the first step in the metastasis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and is the most significant predictor of tumor recurrence decreasing survival by 50%. The lymphatic suppressing properties of mTOR inhibitors are not yet well understood. Lymphatic inhibiting effects of rapamycin were evaluated in vitro using two lymphatic endothelial cell (LEC) lines. An orthotopic mouse model of HNSCC (OSC-19 cells) was used to evaluate anti-lymphangiogenic effects of rapamycin in vivo. The incidence of cervical lymph node metastases, numbers of tumor-free lymphatic vessels and those invaded by tumor cells in mouse lingual tissue, and expression of pro-lymphangiogenic markers were assessed. Rapamycin significantly decreased lymphatic vascular density (p = 0.027), reduced the fraction of lymphatic vessels invaded by tumor cells in tongue tissue (p = 0.013) and decreased metastasis-positive lymph nodes (p = 0.04). Rapamycin also significantly attenuated the extent of metastatic tumor cell spread within lymph nodes (p < 0.0001). We found that rapamycin significantly reduced LEC proliferation and was correlated with decreased VEGFR-3 expression in both LEC, and in some HNSCC cell lines. The results of this study demonstrate anti-lymphangiogenic properties of mTOR inhibitors in HNSCC. mTOR inhibitors suppress autocrine and paracrine growth stimulation of tumor and lymphatic endothelial cells by impairing VEGF-C/VEGFR-3 axis and release of soluble VEGFR-2. In a murine HNSCC orthotopic model rapamycin significantly suppressed lymphovascular invasion, decreased cervical lymph node metastasis and delayed the spread of metastatic tumor cells within the lymph nodes

  20. Head-to-head comparison of adaptive statistical and model-based iterative reconstruction algorithms for submillisievert coronary CT angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benz, Dominik C; Fuchs, Tobias A; Gräni, Christoph; Studer Bruengger, Annina A; Clerc, Olivier F; Mikulicic, Fran; Messerli, Michael; Stehli, Julia; Possner, Mathias; Pazhenkottil, Aju P; Gaemperli, Oliver; Kaufmann, Philipp A; Buechel, Ronny R

    2018-02-01

    Iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithms allow for a significant reduction in radiation dose of coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA). We performed a head-to-head comparison of adaptive statistical IR (ASiR) and model-based IR (MBIR) algorithms to assess their impact on quantitative image parameters and diagnostic accuracy for submillisievert CCTA. CCTA datasets of 91 patients were reconstructed using filtered back projection (FBP), increasing contributions of ASiR (20, 40, 60, 80, and 100%), and MBIR. Signal and noise were measured in the aortic root to calculate signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). In a subgroup of 36 patients, diagnostic accuracy of ASiR 40%, ASiR 100%, and MBIR for diagnosis of coronary artery disease (CAD) was compared with invasive coronary angiography. Median radiation dose was 0.21 mSv for CCTA. While increasing levels of ASiR gradually reduced image noise compared with FBP (up to - 48%, P ASiR (-59% compared with ASiR 100%; P ASiR 40% and ASiR 100% resulted in substantially lower diagnostic accuracy to detect CAD as diagnosed by invasive coronary angiography compared with MBIR: sensitivity and specificity were 100 and 37%, 100 and 57%, and 100 and 74% for ASiR 40%, ASiR 100%, and MBIR, respectively. MBIR offers substantial noise reduction with increased SNR, paving the way for implementation of submillisievert CCTA protocols in clinical routine. In contrast, inferior noise reduction by ASiR negatively affects diagnostic accuracy of submillisievert CCTA for CAD detection. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2017. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Novel Profiling Model and Side Effects of Helical Scan Silicon Heads

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hozoi, A.; Groenland, J.P.J.; Albertini, J.B.; Lodder, J.C.

    2002-01-01

    Partial erasure of track edges was directly measured from triple-track patterns using a novel model to interpret the output profiles. The model is based on representing the read head as the sum of a reference width, wavelength independent, and two side reading effective widths that are wavelength

  2. Does Head Start differentially benefit children with risks targeted by the program’s service model?☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Elizabeth B.; Farkas, George; Duncan, Greg J.

    2015-01-01

    Data from the Head Start Impact Study (N = 3540) were used to test for differential benefits of Head Start after one program year and after kindergarten on pre-academic and behavior outcomes for children at risk in the domains targeted by the program’s comprehensive services. Although random assignment to Head Start produced positive treatment main effects on children’s pre-academic skills and behavior problems, residualized growth models showed that random assignment to Head Start did not differentially benefit the pre-academic skills of children with risk factors targeted by the Head Start service model. The models showed detrimental impacts of Head Start for maternal-reported behavior problems of high-risk children, but slightly more positive impacts for teacher-reported behavior. Policy implications for Head Start are discussed. PMID:26379369

  3. Nonlinear analysis of pre-stressed concrete containment vessel (PCCV) using the damage plasticity model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shokoohfar, Ahmad; Rahai, Alireza, E-mail: rahai@aut.ac.ir

    2016-03-15

    Highlights: • This paper describes nonlinear analyses of a 1:4 scale model of a (PCCV). • Coupled temp-disp. analysis and concrete damage plasticity are considered. • Temperature has limited effects on correct failure mode estimation. • Higher pre-stressing forces have limited effects on ultimate radial displacements. • Anchorage details of liner plates leads to prediction of correct failure mode. - Abstract: This paper describes the nonlinear analyses of a 1:4 scale model of a pre-stressed concrete containment vessel (PCCV). The analyses are performed under pressure and high temperature effects with considering anchorage details of liner plate. The temperature-time history of the model test is considered as an input boundary condition in the coupled temp-displacement analysis. The constitutive model developed by Chang and Mander (1994) is adopted in the model as the basis for the concrete stress–strain relation. To trace the crack pattern of the PCCV concrete faces, the concrete damage plasticity model is applied. This study includes the results of the thermal and mechanical behaviors of the PCCV subject to temperature loading and internal pressure at the same time. The test results are compared with the analysis results. The analysis results show that the temperature has little impact on the ultimate pressure capacity of the PCCV. To simulate the exact failure mode of the PCCV, the anchorage details of the liner plates around openings should be maintained in the analytical models. Also the failure mode of the PCCV structure hasn’t influenced by hoop tendons pre-stressing force variations.

  4. A three-temperature model of selective photothermolysis for laser treatment of port wine stain containing large malformed blood vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, D.; Wang, G.X.; He, Y.L.; Wu, W.J.; Chen, B.

    2014-01-01

    As congenital vascular malformations, port wine stain (PWS) is composed of ectatic venular capillary blood vessels buried within healthy dermis. In clinic, pulsed dye laser (PDL) in visible band (e.g. 585 nm) together with cryogen spray cooling (CSC) have become the golden standard for treatment of PWS. However, due to the limited energy deposition of the PDL in blood, large blood vessels are likely to survive from the laser irradiation. As a result, complete clearance of the lesions is rarely achieved. Assuming the local thermal non-equilibrium in skin tissue during the laser surgery, a three-temperature model is proposed to treat the PWS tissue as a porous media composed of a non-absorbing dermal matrix buried with the blood as well as the large malformed blood vessels. Three energy equations are constructed and solved coupling for the temperature of the blood in average-sized PWS vessels, non-absorbing dermal tissues and large malformed blood vessels, respectively. Subsequently, the thermal responses of human skin to visible (585 nm) and near-infrared (1064 nm) laser irradiations with various pulse durations in conjunction with cryogen spray cooling are investigated by the new model, and Arrhenius integral is used to analyze the thermal damage. The simulations show that the short pulse duration of 1.5 ms results in a higher selective heating of blood over epidermis, which will lead to a desired clinic outcome than the longer pulse duration. Due to a much deeper light penetration depth, laser irradiation with 1064 nm in wavelength is superior to that with 585 nm in treating patients with cutaneous hyper-vascular malformation. Complete coagulations are predicted in large-sized and deeply extending blood vessels by 1064 nm laser. - Highlights: •A three-temperature model is proposed for the laser treatment of port wine stain (PWS). •Average sized and large malformed blood vessels in porous medium (tissue) are considered. •Thermal responses of PWS to

  5. OceanRoute: Vessel Mobility Data Processing and Analyzing Model Based on MapReduce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chao; Liu, Yingjian; Guo, Zhongwen; Jing, Wei

    2018-06-01

    The network coverage is a big problem in ocean communication, and there is no low-cost solution in the short term. Based on the knowledge of Mobile Delay Tolerant Network (MDTN), the mobility of vessels can create the chances of end-to-end communication. The mobility pattern of vessel is one of the key metrics on ocean MDTN network. Because of the high cost, few experiments have focused on research of vessel mobility pattern for the moment. In this paper, we study the traces of more than 4000 fishing and freight vessels. Firstly, to solve the data noise and sparsity problem, we design two algorithms to filter the noise and complement the missing data based on the vessel's turning feature. Secondly, after studying the traces of vessels, we observe that the vessel's traces are confined by invisible boundary. Thirdly, through defining the distance between traces, we design MR-Similarity algorithm to find the mobility pattern of vessels. Finally, we realize our algorithm on cluster and evaluate the performance and accuracy. Our results can provide the guidelines on design of data routing protocols on ocean MDTN.

  6. A Stefan model for mass transfer in a rotating disk reaction vessel

    KAUST Repository

    BOHUN, C. S.

    2015-05-04

    Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2015. In this paper, we focus on the process of mass transfer in the rotating disk apparatus formulated as a Stefan problem with consideration given to both the hydrodynamics of the process and the specific chemical reactions occurring in the bulk. The wide range in the reaction rates of the underlying chemistry allows for a natural decoupling of the problem into a simplified set of weakly coupled convective-reaction-diffusion equations for the slowly reacting chemical species and a set of algebraic relations for the species that react rapidly. An analysis of the chemical equilibrium conditions identifies an expansion parameter and a reduced model that remains valid for arbitrarily large times. Numerical solutions of the model are compared to an asymptotic analysis revealing three distinct time scales and chemical diffusion boundary layer that lies completely inside the hydrodynamic layer. Formulated as a Stefan problem, the model generalizes the work of Levich (Levich and Spalding (1962) Physicochemical hydrodynamics, vol. 689, Prentice-Hall Englewood Cliffs, NJ) and will help better understand the natural limitations of the rotating disk reaction vessel when consideration is made for the reacting chemical species.

  7. Application of micromechanical models of ductile fracture initiation to reactor pressure vessel materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaouadi, R.; Walle, E. van; Fabry, A.; Velde, J. van de; Meester, P. de

    1996-01-01

    The aim of the current study is the application of local micromechanical models to predict crack initiation in ductile materials. Two reactor pressure vessel materials have been selected for this study: JRQ IAEA monitor base metal (A533B Cl.1) and Doel-IV weld material. Charpy impact tests have been performed in both un-irradiated and irradiated conditions. In addition to standard tensile tests, notched tensile specimens have been tested. The upper shelf energy of the weld material remains almost un-affected by irradiation, whereas a decrease of 20% is detected for the base metal. Accordingly, the tensile properties of the weld material do not reveal a clear irradiation effect on the yield and ultimate stresses, this in contrast to the base material flow properties. The tensile tests have been analyzed in terms of micromechanical models. A good correlation is found between the standard tests and the micromechanical models, that are able to predict the ductile damage evolution in these materials. Additional information on the ductility behavior of these materials is revealed by this micromechanical analysis

  8. Development of New, Low-Head Hydropower Turbine - Modeling & Laboratory Test DE-EE0005426

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krouse, Wayne [Hydro Green Energy, Westmont, IL (United States)

    2014-12-05

    Hydro Green Energy, LLC (HGE) will complete the design, fabrication and laboratory testing of a scaled, vertically stackable, low-head hydropower turbine called the Modular Bulb Turbine (MBT). HGE will also complete a summary report that includes the laboratory testing results and analysis of the tests. Project Goals: Design, model and test modular bulb turbine for installation in numerous HGE low-head hydropower projects at non-powered USACE dams. Project Results: The sub-scale prototype was tested successfully at a leading US hydraulic laboratory. Laboratory data results agreed well with predicted results from numerical modeling.

  9. Evaluation for In-Vessel Retention Capabilities with In-Vessel Injection and External Reactor Vessel Cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Seong; Ryu, In Chul; Moon, Young Tae [KEPCO Engineering and Construction Co. Ltd., Deajeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    If the accident has not progressed to the point of substantial changes in the core geometry, establishing adequate cooling is as straightforward as re-establishing flow through the reactor core. However, if the accident has progressed to the point where the core geometry is substantially altered as a result of material melting and relocation, as was the case in the TMI-2 accident, the means of cooling the debris are not as straightforward. From this time on, the reactor core was either completely or nearly covered by water, with high pressure injection flow initiated shortly after three hours into the accident. However, the core debris was not coolable in this configuration and a substantial quantity of molten core material drained into the bypass region, with approximately twenty metric tons of molten debris draining into the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) lower head. Hence, the core configuration developed at approximately three hours into the accident was not coolable, even submerged in water. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate in-vessel retention capabilities with in-vessel injection (IVI) and external reactor vessel cooling (ERVC) available in a reactor application by using the integrated severe accident analysis code. The MAAP5 models were improved to facilitate evaluation of the in-vessel retention capability of APR1400. In-vessel retention capabilities have been analyzed for the APR1400 using the MAAP5.03 code. The results show that in-vessel retention is feasible when in-vessel injection is initiated within a relatively short time frame under the simulation condition used in the present study.

  10. Evaluation for In-Vessel Retention Capabilities with In-Vessel Injection and External Reactor Vessel Cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong Seong; Ryu, In Chul; Moon, Young Tae

    2016-01-01

    If the accident has not progressed to the point of substantial changes in the core geometry, establishing adequate cooling is as straightforward as re-establishing flow through the reactor core. However, if the accident has progressed to the point where the core geometry is substantially altered as a result of material melting and relocation, as was the case in the TMI-2 accident, the means of cooling the debris are not as straightforward. From this time on, the reactor core was either completely or nearly covered by water, with high pressure injection flow initiated shortly after three hours into the accident. However, the core debris was not coolable in this configuration and a substantial quantity of molten core material drained into the bypass region, with approximately twenty metric tons of molten debris draining into the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) lower head. Hence, the core configuration developed at approximately three hours into the accident was not coolable, even submerged in water. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate in-vessel retention capabilities with in-vessel injection (IVI) and external reactor vessel cooling (ERVC) available in a reactor application by using the integrated severe accident analysis code. The MAAP5 models were improved to facilitate evaluation of the in-vessel retention capability of APR1400. In-vessel retention capabilities have been analyzed for the APR1400 using the MAAP5.03 code. The results show that in-vessel retention is feasible when in-vessel injection is initiated within a relatively short time frame under the simulation condition used in the present study

  11. Analysis of two colliding fractionally damped spherical shells in modelling blunt human head impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossikhin, Yury A.; Shitikova, Marina V.

    2013-06-01

    The collision of two elastic or viscoelastic spherical shells is investigated as a model for the dynamic response of a human head impacted by another head or by some spherical object. Determination of the impact force that is actually being transmitted to bone will require the model for the shock interaction of the impactor and human head. This model is indended to be used in simulating crash scenarios in frontal impacts, and provide an effective tool to estimate the severity of effect on the human head and to estimate brain injury risks. The model developed here suggests that after the moment of impact quasi-longitudinal and quasi-transverse shock waves are generated, which then propagate along the spherical shells. The solution behind the wave fronts is constructed with the help of the theory of discontinuities. It is assumed that the viscoelastic features of the shells are exhibited only in the contact domain, while the remaining parts retain their elastic properties. In this case, the contact spot is assumed to be a plane disk with constant radius, and the viscoelastic features of the shells are described by the fractional derivative standard linear solid model. In the case under consideration, the governing differential equations are solved analytically by the Laplace transform technique. It is shown that the fractional parameter of the fractional derivative model plays very important role, since its variation allows one to take into account the age-related changes in the mechanical properties of bone.

  12. Research vessels

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, P.S.

    The role of the research vessels as a tool for marine research and exploration is very important. Technical requirements of a suitable vessel and the laboratories needed on board are discussed. The history and the research work carried out...

  13. Modeling the color perception of port wine stains and its relation to the depth of laser coagulated blood vessels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lakmaker, O.; Pickering, J. W.; van Gemert, M. J.

    1993-01-01

    To find the maximal depth of an ecstatic vessel in the dermis that contributes to the abnormal color of a port wine stain (PWS), "normal" and "laser treated PWS skin" are modeled, respectively, as a two-layer plane parallel geometry consisting of an epidermis and a dermis, and as a three-layer

  14. Tests of the geometrical description of blood vessels in a thermal model using counter-current geometries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, G. M.; Kotte, A. N.; Crezee, J.; Lagendijk, J. J.

    1997-01-01

    We have developed a thermal model, for use in hyperthermia treatment planning, in which blood vessels are described as geometrical objects; 3D curves with associated diameters. For the calculation of the heat exchange with the tissue an analytic result is used. To arrive at this result some

  15. Low Reynolds number steady state flow through a branching network of rigid vessels: II. A finite element mixture model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huyghe, J.M.R.J.; Oomens, C.W.J.; Campen, van D.H.; Heethaar, R.M.

    1989-01-01

    This research aims at formulating and verifying a finite element mixture formulation for blood perfusion. The equations derived in a companion paper [3] are discretized according to the Galerkin method. A flow experiment in a rigid model of a vascular tree of about 500 vessels is performed in order

  16. Models for embrittlement recovery due to annealing of reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eason, E.D.; Wright, J.E.; Nelson, E.E.; Odette, G.R.; Mader, E.V.

    1995-05-01

    The reactor pressure vessel (RPV) surrounding the core of a commercial nuclear power plant is subject to embrittlement due to exposure to high energy neutrons. The effects of irradiation embrittlement can be reduced by thermal annealing at temperatures higher than the normal operating conditions. However, a means of quantitatively assessing the effectiveness of annealing for embrittlement recovery is needed. The objective of this work was to analyze the pertinent data on this issue and develop quantitative models for estimating the recovery in 30 ft-lb (41 J) Charpy transition temperature and Charpy upper shelf energy due to annealing. Data were gathered from the Test Reactor Embrittlement Data Base and from various annealing reports. An analysis data base was developed, reviewed for completeness and accuracy, and documented as part of this work. Independent variables considered in the analysis included material chemistries, annealing time and temperature, irradiation time and temperature, fluence, and flux. To identify important variables and functional forms for predicting embrittlement recovery, advanced statistical techniques, including pattern recognition and transformation analysis, were applied together with current understanding of the mechanisms governing embrittlement and recovery. Models were calibrated using multivariable surface-fitting techniques. Several iterations of model calibration, evaluation with respect to mechanistic and statistical considerations, and comparison with the trends in hardness data produced correlation models for estimating Charpy upper shelf energy and transition temperature after irradiation and annealing. This work provides a clear demonstration that (1) microhardness recovery is generally a very good surrogate for shift recovery, and (2) there is a high level of consistency between the observed annealing trends and fundamental models of embrittlement and recovery processes

  17. Effects of exercise training on pulmonary vessel muscularization and right ventricular function in an animal model of COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassel, Erlend; Berre, Anne Marie; Skjulsvik, Anne Jarstein; Steinshamn, Sigurd

    2014-09-28

    Right ventricular dysfunction in COPD is common, even in the absence of pulmonary hypertension. The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of high intensity interval training (HIIT) on right ventricular (RV) function, as well as pulmonary blood vessel remodeling in a mouse model of COPD. 42 female A/JOlaHsd mice were randomized to exposure to either cigarette smoke or air for 6 hours/day, 5 days/week for 14 weeks. Mice from both groups were further randomized to sedentariness or HIIT for 4 weeks. Cardiac function was evaluated by echocardiography and muscularization of pulmonary vessel walls by immunohistochemistry. Smoke exposure induced RV systolic dysfunction demonstrated by reduced tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion. HIIT in smoke-exposed mice reversed RV dysfunction. There were no significant effects on the left ventricle of neither smoke exposure nor HIIT. Muscularization of the pulmonary vessels was reduced after exercise intervention, but no significant effects on muscularization were observed from smoke exposure. RV function was reduced in mice exposed to cigarette smoke. No Increase in pulmonary vessel muscularization was observed in these mice, implying that other mechanisms caused the RV dysfunction. HIIT attenuated the RV dysfunction in the smoke exposed mice. Reduced muscularization of the pulmonary vessels due to HIIT suggests that exercise training not only affects the heart muscle, but also has important effects on the pulmonary vasculature.

  18. Short time effects of radiotherapy on lymphatic vessels and restorative lymphatic pathways: experimental approaches ina mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastouret, F; Lievens, P; Leduc, O; Bourgeois, P; Tournel, K; Lamote, J; Zirak, C; Leduc, A

    2014-06-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) is an important component in the therapeutic approach to oncologic conditions. This study presents the investigative results on the impact of RT on lymphatic vessels and on the regenerative response of the lymphatic system in a mouse model. We first irradiated 3 groups of ten mice using brachytherapy in a single treatment of 20 Gy. We then performed morphological examination of the irradiated lymphatic vessels using an in vivo microscopic transillumination technique at 2, 4, and 6 weeks. Next we evaluated lymphatic flow using lymphoscintigraphy and in vivo microscopy at 6 to 11 weeks in: 10 additional mice following irradiation as above (IR), in 10 mice following incision of a lymphatic vessel (I), and in a non-treated control group of 10 mice (N). Intact lymphatic vessels were observed in all mice at 2, 4, and 8 weeks following the single dose of radiotherapy in the first group of mice and normal lymphatic flow was fully restored in the irradiated (IR) and incised (I) mice indicating that the reparative substitution lymphatic pathways are functioning normally. We found that following irradiation with one dose of 20 Gy, lymphatic vessels were not visibly damaged and also that lymphatic flow was consistently restored and substitutive lymphatic pathways formed.

  19. Modeling and analysis of alternative concept of ITER vacuum vessel primary heat transfer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbajo, Juan; Yoder, Graydon; Dell'Orco, G.; Curd, Warren; Kim, Seokho

    2010-01-01

    A RELAP5-3D model of the ITER (Latin for 'the way') vacuum vessel (VV) primary heat transfer system has been developed to evaluate a proposed design change that relocates the heat exchangers (HXs) from the exterior of the tokamak building to the interior. This alternative design protects the HXs from external hazards such as wind, tornado, and aircraft crash. The proposed design integrates the VV HXs into a VV pressure suppression system (VVPSS) tank that contains water to condense vapour in case of a leak into the plasma chamber. The proposal is to also use this water as the ultimate sink when removing decay heat from the VV system. The RELAP5-3D model has been run under normal operating and abnormal (decay heat) conditions. Results indicate that this alternative design is feasible, with no effects on the VVPSS tank under normal operation and with tank temperature and pressure increasing under decay heat conditions resulting in a requirement to remove steam generated if the VVPSS tank low pressure must be maintained.

  20. Modeling and simulation of the bubble-induced flow in wine fermentation vessels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidt Dominik

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Detailed flow pattern analyses regarding wine fermentations conducted without mechanical agitation are limited to lab-scale investigations, as industrial size measurements are expensive and difficult to realize. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD methods can offer an alternative and more flexible approach to gain insight into such bubble induced fluid flows. Therefore, the aim of this study was to transfer the findings of existing research onto a CFD model capable of capturing the three- dimensional flow pattern in industrial scale wine fermentation vessels. First results were obtained by using an extended version of the OpenFOAM® (v.2.2.x solver multiphaseEulerFoam for modeling the gas-liquid two phase system. With parameters from the most vigorous phase of wine fermentation a fully developed, unsteady flow regime could be established after approx. 120 s of real time. Thereby the groundwork for further evaluations of e.g. mixing efficiency or cooling equipment optimizations with CFD methods is laid.

  1. Modeling of irradiation embrittlement and annealing/recovery in pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lott, R.G.; Freyer, P.D.

    1996-01-01

    The results of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) annealing studies are interpreted in light of the current understanding of radiation embrittlement phenomena in RPV steels. An extensive RPV irradiation embrittlement and annealing database has been compiled and the data reveal that the majority of annealing studies completed to date have employed test reactor irradiated weldments. Although test reactor and power reactor irradiations result in similar embrittlement trends, subtle differences between these two damage states can become important in the interpretation of annealing results. Microstructural studies of irradiated steels suggest that there are several different irradiation-induced microstructural features that contribute to embrittlement. The amount of annealing recovery and the post-anneal re-embrittlement behavior of a steel are determined by the annealing response of these microstructural defects. The active embrittlement mechanisms are determined largely by the irradiation temperature and the material composition. Interpretation and thorough understanding of annealing results require a model that considers the underlying physical mechanisms of embrittlement. This paper presents a framework for the construction of a physically based mechanistic model of irradiation embrittlement and annealing behavior

  2. Investigation of magnetic nanoparticle targeting in a simplified model of small vessel aneurysm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirzababaei, S.N. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Noshirvani Babol University of Technology, Babol (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Gorji, Tahereh B., E-mail: gorji.tahereh@stu.nit.ac.ir [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Noshirvani Babol University of Technology, Babol (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Baou, M.; Gorji-Bandpy, M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Noshirvani Babol University of Technology, Babol (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fatouraee, Nasser [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    An in simulacra study was conducted to investigate the capture efficiency (CE) of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in aneurysm model, under the effect of a bipolar permanent magnetic system positioned at the vicinity of the model vessel. The bipolar magnetic system with an active space of 9 cm was designed by FEMM software. The MNPs were magnetite nanoparticles synthesized by the hydrothermal method which were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope and magnetometer measurements. Ferrofluid velocity, magnetic field strength, and aneurysm volume all proved to be important parameters which affect the capturing of MNPs. Overall, the results of this in simulacra study confirmed the effectiveness of magnetic targeting for possible aneurysm embolization. - Highlights: • An in simulacra investigation of the magnetic targeting in mechanical aneurysm embolization was conducted. • A bipolar permanent magnetic system with an active space of 9 cm was designed by FEMM software. • Magnetic nanofluid was synthetized and applied in an experimental setup to study the effect of different flow, magnetic field and geometry parameters on the capture efficiency of the magnetic particles acting as a dug carrier agent.

  3. Nanostructure evolution of neutron-irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels: Revised Object kinetic Monte Carlo model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiapetto, M., E-mail: mchiapet@sckcen.be [SCK-CEN, Nuclear Materials Science Institute, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Unité Matériaux Et Transformations (UMET), UMR 8207, Université de Lille 1, ENSCL, F-59600 Villeneuve d’Ascq Cedex (France); Messina, L. [DEN-Service de Recherches de Métallurgie Physique, CEA, Université Paris-Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Roslagstullsbacken 21, SE-114 21 Stockholm (Sweden); Becquart, C.S. [Unité Matériaux Et Transformations (UMET), UMR 8207, Université de Lille 1, ENSCL, F-59600 Villeneuve d’Ascq Cedex (France); Olsson, P. [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Roslagstullsbacken 21, SE-114 21 Stockholm (Sweden); Malerba, L. [SCK-CEN, Nuclear Materials Science Institute, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2017-02-15

    This work presents a revised set of parameters to be used in an Object kinetic Monte Carlo model to simulate the microstructure evolution under neutron irradiation of reactor pressure vessel steels at the operational temperature of light water reactors (∼300 °C). Within a “grey-alloy” approach, a more physical description than in a previous work is used to translate the effect of Mn and Ni solute atoms on the defect cluster diffusivity reduction. The slowing down of self-interstitial clusters, due to the interaction between solutes and crowdions in Fe is now parameterized using binding energies from the latest DFT calculations and the solute concentration in the matrix from atom-probe experiments. The mobility of vacancy clusters in the presence of Mn and Ni solute atoms was also modified on the basis of recent DFT results, thereby removing some previous approximations. The same set of parameters was seen to predict the correct microstructure evolution for two different types of alloys, under very different irradiation conditions: an Fe-C-MnNi model alloy, neutron irradiated at a relatively high flux, and a high-Mn, high-Ni RPV steel from the Swedish Ringhals reactor surveillance program. In both cases, the predicted self-interstitial loop density matches the experimental solute cluster density, further corroborating the surmise that the MnNi-rich nanofeatures form by solute enrichment of immobilized small interstitial loops, which are invisible to the electron microscope.

  4. SCDAP/RELAP5 modeling of movement of melted material through porous debris in lower head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siefken, L. J.; Harvego, E. A.

    2000-01-01

    A model is described for the movement of melted metallic material through a ceramic porous debris bed. The model is designed for the analysis of severe accidents in LWRs, wherein melted core plate material may slump onto the top of a porous bed of relocated core material supported by the lower head. The permeation of the melted core plate material into the porous debris bed influences the heatup of the debris bed and the heatup of the lower head supporting the debris. A model for mass transport of melted metallic material is applied that includes terms for viscosity and turbulence but neglects inertial and capillary terms because of their small value relative to gravity and viscous terms in the momentum equation. The relative permeability and passability of the porous debris are calculated as functions of debris porosity, particle size, and effective saturation. An iterative numerical solution is used to solve the set of nonlinear equations for mass transport. The effective thermal conductivity of the debris is calculated as a function of porosity, particle size, and saturation. The model integrates the equations for mass transport with a model for the two-dimensional conduction of heat through porous debris. The integrated model has been implemented into the SCDAP/RELAP5 code for the analysis of the integrity of LWR lower heads during severe accidents. The results of the model indicate that melted core plate material may permeate to near the bottom of a 1m deep hot porous debris bed supported by the lower head. The presence of the relocated core plate material was calculated to cause a 12% increase in the heat flux on the external surface of the lower head

  5. Advanced in-vessel retention design for next generation risk management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Kune Y.; Hwang, Il Soon [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    In the TMI-2 accident, approximately twenty (20) tons of molten core material drained into the lower plenum. Early advanced light water reactor (LWR) designs assumed a lower head failure and incorporated various measures for ex-vessel accident mitigation. However,one of the major findings from the TMI-2 Vessel Investigation Project was that one part of the reactor lower head wall estimated to have attained a temperature of 1100 deg C for about 30 minutes has seemingly experienced a comparatively rapid cooldown with no major threat to the vessel integrity. In this regard, recent empirical and analytical studies have shifted interests to such in-vessel retention designs or strategies as reactor cavity flooding, in-vessel flooding and engineered gap cooling of the vessel. Accurate thermohydrodynamic and creep deformation modeling and rupture prediction are the key to the success in developing practically useful in-vessel accident/risk management strategies. As an advanced in-vessel design concept, this work presents the COrium Attack Syndrome Immunization Structures (COASIS) that are being developed as prospective in-vessel retention devices for a next-generation LWR in concert with existing ex-vessel management measures. Both the engineered gap structures in-vessel (COASISI) and ex-vessel (COASISO) are demonstrated to maintain effective heat transfer geometry during molten core debris attack when applied to the Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plant (KSNPP) reactor. The likelihood of lower head creep rupture during a severe accident is found to be significantly suppressed by the COASIS options. 15 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab. (Author)

  6. Advanced in-vessel retention design for next generation risk management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Kune Y; Hwang, Il Soon [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    In the TMI-2 accident, approximately twenty (20) tons of molten core material drained into the lower plenum. Early advanced light water reactor (LWR) designs assumed a lower head failure and incorporated various measures for ex-vessel accident mitigation. However,one of the major findings from the TMI-2 Vessel Investigation Project was that one part of the reactor lower head wall estimated to have attained a temperature of 1100 deg C for about 30 minutes has seemingly experienced a comparatively rapid cooldown with no major threat to the vessel integrity. In this regard, recent empirical and analytical studies have shifted interests to such in-vessel retention designs or strategies as reactor cavity flooding, in-vessel flooding and engineered gap cooling of the vessel. Accurate thermohydrodynamic and creep deformation modeling and rupture prediction are the key to the success in developing practically useful in-vessel accident/risk management strategies. As an advanced in-vessel design concept, this work presents the COrium Attack Syndrome Immunization Structures (COASIS) that are being developed as prospective in-vessel retention devices for a next-generation LWR in concert with existing ex-vessel management measures. Both the engineered gap structures in-vessel (COASISI) and ex-vessel (COASISO) are demonstrated to maintain effective heat transfer geometry during molten core debris attack when applied to the Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plant (KSNPP) reactor. The likelihood of lower head creep rupture during a severe accident is found to be significantly suppressed by the COASIS options. 15 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab. (Author)

  7. BrainK for Structural Image Processing: Creating Electrical Models of the Human Head

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available BrainK is a set of automated procedures for characterizing the tissues of the human head from MRI, CT, and photogrammetry images. The tissue segmentation and cortical surface extraction support the primary goal of modeling the propagation of electrical currents through head tissues with a finite difference model (FDM or finite element model (FEM created from the BrainK geometries. The electrical head model is necessary for accurate source localization of dense array electroencephalographic (dEEG measures from head surface electrodes. It is also necessary for accurate targeting of cerebral structures with transcranial current injection from those surface electrodes. BrainK must achieve five major tasks: image segmentation, registration of the MRI, CT, and sensor photogrammetry images, cortical surface reconstruction, dipole tessellation of the cortical surface, and Talairach transformation. We describe the approach to each task, and we compare the accuracies for the key tasks of tissue segmentation and cortical surface extraction in relation to existing research tools (FreeSurfer, FSL, SPM, and BrainVisa. BrainK achieves good accuracy with minimal or no user intervention, it deals well with poor quality MR images and tissue abnormalities, and it provides improved computational efficiency over existing research packages.

  8. Validation of a LES turbulence modeling approach on a steady engine head flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijnen, V.; Somers, L.M.T.; Baert, R.S.G.; Goey, de L.P.H.; Dias, V.

    2005-01-01

    The application of the LES turbulence modeling approach in the Kiva-environment is validated on a complex geometry. Results for the steady flow in a realistic geometry of a production type heavy-duty diesel engine head with 120 mm cylinder bore are presented. The bulk Reynolds number is Reb = 1 fl

  9. Computational modeling of the probability of destructions in total joint endoprosthesis ceramic heads using Weibull's theory

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Janíček, P.; Fuis, Vladimír; Málek, M.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 4 (2010), s. 42-51 ISSN 1335-2393 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : computational modeling * ceramic head * in vivo destructions * hip joint endoprosthesis * probabily of rupture Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  10. A Statistical Model of Head Asymmetry in Infants with Deformational Plagiocephaly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lanche, Stéphanie; Darvann, Tron Andre; Ólafsdóttir, Hildur

    2007-01-01

    Deformational plagiocephaly is a term describing cranial asymmetry and deformation commonly seen in infants. The purpose of this work was to develop a methodology for assessment and modelling of head asymmetry. The clinical population consisted of 38 infants for whom 3-dimensional surface scans...... quantitative description of the asymmetry present in the dataset....

  11. Improving head and neck CTA with hybrid and model-based iterative reconstruction techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niesten, J. M.; van der Schaaf, I. C.; Vos, P. C.; Willemink, MJ; Velthuis, B. K.

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To compare image quality of head and neck computed tomography angiography (CTA) reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP), hybrid iterative reconstruction (HIR) and model-based iterative reconstruction (MIR) algorithms. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The raw data of 34 studies were

  12. Optimal control of a head-of-line processor sharing model with regular and opportunity customers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijk, van A.C.C.

    2011-01-01

    Motivated by a workload control setting, we study a model where two types of customers are served by a single server according to the head-of-line processor sharing discipline. Regular customers and opportunity customers are arriving to the system according to two independent Poisson processes, each

  13. Tumor Blood Vessel Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munn, Lance

    2009-11-01

    ``Normalization'' of tumor blood vessels has shown promise to improve the efficacy of chemotherapeutics. In theory, anti-angiogenic drugs targeting endothelial VEGF signaling can improve vessel network structure and function, enhancing the transport of subsequent cytotoxic drugs to cancer cells. In practice, the effects are unpredictable, with varying levels of success. The predominant effects of anti-VEGF therapies are decreased vessel leakiness (hydraulic conductivity), decreased vessel diameters and pruning of the immature vessel network. It is thought that each of these can influence perfusion of the vessel network, inducing flow in regions that were previously sluggish or stagnant. Unfortunately, when anti-VEGF therapies affect vessel structure and function, the changes are dynamic and overlapping in time, and it has been difficult to identify a consistent and predictable normalization ``window'' during which perfusion and subsequent drug delivery is optimal. This is largely due to the non-linearity in the system, and the inability to distinguish the effects of decreased vessel leakiness from those due to network structural changes in clinical trials or animal studies. We have developed a mathematical model to calculate blood flow in complex tumor networks imaged by two-photon microscopy. The model incorporates the necessary and sufficient components for addressing the problem of normalization of tumor vasculature: i) lattice-Boltzmann calculations of the full flow field within the vasculature and within the tissue, ii) diffusion and convection of soluble species such as oxygen or drugs within vessels and the tissue domain, iii) distinct and spatially-resolved vessel hydraulic conductivities and permeabilities for each species, iv) erythrocyte particles advecting in the flow and delivering oxygen with real oxygen release kinetics, v) shear stress-mediated vascular remodeling. This model, guided by multi-parameter intravital imaging of tumor vessel structure

  14. Debris interactions in reactor vessel lower plena during a severe accident. II. Integral analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, K.Y.; Henry, R.E.

    1996-01-01

    For pt.I see ibid., p.147-63, 1996. The integral physico-numerical model for the reactor vessel lower head response has been exercised for the TMI-2 accident and possible severe accident scenarios in PWR and BWR designs. The proposed inherent cooling mechanism of the reactor material creep and subsequent water ingression implemented in this predictive model provides a consistent representation of how the debris was finally cooled in the TMI-2 accident and how the reactor lower head integrity was maintained during the course of the incident. It should be recalled that in order for this strain to occur, the vessel lower head had to achieve temperatures in excess of 1000 C. This is certainly in agreement with the temperatures determined by metallographic examinations during the TMI-2 vessel inspection program. The integral model was also applied to typical PWR and BWR lower plena with and without structures under pressurized conditions spanning the first relocation of core material to the reactor vessel failure due to creep without recovery actions. The design application results are presented with particular attention being focused on water ingression into the debris bed through the gap formed between the debris and the vessel wall. As an illustration of the accident management application, the lower plenum with structures was recovered after an extensive amount of creep had damaged the vessel wall. The computed lower head temperatures were found to be significantly lower (by more than 300 K in this particular example) with recovery relative to the case without recovery. This clearly demonstrates the potential for in-vessel cooling of the reactor vessel without a need to externally submerge the lower head should such a severe accident occur as core melting and relocation. (orig.)

  15. Study on applicability of PIV measurement to natural convection in a scaled reactor vessel model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Takahiro; Koga, Tomonari; Eguchi, Yuzuru; Watanabe, Osamu

    2009-01-01

    The applicability of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) to natural convection in the plenum of a scaled water test model of the Japan Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (JSFR) is studied in the paper. PIV measurement of such a buoyancy-driven flow in a geometrically complicated vessel is difficult in general, because the detection rate of tracer particles tends to decrease, and the noisy optical reflection to increase. In our measurements, tracer particles are adequately seeded in the hot plenum and particle images are captured by using a double-pulsed Nd:YAG laser and a high-speed camera. Then, image-processing techniques are employed to eliminate unphysical velocity vectors and unnecessary background images. The PIV results have shown that clear flow pattern can be extracted by time-averaging 300 sets of instantaneous PIV data in spite of highly fluctuating features of velocity in space and time. Moreover, the evaluation of the statistical quantities such as variance, skewness, and kurtosis has revealed the characteristic of the non-stationary spouting flows at the heater outlet. (author)

  16. A MODEL OF MIRA'S COMETARY HEAD/TAIL ENTERING THE LOCAL BUBBLE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esquivel, A.; Raga, A. C.; RodrIguez-Gonzalez, A.; Lopez-Camara, D.; Velazquez, P. F.; Canto, J.; De Colle, F.

    2010-01-01

    We model the cometary structure around Mira as the interaction of an asymptotic giant branch stellar wind from Mira A with a streaming environment. Our simulations introduce the following new element: we assume that after 200 kyr of evolution in a dense environment, Mira entered the Local Bubble (low-density coronal gas). As Mira enters the bubble, the head of the comet expands quite rapidly, while the tail remains well collimated for a >100 kyr timescale. The result is a broad-head/narrow-tail structure that resembles the observed morphology of Mira's comet. The simulations were carried out with our new adaptive grid code WALICXE, which is described in detail.

  17. Experimental investigation of stresses and deformations of the model of a pod-boiler-prestressed concrete pressure vessel. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoever, R.

    1973-01-01

    Investigations of elastic models are suitable to obtain independent values for stress states and deformations of thickwalled pressure vessels to check computer programs for three-dimensional elastic calculations. An elastic model of epoxy resin was constructed with the geometry of the pod boiler pressure vessel of the Hartlepool nuclear power station. With this model strains and deformations were measured for internal pressure. The stress states in the neighbourhood of the large vertical openings for the boiler pods and the horizontal gas ducts and at the junction of cylinder and plates were of special interest. Therefore most of the gauges were concentrated in these regions. A considerable number of strain gauges were embedded in the wall. The construction of the model is described in part one and results of the measurements are presented and discussed in part two of this report. (orig.) [de

  18. Posttest analysis of a 1:4-scale prestressed concrete containment vessel model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dameron, R.A.; Rashid, Y.R.; Hessheimer, M.F.

    2003-01-01

    The Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) of Japan and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, co-sponsored a Cooperative Containment Research Program at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in Albuquerque, New Mexico. As part of the program, a prestressed concrete containment vessel (PCCV) model was subjected to a series of overpressurization tests at SNL beginning in July 2000 and culminating in a functional failure mode or Limit State Test (LST) in September 2000 and a Structural Failure Mode Test (SFMT) in November 2001. The PCCV model, uniformly scaled at 1:4, is representative of the containment structure of an actual Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) plant (OHI-3) in Japan. The objectives of the pressurization tests were to obtain measurement of the structural response to pressure loading beyond design basis accident in order to validate analytical modeling, to find pressure capacity of the model, and to observe its failure mechanisms. This paper compares results of pretest analytical studies of the PCCV model to the PCCV high pressure test measurements and describes results of post-test analytical studies. These analyses have been performed by ANATECH Corp. under contract with Sandia National Laboratories. The post-test analysis represents the third phase of a comprehensive PCCV analysis effort. The first phase consisted of preliminary analyses to determine what finite element models would be necessary for the pretest prediction analyses, and the second phase consisted of the pretest prediction analyses. The principal objectives of the post-test analyses were: (1) to provide insights to improve the analytical methods for predicting the structural response and failure modes of a prestressed concrete containment, and (2) to evaluate by analysis any phenomena or failure mode observed during the test that had not been explicitly predicted by analysis. In addition to summarizing comparisons between measured

  19. Spectra and neutron dose of an 18 MV Linac using two geometric models of the head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrera, M. T.; Pino, F.; Barros, H.; Sajo-Bohus, L.; Davila, J.; Salcedo, E.; Vega C, H. R.; Benites R, J. L.

    2015-10-01

    Full text: Using the Monte Carlo method, by MCNP5 code, simulations were performed with different source terms and 2 geometric models of the head to obtain spectra in energy, flow and doses of photo-neutrons at different positions on the stretcher and in the radiotherapy room. The simplest model was a spherical shell of tungsten; the second was the complete model of a heterogeneous head of an accelerator Varian ix. In both models Tosi function was used as a source term. In addition, for the second model Sheikh-Bagheri distribution was used for photons and photo-neutrons were generated. Also in both models the radiotherapy room of Gurve group of the Teaching Medical Center La Trinidad was included, which is equipped with an accelerator Varian Clinic 2100. In this Center passive detectors PADC (Cr-39) were irradiated with neutron converters, with 18 MeV photons radiation. The measured neutron flow was compared with that obtained with Monte Carlo calculations. The Monte Carlo flows are similar to those measured at the isocenter. The simplest model underestimates the neutron flow compared with the calculated flows with the heterogeneous model of the head. (Author)

  20. Immunocompromised and immunocompetent mouse models for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei ZG

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Zhen-ge Lei,1,* Xiao-hua Ren,2,* Sha-sha Wang,3 Xin-hua Liang,3,4 Ya-ling Tang3,5 1Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Stomatological Hospital Affiliated to Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi, 2Department of Stomatology, Sichuan Medical Science Academy and Sichuan Provincial People’s Hospital, 3State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, 4Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, West China College of Stomatology, Sichuan University, 5Department of Oral Pathology, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Mouse models can closely mimic human oral squamous epithelial carcinogenesis, greatly expand the in vivo research possibilities, and play a critical role in the development of diagnosis, monitoring, and treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. With the development of the recent research on the contribution of immunity/inflammation to cancer initiation and progression, mouse models have been divided into two categories, namely, immunocompromised and immunocompetent mouse models. And thus, this paper will review these two kinds of models applied in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma to provide a platform to understand the complicated histological, molecular, and genetic changes of oral squamous epithelial tumorigenesis. Keywords: head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, HNSCC, mouse models, immunocompromised models, immunocompetent models, transgenic models

  1. Markov Chain Model-Based Optimal Cluster Heads Selection for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulnaz Ahmed

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The longer network lifetime of Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs is a goal which is directly related to energy consumption. This energy consumption issue becomes more challenging when the energy load is not properly distributed in the sensing area. The hierarchal clustering architecture is the best choice for these kind of issues. In this paper, we introduce a novel clustering protocol called Markov chain model-based optimal cluster heads (MOCHs selection for WSNs. In our proposed model, we introduce a simple strategy for the optimal number of cluster heads selection to overcome the problem of uneven energy distribution in the network. The attractiveness of our model is that the BS controls the number of cluster heads while the cluster heads control the cluster members in each cluster in such a restricted manner that a uniform and even load is ensured in each cluster. We perform an extensive range of simulation using five quality measures, namely: the lifetime of the network, stable and unstable region in the lifetime of the network, throughput of the network, the number of cluster heads in the network, and the transmission time of the network to analyze the proposed model. We compare MOCHs against Sleep-awake Energy Efficient Distributed (SEED clustering, Artificial Bee Colony (ABC, Zone Based Routing (ZBR, and Centralized Energy Efficient Clustering (CEEC using the above-discussed quality metrics and found that the lifetime of the proposed model is almost 1095, 2630, 3599, and 2045 rounds (time steps greater than SEED, ABC, ZBR, and CEEC, respectively. The obtained results demonstrate that the MOCHs is better than SEED, ABC, ZBR, and CEEC in terms of energy efficiency and the network throughput.

  2. Modulation of lung inflammation by vessel dilator in a mouse model of allergic asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cormier Stephania A

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP and its receptor, NPRA, have been extensively studied in terms of cardiovascular effects. We have found that the ANP-NPRA signaling pathway is also involved in airway allergic inflammation and asthma. ANP, a C-terminal peptide (amino acid 99–126 of pro-atrial natriuretic factor (proANF and a recombinant peptide, NP73-102 (amino acid 73–102 of proANF have been reported to induce bronchoprotective effects in a mouse model of allergic asthma. In this report, we evaluated the effects of vessel dilator (VD, another N-terminal natriuretic peptide covering amino acids 31–67 of proANF, on acute lung inflammation in a mouse model of allergic asthma. Methods A549 cells were transfected with pVD or the pVAX1 control plasmid and cells were collected 24 hrs after transfection to analyze the effect of VD on inactivation of the extracellular-signal regulated receptor kinase (ERK1/2 through western blot. Luciferase assay, western blot and RT-PCR were also performed to analyze the effect of VD on NPRA expression. For determination of VD's attenuation of lung inflammation, BALB/c mice were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin and then treated intranasally with chitosan nanoparticles containing pVD. Parameters of airway inflammation, such as airway hyperreactivity, proinflammatory cytokine levels, eosinophil recruitment and lung histopathology were compared with control mice receiving nanoparticles containing pVAX1 control plasmid. Results pVD nanoparticles inactivated ERK1/2 and downregulated NPRA expression in vitro, and intranasal treatment with pVD nanoparticles protected mice from airway inflammation. Conclusion VD's modulation of airway inflammation may result from its inactivation of ERK1/2 and downregulation of NPRA expression. Chitosan nanoparticles containing pVD may be therapeutically effective in preventing allergic airway inflammation.

  3. Safety margin evaluation of pre-stressed concrete nuclear containment vessel model with BARC code ULCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basha, S.M.; Patnaik, R.; Ramanujam, S.; Singh, R.K.; Kushwaha, H.S.; Venkat Raj, V.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Ultimate load capacity assessment of nuclear containments has been a thrust research area for Indian pressurised heavy water reactor (PHWR) power programme. For containment safety assessment of Indian PHWRs a finite element code ULCA was developed at BARC, Trombay. This code has been extensively benchmarked with experimental results and for prediction of safety margins of Indian PHWRs. The present paper highlights the analysis results for prestressed concrete containment vessel (PCCV) tested at Sandia National Labs, USA in a round robin analysis activity co-sponsored by Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC), Japan and the U.S Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Three levels of failure pressure predictions namely the upper bound, the most probable and the lower bound (all with 90% confidence) were made as per the requirements of the round robin analysis activity. The most likely failure pressure is predicted to be in the range of 2.95 Pd to 3.15 Pd (Pd = design pressure of 0.39 MPa for the PCCV model) depending on the type of liners used in the construction of the PCCV model. The lower bound value of the ultimate pressure of 2.80 Pd and the upper bound of the ultimate pressure of 3.45 Pd are also predicted from the analysis. These limiting values depend on the assumptions of the analysis for simulating the concrete tendon interaction and the strain hardening characteristics of the steel members. The experimental test has been recently concluded at Sandia Laboratory and the peak pressure reached during the test is 3.3 Pd that is enveloped by our upper bound prediction of 3.45 Pd and is close to the predicted most likely pressure of 3.15 Pd

  4. Podoplanin immunopositive lymphatic vessels at the implant interface in a rat model of osteoporotic fractures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Susanne Lips

    Full Text Available Insertion of bone substitution materials accelerates healing of osteoporotic fractures. Biodegradable materials are preferred for application in osteoporotic patients to avoid a second surgery for implant replacement. Degraded implant fragments are often absorbed by macrophages that are removed from the fracture side via passage through veins or lymphatic vessels. We investigated if lymphatic vessels occur in osteoporotic bone defects and whether they are regulated by the use of different materials. To address this issue osteoporosis was induced in rats using the classical method of bilateral ovariectomy and additional calcium and vitamin deficient diet. In addition, wedge-shaped defects of 3, 4, or 5 mm were generated in the distal metaphyseal area of femur via osteotomy. The 4 mm defects were subsequently used for implantation studies where bone substitution materials of calcium phosphate cement, composites of collagen and silica, and iron foams with interconnecting pores were inserted. Different materials were partly additionally functionalized by strontium or bisphosphonate whose positive effects in osteoporosis treatment are well known. The lymphatic vessels were identified by immunohistochemistry using an antibody against podoplanin. Podoplanin immunopositive lymphatic vessels were detected in the granulation tissue filling the fracture gap, surrounding the implant and growing into the iron foam through its interconnected pores. Significant more lymphatic capillaries were counted at the implant interface of composite, strontium and bisphosphonate functionalized iron foam. A significant increase was also observed in the number of lymphatics situated in the pores of strontium coated iron foam. In conclusion, our results indicate the occurrence of lymphatic vessels in osteoporotic bone. Our results show that lymphatic vessels are localized at the implant interface and in the fracture gap where they might be involved in the removal of

  5. Podoplanin Immunopositive Lymphatic Vessels at the Implant Interface in a Rat Model of Osteoporotic Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lips, Katrin Susanne; Kauschke, Vivien; Hartmann, Sonja; Thormann, Ulrich; Ray, Seemun; Kampschulte, Marian; Langheinrich, Alexander; Schumacher, Matthias; Gelinsky, Michael; Heinemann, Sascha; Hanke, Thomas; Kautz, Armin R.; Schnabelrauch, Matthias; Schnettler, Reinhard; Heiss, Christian; Alt, Volker; Kilian, Olaf

    2013-01-01

    Insertion of bone substitution materials accelerates healing of osteoporotic fractures. Biodegradable materials are preferred for application in osteoporotic patients to avoid a second surgery for implant replacement. Degraded implant fragments are often absorbed by macrophages that are removed from the fracture side via passage through veins or lymphatic vessels. We investigated if lymphatic vessels occur in osteoporotic bone defects and whether they are regulated by the use of different materials. To address this issue osteoporosis was induced in rats using the classical method of bilateral ovariectomy and additional calcium and vitamin deficient diet. In addition, wedge-shaped defects of 3, 4, or 5 mm were generated in the distal metaphyseal area of femur via osteotomy. The 4 mm defects were subsequently used for implantation studies where bone substitution materials of calcium phosphate cement, composites of collagen and silica, and iron foams with interconnecting pores were inserted. Different materials were partly additionally functionalized by strontium or bisphosphonate whose positive effects in osteoporosis treatment are well known. The lymphatic vessels were identified by immunohistochemistry using an antibody against podoplanin. Podoplanin immunopositive lymphatic vessels were detected in the granulation tissue filling the fracture gap, surrounding the implant and growing into the iron foam through its interconnected pores. Significant more lymphatic capillaries were counted at the implant interface of composite, strontium and bisphosphonate functionalized iron foam. A significant increase was also observed in the number of lymphatics situated in the pores of strontium coated iron foam. In conclusion, our results indicate the occurrence of lymphatic vessels in osteoporotic bone. Our results show that lymphatic vessels are localized at the implant interface and in the fracture gap where they might be involved in the removal of lymphocytes, macrophages

  6. Development and application of surrogate model for assessment of ex-vessel debris bed dryout probability - 15157

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakush, S.E.; Lubchenko, N.T.; Kudinov, P.

    2015-01-01

    In this work we consider a water-cooled power reactor severe accident scenario with pressure vessel failure and subsequent release of molten corium. A surrogate model for prediction of dryout heat flux for ex-vessels debris beds of different shapes is developed. Functional form of dryout heat flux dependence on problem parameters is developed by the analysis of coolability problem in non-dimensional variables. It is shown that for a flat debris bed the dryout heat flux can be represented in terms of three 1-dimensional functions for which approximating formulas are found. For two-dimensional debris beds (cylindrical, conical, Gaussian heap, mound-shaped), an additional function taking into account the bed shape geometry is obtained from numerical simulations using DECOSIM code as a full model. With the surrogate model in hand, risk analysis of debris bed coolability is carried out by Monte Carlo sampling of the input parameters within selected ranges, with assumed distribution functions

  7. Numerical modeling of the pulse wave propagation in large blood vessels based on liquid and wall interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rup, K; Dróżdż, A

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to develop a non-linear, one-dimensional model of pulse wave propagation in the arterial cardiovascular system. The model includes partial differential equations resulting from the balance of mass and momentum for the fluid-filled area and the balance equation for the area of the wall and vessels. The considered mathematical model of pulse wave propagation in the thoracic aorta section takes into account the viscous dissipation of fluid energy, realistic values of parameters describing the physicochemical properties of blood and vessel wall. Boundary and initial conditions contain the appropriate information obtained from in vivo measurements. As a result of the numerical solution of the mass and momentum balance equations for the blood and the equilibrium equation for the arterial wall area, time- dependent deformation, respective velocity profiles and blood pressure were determined.

  8. Stress analysis in a non axisymmetric loaded reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albuquerque, Levi Barcelos; Assis, Gracia Menezes V. de; Miranda, Carlos Alexandre J.; Cruz, Julio Ricardo B.; Mattar Neto, Miguel

    1995-01-01

    In this work we intend to present the stress analysis of a PWR vessel under postulated concentrated loads. The vessel was modeled with Axisymmetric solid 4 nodes harmonic finite elements with the use of the ANSYS program, version 5.0. The bolts connecting the vessel flanges were modeled with beam elements. Some considerations were made to model the contact between the flanges. The perforated part of the vessel tori spherical head was modeled (with reduced properties due to its holes) to introduce its stiffness and loads but was not within the scope of this work. The loading consists of some usual ones, as pressure, dead weight, bolts preload, seismic load and some postulated ones as concentrated loads, over the vessel, modeled by Fourier Series. The results in the axisymmetric model are taken in terms of linearized stresses, obtained in some circumferential positions and for each position, in some sections along the vessel. Using the ASME Code (Section III, Division 1, Sub-section NB) the stresses are within the allowable limits. In order to draw some conclusions about stress linearization, the membrane plus bending stresses (Pl + Pb) are obtained and compared in some sections, using three different methods. (author)

  9. Radiotherapy and chemotherapy change vessel tree geometry and metastatic spread in a small cell lung cancer xenograft mouse tumor model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorsten Frenzel

    Full Text Available Tumor vasculature is critical for tumor growth, formation of distant metastases and efficiency of radio- and chemotherapy treatments. However, how the vasculature itself is affected during cancer treatment regarding to the metastatic behavior has not been thoroughly investigated. Therefore, the aim of this study was to analyze the influence of hypofractionated radiotherapy and cisplatin chemotherapy on vessel tree geometry and metastasis formation in a small cell lung cancer xenograft mouse tumor model to investigate the spread of malignant cells during different treatments modalities.The biological data gained during these experiments were fed into our previously developed computer model "Cancer and Treatment Simulation Tool" (CaTSiT to model the growth of the primary tumor, its metastatic deposit and also the influence on different therapies. Furthermore, we performed quantitative histology analyses to verify our predictions in xenograft mouse tumor model.According to the computer simulation the number of cells engrafting must vary considerably to explain the different weights of the primary tumor at the end of the experiment. Once a primary tumor is established, the fractal dimension of its vasculature correlates with the tumor size. Furthermore, the fractal dimension of the tumor vasculature changes during treatment, indicating that the therapy affects the blood vessels' geometry. We corroborated these findings with a quantitative histological analysis showing that the blood vessel density is depleted during radiotherapy and cisplatin chemotherapy. The CaTSiT computer model reveals that chemotherapy influences the tumor's therapeutic susceptibility and its metastatic spreading behavior.Using a system biological approach in combination with xenograft models and computer simulations revealed that the usage of chemotherapy and radiation therapy determines the spreading behavior by changing the blood vessel geometry of the primary tumor.

  10. Rapidly re-computable EEG (electroencephalography) forward models for realistic head shapes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ermer, J.J.; Mosher, J.C.; Baillet, S.; Leahy, R.M.

    2001-01-01

    Solution of the EEG source localization (inverse) problem utilizing model-based methods typically requires a significant number of forward model evaluations. For subspace based inverse methods like MUSIC (6), the total number of forward model evaluations can often approach an order of 10 3 or 10 4 . Techniques based on least-squares minimization may require significantly more evaluations. The observed set of measurements over an M-sensor array is often expressed as a linear forward spatio-temporal model of the form: F = GQ + N (1) where the observed forward field F (M-sensors x N-time samples) can be expressed in terms of the forward model G, a set of dipole moment(s) Q (3xP-dipoles x N-time samples) and additive noise N. Because of their simplicity, ease of computation, and relatively good accuracy, multi-layer spherical models (7) (or fast approximations described in (1), (7)) have traditionally been the 'forward model of choice' for approximating the human head. However, approximation of the human head via a spherical model does have several key drawbacks. By its very shape, the use of a spherical model distorts the true distribution of passive currents in the skull cavity. Spherical models also require that the sensor positions be projected onto the fitted sphere (Fig. 1), resulting in a distortion of the true sensor-dipole spatial geometry (and ultimately the computed surface potential). The use of a single 'best-fitted' sphere has the added drawback of incomplete coverage of the inner skull region, often ignoring areas such as the frontal cortex. In practice, this problem is typically countered by fitting additional sphere(s) to those region(s) not covered by the primary sphere. The use of these additional spheres results in added complication to the forward model. Using high-resolution spatial information obtained via X-ray CT or MR imaging, a realistic head model can be formed by tessellating the head into a set of contiguous regions (typically the scalp

  11. Hydraulic head interpolation using ANFIS—model selection and sensitivity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtulus, Bedri; Flipo, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the efficiency of ANFIS (adaptive neuro fuzzy inference system) for interpolating hydraulic head in a 40-km 2 agricultural watershed of the Seine basin (France). Inputs of ANFIS are Cartesian coordinates and the elevation of the ground. Hydraulic head was measured at 73 locations during a snapshot campaign on September 2009, which characterizes low-water-flow regime in the aquifer unit. The dataset was then split into three subsets using a square-based selection method: a calibration one (55%), a training one (27%), and a test one (18%). First, a method is proposed to select the best ANFIS model, which corresponds to a sensitivity analysis of ANFIS to the type and number of membership functions (MF). Triangular, Gaussian, general bell, and spline-based MF are used with 2, 3, 4, and 5 MF per input node. Performance criteria on the test subset are used to select the 5 best ANFIS models among 16. Then each is used to interpolate the hydraulic head distribution on a (50×50)-m grid, which is compared to the soil elevation. The cells where the hydraulic head is higher than the soil elevation are counted as "error cells." The ANFIS model that exhibits the less "error cells" is selected as the best ANFIS model. The best model selection reveals that ANFIS models are very sensitive to the type and number of MF. Finally, a sensibility analysis of the best ANFIS model with four triangular MF is performed on the interpolation grid, which shows that ANFIS remains stable to error propagation with a higher sensitivity to soil elevation.

  12. Can Predictive Modeling Identify Head and Neck Oncology Patients at Risk for Readmission?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Amy M; Casper, Keith A; Peter, Kay St; Wilson, Keith M; Mark, Jonathan R; Collar, Ryan M

    2018-05-01

    Objective Unplanned readmission within 30 days is a contributor to health care costs in the United States. The use of predictive modeling during hospitalization to identify patients at risk for readmission offers a novel approach to quality improvement and cost reduction. Study Design Two-phase study including retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data followed by prospective longitudinal study. Setting Tertiary academic medical center. Subjects and Methods Prospectively collected data for patients undergoing surgical treatment for head and neck cancer from January 2013 to January 2015 were used to build predictive models for readmission within 30 days of discharge using logistic regression, classification and regression tree (CART) analysis, and random forests. One model (logistic regression) was then placed prospectively into the discharge workflow from March 2016 to May 2016 to determine the model's ability to predict which patients would be readmitted within 30 days. Results In total, 174 admissions had descriptive data. Thirty-two were excluded due to incomplete data. Logistic regression, CART, and random forest predictive models were constructed using the remaining 142 admissions. When applied to 106 consecutive prospective head and neck oncology patients at the time of discharge, the logistic regression model predicted readmissions with a specificity of 94%, a sensitivity of 47%, a negative predictive value of 90%, and a positive predictive value of 62% (odds ratio, 14.9; 95% confidence interval, 4.02-55.45). Conclusion Prospectively collected head and neck cancer databases can be used to develop predictive models that can accurately predict which patients will be readmitted. This offers valuable support for quality improvement initiatives and readmission-related cost reduction in head and neck cancer care.

  13. A model for structural analysis of nuclear reactor pressure vessel flanges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, C.A. de.

    1987-01-01

    Due to the recent Brazilian advances in the nuclear technology area, it has been necessary the development of design and analysis methods for pressurized water reactor components, also as other components of a nuclear plant. This work proposes a methodology for the structural analysis of large diameter nuclear reactor pressure vessel flanges. In the analysis the vessel is divided into shell-of-revolution elements, the flanges are represented by rigid rings, and the bolts are treated as beams. The flexibility method is used for solving the problem. A computer program is shown, and the given results (displacements and stresses) are compared with results obtained by the finite element method. Although developed for nuclear reactor pressure vessel calculations, the program is more general, being possible its use for the analysis of any structure composed by shells of revolution. (author)

  14. Development of a Numerical Model of Hypervelocity Impact into a Pressurized Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, M. A.; Davis, B. A.; Miller, J. E.

    2017-01-01

    . Also seen in the figure is the eroded projectile that had passed into the COPV vessel with the generated shock wave in the pressurant propagating just ahead of the material. In this paper, pertinent experimental details and the development of the material constitutive models necessary for this work along with the efforts to validate their use are dis-cussed. The simulation results are presented and compared with the NASA experimental observations. While work is on-going from this effort, early observations pertinent to the failure threshold are presented.

  15. The evaluation of pressure effects on the ex-vessel cooling for KNGR with MELCOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jong Hwa; Park, Soo Yong; Kim, Dong Ha

    2001-03-01

    In this report, the effect of external vessel cooling on debris coolability and vessel integrity for the KNGR were examined from the two typical pressure range of high(170 bar) and low(5 bar)case using the lower plenum model in MELCOR1.8.4. As the conditions of these calculations, 80 ton of debris was relocated simultaneously into the lower vessel head and the debris relocation temperature from the core region was 2700 K. The decay heat has been assumed to be that of one hour after reactor shutdown. The creep failure of the vessel wall was simulated with 1-D model, which can consider the rapid temperature gradient over the wall thickness during the ex-vessel cooling. From the calculation results, both the coolant temperature and the total amount of coolant mass injected into the cavity are known to be the important factors in determining the time period to keep the external vessel cool. Therefore, a long-term strategy to keep the coolant temperature subcooled throughout the transient is suggested to sustain or prolong the effect of external vessel cooling. Also, it is expected that to keep the primary side at low pressure and to perform the ex-vessel flooding be the essential conditions to sustain the vessel integrity. From MELCOR, the penetration failure always occurs after relocation regardless of the RCS pressure or availability of the external vessel cooling. Therefore, It is expected that the improvement of the model for the penetration tube failure will be necessary

  16. The evaluation of pressure effects on the ex-vessel cooling for KNGR with MELCOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jong Hwa; Park, Soo Yong; Kim, Dong Ha

    2001-03-01

    In this report, the effect of external vessel cooling on debris coolability and vessel integrity for the KNGR were examined from the two typical pressure range of high(170 bar) and low(5 bar)case using the lower plenum model in MELCOR1.8.4. As the conditions of these calculations, 80 ton of debris was relocated simultaneously into the lower vessel head and the debris relocation temperature from the core region was 2700 K. The decay heat has been assumed to be that of one hour after reactor shutdown. The creep failure of the vessel wall was simulated with 1-D model, which can consider the rapid temperature gradient over the wall thickness during the ex-vessel cooling. From the calculation results, both the coolant temperature and the total amount of coolant mass injected into the cavity are known to be the important factors in determining the time period to keep the external vessel cool. Therefore, a long-term strategy to keep the coolant temperature subcooled throughout the transient is suggested to sustain or prolong the effect of external vessel cooling. Also, it is expected that to keep the primary side at low pressure and to perform the ex-vessel flooding be the essential conditions to sustain the vessel integrity. From MELCOR, the penetration failure always occurs after relocation regardless of the RCS pressure or availability of the external vessel cooling. Therefore, It is expected that the improvement of the model for the penetration tube failure will be necessary.

  17. A mouse model of weight-drop closed head injury: emphasis on cognitive and neurological deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Khalin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a leading cause of death and disability in individuals worldwide. Producing a clinically relevant TBI model in small-sized animals remains fairly challenging. For good screening of potential therapeutics, which are effective in the treatment of TBI, animal models of TBI should be established and standardized. In this study, we established mouse models of closed head injury using the Shohami weight-drop method with some modifications concerning cognitive deficiency assessment and provided a detailed description of the severe TBI animal model. We found that 250 g falling weight from 2 cm height produced severe closed head injury in C57BL/6 male mice. Cognitive disorders in mice with severe closed head injury could be detected using passive avoidance test on day 7 after injury. Findings from this study indicate that weight-drop injury animal models are suitable for further screening of brain neuroprotectants and potentially are similar to those seen in human TBI.

  18. Rebound coefficient of collisionless gas in a rigid vessel. A model of reflection of field-reversed configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takaku, Yuichi; Hamada, Shigeo

    1996-01-01

    A system of collisionless neutral gas contained in a rigid vessel is considered as a simple model of reflection of field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasma by a magnetic mirror. The rebound coefficient of the system is calculated as a function of the incident speed of the vessel normalized by the thermal velocity of the gas before reflection. The coefficient is compared with experimental data of FIX (Osaka U.) and FRX-C/T(Los Alamos N.L.). Agreement is good for this simple model. Interesting is that the rebound coefficient takes the smallest value (∼0.365) as the incident speed tends to zero and approaches unity as it tends to infinity. This behavior is reverse to that expected for a system with collision dominated fluid instead of collisionless gas. By examining the rebound coefficient, therefore, it could be successfully inferred whether the ion mean free path in each experiment was longer or shorter than the plasma length. (author)

  19. An agent-based model of the response to angioplasty and bare-metal stent deployment in an atherosclerotic blood vessel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia E Curtin

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: While animal models are widely used to investigate the development of restenosis in blood vessels following an intervention, computational models offer another means for investigating this phenomenon. A computational model of the response of a treated vessel would allow investigators to assess the effects of altering certain vessel- and stent-related variables. The authors aimed to develop a novel computational model of restenosis development following an angioplasty and bare-metal stent implantation in an atherosclerotic vessel using agent-based modeling techniques. The presented model is intended to demonstrate the body's response to the intervention and to explore how different vessel geometries or stent arrangements may affect restenosis development. METHODS: The model was created on a two-dimensional grid space. It utilizes the post-procedural vessel lumen diameter and stent information as its input parameters. The simulation starting point of the model is an atherosclerotic vessel after an angioplasty and stent implantation procedure. The model subsequently generates the final lumen diameter, percent change in lumen cross-sectional area, time to lumen diameter stabilization, and local concentrations of inflammatory cytokines upon simulation completion. Simulation results were directly compared with the results from serial imaging studies and cytokine levels studies in atherosclerotic patients from the relevant literature. RESULTS: The final lumen diameter results were all within one standard deviation of the mean lumen diameters reported in the comparison studies. The overlapping-stent simulations yielded results that matched published trends. The cytokine levels remained within the range of physiological levels throughout the simulations. CONCLUSION: We developed a novel computational model that successfully simulated the development of restenosis in a blood vessel following an angioplasty and bare-metal stent deployment based on

  20. Channel Model of Molecular Communication via Diffusion in a Vessel-like Environment Considering a Partially Covering Receiver

    OpenAIRE

    Turan, Meriç; Kuran, Mehmet Sukru; Yilmaz, H. Birkan; Demirkol, Ilker; Tugcu, Tuna

    2018-01-01

    By considering potential health problems that a fully covering receiver may cause in vessel-like environments, the implementation of a partially covering receiver is needed. To this end, distribution of hitting location of messenger molecules (MM) is analyzed within the context of molecular communication via diffusion with the aim of channel modeling. The distribution of these MMs for a fully covering receiver is analyzed in two parts: angular and radial dimensions. For the angular distributi...

  1. THE DISPUTE RESOLUTION MODEL OF VILLAGE HEAD ELECTION THROUGH NON LITIGATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Praptianingsih

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Article Number 6 of 2014 clauses 37 verses (5 and (6 provides that the regent in the district must resolve the dispute over the election result of the village head within 30 days. At the district level, the Regional Regulations governing the settlement of village head election disputes and regulations are effective in the dispute profession.However, the laws and regulations at the local / district level have not yet clearly defined the form / format of the outcome of the dispute over the election of the village mayors. The specific purpose of this research is to formulate the model form in the effort to solve the disputes of Village mayors Election by doing syncretism of existing strategy. The Urgency of this research that is (a need to build juridical system in handling dispute of village head election; (b the synchronization of district regulations governing the handling of village head election disputes both vertically and horizontally (c needs a dispute resolution strategy by developing a model of settlement that provides protection of constitutional rights and ensures that government agenda.Research activities in Jember, Bondowoso and Lumajang districts, with a total sample of 150 people. Data collection techniques use Participatory Action Research (PAR and Focus Group Discussion (FGD methods. The Data analysis technique using qualitative analysis.The result of this research is the policy of settlement of disputes of village head election is set forth in juridical instrument at local level, result of settlement stated in peace agreement.This Agreement is then submitted to the Court for the issuance of the Deed of Peace in order to ensure the validity of the legal force for the parties.

  2. Testing the dual-route model of perceived gaze direction: Linear combination of eye and head cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Yumiko; Mareschal, Isabelle; Clifford, Colin W G

    2016-06-01

    We have recently proposed a dual-route model of the effect of head orientation on perceived gaze direction (Otsuka, Mareschal, Calder, & Clifford, 2014; Otsuka, Mareschal, & Clifford, 2015), which computes perceived gaze direction as a linear combination of eye orientation and head orientation. By parametrically manipulating eye orientation and head orientation, we tested the adequacy of a linear model to account for the effect of horizontal head orientation on perceived direction of gaze. Here, participants adjusted an on-screen pointer toward the perceived gaze direction in two image conditions: Normal condition and Wollaston condition. Images in the Normal condition included a change in the visible part of the eye along with the change in head orientation, while images in the Wollaston condition were manipulated to have identical eye regions across head orientations. Multiple regression analysis with explanatory variables of eye orientation and head orientation revealed that linear models account for most of the variance both in the Normal condition and in the Wollaston condition. Further, we found no evidence that the model with a nonlinear term explains significantly more variance. Thus, the current study supports the dual-route model that computes the perceived gaze direction as a linear combination of eye orientation and head orientation.

  3. Green vessel scheduling in liner shipping: Modeling carbon dioxide emission costs in sea and at ports of call

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxim A. Dulebenets

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Considering a substantial increase in volumes of the international seaborne trade and drastic climate changes due to carbon dioxide emissions, liner shipping companies have to improve planning of their vessel schedules and improve energy efficiency. This paper presents a novel mixed integer non-linear mathematical model for the green vessel scheduling problem, which directly accounts for the carbon dioxide emission costs in sea and at ports of call. The original non-linear model is linearized and then solved using CPLEX. A set of numerical experiments are conducted for a real-life liner shipping route to reveal managerial insights that can be of importance to liner shipping companies. Results indicate that the proposed mathematical model can serve as an efficient planning tool for liner shipping companies and may assist with evaluation of various carbon dioxide taxation schemes. Increasing carbon dioxide tax may substantially change the design of vessel schedules, incur additional route service costs, and improve the environmental sustainability. However, the effects from increasing carbon dioxide tax on the marine container terminal operations are found to be very limited.

  4. Modeling the Role of the Glymphatic Pathway and Cerebral Blood Vessel Properties in Alzheimer’s Disease Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyrtsos, Christina Rose; Baras, John S.

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia in the elderly, affecting over 10% population over the age of 65 years. Clinically, AD is described by the symptom set of short term memory loss and cognitive decline, changes in mentation and behavior, and eventually long-term memory deficit as the disease progresses. On imaging studies, significant atrophy with subsequent increase in ventricular volume have been observed. Pathology on post-mortem brain specimens demonstrates the classic findings of increased beta amyloid (Aβ) deposition and the presence of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) within affected neurons. Neuroinflammation, dysregulation of blood-brain barrier transport and clearance, deposition of Aβ in cerebral blood vessels, vascular risk factors such as atherosclerosis and diabetes, and the presence of the apolipoprotein E4 allele have all been identified as playing possible roles in AD pathogenesis. Recent research has demonstrated the importance of the glymphatic system in the clearance of Aβ from the brain via the perivascular space surrounding cerebral blood vessels. Given the variety of hypotheses that have been proposed for AD pathogenesis, an interconnected, multilayer model offers a unique opportunity to combine these ideas into a single unifying model. Results of this model demonstrate the importance of vessel stiffness and heart rate in maintaining adequate clearance of Aβ from the brain. PMID:26448331

  5. Vessel grounding in entrance channels: case studies and physical model tests

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tulsi, K

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available . It was found that high speed impacts of 8 to 12 knots at 10° to the channel side slopes have the potential to damage the hull and require enormous tug forces to re-float the grounded vessel....

  6. Intravenous thrombolysis of large vessel occlusions is associated with higher hospital costs than small vessel strokes: a rationale for developing stroke severity-based financial models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Ansaar T; Evans, Kim; Riggs, Jack E; Hobbs, Gerald R

    2016-04-01

    Owing to their severity, large vessel occlusion (LVO) strokes may be associated with higher costs that are not reflected in current coding systems. This study aimed to determine whether intravenous thrombolysis costs are related to the presence or absence of LVO. Patients who had undergone intravenous thrombolysis over a 9-year period were divided into LVO and no LVO (nLVO) groups based on admission CT angiography. The primary outcome was hospital cost per admission. Secondary outcomes included admission duration, 90-day clinical outcome, and discharge destination. 119 patients (53%) had LVO and 104 (47%) had nLVO. Total mean±SD cost per LVO patient was $18,815±14,262 compared with $15,174±11,769 per nLVO patient (p=0.04). Hospital payments per admission were $17,338±13,947 and $15,594±16,437 for LVO and nLVO patients, respectively (p=0.4). A good outcome was seen in 33 LVO patients (27.7%) and in 69 nLVO patients (66.4%) (OR 0.2, 95% CI 0.1 to 0.3, pregression analysis after controlling for comorbidities showed the presence of LVO to be an independent predictor of higher total hospital costs. The presence or absence of LVO is associated with significant differences in hospital costs, outcomes, admission duration, and home discharge. These differences can be important when developing systems of care models for acute ischemic stroke. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  7. A comparison of elastic-plastic and variable modulus-cracking constitutive models for prestressed concrete reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, C.A.; Smith, P.D.

    1979-01-01

    Numerical prediction of the behavior of prestressed concrete reactor vessels (PCRVs) under static, dynamic and long term loadings is complicated by the currently ill-defined behavior of concrete under stress and the three-dimensional nature of PCRVs. Which constitutive model most closely approximates the behavior of concrete in PCRVs under load has not yet been decided. Many equations for accurately modeling the three-dimensional behavior of PCRVs tax the capability of a most up-to-date computing system. The main purpose of this paper is to compare the characteristics of two constitutive models which have been proposed for concrete, variable modulus cracking model and elastic-plastic model. Moreover, the behavior of typical concrete structures was compared, the materials of which obey these constitutive laws. The response to internal pressure of PCRV structure, the constitutive models for concrete, the test problems using a thick-walled concrete ring and a rectangular concrete plate, and the analysis of an axisymmetric concrete pressure vessel PV-26 using the variable modulus cracking model of the ADINA code are explained. The variable modulus cracking model can predict the behavior of reinforced concrete structures well into the range of nonlinear behavior. (Kako, I.)

  8. Maury Journals - US Vessels

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — U.S. vessels observations, after the 1853 Brussels Conference that set International Maritime Standards, modeled after Maury Marine Standard Observations.

  9. SAR in human head model due to resonant wireless power transfer system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chao; Liu, Guoqiang; Li, Yanhong; Song, Xianjin

    2016-04-29

    Efficient mid-range wireless power transfer between transmitter and the receiver has been achieved based on the magnetic resonant coupling method. The influence of electromagnetic field on the human body due to resonant wireless power transfer system (RWPT) should be taken into account during the design process of the system. To analyze the transfer performance of the RWPT system and the change rules of the specific absorption rate (SAR) in the human head model due to the RWPT system. The circuit-field coupling method for a RWPT system with consideration of the displacement current was presented. The relationship between the spiral coil parameters and transfer performance was studied. The SAR in the human head model was calculated under two different exposure conditions. A system with output power higher than 10 W at 0.2 m distance operating at a frequency of approximately 1 MHz was designed. The FEM simulation results show the peak SAR value is below the safety limit which appeared when the human head model is in front of the transmitter. The simulation results agreed well with the experimental results, which verified the validity of the analysis and design.

  10. Modeling with finite element of the upper head spring; Modelizacion con elementos finitos del resorte del cabezal superior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz Cardador, J.; Cerrain Arranz, A.

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this work is the development of a model of finite element of the upper head spring so that it can be used as a tool in the design of the same. For this purpose, simulates the behavior to compression spring of the integrated head 17 x 17 using a numerical model and are validated with experimental results obtained in tests conducted by ENUSA. The validated model is a new tool to the spring design of the upper head whose use can extend both for the evaluation of current designs as for the evaluation of new modifications.

  11. Design of pressure vessels using shape optimization: An integrated approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carbonari, R.C., E-mail: ronny@usp.br [Department of Mechatronic Engineering, Escola Politecnica da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Mello Moraes, 2231 Sao Paulo, SP 05508-900 (Brazil); Munoz-Rojas, P.A., E-mail: pablo@joinville.udesc.br [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Universidade do Estado de Santa Catarina, Bom Retiro, Joinville, SC 89223-100 (Brazil); Andrade, E.Q., E-mail: edmundoq@petrobras.com.br [CENPES, PDP/Metodos Cientificos, Petrobras (Brazil); Paulino, G.H., E-mail: paulino@uiuc.edu [Newmark Laboratory, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 205 North Mathews Av., Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 158 Mechanical Engineering Building, 1206 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801-2906 (United States); Nishimoto, K., E-mail: knishimo@usp.br [Department of Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering, Escola Politecnica da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Mello Moraes, 2231 Sao Paulo, SP 05508-900 (Brazil); Silva, E.C.N., E-mail: ecnsilva@usp.br [Department of Mechatronic Engineering, Escola Politecnica da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Mello Moraes, 2231 Sao Paulo, SP 05508-900 (Brazil)

    2011-05-15

    Previous papers related to the optimization of pressure vessels have considered the optimization of the nozzle independently from the dished end. This approach generates problems such as thickness variation from nozzle to dished end (coupling cylindrical region) and, as a consequence, it reduces the optimality of the final result which may also be influenced by the boundary conditions. Thus, this work discusses shape optimization of axisymmetric pressure vessels considering an integrated approach in which the entire pressure vessel model is used in conjunction with a multi-objective function that aims to minimize the von-Mises mechanical stress from nozzle to head. Representative examples are examined and solutions obtained for the entire vessel considering temperature and pressure loading. It is noteworthy that different shapes from the usual ones are obtained. Even though such different shapes may not be profitable considering present manufacturing processes, they may be competitive for future manufacturing technologies, and contribute to a better understanding of the actual influence of shape in the behavior of pressure vessels. - Highlights: > Shape optimization of entire pressure vessel considering an integrated approach. > By increasing the number of spline knots, the convergence stability is improved. > The null angle condition gives lower stress values resulting in a better design. > The cylinder stresses are very sensitive to the cylinder length. > The shape optimization of the entire vessel must be considered for cylinder length.

  12. A Semi-analytical model for creep life prediction of butt-welded joints in cylindrical vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarrabi, K.

    2001-01-01

    There have been many investigations on the life assessment of high temperature weldments used in cylindrical pressure vessels, pipes and tubes over the last two decades or so. But to the author's knowledge, currently, there exists no practical, economical and relatively accurate model for creep life assessment of butt-welded joints in cylindrical pressure vessels. This paper describes a semi-analytical and economical model for creep life assessment of butt-welded joints. The first stage of the development of the model is described where the model takes into account the material discontinuities at the welded joint only. The development of the model to include other factors such as geometrical stress concentrations, residual stresses, etc will be reported separately. It has been shown that the proposed model can estimate the redistributions of stresses in the weld and Haz with an error of less than 4%. It has also been shown that the proposed model can conservatively predict the creep life of a butt-welded joint with an error of less than 16%

  13. A phenomenological analysis of melt progression in the lower head of a pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seiler, J.M., E-mail: jean-marie.seiler@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DTN, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Tourniaire, B. [EDF/Septen, Lyon (France)

    2014-03-15

    Highlights: • We propose a phenomenological description of melt progression into the lower head. • We examine changes in heat loads on the vessel. • Heat loads are more severe than emphasized by the bounding situation assumption. • Both primary circuit and ex-vessel reflooding are necessary for in-vessel retention. • Vessel failure conditions are examined. - Abstract: The analysis of in-vessel corium cooling (IVC) and retention (IVR) involves the description of very complex and transient physical phenomena. To get round this difficulty, “bounding” situations are often emphasized for the demonstration of corium coolability, by vessel flooding and/or by reactor pit flooding. This approach however comes up against its own limitations. More realistic melt progression scenarios are required to provide plausible corium configurations and vessel failure conditions. Work to develop more realistic melt progression scenarios has been done at CEA, in collaboration with EDF. Development has concentrated on the French 1300 MWe PWR, considering both dry scenarios and the possibility of flooding of the RPC (reactor primary circuit) and/or the reactor pit. The models used for this approach have been derived from the analysis of the TMI2 accident and take benefit from the lessons derived from several programs related to pool thermal hydraulics (BALI, COPO, ACOPO, etc.), material interactions (RASPLAV, MASCA), critical heat flux (CHF) on the external surface of the vessel (KAIST, SULTAN, ULPU), etc. Important conclusions of this work are as follows: (a)After the start of corium melting and onset of melt formation in the core at low pressure (∼1 to 5 bars), it seems questionable that RPV (reactor pressure vessel) reflooding alone would be sufficient to achieve corium retention in the vessel; (b)If the vessel is not cooled externally, it may fail due to local heat-up before the whole core fuel inventory is relocated in the lower head; (c)Even if the vessel is

  14. Model of passage of vessels through the waterway section forming the schedule in the course of its implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Plotnikov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The model of passage of vessels through a section of the waterway is considered, which independently determines the order of passage of vessels with limited capacity of sections of the track. Such a model will consist of a number of standard algorithmic networks. When composing the schedule in the model, the following preference rules were used: first-come-first-served (that is, if the ship occupied the workplace, this decision is not canceled; The rule of the shortest operation; For the swamps the priority of vessels going downstream (the direction of flow from the source to the drain. An algorithmic network that implements the search for an acceptable schedule must implement the following for conflicting operations: the operation that has started is not interrupted; If several operations simultaneously claim for one workplace (port, reach and their number is greater than its throughput, then the conflict resolution is carried out in accordance with predefined preference rules or based on the user's decision; If the operation is waiting for the release of the workplace, it does not occupy the resource; The resource is returned immediately after the operation is completed. The considered design of algorithmic networks allows to resolve the conflict, with a simultaneous resource request, to take the resource once, remember that it was received and return it after the end of the operation, then the resource receives a contra-controlling operation for execution. However, the use of this design introduces redundancy into the model, even if it is used only for conflicting operations. The model is presented in the language of algorithmic networks and is implemented in the system of modeling automation KOGNITRON.

  15. Analysis of lower head failure with simplified models and a finite element code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koundy, V. [CEA-IPSN-DPEA-SEAC, Service d' Etudes des Accidents, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Nicolas, L. [CEA-DEN-DM2S-SEMT, Service d' Etudes Mecaniques et Thermiques, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Combescure, A. [INSA-Lyon, Lab. Mecanique des Solides, Villeurbanne (France)

    2001-07-01

    The objective of the OLHF (OECD lower head failure) experiments is to characterize the timing, mode and size of lower head failure under high temperature loading and reactor coolant system pressure due to a postulated core melt scenario. Four tests have been performed at Sandia National Laboratories (USA), in the frame of an OECD project. The experimental results have been used to develop and validate predictive analysis models. Within the framework of this project, several finite element calculations were performed. In parallel, two simplified semi-analytical methods were developed in order to get a better understanding of the role of various parameters on the creep phenomenon, e.g. the behaviour of the lower head material and its geometrical characteristics on the timing, mode and location of failure. Three-dimensional modelling of crack opening and crack propagation has also been carried out using the finite element code Castem 2000. The aim of this paper is to present the two simplified semi-analytical approaches and to report the status of the 3D crack propagation calculations. (authors)

  16. Resistor mesh model of a spherical head: part 1: applications to scalp potential interpolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauveau, N; Morucci, J P; Franceries, X; Celsis, P; Rigaud, B

    2005-11-01

    A resistor mesh model (RMM) has been implemented to describe the electrical properties of the head and the configuration of the intracerebral current sources by simulation of forward and inverse problems in electroencephalogram/event related potential (EEG/ERP) studies. For this study, the RMM representing the three basic tissues of the human head (brain, skull and scalp) was superimposed on a spherical volume mimicking the head volume: it included 43 102 resistances and 14 123 nodes. The validation was performed with reference to the analytical model by consideration of a set of four dipoles close to the cortex. Using the RMM and the chosen dipoles, four distinct families of interpolation technique (nearest neighbour, polynomial, splines and lead fields) were tested and compared so that the scalp potentials could be recovered from the electrode potentials. The 3D spline interpolation and the inverse forward technique (IFT) gave the best results. The IFT is very easy to use when the lead-field matrix between scalp electrodes and cortex nodes has been calculated. By simple application of the Moore-Penrose pseudo inverse matrix to the electrode cap potentials, a set of current sources on the cortex is obtained. Then, the forward problem using these cortex sources renders all the scalp potentials.

  17. Modelling of in-vessel retention after relocation of corium into the lower plenum - Evaluation of the temperature field and of the viscoplastic deformation of the vessel wall. Reactor safety research, project No.:150 1254 - Final report; Beitrag zur Modellierung der Schmelzerueckhaltung im RDB nach Verlagerung von Corium in das untere Plenum - Berechnung des Temperaturfeldes und der viskoplastischen Verformung der Behaelterwand. Reaktorsicherheitsforschung, Vorhaben-Nr.: 150 1254 - Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altstadt, E.; Willschuetz, H.G. [Forschungszentrum Rossendorf e.V. (FZR), Dresden (Germany)

    2005-01-01

    Considering the hypothetical core melt down scenario for a light water reactor (LWR) a possible failure mode of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and its failure time has to be investigated for a determination of the loadings on the containment. Several experiments have been performed accompanied with material properties evaluation, theoretical, and numerical work. At the Institute Of Safety Research of the FZR a finite element model has been developed simulating the thermal processes and the viscoplastic behaviour of the vessel wall. An advanced model for creep and material damage has been established and has been validated using experimental data. The thermal hydraulic and the mechanical calculations are sequentially and recursively coupled. The model is capable of evaluating fracture time and fracture position of a vessel with an internally heated melt pool. The model was applied to pre- and post test calculations for the FOREVER test series representing the RPV of a PWR in the scale of 1:10. These experiments were performed at the Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm. The results of the calculations can be summarised as follows: The creeping process is caused by the simultaneous presence of high temperature (>600 C) and pressure (>1 MPa). The hot focus region is the most endangered zone exhibiting the highest creep strain rates. The exact level of temperature and pressure has an influence on the vessel failure time but not on the failure position. The failure time can be predicted with an uncertainty of 20 to 25%. This uncertainty is caused by the large scatter and the high temperature sensitivity of the viscoplastic properties of the RPV steel. Contrary to the hot focus region, the lower centre of the vessel head exhibits a higher strength because of the lower temperatures in this zone. The lower part moves down without significant deformation. Therefore it can be assumed, that the vessel failure can be retarded or prevented by supporting this range. The

  18. Lower head failure analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rempe, J.L.; Thinnes, G.L.; Allison, C.M.; Cronenberg, A.W.

    1991-01-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission is sponsoring a lower vessel head research program to investigate plausible modes of reactor vessel failure in order to determine (a) which modes have the greatest likelihood of occurrence during a severe accident and (b) the range of core debris and accident conditions that lead to these failures. This paper presents the methodology and preliminary results of an investigation of reactor designs and thermodynamic conditions using analytic closed-form approximations to assess the important governing parameters in non-dimensional form. Preliminary results illustrate the importance of vessel and tube geometrical parameters, material properties, and external boundary conditions on predicting vessel failure. Thermal analyses indicate that steady-state temperature distributions will occur in the vessel within several hours, although the exact time is dependent upon vessel thickness. In-vessel tube failure is governed by the tube-to-debris mass ratio within the lower head, where most penetrations are predicted to fail if surrounded by molten debris. Melt penetration distance is dependent upon the effective flow diameter of the tube. Molten debris is predicted to penetrate through tubes with a larger effective flow diameter, such as a boiling water reactor (BWR) drain nozzle. Ex-vessel tube failure for depressurized reactor vessels is predicted to be more likely for a BWR drain nozzle penetration because of its larger effective diameter. At high pressures (between ∼0.1 MPa and ∼12 MPa) ex-vessel tube rupture becomes a dominant failure mechanism, although tube ejection dominates control rod guide tube failure at lower temperatures. However, tube ejection and tube rupture predictions are sensitive to the vessel and tube radial gap size and material coefficients of thermal expansion

  19. Construction of tomographic head model using sectioned photographic images of cadaver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Choon Sik; Lee, Jai Ki; Park, Jin Seo; Chung, Min Suk

    2004-01-01

    Tomographic models are currently the most complete, developed and realistic models of the human anatomy. They have been used to estimate organ doses for diagnostic radiation examination and radiotherapy treatment planning, and radiation protection. The quality of original anatomic images is a key factor to build a quality tomographic model. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan, from which most of current tomographic models are constructed, have their inherent shortcomings. In this study, a tomographic model of Korean adult male head was constructed by using serially sectioned photographs of cadaver. The cadaver was embedded, frozen, serially sectioned and photographed by high resolution digital camera at 0.2 mm interval. The contours of organs and tissues in photographs were segmented by several trained anatomists. The 120 segmented images of head at 2mm interval were converted into binary files and ported into Monte Carlo code to perform an example calculation of organ dose. Whole body tomographic model will be constructed by using the procedure developed in this study

  20. Evolution of shear stress, protein expression, and vessel area in an animal model of arterial dilatation in hemodialysis grafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Sanjay; Fu, Alex A.; Misra, Khamal D.; Glockner, James F.; Mukhopadyay, Debabrata

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the wall shear stress, protein expression of matrix metalloproteinases-2 (MMP-2), -9 (MMP-9), and the inhibitors (tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1), and -2 (TIMP-2)), and vessel area over time in a porcine model for hemodialysis polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) grafts. Materials and methods In 21 pigs, subtotal renal infarction was performed and 28 days later, a PTFE graft was placed to connect the carotid artery to the ipsilateral jugular vein. Phase contrast MR was used to measure blood flow and vessel area at 1, 3, 7, and 14 days after graft placement. Wall shear stress was estimated from Poiseuille’s law. Animals were sacrificed at day 3 (N=7), day 7 (N=7), and day 14 (N=7) and expression of MMP-2, MMP-9, TIMP-1, and TIMP-2 were determined at the grafted and control arteries. Results The mean wall shear stress of the grafted artery was higher than the control artery at all time points (P<0.05). It peaked by day 3 and decreased by days 7–14 as the vessel area nearly doubled. By days 7–14, there was a significant increase in active MMP-2 followed by a significant increase in pro and active MMP-9 by day 14 (P<0.05, grafted artery versus control). TIMP-1 expression peaked by day 7 and then decreased while TIMP-2 expression was decreased at days 7–14. Conclusions The wall shear stress of the grafted artery peaks by day 3 with increased MMP-2 activity by days 7–14 followed by pro and active MMP-9 by day 14 and the vessel area nearly doubled. PMID:20123196

  1. VVER vessel steel corrosion at interaction with molten corium in oxidizing atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechta, S.V. [Alexandrov Research Institute of Technologies (NITI), Sosnovy Bor (Russian Federation)], E-mail: bechta@sbor.spb.su; Granovsky, V.S.; Khabensky, V.B.; Krushinov, E.V.; Vitol, S.A.; Sulatsky, A.A. [Alexandrov Research Institute of Technologies (NITI), Sosnovy Bor (Russian Federation); Gusarov, V.V.; Almiashev, V.I. [Institute of Silicate Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences (ISCh RAS), St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Lopukh, D.B. [SPb State Electrotechnical University (SPbGETU), St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Bottomley, D. [EUROPAISCHE KOMMISSION, Joint Research Centre Institut fuer Transurane (ITU), Karlsruhe (Germany); Fischer, M. [AREVA NP GmbH, Erlangen (Germany); Piluso, P. [CEA/DEN/DSNI, Saclay (France); Miassoedov, A.; Tromm, W. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe (Germany); Altstadt, E. [Forschungszentrum Rossendorf (FZR), Dresden (Germany); Fichot, F. [IRSN/DPAM/SEMCA, St. Paul lez Durance (France); Kymalainen, O. [FORTUM Nuclear Services Ltd., Espoo (Finland)

    2009-06-15

    The long-term in-vessel corium retention (IVR) in the lower head bears a risk of the vessel wall deterioration caused by steel corrosion. The ISTC METCOR Project has studied physicochemical impact of prototypic coria having different compositions in air and steam and has generated valuable experimental data on vessel steel corrosion. It is found that the corrosion rate is sensitive to corium composition, but the composition of oxidizing above-melt atmosphere (air, steam) has practically no influence on it. A model of the corrosion process that integrates the experimental data, is proposed and used for development of correlations.

  2. VVER vessel steel corrosion at interaction with molten corium in oxidizing atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bechta, S.V.; Granovsky, V.S.; Khabensky, V.B.; Krushinov, E.V.; Vitol, S.A.; Sulatsky, A.A.; Gusarov, V.V.; Almiashev, V.I.; Lopukh, D.B.; Bottomley, D.; Fischer, M.; Piluso, P.; Miassoedov, A.; Tromm, W.; Altstadt, E.; Fichot, F.; Kymalainen, O.

    2009-01-01

    The long-term in-vessel corium retention (IVR) in the lower head bears a risk of the vessel wall deterioration caused by steel corrosion. The ISTC METCOR Project has studied physicochemical impact of prototypic coria having different compositions in air and steam and has generated valuable experimental data on vessel steel corrosion. It is found that the corrosion rate is sensitive to corium composition, but the composition of oxidizing above-melt atmosphere (air, steam) has practically no influence on it. A model of the corrosion process that integrates the experimental data, is proposed and used for development of correlations.

  3. Modeling of the consequences of an air ingress in the vessel on the source term calculation in a severe accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beuzet, E.

    2010-01-01

    This work deals with severe accidents in nuclear power plants with an air ingress in the vessel. Air, which is very oxidizing, enhances noticeably ruthenium release, due to a high fuel oxidation. Oxygen affinity is decreasing between zircaloy cladding, fuel and ruthenium which is released from fuel as volatile and radio-toxic oxides. The main objective was to develop models for cladding and fuel oxidation and ruthenium release and implement them in the severe accident code MAAP. For each phenomenon, the literature study contributes to establish numerical models, validated against specific experiments. Cladding oxidation by air leads to a dense zirconia layer and, after cracking, a porous zirconia. Its modelling was validated against QUENCH-10 (KIT) and PARAMETER-SF4 (LUCH) experiments and 'NUREG' oxide mass gain law was selected as the best current compromise. Ruthenium release is modelled as an instantaneous oxide volatilisation at the fuel surface, controlled by fuel oxidation, which is itself based on a surface reaction assumption. These models were validated against a selected set of VERCORS (CEA) experiments. Ruthenium release is well-reproduced, particularly for air and steam atmospheres. To finish, an accidental scenario with air ingress in the vessel was simulated: a first value was given for the time needed to completely release ruthenium still present in core and was compared to the other studies. This simulation underlines the high ruthenium release under air conditions. (author)

  4. Automatic extraction of soft tissues from 3D MRI head images using model driven analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Hao; Yamamoto, Shinji; Imao, Masanao.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents an automatic extraction system (called TOPS-3D : Top Down Parallel Pattern Recognition System for 3D Images) of soft tissues from 3D MRI head images by using model driven analysis algorithm. As the construction of system TOPS we developed, two concepts have been considered in the design of system TOPS-3D. One is the system having a hierarchical structure of reasoning using model information in higher level, and the other is a parallel image processing structure used to extract plural candidate regions for a destination entity. The new points of system TOPS-3D are as follows. (1) The TOPS-3D is a three-dimensional image analysis system including 3D model construction and 3D image processing techniques. (2) A technique is proposed to increase connectivity between knowledge processing in higher level and image processing in lower level. The technique is realized by applying opening operation of mathematical morphology, in which a structural model function defined in higher level by knowledge representation is immediately used to the filter function of opening operation as image processing in lower level. The system TOPS-3D applied to 3D MRI head images consists of three levels. First and second levels are reasoning part, and third level is image processing part. In experiments, we applied 5 samples of 3D MRI head images with size 128 x 128 x 128 pixels to the system TOPS-3D to extract the regions of soft tissues such as cerebrum, cerebellum and brain stem. From the experimental results, the system is robust for variation of input data by using model information, and the position and shape of soft tissues are extracted corresponding to anatomical structure. (author)

  5. The influence of surrogate blood vessels on the impact response of a physical model of the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnaik, Yednesh; Beillas, Philippe; Demetropoulos, Constantine K; Hardy, Warren N; Yang, King H; King, Albert I

    2004-11-01

    Cerebral blood vessels are an integral part of the brain and may play a role in the response of the brain to impact. The purpose of this study was to quantify the effects of surrogate vessels on the deformation patterns of a physical model of the brain under various impact conditions. Silicone gel and tubing were used as surrogates for brain tissue and blood vessels, respectively. Two aluminum cylinders representing a coronal section of the brain were constructed. One cylinder was filled with silicone gel only, and the other was filled with silicone gel and silicone tubing arranged in the radial direction in the peripheral region. An array of markers was embedded in the gel in both cylinders to facilitate strain calculation via high-speed video analysis. Both cylinders were simultaneously subjected to a combination of linear and angular acceleration using a two-segment pendulum. Marker motion was tracked, and maximum shear strain (MSS) and maximum principal strain (MPS) were calculated using markers clustered in groups of three. Four test series were conducted. Peak angular acceleration varied from 2,600 to 26,000 rad/s2, and peak angular speed varied from 17 to 29 rad/s. For a given impact condition, the test-to-test variation of these values was less than 5.5%. For all clusters, the peak MSS and peak MPS for both physical models were less than 26% and 32%, respectively. For 90% of the cluster locations, the absolute value of the difference in peak MSS and peak MPS between the physical models was 4% and 6%, respectively. In the physical model with tubing, strain tended to decrease in the periphery (near to the tubing), while it tended to increase toward the center (away from the tubing). Strain amplitudes were found to be sensitive to the peak angular speeds. In general, this study suggests that the vasculature could influence the deformation response of the brain.

  6. Implementation of a practical model for light and heat distribution using laser-induced thermotherapy near to a large vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verhey, J F; Mohammed, Y; Ludwig, A; Giese, K

    2003-01-01

    This paper introduces a simulation model for light and heat transport in tissues including perfusion effects. The model enables an efficient simulation of the damaged zone induced with an optical fibre for laser interstitial thermotherapy (LITT). It is designed specially for, but not limited to, tissue ablation in the neck region near to vessels. We describe in detail the effects of the rise in temperature caused by the absorption of light in tissue, using the heat equation and including the cooling effects of flow in vessels and of microperfusion in tissue in order to determine the extent of thermal damage. The extent of the necrosis zone is calculated with a damage function at each point of a finite element method (FEM) mesh. The FEM mesh is implemented with FEMLAB 2.3 as an add-on for finite element modelling for Matlab 6.5. LITT for tumour ablation in liver and some other anatomical regions is a well-known and established method (Bundesaerztekammer und Kassenaerztliche Bundesvereinigung 2002 Assessment der Bundesaerztekammer und der Kassenaerztlichen Bundesvereinigung, Koeln). Investigations of treatments using LITT in the neck region are still in progress. We propose a refined model to validate the LITT method in the future in another anatomic region, e.g., in the highly sensitive region of the neck. Our calculations show that in order to induce a lesion with a maximum diameter of about 1 cm near to a large vessel, an application time between 3 and 4 min is needed using a laser power of about 10 W with a Nd:YAG 1064 nm radiation wavelength

  7. Implementation of a practical model for light and heat distribution using laser-induced thermotherapy near to a large vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verhey, J F [Department of Medical Informatics, University of Goettingen, Robert-Koch-Str. 40, D-37075 Goettingen (Germany); Mohammed, Y [Department of Medical Informatics, University of Goettingen, Robert-Koch-Str. 40, D-37075 Goettingen (Germany); Ludwig, A [Department of Craneo-Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Goettingen, Robert-Koch-Str. 40, D-37075 Goettingen (Germany); Giese, K [Department of Medical Informatics, University of Goettingen, Robert-Koch-Str. 40, D-37075 Goettingen (Germany)

    2003-11-07

    This paper introduces a simulation model for light and heat transport in tissues including perfusion effects. The model enables an efficient simulation of the damaged zone induced with an optical fibre for laser interstitial thermotherapy (LITT). It is designed specially for, but not limited to, tissue ablation in the neck region near to vessels. We describe in detail the effects of the rise in temperature caused by the absorption of light in tissue, using the heat equation and including the cooling effects of flow in vessels and of microperfusion in tissue in order to determine the extent of thermal damage. The extent of the necrosis zone is calculated with a damage function at each point of a finite element method (FEM) mesh. The FEM mesh is implemented with FEMLAB 2.3 as an add-on for finite element modelling for Matlab 6.5. LITT for tumour ablation in liver and some other anatomical regions is a well-known and established method (Bundesaerztekammer und Kassenaerztliche Bundesvereinigung 2002 Assessment der Bundesaerztekammer und der Kassenaerztlichen Bundesvereinigung, Koeln). Investigations of treatments using LITT in the neck region are still in progress. We propose a refined model to validate the LITT method in the future in another anatomic region, e.g., in the highly sensitive region of the neck. Our calculations show that in order to induce a lesion with a maximum diameter of about 1 cm near to a large vessel, an application time between 3 and 4 min is needed using a laser power of about 10 W with a Nd:YAG 1064 nm radiation wavelength.

  8. Parameterisation effect on the behaviour of a head-dependent hydro chain using a nonlinear model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catalao, J.P.S.; Mariano, S.J.P.S.; Mendes, V.M.F.; Ferreira, L.A.F.M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper is on the problem of short-term hydro scheduling (STHS), particularly concerning a head-dependent hydro chain. We use a method based on nonlinear programming (NLP), namely quadratic programming, to consider hydroelectric power generation a function of water discharge and of the head. The method has been applied successfully to solve a test case based on a realistic cascaded hydro system with a negligible computational time requirement and is also applied to show that the role played by reservoirs in the hydro chain do not depend only on their relative position. As a new contribution to earlier studies, which presented reservoir operation rules mainly for medium and long-term planning procedures, we show that the physical data defining hydro chain parameters used in the nonlinear model have an effect on the STHS, implying different optimal storage trajectories for the reservoirs accordingly not only with their position in the hydro chain but also with the new parameterisation defining the data for the hydro system. Moreover, considering head dependency in the hydroelectric power generation, usually neglected for hydro plants with a large storage capacity, provides a better short-term management of the conversion of the potential energy available in the reservoirs into electric energy, which represents a major advantage for the hydroelectric utilities in a competitive electricity market. (author)

  9. Hypothyroidism after primary radiotherapy for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: Normal tissue complication probability modeling with latent time correction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønjom, Marianne Feen; Brink, Carsten; Bentzen, Søren

    2013-01-01

    To develop a normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model of radiation-induced biochemical hypothyroidism (HT) after primary radiotherapy for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) with adjustment for latency and clinical risk factors.......To develop a normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model of radiation-induced biochemical hypothyroidism (HT) after primary radiotherapy for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) with adjustment for latency and clinical risk factors....

  10. Stresses in transition region of VVER-1000 reactor vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Namgung, I. [KEPCO International Nuclear Graduate School, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Nguye, T.L. [KEPCO International Nuclear Graduate School, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); National Research Inst. of Mechanical Engineering, Hanoi City, Vietnam (China)

    2014-07-01

    Most of the western PWR reactor's bottom head is hemi-spherical shape, however for Russian designed VVER family of reactor it is ellipsoidal shape. The transition region from shell side to ellipsoidal head and transition top flange to cylindrical shell develop higher stress concentration than western PWR reactor vessel. This region can be modeled as conical shell with varying thickness. The theoretical derivation of stress in the thick-walled conical cylinder with varying thickness was developed and shown in detail. The results is applied to VVER-1000 reactor vessel of which shell to bottom ellipsoidal shell and shell to upper flange were investigated for stress field. The theoretical calculations were also compared with FEM solutions. An axisymmetric 3D model of VVER-1000 reactor vessel (without closure head) FEM model was created and internal hydrostatic pressure boundary condition was applied. The stress results from FEM and theoretical calculation were compared, and the discrepancies and accuracies of the theoretical results were discussed. (author)

  11. Stresses in transition region of VVER-1000 reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namgung, I.; Nguye, T.L.

    2014-01-01

    Most of the western PWR reactor's bottom head is hemi-spherical shape, however for Russian designed VVER family of reactor it is ellipsoidal shape. The transition region from shell side to ellipsoidal head and transition top flange to cylindrical shell develop higher stress concentration than western PWR reactor vessel. This region can be modeled as conical shell with varying thickness. The theoretical derivation of stress in the thick-walled conical cylinder with varying thickness was developed and shown in detail. The results is applied to VVER-1000 reactor vessel of which shell to bottom ellipsoidal shell and shell to upper flange were investigated for stress field. The theoretical calculations were also compared with FEM solutions. An axisymmetric 3D model of VVER-1000 reactor vessel (without closure head) FEM model was created and internal hydrostatic pressure boundary condition was applied. The stress results from FEM and theoretical calculation were compared, and the discrepancies and accuracies of the theoretical results were discussed. (author)

  12. Behaviour of the nozzle corner region during the first phase of the fatigue test on scaled models of pressure vessels (JRC Vessel A)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jovanovic, A.; Lucia, A.C.; Brunnhuber, R.; Elbaz, J.M.; Schwarz, U.

    1987-01-01

    The work presented here deals mainly with the stress and fracture mechanics aspects of the first phase of the structural reliability experimental program based on the scaled experimental vessel at Ispra. The overall research and experiments make also part of the structural reliability assessment extrapolation pattern for the full-scale structures. The work presented here deals with the problem of the nozzle corner cracks induced by the fatigue under the pressure cycling

  13. Development of a surrogate model for analysis of ex-vessel steam explosion in Nordic type BWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grishchenko, Dmitry, E-mail: dmitry@safety.sci.kth.se; Basso, Simone, E-mail: simoneb@kth.se; Kudinov, Pavel, E-mail: pavel@safety.sci.kth.se

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • Severe accident. • Steam explosion. • Surrogate model. • Sensitivity study. • Artificial neural networks. - Abstract: Severe accident mitigation strategy adopted in Nordic type Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) employs ex-vessel core melt cooling in a deep pool of water below reactor vessel. Energetic fuel–coolant interaction (steam explosion) can occur during molten core release into water. Dynamic loads can threaten containment integrity increasing the risk of fission products release to the environment. Comprehensive uncertainty analysis is necessary in order to assess the risks. Computational costs of the existing fuel–coolant interaction (FCI) codes is often prohibitive for addressing the uncertainties, including the effect of stochastic triggering time. This paper discusses development of a computationally efficient surrogate model (SM) for prediction of statistical characteristics of steam explosion impulses in Nordic BWRs. The TEXAS-V code was used as the Full Model (FM) for the calculation of explosion impulses. The surrogate model was developed using artificial neural networks (ANNs) and the database of FM solutions. Statistical analysis was employed in order to treat chaotic response of steam explosion impulse to variations in the triggering time. Details of the FM and SM implementation and their verification are discussed in the paper.

  14. Development of a Weibull model of cleavage fracture toughness for shallow flaws in reactor pressure vessel material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bass, B.R.; Williams, P.T.; McAfee, W.J.; Pugh, C.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., Heavy-Section Steel Technology Program, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2001-07-01

    A primary objective of the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) -sponsored Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program is to develop and validate technology applicable to quantitative assessments of fracture prevention margins in nuclear reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) containing flaws and subjected to service-induced material toughness degradation. This paper describes an experimental/analytical program for the development of a Weibull statistical model of cleavage fracture toughness for applications to shallow surface-breaking and embedded flaws in RPV materials subjected to multi-axial loading conditions. The experimental part includes both material characterization testing and larger fracture toughness experiments conducted using a special-purpose cruciform beam specimen developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory for applying biaxial loads to shallow cracks. Test materials (pressure vessel steels) included plate product forms (conforming to ASTM A533 Grade B Class 1 specifications) and shell segments procured from a pressurized-water reactor vessel intended for a nuclear power plant. Results from tests performed on cruciform specimens demonstrated that biaxial loading can have a pronounced effect on shallow-flaw fracture toughness in the lower-transition temperature region. A local approach methodology based on a three-parameter Weibull model was developed to correlate these experimentally-observed biaxial effects on fracture toughness. The Weibull model, combined with a new hydrostatic stress criterion in place of the more commonly used maximum principal stress in the kernel of the Weibull stress integral definition, is shown to provide a scaling mechanism between uniaxial and biaxial loading states for 2-dimensional flaws located in the A533-B plate material. The Weibull stress density was introduced as a matrice for identifying regions along a semi-elliptical flaw front that have a higher probability of cleavage initiation. Cumulative

  15. Fluid elastic instability analysis of 1/6th experimental model of PFBR main vessel cooling circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jalaldeen, S.; Ravi, R.; Chellapandi, P.; Bhoje, S.B.

    1993-01-01

    In reactor assembly of Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR), the main vessel (MV) temperature is kept below creep range i.e. less than 427 deg C by way of diverting a small fraction of core flow from the cold pool and sent through the passage between main vessel and an outer cylindrical baffle to cool the vessel. The sodium coning from this, is collected by another inner baffle and then returned to cold pool again. This system is termed as MV cooling circuit. The outer and inner baffles form feeding and restitution collectors respectively. The sodium from the feeding collector flows over the outer baffle and falls through a height of about 0.5 m before impacting on the free surface of sodium in the restitution collector. The fall of sodium may become a source of vibration of the baffles. Such vibrations have been already noted in case of SPX-I during its commissioning stage. For PFBR, the theoretical analysis was done to assess the fluid-elastic instability risks and stability charts were obtained. By this, it was concluded that the operating point (flow rate and fall height) lies within the stable zone. In order to confirm the above analysis results, a series of experiments were proposed. One preliminary experiment on 1/16 th model of MV cooling circuit has been completed. This model has also been analysed theoretically for the fluid- elastic instability, the theoretical analysis involves 2 stage computations. In the first stage, free vibration analysis with fluid structure interaction (FSI) effect for experimental model has been done using INCA (CASTEM 1985) code and all the mode shapes including sloshing are extracted. In the second stage the instability analysis is performed with the free vibration results from INCA. For the instability computations, a code WEIR has been written based on Aita's instability criteria [Aita.S. 1986

  16. Development of a Weibull model of cleavage fracture toughness for shallow flaws in reactor pressure vessel material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bass, B.R.; Williams, P.T.; McAfee, W.J.; Pugh, C.E.

    2001-01-01

    A primary objective of the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) -sponsored Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program is to develop and validate technology applicable to quantitative assessments of fracture prevention margins in nuclear reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) containing flaws and subjected to service-induced material toughness degradation. This paper describes an experimental/analytical program for the development of a Weibull statistical model of cleavage fracture toughness for applications to shallow surface-breaking and embedded flaws in RPV materials subjected to multi-axial loading conditions. The experimental part includes both material characterization testing and larger fracture toughness experiments conducted using a special-purpose cruciform beam specimen developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory for applying biaxial loads to shallow cracks. Test materials (pressure vessel steels) included plate product forms (conforming to ASTM A533 Grade B Class 1 specifications) and shell segments procured from a pressurized-water reactor vessel intended for a nuclear power plant. Results from tests performed on cruciform specimens demonstrated that biaxial loading can have a pronounced effect on shallow-flaw fracture toughness in the lower-transition temperature region. A local approach methodology based on a three-parameter Weibull model was developed to correlate these experimentally-observed biaxial effects on fracture toughness. The Weibull model, combined with a new hydrostatic stress criterion in place of the more commonly used maximum principal stress in the kernel of the Weibull stress integral definition, is shown to provide a scaling mechanism between uniaxial and biaxial loading states for 2-dimensional flaws located in the A533-B plate material. The Weibull stress density was introduced as a matrice for identifying regions along a semi-elliptical flaw front that have a higher probability of cleavage initiation. Cumulative

  17. Novel method for edge detection of retinal vessels based on the model of the retinal vascular network and mathematical morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lei; Zheng, Xiaoxiang; Zhang, Hengyi; Yu, Yajun

    1998-09-01

    Accurate edge detection of retinal vessels is a prerequisite for quantitative analysis of subtle morphological changes of retinal vessels under different pathological conditions. A novel method for edge detection of retinal vessels is presented in this paper. Methods: (1) Wavelet-based image preprocessing. (2) The signed edge detection algorithm and mathematical morphological operation are applied to get the approximate regions that contain retinal vessels. (3) By convolving the preprocessed image with a LoG operator only on the detected approximate regions of retinal vessels, followed by edges refining, clear edge maps of the retinal vessels are fast obtained. Results: A detailed performance evaluation together with the existing techniques is given to demonstrate the strong features of our method. Conclusions: True edge locations of retinal vessels can be fast detected with continuous structures of retinal vessels, less non- vessel segments left and insensitivity to noise. The method is also suitable for other application fields such as road edge detection.

  18. Modeling the Isentropic Head Value of Centrifugal Gas Compressor using Genetic Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safiyullah Ferozkhan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gas compressor performance is vital in oil and gas industry because of the equipment criticality which requires continuous operations. Plant operators often face difficulties in predicting appropriate time for maintenance and would usually rely on time based predictive maintenance intervals as recommended by original equipment manufacturer (OEM. The objective of this work is to develop the computational model to find the isentropic head value using genetic programming. The isentropic head value is calculated from the OEM performance chart. Inlet mass flow rate and speed of the compressor are taken as the input value. The obtained results from the GP computational models show good agreement with experimental and target data with the average prediction error of 1.318%. The genetic programming computational model will assist machinery engineers to quantify performance deterioration of gas compressor and the results from this study will be then utilized to estimate future maintenance requirements based on the historical data. In general, this genetic programming modelling provides a powerful solution for gas compressor operators to realize predictive maintenance approach in their operations.

  19. Effects of exercise training on pulmonary vessel muscularization and right ventricular function in an animal model of COPD

    OpenAIRE

    Hassel, Erlend; Berre, Anne Marie; Skjulsvik, Anne Jarstein; Steinshamn, Sigurd

    2014-01-01

    Background Right ventricular dysfunction in COPD is common, even in the absence of pulmonary hypertension. The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of high intensity interval training (HIIT) on right ventricular (RV) function, as well as pulmonary blood vessel remodeling in a mouse model of COPD. Methods 42 female A/JOlaHsd mice were randomized to exposure to either cigarette smoke or air for 6 hours/day, 5 days/week for 14 weeks. Mice from both groups were further randomized t...

  20. LANL Robotic Vessel Scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webber, Nels W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-25

    Los Alamos National Laboratory in J-1 DARHT Operations Group uses 6ft spherical vessels to contain hazardous materials produced in a hydrodynamic experiment. These contaminated vessels must be analyzed by means of a worker entering the vessel to locate, measure, and document every penetration mark on the vessel. If the worker can be replaced by a highly automated robotic system with a high precision scanner, it will eliminate the risks to the worker and provide management with an accurate 3D model of the vessel presenting the existing damage with the flexibility to manipulate the model for better and more in-depth assessment.The project was successful in meeting the primary goal of installing an automated system which scanned a 6ft vessel with an elapsed time of 45 minutes. This robotic system reduces the total time for the original scope of work by 75 minutes and results in excellent data accumulation and transmission to the 3D model imaging program.

  1. DSTAR: A comprehensive tokamak resistive disruption model for vacuum vessel components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merrill, B.J.; Jardin, S.C.

    1987-01-01

    A computer code, DSTAR, has recently been developed to quantify the surface erosion and induced forces than can occur during major tokamak plasma disruptions. A disruption analysis has been performed for the TFCX fusion device. The limiters and inboard first wall were assumed to be clad with beryllium. Disruption simulations were performed with and without these structures present, to determine their electromagnetic influence. The results with structure show that the ablated wall material is transported poloidally, as well as radially, in the plasma causing the outermost regions of the plasma to cool. The plasma moves downward and deforms while maintaining contact with the lower limiter. This motion maintains the peak impurity radiant source directly above the exposed surface. For the disruption simulation without the vacuum vessel included, the plasma moves radially along the lower limiter until it contacts the inboard wall, causing ablation of this surface as well. The conclusion is drawn that disruption simulations that do not include both the thermal and electromagnetic response of the vaccum vessel will not result in an accurate prediction. (orig.)

  2. 3D CT modeling of hepatic vessel architecture and volume calculation in living donated liver transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frericks, Bernd B.; Caldarone, Franco C.; Savellano, Dagmar Hoegemann; Stamm, Georg; Kirchhoff, Timm D.; Shin, Hoen-Oh; Galanski, Michael; Nashan, Bjoern; Klempnauer, Juergen; Schenk, Andrea; Selle, Dirk; Spindler, Wolf; Peitgen, Heinz-Otto

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a software tool for non-invasive preoperative volumetric assessment of potential donors in living donated liver transplantation (LDLT). Biphasic helical CT was performed in 56 potential donors. Data sets were post-processed using a non-commercial software tool for segmentation, volumetric analysis and visualisation of liver segments. Semi-automatic definition of liver margins allowed the segmentation of parenchyma. Hepatic vessels were delineated using a region-growing algorithm with automatically determined thresholds. Volumes and shapes of liver segments were calculated automatically based on individual portal-venous branches. Results were visualised three-dimensionally and statistically compared with conventional volumetry and the intraoperative findings in 27 transplanted cases. Image processing was easy to perform within 23 min. Of the 56 potential donors, 27 were excluded from LDLT because of inappropriate liver parenchyma or vascular architecture. Two recipients were not transplanted due to poor clinical conditions. In the 27 transplanted cases, preoperatively visualised vessels were confirmed, and only one undetected accessory hepatic vein was revealed. Calculated graft volumes were 1110±180 ml for right lobes, 820 ml for the left lobe and 270±30 ml for segments II+III. The calculated volumes and intraoperatively measured graft volumes correlated significantly. No significant differences between the presented automatic volumetry and the conventional volumetry were observed. A novel image processing technique was evaluated which allows a semi-automatic volume calculation and 3D visualisation of the different liver segments. (orig.)

  3. Field Distribution of Transcranial Static Magnetic Stimulation in Realistic Human Head Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharayil, Joseph J; Goetz, Stefan M; Bernabei, John M; Peterchev, Angel V

    2017-10-10

    The objective of this work was to characterize the magnetic field (B-field) that arises in a human brain model from the application of transcranial static magnetic field stimulation (tSMS). The spatial distribution of the B-field magnitude and gradient of a cylindrical, 5.08 cm × 2.54 cm NdFeB magnet were simulated in air and in a human head model using the finite element method and calibrated with measurements in air. The B-field was simulated for magnet placements over prefrontal, motor, sensory, and visual cortex targets. The impact of magnetic susceptibility of head tissues on the B-field was quantified. Peak B-field magnitude and gradient respectively ranged from 179-245 mT and from 13.3-19.0 T/m across the cortical targets. B-field magnitude, focality, and gradient decreased with magnet-cortex distance. The variation in B-field strength and gradient across the anatomical targets largely arose from the magnet-cortex distance. Head magnetic susceptibilities had negligible impact on the B-field characteristics. The half-maximum focality of the tSMS B-field ranged from 7-12 cm 3 . This is the first presentation and characterization of the three-dimensional (3D) spatial distribution of the B-field generated in a human brain model by tSMS. These data can provide quantitative dosing guidance for tSMS applications across various cortical targets and subjects. The finding that the B-field gradient is high near the magnet edges should be considered in studies where neural tissue is placed close to the magnet. The observation that susceptibility has negligible effects confirms assumptions in the literature. © 2017 International Neuromodulation Society.

  4. Cortical imaging on a head template: a simulation study using a resistor mesh model (RMM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauveau, Nicolas; Franceries, Xavier; Aubry, Florent; Celsis, Pierre; Rigaud, Bernard

    2008-09-01

    The T1 head template model used in Statistical Parametric Mapping Version 2000 (SPM2), was segmented into five layers (scalp, skull, CSF, grey and white matter) and implemented in 2 mm voxels. We designed a resistor mesh model (RMM), based on the finite volume method (FVM) to simulate the electrical properties of this head model along the three axes for each voxel. Then, we introduced four dipoles of high eccentricity (about 0.8) in this RMM, separately and simultaneously, to compute the potentials for two sets of conductivities. We used the direct cortical imaging technique (CIT) to recover the simulated dipoles, using 60 or 107 electrodes and with or without addition of Gaussian white noise (GWN). The use of realistic conductivities gave better CIT results than standard conductivities, lowering the blurring effect on scalp potentials and displaying more accurate position areas when CIT was applied to single dipoles. Simultaneous dipoles were less accurately localized, but good qualitative and stable quantitative results were obtained up to 5% noise level for 107 electrodes and up to 10% noise level for 60 electrodes, showing that a compromise must be found to optimize both the number of electrodes and the noise level. With the RMM defined in 2 mm voxels, the standard 128-electrode cap and 5% noise appears to be the upper limit providing reliable source positions when direct CIT is used. The admittance matrix defining the RMM is easy to modify so as to adapt to different conductivities. The next step will be the adaptation of individual real head T2 images to the RMM template and the introduction of anisotropy using diffusion imaging (DI).

  5. Modeling the Thermal Mechanical Behavior of a 300 K Vacuum Vessel that is Cooled by Liquid Hydrogen in Film Boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, S.Q.; Green, M.A.; Lau, W.

    2004-01-01

    This report discusses the results from the rupture of a thin window that is part of a 20-liter liquid hydrogen vessel. This rupture will spill liquid hydrogen onto the walls and bottom of a 300 K cylindrical vacuum vessel. The spilled hydrogen goes into film boiling, which removes the thermal energy from the vacuum vessel wall. This report analyzes the transient heat transfer in the vessel and calculates the thermal deflection and stress that will result from the boiling liquid in contact with the vessel walls. This analysis was applied to aluminum and stainless steel vessels

  6. TMI-2 Vessel Investigation Project Metallurgical Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diercks, D.R.; Neimark, L.A.

    1990-01-01

    The TMI-2 [Three Mile Island unit 2] Vessel Investigation Project Metallurgical Program at Argonne National Laboratory is a part of the international TMI-2 Vessel Investigation Project being conducted jointly by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). The overall project consists of three phases, namely (1) recovery of material samples from the lower head of the TMI-2 reactor, (2) examination and analysis of the lower head samples and the preparation and testing of archive material subjected to a similar thermal history, and (3) procurement, examination, and analysis of companion core material located adjacent to or near the lower head material. The specific objectives of the ANL Metallurgical Program, which accounts for a major portion of Phase 2, are to prepare metallographic and mechanical test specimen blanks from the TMI-2 lower head material, prepare similar test specimen blanks from suitable archive material subjected to the appropriate thermal processing, determine the mechanical properties of the lower vessel head and archive materials under the conditions of the core-melt accident, and assess the lower head integrity and margin-to-failure during the accident. The ANL work consists of three tasks: (1) archive materials program, (2) fabrication of metallurgical and mechanical test specimens from the TMI-2 pressure vessel samples, and (3) mechanical property characterization of TMI-2 lower pressure vessel head and archive material

  7. Prestressed pressure vessel for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    The pressure vessel consists of a wall, a bottom, and a closure head, the wall being composed of annular segments. The closure head can be seated on the edge of the wall. Wall and closure head have got axial prestressing channels in which through-going steel tendons are arranged. They are concentrated in bundles and held above the head by anchoring devices. Within the prestressing channels of the head there are supporting jackets attached to the edge of the wall and projecting from the head through a coller. The anchoring devices, e.g. anchoring plates, may be optionally supported on the collars of the supporting jackets or on the closure head by means of auxiliary devices. The auxiliary devices for this purpose consist of extension nuts attached to the anchoring plates and closure head connecting shells. The closure head therefore may be drawn off over the anchoring devices. (DG) [de

  8. MIDA: A Multimodal Imaging-Based Detailed Anatomical Model of the Human Head and Neck.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Ida Iacono

    Full Text Available Computational modeling and simulations are increasingly being used to complement experimental testing for analysis of safety and efficacy of medical devices. Multiple voxel- and surface-based whole- and partial-body models have been proposed in the literature, typically with spatial resolution in the range of 1-2 mm and with 10-50 different tissue types resolved. We have developed a multimodal imaging-based detailed anatomical model of the human head and neck, named "MIDA". The model was obtained by integrating three different magnetic resonance imaging (MRI modalities, the parameters of which were tailored to enhance the signals of specific tissues: i structural T1- and T2-weighted MRIs; a specific heavily T2-weighted MRI slab with high nerve contrast optimized to enhance the structures of the ear and eye; ii magnetic resonance angiography (MRA data to image the vasculature, and iii diffusion tensor imaging (DTI to obtain information on anisotropy and fiber orientation. The unique multimodal high-resolution approach allowed resolving 153 structures, including several distinct muscles, bones and skull layers, arteries and veins, nerves, as well as salivary glands. The model offers also a detailed characterization of eyes, ears, and deep brain structures. A special automatic atlas-based segmentation procedure was adopted to include a detailed map of the nuclei of the thalamus and midbrain into the head model. The suitability of the model to simulations involving different numerical methods, discretization approaches, as well as DTI-based tensorial electrical conductivity, was examined in a case-study, in which the electric field was generated by transcranial alternating current stimulation. The voxel- and the surface-based versions of the models are freely available to the scientific community.

  9. Reply to Discussion by Zekai Șen on "Modeling karst spring hydrograph recession based on head drop at sinkholes"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Malcolm S.; Goldscheider, Nico; Li, Guangquan

    2018-02-01

    We are pleased to learn that the model presented in our paper dealing with the "modeling karst spring hydrograph recession based on head drop at sinkholes," published in the Journal of Hydrology in 2016 (Li et al., 2016), is of interest to readers of this journal. Our study presented a new non-exponential model for assessing spring hydrographs in terms of head drop at flooded sinkholes, as an extension of an earlier model proposed by Li and Field (2014). In both papers, we used two spring hydrographs measured in the St. Marks Karst Watershed in northwest Florida to test the applicability and to verify the validity of our models.

  10. Determination of stimulation focality in heterogeneous head models during transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Erik; Hadimani, Ravi; Jiles, David

    2015-03-01

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is an increasingly popular tool used by both the scientific and medical community to understand and treat the brain. TMS has the potential to help people with a wide range of diseases such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, and PTSD, while currently being used to treat people with chronic, drug-resistant depression. Through computer simulations, we are able to see the electric field that TMS induces in anatomical human models, but there is no measure to quantify this electric field in a way that relates to a specific patient undergoing TMS therapy. We propose a way to quantify the focality of the induced electric field in a heterogeneous head model during TMS by relating the surface area of the brain being stimulated to the total volume of the brain being stimulated. This figure would be obtained by conducting finite element analysis (FEA) simulations of TMS therapy on a patient specific head model. Using this figure to assist in TMS therapy will allow clinicians and researchers to more accurately stimulate the desired region of a patient's brain and be more equipped to do comparative studies on the effects of TMS across different patients. This work was funded by the Carver Charitable Trust.

  11. Effective scattering coefficient of the cerebral spinal fluid in adult head models for diffuse optical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custo, Anna; Wells, William M., III; Barnett, Alex H.; Hillman, Elizabeth M. C.; Boas, David A.

    2006-07-01

    An efficient computation of the time-dependent forward solution for photon transport in a head model is a key capability for performing accurate inversion for functional diffuse optical imaging of the brain. The diffusion approximation to photon transport is much faster to simulate than the physically correct radiative transport equation (RTE); however, it is commonly assumed that scattering lengths must be much smaller than all system dimensions and all absorption lengths for the approximation to be accurate. Neither of these conditions is satisfied in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Since line-of-sight distances in the CSF are small, of the order of a few millimeters, we explore the idea that the CSF scattering coefficient may be modeled by any value from zero up to the order of the typical inverse line-of-sight distance, or approximately 0.3 mm-1, without significantly altering the calculated detector signals or the partial path lengths relevant for functional measurements. We demonstrate this in detail by using a Monte Carlo simulation of the RTE in a three-dimensional head model based on clinical magnetic resonance imaging data, with realistic optode geometries. Our findings lead us to expect that the diffusion approximation will be valid even in the presence of the CSF, with consequences for faster solution of the inverse problem.

  12. Integrated Model of the Eye/Optic Nerve Head Biomechanical Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethier, C. R.; Feola, A.; Myers, J. G.; Nelson, E.; Raykin, J.; Samuels, B.

    2017-01-01

    Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome is a concern for long-duration space flight. Previously, it has been suggested that ocular changes observed in VIIP syndrome are related to the cephalad fluid shift that results in altered fluid pressures [1]. We are investigating the impact of changes in intracranial pressure (ICP) using a combination of numerical models, which simulate the effects of various environment conditions, including finite element (FE) models of the posterior eye. The specific interest is to understand how altered pressures due to gravitational changes affect the biomechanical environment of tissues of the posterior eye and optic nerve sheath. METHODS: Additional description of the numerical modeling is provided in the IWS abstract by Nelson et al. In brief, to simulate the effects of a cephalad fluid shift on the cardiovascular and ocular systems, we utilized a lumped-parameter compartment model of these systems. The outputs of this lumped-parameter model then inform boundary conditions (pressures) for a finite element model of the optic nerve head (Figure 1). As an example, we show here a simulation of postural change from supine to 15 degree head-down tilt (HDT), with primary outcomes being the predicted change in strains at the optic nerve head (ONH) region, specifically in the lamina cribrosa (LC), retrolaminar optic nerve, and prelaminar neural tissue (PLNT). The strain field can be decomposed into three orthogonal components, denoted as the first, second and third principal strains. We compare the peak tensile (first principal) and compressive (third principal) strains, since elevated strain alters cell phenotype and induces tissue remodeling. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Our lumped-parameter model predicted an IOP increase of c. 7 mmHg after 21 minutes of 15 degree HDT, which agreed with previous reports of IOP in HDT [1]. The corresponding FEM simulations predicted a relative increase in the magnitudes of the peak tensile

  13. Numerical Modeling of Scour at the Head of a Vertical-Wall Breakwater in Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baykal, C.; Balcı, H. B.; Sumer, B. M.; Fuhrman, D. R.

    2017-12-01

    This study presents a 3D numerical modeling study on the flow and scour at the head of a vertical-wall breakwater in regular waves. The numerical model utilized in the study is based on that given by Jacobsen (2011). The present model has been applied successfully to the scour and backfilling beneath submarine pipelines by Fuhrman et al. (2014), and around a vertical cylindrical pile mounted on a horizontal plane sediment bed by Baykal et al. (2015, 2017). The model is composed of two main modules. The first module is the hydrodynamic model where Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) equations are solved with a k-ω turbulence closure. The second module is the morphologic model which comprises five sub-modules, namely; bed load, suspended load, sand slide, bed evolution and 3D mesh motion. The model is constructed in open-source CFD toolbox OpenFOAM. In this study, the model is applied to experimental data sets of Sumer and Fredsoe (1997) on the scour around a vertical-wall breakwater with a circular round head. Here, it is given the preliminary results of bed evolution of Test-8 of Sumer and Fredsoe (1997) in which a vertical-wall breakwater head with a width of B=140 mm is subjected to oscillatory flow with Tw=2.0 s and maximum orbital velocity at the bed Um=22cm/s, resulting in a Keulegan-Carpenter number, KC=3.14, close to KC experienced in real-life situations (KC = O(1)). The grain size is d=0.17 mm. The Shields parameter in the test case is given as θc=0.11, larger than the critical value for the initiation of motion implying that the scour is in the live-bed regime. The computational domain used in the simulations has the following dimensions: Length, l=40B, Width, w=20B, and Height, h=2B. The total number of cells is O(105) in the simulations. The scoured bed profile computed at the end of 3 periods of oscillatory flow of Test-8 is given in the figure below. The color scale in the figure is given for the ratio of bed elevation to the width of breakwater

  14. Study of the influence of the laterality of mobile phone use on the SAR induced in two head models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanmi, Amal; Varsier, Nadège; Hadjem, Abdelhamid; Conil, Emmanuelle; Picon, Odile; Wiart, Joe

    2013-05-01

    The objective of this paper is to investigate and to analyse the influence of the laterality of mobile phone use on the exposure of the brain to radio-frequencies (RF) and electromagnetic fields (EMF) from different mobile phone models using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The study focuses on the comparison of the specific absorption rate (SAR) induced on the right and left sides of two numerical adult and child head models. The heads are exposed by both phone models operating in GSM frequency bands for both ipsilateral and contralateral configurations. A slight SAR difference between the two sides of the heads is noted. The results show that the variation between the left and the right sides is more important at 1800 MHz for an ipsilateral use. Indeed, at this frequency, the variation can even reach 20% for the SAR10g and the SAR1g induced in the head and in the brain, respectively. Moreover, the average SAR induced by the mobile phone in the half hemisphere of the brain in ipsilateral exposure is higher than in contralateral exposure. Owing to the superficial character of energy deposition at 1800 MHz, this difference in the SAR induced for the ipsilateral and contralateral usages is more significant at 1800 MHz than at 900 MHz. The results have shown that depending on the phantom head models, the SAR distribution in the brain can vary because of differences in anatomical proportions and in the geometry of the head models. The induced SAR in child head and in sub-regions of the brain is significantly higher (up to 30%) compared to the adult head. This paper confirms also that the shape/design of the mobile and the location of the antenna can have a large influence at high frequency on the exposure of the brain, particularly on the SAR distribution and on the distinguished brain regions.

  15. Effects of head down tilt on episcleral venous pressure in a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavery, W J; Kiel, J W

    2013-06-01

    In humans, changing from upright to supine elicits an approximately 10 mmHg increase in cephalic venous pressure caused by the hydrostatic column effect, but episcleral venous pressure (EVP) and intraocular pressure (IOP) rise by only a few mmHg. The dissociation of the small increases in IOP and EVP compared to the larger increase in cephalic venous pressure suggests a regulatory mechanism controlling EVP. The aim of the present study was to determine if the rabbit model is suitable to study the effects of postural changes on EVP despite its short hydrostatic column. In anesthetized rabbits (n = 43), we measured arterial pressure (AP), IOP, and orbital venous pressure (OVP) by direct cannulation; carotid blood flow (BFcar) by transit time ultrasound, heart rate (HR) by digital cardiotachometer, and EVP with a servonull micropressure system. The goal of the protocol was to obtain measurement of supine EVP for ≈10 min, followed by ≈10 min of EVP measurement with the rabbit in a head down tilt. The data were analyzed by paired t-tests and the results reported as the mean ± standard error of the mean. In a separate group of animals (n = 35), aqueous flow was measured by fluorophotometry. This protocol entailed measurement of aqueous flow in the supine position for ≈60 min, followed by ≈60 min of aqueous flow measurement with the rabbit in a head down tilt. From supine to head down tilt, AP and BFcar were unchanged, IOP increased by 2.3 ± 0.4 mmHg (p measurements of the pressures and systemic parameters likely involved in the EVP responses to posture change. The present results indicate directionally similar EVP and IOP responses to tilt as occur in humans and, as in humans, the responses are smaller than would be expected from the change in the hydrostatic column height. Also, as in humans, the model reveals no change in aqueous flow during head down tilt. We conclude the rabbit model is appropriate for studying the mechanisms responsible for the relative

  16. Characterization of an Ex vivo Femoral Head Model Assessed by Markers of Bone and Cartilage Turnover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Suzi Hoegh; Goettrup, Anne Sofie; Thomsen, Gedske; Christensen, Søren Tvorup; Schultz, Nikolaj; Henriksen, Kim; Bay-Jensen, Anne-Christine; Karsdal, Morten Asser

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The pathophysiology of osteoarthritis involves the whole joint and is characterized by cartilage degradation and altered subchondral bone turnover. At present, there is a need for biological models that allow investigation of the interactions between the key cellular players in bone/cartilage: osteoblasts, osteoclasts, and chondrocytes. Methods: Femoral heads from 3-, 6-, 9-, and 12-week-old female mice were isolated and cultured for 10 days in serum-free media in the absence or presence of IGF-I (100 nM) (anabolic stimulation) or OSM (10 ng/mL) + TNF-α (20 ng/mL) (catabolic stimulation). Histology on femoral heads before and after culture was performed, and the growth plate size was examined to evaluate the effects on cell metabolism. The conditioned medium was examined for biochemical markers of bone and cartilage degradation/formation. Results: Each age group represented a unique system regarding the interest of bone or cartilage metabolism. Stimulation over 10 days with OSM + TNF-α resulted in depletion of proteoglycans from the cartilage surface in all ages. Furthermore, OSM + TNF-α decreased growth plate size, whereas IGF-I increased the size. Measurements from the conditioned media showed that OSM + TNF-α increased the number of osteoclasts by approximately 80% and induced bone and cartilage degradation by approximately 1200% and approximately 2600%, respectively. Stimulation with IGF-I decreased the osteoclast number and increased cartilage formation by approximately 30%. Conclusion: Biochemical markers and histology together showed that the catabolic stimulation induced degradation and the anabolic stimulation induced formation in the femoral heads. We propose that we have established an explant whole-tissue model for investigating cell-cell interactions, reflecting parts of the processes in the pathogenesis of joint degenerative diseases. PMID:26069585

  17. Detailed modeling of KALININ-3 NPP VVER-1000 reactor pressure vessel by the coupled system code ATHLET/BIPR-VVER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikonov, S.P.; Velkov, K.; Pautz, A.

    2011-01-01

    The paper gives an overview of the recent developments of a new reactor pressure vessel (RPV) model of VVER-1000 for the coupled system code ATHLET/BIPR-VVER. Based on the previous experience a methodology is worked out for modeling the RPV in a pseudo-3D way with the help of a multiple parallel thermal-hydraulic channel scheme that follows the hexagonal fuel assembly structure from the bottom to the top of the reactor. The results of the first application of the new modeling are discussed on the base of the OECD/NEA coupled code benchmark for Kalinin-3 NPP transient. Coolant mass flow distributions in reactor volume of VVER 1000 reactor are presented and discussed. It is shown that along the core height a mass flow re-distribution of the coolant takes place starting approximately at an axial layer located 1 meter below the core outlet. (author)

  18. Numerical modeling of in-vessel melt water interaction in large scale PWR`s

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolev, N.I. [Siemens AG, KWU NA-M, Erlangen (Germany)

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents a comparison between IVA4 simulations and FARO L14, L20 experiments. Both experiments were performed with the same geometry but under different initial pressures, 51 and 20 bar respectively. A pretest prediction for test L21 which is intended to be performed under an initial pressure of 5 bar is also presented. The strong effect of the volume expansion of the evaporating water at low pressure is demonstrated. An in-vessel simulation for a 1500 MW el. PWR is presented. The insight gained from this study is: that at no time are conditions for the feared large scale melt-water intermixing at low pressure in force, with this due to the limiting effect of the expansion process which accelerates the melt and the water into all available flow paths. (author)

  19. Resistor mesh model of a spherical head: part 2: a review of applications to cortical mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauveau, N; Morucci, J P; Franceries, X; Celsis, P; Rigaud, B

    2005-11-01

    A resistor mesh model (RMM) has been validated with reference to the analytical model by consideration of a set of four dipoles close to the cortex. The application of the RMM to scalp potential interpolation was detailed in Part 1. Using the RMM and the same four dipoles, the different methods of cortical mapping were compared and have shown the potentiality of this RMM for obtaining current and potential cortical distributions. The lead-field matrices are well-adapted tools, but the use of a square matrix of high dimension does not permit the inverse solution to be improved in the presence of noise, as a regularisation technique is necessary with noisy data. With the RMM, the transfer matrix and the cortical imaging technique proved to be easy to implement. Further development of the RMM will include application to more realistic head models with more accurate conductivities.

  20. Characterization, modelization and optimization of the Double Chooz acrylic vessels: physics impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Queval, R.

    2010-01-01

    Double Chooz is one of the new generation experiments designed to measure the last unknown leptonic mixing angle, θ 13 . Il studies the oscillations of electronic antineutrinos produced by the Chooz nuclear power plant. Our knowledge on θ 13 can be improved by reducing both statistical errors (increasing both the detector size and run time) and systematic errors (using identical near and far detectors). Also, special care is dedicated to analyze backgrounds generated by natural radioactivity and cosmic ray interactions. The work presented here mostly focuses on Target and Gamma Catcher acrylic vessels, in the core of the detector. A new material designed for the experiment was developed since no pre-existing material met the required conditions. This material was characterized optically, to maximize light transmission and reduce the induced dead zone. With this in mind, a physics study of the Target vessel design was performed to identify any spectral distortion or count rate modification it could induce. As far as backgrounds are concerned, the material is radio-pure enough so that the singles rate coming from acrylic is negligible compared to the one from the photomultiplier tubes. An unknown single source is coming from the external contamination in the detector, such as dust. This is why we defined cleanliness goals for the detector fabrication and integration. These goals were met, thanks to well-defined protocols and careful team work. After three years of data taking, Double Chooz could disentangle an oscillation signal at 3α for sin 2 2θ 13 ≥ 0.05 - 0.06. If no oscillations were observed, the experiment could give an upper limit on sin 2 2θ 13 of 0.02 - 0.03 at 90 % C.L. (author) [fr

  1. Non-linear analysis up to rupture of a model of a multi-cavity prestressed concrete pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebora, B.; Uffer, F.; Zimmermann, T.

    1977-01-01

    Within the frame of a German-Swiss agreement concerning the project of a high-temperature nuclear plant (HHT), the Swiss Federal Institute for Reactor Research (EIR, in Wuerlingen) has developed an integrated variant of an helium-cooled high temperature reactor of 3x500 Mwe. A test on a model (1:20) of this prestressed concrete nuclear vessel with multiple cavities has been carried out under the supervision of 'Bonnard et Gardel ingenieurs-conseils SA (BG). The aim of this analysis is to determine the mechanism of ruin and ultimate load of the structure. In addition, comparison with the results of the test emphasizes the mathematical model with a view to its utilisation for the analysis of any prestressed concrete nuclear vessel. The principal interest of this paper is to show the accuracy of non-linear analysis of a complex massive structure with the test results and the evolution of the behaviour of the structure from the apparition of the first crack up to the ruin by rupture of the steel wires. (Auth.)

  2. SU-G-TeP1-08: LINAC Head Geometry Modeling for Cyber Knife System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, B; Li, Y; Liu, B; Guo, B; Xu, X; Wei, R; Zhou, F [Beihang University, Beijing, Beijing (China); Xu, S [PLA General Hospital, Beijing, Beijing (China); Wu, Q [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Knowledge of the LINAC head information is critical for model based dose calculation algorithms. However, the geometries are difficult to measure precisely. The purpose of this study is to develop linac head models for Cyber Knife system (CKS). Methods: For CKS, the commissioning data were measured in water at 800mm SAD. The measured full width at half maximum (FWHM) for each cone was found greater than the nominal value, this was further confirmed by additional film measurement in air. Diameter correction, cone shift and source shift models (DCM, CSM and SSM) are proposed to account for the differences. In DCM, a cone-specific correction is applied. For CSM and SSM, a single shift is applied to the cone or source physical position. All three models were validated with an in-house developed pencil beam dose calculation algorithm, and further evaluated by the collimator scatter factor (Sc) correction. Results: The mean square error (MSE) between nominal diameter and the FWHM derived from commissioning data and in-air measurement are 0.54mm and 0.44mm, with the discrepancy increasing with cone size. Optimal shift for CSM and SSM is found to be 9mm upward and 18mm downward, respectively. The MSE in FWHM is reduced to 0.04mm and 0.14mm for DCM and CSM (SSM). Both DCM and CSM result in the same set of Sc values. Combining all cones at SAD 600–1000mm, the average deviation from 1 in Sc of DCM (CSM) and SSM is 2.6% and 2.2%, and reduced to 0.9% and 0.7% for the cones with diameter greater than 15mm. Conclusion: We developed three geometrical models for CKS. All models can handle the discrepancy between vendor specifications and commissioning data. And SSM has the best performance for Sc correction. The study also validated that a point source can be used in CKS dose calculation algorithms.

  3. Parallel Solver for Diffuse Optical Tomography on Realistic Head Models With Scattering and Clear Regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Placati, Silvio; Guermandi, Marco; Samore, Andrea; Scarselli, Eleonora Franchi; Guerrieri, Roberto

    2016-09-01

    Diffuse optical tomography is an imaging technique, based on evaluation of how light propagates within the human head to obtain the functional information about the brain. Precision in reconstructing such an optical properties map is highly affected by the accuracy of the light propagation model implemented, which needs to take into account the presence of clear and scattering tissues. We present a numerical solver based on the radiosity-diffusion model, integrating the anatomical information provided by a structural MRI. The solver is designed to run on parallel heterogeneous platforms based on multiple GPUs and CPUs. We demonstrate how the solver provides a 7 times speed-up over an isotropic-scattered parallel Monte Carlo engine based on a radiative transport equation for a domain composed of 2 million voxels, along with a significant improvement in accuracy. The speed-up greatly increases for larger domains, allowing us to compute the light distribution of a full human head ( ≈ 3 million voxels) in 116 s for the platform used.

  4. Solving the forward problem in EEG source analysis by spherical and fdm head modeling: a comparative analysis - biomed 2009

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vatta, F.; Meneghini, F.; Esposito, F.; Mininel, S.; Di Salle, F.

    2009-01-01

    Neural source localization techniques based on electroencephalography (EEG) use scalp potential data to infer the location of underlying neural activity. This procedure entails modeling the sources of EEG activity and modeling the head volume conduction process to link the modeled sources to the

  5. HYDROïD humanoid robot head with perception and emotion capabilities :Modeling, Design and Experimental Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samer eAlfayad

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of the HYDROïD humanoid robot project, this paper describes the modeling and design of an electrically actuated head mechanism. Perception and emotion capabilities are considered in the design process. Since HYDROïD humanoid robot is hydraulically actuated, the choice of electrical actuation for the head mechanism addressed in this paper is justified. Considering perception and emotion capabilities leads to a total number of 15 degrees of freedom for the head mechanism which are split on four main sub-mechanisms: the neck, the mouth, the eyes and the eyebrows. Biological data and kinematics performances of human head are taken as inputs of the design process. A new solution of uncoupled eyes is developed to possibly address the master-slave process that links the human eyes as well as vergence capabilities. Modeling each sub-system is carried out in order to get equations of motion, their frequency responses and their transfer functions. The neck pitch rotation is given as a study example. Then, the head mechanism performances are presented through a comparison between model and experimental results validating the hardware capabilities. Finally, the head mechanism is integrated on the HYDROïD upper-body. An object tracking experiment coupled with emotional expressions is carried out to validate the synchronization of the eye rotations with the body motions.

  6. Mechanical behaviour of pressure vessel head penetrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faidy, C.; Ternon, F.; Vagner, J.; Vaindirlis, M.

    1994-01-01

    After leaks on Bugey 3 penetrations EdF and Framatome have started a study on the stress corrosion phenomenon of Inconel 600. In this paper, limited to the mechanical aspect, we present an estimation of in service stresses, the experimental program on mockup for visualize the surface stress and the noxiousness of potential cracks. 5 figs., 6 tabs., 5 refs

  7. State of the Art Report for the In-Vessel Late Core Melt Progression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hee Dong; Kang, Kyoung Ho; Park, Rae Joon

    2009-04-01

    The formation of corium pool in the reactor vessel lower head and its behavior is still an important issue. This issue is closely related to understanding of the core melting, its course, critical phases and timing during severe accidents and the influence of these processes on the accident progression, especially the evaluation of in-vessel retention by external reactor vessel cooling (IVR-ERVC) as a severe accident management strategy. The previous researches focused on the quisi-steady state behavior of molten corium pool in the lower head and related in-vessel retention problem. However, questions of the feasibility of the in-vessel retention concept for high power density reactor and uncertainties due to layering effect require further studies. These researches are rather essential to consider the whole evolution of the accident including formation and growth of the molten pool and the characteristic of corium arrival in the lower head and molten pool behavior after the core debris remelting. The general objective of the LIVE program performed at FzK is to study the corium pool formation and behavior with emphasis on the transient behavior through the large scale 3-D experiments. In this report, description of LIVE experimental facility and results of performance test are briefly summarized and the process to select the simulant is depicted. Also, the results of LIVE L1 and L2 tests and analytical models are included. These experimental results are very useful to development and verification of the model of molten corium pool behavior

  8. Review of the TMI-2 accident evaluation and vessel investigation projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ladekarl Thomsen, Knud

    1998-03-01

    The results of the TMI-2 Accident Evaluation Programme and the Vessel Investigation Project have been reviewed as part of a literature study on core meltdown and in-vessel coolability. The emphasis is placed on the late phase melt progression, which is of special relevance to the NKS-sponsored RAK-2.1 project on Severe Accident Phenomenology. The body of the report comprises three main sections, The TMI-2 Accident Scenario, Core Region and Relocation Path Investigations, and Lower Head Investigations. In the final discussion, the lower head gap formation mechanism is explained in terms of thermal contraction and fracturing of the debris crust. This model seems more plausible than the MAAP model based on creep expansion of the lower head. (au) 1 tab., 33 ills., 31 refs.

  9. A new model for anisotropic damage in concrete and its application to the prediction of failure of some containment vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badel, P.-B.; Godard, V.; Leblond, J.-B.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to propose a new model for damage in concrete structures which incorporates such complex features as damage anisotropy and asymmetry between tension and compression, while being expressed in a format well suited for numerical applications and involving a limited number of material parameters which can be determined from standard experiments. A crude version of the model involving a single tonsorial internal variable representing damage in tension, and a single material parameter, is presented first. The predictions of this simple model are satisfactory in simple tension, but not so in simple compression. As a remedy, various refinements are then introduced in a second version of the model involving an additional tonsorial or scalar internal variable representing damage in compression, and five additional material parameters. An example of determination of the model parameters using experimental stress-strain curves in simple tension and compression, plus failure envelopes in biaxial tension/compression, is presented next. The model is finally applied to the numerical prediction of the failure of some containment vessel subjected to some large internal pressure, with a comparison with calculations based on a simpler isotropic variant of the model using a single scalar damage variable. The results illustrate the relevance of models incorporating both asymmetry between tension and compression and anisotropy of damage for simulations of industrial concrete structures. (authors)

  10. Dynamic head-neck stabilization and modulation with perturbation bandwidth investigated using a multisegment neuromuscular model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Happee, R. (Riender); de Bruijn, E. (Edo); Forbes, P.A. (Patrick A.); F.C.T. van der Helm (Frans C.)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractThe human head-neck system requires continuous stabilization in the presence of gravity and trunk motion. We investigated contributions of the vestibulocollic reflex (VCR), the cervicocollic reflex (CCR), and neck muscle co-contraction to head-in-space and head-on-trunk stabilization,

  11. Dynamic head-neck stabilization and modulation with perturbation bandwidth investigated using a multisegment neuromuscular model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Happee, R.; de Bruijn, E.; Forbes, P.A.; van der Helm, F.C.T.

    2017-01-01

    The human head-neck system requires continuous stabilization in the presence of gravity and trunk motion. We investigated contributions of the vestibulocollic reflex (VCR), the cervicocollic reflex (CCR), and neck muscle co-contraction to head-in-space and head-on-trunk stabilization, and

  12. Stroke type differentiation using spectrally constrained multifrequency EIT: evaluation of feasibility in a realistic head model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malone, Emma; Jehl, Markus; Arridge, Simon; Betcke, Timo; Holder, David

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the application of multifrequency electrical impedance tomography (MFEIT) to imaging the brain in stroke patients. The use of MFEIT could enable early diagnosis and thrombolysis of ischaemic stroke, and therefore improve the outcome of treatment. Recent advances in the imaging methodology suggest that the use of spectral constraints could allow for the reconstruction of a one-shot image. We performed a simulation study to investigate the feasibility of imaging stroke in a head model with realistic conductivities. We introduced increasing levels of modelling errors to test the robustness of the method to the most common sources of artefact. We considered the case of errors in the electrode placement, spectral constraints, and contact impedance. The results indicate that errors in the position and shape of the electrodes can affect image quality, although our imaging method was successful in identifying tissues with sufficiently distinct spectra. (paper)

  13. Temperature elevation in the eye of anatomically based human head models for plane-wave exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirata, A; Watanabe, S; Fujiwara, O; Kojima, M; Sasaki, K; Shiozawa, T

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the temperature elevation in the eye of anatomically based human head models for plane-wave exposures. The finite-difference time-domain method is used for analyzing electromagnetic absorption and temperature elevation. The eyes in the anatomic models have average dimensions and weight. Computational results show that the ratio of maximum temperature in the lens to the eye-average SAR (named 'heating factor for the lens') is almost uniform (0.112-0.147 deg. C kg W -1 ) in the frequency region below 3 GHz. Above 3 GHz, this ratio increases gradually with an increase of frequency, which is attributed to the penetration depth of an electromagnetic wave. Particular attention is paid to the difference in the heating factor for the lens between this study and earlier works. Considering causes clarified in this study, compensated heating factors in all these studies are found to be in good agreement

  14. Heat transfer between relocated materials and the RPV lower head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rempe, J.L.; Knudson, D.L. [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kohriyama, T. [INSS, Fukui (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    Questions about the coolability of a continuous mass of relocated corium were raised during the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) Vessel Investigation Project (VIP) Post-accident examinations indicate that nearly half of the material that relocated to the vessel lower head during the TMI-2 accident formed a cohesive or ''continuous'' layer. TMI-2 VIP results and other evidence suggest that conduction through this continuous layer of solidified corium materials was assisted by other cooling mechanisms. Because increased knowledge about in-vessel coolability of corium materials may assist reactor designers in demonstrating that their concepts are passively safe, there is international interest in this topic. However, data are needed to identify what cooling mechanism(s) occurred and to develop a validated model for predicting this cooling. Corium cooling models significantly impact predictions for subsequent accident progression, such as the estimated time and mode of vessel failure. Hence, improved cooling models will provide a much needed, missing component of severe accident analyses. This paper provides a critical review of research investigating the coolability of corium relocating to a water-filled lower head. Where possible, existing models and data for predicting cooling are quantitatively compared; and governing relationships are identified. Key phenomena that should be incorporated into models for predicting this heat transfer are discussed, and deficiencies in current models and available data for predicting cooling are noted. Recommendations for improving these models and for obtaining data to validate these models are also provided. (author)

  15. Heat transfer between relocated materials and the RPV lower head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rempe, J.L.; Knudson, D.L.; Kohriyama, T.

    2001-01-01

    Questions about the coolability of a continuous mass of relocated corium were raised during the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) Vessel Investigation Project (VIP) Post-accident examinations indicate that nearly half of the material that relocated to the vessel lower head during the TMI-2 accident formed a cohesive or ''continuous'' layer. TMI-2 VIP results and other evidence suggest that conduction through this continuous layer of solidified corium materials was assisted by other cooling mechanisms. Because increased knowledge about in-vessel coolability of corium materials may assist reactor designers in demonstrating that their concepts are passively safe, there is international interest in this topic. However, data are needed to identify what cooling mechanism(s) occurred and to develop a validated model for predicting this cooling. Corium cooling models significantly impact predictions for subsequent accident progression, such as the estimated time and mode of vessel failure. Hence, improved cooling models will provide a much needed, missing component of severe accident analyses. This paper provides a critical review of research investigating the coolability of corium relocating to a water-filled lower head. Where possible, existing models and data for predicting cooling are quantitatively compared; and governing relationships are identified. Key phenomena that should be incorporated into models for predicting this heat transfer are discussed, and deficiencies in current models and available data for predicting cooling are noted. Recommendations for improving these models and for obtaining data to validate these models are also provided. (author)

  16. MRI-Based Multiscale Model for Electromagnetic Analysis in the Human Head with Implanted DBS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Ida Iacono

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Deep brain stimulation (DBS is an established procedure for the treatment of movement and affective disorders. Patients with DBS may benefit from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI to evaluate injuries or comorbidities. However, the MRI radio-frequency (RF energy may cause excessive tissue heating particularly near the electrode. This paper studies how the accuracy of numerical modeling of the RF field inside a DBS patient varies with spatial resolution and corresponding anatomical detail of the volume surrounding the electrodes. A multiscale model (MS was created by an atlas-based segmentation using a 1 mm3 head model (mRes refined in the basal ganglia by a 200 μm2 ex-vivo dataset. Four DBS electrodes targeting the left globus pallidus internus were modeled. Electromagnetic simulations at 128 MHz showed that the peak of the electric field of the MS doubled (18.7 kV/m versus 9.33 kV/m and shifted 6.4 mm compared to the mRes model. Additionally, the MS had a sixfold increase over the mRes model in peak-specific absorption rate (SAR of 43.9 kW/kg versus 7 kW/kg. The results suggest that submillimetric resolution and improved anatomical detail in the model may increase the accuracy of computed electric field and local SAR around the tip of the implant.

  17. Heads Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Connect with Us HEADS UP Apps Reshaping the Culture Around Concussion in Sports Get HEADS UP on Your Web Site Concussion ... HEADS UP on your web site! Create a culture of safety for young athletes Officials, learn how you can ... UP to Providers HEADS UP to Youth Sports HEADS UP to School Sports HEADS UP to ...

  18. Rose Bengal Photothrombosis by Confocal Optical Imaging In Vivo: A Model of Single Vessel Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talley Watts, Lora; Zheng, Wei; Garling, R Justin; Frohlich, Victoria C; Lechleiter, James Donald

    2015-06-23

    In vivo imaging techniques have increased in utilization due to recent advances in imaging dyes and optical technologies, allowing for the ability to image cellular events in an intact animal. Additionally, the ability to induce physiological disease states such as stroke in vivo increases its utility. The technique described herein allows for physiological assessment of cellular responses within the CNS following a stroke and can be adapted for other pathological conditions being studied. The technique presented uses laser excitation of the photosensitive dye Rose Bengal in vivo to induce a focal ischemic event in a single blood vessel. The video protocol demonstrates the preparation of a thin-skulled cranial window over the somatosensory cortex in a mouse for the induction of a Rose Bengal photothrombotic event keeping injury to the underlying dura matter and brain at a minimum. Surgical preparation is initially performed under a dissecting microscope with a custom-made surgical/imaging platform, which is then transferred to a confocal microscope equipped with an inverted objective adaptor. Representative images acquired utilizing this protocol are presented as well as time-lapse sequences of stroke induction. This technique is powerful in that the same area can be imaged repeatedly on subsequent days facilitating longitudinal in vivo studies of pathological processes following stroke.

  19. 3-D trajectory model for MDT using micro-spheres implanted within large blood vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choomphon-anomakhun, Natthaphon; Natenapit, Mayuree

    2016-09-01

    Implant assisted magnetic drug targeting (IA-MDT) using ferromagnetic spherical targets implanted within large blood vessels and subjected to a uniform externally applied magnetic field (H0) has been investigated and reported for the first time. The capture areas (As) of magnetic drug carrier particles (MDCPs) were determined from the analysis of particle trajectories simulated from equations of motion. Then, the effects of various parameters, such as types of ferromagnetic materials in the targets and MDCPs, blood flow rates, mass fraction of the ferromagnetic material in the MDCPs, average radii of MDCPs (Rp) and the strength of H0 on the As were obtained. Furthermore, the effects of saturation magnetization of the ferromagnetic materials in the MDCPs and within the targets on the As were analyzed. After this, the suitable strengths of H0 and Rp for IA-MDT designs were reported. Dimensionless As, ranging from 2 to 7, was obtained with Rp ranging from 500 to 2500 nm, μ0H0 less than 0.8 T and a blood flow rate of 0.1 m s-1. The target-MDCP materials considered are iron-iron, iron-magnetite and SS409-magnetite, respectively.

  20. Intravenous injection of artificial red cells and subsequent dye laser irradiation causes deep vessel impairment in an animal model of port-wine stain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rikihisa, Naoaki; Tominaga, Mai; Watanabe, Shoji; Mitsukawa, Nobuyuki; Saito, Yoshiaki; Sakai, Hiromi

    2018-03-15

    Our previous study proposed using artificial blood cells (hemoglobin vesicles, Hb-Vs) as photosensitizers in dye laser treatment for port-wine stains (PWSs). Dye laser photons are absorbed by red blood cells (RBCs) and hemoglobin (Hb) mixture, which potentially produce more heat and photocoagulation and effectively destroy endothelial cells. Hb-Vs combination therapy will improve clinical outcomes of dye laser treatment for PWSs because very small vessels do not contain sufficient RBCs and they are poor absorbers/heaters of lasers. In the present study, we analyzed the relationship between vessel depth from the skin surface and vessel distraction through dye laser irradiation following intravenous Hb-Vs injection using a chicken wattle model. Hb-Vs were administered and chicken wattles underwent high-energy irradiation at energy higher than in the previous experiments. Hb-Vs location in the vessel lumen was identified to explain its photosensitizer effect using human Hb immunostaining of the irradiated wattles. Laser irradiation with Hb-Vs can effectively destroy deep vessels in animal models. Hb-Vs tend to flow in the marginal zone of both small and large vessels. Increasing laser power combined with Hb-Vs injection contributed for deep vessel impairment because of the synergetic effect of both methods. Newly added Hb tended to flow near the target endothelial cells of the laser treatment. In Hb-Vs and RBC mixture, heat transfer to endothelial cells from absorbers/heater may increase. Hb-Vs function as photosensitizers to destroy deep vessels within a restricted distance that the photon can reach.

  1. Containment vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zbirohowski-Koscia, K.F.; Roberts, A.C.

    1980-01-01

    A concrete containment vessel for nuclear reactors is disclosed that is spherical and that has prestressing tendons disposed in first, second and third sets, the tendons of each set being all substantially concentric and centred around a respective one of the three orthogonal axes of the sphere; the tendons of the first set being anchored at each end at a first anchor rib running around a circumference of the vessel, the tendons of the second set being anchored at each end at a second anchor rib running around a circumference of the sphere and disposed at 90 0 to the first rib, and the tendons of the third set being anchored some to the first rib and the remainder to the second rib. (author)

  2. Anatomical Reproducibility of a Head Model Molded by a Three-dimensional Printer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Kosuke; Nemoto, Masaaki; Masuda, Hiroyuki; Okonogi, Shinichi; Nomoto, Jun; Harada, Naoyuki; Sugo, Nobuo; Miyazaki, Chikao

    2015-01-01

    We prepared rapid prototyping models of heads with unruptured cerebral aneurysm based on image data of computed tomography angiography (CTA) using a three-dimensional (3D) printer. The objective of this study was to evaluate the anatomical reproducibility and accuracy of these models by comparison with the CTA images on a monitor. The subjects were 22 patients with unruptured cerebral aneurysm who underwent preoperative CTA. Reproducibility of the microsurgical anatomy of skull bone and arteries, the length and thickness of the main arteries, and the size of cerebral aneurysm were compared between the CTA image and rapid prototyping model. The microsurgical anatomy and arteries were favorably reproduced, apart from a few minute regions, in the rapid prototyping models. No significant difference was noted in the measured lengths of the main arteries between the CTA image and rapid prototyping model, but errors were noted in their thickness (p printer. It was concluded that these models are useful tools for neurosurgical simulation. The thickness of the main arteries and size of cerebral aneurysm should be comprehensively judged including other neuroimaging in consideration of errors.

  3. An efficient modeling of fine air-gaps in tokamak in-vessel components for electromagnetic analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Dong Keun; Pak, Sunil; Jhang, Hogun

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A simple and efficient modeling technique is introduced to avoid undesirable massive air mesh which is usually encountered at the modeling of fine structures in tokamak in-vessel component. ► This modeling method is based on the decoupled nodes at the boundary element mocking the air gaps. ► We demonstrated the viability and efficacy, comparing this method with brute force modeling of air-gaps and effective resistivity approximation instead of detail modeling. ► Application of the method to the ITER machine was successfully carried out without sacrificing computational resources and speed. - Abstract: A simple and efficient modeling technique is presented for a proper analysis of complicated eddy current flows in conducting structures with fine air gaps. It is based on the idea of replacing a slit with the decoupled boundary of finite elements. The viability and efficacy of the technique is demonstrated in a simple problem. Application of the method to electromagnetic load analyses during plasma disruptions in ITER has been successfully carried out without sacrificing computational resources and speed. This shows the proposed method is applicable to a practical system with complicated geometrical structures.

  4. Finite Element Model of the human head validated by the reconstruction of a real child sport accident

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brichtová, E.; Jiroušek, Ondřej; Gál, P.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 82, č. 3 (2009), s. 175-180 ISSN 1211-3395 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP103/07/P483 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20710524 Keywords : paediatric brain injury * finite element models * head trauma * injury models Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  5. The impact of vessel size on vulnerability curves: data and models for within-species variability in saplings of aspen, Populus tremuloides Michx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jing; Tyree, Melvin T

    2010-07-01

    The objective of this study was to quantify the relationship between vulnerability to cavitation and vessel diameter within a species. We measured vulnerability curves (VCs: percentage loss hydraulic conductivity versus tension) in aspen stems and measured vessel-size distributions. Measurements were done on seed-grown, 4-month-old aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx) grown in a greenhouse. VCs of stem segments were measured using a centrifuge technique and by a staining technique that allowed a VC to be constructed based on vessel diameter size-classes (D). Vessel-based VCs were also fitted to Weibull cumulative distribution functions (CDF), which provided best-fit values of Weibull CDF constants (c and b) and P(50) = the tension causing 50% loss of hydraulic conductivity. We show that P(50) = 6.166D(-0.3134) (R(2) = 0.995) and that b and 1/c are both linear functions of D with R(2) > 0.95. The results are discussed in terms of models of VCs based on vessel D size-classes and in terms of concepts such as the 'pit area hypothesis' and vessel pathway redundancy.

  6. Calculation of electrical potentials on the surface of a realistic head model by finite differences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemieux, L.; McBride, A.; Hand, J.W.

    1996-01-01

    We present a method for the calculation of electrical potentials at the surface of realistic head models from a point dipole generator based on a 3D finite-difference algorithm. The model was validated by comparing calculated values with those obtained algebraically for a three-shell spherical model. For a 1.25 mm cubic grid size, the mean error was 4.9% for a superficial dipole (3.75 mm from the inner surface of the skull) pointing in the radial direction. The effect of generator discretization and node spacing on the accuracy of the model was studied. Three values of the node spacing were considered: 1, 1.25 and 1.5 mm. The mean relative errors were 4.2, 6.3 and 9.3%, respectively. The quality of the approximation of a point dipole by an array of nodes in a spherical neighbourhood did not depend significantly on the number of nodes used. The application of the method to a conduction model derived from MRI data is demonstrated. (author)

  7. A comparative analysis of reactor lower head debris cooling models employed in the existing severe accident analysis codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, K.I.; Kim, D.H.; Kim, S.B.; Kim, H.D.

    1998-08-01

    MELCOR and MAAP4 are the representative severe accident analysis codes which have been developed for the integral analysis of the phenomenological reactor lower head corium cooling behavior. Main objectives of the present study is to identify merits and disadvantages of each relevant model through the comparative analysis of the lower plenum corium cooling models employed in these two codes. The final results will be utilized for the development of LILAC phenomenological models and for the continuous improvement of the existing MELCOR reactor lower head models, which are currently being performed at the KAERI. For these purposes, first, nine reference models are selected featuring the lower head corium behavior based on the existing experimental evidences and related models. Then main features of the selected models have been critically analyzed, and finally merits and disadvantages of each corresponding model have been summarized in the view point of realistic corium behavior and reasonable modeling. Being on these evidences, summarized and presented the potential improvements for developing more advanced models. The present study has been focused on the qualitative comparison of each model and so more detailed quantitative analysis is strongly required to obtain the final conclusions for their merits and disadvantages. In addition, in order to compensate the limitations of the current model, required further studies relating closely the detailed mechanistic models with the molten material movement and heat transfer based on phase-change in the porous medium, to the existing simple models. (author). 36 refs

  8. FOREVER Experiments on Thermal and Mechanical Behavior of a Reactor Pressure Vessel during a Severe Accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sehgal, B.R.; Nourgaliev, R.R.; Dinh, T.N.; Karbojian, A.; Green, J.A.; Bui, V.A.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the FOREVER (Failure Of Reactor Vessel Retention) experimental program, which is currently underway at the Division of Nuclear Power Safety, Royal Institute of Technology (RIT/NPS). The objectives of the FOREVER experiments are to obtain data and develop validated models (i) on the melt coolability process inside the vessel, in the presence of water (in particular, on the efficacy of the postulated gap cooling to preclude vessel failure); and (ii) on the lower head failure due to the creep process in the absence of water inside and/or outside the lower head. The facility employs 1/10.-scale carbon steel vessels of 0.4 m diameter, 15 mm thickness and 600 mm height. Up to 20 liters of binary-oxide melts with 100-300 K superheat are employed, as a simulant for the prototypic corium melt, and internal heating is provided by electrical heaters of up to 20 kW power in order to maintain the vessel wall temperatures at 1100-1200 K. Auxiliary systems are designed to provide an overpressure up to 4 MPa in the test vessel. Thus, severe accident scenarios with RCS depressurization are modeled. Creep behavior of the three-dimensional vessel, formation of the gap between the melt pool crust and the creeping vessel, and mechanisms of the gap cooling by water ingression will be the subjects of study and measurements in the FOREVER experimental program. Scaling rationale as well as pre-test analyses of the thermal and mechanical behavior of the FOREVER test vessels are presented. (authors)

  9. Energy conservation in two wheeler head tube welding fixture by modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamalanathan, S.; Guruprasad, B.; Elango, A.

    2018-05-01

    Energy conservation in automotive industry plays a significant role to increase the productivity which reduces the Men, Material, and Machinery. The Automotive industry sector is one of the major sector which works in two or more times of loading of work pieces in welding fixture. It consumes more energy. This project focuses on reduce the energy consumption by applying single time loading of work pieces with minimum number of labours, machine and reduces scrap. Welding fixtures are designed for the components which are difficult to weld in normal way or without any holding unit. The fixture is to be designed for the two wheeler head tube assembly which is to be welded with its companion for its application. It is demonstrated by modelling in Uni-graphics Software and FEA analysis will be done by ANSYS and experimentally products are tested and execute in industry. A code of practice suggested establishing acceptable standard for energy used in Automotive industry.

  10. The New York Head-A precise standardized volume conductor model for EEG source localization and tES targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu; Parra, Lucas C; Haufe, Stefan

    2016-10-15

    In source localization of electroencephalograpic (EEG) signals, as well as in targeted transcranial electric current stimulation (tES), a volume conductor model is required to describe the flow of electric currents in the head. Boundary element models (BEM) can be readily computed to represent major tissue compartments, but cannot encode detailed anatomical information within compartments. Finite element models (FEM) can capture more tissue types and intricate anatomical structures, but with the higher precision also comes the need for semi-automated segmentation, and a higher computational cost. In either case, adjusting to the individual human anatomy requires costly magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and thus head modeling is often based on the anatomy of an 'arbitrary' individual (e.g. Colin27). Additionally, existing reference models for the human head often do not include the cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF), and their field of view excludes portions of the head and neck-two factors that demonstrably affect current-flow patterns. Here we present a highly detailed FEM, which we call ICBM-NY, or "New York Head". It is based on the ICBM152 anatomical template (a non-linear average of the MRI of 152 adult human brains) defined in MNI coordinates, for which we extended the field of view to the neck and performed a detailed segmentation of six tissue types (scalp, skull, CSF, gray matter, white matter, air cavities) at 0.5mm(3) resolution. The model was solved for 231 electrode locations. To evaluate its performance, additional FEMs and BEMs were constructed for four individual subjects. Each of the four individual FEMs (regarded as the 'ground truth') is compared to its BEM counterpart, the ICBM-NY, a BEM of the ICBM anatomy, an 'individualized' BEM of the ICBM anatomy warped to the individual head surface, and FEMs of the other individuals. Performance is measured in terms of EEG source localization and tES targeting errors. Results show that the ICBM-NY outperforms

  11. Computing the partial volume of pressure vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiencke, Bent [Nestle USA, Corporate Engineering, 800 N. Brand Blvd, Glendale, CA 91203 (United States)

    2010-06-15

    The computation of the partial and total volume of pressure vessels with various type of head profiles requires detailed knowledge of the head profile geometry. Depending on the type of head profile the derivation of the equations can become very complex and the calculation process cumbersome. Certain head profiles require numerical methods to obtain the partial volume, which for most application is beyond the scope of practicability. This paper suggests a unique method that simplifies the calculation procedure for the various types of head profiles by using one common set of equations without the need for numerical or complex computation methods. For ease of use, all equations presented in this paper are summarized in a single table format for horizontal and vertical vessels. (author)

  12. Follow the heart or the head? The interactive influence model of emotion and cognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiayi eLuo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The experience of emotion has a powerful influence on daily-life decision making. Following Plato’s description of emotion and reason as two horses pulling us in opposite directions, modern dual-system models of decision making endorse the antagonism between reason and emotion. Decision making is perceived as the competition between an emotion system that is automatic but prone to error and a reason system that is slow but rational. The reason system (in the head reins in our impulses (from the heart and overrides our snap judgments. However, from Darwin’s evolutionary perspective, emotion is adaptive, guiding us to make sound decisions in uncertainty. In this review, we provide a new model, called The interactive influence model of emotion & cognition, to elaborate the relationship of emotion and reason in decision making. Specifically, in our model, we identify factors that determine when emotions override reason and delineate the type of contexts in which emotions help or hurt decision making. We then illustrate how cognition modulates emotion and how they cooperate to affect decision making.

  13. Follow the heart or the head? The interactive influence model of emotion and cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jiayi; Yu, Rongjun

    2015-01-01

    The experience of emotion has a powerful influence on daily-life decision making. Following Plato's description of emotion and reason as two horses pulling us in opposite directions, modern dual-system models of decision making endorse the antagonism between reason and emotion. Decision making is perceived as the competition between an emotion system that is automatic but prone to error and a reason system that is slow but rational. The reason system (in "the head") reins in our impulses (from "the heart") and overrides our snap judgments. However, from Darwin's evolutionary perspective, emotion is adaptive, guiding us to make sound decisions in uncertainty. Here, drawing findings from behavioral economics and neuroeconomics, we provide a new model, labeled "The interactive influence model of emotion and cognition," to elaborate the relationship of emotion and reason in decision making. Specifically, in our model, we identify factors that determine when emotions override reason and delineate the type of contexts in which emotions help or hurt decision making. We then illustrate how cognition modulates emotion and how they cooperate to affect decision making.

  14. A dynamic model of neurovascular coupling: implications for blood vessel dilation and constriction

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Y.; Pan, Y.; Harris, S.; Billings, S.A.; Coca, D.; Berwick, J.; Jones, M.; Kennerley, A.; Johnston, D.; Martin, C.; Devonshire, I.M.; Mayhew, J.

    2010-01-01

    Neurovascular coupling in response to stimulation of the rat barrel cortex was investigated using concurrent multichannel electrophysiology and laser Doppler flowmetry. The data were used to build a linear dynamic model relating neural activity to blood flow. Local field potential time series were subject to current source density analysis, and the time series of a layer IV sink of the barrel cortex was used as the input to the model. The model output was the time series of the changes in reg...

  15. Nuclear reactor support and seismic restraint with in-vessel core retention cooling features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, Tyler A.; Edwards, Michael J.

    2018-01-23

    A nuclear reactor including a lateral seismic restraint with a vertically oriented pin attached to the lower vessel head and a mating pin socket attached to the floor. Thermally insulating materials are disposed alongside the exterior surface of a lower portion of the reactor pressure vessel including at least the lower vessel head.

  16. Multiphysics Modeling of Electric-Swing Adsorption System with In-Vessel Condensation (POSTPRINT)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Petkovska, Menka; Antov-Bozalo, Danijela; Markovic, Ana; Sullivan, Patrick D

    2007-01-01

    Mathematical modeling of an Electric-Swing Adsorption (ESA) system (adsorption cycle with electrothermal desorption step, performed by direct heating of the adsorbent particles by passing electric current...

  17. Handling and carrying head for nuclear fuel assemblies and installation including this head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artaud, R.; Cransac, J.P.; Jogand, P.

    1986-01-01

    The present invention proposes a handling and carrying head ensuring efficiently the cooling of the nuclear fuel asemblies it transports so that any storage in liquid metal in a drum within or adjacent the reactor vessel is suppressed. The invention claims also a nuclear fuel handling installation including the head; it allows a longer time between loading and unloading campaigns and the space surrounding the reactor vessel keeps free without occupying a storage zone within the vessel [fr

  18. Strength and water-tightness of the closure head and valves of a model cask under high external pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terada, O.; Kumada, M.; Hayakawa, T.; Mochizuki, S.; Ohrui, K.

    1978-01-01

    This paper describes experimental research on the strength and water-tightness of the closure head and attached valves of a model cask under high external pressure, in simulation of its having been accidentally lost in the deep sea. Both the external pressure tests and the corrosion tests were carried out using scale models of the closure head of an 80-ton spent-fuel shipping cask, and the full size pressure relief valves and drain valves which were to be attached to the actual cask. Based on the results of the above tests, evaluations were made, and new information was obtained on the pressure-proof strength and water-tightness of the closure head of the cask and the valves. Lastly, research which is being carried on in Japan on the pressure equalizer is also introduced

  19. Suppression of cellular immunity by head and neck irradiation. Precipitating factors and reparative mechanisms in an experimental model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, W.C.; Hasslinger, B.J.; Suter, C.M.; Blanchard, C.L.; Goldstein, A.L.; Chretien, P.B.

    1986-01-01

    A model was developed in C 3 H mice to investigate the immunosuppressive effects of head and neck irradiation and to explore mechanisms for repair of the defects. Mice receiving 1200 rad (12 Gy) of head and neck irradiation showed significant depression of delayed-type hypersensitivity, peripheral blood lymphocyte counts, spleen cell counts, and spleen cell production of interleukin-2. Treatment with optimal dosages of thymosin alpha 1 (T alpha-1) produced significant increases in all of these values, in some instances to levels higher than in the nonirradiated controls. In identical experiments with mice irradiated to a portal limited to the pelvic region, T alpha-1 induced only partial remission of the abnormalities. The dose response of T alpha-1 with head and neck irradiation showed a relatively limited dose range for immune restoration, a finding that warrants similar determinations in clinical trials with immunomodulating agents. The results suggest a potential clinical usefulness of T alpha-1 and also interleukin-2 in restoring cellular immunity after irradiation for head and neck cancers. The model appears to be useful for investigating immunomodulating agents before they are clinically evaluated as adjuvants with head and neck irradiation regimens

  20. Nanoimmunoassay to Detect Responses in Head and Neck Cancer: Feasibility in a Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Matthew A; Khalil, Ashraf A; Schoeff, Stephen S; Allak, Amir; VanKoevering, Kyle K; Maxwell, Anne K; Adejumo, Oluwayemisi; Mendez, Rolando E; Jameson, Mark J

    2014-07-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of detecting and quantifying extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK) phosphorylation status using nanoimmunoassay (NIA). Analyses using Cal27, SCC25, and OSC19 head and neck squamous carcinoma cell lines in vitro and in a murine xenograft model. NIA and immunoblot were performed on whole-cell lysates, tumor lysates, and fine-needle aspirate biopsies to detect ERK phosphorylation states. Using NIA, all 6 isoforms of ERK1/2, including nonphosphorylated, monophosphorylated, and diphosphorylated species, could be reliably detected, distinguished, and quantified in a single assay using a single antibody. In vitro treatment of Cal27 cells with the epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor gefitinib abolished phospho-ERK detection by immunoblot but resulted in residual detectable species by NIA. Residual phospho-ERK in gefitinib-treated cells could be further reduced by the addition of the insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor inhibitor OSI-906; this correlated with an additional decrease in proliferation over gefitinib alone. In a pilot study of 4 murine xenograft tumors, NIA performed on tumor lysates and fine-needle aspirate biopsies demonstrated altered ERK profiles after 2 days of gefitinib treatment compared with untreated mice. NIA offers a novel approach to quantitating the activation state of signaling molecules such as ERK in nanoscale in vitro and in vivo samples across a wide dynamic range. As such, it has potential to provide molecular diagnostic information before, during, and after treatment using a minimally invasive technique. Further study is warranted to determine its utility in assessing signaling proteins as biomolecular outcome predictors in clinical trials. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2014.

  1. Thermal modeling of head disk interface system in heat assisted magnetic recording

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vemuri, Sesha Hari; Seung Chung, Pil; Jhon, Myung S., E-mail: mj3a@andrew.cmu.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering and Data Storage Systems Center, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Ave., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Min Kim, Hyung [Department of Mechanical System Engineering, Kyonggi University, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-07

    A thorough understanding of the temperature profiles introduced by the heat assisted magnetic recording is required to maintain the hotspot at the desired location on the disk with minimal heat damage to other components. Here, we implement a transient mesoscale modeling methodology termed lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) for phonons (which are primary carriers of energy) in the thermal modeling of the head disk interface (HDI) components, namely, carbon overcoat (COC). The LBM can provide more accurate results compared to conventional Fourier methodology by capturing the nanoscale phenomena due to ballistic heat transfer. We examine the in-plane and out-of-plane heat transfer in the COC via analyzing the temperature profiles with a continuously focused and pulsed laser beam on a moving disk. Larger in-plane hotspot widening is observed in continuously focused laser beam compared to a pulsed laser. A pulsed laser surface develops steeper temperature gradients compared to continuous hotspot. Furthermore, out-of-plane heat transfer from the COC to the media is enhanced with a continuous laser beam then a pulsed laser, while the temperature takes around 140 fs to reach the bottom surface of the COC. Our study can lead to a realistic thermal model describing novel HDI material design criteria for the next generation of hard disk drives with ultra high recording densities.

  2. Investigation of tDCS volume conduction effects in a highly realistic head model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, S.; Rampersad, S. M.; Aydin, Ü.; Vorwerk, J.; Oostendorp, T. F.; Neuling, T.; Herrmann, C. S.; Stegeman, D. F.; Wolters, C. H.

    2014-02-01

    Objective. We investigate volume conduction effects in transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and present a guideline for efficient and yet accurate volume conductor modeling in tDCS using our newly-developed finite element (FE) approach. Approach. We developed a new, accurate and fast isoparametric FE approach for high-resolution geometry-adapted hexahedral meshes and tissue anisotropy. To attain a deeper insight into tDCS, we performed computer simulations, starting with a homogenized three-compartment head model and extending this step by step to a six-compartment anisotropic model. Main results. We are able to demonstrate important tDCS effects. First, we find channeling effects of the skin, the skull spongiosa and the cerebrospinal fluid compartments. Second, current vectors tend to be oriented towards the closest higher conducting region. Third, anisotropic WM conductivity causes current flow in directions more parallel to the WM fiber tracts. Fourth, the highest cortical current magnitudes are not only found close to the stimulation sites. Fifth, the median brain current density decreases with increasing distance from the electrodes. Significance. Our results allow us to formulate a guideline for volume conductor modeling in tDCS. We recommend to accurately model the major tissues between the stimulating electrodes and the target areas, while for efficient yet accurate modeling, an exact representation of other tissues is less important. Because for the low-frequency regime in electrophysiology the quasi-static approach is justified, our results should also be valid for at least low-frequency (e.g., below 100 Hz) transcranial alternating current stimulation.

  3. Brain response to primary blast wave using validated finite element models of human head and advanced combat helmet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liying eZhang

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Blast-induced traumatic brain injury has emerged as a signature injury in combat casualty care. Present combat helmets are designed primarily to protect against ballistic and blunt impacts, but the current issue with helmets is protection concerning blasts. In order to delineate the blast wave attenuating capability of the Advanced Combat Helmet (ACH, a finite element (FE study was undertaken to evaluate the head response against blast loadings with and without helmet using a partially validated FE model of the human head and ACH. Four levels of overpressures (0.27-0.66 MPa from the Bowen’s lung iso-damage threshold curves were used to simulate blast insults. Effectiveness of the helmet with respect to head orientation was also investigated. The resulting biomechanical responses of the brain to blast threats were compared for human head with and without the helmet. For all Bowen’s cases, the peak intracranial pressures (ICP in the head ranged from 0.68-1.8 MPa in the coup cortical region. ACH was found to mitigate ICP in the head by 10-35%. Helmeted head resulted in 30% lower average peak brain strains and product of strain and strain rate. Among three blast loading directions with ACH, highest reduction in peak ICP (44% was due to backward blasts whereas the lowest reduction in peak ICP and brain strains was due to forward blast (27%. The biomechanical responses of a human head to primary blast insult exhibited directional sensitivity owing to the different geometry contours and coverage of the helmet construction and asymmetric anatomy of the head. Thus, direction-specific tolerances are needed in helmet design in order to offer omni-directional protection for the human head. The blasts of varying peak overpressures and durations that are believed to produce the same level of lung injury produce different levels of mechanical responses in the brain, and hence "iso-damage" curves for brain injury are likely different than the Bowen curves

  4. Strategy for magnetic resonance imaging of the head: results of a semi-empirical model. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Droege, R.T.; Wiener, S.N.; Rzeszotarski, M.S.

    1984-01-01

    This paper is an introduction to lesion detection problems of MR. A mathematical model previously developed for normal anatomy has been extended to predict the appearance of any hypothetical lesion in magnetic (MR) images of the head. The model is applied to selected clinical images to demonstrate the loss of lesion visibility attributable to ''crossover'' and ''boundary effect.'' The model is also used to explain the origins of these problems, and to demonstrate that appropriate gray-scale manipulations can remedy these problems

  5. Semi-analytical models of hydroelastic sloshing impact in tanks of liquefied natural gas vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten, I; Malenica, Š; Korobkin, A

    2011-07-28

    The present paper deals with the methods for the evaluation of the hydroelastic interactions that appear during the violent sloshing impacts inside the tanks of liquefied natural gas carriers. The complexity of both the fluid flow and the structural behaviour (containment system and ship structure) does not allow for a fully consistent direct approach according to the present state of the art. Several simplifications are thus necessary in order to isolate the most dominant physical aspects and to treat them properly. In this paper, choice was made of semi-analytical modelling for the hydrodynamic part and finite-element modelling for the structural part. Depending on the impact type, different hydrodynamic models are proposed, and the basic principles of hydroelastic coupling are clearly described and validated with respect to the accuracy and convergence of the numerical results.

  6. Implementation of a gust front head collapse scheme in the WRF numerical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lompar, Miloš; Ćurić, Mladjen; Romanic, Djordje

    2018-05-01

    Gust fronts are thunderstorm-related phenomena usually associated with severe winds which are of great importance in theoretical meteorology, weather forecasting, cloud dynamics and precipitation, and wind engineering. An important feature of gust fronts demonstrated through both theoretical and observational studies is the periodic collapse and rebuild of the gust front head. This cyclic behavior of gust fronts results in periodic forcing of vertical velocity ahead of the parent thunderstorm, which consequently influences the storm dynamics and microphysics. This paper introduces the first gust front pulsation parameterization scheme in the WRF-ARW model (Weather Research and Forecasting-Advanced Research WRF). The influence of this new scheme on model performances is tested through investigation of the characteristics of an idealized supercell cumulonimbus cloud, as well as studying a real case of thunderstorms above the United Arab Emirates. In the ideal case, WRF with the gust front scheme produced more precipitation and showed different time evolution of mixing ratios of cloud water and rain, whereas the mixing ratios of ice and graupel are almost unchanged when compared to the default WRF run without the parameterization of gust front pulsation. The included parameterization did not disturb the general characteristics of thunderstorm cloud, such as the location of updraft and downdrafts, and the overall shape of the cloud. New cloud cells in front of the parent thunderstorm are also evident in both ideal and real cases due to the included forcing of vertical velocity caused by the periodic collapse of the gust front head. Despite some differences between the two WRF simulations and satellite observations, the inclusion of the gust front parameterization scheme produced more cumuliform clouds and seem to match better with real observations. Both WRF simulations gave poor results when it comes to matching the maximum composite radar reflectivity from radar

  7. SU-C-BRF-03: PCA Modeling of Anatomical Changes During Head and Neck Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chetvertkov, M; Kim, J; Siddiqui, F; Kumarasiri, A; Chetty, I; Gordon, J

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To develop principal component analysis (PCA) models from daily cone beam CTs (CBCTs) of head and neck (H and N) patients that could be used prospectively in adaptive radiation therapy (ART). Methods: : For 7 H and N patients, Pinnacle Treatment Planning System (Philips Healthcare) was used to retrospectively deformably register daily CBCTs to the planning CT. The number N of CBCTs per treatment course ranged from 14 to 22. For each patient a PCA model was built from the deformation vector fields (DVFs), after first subtracting the mean DVF, producing N eigen-DVFs (EDVFs). It was hypothesized that EDVFs with large eigenvalues represent the major anatomical deformations during the course of treatment, and that it is feasible to relate each EDVF to a clinically meaningful systematic or random change in anatomy, such as weight loss, neck flexion, etc. Results: DVFs contained on the order of 3×87×87×58=1.3 million scalar values (3 times the number of voxels in the registered volume). The top 3 eigenvalues accounted for ∼90% of variance. Anatomical changes corresponding to an EDVF were evaluated by generating a synthetic DVF, and applying that DVF to the CT to produce a synthetic CBCT. For all patients, the EDVF for the largest eigenvalue was interpreted to model weight loss. The EDVF for other eigenvalues appeared to represented quasi-random fraction-to-fraction changes. Conclusion: The leading EDVFs from single-patient PCA models have tentatively been identified with weight loss changes during treatment. Other EDVFs are tentatively identified as quasi-random inter-fraction changes. Clean separation of systematic and random components may require further work. This work is expected to facilitate development of population-based PCA models that can be used to prospectively identify significant anatomical changes, such as weight loss, early in treatment, triggering replanning where beneficial

  8. Modeling flow stress constitutive behavior of SA508-3 steel for nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Mingyue, E-mail: mysun@imr.ac.cn [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Luhan, Hao; Shijian, Li; Dianzhong, Li; Yiyi, Li [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: > A series of flow stress constitutive equations for SA508-3 steel were successfully established. > The experimental results under different conditions have validated the constitutive equations. > An industrial application of the model was present to simulate a large conical shell forging process. - Abstract: Based on the measured stress-strain curves under different temperatures and strain rates, a series of flow stress constitutive equations for SA508-3 steel were firstly established through the classical theories on work hardening and softening. The comparison between the experimental and modeling results has confirmed that the established constitutive equations can correctly describe the mechanical responses and microstructural evolutions of the steel under various hot deformation conditions. We further represented a successful industrial application of this model to simulate a forging process for a large conical shell used in a nuclear steam generator, which evidences its practical and promising perspective of our model with an aim of widely promoting the hot plasticity processing for heavy nuclear components of fission reactors.

  9. Modeling flow stress constitutive behavior of SA508-3 steel for nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Mingyue; Hao Luhan; Li Shijian; Li Dianzhong; Li Yiyi

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → A series of flow stress constitutive equations for SA508-3 steel were successfully established. → The experimental results under different conditions have validated the constitutive equations. → An industrial application of the model was present to simulate a large conical shell forging process. - Abstract: Based on the measured stress-strain curves under different temperatures and strain rates, a series of flow stress constitutive equations for SA508-3 steel were firstly established through the classical theories on work hardening and softening. The comparison between the experimental and modeling results has confirmed that the established constitutive equations can correctly describe the mechanical responses and microstructural evolutions of the steel under various hot deformation conditions. We further represented a successful industrial application of this model to simulate a forging process for a large conical shell used in a nuclear steam generator, which evidences its practical and promising perspective of our model with an aim of widely promoting the hot plasticity processing for heavy nuclear components of fission reactors.

  10. Light distributions in a port wine stain model containing multiple cylindrical and curved blood vessels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lucassen, G. W.; Verkruysse, W.; Keijzer, M.; van Gemert, M. J.

    1996-01-01

    Knowledge of the light distribution in skin tissue is important for the understanding, prediction, and improvement of the clinical results in laser treatment of port wine stains (PWS). The objective of this study is to improve modelling of PWS treated by laser using an improved and more realistic

  11. Numerical model for verification of constitutive laws of blood vessel wall

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Macková, H.; Chlup, Hynek; Žitný, R.

    -, 2/1 (2007), s. 66-66 ISSN 1880-9863 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : constitutive law * numerical model * pulse wave velocity Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics http://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/browse/jbse/2/Suppl.1/_contents

  12. Feasibility of primary tumor culture models and preclinical prediction assays for head and neck cancer : A narrative review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dohmen, Amy J C; Swartz, Justin E.; Van Den Brekel, Michiel W M; Willems, Stefan M.; Spijker, René; Neefjes, Jacques; Zuur, Charlotte L.

    2015-01-01

    Primary human tumor culture models allow for individualized drug sensitivity testing and are therefore a promising technique to achieve personalized treatment for cancer patients. This would especially be of interest for patients with advanced stage head and neck cancer. They are extensively treated

  13. On numerical modeling of low-head direct chill ingot caster for magnesium alloy AZ31

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mainul Hasan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive 3D turbulent CFD study has been carried out to simulate a Low-Head (LH vertical Direct Chill (DC rolling ingot caster for the common magnesium alloy AZ31. The model used in this study takes into account the coupled laminar/turbulent melt flow and solidification aspects of the process and is based on the control-volume finite-difference approach. Following the aluminum/magnesium DC casting industrial practices, the LH mold is taken as 30 mm with a hot top of 60 mm. The previously verified in-house code has been modified to model the present casting process. Important quantitative results are obtained for four casting speeds, for three inlet melt pouring temperatures (superheats and for three metal-mold contact heat transfer coefficients for the steady state operational phase of the caster. The variable cooling water temperatures reported by the industry are considered for the primary and secondary cooling zones during the simulations. Specifically, the temperature and velocity fields, sump depth and sump profiles, mushy region thickness, solid shell thickness at the exit of the mold and axial temperature profiles at the center and at three strategic locations at the surface of the slab are presented and discussed.

  14. Establishment of a head injury by club model in rabbits and experimental conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Yunxing; Xi Huanjiu; Zhang Jing; Li Hongwei; Yin Zhiyong; Zhao Hui

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To establish an animal model to replicate the injury by club in forensic medicine. Methods: Twenty-four New Zealand white rabbits were divided into control group (n=4), minor injury group (n=10), and severe injury group (n=10). Based on the BIM-Ⅱ Horizontal Bio-impact Machine, a self-designed iron bar was used to produce head injury by club. Six hours after injury, all the rabbits were subjected to a CT examination and dissected to observe the injury morphology and undergo routine pathological examination. Four control, six minor and severe rabbits were given moisture content examination. Results: Varying degrees of positive signs of the nervous system were observed in all the injured rabbits within 6 hours. The mortality rate was 1/10 in the minor injury group and 6/10 in the severe injury group. The morphological changes consisted of different levels of scalp hematoma, skull fracture, epidural hematoma, subdural hematoma, subarachnoid hemorrhage and brain injury. The difference in moisture content between the three groups was of statistical significance. Conclusion: Under the rigidly-controlled experimental condition, this animal model produces good reproducibility and stable results. Meanwhile, it can simulate the morphology of injury by club and be used to study the mechanism of injury by club in forensic medicine. (authors)

  15. Early magnetic resonance imaging and histologic findings in a model of avascular necrosis of femoral head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Takuya [Kanazawa Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1997-12-01

    The present study was performed to examine early MR images and histologic findings using a canine model of avascular necrosis of femoral head (ANFH). The ANFH model was surgically induced. At three days, 1, 2 and 4 weeks after surgery, the proximal femurs were excised. MR images were obtained in 4 dogs at 3 days and 7 dogs at each of the other intervals. Histologic examinations were performed on 7 dogs at each interval. Three days after surgery, MR showed almost no abnormal findings. Histologic changes included edematous bone marrow and bleeding in the bone marrow in some regions. One week after surgery, empty lacunae in trabecular bones and immature fibrous tissues in the bone marrow were seen in some cases, but appositional bone was not yet apparent. In only one case, abnormal MR findings -a ringlike pattern- were seen. Two weeks after surgery, 4 cases showed appositional bones on histology and abnormalities on MR images. Four weeks after surgery, fibrous tissues had matured and appositional bones had increased. Therefore, all 7 cases showed MR imaging abnormalities. Abnormal MR images included a ringlike pattern, and homogeneous and inhomogeneous patterns. These results indicated that MR imaging shows abnormality 2 weeks after surgery at the latest. (author)

  16. Automated Sperm Head Detection Using Intersecting Cortical Model Optimised by Particle Swarm Optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Weng Chun; Mat Isa, Nor Ashidi

    2016-01-01

    In human sperm motility analysis, sperm segmentation plays an important role to determine the location of multiple sperms. To ensure an improved segmentation result, the Laplacian of Gaussian filter is implemented as a kernel in a pre-processing step before applying the image segmentation process to automatically segment and detect human spermatozoa. This study proposes an intersecting cortical model (ICM), which was derived from several visual cortex models, to segment the sperm head region. However, the proposed method suffered from parameter selection; thus, the ICM network is optimised using particle swarm optimization where feature mutual information is introduced as the new fitness function. The final results showed that the proposed method is more accurate and robust than four state-of-the-art segmentation methods. The proposed method resulted in rates of 98.14%, 98.82%, 86.46% and 99.81% in accuracy, sensitivity, specificity and precision, respectively, after testing with 1200 sperms. The proposed algorithm is expected to be implemented in analysing sperm motility because of the robustness and capability of this algorithm.

  17. Stress categorization in nozzle to pressure vessel connections finite elements models; Categorizacao de tensoes em modelos de elementos finitos de conexoes bocal-vaso de pressao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albuquerque, Levi Barcelos de

    1999-07-01

    The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section III , is the most important code for nuclear pressure vessels design. Its design criteria were developed to preclude the various pressure vessel failure modes throughout the so-called 'Design by Analysis', some of them by imposing stress limits. Thus, failure modes such as plastic collapse, excessive plastic deformation and incremental plastic deformation under cyclic loading (ratchetting) may be avoided by limiting the so-called primary and secondary stresses. At the time 'Design by Analysis' was developed (early 60's) the main tool for pressure vessel design was the shell discontinuity analysis, in which the results were given in membrane and bending stress distributions along shell sections. From that time, the Finite Element Method (FEM) has had a growing use in pressure vessels design. In this case, the stress results are neither normally separated in membrane and bending stress nor classified in primary and secondary stresses. This process of stress separation and classification in Finite Element (FE) results is what is called stress categorization. In order to perform the stress categorization to check results from FE models against the ASME Code stress limits, mainly from 3D solid FE models, several research works have been conducted. This work is included in this effort. First, a description of the ASME Code design criteria is presented. After that, a brief description of how the FEM can be used in pressure vessel design is showed. Several studies found in the literature on stress categorization for pressure vessel FE models are reviewed and commented. Then, the analyses done in this work are presented in which some typical nozzle to pressure vessel connections subjected to internal pressure and concentrated loads were modeled with solid finite elements. The results from linear elastic and limit load analyses are compared to each other and also with the results obtained by formulae

  18. Numerical Field Model Simulation of Full Scale Fire Tests in a Closed Spherical/Cylindrical Vessel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-12-01

    the behavior of an actual fire on board a ship. The computer model will be verified by the experimental data obtained in Fire-l. It is important to... behavior in simulations where convection is important. The upwind differencing scheme takes into account the unsymmetrical phenomenon of convection by using...TANK CELL ON THE NORTH SIDE) FOR A * * PARTICULAR FIRE CELL * * COSUMS (I,J) = THE ARRAY TO STORE THE SIMILIAR VALUE FOR THE FIRE * * CELL TO THE SOUTH

  19. Predicting superdeformed rotational band-head spin in A ∼ 190 mass region using variable moment of inertia model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uma, V.S.; Goel, Alpana; Yadav, Archana; Jain, A.K.

    2016-01-01

    The band-head spin (I 0 ) of superdeformed (SD) rotational bands in A ∼ 190 mass region is predicted using the variable moment of inertia (VMI) model for 66 SD rotational bands. The superdeformed rotational bands exhibited considerably good rotational property and rigid behaviour. The transition energies were dependent on the prescribed band-head spins. The ratio of transition energies over spin Eγ/ 2 I (RTEOS) vs. angular momentum (I) have confirmed the rigid behaviour, provided the band-head spin value is assigned correctly. There is a good agreement between the calculated and the observed transition energies. This method gives a very comprehensive interpretation for spin assignment of SD rotational bands which could help in designing future experiments for SD bands. (author)

  20. Measuring optical properties of a blood vessel model using optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitz, David; Hinds, Monica T.; Tran, Noi; Vartanian, Keri; Hanson, Stephen R.; Jacques, Steven L.

    2006-02-01

    In this paper we develop the concept of a tissue-engineered optical phantom that uses engineered tissue as a phantom for calibration and optimization of biomedical optics instrumentation. With this method, the effects of biological processes on measured signals can be studied in a well controlled manner. To demonstrate this concept, we attempted to investigate how the cellular remodeling of a collagen matrix affected the optical properties extracted from optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of the samples. Tissue-engineered optical phantoms of the vascular system were create