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Sample records for vessel dynamic response

  1. Sea State Estimation Using Vessel Response in Dynamic Positioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    H. Brodtkorb, Astrid; Nielsen, Ulrik Dam; J. Sørensen, Asgeir

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method for estimating the sea state parameters based on the heave, roll and pitch response of a vessel in dynamic positioning (DP), i.e., without forward speed. The algorithm finds the wave spectrum estimate from the response measurements by directly solving a set...

  2. Trabeculectomy Improves Vessel Response Measured by Dynamic Vessel Analysis (DVA) in Glaucoma Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    J, Michael Selbach; Schallenberg, Maurice; Kramer, Sebastian; Anastassiou, Gerasimos; Steuhl, Klaus-Peter; Vilser, Walthard; Kremmer, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    To determine the effects of surgical IOP reduction (trabeculectomy) on retinal blood flow parameters in glaucoma patients using Dynamic Vessel Analysis (DVA). 26 eyes of 26 patients with progressive primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) despite maximal topical therapy were examined before and after trabeculectomy. The responses of the retinal vessels to flickering light provocation were measured with DVA the day before surgery and 4 to 6 weeks after trabeculectomy. Between 3 and 4 weeks before surgery all local therapies were stopped and a systemic therapy with acetazolamide and conservative free topic steroidal eye drops was started. In 19 patients (73%), an inadequate response to the flicker stimulation was measured preoperatively. In these patients, the maximum dilation of arteries and veins was reduced significantly as compared to healthy eyes. In this group, the maximum dilation of the arteries following the flicker provocation improved from 1.4% before to 3.8% following trabeculectomy (p<0.01). In retinal veins, this parameter increased from 3.1% to 4.6% (p<0.05). In the 7 patients whose arterial and venous reactions to flickering light provocation preoperatively did not differ from healthy eyes, there was no significant change after surgery. The initial baseline values of arteries and veins (MU) did not deviate significantly in both groups. POAG patients with progressive disease and impaired vascular regulation profit from IOP lowering trabeculectomy concerning vascular reactivity and dilative reserve, indicating a possible improvement of retinal perfusion following effective IOP control. Future studies with long-term follow-up must determine the clinical importance of these findings for the treatment of glaucoma patients.

  3. Electromagnetic dynamic response of HL-2M vacuum vessel under plasma disruption considering the electromagneto-mechanical coupling effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Hongwei; Yuan, Zhensheng; Li, Weixin; Pei, Cuixiang; Xie, Shejuan [State Key Laboratory for Strength and Vibration of Mechanical Structures, Shaanxi Engineering Research Center for NDT and Structural Integrity Evaluation, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Chen, Zhenmao, E-mail: chenzm@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Strength and Vibration of Mechanical Structures, Shaanxi Engineering Research Center for NDT and Structural Integrity Evaluation, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Pan, Yudong; Cai, Lijun; Li, Jiaxian [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • A 1/5 numerical model is established and validated for HL-2M vacuum vessel. • The Lagrangian approach used for treating the EM-mechanical coupling problem is introduced. • The EM field and structural dynamic response of HL-2M VV during plasma disruptions are simulated by using the Lagrangian strategy. • The dynamic responses of the VV of HL-2M are compared to clarify the effect of the EM-mechanical coupling under the MD and VED conditions. • The results present a basis for the safe operation of the HL-2M VV device. - Abstract: During plasma disruptions (PDs), transient eddy currents are induced in the HL-2M vacuum vessel (VV) which is a D-shaped, double thin-wall structure. Under the circumstance of high magnetic field, the resulting electromagnetic (EM) forces during PDs are large and the dynamic response of related structures may be violent. In this complicated EM circumstance, the EM-mechanical coupling effect may also have a great influence on the dynamic response of VV structure. In this paper, the EM field and structural dynamic response of HL-2M VV during PDs are simulated by adopting a numerical code of the Lagrangian approach. The Lagrangian approach is on the basis of the Maxwell equations in the Lagrangian description, which treats the coupling behavior of magnetic damping effect without explicitly using the velocity term. This approach can be easily applied to actual structures by updating FEM meshes and reforming coefficient matrices before calculating EM field at each time step. In this work, the disruption plasma currents of operating conditions are simulated by using the DINA code and then the dynamic responses of displacements and stresses of the VV of HL-2M are obtained for both cases with and without considering the coupling effect. The numerical results show that stresses under the disruptions (MD and VDE) are not significant and the coupling effect does not significantly affect the peak dynamic response for the HL-2M

  4. LQG Dynamic Positioning for a Supply Vessel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Scott Ron

    The purpose of this study is to merge my on the job marine experience and the control knowledge gathered throughout my studies at University of California San Diego into a practical control design. This thesis creates a Dynamic Positioning (DP) control loop for a supply vessel which utilizes two azimuthal thrusters as actuators. The control loop is designed to also account for external environmental disturbances and sensor measurement noise. The control loop is accomplished using modern control theory which makes use of known vessel dynamics and assumptions associated with the environment and sensor measurement variances. During this thesis research and design period, a testing platform for the control loop was required. Without the ability to retrofit a physical vessel with the proposed azimuthal thrusters it was determined that a simulation model would be required and was designed and implemented in Matlab Simulink to allow for control loop testing and validation. This simulation model is presented as part of the thesis research and design flow as it was a required element of the design and encompasses the knowledge acquired in my marine work and during my period at UCSD. Control loop performance results were obtained through testing on the generated simulation model. These results allowed for validation and optimization during the design phases of the vessel control loop. The principal conclusions were that the simulation model provided sufficient dynamics to properly execute the required tests to the control loop and that the implemented control loop was capable of operating within the determined parameters set forth in the design validation testing.

  5. Interplay between Inflammatory Responses and Lymphatic Vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Kihyuk; Lee, Seung-Hyo

    2014-08-01

    Lymphatic vessels are routes for leukocyte migration and fluid drainage. In addition to their passive roles in migration of leukocytes, increasing evidence indicates their active roles in immune regulation. Tissue inflammation rapidly induces lymphatic endothelial cell proliferation and chemokine production, thereby resulting in lymphangiogenesis. Furthermore, lymphatic endothelial cells induce T cell tolerance through various mechanisms. In this review, we focus on the current knowledge on how inflammatory cytokines affect lymphangiogenesis and the roles of lymphatic vessels in modulating immune responses.

  6. Dynamics of micro-bubble sonication inside a phantom vessel

    KAUST Repository

    Qamar, Adnan

    2013-01-10

    A model for sonicated micro-bubble oscillations inside a phantom vessel is proposed. The model is not a variant of conventional Rayleigh-Plesset equation and is obtained from reduced Navier-Stokes equations. The model relates the micro-bubble oscillation dynamics with geometric and acoustic parameters in a consistent manner. It predicts micro-bubble oscillation dynamics as well as micro-bubble fragmentation when compared to the experimental data. For large micro-bubble radius to vessel diameter ratios, predictions are damped, suggesting breakdown of inherent modeling assumptions for these cases. Micro-bubble response with acoustic parameters is consistent with experiments and provides physical insight to the micro-bubble oscillation dynamics.

  7. Dynamic stroma reorganization drives blood vessel dysmorphia during glioma growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathivet, Thomas; Bouleti, Claire; Van Woensel, Matthias; Stanchi, Fabio; Verschuere, Tina; Phng, Li-Kun; Dejaegher, Joost; Balcer, Marly; Matsumoto, Ken; Georgieva, Petya B; Belmans, Jochen; Sciot, Raf; Stockmann, Christian; Mazzone, Massimiliano; De Vleeschouwer, Steven; Gerhardt, Holger

    2017-10-16

    Glioma growth and progression are characterized by abundant development of blood vessels that are highly aberrant and poorly functional, with detrimental consequences for drug delivery efficacy. The mechanisms driving this vessel dysmorphia during tumor progression are poorly understood. Using longitudinal intravital imaging in a mouse glioma model, we identify that dynamic sprouting and functional morphogenesis of a highly branched vessel network characterize the initial tumor growth, dramatically changing to vessel expansion, leakage, and loss of branching complexity in the later stages. This vascular phenotype transition was accompanied by recruitment of predominantly pro-inflammatory M1-like macrophages in the early stages, followed by in situ repolarization to M2-like macrophages, which produced VEGF-A and relocate to perivascular areas. A similar enrichment and perivascular accumulation of M2 versus M1 macrophages correlated with vessel dilation and malignancy in human glioma samples of different WHO malignancy grade. Targeting macrophages using anti-CSF1 treatment restored normal blood vessel patterning and function. Combination treatment with chemotherapy showed survival benefit, suggesting that targeting macrophages as the key driver of blood vessel dysmorphia in glioma progression presents opportunities to improve efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents. We propose that vessel dysfunction is not simply a general feature of tumor vessel formation, but rather an emergent property resulting from a dynamic and functional reorganization of the tumor stroma and its angiogenic influences. © 2017 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  8. Simulation of liquid dynamics in a cryogenic mobile vessels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Lisowski

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Technical gases becomes liquid in extremely low temperature ranging minus 200 °C and very high pressure what makes that transportationdevices have to perform very strict requirement. Presented paper shows selected aspect of simulation of liquefied gas sloshing in aspect of requirements that mobile vessels have to fulfill. Mobile vessel which is the object of simulation is a two shell tank with vacuum and layer insulation between shells adapted to 20 ft container. It is assigned for see, railway and road transport and have to follow all of requirements for such transportation systems. Requirements for such tank are enclosed in standard ISO 1496-3 which deals with freight containers and standard EN13530-2 that describes vacuum, cryogenic vessels. The standards EN13530-2 defines that vessels which are to be filled equal or less than 80% should be fitted with surge plates to provide vessel stability and limit dynamic loads. Additionally surge plates area has tobe at least 70% of cross section of the vessel and volume between surge plates shall be not higher than 7.5 m3. Structure of the vessel as well as the surge plate should resist of longitudinal acceleration of 2g. Additionally surge plates shall resists stresses caused by pressure distributed across the area of surge plate and the pressure shall be calculated as mass of liquid between plates and acceleration 2g. In this paper is presented way of simulation of dynamic behavior of liquefied Argon on vessel structure. A numerical methods likeComputational Fluid Dynamics (CFD and Finite Element Analysis (FEA were used for this purpose. Combination of both tools allowedto get pick value of dynamic pressure that arising during acceleration of 2g, which was assumed is 0.2 s and investigate resistance of vessel and container structure. Presented approach is called Fluid – Structure Interaction simulation. In CFD simulation was used Ansys CFX code, while for FEA calculations Pro/Mechanica package.

  9. Development of a dynamic in vitro model of a stented blood vessel to evaluate the effects of stent strut material selection and surface coating on smooth muscle cell response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winn, Bradley Huegh

    formation of this new tissue, primarily consisting of VSMCs of the synthetic phenotype and their subsequent extracellular matrix, is the sole causation of in-stent restenosis since the stent serves to prevent elastic recoil and negative remodeling. This doctoral research program is focused on endovascular stent biomaterials science and engineering. Overall, this doctoral project is founded on the hypothesis that smooth muscle cell hyperplasia, as an important causative factor for vascular restenosis following endovascular stent deployment, is triggered by the various effects of stent strut contact on the vessel wall including contact forces and material biocompatibility. In this program, a dynamic in vitro model of a stented blood vessel aimed at evaluating the effect of stent strut material selection, and surface coating on smooth muscle cell response was developed. The in vitro stented artery model was validated through the proliferation of VSMC in contact with stent struts. Additionally, it was demonstrated that, with respect to known biocompatible materials such as Nitinol and 316L stainless steel, DNA synthesis and alpha-actin expression, as indicators of VSMC phenotype, are independent of stent material composition. Furthermore, hydroxyapatite was shown to be a biocompatible stent surface coating with acceptable post-strain integrity. This coating was shown in a feasibility study to be capable of serving as a favorable drug delivery platform able to reliably deliver locally therapeutic doses of bisphosphonates, such as alendronate, to control VSMC proliferation in an in vitro model of a stented blood vessel. This stent coating/drug combination may be effective for reducing restenosis as a result of VSMC hyperplasia in vivo.

  10. Microfluidic strategy to investigate dynamics of small blood vessel function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasotharan, Sanjesh; Bolz, Steffen-Sebastian; Guenther, Axel

    2010-11-01

    Resistance arteries (RAs, 30-300 microns in diameter) that are located within the terminal part of the vascular tree regulate the laminar perfusion of tissue with blood, via the peripheral vascular resistance, and hence controls the systemic blood pressure. The structure of RAs is adapted to actively controlling flow resistance by dynamically changing their diameter, which is non-linearly dependent on the temporal variation of the transmural pressure, perfusion flow rate and spatiotemporal changes in the chemical environment. Increases in systemic blood pressure (hypertension) resulting from pathologic changes in the RA response represent the primary risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. We use a microfluidic strategy to investigate small blood vessels by quantifying structural variations within the arterial wall, RA outer contour and diameter over time. First, we document the artery response to vasomotor drugs that were homogeneously applied at step-wise increasing concentration. Second, we investigate the response in the presence of well-defined axial and circumferential heterogeneities. Artery per- and superfusion is discussed based on microscale PIV measurements of the fluid velocity on both sides of the arterial wall. Structural changes in the arterial wall are quantified using cross-correlation and proper orthogonal decomposition analyses of bright-field micrographs.

  11. Interplay between Inflammatory Responses and Lymphatic Vessels

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, Kihyuk; Lee, Seung-Hyo

    2014-01-01

    Lymphatic vessels are routes for leukocyte migration and fluid drainage. In addition to their passive roles in migration of leukocytes, increasing evidence indicates their active roles in immune regulation. Tissue inflammation rapidly induces lymphatic endothelial cell proliferation and chemokine production, thereby resulting in lymphangiogenesis. Furthermore, lymphatic endothelial cells induce T cell tolerance through various mechanisms. In this review, we focus on the current knowledge on h...

  12. Dynamic Endothelial Cell Rearrangements Drive Developmental Vessel Regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Claudio A.; Jones, Martin L.; Bernabeu, Miguel O.; Geudens, Ilse; Mathivet, Thomas; Rosa, Andre; Lopes, Felicia M.; Lima, Aida P.; Ragab, Anan; Collins, Russell T.; Phng, Li-Kun; Coveney, Peter V.; Gerhardt, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Patterning of functional blood vessel networks is achieved by pruning of superfluous connections. The cellular and molecular principles of vessel regression are poorly understood. Here we show that regression is mediated by dynamic and polarized migration of endothelial cells, representing anastomosis in reverse. Establishing and analyzing the first axial polarity map of all endothelial cells in a remodeling vascular network, we propose that balanced movement of cells maintains the primitive plexus under low shear conditions in a metastable dynamic state. We predict that flow-induced polarized migration of endothelial cells breaks symmetry and leads to stabilization of high flow/shear segments and regression of adjacent low flow/shear segments. PMID:25884288

  13. Plastic instabilities in statically and dynamically loaded spherical vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duffey, Thomas A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rodriguez, Edward A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Significant changes were made in design limits for pressurized vessels in the 2007 version of the ASME Code (Section VIII, Div. 3) and 2008 and 2009 Addenda. There is now a local damage-mechanics based strain-exhaustion limit as well as the well-known global plastic collapse limit. Moreover, Code Case 2564 (Section VIII, Div. 3) has recently been approved to address impulsively loaded vessels. It is the purpose of this paper to investigate the plastic collapse limit as it applies to dynamically loaded spherical vessels. Plastic instabilities that could potentially develop in spherical shells under symmetric loading conditions are examined for a variety of plastic constitutive relations. First, a literature survey of both static and dynamic instabilities associated with spherical shells is presented. Then, a general plastic instability condition for spherical shells subjected to displacement controlled and impulsive loading is given. This instability condition is evaluated for six plastic and visco-plastic constitutive relations. The role of strain-rate sensitivity on the instability point is investigated. Calculations for statically and dynamically loaded spherical shells are presented, illustrating the formation of instabilities as well as the role of imperfections. Conclusions of this work are that there are two fundamental types of instabilities associated with failure of spherical shells. In the case of impulsively loaded vessels, where the pulse duration is short compared to the fundamental period of the structure, one instability type is found not to occur in the absence of static internal pressure. Moreover, it is found that the specific role of strain-rate sensitivity on the instability strain depends on the form of the constitutive relation assumed.

  14. Effects of dynamic shear and transmural pressure on wall shear stress sensitivity in collecting lymphatic vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornuta, Jeffrey A; Nepiyushchikh, Zhanna; Gasheva, Olga Y; Mukherjee, Anish; Zawieja, David C; Dixon, J Brandon

    2015-11-01

    Given the known mechanosensitivity of the lymphatic vasculature, we sought to investigate the effects of dynamic wall shear stress (WSS) on collecting lymphatic vessels while controlling for transmural pressure. Using a previously developed ex vivo lymphatic perfusion system (ELPS) capable of independently controlling both transaxial pressure gradient and average transmural pressure on an isolated lymphatic vessel, we imposed a multitude of flow conditions on rat thoracic ducts, while controlling for transmural pressure and measuring diameter changes. By gradually increasing the imposed flow through a vessel, we determined the WSS at which the vessel first shows sign of contraction inhibition, defining this point as the shear stress sensitivity of the vessel. The shear stress threshold that triggered a contractile response was significantly greater at a transmural pressure of 5 cmH2O (0.97 dyne/cm(2)) than at 3 cmH2O (0.64 dyne/cm(2)). While contraction frequency was reduced when a steady WSS was applied, this inhibition was reversed when the applied WSS oscillated, even though the mean wall shear stresses between the conditions were not significantly different. When the applied oscillatory WSS was large enough, flow itself synchronized the lymphatic contractions to the exact frequency of the applied waveform. Both transmural pressure and the rate of change of WSS have significant impacts on the contractile response of lymphatic vessels to flow. Specifically, time-varying shear stress can alter the inhibition of phasic contraction frequency and even coordinate contractions, providing evidence that dynamic shear could play an important role in the contractile function of collecting lymphatic vessels. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Combining operational models and data into a dynamic vessel risk assessment tool for coastal regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, R.; Braunschweig, F.; Lourenço, F.; Neves, R.

    2016-02-01

    The technological evolution in terms of computational capacity, data acquisition systems, numerical modelling and operational oceanography is supplying opportunities for designing and building holistic approaches and complex tools for newer and more efficient management (planning, prevention and response) of coastal water pollution risk events. A combined methodology to dynamically estimate time and space variable individual vessel accident risk levels and shoreline contamination risk from ships has been developed, integrating numerical metocean forecasts and oil spill simulations with vessel tracking automatic identification systems (AIS). The risk rating combines the likelihood of an oil spill occurring from a vessel navigating in a study area - the Portuguese continental shelf - with the assessed consequences to the shoreline. The spill likelihood is based on dynamic marine weather conditions and statistical information from previous accidents. The shoreline consequences reflect the virtual spilled oil amount reaching shoreline and its environmental and socio-economic vulnerabilities. The oil reaching shoreline is quantified with an oil spill fate and behaviour model running multiple virtual spills from vessels along time, or as an alternative, a correction factor based on vessel distance from coast. Shoreline risks can be computed in real time or from previously obtained data. Results show the ability of the proposed methodology to estimate the risk properly sensitive to dynamic metocean conditions and to oil transport behaviour. The integration of meteo-oceanic + oil spill models with coastal vulnerability and AIS data in the quantification of risk enhances the maritime situational awareness and the decision support model, providing a more realistic approach in the assessment of shoreline impacts. The risk assessment from historical data can help finding typical risk patterns ("hot spots") or developing sensitivity analysis to specific conditions, whereas real

  16. Systems Theoretic Process Analysis Applied to an Offshore Supply Vessel Dynamic Positioning System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    support vessels, cable layers, pipe-laying vessels, shuttle tankers , trenching and dredging vessels, [and] supply vessels” [3]. The term DP system ... SYSTEMS THEORETIC PROCESS ANALYSIS APPLIED TO AN OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSEL DYNAMIC POSITIONING SYSTEM by Blake Ryan Abrecht B.S. Systems ...Engineering with a Focus on Human Factors United States Air Force Academy, 2014 SUBMITTED TO THE INSTITUTE FOR DATA, SYSTEMS , AND SOCIETY IN PARTIAL

  17. 77 FR 62247 - Dynamic Positioning Operations Guidance for Vessels Other Than Mobile Offshore Drilling Units...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-12

    ...] Dynamic Positioning Operations Guidance for Vessels Other Than Mobile Offshore Drilling Units Operating on... voluntary guidance titled ``Mobile Offshore Drilling Unit Dynamic Positioning Guidance''. The notice recommended owners and operators of Mobile Offshore Drilling Units (MODUs) follow Marine Technology Society...

  18. Research on risk long range identification for vessel traffic dynamic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Ji; Guo, Ruijuan; Wang, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Hainan

    2017-09-01

    Vessel Long-range identification and tracking system has already been widely installed and applied in vessel. In this paper AIS system, vessel reporting system and LRIT in China are compared and analyzed based on the coverage area, confidentiality and accuracy of the LRIT information. Vessel Long-range identification and tracking model is established through a combination of AIS with LRIT system, which is applied to the research of vessel traffic dynamic system risk long range identification. Finally, the application of LRIT in the maritime field is discussed.

  19. Study of fluid dynamics reveals direct communications between lymphatic vessels and venous blood vessels at lymph nodes of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Kazu; Mori, Shiro; Kodama, Tetsuya

    2017-06-01

    Cancer cells metastasize to lymph nodes, with distant metastasis resulting in poor prognosis. The role of lymph node metastasis (LNM) in the spread of cancer to distant organs remain incompletely characterized. The visualization of flow dynamics in the lymphatic and blood vessels of MXH10/Mo-lpr/lpr mice, which develop systemic swelling of lymph nodes up to 10mm in diameter, has revealed that lymph nodes have the potential to be a direct source of systemic metastasis. However, it is not known whether these fluid dynamics characteristics are universal phenomena present in other strains of laboratory mice. Here we show that the fluid dynamics observed in MXH10/Mo-lpr/lpr mice are the same as those observed in C57BL/6J, BALB/cAJcl and NOD/ShiJic-scidJcl mice. Furthermore, when fluorescent solution was injected into a tumor-bearing lymph node, the flow dynamics observed in the efferent lymphatic vessels and thoracoepigastric vein depended on the type of tumor cell. Our results indicate that fluid dynamics in the lymphatic and blood vessels of MXH10/Mo-lpr/lpr mice are generalized phenomena seen in conventional laboratory mice. We anticipate our results can facilitate studies of the progression of lymphatic metastasis to hematogenous metastasis via lymph nodes and the early diagnosis and treatment of LNM. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. 46 CFR 154.409 - Dynamic loads from vessel motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... to the probability level of 10−8, by using one of the following methods: (1) Method 1 is a detailed analysis of the vessel's acceleration components. (2) Method 2 applies to vessels of 50 m (164 ft) or more in length and is an analysis by the following formulae that corresponds to a 10−8 probability level...

  1. Dynamics of bubble collapse under vessel confinement in 2D hydrodynamic experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpuntova, Galina; Austin, Joanna

    2013-11-01

    One trauma mechanism in biomedical treatment techniques based on the application of cumulative pressure pulses generated either externally (as in shock-wave lithotripsy) or internally (by laser-induced plasma) is the collapse of voids. However, prediction of void-collapse driven tissue damage is a challenging problem, involving complex and dynamic thermomechanical processes in a heterogeneous material. We carry out a series of model experiments to investigate the hydrodynamic processes of voids collapsing under dynamic loading in configurations designed to model cavitation with vessel confinement. The baseline case of void collapse near a single interface is also examined. Thin sheets of tissue-surrogate polymer materials with varying acoustic impedance are used to create one or two parallel material interfaces near the void. Shadowgraph photography and two-color, single-frame particle image velocimetry quantify bubble collapse dynamics including jetting, interface dynamics and penetration, and the response of the surrounding material. Research supported by NSF Award #0954769, ``CAREER: Dynamics and damage of void collapse in biological materials under stress wave loading.''

  2. 78 FR 60099 - Nontank Vessel Response Plans and Other Response Plan Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    ... vrp@uscg.mil . If you have questions on viewing the docket, call Ms. Renee V. Wright, Program Manager...(g)(1) 15. MARPOL VRP requirements--Sec. 155.5030(h) 16. Protection and Indemnity (P&I) Club--Sec...), Fourth Edition, 2005 U.S.C. United States Code VRP Vessel response plan WCD Worst case discharge II...

  3. Adaptive wave filtering for dynamic positioning of marine vessels using maximum likelihood identification: Theory and experiments

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Hassani, V.; Sorensen, A.J.; Pascoal, A.M.

    This paper addresses a filtering problem that arises in the design of dynamic positioning systems for ships and offshore rigs subjected to the influence of sea waves. The dynamic model of the vessel captures explicitly the sea state as an uncertain...

  4. Modeling and Control for Dynamic Positioned Marine Vessels in Drifting Managed Sea Ice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Øyvind Kåre Kjerstad

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a development framework for dynamic positioning control systems for marine vessels in managed ice. Due to the complexity of the vessel-ice and ice-ice interactions a configurable high fidelity numerical model simulating the vessel, the ice floes, the water, and the boundaries is applied. The numerical model is validated using experimental data and coupled with a control application incorporating sensor models, control systems, actuator models, and other external dynamics to form a closed loop development platform. The ice drift reversal is simulated by moving the positioning reference frame in an elliptic trajectory, rather than moving each individual ice floe. A control plant model is argued, and a control system for managed ice is proposed based on conventional open water design methods. A case study shows that dynamic positioning in managed ice is feasible for some moderate ice conditions.

  5. Walled Carotid Bifurcation Phantoms for Imaging Investigations of Vessel Wall Motion and Blood Flow Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee, Adrian J Y; Ho, Chung Kit; Yiu, Billy Y S; Yu, Alfred C H

    2016-07-18

    As a major application domain of vascular ultrasound, the carotid artery has long been the subject of anthropomorphic phantom design. It is nevertheless not trivial to develop walled carotid phantoms that are compatible for use in integrative imaging of carotid wall motion and flow dynamics. In this paper, we present a novel phantom design protocol that can enable efficient fabrication of walled carotid bifurcation phantoms with: (i) high acoustic compatibility, (ii) artery-like vessel elasticity, and (iii) stenotic narrowing feature. Our protocol first involved direct fabrication of the vessel core and an outer mold using computer-aided design tools and 3-D printing technology; these built parts were then used to construct an elastic vessel tube through investment casting of a polyvinyl alcohol containing mixture, and an agar-gelatin tissue mimicking slab was formed around the vessel tube. For demonstration, we applied our protocol to develop a set of healthy and stenosed (25%, 50%, 75%) carotid bifurcation phantoms. Plane wave imaging experiments were performed on these phantoms using an ultrasound scanner with channel-level configurability. Results show that the wall motion dynamics of our phantoms agreed with pulse wave propagation in an elastic vessel (pulse wave velocity of 4.67±0.71 m/s measured at the common carotid artery), and their flow dynamics matched the expected ones in healthy and stenosed bifurcation (recirculation and flow jet formation observed). Integrative imaging of vessel wall motion and blood flow dynamics in our phantoms was also demonstrated, from which we observed fluid-structure interaction differences between healthy and diseased bifurcation phantoms. These findings show that the walled bifurcation phantoms developed with our new protocol are useful in vascular imaging studies that individually or jointly assess wall motion and flow dynamics.

  6. Study on Inland River Vessel Fuel-oil Spillage and Emergency Response Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, R. C.; Shi, N.; Wang, K. S.

    2017-12-01

    by making statistics and conducting regression analysis on the carrying volume of vessels navigating on inland rivers and coastal waters, the linear relation between the oil volume carried by a vessel and its gross tonnage (GT) is found. Based on the linear relation, the possible spillage of a 10,000 GT vessel is estimated by using the empirical formula method which is commonly used to measure oil spillage from any vessel spill incident. In the waters downstream of Yangtze River, the trajectory and fates model is used to predict the drifting paths and fates of the spilled oil under three weather scenarios, and then, the emergency response strategies for vessel oil spills are put forth. The results of the research can be used to develop an empirical method to quickly estimate oil spillage and provide recommendations on oil spill emergency response strategies for decision-makers.

  7. Inter-method agreement in retinal blood vessels diameter analysis between Dynamic Vessel Analyzer and optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benatti, Lucia; Corvi, Federico; Tomasso, Livia; Mercuri, Stefano; Querques, Lea; Ricceri, Fulvio; Bandello, Francesco; Querques, Giuseppe

    2017-06-01

    To analyze the inter-methods agreement in arteriovenous ratio (AVR) evaluation between spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and Dynamic Vessel Analyzer (DVA). Healthy volunteers underwent DVA and SD-OCT examination. AVR was measured by SD-OCT using the four external lines of the optic nerve head-centered 7-line cube and by DVA using an automated AVR estimation. The mean AVR was calculated, twice, separately by two independent readers for each tool. Twenty-two eyes of 11 healthy subjects (five women and six men, mean age 35) were included. AVR analysis by DVA showed high inter-observer agreement between reader 1 and 2, and high intra-observer agreement for both reader 1 and reader 2. With regard to AVR analysis on SD-OCT, we found high inter-observer agreement between reader 1 and 2, and low intra-observer agreement for reader 2 but high intra-observer agreement for reader 1. Overall, the mean AVR measured on SD-OCT turned out to be significantly higher than mean AVR measured through DVA (reader 1, 0.9023 ± 0.06 vs 0.8036 ± 0.08; p DVA and SD-OCT). We found significant difference in the two noninvasive methods for AVR measurement, with a tendency for SD-OCT to overestimate retinal vascular caliber in comparison to DVA. This may be useful for achieving greater accuracy in the evaluation of retinal vessel in ocular as well as systemic diseases.

  8. Distributed Dynamic Condition Response Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hildebrandt, Thomas; Mukkamala, Raghava Rao

    We present distributed dynamic condition response structures as a declarative process model inspired by the workflow language employed by our industrial partner and conservatively generalizing labelled event structures. The model adds to event structures the possibility to 1) finitely specify...... as a labelled transition system. Exploration of the relationship between dynamic condition response structures and traditional models for concurrency, application to more complex scenarios, and further extensions of the model is left to future work....

  9. Synchronization of endothelial Dll4-Notch dynamics switch blood vessels from branching to expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubezio, Benedetta; Blanco, Raquel Agudo; Geudens, Ilse; Stanchi, Fabio; Mathivet, Thomas; Jones, Martin L; Ragab, Anan; Bentley, Katie; Gerhardt, Holger

    2016-04-13

    Formation of a regularly branched blood vessel network is crucial in development and physiology. Here we show that the expression of the Notch ligand Dll4 fluctuates in individual endothelial cells within sprouting vessels in the mouse retina in vivo and in correlation with dynamic cell movement in mouse embryonic stem cell-derived sprouting assays. We also find that sprout elongation and branching associates with a highly differential phase pattern of Dll4 between endothelial cells. Stimulation with pathologically high levels of Vegf, or overexpression of Dll4, leads to Notch dependent synchronization of Dll4 fluctuations within clusters, both in vitro and in vivo. Our results demonstrate that the Vegf-Dll4/Notch feedback system normally operates to generate heterogeneity between endothelial cells driving branching, whilst synchronization drives vessel expansion. We propose that this sensitive phase transition in the behaviour of the Vegf-Dll4/Notch feedback loop underlies the morphogen function of Vegfa in vascular patterning.

  10. Evaluation of dynamic fracture toughness for Yong Gwang unit 5 reactor pressure vessel materials (Baseline Tests)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chi Se Hwan; Kim, Joo Hag; Hong, Jun Hwa; Kwon, Sun Chil; Lee, Bong Sang [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-10-01

    The dynamic fracture toughness (K{sub d}) of intermediate shell and its weld in SA 508 CI. 3 Yong Gwang 5 reactor pressure vessel was determined and evaluated. Precracked thirty six Charpy specimens were tested by using an instrumented impact tester. The purpose of present work is to evaluate and confirm the un-irradiated dynamic fracture toughness and to provide pre-irradiation baseline data for future evaluation on dynamic fracture toughness change during operation. 18 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs. (Author)

  11. Regulation of coronary resistance vessel tone in response to exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncker, Dirk J; Bache, Robert J; Merkus, Daphne

    2012-04-01

    Exercise is a primary stimulus for increased myocardial oxygen demand. The ~6-fold increase in oxygen demand of the left ventricle during heavy exercise is met principally by augmenting coronary blood flow (~5-fold), as hemoglobin concentration and oxygen extraction (which is already ~70% at rest) increase only modestly in most species. As a result, coronary blood flow is tightly coupled to myocardial oxygen consumption over a wide range of physical activity. This tight coupling has been proposed to depend on periarteriolar oxygen tension, signals released from cardiomyocytes and the endothelium as well as neurohumoral influences, but the contribution of each of these regulatory pathways, and their interactions, to exercise hyperemia in the heart remain incompletely understood. In humans, nitric oxide, adenosine and K(ATP) channels each appear to contribute to resting coronary resistance vessel tone, but evidence for a critical contribution to exercise hyperemia is lacking. In dogs K(ATP)-channel activation together with adenosine and nitric oxide contribute to exercise hyperemia in a non-linear redundant fashion. In contrast, in swine nitric oxide, adenosine and K(ATP) channels contribute to resting coronary resistance vessel tone control in a linear additive manner, but do not appear to be mandatory for exercise hyperemia. Rather, exercise hyperemia in swine appears to involve β-adrenergic activation in conjunction with exercise-induced blunting of an endothelin-mediated vasoconstrictor influence. In view of these remarkable species differences in coronary vasomotor control during exercise, future studies are required to determine the system of vasodilator components that mediate exercise hyperemia in humans. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Coronary Blood Flow". Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Significance of fluid-structure interaction phenomena for containment response to ex-vessel steam explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almstroem, H.; Sundel, T. [National Defence Research Establishment, Stockholm (Sweden); Frid, W.; Engelbrektson, A.

    1998-01-01

    When studying the structural response of a containment building to ex-vessel steam explosion loads, a two-step procedure is often used. In the first step of this procedure the structures are treated as rigid and the pressure-time history generated by the explosion at the rigid wall is calculated. In the second step the calculated pressure is applied to the structures. The obvious weakness of the two-step procedure is that it does not correspond to the real dynamic behaviour of the fluid-structure system. The purpose of this paper is to identify and evaluate the relevant fluid-structure interaction phenomena. This is achieved through direct treatment of the explosion process and the structural response. The predictions of a direct and two-step treatment are compared for a BWR Mark II containment design, consisting of two concentric walls interacting with water masses in the central and annular pools. It is shown that the two-step approach leads to unrealistic energy transfer in the containment system studied, and to significant overestimation of the deflection of the containment wall. As regards the pedestal wall, the direct method analysis shows that the flexibility of this wall affects the pressure-time history considerably. Three load types have been identified for this wall namely shock load, water blow as a result of water cavitation, and hydrodynamic load. Reloading impulse due to cavitation phenomena plays an important role as it amounts to about 40% of the total impulse load. Investigation of the generality of the cavitation phenomena in the context of ex-vessel steam explosion loads was outside the scope of this work. (author)

  13. Significance of fluid-structure interaction phenomena for containment response to ex-vessel steam explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almstroem, H.; Sundel, T. (Nat. Defence Res. Establ., Tumba (Sweden)); Frid, W. (Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, SE-10658, Stockholm (Sweden)); Engelbrektson, A. (VBB/SWECO, Box 34044, SE-10026, Stockholm (Sweden))

    1999-05-01

    When studying the structural response of a containment building to ex-vessel steam explosion loads, a two-step procedure is often used. In the first step of this procedure the structures are treated as rigid and the pressure-time history generated by the explosion, at the rigid wall, is calculated. In the second step the calculated pressure is applied to the structures. The obvious weakness of the two-step procedure is that it does not correspond to the real dynamic behaviour of the fluid-structure system. The purpose of this paper is to identify and evaluate the relevant fluid-structure interaction phenomena. This is achieved through direct treatment of the explosion process and the structural response. The predictions of a direct and two-step treatment are compared for a BWR Mark II containment design, consisting of two concentric walls interacting with water masses in the central and annular pools. It is shown that the two-step approach leads to unrealistic energy transfer in the containment system studied and to significant overestimation of the deflection of the containment wall. As regards the pedestal wall, the direct method analysis shows that the flexibility of this wall affects the pressure-time history considerably. Three load types have been identified for this wall namely shock load, water blow as a result of water cavitation, and hydrodynamic load. Reloading impulse due to cavitation phenomena plays an important role as it amounts to [approx]40% of the total impulse load. Investigation of the generality of the cavitation phenomena in the context of ex-vessel steam explosion loads was outside the scope of this work. (orig.) 5 refs.

  14. The economic speed of an oceangoing vessel in a dynamic setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magirou, Evangelos F.; Psaraftis, Harilaos N.; Bouritas, Theodore

    2015-01-01

    The optimal (economic) speed of oceangoing vessels has become of increased importance due to the combined effect of low freight rates and volatile bunker prices. We examine the problem for vessels operating in the spot market in a tramp mode. In the case of known freight rates between origin...... destination combinations, a dynamic programming formulation can be applied to determine both the optimal speed and the optimal voyage sequence. Analogous results are derived for random freight rates of known distributions. In the case of independent rates the economic speed depends on fuel price...... and the expected freight rate, but is independent of the revenue of the particular voyage. For freight rates that depend on a state of the market Markovian random variable, economic speed depends on the market state as well, with increased speed corresponding to good states of the market. The dynamic programming...

  15. Effort dynamics in a fisheries bioeconomic model: A vessel level approach through Game Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorka Merino

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Red shrimp, Aristeus antennatus (Risso, 1816 is one of the most important resources for the bottom-trawl fleets in the northwestern Mediterranean, in terms of both landings and economic value. A simple bioeconomic model introducing Game Theory for the prediction of effort dynamics at vessel level is proposed. The game is performed by the twelve vessels exploiting red shrimp in Blanes. Within the game, two solutions are performed: non-cooperation and cooperation. The first is proposed as a realistic method for the prediction of individual effort strategies and the second is used to illustrate the potential profitability of the analysed fishery. The effort strategy for each vessel is the number of fishing days per year and their objective is profit maximisation, individual profits for the non-cooperative solution and total profits for the cooperative one. In the present analysis, strategic conflicts arise from the differences between vessels in technical efficiency (catchability coefficient and economic efficiency (defined here. The ten-year and 1000-iteration stochastic simulations performed for the two effort solutions show that the best strategy from both an economic and a conservationist perspective is homogeneous effort cooperation. However, the results under non-cooperation are more similar to the observed data on effort strategies and landings.

  16. Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis of Pulsatile Blood Flow Behavior in Modelled Stenosed Vessels with Different Severities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Mehrabi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the behavior of blood flow in the stenosed vessels. Blood is modelled as an incompressible non-Newtonian fluid which is based on the power law viscosity model. A numerical technique based on the finite difference method is developed to simulate the blood flow taking into account the transient periodic behaviour of the blood flow in cardiac cycles. Also, pulsatile blood flow in the stenosed vessel is based on the Womersley model, and fluid flow in the lumen region is governed by the continuity equation and the Navier-Stokes equations. In this study, the stenosis shape is cosine by using Tu and Devil model. Comparing the results obtained from three stenosed vessels with 30%, 50%, and 75% area severity, we find that higher percent-area severity of stenosis leads to higher extrapressure jumps and higher blood speeds around the stenosis site. Also, we observe that the size of the stenosis in stenosed vessels does influence the blood flow. A little change on the cross-sectional value makes vast change on the blood flow rate. This simulation helps the people working in the field of physiological fluid dynamics as well as the medical practitioners.

  17. Deterministic Predictions of Vessel Responses Based on Past Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ulrik Dam; Jensen, Jørgen Juncher

    2017-01-01

    The paper deals with a prediction procedure from which global wave-induced responses can be deterministically predicted a short time, 10-50 s, ahead of current time. The procedure relies on the autocorrelation function and takes into account prior measurements only; i.e. knowledge about wave cond...

  18. Application of novel linear active disturbance rejection control in dynamic positioning control system of vessels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JIN Yue

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aiming at the problem in which a vessel's dynamic positioning system can control it at an expected position,a novel linear active disturbance rejection controller is designed to solve the problem of poor dynamic performance due to the omission of a tracking differentiator. Based on the advantages of linear and nonlinear tracking differentiators,an improved tracking differentiator is designed which can track the differential signal and degrade the effects of noise; it constitutes a novel Linear Active Disturbance Rejection Controller(LADRC. The simulation results show that the novel LADRC based on the improved tracking differentiator has strong robustness,high control accuracy and good dynamic performance compared with the traditional LADRC.

  19. Dynamical response of vibrating ferromagnets

    CERN Document Server

    Gaganidze, E; Ziese, M

    2000-01-01

    The resonance frequency of vibrating ferromagnetic reeds in a homogeneous magnetic field can be substantially modified by intrinsic and extrinsic field-related contributions. Searching for the physical reasons of the field-induced resonance frequency change and to study the influence of the spin glass state on it, we have measured the low-temperature magnetoelastic behavior and the dynamical response of vibrating amorphous and polycrystalline ferromagnetic ribbons. We show that the magnetoelastic properties depend strongly on the direction of the applied magnetic field. The influence of the re-entrant spin glass transition on these properties is discussed. We present clear experimental evidence that for applied fields perpendicular to the main area of the samples the behavior of ferromagnetic reeds is rather independent of the material composition and magnetic state, exhibiting a large decrease of the resonance frequency. This effect can be very well explained with a model based on the dynamical response of t...

  20. Voltage Controlled Dynamic Demand Response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhattarai, Bishnu Prasad; Bak-Jensen, Birgitte; Mahat, Pukar

    2013-01-01

    central or dispersed generations might not be sufficient for future scenario. One of the effective methods to cope with this scenario is to enable demand response. This paper proposes a dynamic voltage regulation based demand response technique to be applied in low voltage (LV) distribution feeders....... An adaptive dynamic model has been developed to determine composite voltage dependency of an aggregated load on feeder level. Following the demand dispatch or control signal, optimum voltage setting at the LV substation is determined based on the voltage dependency of the load. Furthermore, a new technique...... has been proposed to estimate the voltage at consumer point of connection (POC) to ensure operation within voltage limits. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed method is analyzed comprehensively with reference to three different scenarios on a low voltage (LV) feeder (Borup feeder) owned...

  1. The Dynamic Responsiveness of Organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Torben Juul

    Organizational studies should address contemporary challenges of dealing effectively with the increasingly complex and dynamic business conditions. In this context we argue that structural features are linked to the corporate strategy process and affect the organization’s ability to respond...... to ongoing environmental changes. Sustainable performance arguably derives from integrative strategy-making where business opportunities are pursued as they emerge while being directed and coordinated through forward-looking analytics. This combination of decentralized responsiveness and central reasoning...

  2. Behavioural responses of dusky dolphin groups (Lagenorhynchus obscurus) to tour vessels off Kaikoura, New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundquist, David; Gemmell, Neil J; Würsig, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    Commercial viewing and swimming with dusky dolphins (Lagenorhynchus obscurus) near Kaikoura, New Zealand began in the late 1980s and researchers have previously described changes in vocalisation, aerial behaviour, and group spacing in the presence of vessels. This study was conducted to assess the current effects that tourism has on the activity budget of dusky dolphins to provide wildlife managers with information for current decision-making and facilitate development of quantitative criteria for management of this industry in the future. First-order time discrete Markov chain models were used to assess changes in the behavioural state of dusky dolphin pods targeted by tour vessels. Log-linear analysis was conducted on behavioural state transitions to determine whether the likelihood of dolphins moving from one behavioural state to another changed based on natural and anthropogenic factors. The best-fitting model determined by Akaike Information Criteria values included season, time of day, and vessel presence within 300 m. Interactions with vessels reduced the proportion of time dolphins spent resting in spring and summer and increased time spent milling in all seasons except autumn. Dolphins spent more time socialising in spring and summer, when conception occurs and calves are born, and the proportion of time spent resting was highest in summer. Resting decreased and traveling increased in the afternoon. Responses to tour vessel traffic are similar to those described for dusky dolphins elsewhere. Disturbance linked to vessels may interrupt social interactions, carry energetic costs, or otherwise affect individual fitness. Research is needed to determine if increased milling is a result of acoustic masking of communication due to vessel noise, and to establish levels at which changes to behavioural budgets of dusky dolphins are likely to cause long-term harm. Threshold values from these studies would allow managers to set appropriate operational conditions based

  3. Behavioural responses of dusky dolphin groups (Lagenorhynchus obscurus to tour vessels off Kaikoura, New Zealand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Lundquist

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Commercial viewing and swimming with dusky dolphins (Lagenorhynchus obscurus near Kaikoura, New Zealand began in the late 1980s and researchers have previously described changes in vocalisation, aerial behaviour, and group spacing in the presence of vessels. This study was conducted to assess the current effects that tourism has on the activity budget of dusky dolphins to provide wildlife managers with information for current decision-making and facilitate development of quantitative criteria for management of this industry in the future. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: First-order time discrete Markov chain models were used to assess changes in the behavioural state of dusky dolphin pods targeted by tour vessels. Log-linear analysis was conducted on behavioural state transitions to determine whether the likelihood of dolphins moving from one behavioural state to another changed based on natural and anthropogenic factors. The best-fitting model determined by Akaike Information Criteria values included season, time of day, and vessel presence within 300 m. Interactions with vessels reduced the proportion of time dolphins spent resting in spring and summer and increased time spent milling in all seasons except autumn. Dolphins spent more time socialising in spring and summer, when conception occurs and calves are born, and the proportion of time spent resting was highest in summer. Resting decreased and traveling increased in the afternoon. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Responses to tour vessel traffic are similar to those described for dusky dolphins elsewhere. Disturbance linked to vessels may interrupt social interactions, carry energetic costs, or otherwise affect individual fitness. Research is needed to determine if increased milling is a result of acoustic masking of communication due to vessel noise, and to establish levels at which changes to behavioural budgets of dusky dolphins are likely to cause long-term harm. Threshold

  4. Development of FB-MultiPier dynamic vessel-collision analysis models, phase 2 : [summary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    When collisions between large vessels and bridge : supports occur, they can result in significant : damage to bridge and vessel. These collisions : are extremely hazardous, often taking lives on : the vessel and the bridge. Direct costs of repair : a...

  5. Development of FB-MultiPier dynamic vessel-collision analysis models, phase 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Massive waterway vessels such as barges regularly transit navigable waterways in the U.S. During passages that fall within : the vicinity of bridge structures, vessels may (under extreme circumstances) deviate from the intended vessel transit path. A...

  6. Optimal Fuzzy and Dynamics Design of Ecological Sandwich Panel Vessel Roofs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heikki Martikka

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study the basic engineering principles, goals, and constraints are all combined with fuzzy methodology and applied to optimally design sandwich panel circular plate roofs for large vessels loaded statically and dynamically. These panels are made up of two stiff, strong veneer skins separated by vertical and peripheral stiffener plates. Advantages are high strength, lightweight, and sustainability. In the present approach, first the goals and constraints of the end user are identified and expressed as decision variables which are formulated using the engineering variables for materials, geometry, and function. Then same consistent fuzzy satisfaction functions are formed over the desired ranges to suit the customer's desires. The risk of extreme dynamic loadings exciting resonance is studied by natural frequency and mode analysis by FEM and analytical models. The results show the most critical locations and give guidelines for innovative remedies of the concept before detailed FEM analyses to finalize the design.

  7. The Choice of the Maneuver of the Vessel’s Passing Considering the Coordination’s System of the Interactive Vessels and Their Dynamic Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yevgen Volkov

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The maneuver of the altering course of the vessel is a more preferable to avoid a collision. Due to that the calculation of the parameters of the avoidance maneuver should be done considering the dynamic characteristics of the vessel in maneuvering. The paper analyzes the dynamic models of the vessel rotation motion in order to select more appropriate one for the calculation of avoidance maneuver of the vessel applying the altering of the course.

  8. Nested Dynamic Condition Response Graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hildebrandt, Thomas; Mukkamala, Raghava Rao; Slaats, Tijs

    2012-01-01

    We present an extension of the recently introduced declarative process model Dynamic Condition Response Graphs ( DCR Graphs) to allow nested subgraphs and a new milestone relation between events. The extension was developed during a case study carried out jointly with our industrial partner...... Exformatics, a danish provider of case and workflow management systems. We formalize the semantics by giving first a map from Nested to (flat) DCR Graphs with milestones, and then extending the previously given mapping from DCR Graphs to Buchi-automata to include the milestone relation....

  9. Drug and light dose responses to focal photodynamic therapy of single blood vessels in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurana, Mamta; Moriyama, Eduardo H.; Mariampillai, Adrian; Samkoe, Kimberley; Cramb, David; Wilson, Brian C.

    2009-11-01

    As part of an ongoing program to develop two-photon (2-γ) photodynamic therapy (PDT) for treatment of wet-form age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and other vascular pathologies, we have evaluated the reciprocity of drug-light doses in focal-PDT. We targeted individual arteries in a murine window chamber model, using primarily the clinical photosensitizer Visudyne/liposomal-verteporfin. Shortly after administration of the photosensitizer, a small region including an arteriole was selected and irradiated with varying light doses. Targeted and nearby vessels were observed for a maximum of 17 to 25 h to assess vascular shutdown, tapering, and dye leakage/occlusion. For a given end-point metric, there was reciprocity between the drug and light doses, i.e., the response correlated with the drug-light product (DLP). These results provide the first quantification of photosensitizer and light dose relationships for localized irradiation of a single blood vessel and are compared to the DLP required for vessel closure between 1-γ and 2-γ activation, between focal and broad-beam irradiation, and between verteporfin and a porphyrin dimer with high 2-γ cross section. Demonstration of reciprocity over a wide range of DLP is important for further development of focal PDT treatments, such as the targeting of feeder vessels in 2-γ PDT of AMD.

  10. Vessel Noise Affects Beaked Whale Behavior: Results of a Dedicated Acoustic Response Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    frequencies, overlapping with toothed whale vocalizations and hearing sensitivity, with potential behavioral or physiological consequences (e.g. [8–11...whales (Orcinus orca ) increase their call amplitude in response to vessel noise. J Acoust Soc Am 125: 27–32. 12. Tyack PL, Johnson M, Aguilar de Soto N...fast should I swim? Behavioral implications of diving physiology . Sym Zool S Lond 66: 349–368. 37. Thompson D, Fedak MA (2001) How long should a dive

  11. Dynamic Response of Concrete and Concrete Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-26

    low - . AFOSR-T... 84-0.165 DYNAMIC RESPONSE OF CONCRETE AND CONCRETE STRUCTURES FIRST ANNUAL TECHNICAL REPORT LAWRENCE E. 14ALVERN C. ALLEN ROSS...and Subtitle) S. TYPE OF REPORT I PERIOD COVERED DYNAMIC RESPONSE OF CONCRETE 1 DEC 1982 - 30 NOV 1983 AND CONCRETE STRUCTURES I_____198__-__0_NOV_198...Bar Dynamic Loads Fracture Materials Testing Dynamic Properties Impact Rate Effects Dynamic Testing Hopkinson Bar Reinforced Concrete Structures 20

  12. 33 CFR 155.1052 - Response plan development and evaluation criteria for vessels carrying group V petroleum oil as a...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION OIL OR HAZARDOUS MATERIAL POLLUTION PREVENTION REGULATIONS FOR VESSELS Tank Vessel Response Plans for Oil § 155... equipment, including— (1) Sonar, sampling equipment, or other methods for locating the oil on the bottom or...

  13. Ignitor Vacuum Vessel Structural Design with Dynamic Loads Due to Plasma Disruption Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucchiaro, Antonio; Crescenzi, Claudio; Mazzone, Giuseppe; Pizzuto, Aldo; Ramogida, Giuseppe; Roccella, Massimo; Bianchi, Aldo; Parodi, Bruno; Linari, Mauro; Lucca, Flavio; Marin, Anna; Coppi, Bruno

    2004-11-01

    The new reference plasma disruption for IGNITOR produces a significant increase of electromagnetic (EM) loads and requires a dynamic elastic-plastic structural analysis of the vacuum vessel (VV). The EM loads due to the worst disruption event (VDE) have been calculated using the MAXFEA 2D code and it is found that the stresses and deformation that would be produced on a relatively thin chamber could be excessive. A varying thickness configuration for the VV has been adopted on the basis of a step by step optimization with the aim of minimizing the vertical displacement while complying with the allowable plastic strains. A non-linear analysis is required with a modelling of the entire (360°) VV structure. With the new thickness distribution, the VV is capable to withstand several hundred of cycles under plasma disruption conditions in compliance with the ASME III code rules.

  14. Recent advances in vibro-impact dynamics and collision of ocean vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Raouf A.

    2014-11-01

    The treatment of ship impacts and collisions takes different approaches depending on the emphasis of each discipline. For example, dynamicists, physicist, and mathematicians are dealing with developing analytical models and mappings of vibro-impact systems. On the other hand, naval architects and ship designers are interested in developing design codes and structural assessments due to slamming loads, liquid sloshing impact loads in liquefied natural gas tanks and ship grounding accidents. The purpose of this review is to highlight the main differences of the two disciplines. It begins with a brief account of the theory of vibro-impact dynamics based on modeling and mapping of systems experiencing discontinuous changes in their state of motion due to collision. The main techniques used in modeling include power-law phenomenological modeling, Hertzian modeling, and non-smooth coordinate transformations originally developed by Zhuravlev and Ivanov. In view of their effectiveness, both Zhuravlev and Ivanov non-smooth coordinate transformations will be described and assessed for the case of ship roll dynamics experiencing impact with rigid barriers. These transformations have the advantage of converting the vibro-impact oscillator into an oscillator without barriers such that the corresponding equation of motion does not contain any impact term. One of the recent results dealing with the coefficient of restitution is that its value monotonically decreases with the impact velocity and not unique but random in nature. Slamming loads and grounding events of ocean waves acting on the bottom of high speed vessels will be assessed with reference to the ship structural damage. It will be noticed that naval architects and marine engineers are treating these problems using different approaches from those used by dynamicists. The problem of sloshing impact in liquefied natural gas cargo and related problems will be assessed based on the numerical and experimental results. It is

  15. Utilizing the Foreign Body Response to Grow Tissue Engineered Blood Vessels in Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geelhoed, Wouter J; Moroni, Lorenzo; Rotmans, Joris I

    2017-04-01

    It is well known that the number of patients requiring a vascular grafts for use as vessel replacement in cardiovascular diseases, or as vascular access site for hemodialysis is ever increasing. The development of tissue engineered blood vessels (TEBV's) is a promising method to meet this increasing demand vascular grafts, without having to rely on poorly performing synthetic options such as polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) or Dacron. The generation of in vivo TEBV's involves utilizing the host reaction to an implanted biomaterial for the generation of completely autologous tissues. Essentially this approach to the development of TEBV's makes use of the foreign body response to biomaterials for the construction of the entire vascular replacement tissue within the patient's own body. In this review we will discuss the method of developing in vivo TEBV's, and debate the approaches of several research groups that have implemented this method.

  16. Tendon vibration attenuates superficial venous vessel response of the resting limb during static arm exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ooue Anna

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The superficial vein of the resting limb constricts sympathetically during exercise. Central command is the one of the neural mechanisms that controls the cardiovascular response to exercise. However, it is not clear whether central command contributes to venous vessel response during exercise. Tendon vibration during static elbow flexion causes primary muscle spindle afferents, such that a lower central command is required to achieve a given force without altering muscle force. The purpose of this study was therefore to investigate whether a reduction in central command during static exercise with tendon vibration influences the superficial venous vessel response in the resting limb. Methods Eleven subjects performed static elbow flexion at 35% of maximal voluntary contraction with (EX + VIB and without (EX vibration of the biceps brachii tendon. The heart rate, mean arterial pressure, and rating of perceived exertion (RPE in overall and exercising muscle were measured. The cross-sectional area (CSAvein and blood velocity of the basilic vein in the resting upper arm were assessed by ultrasound, and blood flow (BFvein was calculated using both variables. Results Muscle tension during exercise was similar between EX and EX + VIB. However, RPEs at EX + VIB were lower than those at EX (P P vein in the resting limb at EX decreased during exercise from baseline (P vein at EX + VIB did not change during exercise. CSAvein during exercise at EX was smaller than that at EX + VIB (P vein did not change during the protocol under either condition. The decreases in circulatory response and RPEs during EX + VIB, despite identical muscle tension, showed that activation of central command was less during EX + VIB than during EX. Abolishment of the decrease in CSAvein during exercise at EX + VIB may thus have been caused by a lower level of central command at EX + VIB rather than EX. Conclusion Diminished central command induced by tendon

  17. Tendon vibration attenuates superficial venous vessel response of the resting limb during static arm exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooue, Anna; Sato, Kohei; Hirasawa, Ai; Sadamoto, Tomoko

    2012-11-07

    The superficial vein of the resting limb constricts sympathetically during exercise. Central command is the one of the neural mechanisms that controls the cardiovascular response to exercise. However, it is not clear whether central command contributes to venous vessel response during exercise. Tendon vibration during static elbow flexion causes primary muscle spindle afferents, such that a lower central command is required to achieve a given force without altering muscle force. The purpose of this study was therefore to investigate whether a reduction in central command during static exercise with tendon vibration influences the superficial venous vessel response in the resting limb. Eleven subjects performed static elbow flexion at 35% of maximal voluntary contraction with (EX + VIB) and without (EX) vibration of the biceps brachii tendon. The heart rate, mean arterial pressure, and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) in overall and exercising muscle were measured. The cross-sectional area (CSAvein) and blood velocity of the basilic vein in the resting upper arm were assessed by ultrasound, and blood flow (BFvein) was calculated using both variables. Muscle tension during exercise was similar between EX and EX + VIB. However, RPEs at EX + VIB were lower than those at EX (P tension, showed that activation of central command was less during EX + VIB than during EX. Abolishment of the decrease in CSAvein during exercise at EX + VIB may thus have been caused by a lower level of central command at EX + VIB rather than EX. Diminished central command induced by tendon vibration may attenuate the superficial venous vessel response of the resting limb during sustained static arm exercise.

  18. Dynamic vessel wall properties and their reproducibility in subjects with increased cardiovascular risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berkmortel, F; Wollersheim, H; van Langen, H; Thien, T

    1998-06-01

    To determine reproducibility figures of dynamic arterial wall properties such as cross-sectional compliance (CC) and distensibility (DC) in subjects with increased cardiovascular risk, in comparison with healthy adults. A total of 34 persons were divided into three groups with varying cardiovascular risk factors. Diameters (D) and diameter changes (deltaD) during the heart cycle of both common carotid (CCA) and right common femoral (CFA) arteries were measured by a vessel wall movement detector system. Blood pressures (BP) were recorded non-invasively by a semi-automated oscillometric device. CC (=piD(deltaD/2deltaP) in unit mm2/kPa) and DC (=2deltaD/D)/deltaP in unit 10(-3)/kPa) were calculated from the above-mentioned parameters. Measurements were performed twice during one visit and twice again with a time interval of at least 3 days to determine intra-observer intra- and intersession variability. Reproducibility figures of CC and DC of the CCA varied between 8 and 12%, and between 13 and 22% for the CFA. Intra-observer intra- and intersession variability were similar in the three groups. In our studies the reproducibility of dynamic vascular wall properties determined by ultrasound was good. Despite differences in the absolute values for CC and DC in groups with increased cardiovascular risk, mean reproducibility figures remained at a similar level (8-12%) as in healthy volunteers.

  19. Human responses to wave slamming vibration on a polar supply and research vessel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omer, H; Bekker, A

    2018-02-01

    A polar supply and research vessel is pre-disposed to wave slamming which has caused complaints among crew and researchers regarding interference with sleep, equipment use and research activities. The present work undertook to survey passenger claims of sleep interference, disturbed motor tasks and equipment damage as a result of wave slamming during normal operations of this vessel. The hypothesis was investigated that whole-body vibration metrics from ISO 2631-1 are potentially suitable for the prediction of human slamming complaints. Full-scale acceleration measurements were performed and wave slamming events were subsequently identified from the human weighted acceleration time histories. A daily diary survey was also conducted to gather the human response. The vibration caused by wave slamming was found to be strongly correlated with sleep disturbances and activity interference. Sleep and equipment use were found to be the most affected parameters by slamming. Daily vibration dose values were determined by accumulating the vibration as a result of slamming over 24 h periods. This metric accounted for increased magnitudes and frequency of slamming incidents and proved to be the best metric to represent human responses to slamming vibration. The greatest percentage of activities affected by slamming related to sleep regardless of daily cumulative VDV magnitude. More than 50% of the recorded responses related to sleep when the daily cumulative VDV ranged between 8.0 m/s1.75-10.0 m/s1.75. The peak vertical vibration levels recorded on the vessel reach magnitudes which are associated with sleep disturbance in environments where acoustic noise is present. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Thermophysiological responses and work strain in fishermen on deep-sea fishing vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høye, Erik Ulvolden; Sandsund, Mariann; Heidelberg, Cecilie Thon; Aasmoe, Lisbeth; Reinertsen, Randi Eidsmo

    2016-01-01

    Fishermen working on deep-sea vessels in the Barents and Norwegian Sea are exposed to low air temperatures, strong winds, high humidity, rain, snow and work at different intensities. Few studies have investigated the effect of environmental work factors on the physiology of this occupational group. The aim of the study was to investigate work strain and thermophysiological responses of fishermen on the trawl and factory decks of deep-sea vessels. Twenty-five professional male fishermen (age 39 ± 13 years) were recruited to the study which was performed on three trawlers in the Norwegian Sea in April, June and August 2014. During a six-hour shift, heart rate (HR), core (Tc) and mean skin (Ts) temperatures were recorded, and questions about subjective thermal sensation and comfort were answered. Short periods of hard (above 86% of HRmax) work raised Tc by 0.8°C to 37.8°C and decreased Ts by 2.3°C to 29.8°C during work on the trawl deck, and subjects reported being warm and sweaty. On the factory deck long periods of fairly light (between 52% and 66% HRmax) work, Tc of 37.4°C and Ts of 30.9°C were measured. Fishermen experience intermittent periods of heavy work on the trawl deck shown with elevated core temperature and HR. Work on the factory deck includes long periods of repetitive work with light to moderate work strain. A better understanding of work strain and environmental challenges during work on Norwegian deep-sea vessels will help identify exposure risks during work in the cold and heat.

  1. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Soft Grains: Malaria-Infected Red Blood Cells Motion within Obstructed 2-D Capillary Vessel

    CERN Document Server

    Haris, Luman; Haryanto, Freddy; Viridi, Sparisoma

    2013-01-01

    Molecular dynamics has been widely used to numerically solve equation of motion of classical many-particle system. It can be used to simulate many systems including biophysics, whose complexity level is determined by the involved elements. Based on this method, a numerical model had been constructed to mimic the behaviour of malaria-infected red blood cells within capillary vessel. The model was governed by three forces namely Coulomb force, normal force, and Stokes force. By utilizing two dimensional four-cells scheme, theoretical observation was carried out to test its capability. Although the parameters were chosen deliberately, all of the quantities were given arbitrary value. Despite this fact, the results were quite satisfactory. Combined with the previous results, it can be said that the proposed model were sufficient enough to mimic the malaria-infected red blood cells motion within obstructed capillary vessel. Keywords: molecular dynamics, two-dimensional model, red-blood cell motion, malaria

  2. Dynamic Responsive Systems for Catalytic Function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlatkovic, Matea; Collins, Beatrice S. L.; Feringa, Ben L.

    2016-01-01

    Responsive systems have recently gained much interest in the scientific community in attempts to mimic dynamic functions in biological systems. One of the fascinating potential applications of responsive systems lies in catalysis. Inspired by nature, novel responsive catalytic systems have been

  3. Vessel noise affects beaked whale behavior: results of a dedicated acoustic response study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Pirotta

    Full Text Available Some beaked whale species are susceptible to the detrimental effects of anthropogenic noise. Most studies have concentrated on the effects of military sonar, but other forms of acoustic disturbance (e.g. shipping noise may disrupt behavior. An experiment involving the exposure of target whale groups to intense vessel-generated noise tested how these exposures influenced the foraging behavior of Blainville's beaked whales (Mesoplodon densirostris in the Tongue of the Ocean (Bahamas. A military array of bottom-mounted hydrophones was used to measure the response based upon changes in the spatial and temporal pattern of vocalizations. The archived acoustic data were used to compute metrics of the echolocation-based foraging behavior for 16 targeted groups, 10 groups further away on the range, and 26 non-exposed groups. The duration of foraging bouts was not significantly affected by the exposure. Changes in the hydrophone over which the group was most frequently detected occurred as the animals moved around within a foraging bout, and their number was significantly less the closer the whales were to the sound source. Non-exposed groups also had significantly more changes in the primary hydrophone than exposed groups irrespective of distance. Our results suggested that broadband ship noise caused a significant change in beaked whale behavior up to at least 5.2 kilometers away from the vessel. The observed change could potentially correspond to a restriction in the movement of groups, a period of more directional travel, a reduction in the number of individuals clicking within the group, or a response to changes in prey movement.

  4. Vessel noise affects beaked whale behavior: results of a dedicated acoustic response study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirotta, Enrico; Milor, Rachael; Quick, Nicola; Moretti, David; Di Marzio, Nancy; Tyack, Peter; Boyd, Ian; Hastie, Gordon

    2012-01-01

    Some beaked whale species are susceptible to the detrimental effects of anthropogenic noise. Most studies have concentrated on the effects of military sonar, but other forms of acoustic disturbance (e.g. shipping noise) may disrupt behavior. An experiment involving the exposure of target whale groups to intense vessel-generated noise tested how these exposures influenced the foraging behavior of Blainville's beaked whales (Mesoplodon densirostris) in the Tongue of the Ocean (Bahamas). A military array of bottom-mounted hydrophones was used to measure the response based upon changes in the spatial and temporal pattern of vocalizations. The archived acoustic data were used to compute metrics of the echolocation-based foraging behavior for 16 targeted groups, 10 groups further away on the range, and 26 non-exposed groups. The duration of foraging bouts was not significantly affected by the exposure. Changes in the hydrophone over which the group was most frequently detected occurred as the animals moved around within a foraging bout, and their number was significantly less the closer the whales were to the sound source. Non-exposed groups also had significantly more changes in the primary hydrophone than exposed groups irrespective of distance. Our results suggested that broadband ship noise caused a significant change in beaked whale behavior up to at least 5.2 kilometers away from the vessel. The observed change could potentially correspond to a restriction in the movement of groups, a period of more directional travel, a reduction in the number of individuals clicking within the group, or a response to changes in prey movement.

  5. Analog circuit design designing dynamic circuit response

    CERN Document Server

    Feucht, Dennis

    2010-01-01

    This second volume, Designing Dynamic Circuit Response builds upon the first volume Designing Amplifier Circuits by extending coverage to include reactances and their time- and frequency-related behavioral consequences.

  6. Intravital two-photon microscopy of immune cell dynamics in corneal lymphatic vessels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Steven

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The role of lymphatic vessels in tissue and organ transplantation as well as in tumor growth and metastasis has drawn great attention in recent years. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We now developed a novel method using non-invasive two-photon microscopy to simultaneously visualize and track specifically stained lymphatic vessels and autofluorescent adjacent tissues such as collagen fibrils, blood vessels and immune cells in the mouse model of corneal neovascularization in vivo. The mouse cornea serves as an ideal tissue for this technique due to its easy accessibility and its inducible and modifiable state of pathological hem- and lymphvascularization. Neovascularization was induced by suture placement in corneas of Balb/C mice. Two weeks after treatment, lymphatic vessels were stained intravital by intrastromal injection of a fluorescently labeled LYVE-1 antibody and the corneas were evaluated in vivo by two-photon microscopy (TPM. Intravital TPM was performed at 710 nm and 826 nm excitation wavelengths to detect immunofluorescence and tissue autofluorescence using a custom made animal holder. Corneas were then harvested, fixed and analyzed by histology. Time lapse imaging demonstrated the first in vivo evidence of immune cell migration into lymphatic vessels and luminal transport of individual cells. Cells immigrated within 1-5.5 min into the vessel lumen. Mean velocities of intrastromal corneal immune cells were around 9 µm/min and therefore comparable to those of T-cells and macrophages in other mucosal surfaces. CONCLUSIONS: To our knowledge we here demonstrate for the first time the intravital real-time transmigration of immune cells into lymphatic vessels. Overall this study demonstrates the valuable use of intravital autofluorescence two-photon microscopy in the model of suture-induced corneal vascularizations to study interactions of immune and subsequently tumor cells with lymphatic vessels under close as possible

  7. Active disturbance rejection controller design for dynamically positioned vessels based on adaptive hybrid biogeography-based optimization and differential evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Defeng; Ren, Fengkun; Qiao, Lei; Zhang, Weidong

    2017-11-01

    Vessels with a dynamic positioning system (DPS) are widely applied in ocean resource exploration. Because of the inaccuracy and coupling of the vessel dynamic model, it is important to design a controller that performs well in an oceanic environment. The active disturbance rejection controller (ADRC) is introduced in this study to control the vessel movement and positioning in the DPS. The merit of the ADRC is that it does not need an accurate plant and disturbance model. In the proposed method, an adaptive hybrid biogeography-based optimization (BBO) and differential evolution (DE) are developed. The orthogonal learning (OL) mechanism is employed to achieve adaptive switching to different searching mechanisms between BBO and DE. The proposed adaptive hybrid BBO-DE (AHBBODE) algorithm is then used to optimize the parameters of ADRC; these parameters are not easy to determine by using the trial and error method. Finally, the proposed method is compared with the BBO- and DE-based methods. The results show that better performance is obtained by the proposed method. Copyright © 2017 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Analytical Prediction of the Seismic Response of a Reinforced Concrete Containment Vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, R.J.; Rashid, Y.R.; Cherry, J.L.; Chokshi, N.; Tsurumaki, S.

    1999-03-19

    Under the sponsorship of the Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI) of Japan, the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) is investigating the seismic behavior of a Reinforced Concrete Containment Vessel (RCCV) through scale-model testing using the high-performance shaking table at the Tadotsu Engineering Laboratory. A series of tests representing design-level seismic ground motions was initially conducted to gather valuable experimental measurements for use in design verification. Additional tests will be conducted with increasing amplifications of the seismic input until a structural failure of the test model occurs. In a cooperative program with NUPEC, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), through Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), is conducting analytical research on the seismic behavior of RCCV structures. As part of this program, pretest analytical predictions of the model tests are being performed. The dynamic time-history analysis utilizes a highly detailed concrete constitutive model applied to a three-dimensional finite element representation of the test structure. This paper describes the details of the analysis model and provides analysis results.

  9. Lymphangiogenic growth factor responsiveness is modulated by postnatal lymphatic vessel maturation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karpanen, Terhi; Wirzenius, Maria; Mäkinen, Taija; Veikkola, Tanja; Haisma, Hidde J; Achen, Marc G; Stacker, Steven A; Pytowski, Bronislaw; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo; Alitalo, Kari

    Lymphatic vessel plasticity and stability are of considerable importance when attempting to treat diseases associated with the lymphatic vasculature. Development of lymphatic vessels during embryogenesis is dependent on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-C but not VEGF-D. Using a recombinant

  10. Reactive Swarm Formation Control Using Realistic Surface Vessel Dynamics and Environmental Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-10

    time. Additionally, ASVs can stay in operational areas longer than conventional surface ships because they do not require food and supply restocking...tristan.perez@ntnu.no % Date: 2005-05-04 % Comments: %Adapted from the files reference (*) to match the data of the vessel %design of ADI -Limited

  11. Dynamic Responsive Systems for Catalytic Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlatković, Matea; Collins, Beatrice S L; Feringa, Ben L

    2016-11-21

    Responsive systems have recently gained much interest in the scientific community in attempts to mimic dynamic functions in biological systems. One of the fascinating potential applications of responsive systems lies in catalysis. Inspired by nature, novel responsive catalytic systems have been built that show analogy with allosteric regulation of enzymes. The design of responsive catalytic systems allows control of catalytic activity and selectivity. In this Review, advances in the field over the last four decades are discussed and a comparison is made amongst the dynamic responsive systems based on the principles underlying their catalytic mechanisms. The catalyst systems are sorted according to the triggers used to achieve control of the catalytic activity and the distinct catalytic reactions illustrated. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Synchrotron X-ray imaging for nondestructive monitoring of sap flow dynamics through xylem vessel elements in rice leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hae Koo; Lee, Sang Joon

    2010-12-01

    A comprehensive understanding of the sap flow dynamics and xylem hydraulic properties is essential to unravel the functional features of water transport from roots to shoots in vascular plants. To evaluate quantitatively the safety and efficiency of this system, nondestructive methods to assess the interactions between sap ascent kinetics and xylem structure are required. In this study, synchrotron X-ray microscopy was employed to observe anatomical structures and sap flow dynamics in rice (Oryza sativa) xylem simultaneously. The phase-contrast imaging technique allowed nondestructive observation of the xylem structural characteristics and the air-water interfaces generated by dehydration-rehydration cycles in excised leaves. This X-ray microimaging method provided a unique tool to characterize the perforated end walls of vessel elements and to evaluate their influence on hydraulic resistance during the refilling of embolized vessels. The real-time monitoring of the axial and radial sap flow under various environmental conditions highlighted the important role of perforation plates. In summary, we report a new methodology to study the sap flow dynamics and xylem hydraulic properties with μm spatial and ms temporal resolution using X-ray microscopy. The experimental procedure described herein provides a useful handle to understand key sap transport phenomena in xylem. © The Authors (2010). Journal compilation © New Phytologist Trust (2010).

  13. Dynamic response of windturbine to yawed wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuma, A.; Saito, S.; Nakamura, F.

    1984-08-01

    Dynamic response of a two-bladed windturbine to yawed wind is analyzed by means of the local circulation method. The dynamic system is considered to consist of blade deformation, rotor rotational motion and yawing motion of the windturbine. The amplitude of the 2-P vibration in the bending moment and the rotor torque are more significant in the change of wind direction than in that of wind speed. The exemplified windturbine can follow the change of wind direction with fairly small response time. The inertial forces and moments are much smaller than the aerodynamic components because of the high rigidity of the present rotor.

  14. Dynamic response of a flexible space beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Card, M. F.; Anderson, M. S.; Walz, J. E.

    1985-01-01

    Dynamic response of a candidate flexible beam for a space experiment on control of flexible structures is investigated. Studies of natural frequencies reveal a beam length in which torsion and bending frequencies virtually coincide. Eccentric tip mass causes small shifts in natural frequencies but introduces coupled torsional/bending mode shapes. Transient response studies indicate significant effects on tip responses of low damping and first bending mode excitation at higher frequencies. Steady state response suggest displacement and acceleration measurements could be made up to 5 to 12 Hz for the actuator forces/torques assumed.

  15. Reliability-based dynamic positioning of floating vessels with riser and mooring system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fang, Shaoji; Leira, Bernt J.; Blanke, Mogens

    2011-01-01

    To maintain safety of a floating vessel with associated slender components such as risers and mooring line, the vessel is normally kept within a limited region. To specify a safe position in that region, this paper suggests a new position chasing algorithm with the consideration of both riser...... angles and mooring line tensions. The riser angles were considered in an object function in [1] and the mooring line tension was considered in an object function in [2]. The contribution of this paper is to combine riser angle and mooring line tension together in one unified object function....... A combination of scaled riser angles and structural reliability index is utilized to evaluate the “reserve capacity” relative to failure events. With this object function, the riser angles and mooring line tension are considered in a unified formulation, with higher weight added to the riser angles due...

  16. Dynamic epigenetic responses to muscle contraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Morten; Zierath, Juleen R; Barrès, Romain

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is a malleable organ that responds to a single acute exercise bout by inducing the expression of genes involved in structural, metabolic and functional adaptations. Several epigenetic mechanisms including histone H4 deacetylation and loss of promoter methylation have been implicated...... in modifying exercise-responsive gene expression. These transient changes suggest that epigenetic mechanisms are not restricted to early stages of human development but are broad dynamic controllers of genomic plasticity in response to environmental factors....

  17. Suitability of pharmacokinetic models for dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI of abdominal aortic aneurysm vessel wall: a comparison.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Lai Nguyen

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Increased microvascularization of the abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA vessel wall has been related to AAA progression and rupture. The aim of this study was to compare the suitability of three pharmacokinetic models to describe AAA vessel wall enhancement using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients with AAA underwent DCE-MRI at 1.5 Tesla. The volume transfer constant (K(trans , which reflects microvascular flow, permeability and surface area, was calculated by fitting the blood and aneurysm vessel wall gadolinium concentration curves. The relative fit errors, parameter uncertainties and parameter reproducibilities for the Patlak, Tofts and Extended Tofts model were compared to find the most suitable model. Scan-rescan reproducibility was assessed using the interclass correlation coefficient and coefficient of variation (CV. Further, the relationship between K(trans and AAA size was investigated. RESULTS: DCE-MRI examinations from thirty-nine patients (mean age±SD: 72±6 years; M/F: 35/4 with an mean AAA maximal diameter of 49±6 mm could be included for pharmacokinetic analysis. Relative fit uncertainties for K(trans based on the Patlak model (17% were significantly lower compared to the Tofts (37% and Extended Tofts model (42% (p<0.001. K(trans scan-rescan reproducibility for the Patlak model (ICC = 0.61 and CV = 22% was comparable with the Tofts (ICC = 0.61, CV = 23% and Extended Tofts model (ICC = 0.76, CV = 22%. K(trans was positively correlated with maximal AAA diameter (Spearman's ρ = 0.38, p = 0.02 using the Patlak model. CONCLUSION: Using the presented imaging protocol, the Patlak model is most suited to describe DCE-MRI data of the AAA vessel wall with good K(trans scan-rescan reproducibility.

  18. Static and Dynamic Magnetic Response in Ferrofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-10-30

    REPORT Final Report: Static and Dynamic Magnetic Response in Ferrofluids 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Ferrofluids are technologically...physics of relaxation phenomena in magnetic nanoparticles. We have done systematic DC and AC magnetization studies of ferrofluids composed of Fe3O4...15. SUBJECT TERMS Magnetic nanoparticles, ferrofluids , susceptibility Hariharan Srikanth University of South Florida - Tampa 4202 East Fowler Ave

  19. Dynamic response of the thermometric net radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. D. Wilson; W. J. Massman; G. E. Swaters

    2009-01-01

    We computed the dynamic response of an idealized thermometric net radiometer, when driven by an oscillating net longwave radiation intended roughly to simulate rapid fluctuations of the radiative environment such as might be expected during field use of such devices. The study was motivated by curiosity as to whether non-linearity of the surface boundary conditions...

  20. Study on the Dynamic Compound Structure Composed of Mast Cells, Blood Vessels, and Nerves in Rat Acupoint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luo Mingfu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Circulation system, immunity system, and nervous system have a close relationship with meridian phenomen. However, there is still lack of the results of dynamic changes of these structures in acupoint. The aim of this study is to explore the interrelationship by composite staining techniques. Methodology/Principal Findings. Twenty rats were separated into electroacupuncture group (EA and control group (Con randomly. In EA group, the Zusanli and Weishu were stimulated with the 0.1 mA for 25 min. The tissue of these acupoints was double-stained with acetylcholinesterase and Toluidine blue. The compound structure of mast cells, nervous fibers, and mast cells in the acupoint was observed. Conclusions/Significance. The blood vessels, mast cells and acetylcholinesterase responded nerves were clearly observed in acupoint tissues. EA can result in the mast cell recruitment and migration along the blood vessels and nervous bundle, which conformed the dynamic compound structure and played important roles in acupuncture.

  1. Vessel Operating Units (Vessels)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains data for vessels that are greater than five net tons and have a current US Coast Guard documentation number. Beginning in1979, the NMFS...

  2. A theoretical framework for quantifying blood volume flow rate from dynamic angiographic data and application to vessel-encoded arterial spin labeling MRI ☆

    OpenAIRE

    Okell, Thomas W.; Chappell, Michael A.; Jezzard, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Angiographic methods can provide valuable information on vessel morphology and hemodynamics, but are often qualitative in nature, somewhat limiting their ability for comparison across arteries and subjects. In this work we present a method for quantifying absolute blood volume flow rates within large vessels using dynamic angiographic data. First, a kinetic model incorporating relative blood volume, bolus dispersion and signal attenuation is fitted to the data. A self-calibration method is al...

  3. Speaking up: Killer whales (Orcinus orca) increase their call amplitude in response to vessel noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Marla M; Noren, Dawn P; Veirs, Val; Emmons, Candice K; Veirs, Scott

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of anthropogenic sound exposure on the vocal behavior of free-ranging killer whales. Endangered Southern Resident killer whales inhabit areas including the urban coastal waters of Puget Sound near Seattle, WA, where anthropogenic sounds are ubiquitous, particularly those from motorized vessels. A calibrated recording system was used to measure killer whale call source levels and background noise levels (1-40 kHz). Results show that whales increased their call amplitude by 1 dB for every 1 dB increase in background noise levels. Furthermore, nearby vessel counts were positively correlated with these observed background noise levels.

  4. Dynamic lateral response of suction caissons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Latini, Chiara; Zania, Varvara

    2017-01-01

    Deeper water installations of offshore wind turbines may be supported by jacket structures. This study investigates the dynamic response of suction caissons for jackets by analysing 3D finite element models in the frequency domain. The numerical modelling was firstly validated by analytical...... solutions for pile foundations. Groups of crucial dimensionless parameters related to the soil profile and the foundation geometry are identified and their effects on the response of suction caissons are studied. Static stiffness coefficients are presented in a form of mathematical formulas obtained...... by fitting the numerical results, pertaining foundations with different slenderness ratios and embedded in different soil profiles. Sensitivity of the dynamic impedances of suction caissons on the skirt length was showed in this study. Moreover, the results for the suction caissons indicated that the overall...

  5. Dynamic response analysis of DFB fibre lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yujun, Qian; Varming, Poul; Povlsen, Jørn Hedegaard

    1998-01-01

    We present a model for relative intensity noise (RIN) in DFB fibre lasers which predicts measured characteristics accurately. Calculation results implies that the RIN decreases rapidly with stronger Bragg grating and higher pump power. We propose here a simplified model based on three spatially...... independent rate equations to describe the dynamic response of erbium doped DFB fibre lasers on pump power fluctuations, using coupled-mode theory to calculate the steady-state hole-burning of the erbium ion inversion...

  6. Bilateral carotid artery injury response in side impact using a vessel model integrated with a human body model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danelson, Kerry A; Gayzik, F Scott; Yu, Mao M; Martin, R Shayn; Duma, Stefan M; Stitzel, Joel D

    2009-10-01

    In a far-side crash configuration, the occupant can experience severe excursion from the seat space. Given this challenge, there are research efforts focused on alternate restraints, such as four-point belts. A potential implication of this geometry would be interaction of the belt with the occupant's neck. This study examines the response of the carotid arteries using a Finite Element Model (FEM) in a far-side crash configuration with a reversed three-point restraint. A FEM of the carotid artery and neck fascia was developed and integrated with the Total Human Model for Safety (THUMS) version 1.44. This model was subjected to four test conditions simulating far-side crashes. Load conditions included a low velocity impact of approximately 4 m/s and a higher velocity impact of approximately 10 m/s. For each velocity, the model was restrained with a belt placed low on the neck and a belt placed higher on the neck. Strain data in each element of the carotid arteries was analyzed. The overall response of the vessel was examined to determine locations of high strain values. Low belt placement resulted in more head excursion, stretching the carotid on the non-struck side. High belt placement resulted in compression of the artery on the struck side due to direct loading of the vessel from the belt. Strain values in the carotid artery elements increased with increasing speed of impact. The lower and higher speed tests with a low belt configuration resulted in a maximum principal strains, at maximal belt engagement, of 0.223 and 0.459, respectively. Corresponding values for the high belt configuration were 0.222 and 0.563. In both belt configurations, the non-struck side vessel stretched more than the struck side vessel; however, the non-struck side vessel experienced higher compressive forces. Strain values measured during the simulations can be compared to a value of 0.31 to intimal failure in previous experimental tests. These results quantitatively illustrate the two

  7. Dynamic Response of Wall Backfill Retaining System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreenivas Alampalli

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available An in situ full-scale test is conducted to measure the dynamic response of a long cantilever wall that retains backfill soil. The recorded modal parameters of this retaining wall exhibited significant similarity to those of a clamped cantilever plate (rather than those of a cantilever beam or plane-strain analysis. Such a three-dimensional (3-D response pattern is not accounted for by current analysis procedures. A simple 3-D finite element model is employed to further analyze the observed resonant configurations. The results indicate that such configurations play an important role in the seismic response of wall backfill soil systems of variable height, such as wing walls supporting highway approach ramps.

  8. Structural optimization for nonlinear dynamic response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dou, Suguang; Strachan, B. Scott; Shaw, Steven W.

    2015-01-01

    by a single vibrating mode, or by a pair of internally resonant modes. The approach combines techniques from nonlinear dynamics, computational mechanics and optimization, and it allows one to relate the geometric and material properties of structural elements to terms in the normal form for a given resonance......Much is known about the nonlinear resonant response of mechanical systems, but methods for the systematic design of structures that optimize aspects of these responses have received little attention. Progress in this area is particularly important in the area of micro-systems, where nonlinear...... resonant behaviour is being used for a variety of applications in sensing and signal conditioning. In this work, we describe a computational method that provides a systematic means for manipulating and optimizing features of nonlinear resonant responses of mechanical structures that are described...

  9. Stability of dynamic response of suspension bridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capsoni, Antonio; Ardito, Raffaele; Guerrieri, Andrea

    2017-04-01

    The potential occurrence of internal parametric resonance phenomena has been recently indicated as a potential contributory cause of the appearance of critical dynamic states in long-span suspension bridges. At the same time, suspension bridges, in view of their flexibility, are prone to aeroelastic response, such as vortex shedding, torsional divergence and flutter. In this paper, a non-linear dynamic model of a suspension bridge is devised, with the purpose of providing a first attempt toward a unified framework for the study of aeroelastic and internal resonance instabilities. Inspired by the pioneering work of Herrmann and Hauger, the analyses have been based on a linearized formulation that is able to represent the main structural non-linear effects and the coupling given by aerodynamic forces. The results confirm that the interaction between aeroelastic effects and non-linear internal resonance leads to unstable conditions for wind speeds which can be lower than the critical threshold for standard aeroelastic predictions.

  10. 33 CFR Appendix B to Part 155 - Determining and Evaluating Required Response Resources for Vessel Response Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... significant wave heights listed for the applicable operating environment. The Coast Guard may require...,360 Since the requirements for Tier 1 for inland and nearshore exceed the caps, the vessel owner would... Operating Environment Significant Wave Height 1 (feet) Sea State Rivers & Canals ≤1 1 Inland ≤3 2 Great...

  11. Response and Reliability Problems of Dynamic Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren R. K.

    The present thesis consists of selected parts of the work performed by the author on stochastic dynamics and reliability theory of dynamically excited structures primarily during the period 1986-1996.......The present thesis consists of selected parts of the work performed by the author on stochastic dynamics and reliability theory of dynamically excited structures primarily during the period 1986-1996....

  12. Achieving reliable communication in dynamic emergency responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipara, Octav; Plymoth, Anders N; Liu, Fang; Huang, Ricky; Evans, Brian; Johansson, Per; Rao, Ramesh; Griswold, William G

    2011-01-01

    Emergency responses require the coordination of first responders to assess the condition of victims, stabilize their condition, and transport them to hospitals based on the severity of their injuries. WIISARD is a system designed to facilitate the collection of medical information and its reliable dissemination during emergency responses. A key challenge in WIISARD is to deliver data with high reliability as first responders move and operate in a dynamic radio environment fraught with frequent network disconnections. The initial WIISARD system employed a client-server architecture and an ad-hoc routing protocol was used to exchange data. The system had low reliability when deployed during emergency drills. In this paper, we identify the underlying causes of unreliability and propose a novel peer-to-peer architecture that in combination with a gossip-based communication protocol achieves high reliability. Empirical studies show that compared to the initial WIISARD system, the redesigned system improves reliability by as much as 37% while reducing the number of transmitted packets by 23%.

  13. Development of finite element models to predict dynamic bridge response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-10-01

    Dynamic response has long been recognized as one of the significant factors affecting the service life and safety of bridge structures. Even though considerable research, both analytical and experimental, has been devoted to dynamic bridge behavior, ...

  14. Computational analysis of the effect of the control model of intraaorta pump on ventricular unloading and vessel response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Kaiyun; Chang, Yu; Gao, Bin; Liu, Youjun

    2012-01-01

    The intraaorta pump is a novel left ventricular assist device (LVAD) whose hemodynamic effects on the circulatory system is unknown. This article aims to evaluate the different effects on the circulatory system supported by the intraaorta pump. In this article, the pump is controlled by three control strategies, including the continuous flow method, the constant rotational speed, and the constant pressure head. A cardiovascular pump system, which includes cardiovascular circulation, intraaorta pump, and regulating mechanisms of systemic circulation, has been proposed. Left ventricle pressure (LVP), end-diastolic volume (EDV), and left ventricular external work (LVEW) were used to evaluate the degree of ventricular unloading. The pulsatile index (PI), which is defined as a ratio of pulse pressure and mean arterial pressure (MAP), was used to evaluate the effect of the vessel response by three control strategies. The comparison results showed that LVP and EDV were lower than those measured before the intraaorta pump was implanted. For LVEW, the constant pressure head strategy provided a superior ventricular unloading compared with other strategies. Support of the pump led to the lower pulsatility by the three models. However, the PI of the constant pressure head was the most at 0.37. In conclusion, these results indicate that the intraaorta pump controlled by constant pressure head strategy provides superior ventricular unloading and pulsatility of the vessel.

  15. Prediction Models for Dynamic Demand Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aman, Saima; Frincu, Marc; Chelmis, Charalampos; Noor, Muhammad; Simmhan, Yogesh; Prasanna, Viktor K.

    2015-11-02

    As Smart Grids move closer to dynamic curtailment programs, Demand Response (DR) events will become necessary not only on fixed time intervals and weekdays predetermined by static policies, but also during changing decision periods and weekends to react to real-time demand signals. Unique challenges arise in this context vis-a-vis demand prediction and curtailment estimation and the transformation of such tasks into an automated, efficient dynamic demand response (D2R) process. While existing work has concentrated on increasing the accuracy of prediction models for DR, there is a lack of studies for prediction models for D2R, which we address in this paper. Our first contribution is the formal definition of D2R, and the description of its challenges and requirements. Our second contribution is a feasibility analysis of very-short-term prediction of electricity consumption for D2R over a diverse, large-scale dataset that includes both small residential customers and large buildings. Our third, and major contribution is a set of insights into the predictability of electricity consumption in the context of D2R. Specifically, we focus on prediction models that can operate at a very small data granularity (here 15-min intervals), for both weekdays and weekends - all conditions that characterize scenarios for D2R. We find that short-term time series and simple averaging models used by Independent Service Operators and utilities achieve superior prediction accuracy. We also observe that workdays are more predictable than weekends and holiday. Also, smaller customers have large variation in consumption and are less predictable than larger buildings. Key implications of our findings are that better models are required for small customers and for non-workdays, both of which are critical for D2R. Also, prediction models require just few days’ worth of data indicating that small amounts of

  16. A Mathematical Model of Cardiovascular Response to Dynamic Exercise

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Magosso, E

    2001-01-01

    A mathematical model of cardiovascular response to dynamic exercise is presented, The model includes the pulsating heart, the systemic and pulmonary, circulation, a functional description of muscle...

  17. 46 CFR Appendix B to Subpart B of... - Oath for Documentation of Vessels for Use by a Not-For-Profit Oil Spill Response Cooperative

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...-Profit Oil Spill Response Cooperative B Appendix B to Subpart B of Part 68 Shipping COAST GUARD...: EXCEPTIONS TO COASTWISE QUALIFICATION Documentation of Certain Vessels for Oil Spill Cleanup Pt. 68, Subpt. B...-Profit Oil Spill Response Cooperative Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Coast Guard Oath for...

  18. Synthetic reconstruction of dynamic blood flow in cortical arteries using optical coherence tomography for the evaluation of vessel compliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraghis, Edward; Bolduc, Virginie; Gillis, Marc-Antoine; Srinivasan, Vivek J.; Thorin, Éric; Boudoux, Caroline; Lesage, Frédéric

    2011-03-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) has recently been used to produce 3D angiography of microvasculature in the rodent brain in-vivo and blood flow maps of large vessels. Key enabling developments were novel algorithms for detecting Doppler shifts produced by moving scatterers and new scanning protocols tailored to increase sensitivity to small flow speeds. These progresses were pushed by the need for a non invasive imaging modality to monitor quantitative blood flow at a higher resolution and a greater depth than could be achieved by other means. The rationale for this work originates from new hypotheses regarding the role of blood regulation in neurodegenerative diseases and from current investigations of animal models of vascular degeneration. In this work we demonstrate the synthetic reconstruction of dynamic blood flow in mice over the course of a single cardiac cycle in an 800μm wide by ~ 3mm deep B-Frame slice with a lateral resolution of 10μm and a depth resolution of 7μm. Images were taken using a cranial window over the exposed parietal bone of mice skull. Electrocardiography (ECG) recordings were co registered with the OCT A lines at high temporal resolution. QRS peak detection was then used to locate the time value of each A-line in the cardiac cycle and to reconstruct a synthetic temporal frame over one cardiac cycle. Doppler speed in this cardiac cycle was used to measure temporal variations of flow inside arteries and of their area. Three dimensional volume scans yielded measurements of quantitative blood flow on the same arteries. Using these informations a measure of compliance could be established. Comparing measures between atherosclerotic (ATX) and wild type (WT) mice revealed higher blood flow in WT mice, suggested lower systemic compliance in the ATX group but higher compliance of cerebral vasculature on these mice. These results are consistent with expectations showing that OCT is a potential tool for in-vivo arterial compliance evaluation.

  19. Spontaneous Facial Mimicry in Response to Dynamic Facial Expressions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Wataru; Yoshikawa, Sakiko

    2007-01-01

    Based on previous neuroscientific evidence indicating activation of the mirror neuron system in response to dynamic facial actions, we hypothesized that facial mimicry would occur while subjects viewed dynamic facial expressions. To test this hypothesis, dynamic/static facial expressions of anger/happiness were presented using computer-morphing…

  20. Optimization of multi-response dynamic systems integrating multiple ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Optimization of multi-response dynamic systems integrating multiple regression and Taguchi's dynamic signal-to-noise ratio concept. ... International Journal of Engineering, Science and Technology ... The proposed procedure is investigated with respect to three modelling approaches for the dynamic systems. The results of ...

  1. Pittsburgh Response to Endovascular therapy (PRE) score: optimizing patient selection for endovascular therapy for large vessel occlusion strokes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangaraju, Srikant; Aghaebrahim, Amin; Streib, Christopher; Sun, Chung-Huan; Ribo, Marc; Muchada, Marion; Nogueira, Raul; Frankel, Michael; Gupta, Rishi; Jadhav, Ashutosh; Jovin, Tudor G

    2015-11-01

    Endovascular therapy seems to benefit a subset of patients with large vessel occlusion strokes. We aimed to develop a clinically useful tool to identify patients who are likely to benefit from endovascular therapy. In a derivation cohort of consecutively treated patients with anterior circulation large vessel occlusion (Grady Memorial Hospital, N=247), independent predictors (pPittsburgh Response to Endovascular therapy (PRE) score as a predictor of good outcome. The PRE score was validated in two institutional cohorts (University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC): N=393; Unitat d'Ictus Vall d'Hebron: N=204) and its discriminative power for good outcome was compared with other validated tools. Benefit of successful recanalization was assessed in PRE score groups. Independent predictors of good outcome in the derivation cohort (age, baseline National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score and Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score (ASPECTS)) were used in the model: PRE score=age (years)+2×NIHSS-10 × ASPECTS. PRE score was highly predictive of good outcome in the derivation cohort (area under the curve (AUC)=0.79) and validation cohorts (UPMC: AUC=0.79; UIVH: AUC=0.72) with comparable rates of good outcome in all PRE risk quartiles. PRE was superior to Totaled Health Risks In Vascular Events (THRIVE) (p=0.03) and Stroke Prognostication using Age and NIHSS (SPAN) (p=0.007), with a trend towards superiority to Houston Intra-Arterial Therapy 2 (HIAT2) (p=0.06) and iSCORE (p=0.051) in predicting good outcomes. Better outcomes were associated with successful recanalization in patients with PRE scores -24 to +49 but not in patients with PRE scores <-24 or ≥ 50. The PRE score is a validated tool that predicts outcomes and may facilitate patient selection for endovascular therapy in anterior circulation large vessel occlusions. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  2. Dynamical response theory for driven-dissipative quantum systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos Venuti, Lorenzo; Zanardi, Paolo

    2016-03-01

    We discuss dynamical response theory of driven-dissipative quantum systems described by Markovian master equations generating semigroups of maps. In this setting thermal equilibrium states are replaced by nonequilibrium steady states, and dissipative perturbations are considered in addition to the Hamiltonian ones. We derive explicit expressions for the linear dynamical response functions for generalized dephasing channels and for Davies thermalizing generators. We introduce the notion of maximal harmonic response and compute it exactly for a single-qubit channel. Finally, we analyze linear response near dynamical phase transitions in quasifree open quantum systems. It is found that the effect of the dynamical phase transition shows up in a peak at the edge of the spectrum in the imaginary part of the dynamical response function.

  3. Population dynamical responses to climate change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forchhammer, Mads; Schmidt, Niels Martin; Høye, Toke Thomas

    2008-01-01

    approaches, we analyse concurrently the influence of climatic variability and trophic interactions on the temporal population dynamics of species in the terrestrial vertebrate community at Zackenberg. We describe and contrast the population dynamics of three predator species (arctic fox Alopex lagopus, stoat...... of arctic fox were not significantly related to changes in lemming abundance, both the stoat and the breeding of long-tailed skua were mainly related to lemming dynamics. The predator-prey system at Zackenberg differentiates from previously described systems in high-arctic Greenland, which, we suggest...

  4. Computational hydrodynamic comparison of a mini vessel and a USP 2 dissolution testing system to predict the dynamic operating conditions for similarity of dissolution performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bing; Bredael, Gerard; Armenante, Piero M

    2018-01-16

    The hydrodynamic characteristics of a mini vessel and a USP 2 dissolution testing system were obtained and compared to predict the tablet-liquid mass transfer coefficient from velocity distributions near the tablet and establish the dynamic operating conditions under which dissolution in mini vessels could be conducted to generate concentration profiles similar to those in the USP 2. Velocity profiles were obtained experimentally using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) was used to predict the velocity distribution and strain rate around a model tablet. A CFD-based mass transfer model was also developed. When plotted against strain rate, the predicted tablet-liquid mass transfer coefficient was found to be independent of the system where it was obtained, implying that a tablet would dissolve at the same rate in both systems provided that the concentration gradient between the tablet surface and the bulk is the same, the tablet surface area per unit liquid volume is identical, and the two systems are operated at the appropriate agitation speeds specified in this work. The results of this work will help dissolution scientists operate mini vessels so as to predict the dissolution profiles in the USP 2, especially during the early stages of drug development. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The post peak response of concrete for dynamic tensile loading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vegt, I.; Weerheijm, J.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanical response of concrete is represented in the load-deformation curve which shows the response up to maximum strength as well as the post-peak response up to complete failure. Dynamic tests exhibit an extensive rate effect on the tensile strength beyond loading rates of about 50 GPa/s

  6. The response of pile-guided floats subjected to dynamic loading : volume II annex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Pile-Guided floats can be a desirable alternative to stationary berthing structures. Both floats and guide piles are subjected to dynamic : forces such as wind generated waves and impacts from vessels. This project developed a rational basis for esti...

  7. The response of pile-guided floats subjected to dynamic loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Pile-Guided floats can be a desirable alternative to stationary berthing structures. Both floats and guide piles are subjected to dynamic : forces such as wind generated waves and impacts from vessels. This project developed a rational basis for esti...

  8. Towards Trustworthy Adaptive Case Management with Dynamic Condition Response Graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mukkamala, Raghava Rao; Hildebrandt, Thomas; Slaats, Tijs

    2013-01-01

    We describe how the declarative Dynamic Condition Response (DCR) Graphs process model can be used for trustworthy adaptive case management by leveraging the flexible execution, dynamic composition and adaptation supported by DCR Graphs. The dynamically composed and adapted graphs are verified...... for deadlock freedom and liveness in the SPIN model checker by utilizing a mapping from DCR Graphs to PROMELA code. We exemplify the approach by a small workflow extracted from a field study at a danish hospital....

  9. Dynamic response of multiwall boron nitride nanotubes subjected to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dynamic behaviours of multiwall boron nitride nanotubes (MWBNNTs) with finite length were studied by employing continuum ... Multiwall boron nitride nanotube; dynamic response; impact; wave propagation. 1. Introduction. Boron nitride .... eV nm6 26 and R0 = 0.344 nm27 in equation (11) yields η = 0.262 GPa nm−1.

  10. Instantaneous stiffness and hysteresis of dynamic elastic response prosthetic feet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Christina M; Kaufman, Kenton

    2017-10-01

    Dynamic elastic response prosthetic feet are designed to mimic the functional characteristics of the native foot/ankle joint. Numerous designs of dynamic elastic response feet exist which make the prescription process difficult, especially because of the lack of empirical evidence describing the objective performance characteristics of the feet. To quantify the mechanical properties of available dynamic elastic response prosthetic feet, specifically the stiffness and hysteresis. Mechanical testing of dynamic elastic response prosthetic feet. Static Proof Testing in accordance with ISO 10328 was conducted on seven dynamic elastic response prosthetic feet. Load-displacement data were used to calculate the instantaneous stiffness in both the heel and forefoot regions, as well as hysteresis associated with each foot. Heel stiffness was greater than forefoot stiffness for all feet. The heel of the glass composite prosthetic foot was stiffer than the carbon fiber feet and it exhibited less hysteresis. Two different carbon fiber feet had the stiffest forefoot regions. Mechanical testing is a reproducible method that can be used to provide objective evidence about dynamic elastic response prosthetic foot performance and aid in the prescription process. Clinical relevance The quantitative stiffness and hysteresis data from this study can be used by prosthetists to aid the prescription process and make it more objective.

  11. Research vessels

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, P.S.

    by the research vessels RV Gaveshani and ORV Sagar Kanya are reported. The work carried out by the three charted ships is also recorded. A short note on cruise plans for the study of ferromanganese nodules is added...

  12. Radiation sterilized bone response to dynamic loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardas, Marcin; Kubisz, Leszek; Biskupski, Piotr; Mielcarek, Sławomir; Stelmach-Mardas, Marta; Kałuska, Iwona

    2012-08-01

    Allogeneic bone grafts are used on a large scale in surgeries. To avoid the risk of infectious diseases, allografts should be radiation-sterilized. So far, no international consensus has been achieved regarding the optimal radiation dose. Many authors suggest that bone sterilization deteriorates bone mechanical properties. However, no data on the influence of ionizing radiation on bone dynamic mechanical properties are available. Bovine femurs from 2-year old animal were machine cut and irradiated with the doses 10, 15, 25, 35, 45 and 50 kGy. Dynamic mechanical analysis was performed at 1-10 Hz at the temperature range of 0-350 °C in 3-point bending configuration. No statistically significant differences in storage modulus were observed. However, there were significant decreased values of loss modulus between the samples irradiated with doses of 10 (↓14.3%), 15, 45 and 50 kGy (↓33.2%) and controls. It was stated that increased irradiation dose decreases the temperature where collagen denaturation process starts and increases the temperature where the collagen denaturation process finishes. It was shown that activation energy of denaturation process is significantly higher for the samples irradiated with the dose of 50 kGy (615 kJ/mol) in comparison with control samples and irradiation with other doses (100-135 kJ/mol). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The Response Dynamics of Recognition Memory: Sensitivity and Bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koop, Gregory J.; Criss, Amy H.

    2016-01-01

    Advances in theories of memory are hampered by insufficient metrics for measuring memory. The goal of this paper is to further the development of model-independent, sensitive empirical measures of the recognition decision process. We evaluate whether metrics from continuous mouse tracking, or response dynamics, uniquely identify response bias and…

  14. On the Assessment of the Dynamic Response of Soils | Teferra ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper discusses two approaches for determining the dynamic response spectra of structures in which the effect of site conditions are taken into consideration. From the response spectra the estimation of maximum base shear is indicated. In light of the presented discussion, the earthquake loading as stipulaled in the ...

  15. Radiation sterilized bone response to dynamic loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mardas, Marcin, E-mail: marcin.mardas@skpp.edu.pl [Department of Oncology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, ul. Szamarzewskiego 82/84, 60-569 Poznan (Poland); Kubisz, Leszek [Department of Biophysics, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, ul. Fredry 10, 61-701 Poznan (Poland); Biskupski, Piotr; Mielcarek, Slawomir [Department of Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University, ul. Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznan (Poland); Stelmach-Mardas, Marta [Department of Bromatology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, ul. Marcelinska 420, 60-354 Poznan (Poland); Kaluska, Iwona [Centre for Radiation Research and Technology, Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, ul. Dorodna 16, 03-195 Warsaw (Poland)

    2012-08-01

    Allogeneic bone grafts are used on a large scale in surgeries. To avoid the risk of infectious diseases, allografts should be radiation-sterilized. So far, no international consensus has been achieved regarding the optimal radiation dose. Many authors suggest that bone sterilization deteriorates bone mechanical properties. However, no data on the influence of ionizing radiation on bone dynamic mechanical properties are available. Bovine femurs from 2-year old animal were machine cut and irradiated with the doses 10, 15, 25, 35, 45 and 50 kGy. Dynamic mechanical analysis was performed at 1-10 Hz at the temperature range of 0-350 Degree-Sign C in 3-point bending configuration. No statistically significant differences in storage modulus were observed. However, there were significant decreased values of loss modulus between the samples irradiated with doses of 10 ({down_arrow}14.3%), 15, 45 and 50 kGy ({down_arrow}33.2%) and controls. It was stated that increased irradiation dose decreases the temperature where collagen denaturation process starts and increases the temperature where the collagen denaturation process finishes. It was shown that activation energy of denaturation process is significantly higher for the samples irradiated with the dose of 50 kGy (615 kJ/mol) in comparison with control samples and irradiation with other doses (100-135 kJ/mol). - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine changes in the storage modulus and loss modulus of samples irradiated with doses of 10-50 kGy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine changes in the denaturation temperature of samples irradiated with doses of 10-50 kGy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine changes in the activation energy of denaturation process of samples irradiated with doses of 10-50 kGy.

  16. Estimating Reduced Consumption for Dynamic Demand Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chelmis, Charalampos [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Aman, Saima [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Saeed, Muhammad Rizwan [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Frincu, Marc [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Prasanna, Viktor K. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-01-30

    Growing demand is straining our existing electricity generation facilities and requires active participation of the utility and the consumers to achieve energy sustainability. One of the most effective and widely used ways to achieve this goal in the smart grid is demand response (DR), whereby consumers reduce their electricity consumption in response to a request sent from the utility whenever it anticipates a peak in demand. To successfully plan and implement demand response, the utility requires reliable estimate of reduced consumption during DR. This also helps in optimal selection of consumers and curtailment strategies during DR. While much work has been done on predicting normal consumption, reduced consumption prediction is an open problem that is under-studied. In this paper, we introduce and formalize the problem of reduced consumption prediction, and discuss the challenges associated with it. We also describe computational methods that use historical DR data as well as pre-DR conditions to make such predictions. Our experiments are conducted in the real-world setting of a university campus microgrid, and our preliminary results set the foundation for more detailed modeling.

  17. Modelling the Aggregated Dynamic Response of Electric Vehicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ziras, Charalampos; Hu, Junjie; You, Shi

    2017-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in the use of electric vehicles (EVs) for providing fast frequency reserves due to their large installed capacity and their very fast response. Most works focus on scheduling and optimization and usually neglect their aggregated dynamic response, which is particula......There is an increasing interest in the use of electric vehicles (EVs) for providing fast frequency reserves due to their large installed capacity and their very fast response. Most works focus on scheduling and optimization and usually neglect their aggregated dynamic response, which....... Such approximations can be used in power system studies, in order to capture the dynamics of an EV population more accurately. Finally, we compare our approach to the most widely used in the literature, i.e. the averaging method where all EVs are represented with the population’s average values, and discuss the key...

  18. Dynamics of Corporate Social Responsibility in Asia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Rebecca Chunghee; Moon, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    This article investigates Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) in Asia through two related themes: research knowledge and ethical norms. ‘CSR in Asia’ research is shown to be growing, particularly in East Asia. Compared with Western CSR literature, it is shown to be dominated by empirical......, particularly quantitative, research. More substantively, this research is dominated by an issue focus on ethical norms, though this is in real decline. In this light, this article offers a closer investigation of the nature of ethical systems underpinning Asian business, and a comparison of Asian and Western...

  19. Dynamic compressive response of bovine liver tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pervin, Farhana; Chen, Weinong W; Weerasooriya, Tusit

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to experimentally determine the strain rate effects on the compressive stress-strain behavior of bovine liver tissues. Fresh liver tissues were used to make specimens for mechanical loading. Experiments at quasi-static strain rates were conducted at 0.01 and 0.1 s(-1). Intermediate-rate experiments were performed at 1, 10, and 100 s(-1). High strain rate (1000, 2000, and 3000 s(-1)) experiments were conducted using a Kolsky bar modified for soft material characterization. A hollow transmission bar with semi-conductor strain gages was used to sense the weak forces from the soft specimens. Quartz-crystal force transducers were used to monitor valid testing conditions on the tissue specimens. The experiment results show that the compressive stress-strain response of the liver tissue is non-linear and highly rate-sensitive, especially when the strain rate is in the Kolsky bar range. The tissue stiffens significantly with increasing strain rate. The responses from liver tissues along and perpendicular to the liver surface were consistent, indicating isotropic behavior. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Dynamic Frequency Response of Wind Power Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Altin, Müfit

    Electricity generation from wind energy has rapidly increased for the last five years worldwide. In many countries, wind energy targets have been set in the range of 20% to 50% of all electricity generation due to the concerns of CO2 emissions, fossil fuel costs, and energy efficiency. In order...... to maintain sustainable and reliable operation of the power system for these targets, transmission system operators (TSOs) have revised the grid code requirements. Also, the TSOs are planning the future development of the power system with various wind penetration scenarios to integrate more wind power...... is developed for the wind integration studies. For the inertial response study, a new control method is proposed which improves the existing control concepts in terms of reducing the released energy and peak active power of WPPs. It is also shown that when the capability of WPPs considered proposed control...

  1. Dynamic Response of Airfield Pavement to Large Magnitude Loads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    creep speed taxi tests. Heukelom and Klomp (Reference 6) states the Road Research Laboratory concluded that flexible roads behave elastically under...high speed or high frequency dynamic loads would cause inertia effects to influence dynamic pavement response. Heukelom , Klomp, and Foster have...However, Heukelom and Foster (Reference 11) have shown that the modulus measured from sustained vibrations is equal to the modulus associated with

  2. 33 CFR 155.1035 - Response plan requirements for manned vessels carrying oil as a primary cargo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... notification, as much as possible of the information essential for the protection of the marine environment as... discharge or substantial threat of a discharge of oil. If the notifications vary due to vessel location, the... estimate of oil discharged or threat of discharge; (J) Weather and sea conditions on scene; (K) Ship size...

  3. 19 CFR 4.76 - Procedures and responsibilities of carriers filing outbound vessel manifest information via the AES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... outbound vessel manifest information via the AES. 4.76 Section 4.76 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER... manifest information via the AES. (a) The sea carrier's module. The Sea Carrier's Module is a component of... information will be transmitted to Customs via AES for each shipment as far in advance of departure as...

  4. DNS investigation of the dynamical behaviour of trailing vortices in unbaffled stirred vessels at transitional Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Başbuǧ, S.; Papadakis, G.; Vassilicos, J. C.

    2017-06-01

    Flow in an unbaffled stirred vessel agitated by a four-bladed radial impeller is investigated by using direct numerical simulations at Re = 320 and 1600. We observe fluctuations in the power consumption with a peak frequency at ca. three times the impeller rotational speed for both Reynolds numbers. It is discovered that these fluctuations are associated with a periodic event in the wake of the blades, which involves alternating growth and decay of the upper and lower cores of the trailing vortex pair as well as up-and-down swinging motion of the radial jet. Moreover, the phase relation between the wakes of the different blades is examined in detail. Further studies using fractal-shaped blades show that the exact blade shape does not have a strong influence on this phenomenon. However, the wake interaction between the blades, hence the number of blades, has a direct influence on the unsteadiness of trailing vortices.

  5. Capturing the dynamic nascent transcriptome during acute cellular responses: The serum response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Killeen S. Kirkconnell

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic regulation of gene expression via signal transduction pathways is of fundamental importance during many biological processes such as cell state transitioning, cell cycle progression and stress responses. In this study we used serum stimulation as a cell response paradigm to apply the nascent RNA Bru-seq technique in order to capture early dynamic changes in the nascent transcriptome. Our data provides an unprecedented view of the dynamics of genome-wide transcription during the first two hours of serum stimulation in human fibroblasts. While some genes showed sustained induction or repression, other genes showed transient or delayed responses. Surprisingly, the dynamic patterns of induction and suppression of response genes showed a high degree of similarity, suggesting that these opposite outcomes are triggered by a common set of signals. As expected, early response genes such as those encoding components of the AP-1 transcription factor and those involved in the circadian clock were immediately but transiently induced. Surprisingly, transcription of important DNA damage response genes and histone genes were rapidly repressed. We also show that RNA polymerase II accelerates as it transcribes large genes and this was independent of whether the gene was induced or not. These results provide a unique genome-wide depiction of dynamic patterns of transcription of serum response genes and demonstrate the utility of Bru-seq to comprehensively capture rapid and dynamic changes of the nascent transcriptome.

  6. Transcriptome dynamics of the microRNA inhibition response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wen, Jiayu; Leucci, Elenora; Vendramin, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    We report a high-resolution time series study of transcriptome dynamics following antimiR-mediated inhibition of miR-9 in a Hodgkin lymphoma cell-line-the first such dynamic study of the microRNA inhibition response-revealing both general and specific aspects of the physiological response. We show...... miR-9 inhibition inducing a multiphasic transcriptome response, with a direct target perturbation before 4 h, earlier than previously reported, amplified by a downstream peak at ∼32 h consistent with an indirect response due to secondary coherent regulation. Predictive modelling indicates a major...... role for miR-9 in post-transcriptional control of RNA processing and RNA binding protein regulation. Cluster analysis identifies multiple co-regulated gene regulatory modules. Functionally, we observe a shift over time from mRNA processing at early time points to translation at later time points. We...

  7. Wind-induced Dynamic Response of High Rise Buildings

    OpenAIRE

    Bjørnland, Karl Hermann Mathias

    2013-01-01

    This thesis aims to investigate the dynamic response of a high rise concrete structure. Calculations are performed for Lerkendal Hotel, a slender 75 meter high building located in Trondheim. Buffeting response has been the main focus in the calculations, and both displacements, accelerations and cross sectional forces have been obtained.Initially, acceleration demands regarding human comfort in a structure subjected to wind induced vibrations were established using design codes. In addition, ...

  8. Predicting responsiveness to intervention in dyslexia using dynamic assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aravena, S.; Tijms, J.; Snellings, P.; van der Molen, M.W.

    In the current study we examined the value of a dynamic test for predicting responsiveness to reading intervention for children diagnosedwith dyslexia. The test consisted of a 20-minute training aimed at learning eight basic letter–speech sound correspondences within an artificial orthography,

  9. 10 original article dynamics of germs responsible for acute bacterial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    boaz

    DYNAMICS OF GERMS RESPONSIBLE FOR ACUTE BACTERIAL MENINGITIS IN. BURKINA FASO IN THE LAST TEN YEARS (2005-2014). Absatou Ky-Ba1,*, Mahamoudou Sanou2,Juliette -Diallo Tranchot3, Paul A. Christiasen4, Abdoul Salam Ouedraogo3,. Mamadou Tamboura2, Dinanibé Kambiré2, Kalifa Ouattara5, ...

  10. Dynamic response of ultrathin highly dense ZIF-8 nanofilms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cookney, J.; Ogieglo, Wojciech; Hrabanek, P.; Vankelecom, I.; Fila, V.; Benes, Nieck Edwin

    2014-01-01

    Ultrathin ZIF-8 nanofilms are prepared by facile step-by-step dip coating. A critical withdrawal speed allows for films with a very uniform minimum thickness. The high refractive index of the films denotes the absence of mesopores. The dynamic response of the films to CO2 exposure resembles

  11. Using Dynamic Response Index (DRI) as a spinal injury predictor

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ahmed, Rayeesa

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available of injury to the spine. The Dynamic Response Index (DRI) is the injury criterion most used to determine probability of spinal damage of an occupant due to blast loading; however shortcomings of this criterion have been shown in practical applications...

  12. Effects of Joint Stiffening on the Dynamic Response of Frames ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examined the effects of joint stiffening on the dynamic response of frames subjected to lateral loads using the stiffness method. Modified Stiffness coefficients and fixed-end reactions were developed as functions of two parameters α and β representing the ratio of the length of the stiffened portion to that of the ...

  13. Finite Element Vibration and Dynamic Response Analysis of Engineering Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslav Mackerle

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available This bibliography lists references to papers, conference proceedings, and theses/dissertations dealing with finite element vibration and dynamic response analysis of engineering structures that were published from 1994 to 1998. It contains 539 citations. The following types of structures are included: basic structural systems; ground structures; ocean and coastal structures; mobile structures; and containment structures.

  14. Enhancing supply vessel safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    A supply-vessel bridge installation consists of a navigating bridge and a control position aft, from which operators control the ship when close to rigs or platforms, and operate winches and other loading equipment. The international Convention for Safety of I Ale at Sea (SOLAS) does not regulate the layout, so design varies to a large degree, often causing an imperfect working environment. As for other types of ships, more than half the offshore service vessel accidents at sea are caused by bridge system failures. A majority can be traced back to technical design, and operational errors. The research and development project NAUT-OSV is a response to the offshore industry's safety concerns. Analysis of 24 incidents involving contact or collision between supply vessels and offshore installations owned or operated by Norwegian companies indicated that failures in the bridge system were often the cause.

  15. Dynamic materials response at multiscales: Experiments and simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Sheng-Nian

    One of the grand challenges in materials physics is dynamic responses to impulsive loading, including shock waves, radiation, and pulsed fields, due to their highly transient nature and extremely complex microstructure effects. Dynamic responses, such as plasticity, damage, cavitation, phase changes, and chemical reactions, are inherently multiscale and heavily dependent on microstructure. One has to resort to a suite of tools, including experiments, modeling and simulations, and theory. However, the gaps in spatial or temporal scales between experiments and simulations are still wide, while cross-scale theories are still in early development. To this end, we exploit large-scale molecular dynamics simulations, electron microscopy, and ultrafast synchrotron X-ray imaging and scattering, to probe materials response at length scales ranging from lattice to micron, and time scales, from picosecond to second. For examples, simultaneous, high-speed, X-ray imaging (mesoscale strain-field mapping) and diffraction measurements along with macroscopic measurements have been achieved. Based on classical nucleation theory and large-scale molecular dynamics simulations, we demonstrate the equivalence between length and time scales for nucleation events, which provides a framework to bridge different scales. Certainly, advancing multiscale science requires sustained, concerted, experimental, modeling and theoretical efforts. We have benefited from the colleagues at the Advanced Photon Source, and the Peac Institute of Multiscales Sciences.

  16. Dynamic resource allocation in disaster response: tradeoffs in wildfire suppression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nada Petrovic

    Full Text Available Challenges associated with the allocation of limited resources to mitigate the impact of natural disasters inspire fundamentally new theoretical questions for dynamic decision making in coupled human and natural systems. Wildfires are one of several types of disaster phenomena, including oil spills and disease epidemics, where (1 the disaster evolves on the same timescale as the response effort, and (2 delays in response can lead to increased disaster severity and thus greater demand for resources. We introduce a minimal stochastic process to represent wildfire progression that nonetheless accurately captures the heavy tailed statistical distribution of fire sizes observed in nature. We then couple this model for fire spread to a series of response models that isolate fundamental tradeoffs both in the strength and timing of response and also in division of limited resources across multiple competing suppression efforts. Using this framework, we compute optimal strategies for decision making scenarios that arise in fire response policy.

  17. Dynamic Response and Fracture of Composite Gun Tubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerome T. Tzeng

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The fracture behavior due to dynamic response in a composite gun tube subjected to a moving pressure has been investigated. The resonance of stress waves result in very high amplitude and frequency strains in the tube at the instant and location of pressure front passage as the velocity of the projectile approaches a critical value. The cyclic stresses can accelerate crack propagation in the gun tube with an existing imperfection and significantly shorten the fatigue life of gun tubes. The fracture mechanism induced by dynamic amplification effects is particularly critical for composite overwrap barrels because of a multi-material construction, anisotropic material properties, and the potential of thermal degradation.

  18. Effective reconstruction of dynamics of medium response spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trofimov, Vyacheslav A.; Varentsova, Svetlana A.

    2008-10-01

    A new algorithm is suggested to visualize the dynamics of medium response spectrum in terahertz diapason by the singly measured set of partially intersected integral characteristics of the signal. The algorithm is based on SVD method and window sliding method. The analysis, we carried out, demonstrates many advantages of the new algorithm in com-parison with the Gabor-Fourier approach, which allows obtaining the dynamics of only one spectral line for one set of measurements. Among which it is necessary to mention the possibility to get the dynamics of many spectral components simultaneously for one set of measurements as well and therefore to get the complete information about the spectrum dynamics. This allows to identify specific materials with known spectral lines and to distinguish materials with similar spectra, which is of great importance for the detection and identification of different chemicals, pharmaceutical substances and explosives. To demonstrate the efficiency of a proposed algorithm, we compare spectrum dynamics of chocolate and soap, which possess the similar spectra. Our investigation shows that their dynamics widely vary in spec-tral lines. The proposed algorithm can be also applied to voice identification and to reconstruction of a laser beam profile with a great number of local maxima. Developed algorithm allows to measure the characteristic time of medium responce. It is very important for various problems of spectroscopy.

  19. Population dynamics and mutualism: Functional responses of benefits and costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, J. Nathaniel; DeAngelis, Donald L.; Bronstein, Judith L.

    2002-01-01

    We develop an approach for studying population dynamics resulting from mutualism by employing functional responses based on density‐dependent benefits and costs. These functional responses express how the population growth rate of a mutualist is modified by the density of its partner. We present several possible dependencies of gross benefits and costs, and hence net effects, to a mutualist as functions of the density of its partner. Net effects to mutualists are likely a monotonically saturating or unimodal function of the density of their partner. We show that fundamental differences in the growth, limitation, and dynamics of a population can occur when net effects to that population change linearly, unimodally, or in a saturating fashion. We use the mutualism between senita cactus and its pollinating seed‐eating moth as an example to show the influence of different benefit and cost functional responses on population dynamics and stability of mutualisms. We investigated two mechanisms that may alter this mutualism's functional responses: distribution of eggs among flowers and fruit abortion. Differences in how benefits and costs vary with density can alter the stability of this mutualism. In particular, fruit abortion may allow for a stable equilibrium where none could otherwise exist.

  20. Exploring the Dynamics of Responses to Food Production Shocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aled Jones

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Food production shocks can lead to food crises where access to appropriate quantities and quality of food become inadequate, unaffordable, or unreliable on a major scale. While the physical causes of food production shocks are well researched, the dynamics of responses to them are less well understood. This paper reviews those dynamics and includes evidence gathered via interviews of 44 expert practitioners sourced globally from academia, government, industry, think-tanks, and development/relief organizations. The paper confirms that policy interventions are often prioritised for national interests and poorly coordinated at regional and global scales. The paper acknowledges future compounding trends such as climate change and demographic shifts and suggests that while there are signs of incremental progress in better managing the impacts of shock events, coordinated responses at scale will require a paradigm shift involving major policy, market, and technological advancements, and a wide range of public and private sector stakeholders.

  1. Using dissipative particle dynamics to model micromechanics of responsive hydrogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexeev, Alexander; Nikolov, Svetoslav; Fernandez de Las Nieves, Alberto

    2015-03-01

    The ability of responsive hydrogels to undergo complex and reversible shape transformations in response to external stimuli such as temperature, magnetic/electric fields, pH levels, and light intensity has made them the material of choice for tissue scaffolding, drug delivery, bio-adhesive, bio-sensing, and micro-sorting applications. The complex micromechanics and kinetics of these responsive networks however, currently hinders developments in the aforementioned areas. In order to better understand the mechanical properties of these systems and how they change during the volume transition we have developed a dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) model for responsive polymer networks. We use this model to examine the impact of the Flory-Huggins parameter on the bulk and shear moduli. In this fashion we evaluate how environmental factors can affect the micromechanical properties of these networks. Support from NSF CAREER Award (DMR-1255288) is gratefully acknowledged.

  2. Dynamic Response Analysis of an Offshore Wind Turbine

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yu

    2011-01-01

    The offshore wind power is an attractive renewable energy resource. To improve the wind power generation capacity, there is a strong desire for offshore wind turbine to go to deep waters. For offshore fixed wind turbine, stronger foundation like jacket structure has a good applicability for deeper water depth. A 70-meters jacket substructure for offshore wind turbine is designed. This thesis focuses on the dynamic structural response analysis of this jacket substructure, with a particular foc...

  3. From Dynamic Condition Response Structures to Büchi Automata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mukkamala, Raghava Rao; Hildebrandt, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Recently we have presented distributed dynamic condition response structures (DCR structures) as a declarative process model conservatively generalizing labelled event structures to allow for finite specifications of repeated, possibly infinite behavior. The key ideas are to split the causality r...... and show how to characterise the execution of DCR structures and the acceptance condition for infinite runs by giving a map to Bu ̈chi-automata. This is the first step towards automatic verification of processes specified as DCR structures....

  4. Responsive Guest Encapsulation of Dynamic Conjugated Microporous Polymers

    OpenAIRE

    Lai Xu; Youyong Li

    2016-01-01

    The host-guest complexes of conjugated microporous polymers encapsulating C60 and dye molecules have been investigated systematically. The orientation of guest molecules inside the cavities, have different terms: inside the open cavities of the polymer, or inside the cavities formed by packing different polymers. The host backbone shows responsive dynamic behavior in order to accommodate the size and shape of incoming guest molecule or guest aggregates. Simulations show that the host-guest bi...

  5. Dynamic structure of joint-action stimulus-response activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MaryLauren Malone

    Full Text Available The mere presence of a co-actor can influence an individual's response behavior. For instance, a social Simon effect has been observed when two individuals perform a Go/No-Go response to one of two stimuli in the presence of each other, but not when they perform the same task alone. Such effects are argued to provide evidence that individuals co-represent the task goals and the to-be-performed actions of a co-actor. Motivated by the complex-systems approach, the present study was designed to investigate an alternative hypothesis--that such joint-action effects are due to a dynamical (time-evolving interpersonal coupling that operates to perturb the behavior of socially situated actors. To investigate this possibility, participants performed a standard Go/No-Go Simon task in joint and individual conditions. The dynamic structure of recorded reaction times was examined using fractal statistics and instantaneous cross-correlation. Consistent with our hypothesis that participants responding in a shared space would become behaviorally coupled, the analyses revealed that reaction times in the joint condition displayed decreased fractal structure (indicative of interpersonal perturbation processes modulating ongoing participant behavior compared to the individual condition, and were more correlated across a range of time-scales compared to the reaction times of pseudo-pair controls. Collectively, the findings imply that dynamic processes might underlie social stimulus-response compatibility effects and shape joint cognitive processes in general.

  6. Dynamic Causal Modeling of the Cortical Responses to Wrist Perturbations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Yang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical perturbations applied to the wrist joint typically evoke a stereotypical sequence of cortical and muscle responses. The early cortical responses (<100 ms are thought be involved in the “rapid” transcortical reaction to the perturbation while the late cortical responses (>100 ms are related to the “slow” transcortical reaction. Although previous studies indicated that both responses involve the primary motor cortex, it remains unclear if both responses are engaged by the same effective connectivity in the cortical network. To answer this question, we investigated the effective connectivity cortical network after a “ramp-and-hold” mechanical perturbation, in both the early (<100 ms and late (>100 ms periods, using dynamic causal modeling. Ramp-and-hold perturbations were applied to the wrist joint while the subject maintained an isometric wrist flexion. Cortical activity was recorded using a 128-channel electroencephalogram (EEG. We investigated how the perturbation modulated the effective connectivity for the early and late periods. Bayesian model comparisons suggested that different effective connectivity networks are engaged in these two periods. For the early period, we found that only a few cortico-cortical connections were modulated, while more complicated connectivity was identified in the cortical network during the late period with multiple modulated cortico-cortical connections. The limited early cortical network likely allows for a rapid muscle response without involving high-level cognitive processes, while the complexity of the late network may facilitate coordinated responses.

  7. Comparison of hemodynamic responses to static and dynamic exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezucha, G R; Lenser, M C; Hanson, P G; Nagle, F J

    1982-12-01

    Eight healthy male adults (25-34 yr) were studied to compare hemodynamic responses to static exercise (30% MVC in leg extension), static-dynamic exercise (one-arm cranking, 66 and 79% VO2 max-arm), and dynamic exercise (two-leg cycling, 58 and 82% VOmax-legs). Leg extension (LE) strength was measured by a spring scale. Cranking and cycling were performed on a Quinton bicycle ergometer. VO2 was measured using an automated open-circuit system. Heart rate (HR) was monitored from a CM-5 ECG lead, and arterial pressure (Pa) was measured from an indwelling brachial artery catheter. Cardiac output (Q) was measured using a CO2-rebreathing procedure. Total peripheral resistance (TPR) was calculated using the mean arterial pressure (Pa) as the systemic pressure gradient. In 30% LE, a significant (P less than 0.05) Pa increase occurred (pressor response) mediated primarily by an increase in Q. One-arm cranking and two-leg cycling at similar relative VO2 demands resulted in nearly identical increases in Pa due to different contributions of Q and TPR. Q and the arteriovenous O2 difference varied as a function of VO2 regardless of the mode of exercise (static or dynamic). On the other hand, the HR response, which accounted for increased Q in the exercises containing a static component, and Pa varied with mode of exercise. Any generalized scheme of cardiovascular control during exercise must account for the potential influence of dynamic and static components of the exercise.

  8. Dynamic responses of Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron during growth on glycan mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Theresa E; Pudlo, Nicholas A; Koropatkin, Nicole M; Bell, Joshua S K; Moya Balasch, Monica; Jasker, Kevin; Martens, Eric C

    2013-06-01

    Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (Bt) is a human colonic symbiont that degrades many different complex carbohydrates (glycans), the identities and amounts of which are likely to change frequently and abruptly from meal-to-meal. To understand how this organism reacts to dynamic growth conditions, we challenged it with a series of different glycan mixtures and measured responses involved in glycan catabolism. Our results demonstrate that individual Bt cells can simultaneously respond to multiple glycans and that responses to new glycans are extremely rapid. The presence of alternative carbohydrates does not alter response kinetics, but reduces expression of some glycan utilization genes as well as the cell's sensitivity to glycans that are present in lower concentration. Growth in a mixture containing 12 different glycans revealed that Bt preferentially uses some before others. This metabolic hierarchy is not changed by prior exposure to lower priority glycans because re-introducing high priority substrates late in culture re-initiates repression of genes involved in degrading those with lower priority. At least some carbohydrate prioritization effects occur at the level of monosaccharide recognition. Our results provide insight into how a bacterial glycan generalist modifies its responses in dynamic glycan environments and provide essential knowledge to interpret related metabolic behaviour in vivo. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Response-locked brain dynamics of word production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie Riès

    Full Text Available The cortical regions involved in the different stages of speech production are relatively well-established, but their spatio-temporal dynamics remain poorly understood. In particular, the available studies have characterized neural events with respect to the onset of the stimulus triggering a verbal response. The core aspect of language production, however, is not perception but action. In this context, the most relevant question may not be how long after a stimulus brain events happen, but rather how long before the production act do they occur. We investigated speech production-related brain activity time-locked to vocal onset, in addition to the common stimulus-locked approach. We report the detailed temporal interplay between medial and left frontal activities occurring shortly before vocal onset. We interpret those as reflections of, respectively, word selection and word production processes. This medial-lateral organization is in line with that described in non-linguistic action control, suggesting that similar processes are at play in word production and non-linguistic action production. This novel view of the brain dynamics underlying word production provides a useful background for future investigations of the spatio-temporal brain dynamics that lead to the production of verbal responses.

  10. Response-locked brain dynamics of word production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riès, Stéphanie; Janssen, Niels; Burle, Borís; Alario, F-Xavier

    2013-01-01

    The cortical regions involved in the different stages of speech production are relatively well-established, but their spatio-temporal dynamics remain poorly understood. In particular, the available studies have characterized neural events with respect to the onset of the stimulus triggering a verbal response. The core aspect of language production, however, is not perception but action. In this context, the most relevant question may not be how long after a stimulus brain events happen, but rather how long before the production act do they occur. We investigated speech production-related brain activity time-locked to vocal onset, in addition to the common stimulus-locked approach. We report the detailed temporal interplay between medial and left frontal activities occurring shortly before vocal onset. We interpret those as reflections of, respectively, word selection and word production processes. This medial-lateral organization is in line with that described in non-linguistic action control, suggesting that similar processes are at play in word production and non-linguistic action production. This novel view of the brain dynamics underlying word production provides a useful background for future investigations of the spatio-temporal brain dynamics that lead to the production of verbal responses.

  11. Open Automated Demand Response Dynamic Pricing Technologies and Demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghatikar, Girish; Mathieu, Johanna L.; Piette, Mary Ann; Koch, Ed; Hennage, Dan

    2010-08-02

    This study examines the use of OpenADR communications specification, related data models, technologies, and strategies to send dynamic prices (e.g., real time prices and peak prices) and Time of Use (TOU) rates to commercial and industrial electricity customers. OpenADR v1.0 is a Web services-based flexible, open information model that has been used in California utilities' commercial automated demand response programs since 2007. We find that data models can be used to send real time prices. These same data models can also be used to support peak pricing and TOU rates. We present a data model that can accommodate all three types of rates. For demonstration purposes, the data models were generated from California Independent System Operator's real-time wholesale market prices, and a California utility's dynamic prices and TOU rates. Customers can respond to dynamic prices by either using the actual prices, or prices can be mapped into"operation modes," which can act as inputs to control systems. We present several different methods for mapping actual prices. Some of these methods were implemented in demonstration projects. The study results demonstrate show that OpenADR allows interoperability with existing/future systems/technologies and can be used within related dynamic pricing activities within Smart Grid.

  12. Dynamic Characterization and Impulse Response Modeling of Amplitude and Phase Response of Silicon Nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cleary, Ciaran S.; Ji, Hua; Dailey, James M.

    2013-01-01

    Amplitude and phase dynamics of silicon nanowires were measured using time-resolved spectroscopy. Time shifts of the maximum phase change and minimum amplitude as a function of pump power due to saturation of the free-carrier density were observed. A phenomenological impulse response model used t...

  13. Responsive Guest Encapsulation of Dynamic Conjugated Microporous Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lai; Li, Youyong

    2016-06-30

    The host-guest complexes of conjugated microporous polymers encapsulating C60 and dye molecules have been investigated systematically. The orientation of guest molecules inside the cavities, have different terms: inside the open cavities of the polymer, or inside the cavities formed by packing different polymers. The host backbone shows responsive dynamic behavior in order to accommodate the size and shape of incoming guest molecule or guest aggregates. Simulations show that the host-guest binding of conjugated polymers is stronger than that of non-conjugated polymers. This detailed study could provide a clear picture for the host-guest interaction for dynamic conjugated microporous polymers. The mechanism obtained could guide designing new conjugated microporous polymers.

  14. Improving Dynamic Load and Generator Response PerformanceTools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesieutre, Bernard C.

    2005-11-01

    This report is a scoping study to examine research opportunities to improve the accuracy of the system dynamic load and generator models, data and performance assessment tools used by CAISO operations engineers and planning engineers, as well as those used by their counterparts at the California utilities, to establish safe operating margins. Model-based simulations are commonly used to assess the impact of credible contingencies in order to determine system operating limits (path ratings, etc.) to ensure compliance with NERC and WECC reliability requirements. Improved models and a better understanding of the impact of uncertainties in these models will increase the reliability of grid operations by allowing operators to more accurately study system voltage problems and the dynamic stability response of the system to disturbances.

  15. Automated Dynamic Demand Response Implementation on a Micro-grid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuppannagari, Sanmukh R.; Kannan, Rajgopal; Chelmis, Charalampos; Prasanna, Viktor K.

    2016-11-16

    In this paper, we describe a system for real-time automated Dynamic and Sustainable Demand Response with sparse data consumption prediction implemented on the University of Southern California campus microgrid. Supply side approaches to resolving energy supply-load imbalance do not work at high levels of renewable energy penetration. Dynamic Demand Response (D2R) is a widely used demand-side technique to dynamically adjust electricity consumption during peak load periods. Our D2R system consists of accurate machine learning based energy consumption forecasting models that work with sparse data coupled with fast and sustainable load curtailment optimization algorithms that provide the ability to dynamically adapt to changing supply-load imbalances in near real-time. Our Sustainable DR (SDR) algorithms attempt to distribute customer curtailment evenly across sub-intervals during a DR event and avoid expensive demand peaks during a few sub-intervals. It also ensures that each customer is penalized fairly in order to achieve the targeted curtailment. We develop near linear-time constant-factor approximation algorithms along with Polynomial Time Approximation Schemes (PTAS) for SDR curtailment that minimizes the curtailment error defined as the difference between the target and achieved curtailment values. Our SDR curtailment problem is formulated as an Integer Linear Program that optimally matches customers to curtailment strategies during a DR event while also explicitly accounting for customer strategy switching overhead as a constraint. We demonstrate the results of our D2R system using real data from experiments performed on the USC smartgrid and show that 1) our prediction algorithms can very accurately predict energy consumption even with noisy or missing data and 2) our curtailment algorithms deliver DR with extremely low curtailment errors in the 0.01-0.05 kWh range.

  16. Phase response curves for models of earthquake fault dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Franović, Igor; Perc, Matjaz; Klinshov, Vladimir; Nekorkin, Vladimir; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    We systematically study effects of external perturbations on models describing earthquake fault dynamics. The latter are based on the framework of the Burridge-Knopoff spring-block system, including the cases of a simple mono-block fault, as well as the paradigmatic complex faults made up of two identical or distinct blocks. The blocks exhibit relaxation oscillations, which are representative for the stick-slip behavior typical for earthquake dynamics. Our analysis is carried out by determining the phase response curves of first and second order. For a mono-block fault, we consider the impact of a single and two successive pulse perturbations, further demonstrating how the profile of phase response curves depends on the fault parameters. For a homogeneous two-block fault, our focus is on the scenario where each of the blocks is influenced by a single pulse, whereas for heterogeneous faults, we analyze how the response of the system depends on whether the stimulus is applied to the block having a shorter or a ...

  17. Running Safety of Trains under Vessel-Bridge Collision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongle Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To optimize the sensor placement of the health monitoring system, the dynamic behavior of the train-bridge system subjected to vessel-collision should be studied in detail firstly. This study thus focuses on the characteristics of a train-bridge system under vessel-bridge collision. The process of the vessel-bridge collision is simulated numerically with a reliable finite element model (FEM. The dynamic responses of a single car and a train crossing a cable-stayed bridge are calculated. It is shown that the collision causes significant increase of the train’s lateral acceleration, lateral wheelset force, wheel unloading rate, and derailment coefficient. The effect of the collision on the train’s vertical acceleration is much smaller. In addition, parametric studies with various train’s positions, ship tonnage, and train speed are performed. If the train is closer to the vessel-bridge collision position or the ship tonnage is larger, the train will be more dangerous. There is a relatively high probability of running danger at a low speed, resulting from longer stay of the train on the bridge. The train’s position, the ship tonnage, and the train speed must be considered when determining the most adverse conditions for the trains running on bridges under vessel-bridge collision.

  18. A computational analysis of motor synergies by dynamic response decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alessandro, Cristiano; Carbajal, Juan Pablo; d'Avella, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Analyses of experimental data acquired from humans and other vertebrates have suggested that motor commands may emerge from the combination of a limited set of modules. While many studies have focused on physiological aspects of this modularity, in this paper we propose an investigation of its theoretical foundations. We consider the problem of controlling a planar kinematic chain, and we restrict the admissible actuations to linear combinations of a small set of torque profiles (i.e., motor synergies). This scheme is equivalent to the time-varying synergy model, and it is formalized by means of the dynamic response decomposition (DRD). DRD is a general method to generate open-loop controllers for a dynamical system to solve desired tasks, and it can also be used to synthesize effective motor synergies. We show that a control architecture based on synergies can greatly reduce the dimensionality of the control problem, while keeping a good performance level. Our results suggest that in order to realize an effective and low-dimensional controller, synergies should embed features of both the desired tasks and the system dynamics. These characteristics can be achieved by defining synergies as solutions to a representative set of task instances. The required number of synergies increases with the complexity of the desired tasks. However, a possible strategy to keep the number of synergies low is to construct solutions to complex tasks by concatenating synergy-based actuations associated to simple point-to-point movements, with a limited loss of performance. Ultimately, this work supports the feasibility of controlling a non-linear dynamical systems by linear combinations of basic actuations, and illustrates the fundamental relationship between synergies, desired tasks and system dynamics.

  19. A computational analysis of motor synergies by dynamic response decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiano eAlessandro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Analyses of experimental data acquired from humans and other vertebrates have suggested that motor commands may emerge from the combination of a limited set of modules. While many studies have focused on physiological aspects of this modularity, in this paper we propose an investigation of its theoretical foundations. We consider the problem of controlling a planar kinematic chain, and we restrict the admissible actuations to linear combinations of a small set of torque profiles (i.e. motor synergies. This scheme is equivalent to the time-varying synergy model, and it is formalized by means of the dynamic response decomposition (DRD. DRD is a general method to generate open-loop controllers for a dynamical system to solve desired tasks, and it can also be used to synthesize effective motor synergies. We show that a control architecture based on synergies can greatly reduce the dimensionality of the control problem, while keeping a good performance level. Our results suggest that in order to realize an effective and low-dimensional controller, synergies should embed features of both the desired tasks and the system dynamics. These characteristics can be achieved by defining synergies as solutions to a representative set of task instances. The required number of synergies increases with the complexity of the desired tasks. However, a possible strategy to keep the number of synergies low is to construct solutions to complex tasks by concatenating synergy-based actuations associated to simple point-to-point movements, with a limited loss of performance. Ultimately, this work supports the feasibility of controlling a non-linear dynamical systems by linear combinations of basic actuations, and illustrates the fundamental relationship between synergies, desired tasks and system dynamics.

  20. Dynamic pricing for demand response considering market price uncertainty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghazvini, Mohammad Ali Fotouhi; Soares, Joao; Morais, Hugo

    2017-01-01

    Retail energy providers (REPs) can employ different strategies such as offering demand response (DR) programs, participating in bilateral contracts, and employing self-generation distributed generation (DG) units to avoid financial losses in the volatile electricity markets. In this paper......, the problem of setting dynamic retail sales price by a REP is addressed with a robust optimization technique. In the proposed model, the REP offers price-based DR programs while it faces uncertainties in the wholesale market price. The main contribution of this paper is using a robust optimization approach...

  1. The dynamic response of carbon fiber-filled polymer composites

    OpenAIRE

    Patterson B.; Orler E.B.; Furmanski J.; Rigg P.A.; Scharff R.J.; Stahl D.B.; Sheffield S.A.; Gustavsen R.L.; Dattelbaum D.M.; Coe J.D.

    2012-01-01

    The dynamic (shock) responses of two carbon fiber-filled polymer composites have been quantified using gas gun-driven plate impact experimentation. The first composite is a filament-wound, highly unidirectional carbon fiber-filled epoxy with a high degree of porosity. The second composite is a chopped carbon fiber- and graphite-filled phenolic resin with little-to-no porosity. Hugoniot data are presented for the carbon fiber-epoxy (CE) composite to 18.6 GPa in the through-thickness direction,...

  2. Shading responses of carbon allocation dynamics in mountain grassland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahn, M.; Lattanzi, F. A.; Brueggemann, N.; Siegwolf, R. T.; Richter, A.

    2012-12-01

    Carbon (C) allocation strongly influences plant and soil processes. Global environmental changes can alter source - sink relations of plants with potential implications for C allocation. Short-term C allocation dynamics in ecosystems and their responses to environmental changes are still poorly understood. To analyze effects of assimilate supply (i.e. C source strength) on ecosystem C allocation dynamics and the role of non-structural carbohydrates, canopy sections of a mountain meadow were pulse labeled with 13CO2 and subsequently shaded for a week or left unshaded (control). Tracer dynamics in above- and belowground sucrose and starch pools were analysed and coupled using compartmental modelling. The hypothesis was tested that shading affects tracer dynamics in non-structural carbohydrates and diminishes the transfer of recently assimilated C to roots and their storage pools. In unshaded plots up to 40% of assimilated C was routed through short-term storage in shoot starch and sucrose to buffer day / night cycles in photosynthesis. Shoot- and root sucrose and shoot starch were kinetically closely related pools. The tracer dynamics of the modelled root sucrose pool corresponded well with those in soil CO2 efflux. Root starch played no role in buffering day / night cycles and likely acted as a seasonal store. Shading strongly reduced sucrose and starch concentrations in shoots but not roots and resulted in a massive reduction of leaf respiration, while root respiration was much less diminished. Shading affected tracer dynamics in sucrose and starch of shoots: shoot starch rapidly lost tracer, while sucrose transiently increased its tracer content. Surprisingly, shading did not alter the dynamics of root carbohydrates. Even under severe C limitation after one week of shading, tracer C continued to be incorporated in root starch. Also the amount of 13C incorporated in phospholipid fatty acids of soil microbial communities was not reduced by shading, though its

  3. Laser speckle analysis of retinal vascular dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neganova, Anastasiia Y.; Postnov, Dmitry D.; Jacobsen, Jens Christian B.

    2016-01-01

    Studies of vascular responses are usually performed on isolated vessels or on single vessels in vivo. This allows for precise measurements of diameter or blood flow. However, dynamical responses of the whole microvascular network are difficult to access experimentally. We suggest to use full......-field laser speckle imaging to evaluate vascular responses of the retinal network. Image segmentation and vessel recognition algorithms together with response mapping allow us to analyze diameter changes and blood flow responses in the intact retinal network upon systemic administration of the vasoconstrictor...

  4. Response analysis of the dynamic excitation of hen eggs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libor Severa

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Commercially produced hen eggs have been tested by means of dynamic excitation of the egg-shells with following analysis of their response. The falling steel ball have been chosen as a exciting instrument and the laser vibrometer have been used as a measuring device for the egg response. The reproductibility of the experiments has been relatively high and the surface velocity has been found to be significantly dependent on the position around the meridian. Analysed frequency spectrum has shown the peak frequency and frequency history. Proposed numerical model has demonstrated reasonable agreement with experimental results and can be used as an effective tool in modelling of analogous or similar experiments.

  5. Motion and dynamic responses of a semisubmersible in freak waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Deng, Yan-fei; Li, Lei; Tian, Xin-liang; Li, Jun

    2017-12-01

    The present research aims at clarifying the effects of freak wave on the motion and dynamic responses of a semisubmersible. To reveal the effects of mooring stiffness, two mooring systems were employed in the model tests and time-domain simulations. The 6-DOF motion responses and mooring tensions have been measured and the 3-DOF motions of fairleads were calculated as well. From the time series, trajectories and statistics information, the interactions between the freak wave and the semisubmersible have been demonstrated and the effects of mooring stiffness have been identified. The shortage of numerical simulations based on 3D potential flow theory is presented. Results show that the freak wave is likely to cause large horizontal motions for soft mooring system and to result in extremely large mooring tensions for tight mooring system. Therefore, the freak wave is a real threat for the marine structure, which needs to be carefully considered at design stage.

  6. Quasi-static and dynamic response of viscoelastic helical rods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temel, Beytullah; Fırat Çalim, Faruk; Tütüncü, Naki

    2004-04-01

    In this study, the dynamic behaviour of cylindrical helical rods made of linear viscoelastic materials are investigated in the Laplace domain. The governing equations for naturally twisted and curved spatial rods obtained using the Timoshenko beam theory are rewritten for cylindrical helical rods. The curvature of the rod axis, effect of rotary inertia, and shear and axial deformations are considered in the formulation. The material of the rod is assumed to be homogeneous, isotropic and linear viscoelastic. In the viscoelastic material case, according to the correspondence principle, the material constants are replaced with their complex counterparts in the Laplace domain. Ordinary differential equations in scalar form obtained in the Laplace domain are solved numerically using the complementary functions method to calculate the dynamic stiffness matrix of the problem. In the solutions, the Kelvin model is employed. The solutions obtained are transformed to the real space using the Durbin's numerical inverse Laplace transform method. Numerical results for quasi-static and dynamic response of viscoelastic models are presented in the form of graphics.

  7. Vessel Operator System

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Operator cards are required for any operator of a charter/party boat and or a commercial vessel (including carrier and processor vessels) issued a vessel permit from...

  8. Free vibration and dynamic response analysis of spinning structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    The proposed effort involved development of numerical procedures for efficient solution of free vibration problems of spinning structures. An eigenproblem solution procedure, based on a Lanczos method employing complex arithmetic, was successfully developed. This task involved formulation of the numerical procedure, FORTRAN coding of the algorithm, checking and debugging of software, and implementation of the routine in the STARS program. A graphics package for the E/S PS 300 as well as for the Tektronix terminals was successfully generated and consists of the following special capabilities: (1) a dynamic response plot for the stresses and displacements as functions of time; and (2) a menu driven command module enabling input of data on an interactive basis. Finally, the STARS analysis capability was further improved by implementing the dynamic response analysis package that provides information on nodal deformations and element stresses as a function of time. A number of test cases were run utilizing the currently developed algorithm implemented in the STARS program and such results indicate that the newly generated solution technique is significantly more efficient than other existing similar procedures.

  9. Dynamic response of reverse Taylor impact based on DIC technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Jiancheng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Reverse ballistic impact test, which can obtain the response data of rod/projectile more comprehensive and quantitative than forward impact test, was widely used for the measurement of material dynamic and structure response. Based on the DIC technology and traditional optical measurement (high-speed camera measurement, the Taylor experiment of reverse ballistic with different length-diameter ratio and different impact velocities were carried out by 57 mm compression-shear type light-gas gun, which provides the instantaneous response data of the Taylor rod in microsecond level. Then, the transient structural deformation of the specimen and the characteristics of plastic wave propagation were analysed by DIC technology and compared with traditional optical measurement. Applying the theory of reverse Taylor impact deformation and combining with the simulation results by LS-DYNA, the rules of structure deformation and plastic wave propagation were obtained. The method above can be applied for the structure response of penetrator under the condition of reverse ballistic penetration.

  10. Accommodative response/stimulus by dynamic retinoscopy: near add guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goss, David A; Rana, Sania; Ramolia, Julie

    2012-10-01

    Monocular estimation method (MEM) dynamic retinoscopy and low neutral (LN) dynamic retinoscopy are common procedures for evaluating the need for near-point plus adds for improved near-point performance in non-presbyopes. A combination of MEM and LN has been suggested to be a method of plotting accommodative response/accommodative stimulus functions and evaluating guidelines for prescribing from MEM. Using a combined MEM-LN procedure, MEM was performed on 80 young adults at 40 cm, with distance correction and with plus adds in 0.25 D steps up to and including +2.00 D. Modified Thorington dissociated phorias were also performed with each of the plus adds. Subjects picked a preferred add, which subjectively made print easiest and most comfortable to read. The mean preferred add was +0.58 D over the distance prescription. The add derived from subtracting 0.25 D from the lag of accommodation with distance correction averaged 0.10 D more plus than the preferred add. The add at which dynamic retinoscopy showed a "with" motion of 0.25 D averaged 0.54 more plus than the preferred add. The add at which dynamic retinoscopy showed a "with" motion of 0.50 D averaged 0.16 more plus than the preferred add. Adds derived from subtracting 0.25 D from the lag with distance correction and from finding the add that yields 0.50 D of "with" motion compared favorably with the preferred adds on average, but the standard deviations of the differences were high. Those guidelines could be reasonable starting points for the prescription of near-point plus adds for non-presbyopes, but follow-up testing to confirm or adjust add power would be advisable in the clinical setting.

  11. Responses of endothelial cells from different vessels to inflammatory cytokines and shear stress: evidence for the pliability of endothelial phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luu, N Thin; Rahman, Mahbub; Stone, Phil C; Rainger, G Ed; Nash, Gerard B

    2010-01-01

    Local haemodynamic and stromal microenvironments may determine the phenotype of endothelial cells (EC) and regulate their inflammatory responses. We compared neutrophil recruitment by EC from human umbilical veins (HUVEC) or arteries (HUAEC) or from human coronary arteries (HCAEC) after 'static' culture or exposure to shear stress (2 Pa for 24 h) and treatment with tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) or interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta). Static cultures of each type of EC recruited flowing neutrophils efficiently after treatment with TNF-alpha or IL-1beta; differences in culture media caused minor variations. After shear conditioning, the response of HUVEC to TNF-alpha (but not IL-1beta) was much reduced, while the responses of HUAEC and HCAEC to both cytokines were reduced. However, swapping the culture media suggested that the differences in the shear response arose largely from medium constituents, particularly basic fibroblast growth factor. When gene expression profiles for HUVEC were examined immediately after isolation, after 5 days in static culture and after re-exposure to shear, variations in gene expression were only partially attributable to the effects of changes in shear stress. The behaviour of cultured EC may depend as much on the physico-chemical culture conditions as on their origins. The EC phenotype appears to be highly pliable, with environmental factors, such as shear stress and growth factors, modifying responses in an inter-linked manner.

  12. Pressure vessel and method therefor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saunders, Timothy

    2017-09-05

    A pressure vessel includes a pump having a passage that extends between an inlet and an outlet. A duct at the pump outlet includes at least one dimension that is adjustable to facilitate forming a dynamic seal that limits backflow of gas through the passage.

  13. Reactivity of blood vessels in response to prostaglandin E2 in placentas from pregnancies complicated by fetal growth restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luria, Oded; Bar, Jacob; Barnea, Ofer; Golan, Abraham; Kovo, Michal

    2012-05-01

    The authors aimed to study the contractility responses of normal and fetal growth restriction (FGR) placentas to prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2) ) and to correlate the results to subsequent placental histological analysis. A dual-perfused single cotyledon model was used. Placentas from pregnancies complicated by FGR and from normal pregnancies were obtained. Selected cotyledons were cannulated and dually perfused. Following stabilization, three concentrations of PGE(2) (0.05, 0.1, and 0.15 mg/mL) were administered to the fetal arterial side causing contraction/relaxation response. Fetal perfusion pressure was measured continuously during these contraction and relaxation phases. Following the perfusion experiments, the placentas were analyzed for fetal or maternal origin vascular lesions. A total of 21 complete experiments were performed (16 normal, 5 FGR). In response to PGE(2) , FGR placentas exhibited lower change in the perfusion pressure and lower relaxation time constant. Basal perfusion pressure did not differ significantly between the two groups. Placental histopathology lesions, fetal or maternal origin, were more common in the FGR compared with the controls placentas, 80% versus 25%, respectively, P=  0.047. The lower vascular reactivity in response to PGE(2) and the presence of fetal and maternal vascular placental lesions suggest a mechanism explaining the altered vascular supply in FGR. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. The dynamic response of electrostatically driven resonators under mechanical shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Mahmoud I.; Younis, Mohammad I.

    2010-02-01

    This paper presents a theoretical and experimental investigation of the response of electrostatically actuated parallel-plate resonators when subjected to mechanical shock. Resonators are commonly employed in resonant sensors, where they are operated at low pressure for enhanced sensitivity making their response to external disturbances such as shock a critical issue. A single-degree-of-freedom system is used to model a resonator, which is electrostatically driven by a dc load superimposed to an ac harmonic load. Simulation results are demonstrated in a series of shock spectra that help indicate the combined influence of shock, dc and ac loads. The effect of the shock duration coinciding with the ac harmonic frequency is investigated. It is concluded that accounting for electrostatic forces, especially the ac load, is crucial when addressing the reliability and performance of resonators against shock. It is found that for specific shock and ac excitation conditions, a resonator may experience early dynamic pull-in instability. Experimental work has been conducted on a capacitive sensor to verify the obtained theoretical results. The sensor is mounted on top of a small shaker and then both are placed inside a vacuum chamber. Acceleration pulses were applied on the sensor while powered by dc and ac loads. The response of the device was monitored using a laser-Doppler vibrometer. The experimental data were compared to the theoretical results and were found to be in good agreement.

  15. Bmp indicator mice reveal dynamic regulation of transcriptional response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna L Javier

    Full Text Available Cellular responses to Bmp ligands are regulated at multiple levels, both extracellularly and intracellularly. Therefore, the presence of these growth factors is not an accurate indicator of Bmp signaling activity. While a common approach to detect Bmp signaling activity is to determine the presence of phosphorylated forms of Smad1, 5 and 8 by immunostaining, this approach is time consuming and not quantitative. In order to provide a simpler readout system to examine the presence of Bmp signaling in developing animals, we developed BRE-gal mouse embryonic stem cells and a transgenic mouse line that specifically respond to Bmp ligand stimulation. Our reporter identifies specific transcriptional responses that are mediated by Smad1 and Smad4 with the Schnurri transcription factor complex binding to a conserved Bmp-Responsive Element (BRE, originally identified among Drosophila, Xenopus and human Bmp targets. Our BRE-gal mES cells specifically respond to Bmp ligands at concentrations as low as 5 ng/ml; and BRE-gal reporter mice, derived from the BRE-gal mES cells, show dynamic activity in many cellular sites, including extraembryonic structures and mammary glands, thereby making this a useful scientific tool.

  16. Phenotypically heterogeneous podoplanin-expressing cell populations are associated with the lymphatic vessel growth and fibrogenic responses in the acutely and chronically infarcted myocardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimini, Maria; Cannatá, Antonio; Pasquinelli, Gianandrea; Rota, Marcello; Goichberg, Polina

    2017-01-01

    Cardiac lymphatic vasculature undergoes substantial expansion in response to myocardial infarction (MI). However, there is limited information on the cellular mechanisms mediating post-MI lymphangiogenesis and accompanying fibrosis in the infarcted adult heart. Using a mouse model of permanent coronary artery ligation, we examined spatiotemporal changes in the expression of lymphendothelial and mesenchymal markers in the acutely and chronically infarcted myocardium. We found that at the time of wound granulation, a three-fold increase in the frequency of podoplanin-labeled cells occurred in the infarcted hearts compared to non-operated and sham-operated counterparts. Podoplanin immunoreactivity detected LYVE-1-positive lymphatic vessels, as well as masses of LYVE-1-negative cells dispersed between myocytes, predominantly in the vicinity of the infarcted region. Podoplanin-carrying populations displayed a mesenchymal progenitor marker PDGFRα, and intermittently expressed Prox-1, a master regulator of the lymphatic endothelial fate. At the stages of scar formation and maturation, concomitantly with the enlargement of lymphatic network in the injured myocardium, the podoplanin-rich LYVE-1-negative multicellular assemblies were apparent in the fibrotic area, aligned with extracellular matrix deposits, or located in immediate proximity to activated blood vessels with high VEGFR-2 content. Of note, these podoplanin-containing cells acquired the expression of PDGFRβ or a hematoendothelial epitope CD34. Although Prox-1 labeling was abundant in the area affected by MI, the podoplanin-presenting cells were not consistently Prox-1-positive. The concordance of podoplanin with VEGFR-3 similarly varied. Thus, our data reveal previously unknown phenotypic and structural heterogeneity within the podoplanin-positive cell compartment in the infarcted heart, and suggest an alternate ability of podoplanin-presenting cardiac cells to generate lymphatic endothelium and pro

  17. Nonlinear dynamic response of an electrically actuated imperfect microbeam resonator

    KAUST Repository

    Ruzziconi, Laura

    2013-08-04

    We present a study of the dynamic behavior of a MEMS device constituted of an imperfect clamped-clamped microbeam subjected to electrostatic and electrodynamic actuation. Our objective is to develop a theoretical analysis, which is able to describe and predict all the main relevant aspects of the experimental response. Extensive experimental investigation is conducted, where the main imperfections coming from microfabrication are detected and the nonlinear dynamics are explored at increasing values of electrodynamic excitation, in a neighborhood of the first symmetric resonance. The nonlinear behavior is highlighted, which includes ranges of multistability, where the non-resonant and the resonant branch coexist, and intervals where superharmonic resonances are clearly visible. Numerical simulations are performed. Initially, two single mode reduced-order models are considered. One is generated via the Galerkin technique, and the other one via the combined use of the Ritz method and the Padé approximation. Both of them are able to provide a satisfactory agreement with the experimental data. This occurs not only at low values of electrodynamic excitation, but also at higher ones. Their computational efficiency is discussed in detail, since this is an essential aspect for systematic local and global simulations. Finally, the theoretical analysis is further improved and a two-degree-of-freedom reduced-order model is developed, which is capable also to capture the measured second symmetric superharmonic resonance. Despite the apparent simplicity, it is shown that all the proposed reduced-order models are able to describe the experimental complex nonlinear dynamics of the device accurately and properly, which validates the proposed theoretical approach. Copyright © 2013 by ASME.

  18. Managing complexity in process digitalisation with dynamic condition response graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hildebrandt, Thomas; Debois, Søren; Slaats, Tijs

    2017-01-01

    Digitalisation of work and business processes with the aim to provide more efficient services at a higher and consistent quality is high on the agendas in many countries. In Denmark the push for digitalisation is witnessed by the national strategy for digitalisation published every four years....... Sadly, it is also witnessed by a number of expensive failed digitalisation projects. In this paper we point to two key problems in state-of-The art BPM technologies: 1) the use of rigid flow diagrams as the "source code" of process digitalisation is not suitable for managing the complexity of knowledge...... workflows and regulations and 2) insufficient support for continuous and agile end-user mapping and adaptation of processes. We report on research in progress on how the Dynamic Condition Response (DCR) Graph technology and collaborative process repository DCRGraphs.net could support agile and collaborative...

  19. Managing complexity in process digitalisation with dynamic condition response graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hildebrandt, Thomas; Debois, Søren; Slaats, Tijs

    2017-01-01

    Digitalisation of work and business processes with the aim to provide more efficient services at a higher and consistent quality is high on the agendas in many countries. In Denmark the push for digitalisation is witnessed by the national strategy for digitalisation published every four years....... Sadly, it is also witnessed by a number of expensive failed digitalisation projects. In this paper we point to two key problems in state-of-the art BPM technologies: 1) the use of rigid flow diagrams as the “source code” of process digitalisation is not suitable for managing the complexity of knowledge...... workflows and regulations and 2) insufficient support for continuous and agile end-user mapping and adaptation of processes. We report on research in progress on how the Dynamic Condition Response (DCR) Graph technology and collaborative process repository DCRGraphs.net could support agile and collaborative...

  20. Dynamic Response and Simulations of Nanoparticle-Enhanced Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-15

    amplitude of the voltage signal. The response current and impedance are given by: l(t) = , [Cos(oi t -O) + jsin(w t -p)] (3.3) Z = Z,,( coso + jsin 0) (3.4...of the effective technique to handle free electrons in conjunction to molecular dynamics framework . 154 f) The force field used in the present study is...the introductory paper on COMPASS by Sun [4.25]. 1+a =Y[K 2(b-b )2+K 3(b-b )3+K(b-b )]+Y[K(2(-) +K(0-0 )3+ b 0 9 0 0 K4,(0-8)4]+y_[K (l- coso )+2(1-os2o

  1. Nonuniform dynamic gratings in photorefractive media with nonlocal response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugaychuk, S.; Kovács, L.; Mandula, G.; Polgár, K.; Rupp, R. A.

    2003-04-01

    The amplitude of the phase dynamic grating is a nonuniform space distributed in photorefractive crystals with nonlocal response as a result of energy transfer between the interacted waves. The dynamical process of grating formation in the case of transmission two- and four-wave mixing is described by the damped sine-Gordon equation that governs the soliton propagation. A stationary soliton solution for the grating amplitude profile was obtained. Experiments on observation of a nonuniform distribution of the grating amplitude through the crystal volume are presented. It is experimentally shown that the changes of the grating amplitude profile in dependence of input intensity ratio match the solutions of the damped sine-Gordon equation in steady state. The diffraction efficiency of energy transfer is determined by the value of the integral under the grating amplitude profile. The soliton profile is altered with changing input intensity ratio of recorded beams. It provides the effect of diffraction efficiency management by changing the half-width and the position of the soliton. The theory predicts a multisoliton behavior in reversible media with strong amplitifcaiton gain that leads to auto-oscillations of output wave intensities.

  2. Interaction Dynamics Determine Signaling and Output Pathway Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klement Stojanovski

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The understanding of interaction dynamics in signaling pathways can shed light on pathway architecture and provide insights into targets for intervention. Here, we explored the relevance of kinetic rate constants of a key upstream osmosensor in the yeast high-osmolarity glycerol-mitogen-activated protein kinase (HOG-MAPK pathway to signaling output responses. We created mutant pairs of the Sln1-Ypd1 complex interface that caused major compensating changes in the association (kon and dissociation (koff rate constants (kinetic perturbations but only moderate changes in the overall complex affinity (Kd. Yeast cells carrying a Sln1-Ypd1 mutant pair with moderate increases in kon and koff displayed a lower threshold of HOG pathway activation than wild-type cells. Mutants with higher kon and koff rates gave rise to higher basal signaling and gene expression but impaired osmoadaptation. Thus, the kon and koff rates of the components in the Sln1 osmosensor determine proper signaling dynamics and osmoadaptation.

  3. Dynamic adjustment of parental care in response to perceived paternity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neff, B D; Gross, M R

    2001-08-07

    Theories of parental care evolution predict that genetic relatedness will be an important variable in the amount of care a parent provides. However, current inferences of relatedness-based parental investment from studies in humans and birds remain challenged. No study has yet demonstrated parental care adjustment in a manner uncomplicated by life-history correlates or experimental design. We now present a unique test that controls for individual life histories and demonstrates paternity-related dynamic adjustments in parental care. Brood-rearing male bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus) that are cuckolded to a varying degree will either increase or decrease their parental investment in response to changing information on paternity during brood development. Specifically, as parental males detect paternity lost to cuckolders and, hence, a reduction in the value of their brood, they adaptively lower their level of parental care. Conversely, if they detect that their paternity is higher than previously assessed, they adaptively raise their level of parental care. This dynamic adjustment during brood rearing indicates the importance of genetic relatedness in parental investment decisions and provides needed empirical support for theoretical predictions.

  4. The dynamic response of carbon fiber-filled polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dattelbaum, D. M.; Gustavsen, R. L.; Sheffield, S. A.; Stahl, D. B.; Scharff, R. J.; Rigg, P. A.; Furmanski, J.; Orler, E. B.; Patterson, B.; Coe, J. D.

    2012-08-01

    The dynamic (shock) responses of two carbon fiber-filled polymer composites have been quantified using gas gun-driven plate impact experimentation. The first composite is a filament-wound, highly unidirectional carbon fiber-filled epoxy with a high degree of porosity. The second composite is a chopped carbon fiber- and graphite-filled phenolic resin with little-to-no porosity. Hugoniot data are presented for the carbon fiber-epoxy (CE) composite to 18.6 GPa in the through-thickness direction, in which the shock propagates normal to the fibers. The data are best represented by a linear Rankine-Hugoniot fit: Us = 2.87 + 1.17 ×up(ρ0 = 1.536g/cm3). The shock wave structures were found to be highly heterogeneous, both due to the anisotropic nature of the fiber-epoxy microstructure, and the high degree of void volume. Plate impact experiments were also performed on a carbon fiber-filled phenolic (CP) composite to much higher shock input pressures, exceeding the reactants-to-products transition common to polymers. The CP was found to be stiffer than the filament-wound CE in the unreacted Hugoniot regime, and transformed to products near the shock-driven reaction threshold on the principal Hugoniot previously shown for the phenolic binder itself. [19] On-going research is focused on interrogating the direction-dependent dyanamic response and dynamic failure strength (spall) for the CE composite in the TT and 0∘ (fiber) directions.

  5. The dynamic response of carbon fiber-filled polymer composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patterson B.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic (shock responses of two carbon fiber-filled polymer composites have been quantified using gas gun-driven plate impact experimentation. The first composite is a filament-wound, highly unidirectional carbon fiber-filled epoxy with a high degree of porosity. The second composite is a chopped carbon fiber- and graphite-filled phenolic resin with little-to-no porosity. Hugoniot data are presented for the carbon fiber-epoxy (CE composite to 18.6 GPa in the through-thickness direction, in which the shock propagates normal to the fibers. The data are best represented by a linear Rankine-Hugoniot fit: Us = 2.87 + 1.17 ×up(ρ0 = 1.536g/cm3. The shock wave structures were found to be highly heterogeneous, both due to the anisotropic nature of the fiber-epoxy microstructure, and the high degree of void volume. Plate impact experiments were also performed on a carbon fiber-filled phenolic (CP composite to much higher shock input pressures, exceeding the reactants-to-products transition common to polymers. The CP was found to be stiffer than the filament-wound CE in the unreacted Hugoniot regime, and transformed to products near the shock-driven reaction threshold on the principal Hugoniot previously shown for the phenolic binder itself. [19] On-going research is focused on interrogating the direction-dependent dyanamic response and dynamic failure strength (spall for the CE composite in the TT and 0∘ (fiber directions.

  6. Nonlinear dynamical model and response of avian cranial kinesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meekangvan, Preeda; A Barhorst, Alan; Burton, Thomas D; Chatterjee, Sankar; Schovanec, Lawrence

    2006-05-07

    All modern birds have kinetic skulls in which the upper bill can move relative to the braincase, but the biomechanics and motion dynamics of cranial kinesis in birds are poorly understood. In this paper, we model the dynamics of avian cranial kinesis, such as prokinesis and proximal rhynchokinesis in which the upper jaw pivots around the nasal-frontal (N-F) hinge. The purpose of this paper is to present to the biological community an approach that demonstrates the application of sophisticated predictive mathematical modeling tools to avian kinesis. The generality of the method, however, is applicable to the advanced study of the biomechanics of other skeletal systems. The paper begins with a review of the relevant biological literature as well as the essential morphology of avian kinesis, especially the mechanical coupling of the upper and lower jaw by the postorbital ligament. A planar model of the described bird jaw morphology is then developed that maintains the closed kinematic topology of the avian jaw mechanism. We then develop the full nonlinear equations of motion with the assumption that the M. protractor pterygoideus and M. depressor mandibulae act on the quadrate as a pure torque, and the nasal frontal hinge is elastic with damping. The mechanism is shown to be a single degree of freedom device due to the holonomic constraints present in the quadrate-jugal bar-upper jaw-braincase-quadrate kinematic chain as well as the quadrate-lower jaw-postorbital ligament-braincase-quadrate kinematic chain. The full equations are verified via simulation and animation using the parameters of a Grey Heron (Ardea cinerea). Next we develop a simplified analytical model of the equations by power series expansion. We demonstrate that this model reproduces the dynamics of the full model to a high degree of fidelity. We proceed to use the harmonic balance technique to develop the frequency response characteristics of the jaw mechanism. It is shown that this avian cranial

  7. Dynamics of immune response and drug resistance in malaria infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurarie David

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria parasites that concurrently infect a host compete on the basis of their intrinsic growth rates and by stimulating cross-reactive immune responses that inhibit each others' growth. If the phenotypes also show different drug sensitivities ('sensitive' vs. 'resistant' strains, drug treatment can change their joint dynamics and the long-term outcome of the infection: most obviously, persistent drug pressure can permit the more resistant, but otherwise competitively-inferior, strains to dominate. Methods Here a mathematical model is developed to analyse how these and more subtle effects of antimalarial drug use are modulated by immune response, repeated re-inoculation of parasites, drug pharmacokinetic parameters, dose and treatment frequency. Results The model quantifies possible effects of single and multiple (periodic treatment on the outcome of parasite competition. In the absence of further inoculation, the dosage and/or treatment frequency required for complete clearance can be estimated. With persistent superinfection, time-average parasite densities can be derived in terms of the basic immune-regulating parameters, the drug efficacy and treatment regimen. Conclusion The functional relations in the model are applicable to a wide range of conditions and transmission environments, allowing predictions to be made on both the individual and the community levels, and, in particular, transitions from drug-sensitive to drug-resistant parasite dominance to be projected on both levels.

  8. Gene Expression Dynamics Accompanying the Sponge Thermal Stress Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, Christine; Conaco, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Marine sponges are important members of coral reef ecosystems. Thus, their responses to changes in ocean chemistry and environmental conditions, particularly to higher seawater temperatures, will have potential impacts on the future of these reefs. To better understand the sponge thermal stress response, we investigated gene expression dynamics in the shallow water sponge, Haliclona tubifera (order Haplosclerida, class Demospongiae), subjected to elevated temperature. Using high-throughput transcriptome sequencing, we show that these conditions result in the activation of various processes that interact to maintain cellular homeostasis. Short-term thermal stress resulted in the induction of heat shock proteins, antioxidants, and genes involved in signal transduction and innate immunity pathways. Prolonged exposure to thermal stress affected the expression of genes involved in cellular damage repair, apoptosis, signaling and transcription. Interestingly, exposure to sublethal temperatures may improve the ability of the sponge to mitigate cellular damage under more extreme stress conditions. These insights into the potential mechanisms of adaptation and resilience of sponges contribute to a better understanding of sponge conservation status and the prediction of ecosystem trajectories under future climate conditions. PMID:27788197

  9. Ultrafast dynamic response of single crystal β-HMX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaug, Joseph M.; Armstrong, Michael R.; Crowhurst, Jonathan C.; Radousky, Harry B.; Ferranti, Louis; Swan, Raymond; Gross, Rick; Teslich, Nick E.; Wall, Mark A.; Austin, Ryan A.; Fried, Laurence E.

    2017-01-01

    We report results from ultrafast compression experiments conducted on β-HMX single crystals. Results consist of nominally 12 picosecond time-resolved wave profile data, (ultrafast time domain interferometry -TDI measurements), that were analyzed to determine high-velocity wave speeds as a function of piston velocity. TDI results are used to validate calculations of anisotropic stress-strain behavior of shocked loaded energetic materials. Our previous results derived using a 350 ps duration compression drive revealed anisotropic elastic wave response in single crystal β-HMX from (110) and (010) impact planes. Here we present results using a 1.05 ns duration compression drive with a 950 ps interferometry window to extend knowledge of the anisotropic dynamic response of β-HMX within eight microns of the initial impact plane. We observe two distinct wave profiles from (010) and three wave profiles from (010) impact planes. The (110) impact plane wave speeds typically exceed (010) impact plane wave speeds at the same piston velocities. The development of multiple hydrodynamic wave profiles begins at 20 GPa for the (110) impact plane and 28 GPa for the (10) impact plane. We compare our ultrafast TDI results with previous gun and plate impact results on β-HMX and PBX9501.

  10. Dynamic characterization of satellite assembly for responsive space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascarenas, David; Macknelly, David; Mullins, Josh; Wiest, Heather; Park, Gyuhae

    2013-07-01

    The rapid deployment of satellites for responsive space surveillance applications is hindered by the need to flight-qualify their components and the resulting mechanical assembly. Conventional methods for qualification testing of satellite components are costly and time consuming. Furthermore, full-scale vehicles must be subjected to simulated launch loads during testing, and this harsh testing environment increases the risk of damage to satellite components during qualification. This work focuses on replacing this potentially destructive testing procedure with a non-destructive structural health monitoring (SHM)-based technique while maintaining the same level of confidence in the testing procedure's ability to qualify the satellite for flight. We focus on assessing the performance of SHM techniques to replace the high-cost qualification procedure and to localize faults introduced by improper assembly. The goal of this work is to create a dual-use system that can both assist in the process of qualifying the satellite for launch, as well as provide continuous structural integrity monitoring during manufacture, transport, launch and deployment. SHM techniques were applied on a small-scale structure representative of a responsive satellite. The test structure consisted of an extruded aluminum space-frame covered with aluminum shear plates assembled using bolted joints. Multiple piezoelectric transducers were bonded to the test structure and acted as combined actuators and sensors. Piezoelectric active-sensing based techniques, including measurements of low-frequency global frequency response functions and high-frequency wave propagation techniques, were employed. Using these methods in conjunction with finite element modeling, the dynamic properties of the test structure were established and areas of potential damage could be identified and localized. A procedure for guiding the effective placement of the sensors and actuators is also outlined.

  11. River, delta and coastal morphological response accounting for biological dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Goldsmith

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Management and construction can increase resilience in the face of climate change, and benefits can be enhanced through integration of biogenic materials including shells and vegetation. Rivers and coastal landforms are dynamic systems that respond to intentional and unintended manipulation of critical factors, often with unforeseen and/or undesirable resulting effects. River management strategies have impacts that include deltas and coastal areas which are increasingly vulnerable to climate change with reference to sea level rise and storm intensity. Whereas conventional assessment and analysis of rivers and coasts has relied on modelling of hydrology, hydraulics and sediment transport, incorporating additional biological factors can offer more comprehensive, beneficial and realistic alternatives. Suitable modelling tools can provide improved decision support. The question has been whether current models can effectively address biological responses with suitable reliability and efficiency. Since morphodynamic evolution exhibits its effects on a large timescale, the choice of mathematical model is not trivial and depends upon the availability of data, as well as the spatial extent, timelines and computation effort desired. The ultimate goal of the work is to set up a conveniently simplified river morphodynamic model, coupled with a biological dynamics plant population model able to predict the long-term evolution of large alluvial river systems managed through bioengineering. This paper presents the first step of the work related to the application of the model accounting for stationary vegetation condition. Sensitivity analysis has been performed on the main hydraulic, sedimentology, and biological parameters. The model has been applied to significant river training in Europe, Asia and North America, and comparative analysis has been used to validate analytical solutions. Data gaps and further areas for investigation are identified.

  12. Examining the plankton acoustic response with a vessel mounted ADCP across oceanic fronts located in the Drake Passage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Blanc

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available On December 2001 and January 2006, during the LMG01-9 and LMG06-1 cruises to Antarctic Peninsula, at-sea oceanographic and acoustic measurements were conducted onboard the R/V L. M. Gould icebreaker along two transects located between (55.15 °S, 65 ºW and (64.65 °S, 65 ºW and between (55.15 ºS, 64.91 ºW and (62.7 ºS, 62.21 ºW, respectively. The scientific crew consisted of researchers from two US institutes, and a scientific observer from the Argentinean Naval Service of Research & Development under the frame of the US National Science Foundation Antarctic Program. The present work accomplishes an alternative application for a vesselmounted Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP with an operating frequency of 153.6 kHz. Volume Acoustic Backscattering Strengths, S V, were computed from the recorded ADCP's voltages. The obtained values fell in a range of -92 dB to -62 dB, for the layer of the water column comprised between 26 m - 300 m on 2001 and in the range of -93 dB to -58 dB for the water column between 22 m - 300 m on 2006. Depth-averaged, S V, for the upper water column (about the first 150 m on experiment transects were computed as well as S V values averaged in depth and latitude. Data processing revealed interesting features about the upper ocean acoustic behaviour. On December 2001, a significant non-uniform scattering response in the ensonified water column with quite high values of S V, associated with the diel vertical migration, was obtained. Additionally, a remarkable increment in the scattering response was observed at the estimated location of the Antarctic Divergence (AD. This feature was also observed on January 2006 in addition to remarkable high values of S V, in coastal waters of the Antarctic Peninsula. Plotting and exhaustive analyses of S V (z profiles enabled the visualisation of three distinct types of qualitative patterns, namely, curves with: (I two observable maxima, (II only one maximum, (III a depth

  13. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging for prediction of response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Juzhong; Fan, Ming; Zheng, Bin; Shao, Guoliang; Zhang, Juan; Li, Lihua

    2016-03-01

    Breast cancer is the second leading cause of women death in the United States. Currently, Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy (NAC) has become standard treatment paradigms for breast cancer patients. Therefore, it is important to find a reliable non-invasive assessment and prediction method which can evaluate and predict the response of NAC on breast cancer. The Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI) approach can reflect dynamic distribution of contrast agent in tumor vessels, providing important basis for clinical diagnosis. In this study, the efficacy of DCE-MRI on evaluation and prediction of response to NAC in breast cancer was investigated. To this end, fifty-seven cases of malignant breast cancers with MRI examination both before and after two cycle of NAC were analyzed. After pre-processing approach for segmenting breast lesions and background regions, 126-dimensional imaging features were extracted from DCE-MRI. Statistical analyses were then performed to evaluate the associations between the extracted DCE-MRI features and the response to NAC. Specifically, pairwise t test was used to calculate differences of imaging features between MRI examinations before-and-after NAC. Moreover, the associations of these image features with response to NAC were assessed using logistic regression. Significant association are found between response to NAC and the features of lesion morphology and background parenchymal enhancement, especially the feature of background enhancement in normal side of breast (P=0.011). Our study indicate that DCE-MRI features can provide candidate imaging markers to predict response of NAC in breast cancer.

  14. BIOASSAY VESSEL FAILURE ANALYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vormelker, P

    2008-09-22

    Two high-pressure bioassay vessels failed at the Savannah River Site during a microwave heating process for biosample testing. Improper installation of the thermal shield in the first failure caused the vessel to burst during microwave heating. The second vessel failure is attributed to overpressurization during a test run. Vessel failure appeared to initiate in the mold parting line, the thinnest cross-section of the octagonal vessel. No material flaws were found in the vessel that would impair its structural performance. Content weight should be minimized to reduce operating temperature and pressure. Outer vessel life is dependent on actual temperature exposure. Since thermal aging of the vessels can be detrimental to their performance, it was recommended that the vessels be used for a limited number of cycles to be determined by additional testing.

  15. Application of Response Surface Methodology for Modeling of Postweld Heat Treatment Process in a Pressure Vessel Steel ASTM A516 Grade 70.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peasura, Prachya

    2015-01-01

    This research studied the application of the response surface methodology (RSM) and central composite design (CCD) experiment in mathematical model and optimizes postweld heat treatment (PWHT). The material of study is a pressure vessel steel ASTM A516 grade 70 that is used for gas metal arc welding. PWHT parameters examined in this study included PWHT temperatures and time. The resulting materials were examined using CCD experiment and the RSM to determine the resulting material tensile strength test, observed with optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The experimental results show that using a full quadratic model with the proposed mathematical model is YTS = -285.521 + 15.706X1 + 2.514X2 - 0.004X1(2) - 0.001X2(2) - 0.029X1X2. Tensile strength parameters of PWHT were optimized PWHT time of 5.00 hr and PWHT temperature of 645.75°C. The results show that the PWHT time is the dominant mechanism used to modify the tensile strength compared to the PWHT temperatures. This phenomenon could be explained by the fact that pearlite can contribute to higher tensile strength. Pearlite has an intensity, which results in increased material tensile strength. The research described here can be used as material data on PWHT parameters for an ASTM A516 grade 70 weld.

  16. Mechanosensing in developing lymphatic vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planas-Paz, Lara; Lammert, Eckhard

    2014-01-01

    The lymphatic vasculature is responsible for fluid homeostasis, transport of immune cells, inflammatory molecules, and dietary lipids. It is composed of a network of lymphatic capillaries that drain into collecting lymphatic vessels and ultimately bring fluid back to the blood circulation. Lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) that line lymphatic capillaries present loose overlapping intercellular junctions and anchoring filaments that support fluid drainage. When interstitial fluid accumulates within tissues, the extracellular matrix (ECM) swells and pulls the anchoring filaments. This results in opening of the LEC junctions and permits interstitial fluid uptake. The absorbed fluid is then transported within collecting lymphatic vessels, which exhibit intraluminal valves that prevent lymph backflow and smooth muscle cells that sequentially contract to propel lymph.Mechanotransduction involves translation of mechanical stimuli into biological responses. LECs have been shown to sense and respond to changes in ECM stiffness, fluid pressure-induced cell stretch, and fluid flow-induced shear stress. How these signals influence LEC function and lymphatic vessel growth can be investigated by using different mechanotransduction assays in vitro and to some extent in vivo.In this chapter, we will focus on the mechanical forces that regulate lymphatic vessel expansion during embryonic development and possibly secondary lymphedema. In mouse embryos, it has been recently shown that the amount of interstitial fluid determines the extent of lymphatic vessel expansion via a mechanosensory complex formed by β1 integrin and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-3 (VEGFR3). This model might as well apply to secondary lymphedema.

  17. Contrasting Public Opinion Dynamics and Emotional Response during Crisis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkova, Svitlana; Chetviorkin, Ilia; Arendt, Dustin L.; Van Durme, Ben

    2016-11-15

    We propose an approach for contrasting spatiotemporal dynamics of public opinions expressed toward targeted entities, also known as stance detection task, in Russia and Ukraine during crisis. Our analysis relies on a novel corpus constructed from posts on the VKontakte social network, centered on local public opinion of the ongoing Russian-Ukrainian crisis, along with newly annotated resources for predicting expressions of fine-grained emotions including joy, sadness, disgust, anger, surprise and fear. Akin to prior work on sentiment analysis we align traditional public opinion polls with aggregated automatic predictions of sentiments for contrastive geo-locations. We report interesting observations on emotional response and stance variations across geo-locations. Some of our findings contradict stereotypical misconceptions imposed by media, for example, we found posts from Ukraine that do not support Euromaidan but support Putin, and posts from Russia that are against Putin but in favor USA. Furthermore, we are the first to demonstrate contrastive stance variations over time across geo-locations using storyline visualization technique.

  18. Performance and Participation Dynamics in an Emergency Response Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guastello, Stephen J; Marra, David E; Castro, Julian; Gomez, Maribeth; Perna, Claire

    2017-04-01

    This study examined relationships between participation and performance within a team and performance transfer effects between opponents in an Emergency Response (ER) simulation. Classical organizational theories have emphasized the importance of group participation for organizational performance, but there have been few or no attempts to investigate participation-performance relationships in short-interval time series. The experimental task was a Stag Hunt game, as defined in game theory; performance trends would be affected by levels of participation, which in turn should be affected by recent performance experiences that modulate the players' self-efficacy for the task. Participants were 62 undergraduates who were organized into 11 teams of 3 or 4 members playing an ER board game against one attacker. Time series analyses were conducted through nonlinear regression with exponential structural equations and by linear analyses for comparison. Results showed that performance time series of one opponent did not affect the other for teams of this size. Teams showed higher levels of adaptability compared to attackers, as evidenced by higher Lyapunov exponents. Performance affected group participation levels more so than the other way around. There appeared to be emergent group dynamics occurring between two experimental sessions that moderated the validity of the core linear and nonlinear models. Emergent group properties are one of several possible directions for further investigation within this experimental paradigm. Nonlinear models were more accurate than linear models after correcting for correlated residuals.

  19. A normal tissue dose response model of dynamic repair processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alber, Markus; Belka, Claus

    2006-01-01

    A model is presented for serial, critical element complication mechanisms for irradiated volumes from length scales of a few millimetres up to the entire organ. The central element of the model is the description of radiation complication as the failure of a dynamic repair process. The nature of the repair process is seen as reestablishing the structural organization of the tissue, rather than mere replenishment of lost cells. The interactions between the cells, such as migration, involved in the repair process are assumed to have finite ranges, which limits the repair capacity and is the defining property of a finite-sized reconstruction unit. Since the details of the repair processes are largely unknown, the development aims to make the most general assumptions about them. The model employs analogies and methods from thermodynamics and statistical physics. An explicit analytical form of the dose response of the reconstruction unit for total, partial and inhomogeneous irradiation is derived. The use of the model is demonstrated with data from animal spinal cord experiments and clinical data about heart, lung and rectum. The three-parameter model lends a new perspective to the equivalent uniform dose formalism and the established serial and parallel complication models. Its implications for dose optimization are discussed.

  20. Estimation of the Rotational Terms of the Dynamic Response Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Montalvão

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic response of a structure can be described by both its translational and rotational receptances. The latter ones are frequently not considered because of the difficulties in applying a pure moment excitation or in measuring rotations. However, in general, this implies a reduction up to 75% of the complete model. On the other hand, if a modification includes a rotational inertia, the rotational receptances of the unmodified system are needed. In one method, more commonly found in the literature, a so called T-block is attached to the structure. Then, a force, applied to an arm of the T-block, generates a moment together with a force at the connection point. The T-block also allows for angular displacement measurements. Nevertheless, the results are often not quite satisfactory. In this work, an alternative method based upon coupling techniques is developed, in which rotational receptances are estimated without the need of applying a moment excitation. This is accomplished by introducing a rotational inertia modification when rotating the T-block. The force is then applied in its centroid. Several numerical and experimental examples are discussed so that the methodology can be clearly described. The advantages and limitations are identified within the practical application of the method.

  1. Examining Uncertainty in Demand Response Baseline Models and Variability in Automated Response to Dynamic Pricing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathieu, Johanna L.; Callaway, Duncan S.; Kiliccote, Sila

    2011-08-15

    Controlling electric loads to deliver power system services presents a number of interesting challenges. For example, changes in electricity consumption of Commercial and Industrial (C&I) facilities are usually estimated using counterfactual baseline models, and model uncertainty makes it difficult to precisely quantify control responsiveness. Moreover, C&I facilities exhibit variability in their response. This paper seeks to understand baseline model error and demand-side variability in responses to open-loop control signals (i.e. dynamic prices). Using a regression-based baseline model, we define several Demand Response (DR) parameters, which characterize changes in electricity use on DR days, and then present a method for computing the error associated with DR parameter estimates. In addition to analyzing the magnitude of DR parameter error, we develop a metric to determine how much observed DR parameter variability is attributable to real event-to-event variability versus simply baseline model error. Using data from 38 C&I facilities that participated in an automated DR program in California, we find that DR parameter errors are large. For most facilities, observed DR parameter variability is likely explained by baseline model error, not real DR parameter variability; however, a number of facilities exhibit real DR parameter variability. In some cases, the aggregate population of C&I facilities exhibits real DR parameter variability, resulting in implications for the system operator with respect to both resource planning and system stability.

  2. Guam Abandoned Vessel Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Abandoned Vessel Project Data for Guam. Abandoned vessels pose a significant threat to the NOAA Trust resources through physical destruction of coral habitats...

  3. Florida Abandoned Vessel Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Abandoned Vessel Project Data for Florida. Abandoned vessels pose a significant threat to the NOAA Trust resources through physical destruction of coral...

  4. Vessel Arrival Info - Legacy

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Vessel Arrival Info is a spreadsheet that gets filled out during the initial stage of the debriefing process by the debriefer. It contains vessel name, trip...

  5. Assessing Vessel Traffic Service Operator Situation Awareness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiersma, J.W.F.

    2010-01-01

    This thesis describes my study of situation awareness assessment of Vessel Traffic Service (VTS) operators. VTS operators are the traffic controllers on the water. They are responsible for a safe and efficient handling of vessel traffic. They monitor traffic, provide information on request and

  6. HSV-1 targets lymphatic vessels in the eye and draining lymph node of mice leading to edema in the absence of a functional type I interferon response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant-Hudson, Katie M; Chucair-Elliott, Ana J; Conrady, Christopher D; Cohen, Alex; Zheng, Min; Carr, Daniel J J

    2013-10-01

    Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) induces new lymphatic vessel growth (lymphangiogenesis) in the cornea via expression of vascular endothelial growth factor by virally infected epithelial cells. Here, we extend this observation to demonstrate the selective targeting of corneal lymphatics by HSV-1 in the absence of functional type I interferon (IFN) pathway. Specifically, we examined the impact of HSV-1 replication on angiogenesis using type I IFN receptor deficient (CD118(-/-)) mice. HSV-1-induced lymphatic and blood vessel growth into the cornea proper was time-dependent in immunocompetent animals. In contrast, there was an initial robust growth of lymphatic vessels into the cornea of HSV-1-infected CD118(-/-)mice, but such vessels disappeared by day 5 postinfection. The loss was selective as blood vessel integrity remained intact. Magnetic resonance imaging and confocal microscopy analysis of the draining lymph nodes of CD118(-/-) mice revealed extensive edema and loss of lymphatics compared with wild-type mice. In addition to a loss of lymphatic vessels in CD118(-/-) mice, HSV-1 infection resulted in epithelial thinning associated with geographic lesions and edema within the cornea, which is consistent with a loss of lymphatic vasculature. These results underscore the key role functional type I IFN pathway plays in the maintenance of structural integrity within the cornea in addition to the anti-viral characteristics often ascribed to the type I IFN cytokine family. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. ALICE HMPID Radiator Vessel

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    View of the radiator vessels of the ALICE/HMPID mounted on the support frame. Each HMPID module is equipped with 3 indipendent radiator vessels made out of neoceram and fused silica (quartz) windows glued together. The spacers inside the vessel are needed to stand the hydrostatic pressure. http://alice-hmpid.web.cern.ch/alice-hmpid

  8. Dynamic Response and Simulations of Nanoparticle-Enhanced Composites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mantena, P. R; Al-Ostaz, Ahmed; Cheng, Alexander H

    2007-01-01

    ...) molecular dynamics simulations of nanoparticle-enhanced composites and fly- ash based foams that are being considered for the future generation naval structures or retrofitting of existing ones...

  9. Dynamic causal modeling of evoked responses in EEG and MEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Olivier; Kiebel, Stefan J; Harrison, Lee M; Mattout, Jérémie; Kilner, James M; Friston, Karl J

    2006-05-01

    Neuronally plausible, generative or forward models are essential for understanding how event-related fields (ERFs) and potentials (ERPs) are generated. In this paper, we present a new approach to modeling event-related responses measured with EEG or MEG. This approach uses a biologically informed model to make inferences about the underlying neuronal networks generating responses. The approach can be regarded as a neurobiologically constrained source reconstruction scheme, in which the parameters of the reconstruction have an explicit neuronal interpretation. Specifically, these parameters encode, among other things, the coupling among sources and how that coupling depends upon stimulus attributes or experimental context. The basic idea is to supplement conventional electromagnetic forward models, of how sources are expressed in measurement space, with a model of how source activity is generated by neuronal dynamics. A single inversion of this extended forward model enables inference about both the spatial deployment of sources and the underlying neuronal architecture generating them. Critically, this inference covers long-range connections among well-defined neuronal subpopulations. In a previous paper, we simulated ERPs using a hierarchical neural-mass model that embodied bottom-up, top-down and lateral connections among remote regions. In this paper, we describe a Bayesian procedure to estimate the parameters of this model using empirical data. We demonstrate this procedure by characterizing the role of changes in cortico-cortical coupling, in the genesis of ERPs. In the first experiment, ERPs recorded during the perception of faces and houses were modeled as distinct cortical sources in the ventral visual pathway. Category-selectivity, as indexed by the face-selective N170, could be explained by category-specific differences in forward connections from sensory to higher areas in the ventral stream. We were able to quantify and make inferences about these

  10. Dynamic Response of Femoral Cartilage in Knees With Unicompartmental Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Vidal-Lesso

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present work was to determine the dynamic indentation response, stiffness and relaxation curvesfor the shear and the bulk modulus of femoral knee cartilage with no visual damage in cases under unicompartmentalosteoarthritis.A cyclic displacement of 0.5 mm in axial direction was applied with a 3 mm plane-ended cylindrical indenter at specificpoints in the femoral knee cartilage specimens of seven patients with unicompartmental osteoarthritis (UOA. Theindentation force over time was recorded and next the maximum stiffness in all cycles was obtained and compared.Also, the relaxation curves for the shear and the bulk modulus of cartilage were obtained in this work.A decrease in the maximum indentation force was observed comparing between indentation cycles; it was of 6.75 ±0.71% from cycle 1 to cycle 2 and 4.70 ± 0.31% for cycle 2 to cycle 3. Stiffness values changed with a mean of 3.35 ±0.39% from cycle 1 to cycle 2 and 1.40 ± 0.71% from cycle 2 to cycle 3. Moreover, relaxation curves for the shearmodulus and the bulk modulus showed the nonlinear behavior of articular cartilage with UOA.Our results showed that cartilage specimens with no visual damage in UOA preserve a nonlinear viscoelastic behaviorand its stiffness increases through the loading cycles. Our work provides experimental values for generating a morerealistic cartilage behavior than those currently used in computer cartilage models for the study of UOA.

  11. Noise-induced hearing loss alters the temporal dynamics of auditory-nerve responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheidt, Ryan E; Kale, Sushrut; Heinz, Michael G

    2010-10-01

    Auditory-nerve fibers demonstrate dynamic response properties in that they adapt to rapid changes in sound level, both at the onset and offset of a sound. These dynamic response properties affect temporal coding of stimulus modulations that are perceptually relevant for many sounds such as speech and music. Temporal dynamics have been well characterized in auditory-nerve fibers from normal-hearing animals, but little is known about the effects of sensorineural hearing loss on these dynamics. This study examined the effects of noise-induced hearing loss on the temporal dynamics in auditory-nerve fiber responses from anesthetized chinchillas. Post-stimulus-time histograms were computed from responses to 50-ms tones presented at characteristic frequency and 30 dB above fiber threshold. Several response metrics related to temporal dynamics were computed from post-stimulus-time histograms and were compared between normal-hearing and noise-exposed animals. Results indicate that noise-exposed auditory-nerve fibers show significantly reduced response latency, increased onset response and percent adaptation, faster adaptation after onset, and slower recovery after offset. The decrease in response latency only occurred in noise-exposed fibers with significantly reduced frequency selectivity. These changes in temporal dynamics have important implications for temporal envelope coding in hearing-impaired ears, as well as for the design of dynamic compression algorithms for hearing aids.

  12. Declarative Event-Based Workflow as Distributed Dynamic Condition Response Graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hildebrandt, Thomas; Mukkamala, Raghava Rao

    2010-01-01

    We present Dynamic Condition Response Graphs (DCR Graphs) as a declarative, event-based process model inspired by the workflow language employed by our industrial partner and conservatively generalizing prime event structures. A dynamic condition response graph is a directed graph with nodes repr...

  13. Dynamic response of multiwall boron nitride nanotubes subjected to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dynamic behaviours of multiwall boron nitride nanotubes (MWBNNTs) with finite length were studied by employing continuum structure. Multiple elastic shells with nonlinear model of van der Waals interactions were used for developing an inclusive and inexpensive dynamical model of MWBNNTs. The systems of coupled ...

  14. Evolution of taxis responses in virtual bacteria: non-adaptive dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A Goldstein

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria are able to sense and respond to a variety of external stimuli, with responses that vary from stimuli to stimuli and from species to species. The best-understood is chemotaxis in the model organism Escherichia coli, where the dynamics and the structure of the underlying pathway are well characterised. It is not clear, however, how well this detailed knowledge applies to mechanisms mediating responses to other stimuli or to pathways in other species. Furthermore, there is increasing experimental evidence that bacteria integrate responses from different stimuli to generate a coherent taxis response. We currently lack a full understanding of the different pathway structures and dynamics and how this integration is achieved. In order to explore different pathway structures and dynamics that can underlie taxis responses in bacteria, we perform a computational simulation of the evolution of taxis. This approach starts with a population of virtual bacteria that move in a virtual environment based on the dynamics of the simple biochemical pathways they harbour. As mutations lead to changes in pathway structure and dynamics, bacteria better able to localise with favourable conditions gain a selective advantage. We find that a certain dynamics evolves consistently under different model assumptions and environments. These dynamics, which we call non-adaptive dynamics, directly couple tumbling probability of the cell to increasing stimuli. Dynamics that are adaptive under a wide range of conditions, as seen in the chemotaxis pathway of E. coli, do not evolve in these evolutionary simulations. However, we find that stimulus scarcity and fluctuations during evolution results in complex pathway dynamics that result both in adaptive and non-adaptive dynamics depending on basal stimuli levels. Further analyses of evolved pathway structures show that effective taxis dynamics can be mediated with as few as two components. The non-adaptive dynamics

  15. Dynamic Response of Bridge Subjected to Eccentrically Moving Flexible Vehicle: A Semianalytical Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Lalthlamuana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic response of a single span bridge subjected to moving flexible vehicles has been studied using a semianalytical approach. The eccentricity of vehicle path giving rise to torsional motion of the bridge has been incorporated in the approach. The bridge surface irregularity has been considered as the nonhomogeneous process in spatial domain. A closed form expression has been derived to generate response samples corresponding to each input of roughness profile to form an ensemble. Thereafter, averaging across the ensemble has been carried out at each time step to determine mean and standard deviation of bridge and vehicle response. Further, dynamic amplification factor (DAF of the bridge response has been obtained for several combinations of bridge-vehicle parameters. The study reveals that structural bending modes of vehicle can significantly reduce dynamic response of the bridge. The eccentricity of vehicle path and flexural/torsional rigidity ratios plays a significant role in dynamic amplification of bridge response.

  16. Enhanced subliminal emotional responses to dynamic facial expressions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wataru eSato

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Emotional processing without conscious awareness plays an important role in human social interaction. Several behavioral studies reported that subliminal presentation of photographs of emotional facial expressions induces unconscious emotional processing. However, it was difficult to elicit strong and robust effects using this method. We hypothesized that dynamic presentations of facial expressions would enhance subliminal emotional effects and tested this hypothesis with two experiments. Fearful or happy facial expressions were presented dynamically or statically in either the left or the right visual field for 20 (Experiment 1 and 30 (Experiment 2 ms. Nonsense target ideographs were then presented, and participants reported their preference for them. The results consistently showed that dynamic presentations of emotional facial expressions induced more evident emotional biases toward subsequent targets than did static ones. These results indicate that dynamic presentations of emotional facial expressions induce more evident unconscious emotional processing.

  17. Monitoring Bridge Dynamic Responses Using Fiber Bragg Grating Tiltmeters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Feng; Chen, Gang S; Hulsey, J Leroy

    2017-10-20

    In bridge health monitoring, tiltmeters have been used for measuring rotation and curvature; however, their application in dynamic parameter identification has been lacking. This study installed fiber Bragg grating (FBG) tiltmeters on the bearings of a bridge and monitored the dynamic rotational angle. The dynamic features, including natural frequencies and mode shapes, have been identified successfully. The innovation presented in this paper is the first-time use of FBG tiltmeter readings to identify the natural frequencies of a long-span steel girder bridge. The identified results have been verified using a bridge finite element model. This paper introduces a new method for the dynamic monitoring of a bridge using FBG tiltmeters. Limitations and future research directions are also discussed in the conclusion.

  18. Dynamic Pricing for Demand Response Considering Market Price Uncertainty

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mohammad Ali Fotouhi Ghazvini; João Soares; Hugo Morais; Rui Castro; Zita Vale

    2017-01-01

    ...) units to avoid financial losses in the volatile electricity markets. In this paper, the problem of setting dynamic retail sales price by a REP is addressed with a robust optimization technique...

  19. BPC 157 and blood vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiwerth, Sven; Brcic, Luka; Vuletic, Lovorka Batelja; Kolenc, Danijela; Aralica, Gorana; Misic, Marija; Zenko, Anita; Drmic, Domagoj; Rucman, Rudolf; Sikiric, Predrag

    2014-01-01

    This review focuses on the described effects of BPC 157 on blood vessels after different types of damage, and elucidate by investigating different aspects of vascular response to injury (endothelium damage, clotting, thrombosis, vasoconstriction, vasodilatation, vasculoneogenesis and edema formation) especially in connection to the healing processes. In this respect, BPC 157 was concluded to be the most potent angiomodulatory agent, acting through different vasoactive pathways and systems (e.g. NO, VEGF, FAK) and leading to optimization of the vascular response followed, as it has to be expected, by optimization of the healing process. Formation of new blood vessels involves two main, partly overlapping mechanisms, angiogenesis and vasculogenesis. The additional mechanism of arteriogenesis is involved in the formation of collaterals. In conjunction with blood vessel function, we at least have to consider leakage of fluid/proteins/plasma, resulting in edema/exudate formation as well as thrombogenesis. Blood vessels are also strongly involved in tumor biology. In this aspect, we have neoangiogenesis resulting in pathological vascularization, vascular invasion resulting in release of metastatic cells and the phenomenon of homing resulting in formation of secondary tumors--metastases.

  20. A study of the changes in freeboard, stability and motion response of ships and semi-submersible platforms due to vessel icing

    OpenAIRE

    Wold, Lise Eide

    2014-01-01

    There is an increasing demand for energy in the world, and as the traditional fossil fuel supplies are diminishing, it is pushing the oil and gas industry to seek for natural resources in remote and harsh environments. One of these distant and tough environments is in the Arctic region. Vessel icing from both sea-spray icing and atmospheric icing are common in these waters and can impact the safety of a platform or a ship in different ways. Ice accumulation on vessels contributes to an ext...

  1. Measurement of canine pancreatic perfusion using dynamic computed tomography: Influence of input-output vessels on deconvolution and maximum slope methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishimoto, Miori, E-mail: miori@mx6.et.tiki.ne.jp [Department of Clinical Veterinary Science, Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, Nishi 2-11 Inada-cho, Obihiro 080-8555 (Japan); Tsuji, Yoshihisa, E-mail: y.tsuji@extra.ocn.ne.jp [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Shogoinkawara-cho 54, Sakyo-ku 606-8507 (Japan); Katabami, Nana; Shimizu, Junichiro; Lee, Ki-Ja [Department of Clinical Veterinary Science, Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, Nishi 2-11 Inada-cho, Obihiro 080-8555 (Japan); Iwasaki, Toshiroh [Department of Veterinary Internal Medicine, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Saiwai-cho, 3-5-8, Fuchu 183-8509 (Japan); Miyake, Yoh-Ichi [Department of Clinical Veterinary Science, Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, Nishi 2-11 Inada-cho, Obihiro 080-8555 (Japan); Yazumi, Shujiro [Digestive Disease Center, Kitano Hospital, 2-4-20 Ougi-machi, Kita-ku, Osaka 530-8480 (Japan); Chiba, Tsutomu [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Shogoinkawara-cho 54, Sakyo-ku 606-8507 (Japan); Yamada, Kazutaka, E-mail: kyamada@obihiro.ac.jp [Department of Clinical Veterinary Science, Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, Nishi 2-11 Inada-cho, Obihiro 080-8555 (Japan)

    2011-01-15

    Objective: We investigated whether the prerequisite of the maximum slope and deconvolution methods are satisfied in pancreatic perfusion CT and whether the measured parameters between these algorithms are correlated. Methods: We examined nine beagles injected with iohexol (200 mgI kg{sup -1}) at 5.0 ml s{sup -1}. The abdominal aorta and splenic and celiac arteries were selected as the input arteries and the splenic vein, the output veins. For the maximum slope method, we determined the arterial contrast volume of each artery by measuring the area under the curve (AUC) and compared the peak enhancement time in the pancreas with the contrast appearance time in the splenic vein. For the deconvolution method, the artery-to-vein collection rate of contrast medium was calculated. We calculated the pancreatic tissue blood flow (TBF), tissue blood volume (TBV), and mean transit time (MTT) using both algorithms and investigated their correlation based on vessel selection. Results: The artery AUC significantly decreased as it neared the pancreas (P < 0.01). In all cases, the peak time of the pancreas (11.5 {+-} 1.6) was shorter than the appearance time (14.1 {+-} 1.6) in the splenic vein. The splenic artery-vein combination exhibited the highest collection rate (91.1%) and was the only combination that was significantly correlated between TBF, TBV, and MTT in both algorithms. Conclusion: Selection of a vessel nearest to the pancreas is considered as a more appropriate prerequisite. Therefore, vessel selection is important in comparison of the semi-quantitative parameters obtained by different algorithms.

  2. Protein dynamics and the diversity of an antibody response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikary, Ramkrishna; Yu, Wayne; Oda, Masayuki; Zimmermann, Jörg; Romesberg, Floyd E

    2012-08-03

    The immune system is remarkable in its ability to produce antibodies (Abs) with virtually any specificity from a limited repertoire of germ line precursors. Although the contribution of sequence diversity to this molecular recognition has been studied for decades, recent models suggest that protein dynamics may also broaden the range of targets recognized. To characterize the contribution of protein dynamics to immunological molecular recognition, we report the sequence, thermodynamic, and time-resolved spectroscopic characterization of a panel of eight Abs elicited to the chromophoric antigen 8-methoxypyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonate (MPTS). Based on the sequence data, three of the Abs arose from unique germ line Abs, whereas the remaining five comprise two sets of siblings that arose by somatic mutation of a common precursor. The thermodynamic data indicate that the Abs recognize MPTS via a variety of mechanisms. Although the spectroscopic data reveal small differences in protein dynamics, the anti-MPTS Abs generally show similar levels of flexibility and conformational heterogeneity, possibly representing the convergent evolution of the dynamics necessary for function. However, one Ab is significantly more rigid and conformationally homogeneous than the others, including a sibling Ab from which it differs by only five somatic mutations. This example of divergent evolution demonstrates that point mutations are capable of fixing significant differences in protein dynamics. The results provide unique insight into how high affinity Abs may be produced that bind virtually any target and possibly, from a more general perspective, how new protein functions are evolved.

  3. Protein Dynamics and the Diversity of an Antibody Response*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikary, Ramkrishna; Yu, Wayne; Oda, Masayuki; Zimmermann, Jörg; Romesberg, Floyd E.

    2012-01-01

    The immune system is remarkable in its ability to produce antibodies (Abs) with virtually any specificity from a limited repertoire of germ line precursors. Although the contribution of sequence diversity to this molecular recognition has been studied for decades, recent models suggest that protein dynamics may also broaden the range of targets recognized. To characterize the contribution of protein dynamics to immunological molecular recognition, we report the sequence, thermodynamic, and time-resolved spectroscopic characterization of a panel of eight Abs elicited to the chromophoric antigen 8-methoxypyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonate (MPTS). Based on the sequence data, three of the Abs arose from unique germ line Abs, whereas the remaining five comprise two sets of siblings that arose by somatic mutation of a common precursor. The thermodynamic data indicate that the Abs recognize MPTS via a variety of mechanisms. Although the spectroscopic data reveal small differences in protein dynamics, the anti-MPTS Abs generally show similar levels of flexibility and conformational heterogeneity, possibly representing the convergent evolution of the dynamics necessary for function. However, one Ab is significantly more rigid and conformationally homogeneous than the others, including a sibling Ab from which it differs by only five somatic mutations. This example of divergent evolution demonstrates that point mutations are capable of fixing significant differences in protein dynamics. The results provide unique insight into how high affinity Abs may be produced that bind virtually any target and possibly, from a more general perspective, how new protein functions are evolved. PMID:22685303

  4. Pressure vessel design manual

    CERN Document Server

    Moss, Dennis R

    2013-01-01

    Pressure vessels are closed containers designed to hold gases or liquids at a pressure substantially different from the ambient pressure. They have a variety of applications in industry, including in oil refineries, nuclear reactors, vehicle airbrake reservoirs, and more. The pressure differential with such vessels is dangerous, and due to the risk of accident and fatality around their use, the design, manufacture, operation and inspection of pressure vessels is regulated by engineering authorities and guided by legal codes and standards. Pressure Vessel Design Manual is a solutions-focused guide to the many problems and technical challenges involved in the design of pressure vessels to match stringent standards and codes. It brings together otherwise scattered information and explanations into one easy-to-use resource to minimize research and take readers from problem to solution in the most direct manner possible. * Covers almost all problems that a working pressure vessel designer can expect to face, with ...

  5. Thermoviscoelastic dynamic response for a composite material thin narrow strip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Hong Liang; Qi, Li-Li; Liu, Hai-Bo [Hunan University, Changsha (China)

    2015-02-15

    Based on von Karman nonlinear strain-displacement relationships and classical thin plate theory, a list of nonlinear dynamic equilibrium equations for a viscoelastic composite material thin narrow strip under thermal and mechanic loads are deduced. According to the material constitutive relationship and the relaxation modulus in the form of the Prony series, combing with the Newmark method and the Newton-cotes integration method, a new numerical algorithm for direct solving the whole problem in the time domain is established. By applying this numerical algorithm, the viscoelastic composite material thin narrow strip as the research subject is analyzed systematically, and its rich dynamical behaviors are revealed comprehensively. To verify the accuracy of the present work, a comparison is made with previously published results. Finally, the viscoelastic composite material thin narrow strip under harmonic excitation load and impact load are discussed in detail, and many valuable thermoviscoelastic dynamic characteristics are revealed.

  6. Temporal dynamics of epidermal responses of guppies Poecilia reticulata to a sublethal range of waterborne zinc concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheorghiu, C; Marcogliese, D J; Scott, M E

    2009-12-01

    This study assessed the histological changes in the epidermis of guppies Poecilia reticulata induced by waterborne zinc (Zn). Laboratory-reared P. reticulata fry were maintained individually in separate vessels containing artificial water (8 microg l(-1) Zn) to which 0, 15, 30, 60 or 120 microg l(-1) Zn was added. Their epidermal response to Zn was monitored regularly over 4 weeks. Compared with controls, mucus was rapidly released and mucous cell numbers decreased at all concentrations. Thereafter mucous release, epidermal thickness, numbers and size of mucous cells fluctuated at a rate that varied with Zn concentration, but fluctuations declined after day 18. Results clearly highlight the dynamic nature of the epidermal response to sublethal concentrations of waterborne Zn. In general, low concentrations of Zn induced a rapid response with reduced numbers and size of mucous cells and shift in mucin composition, and a subsequent thickening of the epidermis. Epidermal thickness and mucous cell area fluctuated over time but were normal after a month of exposure to low Zn concentrations. The number of mucous cells, however, remained low. Virtually all mucous cells from fish maintained in 15 and 60 microg l(-1) Zn contained acidic mucins throughout the month, whereas fish maintained at 30 microg l(-1) Zn responded by production of neutral mucins during the first 12 days followed by a mixture of neutral and acidic mucins. At 120 microg l(-1) Zn, the most dramatic effects were the gradual but sustained decrease in numbers and area of mucous cells, and the shift to acidic mucins in these cells. Thus, as concentration of Zn increased, the epidermal responses indicated a disturbed host response (dramatic decline in mucous cell numbers, with mixed composition of mucins), which may have been less effective in preventing Zn uptake across the epithelium.

  7. Discrete Model for Concrete Fracture: Numerical Study of Dynamic Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Květoň Josef

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The contribution presents simulations on concrete specimens. The discrete meso-scale particle model with random geometry based on Voronoi tessellation is used. The model was enhanced with dynamic solver based on implicit Newmark method. Model is tested on cantilever beam loaded by a force at the free end to verify the ability of the model to simulate the dynamic behavior of a simple linear elastic material. Results computed with different time discretization and model settings are compared. The behavior of the model in nonlinear regime is investigated on concrete specimens loaded at different displacement rates. The constitutive law used within this contribution is insensitive to strain rate.

  8. Metamodel for nonlinear dynamic response analysis of damaged laminated composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoudi S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Damage affects negatively the safety of the structure and can lead to failure. Thus, it is recommended to use structural health monitoring techniques in order to detect, localize and quantify damage. The main aim of the current work is the development of a numerical metamodel to investigate the dynamic behavior of damaged composite structures. Hence, a metamodelling for damage prediction and dynamic behavior analysis of laminate composite structures is proposed, wherein the stress state in the structure is used as indicative parameters and artificial neural networks as a learning tool.

  9. Maury Journals - German Vessels

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — German vessels observations, after the 1853 Brussels Conference that set International Maritime Standards, modeled after Maury Marine Standard Observations.

  10. Enzyme Sequestration as a Tuning Point in Controlling Response Dynamics of Signalling Networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Feng

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Signalling networks result from combinatorial interactions among many enzymes and scaffolding proteins. These complex systems generate response dynamics that are often essential for correct decision-making in cells. Uncovering biochemical design principles that underpin such response dynamics is a prerequisite to understand evolved signalling networks and to design synthetic ones. Here, we use in silico evolution to explore the possible biochemical design space for signalling networks displaying ultrasensitive and adaptive response dynamics. By running evolutionary simulations mimicking different biochemical scenarios, we find that enzyme sequestration emerges as a key mechanism for enabling such dynamics. Inspired by these findings, and to test the role of sequestration, we design a generic, minimalist model of a signalling cycle, featuring two enzymes and a single scaffolding protein. We show that this simple system is capable of displaying both ultrasensitive and adaptive response dynamics. Furthermore, we find that tuning the concentration or kinetics of the sequestering protein can shift system dynamics between these two response types. These empirical results suggest that enzyme sequestration through scaffolding proteins is exploited by evolution to generate diverse response dynamics in signalling networks and could provide an engineering point in synthetic biology applications.

  11. Organizing the HRM function: Responses to paradoxes, variety and dynamism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keegan, Anne; Bitterling, Ilja; Sylva, Hella; Hoeksema, L.H.

    2017-01-01

    We develop empirically based insights from five case studies and argue that how actors respond to paradoxical tensions helps to explain variety and dynamism in how the HRM function is organized. It also helps to clarify why widely popular models with clearly prescribed structures take on a variety

  12. A Dynamic Market Mechanism for Markets with Shiftable Demand Response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jacob; Knudsen, Jesper Viese; Kiani, Arman

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a dynamic market mechanism that converges to the desired market equilibrium. Both locational marginal prices and the schedules for generation and consumption are determined through a negotiation process between the key market players. In addition to incorporating...

  13. Dynamic Response of Coarse Granular Material to Wave Load

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo

    1998-01-01

    . These factors include the relative density, the minor principal stress, the intermediate principal stress, the stress path, and the effects of nonhomogeneous and localized strains. The relation of the characteristic line to other features of static, cyclic and dynamic (rate dependent) soil behaviour...

  14. Optimization of multi-response dynamic systems integrating multiple ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sensor, IEEE Transactions on Ultrasonics, Ferrolectrics and Frequency Control, Vol. 52, No. 3, pp. 480-486. Yu, W-L, Wu, S-J and Shiah, S-W., 2010. Experimental analysis of dynamic characteristics on the PEM fuel cell stack by using. Taguchi approach with neural networks. International Journal of Hydrogen Energy, Vol.

  15. Dynamic response of fly ash reinforced functionally graded rubber ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The dynamic analysis of jute-epoxy sandwiches with fly ash reinforced functionally gradient (FG) flexible, compliant rubber core is presented. FG samples are prepared using conventional casting technique. Presence of gradation is quantified by weight method. An attempt is made to study the influence of fly ash weight ...

  16. Aircraft Dynamic Response to Damaged and Repaired Runways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-03-01

    second papier traite d’un modele mathematique qui peut tre utilise pour le calcul de la reponse dynamique des structures d’un avion operant sur des...for the dynamic qualification process of aircraft operation on damaged /repaired runways is in- dicated. LIST OF SYMBOLS A matrix of the factors of a

  17. Dynamic compressive mechanical response of a soft polymer material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fan, J.T.; Weerheijm, J.; Sluys, L.J.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic mechanical behaviour of a soft polymer material (Clear Flex 75) was studied using a split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) apparatus. Mechanical properties have been determined at moderate to high strain rates. Real time deformation and fracture were recorded using a high-speed camera.

  18. Modelling foredune dynamics in response to climate change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keijsers, J.G.S.

    2015-01-01

    Coastal dunes are prominent features along many of the world’s sandy shorelines. They are valued for their contributions to flood protection, biodiversity, fresh water supply and recreation. The most seaward dune ridge or foredune is the most dynamic part, showing fluctuations in size and

  19. Dynamic response of nonuniform structures to classes of pressure fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottis, M. G.

    1971-01-01

    A semi-analytical method is developed for the calculation of the response of nonuniform structures to deterministic and random excitation. The method is based on parametric representations of the impulse response and input functions. With these representations, a class of structures of specified geometry and a class of pressure fields of practical concern can be considered simultaneously in a single analytical calculation of structural response. In engineering applications, the parameters in the impulse response function can be fixed once the numerical solution of the associated eigenvalue problem is available; the input function parameters can be specified given a particular input function or pressure field data. This methodology is applied to nonuniform beams and circular cylindrical shells for which parametric response solutions are derived. The computerized version of these solutions is also presented.

  20. Experimental analysis and simulation of the dynamic response of a propeller pitch change actuator

    OpenAIRE

    LECLERCQ, Maxime; MALBURET, François; Veron, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    This paper focuses specifically on the control of the propeller pitch change mechanisms and their associated dynamics. The subject of this article is restricted to the mechanisms using a hydraulic single acting actuator. They function asymmetrically and are subject to important varying external loads under the full flight envelope. This phenomenon has an impact on their dynamic response.The question of the dynamics of these systems is rarely dealt with because, usually for aircraft applicatio...

  1. A study on compliant layers and its influence on dynamic response of a hydrodynamic journal bearing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Kim; Klit, Peder

    2011-01-01

    behavior of the bearing. The influence of the liner stiffness on the dynamic response of a highly dynamically loaded journal bearing is evaluated by varying the stiffness and comparing the response. The configurations with different liner stiffnesses are evaluated on the parameters that are traditionally......For some hydrodynamic bearing applications polymer-lined bearings are chosen over traditional metal alloy bearings due to their better wear and friction properties when operating at very thin films, e.g. in the mixed lubrication region. The introduction of a compliant layer also affects the dynamic...... used to evaluate hydrodynamic bearing designs: dynamic response, maximum pressure, minimum film thickness, wear, power loss and temperature response. The primary findings are that the maximum pressures are reduced significantly and this comes at the expense of slightly higher eccentricity ratios during...

  2. Enhanced perceptual, emotional, and motor processing in response to dynamic facial expressions of emotion1

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    YOSHIKAWA, SAKIKO; SATO, WATARU

    2006-01-01

    .... The results revealed that the broad region of visual cortices, the amygdala, and the right inferior frontal gyrus were more activated in response to dynamic facial expressions than control stimuli...

  3. Enhanced perceptual, emotional, and motor processing in response to dynamic facial expressions of emotion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yoshikawa, Sakiko; Sato, Wataru

    2006-01-01

    .... The results revealed that the broad region of visual cortices, the amygdala, and the right inferior frontal gyrus were more activated in response to dynamic facial expressions than control stimuli...

  4. Accelerating solving the dynamic multi-objective nework design problem using response surface methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wismans, Luc Johannes Josephus; van Berkum, Eric C.; Bliemer, Michiel C.J.; Viti, F.; Immers, B.; Tampere, C.

    2011-01-01

    Multi objective optimization of externalities of traffic solving a network design problem in which Dynamic Traffic Management measures are used, is time consuming while heuristics are needed and solving the lower level requires solving the dynamic user equilibrium problem. Use of response surface

  5. Dynamics of fatty acid vesicles in response to pH stimuli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ikari, Keita; Sakuma, Yuka; Jimbo, Takehiro

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of decanoic acid/decanoate (DA) vesicles in response to pH stimuli. Two types of dynamic processes induced by the micro injection of NaOH solutions are sequentially observed: deformations and topological transitions. In the deformation stage, DA vesicles show a series...

  6. Response and reliability analysis of nonlinear uncertain dynamical structures by the probability density evolution method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren R. K.; Peng, Yongbo; Sichani, Mahdi Teimouri

    2016-01-01

    The paper deals with the response and reliability analysis of hysteretic or geometric nonlinear uncertain dynamical systems of arbitrary dimensionality driven by stochastic processes. The approach is based on the probability density evolution method proposed by Li and Chen (Stochastic dynamics...

  7. Dynamic response of the target container under pulsed heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liping Ni [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    The structural mechanics of a liquid target container for pulsed spallation sources have been simulated using both a commercial code and a PSI-developed program. Results from the transient thermal-structural analysis showed that, due to inertia effects, the dynamic stress in the target container is contributed mainly from direct heating in the initial time stage, and later from the pressure wave in the target liquid once it reaches the wall. (author) figs., tab., refs.

  8. TRPM8-Dependent Dynamic Response in a Mathematical Model of Cold Thermoreceptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erick Olivares

    Full Text Available Cold-sensitive nerve terminals (CSNTs encode steady temperatures with regular, rhythmic temperature-dependent firing patterns that range from irregular tonic firing to regular bursting (static response. During abrupt temperature changes, CSNTs show a dynamic response, transiently increasing their firing frequency as temperature decreases and silencing when the temperature increases (dynamic response. To date, mathematical models that simulate the static response are based on two depolarizing/repolarizing pairs of membrane ionic conductance (slow and fast kinetics. However, these models fail to reproduce the dynamic response of CSNTs to rapid changes in temperature and notoriously they lack a specific cold-activated conductance such as the TRPM8 channel. We developed a model that includes TRPM8 as a temperature-dependent conductance with a calcium-dependent desensitization. We show by computer simulations that it appropriately reproduces the dynamic response of CSNTs from mouse cornea, while preserving their static response behavior. In this model, the TRPM8 conductance is essential to display a dynamic response. In agreement with experimental results, TRPM8 is also needed for the ongoing activity in the absence of stimulus (i.e. neutral skin temperature. Free parameters of the model were adjusted by an evolutionary optimization algorithm, allowing us to find different solutions. We present a family of possible parameters that reproduce the behavior of CSNTs under different temperature protocols. The detection of temperature gradients is associated to a homeostatic mechanism supported by the calcium-dependent desensitization.

  9. TRPM8-Dependent Dynamic Response in a Mathematical Model of Cold Thermoreceptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares, Erick; Salgado, Simón; Maidana, Jean Paul; Herrera, Gaspar; Campos, Matías; Madrid, Rodolfo; Orio, Patricio

    2015-01-01

    Cold-sensitive nerve terminals (CSNTs) encode steady temperatures with regular, rhythmic temperature-dependent firing patterns that range from irregular tonic firing to regular bursting (static response). During abrupt temperature changes, CSNTs show a dynamic response, transiently increasing their firing frequency as temperature decreases and silencing when the temperature increases (dynamic response). To date, mathematical models that simulate the static response are based on two depolarizing/repolarizing pairs of membrane ionic conductance (slow and fast kinetics). However, these models fail to reproduce the dynamic response of CSNTs to rapid changes in temperature and notoriously they lack a specific cold-activated conductance such as the TRPM8 channel. We developed a model that includes TRPM8 as a temperature-dependent conductance with a calcium-dependent desensitization. We show by computer simulations that it appropriately reproduces the dynamic response of CSNTs from mouse cornea, while preserving their static response behavior. In this model, the TRPM8 conductance is essential to display a dynamic response. In agreement with experimental results, TRPM8 is also needed for the ongoing activity in the absence of stimulus (i.e. neutral skin temperature). Free parameters of the model were adjusted by an evolutionary optimization algorithm, allowing us to find different solutions. We present a family of possible parameters that reproduce the behavior of CSNTs under different temperature protocols. The detection of temperature gradients is associated to a homeostatic mechanism supported by the calcium-dependent desensitization. PMID:26426259

  10. PRESSURE-RESISTANT VESSEL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beukers, A.; De Jong, T.

    1997-01-01

    Abstract of WO 9717570 (A1) The invention is directed to a wheel-shaped pressure-resistant vessel for gaseous, liquid or liquefied material having a substantially rigid shape, said vessel comprising a substantially continuous shell of a fiber-reinforced resin having a central opening, an inner

  11. Improving Cybersecurity Incident Response Team (CSIRT) Skills, Dynamics and Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    recommendations for optimal CSIRT performance. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Cyber Incident Response, Response Teams, Cognitive Task Analysis 16. SECURITY...CSIRT, such as forensics or threat intelligence. This network of teams is known as a multiteam system, or MTS. This concept was emphasized throughout...this project. When reading the chapters in the Handbook, it is important to keep in mind that building a productive CSIRT requires not just

  12. Containment vessel drain system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Scott G.

    2018-01-30

    A system for draining a containment vessel may include a drain inlet located in a lower portion of the containment vessel. The containment vessel may be at least partially filled with a liquid, and the drain inlet may be located below a surface of the liquid. The system may further comprise an inlet located in an upper portion of the containment vessel. The inlet may be configured to insert pressurized gas into the containment vessel to form a pressurized region above the surface of the liquid, and the pressurized region may operate to apply a surface pressure that forces the liquid into the drain inlet. Additionally, a fluid separation device may be operatively connected to the drain inlet. The fluid separation device may be configured to separate the liquid from the pressurized gas that enters the drain inlet after the surface of the liquid falls below the drain inlet.

  13. Progress of ITER vacuum vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ioki, K., E-mail: Kimihiro.Ioki@iter.org [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Bayon, A. [F4E, c/ Josep Pla, No. 2, Torres Diagonal Litoral, Edificio B3, E-08019 Barcelona (Spain); Choi, C.H.; Daly, E.; Dani, S.; Davis, J.; Giraud, B.; Gribov, Y.; Hamlyn-Harris, C.; Jun, C.; Levesy, B. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Kim, B.C. [NFRI, 52 Yeoeundong Yuseonggu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Kuzmin, E. [NTC “Sintez”, Efremov Inst., 189631 Metallostroy, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Le Barbier, R.; Martinez, J.-M. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Pathak, H. [ITER-India, A-29, GIDC Electronic Estate, Sector 25, Gandhinagar 382025 (India); Preble, J. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Sa, J.W. [NFRI, 52 Yeoeundong Yuseonggu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Terasawa, A.; Utin, Yu. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); and others

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► This covers the overall status and progress of the ITER vacuum vessel activities. ► It includes design, R and D, manufacturing and approval process of the regulators. ► The baseline design was completed and now manufacturing designs are on-going. ► R and D includes ISI, dynamic test of keys and lip-seal welding/cutting technology. ► The VV suppliers produced full-scale mock-ups and started VV manufacturing. -- Abstract: Design modifications were implemented in the vacuum vessel (VV) baseline design in 2011–2012 for finalization. The modifications are mostly due to interface components, such as support rails and feedthroughs for the in-vessel coils (IVC). Manufacturing designs are being developed at the domestic agencies (DAs) based on the baseline design. The VV support design was also finalized and tests on scale mock-ups are under preparation. Design of the in-wall shielding (IWS) has progressed, considering the assembly methods and the required tolerances. Further modifications are required to be consistent with the DAs’ manufacturing designs. Dynamic tests on the inter-modular and stub keys to support the blanket modules are being performed to measure the dynamic amplification factor (DAF). An in-service inspection (ISI) plan has been developed and R and D was launched for ISI. Conceptual design of the VV instrumentation has been developed. The VV baseline design was approved by the agreed notified body (ANB) in accordance with the French Nuclear Pressure Equipment Order procedure.

  14. Crossfit analysis: a novel method to characterize the dynamics of induced plant responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Jeroen J; van Dam, Nicole M; Hoefsloot, Huub C J; Smilde, Age K

    2009-12-16

    Many plant species show induced responses that protect them against exogenous attacks. These responses involve the production of many different bioactive compounds. Plant species belonging to the Brassicaceae family produce defensive glucosinolates, which may greatly influence their favorable nutritional properties for humans. Each responding compound may have its own dynamic profile and metabolic relationships with other compounds. The chemical background of the induced response is therefore highly complex and may therefore not reveal all the properties of the response in any single model. This study therefore aims to describe the dynamics of the glucosinolate response, measured at three time points after induction in a feral Brassica, by a three-faceted approach, based on Principal Component Analysis. First the large-scale aspects of the response are described in a 'global model' and then each time-point in the experiment is individually described in 'local models' that focus on phenomena that occur at specific moments in time. Although each local model describes the variation among the plants at one time-point as well as possible, the response dynamics are lost. Therefore a novel method called the 'Crossfit' is described that links the local models of different time-points to each other. Each element of the described analysis approach reveals different aspects of the response. The crossfit shows that smaller dynamic changes may occur in the response that are overlooked by global models, as illustrated by the analysis of a metabolic profiling dataset of the same samples.

  15. Crossfit analysis: a novel method to characterize the dynamics of induced plant responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smilde Age K

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many plant species show induced responses that protect them against exogenous attacks. These responses involve the production of many different bioactive compounds. Plant species belonging to the Brassicaceae family produce defensive glucosinolates, which may greatly influence their favorable nutritional properties for humans. Each responding compound may have its own dynamic profile and metabolic relationships with other compounds. The chemical background of the induced response is therefore highly complex and may therefore not reveal all the properties of the response in any single model. Results This study therefore aims to describe the dynamics of the glucosinolate response, measured at three time points after induction in a feral Brassica, by a three-faceted approach, based on Principal Component Analysis. First the large-scale aspects of the response are described in a 'global model' and then each time-point in the experiment is individually described in 'local models' that focus on phenomena that occur at specific moments in time. Although each local model describes the variation among the plants at one time-point as well as possible, the response dynamics are lost. Therefore a novel method called the 'Crossfit' is described that links the local models of different time-points to each other. Conclusions Each element of the described analysis approach reveals different aspects of the response. The crossfit shows that smaller dynamic changes may occur in the response that are overlooked by global models, as illustrated by the analysis of a metabolic profiling dataset of the same samples.

  16. Vertical Dynamic Response of Pile Embedded in Layered Transversely Isotropic Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenbing Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic response of pile embedded in layered transversely isotropic soil and subjected to arbitrary vertical harmonic force is investigated. Based on the viscoelastic constitutive relations for a transversely isotropic medium, the dynamic governing equation of the transversely isotropic soil is obtained in cylindrical coordinates. By introducing the fictitious soil pile model and the distributed Voigt model, the governing equations of soil-pile system are also derived. Firstly, the vertical response of the soil layer is solved by using the Laplace transform technique and the separation of variables technique. Secondly, the analytical solution of velocity response in the frequency domain and its corresponding semianalytical solution of velocity response in the time domain are derived by means of inverse Fourier transform and convolution theorem. Finally, based on the obtained solutions, a parametric study has been conducted to investigate the influence of the soil anisotropy on the vertical dynamic response of pile. It can be seen that the influence of the shear modulus of soil in the vertical plane on the dynamic response of pile is more notable than the influence of the shear modulus of soil in the horizontal plane on the dynamic response of pile.

  17. Oscillatory dynamics in nanocavities with noninstantaneous Kerr response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armaroli, Andrea; Malaguti, Stefania; Bellanca, Gaetano; Trillo, Stefano; Rossi, Alfredo de; Combrie, Sylvain [Department of Engineering, University of Ferrara, Via Saragat 1, IT 44122 Ferrara (Italy); Thales Research and Technology, Palaiseau Cedex FR 91767 (France)

    2011-11-15

    We investigate the impact of a finite response time of Kerr nonlinearities over the onset of spontaneous oscillations (self-pulsing) occurring in a nanocavity. The complete characterization of the underlying Hopf bifurcation in the full parameter space allows us to show the existence of a critical value of the response time and to envisage different regimes of competition with bistability. The transition from a stable oscillatory state to chaos is found to occur only in cavities which are detuned far off-resonance, which turns out to be mutually exclusive with the region where the cavity can operate as a bistable switch.

  18. Effect of felodipine on the myogenic response to dynamic stretch in vascular smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bülow, A; Johansson, B

    1991-04-01

    In the present experiments we examined the effect of felodipine, a vasoselective dihydropyridine calcium antagonist, on contractile responses to dynamic and static stretch of the isolated portal vein of the rat. Dynamic stretch was applied to the vascular smooth muscle at graded rates (from 0.5-1.5% muscle length s-1). Earlier observations (Johansson & Mellander 1975) of a rate-dependent excitation of the vascular smooth muscle by dynamic stretch were confirmed. Addition of felodipine, 3 nM, reduced the spontaneous activity at static lengths to about 50% but resulted in much stronger inhibition of the dynamic stretch responses. Particularly the rate-dependent increase in active force was no longer evident since the response at high rates of passive lengthening was most clearly reduced by felodipine. By contrast, lowering of the extracellular Ca2+ concentration resulted in a comparable attenuation of the spontaneous contractile activity and of the dynamic stretch responses which still showed the typical rate dependence. Therefore, the pronounced inhibition by felodipine of the dynamic myogenic reactivity of the rat portal vein appeared to be a specific effect and not simply related to the overall reduction in contractile activity. We suggest that felodipine, in addition to its inhibition of action potentials and excitation-contraction coupling may exert a special negative influence on the mechano-electrical coupling, i.e. the process that couples dynamic stretch of the vascular smooth muscle to membrane excitation.

  19. On the Boundary between Nonlinear Jump Phenomenon and Linear Response of Hypoid Gear Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Wang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A nonlinear time-varying (NLTV dynamic model of a hypoid gear pair system with time-dependent mesh point, line-of-action vector, mesh stiffness, mesh damping, and backlash nonlinearity is formulated to analyze the transitional phase between nonlinear jump phenomenon and linear response. It is found that the classical jump discontinuity will occur if the dynamic mesh force exceeds the mean value of tooth mesh force. On the other hand, the propensity for the gear response to jump disappears when the dynamic mesh force is lower than the mean mesh force. Furthermore, the dynamic analysis is able to distinguish the specific tooth impact types from analyzing the behaviors of the dynamic mesh force. The proposed theory is general and also applicable to high-speed spur, helical and spiral bevel gears even though those types of gears are not the primary focus of this paper.

  20. Dynamic Response during PEM Fuel Cell Loading-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Gou

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available A study on the effects of controlling and operating parameters for a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM fuel cell on the dynamic phenomena during the loading-up process is presented. The effect of the four parameters of load-up amplitudes and rates, operating pressures and current levels on gas supply or even starvation in the flow field is analyzed based accordingly on the transient characteristics of current output and voltage. Experiments are carried out in a single fuel cell with an active area of 285 cm2. The results show that increasing the loading-up amplitude can inevitably increase the possibility of gas starvation in channels when a constant flow rate has been set for the cathode; With a higher operating pressure, the dynamic performance will be improved and gas starvations can be relieved. The transient gas supply in the flow channel during two loading-up mode has also been discussed. The experimental results will be helpful for optimizing the control and operation strategies for PEM fuel cells in vehicles.

  1. Dynamic Response during PEM Fuel Cell Loading-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Pucheng; Yuan, Xing; Gou, Jun; Li, Pengcheng

    2009-01-01

    A study on the effects of controlling and operating parameters for a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell on the dynamic phenomena during the loading-up process is presented. The effect of the four parameters of load-up amplitudes and rates, operating pressures and current levels on gas supply or even starvation in the flow field is analyzed based accordingly on the transient characteristics of current output and voltage. Experiments are carried out in a single fuel cell with an active area of 285 cm2. The results show that increasing the loading-up amplitude can inevitably increase the possibility of gas starvation in channels when a constant flow rate has been set for the cathode; With a higher operating pressure, the dynamic performance will be improved and gas starvations can be relieved. The transient gas supply in the flow channel during two loading-up mode has also been discussed. The experimental results will be helpful for optimizing the control and operation strategies for PEM fuel cells in vehicles.

  2. Probing the dynamic response of ordered lattice materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, J.; Jensen, B. J.; Barham, M.; Barton, N. R.; Kumar, M.

    2017-06-01

    The advent of additive manufacturing has opened up the possibility of designing and creating lattice structures that were previously not possible. Their remarkable strength-to-weight scaling has garnered immense interest from the research community, but one must ask if their strength, which depends uniquely on their geometric and topological character, still holds when they are deformed dynamically? Taking advantage of the newly commissioned Dynamic Compression Sector at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory, we performed a series of gas gun experiments combined with x-ray phase contrast imaging measurement on additively manufactured polymer lattice and foam structures. With on the order of micron resolution and 100s of ns temporal resolution, the local deformation characteristics of the material can be extracted by tracking the nodal displacements within the lattice material. Properties such as local ligament strain, maximum supported strain, compaction behavior and elastic wave evolution can be extracted from this measurement. We will discuss on-going comparison of the experimental results with direct numerical simulations. This work was performed under the auspices of the US Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  3. Dynamic response of a plane-symmetrical exothermic reaction center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, J. W.; Oppenheim, A. K.

    1972-01-01

    ?sger,An analysis of the dynamic behavior of an idealized, plane-symmetrical exothermic reaction center is presented. The conservation equations for the reaction center are combined and yield a single integral equation expressing a nonlinear transfer function of the system for which the input is provided by a given time profile of the heat released per unit mass while the output gives the pressure pulse it generates under the restriction of plane-symmetrical motion. The solution is governed by a Daumk]hler number. For a given form of the exothermic power pulse profile, the dynamic behavior of the system is completely specified in terms of only this Daumk]hler number and the heat of reaction per unit mass of the combustible medium. Specific solutions are worked out for a set of typical elementary power pulse profiles, and the practical significance of the results is illustrated by their application to the problem of transition to detonation in an explosive gas.

  4. Dynamics of Mixed- Candida Species Biofilms in Response to Antifungals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vipulanandan, G; Herrera, M; Wiederhold, N P; Li, X; Mintz, J; Wickes, B L; Kadosh, D

    2018-01-01

    Oral infections caused by Candida species, the most commonly isolated human fungal pathogen, are frequently associated with biofilms. Although Candida albicans is the predominant organism found in patients with oral thrush, a biofilm infection, there is an increasing incidence of oral colonization and infections caused by non- albicans Candida species, including C. glabrata, C. dubliniensis, and C. tropicalis, which are frequently more resistant to antifungal treatment. While single-species Candida biofilms have been well studied, considerably less is known about the dynamics of mixed- Candida species biofilms and how these dynamics are altered by antifungal treatment. To address these questions, we developed a quantitative polymerase chain reaction-based approach to determine the precise species composition of mixed- Candida species biofilms formed by clinical isolates and laboratory strains in the presence and absence of clinically relevant concentrations of 3 commonly used antifungals: fluconazole, caspofungin, and amphotericin B. In monospecies biofilms, fluconazole exposure favored growth of C. glabrata and C. tropicalis, while caspofungin generally favored significant growth of all species to a varying degree. Fluconazole was not effective against preformed mixed- Candida species biofilms while amphotericin B was potent. As a general trend, in mixed- Candida species biofilms, C. albicans lost dominance in the presence of antifungals. Interestingly, presence in mixed versus monospecies biofilms reduced susceptibility to amphotericin B for C. tropicalis and C. glabrata. Overall, our data suggest that antifungal treatment favors the growth of specific non- albicans Candida species in mixed- Candida species biofilms.

  5. Optimal response to non-equilibrium disturbances under truncated Burgers-Hopf dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thalabard, Simon; Turkington, Bruce

    2017-04-01

    We model and compute the average response of truncated Burgers-Hopf dynamics to finite perturbations away from the Gibbs equipartition energy spectrum using a dynamical optimization framework recently conceptualized in a series of papers. Non-equilibrium averages are there approximated in terms of geodesic paths in probability space that ‘best-fit’ the Liouvillean dynamics over a family of quasi-equilibrium trial densities. By recasting the geodesic principle as an optimal control problem, we solve numerically for the non-equilibrium responses using an augmented Lagrangian, non-linear conjugate gradient descent method. For moderate perturbations, we find an excellent agreement between the optimal predictions and the direct numerical simulations of the truncated Burgers-Hopf dynamics. In this near-equilibrium regime, we argue that the optimal response theory provides an approximate yet predictive counterpart to fluctuation-dissipation identities.

  6. Optimization of multi-response dynamic systems integrating multiple ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016), (2) multiple attribute decision making (MADM) methods based approaches (Tong et al., 2004; Wang and Tong, 2005;. Wang ... the response variables and control factors remain unknown, and therefore, the engineers fail to gain knowledge of professional .... and multiple criteria evaluation of the grey relation model.

  7. Dynamic response of ground supported rectangular water tanks to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... reinforced concrete rectangular water tank under earthquake excitation. A linear three-dimensional finite element analysis and SAP2000 software have been used to predict tank response. The variable analysis parameters considered are the aspect ratio (tank height to length ratio) and tank water level, while the tank wall ...

  8. Periodic response of nonlinear dynamical system with large number ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Additional computational cost is due to matrix multiplication on the right hand side and forward/back substitution which is quite straight forward for parallelization. For obtaining the complete forcing frequency versus response amplitude curve, the analysis is carried out in two phases: (i) first starting from far enough from ...

  9. Dynamic response to moving concentrated masses of uniform ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... moving force solution could be misleading. Also the analysis show that the response amplitudes of both moving force and moving mass problems decrease both with increasing Foundation modulus K and with increasing Rotatory inertia correction factor Ro. Journal of the Nigerian Association of Mathematical Physics Vol.

  10. Dynamic Response to Pedestrian Loads with Statistical Frequency Distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, Steen

    2012-01-01

    by the harmonic components. Measurements indicate that the footfall frequency of a group of pedestrians has a coefficient of variation of the order 0.05–0.1. This is considerably larger than the response bandwidth of a typical lightly damped structure, and at resonance this has a significant influence...

  11. Periodic response of nonlinear dynamical system with large number ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... is proposed for predicting the periodic responses of nonlinear systems directly from solution of second order equations of motion without transforming to double first order equations. The proposed methodology is quite suitable for systems with large number of degrees of freedom such as the banded system of equations ...

  12. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI for monitoring response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loo, C.E.

    2016-01-01

    The general aim of this thesis is to investigate the role of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in monitoring response of breast cancer during neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The role of MRI with respect to achieving personalized breast cancer treatment by improving response monitoring is examined. Our

  13. Dynamic response of the Initial Systolic Time Interval to a breathing stimulus measured with impedance cardiography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Jan H.; Hoekstra, Femke; Habers, Esther; Verdaasdonk, Ruud M.; Janssen, T. W J

    2010-01-01

    The Initial Systolic Time Interval (ISTI) is a measure for the time delay between the electrical and mechanical activity of the heart. The present study reports about the dynamic response of ISTI to a Valsalva manoeuvre. This response was investigated in 22 young healthy volunteers, having different

  14. Human cortical traveling waves: dynamical properties and correlations with responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy M Patten

    Full Text Available The spatiotemporal behavior of human EEG oscillations is investigated. Traveling waves in the alpha and theta ranges are found to be common in both prestimulus and poststimulus EEG activity. The dynamical properties of these waves, including their speeds, directions, and durations, are systematically characterized for the first time, and the results show that there are significant changes of prestimulus spontaneous waves in the presence of an external stimulus. Furthermore, the functional relevance of these waves is examined by studying how they are correlated with reaction times on a single trial basis; prestimulus alpha waves traveling in the frontal-to-occipital direction are found to be most correlated to reaction speeds. These findings suggest that propagating waves of brain oscillations might be involved in mediating long-range interactions between widely distributed parts of human cortex.

  15. Peculiar torsion dynamical response of spider dragline silk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dabiao; Yu, Longteng; He, Yuming; Peng, Kai; Liu, Jie; Guan, Juan; Dunstan, D. J.

    2017-07-01

    The torsional properties of spider dragline silks from Nephila edulis and Nephila pilipes spiders are investigated by using a torsion pendulum technique. A permanent torsional deformation is observed after even small torsional strain. This behaviour is quite different from that of the other materials tested here, i.e., carbon fiber, thin metallic wires, Kevlar fiber, and human hair. The spider dragline thus displays a strong energy dissipation upon the initial excitation (around 75% for small strains and more for a larger strain), which correspondingly reduces the amplitude of subsequent oscillations around the new equilibrium position. The variation of torsional stiffness in relaxation dynamics of spider draglines for different excitations is also determined. The experimental result is interpreted in the light of the hierarchical structure of dragline silk.

  16. On the dynamic response of additively manufactured 316L

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Liam; Eakins, Daniel; Chapman, David; Hooper, Paul

    2017-06-01

    Understanding the dynamic performance of Additively Manufactured (AM) materials is important when designing components for real-world applications. A series of Taylor tests were carried out on AM and conventionally manufactured 316L Stainless Steel. AM specimens were produced with a Renishaw AM250 selective laser melting machine. Taylor tests were conducted in a reverse anvil-on-rod configuration with soft capture and post loading measurements used to corroborate high speed deformation imaging. The influence of microstructure orientation and surface roughness was investigated by manufacturing samples parallel and perpendicular to build direction and with both as-built and machined finishes. Results were compared with optimised Johnson-Cook and Zerilli-Armstrong constitutive models within AUTODYN FE software.

  17. Water response to intense electric fields: A molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marracino, Paolo; Liberti, Micaela; d'Inzeo, Guglielmo; Apollonio, Francesca

    2015-07-01

    This paper investigated polarization properties of water molecules in close proximity to an ionic charge in the presence of external electric fields by using an approach based on simulations at the atomic level. We chose sodium and chloride ions in water as examples of dilute ionic solutions and used molecular dynamics simulations to systematically investigate the influence of an external static electric field on structural, dipolar, and polarization properties of water near charged ions. Results showed that a threshold electric field higher than 10(8) V/m is needed to affect water polarization and increase mean dipole moment of water molecules close to the ion. A similar threshold holds for water permittivity profiles, although a field 10× higher is needed to ensure that water permittivity is almost constant independently of the position close to the ion. Electric fields of such intensities can greatly enhance polarizability of water in hydration shells around ions. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Non-linear dynamic response of a wind turbine blade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, I.; Dugundji, J.

    1979-01-01

    The paper outlines the nonlinear dynamic analysis of an isolated three-degree flap-lag-feather wind turbine blade under a gravity field and with shear flow. Lagrangian equations are used to derive the nonlinear equations of motion of blade for arbitrarily large angular deflections. The limit cycle analysis for forced oscillations and the determination of the principal parametric resonance of the blade due to periodic forces from the gravity field and wind shear are performed using the harmonic balance method. Results are obtained first for a two-degree flap-lag blade, then the effect of the third degree of freedom (feather) is studied. The self-excited flutter solutions are obtained for a uniform wind and with gravity forces neglected. The effects of several parameters on the blade stability are examined, including coning angle, structural damping, Lock number, and feather frequency. The limit cycle flutter solution of a typical configuration shows a substantial nonlinear softening spring behavior.

  19. Carbon Dynamics in Heathlands in Response to a Changing Climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Pia Lund

    Climate is changing, and more adverse changes are expected in the future. Changes, caused by continuously rising atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gasses as CO2, will affect ecosystem processes and functions in the future and hence the cycling of carbon. The vaste amount of studies have...... focused on effects of climate change on aboveground biomass, less have been conducted on belowground biomass, and the thesis is one of few studies comprising both above- and belowground biomass and take interactions of climate change factors into account. To follow the fate of carbon in the ecosystem we...... no persistent changes over the years. Responses of aboveground and belowground biomass were coupled, and Deschampsia flexuosa showed high ability to adapt to treatments. As the major response was observed belowground, I further studied decomposition of fine roots. Fine roots of Deschampsia flexuosa from deep...

  20. Dynamic frequency tuning of electric and magnetic metamaterial response

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, John F; Averitt, Richard; Padilla, Willie; Chen, Hou-Tong

    2014-09-16

    A geometrically modifiable resonator is comprised of a resonator disposed on a substrate, and a means for geometrically modifying the resonator. The geometrically modifiable resonator can achieve active optical and/or electronic control of the frequency response in metamaterials and/or frequency selective surfaces, potentially with sub-picosecond response times. Additionally, the methods taught here can be applied to discrete geometrically modifiable circuit components such as inductors and capacitors. Principally, controlled conductivity regions, using either reversible photodoping or voltage induced depletion activation, are used to modify the geometries of circuit components, thus allowing frequency tuning of resonators without otherwise affecting the bulk substrate electrical properties. The concept is valid over any frequency range in which metamaterials are designed to operate.

  1. Response Surface Analysis of Crowd Dynamics during Tawaf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarita, Zainuddin; Lim Eng, Aik

    2012-07-01

    A refined cellular automata model is applied to simulate the crowd movement of Muslim pilgrims performing the Tawaf ritual within the Al-Haram Mosque in Mecca. The results from the simulation are obtained and the influence of the predictor variables of the evacuation process (pedestrian flow and Tawaf duration) on the responses (pedestrian density, average walking speed, and cumulative evacuee) is investigated using response surface methodology (RSM). The average results from the experiments with an rms error less than 0.5 are obtained from the RSM. Its performance indicates that the RSM possesses excellent predictive ability for the model evacuation study, because both the experimental and the predicted values agree well with the results obtained in this study.

  2. Dynamic Supply Response Analysis of Pakistani Rice Growers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.M.Shaikh

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Alternative specifications of model of supply response of Pakistani rice growers and their economic implications are considered in terms of the existences and nature of production lags, and the choice between expected price and gross returns as the preferred explanatory of producer‟s response to changing economic condition. The analysis indicates that there are lags which are due primarily to the difficulties and cost of rapid adjustment rather than to the time required to revise expectations. The statistical results were similar for the alternative specification of gross margins and prices as the economic decision available. However, the price elasticities derived using the gross margins specification were about a third of those using the prices specification. The gross margin specification yielded additional information in the form of yield and input cost elasticities.

  3. Experimental Observations on Dynamic Response of Selected Transparent Armor Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    10 describe the details of these tests. Results on Crystalline Ceramic Materials AlON EOI Tests AlON is isostructural with magnesium aluminate spinel... aluminate spinel, IJACT, Published on line, 22 October 2010 11. Krell A, Hutzler T, Klimke J (2009) Advanced spinel and Sub- micron Al2O3 for transparent...response on magnesium aluminate spinel. Mater Sci Eng A 528:5088–5095 13. Haney E, Subhash G (2011) Rate sensitive indentation of a coarse grained magnesium

  4. Fluctuation-Response Relation and modeling in systems with fast and slow dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Lacorata

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available We show how a general formulation of the Fluctuation-Response Relation is able to describe in detail the connection between response properties to external perturbations and spontaneous fluctuations in systems with fast and slow variables. The method is tested by using the 360-variable Lorenz-96 model, where slow and fast variables are coupled to one another with reciprocal feedback, and a simplified low dimensional system. In the Fluctuation-Response context, the influence of the fast dynamics on the slow dynamics relies in a non trivial behavior of a suitable quadratic response function. This has important consequences for the modeling of the slow dynamics in terms of a Langevin equation: beyond a certain intrinsic time interval even the optimal model can give just statistical prediction.

  5. A study of the changes in freeboard, stability and motion response of ships and semi-submersible platforms due to vessel icing

    OpenAIRE

    Wold, Lise Eide

    2014-01-01

    Master's thesis in Offshore technology There is an increasing demand for energy in the world, and as the traditional fossil fuel supplies are diminishing, it is pushing the oil and gas industry to seek for natural resources in remote and harsh environments. One of these distant and tough environments is in the Arctic region. Vessel icing from both sea-spray icing and atmospheric icing are common in these waters and can impact the safety of a platform or a ship in different ways. Ice acc...

  6. Dynamic Edematous Response of the Human Heart to Myocardial Infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Jiménez, Rodrigo; Barreiro-Pérez, Manuel; Martin-García, Ana; Sánchez-González, Javier; Agüero, Jaume; Galán-Arriola, Carlos; García-Prieto, Jaime; Díaz-Pelaez, Elena; Vara, Pedro; Martinez, Irene; Zamarro, Ivan; Garde, Beatriz; Sanz, Javier; Fuster, Valentin

    2017-01-01

    Background: Clinical protocols aimed to characterize the post–myocardial infarction (MI) heart by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) need to be standardized to take account of dynamic biological phenomena evolving early after the index ischemic event. Here, we evaluated the time course of edema reaction in patients with ST-segment–elevation MI by CMR and assessed its implications for myocardium-at-risk (MaR) quantification both in patients and in a large-animal model. Methods: A total of 16 patients with anterior ST-segment–elevation MI successfully treated by primary angioplasty and 16 matched controls were prospectively recruited. In total, 94 clinical CMR examinations were performed: patients with ST-segment–elevation MI were serially scanned (within the first 3 hours after reperfusion and at 1, 4, 7, and 40 days), and controls were scanned only once. T2 relaxation time in the myocardium (T2 mapping) and the extent of edema on T2-weighted short-tau triple inversion-recovery (ie, CMR-MaR) were evaluated at all time points. In the experimental study, 20 pigs underwent 40-minute ischemia/reperfusion followed by serial CMR examinations at 120 minutes and 1, 4, and 7 days after reperfusion. Reference MaR was assessed by contrast-multidetector computed tomography during the index coronary occlusion. Generalized linear mixed models were used to take account of repeated measurements. Results: In humans, T2 relaxation time in the ischemic myocardium declines significantly from early after reperfusion to 24 hours, and then increases up to day 4, reaching a plateau from which it decreases from day 7. Consequently, edema extent measured by T2-weighted short-tau triple inversion-recovery (CMR-MaR) varied with the timing of the CMR examination. These findings were confirmed in the experimental model by showing that only CMR-MaR values for day 4 and day 7 postreperfusion, coinciding with the deferred edema wave, were similar to values measured by reference contrast

  7. 2013 Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  8. 2011 Passenger Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  9. 2011 Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  10. 2013 Passenger Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  11. 2013 Tanker Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  12. 2013 Cargo Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  13. High Performance Marine Vessels

    CERN Document Server

    Yun, Liang

    2012-01-01

    High Performance Marine Vessels (HPMVs) range from the Fast Ferries to the latest high speed Navy Craft, including competition power boats and hydroplanes, hydrofoils, hovercraft, catamarans and other multi-hull craft. High Performance Marine Vessels covers the main concepts of HPMVs and discusses historical background, design features, services that have been successful and not so successful, and some sample data of the range of HPMVs to date. Included is a comparison of all HPMVs craft and the differences between them and descriptions of performance (hydrodynamics and aerodynamics). Readers will find a comprehensive overview of the design, development and building of HPMVs. In summary, this book: Focuses on technology at the aero-marine interface Covers the full range of high performance marine vessel concepts Explains the historical development of various HPMVs Discusses ferries, racing and pleasure craft, as well as utility and military missions High Performance Marine Vessels is an ideal book for student...

  14. Cheboygan Vessel Base

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Cheboygan Vessel Base (CVB), located in Cheboygan, Michigan, is a field station of the USGS Great Lakes Science Center (GLSC). CVB was established by congressional...

  15. Maury Journals - US Vessels

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — U.S. vessels observations, after the 1853 Brussels Conference that set International Maritime Standards, modeled after Maury Marine Standard Observations.

  16. 2011 Cargo Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  17. 2011 Tanker Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  18. 2013 Fishing Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  19. Coastal Logbook Survey (Vessels)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains catch (landed catch) and effort for fishing trips made by vessels that have been issued a Federal permit for the Gulf of Mexico reef fish,...

  20. Inducing nonlinear dynamic response via piezoelectric circuitry integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, J.; Tang, J.

    2014-04-01

    Owing to the two-way electro-mechanical coupling characteristics, piezoelectric transducers have been widely used as sensors and actuators in sensing and control applications. In this research, we explore the integration of piezoelectric transducer with the structure, in which the transducer is connected with a Wheatstone bridge based circuitry subjected to chaotic excitation. It is shown that a type of Wheatstone bridge circuit with proper parameters configuration can increase sensitivity in detecting structural anomaly. Such integration has the potential to significantly amplify the response change when the underlying structure is subject to property change. Comprehensive analytical and experimental studies are carried out to demonstrate the concept and validate the performance improvement.

  1. Modeling aspects of the dynamic response of heterogeneous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ionita, Axinte [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Clements, Brad [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mas, Eric [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    In numerical simulations of engineering applications involving heterogeneous materials capturing the local response coming from a distribution of heterogeneities can lead to a very large model thus making simulations difficult. The use of homogenization techniques can reduce the size of the problem but will miss the local effects. Homogenization can also be difficult if the constituents obey different types of constitutive laws. Additional complications arise if inelastic deformation. In such cases a two-scale approach is prefened and tills work addresses these issues in the context of a two-scale Finite Element Method (FEM). Examples of using two-scale FEM approaches are presented.

  2. Dynamic response of desert wetlands to abrupt climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Kathleen; Manker, Craig; Pigati, Jeffrey S.

    2015-01-01

    Desert wetlands are keystone ecosystems in arid environments and are preserved in the geologic record as groundwater discharge (GWD) deposits. GWD deposits are inherently discontinuous and stratigraphically complex, which has limited our understanding of how desert wetlands responded to past episodes of rapid climate change. Previous studies have shown that wetlands responded to climate change on glacial to interglacial timescales, but their sensitivity to short-lived climate perturbations is largely unknown. Here, we show that GWD deposits in the Las Vegas Valley (southern Nevada, United States) provide a detailed and nearly complete record of dynamic hydrologic changes during the past 35 ka (thousands of calibrated 14C years before present), including cycles of wetland expansion and contraction that correlate tightly with climatic oscillations recorded in the Greenland ice cores. Cessation of discharge associated with rapid warming events resulted in the collapse of entire wetland systems in the Las Vegas Valley at multiple times during the late Quaternary. On average, drought-like conditions, as recorded by widespread erosion and the formation of desert soils, lasted for a few centuries. This record illustrates the vulnerability of desert wetland flora and fauna to abrupt climate change. It also shows that GWD deposits can be used to reconstruct paleohydrologic conditions at millennial to submillennial timescales and informs conservation efforts aimed at protecting these fragile ecosystems in the face of anthropogenic warming.

  3. Dynamic response of a collidant impacting a low pressure airbag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreher, Peter A.

    There are many uses of low pressure airbags, both military and commercial. Many of these applications have been hampered by inadequate and inaccurate modeling tools. This dissertation contains the derivation of a four degree-of-freedom system of differential equations from physical laws of mass and energy conservation, force equilibrium, and the Ideal Gas Law. Kinematic equations were derived to model a cylindrical airbag as a single control volume impacted by a parallelepiped collidant. An efficient numerical procedure was devised to solve the simplified system of equations in a manner amenable to discovering design trends. The largest public airbag experiment, both in scale and scope, was designed and built to collect data on low-pressure airbag responses, otherwise unavailable in the literature. The experimental results were compared to computational simulations to validate the simplified numerical model. Experimental response trends are presented that will aid airbag designers. The two objectives of using a low pressure airbag to demonstrate the feasibility to (1) accelerate a munition to 15 feet per second velocity from a bomb bay, and (2) decelerate humans hitting trucks below the human tolerance level of 50 G's, were both met.

  4. LANL Robotic Vessel Scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webber, Nels W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-25

    Los Alamos National Laboratory in J-1 DARHT Operations Group uses 6ft spherical vessels to contain hazardous materials produced in a hydrodynamic experiment. These contaminated vessels must be analyzed by means of a worker entering the vessel to locate, measure, and document every penetration mark on the vessel. If the worker can be replaced by a highly automated robotic system with a high precision scanner, it will eliminate the risks to the worker and provide management with an accurate 3D model of the vessel presenting the existing damage with the flexibility to manipulate the model for better and more in-depth assessment.The project was successful in meeting the primary goal of installing an automated system which scanned a 6ft vessel with an elapsed time of 45 minutes. This robotic system reduces the total time for the original scope of work by 75 minutes and results in excellent data accumulation and transmission to the 3D model imaging program.

  5. Field-dependent dynamic responses from dilute magnetic nanoparticle dispersions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fock, Jeppe; Balceris, Christoph; Costo, Rocio

    2017-01-01

    for particles, which apart from the permanent magnetic moment may also have an induced magnetic moment and shape anisotropy. Using the results from the Fokker-Planck calculations we fit ACS and OM measurements on two multi-core particle systems. The obtained fit parameters also describe the correlations between...... the magnetic moment and size of the particles. From such an analysis on a commercially available polydisperse multicore particle system with an average particle size of 80 nm, we find that the MNP magnetic moment is proportional to the squareroot of the hydrodynamic size....... between the size and the magnetic moment contains information on the morphology and intrinsic structure of the particle. In OM measurements, the variation of the second harmonic light transmission through a dispersion of MNPs is measured in response to an oscillating magnetic field. We solve the Fokker...

  6. Enabling Automated Dynamic Demand Response: From Theory to Practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frincu, Marc; Chelmis, Charalampos; Aman, Saima; Saeed, Rizwan; Zois, Vasileios; Prasanna, Viktor

    2015-07-14

    Demand response (DR) is a technique used in smart grids to shape customer load during peak hours. Automated DR offers utilities a fine grained control and a high degree of confidence in the outcome. However the impact on the customer's comfort means this technique is more suited for industrial and commercial settings than for residential homes. In this paper we propose a system for achieving automated controlled DR in a heterogeneous environment. We present some of the main issues arising in building such a system, including privacy, customer satisfiability, reliability, and fast decision turnaround, with emphasis on the solutions we proposed. Based on the lessons we learned from empirical results we describe an integrated automated system for controlled DR on the USC microgrid. Results show that while on a per building per event basis the accuracy of our prediction and customer selection techniques varies, it performs well on average when considering several events and buildings.

  7. Nonlinear response and dynamical transitions in a phase-field crystal model for adsorbed overlayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos, J A P [Departamento de Ciencias Exatas, Universidade Estadual do Sudoeste da Bahia, 45000-000 Vitoria da Conquista, BA (Brazil); Granato, E [Laboratorio Associado de Sensores e Materiais, Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais, 12245-970 Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Ying, S C; Ala-Nissila, T [Department of Physics, PO Box 1843, Brown University, Providence, RI 02912-1843 (United States); Achim, C V [Department of Applied Physics, Aalto University School of Science and Technology, PO Box 11000, FI-00076 Aalto, Espoo (Finland); Elder, K R, E-mail: Jorge@las.inpe.b [Department of Physics, Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan 48309-4487 (United States)

    2010-09-01

    The nonlinear response and sliding friction behavior of a phase-field crystal model for driven adsorbed atomic layers is determined numerically. The model describes the layer as a continuous density field coupled to the pinning potential of the substrate and under an external driving force. Dynamical equations which take into account both thermal fluctuations and inertial effects are used for numerical simulations of commensurate and incommensurate layers. At low temperatures, the velocity response of an initially commensurate layer shows hysteresis with dynamical melting and freezing transitions at different critical forces. The main features of the sliding friction behavior are similar to the results obtained previously from molecular dynamics simulations of particle models. However, the dynamical transitions correspond to nucleations of stripes rather than closed domains.

  8. Morph or Move? How Distinct Endothelial Cell Responses to Blood Flow Shape Vascular Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Claudio A; Gerhardt, Holger

    2017-06-19

    Blood vessel shape is malleable and dynamically regulated. In two recent papers in Nature Cell Biology, Jin et al. (2017) and Sugden et al. (2017) show that endoglin alters endothelial cell shape or behavior in response to blood flow, thus regulating vessel structure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Dynamic visual responses of accommodation and vergence to electro-holographic images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Aya; Mitobe, Masaya; Okuyama, Fumio; Sakamoto, Yuji

    2017-02-20

    Electro-holography can display images without inducing fatigue and three-dimensional (3D) sickness, i.e., visual discomfort due to viewing a stereoscopic display. Thus, this technology is expected to be applied to 3D media. However, there are no studies that have shown the agreement between the dynamic responses of accommodation and vergence to the reconstructed images of electro-holography and those to the real targets. This paper describes the measurement results of these responses using a developed system that can simultaneously measure the dynamic responses of accommodation and vergence. Moreover, statistical analysis for associating the accommodation and the vergence responses was achieved, and our study confirmed that these responses were in agreement.

  10. Experimental studies of the dynamic mechanical response of a single polymer chain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thormann, Esben; Evans, Drew R.; Craig, Vincent S. J.

    2006-01-01

    The high-frequency and low-amplitude dynamic mechanical response from a single poly(vinyl alcohol) chain was investigated. Modification of a commercial atomic force microscope enabled high-frequency and low-amplitude periodic deformations of polymer chains during extension to be performed....... Such an experiment has previously been considered untenable due to hydrodynamic and viscous effects, but we introduce here a method to isolate the response of the polymer from the hydrodynamic response. For periodic deformations with frequencies of 400-2000 Hz and amplitudes of 0.55-16.9 nm, we find that the dynamic...... mechanical response from poly(vinyl alcohol) does not differ from its static response. This result is not unexpected as poly(vinyl alcohol) is a highly flexible polymer with intramolecular relaxation processes taking place on a short time scale. The choice of a polymer with a fast relaxation allows its...

  11. Dynamic response characteristics analysis of the doubly-fed wind power system under grid voltage drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y.; Wang, J.; Wang, H. H.; Yang, L.; Chen, W.; Xu, Y. T.

    2016-08-01

    Double-fed induction generator (DFIG) is sensitive to the disturbances of grid, so the security and stability of the grid and the DFIG itself are under threat with the rapid increase of DFIG. Therefore, it is important to study dynamic response of the DFIG when voltage drop failure is happened in power system. In this paper, firstly, mathematical models and the control strategy about mechanical and electrical response processes is respectively introduced. Then through the analysis of response process, it is concluded that the dynamic response characteristics are related to voltage drop level, operating status of DFIG and control strategy adapted to rotor side. Last, the correctness of conclusion is validated by the simulation about mechanical and electrical response processes in different voltage levels drop and different DFIG output levels under DIgSILENT/PowerFactory software platform.

  12. Effect of Infills in Influencing the Dynamic Responses of Multistoried Structures

    OpenAIRE

    E. Rahmathulla Noufal

    2015-01-01

    Investigating the dynamic responses of high rise structures under the effect of siesmic ground motion is extremely important for the proper analysis and design of multitoried structures. Since the presence of infilled walls strongly influences the behaviour of frame systems in multistoried buildings, there is an increased need for developing guidelines for the analysis and design of infilled frames under the effect of dynamic loads for safe and proper design of buildings....

  13. Clustering vessel trajectories with alignment kernels under trajectory compression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, G.; van Someren, M.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we apply a selection of alignment measures, such as dynamic time warping and edit distance, to the problem of clustering vessel trajectories. Vessel trajectories are an example of moving object trajectories, which have recently become an important research topic. The alignment measures

  14. Understanding pyrotechnic shock dynamics and response attenuation over distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Richard J.

    Pyrotechnic shock events used during stage separation on rocket vehicles produce high amplitude short duration structural response that can lead to malfunction or degradation of electronic components, cracks and fractures in brittle materials, local plastic deformation, and can cause materials to experience accelerated fatigue life. These transient loads propagate as waves through the structural media losing energy as they travel outward from the source. This work assessed available test data in an effort to better understand attenuation characteristics associated with wave propagation and attempted to update a historical standard defined by the Martin Marietta Corporation in the late 1960's using out of date data acquisition systems. Two data sets were available for consideration. The first data set came from a test that used a flight like cylinder used in NASA's Ares I-X program, and the second from a test conducted with a flat plate. Both data sets suggested that the historical standard was not a conservative estimate of shock attenuation with distance, however, the variation in the test data did not lend to recommending an update to the standard. Beyond considering attenuation with distance an effort was made to model the flat plate configuration using finite element analysis. The available flat plate data consisted of three groups of tests, each with a unique charge density linear shape charge (LSC) used to cut an aluminum plate. The model was tuned to a representative test using the lowest charge density LSC as input. The correlated model was then used to predict the other two cases by linearly scaling the input load based on the relative difference in charge density. The resulting model predictions were then compared with available empirical data. Aside from differences in amplitude due to nonlinearities associated with scaling the charge density of the LSC, the model predictions matched the available test data reasonably well. Finally, modeling best

  15. Effect of friction coefficients on the dynamic response of gear systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lingli; Deng, Zhenyong; Gu, Fengshou; Ball, Andrew D.; Li, Xuejun

    2017-09-01

    The inevitable deterioration of the lubrication conditions in a gearbox in service can change the tribological properties of the meshing teeth. In turn, such changes can significantly affect the dynamic responses and running status of gear systems. This paper investigates such an effect by utilizing virtual prototype technology to model and simulate the dynamics of a wind turbine gearbox system. The change in the lubrication conditions is modeled by the changes in the friction coefficients, thereby indicating that poor lubrication causes not only increased frictional losses but also significant changes in the dynamic responses. These results are further demonstrated by the mean and root mean square values calculated by the simulated responses under different friction coefficients. In addition, the spectrum exhibits significant changes in the first, second, and third harmonics of the meshing components. The findings and simulation method of this study provide theoretical bases for the development of accurate diagnostic techniques.

  16. Covariance of dynamic strain responses for structural damage detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X. Y.; Wang, L. X.; Law, S. S.; Nie, Z. H.

    2017-10-01

    A new approach to address the practical problems with condition evaluation/damage detection of structures is proposed based on the distinct features of a new damage index. The covariance of strain response function (CoS) is a function of modal parameters of the structure. A local stiffness reduction in structure would cause monotonous increase in the CoS. Its sensitivity matrix with respect to local damages of structure is negative and narrow-banded. The damage extent can be estimated with an approximation to the sensitivity matrix to decouple the identification equations. The CoS sensitivity can be calibrated in practice from two previous states of measurements to estimate approximately the damage extent of a structure. A seven-storey plane frame structure is numerically studied to illustrate the features of the CoS index and the proposed method. A steel circular arch in the laboratory is tested. Natural frequencies changed due to damage in the arch and the damage occurrence can be judged. However, the proposed CoS method can identify not only damage happening but also location, even damage extent without need of an analytical model. It is promising for structural condition evaluation of selected components.

  17. Experimental comparison of the dynamic evaporator response using homogeneous and slip flow modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kærn, Martin Ryhl; Elmegaard, Brian; Larsen, Lars Finn Sloth

    2011-01-01

    The dynamic response from an evaporator is important for control of refrigeration and air-conditioning systems. Essentially, the prediction of refrigerant charge inside the evaporator is crucial for the dynamic behavior. The prediction of refrigerant charge follows from suitable void fraction...... correlations from the literature. A chosen set of void fraction correlations (slip flow) and the assumption of homogeneous flow will be investigated in this paper and compared to experiments on a simple coaxial type evaporator. The numerical model of the evaporator is a dynamic distributed mixture model, where...

  18. Adaptive synchronization of drive-response fractional-order complex dynamical networks with uncertain parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li-xin; Jiang, Jun

    2014-05-01

    This paper investigates the adaptive synchronization in the drive-response fractional-order dynamical networks with uncertain parameters. By means of both the stability theory of fractional-order differential system and the adaptive control technique, a novel adaptive synchronization controller is developed with a more general and simpler analytical expression, which does not contain the parameters of the complex network, and effective adaptive laws of parameters. Furthermore, the very strong and conservative uniformly Lipschitz condition on the node dynamics of complex network is released. To demonstrate the validity of the proposed method, the examples for the synchronization of systems with the chaotic and hyper-chaotic node dynamics are presented.

  19. The passive biomechanics of human pelvic collecting lymphatic vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanasiou, Dimitrios; Edgar, Lowell T; Jafarnejad, Mohammad; Nixon, Katherine; Duarte, Delfim; Hawkins, Edwin D; Jamalian, Samira; Cunnea, Paula; Lo Celso, Cristina; Kobayashi, Shunichi; Fotopoulou, Christina; Moore, James E

    2017-01-01

    The lymphatic system has a major significance in the metastatic pathways in women's cancers. Lymphatic pumping depends on both extrinsic and intrinsic mechanisms, and the mechanical behavior of lymphatic vessels regulates the function of the system. However, data on the mechanical properties and function of human lymphatics are lacking. Our aim is to characterize, for the first time, the passive biomechanical behavior of human collecting lymphatic vessels removed at pelvic lymph node dissection during primary debulking surgeries for epithelial ovarian cancer. Isolated vessels were cannulated and then pressurized at varying levels of applied axial stretch in a calcium-free Krebs buffer. Pressurized vessels were then imaged using multi-photon microscopy for collagen-elastin structural composition and fiber orientation. Both pressure-diameter and force-elongation responses were highly nonlinear, and axial stretching of the vessel served to decrease diameter at constant pressure. Pressure-diameter behavior for the human vessels is very similar to data from rat mesenteric vessels, though the human vessels were approximately 10× larger than those from rats. Multiphoton microscopy revealed the vessels to be composed of an inner layer of elastin with an outer layer of aligned collagen fibers. This is the first study that successfully described the passive biomechanical response and composition of human lymphatic vessels in patients with ovarian cancer. Future work should expand on this knowledge base with investigations of vessels from other anatomical locations, contractile behavior, and the implications on metastatic cell transport.

  20. Research on Power Producer’s Bidding Behavior Based on the Best-Response Dynamic Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingqi Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As China’s electricity market is facing many problems, the research on power producer’s bidding behavior can promote the healthy and sustainable development of China’s electricity market. As a special commodity, the “electricity” possesses complicated production process. The instable market constraint condition, nonsymmetric information, and a lot of random factors make the producer’s bidding process more complex. Best-response dynamic is one of the classic dynamic mechanisms of the evolutionary game theory, which applies well in the repeated game and strategy evolution that happen among a few bounded rational players with a quick learning capability. The best-response dynamic mechanism is employed to study the power producer’s bidding behavior in this paper, the producer’s best-response dynamic model is constructed, and how the producers would engage in bidding is analyzed in detail. Taking two generating units in South China regional electricity market as the example, the producer’s bidding behavior by following the producer’s best-response dynamic model is verified. The relationships between the evolutionarily stable strategy (ESS of power producer’s bidding and the market demand, and ceiling and floor price as well as biding frequency are discussed in detail.

  1. Development of dynamic response analysis algorithm for beam structures using transfer of mass coefficient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, M. S.; Yeo, D. J.; Byun, J. H.; Suh, J. J.; Yang, J. K. [Chonnam National University, Yeosu (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-02-15

    The authors developed the transfer mass coefficient method (TMCM) in order to compute effectively the dynamic response of a beam structure. In this paper, the algorithm for the dynamic response analysis of a three-dimensional beam structure is formulated. Through the computation results of numerical models, which are plane and space beam structures, obtained by the transfer mass coefficient method and the direct integration method, we verify that the transfer mass coefficient method can remarkably decrease the computation time of the direct integration method without the loss of accuracy in spite of using small computer storage

  2. Insight into fiber Bragg sensor response at 100-MHz interrogation rates under various dynamic loading conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, George; Jaime, Marcelo; Mielke, Chuck H.; Balakirev, Fedor F.; Azad, Abul; Sandberg, Richard L.; Marshall, Bruce; La Lone, Brandon M.; Henson, Bryan F.; Smilowitz, Laura; Marr-Lyon, Mark; Sandoval, Tom

    2015-05-01

    A 100 MHz fiber Bragg grating (FBG) interrogation system is described and applied to strain, pressure, and shock position sensing. The approach relies on coherent pulse illumination of the FBG sensor with a broadband short pulse from a femtosecond modelocked erbium fiber laser. After interrogation of the FBG sensor, a long multi-kilometer run of single mode fiber was used for chromatic dispersion to temporally stretch the spectral components of the reflected pulse from the FBG sensor. Dynamic strain or pressure induced spectral shifts in the FBG sensor were detected as a pulsed time domain waveform shift after encoding by the chromatic dispersive line. Signals were recorded using a single 35 GHz photodetector and a 25 GHz bandwidth digitizing oscilloscope. Application of this approach to high-speed strain sensing of magnetic materials in pulsed magnetic fields to ~150 T is demonstrated. The FBG wavelength shifts were used to study magnetic field driven magnetostriction effects in LaCoO3. A sub-microsecond temporal shift in the FBG sensor wavelength attached to the sample under first order phase change appears as a fractional length change (strain: ΔL/L<10-4) in the material. A second application to FBG sensing of pressure dynamics to nearly 2 GPa in the thermal ignition of the high explosive PBX-9501 is also demonstrated. Then, as final demonstration, we use a chirped FBG (CFBG) to resolve shock propagation dynamics in 1-D from an explosive detonation that produces fragmentation in an inert confinement vessel. These applications demonstrate the use of this FBG interrogation system in dynamical extreme conditions that would otherwise not be possible using traditional FBG interrogation approaches that are deemed too slow to resolve such events.

  3. Integrating Multiple Autonomous Underwater Vessels, Surface Vessels and Aircraft into Oceanographic Research Vessel Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGillivary, P. A.; Borges de Sousa, J.; Martins, R.; Rajan, K.

    2012-12-01

    Autonomous platforms are increasingly used as components of Integrated Ocean Observing Systems and oceanographic research cruises. Systems deployed can include gliders or propeller-driven autonomous underwater vessels (AUVs), autonomous surface vessels (ASVs), and unmanned aircraft systems (UAS). Prior field campaigns have demonstrated successful communication, sensor data fusion and visualization for studies using gliders and AUVs. However, additional requirements exist for incorporating ASVs and UASs into ship operations. For these systems to be optimally integrated into research vessel data management and operational planning systems involves addressing three key issues: real-time field data availability, platform coordination, and data archiving for later analysis. A fleet of AUVs, ASVs and UAS deployed from a research vessel is best operated as a system integrated with the ship, provided communications among them can be sustained. For this purpose, Disruptive Tolerant Networking (DTN) software protocols for operation in communication-challenged environments help ensure reliable high-bandwidth communications. Additionally, system components need to have considerable onboard autonomy, namely adaptive sampling capabilities using their own onboard sensor data stream analysis. We discuss Oceanographic Decision Support System (ODSS) software currently used for situational awareness and planning onshore, and in the near future event detection and response will be coordinated among multiple vehicles. Results from recent field studies from oceanographic research vessels using AUVs, ASVs and UAS, including the Rapid Environmental Picture (REP-12) cruise, are presented describing methods and results for use of multi-vehicle communication and deliberative control networks, adaptive sampling with single and multiple platforms, issues relating to data management and archiving, and finally challenges that remain in addressing these technological issues. Significantly, the

  4. A system dynamics case study of resilient response to IP theft from a cyber- attack

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sepúlveda Estay, Daniel Alberto; Khan, Omera

    dynamics model from an actual case of resilient response after a cyber-attack. Both casespecific and generic structures are extracted from the case data analysis, and a reaction mechanism is proposed that results in the observed behavior. The identification of these structures should eventually aid...... and swiftness of the supply chain response (resilience). However, current resilience frameworks are qualitative, do not address evolution over time as a relevant aspect, and thus do not provide indications on how to design a resilient response. This paper contributes to closing this gap by developing a system...... decision makers in the process of designing a resilient supply chain response....

  5. Dynamic response characteristics of steel portal frames having semi-rigid joints under sinusoidal wave excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatti, Abdul Qadir

    2017-12-01

    To demonstrate the characteristics of the nonlinear response of steel frames, an elastic dynamic response analysis of the semi-rigid frame is performed under the harmonic wave. The semi-rigid contact is represented by the alternating spring which is given stiffness by a three-parameter energy model which approaches the hysterical curve by hardening model. The properties of spectra and hysteric curves are presented. This study shows that (1) the greater the acceleration input capacitance the smaller the instant connection capability and the smaller is the response. (2) However, by allowing an extreme increase in capacitance input acceleration, response spectra can be increased as the contact stiffness results near zero.

  6. Stromal-epithelial dynamics in response to fractionated radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qayyum, Muqeem Abdul

    Radiotherapy is central to the management of a number of human cancers, either as an adjuvant or primary treatment modality. The principal objective in irradiating tumors is to permanently inhibit their proliferative ability. More than half of all malignancies are primarily treated with radiation, but the heterotypic nature of tumor cells greatly complicates their response to radiotherapy. The need for reliable parameters to predict tumor and normal tissue response to radiation is therefore a prime concern of clinical oncology. Post-operative radiotherapy has commonly been used for early stage breast cancer to treat residual disease. There is continued debate as to what might be the proper dose per fraction as well as the total dose of radiation that needs to be prescribed to prevent disease recurrence. Countries outside the US have adopted increased dose fractionation (i.e., hypofractionation) schemes for early stage breast cancer as a standard of practice; however there is a lack of confidence in these approaches in the United States. The tumor microenvironment plays a significant role in regulating the progression of carcinomas, although the mechanisms are not entirely clear. The primary objective of this work was to characterize, through mechanobiological and radiobiological modeling, a test bed for radiotherapy fractionation techniques assessment. Our goal is to understand how the tumor microenvironment responds to dose fractionation schemes for Breast Conserving Therapy (BCT). Although carcinomas are the major concern for oncology, in this project, the goal is to understand how the stromal microenvironment influences behavior of the cancer cell populations. By classifying 3-D cellular co-cultures as having a reactive or quiescent stroma using the mechanobiology profile (culture stiffness,cellular activation, differentiation, and proliferation) we aim to differentiate the effectiveness of various fractionation schemes. The benefits of understanding heterotypic

  7. Characteristics of identifying linear dynamic models from impulse response data using Prony analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trudnowski, D. J.

    1992-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the characteristics of fitting linear dynamic models to the impulse response of oscillatory dynamic systems using Prony analysis. Many dynamic systems exhibit oscillatory responses with multiple modes of oscillations. Although the underlying dynamics of such systems are often nonlinear, it is frequently possible and very useful to represent the system operating about some set point with a linear model. Derivation of such linear models can be done using two basic approaches: model the system using theoretical derivations and some linearization method such as a Taylor series expansion; or use a curve-fitting technique to optimally fit a linear model to specified system response data. Prony analysis belongs to the second class of system modeling because it is a method of fitting a linear model to the impulse response of a dynamic system. Its parallel formulation inherently makes it well suited for fitting models to oscillatory system data. Such oscillatory dynamic effects occur in large synchronous-generator-based power systems in the form of electromechanical oscillations. To study and characterize these oscillatory dynamics, BPA has developed computer codes to analyze system data using Prony analysis. The objective of this study was to develop a highly detailed understanding of the properties of using Prony analysis to fit models to systems with characteristics often encountered in power systems. This understanding was then extended to develop general 'rules-of-thumb' for using Prony analysis. The general characteristics were investigated by performing fits to data from known linear models under controlled conditions. The conditions studied include various mathematical solution techniques, different parent system configurations, and a large variety of underlying noise characteristics.

  8. Characteristics of identifying linear dynamic models from impulse response data using Prony analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trudnowski, D.J.

    1992-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the characteristics of fitting linear dynamic models to the impulse response of oscillatory dynamic systems using Prony analysis. Many dynamic systems exhibit oscillatory responses with multiple modes of oscillations. Although the underlying dynamics of such systems are often nonlinear, it is frequently possible and very useful to represent the system operating about some set point with a linear model. Derivation of such linear models can be done using two basic approaches: model the system using theoretical derivations and some linearization method such as a Taylor series expansion; or use a curve-fitting technique to optimally fit a linear model to specified system response data. Prony analysis belongs to the second class of system modeling because it is a method of fitting a linear model to the impulse response of a dynamic system. Its parallel formulation inherently makes it well suited for fitting models to oscillatory system data. Such oscillatory dynamic effects occur in large synchronous-generator-based power systems in the form of electromechanical oscillations. To study and characterize these oscillatory dynamics, BPA has developed computer codes to analyze system data using Prony analysis. The objective of this study was to develop a highly detailed understanding of the properties of using Prony analysis to fit models to systems with characteristics often encountered in power systems. This understanding was then extended to develop general rules-of-thumb'' for using Prony analysis. The general characteristics were investigated by performing fits to data from known linear models under controlled conditions. The conditions studied include various mathematical solution techniques; different parent system configurations; and a large variety of underlying noise characteristics.

  9. Characteristics of identifying linear dynamic models from impulse response data using Prony analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trudnowski, D.J.

    1992-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the characteristics of fitting linear dynamic models to the impulse response of oscillatory dynamic systems using Prony analysis. Many dynamic systems exhibit oscillatory responses with multiple modes of oscillations. Although the underlying dynamics of such systems are often nonlinear, it is frequently possible and very useful to represent the system operating about some set point with a linear model. Derivation of such linear models can be done using two basic approaches: model the system using theoretical derivations and some linearization method such as a Taylor series expansion; or use a curve-fitting technique to optimally fit a linear model to specified system response data. Prony analysis belongs to the second class of system modeling because it is a method of fitting a linear model to the impulse response of a dynamic system. Its parallel formulation inherently makes it well suited for fitting models to oscillatory system data. Such oscillatory dynamic effects occur in large synchronous-generator-based power systems in the form of electromechanical oscillations. To study and characterize these oscillatory dynamics, BPA has developed computer codes to analyze system data using Prony analysis. The objective of this study was to develop a highly detailed understanding of the properties of using Prony analysis to fit models to systems with characteristics often encountered in power systems. This understanding was then extended to develop general ``rules-of-thumb`` for using Prony analysis. The general characteristics were investigated by performing fits to data from known linear models under controlled conditions. The conditions studied include various mathematical solution techniques; different parent system configurations; and a large variety of underlying noise characteristics.

  10. Lifting simulation of an offshore supply vessel considering various operating conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Hoon Jeong

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Recently, an offshore support vessel is being widely used to install an offshore structure such as a subsea equipment which is laid on its deck. The lifting operation which is one of the installation operations includes lifting off, lifting in the air, splash zone crossing, deep submerging, and finally landing of the structure with an offshore support vessel crane. There are some major considerations during this operation. Especially, when lifting off the structure, if operating conditions such as ocean environmental loads and hoisting (or lowering speed are bad, the excess of tension of wire ropes of the crane and the collision between the offshore support vessel and the structure can be occurred due to the relative motion between them. To solve this problem, this study performs the lifting simulation while the offshore support vessel installs the structure. The simulation includes the calculation of dynamic responses of the offshore support vessel and the equipment, including the wire tension and the collision detection. To check the applicability of the simulation, it is applied to some lifting steps by varying operating conditions. As a result, it is confirmed that the conditions affect the operability of those steps.

  11. Emotional Empathic Responses to Dynamic Negative Affective Stimuli Is Gender-Dependent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim P. C. Kuypers

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Empathy entails the ability to recognize emotional states in others and feel for them. Since empathy does not take place in a static setting, paradigms utilizing more naturalistic, dynamic stimuli instead of static stimuli are perhaps more suited to grasp the origin of this highly complex social skill. The study was set up to test the effect of stimulus dynamics and gender on empathic responses. Participants were 80 healthy volunteers (N = 40 males aged 22.5 years on average. Behavioral empathy was tested with the multifaceted empathy test, including static emotional stimuli, and the multidimensional movie empathy test (MMET, including dynamic stimuli. Findings showed emotional empathy (EE responses were higher to negative emotional stimuli in both tasks, i.e., using static as well as dynamic stimuli. Interestingly a gender-dependent response was only seen in the MMET using dynamic stimuli. It was shown that females felt more aroused and were more concerned with people in negative affective states. It was concluded that the MMET is suited to study gender differences in EE.

  12. Dynamic Response of Underground Circular Lining Tunnels Subjected to Incident P Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Xu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic stress concentration in tunnels and underground structures during earthquakes often leads to serious structural damage. A series solution of wave equation for dynamic response of underground circular lining tunnels subjected to incident plane P waves is presented by Fourier-Bessel series expansion method in this paper. The deformation and stress fields of the whole medium of surrounding rock and tunnel were obtained by solving the equations of seismic wave propagation in an elastic half space. Based on the assumption of a large circular arc, a series of solutions for dynamic stress were deduced by using a wave function expansion approach for a circular lining tunnel in an elastic half space rock medium subjected to incident plane P waves. Then, the dynamic response of the circular lining tunnel was obtained by solving a series of algebraic equations after imposing its boundary conditions for displacement and stress of the circular lining tunnel. The effects of different factors on circular lining rock tunnels, including incident frequency, incident angle, buried depth, rock conditions, and lining stiffness, were derived and several application examples are presented. The results may provide a good reference for studies on the dynamic response and aseismic design of tunnels and underground structures.

  13. Analysis of the dynamic response of pump-turbine impellers. Influence of the rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egusquiza, Eduard; Valero, Carme; Presas, Alex; Huang, Xingxing; Guardo, Alfredo; Seidel, Ulrich

    2016-02-01

    This paper deals with the dynamic response of pump-turbine impellers. A pump-turbine impeller is a complex structure attached to a rotor and rotating inside a casing full of water with very small clearances between the rotating and the stationary parts. The dynamic response of this type of structures is very complex and it is very much affected by the connection to the rotor as well as by the added mass and boundary conditions. As a consequence its calculation presents several uncertainties. First, the dynamic response of pump-turbine impellers is introduced. Second an experimental investigation in a real impeller attached to the rotor and inside the machine was carried out. For this investigation, the impeller of an existing pump-turbine unit with an installed power of 110 MW and a diameter of 2.87 m was studied. For a better analysis of the experimental results a numerical model using FEM was also built-up. Frequencies and mode-shapes were identified numerically and experimentally and the characteristics of the structural response analyzed. To determine the influence of the rotor and supporting structures on the impeller response the results were compared with the ones obtained with the same impeller but suspended (non-connected to the rotor). Experimental and numerical simulation were also used for this case. The changes in the dynamic response due to the rotor connection were determined. Finally the results obtained are compared with the results from other pump-turbine impellers of different designs and general conclusions about the dynamics of this type of structures are given.

  14. The response of a simple welded structure under dynamic loading conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullis, I.; Chapman, D.; Critchley, R.; Penny, N.; Proud, W.; Kulka, R.; Reynolds, M.

    2006-08-01

    The ability of simple structures to absorb impact energy has a number of applications particularly in mitigation systems. This paper describes integrated modelling and experimental work to characterise the impact response of simple aluminium spheres when empty and filled with water. The experimental work identified the deformation modes and their relationship to impact velocity over a range of velocities up to 200 m.s-1 and included studies of the impact of a single sphere against a rigid surface and the impact of a sphere on another sphere. The numerical modelling showed the importance of friction between the sphere and the impacting surfaces and the weld in controlling the deformation and failure modes. The weld controlled the onset and development of failure. The validation of the modelling studies in predicting the deformation response of the spheres allowed the construction of an iso-damage relationship to predict their response over a wide range of impact conditions. The inclusion of the water as a fill material provided a scaled impact vehicle to study hydraulic ram and the response of a range of fluid filled containers. This has particular relevance to pressure vessels containing volatile explosive liquids and gases.

  15. A Prediction of Response of the Head and Neck of the U.S. Adult Military Population to Dynamic Impact Acceleration from Selected Dynamic Test Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-05-01

    It noceeawy and )Aettfi O haack mombe) Dynamic Response of Head and Neck Physical Characteristics of Head and NecK Mathematical Model Simulationj...response of these volunteers to -Gx sled acca’eratioa at 6 and 15 G’s. Procedures used for comuting the various prameter vilues w-4 coeprisons between...may be used with . mathematical modeling techniques in order to extend and project the NAMRL dynamic response results to the general adult U.S

  16. Dynamic Response of Dam-Reservoir Systems: Review and a Semi-Analytical Proposal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Marcelo Vieira Ribeiro

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper presents a review of current techniques employed for dynamic analysis of concrete gravity dams under seismic action. Traditional procedures applied in design bureaus, such as the Pseudo-Static method, often neglect structural dynamic properties, as well as ground amplification effects. A practical alternative arises with the Pseudo-Dynamic method, which considers a simplified spectrum response in the fundamental mode. The authors propose a self-contained development and detailed examples of this latter method, including a comparison with finite element models using transient response of fluid-structure systems. It is verified that application of the traditional procedure should be done carefully and limited to extremely rigid dams. On the other hand, the proposed development is straightforward and in agreement with finite element results for general cases where dam flexibility plays an important role.

  17. Quantifying heterogeneity and dynamics of clonal fitness in response to perturbation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frick, Peter L; Paudel, Bishal B; Tyson, Darren R; Quaranta, Vito

    2015-07-01

    The dynamics of heterogeneous clonal lineages within a cell population, in aggregate, shape both normal and pathological biological processes. Studies of clonality typically relate the fitness of clones to their relative abundance, thus requiring long-term experiments and limiting conclusions about the heterogeneity of clonal fitness in response to perturbation. We present, for the first time, a method that enables a dynamic, global picture of clonal fitness within a mammalian cell population. This novel assay allows facile comparison of the structure of clonal fitness in a cell population across many perturbations. By utilizing high-throughput imaging, our methodology provides ample statistical power to define clonal fitness dynamically and to visualize the structure of perturbation-induced clonal fitness within a cell population. We envision that this technique will be a powerful tool to investigate heterogeneity in biological processes involving cell proliferation, including development and drug response. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Application backwards characteristics analysis method to dynamic response of metals under high pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Hao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic yield strength of metals/alloys depends on loading pressure and rates sensitively. With the development of laser interferometer measurement system, extracting strength information from window/free surface velocity profiles in shock and ramp loading experiments is becoming an important method to investigate materials’ dynamic response under high pressure and high strain rates. Backwards characteristics analysis method (BCAM can analyze the velocity profiles more reasonable because it accounts for bending of the incoming characteristics due to impedance mismatch between the sample and window. Synthetic analyses of reverse impact experiment and graded-density impactor loading-releasing experiment suggest that BCAM can give more accurate results including sound speed-particle velocity and yield strength at high pressure than incremental impedance matching method. We use BCAM to analyze velocity profiles of Sn in shock-release experiments and obtain its shear modulus and yield strength at different shock pressure and investigate its phase transition and dynamic unloading response.

  19. Dynamic response of reinforced concrete building from the effects of rail transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demjan Ivo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A 3D model of a reinforced concrete building and was created in software ANSYS. The dynamic analysis was focused on the spectral response of the object represented by a random excitation experiment found in records in the form of load spectra

  20. Flexibility dynamics in clusters of residential demand response and distributed generation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MacDougall, P.A.; Kok, J.K.; Warmer, C.; Roossien, B.

    2013-01-01

    Supply and demand response is a untapped resource in the current electrical system. However little work has been done to investigate the dynamics of utilizing such flexibility as well as the potential effects it could have on the infrastructure. This paper provides a starting point to seeing the

  1. Climate Change, Glacier Response, and Vegetation Dynamics in the Himalaya: Contributions Toward Future Earth Initiatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Shea

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Reviewed: Climate Change, Glacier Response, and Vegetation Dynamics in the Himalaya: Contributions Toward Future Earth Initiatives. Edited by R. B. Singh, Udo Schickhoff, and Suraj Mal. Cham, Switzerland: Springer, 2016. xvi + 399 pp. Hardcover: US$ 179.00, ISBN 978-3-319-28975-5. E-book: US$ 139.00, ISBN 978-3-319-28977-9.

  2. Coordinated approaches to quantify long-term ecosystem dynamics in response to global change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiqi Luo; Jerry Melillo; Shuli Niu; Claus Beier; James S. Clark; Aime E.T. Classen; Eric Dividson; Jeffrey S. Dukes; R. Dave Evans; Christopher B. Field; Claudia I. Czimczik; Michael Keller; Bruce A. Kimball; Lara M. Kueppers; Richard J. Norby; Shannon L. Pelini; Elise Pendall; Edward Rastetter; Johan Six; Melinda Smith; Mark G. Tjoelker; Margaret S. Torn

    2011-01-01

    Many serious ecosystem consequences of climate change will take decades or even centuries to emerge. Long-term ecological responses to global change are strongly regulated by slow processes, such as changes in species composition, carbon dynamics in soil and by long-lived plants, and accumulation of nutrient capitals. Understanding and predicting these processes...

  3. Artificial Neural Network-Based Early-Age Concrete Strength Monitoring Using Dynamic Response Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Junkyeong; Lee, Chaggil; Park, Seunghee

    2017-06-07

    Concrete is one of the most common materials used to construct a variety of civil infrastructures. However, since concrete might be susceptible to brittle fracture, it is essential to confirm the strength of concrete at the early-age stage of the curing process to prevent unexpected collapse. To address this issue, this study proposes a novel method to estimate the early-age strength of concrete, by integrating an artificial neural network algorithm with a dynamic response measurement of the concrete material. The dynamic response signals of the concrete, including both electromechanical impedances and guided ultrasonic waves, are obtained from an embedded piezoelectric sensor module. The cross-correlation coefficient of the electromechanical impedance signals and the amplitude of the guided ultrasonic wave signals are selected to quantify the variation in dynamic responses according to the strength of the concrete. Furthermore, an artificial neural network algorithm is used to verify a relationship between the variation in dynamic response signals and concrete strength. The results of an experimental study confirm that the proposed approach can be effectively applied to estimate the strength of concrete material from the early-age stage of the curing process.

  4. Coordinated approaches to quantify long-term ecosystem dynamics in response to global change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Y.; Melillo, J.; Niu, S.

    2011-01-01

    Many serious ecosystem consequences of climate change will take decades or even centuries to emerge. Long-term ecological responses to global change are strongly regulated by slow processes, such as changes in species composition, carbon dynamics in soil and by long-lived plants, and accumulation...

  5. Roll- and pitch-plane-coupled hydro-pneumatic suspension. Part 2: dynamic response analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Dongpu; Rakheja, Subhash; Su, Chun-Yi

    2010-04-01

    In the first part of this study, the potential performance benefits of fluidically coupled passive suspensions were demonstrated through analyses of suspension properties, design flexibility and feasibility. In this second part of the study, the dynamic responses of a vehicle equipped with different configurations of fluidically coupled hydro-pneumatic suspension systems are investigated for more comprehensive assessments of the coupled suspension concepts. A generalised 14 degree-of-freedom nonlinear vehicle model is developed and validated to evaluate vehicle ride and handling dynamic responses and suspension anti-roll and anti-pitch characteristics under various road excitations and steering/braking manoeuvres. The dynamic responses of the vehicle model with the coupled suspension are compared with those of the unconnected suspensions to demonstrate the performance potential of the fluidic couplings. The dynamic responses together with the suspension properties suggest that the full-vehicle-coupled hydro-pneumatic suspension could offer considerable potential in realising enhanced ride and handling performance, as well as improved anti-roll and anti-pitch properties in a very flexible and energy-saving manner.

  6. Dynamic Response of Offshore Wind Turbines subjected to Joint Wave and Wind Loads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Weiliang; Chen, Jianbing; Liu, Wenfeng

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates the dynamic response of offshore wind turbine systems subjected joint wind and wave loads. Relying on the finite element model, Kane’s equation is adopted to consider the rotation of blades. Besides, the generator-torque control and blade-pitch control are taken into consi...

  7. Modeling of the Electro-Mechanical Response of Carbon Nanotubes: Molecular Dynamics and Transport Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svizhenko, Alexel; Anantram, M. P.; Maiti, Amitesh

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs on the modeling of the electromechanical response of carbon nanotubes, utilizing molecular dynamics and transport calculations. The topics include: 1) Simulations of the experiment; 2) Effect of diameter, length and temperature; and 3) Study of sp3 coordination-"The Table experiment".

  8. Exact solutions for dynamic response of a periodic spring and mass structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Q.; Wu, F.; Zhang, H. W.; Zhong, W. X.; Howson, W. P.; Williams, F. W.

    2012-02-01

    This paper derives exact analytical solutions for the dynamic response of a periodic structure for which the unit cell consists of one mass and one spring. The solutions cover arbitrary initial conditions and both polynomial and harmonic external forces. They involve Bessel, Lommel, Weber and hypergeometric functions.

  9. Dynamic response of East Asian Greater White-fronted Geese to changes of environment during migration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Xueyan; Si, Yali; Ji, Luyan; Gong, Peng

    2017-01-01

    Understanding how migratory species select habitats is essential for applied ecology and biological conservation. Although migratory species move across a wide range of environments during migration, their dynamic response to environments has rarely been considered. Taking advantage of the fine

  10. School Crisis Management: A Model of Dynamic Responsiveness to Crisis Life Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Yi-Hwa

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to analyze a school's crisis management and explore emerging aspects of its response to a school crisis. Traditional linear modes of analysis often fail to address complex crisis situations. The present study applied a dynamic crisis life cycle model that draws on chaos and complexity theory to a crisis management case,…

  11. Forced response of shrouded blades with a coupled static/dynamic approach

    OpenAIRE

    Zucca, Stefano; Gulisano, Andrea; Firrone, Christian Maria

    2011-01-01

    A coupled static-dynamic method is proposed and applied to bladed disks with shrouds, in order to calculate the nonlinear forced response in presence of friction damping in the frequency domain. The novel approach allows to improve the already existing methods, which require a preliminary static analysis

  12. Resting hormone level response to a 16-week dynamic and static ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of the study was to evaluate hormonal responses of serum cortisol, growth hormone (GH), testesterone and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) levels during dynamic and static stress exercises in 20 male volunteer student athletes. The serum fasting hormonal levels of the participants were measured after six weeks ...

  13. Demographic response of a shrubland bird to habitat creation, succession, and disturbance in a dynamic landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael E. Akresh; David I. King; Robert T. Brooks

    2015-01-01

    Shrubland birds have experienced widespread declines in the eastern United States. Habitat for shrubland birds is typically dynamic, in which available habitat changes temporally and spatially in response to disturbance and succession. Despite widespread concerns among conservationists about shrubland birds, much is still poorly understood regarding fundamental...

  14. On the importance of excited state dynamic response electron correlation in polarizable embedding methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Janus J.; Sauer, Stephan P. A.; Mikkelsen, Kurt Valentin

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the effect of including a dynamic reaction field at the lowest possible ab inito wave function level of theory, namely the Hartree-Fock (HF) Self-Consistent Field (SCF) level within the Polarizable Embedding (PE) formalism. We formulate HF based PE within the linear response theory...

  15. Complex responses of spring alpine vegetation phenology to snow cover dynamics over the Tibetan Plateau, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Siyuan; Wang, Xiaoyue; Chen, Guangsheng; Yang, Qichun; Wang, Bin; Ma, Yuanxu; Shen, Ming

    2017-09-01

    Snow cover dynamics are considered to play a key role on spring phenological shifts in the high-latitude, so investigating responses of spring phenology to snow cover dynamics is becoming an increasingly important way to identify and predict global ecosystem dynamics. In this study, we quantified the temporal trends and spatial variations of spring phenology and snow cover across the Tibetan Plateau by calibrating and analyzing time series of the NOAA AVHRR-derived normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) during 1983-2012. We also examined how snow cover dynamics affect the spatio-temporal pattern of spring alpine vegetation phenology over the plateau. Our results indicated that 52.21% of the plateau experienced a significant advancing trend in the beginning of vegetation growing season (BGS) and 34.30% exhibited a delaying trend. Accordingly, the snow cover duration days (SCD) and snow cover melt date (SCM) showed similar patterns with a decreasing trend in the west and an increasing trend in the southeast, but the start date of snow cover (SCS) showed an opposite pattern. Meanwhile, the spatial patterns of the BGS, SCD, SCS and SCM varied in accordance with the gradients of temperature, precipitation and topography across the plateau. The response relationship of spring phenology to snow cover dynamics varied within different climate, terrain and alpine plant community zones, and the spatio-temporal response patterns were primarily controlled by the long-term local heat-water conditions and topographic conditions. Moreover, temperature and precipitation played a profound impact on diverse responses of spring phenology to snow cover dynamics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. GOLD PRESSURE VESSEL SEAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A.E.

    1963-11-26

    An improved seal between the piston and die member of a piston-cylinder type pressure vessel is presented. A layer of gold, of sufficient thickness to provide an interference fit between the piston and die member, is plated on the contacting surface of at least one of the members. (AEC)

  17. Network of endocardial vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byung-Cheon; Kim, Hong Bae; Sung, Baeckkyoung; Kim, Ki Woo; Sohn, Jamin; Son, Boram; Chang, Byung-Joon; Soh, Kwang-Sup

    2011-01-01

    Although there have been reports on threadlike structures inside the heart, they have received little attention. We aimed to develop a method for observing such structures and to reveal their ultrastructures. An in situ staining method, which uses a series of procedures of 0.2-0.4% trypan blue spraying and washing, was applied to observe threadlike structures on the surfaces of endocardia. The threadlike structures were isolated and observed by using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Networks of endocardial vessels (20 μm in thickness) with expansions (40-100 μm in diameter) were visualized; they were movable on the endocardium of the bovine atrium and ventricle. CLSM showed that (1) rod-shaped nuclei were aligned along the longitudinal direction of the endocardial vessel and (2) there were many cells inside the expansion. TEM on the endocardial vessel revealed that (1) there existed multiple lumens (1-7 μm in diameter) and (2) the extracellular matrices mostly consisted of collagen fibers, which were aligned along the longitudinal direction of the endocardial vessel or were locally organized in reticular structures. We investigated the endocardial circulatory system in bovine cardiac chambers and its ultrastructures, such as nucleic distributions, microlumens, and collagenous extracellular matrices. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Pressurized Vessel Slurry Pumping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pound, C.R.

    2001-09-17

    This report summarizes testing of an alternate ''pressurized vessel slurry pumping'' apparatus. The principle is similar to rural domestic water systems and ''acid eggs'' used in chemical laboratories in that material is extruded by displacement with compressed air.

  19. Seismic characterization and dynamic site response of a municipal solid waste landfill in Bangalore, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anbazhagan, P; SivakumarBabu, G L; Lakshmikanthan, P; VivekAnand, K S

    2016-03-01

    Seismic design of landfills requires an understanding of the dynamic properties of municipal solid waste (MSW) and the dynamic site response of landfill waste during seismic events. The dynamic response of the Mavallipura landfill situated in Bangalore, India, is investigated using field measurements, laboratory studies and recorded ground motions from the intraplate region. The dynamic shear modulus values for the MSW were established on the basis of field measurements of shear wave velocities. Cyclic triaxial testing was performed on reconstituted MSW samples and the shear modulus reduction and damping characteristics of MSW were studied. Ten ground motions were selected based on regional seismicity and site response parameters have been obtained considering one-dimensional non-linear analysis in the DEEPSOIL program. The surface spectral response varied from 0.6 to 2 g and persisted only for a period of 1 s for most of the ground motions. The maximum peak ground acceleration (PGA) obtained was 0.5 g and the minimum and maximum amplifications are 1.35 and 4.05. Amplification of the base acceleration was observed at the top surface of the landfill underlined by a composite soil layer and bedrock for all ground motions. Dynamic seismic properties with amplification and site response parameters for MSW landfill in Bangalore, India, are presented in this paper. This study shows that MSW has less shear stiffness and more amplification due to loose filling and damping, which need to be accounted for seismic design of MSW landfills in India. © The Author(s) 2016.

  20. Design and testing of magnetorheological valve with fast force response time and great dynamic force range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubík, M.; Macháček, O.; Strecker, Z.; Roupec, J.; Mazůrek, I.

    2017-04-01

    The paper deals with design, simulation and experimental testing of a magnetorheological (MR) valve with short response time. The short response time is achieved by a suitable design of an active zone in combination with use of a ferrite material for magnetic circuit. The magneto-static model and the simplified hydraulic model of the MR valve are examined and experimentally verified. The development the MR valve achieves an average response time 4.1 ms and the maximum dynamic force range of eight.

  1. Spike-train variability of auditory neurons in vivo: dynamic responses follow predictions from constant stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaette, Roland; Gollisch, Tim; Herz, Andreas V M

    2005-06-01

    Reliable accounts of the variability observed in neural spike trains are a prerequisite for the proper interpretation of neural dynamics and coding principles. Models that accurately describe neural variability over a wide range of stimulation and response patterns are therefore highly desirable, especially if they can explain this variability in terms of basic neural observables and parameters such as firing rate and refractory period. In this work, we analyze the response variability recorded in vivo from locust auditory receptor neurons under acoustic stimulation. In agreement with results from other systems, our data suggest that neural refractoriness has a strong influence on spike-train variability. We therefore explore a stochastic model of spike generation that includes refractoriness through a recovery function. Because our experimental data are consistent with a renewal process, the recovery function can be derived from a single interspike-interval histogram obtained under constant stimulation. The resulting description yields quantitatively accurate predictions of the response variability over the whole range of firing rates for constant-intensity as well as amplitude-modulated sound stimuli. Model parameters obtained from constant stimulation can be used to predict the variability in response to dynamic stimuli. These results demonstrate that key ingredients of the stochastic response dynamics of a sensory neuron are faithfully captured by a simple stochastic model framework.

  2. Stability of Mixed-Strategy-Based Iterative Logit Quantal Response Dynamics in Game Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Qian; Di, Zengru; Wu, Jinshan

    2014-01-01

    Using the Logit quantal response form as the response function in each step, the original definition of static quantal response equilibrium (QRE) is extended into an iterative evolution process. QREs remain as the fixed points of the dynamic process. However, depending on whether such fixed points are the long-term solutions of the dynamic process, they can be classified into stable (SQREs) and unstable (USQREs) equilibriums. This extension resembles the extension from static Nash equilibriums (NEs) to evolutionary stable solutions in the framework of evolutionary game theory. The relation between SQREs and other solution concepts of games, including NEs and QREs, is discussed. Using experimental data from other published papers, we perform a preliminary comparison between SQREs, NEs, QREs and the observed behavioral outcomes of those experiments. For certain games, we determine that SQREs have better predictive power than QREs and NEs. PMID:25157502

  3. Stability of mixed-strategy-based iterative logit quantal response dynamics in game theory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Zhuang

    Full Text Available Using the Logit quantal response form as the response function in each step, the original definition of static quantal response equilibrium (QRE is extended into an iterative evolution process. QREs remain as the fixed points of the dynamic process. However, depending on whether such fixed points are the long-term solutions of the dynamic process, they can be classified into stable (SQREs and unstable (USQREs equilibriums. This extension resembles the extension from static Nash equilibriums (NEs to evolutionary stable solutions in the framework of evolutionary game theory. The relation between SQREs and other solution concepts of games, including NEs and QREs, is discussed. Using experimental data from other published papers, we perform a preliminary comparison between SQREs, NEs, QREs and the observed behavioral outcomes of those experiments. For certain games, we determine that SQREs have better predictive power than QREs and NEs.

  4. Dynamic response of arch bridges traversed by high-speed trains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacarbonara, Walter; Colone, Valerio

    2007-07-01

    A mechanical model describing the planar elasto-dynamics of arch bridges with general arch profiles is presented. The model is amenable to analytical or semi-analytical treatments and is effective for parametric studies, design of control systems or structural optimizations. The Ritz's energy approach is employed to calculate the solutions of the vibration eigenvalue problem—natural frequencies and mode shapes—and the forced responses to external excitations, namely those induced by the passage of trains. A closed-form solution of the bridge dynamic response to the transit of trains with arbitrary load distributions and running speeds is found and the train-induced resonances are accordingly discussed. In particular, three European high-speed trains—the French TGV, the Italian ETR 500, and the German ICE—traversing a lower-deck steel arch bridge are considered and the ensuing responses are investigated.

  5. Modelling and Dynamic Response of Steel Reticulated Shell under Blast Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ximei Zhai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Explicit finite element programme LS-DYNA was used to simulate a long-span steel reticulated shell under blast loading to investigate the structural dynamic responses in this paper. The elaborate finite element model of the Kiewitt-8 single-layer reticulated shell with span of 40 m subjected to central blast loading was established and all the process from the detonation of the explosive charge to the demolition, including the propagation of the blast wave and its interaction with structure was reproduced. The peak overpressure from the numerical analysis was compared with empirical formulas to verify the credibility and applicability of numerical simulation for blast loading. The dynamic responses of the structure under blast loading with different TNT equivalent weights of explosive and rise-span ratios were obtained. In addition, the response types of Kiewitt-8 single-layer reticulated shell subjected to central explosive blast loading were defined.

  6. Artificial Neural Networks for Nonlinear Dynamic Response Simulation in Mechanical Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Niels Hørbye; Høgsberg, Jan Becker; Winther, Ole

    2011-01-01

    It is shown how artificial neural networks can be trained to predict dynamic response of a simple nonlinear structure. Data generated using a nonlinear finite element model of a simplified wind turbine is used to train a one layer artificial neural network. When trained properly the network is ab...... to perform accurate response prediction much faster than the corresponding finite element model. Initial result indicate a reduction in cpu time by two orders of magnitude.......It is shown how artificial neural networks can be trained to predict dynamic response of a simple nonlinear structure. Data generated using a nonlinear finite element model of a simplified wind turbine is used to train a one layer artificial neural network. When trained properly the network is able...

  7. Static and dynamic fracture toughness of 25mm thick single edge notch bend (SENB) specimen of C-Mn pressure vessel submerged arc weld metal and flaw assessment under dynamic loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, W.; Wiesner, C. S.

    2003-09-01

    Although there are well established procedures for assessing the significance of defects in welded structures in a number of countries, such as BS7910 and R6 procedures in the UK, the Japanese WES 2807 procedure, the API and MPC procedures in the USA and the recently completed SINT AP procedure resulting from European collaboration, there are no clear guidelines for assessment of the effects of dynamic loading. In principle, the standard procedure can be applied for any rate of loading but there is little or no experience of how to allow for the effects of dynamic loading on load magnitude and material properties. Submerge arc weldments of 100mm thick have been manufactured. The effect of loading rate was investigated by testing 25mm thick SENB specimens. The fracture toughness of the weld metal exhibited marked loading rate sensitivity; shift in fracture toughness transition temperature for high loading rate tests of up to 115^{circ}C for 25mm specimens. Finite element (FE) analyses have been carried out to obtain plastic collapse load solutions for SENB fracture mechanics test piece. A simple equation for estimate of dynamic plastic yielding load has been suggested. Flaw assessment under dynamic loading has been demonstrated using the results of dynamic fracture toughness and plastic yiending load. The general methods of assessment of the significance of defects in BS7910 is shown to be applicable to assessments under dynamic loading up to impact.

  8. Conceptual Design Optimization of an Augmented Stability Aircraft Incorporating Dynamic Response and Actuator Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welstead, Jason; Crouse, Gilbert L., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    Empirical sizing guidelines such as tail volume coefficients have long been used in the early aircraft design phases for sizing stabilizers, resulting in conservatively stable aircraft. While successful, this results in increased empty weight, reduced performance, and greater procurement and operational cost relative to an aircraft with optimally sized surfaces. Including flight dynamics in the conceptual design process allows the design to move away from empirical methods while implementing modern control techniques. A challenge of flight dynamics and control is the numerous design variables, which are changing fluidly throughout the conceptual design process, required to evaluate the system response to some disturbance. This research focuses on addressing that challenge not by implementing higher order tools, such as computational fluid dynamics, but instead by linking the lower order tools typically used within the conceptual design process so each discipline feeds into the other. In thisresearch, flight dynamics and control was incorporated into the conceptual design process along with the traditional disciplines of vehicle sizing, weight estimation, aerodynamics, and performance. For the controller, a linear quadratic regulator structure with constant gains has been specified to reduce the user input. Coupling all the disciplines in the conceptual design phase allows the aircraft designer to explore larger design spaces where stabilizers are sized according to dynamic response constraints rather than historical static margin and volume coefficient guidelines.

  9. Boosted learned kernels for data-driven vesselness measure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisan, E.

    2017-03-01

    Common vessel centerline extraction methods rely on the computation of a measure providing the likeness of the local appearance of the data to a curvilinear tube-like structure. The most popular techniques rely on empirically designed (hand crafted) measurements as the widely used Hessian vesselness, the recent oriented flux tubeness or filters (e.g. the Gaussian matched filter) that are developed to respond to local features, without exploiting any context information nor the rich structural information embedded in the data. At variance with the previously proposed methods, we propose a completely data-driven approach for learning a vesselness measure from expert-annotated dataset. For each data point (voxel or pixel), we extract the intensity values in a neighborhood region, and estimate the discriminative convolutional kernel yielding a positive response for vessel data and negative response for non-vessel data. The process is iterated within a boosting framework, providing a set of linear filters, whose combined response is the learned vesselness measure. We show the results of the general-use proposed method on the DRIVE retinal images dataset, comparing its performance against the hessian-based vesselness, oriented flux antisymmetry tubeness, and vesselness learned with a probabilistic boosting tree or with a regression tree. We demonstrate the superiority of our approach that yields a vessel detection accuracy of 0.95, with respect to 0.92 (hessian), 0.90 (oriented flux) and 0.85 (boosting tree).

  10. An Influence of Gas Explosions on Dynamic Responses of a Single Degree of Freedom Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki-Yeob Kang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Explosion risk analysis (ERA is widely used to derive the dimensioning of accidental loads for design purposes. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD simulations contribute a key part of an ERA and predict possible blast consequences in a hazardous area. Explosion pressures can vary based on the model geometry, the explosion intensity, and explosion scenarios. Dynamic responses of structures under these explosion loads are dependent on a blast wave profile with respect to the magnitude of pressure, duration, and impulse in both positive and negative phases. Understanding the relationship between explosion load profiles and dynamic responses of the target area is important to mitigate the risk of explosion and perform structural design optimization. In the present study, the results of more than 3,000 CFD simulations were considered, and 1.6 million output files were analyzed using a visual basic for applications (VBA tool developed to characterize representative loading shapes. Dynamic response of a structure was investigated in both time and frequency domains using the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT algorithm. In addition, the effects of the residual wave and loading velocity were studied in this paper.

  11. Long-term successional forest dynamics: species and community responses to climatic variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kardol, Paul [ORNL; Todd Jr, Donald E [ORNL; Hanson, Paul J [ORNL; Mulholland, Patrick J [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    Question: Are tree dynamics sensitive to climatic variability, and do tree species differ in their responses to climatic variability? Hence, is vulnerability of forest communities to climatic variability depending on stand composition? Location: Mixed young forest at Walker Branch Watershed near Oak Ridge, East-Tennessee, USA. Methods: Using a long-term data set (1967-2006), we analyzed temporal forest dynamics at the tree and species level, and we analyzed community dynamics for forest stands that different in their initial species composition (i.e., Chestnut Oak, Oak-Hickory, Pine, and Yellow poplar stands). Using summer drought and growing season temperature as defined climate drivers, we evaluated relationships between forest dynamics and climate across levels of organization. Results: Over the 4-decade studied period, forest communities underwent successional change and substantially increased their biomass. Variation in summer drought and growing season temperature contributed to temporal biomass dynamics for some tree species, but not for others. Stand-level responses to climatic variability were shown to be related to responses of specific component species; however, not for Pine stands. Pinus echinata, the dominant species in stands initially identified as Pine stands, decreased over time due to periodical outbreaks of the pine bark beetle (Dendroctonus frontalis). The outbreaks on Walker Branch could not be directly related to climatic conditions. Conclusions: Our results imply that vulnerability of developing forests to predicted climate conditions is stand-type dependent, and hence, is a function of species composition. Autogenic successional processes (or insect outbreaks) were found to prevail over climatic variability in determining long-term forest dynamics for stands dominated by sensitive species, emphasizing the importance of studying interactions between forest succession and climate change.

  12. Pull-in Phenomena and Dynamic Response of a Capacitive Nano-beam Switch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farid Vakili-Tahami

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper static and dynamic responses of a nano-beam subjected to the electrostatic force have been studied. For this purpose, the governing nonlinear equations for static and dynamic behavior of a nano-beam have been obtained. Due to the nonlinearity of electrostatic, van der Waals (vdW and Casimir forces, the governing differential equation for static analysis has been linearized using step by step linearization method (SSLM and the developed linearized equation has been discretized using Galerkin weighted residual method. Dynamic responses have also been studied using linearized form of the Galerkin based reduced order model. In this model, nonlinear force terms have been taken into account using an iteration procedure. Using this model, dynamic response of a nano-switch to a stepwise DC voltage excitation at the presence of Casimir and vdW forces has also been studied. The results show that the Casimir force for some orders of geometric properties has more effect on the static pull-in voltage than the vdW force; and therefore the effect of the vdW force, in some cases can be ignored. The results also show that un-damped dynamic pull-in voltage at the presence of Casimir and vdW forces is 89 % of the static pull-in voltage, whereas, this ratio rises to 90.8 % when the effect of these forces has been ignored. By considering damping effects, pull-in voltage increases up to a definite value of DC voltage. At this level, the nano beam tends to be critically damped and the dynamic pull-in voltage approaches the static pull-in voltage limit.

  13. The dynamic pressure response to rapid dilatation of the resting urethra in healthy women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagi, P; Thind, P; Colstrup, H

    1993-01-01

    The urethral pressure response to a sudden forced dilatation was studied at the bladder neck, in the high-pressure zone and in the distal urethra in ten healthy female volunteers. The pressure response was fitted with a double exponential function of the form Pt = Pequ + P alpha e-t/tau alpha + P...... tissues were computed. The results showed significant differences along the urethra, with the high-pressure zone showing the highest maximum and equilibrium pressures, fastest pressure decay and highest elastic coefficient. The pressure response represents an integrated stress response from...... a detailed assessment of static and dynamic urethral responses to dilatation which can be applied as an experimental simulation of urine ingression, and is therefore presumed to be of value in the evaluation of normal and pathological urethral sphincter function....

  14. Piping benchmark problems. Volume 1. Dynamic analysis uniform support motion response spectrum method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezler, P.; Hartzman, M.; Reich, M.

    1980-08-01

    A set of benchmark problems and solutions have been developed for verifying the adequacy of computer programs used for dynamic analysis and design of nuclear piping systems by the Response Spectrum Method. The problems range from simple to complex configurations which are assumed to experience linear elastic behavior. The dynamic loading is represented by uniform support motion, assumed to be induced by seismic excitation in three spatial directions. The solutions consist of frequencies, participation factors, nodal displacement components and internal force and moment components. Solutions to associated anchor point motion static problems are not included.

  15. Dynamic response and control of a jet-transport aircraft encountering a single-axis vortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilman, Darin R.

    1993-01-01

    The dynamic responses of a jet-transport aircraft to two types of single-axis wind vortex encounters are studied. Aircraft attitude, flight path angle, and aerodynamic angle excursions are analyzed and dominating dynamic forcing effects are identified for each encounter. A simple departure-preventing LQR controller is designed to demonstrate the benefits of using automatic control to reduce the wind vortex hazard. A Proportional-Integral-Filter controller structure successfully regulates the critical parameters, roll angle, phi, and sideslip angle, beta, for the two different vortex encounters considered in this study.

  16. A Dynamic Stackelberg Game of Supply Chain for a Corporate Social Responsibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano Ferrara

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we establish a dynamic game to allocate CSR (Corporate Social Responsibility to the members of a supply chain. We propose a model of a supply chain in a decentralized state which includes a supplier and a manufacturer. For analyzing supply chain performance in decentralized state and the relationships between the members of the supply chain, we formulate a model that crosses through multiperiods with the help of a dynamic discrete Stackelberg game which is made under two different information structures. We obtain an equilibrium point at which both the profits of members and the level of CSR taken up by supply chains are maximized.

  17. Dynamic laser speckle to detect motile bacterial response of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sendra, H [Laboratorio de Laser. Facultad de Ingenieria. Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Juan B. Justo 4302. (7600) Mar del Plata (Argentina); Murialdo, S [Grupo de Ingenieria BioquImica. Departamento de Quimica. Facultad de Ingenieria. Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Juan B. Justo 4302. (7600) Mar del Plata (Argentina); Passoni, L [Laboratorio de BioingenierIa. Facultad de Ingenieria. Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Juan B. Justo 4302. (7600) Mar del Plata (Argentina)

    2007-11-15

    This proposal deals with the technique for detection of motile response of Pseudomonas aeruginosa using dynamic laser speckle or biospeckle as an alternative method. The study of bacterial displacement plays an essential role in biocatalysts processes and biodegradation. Hence, some biodegrading enzymes are benign catalytic that could be used for the production of industrially useful compounds as well as in wastewater treatments. This work presents an experimental set up and a computational process using frame sequences of dynamic laser speckle as a novel application. The objective was the detection of different levels of motility in bacteria. The encouraging results were achieved through a direct and non invasive observation method of the phenomenon.

  18. Parametric Study on Dynamic Response of Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composite Bridges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woraphot Prachasaree

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Because of high strength and stiffness to low self-weight ratio and ease of field installation, fiber reinforced polymer (FRP composite materials are gaining popularity as the materials of choice to replace deteriorated concrete bridge decks. FRP bridge deck systems with lower damping compared to conventional bridge decks can lead to higher amplitudes of vibration causing dynamically active bridge deck leading serviceability problems. The FRP bridge models with different bridge configurations and loading patterns were simulated using finite element method. The dynamic response results under varying FRP deck system parameters were discussed and compared with standard specifications of bridge deck designs under dynamic loads. In addition, the dynamic load allowance equation as a function of natural frequency, span length, and vehicle speed was proposed in this study. The proposed dynamic load allowance related to the first flexural frequency was presented herein. The upper and lower bounds’ limits were established to provide design guidance in selecting suitable dynamic load allowance for FRP bridge systems.

  19. Development of an analysis for the determination of coupled helicopter rotor/control system dynamic response. Part 2: Program listing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, L. R.

    1975-01-01

    A theoretical analysis is developed for a coupled helicopter rotor system to allow determination of the loads and dynamic response behavior of helicopter rotor systems in both steady-state forward flight and maneuvers. The effects of an anisotropically supported swashplate or gyroscope control system and a deformed free wake on the rotor system dynamic response behavior are included.

  20. Ex-vivo dynamic 3-D culture of human tissues in the RCCS™ bioreactor allows the study of Multiple Myeloma biology and response to therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrarini, Marina; Steimberg, Nathalie; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Belloni, Daniela; Berenzi, Angiola; Girlanda, Stefania; Caligaris-Cappio, Federico; Mazzoleni, Giovanna; Ferrero, Elisabetta

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) culture models are emerging as invaluable tools in tumor biology, since they reproduce tissue-specific structural features and cell-cell interactions more accurately than conventional 2-D cultures. Multiple Myeloma, which depends on myeloma cell-Bone Marrow microenvironment interactions for development and response to drugs, may particularly benefit from such an approach. An innovative 3-D dynamic culture model based on the use of the RCCS™ Bioreactor was developed to allow long-term culture of myeloma tissue explants. This model was first validated with normal and pathological explants, then applied to tissues from myeloma patients. In all cases, histological examination demonstrated maintenance of viable myeloma cells inside their native microenvironment, with an overall well preserved histo-architecture including bone lamellae and vessels. This system was then successfully applied to evaluate the cytotoxic effects exerted by the proteasome inhibitor Bortezomib not only on myeloma cells but also on angiogenic vessels. Moreover, as surrogate markers of specialized functions expressed by myeloma cells and microenvironment, β2 microglobulin, VEGF and Angiopoietin-2 levels, as well as Matrix Metalloproteases activity, were evaluated in supernatants from 3D cultures and their levels reflected the effects of Bortezomib treatment. Notably, determination of β2 microglobulin levels in supernatants from Bortezomib-treated samples and in patients'sera following Bortezomib-based therapies disclosed an overall concordance in the response to the drug ex vivo and in vivo. Our findings indicate, as a proof of principle, that 3-D, RCCS™ bioreactor-based culture of tissue explants can be exploited for studying myeloma biology and for a pre-clinical approach to patient-targeted therapy.

  1. Effects of CFRP Strengthening on Dynamic and Fatigue Responses of Composite Bridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kittisak Kuntiyawichai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the effect of CFRP strengthening on dynamic and fatigue responses of composite bridge using finite element program ABAQUS. Dynamic and fatigue responses of composite bridge due to truck load based on AASHTO standard are investigated. Two types of CFRP strengthening techniques, CFRP sheets and CFRP deck, are applied to both the damaged and undamaged bridges. For the case of damaged bridge, two through-thickness crack sizes, 3 mm and 6 mm in depth, are assumed at midspan of the steel girders. Furthermore, effects of the number of steel girders on the dynamic and fatigue responses are also considered. The results show that the maximum responses of composite bridges occur for dual lane cases. By using CFRP as a strengthening material, the maximum stress and deflection of the steel girders reduce and consequently increase the fatigue life of the girders. After introducing initial crack into the steel girders of the composite bridges, the fatigue life of the bridges is dramatically reduced. However, the overall performance of the damaged composite bridge can be improved by using CFRP, albeit with less effectiveness. Therefore, if cracks are found, steel welding must be performed before strengthening the composite bridge by CFRP.

  2. Research on the influence of helical strakes on dynamic response of floating wind turbine platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Qin-wei; Li, Chun

    2017-04-01

    The stability of platform structure is the paramount guarantee of the safe operation of the offshore floating wind turbine. The NREL 5MW floating wind turbine is established based on the OC3-Hywind Spar Buoy platform with the supplement of helical strakes for the purpose to analyze the impact of helical strakes on the dynamic response of the floating wind turbine Spar platform. The dynamic response of floating wind turbine Spar platform under wind, wave and current loading from the impact of number, height and pitch ratio of the helical strakes is analysed by the radiation and diffraction theory, the finite element method and orthogonal design method. The result reveals that the helical strakes can effectively inhibit the dynamic response of the platform but enlarge the wave exciting force; the best parameter combination is two pieces of helical strakes with the height of 15% D ( D is the diameter of the platform) and the pitch ratio of 5; the height of the helical strake and its pitch ratio have significant influence on pitch response.

  3. Effect of material uncertainties on dynamic response of segmental box girder bridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suchart Limkatanyu

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this paper was to investigate the effect of material uncertainties on dynamic response of segmental box girder bridge subjected to a moving load, in this case a rapid passing trains. Literatures concerned with the design of segmental box girder bridge, the application of finite element analysis to model the segmental box girder bridge, and the minimum requirement for structural conditions of the bridge were described and discussed in detail. A series of finite element analysis was carried out using SAP2000 Nonlinear software. The effect was investigated by varying the Modulus of Elasticity by 5%, 10% and 15%. The results were then compared with the case of assumed uniform property which had already been checked for model accuracy using the Standard prEN 1991-2. The results showed that, for the uniform case, the dynamic responses of the bridge gave the highest response at the resonance speed. When considering the non-uniform material properties (non-uniform case, the effect of material uncertainties appeared to have an effect on both displacement and acceleration responses. Nonetheless, the dynamic factor provided in the design code was sufficient for designing the segmental box girder bridge with either uniform or non-uniform material properties for the train speeds considered in this study.

  4. Manipulating the content of dynamic natural scenes to characterize response in human MT/MST.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durant, Szonya; Wall, Matthew B; Zanker, Johannes M

    2011-09-09

    Optic flow is one of the most important sources of information for enabling human navigation through the world. A striking finding from single-cell studies in monkeys is the rapid saturation of response of MT/MST areas with the density of optic flow type motion information. These results are reflected psychophysically in human perception in the saturation of motion aftereffects. We began by comparing responses to natural optic flow scenes in human visual brain areas to responses to the same scenes with inverted contrast (photo negative). This changes scene familiarity while preserving local motion signals. This manipulation had no effect; however, the response was only correlated with the density of local motion (calculated by a motion correlation model) in V1, not in MT/MST. To further investigate this, we manipulated the visible proportion of natural dynamic scenes and found that areas MT and MST did not increase in response over a 16-fold increase in the amount of information presented, i.e., response had saturated. This makes sense in light of the sparseness of motion information in natural scenes, suggesting that the human brain is well adapted to exploit a small amount of dynamic signal and extract information important for survival.

  5. Hawaii Abandoned Vessel Inventory, Kauai

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Abandoned Vessel Project Data for Kauai. Abandoned vessels pose a significant threat to the NOAA Trust resources through physical destruction of coral habitats...

  6. CNMI Abandoned Vessel Inventory, Tinian

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Abandoned Vessel Project Data for Tinian. Abandoned vessels pose a significant threat to the NOAA Trust resources through physical destruction of coral habitats...

  7. Puerto Rico Abandoned Vessel Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Abandoned Vessel Project Data for Puerto Rico. Abandoned vessels pose a significant threat to the NOAA Trust resources through physical destruction of coral...

  8. American Samoa Abandoned Vessel Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Abandoned Vessel Project Data for American Samoa. Abandoned vessels pose a significant threat to the NOAA Trust resources through physical destruction of coral...

  9. Hawaii Abandoned Vessel Inventory, Oahu

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Abandoned Vessel Project Data for Oahu, Hawaii. Abandoned vessels pose a significant threat to the NOAA Trust resources through physical destruction of coral...

  10. Hawaii Abandoned Vessel Inventory, Molokai

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Abandoned Vessel Project Data for Molokai, Hawaii. Abandoned vessels pose a significant threat to the NOAA Trust resources through physical destruction of coral...

  11. CNMI Abandoned Vessel Inventory, Rota

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Abandoned Vessel Project Data for Rota. Abandoned vessels pose a significant threat to the NOAA Trust resources through physical destruction of coral habitats...

  12. Hawaii Abandoned Vessel Inventory, Lanai

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Abandoned Vessel Project Data for Lanai. Abandoned vessels pose a significant threat to the NOAA Trust resources through physical destruction of coral habitats...

  13. For-Hire Vessel Directory

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Vessel Directory is maintained as the sample frame for the For-Hire Survey. I contains data on for-hire vessels on the Atlantic and Gulf coasts. Data include...

  14. CNMI Abandoned Vessel Inventory, Saipan

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Abandoned Vessel Project Data for Saipan. Abandoned vessels pose a significant threat to the NOAA Trust resources through physical destruction of coral habitats...

  15. Hawaii Abandoned Vessel Inventory, Maui

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Abandoned Vessel Project Data for Maui. Abandoned vessels pose a significant threat to the NOAA Trust resources through physical destruction of coral habitats...

  16. Vessels in Transit - Web Tool

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — A web tool that provides real-time information on vessels transiting the Saint Lawrence Seaway. Visitors may sort by order of turn, vessel name, or last location in...

  17. Dynamic response characterization of complex systems through operational identification and dynamic substructuring- An application to gear noise propagation in the automotive industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Klerk, D.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis deals with new methods, which can determine the dynamic response of a complex system identified in operation, based on the knowledge of its subsystem dynamics and excitation. In the first part of this thesis, the identification of component excitation and its transmission into the total

  18. Pressure vessel design manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moss, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    The first section of the book covers types of loadings, failures, and stress theories, and how they apply to pressure vessels. The book delineates the procedures for designing typical components as well as those for designing large openings in cylindrical shells, ring girders, davits, platforms, bins and elevated tanks. The techniques for designing conical transitions, cone-cylinder intersections, intermediate heads, flat heads, and spherically dished covers are also described. The book covers the design of vessel supports subject to wind and seismic loads and one section is devoted to the five major ways of analyzing loads on shells and heads. Each procedure is detailed enough to size all welds, bolts, and plate thicknesses and to determine actual stresses.

  19. New research vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-04-01

    Two “new” ocean-going research vessels operated by the Scripps Institution of Oceanography and the National Science Foundation (NSF) will soon begin full-time scientific duties off the coast of California and in the Antarctic, respectively. The 37.5-m Scripps vessel, named Robert Gordon Sprout in honor of the ex-president of the University of California, replaces the smaller ship Ellen B. Scripps, which had served the institution since 1965. The new ship is a slightly modified Gulf Coast workboat. Under the name of Midnight Alaskan, it had been used for high-resolution geophysical surveys in American and Latin American waters by such firms as Arco Oil & Gas, Exxon, Pennzoil, and Racal-Decca before its purchase by Scripps from a Lousiana chartering firm last summer.

  20. Large vessel vasculitides

    OpenAIRE

    Morović-Vergles, Jadranka; Pukšić, Silva; Gudelj Gračanin, Ana

    2013-01-01

    Large vessel vasculitis includes Giant cell arteritis and Takayasu arteritis. Giant cell arteritis is the most common form of vasculitis affect patients aged 50 years or over. The diagnosis should be considered in older patients who present with new onset of headache, visual disturbance, polymyalgia rheumatica and/or fever unknown cause. Glucocorticoides remain the cornerstone of therapy. Takayasu arteritis is a chronic panarteritis of the aorta ant its major branches presenting commonly in y...

  1. Very Versatile Vessel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    data. This source provides information on aluminum hydrofoil vessels without the added weight of foil structures. The composite armor around the...seating compartment. The sides should also limit wave splash on the deck. The freeboard should contribute reserve buoyancy , increasing large-angle and...Resistance, Powering, and Propulsion Savitsky’s Method Since model testing data or other reliable performance data was unavailable for the proposed

  2. Dynamic response of infrastructure to environmentally induced loads analysis, measurements, testing, and design

    CERN Document Server

    Manolis, George

    2017-01-01

    This book provides state of the art coverage of important current issues in the analysis, measurement, and monitoring of the dynamic response of infrastructure to environmental loads, including those induced by earthquake motion and differential soil settlement. The coverage is in five parts that address numerical methods in structural dynamics, soil–structure interaction analysis, instrumentation and structural health monitoring, hybrid experimental mechanics, and structural health monitoring for bridges. Examples that give an impression of the scope of the topics discussed include the seismic analysis of bridges, soft computing in earthquake engineering, use of hybrid methods for soil–structure interaction analysis, effects of local site conditions on the inelastic dynamic analysis of bridges, embedded models in wireless sensor networks for structural health monitoring, recent developments in seismic simulation methods, and seismic performance assessment and retrofit of structures. Throughout, the empha...

  3. Tunable dynamic response of magnetic gels: impact of structural properties and magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarama, Mitsusuke; Cremer, Peet; Borin, Dmitry Y; Odenbach, Stefan; Löwen, Hartmut; Menzel, Andreas M

    2014-10-01

    Ferrogels and magnetic elastomers feature mechanical properties that can be reversibly tuned from outside through magnetic fields. Here we concentrate on the question of how their dynamic response can be adjusted. The influence of three factors on the dynamic behavior is demonstrated using appropriate minimal models: first, the orientational memory imprinted into one class of the materials during their synthesis; second, the structural arrangement of the magnetic particles in the materials; and third, the strength of an external magnetic field. To illustrate the latter point, structural data are extracted from a real experimental sample and analyzed. Understanding how internal structural properties and external influences impact the dominant dynamical properties helps to design materials that optimize the requested behavior.

  4. Explosion induced dynamic responses of blast wall on FPSO topside: Blast loading application methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki-Yeob Kang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Topside areas on an offshore oil and gas platform are highly susceptible to explosion. A blast wall on these areas plays an important role in preventing explosion damage and must withstand the expected explosion loads. The uniformly distributed loading condition, predicted by Explosion Risk Analyses (ERAs, has been applied in most of the previous analysis methods. However, analysis methods related to load conditions are inaccurate because the blast overpressure around the wall tends to be of low-level in the open area and high-level in the enclosed area. The main objectives of this paper are to study the effects of applying different load applications and compare the dynamic responses of the blast wall. To do so, various kinds of blast pressures were measured by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD simulations on the target area. Nonlinear finite element analyses of the blast wall under two types of identified dynamic loadings were also conducted.

  5. Acetylation dynamics of human nuclear proteins during the ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennetzen, Martin V; Larsen, Dorthe Helena; Dinant, Christoffel

    2013-01-01

    -dependent posttranslational modifications (PTMs). To complement our previous analysis of IR-induced temporal dynamics of nuclear phosphoproteome, we now identify a range of human nuclear proteins that are dynamically regulated by acetylation, and predominantly deacetylation, during IR-induced DDR by using mass spectrometry...... to genotoxic insults. Overall, these results present a resource of temporal profiles of a spectrum of protein acetylation sites during DDR and provide further insights into the highly dynamic nature of regulatory PTMs that help orchestrate the maintenance of genome integrity.......Genotoxic insults, such as ionizing radiation (IR), cause DNA damage that evokes a multifaceted cellular DNA damage response (DDR). DNA damage signaling events that control protein activity, subcellular localization, DNA binding, protein-protein interactions, etc. rely heavily on time...

  6. Academic Research Vessels 1985-1990.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    of them MVC ). Recommnendati ons. * Complete reliance of the academic community on non-academic vessels should be avoided, since such vessels are not...responsible for management of a major fishery on the Bering Sea shelf. This area is covered by ice much of the year. With the spring melting of the ice is...of the group. 5. Meetings of the group shall normally be held four times yearly in- *1 cluding spring and fall semi-annual UNOLS meetings, and at

  7. Information Sharing of Vessel Traffic Service (VTS) and Maritime ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The marine information system provides a central database with online access to support the monitoring of violating vessels, aid to navigation. The system provides emergency response to increase safety within marine activities. Violating vessels data registered by the VTS is collected as evidence for assessment.

  8. Sustainable Oceanographic Vessels - Setting an Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leer, J. C.

    2009-12-01

    In response to climate change, global warming and post “peak oil” fuel scarcity, the oceanographic community should consider reducing its carbon foot print. Why should scientists operate inefficient vessels while lecturing the general public on the need to reduce CO2 emissions? We have already seen curtailment of ship schedules and ship lay-ups, due in part to rising fuel costs, following $140/barrel crude oil. When the global recession ends, upward pressure on oil prices will again commence. Who can forecast how high fuel prices may ultimately rise during the typical 25-30 year lifetime of a research vessel? Are we to curtail future work at sea when oceanic climate research is becoming ever more important? A catamaran research vessel has been designed which can be electrically propelled from by a combination of high efficiency generators, photovoltaic panels and/or sails. Sail produced power is transformed with propellers and motor/generators into electric power which is stored in battery banks. This vessel could operate as the first true hybrid oceanographic research vessel. It could even continue operations without fuel in cases of a severe fuel shortage or fueling denial. Since the power produced by any water turbine increases with the cube of the velocity flowing over its propeller, the low fluid friction and high stability of a catamaran, with reasonably slender hulls, provide an important boost to efficient hybrid operation. The author has chartered a 42’ hybrid catamaran sailboat and found it efficient and extremely easy to operate and control. A 79’ motor sailing catamaran research vessel by Lock Crowther Designs will be presented as one example of a sustainable research vessel with excellent speed and sea-keeping. A center well makes operation as a small drilling/coring ship for coastal climate investigation possible. The center well also supports a host of remote sensing and robotic gear handling capabilities.

  9. High-Latitude Thermosphere Neutral Density Response to Solar Wind Dynamic Pressure Enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Y.; Zesta, E.; Connor, H. K.; Su, Y.-J.; Sutton, E. K.; Huang, C. Y.; Ober, D. M.; Christodoulou, C.; Delay, S.; Oliveira, D. M.

    2017-11-01

    We examine the response of the thermosphere to the impact of solar wind dynamic pressure enhancements using observations and global magneto-hydrodynamics (MHD) simulations by the OpenGGCM model. Combining neutral density observations from the Challenging Minisatellite Payload (CHAMP) and the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites with simultaneous Poynting flux measurements from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) F16, we find that thermospheric density as well as downward Poynting flux intensified shortly after a sudden enhancement of the solar wind dynamic pressure. The intensification manifested mostly on the dayside high-latitude region with peak intensity in the vicinity of the noon and prenoon cusp. OpenGGCM modeling results show that the ionospheric Joule heating increased abruptly in response to the sudden enhancement of the dynamic pressure in the same region as the observed Poynting flux and neutral density enhancements. The modeling results show that the enhanced Joule heating coincides, both in time and location, with the appearance of a pair of high-latitude localized field-aligned currents (FACs) in the cusp region. The FACs intensified and extended azimuthally. Coincidental with the solar wind dynamic pressure enhancement, the y component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) By became strongly positive and, in addition, had some large fluctuations. We explore the separate and combined effects of the dynamic pressure and IMF By perturbations, with specifically designed simulation experiments that isolate the effect of each solar wind parameter. We find that the dynamic pressure enhancement is the primary source for the Joule heating and neutral density enhancements, but the IMF By modulates the level of enhancement.

  10. Validation of Infinite Impulse Response Multilayer Perceptron for Modelling Nuclear Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Cadini

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Artificial neural networks are powerful algorithms for constructing nonlinear empirical models from operational data. Their use is becoming increasingly popular in the complex modeling tasks required by diagnostic, safety, and control applications in complex technologies such as those employed in the nuclear industry. In this paper, the nonlinear modeling capabilities of an infinite impulse response multilayer perceptron (IIR-MLP for nuclear dynamics are considered in comparison to static modeling by a finite impulse response multilayer perceptron (FIR-MLP and a conventional static MLP. The comparison is made with respect to the nonlinear dynamics of a nuclear reactor as investigated by IIR-MLP in a previous paper. The superior performance of the locally recurrent scheme is demonstrated.

  11. Dynamic Response of Wheel-Rail Interaction at Rail Weld in High-Speed Railway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyang An

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available As a main part of continuously welded rail track, rail weld widely exists in high-speed railway. However, short-wave irregularities can easily initiate and develop in rail weld due to the limitation of welding technology and thus rail weld has been a main high-frequency excitation and is responsible for deterioration of track components. This work reports a 3D finite element model of wheel-rail rolling contact which can simulate dynamic wheel-rail interaction at arbitrary contact geometry up to 400 km/h. This model is employed to investigate dynamic response of wheel-rail interaction at theoretical and measured rail weld, including wheel-rail force and axle-box acceleration. These simulation results, combined with Quality Index (QI method, are used to develop a quantitative expression, which can be easily applied for evaluating rail weld deterioration based on measured rail profiles and axle-box acceleration.

  12. Dynamic responses of concrete-filled steel tubular member under axial compression considering creep effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, X. T.; Wang, Y. D.; Dai, C. H.; Ding, M.

    2017-08-01

    The finite element model of concrete-filled steel tubular member was established by the numerical analysis software considering material nonlinearity to analyze concrete creep effect on the dynamic responses of the member under axial compression and lateral impact. In the model, the constitutive model of core concrete is the plastic damage model, that of steel is the Von Mises yield criterion and kinematic hardening model, and the creep effect at different ages is equivalent to the change of concrete elastic modulus. Then the dynamic responses of concrete-filled steel tubular member considering creep effects was simulated, and the effects of creep on contact time, impact load, deflection, stress and strain were discussed. The fruits provide a scientific basis for the design of the impact resistance of concrete filled steel tubular members.

  13. Dynamic responses of a riser under combined excitation of internal waves and background currents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Lou

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the dynamic responses of a riser under the combined excitation of internal waves and background currents are studied. A modified Taylor-Goldstein equation is used to calculate the internal waves vertical structures when background currents exist. By imposing rigid-lid boundary condition, the equation is solved by Thompson-Haskell method. Based on the principle of virtual work, a nonlinear differential equation for riser motions is established combined with the modified Morison formula. Using Newmark-β method, the motion equation is solved in time domain. It is observed that the internal waves without currents exhibit dominated effect on dynamic response of a riser in the first two modes. With the effects of the background currents, the motion displacements of the riser will increase significantly in both cases that wave goes along and against the currents. This phenomenon is most obviously observed at the motions in the first mode.

  14. Dynamic responses of a riser under combined excitation of internal waves and background currents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lou Min

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the dynamic responses of a riser under the combined excitation of internal waves and background currents are studied. A modified Taylor-Goldstein equation is used to calculate the internal waves vertical structures when background currents exist. By imposing rigid-lid boundary condition, the equation is solved by Thompson-Haskell method. Based on the principle of virtual work, a nonlinear differential equation for riser motions is established combined with the modified Morison formula. Using Newmark-β method, the motion equation is solved in time domain. It is observed that the internal waves without currents exhibit dominated effect on dynamic response of a riser in the first two modes. With the effects of the background currents, the motion displacements of the riser will increase significantly in both cases that wave goes along and against the currents. This phenomenon is most obviously observed at the motions in the first mode

  15. Neighborhood structure effects on the Dynamic response of soil-structure interaction by harmonic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Dan-guang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available For realizing the variation of structural dynamic characteristics due to neighbor structure in buildings group, the surface structure is idealized as an equivalent single degree of freedom system with rigid base whose site consists of a single homogeneous layer. Based on the model, a equivalent method on the equivalent seismic excitation is proposed. Then, the differences of seismic response and equivalent seismic input between soil - structure interaction (SSI system and structure -soil-structure interaction (SSSI system are investigated by harmonic analysis. The numerical results show that dynamic responses would be underestimated in SSSI system when the forcing frequencies are close to the Natural frequency if the effects of neighborhood structure were ignored. Neighborhood structure would make the translational displacement increase and rocking vibration decrease. When establishing an effective seismic input, it is necessary to consider the impact of inertia interaction.

  16. Dynamic response improvement of doubly fed induction generator-based wind farm using fuzzy logic controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasanien, Hany M.; Al-Ammar, Essam A.

    2012-11-01

    Doubly fed induction generator (DFIG) based wind farm is today the most widely used concept. This paper presents dynamic response enhancement of DFIG based wind farm under remote fault conditions using the fuzzy logic controller. The goal of the work is to improve the dynamic response of DFIG based wind farm during and after the clearance of fault using the proposed controller. The stability of wind farm during and after the clearance of fault is investigated. The effectiveness of the fuzzy logic controller is then compared with that of a PI controller. The validity of the controllers in restoring the wind farms normal operation after the clearance of fault is illustrated by the simulation results which are carried out using MATLAB/SIMULINK. Simulation results are analyzed under different fault conditions.

  17. Dynamic linear response of the SK spin glass coupled microscopically to a bath

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plefka, T. [Theoretische Festkoerperphysik, TU Darmstadt, Darmstadt (Germany)]. E-mail: timm@arnold.fkp.physik.tu-darmstadt.de

    2002-10-18

    The dynamic linear response theory of a general Ising model weakly coupled to a heat bath is derived by employing the quantum statistical theory of Mori, treating the Hamiltonian of the spin bath coupling as a perturbation, and applying the Markovian approximation. Both the dynamic susceptibility and the relaxation function are expressed in terms of the static susceptibility and the static internal field distribution function. For the special case of the SK spin glass, this internal field distribution can be related to the solutions of the TAP equations in the entire temperature region. Application of this new relation and the use of numerical solutions of the modified TAP equations lead, for finite but large systems, to explicit results for the distribution function and for dynamic linear response functions. A detailed discussion is presented which includes finite-size effects. Due to the derived temperature dependence of the Onsager-Casimir coefficients, a frequency-dependent shift of the cusp temperature of the real part of the dynamic susceptibility is found. (author)

  18. Nonlinear dynamic response of cable-suspended systems under swinging and heaving motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Guohua; Wang, Naige; Wang, Lei; Zhu, Zhencai [China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou (China)

    2017-07-15

    In order to enhance the fidelity, convenient and flexibility of swinging motion, the structure of incompletely restrained cablesuspended system controlled by two drums was proposed, and the dynamic response of the system under swinging and heaving motion were investigated in this paper. The cables are spatially discretized using the assumed modes method and the system equations of motion are derived by Lagrange equations of the first kind. Based on geometric boundary conditions and linear complementary theory, the differential algebraic equations are transformed to a set of classical difference equations. Nonlinear dynamic behavior occurs under certain range of rotational velocity and frequency. The results show that asynchronous motion of suspension platform is easily caused imbalance for cable tension. Dynamic response of different swing frequencies were obtained via power frequency analysis, which could be used in the selection of the working frequency of the swing motion. The work will contribute to a better understanding of the swing frequency, cable tension and posture with dynamic characteristics of unilateral geometric and kinematic constraints in this system, and it is also useful to investigate the accuracy and reliability of instruments in future.

  19. Dynamic compressive response of wrought and additive manufactured 304L stainless steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishida Erik

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Additive manufacturing (AM technology has been developed to fabricate metal components that include complex prototype fabrication, small lot production, precision repair or feature addition, and tooling. However, the mechanical response of the AM materials is a concern to meet requirements for specific applications. Differences between AM materials as compared to wrought materials might be expected, due to possible differences in porosity (voids, grain size, and residual stress levels. When the AM materials are designed for impact applications, the dynamic mechanical properties in both compression and tension need to be fully characterized and understood for reliable designs. In this study, a 304L stainless steel was manufactured with AM technology. For comparison purposes, both the AM and wrought 304L stainless steels were dynamically characterized in compression Kolsky bar techniques. They dynamic compressive stress-strain curves were obtained and the strain rate effects were determined for both the AM and wrought 304L stainless steels. A comprehensive comparison of dynamic compressive response between the AM and wrought 304L stainless steels was performed. SAND2015-0993 C.

  20. Capturing Arabidopsis root architecture dynamics with ROOT-FIT reveals diversity in responses to salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julkowska, Magdalena M; Hoefsloot, Huub C J; Mol, Selena; Feron, Richard; de Boer, Gert-Jan; Haring, Michel A; Testerink, Christa

    2014-11-01

    The plant root is the first organ to encounter salinity stress, but the effect of salinity on root system architecture (RSA) remains elusive. Both the reduction in main root (MR) elongation and the redistribution of the root mass between MRs and lateral roots (LRs) are likely to play crucial roles in water extraction efficiency and ion exclusion. To establish which RSA parameters are responsive to salt stress, we performed a detailed time course experiment in which Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedlings were grown on agar plates under different salt stress conditions. We captured RSA dynamics with quadratic growth functions (root-fit) and summarized the salt-induced differences in RSA dynamics in three growth parameters: MR elongation, average LR elongation, and increase in number of LRs. In the ecotype Columbia-0 accession of Arabidopsis, salt stress affected MR elongation more severely than LR elongation and an increase in LRs, leading to a significantly altered RSA. By quantifying RSA dynamics of 31 different Arabidopsis accessions in control and mild salt stress conditions, different strategies for regulation of MR and LR meristems and root branching were revealed. Different RSA strategies partially correlated with natural variation in abscisic acid sensitivity and different Na(+)/K(+) ratios in shoots of seedlings grown under mild salt stress. Applying root-fit to describe the dynamics of RSA allowed us to uncover the natural diversity in root morphology and cluster it into four response types that otherwise would have been overlooked. © 2014 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  1. An Advanced Dynamic Framed-Slotted ALOHA Algorithm Based on Bayesian Estimation and Probability Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaowei Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an advanced dynamic framed-slotted ALOHA algorithm based on Bayesian estimation and probability response (BE-PDFSA to improve the performance of radio frequency identification (RFID system. The Bayesian estimation is introduced to improve the accuracy of the estimation algorithm for lacking a large number of observations in one query. The probability response is used to adjust responsive probability of the unrecognized tags to make the responsive tag number equal to the frame length. In this way, we can solve the problem of high collision rate with the increase of tag number and improve the throughput of the whole system. From the simulation results, we can see that the algorithm we proposed can greatly improve the stability of RFID system compared with DFSA and other commonly used algorithms.

  2. Time Analysis of Building Dynamic Response Under Seismic Action. Part 1: Theoretical Propositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ufimtcev, E. M.

    2017-11-01

    The first part of the article presents the main provisions of the analytical approach – the time analysis method (TAM) developed for the calculation of the elastic dynamic response of rod structures as discrete dissipative systems (DDS) and based on the investigation of the characteristic matrix quadratic equation. The assumptions adopted in the construction of the mathematical model of structural oscillations as well as the features of seismic forces’ calculating and recording based on the data of earthquake accelerograms are given. A system to resolve equations is given to determine the nodal (kinematic and force) response parameters as well as the stress-strain state (SSS) parameters of the system’s rods.

  3. High frequency dynamic bending response of piezoresistive GaN microcantilevers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukdar, Abdul; Qazi, Muhammad; Koley, Goutam

    2012-12-01

    Static and dynamic ac responses of piezoresistive GaN microcantilevers, with integrated AlGaN/GaN heterostructure field effect transistors as highly sensitive deflection transducers, have been investigated. Very high gauge factor exceeding 3500 was exhibited by the microcantilevers, with quality factor determined from electronically transduced ac response exceeding 200 in air and 4500 at low pressure. The gauge factor reduced at resonance frequency of the cantilevers, possibly due to reduced charge exchange with surface donor and trap states. Ultrasonic waves generated in air by a piezochip, and in the Si substrate through photoacoustic effect, could be detected by the cantilevers with high sensitivity.

  4. Muscle tissue oxygenation, pressure, electrical, and mechanical responses during dynamic and static voluntary contractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedsted, Pernille; Blangsted, Anne Katrine; Søgaard, Karen

    2006-01-01

    Dynamic muscle contractions have been shown to cause greater energy turnover and fatigue than static contractions performed at a corresponding force level. Therefore, we hypothesized that: (1) electro- (EMG) and mechanomyography (MMG), intramuscular pressure (IMP), and reduction in muscle oxygen...... similar in spite of major differences in the MMG and EMG responses of the muscle during contraction periods. This may relate to the surprisingly lower IMP in DYN than IST....

  5. A BIO-ECONOMIC DYNAMIC PROGRAMMING ANALYSIS OF THE SEASONAL SUPPLY RESPONSE BY FLORIDA DAIRY PRODUCERS

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Xiaoming; Thomas H. Spreen; DeLorenzo, Michael A.

    1992-01-01

    Seasonal price premiums have been proposed as a means of dampening the highly seasonal patterns of milk production in Florida. A Markov decision bio-economic model of the breeding and replacement decisions was solved via stochastic dynamic programming and used to analyze the potential supply response to seasonal price premiums. The results of the analysis suggest that the seasonal milk supply in Florida is highly price inelastic.

  6. Dynamics of a Fractional Order HIV Infection Model with Specific Functional Response and Cure Rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnane Boukhouima

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a fractional order model in this paper to describe the dynamics of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection. In the model, the infection transmission process is modeled by a specific functional response. First, we show that the model is mathematically and biologically well posed. Second, the local and global stabilities of the equilibria are investigated. Finally, some numerical simulations are presented in order to illustrate our theoretical results.

  7. Effects of foundation modeling on dynamic response of a soil- structure system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, J.C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Tabatabaie, M. [Kleinfelder, Inc., Pleasanton, CA (United States)

    1996-07-01

    This paper presents the results of our investigation to evaluate the effectiveness of different foundation modeling techniques used in soil-structure interaction analyses. The study involved analysis of three different modeling techniques applied to two different foundation configurations (one with a circular and one with a square shape). The results of dynamic response of a typical nuclear power plant structure supported on such foundations are presented.

  8. Roll- and pitch-plane-coupled hydro-pneumatic suspension. Part 2 dynamic response analyses

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Dongpu; Rakheja, Subhash; Su, Chun-Yi

    2010-01-01

    In the first part of this study, the potential performance benefits of fluidically coupled passive suspensions were demonstrated through analyses of suspension properties, design flexibility and feasibility. In this second part of the study, the dynamic responses of a vehicle equipped with different configurations of fluidically coupled hydro-pneumatic suspension systems are investigated for more comprehensive assessments of the coupled suspension concepts. A generalised 14 degree-of-freedom ...

  9. Non-parametric Bayesian models of response function in dynamic image sequences

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tichý, Ondřej; Šmídl, Václav

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 151, č. 1 (2016), s. 90-100 ISSN 1077-3142 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-29225S Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Response function * Blind source separation * Dynamic medical imaging * Probabilistic models * Bayesian methods Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research Impact factor: 2.498, year: 2016 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2016/AS/tichy-0456983.pdf

  10. Influence of Torsional Excitation on Dynamic Responses of Rotors with a Breathing Slant Crack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhiwen; Hua, Chunrong; Dong, Dawei; Yan, Bing; Fan, Kang

    2017-05-01

    Focusing on a rotor-bearing system with a breathing slant crack in the power transmission machine, influence of torsional excitations on the coupled nonlinear responses of the system is studied in this work. The slant crack element stiffness matrix is derived based on energy principal and the crack breathing phenomenon is simulated by the Crack Closure Line Position (CCLP) model; and the time-varying coupled dynamic equation of a rotor with a slant breathing crack considering the eccentricity of static unbalance is established using the finite element method and is solved by the NEWMARK method; then the influences of static torque and periodic torsional excitations on rotor dynamic responses in transverse and torsional directions are discussed. Results show that with the increment of static torque, cracks will become open gradually and the nonlinearity degree of rotors will increase firstly and then decrease. For periodic torsional excitation, the torsional excitation frequency and its rotating frequency combination can be found in transverse vibration response, and the larger is the amplitude of excitation, the larger are the combinational frequency components. Then a crack monitoring method for power transmission machines can be suggested by monitoring the coupled response characteristics and their variation from transverse responses of rotors before and after the loads change.

  11. Effect Analysis of Vehicle System Parameters on Dynamic Response of Pavement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong-xia Xia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the damage of a semirigid pavement under vehicle loads with varied parameters, the random dynamic loads applied on the pavement by a running vehicle were computed with two degrees of freedom, quarter-vehicle model, and then a three-dimensional finite element analysis model of semirigid asphalt pavement was established. With the peak stress index of each pavement layer, the effect of varied vehicle parameters on pavement response was studied. The results indicated that the stress wave frequency of each pavement layer was similar to that of the dynamic random load, and, with increased pavement depth, the wave effect decreased. The pavement response increased with increased suspension stiffness and tire stiffness and decreased with increased suspension damping and tire damping. Furthermore, compared to the stiffness, the response variation induced by the damping was orders of magnitude lower. Compared with the traditional time response analysis method, the peak response analysis of the pavement structure was more scientific, rational, and intuitive, which could be useful for the study of vehicle-pavement interaction and road damage.

  12. Modeling the dynamic response of pressures in a distributed helium refrigeration system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brubaker, John Carl [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1997-12-01

    A mathematical model is created of the dynamic response of pressures caused by flow inputs to an existing distributed helium refrigeration system. The dynamic system studied consists of the suction and discharge pressure headers and compressor portions of the refrigeration system used to cool the superconducting magnets of the Tevatron accelerator at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The modeling method involves identifying the system from data recorded during a series of controlled tests, with effort made to detect locational differences in pressure response around the four mile accelerator circumference. A review of the fluid mechanics associated with the system indicates linear time invariant models are suitable for the identification, particularly since the governing equations of one dimensional fluid flow are approximated by linear differential equations. An outline of the experimental design and the data acquisition system are given, followed by a detailed description of the modeling, which utilized the Matlab programming language and associated System Identification Toolbox. Two representations of the system are presented. One, a black box model, provides a multi-input, multi-output description assembled from the results of single input step function testing. This description indicates definite variation in pressure response with distance from the flow input location, and also suggests subtle differences in response with the input location itself. A second system representation is proposed which details the relation between continuous flow changes and pressure response, and provides explanation of a previously unappreciated pressure feedback internal to the system.

  13. Morphology effect on the light scattering and dynamic response of polymer network liquid crystal phase modulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiangjie, Zhao; Cangli, Liu; Jiazhu, Duan; Jiancheng, Zeng; Dayong, Zhang; Yongquan, Luo

    2014-06-16

    Polymer network liquid crystal (PNLC) was one of the most potential liquid crystal for submillisecond response phase modulation, which was possible to be applied in submillisecond response phase only spatial light modulator. But until now the light scattering when liquid crystal director was reoriented by external electric field limited its phase modulation application. Dynamic response of phase change when high voltage was applied was also not elucidated. The mechanism that determines the light scattering was studied by analyzing the polymer network morphology by SEM method. Samples were prepared by varying the polymerization temperature, UV curing intensity and polymerization time. The morphology effect on the dynamic response of phase change was studied, in which high voltage was usually applied and electro-striction effect was often induced. The experimental results indicate that the polymer network morphology was mainly characterized by cross linked single fibrils, cross linked fibril bundles or even both. Although the formation of fibril bundle usually induced large light scattering, such a polymer network could endure higher voltage. In contrast, although the formation of cross linked single fibrils induced small light scattering, such a polymer network cannot endure higher voltage. There is a tradeoff between the light scattering and high voltage endurance. The electro-optical properties such as threshold voltage and response time were taken to verify our conclusion. For future application, the monomer molecular structure, the liquid crystal solvent and the polymerization conditions should be optimized to generate optimal polymer network morphology.

  14. Molecular analysis of chondrocytes cultured in agarose in response to dynamic compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mallein-Gerin Frédéric

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Articular cartilage is exposed to high mechanical loads under normal physiological conditions and articular chondrocytes regulate the composition of cartilaginous matrix, in response to mechanical signals. However, the intracellular pathways involved in mechanotransduction are still being defined. Using the well-characterized chondrocyte/agarose model system and dynamic compression, we report protocols for preparing and characterizing constructs of murine chondrocytes and agarose, and analyzing the effect of compression on steady-state level of mRNA by RT-PCR, gene transcription by gene reporter assay, and phosphorylation state of signalling molecules by Western-blotting. The mouse model is of particular interest because of the availability of a large choice of bio-molecular tools suitable to study it, as well as genetically modified mice. Results Chondrocytes cultured in agarose for one week were surrounded by a newly synthesized pericellular matrix, as revealed by immunohistochemistry prior to compression experiments. This observation indicates that this model system is suitable to study the role of matrix molecules and trans-membrane receptors in cellular responsiveness to mechanical stress. The chondrocyte/agarose constructs were then submitted to dynamic compression with FX-4000C™ Flexercell® Compression Plus™ System (Flexcell. After clearing proteins off agarose, Western-blotting analysis showed transient activation of Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK in response to dynamic compression. After assessment by capillary electrophoresis of the quality of RNA extracted from agarose, steady-state levels of mRNA expression was measured by real time PCR. We observed an up-regulation of cFos and cJun mRNA levels as a response to compression, in accordance with the mechanosensitive character observed for these two genes in other studies using cartilage explants submitted to compression. To explore further the

  15. A carboxylesterase, Esterase-6, modulates sensory physiological and behavioral response dynamics to pheromone in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chertemps Thomas

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insects respond to the spatial and temporal dynamics of a pheromone plume, which implies not only a strong response to 'odor on', but also to 'odor off'. This requires mechanisms geared toward a fast signal termination. Several mechanisms may contribute to signal termination, among which odorant-degrading enzymes. These enzymes putatively play a role in signal dynamics by a rapid inactivation of odorants in the vicinity of the sensory receptors, although direct in vivo experimental evidences are lacking. Here we verified the role of an extracellular carboxylesterase, esterase-6 (Est-6, in the sensory physiological and behavioral dynamics of Drosophila melanogaster response to its pheromone, cis-vaccenyl acetate (cVA. Est-6 was previously linked to post-mating effects in the reproductive system of females. As Est-6 is also known to hydrolyze cVA in vitro and is expressed in the main olfactory organ, the antenna, we tested here its role in olfaction as a putative odorant-degrading enzyme. Results We first confirm that Est-6 is highly expressed in olfactory sensilla, including cVA-sensitive sensilla, and we show that expression is likely associated with non-neuronal cells. Our electrophysiological approaches show that the dynamics of olfactory receptor neuron (ORN responses is strongly influenced by Est-6, as in Est-6° null mutants (lacking the Est-6 gene cVA-sensitive ORN showed increased firing rate and prolonged activity in response to cVA. Est-6° mutant males had a lower threshold of behavioral response to cVA, as revealed by the analysis of two cVA-induced behaviors. In particular, mutant males exhibited a strong decrease of male-male courtship, in association with a delay in courtship initiation. Conclusions Our study presents evidence that Est-6 plays a role in the physiological and behavioral dynamics of sex pheromone response in Drosophila males and supports a role of Est-6 as an odorant-degrading enzyme (ODE in male

  16. Consistent spectral predictors for dynamic causal models of steady-state responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Rosalyn J; Stephan, Klaas E; Dolan, Raymond J; Friston, Karl J

    2011-04-15

    Dynamic causal modelling (DCM) for steady-state responses (SSR) is a framework for inferring the mechanisms that underlie observed electrophysiological spectra, using biologically plausible generative models of neuronal dynamics. In this paper, we examine the dynamic repertoires of nonlinear conductance-based neural population models and propose a generative model of their power spectra. Our model comprises an ensemble of interconnected excitatory and inhibitory cells, where synaptic currents are mediated by fast, glutamatergic and GABAergic receptors and slower voltage-gated NMDA receptors. We explore two formulations of how hidden neuronal states (depolarisation and conductances) interact: through their mean and variance (mean-field model) or through their mean alone (neural-mass model). Both rest on a nonlinear Fokker-Planck description of population dynamics, which can exhibit bifurcations (phase transitions). We first characterise these phase transitions numerically: by varying critical model parameters, we elicit both fixed points and quasiperiodic dynamics that reproduce the spectral characteristics (~2-100 Hz) of real electrophysiological data. We then introduce a predictor of spectral activity using centre manifold theory and linear stability analysis. This predictor is based on sampling the system's Jacobian over the orbits of hidden neuronal states. This predictor behaves consistently and smoothly in the region of phase transitions, which permits the use of gradient descent methods for model inversion. We demonstrate this by inverting generative models (DCMs) of SSRs, using simulated data that entails phase transitions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Cholinergic innervation of human mesenteric lymphatic vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Andrea, V; Bianchi, E; Taurone, S; Mignini, F; Cavallotti, C; Artico, M

    2013-11-01

    The cholinergic neurotransmission within the human mesenteric lymphatic vessels has been poorly studied. Therefore, our aim is to analyse the cholinergic nerve fibres of lymphatic vessels using the traditional enzymatic techniques of staining, plus the biochemical modifications of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity. Specimens obtained from human mesenteric lymphatic vessels were subjected to the following experimental procedures: 1) drawing, cutting and staining of tissues; 2) staining of total nerve fibres; 3) enzymatic staining of cholinergic nerve fibres; 4) homogenisation of tissues; 5) biochemical amount of proteins; 6) biochemical amount of AChE activity; 6) quantitative analysis of images; 7) statistical analysis of data. The mesenteric lymphatic vessels show many AChE positive nerve fibres around their wall with an almost plexiform distribution. The incubation time was performed at 1 h (partial activity) and 6 h (total activity). Moreover, biochemical dosage of the same enzymatic activity confirms the results obtained with morphological methods. The homogenates of the studied tissues contain strong AChE activity. In our study, the lymphatic vessels appeared to contain few cholinergic nerve fibres. Therefore, it is expected that perivascular nerve stimulation stimulates cholinergic nerves innervating the mesenteric arteries to release the neurotransmitter AChE, which activates muscarinic or nicotinic receptors to modulate adrenergic neurotransmission. These results strongly suggest, that perivascular cholinergic nerves have little or no effect on the adrenergic nerve function in mesenteric arteries. The cholinergic nerves innervating mesenteric arteries do not mediate direct vascular responses.

  18. Dynamics of rhizosphere properties and antioxidative responses in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) under cadmium stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yonghua; Wang, Li; Yang, Linsheng; Li, Hairong

    2014-04-01

    In this study, we performed a rhizobox experiment to examine the dynamic changes in the rhizosphere properties and antioxidant enzyme responses of Triticum aestivum L. under three levels of cadmium stress. A set of micro-techniques (i.e., Rhizobox and Rhizon SMS) were applied for the dynamically non-destructive collection of the rhizosphere soil solution to enable the observation at a high temporal resolution. The dynamics of soluble cadmium and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the rhizosphere soil solutions of the Triticum aestivum L. were characterised by the sequence week 0 after sowing (WAS0)0.05) and growth duration (p0.05). These results suggested the enhancement of DOC production and the greater antioxidant enzyme activities were two important protective mechanisms of Triticum aestivum L. under cadmium stress, whereas rhizosphere acidification might be an important mechanism for the mobilisation of soil cadmium. The results also revealed that plant-soil interactions strongly influence the soil solution chemistry in the rhizosphere of Triticum aestivum L., that, in turn, can stimulate chemical and biochemical responses in the plants. In most cases, these responses to cadmium stress were sensitive and might allow us to develop strategies for reducing the risks of the cadmium contamination to crop production. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of Different Groundwater Levels on Seismic Dynamic Response and Failure Mode of Sandy Slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shuai; Lv, Yuejun; Peng, Yanju; Zhang, Lifang; Xiu, Liwei

    2015-01-01

    Heavy seismic damage tends to occur in slopes when groundwater is present. The main objectives of this paper are to determine the dynamic response and failure mode of sandy slope subjected simultaneously to seismic forces and variable groundwater conditions. This paper applies the finite element method, which is a fast and efficient design tool in modern engineering analysis, to evaluate dynamic response of the slope subjected simultaneously to seismic forces and variable groundwater conditions. Shaking table test is conducted to analyze the failure mode and verify the accuracy of the finite element method results. The research results show that dynamic response values of the slope have different variation rules under near and far field earthquakes. And the damage location and pattern of the slope are different in varying groundwater conditions. The destruction starts at the top of the slope when the slope is in no groundwater, which shows that the slope appears obvious whipping effect under the earthquake. The destruction starts at the toe of the slope when the slope is in the high groundwater levels. Meanwhile, the top of the slope shows obvious seismic subsidence phenomenon after earthquake. Furthermore, the existence of the groundwater has a certain effect of damping. PMID:26560103

  20. Effect of Different Groundwater Levels on Seismic Dynamic Response and Failure Mode of Sandy Slope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shuai; Lv, Yuejun; Peng, Yanju; Zhang, Lifang; Xiu, Liwei

    2015-01-01

    Heavy seismic damage tends to occur in slopes when groundwater is present. The main objectives of this paper are to determine the dynamic response and failure mode of sandy slope subjected simultaneously to seismic forces and variable groundwater conditions. This paper applies the finite element method, which is a fast and efficient design tool in modern engineering analysis, to evaluate dynamic response of the slope subjected simultaneously to seismic forces and variable groundwater conditions. Shaking table test is conducted to analyze the failure mode and verify the accuracy of the finite element method results. The research results show that dynamic response values of the slope have different variation rules under near and far field earthquakes. And the damage location and pattern of the slope are different in varying groundwater conditions. The destruction starts at the top of the slope when the slope is in no groundwater, which shows that the slope appears obvious whipping effect under the earthquake. The destruction starts at the toe of the slope when the slope is in the high groundwater levels. Meanwhile, the top of the slope shows obvious seismic subsidence phenomenon after earthquake. Furthermore, the existence of the groundwater has a certain effect of damping.

  1. Effects of rail thermal stress on the dynamic response of vehicle and track

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yishi; Yu, Zujun; Shi, Hongmei

    2015-01-01

    A new method is proposed to obtain the dynamic responses of the vehicle-track coupling system under the conditions of rail thermal stress changes in high-speed railways. Exact models are established with different rail longitudinal forces, in which multibody dynamic models are used for vehicles and the direct stiffness method for structures. In order to provide a general, simple and flexible formulation to express longitudinal stress distribution, the accurate model of long slab track consists of many small units with parameters which can be initialised separately. The exact analytical equation of track frequency and modal function was obtained by the transition matrix method, which can be used in calculating the dynamic response of wheel-rail coupling model. The proposed model is verified through comparisons with other classical solutions. Under the influence of train velocities and track irregularities, the specific vibration performances that frequency shifted and amplitude peak enhanced with thermal force are demonstrated through examples. The results show that the response analyses of vehicle and track have great application potentiality for fast estimation of the rail longitudinal stress.

  2. Coupled dynamic response analysis of a multi-column tension-leg-type floating wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yong-sheng; Yang, Jian-min; He, Yan-ping; Gu, Min-tong

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a coupled dynamic response analysis of a multi-column tension-leg-type floating wind turbine (WindStar TLP system) under normal operation and parked conditions. Wind-only load cases, wave-only load cases and combined wind and wave load cases were analyzed separately for the WindStar TLP system to identify the dominant excitation loads. Comparisons between an NREL offshore 5-MW baseline wind turbine installed on land and the WindStar TLP system were performed. Statistics of selected response variables in specified design load cases (DLCs) were obtained and analyzed. It is found that the proposed WindStar TLP system has small dynamic responses to environmental loads and it thus has almost the same mean generator power output under operating conditions as the land-based system. The tension mooring system has a sufficient safety factor, and the minimum tendon tension is always positive in all selected DLCs. The ratio of ultimate load of the tower base fore-aft bending moment for the WindStar TLP system versus the land-based system can be as high as 1.9 in all of the DLCs considered. These results will help elucidate the dynamic characteristics of the proposed WindStar TLP system, identify the difference in load effect between it and land-based systems, and thus make relevant modifications to the initial design for the WindStar TLP system.

  3. Effect of Different Groundwater Levels on Seismic Dynamic Response and Failure Mode of Sandy Slope.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Huang

    Full Text Available Heavy seismic damage tends to occur in slopes when groundwater is present. The main objectives of this paper are to determine the dynamic response and failure mode of sandy slope subjected simultaneously to seismic forces and variable groundwater conditions. This paper applies the finite element method, which is a fast and efficient design tool in modern engineering analysis, to evaluate dynamic response of the slope subjected simultaneously to seismic forces and variable groundwater conditions. Shaking table test is conducted to analyze the failure mode and verify the accuracy of the finite element method results. The research results show that dynamic response values of the slope have different variation rules under near and far field earthquakes. And the damage location and pattern of the slope are different in varying groundwater conditions. The destruction starts at the top of the slope when the slope is in no groundwater, which shows that the slope appears obvious whipping effect under the earthquake. The destruction starts at the toe of the slope when the slope is in the high groundwater levels. Meanwhile, the top of the slope shows obvious seismic subsidence phenomenon after earthquake. Furthermore, the existence of the groundwater has a certain effect of damping.

  4. Frequency response of a viscoelastic tensegrity model: Structural rearrangement contribution to cell dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañadas, Patrick; Wendling-Mansuy, Sylvie; Isabey, Daniel

    2006-08-01

    In an attempt to understand the role of structural rearrangement onto the cell response during imposed cyclic stresses, we simulated numerically the frequency-dependent behavior of a viscoelastic tensegrity structure (VTS model) made of 24 elastic cables and 6 rigid bars. The VTS computational model was based on the nonsmooth contact dynamics (NSCD) method in which the constitutive elements of the tensegrity structure are considered as a set of material points that mutually interact. Low amplitude oscillatory loading conditions were applied and the frequency response of the overall structure was studied in terms of frequency dependence of mechanical properties. The latter were normalized by the homogeneous properties of constitutive elements in order to capture the essential feature of spatial rearrangement. The results reveal a specific frequency-dependent contribution of elastic and viscous effects which is responsible for significant changes in the VTS model dynamical properties. The mechanism behind is related to the variable contribution of spatial rearrangement of VTS elements which is decreased from low to high frequency as dominant effects are transferred from mainly elastic to mainly viscous. More precisely, the elasticity modulus increases with frequency while the viscosity modulus decreases, each evolution corresponding to a specific power-law dependency. The satisfactorily agreement found between present numerical results and the literature data issued from in vitro cell experiments suggests that the frequency-dependent mechanism of spatial rearrangement presently described could play a significant and predictable role during oscillatory cell dynamics.

  5. Perturbation of dynamic response at short outlets glaciers of Jostedalsbreen, maritime South Norway?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Stefan

    2010-05-01

    Mountain glaciers are key indicators of global climate change. Changes in glacier volume, area, and length are determined by the climate and related mass flux/glacier flow. For several aspects of sustainable development in high-mountain regions (hydro-electric energy, water supply, tourism, etc.) it is crucial to estimate future glacier variations. Therefore, the interactions and relationships between individual meteorological and glaciological parameters need to be known before any model can be applied. Due to their steep mass balance gradient and high mass turnover, maritime mountain glaciers might respond very sensitively to changes of predominant weather or climate conditions. The steep outlet glaciers of Jostedalsbreen, western South Norway, underwent two fairly contrasting periods during the past 20 years. Interpretation of this ‘extreme' behaviour presented here deserved special attention. Detailed analysis of mass-balance, length variation, and climate data from maritime Southern Norway reveals their variations are not entirely determined by air temperature changes. A considerable increase in ice mass and related frontal advance during the AD 1990s was caused by increased winter precipitation. By contrast, a frontal retreat starting around AD 2000 continued and accelerated in recent years. Although above-average summer air temperatures unambiguously were responsible for this retreat, its proportion significantly exceeded the slight contemporary glacier mass loss. Since 2000, length variations at the short outlets of Jostedalsbreen seem to be decoupled from the net mass-balance data series. Additionally, the dynamic response of the glacier front to net balance and mass flux variations has been disturbed. Previously applicable terminus reaction times of 3 to 4 years have been replaced by an immediate response to higher summer air temperatures. The correlation of net balance to length variation dropped significant since AD 2000. Comparable changes between

  6. Dynamic Fracture of Nanocomposites and Response of Fiber Composite Panels to Shock Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Arun

    2009-06-01

    This lecture will present studies on the response of novel engineering materials to extreme dynamic loadings. In particular, the talk will focus on the behavior of sandwich composite materials to shock loading and dynamic fracture of nano-composite materials. Results from an experimental study on the response of sandwich materials to controlled blast loading will be presented. In this study, a shock tube facility was utilized to apply blast loading to simply supported plates of E-glass vinyl ester/PVC foam sandwich composite materials. Pressure sensors were mounted at the end of the muzzle section of the shock tube to measure the incident pressure and the reflected pressure profiles during the experiment. A high speed digital camera was utilized to capture the real time side deformation of the materials, as well as the development and progression of damage. Macroscopic and microscopic examination was then implemented to study the post-mortem damage. Conclusions on the relative performance of sandwich composites under blast loadings will also be discussed. Results from an experimental investigation conducted to evaluate the mechanical properties of novel materials fabricated using nano sized particles in polymer matrix will also be presented. Unsaturated polyester resin specimens embedded with small loadings of nano sized particles of TiO2 and Al2O3 were fabricated using a direct ultrasonification method to study the effects of nanosized particles on nanocomposite fracture properties. The ultrasonification method employed produced nanocomposites with excellent particle dispersion as verified by TEM. Experiments were conducted to investigate the dynamic crack initiation and rapid crack propagation in theses particle reinforced materials. High-speed digital imaging was employed along with dynamic photoelasticity to obtain real time, full-field quantification of the stress field associated with the dynamic fracture process. Birefringent coatings were used to conduct

  7. Dynamic Encoding of Acoustic Features in Neural Responses to Continuous Speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalighinejad, Bahar; Cruzatto da Silva, Guilherme; Mesgarani, Nima

    2017-02-22

    Humans are unique in their ability to communicate using spoken language. However, it remains unclear how the speech signal is transformed and represented in the brain at different stages of the auditory pathway. In this study, we characterized electroencephalography responses to continuous speech by obtaining the time-locked responses to phoneme instances (phoneme-related potential). We showed that responses to different phoneme categories are organized by phonetic features. We found that each instance of a phoneme in continuous speech produces multiple distinguishable neural responses occurring as early as 50 ms and as late as 400 ms after the phoneme onset. Comparing the patterns of phoneme similarity in the neural responses and the acoustic signals confirms a repetitive appearance of acoustic distinctions of phonemes in the neural data. Analysis of the phonetic and speaker information in neural activations revealed that different time intervals jointly encode the acoustic similarity of both phonetic and speaker categories. These findings provide evidence for a dynamic neural transformation of low-level speech features as they propagate along the auditory pathway, and form an empirical framework to study the representational changes in learning, attention, and speech disorders.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT We characterized the properties of evoked neural responses to phoneme instances in continuous speech. We show that each instance of a phoneme in continuous speech produces several observable neural responses at different times occurring as early as 50 ms and as late as 400 ms after the phoneme onset. Each temporal event explicitly encodes the acoustic similarity of phonemes, and linguistic and nonlinguistic information are best represented at different time intervals. Finally, we show a joint encoding of phonetic and speaker information, where the neural representation of speakers is dependent on phoneme category. These findings provide compelling new evidence for

  8. Global genetic response in a cancer cell: self-organized coherent expression dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Masa; Hashimoto, Midori; Takenaka, Yoshiko; Motoike, Ikuko N; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the basic mechanism of the spatio-temporal self-control of genome-wide gene expression engaged with the complex epigenetic molecular assembly is one of major challenges in current biological science. In this study, the genome-wide dynamical profile of gene expression was analyzed for MCF-7 breast cancer cells induced by two distinct ErbB receptor ligands: epidermal growth factor (EGF) and heregulin (HRG), which drive cell proliferation and differentiation, respectively. We focused our attention to elucidate how global genetic responses emerge and to decipher what is an underlying principle for dynamic self-control of genome-wide gene expression. The whole mRNA expression was classified into about a hundred groups according to the root mean square fluctuation (rmsf). These expression groups showed characteristic time-dependent correlations, indicating the existence of collective behaviors on the ensemble of genes with respect to mRNA expression and also to temporal changes in expression. All-or-none responses were observed for HRG and EGF (biphasic statistics) at around 10-20 min. The emergence of time-dependent collective behaviors of expression occurred through bifurcation of a coherent expression state (CES). In the ensemble of mRNA expression, the self-organized CESs reveals distinct characteristic expression domains for biphasic statistics, which exhibits notably the presence of criticality in the expression profile as a route for genomic transition. In time-dependent changes in the expression domains, the dynamics of CES reveals that the temporal development of the characteristic domains is characterized as autonomous bistable switch, which exhibits dynamic criticality (the temporal development of criticality) in the genome-wide coherent expression dynamics. It is expected that elucidation of the biophysical origin for such critical behavior sheds light on the underlying mechanism of the control of whole genome.

  9. Global genetic response in a cancer cell: self-organized coherent expression dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masa Tsuchiya

    Full Text Available Understanding the basic mechanism of the spatio-temporal self-control of genome-wide gene expression engaged with the complex epigenetic molecular assembly is one of major challenges in current biological science. In this study, the genome-wide dynamical profile of gene expression was analyzed for MCF-7 breast cancer cells induced by two distinct ErbB receptor ligands: epidermal growth factor (EGF and heregulin (HRG, which drive cell proliferation and differentiation, respectively. We focused our attention to elucidate how global genetic responses emerge and to decipher what is an underlying principle for dynamic self-control of genome-wide gene expression. The whole mRNA expression was classified into about a hundred groups according to the root mean square fluctuation (rmsf. These expression groups showed characteristic time-dependent correlations, indicating the existence of collective behaviors on the ensemble of genes with respect to mRNA expression and also to temporal changes in expression. All-or-none responses were observed for HRG and EGF (biphasic statistics at around 10-20 min. The emergence of time-dependent collective behaviors of expression occurred through bifurcation of a coherent expression state (CES. In the ensemble of mRNA expression, the self-organized CESs reveals distinct characteristic expression domains for biphasic statistics, which exhibits notably the presence of criticality in the expression profile as a route for genomic transition. In time-dependent changes in the expression domains, the dynamics of CES reveals that the temporal development of the characteristic domains is characterized as autonomous bistable switch, which exhibits dynamic criticality (the temporal development of criticality in the genome-wide coherent expression dynamics. It is expected that elucidation of the biophysical origin for such critical behavior sheds light on the underlying mechanism of the control of whole genome.

  10. Lymphatic Vessels: The Next Frontier in Lung Transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Ye; Liu, Kaifeng; Lamattina, Anthony Mark; Visner, Gary; El-Chemaly, Souheil

    2017-09-01

    Lymphatic vessels are essential for the uptake of fluid, immune cells, macromolecules, and lipids from the interstitial space. During lung transplant surgery, the pulmonary lymphatic vessel continuum is completely disrupted, and, as a result, lymphatic drainage function is severely compromised. After transplantation, the regeneration of an effective lymphatic drainage system plays a crucial role in maintaining interstitial fluid balance in the lung allograft. In the meantime, these newly formed lymphatic vessels are commonly held responsible for the development of immune responses leading to graft rejection, because they are potentially capable of transporting antigen-presenting cells loaded with allogeneic antigens to the draining lymph nodes. However, despite remarkable progress in the understanding of lymphatic biology, there is still a paucity of consistent evidence that demonstrates the exact impacts of lymphatic vessels on lung graft function. In this review, we examine the current literature related to roles of lymphatic vessels in the pathogenesis of lung transplant rejection.

  11. Vessel Traffic Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-12-01

    Yorker" articles titled Silent Spring by Rachel Carson in 1963 produced a unifying effect, "the sort of rallying point of the movement to protect the...6232, 92d Cong., 1st. sess., 1971, p. 2. 15. Carson , Rachel L. , The Sea Around Us, New York: Oxford Univesity Press, 195-, p. IV. 16. U.S., Congress...Government Printing Office, 1974. 63. Buhler, L. and Geiger, J., Vessel Traffic Data Extraction MethodoloqX, Silver Spring , Maryland, O6erFae-tns

  12. Vanishing corneal vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Luke; Chana, Rupinder

    2013-01-01

    We wish to highlight the importance of acknowledging the accompanying effects of topical phenylephrine drops on the eye other than its intended mydriasis. We reported a case of a 92-year-old woman with a corneal graft who was noted to have superficial corneal vascularisation which was not documented previously. After the instillation of topical tropicamide 1% and phenylephrine 2.5%, for funduscopy, the corneal vascularisation was not visible. When reassessed on another visit, tropicamide had no effect on the vessels and only phenylephrine did. We wish to highlight that when reviewing patients in cornea clinics, instilling phenylephrine prior to being seen may mask important corneal vascularisation. PMID:24121816

  13. A unified stochastic formulation of dissipative quantum dynamics. II. Beyond linear response of spin baths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Chang-Yu; Cao, Jianshu

    2018-01-07

    We use the "generalized hierarchical equation of motion" proposed in Paper I [C.-Y. Hsieh and J. Cao, J. Chem. Phys. 148, 014103 (2018)] to study decoherence in a system coupled to a spin bath. The present methodology allows a systematic incorporation of higher-order anharmonic effects of the bath in dynamical calculations. We investigate the leading order corrections to the linear response approximations for spin bath models. Two kinds of spin-based environments are considered: (1) a bath of spins discretized from a continuous spectral density and (2) a bath of localized nuclear or electron spins. The main difference resides with how the bath frequency and the system-bath coupling parameters are distributed in an environment. When discretized from a continuous spectral density, the system-bath coupling typically scales as ∼1/NB where NB is the number of bath spins. This scaling suppresses the non-Gaussian characteristics of the spin bath and justifies the linear response approximations in the thermodynamic limit. For the nuclear/electron spin bath models, system-bath couplings are directly deduced from spin-spin interactions and do not necessarily obey the 1/NB scaling. It is not always possible to justify the linear response approximations in this case. Furthermore, if the spin-spin Hamiltonian is highly symmetrical, there exist additional constraints that generate highly non-Markovian and persistent dynamics that is beyond the linear response treatments.

  14. Zinc oxide nanoparticle based optical fiber humidity sensor having linear response throughout a large dynamic range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aneesh, R; Khijwania, Sunil K

    2011-09-20

    The main objective of the present work is to develop an optical fiber relative humidity (RH) sensor having a linear response throughout over the widest possible dynamic range. We report an optical fiber RH sensor based on the evanescent wave absorption spectroscopy that fulfills this objective. The fiber sensor employs a specific nanoparticle (zinc oxide) doped sol-gel nanostructured sensing film of optimum thickness, synthesized over a short length of a centrally decladded straight and uniform optical fiber. A detailed experimental investigation is carried out to analyze the sensor response/characteristics. Fiber sensor response is observed to be linear throughout the dynamic range as wide as 4% to 96% RH. The observed linear sensitivity for the fiber sensor is 0.0012 RH(-1). The average response time of the reported sensor is observed to be as short as 0.06 s during the humidification. In addition, the sensor exhibited a very good degree of reversibility and extremely high reliability as well as repeatability.

  15. Fault-Tolerant Electro-Responsive Surfaces for Dynamic Micropattern Molds and Tunable Optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, I-Ting; Wang, Tiesheng; Zhang, Fenghua; Smoukov, Stoyan K

    2017-10-02

    Electrically deformable surfaces based on dielectric elastomers have recently demonstrated controllable microscale roughness, ease of operation, fast response, and possibilities for programmable control. Potential applications include marine anti-biofouling, dynamic pattern generation, and voltage-controlled smart windows. Most of these systems, however, exhibit limited durability due to irreversible dielectric breakdown. Lowering device voltage to avoid this issue is hindered by an inadequate understanding of the electrically-induced wrinkling deformation as a function of the deformable elastic film thickness. Here we report responsive surfaces that overcome these shortcomings: we achieve fault-tolerant behavior based on the ability to self-insulate breakdown faults, and we enhance fundamental understanding of the system by quantifying the critical field necessary to induce wrinkles in films of different thickness and comparing to analytical models. We also observe new capabilities of these responsive surfaces, such as field amplification near local breakdown sites, which enable actuation and wrinkle pattern formation at lower applied voltages. We demonstrate the wide applicability of our responsive, fault-tolerant films by using our system for adjustable transparency films, tunable diffraction gratings, and a dynamic surface template/factory from which various static micropatterns can be molded on demand.

  16. Solving a Location, Allocation, and Capacity Planning Problem with Dynamic Demand and Response Time Service Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrie Ka Yuk Lin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Logistic systems with uncertain demand, travel time, and on-site processing time are studied here where sequential trip travel is allowed. The relationship between three levels of decisions: facility location, demand allocation, and resource capacity (number of service units, satisfying the response time requirement, is analysed. The problem is formulated as a stochastic mixed integer program. A simulation-based hybrid heuristic is developed to solve the dynamic problem under different response time service level. An initial solution is obtained from solving static location-allocation models, followed by iterative improvement of the three levels of decisions by ejection, reinsertion procedure with memory of feasible and infeasible service regions. Results indicate that a higher response time service level could be achieved by allocating a given resource under an appropriate decentralized policy. Given a response time requirement, the general trend is that the minimum total capacity initially decreases with more facilities. During this stage, variability in travel time has more impact on capacity than variability in demand arrivals. Thereafter, the total capacity remains stable and then gradually increases. When service level requirement is high, the dynamic dispatch based on first-come-first-serve rule requires smaller capacity than the one by nearest-neighbour rule.

  17. Dynamic regulation of gene expression using sucrose responsive promoters and RNA interference in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Thomas C; Espinosa, Monica I; Nielsen, Lars K; Vickers, Claudia E

    2015-04-01

    Engineering dynamic, environmentally- and temporally-responsive control of gene expression is one of the principle objectives in the field of synthetic biology. Dynamic regulation is desirable because many engineered functions conflict with endogenous processes which have evolved to facilitate growth and survival, and minimising conflict between growth and production phases can improve product titres in microbial cell factories. There are a limited number of mechanisms that enable dynamic regulation in yeast, and fewer still that are appropriate for application in an industrial setting. To address this problem we have identified promoters that are repressed during growth on glucose, and activated during growth on sucrose. Catabolite repression and preferential glucose utilisation allows active growth on glucose before switching to production on sucrose. Using sucrose as an activator of gene expression circumvents the need for expensive inducer compounds and enables gene expression to be triggered during growth on a fermentable, high energy-yield carbon source. The ability to fine-tune the timing and population density at which gene expression is activated from the SUC2 promoter was demonstrated by varying the ratio of glucose to sucrose in the growth medium. Finally, we demonstrated that the system could also be used to repress gene expression (a process also required for many engineering projects). We used the glucose/sucrose system to control a heterologous RNA interference module and dynamically repress the expression of a constitutively regulated GFP gene. The low noise levels and high dynamic range of the SUC2 promoter make it a promising option for implementing dynamic regulation in yeast. The capacity to repress gene expression using RNA interference makes the system highly versatile, with great potential for metabolic engineering applications.

  18. Blood-Vessel-on-a-Chip Platforms for Evaluating Nanoparticle Drug Delivery Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuancheng; Zhu, Kai; Liu, Xiao; Zhang, Y Shrike

    2017-09-24

    Nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems hold great promise for the treatment of major diseases. However, their slow translation from bench to the clinic posts a serious concern. It is mainly attributed to the lack of suitable in vitro platforms for rapid and accurate screening of nanomedicine. Recent developments in microfluidic technologies have provided the possibility to reproduce the biomimetic blood vessel microenvironments outside the body, thus offering a convenient means to characterize the in vivo dynamics and biological responses of nanoparticles. In this review, we discuss the challenges facing the field of nanoparticle drug delivery and highlight the urgent need for construction of blood-vessel-on-a-chip platforms for testing nanomedicine. We subsequently illustrate advances in fabricating various well-controlled blood-vessel-on-a-chip platforms, covering a few examples that have used such models for evaluating nanoparticles behaviors. We then summarize with conclusions and perspectives. We anticipate that, further development of these blood-vessel-on-a-chip platforms with improved biomimetic parameters, tissue specificity, and personalization, will enable their wide applications in drug screening including nanomedicine. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  19. Geosynchronous magnetic field responses to fast solar wind dynamic pressure enhancements: MHD field model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. R. Sun

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We performed global MHD simulations of the geosynchronous magnetic field in response to fast solar wind dynamic pressure (Pd enhancements. Taking three Pd enhancement events in 2000 as examples, we found that the main features of the total field B and the dominant component Bz can be efficiently predicted by the MHD model. The predicted B and Bz varies with local time, with the highest level near noon and a slightly lower level around mid-night. However, it is more challenging to accurately predict the responses of the smaller component at the geosynchronous orbit (i.e., Bx and By. In contrast, the limitations of T01 model in predicting responses to fast Pd enhancements are presented.

  20. Dynamic response analysis of an aircraft structure under thermal-acoustic loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, H.; Li, H. B.; Zhang, W.; Wu, Z. Q.; Liu, B. R.

    2016-09-01

    Future hypersonic aircraft will be exposed to extreme combined environments includes large magnitude thermal and acoustic loads. It presents a significant challenge for the integrity of these vehicles. Thermal-acoustic test is used to test structures for dynamic response and sonic fatigue due to combined loads. In this research, the numerical simulation process for the thermal acoustic test is presented, and the effects of thermal loads on vibro-acoustic response are investigated. To simulate the radiation heating system, Monte Carlo theory and thermal network theory was used to calculate the temperature distribution. Considering the thermal stress, the high temperature modal parameters are obtained with structural finite element methods. Based on acoustic finite element, modal-based vibro-acoustic analysis is carried out to compute structural responses. These researches are very vital to optimum thermal-acoustic test and structure designs for future hypersonic vehicles structure

  1. Dynamics of DNA damage response proteins at DNA breaks: a focus on protein modifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polo, Sophie E.; Jackson, Stephen P.

    2011-01-01

    Genome integrity is constantly monitored by sophisticated cellular networks, collectively termed the DNA damage response (DDR). A common feature of DDR proteins is their mobilization in response to genotoxic stress. Here, we outline how the development of various complementary methodologies has provided valuable insights into the spatiotemporal dynamics of DDR protein assembly/disassembly at sites of DNA strand breaks in eukaryotic cells. Considerable advances have also been made in understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms for these events, with post-translational modifications of DDR factors being shown to play prominent roles in controlling the formation of foci in response to DNA-damaging agents. We review these regulatory mechanisms and discuss their biological significance to the DDR. PMID:21363960

  2. Ultra-Stretchable Ionic Nanocomposites: From Dynamic Bonding to Multi-Responsive Behavior

    KAUST Repository

    Odent, Jeremy

    2017-06-12

    Although multi-responsive materials have the potential to revolutionize a wide spectrum of technologies, the design of systems that combine a range of responses to a variety of different external changes without the associated property trade-offs has remained elusive. We herein demonstrate a new family of multi-responsive nanocomposites that leverage the dynamic and reversible nature of electrostatic interactions present in ionic systems with the reinforcement ability of nanoparticles in nanocomposites. This new design leads to a unique property profile that combines simultaneous improvements in stiffness, toughness and extensibility. In addition to their exceptional stretchability, the new, ionic nanocomposites exhibit unique strain-dependent behavior (i.e. the deformation increases with increasing strain rate) and return to normal state after deformation including shape-memory and scratching recovery.

  3. The dynamic pressure response to rapid dilatation of the resting urethra in healthy women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagi, P; Thind, P; Colstrup, H

    1993-01-01

    beta e-t/tau beta, where Pequ, P alpha and P beta are constants, and tau alpha and tau beta are time constants; this equation has previously been demonstrated to describe the pressure decay following dilatation. On the basis of a theoretical model the elastic and viscous constants for the urethral......The urethral pressure response to a sudden forced dilatation was studied at the bladder neck, in the high-pressure zone and in the distal urethra in ten healthy female volunteers. The pressure response was fitted with a double exponential function of the form Pt = Pequ + P alpha e-t/tau alpha + P...... a detailed assessment of static and dynamic urethral responses to dilatation which can be applied as an experimental simulation of urine ingression, and is therefore presumed to be of value in the evaluation of normal and pathological urethral sphincter function....

  4. A minimal titration modelization of the mammalian dynamical heat shock response

    CERN Document Server

    Aude, Sivéry; Thommen, Quentin

    2015-01-01

    Environmental stress, such as oxidative or heat stress, induces the activation of the Heat Shock Response (HSR) which leads to an increase in the heat shock proteins (HSPs) level. These HSPs act as molecular chaperones to maintain proteostasis. Even if the main heat shock response partners are well known, a detailed description of the dynamical properties of the HSR network is still missing. In this study, we derive a minimal mathematical model of cellular response to heat shock that reproduces available experimental data sets both on transcription factor activity and cell viability. This simplistic model highlights the key mechanistic processes that rule the HSR network and reveals (i) the titration of Heat Shock Factor 1 (HSF1) by chaperones as the guiding line of the network, (ii) that protein triage governs the fate of damaged proteins and (iii) three different temperature regimes describing normal, acute or chronic stress.

  5. Dynamic lymph flow imaging in patients with oedema of the lower limb for evaluation of the functional outcome after autologous lymph vessel transplantation: an 8-year follow-up study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, Mayo; Hahn, Klaus [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Ziemssenstrasse 1, 80335 Munich (Germany); Baumeister, Ruediger G.H. [Department of Micro-, Hand and Reconstructive Surgery, Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich (Germany)

    2003-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to monitor the functional outcome of microsurgical intervention on lymph drainage by means of non-invasive, readily available lymphoscintigraphy. Eight patients with primary or secondary lymphoedema of the lower limb were investigated before and for 8 years after autologous lymph vessel transplantation. For scintigraphy, technetium-99m labelled nanocolloid was subcutaneously injected into the first interdigital space of the affected limb. Sequential images were acquired up to 6 h p.i.; for semiquantitative evaluation a numerical transport index was established by assigning scores of up to 9 on each of five criteria: lymphatic transport kinetics, distribution pattern of the radiopharmaceutical, time to appearance of lymph nodes, visualisation of lymph nodes and visualisation of lymph vessels/grafts. Ti values <10 were considered normal. In all eight patients, lymphatic function significantly (P{<=}0.01) improved after microsurgical treatment. Permanent function of vessel grafts was indicated by persistently low Ti values during the entire observation period, impressively demonstrating the success of this complex microsurgical technique. Patients with scintigraphic visualisation of the vessel graft (n=2/8) showed a substantially better postoperative outcome than those without visualisation of the vessel graft. The findings indicate that lymph vessel transplantation significantly improves lymph drainage in patients with primary or secondary lymphoedema of the lower limb. Thus, lymphoscintigraphy is helpful not only in planning microsurgical treatment but also in monitoring the postoperative outcome. (orig.)

  6. In vivo measurement of localized tibiofemoral cartilage strains in response to dynamic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, E Grant; Widmyer, Margaret R; Utturkar, Gangadhar M; Spritzer, Charles E; Garrett, William E; DeFrate, Louis E

    2015-02-01

    Altered local mechanical loading may disrupt normal cartilage homeostasis and play a role in the progression of osteoarthritis. Currently, there are limited data quantifying local cartilage strains in response to dynamic activity in normal or injured knees. To directly measure local tibiofemoral cartilage strains in response to a dynamic hopping activity in normal healthy knees. We hypothesized that local regions of cartilage will exhibit significant compressive strains in response to hopping, while overall compartmental averages may not. Controlled laboratory study. Both knees of 8 healthy subjects underwent magnetic resonance imaging before and immediately after a dynamic hopping activity. Images were segmented and then used to create 3-dimensional surface models of bone and cartilage. These pre- and postactivity models were then registered using an iterative closest point technique to enable site-specific measurements of cartilage strain (defined as the normalized change in cartilage thickness before and after activity) on the femur and tibia. Significant strains were observed in both the medial and lateral tibial cartilage, with each compartment averaging a decrease of 5%. However, these strains varied with location within each compartment, reaching a maximum compressive strain of 8% on the medial plateau and 7% on the lateral plateau. No significant averaged compartmental strains were observed in the medial or lateral femoral cartilage. However, local regions of the medial and lateral femoral cartilage experienced significant compressive strains, reaching maximums of 6% and 3%, respectively. Local regions of both the femur and tibia experienced significant cartilage strains as a result of dynamic activity. An understanding of changes in cartilage strain distributions may help to elucidate the biomechanical factors contributing to cartilage degeneration after joint injury. Site-specific measurements of in vivo cartilage strains are important because altered

  7. Studying Climate Response to Forcing by the Nonlinear Dynamical Mode Decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhin, Dmitry; Gavrilov, Andrey; Loskutov, Evgeny; Feigin, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    An analysis of global climate response to external forcing, both anthropogenic (mainly, CO2 and aerosol) and natural (solar and volcanic), is needed for adequate predictions of global climate change. Being complex dynamical system, the climate reacts to external perturbations exciting feedbacks (both positive and negative) making the response non-trivial and poorly predictable. Thus an extraction of internal modes of climate system, investigation of their interaction with external forcings and further modeling and forecast of their dynamics, are all the problems providing the success of climate modeling. In the report the new method for principal mode extraction from climate data is presented. The method is based on the Nonlinear Dynamical Mode (NDM) expansion [1,2], but takes into account a number of external forcings applied to the system. Each NDM is represented by hidden time series governing the observed variability, which, together with external forcing time series, are mapped onto data space. While forcing time series are considered to be known, the hidden unknown signals underlying the internal climate dynamics are extracted from observed data by the suggested method. In particular, it gives us an opportunity to study the evolution of principal system's mode structure in changing external conditions and separate the internal climate variability from trends forced by external perturbations. Furthermore, the modes so obtained can be extrapolated beyond the observational time series, and long-term prognosis of modes' structure including characteristics of interconnections and responses to external perturbations, can be carried out. In this work the method is used for reconstructing and studying the principal modes of climate variability on inter-annual and decadal time scales accounting the external forcings such as anthropogenic emissions, variations of the solar activity and volcanic activity. The structure of the obtained modes as well as their response to

  8. Dynamic response for structural health monitoring of the Penang (I) cable-stayed bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, M. I.; Sulaeman, E.; Mustapha, F.

    2017-03-01

    The paper discusses the dynamic response of the Penang (I) cable stayed bridge structure under various moving load representing typical traffic load of the bridge. The bridge has a total span of 440 m excluding the transition bridge that assumed to be not connected structurally to the main bridge structure. The bridge that links the fast growing Pinang Island and the Malaysian Mainland Peninsula has been known to be fully utilized which leads to the construction of Penang (II) bridge and now the third one. Due to highly traffic use of the bridge that may lead to reduction of the bridge design life, the dynamic response of the bridge becomes important to predict critical part of the bridge structure elements including the main girder and the 144 stay cables. The present study reveals that, due to flexible nature of the cable stayed bridge, the moving load that interacts with the natural dynamic characteristics of the bridge, gives significant stress increment compare to proportional static load especially when the moving load is un-symmetric. For this reason, several classes of typical vehicle passing the bridge with various vehicle speeds are investigated to demonstrate their effect on the bridge displacement, internal forces and stresses. The results can be used for further fatigue assessment of the bridge.

  9. Population responses to environmental change in a tropical ant: the interaction of spatial and temporal dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doug Jackson

    Full Text Available Spatial structure can have a profound, but often underappreciated, effect on the temporal dynamics of ecosystems. Here we report on a counterintuitive increase in the population of a tree-nesting ant, Azteca sericeasur, in response to a drastic reduction in the number of potential nesting sites. This surprising result is comprehensible when viewed in the context of the self-organized spatial dynamics of the ants and their effect on the ants' dispersal-limited natural enemies. Approximately 30% of the trees in the study site, a coffee agroecosystem in southern Mexico, were pruned or felled over a two-year period, and yet the abundance of the ant nests more than doubled over the seven-year study. Throughout the transition, the spatial distribution of the ants maintained a power-law distribution - a signal of spatial self organization - but the local clustering of the nests was reduced post-pruning. A cellular automata model incorporating the changed spatial structure of the ants and the resulting partial escape from antagonists reproduced the observed increase in abundance, highlighting how self-organized spatial dynamics can profoundly influence the responses of ecosystems to perturbations.

  10. Population responses to environmental change in a tropical ant: the interaction of spatial and temporal dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Doug; Vandermeer, John; Perfecto, Ivette; Philpott, Stacy M

    2014-01-01

    Spatial structure can have a profound, but often underappreciated, effect on the temporal dynamics of ecosystems. Here we report on a counterintuitive increase in the population of a tree-nesting ant, Azteca sericeasur, in response to a drastic reduction in the number of potential nesting sites. This surprising result is comprehensible when viewed in the context of the self-organized spatial dynamics of the ants and their effect on the ants' dispersal-limited natural enemies. Approximately 30% of the trees in the study site, a coffee agroecosystem in southern Mexico, were pruned or felled over a two-year period, and yet the abundance of the ant nests more than doubled over the seven-year study. Throughout the transition, the spatial distribution of the ants maintained a power-law distribution - a signal of spatial self organization - but the local clustering of the nests was reduced post-pruning. A cellular automata model incorporating the changed spatial structure of the ants and the resulting partial escape from antagonists reproduced the observed increase in abundance, highlighting how self-organized spatial dynamics can profoundly influence the responses of ecosystems to perturbations.

  11. Dynamic response mitigation of floating wind turbine platforms using tuned liquid column dampers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaksic, V; Wright, C S; Murphy, J; Afeef, C; Ali, S F; Mandic, D P; Pakrashi, V

    2015-02-28

    In this paper, we experimentally study and compare the effects of three combinations of multiple tuned liquid column dampers (MTLCDs) on the dynamic performance of a model floating tension-leg platform (TLP) structure in a wave basin. The structural stability and safety of the floating structure during operation and maintenance is of concern for the performance of a renewable energy device that it might be supporting. The dynamic responses of the structure should thus be limited for these renewable energy devices to perform as intended. This issue is particularly important during the operation of a TLP in extreme weather conditions. Tuned liquid column dampers (TLCDs) can use the power of sloshing water to reduce surge motions of a floating TLP exposed to wind and waves. This paper demonstrates the potential of MTLCDs in reducing dynamic responses of a scaled TLP model through an experimental study. The potential of using output-only statistical markers for monitoring changes in structural conditions is also investigated through the application of a delay vector variance (DVV) marker for different conditions of control for the experiments. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  12. Comparison study between static and dynamic responses of optical fiber weight in motion sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanto, D.; Ula, R. K.; Setiono, A.; Puranto, P.; Adinanta, H.; Waluyo, T. B.; Widiyatmoko, B.

    2017-04-01

    This research investigates responses of Optical Fiber Weight in Motion (WIM) sensors when static and dynamic weighing vehicle are applied. The vehicle used in the experiment was a replica of Mitsubishi FE 71 with weight of 23.01 kg. The WIM measurement system consisted of LED 1310 nm, optical fiber based WIM sensor, transimpedance amplified photodetector Ge PDA50 from Thorlabs, data acquisition DT translation 9816 S, speed sensors, and software program for WIM Evaluation. Static weighing was performed when the vehicle stopped. Besides performing static weighing on WIM sensor, measurement was also conducted on Kenko scale as validation. Meanwhile, measurement of dynamic weight was only conducted when the vehicle moved at a constant speed of about 1 km/h through WIM sensor. Experimental results showed two curves corresponded to the front axle load and the rear axle load. During static weighing, both WIM sensor and Kenko scales indicated similar output, which were flat curves. On the other hand, during dynamic weighing, WIM sensor had different output that was a pulse response. This preliminary study resulted in changes of amplitude and output shape. Unlike static weighing, moving vehicles contributed to the output of WIM sensor.

  13. Response lags and environmental dynamics of restoration efforts for Lake Rotorua, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Hannah; Hamilton, David P.; Doole, Graeme J.

    2015-07-01

    Regulatory responses to degradation of freshwater ecosystems have been characterized by long response times and have often failed to prevent declining health or to implement successful restoration programs. We studied environmental and management dynamics of ecosystem restoration in Lake Rotorua, New Zealand, where land use intensification is the main driver of water quality decline. Water quality decline, invasions by exotic submerged plants and occurrences of algal blooms have led to a number of in-lake interventions such as herbicide spraying (to control submerged plants) and dosing of inflows with Alum to flocculate phosphorus (and reduce algal blooms). Management of land use to reduce nutrient run-off has also been initiated. Based on the drivers-pressures-state-impact-response (DPSIR) framework, water quality changes and management responses were examined by studying research publications and data from 1922 to 2013. Multinomial regression analysis based on the generalized maximum entropy model was used to investigate the five categories of DPSIR and examine relationships of environmental dynamics and regulatory responses. We tested whether the visibility of ecosystem degradation in the public sphere, and social lag times to respond to them, were drivers of failures of these regulatory responses. Our study shows that management was reactive, and regulations often took effect only when ecosystem decline was already well advanced. There was a disconnect between land use intensification and its role in driving water quality change. Our results indicate that science can better inform management decision making by providing a holistic framework integrating ecological knowledge, economic interest and societal constraints.

  14. Dynamics of brain responses to phobic-related stimulation in specific phobia subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caseras, Xavier; Mataix-Cols, David; Trasovares, Maria Victoria; López-Solà, Marina; Ortriz, Hector; Pujol, Jesus; Soriano-Mas, Carles; Giampietro, Vincent; Brammer, Michael J; Torrubia, Rafael

    2010-10-01

    Very few studies have investigated to what extent different subtypes of specific phobia share the same underlying functional neuroanatomy. This study aims to investigate the potential differences in the anatomy and dynamics of the blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) responses associated with spider and blood-injection-injury phobias. We used an event-related paradigm in 14 untreated spider phobics, 15 untreated blood-injection-injury phobics and 17 controls. Phobic images successfully induced distress only in phobic participants. Both phobic groups showed a similar pattern of heart rate increase following the presentation of phobic stimuli, this being different from controls. The presentation of phobic images induced activity within the same brain network in all participants, although the intensity of brain responses was significantly higher in phobics. Only blood-injection-injury phobics showed greater activity in the ventral prefrontal cortex compared with controls. This phobia group also presented a lower activity peak in the left amygdala compared with spider phobics. Importantly, looking at the dynamics of BOLD responses, both phobia groups showed a quicker time-to-peak in the right amygdala than controls, but only spider phobics also differed from controls in this parameter within the left amygdala. Considering these and previous findings, both phobia subtypes show very similar responses regarding their immediate reaction to phobia-related images, but critical differences in their sustained responses to these stimuli. These results highlight the importance of considering complex mental processes potentially associated with coping and emotion regulation processes, rather than exclusively focusing on primary neural responses to threat, when investigating fear and phobias. © 2010 The Authors. European Journal of Neuroscience © 2010 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. A novel methodology for adaptive wave filtering of marine vessels: Theory and experiments

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Hassani, V.; Pascoal, A.M.; Sorensen, A.J.

    This paper addresses a filtering problem that arises in the design of dynamic positioning systems for ships and offshore rigs subjected to the influence of sea waves. The vessel`s dynamic model adopted captures the sea state as an uncertain...

  16. ISO and EIGA standards for cryogenic vessels and accessories

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    The EIGA/WG 6’s scope is cryogenic vessels and accessories, including their design, material compatibility, operational requirements and periodical inspection. The specific responsibilities include monitoring international standardization (ISO, CEN) and regulations (UN, TPED, PED...

  17. 46 CFR 289.2 - Vessels included.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... CONSTRUCTION-DIFFERENTIAL SUBSIDY VESSELS, OPERATING-DIFFERENTIAL SUBSIDY VESSELS AND OF VESSELS SOLD OR ADJUSTED UNDER THE MERCHANT SHIP SALES ACT 1946 § 289.2 Vessels included. Vessels subject to the provisions of this part are: (a) All vessels which may in the future be constructed or sold with construction...

  18. Reactor pressure vessel. Status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliot, B.J.; Hackett, E.M.; Lee, A.D. [and others

    1996-10-01

    This report describes the issues raised as a result of the staffs review of Generic Letter (GL) 92-01, Revision 1, responses and plant-specific reactor pressure vessel (RPV) assessments and the actions taken or work in progress to address these issues. In addition, the report describes actions taken by the staff and the nuclear industry to develop a thermal annealing process for use at U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. This process is intended to be used as a means of mitigating the effects of neutron radiation on the fracture toughness of RPV materials. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued GL 92-01, Revision 1, Supplement 1, to obtain information needed to assess compliance with regulatory requirements and licensee commitments regarding RPV integrity. GL 92-01, Revision 1, Supplement 1, was issued as a result of generic issues that were raised in the NRC staff`s reviews of licensee responses to GL 92-01, Revision 1, and plant-specific RPV evaluations. In particular, an integrated review of all data submitted in response to GL 92-01, Revision 1, indicated that licensees may not have considered all relevant data in their RPV assessments. This report is representative of submittals to and evaluations by the staff as of September 30, 1996. An update of this report will be issued at a later date.

  19. Mechanical response of two polyimides through coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudarkodi, V.; Sooraj, K.; Nair, Nisanth N.; Basu, Sumit; Parandekar, Priya V.; Sinha, Nishant K.; Prakash, Om; Tsotsis, Tom

    2018-03-01

    Coarse-grained molecular dynamics (MD) simulations allow us to predict the mechanical responses of polymers, starting merely with a description of their molecular architectures. It is interesting to ask whether, given two competing molecular architectures, coarse-grained MD simulations can predict the differences that can be expected in their mechanical responses. We have studied two crosslinked polyimides PMR15 and HFPE52—both used in high- temperature applications—to assess whether the subtle differences in their uniaxial stress–strain responses, revealed by experiments, can be reproduced by carefully coarse-grained MD models. The coarse graining procedure for PMR15 is outlined in this work, while the coarse grain forcefields for HFPE52 are borrowed from an earlier one (Pandiyan et al 2015 Macromol. Theory Simul. 24 513–20). We show that the stress–strain responses of both these polyimides are qualitatively reproduced, and important insights into their deformation and failure mechanisms are obtained. More importantly, the differences in the molecular architecture between the polyimides carry over to the differences in the stress–strain responses in a manner that parallels the experimental results. A critical assessment of the successes and shortcomings of predicting mechanical responses through coarse-grained MD simulations has been made.

  20. Dynamic selection of ship responses for estimation of on-site directional wave spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ingrid Marie Vincent; Storhaug, Gaute

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of the wave environment in which a ship is operating is crucial for most on-board decision support systems. Previous research has shown that the directional wave spectrum can be estimated by the use of measured global ship responses and a set of transfer functions determined for the spe......Knowledge of the wave environment in which a ship is operating is crucial for most on-board decision support systems. Previous research has shown that the directional wave spectrum can be estimated by the use of measured global ship responses and a set of transfer functions determined...... for the specific ship. The approach can either be based on parametric or Bayesian (non-parametric) modelling, and in both cases a set of three ship responses usually provides the best estimation. The optimal response combination of three responses at any time depends on the environmental conditions...... and the operation of the ship. Since measurements of more than three responses are usually available, a quick, dynamic selection procedure of the three signals best suited for the wave spectrum estimation procedure is essential. In the present paper the concept of a selection method based on a simple pre...

  1. Lung vessel segmentation in CT images using graph-cuts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Zhiwei; Staring, Marius; Stoel, Berend C.

    2016-03-01

    Accurate lung vessel segmentation is an important operation for lung CT analysis. Filters that are based on analyzing the eigenvalues of the Hessian matrix are popular for pulmonary vessel enhancement. However, due to their low response at vessel bifurcations and vessel boundaries, extracting lung vessels by thresholding the vesselness is not sufficiently accurate. Some methods turn to graph-cuts for more accurate segmentation, as it incorporates neighbourhood information. In this work, we propose a new graph-cuts cost function combining appearance and shape, where CT intensity represents appearance and vesselness from a Hessian-based filter represents shape. Due to the amount of voxels in high resolution CT scans, the memory requirement and time consumption for building a graph structure is very high. In order to make the graph representation computationally tractable, those voxels that are considered clearly background are removed from the graph nodes, using a threshold on the vesselness map. The graph structure is then established based on the remaining voxel nodes, source/sink nodes and the neighbourhood relationship of the remaining voxels. Vessels are segmented by minimizing the energy cost function with the graph-cuts optimization framework. We optimized the parameters used in the graph-cuts cost function and evaluated the proposed method with two manually labeled sub-volumes. For independent evaluation, we used 20 CT scans of the VESSEL12 challenge. The evaluation results of the sub-volume data show that the proposed method produced a more accurate vessel segmentation compared to the previous methods, with F1 score 0.76 and 0.69. In the VESSEL12 data-set, our method obtained a competitive performance with an area under the ROC curve of 0.975, especially among the binary submissions.

  2. Responses of Cloud Type Distributions to the Large-Scale Dynamical Circulation: Water Budget-Related Dynamical Phase Space and Dynamical Regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Sun; Del Genio, Anthony; Wang, Tao; Kahn, Brian; Fetzer, Eric J.; L'Ecuyer, Tristan S.

    2015-01-01

    Goals: Water budget-related dynamical phase space; Connect large-scale dynamical conditions to atmospheric water budget (including precipitation); Connect atmospheric water budget to cloud type distributions.

  3. Flight control of fruit flies: dynamic response to optic flow and headwind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Kiaran K K; Srinivasan, Mandyam V

    2017-06-01

    Insects are magnificent fliers that are capable of performing many complex tasks such as speed regulation, smooth landings and collision avoidance, even though their computational abilities are limited by their small brain. To investigate how flying insects respond to changes in wind speed and surrounding optic flow, the open-loop sensorimotor response of female Queensland fruit flies ( Bactrocera tryoni ) was examined. A total of 136 flies were exposed to stimuli comprising sinusoidally varying optic flow and air flow (simulating forward movement) under tethered conditions in a virtual reality arena. Two responses were measured: the thrust and the abdomen pitch. The dynamics of the responses to optic flow and air flow were measured at various frequencies, and modelled as a multicompartment linear system, which accurately captured the behavioural responses of the fruit flies. The results indicate that these two behavioural responses are concurrently sensitive to changes of optic flow as well as wind. The abdomen pitch showed a streamlining response, where the abdomen was raised higher as the magnitude of either stimulus was increased. The thrust, in contrast, exhibited a counter-phase response where maximum thrust occurred when the optic flow or wind flow was at a minimum, indicating that the flies were attempting to maintain an ideal flight speed. When the changes in the wind and optic flow were in phase (i.e. did not contradict each other), the net responses (thrust and abdomen pitch) were well approximated by an equally weighted sum of the responses to the individual stimuli. However, when the optic flow and wind stimuli were presented in counterphase, the flies seemed to respond to only one stimulus or the other, demonstrating a form of 'selective attention'. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  4. Transcriptional dynamics reveal critical roles for non-coding RNAs in the immediate-early response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart Aitken

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The immediate-early response mediates cell fate in response to a variety of extracellular stimuli and is dysregulated in many cancers. However, the specificity of the response across stimuli and cell types, and the roles of non-coding RNAs are not well understood. Using a large collection of densely-sampled time series expression data we have examined the induction of the immediate-early response in unparalleled detail, across cell types and stimuli. We exploit cap analysis of gene expression (CAGE time series datasets to directly measure promoter activities over time. Using a novel analysis method for time series data we identify transcripts with expression patterns that closely resemble the dynamics of known immediate-early genes (IEGs and this enables a comprehensive comparative study of these genes and their chromatin state. Surprisingly, these data suggest that the earliest transcriptional responses often involve promoters generating non-coding RNAs, many of which are produced in advance of canonical protein-coding IEGs. IEGs are known to be capable of induction without de novo protein synthesis. Consistent with this, we find that the response of both protein-coding and non-coding RNA IEGs can be explained by their transcriptionally poised, permissive chromatin state prior to stimulation. We also explore the function of non-coding RNAs in the attenuation of the immediate early response in a small RNA sequencing dataset matched to the CAGE data: We identify a novel set of microRNAs responsible for the attenuation of the IEG response in an estrogen receptor positive cancer cell line. Our computational statistical method is well suited to meta-analyses as there is no requirement for transcripts to pass thresholds for significant differential expression between time points, and it is agnostic to the number of time points per dataset.

  5. Blood flow reprograms lymphatic vessels to blood vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chiu-Yu; Bertozzi, Cara; Zou, Zhiying; Yuan, Lijun; Lee, John S; Lu, MinMin; Stachelek, Stan J; Srinivasan, Sathish; Guo, Lili; Vicente, Andres; Vincente, Andres; Mericko, Patricia; Levy, Robert J; Makinen, Taija; Oliver, Guillermo; Kahn, Mark L

    2012-06-01

    Human vascular malformations cause disease as a result of changes in blood flow and vascular hemodynamic forces. Although the genetic mutations that underlie the formation of many human vascular malformations are known, the extent to which abnormal blood flow can subsequently influence the vascular genetic program and natural history is not. Loss of the SH2 domain-containing leukocyte protein of 76 kDa (SLP76) resulted in a vascular malformation that directed blood flow through mesenteric lymphatic vessels after birth in mice. Mesenteric vessels in the position of the congenital lymphatic in mature Slp76-null mice lacked lymphatic identity and expressed a marker of blood vessel identity. Genetic lineage tracing demonstrated that this change in vessel identity was the result of lymphatic endothelial cell reprogramming rather than replacement by blood endothelial cells. Exposure of lymphatic vessels to blood in the absence of significant flow did not alter vessel identity in vivo, but lymphatic endothelial cells exposed to similar levels of shear stress ex vivo rapidly lost expression of PROX1, a lymphatic fate-specifying transcription factor. These findings reveal that blood flow can convert lymphatic vessels to blood vessels, demonstrating that hemodynamic forces may reprogram endothelial and vessel identity in cardiovascular diseases associated with abnormal flow.

  6. Using an agent-based model to analyze the dynamic communication network of the immune response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doolittle John

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The immune system behaves like a complex, dynamic network with interacting elements including leukocytes, cytokines, and chemokines. While the immune system is broadly distributed, leukocytes must communicate effectively to respond to a pathological challenge. The Basic Immune Simulator 2010 contains agents representing leukocytes and tissue cells, signals representing cytokines, chemokines, and pathogens, and virtual spaces representing organ tissue, lymphoid tissue, and blood. Agents interact dynamically in the compartments in response to infection of the virtual tissue. Agent behavior is imposed by logical rules derived from the scientific literature. The model captured the agent-to-agent contact history, and from this the network topology and the interactions resulting in successful versus failed viral clearance were identified. This model served to integrate existing knowledge and allowed us to examine the immune response from a novel perspective directed at exploiting complex dynamics, ultimately for the design of therapeutic interventions. Results Analyzing the evolution of agent-agent interactions at incremental time points from identical initial conditions revealed novel features of immune communication associated with successful and failed outcomes. There were fewer contacts between agents for simulations ending in viral elimination (win versus persistent infection (loss, due to the removal of infected agents. However, early cellular interactions preceded successful clearance of infection. Specifically, more Dendritic Agent interactions with TCell and BCell Agents, and more BCell Agent interactions with TCell Agents early in the simulation were associated with the immune win outcome. The Dendritic Agents greatly influenced the outcome, confirming them as hub agents of the immune network. In addition, unexpectedly high frequencies of Dendritic Agent-self interactions occurred in the lymphoid compartment late in the

  7. Retinal vessel centerline extraction using multiscale matched filters, confidence and edge measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofka, Michal; Stewart, Charles V

    2006-12-01

    Motivated by the goals of improving detection of low-contrast and narrow vessels and eliminating false detections at nonvascular structures, a new technique is presented for extracting vessels in retinal images. The core of the technique is a new likelihood ratio test that combines matched-filter responses, confidence measures and vessel boundary measures. Matched filter responses are derived in scale-space to extract vessels of widely varying widths. A vessel confidence measure is defined as a projection of a vector formed from a normalized pixel neighborhood onto a normalized ideal vessel profile. Vessel boundary measures and associated confidences are computed at potential vessel boundaries. Combined, these responses form a six-dimensional measurement vector at each pixel. A training technique is used to develop a mapping of this vector to a likelihood ratio that measures the "vesselness" at each pixel. Results comparing this vesselness measure to matched filters alone and to measures based on the Hessian of intensities show substantial improvements, both qualitatively and quantitatively. The Hessian can be used in place of the matched filter to obtain similar but less-substantial improvements or to steer the matched filter by preselecting kernel orientations. Finally, the new vesselness likelihood ratio is embedded into a vessel tracing framework, resulting in an efficient and effective vessel centerline extraction algorithm.

  8. Fluid Compressibility Effects on the Dynamic Response of Hydrostatic Journal Bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanandres, Luis A.

    1991-01-01

    A theoretical analysis for the dynamic performance characteristics of laminar flow, capillar/orifice compensated hydrostatic journal bearings is presented. The analysis considers in detail the effect of fluid compressibility in the bearing recesses. At high frequency excitations beyond a break frequency, the bearing hydrostatic stiffness increases sharply and it is accompanied by a rapid decrease in direct damping. Also, the potential of pneumatic hammer instability (negative damping) at low frequencies is likely to occur in hydrostatic bearing applications handling highly compressible fluids. Useful design criteria to avoid undesirable dynamic operating conditions at low and high frequencies are determined. The effect of fluid recess compressibility is brought into perspective, and found to be of utmost importance on the entire frequency spectrum response and stability characteristics of hydrostatic/hybrid journal bearings.

  9. Dynamic response of the Martian ionosphere to an interplanetary shock: Mars Express and MAVEN observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Y.; Gurnett, D. A.; Kopf, A. J.; Halekas, J. S.; Ruhunusiri, S.; Lee, C. O.; Hara, T.; Espley, J.; DiBraccio, G. A.; Mitchell, D. L.; Mazelle, C.; Larson, D. E.; Jakosky, B. M.

    2017-09-01

    Multipoint observations from the Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionosphere Sounding (MARSIS) instrument on board Mars Express and the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) mission reveal a dynamic response of the Martian ionosphere to abrupt variations in the upstream solar wind plasma. On 2 February 2017, MAVEN, located upstream from the Martian bow shock, encountered a corotating interaction region-related interplanetary shock with a sudden enhancement in the dynamic pressure. MARSIS, operating in the upper ionosphere at ˜478 km altitudes and ˜78° solar zenith angles, observed a sharp increase in the local magnetic field magnitude ˜1 min after the shock passage at MAVEN. The time lag is roughly consistent with the expected propagation time of a pressure pulse from the bow shock to the upper ionosphere at the fast magnetosonic speed. Subsequently, remote soundings recorded disturbed signatures of the topside ionosphere below Mars Express.

  10. ITER Vacuum Vessel design and construction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ioki, K., E-mail: Kimihiro.Ioki@iter.org [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Choi, C.H.; Daly, E.; Dani, S.; Davis, J.; Giraud, B.; Gribov, Y.; Hamlyn-Harris, C. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Jones, L. [F4E, c/Josep Pla, n.2, Torres Diagonal Litoral, Edificio B3, E-08019 Barcelona (Spain); Jun, C. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Kim, B.C. [NFRI, 52 Yeoeundong Yuseonggu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Kuzmin, E. [NTC ' Sintez' , Efremov Inst., 189631 Metallostroy, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Le Barbier, R.; Martinez, J.-M. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Pathak, H. [ITER-India, A-29, GIDC Electronic Estate, Sector -25, Gandhinagar 382025 (India); Preble, J.; Reich, J. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Sa, J.W. [NFRI, 52 Yeoeundong Yuseonggu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Terasawa, A.; Utin, Yu. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); and others

    2012-08-15

    After implementing a few design modifications (referred to as the 'Modified Reference Design') in 2009, the Vacuum Vessel (VV) design had been stabilized. The VV design is being finalized, including interface components such as support rails and feedthroughs for the in-vessel coils. It is necessary to make adjustments to the locations of the blanket supports and manifolds to accommodate design modifications to the in-vessel coils. The VV support design is also being finalized considering a structural simplification. Design of the in-wall shielding (IWS) has progressed, considering the assembly methods and the required tolerances. The detailed layout of ferritic steel plates and borated steel plates was optimized based on the toroidal field ripple analysis. A dynamic test on the inter-modular key to support the blanket modules was performed to measure the dynamic amplification factor (DAF). An R and D program has started to select and qualify the welding and cutting processes for the port flange lip seal. The ITER VV material 316 L(N) IG was already qualified and the Modified Reference Design was approved by the Agreed Notified Body (ANB) in accordance with the Nuclear Pressure Equipment Order procedure.

  11. Design sensitivity analysis of dynamic responses for a BLDC motor with mechanical and electromagnetic interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Hyungbin; Bae, Dae Sung; Chung, Jintai

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents a design sensitivity analysis of dynamic responses of a BLDC motor with mechanical and electromagnetic interactions. Based on the equations of motion which consider mechanical and electromagnetic interactions of the motor, the sensitivity equations for the dynamic responses were derived by applying the direct differential method. From the sensitivity equation along with the equations of motion, the time responses for the sensitivity analysis were obtained by using the Newmark time integration method. The sensitivities of the motor performances such as the electromagnetic torque, rotating speed, and vibration level were analyzed for the six design parameters of rotor mass, shaft/bearing stiffness, rotor eccentricity, winding resistance, coil turn number, and residual magnetic flux density. Furthermore, to achieve a higher torque, higher speed, and lower vibration level, a new BLDC motor was designed by applying the multi-objective function method. It was found that all three performances are sensitive to the design parameters in the order of the coil turn number, magnetic flux density, rotor mass, winding resistance, rotor eccentricity, and stiffness. It was also found that the torque and vibration level are more sensitive to the parameters than the rotating speed. Finally, by applying the sensitivity analysis results, a new optimized design of the motor resulted in better performances. The newly designed motor showed an improved torque, rotating speed, and vibration level.

  12. Prevalence of Ventilatory Conditions for Dynamic Fluid Responsiveness Prediction in 2 Tertiary Intensive Care Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Pedro V; Rodrigues, Bruno N; Miranda, Leandro C; Zampieri, Fernando G; Queiroz, Eduardo L; Schettino, Guilherme; Azevedo, Luciano C; Park, Marcelo; Taniguchi, Leandro U

    2016-05-01

    Dynamic parameters for fluid responsiveness obtained from heart-lung interaction during invasive mechanical ventilation require specific conditions not always present in intensive care unit (ICU) patients. The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence of these conditions in critically ill patients. We conducted a prospective observational study in 2 medical-surgical ICUs. We evaluated whether it would be possible to measure dynamic indices of fluid responsiveness when fluid expansion was administered. We recorded whether the patients were in controlled invasive mechanical ventilation with tidal volume >8 mL/kg and without arrhythmias. The proportion of patients who fulfilled these conditions was recorded. A post hoc subgroup analyses by terciles of Simplified Acute Physiology Score 3 (SAPS3) were performed. A total of 826 fluid challenges were undertaken in 424 patients during the study. The use of controlled mechanical ventilation with tidal volume > 8 mL/kg and without arrhythmias occurred in only 2.9% of the patients at the time of fluid challenge episodes. There was an increase in the prevalence of these conditions as the severity of the patients also increased: lower tercile of SAPS3 (0%), intermediate tercile (2%), and higher tercile (6.9%; P parameters for predicting fluid responsiveness in ICU may have restricted applicability in daily practice, even in more severe patients, due to low prevalence of required conditions. © The Author(s) 2014.

  13. FE Analysis of Dynamic Response of Aircraft Windshield against Bird Impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uzair Ahmed Dar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bird impact poses serious threats to military and civilian aircrafts as they lead to fatal structural damage to critical aircraft components. The exposed aircraft components such as windshields, radomes, leading edges, engine structure, and blades are vulnerable to bird strikes. Windshield is the frontal part of cockpit and more susceptible to bird impact. In the present study, finite element (FE simulations were performed to assess the dynamic response of windshield against high velocity bird impact. Numerical simulations were performed by developing nonlinear FE model in commercially available explicit FE solver AUTODYN. An elastic-plastic material model coupled with maximum principal strain failure criterion was implemented to model the impact response of windshield. Numerical model was validated with published experimental results and further employed to investigate the influence of various parameters on dynamic behavior of windshield. The parameters include the mass, shape, and velocity of bird, angle of impact, and impact location. On the basis of numerical results, the critical bird velocity and failure locations on windshield were also determined. The results show that these parameters have strong influence on impact response of windshield, and bird velocity and impact angle were amongst the most critical factors to be considered in windshield design.

  14. Dynamic Responses of the Earth's Outer Core to Assimilation of Observed Geomagnetic Secular Variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Weijia; Tangborn, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Assimilation of surface geomagnetic observations and geodynamo models has advanced very quickly in recent years. However, compared to advanced data assimilation systems in meteorology, geomagnetic data assimilation (GDAS) is still in an early stage. Among many challenges ranging from data to models is the disparity between the short observation records and the long time scales of the core dynamics. To better utilize available observational information, we have made an effort in this study to directly assimilate the Gauss coefficients of both the core field and its secular variation (SV) obtained via global geomagnetic field modeling, aiming at understanding the dynamical responses of the core fluid to these additional observational constraints. Our studies show that the SV assimilation helps significantly to shorten the dynamo model spin-up process. The flow beneath the core-mantle boundary (CMB) responds significantly to the observed field and its SV. The strongest responses occur in the relatively small scale flow (of the degrees L is approx. 30 in spherical harmonic expansions). This part of the flow includes the axisymmetric toroidal flow (of order m = 0) and non-axisymmetric poloidal flow with m (is) greater than 5. These responses can be used to better understand the core flow and, in particular, to improve accuracies of predicting geomagnetic variability in future.

  15. Dynamics of the atmospheric boundary layer response to ocean mesoscale sea surface temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Niklas; Taguchi, Bunmei; Nonaka, Masami; Kuwano-Yoshida, Akira; Nakamura, Hisashi

    2017-04-01

    A recent theory for the mid-latitude atmospheric response to ocean mesoscale sea surface temperature (SST) variations is tested in the Southern Ocean using an extended integration of an atmospheric general circulation model. The theory is based on a linearization of the steady state, atmospheric boundary-layer dynamics, and yields the atmospheric response as classical Ekman dynamics extended to include advection, and sea surface temperature induced changes of atmospheric mixing and hydrostatic pressure. The theory predicts the response at each horizontal wave number to be governed by spectral transfer function between sea surface temperature and boundary layer variables, that are dependent on large-scale winds and the formulation of boundary layer mixing. The general circulation model, AFES, is shown to reproduce observed regressions between surface wind stress and sea surface temperatures. These 'coupling coefficients' are explained by SST induced changes of the surface stability, that directly impact surface stress, and changes of the surface winds. Estimates of the spectral transfer function between the latter and surface temperature are consistent with the theory, and suggest that it faithfully captures the underlying physics.

  16. Dissecting dynamic genetic variation that controls temporal gene response in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avital Brodt

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Inter-individual variation in regulatory circuits controlling gene expression is a powerful source of functional information. The study of associations among genetic variants and gene expression provides important insights about cell circuitry but cannot specify whether and when potential variants dynamically alter their genetic effect during the course of response. Here we develop a computational procedure that captures temporal changes in genetic effects, and apply it to analyze transcription during inhibition of the TOR signaling pathway in segregating yeast cells. We found a high-order coordination of gene modules: sets of genes co-associated with the same genetic variant and sharing a common temporal genetic effect pattern. The temporal genetic effects of some modules represented a single state-transitioning pattern; for example, at 10-30 minutes following stimulation, genetic effects in the phosphate utilization module attained a characteristic transition to a new steady state. In contrast, another module showed an impulse pattern of genetic effects; for example, in the poor nitrogen sources utilization module, a spike up of a genetic effect at 10-20 minutes following stimulation reflected inter-individual variation in the timing (rather than magnitude of response. Our analysis suggests that the same mechanism typically leads to both inter-individual variation and the temporal genetic effect pattern in a module. Our methodology provides a quantitative genetic approach to studying the molecular mechanisms that shape dynamic changes in transcriptional responses.

  17. Dynamic emotional and neural responses to music depend on performance expression and listener experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapin, Heather; Jantzen, Kelly; Kelso, J A Scott; Steinberg, Fred; Large, Edward

    2010-12-16

    Apart from its natural relevance to cognition, music provides a window into the intimate relationships between production, perception, experience, and emotion. Here, emotional responses and neural activity were observed as they evolved together with stimulus parameters over several minutes. Participants listened to a skilled music performance that included the natural fluctuations in timing and sound intensity that musicians use to evoke emotional responses. A mechanical performance of the same piece served as a control. Before and after fMRI scanning, participants reported real-time emotional responses on a 2-dimensional rating scale (arousal and valence) as they listened to each performance. During fMRI scanning, participants listened without reporting emotional responses. Limbic and paralimbic brain areas responded to the expressive dynamics of human music performance, and both emotion and reward related activations during music listening were dependent upon musical training. Moreover, dynamic changes in timing predicted ratings of emotional arousal, as well as real-time changes in neural activity. BOLD signal changes correlated with expressive timing fluctuations in cortical and subcortical motor areas consistent with pulse perception, and in a network consistent with the human mirror neuron system. These findings show that expressive music performance evokes emotion and reward related neural activations, and that music's affective impact on the brains of listeners is altered by musical training. Our observations are consistent with the idea that music performance evokes an emotional response through a form of empathy that is based, at least in part, on the perception of movement and on violations of pulse-based temporal expectancies.

  18. Dynamic emotional and neural responses to music depend on performance expression and listener experience.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Chapin

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Apart from its natural relevance to cognition, music provides a window into the intimate relationships between production, perception, experience, and emotion. Here, emotional responses and neural activity were observed as they evolved together with stimulus parameters over several minutes. Participants listened to a skilled music performance that included the natural fluctuations in timing and sound intensity that musicians use to evoke emotional responses. A mechanical performance of the same piece served as a control. Before and after fMRI scanning, participants reported real-time emotional responses on a 2-dimensional rating scale (arousal and valence as they listened to each performance. During fMRI scanning, participants listened without reporting emotional responses. Limbic and paralimbic brain areas responded to the expressive dynamics of human music performance, and both emotion and reward related activations during music listening were dependent upon musical training. Moreover, dynamic changes in timing predicted ratings of emotional arousal, as well as real-time changes in neural activity. BOLD signal changes correlated with expressive timing fluctuations in cortical and subcortical motor areas consistent with pulse perception, and in a network consistent with the human mirror neuron system. These findings show that expressive music performance evokes emotion and reward related neural activations, and that music's affective impact on the brains of listeners is altered by musical training. Our observations are consistent with the idea that music performance evokes an emotional response through a form of empathy that is based, at least in part, on the perception of movement and on violations of pulse-based temporal expectancies.

  19. Dynamic metabolic response to multiple spreading depolarizations in patients with acute brain injury: an online microdialysis study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feuerstein, Delphine; Manning, Andrew; Hashemi, Parastoo

    2010-01-01

    Spreading depolarizations (SDs) occur spontaneously with high incidence in patients with acute brain injury. They can be detected by subdural electrocorticographic recordings. We here characterize the dynamic metabolic response to these events. A microdialysis catheter was inserted into perilesio...

  20. NDVI‐indicated long‐term vegetation dynamics in Mongolia and their response to climate change at biome scale

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bao, Gang; Bao, Yuhai; Sanjjava, Amarjargal; Qin, Zhihao; Zhou, Yi; Xu, Guang

    2015-01-01

    ...), and temperature and precipitation data derived from 60 meteorological stations, this study has thoroughly examined vegetation dynamics in Mongolia and their responses to regional climate change at biome scale...