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Sample records for vessel density assessed

  1. Lymphatic vessel density in vocal cord carcinomas assessed with LYVE-1 receptor expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koskinen, Walter J.; Bono, Petri; Leivo, Ilmo; Vaheri, Antti; Aaltonen, Leena-Maija; Joensuu, Heikki

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: Early stage vocal cord carcinomas are usually cured by radiation therapy despite the use of portals that exclude the cervical lymph nodes. We investigated whether the lymphatic vessel density (LVD) of vocal cord carcinomas differs from that of other head and neck carcinomas. Patients and methods: Deparaffinized tissue from tumors of 60 patients diagnosed with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) were immunostained for LYVE-1, a novel lymphatic vessel marker. Twenty-two had vocal cord carcinoma. Tumor blood vessel density (BVD) was assessed using immunostaining for CD31. Results: Tumor overall LVD, including both intra- and peritumoral lymph vessels, was 10-fold lower than the BVD (5 counts/mm 2 vs. 52 mm -2 , respectively). A high LVD was associated with a high BVD (P=.002), but neither was associated with the tumor size. Both tumor LVD and BVD were lower in vocal cord carcinomas than in HNSCCs arising at other sites (median, 0 vs. 7 mm -2 , P=.016; and median, 36 vs. 52 mm -2 , P=.006, respectively). Only one vocal cord carcinoma was associated with a regional metastasis at the time of the diagnosis. Among the rest of the cases tumor size was a better predictor for the presence of regional metastases than tumor BVD or LVD in a logistic regression model (odds ratio 2.2, 95% CI 1.1-4.5). Conclusion: Vocal cord carcinomas have a low lymph vessel density as compared with HNSCCs arising at other sites

  2. 2011 Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  3. 2011 Fishing Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  4. 2013 Tanker Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  5. 2013 Cargo Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  6. 2013 Fishing Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  7. 2013 Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  8. 2013 Pleasure Craft and Sailing Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  9. 2011 Pleasure Craft Sailing Vessel Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Automatic Identification Systems (AIS) are a navigation safety device that transmits and monitors the location and characteristics of many vessels in U.S. and...

  10. Method of measuring density of gas in a vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shono, Kosuke.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To accurately measure the density of a gas in a vessel even at a loss-of-coolant accident in a BWR type reactor. Method: When at least one of the pressure or the temperature of gas in a vessel exceeds the usable range of a gas density measuring instrument due to a loss-of-coolant accident, the gas in the vessel is sampled, and the pressure or the temperature of the sampled gas are measured by matching them to the usable conditions of the gas density measuring instrument. Hydrogen gas and oxygen gas densities exceeding the usable range of the gas density measuring instrument are calculated by the following formulae based on the measured values. C'sub(O) = P sub(T).C sub(O)/P sub(T), C'sub(H) = C''sub(H).C'sub(O)/C''sub(O), where C sub(O), P sub(T), C'sub(H) represent the oxygen density, the total pressure and the hydrogen density of the internal pressure gas of the vessel after the respective gas density measuring instruments exceed the usable ranges; C sub(O), P sub(T) represent the oxygen density and the total pressure of the gas in the vessel before the gas density measuring instruments exceeded the usable range, and C''sub(H), C''sub(O) represent the hydrogen density and oxygen density of the respective sampled gases. (Kamimura, M.)

  11. Correlation between blood and lymphatic vessel density and results of contrast-enhanced spectral mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luczynska, Elzbieta; Niemiec, Joanna; Ambicka, Aleksandra; Adamczyk, Agnieszka; Walasek, Tomasz; Ryś, Janusz; Sas-Korczyńska, Beata

    2015-09-01

    Contrast-enhanced spectral mammography (CESM) is a novel technique used for detection of tumour vascularity by imaging the moment in which contrast, delivered to the lesion by blood vessels, leaks out of them, and flows out through lymphatic vessels. In our study, we included 174 women for whom spectral mammography was performed for diagnostic purposes. The relationship between enhancement in CESM and blood vessel density (BVD), lymphatic vessel density (LVD) or the percentage of fields with at least one lymphatic vessel (distribution of podoplanin-positive vessels - DPV) and other related parameters was assessed in 55 cases. BVD, LVD and DPV were assessed immunohistochemically, applying podoplanin and CD31/CD34 as markers of lymphatic and blood vessels, respectively. The sensitivity (in detection of malignant lesions) of CESM was 100%, while its specificity - 39%. We found a significant positive correlation between the intensity of enhancement in CESM and BVD (p = 0.007, r = 0.357) and a negative correlation between the intensity of enhancement in CESM and DPV (p = 0.003, r = -0.390). Lesions with the highest enhancement in CESM showed a high number of blood vessels and a low number of lymphatics. 1) CESM is a method characterized by high sensitivity and acceptable specificity; 2) the correlation between CESM results and blood/lymphatic vessel density confirms its utility in detection of tissue angiogenesis and/or lymphangiogenesis.

  12. Lymphatic vessel density and function in experimental bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saban, Marcia R; Wu, Xue-Ru; Saban, Ricardo; Towner, Rheal; Smith, Nataliya; Abbott, Andrew; Neeman, Michal; Davis, Carole A; Simpson, Cindy; Maier, Julie; Mémet, Sylvie

    2007-01-01

    The lymphatics form a second circulatory system that drains the extracellular fluid and proteins from the tumor microenvironment, and provides an exclusive environment in which immune cells interact and respond to foreign antigen. Both cancer and inflammation are known to induce lymphangiogenesis. However, little is known about bladder lymphatic vessels and their involvement in cancer formation and progression. A double transgenic mouse model was generated by crossing a bladder cancer-induced transgenic, in which SV40 large T antigen was under the control of uroplakin II promoter, with another transgenic mouse harboring a lacZ reporter gene under the control of an NF-κB-responsive promoter (κB-lacZ) exhibiting constitutive activity of β-galactosidase in lymphatic endothelial cells. In this new mouse model (SV40-lacZ), we examined the lymphatic vessel density (LVD) and function (LVF) during bladder cancer progression. LVD was performed in bladder whole mounts and cross-sections by fluorescent immunohistochemistry (IHC) using LYVE-1 antibody. LVF was assessed by real-time in vivo imaging techniques using a contrast agent (biotin-BSA-Gd-DTPA-Cy5.5; Gd-Cy5.5) suitable for both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and near infrared fluorescence (NIRF). In addition, IHC of Cy5.5 was used for time-course analysis of co-localization of Gd-Cy5.5 with LYVE-1-positive lymphatics and CD31-positive blood vessels. SV40-lacZ mice develop bladder cancer and permitted visualization of lymphatics. A significant increase in LVD was found concomitantly with bladder cancer progression. Double labeling of the bladder cross-sections with LYVE-1 and Ki-67 antibodies indicated cancer-induced lymphangiogenesis. MRI detected mouse bladder cancer, as early as 4 months, and permitted to follow tumor sizes during cancer progression. Using Gd-Cy5.5 as a contrast agent for MRI-guided lymphangiography, we determined a possible reduction of lymphatic flow within the tumoral area. In addition, NIRF

  13. Atlantic Marine Mammal Assessment Vessel Surveys

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data sets are a compilation of large vessel surveys for marine mammal stock assessments in South Atlantic (Florida to Maryland) waters from 1994 to the...

  14. Caribbean Marine Mammal Assessment Vessel Surveys

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data sets are a compilation of large vessel surveys for marine mammal stock assessments in Caribbean waters conducted during 2000-2001. These surveys were...

  15. A study of reactor vessel integrity assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Hoon [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong Kyung; Shin, Chang Ho; Seo, Bo Kyun [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-02-15

    The fast neutron fluence at the Reactor Pressure Vessel(RPV) of KNGR designed for 60 years lifetime was calculated by full-scope Monte Carlo simulation for reactor vessel integrity assessment. KNGR core geometry was modeled on a three-dimensional representation of the one-sixteenth of the reactor in-vessel component. Each fuel assemblies were modeled explicitly, and each fuel pins were axially divided into 5 segments. The maximum flux of 4.3 x 10{sup 10} neutrons/cm{sup 2}. sec at the RPV was obtained by tallying neutrons crossing the beltline of inner surface of the RPV.

  16. Assessment of reactor vessel integrity (ARVI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sehgal, B.R. E-mail: sehgal@ne.kth.se; Theerthan, A.; Giri, A.; Karbojian, A.; Willschuetz, H.G.; Kymaelaeinen, O.; Vandroux, S.; Bonnet, J.M.; Seiler, J.M.; Ikkonen, K.; Sairanen, R.; Bhandari, S.; Buerger, M.; Buck, M.; Widmann, W.; Dienstbier, J.; Techy, Z.; Kostka, P.; Taubner, R.; Theofanous, T.; Dinh, T.N

    2003-04-01

    The cost-shared project ARVI (assessment of reactor vessel integrity) involves a total of nine organisations from Europe and USA. The objective of the ARVI Project is to resolve the safety issues that remain unresolved for the melt vessel interaction phase of the in-vessel progression of a severe accident. The work consists of experiments and analysis development. Four tests were performed in the EC-FOREVER Programme, in which failure was achieved in-vessels employing the French pressure vessel steel. The tests were analysed with the commercial code ANSYS-Multiphysics, and the codes SYSTUS+ and PASULA, and quite good agreement was achieved for the failure location. Natural convection experiments in stratified pools have been performed in the SIMECO and the COPO facilities, which showed that much greater heat is transferred downwards for immiscible layers or before layers mix. A model for gap cooling and a set of simplified models for the system codes have been developed. MVITA code calculations have been performed for the Czech and Hungarian VVERs, towards evaluation of the in-vessel melt retention accident management scheme. Tests have been performed at the ULPU facility with organised flow for vessel external cooling. Considerable enhancement of the critical heat flux (CHF) was obtained. The ARVI Project has reached the halfway stage. This paper presents the results obtained thus far from the project.

  17. Human islet viability and function is maintained during high density shipment in silicone rubber membrane vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitzmann, Jennifer P; Pepper, Andrew R; Lopez, Boris G; Pawlick, Rena; Kin, Tatsuya; O’Gorman, Doug; Mueller, Kathryn R; Gruessner, Angelika C; Avgoustiniatos, Efstathios S; Karatzas, Theodore; Szot, Greg L; Posselt, Andrew M; Stock, Peter G; Wilson, John R; Shapiro, AM; Papas, Klearchos K

    2014-01-01

    The shipment of human islets from processing centers to distant laboratories is beneficial for both research and clinical applications. The maintenance of islet viability and function in transit is critically important. Gas-permeable silicone rubber membrane (SRM) vessels reduce the risk of hypoxia-induced death or dysfunction during high-density islet culture or shipment. SRM vessels may offer additional advantages: they are cost-effective (fewer flasks, less labor needed), safer (lower contamination risk), and simpler (culture vessel can also be used for shipment). Human islets(IE) were isolated from two manufacturing centers and shipped in 10cm2 surface area SRM vessels in temperature and pressure controlled containers to a distant center following at least two days of culture (n = 6). Three conditions were examined: low density (LD), high density (HD), and a micro centrifuge tube negative control (NC). LD was designed to mimic the standard culture density for human islet preparations (200 IE/cm2), while HD was designed to have a 20-fold higher tissue density, which would enable the culture of an entire human isolation in 1–3 vessels. Upon receipt, islets were assessed for viability, measured by oxygen consumption rate normalized to DNA content (OCR/DNA), and quantity, measured by DNA, and, when possible, potency and function with dynamic glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) measurements and transplants in immunodeficient B6 rag mice. Post-shipment OCR/DNA was not reduced in HD versus LD, and was substantially reduced in the NC condition. HD islets exhibited normal function post-shipment. Based on the data we conclude that entire islet isolations (up to 400,000 IE) may be shipped using a single, larger SRM vessel with no negative effect on viability and ex vivo and in vivo function. PMID:25131090

  18. Code boiler and pressure vessel life assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farr, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    In the United States of America and in Canada, laws and controls for determining life assessment for continued operation of equipment exist only for those pressure vessels built to Section III and evaluated according to Section XI. In this presentation, some of those considerations which are made in the USA and Canada for deciding on life or condition assessment of boilers and pressure vessels designed and constructed to other sections of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code are reviewed. Life assessment or condition assesssment is essential in determining what is necessary for continued operation. With no ASME rules being adopted by laws or regulations, other than OSHA in the USA and similar environmental controls in Canada, to control life assessment for continued operation, the equipment owner must decide if assessment is to be done and how much to do. Some of those considerations are reviewed along with methods and procedures to make an assessment along with a discussion of where the ASME B and PV Code currently stands regarding continued operation. (orig.)

  19. Assessment of reactor vessel integrity (ARVI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sehgal, B.R. [Division of Nuclear Power Safety (NPS), Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Drottning Kristinas Vaeg 33A, 10044 Stockholm (Sweden)]. E-mail: sehgal@ne.kth.se; Karbojian, A. [Division of Nuclear Power Safety (NPS), Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Drottning Kristinas Vaeg 33A, 10044 Stockholm (Sweden); Giri, A. [Division of Nuclear Power Safety (NPS), Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Drottning Kristinas Vaeg 33A, 10044 Stockholm (Sweden); Kymaelaeinen, O. [FortumEngNP (Finland); Bonnet, J.M. [CEA (France); Ikkonen, K. [Division of Nuclear Power Safety (NPS), Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Drottning Kristinas Vaeg 33A, 10044 Stockholm (Sweden); Sairanen, R. [VTT (Finland); Bhandari, S. [FRAMATOME (France); Buerger, M. [USTUTT (Germany); Dienstbier, J. [NRI Rez (Czech Republic); Techy, Z. [VEIKI (Hungary); Theofanous, T. [UCSB (United States)

    2005-02-01

    The assessment of reactor vessel integrity (ARVI) project involved a total of nine organizations from Europe and USA. The work consisted of experiments and analysis development. The modeling activities in the area of structural analyses were focused on the support of EC-FOREVER experiments as well as on the exploitation of the data obtained from those experiments for modeling of creep deformation and the validation of the industry structural codes. Work was also performed for extension of melt natural convection analyses to consideration of stratification, and mixing (in the CFD codes). Other modeling activities were for (1) gap cooling CHF and (2) developing simple models for system code. Finally, the methodology and data was applied for the design of IVMR severe accident management scheme for VVER-440/213 plants. The work was broken up into five packages. They were divided into tasks, which were performed by different partners. The major experimental project continued was EC-FOREVER in which data was obtained on in-vessel melt pool coolability. In previous EC-FOREVER experiments data was obtained on melt pool natural convection and lower head creep failure and rupture. Those results obtained were related to the following issues: (1) multiaxial creep laws for different vessel steels (2) effects of penetrations, and (3) mode and location of lower head failure. The two EC-FOREVER tests reported here are related to (a) the effectiveness of gap cooling and (b) water ingression for in vessel melt coolability. Two other experimental projects were also conducted. One was the COPO experiments, which was concerned with the effects of stratification and metal layer on the thermal loads on the lower head wall during melt pool convection. The second experimental project was conducted at ULPU facility, which provided data and correlations of CHF due to the external cooling of the lower head.

  20. Lymphatic vessels assessment in feline mammary tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarli, Giuseppe; Sassi, Francesco; Brunetti, Barbara; Rizzo, Antonio; Diracca, Laura; Benazzi, Cinzia

    2007-01-01

    The lymphatic vessels play a crucial role in a variety of human cancers since tumour cell lymphatic invasion significantly influences prognosis. It is not known if pre-existing lymphatics are enough for tumour dissemination or de novo development is necessary. VEGFR-3 is an angiogenetic mediator for both lymphatic and blood vessels during embryonic development, and only for lymphatics after birth. VEGF is a mediator of both vasculogenesis and angiogenesis, regulates the growth of lymphatics in various experimental models, and is produced in many solid tumours. CD44 mediates hyaluronic acid (HA)-dependent cell adhesion: besides promoting invasion, this interaction also supports neoangiogenesis that indirectly stimulates tumour cell proliferation. The expression of VEGF-C (Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor – C), its receptor VEGFR-3 and CD44, were studied on feline mammary samples to assess the importance of lymphangiogenesis and lymphangiotrophism in neoplasia. Samples were taken from six normal mammary glands (NMG), ten benign (BT) and 32 malignant (MT) tumours. Immunohistochemical laminin/VEGFR-3 double stain, VEGF-C and CD44 stains were applied to 4 μm-thick sections, and their expression evaluated in intratumoral/extratumoral and intramammary/extramammary fields. All groups revealed a higher number of lymphatics in the extratumoral/extramammary areas. VEGF-C expression in the epithelium paralleled the number of positive vessels in the NMG, BT and MT, whereas VEGF-C higher expression was noted in the intratumoral fields only in infiltrating MT. CD44 score was lower in extratumoral than intratumoral fields in tumours and showed a significant increase in extramammary/extratumoral fields from NMG to MT. Pearson test showed a significant and inversely proportional correlation between CD44 expression and the number of lymphatic vessels with VEGFR-3 in malignant infiltrating tumours. The number of both VEGFR-3 positive and negative lymphatics in the extratumoral

  1. AFSC/FMA/Vessel Assessment Logging

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Vessels fishing trawl gear, vessels fishing hook-and-line and pot gear that are also greater than 57.5 feet overall, and shoreside and floating processing facilities...

  2. Low lymphatic vessel density associates with chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luukkainen, A; Seppälä, M; Renkonen, J; Renkonen, R; Hagstrő M, J; Huhtala, H; Rautiainen, M; Myller, J; Paavonen, T; Ranta, A; Torkkeli, T; Toppila-Salmi, S

    2017-06-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis with and without nasal polyps (CRSwNP and CRSsNP) and antrochoanal polyps (ACP) are different upper airway inflammation phenotypes with different pathomechanisms. In order to understand the development of tissue edema, the present study aimed to evaluate lymphatic vessel density in CRSsNP, CRSwNP and ACP. 120 retrospective nasal and maxillary sinus specimens were stained immunohistochemically with a von Willebrand factor polyclonal antibody recognizing vascular and lymphatic endothelium, and with a podoplanin monoclonal antibody recognizing lymphatic endothelium. Vessels were studied by microscopy in a blinded fashion, and the vessel density and the relative density of lymphatic vessels were calculated. Patient characteristic factors and follow-up data of in average 9 years were collected from patient records. In the nasal cavity, the low absolute and relative density of vessels and of lymphatic vessels was associated with CRSwNP and ACP tissues compared to control inferior turbinate. This was observed also in the inflammatory hotspot area. In the maxillary sinus, lower absolute and relative density of lymphatic vessels associated with the CRSwNP phenotype. High lymphatic vessel density in polyp tissue associated with the need for revision CRS-surgery. As a conclusion, low density of lymphatic vessels distinguished patients with CRSwNP not only in the hotspot area of polyp tissue, but also in maxillary sinus mucosa. Yet, higher lymphatic vessel density seems to associate with polyp recurrence. Further studies are still needed to explore if formation of nasal polyps could be diminished by intranasal therapeutics affecting lymphangiogenesis.

  3. Glaucoma Diagnostic Ability of the Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography Vessel Density Parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jae Keun; Hwang, Young Hoon; Wi, Jae Min; Kim, Mijin; Jung, Jong Jin

    2017-11-01

    To investigate the glaucoma diagnostic abilities of vessel density parameters as determined by optical coherence tomography (OCT) angiography in different stages of glaucoma. A total of 113 healthy eyes and 140 glaucomatous eyes were enrolled. Diagnostic abilities of the OCT vessel density parameters in the optic nerve head (ONH), peripapillary, and macular regions were evaluated by calculating the area under the receiver operation characteristic curves (AUCs). AUCs of the peripapillary vessel density parameters and circumpapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness were compared. OCT angiography vessel densities in the ONH, peripapillary, and macular regions in the glaucomatous eyes were significantly lower than those in the healthy eyes (P glaucoma detection. The peripapillary vessel density parameters showed similar AUCs with the corresponding sectoral RNFL thickness (P > 0.05). However, in the early stage of glaucoma, the AUCs of the inferotemporal and temporal peripapillary vessel densities were significantly lower than that of the RNFL thickness (P glaucoma diagnostic ability with circumpapillary RNFL thickness, in the early stage, the vessel density parameters showed limited clinical value.

  4. 33 CFR 104.305 - Vessel Security Assessment (VSA) requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... baggage; and (vi) Vessel stores; (2) Threat assessments, including the purpose and methodology of the assessment, for the area or areas in which the vessel operates or at which passengers embark or disembark; (3... and control procedures; (ii) Identification systems; (iii) Surveillance and monitoring equipment; (iv...

  5. Progressive Macula Vessel Density Loss in Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma: A Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoji, Takuhei; Zangwill, Linda M; Akagi, Tadamichi; Saunders, Luke J; Yarmohammadi, Adeleh; Manalastas, Patricia Isabel C; Penteado, Rafaella C; Weinreb, Robert N

    2017-10-01

    To characterize the rate of macula vessel density loss in primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG), glaucoma-suspect, and healthy eyes. Longitudinal, observational cohort from the Diagnostic Innovations in Glaucoma Study. One hundred eyes (32 POAG, 30 glaucoma-suspect, and 38 healthy) followed for at least 1 year with optical coherence tomography angiography (OCT-A) imaging on at least 2 visits were included. Vessel density was calculated in the macula superficial layer. The rate of change was compared across diagnostic groups using a multivariate linear mixed-effects model. Baseline macula vessel density was highest in healthy eyes, followed by glaucoma-suspect and POAG eyes (P macula whole en face vessel density was significantly faster in glaucoma eyes (-2.23%/y) than in glaucoma-suspect (0.87%/y, P = .001) or healthy eyes (0.29%/y, P = .004). Conversely, the rate of change in ganglion cell complex (GCC) thickness was not significantly different from zero in any diagnostic group, and no significant differences in the rate of GCC change among diagnostic groups were found. With a mean follow-up of less than 14 months, eyes with POAG had significantly faster loss of macula vessel density than either glaucoma-suspect or healthy eyes. Serial OCT-A measurements also detected glaucomatous change in macula vessel density in eyes without evidence of change in GCC thickness. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Integration of vessel traits, wood density, and height in angiosperm shrubs and trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Cabrera, Hugo I; Schenk, H Jochen; Cevallos-Ferriz, Sergio R S; Jones, Cynthia S

    2011-05-01

    Trees and shrubs tend to occupy different niches within and across ecosystems; therefore, traits related to their resource use and life history are expected to differ. Here we analyzed how growth form is related to variation in integration among vessel traits, wood density, and height. We also considered the ecological and evolutionary consequences of such differences. In a sample of 200 woody plant species (65 shrubs and 135 trees) from Argentina, Mexico, and the United States, standardized major axis (SMA) regression, correlation analyses, and ANOVA were used to determine whether relationships among traits differed between growth forms. The influence of phylogenetic relationships was examined with a phylogenetic ANOVA and phylogenetically independent contrasts (PICs). A principal component analysis was conducted to determine whether trees and shrubs occupy different portions of multivariate trait space. Wood density did not differ between shrubs and trees, but there were significant differences in vessel diameter, vessel density, theoretical conductivity, and as expected, height. In addition, relationships between vessel traits and wood density differed between growth forms. Trees showed coordination among vessel traits, wood density, and height, but in shrubs, wood density and vessel traits were independent. These results hold when phylogenetic relationships were considered. In the multivariate analyses, these differences translated as significantly different positions in multivariate trait space occupied by shrubs and trees. Differences in trait integration between growth forms suggest that evolution of growth form in some lineages might be associated with the degree of trait interrelation.

  7. Guidelines for pressure vessel safety assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yukawa, S.

    1990-04-01

    A technical overview and information on metallic pressure containment vessels and tanks is given. The intent is to provide Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) personnel and other persons with information to assist in the evaluation of the safety of operating pressure vessels and low pressure storage tanks. The scope is limited to general industrial application vessels and tanks constructed of carbon or low alloy steels and used at temperatures between -75 and 315 C (-100 and 600 F). Information on design codes, materials, fabrication processes, inspection and testing applicable to the vessels and tanks are presented. The majority of the vessels and tanks are made to the rules and requirements of ASME Code Section VIII or API Standard 620. The causes of deterioration and damage in operation are described and methods and capabilities of detecting serious damage and cracking are discussed. Guidelines and recommendations formulated by various groups to inspect for the damages being found and to mitigate the causes and effects of the problems are presented.

  8. Measuring neutron flux density in near-vessel space of a commercial WWER-1000 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borodkin, G.I.; Eremin, A.N.; Lomakin, S.S.; Morozov, A.G.

    1987-01-01

    Distribution of neutron flux density in two experimental channels on the reactor vessel external surface and in ionization chamber channel of a commercial WWER-1000 reactor, is measured by the activation detector technique. Azimuthal distributions of fast and thermal neutron fluxes and height distributions of fast neutron flux density within energy range >1.2 and 2.3 MeV are obtained. Conclusion is made, that reactor core state and its structural peculiarities in the measurement range essentially affect space and energy distribution of neutron field near the vessel. It should be taken into account when determining permissible neutron fluence for the reactor vessel

  9. Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography Vessel Density in Healthy, Glaucoma Suspect, and Glaucoma Eyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarmohammadi, Adeleh; Zangwill, Linda M.; Diniz-Filho, Alberto; Suh, Min Hee; Manalastas, Patricia Isabel; Fatehee, Naeem; Yousefi, Siamak; Belghith, Akram; Saunders, Luke J.; Medeiros, Felipe A.; Huang, David; Weinreb, Robert N.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness and optical coherence tomography angiography (OCT-A) retinal vasculature measurements in healthy, glaucoma suspect, and glaucoma patients. Methods Two hundred sixty-one eyes of 164 healthy, glaucoma suspect, and open-angle glaucoma (OAG) participants from the Diagnostic Innovations in Glaucoma Study with good quality OCT-A images were included. Retinal vasculature information was summarized as a vessel density map and as vessel density (%), which is the proportion of flowing vessel area over the total area evaluated. Two vessel density measurements extracted from the RNFL were analyzed: (1) circumpapillary vessel density (cpVD) measured in a 750-μm-wide elliptical annulus around the disc and (2) whole image vessel density (wiVD) measured over the entire image. Areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUROC) were used to evaluate diagnostic accuracy. Results Age-adjusted mean vessel density was significantly lower in OAG eyes compared with glaucoma suspects and healthy eyes. (cpVD: 55.1 ± 7%, 60.3 ± 5%, and 64.2 ± 3%, respectively; P glaucoma and healthy eyes, the age-adjusted AUROC was highest for wiVD (0.94), followed by RNFL thickness (0.92) and cpVD (0.83). The AUROCs for differentiating between healthy and glaucoma suspect eyes were highest for wiVD (0.70), followed by cpVD (0.65) and RNFL thickness (0.65). Conclusions Optical coherence tomography angiography vessel density had similar diagnostic accuracy to RNFL thickness measurements for differentiating between healthy and glaucoma eyes. These results suggest that OCT-A measurements reflect damage to tissues relevant to the pathophysiology of OAG. PMID:27409505

  10. Assessment of the integrity of WWER type reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brumovsky, M.

    1995-01-01

    Procedures are given for the assessment of the residual lifetime of reactor pressure vessels with respect to a sudden failure, the lifetime of vessels with defects disclosed during in-service inspections, and the fatigue or corrosion-mechanical lifetime. Also outlined are the ways of assessing the effects of major degradation mechanisms, i.e. radiation embrittlement, thermal aging, and fatigue damage, including the use of calculated values and experimental examination, by means of surveillance specimens in particular. All results of assessment performed so far indicate that the life of reactor pressure vessels at the Dukovany, Jaslovske Bohunice, and Temelin nuclear power plants is well secured. 7 figs., 3 refs

  11. Automated Measurement Of The Density Of Vessels On Whole Slide Images Of Paediatric Brain Tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Deroulers

    2016-06-01

    Only a few parameters have to be chosen, once and for all samples (e.g., the minimal acceptable size of a blood vessel fragment, which makes the method more robust than assessment by a (panel of human expert(s. The automatic calibration steps enable one to deal with a heterogeneous set of slides (e.g., slight differences in background colour and staining. The method uses only open-source software. It is easy to extend or improve and not tight to a single immunomarker. We applied the method to 129 paediatric brain tumours of 8 different types and 3 locations (posterior fossa, thalamus, hemispheres — 185 samples in total. For each patient, the density of microvessels in the sample is compared to the cerebral blood flow as assessed by preoperative perfusion-weighted-imaging using arterial-spin-labeling. We find a good correlation between microvascular density, MRI data and tumour grading. The microvascular density is broadly distributed among the samples. Visualisation in a web browser is slightly more fluid when images are uploaded in the DeepZoom format rather than as pyramidal TIFF images, but the former consumes roughly 20 times more disk space and needs the transfer of a very large number of files after each modification, which is less tractable.

  12. Gulf of Mexico Marine Mammal Assessment Vessel Surveys

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data sets are a compilation of large vessel surveys for marine mammal stock assessments in the Gulf of Mexico from 1991 to the present. These are designed as...

  13. Flaw density examinations of a clad boiling water reactor pressure vessel segment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, K.V.; McClung, R.W.

    1986-01-01

    Flaw density is the greatest uncertainty involved in probabilistic analyses of reactor pressure vessel failure. As part of the Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program, studies have been conducted to determine flaw density in a section of reactor pressure vessel cut from the Hope Creek Unit 2 vessel [nominally 0.7 by 3 m (2 by 10 ft)]. This section (removed from the scrapped vessel that was never in service) was evaluated nondestructively to determine the as-fabricated status. We had four primary objectives: (1) evaluate longitudinal and girth welds for flaws with manual ultrasonics, (2) evaluate the zone under the nominal 6.3-mm (0.25-in.) clad for cracking (again with manual ultrasonics), (3) evaluate the cladding for cracks with a high-sensitivity fluorescent penetrant method, and (4) determine the source of indications detected

  14. Probabilistic assessment of pressure vessel and piping reliability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundararajan, C.

    1986-01-01

    The paper presents a critical review of the state-of-the-art in probabilistic assessment of pressure vessel and piping reliability. First the differences in assessing the reliability directly from historical failure data and indirectly by a probabilistic analysis of the failure phenomenon are discussed and the advantages and disadvantages are pointed out. The rest of the paper deals with the latter approach of reliability assessment. Methods of probabilistic reliability assessment are described and major projects where these methods are applied for pressure vessel and piping problems are discussed. An extensive list of references is provided at the end of the paper

  15. Ultrasonic density detector for vessel and reactor core two-phase flow measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arave, A.E.

    1979-01-01

    A local ultrasonic density (LUD) detector has been developed by EG and G Idaho, Inc., at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) reactor vessel and core two-phase flow density measurements. The principle of operating the sensor is the change in propagation time of a torsional ultrasonic wave in a metal transmission line as a function of the density of the surrounding media. A theoretical physics model is presented which represents the total propagation time as a function of the sensor modulus of elasticity and polar moment of inertia

  16. Iter in vessel viewing system design and assessment activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neri, C., E-mail: carlo.neri@enea.it [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, Via Enrico Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); Costa, P.; Ferri De Collibus, M.; Florean, M.; Mugnaini, G.; Pillon, M.; Pollastrone, F.; Rossi, P. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, Via Enrico Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy)

    2011-10-15

    The In Vessel Viewing System (IVVS) is fundamental remote handling equipment, which will be used to make a survey of the status of the blanket first wall and divertor plasma facing components. A prototype of a laser In Vessel Viewing and ranging System was developed and tested at ENEA laboratories in Frascati under EFDA task agreements, it is able to perform sub-millimetric bi-dimensional and three-dimensional images inside ITER during maintenance procedure allowing the evaluation of the state and damages of the in-vessel surface. The present prototype has been designed to operate under room conditions and starting from springtime 2009 a Grant with F4E is in progress for the design and the assessment of the IVVS system for ITER, keeping in account all the environmental conditions and constraints.

  17. Effect of moisture availability on wood density and vessel characteristics of Eucalyptus grandis in the warm temperate region of South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Naidoo, Sasha

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available intolerant of adverse conditions, and performs poorly when planted on shallow soils and/or on dry sites. A study was conducted to assess the effect of moisture availability on the wood density and vessel characteristics of E. grandis grown in the warm...

  18. Lymphatic Vessel Density as Prognostic Factor in Breast Carcinoma: Relation to Clinico pathologic Parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Gendi, S.; Abdel-Hadi, M.

    2009-01-01

    Angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis are essential for breast cancer growth and progression. This study aimed at investigating lymphatic micro vessel density (LVD) and microvessel density (MVD) as prognostic markers in breast carcinoma. Forty breast carcinomas were immuno stained for D2-40, CD31 and VEGF. Median lymphatic and blood micro vessel densities, as well as VEGF expression, were related to each other and to clinico pathologic parameters including lymph node (Ln) status. The efficacy of haematoxylin and eosin (H and E) in detecting lymphatic vessel invasion (LVI) compared to D2-40 immunostaining was also investigated. D2-40 stained normal lymphatic endothelium and myoepithelial cells, but with different staining patterns. D2-40 LVD related significantly to CD31 counts (r=0.470; p=0.002), and LN metastasis (Mann-Whitney U=101.500; p=0.043); however, it did not relate to age, tumor grade, tumor size or LVI. D2-40 identified LVI in 3 more cases (7.5%) than those detected by H and E. VEGF was expressed in 85% of cases, and was significantly related to CD31 and D2-40 counts (p=0.033 and 0.007, respectively). In conclusion, D2-40 LVD showed a significant association with LN metastasis, and can be considered to segregate patients with positive from those with negative LNs. D2-40 enhances the detection of LVI relative to H and E staining reflecting a potential for lymphatic metastatic spread and possible poor prognosis

  19. French nuclear plants PWR vessel integrity assessment and life management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezdikian, G. [Electricite de France (EDF), Div. Production Nucleaire, 93 - Saint-Denis (France); Quinot, P. [FRAMATOME, Dept. Bloc Reacteur et Boucles Primaires, 92 - Paris-La-Defence (France); Faidy, C.; Churier-Bossennec, H. [Electricite de France (EDF), Div. Ingenierie et Service, 69 - Villeurbanne (France)

    2001-07-01

    The Reactor Pressure Vessel life management of 56 PWR 3 loop and 4 loop reactors units was engaged by the French Utility EDF (Electricite de France) a few years ago and is yet on going on. This paper will present the work carried out within the framework of justifying why the 34 three loop reactor vessels will remain acceptable for operation for a lifetime of at least 40-years. A summary of the measures will be given. An overall review of actions will be presented describing the French approach, using important existing databases, including studies related to irradiation surveillance monitoring program and end of life fluence assessment. The last results obtained are based on generic integrity analyses for all categories of situations (normal upset emergency and faulted conditions) until the end of lifetime, postulating circumferential an radial kinds of flaw located in the stainless steel cladding or shallow sub-cladding area. The results of structural integrity analyses beginning with elastic computations and completed with three-dimensional finite element elastic plastic computations for envelope cases, are compared with code criteria for operating plants. The objective is to evaluate the margins on different parameters as RTNDT (Reference Nil Ductility Transition Temperature), toughness or crack size, to justify the global fitness for service of all these Reactor Pressure Vessels. The paper introduces EDF's maintenance strategy, related to integrity assessment, for those nuclear power plants under operation, based on NDE in-service inspection of the first thirty millimeters in the thickness of the wall and major surveillance programs of the vessels. (author)

  20. French nuclear plants PWR vessel integrity assessment and life management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezdikian, G.; Quinot, P.; Faidy, C.; Churier-Bossennec, H.

    2001-01-01

    The Reactor Pressure Vessel life management of 56 PWR 3 loop and 4 loop reactors units was engaged by the French Utility EDF (Electricite de France) a few years ago and is yet on going on. This paper will present the work carried out within the framework of justifying why the 34 three loop reactor vessels will remain acceptable for operation for a lifetime of at least 40-years. A summary of the measures will be given. An overall review of actions will be presented describing the French approach, using important existing databases, including studies related to irradiation surveillance monitoring program and end of life fluence assessment. The last results obtained are based on generic integrity analyses for all categories of situations (normal upset emergency and faulted conditions) until the end of lifetime, postulating circumferential an radial kinds of flaw located in the stainless steel cladding or shallow sub-cladding area. The results of structural integrity analyses beginning with elastic computations and completed with three-dimensional finite element elastic plastic computations for envelope cases, are compared with code criteria for operating plants. The objective is to evaluate the margins on different parameters as RTNDT (Reference Nil Ductility Transition Temperature), toughness or crack size, to justify the global fitness for service of all these Reactor Pressure Vessels. The paper introduces EDF's maintenance strategy, related to integrity assessment, for those nuclear power plants under operation, based on NDE in-service inspection of the first thirty millimeters in the thickness of the wall and major surveillance programs of the vessels. (author)

  1. An assessment of acoustic emission for nuclear pressure vessel monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scruby, C.B.

    1983-01-01

    Recent research has greatly improved our understanding of the basic mechanisms of deformation and fracture that generate detectable acoustic emission signals in structural steels. A critical review of the application of acoustic emission (AE) to the fabrication, proof testing and in-service monitoring of nuclear pressure vessels is presented in the light of this improved understanding. The detectability of deformation and fracture processes in pressure vessel steels is discussed, and recommendations made for improving source location accuracy and the development of quantitative source assessment techniques. Published data suggest that AE can make an important contribution to fabrication monitoring, and to the detection of defects in lower toughness materials during vessel proof testing. In high toughness materials, however, the signals generated during ductile crack growth may frequently be too weak for reliable detection. The feasibility of AE for continuous monitoring has not yet been adequately demonstrated because of high background noise levels and uncertainty about AE signal strengths from the defect growth processes that occur in service. In-service leak detection by AE shows considerable promise. It is recommended that further tests are carried out with realistic defects, and under realistic conditions of loading (including thermal shock and fatigue) and of environment. (author)

  2. Retinal vessels caliber assessment in patients with arterial hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Semenova

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to evaluate the diagnostic capability of automated retinal vessels (RV caliber estimation for hypertensive angiopathy.Methods: this study included 146 patients (292 eyes with arterial hypertension. All the subjects underwent fundus photography and RV caliber estimation. the latter was performed using newly developed computer-based method for automated vessel detection and central retinal arteriolar and venular equivalents determination (CRAE & CRVE. Sensitivity, specificity, and reproducibility of the method were estimated.Results: the method of RV caliber assessment showed good reproducibility. the overall specificity and sensitivity were 74% and 80.77%, respectively. Computer-based method of retinal vascular caliber assessment revealed higher predictive value comparing with ophthalmoscopic assessment (AUC = 0.903 and 0.85, respectively. Retinal arteriolar and venular caliber and AVR tend to decrease with age. Higher blood pressure is associated with narrower retinal arterioles.Conclusion: Novel method of RV caliber estimation demonstrated high information value. these findings are in good agreementwith data from major population-based studies.

  3. Retinal vessels caliber assessment in patients with arterial hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Semenova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to evaluate the diagnostic capability of automated retinal vessels (RV caliber estimation for hypertensive angiopathy.Methods: this study included 146 patients (292 eyes with arterial hypertension. All the subjects underwent fundus photography and RV caliber estimation. the latter was performed using newly developed computer-based method for automated vessel detection and central retinal arteriolar and venular equivalents determination (CRAE & CRVE. Sensitivity, specificity, and reproducibility of the method were estimated.Results: the method of RV caliber assessment showed good reproducibility. the overall specificity and sensitivity were 74% and 80.77%, respectively. Computer-based method of retinal vascular caliber assessment revealed higher predictive value comparing with ophthalmoscopic assessment (AUC = 0.903 and 0.85, respectively. Retinal arteriolar and venular caliber and AVR tend to decrease with age. Higher blood pressure is associated with narrower retinal arterioles.Conclusion: Novel method of RV caliber estimation demonstrated high information value. these findings are in good agreementwith data from major population-based studies.

  4. Assessment of in-vessel corium retention in CPR1000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xing; Zhang Shishun; Lin Jiming

    2011-01-01

    The In-Vessel corium Retention (IVR) strategy of Chinese 1000 MW class commercial pressurized water reactor (CPR1000) is assessed by Risk-Oriented Accident Analysis Methodology (ROAAM). Four representative severe accident scenarios are selected for the IVR assessment in this paper. According to four representative severe accident scenarios consequence calculated by the deterministic code combined with engineering judgment, the input probability distribution of the assessment is determined. Success probability of IVR from the viewpoint of thermal failure is then predicted using MOPOL code. MOPOL is a code developed basing on the well known ROAAM frame and heat transfer model of corium. It is demonstrated that the success probability of IVR by Reactor Cavity Flooding in CPR1000 is potentially higher than 99%. Application of IVR strategy in CPR1000 is envisioned probable if a further more comprehensive risk-benefit evaluation conclusion is positive. (authors)

  5. Chronic hydrocephalus-induced hypoxia: increased expression of VEGFR-2+ and blood vessel density in hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dombrowski, S M; Deshpande, A; Dingwall, C; Leichliter, A; Leibson, Z; Luciano, M G

    2008-03-18

    Chronic hydrocephalus (CH) is a neurological disease characterized by increased cerebrospinal fluid volume and pressure that is often associated with impaired cognitive function. By and large, CH is a complex and heterogeneous cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) disorder where the exact site of brain insult is uncertain. Several mechanisms including neural compression, fiber stretch, and local or global hypoxia have been implicated in the underlying pathophysiology of CH. Specifically, the hippocampus, which plays a significant role in memory processing and is in direct contact with expanding CSF ventricles, may be involved. Using our model of chronic hydrocephalus, we quantified the density of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR-2(+)) neurons, glial, endothelial cells, and blood vessels in hippocampal regions CA1, CA2-3, dentate gyrus and hilus using immunohistochemical and stereological methods. Density and %VEGFR-2(+) cell populations were estimated for CH animals (2-3 weeks vs. 12-16 weeks) and surgical controls (SC). Overall, we found approximately six- to eightfold increase in the cellular density of VEGFR-2(+) and more than double blood vessel density (BVd) in the hippocampus of CH compared with SC. There were no significant regional differences in VEGFR-2(+) cellular and BVd expression in the CH group. VEGFR-2(+) and BVds were significantly related to changes in CSF volume (Pvessel expression was related to focal compression alone or in combination with global ischemia/hypoxia conditions as previously described. These findings suggest that VEGFR-2 may play an adaptive role in angiogenesis after CH

  6. Regulatory Assessment Technologies for Aging of Reactor Vessel Internals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jhung, Myung Jo; Park, Jeong Soon; Ko, Hanok [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    In order to develop the audit calculation system, it is required to develop crack evaluation, seismic analysis and thermal-hydraulic analysis techniques for RVIs so that integrity of RVIs under the aging environment can be evaluated and be assured. In addition, regulatory requirements including safety review and inspection guides should be developed in order to assure the quality and uniformity of safety reviews and inspections regarding aging assessment and management of RVIs. Since Reactor Vessel Internals (RVIs) are installed within the reactor pressure vessel and surround the fuel assemblies, some of them are exposed to the environment such as high neutron irradiation, high temperature and reactor coolant flow. Those environmental factors can cause damage to RVIs including cracks, loss of material, fatigue, loss of fracture toughness and change of dimension as the operation time of nuclear power plants (NPPs) increases. For long-term operation more than 40 years, aging management of RVIs is important. The final objectives of this study are to establish the audit calculation system for RVIs and to develop regulatory requirements for aging assessment and management of RVIs considering their operating conditions, materials, and possible aging mechanisms.

  7. Changes in peripapillary blood vessel density in Graves' orbitopathy after orbital decompression surgery as measured by optical coherence tomography angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Kyle T; Bullock, John R; Drumright, Ryan T; Olsen, Matthew J; Penman, Alan D

    2018-03-08

    The purpose is to evaluate the utility of optical coherence tomography (OCT) angiography in the evaluation of Graves' orbitopathy (GO) and response to orbital decompression in patients with and without dysthyroid optic neuropathy (DON). This was a single-center, prospective case series in a cohort of 12 patients (24 orbits) with GO and ±DON, (6 orbits) who underwent bilateral orbital decompression. All patients underwent pre- and postoperative OCT angiography of the peripapillary area. Vessel density indices were calculated in a 4.5 mm × 4.5 mm ellipsoid centered on the optic disk using split-spectrum amplitude decorrelation angiography algorithm, producing the vessel density measurements. Mean change in vessel density indices was compared between pre- and postoperative sessions and between patients with and without DON. Patient 1, a 34-year-old male with GO and unilateral DON OD, showed a significant reduction in blood vessel density indices oculus dexter (OD) (DON eye) after decompression while a more modest reduction was found oculus sinister (OS) with the greatest change noted intrapapillary. Patient 2, a 50-year-old male with DON OU, showed worsening neuropathy following decompression OD that was confirmed by angiographic density indices. Patient 3, a 55-year-female with DON, showed a reduction in blood vessel density OD and increased density OS. Patients without DON showed overall less impressive changes in indices as compared to those with DON. Using OCT angiography, response to surgical treatment in GO orbits, more so in orbits with DON, can be demonstrated and quantified using vessel density indices with reproducibility.

  8. Reactor vessel assessment and the development of a reactor vessel life extension program for Calvert Cliffs Units One and Two

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montgomery, B.; Hijeck, P.J.

    1988-01-01

    A study has been undertaken to provide a general assessment of the life extension capabilities for the Calvert Cliffs Units One and Two reactor pressure vessels. The purpose of the study is to assess the general life extension capabilities for the Calvert Cliffs reactor pressure vessels based upon an extension and variation of the Surry pilot plant life extension study. This assessment provided a detailed reactor vessel surveillance program for plant life extension along with a hierarchy of specific tasks necessary for attaining maximum useful life. The assessment identified a number of critical issues which may impact life attainment and extension along with potential solutions to address these issues to ensure the life extension option is not precluded

  9. Assessment of environmentally assisted cracking in PWR pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tice, D.R.

    1991-01-01

    There is a possibility that extension of pre-existing flaws in the reactor pressure vessel of a pressurised water reactor (PWR) may occur by environmentally assisted cracking, in particular by corrosion fatigue under cyclic transient loading. Crack growth predictions have usually been carried out using cyclic crack growth rate (da/dN) versus stress intensity range (δK) curves, such as those given in Section XI, Appendix A of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. However, the inherent time dependent nature of environmental cracking processes renders such an approach unrealistic. The present paper describes the development of an alternative time based assessment methodology. Illustrative calculations of expected crack growth of assumed defects made using the cyclic (ASME XIA) and time-based approaches are compared. The results illustrate that crack growth predicted by the time-based approach can be greater or less than that calculated by the traditional method. For a PWR operated with good control of water chemistry, actual crack growth rates are expected to be well below those predicted by the ASME code. (Author)

  10. Factors in the fail safe approach to pressure vessel assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connors, D.C.; Darlaston, B.J.L.; Hellen, R.A.J.

    1978-01-01

    The 'leak before break' concept is described in the context of pressure vessel assessment. The factors which determine whether a pipe containing an axial flaw will leak or break under pressure loading are discussed using a post-yield fracture mechanics method. A model is used in which it is assumed that initially the ligament beneath the flaw fails to form a full thickness defect in the pipe. The stability of the full thickness defect at the pressure causing ligament failure is then examined to ascertain whether it would remain at the snap through length or would propagate by fast fracture, to form a leak or a break. The method is used to analyse the results of a series of pipe rupture tests, and it is found that a distinction between leaks and breaks is achieved. (author)

  11. Assessment of the dynamic behaviours of the ITER Vacuum Vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blocki, J., E-mail: jacek.blocki@f4e.europa.eu [Fusion for Energy, Josep Pla 2, Torres Diagonal Litoral B3, 08019 Barcelona (Spain); Combescure, D. [Fusion for Energy, Josep Pla 2, Torres Diagonal Litoral B3, 08019 Barcelona (Spain); Mazzone, G. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► The cyclic symmetry structure with special boundary conditions has been analyzed. ► Results based on the FE solid model and on the FE shell model have been compared. ► The effect of the missing mass contained has been checked. -- Abstract: The dynamic behaviour of the ITER Vacuum Vessel (VV) under seismic loads will be assessed by carrying out the modal analysis and then by applying the response spectrum method which describes earthquake motions. The effect of the missing mass is included in this last analysis. Numerical results are based on two different Finite Element (FE) models and on three different methods by which natural frequencies and mode shapes are defined. It means, it is applied the cyclic symmetry method, the component mode synthesis method and the 360° FE model of the VV. Comparisons between obtained results for the different models and methods are presented.

  12. Probabilistic assessment of flaw evaluation procedures for pressure vessel integrity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaffer, D.H.; Bamford, W.H.; Jouris, G.M.

    1980-01-01

    Prudent design procedures, in order to err in the direction of conservative over-strength rather than risky under-strength, have taken bounding values rather than best estimates for material parameters, and wherever possible, used conservative input for the calculations. The growing data base for this work is now beginning to allow an assessment of the conservatism that has been incorporated into the design procedure. Quantitative estimates of the variability associated with crack growth rates and fracture toughness have been generated in connection with other studies, and it would be useful to incorporate such information into an overall assessment of the design margins that are prescribed. In addition to getting an estimate of the conservatism in the current procedure, this study should provide a useful insight into the relative degree of margin that is introduced at each stage of the flaw evaluation process. Identification of the step by step margins should lead to more effective data collection programs from which information for adequately controlling the design conservatism can be obtained. The study will also provide valuable guidance in fixing revised design reference curves and safety factors so that adequate overall margins can be maintained without excess conservatism. This study is limited to vessel rupture in a brittle mode, and examples for illustration are particularly related to the beltline region of a reactor pressure vessel. The methodology, however, is applicable to all regions for which the required stress analyses, operating history, and material parameters are available. The work being carried out here is in consonance with ASME Section XI on Flaw Evaluation Procedures. It is concerned both with flaws under normal operating conditions and flaws under faulted conditions. (author)

  13. Assessment of alternative vessel and blanket design on ITER operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavinato, M., E-mail: mario.cavinato@f4e.europa.e [FUSION FOR ENERGY Joint Undertaking, 08019 Barcelona (Spain); Portone, A.; Saibene, G.; Sartori, R. [FUSION FOR ENERGY Joint Undertaking, 08019 Barcelona (Spain); Albanese, R.; Ambrosino, G.; Ariola, M. [Associazione Euratom-ENEA-CREATE, DIMET, Universita degli Studi di Napoli (Italy); Artaserse, G. [Associazione Euratom-ENEA-CREATE, DIMET, Universita degli Studi di Reggio Calabria (Italy); Mattei, M. [Associazione Euratom-ENEA-CREATE, DIAM, Seconda Universita di Napoli, Via Roma 29, Aversa, CE 81031 Italy (Italy); Pironti, A. [Associazione Euratom-ENEA-CREATE, DIMET, Universita degli Studi di Napoli (Italy); Villone, F. [Associazione Euratom-ENEA-CREATE, DIMET, Universita degli Studi di Cassino (Italy)

    2010-12-15

    In the framework of the ITER project, an investigation has been conducted on an alternative vessel and blanket design, aimed at reducing cost and production risk. The modifications proposed have a strong impact on plasma control since they affect the main conducting structures surrounding the plasma column, providing passive stabilization but at the same time shielding the field generated by the active coils to control the plasma motion and shape. An extensive analysis was performed to assess the plasma vertical controllability and the modified requirements to the in-vessel vertical stability coils system as well as to the external Poloidal Field coils system. A similar analysis was aimed at assessing the performance of the shape control system in presence of the modified structures. The effect on plasma breakdown was also evaluated in terms of maximum initial loop voltage, quality of magnetic null and the flux loss related to the breakdown delay that was quantified under the same hypothesis employed by ITER for the baseline design. Furthermore, the modified design presents issues for the magnetic diagnostic system, related to the shielding of the probes by the eddy currents, which were analysed with a 3D model. The results of the analyses performed have some general interest in particular regarding the influence on plasma stability of 3D structures with close proximity to the plasma. The present paper aims at giving an overview of the analyses that have been carried out and a summary of the results in terms of impact of the modified design on plasma control and scenario, and in general an evaluation of the role of passive structure in plasma vertical stability and shape control.

  14. Capacity assessment of concrete containment vessels subjected to aircraft impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andonov, Anton; Kostov, Marin; Iliev, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • An approach to assess the containment capacity to aircraft impact via fragility curves is proposed. • Momentum over Area was defined as most suitable reference parameter to describe the aircraft load. • The effect of the impact induced damages on the containment pressure capacity has been studied. • The studied containment shows no reduction of the pressure capacity for the investigated scenarios. • The effectiveness of innovative protective structure against aircraft impact has been evaluated. - Abstract: The paper describes the procedure and the results from the assessment of the vulnerability of a generic pre-stressed containment structure subjected to a large commercial aircraft impact. Impacts of Boeing 737, Boeing 767 and Boeing 747 have been considered. The containment vulnerability is expressed by fragility curves based on the results of a number of nonlinear dynamic analyses. Three reference parameters have been considered as impact intensity measure in the fragility curve definition: peak impact force (PIF), peak impact pressure (PIP) and Momentum over Area (MoA). Conclusions on the most suitable reference parameter as well on the vulnerability of such containment vessels are drawn. The influence of the aircraft impact induced damages on the containment ultimate pressure capacity is also assessed and some preliminary conclusions on this are drawn. The paper also addresses a conceptual design of a protective structure able to decrease the containment vulnerability and provide a preliminary assessment of the applicability of such concept.

  15. Capacity assessment of concrete containment vessels subjected to aircraft impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andonov, Anton, E-mail: anton.andonov@mottmac.com; Kostov, Marin; Iliev, Alexander

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • An approach to assess the containment capacity to aircraft impact via fragility curves is proposed. • Momentum over Area was defined as most suitable reference parameter to describe the aircraft load. • The effect of the impact induced damages on the containment pressure capacity has been studied. • The studied containment shows no reduction of the pressure capacity for the investigated scenarios. • The effectiveness of innovative protective structure against aircraft impact has been evaluated. - Abstract: The paper describes the procedure and the results from the assessment of the vulnerability of a generic pre-stressed containment structure subjected to a large commercial aircraft impact. Impacts of Boeing 737, Boeing 767 and Boeing 747 have been considered. The containment vulnerability is expressed by fragility curves based on the results of a number of nonlinear dynamic analyses. Three reference parameters have been considered as impact intensity measure in the fragility curve definition: peak impact force (PIF), peak impact pressure (PIP) and Momentum over Area (MoA). Conclusions on the most suitable reference parameter as well on the vulnerability of such containment vessels are drawn. The influence of the aircraft impact induced damages on the containment ultimate pressure capacity is also assessed and some preliminary conclusions on this are drawn. The paper also addresses a conceptual design of a protective structure able to decrease the containment vulnerability and provide a preliminary assessment of the applicability of such concept.

  16. Evaluation of Mast Cell and Blood Vessel Density in Inflammatory Periapical Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safoura Seifi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Radicular cystsand periapical granulomas are the most common periapical inflammatory lesions. However, the role of cellular immunity and microvessels in their pathogenesis remains unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the mast cell density (MCD, mircovessel density (MVD and investigating the correlation between their densities with each other in the above mentioned lesions.Materials & Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study, 40 paraffin blocks of mentioned lesions were selected from achieves of School of Dentistry, Babol University of Medical Sciences. Three sections were prepared from each block and stained by hematoxylin-eosin, toluidine blue, and immunohistochemically for CD34 to determine the score of inflammation, presence of mast cells and degranulatedmast cells (DMCs, and MVD, respectively. The correlation between MCD and either inflammatory infiltrate or MVD was evaluated. Data analyzed by t student, Mann-Whitney and Spearman test.Results: Mast cells were present in all periapical inflammatory lesions; 15.4±14.8 for MCD, 7.2±6.1 for DMCs, and the ratio of DMCs to total number of MCs was 0.354±0.166 and 14.8+4.44 for blood vessel density in radicular cyst and 8.52±6.75, 2.91±2.1, 0.196±0.194 and 13±8.02 in periapical granulomas, respectively. There was a positive correlation between MCD and MVD in radicular cyst (P=0.03, r=0.341, but not in periapical granulomas (P=0.6, r=0.124. MCD and MVD increased with the score of inflammation in radicular cyst (P=0.001, r=0.7 and periapical granuloma (P=0.012, r=0.54.Conclusion: Mast cells and microvessels play a role in pathogenesis of periapical inflammatory lesions. In this study, the density of mast cells and DMCs in radicular cyst was higher than periapical granulomas, but no difference was observed regarding MVD in periapical inflammatory lesions. It seems that the relationship between MCD and MVD is different based on the clinical stage of periapical

  17. Quantitative assessment of breast density from mammograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamal, N.; Ng, K.H.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: It is known that breast density is increasingly used as a risk factor for breast cancer. This study was undertaken to develop and validate a semi-automated computer technique for the quantitative assessment of breast density from digitised mammograms. A computer technique had been developed using MATLAB (Version 6.1) based GUI applications. This semi-automated image analysis tool consists of gradient correction, segmentation of breast region from background, segmentation of fibroglandular and adipose region within the breast area and calculation of breast density. The density is defined as the percentage of fibroglandular tissue area divided by the total breast area in the mammogram. This technique was clinically validated with 122 normal mammograms; these were subjectively evaluated and classified according to the five parenchyma patterns of the Tabar's scheme (Class I- V) by a consultant radiologist. There was a statistical significant correlation between the computer technique and subjective classification (r 2 = 0.84, p<0.05). 71.3% of subjective classification was correctly classified using the computer technique. We had developed a computer technique for the quantitative assessment of breast density and validated its accuracy for computerized classification based on Tabar's scheme. This quantitative tool is useful for the evaluation of a large dataset of mammograms to predict breast cancer risk based on density. Furthermore it has the potential to provide an early marker for success or failure in chemoprevention studies such as hormonal replacement therapy. Copyright (2004) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  18. Assessment of the TRINO reactor pressure vessel integrity: theoretical analysis and NDE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milella, P P; Pini, A [ENEA, Rome (Italy)

    1988-12-31

    This document presents the method used for the capability assessment of the Trino reactor pressure vessel. The vessel integrity assessment is divided into the following parts: transients evaluation and selection, fluence estimate for the projected end of life of the vessel, characterization of unirradiated and irradiated materials, thermal and stress analysis, fracture mechanics analysis and eventually fracture input to Non Destructive Examination (NDE). For each part, results are provided. (TEC).

  19. Role of radiation embrittlement in reactor vessel integrity assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marston, T.U.; Chexal, V.K.; Wyckoff, M.

    1982-01-01

    Reactor vessel integrity calculations are complex. The effect of radiation embrittlement on vessel material properties is a very important aspect of any vessel integrity evaluation. The importance of realistic (based on surveillance capsule results) rather than conservative estimates of the material properties (based on regulatory curves) cannot be overestimated. It is also important to make realistic thermal hydraulic and system operations assumptions. In addition, use of actual flaw sizes from in-service inspections (versus hypothetical flaw size selection) will promote realism. Important research results exist that need to be incorporated into the regulatory process. The authors believe results from current research and development efforts will demonstrate that, with reasonable assumptions and best estimate calculations, the safety of even the older reactor vessels with high copper content welds can be assured over their design lifetimes without the need for major fixes. The utilities, through EPRI and the vendors, have dedicated a significant effort to solving the pressurized thermal shock problem

  20. The relevance of crack arrest phenomena for pressure vessel structural integrity assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connors, D.C.; Dowling, A.R.; Flewitt, P.E.J.

    1996-01-01

    The potential role of a crack arrest argument for the structural integrity assessments of steel pressure vessels and the relationship between crack initiation and crack arrest philosophies are described. A typical structural integrity assessment using crack initiation fracture mechanics is illustrated by means of a case study based on assessment of the steel pressure vessels for Magnox power stations. Evidence of the occurrence of crack arrest in structures is presented and reviewed, and the applications to pressure vessels which are subjected to similar conditions are considered. An outline is given of the material characterisation that would be required to undertake a crack arrest integrity assessment. It is concluded that crack arrest arguments could be significant in the structural integrity assessment of PWR reactor pressure vessels under thermal shock conditions, whereas for Magnox steel pressure vessels it would be limited in its potential to supporting existing arguments. (author)

  1. Automated image segmentation and registration of vessel wall MRI for quantitative assessment of carotid artery vessel wall dimensions and plaque composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klooster, Ronald van 't

    2014-01-01

    The main goal of this thesis was to develop methods for automated segmentation, registration and classification of the carotid artery vessel wall and plaque components using multi-sequence MR vessel wall images to assess atherosclerosis. First, a general introduction into atherosclerosis and

  2. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN FOVEAL AVASCULAR ZONE AREA, VESSEL DENSITY, AND CYSTOID CHANGES IN DIABETIC RETINOPATHY, AN OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY ANGIOGRAPHY STUDY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarassoly, Kia; Miraftabi, Arezoo; Soltan Sanjari, Mostafa; Parvaresh, Mohammad Mehdi

    2017-06-29

    To measure the foveal avascular zone (FAZ) areas and vessel densities of patients with diabetic retinopathy and to study their relationship with diabetic cystoid changes and retinal thickness. Prospective case series of 51 eyes of 31 patients with diabetic retinopathy. The eyes were grouped based on the presence or absence of cystoid edema and evaluated using optical coherence tomography angiography. The FAZ areas and vessel density were compared. The FAZ area at the superficial capillary plexus level was equal between the eyes with and without cystoid edema. Vessel density did not differ as well. There was no correlation with retinal thickness. In eyes with cystoid changes, FAZ area changes at the deep capillary plexus level were difficult to interpret. The FAZ area and vessel density at the superficial capillary plexus level are reproducible and independent of the presence of cystoid edema.

  3. Elliptical local vessel density: a fast and robust quality metric for retinal images

    OpenAIRE

    Giancardo, L.; Abramoff, M.D.; Chaum, E.; Karnowski, T.P.; Meriaudeau, F.; Tobin, K.W.

    2008-01-01

    A great effort of the research community is geared towards the creation of an automatic screening system able to promptly detect diabetic retinopathy with the use of fundus cameras. In addition, there are some documented approaches for automatically judging the image quality. We propose a new set of features independent of field of view or resolution to describe the morphology of the patient's vessels. Our initial results suggest that these features can be used to estimate the image quality i...

  4. Dissociation between vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 and blood vessel density in the caudate nucleus after chronic hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Abhishek; Dombrowski, Stephen M; Leichliter, Anna; Krajcir, Natalie; Zingales, Nicholas; Inoue, Masahiro; Schenk, Soren; Fukamachi, Kiyotaka; Luciano, Mark G

    2009-11-01

    Chronic hydrocephalus (CH) is characterized by the presence of ventricular enlargement, decreased cerebral blood flow (CBF), and brain tissue oxygen delivery. Although the underlying pathophysiological role of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is not clear, ischemic-hypoxic events in CH are known to trigger its release. Previously, we have shown increased VEGF receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) and blood vessel density (BVd) in the hippocampus after CH. We investigated changes in neuronal and glial VEGFR-2 density and BVd in the caudate nucleus in an experimental model of CH. Animals with CH were divided into short term (ST, 2 to 4 weeks) and long term (LT, 12 to 16 weeks) and were compared with surgical controls (SCs, 12 to 16 weeks). The cellular and BVds were estimated using immunohistochemical and stereological counting methods. Overall, percentage (%)VEGFR-2 neurons were approximately two times greater in CH (ST, LT) than in SC. By comparison, glial cell %VEGFR-2 was greater by 10% to 17% in ST and 4% to 11% lower in LT compared with that in SC. Blood vessel density was significantly lower in CH than in SC in the superficial caudate. Changes in cerebrospinal fluid ventricular volume and pressure, as well as in CBF did not correlate with either VEGFR-2 or BVd. These observed findings suggest that destructive forces may outweigh angiogenic forces and possibly show a disassociation between VEGFR-2 and BV expressions.

  5. Assessment of the effects of neutron fluence on Swedish nuclear pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, S.

    1980-11-01

    Nuclear pressure vessels are subject to neutron irradiation during service causing embrittlement. This is one important factor in the overall problem of reactor vessel integrity. At present the irradiation effects are mainly assessed by the Charpy V-notch test. Two measures of embrittlement are defined: the increase of the ductile/brittle transition temperature and the decrease in the upper-shelf energy. The object of the present work is to assess these changes for the Swedish nuclear pressure vessels. On the basis of data from irradiations carried out in other countries and Swedish surveillance programmes, the expected end of life embrittlement is estimated for Swedish vessels. The results show that the embrittlement of most reactor vessels is expected to be quite small. Oskarshamn 1 and PWR-vessels, however, will probably show moderate changes, the former due to the higher copper content, and the latter due to the high end of life fluences. Some of the vessel materials which exhibit marginal properties in the upper-shelf energy, as measured by the Charpy V-notch impact test, are identified. It is recommended that fracture mechanics analyses be applied in these cases. (author)

  6. Experimental and numerical study on density stratification erosion phenomena with a vertical buoyant jet in a small vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Satoshi, E-mail: abe.satoshi@jaea.go.jp; Ishigaki, Masahiro; Sibamoto, Yasuteru; Yonomoto, Taisuke

    2016-07-15

    Highlights: • This paper shows results of a small scale experiment and CFD analyses on a density stratification erosion with a vertical buoyant jet. • The particle image velocimetry (PIV) and quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) with a multiport rotating valve were applied. • Two typical well-used RANS models were applied. • The simulated stratification erosion was in agreement with the experimental result, which suggested that the turbulence mixing occurred only in the jet impinging region. - Abstract: The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has started the ROSA-SA project to investigate thermal hydraulic phenomena in a reactor containment vessel during a severe accident. The hydrogen distribution in the vessel is one of significant safety issues in discussing a potential of hydrogen combustion in the containment. Density stratification and its break-up are important phenomena affecting the hydrogen distribution. This paper focuses on a density stratification erosion and break-up mechanism with a vertical buoyant jet promoting the turbulent helium transport. Small scale experiment and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses were carried out for investigating this phenomena. In the experiment, a rectangular vessel made with acrylic plates with a width of 1.5 m, a length of 1.5 m and a height of 1.8 m was used for visualizing flow field with particle image velocimetry (PIV) system. The quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) system with a multiport rotating valve was applied for measuring gaseous concentration at 20 elevation points. In CFD analysis with OpenFOAM, two typical well-used turbulence models were used: low-Reynolds number type k–ε model and SST k–ω model, with a turbulence model modification to consider the buoyant effect in the stratification. As a result, the stratification erosion in the CFD analyses with the modified turbulence model agreed well with the experimental data, indicating importance of the turbulence damping by the buoyant effect.

  7. Experimental and numerical study on density stratification erosion phenomena with a vertical buoyant jet in a small vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Satoshi; Ishigaki, Masahiro; Sibamoto, Yasuteru; Yonomoto, Taisuke

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • This paper shows results of a small scale experiment and CFD analyses on a density stratification erosion with a vertical buoyant jet. • The particle image velocimetry (PIV) and quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) with a multiport rotating valve were applied. • Two typical well-used RANS models were applied. • The simulated stratification erosion was in agreement with the experimental result, which suggested that the turbulence mixing occurred only in the jet impinging region. - Abstract: The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has started the ROSA-SA project to investigate thermal hydraulic phenomena in a reactor containment vessel during a severe accident. The hydrogen distribution in the vessel is one of significant safety issues in discussing a potential of hydrogen combustion in the containment. Density stratification and its break-up are important phenomena affecting the hydrogen distribution. This paper focuses on a density stratification erosion and break-up mechanism with a vertical buoyant jet promoting the turbulent helium transport. Small scale experiment and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses were carried out for investigating this phenomena. In the experiment, a rectangular vessel made with acrylic plates with a width of 1.5 m, a length of 1.5 m and a height of 1.8 m was used for visualizing flow field with particle image velocimetry (PIV) system. The quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) system with a multiport rotating valve was applied for measuring gaseous concentration at 20 elevation points. In CFD analysis with OpenFOAM, two typical well-used turbulence models were used: low-Reynolds number type k–ε model and SST k–ω model, with a turbulence model modification to consider the buoyant effect in the stratification. As a result, the stratification erosion in the CFD analyses with the modified turbulence model agreed well with the experimental data, indicating importance of the turbulence damping by the buoyant effect.

  8. Integrity assessment of TAPS reactor pressure vessel at extended EOL using surveillance test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatterjee, S.; Shah, Priti Kotak

    2008-05-01

    Integrity assessment of pressure vessels of nuclear reactors (RPV) primarily concentrates on the prevention of brittle failure and conditions are defined under which brittle failure can be excluded. Accordingly, two approaches based on Transition Temperature Concept and Fracture Mechanics Concept were adopted using the impact test results of three credible surveillance data sets obtained from the surveillance specimens of Tarapur Atomic Power Station. RT NDT data towards end of life (EOL) were estimated from the impact test results in accordance with the procedures of USNRC Regulatory Guide 1.99, Rev. 2 and were used as primary input for assessment of the vessel integrity. SA302B (nickel modified) steel cladded with stainless steel is used as the pressure vessel material for the two 210 MWe boiling water reactors of the Tarapur Atomic Power Station (TAPS). The reactors were commissioned during the year 1969. The chemical compositions of SA302B (modified) steel used in fabricating the vessel and the specified tensile property and the Charpy impact property requirements of the steel broadly meet ASME specified requirements. Therefore, the pressure temperature limit curves prescribed by General Electric (G.E.) were compared with those as obtained using procedures of ASME Section XII, Appendix G. The tensile and the Charpy impact properties at 60 EFPY of vessel operation as derived from the surveillance specimens even fulfilled the specified requirements for the virgin material of ASME. Integrity assessment carried out using the two approaches indicated the safety of the vessel for continued operation up to 60 EFPY. (author)

  9. Elliptical Local Vessel Density: a Fast and Robust Quality Metric for Fundus Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giancardo, Luca [ORNL; Chaum, Edward [ORNL; Karnowski, Thomas Paul [ORNL; Meriaudeau, Fabrice [ORNL; Tobin Jr, Kenneth William [ORNL; Abramoff, M.D. [University of Iowa

    2008-01-01

    A great effort of the research community is geared towards the creation of an automatic screening system able to promptly detect diabetic retinopathy with the use of fundus cameras. In addition, there are some documented approaches to the problem of automatically judging the image quality. We propose a new set of features independent of Field of View or resolution to describe the morphology of the patient's vessels. Our initial results suggest that they can be used to estimate the image quality in a time one order of magnitude shorter respect to previous techniques.

  10. Identification and initial assessment of candidate BWR late-phase in-vessel accident management strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodge, S.A.

    1991-01-01

    Work sponsored by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) to identify and perform preliminary assessments of candidate BWR [boiling water reactor] in-vessel accident management strategies was completed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during fiscal year 1990. Mitigative strategies for containment events have been the subject of a companion study at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The focus of this Oak Ridge effort was the development of new strategies for mitigation of the late phase events, that is, the events that would occur in-vessel after the onset of significant core damage. The work began with an investigation of the current status of BWR in-vessel accident management procedures and proceeded through a preliminary evaluation of several candidate new strategies. The steps leading to the identification of the candidate strategies are described. The four new candidate late-phase (in-vessel) accident mitigation strategies identified by this study and discussed in the report are: (1) keep the reactor vessel depressurized; (2) restore injection in a controlled manner; (3) inject boron if control blade damage has occurred; and (4) containment flooding to maintain core and structural debris in-vessel. Additional assessments of these strategies are proposed

  11. Verification of the analytical fracture assessments methods by a large scale pressure vessel test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keinanen, H; Oberg, T; Rintamaa, R; Wallin, K

    1988-12-31

    This document deals with the use of fracture mechanics for the assessment of reactor pressure vessel. Tests have been carried out to verify the analytical fracture assessment methods. The analysis is focused on flaw dimensions and the scatter band of material characteristics. Results are provided and are compared to experimental ones. (TEC).

  12. Failure assessment of pressure vessels under yielding conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, R.P.; Darlaston, B.J.L.; Townley, C.H.A.

    1977-01-01

    The paper summarizes the work carried out to establish the behavior of structures containing defects and outlines a failure assessment route which can be used to assess the integrity of a structure containing a defect. The basis for this failure assessment route is the two-criteria approach of Dowling and Townley, which can be applied to structures containing defects irrespective of whether they are in the linear elastic fracture mechanics regime, the fully plastic regime, or in an intermediate regime. The extension of this concept to include crack growth by stable tearing is dealt with in the paper

  13. [Key vessels assessment and operation highlights in laparoscopic extended right hemicolectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Zhao, Quanquan

    2018-03-25

    Laparoscopic radical colectomies have been more widely used gradually, among which laparoscopic extended right hemicolectomy is considered as the most difficult procedure. The difficulty of extended right hemicolectomy lies in the need to dissect lymph nodes along the superior mesenteric vein (SMV) and disconnect numerous and possible aberrant vessels. To address this problem, we emphasize two points in key vessel assessment: getting familiar with the anatomy along the medial-to-lateral approach and having a good understanding about the preoperative imaging presentations. An accurately preoperative imaging assessment by abdominal enhanced CT can help the surgeon understand the relative position of the key vessels to be dealt with during operation and the situation of the possible aberrant vessels so as to guide the procedure more effectively and facilitate the prevention and management of the intraoperative complications. During operation, the operator should pay special attention to the management of the vessels in the ileocolic vessel region, Henle's trunk and middle colon vessels. The operation highlights of the key vessels are as follows: (1) The ileocolic vessels: identifying the Toldt's gap correctly and opening the vascular sheath of the SMV securely; making sure that the duodenum is well protected. (2) Henle's trunk: dissecting along the surface of the Henle's trunk; preserving the anterior superior pancreaticoduodenal vein (ASPDV) and main trunk of the Henle's trunk; disconnecting the roots of the right colic vein (RCV) and right gastroepiploic vein (RGEV), and then dissecting lymph nodes along the surface of the pancreas. (3) The middle colon vessels: identifying the root of the middle colon vessel along the lower edge of the pancreas; avoiding entering behind the pancreas; mobilizing the transverse mesocolon sufficiently along the surface of the pancreas. Finally, we discuss and analyze the disputes currently existing in laparoscopic extended right

  14. Probabilistic Assessment of the Design and Safety of HSLA-100 Steel Confinement Vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.M. Dolin

    2003-03-03

    This probabilistic approach for assessing the design and safety of the HSLA-100 steel confinement vessel used for a DynEx test involved the probability of failure for several scenarios, in which a fragment may penetrate the vessel. The samples involve vessel thicknesses of 1 inch, 2 inches, and 5.25 inches--the combined thicknesses of the 2 inch containment vessel and the 3.25 inch safety vessel. Two simulation approaches were used for each scenario to assess the probability of failure. The Likelihood of Occurrence method simultaneously models all likely fragment events of a test, for which the net probability of failure is the sum of all the fragment events. The Stochastic Sampling method determines the probability of a fragment perforation on the basis of a logical model and takes the overall probability that an experiment results in failure as the maximum probability for any fragment event. With margin and safety assessments taken into account, it was concluded that the one and two inch thicknesses by themselves are inadequate for containing a DynEx test. The 5.25 inch thickness was determined to be safe by the Likelihood of Occurrence method and nearly adequate by the Stochastic Sampling simulation.

  15. Assessment of disease activity in large-vessel vasculitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aydin, Sibel Z.; Direskeneli, Haner; Merkel, Peter A.

    2017-01-01

    Objective. To arrive at consensus for candidate outcomes for disease activity assessment in largevessel vasculitis (LVV) in clinical trials. Methods.A Delphi survey including 99 items was circulated among international experts for 3 rounds. Results. Fifty-seven items were accepted for both giant ...

  16. Assessment of environmentally assisted cracking in PWR pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tice, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    1) Since environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) is a time dependent process, assessment should be based on time rather than cycle dependent parameters. Thus an a/sub e/ vs a/sub i/ (or strain rate) basis for assessment should be used in preference to da/dN vs ΔK. 2) The threshold strain rate or velocity for the onset of EAC is controlled by material and environmental factors (e.g. steel sulphur content and water chemistry), and possibly by mechanical loading factors such as R ratio and load interaction effects. Above the threshold, crack growth rates are usually unacceptably rapid. 3) Sample calculations show that predicted crack growth rates using a time based model can be below or above those calculated using ASME XI depending on the value of the EAC threshold velocity but that for normal PWR operating conditions rates are likely to be below those predicted by the ASME code

  17. Residual life assessment of French PWR vessel head penetrations through metallurgical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pichon, C.; Boudot, R.; Benhamou, C.; Gelpi, A.

    1994-01-01

    In September 1991, a vessel head penetration was found leaking at Bugey 3 plant during the hydrotest included in the framework of decennial In Service Inspections. Non destructive examinations performed afterwards on several other plants have shown some cracked penetrations. Destructive expertise confirmed quickly that again this new problem is related to stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 used as base material. During the last 15 years, similar cracking have been met in steam generator tubes and secondly in pressurizer instrumentation tubes. In spite of all the work performed since that time an extension appears to be necessary for explaining the features of this new event; however material sensitivity, stress and temperature still remain the key parameters governing the behavior of Alloy 600 in PWR environment. In this paper, only the material sensitivity of vessel head penetrations is examined through metallurgical analysis in relation with SCC tests. On the basis of vessel head field experience in combination with thermomechanical process used for fabrication of original bars criteria for a sensitivity ranking of penetrations are proposed. Metallurgical investigations and SCC tests were carried out to support this sensitivity ranking. The final aim is to use such information among those quoted above for assessment of vessel heads residual life. This document is an overview of the work performed in France concerning the material sensitivity of forged Alloy 600. It represents an important part of the assessments and investigations undertaken in France on the stress corrosion cracking phenomenon affecting the reactor vessel head penetrations in PWR's

  18. Prediction of melanoma metastasis by the Shields index based on lymphatic vessel density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metcalfe Chris

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Melanoma usually presents as an initial skin lesion without evidence of metastasis. A significant proportion of patients develop subsequent local, regional or distant metastasis, sometimes many years after the initial lesion was removed. The current most effective staging method to identify early regional metastasis is sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB, which is invasive, not without morbidity and, while improving staging, may not improve overall survival. Lymphatic density, Breslow's thickness and the presence or absence of lymphatic invasion combined has been proposed to be a prognostic index of metastasis, by Shields et al in a patient group. Methods Here we undertook a retrospective analysis of 102 malignant melanomas from patients with more than five years follow-up to evaluate the Shields' index and compare with existing indicators. Results The Shields' index accurately predicted outcome in 90% of patients with metastases and 84% without metastases. For these, the Shields index was more predictive than thickness or lymphatic density. Alternate lymphatic measurement (hot spot analysis was also effective when combined into the Shields index in a cohort of 24 patients. Conclusions These results show the Shields index, a non-invasive analysis based on immunohistochemistry of lymphatics surrounding primary lesions that can accurately predict outcome, is a simple, useful prognostic tool in malignant melanoma.

  19. A Nordic approach to impact assessment of accidents with nuclear-propelled vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reistad, O.; Hustveit, S.; Palsson, S.E.; Hoe, S.; Lahtinen, J.

    2012-11-01

    The MareNuc project has identified the parameters in a graded approach to impact assessment for marine nuclear reactors. The graded approach is founded on the following elements: 1) More detailed understanding of previous accidents in nuclear-propelled vessels (initiating events, accident developments, release fractions), including release mechanisms (radionuclide retention in vessel construction); 2) Bench-marking of release scenarios using modelling tools applied in the Nordic countries, in addition to demonstration of generally accessible and free software developed by the IAEA; 3) Other systematic approaches to safety assessments of vessel port calls, and to the design and maintenance of emergency preparedness systems; More specifically, increased emphasis compared to earlier analysis after the Kursk accident is given to the engineered vessel barriers. Relevant standards from impact assessments for commercial nuclear power plants have been identified, such as from the NUREG series. The Nordic approaches to safety evaluation, impact assessments and emergency preparedness organisation was also reported as part of the project. The Canadian approach for international port calls was carefully reported and assessed as part of the project, and commended for its broad and comprehensive approach to reactor and vessel design for the nationalities involved, to the design and maintenance of emergency preparedness systems, and the well-structured and broad cooperation between civilian and military institutions. This approach goes beyond the current approach in the Nordic countries, also in the case of Norway, which experience regular port calls from allied nuclear navies. The overall result is a broader understanding in the Nordic countries for the importance of the various parameters for impact assessment of releases from marine reactors, and to the design and maintenance of an emergency preparedness organisation without detailed knowledge of the installation in question

  20. A Nordic approach to impact assessment of accidents with nuclear-propelled vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reistad, O. [Institute for Energy Technology, Kjeller (Norway); Hustveit, S. [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, Oesteraes (Norway); Palsson, S.E. [Icelandic Radiation Safety Authority, Reykjavik (Iceland); Hoe, S. [Danish Emergency Management Agency, Birkeroed (Denmark); Lahtinen, J. [STUK, Helsinki (Finland)

    2012-11-15

    The MareNuc project has identified the parameters in a graded approach to impact assessment for marine nuclear reactors. The graded approach is founded on the following elements: 1) More detailed understanding of previous accidents in nuclear-propelled vessels (initiating events, accident developments, release fractions), including release mechanisms (radionuclide retention in vessel construction); 2) Bench-marking of release scenarios using modelling tools applied in the Nordic countries, in addition to demonstration of generally accessible and free software developed by the IAEA; 3) Other systematic approaches to safety assessments of vessel port calls, and to the design and maintenance of emergency preparedness systems; More specifically, increased emphasis compared to earlier analysis after the Kursk accident is given to the engineered vessel barriers. Relevant standards from impact assessments for commercial nuclear power plants have been identified, such as from the NUREG series. The Nordic approaches to safety evaluation, impact assessments and emergency preparedness organisation was also reported as part of the project. The Canadian approach for international port calls was carefully reported and assessed as part of the project, and commended for its broad and comprehensive approach to reactor and vessel design for the nationalities involved, to the design and maintenance of emergency preparedness systems, and the well-structured and broad cooperation between civilian and military institutions. This approach goes beyond the current approach in the Nordic countries, also in the case of Norway, which experience regular port calls from allied nuclear navies. The overall result is a broader understanding in the Nordic countries for the importance of the various parameters for impact assessment of releases from marine reactors, and to the design and maintenance of an emergency preparedness organisation without detailed knowledge of the installation in question

  1. Lifetime assessment on PWR reactor vessel internals in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Sung-Gyu; Jin, Tae-Eun; Jeong, Ill-Seok

    2002-01-01

    In order to extend the operating time of the Kori Unit 1 reactor internals, a comprehensive review of the potential ageing problems and a safety assessment have been performed. As the plant ages, reactor internal components which are subject to various ageing mechanism should be identified and evaluated based on the systematic technical procedure. In this respect, technical procedure for lifetime evaluation had been developed and applied to reactor internals. This paper describes a overall assessment and ageing management procedure and evaluation results for reactor internals. Also this paper suggests the optimal ageing management programs to maintain the integrity of reactor internals beyond design life based on the evaluation results. A review of all known potential ageing mechanisms was performed for each of the reactor internal subcomponents. From these results, 8 ageing mechanisms such as void swelling, irradiation and thermal embrittlement, fatigue, stress corrosion cracking, IASCC, stress relaxation, and wear for the reactor internal components were expected to be of major concerns during the current or extended plant life. In this study, 8 ageing mechanisms were identified for lifetime evaluation. For these ageing mechanisms, lifetime assessment was performed. As a result of this evaluation, it is expected that core barrel will exceed the IASCC threshold value during 40 operating years, and baffle/former and baffle former bolts will exceed the threshold value for void swelling, irradiation embrittlement, IASCC, stress relaxation during 40 operating years. However, for all other reactor internals subcomponents, thermal embrittlement, fatigue, SCC, and wear were identified as nonsignificant. As a result of lifetime evaluations, 4 ageing mechanisms were established to be plausible for 3 subcomponents. These results are shown. The existing ageing management programs (AMPs) for Kori Unit 1, such as ISI, water chemistry control, rod drop time testing etc., were

  2. Combining operational models and data into a dynamic vessel risk assessment tool for coastal regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, R.; Braunschweig, F.; Lourenço, F.; Neves, R.

    2016-02-01

    The technological evolution in terms of computational capacity, data acquisition systems, numerical modelling and operational oceanography is supplying opportunities for designing and building holistic approaches and complex tools for newer and more efficient management (planning, prevention and response) of coastal water pollution risk events. A combined methodology to dynamically estimate time and space variable individual vessel accident risk levels and shoreline contamination risk from ships has been developed, integrating numerical metocean forecasts and oil spill simulations with vessel tracking automatic identification systems (AIS). The risk rating combines the likelihood of an oil spill occurring from a vessel navigating in a study area - the Portuguese continental shelf - with the assessed consequences to the shoreline. The spill likelihood is based on dynamic marine weather conditions and statistical information from previous accidents. The shoreline consequences reflect the virtual spilled oil amount reaching shoreline and its environmental and socio-economic vulnerabilities. The oil reaching shoreline is quantified with an oil spill fate and behaviour model running multiple virtual spills from vessels along time, or as an alternative, a correction factor based on vessel distance from coast. Shoreline risks can be computed in real time or from previously obtained data. Results show the ability of the proposed methodology to estimate the risk properly sensitive to dynamic metocean conditions and to oil transport behaviour. The integration of meteo-oceanic + oil spill models with coastal vulnerability and AIS data in the quantification of risk enhances the maritime situational awareness and the decision support model, providing a more realistic approach in the assessment of shoreline impacts. The risk assessment from historical data can help finding typical risk patterns ("hot spots") or developing sensitivity analysis to specific conditions, whereas real

  3. Use of Master Curve technology for assessing shallow flaws in a reactor pressure vessel material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bass, Bennett Richard; Taylor, Nigel

    2006-01-01

    In the NESC-IV project an experimental/analytical program was performed to develop validated analysis methods for transferring fracture toughness data to shallow flaws in reactor pressure vessels subject to biaxial loading in the lower-transition temperature region. Within this scope an extensive range of fracture tests was performed on material removed from a production-quality reactor pressure vessel. The Master Curve analysis of this data is reported and its application to the assessment of the project feature tests on large beam test pieces.

  4. Ultrasound assessment of the posterior circumflex humeral artery in elite volleyball players: Aneurysm prevalence, anatomy, branching pattern and vessel characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    van de Pol, Daan; Maas, Mario; Terpstra, Aart; Pannekoek-Hekman, Marja; Alaeikhanehshir, Sena; Kuijer, P. Paul F. M.; Planken, R. Nils

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine the prevalence of posterior circumflex humeral artery (PCHA) aneurysms and vessel characteristics of the PCHA and deep brachial artery (DBA) in elite volleyball players. Methods Two-hundred and eighty players underwent standardized ultrasound assessment of the dominant arm by a vascular technologist. Assessment included determination of PCHA aneurysms (defined as segmental vessel dilatation ?150 %), PCHA and DBA anatomy, branching pattern, vessel course and diameter. R...

  5. Assessment of integrity for the pressure vessel internals of PWRs under blowdown loadings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geiss, M.; Benner, J.; Ludwig, A.

    1984-01-01

    In safety analysis of pressurized water reactors the loss-of-coolant accident plays a central role. Thereby a sudden break of a cold primary coolant pipe close to the reactor pressure vessel is postulated. The sudden pressure release of the primary system (blowdown) causes high dynamic loading on the pressure vessel internals. The resulting deformations must not impair shut down of the reactor and decay heat removal in an inadmissible way. For this assessment a blowdown analysis for a 1300 MW pressurized water reactor is carried out. These investigations are completed with a detailed stress analysis for the highly loaded core barrel clamping. The results show that the reactor pressure vessel internals are able to withstand blowdown loading. Even in case of a sudden and complete break of the primary coolant pipe the loading has to be twice as high to endanger the structural integrity. (orig.) [de

  6. Non-invasive assessment of vessel morphology and function in tumors by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiessling, Fabian; Jugold, Manfred; Woenne, Eva C.; Brix, Gunnar

    2007-01-01

    The switch to an angiogenic phenotype is an important precondition for tumor growth, invasion and spread. Since newly formed vessels are characterized by structural, functional and molecular abnormalities, they offer promising targets for tumor diagnosis and therapy. Previous studies indicate that MRI is valuable to assess vessel morphology and function. It can be used to distinguish between benign and malignant lesions and to improve delineation of proliferating areas within heterogeneous tumors. In addition, tracer kinetic analysis of contrast-enhanced image series allows the estimation of well-defined physiological parameters such as blood volume, blood flow and vessel permeability. Frequently, changes of these parameters during cytostatic, anti-angiogenic and radiation therapy precede tumor volume reduction. Moreover, target-specific MRI techniques can be used to elucidate the expression of angiogenic markers at the molecular level. This review summarizes strategies for non-invasive characterization of tumor vascularization by functional and molecular MRI, hereby introducing representative preclinical and clinical applications. (orig.)

  7. Identification and assessment of BWR in-vessel severe accident mitigation strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodge, S.A.; Kress, T.S.; Cleveland, J.C.; Petek, M.

    1992-01-01

    This paper briefly describes the results of work carried out in support of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Accident Management Research Program to evaluate the effectiveness and feasibility of current and proposed strategies for BWR severe accident management. These results are described in detail in the just-released report Identification and Assessment of BWR In-Vessel Severe Accident Mitigation Strategies, NUREG/CR-5869, which comprises three categories of findings. First, an assessment of the current status of accident management strategies for the mitigation of in-vessel events for BWR severe accident sequences is combined with a review of the BWR Owners' Group Emergency Procedure Guidelines (EPGs) to determine the extent to which they currently address the characteristic events of an unmitigated severe accident. Second, where considered necessary, new candidate accident management strategies are proposed for mitigation of the late-phase (after core damage has occurred) events. Finally, two of the four candidate strategies identified by this effort are assessed in detail. These are (1) preparation of a boron solution for reactor vessel refill should control blade damage occur during a period of temporary core dryout and (2) containment flooding to maintain the core debris within the reactor vessel if the injection systems cannot be restored

  8. Assessment of W7-X plasma vessel pressurisation in case of LOCA taking into account in-vessel components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbonavičius, E., E-mail: Egidijus.Urbonavicius@lei.lt; Povilaitis, M., E-mail: Mantas.Povilaitis@lei.lt; Kontautas, A., E-mail: Aurimas.Kontautas@lei.lt

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Analysis of the vacuum vessel response to the LOCA in W7-X was performed using lumped-parameter codes COCOSYS and ASTEC. • Benchmarking of the results received with two codes provides more confidence in results and helps in identification of possible important differences in the modelling. • The performed analysis answered the questions set in the installed plasma vessel venting system during overpressure of PV in case of 40 mm diameter LOCA in “baking” mode. • Differences in time until opening the burst disk observed in ASTEC and COCOSYS results are caused by differences in heat transfer modelling. - Abstract: This paper presents the analysis of W7-X vacuum vessel response taking into account in-vessel components. A detailed analysis of the vacuum vessel response to the loss of coolant accident was performed using lumped-parameter codes COCOSYS and ASTEC. The performed analysis showed that the installed plasma vessel venting system prevents overpressure of PV in case of 40 mm diameter LOCA in “baking” mode. The performed analysis revealed differences in heat transfer modelling implemented in ASTEC and COCOSYS computer codes, which require further investigation to justify the correct approach for application to fusion facilities.

  9. Assessment of W7-X plasma vessel pressurisation in case of LOCA taking into account in-vessel components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urbonavičius, E.; Povilaitis, M.; Kontautas, A.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Analysis of the vacuum vessel response to the LOCA in W7-X was performed using lumped-parameter codes COCOSYS and ASTEC. • Benchmarking of the results received with two codes provides more confidence in results and helps in identification of possible important differences in the modelling. • The performed analysis answered the questions set in the installed plasma vessel venting system during overpressure of PV in case of 40 mm diameter LOCA in “baking” mode. • Differences in time until opening the burst disk observed in ASTEC and COCOSYS results are caused by differences in heat transfer modelling. - Abstract: This paper presents the analysis of W7-X vacuum vessel response taking into account in-vessel components. A detailed analysis of the vacuum vessel response to the loss of coolant accident was performed using lumped-parameter codes COCOSYS and ASTEC. The performed analysis showed that the installed plasma vessel venting system prevents overpressure of PV in case of 40 mm diameter LOCA in “baking” mode. The performed analysis revealed differences in heat transfer modelling implemented in ASTEC and COCOSYS computer codes, which require further investigation to justify the correct approach for application to fusion facilities.

  10. Contribution for the improvement of pressurized thermal shock assessment methodologies in PWR pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, Paulo de Tarso Vida

    2005-01-01

    The structural integrity assessment of nuclear reactor pressure vessel, concerned to Pressurized Thermal Shock (PTS) accidents, became a necessity and has been investigated since the eighty's. The recognition of the importance of PTS assessment has led the international nuclear technology community to devote a considerable research effort directed to the complete integrity assessment process of the Reactor Pressure Vessels (VPR). Researchers in Europe, Japan and U.S.A. have concentrated efforts in the VPR structural and fracture analysis, conducting experiments to best understand how specific factors act on the behavior of discontinuities, under PTS loading conditions. The main goal of this work is to study de structural behavior of an 'in scale' PWR nuclear reactor pressure vessel model, containing actual discontinuities, under loading conditions generated by a pressurized thermal shock. To construct the pressure vessel model utilized in this research, the approach developed by Barroso (1995) and based on likelihood studies, related to thermal-hydraulic behavior during the PTS was employed. To achieve the objective of this research, a new methodology to generate cracks, with known geometry and localization in the vessel model wall was developed. Additionally, an hydraulic circuit, able to flood the vessel model, heated to 300 deg C, with 10 m 3 of water at 8 deg C, in 170 seconds, was built. Thermo-hydraulic calculations using RELAP5/M0D 3.2.2γ computational code were done, to estimate the temperature profiles during the cooling time. The resulting data subsidized the thermo-structural calculations that were accomplished using ANSYS 7.01 computational code, for both 2D and 3D models. So, the stress profiles obtained with these calculations were associated with fracture mechanics concepts, to assess the crack growth behavior in the VPR model wall. After the PTS test, the VPR model was submitted to destructive and non-destructive inspections. The results

  11. Axial Length Variation Impacts on Superficial Retinal Vessel Density and Foveal Avascular Zone Area Measurements Using Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, Danuta M; Gong, Peijun; An, Di; Menghini, Moreno; Hansen, Alex; Mackey, David A; Sampson, David D; Chen, Fred K

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the impact of image magnification correction on superficial retinal vessel density (SRVD) and foveal avascular zone area (FAZA) measurements using optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA). Participants with healthy retinas were recruited for ocular biometry, refraction, and RTVue XR Avanti OCTA imaging with the 3 × 3-mm protocol. The foveal and parafoveal SRVD and FAZA were quantified with custom software before and after correction for magnification error using the Littman and the modified Bennett formulae. Relative changes between corrected and uncorrected SRVD and FAZA were calculated. Forty subjects were enrolled and the median (range) age of the participants was 30 (18-74) years. The mean (range) spherical equivalent refractive error was -1.65 (-8.00 to +4.88) diopters and mean (range) axial length was 24.42 mm (21.27-28.85). Images from 13 eyes were excluded due to poor image quality leaving 67 for analysis. Relative changes in foveal and parafoveal SRVD and FAZA after correction ranged from -20% to +10%, -3% to +2%, and -20% to +51%, respectively. Image size correction in measurements of foveal SRVD and FAZA was greater than 5% in 51% and 74% of eyes, respectively. In contrast, 100% of eyes had less than 5% correction in measurements of parafoveal SRVD. Ocular biometry should be performed with OCTA to correct image magnification error induced by axial length variation. We advise caution when interpreting interocular and interindividual comparisons of SRVD and FAZA derived from OCTA without image size correction.

  12. A feasibility experiment for assessing the efficacy of ex-vessel cooling through the external gap structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, K. H.; Kim, J. H.; Park, L. J.; Kim, S. B.; Hwang, I. S.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a feasibility experiment for assessing the efficacy of ex-vessel cooling through the external gap structure during a severe accident. In this study, a 1/8 linear scale mockup of a lower plenum was used with Al2O3/Fe thermite melt as a corium simulant. The results show that in dry case test conducted without cooling the outside of the vessel, after about thirty second from the thermite ignition the vessel was heated to cause a complete melt penetration at about 30 degree upper position from the bottom. Whereas in wet case test conducted cooling the outside of the vessel with 0.85 kg/s of water flow rate using 2.5 cm of uniform gap structure, the vessel effectively cooled down with 23.7 K/s of cooling rate by nucleate boiling at the surface of the vessel. The results of two-dimensional analyses using FLUENT code show a similar trend of vessel thermal behavior presented in the tests. Synthesized the results of the tests and analyses work, a natural convection of the melt pool could cause the formation of hot spot at the upper portion of the vessel, but the vessel could effectively cool down by heat removal with ex-vessel cooling

  13. Automated volumetric breast density estimation: A comparison with visual assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, J.M.; Ko, E.S.; Han, B.-K.; Ko, E.Y.; Shin, J.H.; Hahn, S.Y.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To compare automated volumetric breast density (VBD) measurement with visual assessment according to Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS), and to determine the factors influencing the agreement between them. Materials and methods: One hundred and ninety-three consecutive screening mammograms reported as negative were included in the study. Three radiologists assigned qualitative BI-RADS density categories to the mammograms. An automated volumetric breast-density method was used to measure VBD (% breast density) and density grade (VDG). Each case was classified into an agreement or disagreement group according to the comparison between visual assessment and VDG. The correlation between visual assessment and VDG was obtained. Various physical factors were compared between the two groups. Results: Agreement between visual assessment by the radiologists and VDG was good (ICC value = 0.757). VBD showed a highly significant positive correlation with visual assessment (Spearman's ρ = 0.754, p < 0.001). VBD and the x-ray tube target was significantly different between the agreement group and the disagreement groups (p = 0.02 and 0.04, respectively). Conclusion: Automated VBD is a reliable objective method to measure breast density. The agreement between VDG and visual assessment by radiologist might be influenced by physical factors

  14. Fracture risk assessment for the pressurized water reactor pressure vessel under pressurized thermal shock events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, Hsoung-Wei; Huang, Chin-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Highlight: • The PTS loading conditions consistent with the USNRC's new PTS rule are applied as the loading condition for a Taiwan domestic PWR. • The state-of-the-art PFM technique is employed to analyze a reactor pressure vessel. • Novel flaw model and embrittlement correlation are considered in the study. • The RT-based regression formula of NUREG-1874 was also utilized to evaluate the failure risks of RPV. • For slightly embrittled RPV, the SO-1 type PTSs play more important role than other types of PTS. - Abstract: The fracture risk of the pressurized water reactor pressure vessel of a Taiwan domestic nuclear power plant has been evaluated according to the technical basis of the U.S.NRC's new pressurized thermal shock (PTS) screening criteria. The ORNL's FAVOR code and the PNNL's flaw models were employed to perform the probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis associated with plant specific parameters of the domestic reactor pressure vessel. Meanwhile, the PTS thermal hydraulic and probabilistic risk assessment data analyzed from a similar nuclear power plant in the United States for establishing the new PTS rule were applied as the loading conditions. Besides, an RT-based regression formula derived by the U.S.NRC was also utilized to verify the through-wall cracking frequencies. It is found that the through-wall cracking of the analyzed reactor pressure vessel only occurs during the PTS events resulted from the stuck-open primary safety relief valves that later reclose, but with only an insignificant failure risk. The results indicate that the Taiwan domestic PWR pressure vessel has sufficient structural margin for the PTS attack until either the current license expiration dates or during the proposed extended operation periods.

  15. Quantitative assessment of breast density: comparison of different methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin Naishan; Guo Li; Dang Yi; Song Luxin; Wang Xiaoying

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To Compare different methods of quantitative breast density measurement. Methods: The study included sixty patients who underwent both mammography and breast MRI. The breast density was computed automatically on digital mammograms with R2 workstation, Two experienced radiologists read the mammograms and assessed the breast density with Wolfe and ACR classification respectively. Fuzzy C-means clustering algorithm (FCM) was used to assess breast density on MRI. Each assessment method was repeated after 2 weeks. Spearman and Pearson correlations of inter- and intrareader and intermodality were computed for density estimates. Results: Inter- and intrareader correlation of Wolfe classification were 0.74 and 0.65, and they were 0.74 and 0.82 for ACR classification respectively. Correlation between Wolfe and ACR classification was 0.77. High interreader correlation of 0.98 and intrareader correlation of 0.96 was observed with MR FCM measurement. And the correlation between digital mammograms and MRI was high in the assessment of breast density (r=0.81, P<0.01). Conclusion: High correlation of breast density estimates on digital mammograms and MRI FCM suggested the former could be used as a simple and accurate method. (authors)

  16. Correlations Between the Density of Tryptase Positive Mast Cells (DMCT and that of New Blood Vessels (CD105+ in Patients with Gastric Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Micu Gianina Viorica

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Mast cells proteases, tryptase and chymase are directly involved in the growth and progression of solid tumors due to their important role in tumor angiogenesis. We examined the density of tryptase positive mast cells and the mean density of new blood vessels in gastric malignant tumors of patients with and without Helicobacter pylori infection, using immunohistochemical staining for tryptase (for mast cells and CD 105 (for new vessels. Tryptase and CD 105 expression was detected in gastrectomy specimens. In this study, mast cell density correlates with angiogenesis and the growth and progression of gastric cancer. It also shows that the participation of Helicobacter pylori infection in the growth and progress of gastric neoplasia is due to an increase of peritumoral angiogenesis, with subsequent local and distant tumor spread and perivascular growth, but without perineural and nodal involvement.

  17. FRACTURE MECHANICS UNCERTAINTY ANALYSIS IN THE RELIABILITY ASSESSMENT OF THE REACTOR PRESSURE VESSEL: (2D SUBJECTED TO INTERNAL PRESSURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Entin Hartini

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT FRACTURE MECHANICS UNCERTAINTY ANALYSIS IN THE RELIABILITY ASSESSMENT OF THE REACTOR PRESSURE VESSEL: (2D SUBJECTED TO INTERNAL PRESSURE. The reactor pressure vessel (RPV is a pressure boundary in the PWR type reactor which serves to confine radioactive material during chain reaction process. The integrity of the RPV must be guaranteed either  in a normal operation or accident conditions. In analyzing the integrity of RPV, especially related to the crack behavior which can introduce break to the reactor pressure vessel, a fracture mechanic approach should be taken for this assessment. The uncertainty of input used in the assessment, such as mechanical properties and physical environment, becomes a reason that the assessment is not sufficient if it is perfomed only by deterministic approach. Therefore, the uncertainty approach should be applied. The aim of this study is to analize the uncertainty of fracture mechanics calculations in evaluating the reliability of PWR`s reactor pressure vessel. Random character of input quantity was generated using probabilistic principles and theories. Fracture mechanics analysis is solved by Finite Element Method (FEM with  MSC MARC software, while uncertainty input analysis is done based on probability density function with Latin Hypercube Sampling (LHS using python script. The output of MSC MARC is a J-integral value, which is converted into stress intensity factor for evaluating the reliability of RPV’s 2D. From the result of the calculation, it can be concluded that the SIF from  probabilistic method, reached the limit value of  fracture toughness earlier than SIF from  deterministic method.  The SIF generated by the probabilistic method is 105.240 MPa m0.5. Meanwhile, the SIF generated by deterministic method is 100.876 MPa m0.5. Keywords: Uncertainty analysis, fracture mechanics, LHS, FEM, reactor pressure vessels   ABSTRAK ANALISIS KETIDAKPASTIAN FRACTURE MECHANIC PADA EVALUASI KEANDALAN

  18. Proton density differences in signal characteristics of multiple sclerosis plaques versus white matter lesions of small vessel disease and vasculitis on high-field strength MR images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peyster, R.G.; Siegal, T.L.

    1990-01-01

    This paper determines if variations in signal intensity characteristics on multi-spin-echo images obtained with a high-field-strength magnet can be useful in differentiating demyelinating plaques of multiple sclerosis from other pathologic white matter processes due to small vessel disease and vasculities. Using the first of two multi-spin-echo images obtained with a General Electric 1.5-T magnet, the investigators compared signal intensity characteristics in 30 patients with a firm clinical diagnosis of multiple sclerosis versus a control group of 30 patients with a known clinical history of small-vessel disease and vasculitis are isodense to gray matter on proton-density images

  19. Identification and assessment of BWR in-vessel severe accident mitigation strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodge, S.A.; Cleveland, J.C.; Kress, T.S.; Petek, M.

    1992-10-01

    This report provides the results of work carried out in support of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Accident Management Research Program to develop a technical basis for evaluating the effectiveness and feasibility of current and proposed strategies for boiling water reactor (BWR) severe accident management. First, the findings of an assessment of the current status of accident management strategies for the mitigation of in-vessel events for BWR severe accident sequences are described. This includes a review of the BWR Owners' Group Emergency Procedure Guidelines (EPGSs) to determine the extent to which they currently address the characteristic events of an unmitigated severe accident and to provide the basis for recommendations for enhancement of accident management procedures. Second, where considered necessary, new candidate accident management strategies are proposed for mitigation of the late-phase (after core damage has occurred) events. Finally, recommendations are made for consideration of additional strategies where warranted, and two of the four candidate strategies identified by this effort are assessed in detail: (1) preparation of a boron solution for reactor vessel refill should control blade damage occur during a period of temporary core dryout and (2) containment flooding to maintain the core debris within the reactor vessel if the injection systems cannot be restored

  20. Identification and assessment of BWR in-vessel severe accident mitigation strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodge, S.A.; Cleveland, J.C.; Kress, T.S.; Petek, M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1992-10-01

    This report provides the results of work carried out in support of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Accident Management Research Program to develop a technical basis for evaluating the effectiveness and feasibility of current and proposed strategies for boiling water reactor (BWR) severe accident management. First, the findings of an assessment of the current status of accident management strategies for the mitigation of in-vessel events for BWR severe accident sequences are described. This includes a review of the BWR Owners` Group Emergency Procedure Guidelines (EPGSs) to determine the extent to which they currently address the characteristic events of an unmitigated severe accident and to provide the basis for recommendations for enhancement of accident management procedures. Second, where considered necessary, new candidate accident management strategies are proposed for mitigation of the late-phase (after core damage has occurred) events. Finally, recommendations are made for consideration of additional strategies where warranted, and two of the four candidate strategies identified by this effort are assessed in detail: (1) preparation of a boron solution for reactor vessel refill should control blade damage occur during a period of temporary core dryout and (2) containment flooding to maintain the core debris within the reactor vessel if the injection systems cannot be restored.

  1. The treatment of residual stress in fracture assessment of pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, D.; Knowles, J.

    1992-01-01

    The treatment of weld residual stress in the fracture assessment of cylindrical pressure vessels is considered through partitioning the stress into membrane, bending and self-balancing through wall components. The influence of each on fracture behavior is discussed. Stress intensity factor solutions appropriate to each type of stress are presented. Short range, medium range and long range stress categories are identified according to simple rules relating the effect of increasing crack length to stress intensity factor and ligament net stress. Proposals are made on how the stress intensity factor from these stress types may be incorporated into a Kr, Lr based fracture assessment

  2. Safety assessment of in-vessel vapor explosion loads in next generation reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, Kwang Hyun; Cho, Jong Rae; Choi, Byung Uk; Kim, Ki Yong; Lee, Kyung Jung [Korea Maritime University, Busan (Korea); Park, Ik Kyu [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea)

    1998-12-01

    A safety assessment of the reactor vessel lower head integrity under in-vessel vapor explosion loads has been performed. The premixing and explosion calculations were performed using TRACER-II code. Using the calculated explosion pressures imposed on the lower head inner wall, strain calculations were performed using ANSYS code. The explosion analyses show that the explosion impulses are not altered significantly by the uncertain parameters of triggering location and time, fuel and vapor volume fractions in uniform premixture bounding calculations within the conservative ranges. Strain analyses using the calculated pressure loads on the lower head inner wall show that the vapor explosion-induced lower head failure is physically unreasonable. The static analysis using the conservative explosion-end pressure of 7,246 psia shows that the maximum equivalent strain is 4.3% at the bottom of lower head, which is less than the allowable threshold value of 11%. (author). 24 refs., 40 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Progressive Decrease of Peripapillary Angioflow Vessel Density During Structural and Visual Field Progression in Early Primary Open-angle Glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holló, Gábor

    2017-07-01

    To present a case of early primary open-angle glaucoma in which retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT), ganglion cell complex (GCC), and visual field progression were accompanied with significant progression of peripapillary angioflow vessel density (PAFD) measured with optical coherence tomographic angiography. A 68-year-old female patient who was under topical intraocular pressure (IOP) lowering medication for 20 years for ocular hypertension of the right and preperimetric primary open-angle glaucoma of the left eye (with reproducible inferotemporal and superotemporal neuroretinal rim and RNFL loss) was prospectively imaged with the AngioVue OCT for RNFLT, GCC thickness, and PAFD, and investigated with the Octopus Normal G2 visual field test on the same days at 6-month intervals for 18 months, while the IOP of the left eye escaped from control. IOP of the left eye fluctuated between 14 and 30 mm Hg in the study period. RNFLT, GCC thickness, and peripapillary PAFD all decreased significantly (linear regression analysis, P=0.030, 0.040, and 0.020, respectively), and a significant 2.1 dB/y progression was seen for a superior visual field cluster. The RNFLT, peripapillary PAFD, and visual field of the right eye remained normal and unchanged. In our case IOP elevation, glaucomatous visual field conversion, and structural progression were accompanied with significant progressive decrease of peripapillary PAFD. The simultaneous thinning of RNFLT and GCC and decrease of peripapillary PAFD suggest that PAFD may potentially be an additional indicator of early progression in primary open-angle glaucoma.

  4. Assessment of Radiation Embrittlement in Nuclear Reactor Pressure Vessel Surrogate Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balzar, Davor

    2010-10-01

    The radiation-enhanced formation of small (1-2 nm) copper-rich precipitates (CRPs) is critical for the occurrence of embrittlement in nuclear-reactor pressure vessels. Small CRPs are coherent with the bcc matrix, which causes local matrix strain and interaction with the dislocation strain fields, thus impeding dislocation mobility. As CRPs grow, there is a critical size at which a phase transformation occurs, whereby the CRPs are no longer coherent with the matrix, and the strain is relieved. Diffraction-line-broadening analysis (DLBA) and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) were used to characterize the precipitate formation in surrogate ferritic reactor-pressure vessel steels. The materials were aged for different times at elevated temperature to produce a series of specimens with different degrees of copper precipitation. SANS measurements showed that the precipitate size distribution broadens and shifts toward larger sizes as a function of ageing time. Mechanical hardness showed an increase with ageing time, followed by a decrease, which can be associated with the reduction in the number density as well as the loss of coherency at larger sizes. Inhomogeneous strain correlated with mechanical hardness.

  5. Retinal hemodynamic oxygen reactivity assessed by perfusion velocity, blood oximetry and vessel diameter measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klefter, Oliver Niels; Lauritsen, Anne Øberg; Larsen, Michael

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To test the oxygen reactivity of a fundus photographic method of measuring macular perfusion velocity and to integrate macular perfusion velocities with measurements of retinal vessel diameters and blood oxygen saturation. METHODS: Sixteen eyes in 16 healthy volunteers were studied at two...... is a valid method for assessing macular perfusion. Results were consistent with previous observations of hyperoxic blood flow reduction using blue field entoptic and laser Doppler velocimetry. Retinal perfusion seemed to be regulated around individual set points according to blood glucose levels. Multimodal...

  6. Assessment of turbulent flow effects on the vessel wall using four-dimensional flow MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Magnus; Lantz, Jonas; Ebbers, Tino; Dyverfeldt, Petter

    2017-06-01

    To explore the use of MR-estimated turbulence quantities for the assessment of turbulent flow effects on the vessel wall. Numerical velocity data for two patient-derived models was obtained using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for two physiological flow rates. The four-dimensional (4D) Flow MRI measurements were simulated at three different spatial resolutions and used to investigate the estimation of turbulent wall shear stress (tWSS) using the intravoxel standard deviation (IVSD) of velocity and turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) estimated near the vessel wall. Accurate estimation of tWSS using the IVSD is limited by the spatial resolution achievable with 4D Flow MRI. TKE, estimated near the wall, has a strong linear relationship to the tWSS (mean R 2  = 0.84). Near-wall TKE estimates from MR simulations have good agreement to CFD-derived ground truth (mean R 2  = 0.90). Maps of near-wall TKE have strong visual correspondence to tWSS. Near-wall estimation of TKE permits assessment of relative maps of tWSS, but direct estimation of tWSS is challenging due to limitations in spatial resolution. Assessment of tWSS and near-wall TKE may open new avenues for analysis of different pathologies. Magn Reson Med 77:2310-2319, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  7. Preliminary assessment for dust contamination of ITER In-Vessel Transporter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Makiko, E-mail: saito.makiko@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Fusion Research and Development Directorate, Naka, Ibaraki-ken 311-0193 (Japan); Ueno, Kenichi; Maruyama, Takahito; Murakami, Shin; Takeda, Nobukazu; Kakudate, Satoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Fusion Research and Development Directorate, Naka, Ibaraki-ken 311-0193 (Japan); Nakahira, Masataka; Tesini, Alessandro [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 St Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: •To assess the exposure to the maintenance workers, we calculated the effective dose rate. •To reduce the effective dose rate, the IVT was decontaminated and underwent a design change. •The effective dose rate at each maintenance point was also calculated. -- Abstract: After plasma operations of ITER, radioactive dust will have accumulated in the vacuum vessel (VV). The In-Vessel Transporter (IVT) will be introduced into the VV to remove the shield blanket modules for maintenance or replacement and later reinstall them. The IVT itself also needs to undergo regular maintenance in the Hot Cell Facility (HCF). It is assumed that maintenance workers will be exposed to radioactive dust that has adhered to the surfaces of the IVT. In this study, the areas of the IVT that may be contaminated by dust are evaluated to assess the level of exposure to workers during maintenance work in the HCF. Decontamination processes for the IVT, such as a combination of vacuuming and brushing, were investigated and the dose rate after these processes was evaluated. Even though dust was removed from surfaces where decontamination was possible, the dose rate was very high at some assessment points. To decrease the dose rate in accordance with ALARA policy, a decontamination plan and a maintenance plan, which includes the removal of dust, a radiation shield system, and a reduction in working time are proposed.

  8. An effective surveillance strategy for reactor pressure vessel assessment in the long term operation perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaouadi, R.; Gerard, R.

    2015-01-01

    The reactor pressure vessel (RPV) irradiation embrittlement is monitored by means of surveillance capsules containing the RPV belt-line materials, inserted inside the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) before the start of operation. These capsules are placed at location where they receive a higher neutron flux than the vessel wall, by a factor of the order of 2 to 3. They are regularly retrieved and tested to evaluate the RPV irradiation embrittlement according to specific regulatory procedures and standards, in order to guarantee the safe operation of the RPV throughout its lifetime. These procedures are often relying on empirical but conservative concepts. In parallel, material research reactor (MTR) irradiations are often used to support the surveillance data and to develop a better understanding of irradiation effects, not only qualitatively but also quantitatively. Taking advantage of the increased understanding of irradiation effects, analytical tools were developed to improve the evaluation embrittlement and quality assurance of the RPV embrittlement assessment. In this framework, an alternative but complementary surveillance program assessment was developed in Belgium, the so-called enhanced surveillance, in order to benefit from the latest developments in the area of materials science and irradiation effects. The neutron flux and fracture properties of the surveillance materials can be reliably characterized and correlated to each other using physically-based rather than empirical concepts. The enhanced surveillance approach is complementary to the mandatory regulatory procedure and allows quantifying the conservatism of the regulatory approach. The enhanced surveillance approach that uses the reconstitution technology to fabricate additional small size specimens, appropriate modeling tools and microstructural examination when required, makes it possible to rationalize all available information in a physically-based way

  9. Fracture behaviour assessment of a flawed pressure vessel in the hydro-test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkimo, M; Rintamac, R

    1988-12-31

    This document deals with the fracture properties of a flawed pressure vessel. The experiment was carried out within the Nordic Countries on a vessel in a Finnish refinery. The instrumentation used included acoustic emission. Some results are provided. (TEC).

  10. Assessment of the significance of coronary collateral vessel by using thallium-201 myocardial imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanoh, Yasushi; Shiotani, Hideyuki; Fukuzaki, Hisashi; Maeda, Kazumi.

    1988-01-01

    For functional assessment of coronary collateral vessels, twenty-three patients with effort angina pectoris who had total coronary obstruction were studied. The patients were divided depending on the degree of development of collateral vessels into two groups, i.e. good collateral group I (n = 13) and poor collateral group II (n = 10). Thallium-201 scan was performed immediately (Ex-1 image), 20 minutes (Ex-2 image) after exercise and after nitroglycerin administration (NTG image) respectively. In all images, the relative percent activity of thallium-201 in the collateral-dependent ischemic area to the normal myocardium were calculated and were compaired between two groups. Relative percent activities in group I and II were as follows : Ex-1 image ; 75.8 ± 3.5 % vs. 77.2 ± 2.9 % (NS), Ex-2 images ; 85.3 ± 4.5 % vs. 79.3 ± 3.9 % (p < 0.005), NTG image ; 97.3 ± 3.1 % vs. 96.4 ± 5.2 % (NS). From these results, it was elucidated that good collateral induced early partial redistribution in its perfusion area, suggesting that good collateral circulation may provide rapid recovery from myocardial ischemia. (author)

  11. Assessment and selection of materials for ITER in-vessel components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinin, G.; Barabash, V.; Cardella, A.; Dietz, J.; Ioki, K.; Matera, R.; Santoro, R. T.; Tivey, R.; ITER Home Teams

    2000-12-01

    During the international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER) engineering design activities (EDA) significant progress has been made in the selection of materials for the in-vessel components of the reactor. This progress is a result of the worldwide collaboration of material scientists and industries which focused their effort on the optimisation of material and component manufacturing and on the investigation of the most critical material properties. Austenitic stainless steels 316L(N)-IG and 316L, nickel-based alloys Inconel 718 and Inconel 625, Ti-6Al-4V alloy and two copper alloys, CuCrZr-IG and CuAl25-IG, have been proposed as reference structural materials, and ferritic steel 430, and austenitic steel 304B7 with the addition of boron have been selected for some specific parts of the ITER in-vessel components. Beryllium, tungsten and carbon fibre composites are considered as plasma facing armour materials. The data base on the properties of all these materials is critically assessed and briefly reviewed in this paper together with the justification of the material selection (e.g., effect of neutron irradiation on the mechanical properties of materials, effect of manufacturing cycle, etc.).

  12. Pulmonary artery pulsatility and effect on vessel diameter assessment in magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shariat, Masoud; Schantz, Daryl; Yoo, Shi-Joon; Wintersperger, Bernd J.; Seed, Mike; Alnafisi, Bahiyah; Chu, Leysia; MacGowan, Christopher K.; Amerom, Joshua van; Grosse-Wortmann, Lars

    2014-01-01

    systolic cine SSFP or MRA in both groups (p < 0.0001). Vessel diameters measured on systolic SSFP were significantly larger than measurements made on diastolic SSFP (p < 0.0001). There was no significant difference between vessel measurements on MRA and measurements on systolic cine SSFP (p = 0.44 for the TOF group and p = 0.79 for ARVC group). Measurements on the MRA datasets were significantly larger than those on diastolic SSFP images (p < 0.0001). Conclusion: Black blood, white blood and MRA sequences are all reproducible CMR methods for the assessment of arterial diameters in children and adolescents. Measurements from systolic phase SSFP images are comparable to those from contrast-enhanced MRA. Therefore, the administration of contrast medium is not necessary in every case. Cine SSFP images offer the additional advantage over the other methods in such that both the largest and the smallest diameter of the vessel during the cardiac cycle can be assessed using this technique. This is even more relevant in highly pulsatile circulations, such as patients with repaired TOF and significant pulmonary insufficiency

  13. Pulmonary artery pulsatility and effect on vessel diameter assessment in magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shariat, Masoud, E-mail: masoudshariat@gmail.com [Department of Medical Imaging, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Schantz, Daryl, E-mail: daryl.schantz@gmail.com [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Yoo, Shi-Joon, E-mail: shi-joon.yoo@sickkids.ca [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Wintersperger, Bernd J., E-mail: bernd.wintersperger@uhn.ca [Department of Medical Imaging, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Seed, Mike, E-mail: mike.seed@sickkids.ca [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Cardiology, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Alnafisi, Bahiyah, E-mail: bahiyah.alnafisi@uhn.ca [Department of Medical Imaging, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Chu, Leysia, E-mail: leysia_99@yahoo.com [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); MacGowan, Christopher K., E-mail: christopher.macgowan@sickkids.ca [Department of Physiology and Experimental Medicine, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Amerom, Joshua van, E-mail: Joshu.vanamerom@sickkids.ca [Department of Physiology and Experimental Medicine, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Grosse-Wortmann, Lars, E-mail: lars.grosse-wortmann@sickkids.ca [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Cardiology, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-02-15

    systolic cine SSFP or MRA in both groups (p < 0.0001). Vessel diameters measured on systolic SSFP were significantly larger than measurements made on diastolic SSFP (p < 0.0001). There was no significant difference between vessel measurements on MRA and measurements on systolic cine SSFP (p = 0.44 for the TOF group and p = 0.79 for ARVC group). Measurements on the MRA datasets were significantly larger than those on diastolic SSFP images (p < 0.0001). Conclusion: Black blood, white blood and MRA sequences are all reproducible CMR methods for the assessment of arterial diameters in children and adolescents. Measurements from systolic phase SSFP images are comparable to those from contrast-enhanced MRA. Therefore, the administration of contrast medium is not necessary in every case. Cine SSFP images offer the additional advantage over the other methods in such that both the largest and the smallest diameter of the vessel during the cardiac cycle can be assessed using this technique. This is even more relevant in highly pulsatile circulations, such as patients with repaired TOF and significant pulmonary insufficiency.

  14. Assessment of aluminum structural materials for service within the ANS reflector vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrell, K.

    1995-08-01

    Most of the components in the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor, including the reflector vessel, will be built from the aluminum alloy 6061 (lMg,0.6Si) in its precipitation-hardened T6 and T651 conditions. The microstructural and mechanical characteristics of the alloy are described, and its operating boundaries of stress, temperature, and time in its unirradiated state are defined. The material's responses to neutron radiation exposure in aqueous environments are reviewed in detail. The particular service conditions of stress, temperature, and radiation exposure expected for individual components in the ANS are listed, and the suitability of each component to meet the demands is assessed. Areas of uncertainties are outlined, and various suggestions and recommendations are made to give improved confidence in the predictions

  15. Development of a shallow-flaw fracture assessment methodology for nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bass, B.R.; Bryson, J.W.; Dickson, T.L.; McAfee, W.J.; Pennell, W.E.

    1996-01-01

    Shallow-flaw fracture technology is being developed within the Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program for application to the safety assessment of radiation-embrittled nuclear reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) containing postulated shallow flaws. Cleavage fracture in shallow-flaw cruciform beam specimens tested under biaxial loading at temperatures in the lower transition temperature range was shown to be strain-controlled. A strain-based dual-parameter fracture toughness correlation was developed and shown to be capable of predicting the effect of crack-tip constraint on fracture toughness for strain-controlled fracture. A probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) model that includes both the properties of the inner-surface stainless-steel cladding and a biaxial shallow-flaw fracture toughness correlation gave a reduction in probability of cleavage initiation of more than two orders of magnitude from an ASME-based reference case

  16. Local breast density assessment using reacquired mammographic images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Eloy; Diaz, Oliver; Martí, Robert; Diez, Yago; Gubern-Mérida, Albert; Sentís, Melcior; Martí, Joan; Oliver, Arnau

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to evaluate the spatial glandular volumetric tissue distribution as well as the density measures provided by Volpara™ using a dataset composed of repeated pairs of mammograms, where each pair was acquired in a short time frame and in a slightly changed position of the breast. We conducted a retrospective analysis of 99 pairs of repeatedly acquired full-field digital mammograms from 99 different patients. The commercial software Volpara™ Density Maps (Volpara Solutions, Wellington, New Zealand) is used to estimate both the global and the local glandular tissue distribution in each image. The global measures provided by Volpara™, such as breast volume, volume of glandular tissue, and volumetric breast density are compared between the two acquisitions. The evaluation of the local glandular information is performed using histogram similarity metrics, such as intersection and correlation, and local measures, such as statistics from the difference image and local gradient correlation measures. Global measures showed a high correlation (breast volume R=0.99, volume of glandular tissue R=0.94, and volumetric breast density R=0.96) regardless the anode/filter material. Similarly, histogram intersection and correlation metric showed that, for each pair, the images share a high degree of information. Regarding the local distribution of glandular tissue, small changes in the angle of view do not yield significant differences in the glandular pattern, whilst changes in the breast thickness between both acquisition affect the spatial parenchymal distribution. This study indicates that Volpara™ Density Maps is reliable in estimating the local glandular tissue distribution and can be used for its assessment and follow-up. Volpara™ Density Maps is robust to small variations of the acquisition angle and to the beam energy, although divergences arise due to different breast compression conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. ASSESSMENT OF THE POTENTIAL FOR HYDROGEN GENERATION DURING GROUTING OPERATIONS IN THE R AND P REACTOR VESSELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiersma, B.

    2010-05-24

    The R- and P-reactor buildings were retired from service and are now being prepared for deactivation and decommissioning (D and D). D and D activities consist primarily of immobilizing contaminated components and structures in a grout-like formulation. Aluminum corrodes very rapidly when it comes in contact with the alkaline grout materials and as a result produces hydrogen gas. To address this potential deflagration/explosion hazard, the Materials Science and Technology Directorate (MS and T) of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has been requested to review and evaluate existing experimental and analytical studies of this issue to determine if any process constraints on the chemistry of the fill material and the fill operation are necessary. Various options exist for the type of grout material that may be used for D and D of the reactor vessels. The grout formulation options include ceramicrete (pH 6-8), low pH portland cement + silica fume grout (pH 10.4), or Portland cement groupt (pH 12.5). The assessment concluded that either ceramicrete or the silica fume grout may be used to safely grout the P-reactor vessel. The risk of accumulation of a flammable mixture of hydrogen between the grout-air interface and the top of the reactor is very low. Portland cement grout, on the other hand, for the same range of process parameters does not provide a margin of safety against the accumulation of flammable gas in the reactor vessel during grouting operations in the P-reactor vessel. It is recommended that this grout not be utilized for this task. The R-reactor vessel cotnains significantly less aluminum based on current facility process knowledge, surface observations, and drawings. Therefore, a Portland cement grout may be considered for grouting operations as well as the other grout formulations. For example, if the grout fill rate is less than 1 inch/min and the grout temperature is maintained at 70 C or less, the risk of hydrogen accumulation during fill

  18. Assessment of gamma irradiation heating and damage in miniature neutron source reactor vessel using computational methods and SRIM - TRIM code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appiah-Ofori, F. F.

    2014-07-01

    The Effects of Gamma Radiation Heating and Irradiation Damage in the reactor vessel of Ghana Research Reactor 1, Miniature Neutron Source Reactor were assessed using Implicit Control Volume Finite Difference Numerical Computation and validated by SRIM - TRIM Code. It was assumed that 5.0 MeV of gamma rays from the reactor core generate heat which interact and absorbed completely by the interior surface of the MNSR vessel which affects it performance due to the induced displacement damage. This displacement damage is as result of lattice defects being created which impair the vessel through formation of point defect clusters such as vacancies and interstitiaIs which can result in dislocation loops and networks, voids and bubbles and causing changes in the layers in the thickness of the vessel. The microscopic defects produced in the vessel due to γ - radiation damage are referred to as radiation damage while the defects thus produced modify the macroscopic properties of the vessel which are also known as the radiation effects. These radiation damage effects are of major concern for materials used in nuclear energy production. In this study, the overall objective was to assess the effects of gamma radiation heating and damage in GHARR - I MNSR vessel by a well-developed Mathematical model, Analytical and Numerical solutions, simulating the radiation damage in the vessel. SRIM - TRIM Code was used as a computational tool to determine the displacement per atom (dpa) associated with radiation damage while implicit Control Volume Finite Difference Method was used to determine the temperature profile within the vessel due to γ - radiation heating respectively. The methodology adopted in assessing γ - radiation heating in the vessel involved development of the One-Dimensional Steady State Fourier Heat Conduction Equation with Volumetric Heat Generation both analytical and implicit Control Volume Finite Difference Method approach to determine the maximum temperature and

  19. Assessing the effect of electron density in photon dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seco, J.; Evans, P. M.

    2006-01-01

    Photon dose calculation algorithms (such as the pencil beam and collapsed cone, CC) model the attenuation of a primary photon beam in media other than water, by using pathlength scaling based on the relative mass density of the media to water. In this study, we assess if differences in the electron density between the water and media, with different atomic composition, can influence the accuracy of conventional photon dose calculations algorithms. A comparison is performed between an electron-density scaling method and the standard mass-density scaling method for (i) tissues present in the human body (such as bone, muscle, etc.), and for (ii) water-equivalent plastics, used in radiotherapy dosimetry and quality assurance. We demonstrate that the important material property that should be taken into account by photon dose algorithms is the electron density, and not the mass density. The mass-density scaling method is shown to overestimate, relative to electron-density predictions, the primary photon fluence for tissues in the human body and water-equivalent plastics, where 6%-7% and 10% differences were observed respectively for bone and air. However, in the case of patients, differences are expected to be smaller due to the large complexity of a treatment plan and of the patient anatomy and atomic composition and of the smaller thickness of bone/air that incident photon beams of a treatment plan may have to traverse. Differences have also been observed for conventional dose algorithms, such as CC, where an overestimate of the lung dose occurs, when irradiating lung tumors. The incorrect lung dose can be attributed to the incorrect modeling of the photon beam attenuation through the rib cage (thickness of 2-3 cm in bone upstream of the lung tumor) and through the lung and the oversimplified modeling of electron transport in convolution algorithms. In the present study, the overestimation of the primary photon fluence, using the mass-density scaling method, was shown

  20. CT-based bone density assessment for iliosacral screw trajectories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Schicho

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Sacroiliac screw placement is one standard treatment option for stabilization of posterior pelvic ring injuries encountering high intra- and inter-individual variations of bone stock quality as well as a vast variety and prevalence of sacral dysmorphism. An individual, easy-to-use preoperative bone stock quality estimation would be of high value for the surgeon. Materials and Methods: We analyzed 36 standard computed tomography datasets with the uninjured pelvic ring. Using a two-plane cross-referencing technique, we assessed the Hounsfield unit (HU mean values as well as standard deviation and minimum/maximum values within selected region of interests (ROIs at five key areas: os ilium left and right, massa lateralis of os sacrum left and right, and central vertebral body on levels S1 and S2. Results: Results showed no difference in mean HU at any ROI when comparing male and female data. For all ROIs set on S1 and S2, there was an age-related decline of HU with a calculated slope significantly different from zero. There was no statistical difference of slopes when comparing S1- and S2-level with respect to any distinct ROI. Comparison of levels S1 and S2 revealed differences at the vertebral body and at the right os ilium. The right and left massa lateralis of os sacrum had lower bone density than the center of the vertebral body, the right, or left os ilium on S1; right and left massa lateralis density did not differ significantly. On level S2, results were comparable with no difference of massa lateralis density. Conclusion: With our easy-to-use preoperative assessment of bone density of five key areas of sacroiliac screw anchoring we were able to find the lowest bone density in both the left and right massa lateralis on levels S1 and S2 with high inter- and intra-individual variations. Significantly lower bone density was found in the center of the vertebral bodies S2 in comparison to S1, which both are crucial for iliosacral

  1. Radiographic evaluation of vessel count and density with quantitative magnetic resonance imaging during external breast expansion in Asian women: A prospective clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myung, Yujin; Kwon, Heeyeon; Pak, Changsik; Lee, Hobin; Jeong, Jae Hoon; Heo, Chan Yeong

    2016-12-01

    Breast augmentation with fat transfer does not bear the risks associated with silicone implantation. The method can potentially be especially useful in Asian women, who often reject augmentation mammoplasty with implants. This prospective clinical trial evaluated the effects of external breast expansion on breast density and vessel count using magnetic resonance imaging. Thirty-four enrolled patients were instructed to apply one of two devices, the conventional BRAVA device (used in the AESTES trial) or a novel external expansion device (EVERA) designed for Asian women, continuously for 8 h per day for 12 weeks. For external expansion, the pressure was set to 25 mmHg. Follow-up examinations were performed for 4 weeks after completion of the expansion. The ratio between the fibroglandular and adipose tissues of the breast was measured using T1-weighted MRI, and the number of vessels in the breast tissue was determined before and after the treatment by contrast MRI. Additionally, the volume of the breast was measured by laser scanning before, during, and after the device application. The obtained measurements were compared within and between the groups at different time points. Six patients dropped out, while 28 completed the trial without major side effects or adverse events. External expansion significantly increased breast vessel count in both the EVERA and AESTES groups (p = 0.019, p = 0.022). However, it did not significantly change breast density in either group (p = 0.186, p = 0.638). No significant intergroup differences were noted in vessel count (p = 0.874) or density (p = 0.482). Breast volume increases after 12 weeks of application were statistically significant in both groups, with mean changes of 81 ± 22 cc (AESTES) and 98 ± 30 cc (EVERA) (p Asian women. Level II, therapeutic study. Copyright © 2016 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Structural integrity assessment of the reactor pressure vessel under the pressurized thermal shock loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Mingya; Lu, Feng; Wang, Rongshan; Ren, Ai

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The regulation and the code are proved to be conservative in the integrity assessment. • This study is helpful to understand the complex influence of the parameters. • The most dangerous case is given for the reference transient. - Abstract: Fracture mechanics analysis of pressurized thermal shock (PTS) is the key element of the integrity evaluation of the nuclear reactor pressure vessel (RPV). While the regulation of 10 CFR 50.61 and the ASME Code provide the guidance for the structural integrity, the guidance has been prepared under conservative assumptions. In this paper, the effects of conservative assumptions involved in the PTS analysis were investigated. The influence of different parameters, such as crack size, cladding effect and neutron fluence, were reviewed based on 3-D finite element analyses. Also, the sensitivity study of elastic–plastic approach, crack type and cladding thickness were reviewed. It was shown that crack depth, crack type, plastic effect and cladding thickness change the safety margin (SM) significantly, and the SM at the deepest point of the crack is not always smaller than that of the surface point, indicating that both the deepest and surface points of the crack front should be considered. For the reference transient, deeper cracks always give more conservative prediction. So compared to the prescribed analyses of a set of postulated defects with varying depths in the ASME code, it only needs to assess the crack with maximum depth in the code for the reference transient according to the conclusions

  3. Assessment of the Zaporizhya NPP unit 1 reactor pressure vessel safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podkopaev, V.; Popov, V.; Zaritsky, N.

    1997-01-01

    This emergency situation had occurred at the ZNPP unit 1 while its being under ''hot shutdown'' in natural coolant circulation mode. The main difference between emergency situation and mode with improper setting of PPPD described in the ''Technical Safety Substantiation (TSS) is that this mode is being considered in the TSS under rated power of reactor with main circulation pumps (MCP) under operation. This difference is a substantial one. For this reason a necessity appeared to asses an integrity of referred reactor pressure vessel (RPV) under given emergency situation to judge whether results obtained meet the ND requirements (safety assessment). Under operation such RPV elements are being mostly affected as upper cooling, lower cowling, weld No. 3 weld No. 4 situated in front of core. These elements materials ageing process is the most intense one. Thus, this work was aimed at investigation of structure material behavior and RPV integrity assessment under thermal shock conditions while PPPD improper setting. At that time the most attention was drawn to above mentioned upper and lower cowlings along with welds No. 3 and 4. 5 refs, figs, 10 tabs

  4. Assessment of the Zaporizhya NPP unit 1 reactor pressure vessel safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podkopaev, V; Popov, V; Zaritsky, N [State Scientific and Technical Centre on Nuclear and Radiation Safety (SSTC NRS), Kiev (Ukraine)

    1997-09-01

    This emergency situation had occurred at the ZNPP unit 1 while its being under ``hot shutdown`` in natural coolant circulation mode. The main difference between emergency situation and mode with improper setting of PPPD described in the ``Technical Safety Substantiation (TSS) is that this mode is being considered in the TSS under rated power of reactor with main circulation pumps (MCP) under operation. This difference is a substantial one. For this reason a necessity appeared to asses an integrity of referred reactor pressure vessel (RPV) under given emergency situation to judge whether results obtained meet the ND requirements (safety assessment). Under operation such RPV elements are being mostly affected as upper cooling, lower cowling, weld No. 3 weld No. 4 situated in front of core. These elements materials ageing process is the most intense one. Thus, this work was aimed at investigation of structure material behavior and RPV integrity assessment under thermal shock conditions while PPPD improper setting. At that time the most attention was drawn to above mentioned upper and lower cowlings along with welds No. 3 and 4. 5 refs, figs, 10 tabs.

  5. Triple –E Vessels: Tonnage Measurement and Suez Canal Dues Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsayed Hussein Galall

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Container is growing faster than GDP, Shipping lines always attempt to augment efficiencyby reducing cost and by attracting larger volumes of containers. As a result rising containerfreight rates the lines have been driven to increase economic of scale, by building mega shipsand fewer mere efficient port calls. In 2011 Maersk line ordered up to 20 new “Triple- E “Class of container vessels deliversbetween 2013- 2015. These class of mega container vessels have its way through Suez Canal,other companies CMA, CGM also ordered this type of mega container vessels, in order toreach higher profits due to the achieved economics of scale It is believed that 20000 TEUcould be the next target size. Present mega container fleet and any future feasible potential vessel capacity expansionmore than 18000 TEU put Suez Canal route in strong competitive position. MeanwhilePanama Canal will not be able to handle vessels larger than 12600 TEU even after itsexpansion in 2015.

  6. Workshop on processing of nuclear data for use in power reactor pressure vessel lifetime assessment. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paviotti Corcuera, R.; Greenwood, L.R.; Muir, D.W.

    1999-02-01

    This document summarizes the contents of the workshop on processing of nuclear data for use in power reactor pressure vessel lifetime assessment. A short description of the main topics of the agenda, the list of participants and comments and recommendations are given. (author)

  7. An assessment of osteoporosis and low bone density in postmenopausal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hafeez, F.; Khurshid, R.

    2009-01-01

    Assessment of bone mineral density and other risk factors of osteoporosis in postmenopausal age group of Pakistani population and to compare them with premenopausal group. The risk factors of osteoporosis were studied both in premenopausal and postmenopausal groups. These risk factors can be exogenous or endogenous. Endogenous risk factors are aging, altered menstrual status, low bone mass, positive family history and oestrogen deficiency. Exogenous factors include lack of adequate nutrition (milk, calcium, vitamin D etc.) and lack of physical exercise. These risk factors were evaluated by taking history, recording height and weight, doing blood parameters and checking bone mineral density. Oestrogen level was carried out by the Eliza technique. Bone mass density was carried out by the bone heel densitometer. The data was analyzed statistically and the values of two groups were compared. The risk factors in postmenopausal group were low BMD, low oestrogen levels, poor intake of milk and calcium and lack of physical exercise. All women should get checked their BMD in this age group. Regular exercise and adequate calcium intake can still help in postmenopausal age group. (author)

  8. The influence of fire exposure on austenitic stainless steel for pressure vessel fitness-for-service assessment: Experimental research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo; Shu, Wenhua; Zuo, Yantian

    2017-04-01

    The austenitic stainless steels are widely applied to pressure vessel manufacturing. The fire accident risk exists in almost all the industrial chemical plants. It is necessary to make safety evaluation on the chemical equipment including pressure vessels after fire. Therefore, the present research was conducted on the influences of fire exposure testing under different thermal conditions on the mechanical performance evolution of S30408 austenitic stainless steel for pressure vessel equipment. The metallurgical analysis described typical appearances in micro-structure observed in the material suffered by fire exposure. Moreover, the quantitative degradation of mechanical properties was investigated. The material thermal degradation mechanism and fitness-for-service assessment process of fire damage were further discussed.

  9. Assessment of jeopardized myocardium in patients with one-vessel disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iskandrian, A.S.; Lichtenberg, R.; Segal, B.L.; Mintz, G.S.; Mundth, E.D.; Hakki, A.-H.; Kimbiris, D.; Bemis, C.E.; Croll, M.N.; Kane, S.A.

    1982-01-01

    The size of the perfusion defect was assessed from a quantitative analysis of exercise thallium-201 images. Quantitative analysis was determined by measuring the area and the perimeter of the perfusion defect and expressing it as a percentage of the total left ventricular area or perimeter in three projections. Using this technique, we studied 50 patients with one-vessel disease of 50% or greater diameter narrowing. The planimetric and the perimetric methods correlated well (p<0.001, r=0.97). Of the 11 patients with less than 70% diameter narrowing, only one patient had abnormal exercise thallium-201 images. Of the remaining 39 patients with 70% or greater diameter narrowing, 35 had abnormal exercise images. The defects were larger in patients with left anterior descending coronary artery disease (33 +/- 10%; mean +/- SD by perimetry) than in patients with left circumflex coronary artery disease (19 +/- 14%, p<0.01) or right coronary artery disease (17 +/- 11%, p<0.01). There was also significant variation in the sizes of the defects in the three projections in patients with left circumflex and right coronary artery disease, but not in patients with left anterior descending coronary artery disease. Patients with left anterior descending coronary artery disease with collaterals had smaller defects than their counterparts without collaterals

  10. Pressure vessel inspection criteria based on fitness-for-purpose assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grover, J.L.; Cipolla, R.C.

    1985-01-01

    The paper on pressure vessel inspection investigates the methodology required to establish an inspection strategy consistent with fracture mechanics analysis, i.e. to define allowable flaw sizes based on location within the vessel. The methodology is demonstrated using a sample problem for a typical pressurised water reactor pressure vessel, and shows the impact of certain assumptions on the inspection strategy. The results indicate that the flaw size varies with the shape of the assumed residual stress field and the through-thickness location. Also in general, the fracture mechanics evaluation allows flaws much larger than are allowed by the inspection acceptance criteria. (UK)

  11. Ultrasound assessment of the posterior circumflex humeral artery in elite volleyball players: Aneurysm prevalence, anatomy, branching pattern and vessel characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Pol, Daan; Maas, Mario; Terpstra, Aart; Pannekoek-Hekman, Marja; Alaeikhanehshir, Sena; Kuijer, P Paul F M; Planken, R Nils

    2017-03-01

    To determine the prevalence of posterior circumflex humeral artery (PCHA) aneurysms and vessel characteristics of the PCHA and deep brachial artery (DBA) in elite volleyball players. Two-hundred and eighty players underwent standardized ultrasound assessment of the dominant arm by a vascular technologist. Assessment included determination of PCHA aneurysms (defined as segmental vessel dilatation ≥150 %), PCHA and DBA anatomy, branching pattern, vessel course and diameter. The PCHA and DBA were identified in 100 % and 93 % (260/280) of cases, respectively. The prevalence of PCHA aneurysms was 4.6 % (13/280). All aneurysms were detected in proximal PCHA originating from the axillary artery (AA). The PCHA originated from the AA in 81 % of cases (228/280), and showed a curved course dorsally towards the humeral head in 93 % (211/228). The DBA originated from the AA in 73 % of cases (190/260), and showed a straight course parallel to the AA in 93 % (177/190). PCHA aneurysm prevalence in elite volleyball players is high and associated with a specific branching type: a PCHA that originates from the axillary artery. Radiologists should have a high index of suspicion for this vascular overuse injury. For the first time vessel characteristics and reference values are described to facilitate ultrasound assessment. • Prevalence of PCHA aneurysms is 4.6 % among elite volleyball players. • All aneurysms are in proximal PCHA that originates directly from AA. • Vessel characteristics and reference values are described to facilitate US assessment. • Mean PCHA and DBA diameters can be used as reference values. • Radiologists need a high index of suspicion for this vascular overuse injury.

  12. Vessel Operating Units (Vessels)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains data for vessels that are greater than five net tons and have a current US Coast Guard documentation number. Beginning in1979, the NMFS...

  13. Applicability assessment of plug weld to ITER vacuum vessel by crack propagation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohmori, Junji; Nakahira, Masataka; Takeda, Nobukazu; Shibanuma, Kiyoshi; Sago, Hiromi; Onozuka, Masanori

    2006-03-01

    In order to improve the fabricability of the vacuum vessel (VV) of International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), applicability of plug weld between VV outer shell and stiffening ribs/blanket support housings has been assessed using crack propagation analysis for the plug weld. The ITER VV is a double-wall structure of inner and outer shells with ribs and housings between the shells. For the fabrication of VV, ribs and housings are welded to outer shell after welding to inner shell. A lot of weld grooves should be adjusted for welding outer shell. The plug weld is that outer shells with slit at the weld region are set on ribs/housings then outer shells are welded to them by filling the slits with weld metal. The plug weld can allow larger tolerance of weld groove gap than ordinary butt weld. However, un-welded lengths parallel to outer sell surface remain in the plug weld region. It is necessary to evaluate the allowable un-welded length to apply the plug weld to ITER VV fabrication. For the assessment, the allowable un-welded lengths have been calculated by crack propagation analyses for load conditions, conservatively assuming the un-welded region is a crack. In the analyses, firstly allowable crack lengths are calculated from the stresses of the weld region. Then assuming initial crack length, crack propagation is calculated during operation period. Allowable initial crack lengths are determined on the condition that the propagated cracks should not exceed the allowable crack lengths. The analyses have been carried out for typical inboard straight region and inboard upper curved region with the maximum housing stress. The allowable initial cracks of ribs are estimated to be 8.8mm and 38mm for the rib and the housing, respectively, considering inspection error of 4.4mm. Plug weld between outer shell and ribs/housings could be applicable. (author)

  14. Assessment of intracranial vessels in association with carotid atherosclerosis and brain vascular lesions in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oláh, Csaba; Kardos, Zsófia; Sepsi, Mariann; Sas, Attila; Kostyál, László; Bhattoa, Harjit Pal; Hodosi, Katalin; Kerekes, György; Tamási, László; Valikovics, Attila; Bereczki, Dániel; Szekanecz, Zoltán

    2017-09-26

    Stroke has been associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We assessed patients with RA and healthy control subjects by transcranial Doppler (TCD), carotid ultrasonography and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Altogether, 41 female patients with RA undergoing methotrexate (MTX) or biologic treatment and 60 age-matched control subjects underwent TCD assessment of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) and basilar artery. Pulsatility index (PI), resistivity (resistance) index (RI) and circulatory reserve capacity (CRC) were determined at rest (r) and after apnoea (a) and hyperventilation (h). The presence of carotid plaques and carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) were also determined. Intracerebral vascular lesions were investigated by brain MRI. MCA PI and RI values at rest and after apnoea were significantly increased in the total and MTX-treated RA populations vs control subjects. MCA CRC was also impaired, and basilar artery PI was higher in RA. More patients with RA had carotid plaques and increased cIMT. Linear regression analysis revealed that left PI(r) and RI(r) correlated with disease duration and that left PI(r), RI(r), PI(a), PI(h) and basilar PI correlated with disease activity. Right CRC inversely correlated with 28-joint Disease Activity Score. Disease activity was an independent determinant of left PI(a) and right CRC. Compared with long-term MTX treatment alone, the use of biologics in combination with MTX was associated with less impaired cerebral circulation. Impaired cerebral circulation was also associated with measures of carotid atherosclerosis. To our knowledge, this is the first study to show increased distal MCA and basilar artery occlusion in RA as determined by TCD. Patients with RA also had CRC defects. We also confirmed increased carotid plaque formation and increased cIMT. Biologics may beneficially influence some parameters in the intracranial vessels.

  15. Sense, enrich and classify: The scanmaris workshop for assessment of vessel's abnormal behavior in the EEZ

    OpenAIRE

    Jangal , Florent; Giraud , Marie-Annick; Morel , Michel; Mano , Jean-Pierre; Napoli , Aldo; Littaye , Anne

    2008-01-01

    International audience; Constant monitoring of the Exclusive Economic Zone cannot be performed only using high performance sensors. On the one hand, all available information on the observed area as juridical history of vessels or delineation of fishing zone is not necessarily measurable. On the other hand, even if the large amount of available information could be caught out they would be useless if none thorough sorting and analysis are carried on. So, we propose to sense vessel trail in Ex...

  16. On the calculation of leakage rates from vessels filled with high density gaseous CO2 using pressure drop data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, A.F.

    1987-09-01

    This paper considers calculation methods to estimate leakage rates from pressure drop data from vessels filled with high pressure (40 bar) low temperature (25 0 C) CO 2 . It is essential to consider the non-ideality of CO 2 under these conditions if accurate results are to be obtained. There are two main areas where this is relevant: the first is the use of temperature measurements to adjust the measured pressure readings so that the effect of temperature fluctuations is eliminated. The second is in the conversion of the pressure drop data to volumetric leak rate. An example test is described in which it is shown that the CO 2 based temperature correction method improves the accuracy of the pressure drop estimate by about a factor of ten over using a perfect gas assumption and a factor of about 25 over not attempting to adjust the pressure at all. Also the flow rate obtained from assuming the gas was perfect was almost a factor of two too low. A method for scaling leakage rates to other temperature pressures and gases is also given brief consideration in this report. It is observed that the results of scaling are strongly dependent on the flow regime assumed and it is not possible to determine the flow regime from the pressure drop data. Consequently only upper and lower bounds to the scaled estimate can be quoted. (U.K.)

  17. Assessment of motion effects on the FPSO (Floating, Production, Storage and Offloading) vessel Terra Nova

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, B.; Hofer, K. [Defence Research and Development Canada, Toronto, ON (Canada); Brooks, C.J. [Survival Systems Group Ltd., Dartmouth, NS (Canada)

    2002-10-01

    A study was conducted to define the incidence and severity of seasickness, motion-induced fatigue and task performance problems encountered on the Floating, Production, Storage, Offshore (FPSO) vessel which Petro-Canada operates in the Grands Banks of Newfoundland at the Terra Nova Field. The FPSO vessel is tethered to the oil well head by flexible couplings and is subjected to severe wave motion at sea. Crew members living and working aboard the FPSO vessel are exposed to more severe weather motion compared to those on fixed installation platforms, particularly during the winter months. The study involved a questionnaire to determine if seasickness is a problem and whether specific ship motions affect sleep, mental and physical performance on the vessel. Ship motion data was obtained through sensors mounted on the bow of the vessel. Respondents revealed that the incidence and severity of motion sickness and sleep disturbance ranged from slight to moderate. The correlation between sleep disturbance and ship motion was high. Problems in task performance ranged from loss of concentration, decision making and memory disorders and task completion problems. The number of safety, health and performance issues increased with bad weather conditions. One of the objectives of this study is to develop recommendations to provide operations guidance to improve comfort and performance on FPSO vessels. 13 tabs., 7 figs.

  18. Preliminary structural assessment of DEMO vacuum vessel against a vertical displacement event

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mozzillo, Rocco; Tarallo, Andrea; Marzullo, Domenico; Bachmann, Christian; Di Gironimo, Giuseppe; Mazzone, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The paper focuses on a preliminary structural analysis of the current concept design of DEMO vacuum vessel. • The Vacuum Vessel was checked against the VDE in combinations with the weight force of all components that the vessel shall bear. • Different configurations for the vacuum vessel supports are considered, showing that the best solution is VV supported at the lower port. • The analyses evaluated the “P damage” according to RCC-MRx code. - Abstract: This paper focuses on a preliminary structural analysis of the current concept design of DEMO vacuum vessel (VV). The VV structure is checked against a vertical load due to a Vertical Displacement Event in combination with the weight force of all components that the main vessel shall bear. Different configurations for the supports are considered. Results show that the greatest safety margins are reached when the tokamak is supported through the lower ports rather than the equatorial ports, though all analyzed configurations are compliant with RCC-MRx design rules.

  19. Preliminary structural assessment of DEMO vacuum vessel against a vertical displacement event

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mozzillo, Rocco, E-mail: rocco.mozzillo@unina.it [CREATE, University of Naples Federico II, DII, P.le Tecchio 80, 80125, Naples (Italy); Tarallo, Andrea; Marzullo, Domenico [CREATE, University of Naples Federico II, DII, P.le Tecchio 80, 80125, Naples (Italy); Bachmann, Christian [EUROfusion PMU, Boltzmannstraße 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Di Gironimo, Giuseppe [CREATE, University of Naples Federico II, DII, P.le Tecchio 80, 80125, Naples (Italy); Mazzone, Giuseppe [Unità Tecnica Fusione - ENEA C.R. Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Italy)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • The paper focuses on a preliminary structural analysis of the current concept design of DEMO vacuum vessel. • The Vacuum Vessel was checked against the VDE in combinations with the weight force of all components that the vessel shall bear. • Different configurations for the vacuum vessel supports are considered, showing that the best solution is VV supported at the lower port. • The analyses evaluated the “P damage” according to RCC-MRx code. - Abstract: This paper focuses on a preliminary structural analysis of the current concept design of DEMO vacuum vessel (VV). The VV structure is checked against a vertical load due to a Vertical Displacement Event in combination with the weight force of all components that the main vessel shall bear. Different configurations for the supports are considered. Results show that the greatest safety margins are reached when the tokamak is supported through the lower ports rather than the equatorial ports, though all analyzed configurations are compliant with RCC-MRx design rules.

  20. Fe3O4@ZnO core-shell nanocomposites for efficient and repetitive removal of low density lipoprotein in plasma and on blood vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Xiao; Lu, Juan; Yue, Danyang; Fan, Yijuan; Yi, Caixia; Wang, Xiaoying; Zhang, Mengxue; Pan, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Low density lipoprotein (LDL)-apheresis therapy, which directly removes LDL from plasma by LDL-adsorbents in vitro is found to be clinically effective and safe to lower the LDL content in blood to prevent cardiovascular disease. Thus, developing excellent LDL adsorbents are becoming more and more attractive. Herein, functional Fe 3 O 4 @ZnO core–shell nanocomposites have been synthesized by a facile and eco-friendly two-step method. Not only do they possess high LDL adsorption (in PBS/plasma as well as on blood vessels) and favorable magnetic targeting ability but they can also be reused conveniently, which offer the Fe 3 O 4 @ZnO core–shell nanocomposites significant potential in the removal of LDL in vitro and in vivo. (paper)

  1. Correlation between expressions of hypoxia -inducible factor (HIF-1α, blood vessels density, cell proliferation, and apoptosis intensity in canine fibromas and fibrosarcomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madej Janusz A.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to demonstrate the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1α in soft tissue mesenchymal tumours (fibroma and fibrosarcoma in dogs. An attempt was made to correlate the obtained results with density of blood vessels (expression of von Willebrand Factor, vWF, expression of Ki-67 proliferation antigen, and with intensity of apoptosis in studied tumours. The study was performed on paraffin sections of 15 fibromas and 40 fibrosarcomas sampled from 55 female dogs aged 6 to 16 years. Immunohistochemical staining against HIF-1α, vWF, and Ki-67 was performed. Apoptosis was detected with the use of TUNEL reaction. A significantly higher HIF-1α expression was noted in fibrosarcomas in comparison to fibromas (P < 0.0001. HIF-1α expression in fibromas manifested strong positive correlation with tumour vascularity (r = 0.67, P = 0.007. Moreover, HIF-1α expression in fibrosarcomas manifested a moderate positive correlation with tumour malignancy grade (r = 0.44, P = 0.004, tumour vascularity (r = 0.52, P < 0.001, Ki-67 antigen expression (r = 0.42; P = 0.007, and TUNELpositive cells (r = 0.37, P = 0.017. Expression of HIF-1α was detected in 86.7% of fibroma type tumours and in 100% of fibrosarcomas. In all studied tumours expression of HIF-1α manifested positive correlation with the density of blood vessels, and in fibrosarcomas it correlated also with malignancy grade, intensity of Ki-67 expression, and with intensity of apoptosis in tumour cells.

  2. Transferability of results of PTS experiments to the integrity assessment of reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roos, E.; Eisele, U.; Stumpfrock, L.

    1997-01-01

    The integrity assessment of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) is based on the fracture mechanics concept as provided in the code. However this concept covers only the linear-elastic fracture mechanics regime on the basis of the reference temperature RT NDT as derived from charpy impact and drop-weight test. The conservatism of this concept was demonstrated for a variety of different materials covering optimized and lower bound material states with regard to unirradiated and irradiated conditions. For the elastic-plastic regime, methodologies have been developed to describe ductile crack initiation and stable crack growth. The transferability of both, the linear-elastic and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics concept was investigated with the help of large scale specimens focusing on complex loading situations as they result from postulated thermal shock events for the RPV. A series of pressurized thermal shock (PTS) experiments were performed in which the applicability of the fracture mechanics parameters derived from small scale specimen testing could be demonstrated. This includes brittle (static and dynamic) crack initiation and crack arrest in the low charpy energy regime as well as stable crack initiation, stable crack growth and crack arrest in the upper shelf toughness regime. The paper provides the basic material data, the load paths, representative for large complex components as well as experimental and theoretical results of PTS experiments. From these data it can be concluded that the available fracture mechanics concepts can be used to describe the component behavior under transient loading conditions. (author). 26 refs, 12 figs, 1 tab

  3. Transferability of results of PTS experiments to the integrity assessment of reactor pressure vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roos, E; Eisele, U; Stumpfrock, L [MPA Stuttgart (Germany)

    1997-09-01

    The integrity assessment of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) is based on the fracture mechanics concept as provided in the code. However this concept covers only the linear-elastic fracture mechanics regime on the basis of the reference temperature RT{sub NDT} as derived from charpy impact and drop-weight test. The conservatism of this concept was demonstrated for a variety of different materials covering optimized and lower bound material states with regard to unirradiated and irradiated conditions. For the elastic-plastic regime, methodologies have been developed to describe ductile crack initiation and stable crack growth. The transferability of both, the linear-elastic and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics concept was investigated with the help of large scale specimens focusing on complex loading situations as they result from postulated thermal shock events for the RPV. A series of pressurized thermal shock (PTS) experiments were performed in which the applicability of the fracture mechanics parameters derived from small scale specimen testing could be demonstrated. This includes brittle (static and dynamic) crack initiation and crack arrest in the low charpy energy regime as well as stable crack initiation, stable crack growth and crack arrest in the upper shelf toughness regime. The paper provides the basic material data, the load paths, representative for large complex components as well as experimental and theoretical results of PTS experiments. From these data it can be concluded that the available fracture mechanics concepts can be used to describe the component behavior under transient loading conditions. (author). 26 refs, 12 figs, 1 tab.

  4. Hyperintense vessels on FLAIR: A useful non-invasive method for assessing intracerebral collaterals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Wenhua; Xu Gelin; Yue Xuanye; Wang Xiaoliang; Ma Minmin; Zhang Renliang; Wang Handong; Zhou Changsheng; Liu Xinfeng

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This study was aimed to evaluate relationship between hyperintense vessels (HV) on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) and artery steno-occlusion related intracerebral collaterals. Materials and methods: A total of 233 patients with 260 atherosclerotic lesions in the M1 segment of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) were examined with FLAIR and digital subtraction angiography (DSA). HV were graded as 0, 1, 2 and 3 by its distributions in the MCA territory. Grade 0 indicated no HV; Grade 1 indicated the HV limited in Sylvian fissure; Grade 2 indicated the HV limited in Sylvian fissure and the temporal-occipital junction; Grade 3 indicated the HV extended to frontal-parietal lobes. Collateral blood flows were classified by DSA results. The relationship between HV grades and patterns of collateral flows was analyzed. Results: HV were observed in 76 out of 260 hemispheres. For patients with Grade 1 HV, most of their collateral flows (80.8%) were antegrade; for patients with Grade 2, the retrograde leptomeningeal flows were commonly manifested as anterior cerebral artery to MCA (75%); for patients with Grade 3 HV, most of the retrograde leptomeningeal flows were manifested as posterior cerebral artery to MCA (81.8%). As the grade HV increased, the frequency of retrograde leptomeningeal collateral from ACA to MCA decreased (100% to 75% and to 18.2%), and increased (0% to 25% and to 81.8%) for the retrograde leptomeningeal collateral via PCA to MCA (P < 0.001). Conclusions: The HV could assess non-invasively intracerebral collaterals in patients with steno-occlusive lesions of M1 segment of MCA.

  5. Preliminary assessment of the effects of biaxial loading on reactor pressure vessel structural-integrity-assessment technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennell, W.E.; Bass, B.R.; Bryson, J.W.; Dickson, T.L.; McAfee, W.J.; Merkle, J.G.

    1996-01-01

    Effects of biaxial loading on shallow-flaw fracture toughness were studied to determine potential impact on structural integrity assessment of a reactor pressure vessel (RPV) under pressurized thermal shock (PTS) transient loading and pressure-temperature (PT) loading produced by reactor heatup and cooldown transients. Biaxial shallow-flaw fracture-toughness tests results were also used to determine the parameter controlling fracture in the transition temperature range, and to develop a related dual-parameter fracture-toughness correlation. Shallow-flaw and biaxial loading effects were found to reduce the conditional probability of crack initiation by a factor of nine when the shallow-flaw fracture-toughness K Jc data set, with biaxial-loading effects adjustments, was substituted in place of ASME Code K Ic data set in PTS analyses. Biaxial loading was found to reduce the shallow-flaw fracture toughness of RPV steel such that the lower-bound curve was located between ASME K Ic and K IR curves. This is relevant to future development of P-T curve analysis procedures. Fracture in shallow-flaw biaxial samples tested in the lower transition temperature range was shown to be strain controlled. A strain-based dual-parameter fracture-toughness correlation was developed and shown to be capable of predicting the effect of crack-tip constraint on fracture toughness for strain-controlled fracture

  6. An assessment of the economic consequences of thermal annealing of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griesbach, T.J.; Server, W.L.

    1991-01-01

    The use of a thermal heat treatment to recover mechanical properties which were degraded by neutron radiation exposure is a potential method for assuring reactor pressure vessel licensing life and possible license renewal. 'Wet anneals' at temperatures less than 343degC have been conducted on test reactors in Alaska (SM-1A) and Belgium (BR3). The Soviets have also performed 'dry anneals' at higher temperatures near or above 450degC on several commercial reactor vessels. Technical and economic uncertainties have made utilities in the United States reluctant to seriously consider thermal annealing of large commercial reactor vessels except as a last resort option. However, as a utility begins to experience significant radiation embrittlement or considers extending the operating license life of the vessel, thermal annealing can be a viable option depending upon many considerations. These considerations include other possible remedial measures that can be taken (i.e., flux reduction), economic issues with regard to utility finances, and corporate philosophy. A decision analysis model has been developed to analyze the thermal anneal option in comparison to other alternatives for a number of possible combinations and timing. The results for a postulated vessel and embrittlement condition are presented to show that thermal annealing can be a viable management option which should be taken seriously. (author)

  7. Assessing the Efficiency of Small-Scale and Bottom Trawler Vessels in Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Pinello

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the technical and scale efficiency of two types of Greek fishing vessels, small-scale vessels and bottom trawlers, using a bias-corrected input-oriented Data Envelopment Analysis model. Moreover, the associations between efficiency scores and vessel’s and skipper’s characteristics are also explored. The results indicate that small-scale vessels achieve a very low average technical efficiency score (0.42 but a much higher scale efficiency score (0.81. Conversely, bottom trawlers achieve lower scale but higher technical efficiency scores (0.68 and 0.73, respectively. One important finding of this study is that the technical efficiency of small-scale vessels, in contrast to trawlers, is positively associated with the experience of the skipper. In a looser context, it can be said that small-scale fisheries mainly rely on skill, whereas bottom trawlers rely more on technology. This study concludes that there is space for improvement in efficiency, mainly for small-scale vessels, which could allow the achievement of the same level of output by using reduced inputs.

  8. A fracture mechanics and reliability based method to assess non-destructive testings for pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitagawa, Hideo; Hisada, Toshiaki

    1979-01-01

    Quantitative evaluation has not been made on the effects of carrying out preservice and in-service nondestructive tests for securing the soundness, safety and maintainability of pressure vessels, spending large expenses and labor. Especially the problems concerning the time and interval of in-service inspections lack the reasonable, quantitative evaluation method. In this paper, the problems of pressure vessels are treated by having developed the analysis method based on reliability technology and probability theory. The growth of surface cracks in pressure vessels was estimated, using the results of previous studies. The effects of nondestructive inspection on the defects in pressure vessels were evaluated, and the influences of many factors, such as plate thickness, stress, the accuracy of inspection and so on, on the effects of inspection, and the method of evaluating the inspections at unequal intervals were investigated. The analysis of reliability taking in-service inspection into consideration, the evaluation of in-service inspection and other affecting factors through the typical examples of analysis, and the review concerning the time of inspection are described. The method of analyzing the reliability of pressure vessels, considering the growth of defects and preservice and in-service nondestructive tests, was able to be systematized so as to be practically usable. (Kako, I.)

  9. Application of ductile fracture assessment methods for the assessment of pressure vessels from high strength steels (HSS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisele, U.; Schiedermaier, J.

    2003-01-01

    The economical and safe design of pressure vessels requires, besides others, also a detailed knowledge of the vessel failure behaviour in the case of existing imperfections or cracks. The behaviour of a cracked component under a given loading situation depends on material toughness. For ferritic steels, the material toughness is varying with temperature. At low temperature dominantly brittle fracture behaviour is observed, at high temperature the failure mode is dominantly ductile fracture. The transition between these two extremes is floating. In the case of existing or postulated cracks, the safety analysis has to be performed using fracture mechanics methods. In the lower shelf of toughness, K iC as of ASTM E 399 is the characterising value for crack initiation and immediate unstable crack extension (cleavage). In the upper shelf level the characterising value is the ''actual crack initiation toughness'' J i acc. to ISO 12135, characterising the onset of slow stable crack extension. For the transition regime in ASTM E 1921 the instability values K JC are defined, characterising cleavage failure after more or less extended ductile crack growth. The safety analysis of a component operated in the upper shelf of the material toughness, has to consider initiation as well as stable crack extension following initiation. The inclusion of any crack extension into this consideration needs to consider the influence of the constraint in front of a crack tip, leading to multiaxial stress conditions and decreasing the material crack resistance significantly. Thus, the exclusion of crack initiation needs to be proven in a first step of each safety analysis. Assessing the component in a uniform way over the relevant temperature range is possible by using initiation characteristics, which also have the advantage of transferability. A change of criterion considering initiation at the lower shelf, instability in the transition range and again initiation in the upper shelf can be

  10. The inclusion of weld residual stress in fracture margin assessments of embrittled nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickson, T.L.; Bass, B.R.; McAfee, W.J.

    1998-01-01

    Analyses were performed to determine the impact of weld residual stresses in a reactor pressure vessel (RPV) on (1) the generation of pressure temperature (P-T) curves required for maintaining specified fracture prevention margins during nuclear plant startup and shutdown, and (2) the conditional probability of vessel failure due to pressurized thermal shock (PTS) loading. The through wall residual stress distribution in an axially oriented weld was derived using measurements taken from a shell segment of a canceled RPV and finite element thermal stress analyses. The P-T curve derived from the best estimate load analysis and a t / 8 deep flaw, based on K Ic , was less limiting than the one derived from the current methodology prescribed in the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. The inclusion of the weld residual stresses increased the conditional probability of cleavage fracture due to PTS loading by a factor ranging from 2 to 4

  11. The probabilistic structural integrity assessment of reactor pressure vessels under pressurized thermal shock loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Mingya, E-mail: chenmingya@cgnpc.com.cn [Suzhou Nuclear Power Research Institute, 215004 Suzhou, Jiangsu Province (China); Lu, Feng; Wang, Rongshan; Yu, Weiwei [Suzhou Nuclear Power Research Institute, 215004 Suzhou, Jiangsu Province (China); Wang, Donghui [State Nuclear Power Plant Service Company, 200237 Shanghai (China); Zhang, Guodong; Xue, Fei [Suzhou Nuclear Power Research Institute, 215004 Suzhou, Jiangsu Province (China)

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • The methodology and the case study of the FAVOR software were shown. • The over-conservative parameters in the DFM were shown. • The differences between the PFM and the DFM were discussed. • The limits in the current FAVOR were studied. - Abstract: The pressurized thermal shock (PTS) event poses a potentially significant challenge to the structural integrity of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) during the long time operation (LTO). In the USA, the “screening criteria” for maximum allowable embrittlement of RPV material, which forms part of the USA regulations, is based on the probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM). The FAVOR software developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is used to establish the regulation. As the technical basis of FAVOR is not the most widely-used and codified methodologies, such as the ASME and RCC-M codes, in most countries (with exception of the USA), proving RPV integrity under the PTS load is still based on the deterministic fracture mechanics (DFM). As the maximum nil-ductility-transition temperature (RT{sub NDT}) of the beltline material for the 54 French RPVs after 40 years operation is higher than the critical values in the IAEA-TECDOC-1627 and European NEA/CSNI/R(99)3 reports (while still obviously lower than the “screening criteria” of the USA), it may conclude that the RPV will not be able to run in the LTO based on the DFM. In the FAVOR, the newest developments of fracture mechanics are applied, such as the warm pre-stress (WPS) effect, more accurate estimation of the flaw information and less conservation of the toughness (such as the three-parameter Weibull distribution of the fracture toughness). In this paper, the FAVOR software is first applied to show both the methodology and the results of the PFM, and then the limits in the current FAVOR software (Version 6.1, which represents the baseline for re-assessing the regulation of 10 CFR 50.61), lack of the impact of the constraint effect

  12. Probabilistic retinal vessel segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chang-Hua; Agam, Gady

    2007-03-01

    Optic fundus assessment is widely used for diagnosing vascular and non-vascular pathology. Inspection of the retinal vasculature may reveal hypertension, diabetes, arteriosclerosis, cardiovascular disease and stroke. Due to various imaging conditions retinal images may be degraded. Consequently, the enhancement of such images and vessels in them is an important task with direct clinical applications. We propose a novel technique for vessel enhancement in retinal images that is capable of enhancing vessel junctions in addition to linear vessel segments. This is an extension of vessel filters we have previously developed for vessel enhancement in thoracic CT scans. The proposed approach is based on probabilistic models which can discern vessels and junctions. Evaluation shows the proposed filter is better than several known techniques and is comparable to the state of the art when evaluated on a standard dataset. A ridge-based vessel tracking process is applied on the enhanced image to demonstrate the effectiveness of the enhancement filter.

  13. An experimental study of assessment of weld quality on fatigue reliability analysis of a nuclear pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai Shuhe

    1993-01-01

    The steam generator in PWR primary coolant system China of Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant is a crucial unit belonging to the category of nuclear pressure vessel. The purpose of this research work is to make an examination of the weld quality of the steam generator under fatigue loading and to assess its reliability by using the experimental results of fatigue test of material of nuclear pressure vessel S-271 (Chinese Standard) and of qualified tests of welded seams of a simulated prototype of bottom closure head of the steam generator. A guarantee of weld quality is proposed as a subsequent verification for China National Nuclear Safety Supervision Bureau. The results of reliability analysis reported in this work can be taken as a supplementary material of Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) of Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant. According to the requirement of Provision II-1500 cyclic testing, ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section III, Rules for Construction of Nuclear Power Plant Components, a simulated prototype of the bottom closure head of the steam generator was made for qualified tests. To find the quantified results of reliability assessment by using the testing data, two proposals are presented

  14. Use of Ultrasmall Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Enhanced Susceptibility Weighted Imaging and Mean Vessel Density Imaging to Monitor Antiangiogenic Effects of Sorafenib on Experimental Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuohui Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated effectiveness of ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide enhanced susceptibility weighted imaging (USPIO-enhanced SWI and mean vessel density imaging (Q in monitoring antiangiogenic effects of Sorafenib on orthotopic hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Thirty-five HCC xenografts were established. USPIO-enhanced SWI and Q were performed on a 1.5 T MR scanner at baseline, 7, 14, and 21 days after Sorafenib treatment. Intratumoral susceptibility signal intensity (ITSS and Q were serially measured and compared between the treated (n = 15 and control groups (n = 15. Both ITSS and Q were significantly lower in the treated group at each time point (P < 0.05. Measurements in the treated group showed that ITSS persisted at 7 days (P = 0.669 and increased at 14 and 21 days (P < 0.05, while Q significantly declined at 7 days (P = 0.028 and gradually increased at 14 and 21 days. In the treated group, significant correlation was found between Q and histologic microvessel density (MVD (r = 0.753, P < 0.001, and ITSS correlated well with MVD (r = 0.742, P = 0.002 after excluding the data from baseline. This study demonstrated that USPIO-enhanced SWI and Q could provide novel biomarkers for evaluating antiangiogenic effects of Sorafenib on HCC.

  15. Quantitative assessment of cross-sectional area of small pulmonary vessels in patients with COPD using inspiratory and expiratory MDCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Yukiko; Kawata, Naoko; Yanagawa, Noriyuki; Sugiura, Toshihiko; Sakurai, Yoriko; Sato, Misuzu; Iesato, Ken; Terada, Jiro; Sakao, Seiichiro; Tada, Yuji; Tanabe, Nobuhiro; Suzuki, Yoichi; Tatsumi, Koichiro

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Structural and functional changes in pulmonary vessels are prevalent at the initial stages of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). These vascular alterations can be assessed using cross-sectional area (CSA) of small pulmonary vessels. However, neither in non-COPD smokers nor in COPD patients it has been defined whether the structural changes of pulmonary vessels detected by paired inspiratory and expiratory CT scans are associated with emphysematous changes. We quantified the CSA and low attenuation area (LAA) and evaluated the changes in these parameters in the inspiratory and expiratory phases. Materials and methods: Fifty consecutive non-COPD smokers and COPD patients were subjected to multi detector-row CT and the percentage of vessels with a CSA less than 5 mm 2 as well as the percentage LAA for total lung area (%CSA < 5, %LAA, respectively) were calculated. Results: The %CSA < 5 correlated negatively with %LAA. The %CSA < 5 was lower in COPD patients with emphysema as compared with non-COPD smokers and COPD patients with or without mild emphysema. In addition, the %CSA < 5 was lower in the no/mild emphysema subgroup as compared with non-COPD smokers. The respiratory phase change of %CSA < 5 in COPD patients was greater than that in non-COPD smokers. Conclusion: The percentage of small pulmonary vessels decreased as emphysematous changes increase, and this decrease was observed even in patients with no/mild emphysema. Furthermore, respiratory phase changes in CSA were higher in COPD patients than in non-COPD smokers

  16. Myocardial damage in successful vessel coronary angioplasty as assessed by creatinine kinase and its myocardium band isoenzyme levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbas, S.; Samor, N.A.; Kayani, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    To determine the frequency of myocardial damage in elective, successful, single vessel percutaneous coronary angioplasty by assessing myocardial band (MB), creatinine kinase levels and to find out the association of common modifiable risk factors with myocardial damage in patients undergoing single vessel coronary angioplasty. Fifty patients undergoing elective and successful single vessel percutaneous coronary angioplasty were evaluated with creatinine kinase and creatinine kinase MB levels before and after 8 hours and 1st day following coronary angioplasty. Studied variables included the length of stent deployed, maximum deployment pressure and total balloon inflation time, apart from hypertension, cholesterol level, smoking and diabetes mellitus. Out of 50 patients, 9 had raised creatinine kinase at 8 hours (18%) and 10 had raised creatinine kinase (20%) on 1st day following coronary angioplasty, 7 (14%) patients and 8 (16%) patients had raised creatinine kinase MB levels at 8 hours and 1st day following coronary angioplasty respectively. The rise of either was equal to or more than 3 times the normal limits. Modifiable risk factors, significantly associated with myocardial damage, were diabetes mellitus (p=0.006) and LDL levels (p=0.009) in patients undergoing single vessel coronary angioplasty. Successful elective, uncomplicated, single vessel coronary angioplasty resulted in some myocardial damage evident by mild rise in cardiac enzymes but rise of creatinine kinase MB above 3 times of normal, which signifies percutaneous coronary angioplasty-related myocardial infarction, was not seen. There was a significant association between diabetes mellitus, LDL levels and myocardial damage in patients undergoing coronary angioplasty but no significant association was found between hypertension, smoking and myocardial damage. (author)

  17. Quantitative assessment of cross-sectional area of small pulmonary vessels in patients with COPD using inspiratory and expiratory MDCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuura, Yukiko, E-mail: matsuyuki_future@yahoo.co.jp [Department of Respirology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8670 Japan (Japan); Kawata, Naoko, E-mail: chumito_03@yahoo.co.jp [Department of Respirology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8670 Japan (Japan); Yanagawa, Noriyuki, E-mail: yanagawa@ho.chiba-u.ac.jp [Department of Respirology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8670 Japan (Japan); Sugiura, Toshihiko, E-mail: sugiura@js3.so-net.ne.jp [Department of Respirology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8670 Japan (Japan); Sakurai, Yoriko, E-mail: yoliri@nifty.com [Department of Respirology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8670 Japan (Japan); Sato, Misuzu, E-mail: mis_misuzu@yahoo.co.jp [Department of Respirology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8670 Japan (Japan); Iesato, Ken, E-mail: iesato_k@yahoo.co.jp [Department of Respirology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8670 Japan (Japan); Terada, Jiro, E-mail: jirotera@chiba-u.jp [Department of Respirology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8670 Japan (Japan); Sakao, Seiichiro, E-mail: sakao@faculty.chiba-u.jp [Department of Respirology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8670 Japan (Japan); Tada, Yuji, E-mail: ytada@faculty.chiba-u.jp [Department of Respirology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8670 Japan (Japan); Tanabe, Nobuhiro, E-mail: ntanabe@faculty.chiba-u.jp [Department of Respirology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8670 Japan (Japan); Suzuki, Yoichi, E-mail: ysuzuki@faculty.chiba-u.jp [Department of public Health, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8670 Japan (Japan); Tatsumi, Koichiro, E-mail: tatsumi@faculty.chiba-u.jp [Department of Respirology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8670 Japan (Japan)

    2013-10-01

    Objectives: Structural and functional changes in pulmonary vessels are prevalent at the initial stages of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). These vascular alterations can be assessed using cross-sectional area (CSA) of small pulmonary vessels. However, neither in non-COPD smokers nor in COPD patients it has been defined whether the structural changes of pulmonary vessels detected by paired inspiratory and expiratory CT scans are associated with emphysematous changes. We quantified the CSA and low attenuation area (LAA) and evaluated the changes in these parameters in the inspiratory and expiratory phases. Materials and methods: Fifty consecutive non-COPD smokers and COPD patients were subjected to multi detector-row CT and the percentage of vessels with a CSA less than 5 mm{sup 2} as well as the percentage LAA for total lung area (%CSA < 5, %LAA, respectively) were calculated. Results: The %CSA < 5 correlated negatively with %LAA. The %CSA < 5 was lower in COPD patients with emphysema as compared with non-COPD smokers and COPD patients with or without mild emphysema. In addition, the %CSA < 5 was lower in the no/mild emphysema subgroup as compared with non-COPD smokers. The respiratory phase change of %CSA < 5 in COPD patients was greater than that in non-COPD smokers. Conclusion: The percentage of small pulmonary vessels decreased as emphysematous changes increase, and this decrease was observed even in patients with no/mild emphysema. Furthermore, respiratory phase changes in CSA were higher in COPD patients than in non-COPD smokers.

  18. Safety assessment of a multicavity prestressed concrete reactor vessel with hot liner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lafitte, R.; Marchand, J. D. [Bonnard et Gardel, Ingenieurs-Conseil, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    1981-01-15

    The prestressed concrete reactor vessel of the high temperature reactor with helium turbine project differs from those realized up to this day by the important number of cavities, by the different cavity pressures and by a liner in contact with hot gas. For the cases of operating conditions, the computations can be based on an identical pressure in all the cavities. The overdimensioning of the vessel which results is not a determining factor at this stage of the project. The possible loss of leaktightness of the liner can introduce gas pressure into the walls of the vessel. The great thickness of the walls makes it impossible to withstand the resulting forces with prestressing in offering sufficient safety factor against collapse. It is thus important to design a drainage network largely dimensioned. The warm liner appears at this stage of the project too highly stressed by fatigue at the singularity points (ducts between cavities, angles). A solution is proposed which limits the variations of thermal stresses by using a steel with low coefficient of thermal expansion. The cavity closures, which are numerous and some with large dimensions are an important aspect of the vessel safety. A solution of reinforced concrete shell with independent liner is proposed.

  19. Safety assessment of a multicavity prestressed concrete reactor vessel with hot liner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lafitte, R.; Marchand, J.D.

    1981-01-01

    The prestressed concrete reactor vessel of the high temperature reactor with helium turbine project differs from those realized up to this day by the important number of cavities, by the different cavity pressures and by a liner in contact with hot gas. For the cases of operating conditions, the computations can be based on an identical pressure in all the cavities. The overdimensioning of the vessel which results is not a determining factor at this stage of the project. The possible loss of leaktightness of the liner can introduce gas pressure into the walls of the vessel. The great thickness of the walls makes it impossible to withstand the resulting forces with prestressing in offering sufficient safety factor against collapse. It is thus important to design a drainage network largely dimensioned. The warm liner appears at this stage of the project too highly stressed by fatigue at the singularity points (ducts between cavities, angles). A solution is proposed which limits the variations of thermal stresses by using a steel with low coefficient of thermal expansion. The cavity closures, which are numerous and some with large dimensions are an important aspect of the vessel safety. A solution of reinforced concrete shell with independent liner is proposed

  20. Assessment of bone mineral density in young female handball players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tathyane Krahenbühl

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Optimizing bone mass gain during childhood and adolescence may help prevent bone diseases in advanced ages. The aim of this study was to verify the bone mineral density (BMD and bone mineral content (BMC in female adolescent’s handball players. This is a cross-sectional study where 68 female adolescents (12–17 years were allocated into two groups: handball players (n = 29 (HG and control group (n = 39 (CG. BMC and BMD from total body (TB, total body less head (TBLH, lumbar spine (L1–L4, femoral neck (FN, Ward’s triangle (WT and respectively Z-scores were measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA. Sexual maturity, menarche, PHV, time of sun exposure, physical activity level and Calcium and vitamin D intake were assessed. The HG showed significantly higher BMC, BMD as well Z-scores values (p≤0.05 of total body, TBLH, femoral neck, hip and lumbar spine than the CG. When the values were adjusted for lean soft tissue (LST the HG showed significantly higher BMC of femoral neck (p≤0.05, as well as BMD of TBLH and femoral neck (p≤0.05 and Z-score values all bone sites except hip, than the CG. We conclude that handball players have significantly higher bone mass values compared to group of girls of the same age.

  1. Quantitative assessment of periimplant bone density (HU) on CBCT image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goo, Jong Gook; Kim, Jin Soo; Kim, Jae Duk

    2008-01-01

    The primary aims of this retrospective study were to compare subjective bone quality and bone quality based on the Hounsfield scale in different segments of the edentulous jaw, and to establish quantitative and objective assessment of the bone quality. Twenty eight randomly selected cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) scans were analyzed. For evaluation one hundred and twelve edentulous areas were selected. Implant recipient sites were evaluated visually for Lekholm and Zarb classification. The same sites were subsequently evaluated digitally using the Hounsfield scale with Vimplant 2.0 TM , and the results were correlated with visual classification. Data was subject for statistical analysis in order to determine correlation between recorded HU and the regions of the mouth with the Kruskal-Wallis test. The highest unit/mean density value (311 HU) was found in the anterior mandible, followed by 259 HU for the posterior mandible, 216 HU for the anterior maxilla, and 127 HU for the posterior maxilla. These results demonstrate a strong correlation for HU depending on the region of the mouth (p TM with Vimplant TM software.

  2. Relative density: the key to stocking assessment in regional analysis—a forest survey viewpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colin D. MacLean

    1979-01-01

    Relative density is a measure of tree crowding compared to a reference level such as normal density. This stand attribute, when compared to management standards, indicates adequacy of stocking. The Pacific Coast Forest Survey Unit assesses the relative density of each stand sampled by summing the individual density contributions of each tree tallied, thus quantifying...

  3. Assessment of wood density of seven clones of Eucalyptus grandis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    With the objective of evaluating the correlation of wood basic density with age in seven Eucalyptus grandis clones planted in Brazil, five trees in each clone were sampled at the ages of 0, 5, 1, 5, 2, 5, 3, 5, 4, 5 and 7, 5 years. The analysis of these samples showed that the intraclonal variation of the basic density (except for 0, ...

  4. Experiments for neutron fluence assessment on WWER-440 and WWER-1000 pressure vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilieva, K; Apostolov, T; Penev, I; Trifonov, A; Taskaev, E; Belousov, S; Antonov, S; Petrova, T; Stoeva, L [Bylgarska Akademiya na Naukite, Sofia (Bulgaria). Inst. za Yadrena Izsledvaniya i Yadrena Energetika; Boyadzhiev, Z; Nelov, N; Tsocheva, V; Andreeva, I; Lilkov, B; Velichkov, V; Monev, M [Kombinat Atomna Energetika, Kozloduj (Bulgaria)

    1996-12-31

    The activity of shavings sampled out from the expected maximum embrittlement location (weld 4) on the inner pressure vessel wall of the Kozloduy-1 Unit after the 14-th cycle has been measured. The experiment was carried out along the INEI channel using Fe and Cu string and foil detectors. The axial neutron flux distribution at the Unit 3 after the cycle 11 has been measured and compared to the calculated values. The calculations of the expected activities have been carried out taking into account the local power distribution. A comparison between measured and calculated values using ACTIVAT code is made. It shows a discrepancy of about 20%. It is recommended to carry out ex-vessel neutron fluence measurements using a rack device with activation detectors in order to verify the calculation results. 8 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Fracture assessment of the Oskarshamn 1 reactor pressure vessel under cold over-pressurization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sattari-Far, I. [DNV Technical Consulting AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2001-03-01

    The major motivation of this study was to develop a methodology for fracture assessment of surface defects in the 01 reactor pressure vessel under cold loading scenarios, particularly the cold over-pressurization event. According to a previous study, the FENIX project, the cold over-pressurization of the O1 reactor is a limiting loading case, as the ductile/brittle transition temperature (RT{sub NDT}) of certain welds in the O1 beltline region may be over 100 deg C at the-end-of-life condition. The FENIX project gave values of the acceptable and critical crack depth to be equal to the thickness of the cladding layer (about 6 mm) under this load case using the ASME K{sub Ic} reference curve methodology. This study is aimed to develop a methodology to give a more precise fracture assessment of the O1 reactor under cold loading scenarios. Some of the main objectives of this study have been as below: To prepare a material which can simulate the mechanical properties and RT{sub NDT} of the O1 reactor at the end-of-life conditions. To conduct a fracture mechanics test program to cover the essential influencing factors, such as crack geometry (shallow and deep cracks) and loading condition (uniaxial and biaxial) on the cleavage fracture toughness. To perform fracture mechanics analyses to identify a suitable methodology for assessment of the experimental results. To study the responses of engineering fracture assessment methods to the experimental results from the clad specimens. To propose a fracture assessment procedure for determination of the acceptable and critical flaw sizes in the 01 reactor under the cold loading events. A test program consisted of experiments on standard SEN(B) specimens and clad beams, containing surface cracks was conducted during the course of this project. A total of nine clad beams and clad cruciform specimens were tested under uniaxial and biaxial loading. The test material is reactor steel of type A 508 Grade B, which is specially heat

  6. Fracture assessment of the Oskarshamn 1 reactor pressure vessel under cold over-pressurization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sattari-Far, I.

    2001-03-01

    The major motivation of this study was to develop a methodology for fracture assessment of surface defects in the 01 reactor pressure vessel under cold loading scenarios, particularly the cold over-pressurization event. According to a previous study, the FENIX project, the cold over-pressurization of the O1 reactor is a limiting loading case, as the ductile/brittle transition temperature (RT NDT ) of certain welds in the O1 beltline region may be over 100 deg C at the-end-of-life condition. The FENIX project gave values of the acceptable and critical crack depth to be equal to the thickness of the cladding layer (about 6 mm) under this load case using the ASME K Ic reference curve methodology. This study is aimed to develop a methodology to give a more precise fracture assessment of the O1 reactor under cold loading scenarios. Some of the main objectives of this study have been as below: To prepare a material which can simulate the mechanical properties and RT NDT of the O1 reactor at the end-of-life conditions. To conduct a fracture mechanics test program to cover the essential influencing factors, such as crack geometry (shallow and deep cracks) and loading condition (uniaxial and biaxial) on the cleavage fracture toughness. To perform fracture mechanics analyses to identify a suitable methodology for assessment of the experimental results. To study the responses of engineering fracture assessment methods to the experimental results from the clad specimens. To propose a fracture assessment procedure for determination of the acceptable and critical flaw sizes in the 01 reactor under the cold loading events. A test program consisted of experiments on standard SEN(B) specimens and clad beams, containing surface cracks was conducted during the course of this project. A total of nine clad beams and clad cruciform specimens were tested under uniaxial and biaxial loading. The test material is reactor steel of type A 508 Grade B, which is specially heat-treated to

  7. Optical Coherence Tomography for the Assessment of Coronary Atherosclerosis and Vessel Response after Stent Implantation

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzalo, Nieves

    2010-01-01

    textabstractOptical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is a light-based imaging modality that can provide in vivo high-resolution images of the coronary artery with a level of resolution (axial 10-20 µm) ten times higher than intravascular ultrasound. The technique, uses low-coherent near infrarred light to create high-resolution cross sectional images of the vessel. The technology refinement achieved in the last years has made this imaging modality less procedurally demanding opening its possibiliti...

  8. ASSESSMENT OF STAND DENSITY AND GROWTH RATE OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABIA

    Department of Forestry and Wildlife Resources Management, Cross River University of. Technology ... them for light, soil moisture and nutrients. It therefore, has .... Table 1: Density and basal area of tree species at different plots. Tree species.

  9. Assessment of Corn Densities on Ecological Indices of Weed Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Mahmoodi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Diversity, dominance, and stability of weeds are the most important ecological properties in agricultural systems, which influenced by management factors such as crop density, abundantly. This experiment was conducted in 2009 at Ferdowsi University of Mashhad Research Field. The experimental design was interval mapping with four levels of corn densities (5, 6, 7 and 9 plant.m-2 and four levels of weed control (full-control, without control, broad-leaves control and grasses control. Weed sampling was done at 3 stages included beginning and end of critical period weed control and harvesting time. The results showed that the effect of plant density on species diversity was significant; some how the amount of Shanon and Simpson Indices were lowest in the 9 plant.m-2 (0.39 and 0.45, respectively and greatest in 5 plant.m-2 (0.84. The results also showed that the maximum amount of dominance index was observed in 9 plant.m-2, that was seen in Echinochloa crus- galli and Convulvulus arvensis at the beginning of growing season, then in Solanum nigrum and Amaranthus retroflexus in the end of growing season. The amount of community dominance index in 9 plant.m-2 was higher than other densities, and it decreased with decline of densities. based on the results of present experiment the linear relationship between plant species and area was found. The calculated amount of Alpha and Beta diversities. in a θ and β scales based on coefficients of this relationship were 0.534 (four species per unit area and 0.29 (two species per unit area, respectively. In conclusion the result of this experiment pointed that the weeds diversity decreased with increasing of corn density, weed diversity decreased and therefore, having appropriate plant density is very efficient for sustainable weed management.

  10. Assessment of In-vessel corium retention for VVER-440/V213

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matejovic, P.; Barnak, M.; Bachraty, M.; Berky, R.

    2011-01-01

    In-vessel corium retention (IVR) via external reactor vessel cooling (ERVC) has been recognised as a feasible and promising severe accident management strategy for VVER-440/V213 reactors. In general, the avoiding of boiling crisis on outer (cooled) RPV (reactor pressure vessel) surface is sufficient condition for preserving the RPV integrity. The crucial point of the proposed IVR concept for VVER-440/V213 is the narrow gap between elliptical lower head and thermal and biological shield. In the cold conditions the width of this gap is only about 2 cm and would be even lower in hot IVR conditions, when the reactor wall is subjected to large thermal gradients due to temperature difference between the hot inner surface (loaded by corium) and cold outer surface (which is cooled by water in flooded cavity). Sufficient gap should remain free for coolant flow for the success of the proposed IVR concept. Thus, realistic estimation of thermal load and corresponding deformations of reactor wall and their impact on gap width are of primarily importance. Two different approaches were used for the estimation of the thermal load: a conservative approach and a transient approach, both were computed with the ASTEC code. The structural analysis of RPV subjected to IVR load was performed using the finite element method (FEM) code ANSYS release 10.0. From the results obtained it follows, that even when the RPV is subjected to limiting loading conditions during severe accident, there should be sufficient gap width (∼ 1 cm) between RPV wall and thermal/biological shield for the coolant flow in natural circulation regime alongside the outer surface of the RPV wall

  11. An assessment of ex-vessel fuel-coolant interaction energetics for advanced light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, J.G.; Corradini, M.L.

    1997-01-01

    The occurrence of an energetic fuel/coolant interaction (FCI) below the reactor pressure vessel in the cavity of advanced light water reactors (ALWRs) are analyzed to determine the possible hazard to structural walls as a result of dynamic liquid phase pressures. Such analyses are important to demonstrate that these cavity walls will maintain their integrity so that ex-vessel core debris coolability is possible. Past studies that have examined this or related issues are reviewed, and a methodology is proposed to analyze the occurrence of this physical event using the IFCI and TEXAS models for the FCI as well as dynamic shock wave propagation estimates using hand calculations as well as the CTH hydro model. Scenarios for the ALWRs are reviewed, and one severe accident scenario is used as an example to demonstrate the methodology. Such methodologies are recommended for consideration in future safety studies. These methodologies should be verified with direct comparison to energetic FCI data such as that being produced in KROTOS at the Joint Research Centre, Ispra

  12. In-vessel core debris retention through external flooding of the reactor pressure vessel. SCDAP/RELAP5 assessment for the SBWR lower head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heel, A.M.J.M. van.

    1995-09-01

    In this report the results are discussed from various analyses on the feasibility and phenomenology of the External Flooding (EF) concept for an SBWR lower head, filled with a large heat generating corium mass. In applying External Flooding as an accident management strategy after or during core melt down, the lower drywell is filled with water up to a level where a large portion of the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) is flooded. The purpose of this method is to establish cooling of the vessel wall, that is challenged by the heat load resulting from the corium, in such a way that its structural integrity if not endangered. The analysis discussed in this report focus on the thermal response of the vessel wall and the ex-vessel boiling processes under the conditions described above. For these analyses the SCDAP/REALP5 MOD 3.1 code was used. The major outcome of the calculations is, that a major part of the vessel wall remains well below themelting temperature of carbon steel, as long as flooding of the external surface of the lower head is established. The SCDAP/RELAP5 analyses indicated that low-quality Critical Heat Flux (CHF) was not exceeded, under all the conditions that had been tested. However, a comaprison of the heat fluxes, as calculated in RELAP5, with the CHF values obtained from the Zuber correlation and the Vishnev correction factor (for boiling at inclined surfaces) proved that CHF values, based on these criteria, were exceeded in several surface points of the lower head mesh. The correlations, as resident in the current version of RELAP5 MOD 3.1, might lead to over-estimation of CHF for the EF analyses discussed in this report. The use of the more conservative Zuber correlation with the Vishnev correction factor is recommended for EF analyses. (orig.)

  13. Variability of breast density assessment in short-term reimaging with digital mammography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Won Hwa [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Woo Kyung, E-mail: moonwk@snu.ac.kr [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sun Mi [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Ann [Department of Radiology, Seoul Metropolitan Government Seoul National University, Boramae Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Jung Min; Koo, Hye Ryoung; Lee, Su Hyun; Cho, Nariya [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-01

    Objective: To evaluate the variability of breast density assessments in short-term reimaging with digital mammography. Materials and methods: In 186 women, short term (mean interval, 27.6 days) serial digital mammograms including CC and MLO views were obtained without any treatment. Mammographic density assessments were performed by three blinded radiologists for Breast Imaging Report and Data System (BI-RADS, grades 1–4) and visual percentage density (PD) estimation, and by one radiologist for computer-aided PD estimation. The variability of assessments was analyzed according to the age, breast density, and mammography types by multivariate logistic regression. Results: In BI-RADS assessments, 29% (161 of 558) of breast density categories were assessed differently after short-term reimaging and the mean absolute difference in PD for CC and MLO view was 7.6% and 8.1% for visual assessments, and 7.4% and 6.4% for computer-aided assessments, respectively. Among all computer-aided assessments, 29% (54 of 186) of CC view and 22% (41 of 186) of MLO view assessments had discrepancy over 10% in PD. Younger age (<50), greater breast density (grades 3 and 4), and different mammography types were significantly associated with the variability. Conclusion: Considerable variability in breast density assessments occurred in short-term reimaging with digital mammography, particularly in women with younger age and greater breast density and when examined using different types of mammography.

  14. Variability of breast density assessment in short-term reimaging with digital mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Won Hwa; Moon, Woo Kyung; Kim, Sun Mi; Yi, Ann; Chang, Jung Min; Koo, Hye Ryoung; Lee, Su Hyun; Cho, Nariya

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the variability of breast density assessments in short-term reimaging with digital mammography. Materials and methods: In 186 women, short term (mean interval, 27.6 days) serial digital mammograms including CC and MLO views were obtained without any treatment. Mammographic density assessments were performed by three blinded radiologists for Breast Imaging Report and Data System (BI-RADS, grades 1–4) and visual percentage density (PD) estimation, and by one radiologist for computer-aided PD estimation. The variability of assessments was analyzed according to the age, breast density, and mammography types by multivariate logistic regression. Results: In BI-RADS assessments, 29% (161 of 558) of breast density categories were assessed differently after short-term reimaging and the mean absolute difference in PD for CC and MLO view was 7.6% and 8.1% for visual assessments, and 7.4% and 6.4% for computer-aided assessments, respectively. Among all computer-aided assessments, 29% (54 of 186) of CC view and 22% (41 of 186) of MLO view assessments had discrepancy over 10% in PD. Younger age (<50), greater breast density (grades 3 and 4), and different mammography types were significantly associated with the variability. Conclusion: Considerable variability in breast density assessments occurred in short-term reimaging with digital mammography, particularly in women with younger age and greater breast density and when examined using different types of mammography

  15. Research vessels

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, P.S.

    The role of the research vessels as a tool for marine research and exploration is very important. Technical requirements of a suitable vessel and the laboratories needed on board are discussed. The history and the research work carried out...

  16. Dosimetry-adjusted reactor physics parameters for pressure vessel neutron exposure assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McElroy, W.N.; Kellogg, L.S.

    1988-01-01

    The ASTM E706 master matrix standard describes a series of 20 American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard practices, guides, and methods for use in the prediction of neutron-induced changes in light water reactor (LWR) pressure vessel (PV) and support structure steels throughout a PV's service life. Some of these are existing ASTM standards, some are ASTM standards that have been modified, and some are new ASTM standards. These standards are periodically revised to assume their applicability during the 40-yr (32 effective full-power years) design license period for a nuclear power plant. They are now under review by two new ASTM plant life extension task groups: E10.05.11 on physics dosimetry and E10.02.11 on metallurgy. A brief review on the current application of these standards and a discussion of the status of work to verify the accuracy of derived physics-dosimetry parameter values is presented in this paper

  17. Assessing the viability of microorganisms in the ballast water of vessels transiting the North Atlantic Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steichen, Jamie L; Quigg, Antonietta

    2015-12-15

    Testing phytoplankton viability within ballast tanks and receiving waters of ballast water discharge remain understudied. Potentially harmful dinoflagellates and diatoms are transported via ballast water to Galveston Bay, Texas (USA), home to three major ports: Houston, Texas City and Galveston. Ballast water from vessels transiting the North Atlantic Ocean was inoculated into treatments representing low and high salinity conditions similar to the Ports of Houston and Galveston respectively. Phytoplankton in ballast water growout experiments were deemed viable and showed growth in low and mid salinities with nutrient enrichment. Molecular methods identified several genera: Dinophysis, Gymnodinium, Gyrodinium, Heterocapsa, Peridinium, Scrippsiella, Chaetoceros and Nitzschia. These phytoplankton genera were previously identified in Galveston Bay except Scrippsiella. Phytoplankton, including those capable of forming harmful algal blooms leading to fish and shellfish kills, are transported to Galveston Bay via ballast water, and are viable when introduced to similar salinity conditions found in Galveston Bay ports. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Assessment of models predicting irradiation effects on tensile properties of reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pineau, L.; Landron, C.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, an analysis of tensile data acquired as part of the French Reactor Vessel Surveillance Program (RVSP) is produced. This program contains amongst other mechanical tests, tensile tests at 20 and 300 C degrees on non irradiated base metals and at 300 C degrees only on irradiated materials. It shows that irradiation leads to an increase in the yield strength and a decrease in the strain hardening. The exploitation of tensile results has permitted to express a relationship between yield strength increase measured and fluence value, as well as between strain hardening decrease and yield strength evolution. The use of these relations in the aim at predicting evolution of tensile properties with irradiation has then permitted to propose a methodology to model entire stress-strain curves of irradiated base metal only based on the non irradiated stress-strain curve. These predictions were successfully compared with an experimental standard case. (authors)

  19. Scatter modelling of fracture toughness data for reactor pressure vessel structural integrity assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesoz, M.

    1997-01-01

    In the last decade, there has been an increasing interest at EDF in developing and applying probabilistic methods for a variety of purposes. In the field of structural integrity and reliability they are used to evaluate the effect of deterioration due to ageing mechanisms, mainly on major passive structural components such as reactor pressure vessel, steam generator and piping in nuclear plants. Such approaches provide an attractive supplement to the more conventional deterministic method, based upon pessimistic assumptions, that give results too far from reality to support effective decisions. In addition to deterministic calculations, a Probabilistic Fracture Mechanics model has been developed in order to analyse the risk of brittle failure of the reactor pressure vessel and to perform sensitivity studies. The material fracture toughness (K IC ) uncertainty appears to be strongly influencing the probability of failure under accidental conditions. Up to now, this parameter is determined from the RCC-M code reference curve, which is the same as the ASME reference curve. But an important issue when performing probabilistic analysis is the correct statistical modelling of input parameters. That's why modelling works have been carried out using results of fracture toughness tests performed for demonstrating the validity of the reference curve. This paper presents the statistical treatments that have been performed to model the scatter of temperature dependent parameter (K IC (T). A specific data base containing a few hundreds of French and US results have been carried and Weibull models have been fitted, based on various master curve equations (K. Wallin (Senior Adviser at the Technical Research Centre of Finland) or RCC-M types). (author)

  20. Study of system safety evaluation on LTO of national project. Structural integrity assessment of reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onizawa, Kunio; Masaki, Koichi; Katsuyama, Jinya; Nishiyama, Yutaka; Osakabe, Kazuya; Nishikawa, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    To assure the structural integrity of a reactor pressure vessel (RPV) is known as one of the critical issues to maintain the safe long-term operation of a nuclear power plant. In Japan, the assessment methods for RPV integrity, stipulated in the codes and standards, have been endorsed by the regulatory body. Authors have initiated extensive research on the improvement of structural integrity assessment methods of RPVs. In this paper, we describe some research results obtained from the first-year activity. These include the study on revisiting the technical background of the methods, such as loading conditions, postulated crack definition, the other evaluation methods. In addition, studies on probabilistic methods for the applicability to the current rules and the standardization of the probabilistic analysis methods have been presented. (author)

  1. Uranium density reduction on fuel element side plates assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rios, Ilka A.; Andrade, Delvonei A.; Domingos, Douglas B.; Umbehaun, Pedro E.

    2011-01-01

    During operation of IEA-R1 research reactor, located at Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, IPEN - CNEN/SP, an abnormal oxidation on some fuel elements was noted. It was also verified, among the possible causes of the problem, that the most likely one was insufficient cooling of the elements in the core. One of the propositions to solve or minimize the problem is to reduce uranium density on fuel elements side plates. In this paper, the influence of this change on neutronic and thermal hydraulic parameters for IEA-R1 reactor is verified by simulations with the codes HAMMER and CITATION. Results are presented and discussed. (author)

  2. Uranium density reduction on fuel element side plates assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rios, Ilka A. [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo (CTMSP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Andrade, Delvonei A.; Domingos, Douglas B.; Umbehaun, Pedro E. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    During operation of IEA-R1 research reactor, located at Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, IPEN - CNEN/SP, an abnormal oxidation on some fuel elements was noted. It was also verified, among the possible causes of the problem, that the most likely one was insufficient cooling of the elements in the core. One of the propositions to solve or minimize the problem is to reduce uranium density on fuel elements side plates. In this paper, the influence of this change on neutronic and thermal hydraulic parameters for IEA-R1 reactor is verified by simulations with the codes HAMMER and CITATION. Results are presented and discussed. (author)

  3. Assessing the port to port risk of vessel movements vectoring non-indigenous marine species within and across domestic Australian borders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Marnie L; Hewitt, Chad L

    2011-07-01

    Biofouling of vessels is implicated as a high risk transfer mechanism of non-indigenous marine species (NIMS). Biofouling on international vessels is managed through stringent border control policies, however, domestic biofouling transfers are managed under different policies and legislative arrangements as they cross internal borders. As comprehensive guidelines are developed and increased compliance of international vessels with 'clean hull' expectations increase, vessel movements from port to port will become the focus of biosecurity management. A semi-quantitative port to port biofouling risk assessment is presented that evaluates the presence of known NIMS in the source port and determines the likelihood of transfer based on the NIMS association with biofouling and environmental match between source and receiving ports. This risk assessment method was used to assess the risk profile of a single dredge vessel during three anticipated voyages within Australia, resulting in negligible to low risk outcomes. This finding is contrasted with expectations in the literature, specifically those that suggest slow moving vessels pose a high to extreme risk of transferring NIMS species.

  4. Assessment of Microbial Fuel Cell Configurations and Power Densities

    KAUST Repository

    Logan, Bruce E.

    2015-07-30

    Different microbial electrochemical technologies are being developed for a many diverse applications, including wastewater treatment, biofuel production, water desalination, remote power sources, and as biosensors. Current and energy densities will always be limited relative to batteries and chemical fuel cells, but these technologies have other advantages based on the self-sustaining nature of the microorganisms that can donate or accept electrons from an electrode, the range of fuels that can be used, and versatility in the chemicals that can be produced. The high cost of membranes will likely limit applications of microbial electrochemical technologies that might require a membrane. For microbial fuel cells, which do not need a membrane, questions remain on whether larger-scale systems can produce power densities similar to those obtained in laboratory-scale systems. It is shown here that configuration and fuel (pure chemicals in laboratory media versus actual wastewaters) remain the key factors in power production, rather than the scale of the application. Systems must be scaled up through careful consideration of electrode spacing and packing per unit volume of reactor.

  5. Assessment of Microbial Fuel Cell Configurations and Power Densities

    KAUST Repository

    Logan, Bruce E.; Wallack, Maxwell J; Kim, Kyoung-Yeol; He, Weihua; Feng, Yujie; Saikaly, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Different microbial electrochemical technologies are being developed for a many diverse applications, including wastewater treatment, biofuel production, water desalination, remote power sources, and as biosensors. Current and energy densities will always be limited relative to batteries and chemical fuel cells, but these technologies have other advantages based on the self-sustaining nature of the microorganisms that can donate or accept electrons from an electrode, the range of fuels that can be used, and versatility in the chemicals that can be produced. The high cost of membranes will likely limit applications of microbial electrochemical technologies that might require a membrane. For microbial fuel cells, which do not need a membrane, questions remain on whether larger-scale systems can produce power densities similar to those obtained in laboratory-scale systems. It is shown here that configuration and fuel (pure chemicals in laboratory media versus actual wastewaters) remain the key factors in power production, rather than the scale of the application. Systems must be scaled up through careful consideration of electrode spacing and packing per unit volume of reactor.

  6. TPE upgrade for enhancing operational safety and improving in-vessel tritium inventory assessment in fusion nuclear environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimada, M., E-mail: Masashi.Shimada@inl.gov [Fusion Safety Program, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Taylor, C.N.; Moore-McAteer, L.; Pawelko, R.J. [Fusion Safety Program, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Kolasinski, R.D.; Buchenauer, D.A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Hydrogen and Materials Science Department, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Cadwallader, L.C.; Merrill, B.J. [Fusion Safety Program, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)

    2016-11-01

    The Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE) is a unique high-flux linear plasma device that can handle beryllium, tritium, and neutron-irradiated plasma facing materials, and is the only existing device dedicated to evaluate in-vessel tritium inventory in the nuclear environment for fusion safety. The electrical upgrade were recently carried out to enhance operational safety and to improve plasma performance. New DC power supplies and a new control center enable remote plasma operations from outside of the contamination area for tritium, minimizing the possible exposure risk with tritium and beryllium and eliminating heat stress issue. In November 2015, the TPE successfully achieved first deuterium plasma via remote operation after a significant three-year upgrade. Simple linear scaling estimate showed that the TPE is expected to achieve Γ{sub i}{sup max} of >1.0 × 10{sup 23} m{sup −2} s{sup −1} and q{sub heat} of >1 MW m{sup −2} with new power supplies. This upgrade not only improves operational safety of the worker, but also enhances plasma performance to better simulate extreme plasma-material conditions expected in ITER, FNSF, and DEMO for improving in-vessel tritium inventory assessment in fusion nuclear environment.

  7. Assessment of the advantages of a residual heat removal system inside the reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gautier, G.M.

    1995-01-01

    In the framework of research on diversified means for removing the residual heat from pressurized water reactors, the CEA is studying a passive system called RRP (Refroidissement du Reacteur au Primaire, or primary circuit cooling system), which includes integrated heat-exchangers and a layout of the internal structures so as to obtain convection from the primary circuit inside the vessel, whatever the state of the loops. This system is operational for all primary circuit temperatures and pressures, as well as for a wide range of conditions: it is independent of the state of the loops, even if the volume of water in the primary circuit is small, it is compatible with either a passive or an active operation mode, and compatible with any other decay heat removal systems. An evaluation is presented here of the performance of the RRP system in the event of a small primary circuit break in a totally passive operation mode without the intervention of another system. The results of this evaluation show the interest of such a system: a clear increase of the time-delay for the implementation of a low pressure safety injection system, no need for the use of a high pressure safety injection system. (author). 4 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  8. Assessment of the advantages of a residual heat removal system inside the reactor pressure vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gautier, G.M. [Commissariat a l`Energie Atomique, Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France)

    1995-09-01

    In the framework of research on diversified means for removing residual heat from pressurized water reactors, the CEA is studying a passive system called RRP (Refroidissement du Reacteur au Primaire, or primary circuit cooling system). This system consists of integrated heat-exchangers and a layout of the internal structures so as to obtain convection from the primary circuit inside the vessel, whatever the state of the loops. This system is operational for all primary circuit temperatures and pressures, as well as for a wide range of conditions: such as independent from the state of the loops, low volume of water in the primary circuit, compatibility with either a passive or an active operation mode, and compatibility with any other decay heat removal systems. This paper presents an evaluation of the performance of the RRP system in the event of a small primary circuit break in a totally passive operation mode without the intervention of any another system. The results of this evaluation show the potential interest of such a system: a clear increase of the time-delay for the implementation of a low pressure safety injection system and no need for the use of a high pressure safety injection system.

  9. Application of probabilistic fracture mechanics to reactor pressure vessel safety assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venturini, V.; Pitner, P.

    1995-06-01

    Among all the components of a PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) nuclear power plant, the reactor vessel is of major importance for safety. The integrity of this structure must be guaranteed in all circumstances, even in the case of the most severe accidents, and its mechanical state can be decisive for the lifetime of the plant. The brittle rupture would be the most important of all potential hazards if the irradiation effects were not consistent with predictions. The interest of having a reliable and precise method of evaluating the available safety margins and the integrity of this component led Electricite de France (EDF) to carry out a probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis. The probabilistic model developed by integration of the uncertainties in the usual fracture mechanics equations is presented. A special focus is made on the problem of coupling thermo-mechanical finite element calculations and reliability analysis. The use of a finite element code can be associated with prohibitive computation times when it is invoked numerous times during simulations sequences or complex iterative procedures. The response surface method is used. It provides an approximation of the response from a reduced number of original data. The global approach is illustrated on an example corresponding to a specific accidental transient. A validation of the obtained results is also carried out through the comparison with an equivalent model without coupling. (author)

  10. Early construction and operation of the highly contaminated water treatment system in Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (4). Assessment of hydrogen behavior in stored Cs adsorption vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Masahiro; Arai, Takahiro; Nishi, Yoshihisa

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen diffusion behavior in a cesium adsorption vessel is assessed. The vessel is used to remove radioactive substance from contaminated water, which is proceeded from Fukushima accident. Experiment and numerical calculation are conducted to clarify the characteristics of natural circulation in the vessel. The natural circulation arising from the temperature difference between inside and outside the vessel is confirmed. We develop an evaluation model to predict the natural circulation and its prediction agrees well with the results obtained by the experiment and the calculation. Using the model, we predict steady and transient behavior of hydrogen concentration. Results indicate that hydrogen concentration is kept lower than the flammability limit when the short vent pipe is open. (author)

  11. Application of Master Curve fracture toughness for reactor pressure vessel integrity assessment in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Server, William; Rosinski, Stan; Lott, Randy; Kim, Charles; Weakland, Dennis

    2002-01-01

    The Master Curve fracture toughness approach has been used in the USA for better defining the transition temperature fracture toughness of irradiated reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels for end-of-life (EOL) and EOL extension (EOLE) time periods. The first application was for the Kewaunee plant in which the life-limiting material was a circumferential weld metal. Fracture toughness testing of this weld metal corresponding to EOL and beyond EOLE was used to reassess the PTS screening value, RT PTS , and to develop new operating pressure-temperature curves. The NRC has approved this application using a shift-based methodology and higher safety margins than those proposed by the utility and its contractors. Beaver Valley Unit 1, a First Energy nuclear plant, has performed similar fracture toughness testing, but none of the testing has been conducted at EOL or EOLE at this time. Therefore, extrapolation of the life-limiting plate data to higher fluences is necessary, and the projections will be checked in the next decade by Master Curve fracture toughness testing of all of the Beaver Valley Unit 1 beltline materials (three plates and three welds) at fluences near or greater than EOLE. A supplemental surveillance capsule has been installed in the sister plant, Beaver Valley Unit 2, which has the capability of achieving a higher lead factor while operating under essentially the same environment. The Beaver Valley Unit 1 evaluation has been submitted to the NRC. This paper reviews the shift-based approach taken for the Beaver Valley Unit 1 RPV and presents the use of the RT T 0 methodology (which evolved out of the Master Curve testing and endorsed through two ASME Code Cases). The applied margin accounts for uncertainties in the various material parameters. Discussion of a direct measurement of RT T 0 approach, as originally submitted for the Kewaunee case, is also presented

  12. Making the link between radiological assessment, nuclear safety assessment and environmental impact assessment, as applied to unloading of the Lepse spent fuel storage vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Graham M.; Sneve, Malgorzata K.; Markarov, Valentine G.

    2000-01-01

    Planning and optimisation of radioactive waste management operations is a complicated task involving scientific, technical and social issues. There are many factors which have to be balanced, involving trade-offs such as those between safety now and long term safety; between protection of human health and protection of the environment as a whole; between protection of workers and protection of the public; and between mitigation of risks of major accidents and mitigation of routine low-level but certain to occur risks. Managing the spent fuel currently stored on the Lepse vessel in Murmansk offers as big a challenge as any other in this context. The Russian Federation state regulatory process imposes strict requirements on operators to demonstrate adequate safety, environmental and human health protection. Practically, however, there is little experience in Russia or elsewhere on how to combine all the issues referred to above within an overall assessment that leads to informed decision making. The paper will describe the components of assessment work being considered within the context of the regulatory planning of Lepse unloading operations. The scope will focus on radiation protection issues but also include non-radioactive pollution risks and other safety issues have to be taken into account if a truly optimal allocation and application of resources is to be made. Consideration will be given to radiation worker dose and other health risk assessments for routine operations, safety assessments of special operations such as spent fuel handling; and the radiological and other environmental and human health impacts of planned releases of effluents to the biosphere. The need to identify and collate particular relevant information will discussed and the links between the different components of the overall assessment will be identified with a view to improving the overall effectiveness of the assessment process. The problem of combining all the information coherently

  13. New method of safety assessment for pressure vessel of nuclear power plant--brief introduction of master curve approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Wendou

    2011-01-01

    The new Master Curve Method is called as a revolutionary advance to the assessment of- reactor pressure vessel integrity in USA. This paper explains the origin, basis and standard of the Master Curve from the reactor pressure-temperature limit curve which assures the safety of nuclear power plant. According to the characteristics of brittle fracture which is greatly susceptible to the microstructure, the theory and the test method of the Master Curve as well as its statistical law which can be modeled using Weibull distribution are described in this paper. The meaning, advantage, application and importance of the Master Curve as well as the relation between the Master Curve and nuclear power safety are understood from the fitting formula for the fracture toughness database by Weibull distribution model. (author)

  14. Tempest in a vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barre, Bertrand

    2015-01-01

    As the ASN made some statements about anomalies of carbon content in the EPR vessel bottom and top, the author recalls and comments some technical issues to better understand the information published on this topic. He notably addresses the role of the vessel, briefly indicates its operating conditions, shape and structure, and mechanical components for the top, its material and mechanical properties, and test samples used to assess mechanical properties. He also comments the phenomenon of radio-induced embrittlement, the vessel manufacturing process, and evokes the applicable regulations. He quotes and comments statements made by the ASN and Areva which evoke further assessments of the concerned components

  15. Corrosion Assessment of Candidate Materials for the SHINE Subcritical Assembly Vessel and Components FY14 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawel, Steven J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Laboratory corrosion testing of candidate alloys—including Zr-4 and Zr-2.5Nb representing the target solution vessel, and 316L, 2304, 304L, and 17-4 PH stainless steels representing process piping and balance-of-plant components—was performed in support of the proposed SHINE process to produce 99Mo from low-enriched uranium. The test solutions used depleted uranyl sulfate in various concentrations and incorporated a range of temperatures, excess sulfuric acid concentrations, nitric acid additions (to simulate radiolysis product generation), and iodine additions. Testing involved static immersion of coupons in solution and in the vapor above the solution, and was extended to include planned-interval tests to examine details associated with stainless steel corrosion in environments containing iodine species. A large number of galvanic tests featuring couples between a stainless steel and a zirconium-based alloy were performed, and limited vibratory horn testing was incorporated to explore potential erosion/corrosion features of compatibility. In all cases, corrosion of the zirconium alloys was observed to be minimal, with corrosion rates based on weight loss calculated to be less than 0.1 mil/year with no change in surface roughness. The resulting passive film appeared to be ZrO2 with variations in thickness that influence apparent coloration (toward light brown for thicker films). Galvanic coupling with various stainless steels in selected exposures had no discernable effect on appearance, surface roughness, or corrosion rate. Erosion/corrosion behavior was the same for zirconium alloys in uranyl sulfate solutions and in sodium sulfate solutions adjusted to a similar pH, suggesting there was no negative effect of uranium resulting from fluid dynamic conditions aggressive to the passive film. Corrosion of the candidate stainless steels was similarly modest across the entire range of exposures. However, some sensitivity to corrosion of the stainless steels was

  16. Fatigue status assessment for reactor pressure vessel based on actual operational transient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Guangqiang; Liao Changbin; Dai Bing; Gui Chun

    2013-01-01

    Background: Fatigue is an important aging mechanism in RPV and it must be contained to aging management working range. Purpose: In order to ensure the safety operation of nuclear power plants, as extension of RPV service time, it is necessary to assess the fatigue damage caused by actual operation transient. Methods: Based on monitoring data of actual operation during the past eleven years, refer to design transient, the statistic analysis for types and occurrence times of actual transient is carried out, at the same time, every transients are combined as different operation cycles and the temperature field and stress field of typical components are analyzed by FEM. Results: Based on these information, fatigue analysis and assessment are finished, if later-actual transients are similar with the previous transients, the calculation result shows that the ratio between maximum of cumulative usage factors and design calculation value is 0.4967 the design transients is conservative. Conclusions: Fatigue status of RPV could be assessed and traced quickly through fatigue status assessment method in this paper based on actual operational transient and assessment result would be a good reference for RPV aging management. (authors)

  17. Assessment and management of ageing of major nuclear power plant components important to safety: PWR vessel internals: 2007 update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-06-01

    At present, there are over four hundred operational nuclear power plants (NPPs) in IAEA Member States. Operating experience has shown that effective control of the ageing degradation of the major NPP components (e.g. caused by unanticipated phenomena and by operating, maintenance or manufacturing errors) is one of the most important issues for plant safety and also plant life. Ageing in these NPPs must be therefore effectively managed to ensure the availability of design functions throughout the plant service life. From the safety perspective, this means controlling within acceptable limits the ageing degradation and wearout of plant components important to safety so that adequate safety margins remain, i.e. integrity and functional capability in excess of normal operating requirements. IAEA-TECDOC-1119 documents ageing assessment and management practices for PWR Reactor Vessel Internals (RVIs) that were current at the time of its finalization in 1997-1998. Safety significant operating events have occurred since the finalization of the TECDOC, e.g. irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of baffle-former bolts, which threatened the integrity of the vessel internals. In addition, concern of fretting wear of control rod guide tubes has been raised in Japan. These events led to new ageing management actions by both NPP operators and regulators. Therefore it was recognized that IAEA-TECDOC-1119 should be updated by incorporating those new events and their countermeasures. The objective of this report is to update relevant sections of the existing IAEA-TECDOC- 1119 in order to provide current ageing management guidance for PWR RVIs to all involved in the operation and regulation of PWRs and thus to help ensure PWR safety in IAEA Member States throughout their entire service life

  18. The application of stereo-video technology for the assessment on population change of black rockfish Sebastes schlegeli in a vessel reef area in Haizhou Bay, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Xu, Qiang; Xu, Qinzeng; Zhang, Yingqiu; Yang, Hongsheng

    2015-01-01

    The assessment of population structure and abundance of fish assemblages associated with artificial reefs (ARs) is an important aspect of AR management. In the present study, we used a Dive-Operated Stereo Video (stereo-DOV) technique to assess the population structure and abundance of Sebastes schlegeli associated with two metallic, and three wooden, vessel reefs in Haizhou Bay during 2012 and 2013. The study used video systems to obtain length measurements and estimates of abundance. The size composition of S. schlegeli differed among reefs and individuals around vessel reefs were all adults, with total lengths (TL) of >20 cm. Juvenile fish were encountered by divers in a rocky area near the island away from the vessel reefs. The largest individual S. schlegeli (with the highest TL) among five reefs were found around a metallic vessel reef in both 2012 and 2013. TL of S. s chlegeli from all reefs increased by an average of 3.2 cm ( P<0.05) from 2012 to 2013, with an estimated mean weight increase of 250.4 g ( P<0.05). The video survey also indicated a decrease in the biomass of schools near two metallic vessels between the years. Stereo-video technology was found to be suitable for rockfish surveys around the reefs.

  19. A support vector density-based importance sampling for reliability assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, Hongzhe; Zhang, Hao; Wang, Wei

    2012-01-01

    An importance sampling method based on the adaptive Markov chain simulation and support vector density estimation is developed in this paper for efficient structural reliability assessment. The methodology involves the generation of samples that can adaptively populate the important region by the adaptive Metropolis algorithm, and the construction of importance sampling density by support vector density. The use of the adaptive Metropolis algorithm may effectively improve the convergence and stability of the classical Markov chain simulation. The support vector density can approximate the sampling density with fewer samples in comparison to the conventional kernel density estimation. The proposed importance sampling method can effectively reduce the number of structural analysis required for achieving a given accuracy. Examples involving both numerical and practical structural problems are given to illustrate the application and efficiency of the proposed methodology.

  20. Assessment and management of ageing of major nuclear power plant components important to safety: BWR pressure vessel internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-10-01

    At present, there are over four hundred operational nuclear power plants (NPPs) in IAEA Member States. Operating experience has shown that ineffective control of the ageing degradation of the major NPP components (caused for instance by unanticipated phenomena and by operating maintenance or manufacturing errors) can jeopardize plant safety and also plant life. Ageing in these NPPs must be therefore effectively managed to ensure the availability of design functions throughout the plant service life. From the safety perspective, this means controlling, within acceptable limits, the ageing degradation and ware out of components important to safety so that adequate safety margins remain, i.e. integrity and functional capability in excess of normal operating requirements. This TECDOC is one in a series of guidance reports on the assessment and management of ageing of the major NPP components important to safety. The reports are based on experience and practices of NPP operators, regulators, designers, manufacturers, and technical support organizations and a widely accepted Methodology for the Management of Ageing of NPP Components Important to Safety, which was issued by the IAEA in 1992. Since the reports are written from a safety perspective, they do not address life or life cycle management of plant components, which involves economic considerations. The current practices for the assessment of safety margins (fitness for service) and the inspection, monitoring and mitigation of ageing degradation of selected components of heavy water moderated reactors (HWRs), boiling water reactors (BWRs), pressurized water reactors (PWRs), and water moderated, water cooled energy reactors (WWERs) are documented in the reports. These practices are intended to help all involved directly and indirectly in ensuring the safe operation of NPPs, and also to provide a common technical basis for dialogue between plant operators and regulators when dealing with age related licensing issues

  1. Assessing the feasibility of a high-temperature, helium-cooled vacuum vessel and first wall for the Vulcan tokamak conceptual design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnard, H.S.; Hartwig, Z.S.; Olynyk, G.M.; Payne, J.E.

    2012-01-01

    The Vulcan conceptual design (R = 1.2 m, a = 0.3 m, B 0 = 7 T), a compact, steady-state tokamak for plasma–material interaction (PMI) science, must incorporate a vacuum vessel capable of operating at 1000 K in order to replicate the temperature-dependent physical chemistry that will govern PMI in a reactor. In addition, the Vulcan divertor must be capable of handling steady-state heat fluxes up to 10 MW m −2 so that integrated materials testing can be performed under reactor-relevant conditions. A conceptual design scoping study has been performed to assess the challenges involved in achieving such a configuration. The Vulcan vacuum system comprises an inner, primary vacuum vessel that is thermally and mechanically isolated from the outer, secondary vacuum vessel by a 10 cm vacuum gap. The thermal isolation minimizes heat conduction between the high-temperature helium-cooled primary vessel and the water-cooled secondary vessel. The mechanical isolation allows for thermal expansion and enables vertical removal of the primary vessel for maintenance or replacement. Access to the primary vessel for diagnostics, lower hybrid waveguides, and helium coolant is achieved through ∼1 m long intra-vessel pipes to minimize temperature gradients and is shown to be commensurate with the available port space in Vulcan. The isolated primary vacuum vessel is shown to be mechanically feasible and robust to plasma disruptions with analytic calculations and finite element analyses. Heat removal in the first wall and divertor, coupled with the ability to perform in situ maintenance and replacement of divertor components for scientific purposes, is achieved by combining existing helium-cooled techniques with innovative mechanical attachments of plasma facing components, either in plate-type helium-cooled modules or independently bolted, helium-jet impingement-cooled tiles. The vacuum vessel and first wall design enables a wide range of potential PFC materials and configurations to

  2. Low frequency oscillations in cephalic vessels assessed by near infrared spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phillip, Dorte; Schytz, Henrik W; Selb, Juliette

    2012-01-01

    of oxygenated haemoglobin (oxyHb) and the velocity of the middle cerebral artery (Vmca) to the arterial blood pressure (ABP). The direct left-right phase shifts of oxyHb and Vmca were also assessed. We examined 44 healthy volunteers by simultaneous recordings of ABP, oxyHb and Vmca during spontaneous and paced...... breathing at 6 breaths per minute on two separate days. RESULTS: The variation between hemispheres had a prediction interval (PI) of ± 39° for ABP-oxyHb phase shift and ± 69% for gain. ABP-Vmca showed ± 57° PI phase shift and ± 158% PI for gain. The variation from day to day showed ± 61° PI for ABP......-oxyHb phase shift and ± 297% PI for gain. ABP-Vmca showed ± 45° PI phase shift and ± 166% PI for gain. We found a linear relation between phase shift of oxyHb and Vmca at paced breathing (P=0.0005), but not at rest (P=0.235). CONCLUSION: Our results show that LFO phase shift ABP-oxyHb may be used as a robust...

  3. Corrosion Assessment of Candidate Materials for the SHINE Subcritical Assembly Vessel and Components FY15 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawel, Steven J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-01-01

    In the previous report of this series, a literature review was performed to assess the potential for substantial corrosion issues associated with the proposed SHINE process conditions to produce 99Mo. Following the initial review, substantial laboratory corrosion testing was performed emphasizing immersion and vapor-phase exposure of candidate alloys in a wide variety of solution chemistries and temperatures representative of potential exposure conditions. Stress corrosion cracking was not identified in any of the exposures up to 10 days at 80°C and 10 additional days at 93°C. Mechanical properties and specimen fracture face features resulting from slow-strain rate tests further supported a lack of sensitivity of these alloys to stress corrosion cracking. Fluid velocity was found not to be an important variable (0 to ~3 m/s) in the corrosion of candidate alloys at room temperature and 50°C. Uranium in solution was not found to adversely influence potential erosion-corrosion. Potentially intense radiolysis conditions slightly accelerated the general corrosion of candidate alloys, but no materials were observed to exhibit an annualized rate above 10 μm/y.

  4. Vessel asymmetry as an additional diagnostic tool in the assessment of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Doyle, Barry J

    2009-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) rupture is believed to occur when the local mechanical stress exceeds the local mechanical strength of the wall tissue. On the basis of this hypothesis, the knowledge of the stress acting on the wall of an unruptured aneurysm could be useful in determining the risk of rupture. The role of asymmetry has previously been identified in idealized AAA models and is now studied using realistic AAAs in the current work. METHODS: Fifteen patient-specific AAAs were studied to estimate the relationship between wall stress and geometrical parameters. Three-dimensional AAA models were reconstructed from computed tomography scan data. The stress distribution on the AAA wall was evaluated by the finite element method, and peak wall stress was compared with both diameter and centerline asymmetry. A simple method of determining asymmetry was adapted and developed. Statistical analyses were performed to determine potential significance of results. RESULTS: Mean von Mises peak wall stress +\\/- standard deviation was 0.4505 +\\/- 0.14 MPa (range, 0.3157-0.9048 MPa). Posterior wall stress increases with anterior centerline asymmetry. Peak stress increased by 48% and posterior wall stress by 38% when asymmetry was introduced into a realistic AAA model. CONCLUSION: The relationship between posterior wall stress and AAA asymmetry showed that excessive bulging of one surface results in elevated wall stress on the opposite surface. Assessing the degree of bulging and asymmetry that is experienced in an individual AAA may be of benefit to surgeons in the decision-making process and may provide a useful adjunct to diameter as a surgical intervention guide.

  5. Pressurized thermal shock in nuclear power plants: Good practices for assessment. Deterministic evaluation for the integrity of reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-02-01

    Starting in the early 1970s, a series of coordinated research projects (CRPs) was sponsored by the IAEA focusing on the effects of neutron radiation on reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels and RPV integrity. In conjunction with these CRPs, many consultants meetings, specialists meetings, and international conferences, dating back to the mid-1960s, were held. Individual studies on the basic phenomena of radiation hardening and embrittlement were also performed to better understand increases in tensile strength and shifts to higher temperatures for the integrity of the RPV. The overall objective of this CRP was to perform benchmark deterministic calculations of a typical pressurized thermal shock (PTS) regime, with the aim of comparing the effects of individual parameters on the final RPV integrity assessment, and then to recommend the best practices for their implementation in PTS procedures. At present, several different procedures and approaches are used for RPV integrity assessment for both WWER 440-230 reactors and pressurized water reactors (PWRs). These differences in procedures and approaches are based, in principle, on the different codes and rules used for design and manufacturing, and the different materials used for the various types of reactor, and the different levels of implementation of recent developments in fracture mechanics. Benchmark calculations were performed to improve user qualification and to reduce the user effect on the results of the analysis. This addressed generic PWR and WWER types of RPV, as well as sensitivity analyses. The complementary sensitivity analyses showed that the following factors significantly influenced the assessment: flaw size, shape, location and orientation, thermal hydraulic assumptions and material toughness. Applying national codes and procedures to the benchmark cases produced significantly different results in terms of allowable material toughness. This was mainly related to the safety factors used and the

  6. A preliminary assessment of biofouling and non-indigenous marine species associated with commercial slow-moving vessels arriving in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Grant A; Forrest, Barrie M

    2010-07-01

    Vessel traffic is the primary pathway for non-indigenous marine species introductions to New Zealand, with hull fouling recognised as being an important mechanism. This article describes hull fouling on seven slow-moving commercial vessels sampled over a 1 year period. Sampling involved the collection of images and fouling specimens from different hull locations using a standardised protocol developed to assess vessel biofouling in New Zealand. A total of 29 taxa was identified by expert taxonomists, of which 24% were indigenous to New Zealand and 17% non-indigenous. No first records to New Zealand were reported, however 59% of species were classified as 'unknown' due to insufficient taxonomic resolution. The extent of fouling was low compared to that described for other slow-movers. Fouling cover, biomass and richness were on average 17.1% (SE = 1.8%), 5.2 g (SE = 1.1 g) and 0.8 (SE = 0.07) per photoquadrat (200 x 200 mm), respectively. The fouling extent was lowest on the main hull areas where the antifouling paint was in good condition. In contrast, highest levels of fouling were associated with dry-docking support strips and other niche areas of the hull where the paint condition was poor. Future studies should target vessels from a broader range of bioregions, including vessels that remain idle for extended periods (ie months) between voyages, to increase understanding of the biosecurity risks posed by international commercial slow-movers.

  7. Diagnostic value of Doppler assessment of the hepatic and portal vessels and ultrasound of the spleen in liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donohue, John; Ng, Chaan; Catnach, Susan; Farrant, Patricia; Williams, Roger

    2004-02-01

    To investigate the clinical utility and the intra-observer and inter-observer variability of Doppler ultrasound assessment of the hepatic and portal vessels along with measurement of spleen size in the diagnosis of chronic liver disease and cirrhosis. Ultrasound measurements of portal vein diameter (PVD), portal vein velocity (PVV), hepatic arterial resistance index (HARI), hepatic vein profile (HVP), and spleen size were obtained in 49 controls and 45 patients with liver disease (23 with primary biliary cirrhosis, 22 with hepatitis C) by two experienced observers, who each performed three blinded measurements of each variable. Control values were derived from normal hospital workers. Percutaneous liver biopsies in 41 of the patients showed cirrhosis (14 patients), moderate/severe fibrosis (13 patients), and early disease (14 patients). Seventy-one percent of cirrhotic patients had splenomegaly (> 13.6 cm). The spleen size was significantly larger in cirrhotics (16.0 cm) than in non-cirrhotics (13.0 cm, P HVP was abnormal in 76.9% of cirrhotics, 57.7% of non-cirrhotics and 2.1% of controls (P HVP are useful predictors of chronic liver disease and cirrhosis, and both can be measured reliably and reproducibly. However, Doppler measurements of PVV, PVD and HARI are not useful in distinguishing patients with chronic liver disease from normal controls.

  8. DESIGN OF A VIBRATION AND STRESS MEASUREMENT SYSTEM FOR AN ADVANCED POWER REACTOR 1400 REACTOR VESSEL INTERNALS COMPREHENSIVE VIBRATION ASSESSMENT PROGRAM

    OpenAIRE

    KO, DO-YOUNG; KIM, KYU-HYUNG

    2013-01-01

    In accordance with the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC), Regulatory Guide 1.20, the reactor vessel internals comprehensive vibration assessment program (RVI CVAP) has been developed for an Advanced Power Reactor 1400 (APR1400). The purpose of the RVI CVAP is to verify the structural integrity of the reactor internals to flow-induced loads prior to commercial operation. The APR1400 RVI CVAP consists of four programs (analysis, measurement, inspection, and assessment). Thoughtful prepa...

  9. Assessment and management of ageing of major nuclear power plant components important to safety: PWR vessel internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-10-01

    At present, there are over four hundred operational nuclear power plants (NPPs) in IAEA Member States. Operating experience has shown that ineffective control of the ageing degradation of the major NPP components (e.g. caused by unanticipated phenomena and by operating, maintenance or manufacturing errors) can jeopardize plant safety and also plant life. Ageing in these NPPs must be therefore effectively managed to ensure the availability of design functions throughout the plant service life. From the safety perspective, this means controlling within acceptable limits the ageing degradation and wear-out of plant components important to safety so that adequate safety margins remain, i.e. integrity and functional capability in excess of normal operating requirements. This TECDOC is one in a series of reports on the assessment and management of ageing of the major NPP components important to safety. The reports are based on experience and practices of NPP operators, regulators, designers, manufacturers, and technical support organizations and a widely accepted Methodology for the Management of Ageing of NPP Components Important to Safety, which was issued by the IAEA in 1992. The current practices for the assessment of safety margins (fitness-for-service) and the inspection, monitoring and mitigation of ageing degradation of selected components of Canada deuterium-uranium (CANDU) reactors, boiling water reactors (BWRs), pressurized water reactors (PWRs), and water moderated, water cooled energy reactors (WWERs) are documented in the reports. These practices are intended to help all involved directly and indirectly in ensuring the safe operation of NPPs, and to provide a common technical basis for dialogue between plant operators and regulators when dealing with age related licensing issues. The guidance reports are directed at technical experts from NPPs and from regulatory, plant design, manufacturing and technical support organizations dealing with specific plant

  10. Assessment of Ultimate Load Capacity for Pre-Stressed Concrete Containment Vessel Model of PWR Design With BARC Code ULCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basha, S.M.; Singh, R.K.; Patnaik, R.; Ramanujam, S.; Kushwaha, H.S.; Venkat Raj, V.

    2002-01-01

    Ultimate load capacity assessment of nuclear containments has been a thrust research area for Indian Pressurised Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) power programme. For containment safety assessment of Indian PHWRs a finite element code ULCA was developed at BARC, Trombay. This code has been extensively benchmarked with experimental results. The present paper highlights the analysis results for Prestressed Concrete Containment Vessel (PCCV) tested at Sandia National Labs, USA in a Round Robin analysis activity co-sponsored by Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC), Japan and the U.S Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Three levels of failure pressure predictions namely the upper bound, the most probable and the lower bound (all with 90% confidence) were made as per the requirements of the round robin analysis activity. The most likely failure pressure is predicted to be in the range of 2.95 Pd to 3.15 Pd (Pd= design pressure of 0.39 MPa for the PCCV model) depending on the type of liners used in the construction of the PCCV model. The lower bound value of the ultimate pressure of 2.80 Pd and the upper bound of the ultimate pressure of 3.45 Pd are also predicted from the analysis. These limiting values depend on the assumptions of the analysis for simulating the concrete-tendon interaction and the strain hardening characteristics of the steel members. The experimental test has been recently concluded at Sandia Laboratory and the peak pressure reached during the test is 3.3 Pd that is enveloped by our upper bound prediction of 3.45 Pd and is close to the predicted most likely pressure of 3.15 Pd. (authors)

  11. Bone density assessment for evaluation of gender differences in cervical vertebral maturation: A computed tomography study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Usha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The cervical vertebral maturation (CVM method is a vital tool for assessing the biological maturation of the orthodontic patient to evaluate the amount of mandibular bone growth left. Aim: To assess and visualize the cervical vertebral morphology (bone density of orthodontic patients of the age group 9,16,27 years. Material and Methods: Twenty four subjects with age group of 9,16,27 who were randomly selected and subjected to 3d tomographic study to estimate the biological age of the orthodontic patients by analyzing c1 c2 and c3 vertebrae. Result: The results showed that bone density of males is lesser than females in 9 and 16 years, whereas they have more bone density than females in 27 years. Conclusion: The study provides qualitative method of assessing the biological age of the patient by using images of cervical vertebrae by three dimensional approach. Hence it can be useful for orthodontic diagnosis and treatment plan.

  12. Bone density assessment for evaluation of gender differences in cervical vertebral maturation: A computed tomography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usha, K; Baskaranarayanan, Balashanmugam; Nagarajan, D; Selvarani, R; Vijjaykanth, M

    2016-10-01

    The cervical vertebral maturation (CVM) method is a vital tool for assessing the biological maturation of the orthodontic patient to evaluate the amount of mandibular bone growth left. To assess and visualize the cervical vertebral morphology (bone density) of orthodontic patients of the age group 9,16,27 years. Twenty four subjects with age group of 9,16,27 who were randomly selected and subjected to 3d tomographic study to estimate the biological age of the orthodontic patients by analyzing c1 c2 and c3 vertebrae. The results showed that bone density of males is lesser than females in 9 and 16 years, whereas they have more bone density than females in 27 years. The study provides qualitative method of assessing the biological age of the patient by using images of cervical vertebrae by three dimensional approach. Hence it can be useful for orthodontic diagnosis and treatment plan.

  13. Quantitative assessment of breast density from digitized mammograms into Tabar's patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamal, N [Medical Technology Division, Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Technology Research (MINT) 43000 Kajang (Malaysia); Ng, K-H [Department of Radiology, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Looi, L-M [Department of Pathology, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); McLean, D [Medical Physics Department, Westmead Hospital, Sydney, NSW 2145 (Australia); Zulfiqar, A [Department of Radiology, Hospital Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 56000 Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia (Malaysia); Tan, S-P [Department of Radiology, Hospital Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 56000 Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia (Malaysia); Liew, W-F [Department of Radiology, Hospital Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 56000 Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia (Malaysia); Shantini, A [Department of Radiology, Kuala Lumpur Hospital, 50586 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Ranganathan, S [Department of Radiology, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2006-11-21

    We describe a semi-automated technique for the quantitative assessment of breast density from digitized mammograms in comparison with patterns suggested by Tabar. It was developed using the MATLAB-based graphical user interface applications. It is based on an interactive thresholding method, after a short automated method that shows the fibroglandular tissue area, breast area and breast density each time new thresholds are placed on the image. The breast density is taken as a percentage of the fibroglandular tissue to the breast tissue areas. It was tested in four different ways, namely by examining: (i) correlation of the quantitative assessment results with subjective classification, (ii) classification performance using the quantitative assessment technique, (iii) interobserver agreement and (iv) intraobserver agreement. The results of the quantitative assessment correlated well (r{sup 2} = 0.92) with the subjective Tabar patterns classified by the radiologist (correctly classified 83% of digitized mammograms). The average kappa coefficient for the agreement between the readers was 0.63. This indicated moderate agreement between the three observers in classifying breast density using the quantitative assessment technique. The kappa coefficient of 0.75 for intraobserver agreement reflected good agreement between two sets of readings. The technique may be useful as a supplement to the radiologist's assessment in classifying mammograms into Tabar's pattern associated with breast cancer risk.

  14. Quantitative assessment of breast density from digitized mammograms into Tabar's patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamal, N; Ng, K-H; Looi, L-M; McLean, D; Zulfiqar, A; Tan, S-P; Liew, W-F; Shantini, A; Ranganathan, S

    2006-01-01

    We describe a semi-automated technique for the quantitative assessment of breast density from digitized mammograms in comparison with patterns suggested by Tabar. It was developed using the MATLAB-based graphical user interface applications. It is based on an interactive thresholding method, after a short automated method that shows the fibroglandular tissue area, breast area and breast density each time new thresholds are placed on the image. The breast density is taken as a percentage of the fibroglandular tissue to the breast tissue areas. It was tested in four different ways, namely by examining: (i) correlation of the quantitative assessment results with subjective classification, (ii) classification performance using the quantitative assessment technique, (iii) interobserver agreement and (iv) intraobserver agreement. The results of the quantitative assessment correlated well (r 2 = 0.92) with the subjective Tabar patterns classified by the radiologist (correctly classified 83% of digitized mammograms). The average kappa coefficient for the agreement between the readers was 0.63. This indicated moderate agreement between the three observers in classifying breast density using the quantitative assessment technique. The kappa coefficient of 0.75 for intraobserver agreement reflected good agreement between two sets of readings. The technique may be useful as a supplement to the radiologist's assessment in classifying mammograms into Tabar's pattern associated with breast cancer risk

  15. Improvements in the Quantitative Assessment of Cerebral Blood Volume and Flow with the Removal of Vessel Voxels from MR Perfusion Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Mu Huo Teng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To improve the quantitative assessment of cerebral blood volume (CBV and flow (CBF in the brain voxels from MR perfusion images. Materials and Methods. Normal brain parenchyma was automatically segmented with the time-to-peak criteria after cerebrospinal fluid removal and preliminary vessel voxel removal. Two scaling factors were calculated by comparing the relative CBV and CBF of the segmented normal brain parenchyma with the absolute values in the literature. Using the scaling factors, the relative values were converted to the absolute CBV and CBF. Voxels with either CBV > 8 mL/100 g or CBF > 100 mL/100 g/min were characterized as vessel voxels and were excluded from the quantitative measurements. Results. The segmented brain parenchyma with normal perfusion was consistent with the angiographic findings for each patient. We confirmed the necessity of dual thresholds including CBF and CBV for proper removal of vessel voxels. The scaling factors were 0.208 ± 0.041 for CBV, and 0.168 ± 0.037, 0.172 ± 0.037 for CBF calculated using standard and circulant singular value decomposition techniques, respectively. Conclusion. The automatic scaling and vessel removal techniques provide an alternative method for obtaining improved quantitative assessment of CBV and CBF in patients with thromboembolic cerebral arterial disease.

  16. Preliminary Assessment of the Possible BWR Core/Vessel Damage States for Fukushima Daiichi Station Blackout Scenarios Using RELAP/SCDAPSIM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Allison

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Immediately after the accident at Fukushima Daiichi, Innovative Systems Software and other members of the international SCDAP Development and Training Program started an assessment of the possible core/vessel damage states of the Fukushima Daiichi Units 1–3. The assessment included a brief review of relevant severe accident experiments and a series of detailed calculations using RELAP/SCDAPSIM. The calculations used a detailed RELAP/SCDAPSIM model of the Laguna Verde BWR vessel and related reactor cooling systems. The Laguna Verde models were provided by the Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias, the Mexican nuclear regulatory authority. The initial assessment was originally presented to the International Atomic Energy Agency on March 21 to support their emergency response team and later to our Japanese members to support their Fukushima Daiichi specific analysis and model development.

  17. Axial length and cone density as assessed with adaptive optics in myopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supriya Dabir

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To assess the variations in cone mosaic in myopia and its correlation with axial length (AL. Subjects and Methods: Twenty-five healthy myopic volunteers underwent assessment of photoreceptors using adaptive optics retinal camera at 2° and 3° from the foveal center in four quadrants superior, inferior, temporal and nasal. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 17 (IBM. Multivariable regression analysis was conducted to study the relation between cone density and AL, quadrant around the fovea and eccentricity from the fovea. Results: The mean cone density was significantly lower as the eccentricity increased from 2° from the fovea to 3° (18,560 ± 5455-16,404 ± 4494/mm 2 respectively. There was also a statistically significant difference between four quadrants around the fovea. The correlation of cone density and spacing with AL showed that there was a significant inverse relation of AL with the cone density. Conclusion: In myopic patients with good visual acuity cone density around the fovea depends on the quadrant, distance from the fovea as well as the AL. The strength of the relation of AL with cone density depends on the quadrant and distance.

  18. Final report on the reactor pressure vessel pressurized-thermal-shock. International comparative assessment study (RPV PTS ICAS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sievers, J.; Schulz, H.; Bass, R.; Pugh, C.

    1999-10-01

    A summary of the recently completed International Comparative Assessment Study of Pressurized-Thermal-Shock in Reactor Pressure Vessels (RPV PTS ICAS) is presented here to record the results in actual and comparative fashions. Within the DFM task, where account was taken of material properties and boundary conditions, reasonable agreement was obtained in linear-elastic and elastic-plastic analysis results. Linear elastic analyses and J-estimation schemes were shown to provide conservative estimates of peak crack driving force when compared with those obtained using complex three-dimensional (3D) finite element analyses. Predictions of RT NDT generally showed less scatter than that observed in crack driving force calculations due to the fracture toughness curve used for fracture assessment in the transition temperature region. Observed scatter in some analytical results could be traced mainly to a misinterpretation of the thermal expansion coefficient data given for the cladding and base metal. Also, differences in some results could be due to a quality assurance problem related to procedures for approximating the loading data given in the Problem Statement. For the PFM task, linear-elastic solutions were again shown to be conservative with respect to elastic-plastic solutions (by a factor of 2 to 4). Scatter in solutions obtained using the same computer code was generally attributable to differences in input parameters, e.g. standard deviations for the initial value of RT NDT , as well as for nickel and copper content. In the THM task, while there was a high degree of scatter during the early part of the transient, reasonable agreement in results was obtained during the latter part of the transient. Generally, the scatter was due to differences in analytical approaches used by participants, which included correlation-based engineering methods, system codes and three-dimensional computational fluids dynamics codes. Some of the models used to simulate condensation

  19. Assessment and management of ageing of major nuclear power plant components important to safety: PWR pressure vessels. 2007 update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-06-01

    At present, there are over four hundred operational nuclear power plants (NPPs) in IAEA Member States. Operating experience has shown that effective control of the ageing degradation of the major NPP components (e.g. caused by unanticipated phenomena and by operating, maintenance or manufacturing errors) is one of the most important issues for plant safety and also plant life. Ageing in these NPPs must be therefore effectively managed to ensure the availability of design functions throughout the plant service life. From the safety perspective, this means controlling within acceptable limits the ageing degradation and wear-out of plant components important to safety so that adequate safety margins remain, i.e. integrity and functional capability in excess of normal operating requirements. IAEA-TECDOC-1120 documented ageing assessment and management practices for pressurized water reactor (PWR) reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) that were current at the time of its finalization in 1997-1998. Safety significant operating events have occurred since the finalization of the TECDOC, e.g. primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) of Alloy 600 control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) penetrations and boric acid corrosion/wastage of RPV heads, which threatened the integrity of the RPV heads. These events led to new ageing management actions by both NPP operators and regulators. Therefore it was recognized that IAEA-TECDOC-1120 should be updated by incorporating those new events and their countermeasures. The objective of this report is to update IAEA-TECDOC-1120 in order to provide current ageing management guidance for PWR RPVs to all involved in the operation and regulation of PWRs and thus to help ensure PWR RPV integrity in IAEA Member States throughout their entire service life

  20. Comparing Visually Assessed BI-RADS Breast Density and Automated Volumetric Breast Density Software: A Cross-Sectional Study in a Breast Cancer Screening Setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Waal, Daniëlle; den Heeten, Gerard J.; Pijnappel, Ruud M.; Schuur, Klaas H.; Timmers, Johanna M. H.; Verbeek, André L. M.; Broeders, Mireille J. M.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to compare different methods for measuring breast density, both visual assessments and automated volumetric density, in a breast cancer screening setting. These measures could potentially be implemented in future screening programmes, in the context of personalised

  1. Comparing Visually Assessed BI-RADS Breast Density and Automated Volumetric Breast Density Software: A Cross-Sectional Study in a Breast Cancer Screening Setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waal, D. van der; Heeten, GJ. den; Pijnappel, R.M.; Schuur, K.H.; Timmers, J.M.; Verbeek, A.L.; Broeders, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The objective of this study is to compare different methods for measuring breast density, both visual assessments and automated volumetric density, in a breast cancer screening setting. These measures could potentially be implemented in future screening programmes, in the context of

  2. Comparing Visually Assessed BI-RADS Breast Density and Automated Volumetric Breast Density Software : A Cross-Sectional Study in a Breast Cancer Screening Setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Waal, Danielle; den Heeten, Gerard J.; Pijnappel, Ruud M.; Schuur, Klaas H.; Timmers, Johanna M. H.; Verbeek, Andre L. M.; Broeders, Mireille J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The objective of this study is to compare different methods for measuring breast density, both visual assessments and automated volumetric density, in a breast cancer screening setting. These measures could potentially be implemented in future screening programmes, in the context of

  3. Automated breast tissue density assessment using high order regional texture descriptors in mammography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Yan Nei; Lieng, Monica Keiko; Li, Jingmei; Khoo, David Aik-Aun

    2014-03-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer and second leading cause of cancer death among women in the US. The relative survival rate is lower among women with a more advanced stage at diagnosis. Early detection through screening is vital. Mammography is the most widely used and only proven screening method for reliably and effectively detecting abnormal breast tissues. In particular, mammographic density is one of the strongest breast cancer risk factors, after age and gender, and can be used to assess the future risk of disease before individuals become symptomatic. A reliable method for automatic density assessment would be beneficial and could assist radiologists in the evaluation of mammograms. To address this problem, we propose a density classification method which uses statistical features from different parts of the breast. Our method is composed of three parts: breast region identification, feature extraction and building ensemble classifiers for density assessment. It explores the potential of the features extracted from second and higher order statistical information for mammographic density classification. We further investigate the registration of bilateral pairs and time-series of mammograms. The experimental results on 322 mammograms demonstrate that (1) a classifier using features from dense regions has higher discriminative power than a classifier using only features from the whole breast region; (2) these high-order features can be effectively combined to boost the classification accuracy; (3) a classifier using these statistical features from dense regions achieves 75% accuracy, which is a significant improvement from 70% accuracy obtained by the existing approaches.

  4. LANL Robotic Vessel Scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webber, Nels W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-25

    Los Alamos National Laboratory in J-1 DARHT Operations Group uses 6ft spherical vessels to contain hazardous materials produced in a hydrodynamic experiment. These contaminated vessels must be analyzed by means of a worker entering the vessel to locate, measure, and document every penetration mark on the vessel. If the worker can be replaced by a highly automated robotic system with a high precision scanner, it will eliminate the risks to the worker and provide management with an accurate 3D model of the vessel presenting the existing damage with the flexibility to manipulate the model for better and more in-depth assessment.The project was successful in meeting the primary goal of installing an automated system which scanned a 6ft vessel with an elapsed time of 45 minutes. This robotic system reduces the total time for the original scope of work by 75 minutes and results in excellent data accumulation and transmission to the 3D model imaging program.

  5. Assessment of Nucleation Site Density Models for CFD Simulations of Subcooled Flow Boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoang, N. H.; Chu, I. C.; Euh, D. J.; Song, C. H.

    2015-01-01

    of the nucleation site density to the computation of the near wall heat transfer in the subcooled flow boiling, the evaluation of existing correlations of the nucleation site density are interested in this study. This assessment is carried out with published databases available in the literature. A CFD simulation of the DEBORA test using different models of the nucleation site density is then presented. The nucleation site density does not depend simply on only the wall superheat or cavity size. The surface conditions have a significant influence on the formation of the nucleation site density

  6. Assessment of the integral code ASTEC with respect to the late in-vessel phase of core degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Alessandro, Christophe; Starflinger, Joerg

    2014-01-01

    The integral code ASTEC is being developed jointly by GRS and IRSN as the European reference code for severe accidents. In the EU project CESAM it is foreseen to assess the capabilities of ASTEC to deal with a broad range of reactor designs (PWR, BWR, VVER, CANDU, Gen III+, etc.) and especially to model and capture the effect of severe accident mitigation measures. This requires a physically sound and sufficiently accurate modelling of the processes and phenomena that govern the course of the accident, and the modelling has to be validated to a sufficient extent. Concentrating on the in-vessel aspects of severe accidents, the present paper addresses these requirements by presenting results of ASTEC calculations for relevant experiments that cover the major physical phenomena during core degradation (melting and relocation of the fuel, oxidation, molten corium pool formation and its coolability in the lower plenum once it slumped from the core region). The assessment of models for bundle degradation is based on CORA (13 and W2). CORA represented a bundle of non-irradiated, electrically heated UO 2 -rods. Melt progression in strongly degraded geometry is addressed in the PHEBUS-FTP4 experiment carried out with irradiated fuel in debris bed configuration. The validation of molten pool modelling is based on BALI and RASPLAV-Salt experiments. The BALI-facility consists of a full-scale slice of lower plenum (allowing experiments at prototypical Rayleigh numbers) and utilizes uniformly heated water as simulant for corium. The RASPLAV experiments use a scaled-down slice of the lower head. Use of non-eutectic molten salt as simulant should address the effect of a significant solidification range typical for real corium. Calculation results of ASTEC are discussed in comparison with experimental measurements. Further, questions concerning the extrapolation of findings from validation to reactor application are critically discussed, concerning e.g. choice of model parameters

  7. Assessment and Management of ageing of major nuclear power plant components important to safety: PWR pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-10-01

    At present, there are over four hundred operational nuclear power plants (NPPs) in IAEA Member States. Operating experience has shown that ineffective control of the ageing degradation of the major NPP components (e.g., caused by unanticipated phenomena and by operating, maintenance or manufacturing errors) can jeopardize plant safety and also plant life. Ageing in these NPPs must be therefore effectively managed to ensure the availability of design functions throughout the plant service life. From the safety perspective, this means controlling within acceptable limits the ageing degradation and wear-out of plant components important to safety so that adequate safety margins remain, i.e. integrity and functional capability in excess of normal operating requirements. This TECDOC is one in a series of reports on the assessment and management of ageing of the major NPP components important to safety. The reports are based on experience and practices of NPP operators, regulators, designers, manufacturers and technical support organizations and a widely accepted Methodology for the Management of Ageing of NPP Components Important to Safety which was issued by the IAEA in 1992. The current practices for the assessment of safety margins (fitness-for-service) and the inspection, monitoring and mitigation of ageing degradation of selected components of Canada deuterium-uranium (CANDU) reactors, boiling water reactors (BWRs), pressurized water reactors (PWRs), including water moderated, water cooled energy reactors (WWERs) are documented in the reports. These practices are intended to help all involved directly and indirectly in ensuring the safe operation of NPPs; and also to provide a common technical basis for dialogue between plant operators and regulators when dealing with age related licensing issues. Since the reports are written from a safety perspective, they do not address life or life-cycle management of the plant components, which involves the integration of

  8. Assessment and management of ageing of major nuclear power plant components important to safety: BWR pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-10-01

    At present, there are over four hundred operational nuclear power plants (NPPs) in IAEA Member States. Operating experience has shown that ineffective control of the ageing degradation of the major NPP components (caused for instance by unanticipated phenomena and by operating, maintenance or manufacturing errors) can jeopardize plant safety and also plant life. Ageing in these NPPs must be therefore effectively managed to ensure the availability of design functions throughout the plant service life. From the safety perspective, this means controlling, within acceptable limits, the ageing degradation and wear out of plant components important to safety so that adequate safety margins remain, i.e. integrity and functional capability in excess of normal operating requirements. This TECDOC is one in a series of reports on the assessment and management of ageing of the major NPP components important to safety. The reports are based on experience and practices of NPP operators, regulators, designers, manufacturers and technical support organizations and a widely accepted Methodology for the Management of Ageing of NPP Components Important to Safety, which was issued by the IAEA in 1992. Since the reports are written from a safety perspective, they do not address life or life cycle management of plant components, which involves economic considerations. The current practices for the assessment of safety margins (fitness for service) and the inspection, monitoring and mitigation of ageing degradation of selected components of Canada deuterium-uranium (CANDU) reactors, boiling water reactors (BWRs), pressurized water reactors (PWRs), and water moderated, water cooled energy reactors (WWERs) are documented in the reports. These practices are intended to help all involved directly and indirectly in ensuring the safe operation of NPPs, and also to provide a common technical basis for dialogue between plant operators and regulators when dealing with age related licensing issues

  9. Influence of bone mineral density measurement on fracture risk assessment tool® scores in postmenopausal Indian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daswani, Bhavna; Desai, Meena; Mitra, Sumegha; Gavali, Shubhangi; Patil, Anushree; Kukreja, Subhash; Khatkhatay, M Ikram

    2016-03-01

    Fracture risk assessment tool® calculations can be performed with or without addition of bone mineral density; however, the impact of this addition on fracture risk assessment tool® scores has not been studied in Indian women. Given the limited availability and high cost of bone mineral density testing in India, it is important to know the influence of bone mineral density on fracture risk assessment tool® scores in Indian women. Therefore, our aim was to assess the contribution of bone mineral density in fracture risk assessment tool® outcome in Indian women. Apparently healthy postmenopausal Indian women (n = 506), aged 40-72 years, without clinical risk factors for bone disease, were retrospectively selected, and their fracture risk assessment tool® scores calculated with and without bone mineral density were compared. Based on WHO criteria, 30% women were osteoporotic, 42.9% were osteopenic and 27.1% had normal bone mineral density. Fracture risk assessment tool® scores for risk of both major osteoporotic fracture and hip fracture significantly increased on including bone mineral density (P women eligible without bone mineral density was 0 and with bone mineral density was 1, P > 0.05, whereas, for hip fracture risk number of women eligible without bone mineral density was 2 and with bone mineral density was 17, P Indian women. © The Author(s) 2016.

  10. Bilateral mammographic density asymmetry and breast cancer risk: A preliminary assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Bin; Sumkin, Jules H.; Zuley, Margarita L.; Wang, Xingwei; Klym, Amy H.; Gur, David

    2012-01-01

    To improve efficacy of breast cancer screening and prevention programs, it requires a risk assessment model with high discriminatory power. This study aimed to assess classification performance of using computed bilateral mammographic density asymmetry to predict risk of individual women developing breast cancer in near-term. The database includes 451 cases with multiple screening mammography examinations. The first (baseline) examinations of all case were interpreted negative. In the next sequential examinations, 187 cases developed cancer or surgically excised high-risk lesions, 155 remained negative (not-recalled), and 109 were recalled benign cases. From each of two bilateral cranio-caudal view images acquired from the baseline examination, we computed two features of average pixel value and local pixel value fluctuation. We then computed mean and difference of each feature computed from two images. When applying the computed features and other two risk factors (woman's age and subjectively rated mammographic density) to predict risk of cancer development, areas under receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC) were computed to evaluate the discriminatory/classification performance. The AUCs are 0.633 ± 0.030, 0.535 ± 0.036, 0.567 ± 0.031, and 0.719 ± 0.027 when using woman's age, subjectively rated, computed mean and asymmetry of mammographic density, to classify between two groups of cancer-verified and negative cases, respectively. When using an equal-weighted fusion method to combine woman's age and computed density asymmetry, AUC increased to 0.761 ± 0.025 (p < 0.05). The study demonstrated that bilateral mammographic density asymmetry could be a significantly stronger risk factor associated to the risk of women developing breast cancer in near-term than woman's age and assessed mean mammographic density.

  11. Bilateral mammographic density asymmetry and breast cancer risk: A preliminary assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Bin, E-mail: zhengb@upmc.edu [Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh, 3362 Fifth Ave, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Sumkin, Jules H., E-mail: jsumkin@mail.magee.edu [Department of Radiology, Magee Womens Hospital, 300 Halket Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Zuley, Margarita L., E-mail: zuleyml@upmc.edu [Department of Radiology, Magee Womens Hospital, 300 Halket Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Wang, Xingwei, E-mail: wangx6@upmc.edu [Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh, 3362 Fifth Ave, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Klym, Amy H., E-mail: klymah@upmc.edu [Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh, 3362 Fifth Ave, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Gur, David, E-mail: gurd@upmc.edu [Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh, 3362 Fifth Ave, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

    2012-11-15

    To improve efficacy of breast cancer screening and prevention programs, it requires a risk assessment model with high discriminatory power. This study aimed to assess classification performance of using computed bilateral mammographic density asymmetry to predict risk of individual women developing breast cancer in near-term. The database includes 451 cases with multiple screening mammography examinations. The first (baseline) examinations of all case were interpreted negative. In the next sequential examinations, 187 cases developed cancer or surgically excised high-risk lesions, 155 remained negative (not-recalled), and 109 were recalled benign cases. From each of two bilateral cranio-caudal view images acquired from the baseline examination, we computed two features of average pixel value and local pixel value fluctuation. We then computed mean and difference of each feature computed from two images. When applying the computed features and other two risk factors (woman's age and subjectively rated mammographic density) to predict risk of cancer development, areas under receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC) were computed to evaluate the discriminatory/classification performance. The AUCs are 0.633 {+-} 0.030, 0.535 {+-} 0.036, 0.567 {+-} 0.031, and 0.719 {+-} 0.027 when using woman's age, subjectively rated, computed mean and asymmetry of mammographic density, to classify between two groups of cancer-verified and negative cases, respectively. When using an equal-weighted fusion method to combine woman's age and computed density asymmetry, AUC increased to 0.761 {+-} 0.025 (p < 0.05). The study demonstrated that bilateral mammographic density asymmetry could be a significantly stronger risk factor associated to the risk of women developing breast cancer in near-term than woman's age and assessed mean mammographic density.

  12. Accuracy, precision, and economic efficiency for three methods of thrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) population density assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Andrew M; Parrella, Michael P

    2011-08-01

    Western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), is a major horticultural pest and an important vector of plant viruses in many parts of the world. Methods for assessing thrips population density for pest management decision support are often inaccurate or imprecise due to thrips' positive thigmotaxis, small size, and naturally aggregated populations. Two established methods, flower tapping and an alcohol wash, were compared with a novel method, plant desiccation coupled with passive trapping, using accuracy, precision and economic efficiency as comparative variables. Observed accuracy was statistically similar and low (37.8-53.6%) for all three methods. Flower tapping was the least expensive method, in terms of person-hours, whereas the alcohol wash method was the most expensive. Precision, expressed by relative variation, depended on location within the greenhouse, location on greenhouse benches, and the sampling week, but it was generally highest for the flower tapping and desiccation methods. Economic efficiency, expressed by relative net precision, was highest for the flower tapping method and lowest for the alcohol wash method. Advantages and disadvantages are discussed for all three methods used. If relative density assessment methods such as these can all be assumed to accurately estimate a constant proportion of absolute density, then high precision becomes the methodological goal in terms of measuring insect population density, decision making for pest management, and pesticide efficacy assessments.

  13. Evaluation of creep-fatigue crack growth for large-scale FBR reactor vessel and NDE assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Young Sang; Kim, Jong Bum; Kim, Seok Hun; Yoo, Bong

    2001-03-01

    Creep fatigue crack growth contributes to the failure of FRB reactor vessels in high temperature condition. In the design stage of reactor vessel, crack growth evaluation is very important to ensure the structural safety and setup the in-service inspection strategy. In this study, creep-fatigue crack growth evaluation has been performed for the semi-elliptical surface cracks subjected to thermal loading. The thermal stress analysis of a large-scale FBR reactor vessel has been carried out for the load conditions. The distributions of axial, radial, hoop, and Von Mises stresses were obtained for the loading conditions. At the maximum point of the axial and hoop stress, the longitudinal and circumferential surface cracks (i.e. PTS crack, NDE short crack and shallow long crack) were postulated. Using the maximum and minimum values of stresses, the creep-fatigue crack growth of the proposed cracks was simulated. The crack growth rate of circumferential cracks becomes greater than that of longitudinal cracks. The total crack growth of the largest PTS crack is very small after 427 cycles. The structural integrity of a large-scale reactor can be maintained for the plant life. The crack depth growth of the shallow long crack is faster than that of the NDE short crack. In the ISI of the large-scale FBR reactor vessel, the ultrasonic inspection is beneficial to detect the shallow circumferential cracks.

  14. Analytical and computational methodology to assess the over pressures generated by a potential catastrophic failure of a cryogenic pressure vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamora, I.; Fradera, J.; Jaskiewicz, F.; Lopez, D.; Hermosa, B.; Aleman, A.; Izquierdo, J.; Buskop, J.

    2014-07-01

    Idom has participated in the risk evaluation of Safety Important Class (SIC) structures due to over pressures generated by a catastrophic failure of a cryogenic pressure vessel at ITER plant site. The evaluation implements both analytical and computational methodologies achieving consistent and robust results. (Author)

  15. Analytical and computational methodology to assess the over pressures generated by a potential catastrophic failure of a cryogenic pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamora, I.; Fradera, J.; Jaskiewicz, F.; Lopez, D.; Hermosa, B.; Aleman, A.; Izquierdo, J.; Buskop, J.

    2014-01-01

    Idom has participated in the risk evaluation of Safety Important Class (SIC) structures due to over pressures generated by a catastrophic failure of a cryogenic pressure vessel at ITER plant site. The evaluation implements both analytical and computational methodologies achieving consistent and robust results. (Author)

  16. Containment vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zbirohowski-Koscia, K.F.; Roberts, A.C.

    1980-01-01

    A concrete containment vessel for nuclear reactors is disclosed that is spherical and that has prestressing tendons disposed in first, second and third sets, the tendons of each set being all substantially concentric and centred around a respective one of the three orthogonal axes of the sphere; the tendons of the first set being anchored at each end at a first anchor rib running around a circumference of the vessel, the tendons of the second set being anchored at each end at a second anchor rib running around a circumference of the sphere and disposed at 90 0 to the first rib, and the tendons of the third set being anchored some to the first rib and the remainder to the second rib. (author)

  17. Improving snow density estimation for mapping SWE with Lidar snow depth: assessment of uncertainty in modeled density and field sampling strategies in NASA SnowEx

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raleigh, M. S.; Smyth, E.; Small, E. E.

    2017-12-01

    The spatial distribution of snow water equivalent (SWE) is not sufficiently monitored with either remotely sensed or ground-based observations for water resources management. Recent applications of airborne Lidar have yielded basin-wide mapping of SWE when combined with a snow density model. However, in the absence of snow density observations, the uncertainty in these SWE maps is dominated by uncertainty in modeled snow density rather than in Lidar measurement of snow depth. Available observations tend to have a bias in physiographic regime (e.g., flat open areas) and are often insufficient in number to support testing of models across a range of conditions. Thus, there is a need for targeted sampling strategies and controlled model experiments to understand where and why different snow density models diverge. This will enable identification of robust model structures that represent dominant processes controlling snow densification, in support of basin-scale estimation of SWE with remotely-sensed snow depth datasets. The NASA SnowEx mission is a unique opportunity to evaluate sampling strategies of snow density and to quantify and reduce uncertainty in modeled snow density. In this presentation, we present initial field data analyses and modeling results over the Colorado SnowEx domain in the 2016-2017 winter campaign. We detail a framework for spatially mapping the uncertainty in snowpack density, as represented across multiple models. Leveraging the modular SUMMA model, we construct a series of physically-based models to assess systematically the importance of specific process representations to snow density estimates. We will show how models and snow pit observations characterize snow density variations with forest cover in the SnowEx domains. Finally, we will use the spatial maps of density uncertainty to evaluate the selected locations of snow pits, thereby assessing the adequacy of the sampling strategy for targeting uncertainty in modeled snow density.

  18. LORETA current source density for duration mismatch negativity and neuropsychological assessment in early schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiro Miyanishi

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Patients with schizophrenia elicit cognitive decline from the early phase of the illness. Mismatch negativity (MMN has been shown to be associated with cognitive function. We investigated the current source density of duration mismatch negativity (dMMN, by using low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (LORETA, and neuropsychological performance in subjects with early schizophrenia. METHODS: Data were obtained from 20 patients meeting DSM-IV criteria for schizophrenia or schizophreniform disorder, and 20 healthy control (HC subjects. An auditory odd-ball paradigm was used to measure dMMN. Neuropsychological performance was evaluated by the brief assessment of cognition in schizophrenia Japanese version (BACS-J. RESULTS: Patients showed smaller dMMN amplitudes than those in the HC subjects. LORETA current density for dMMN was significantly lower in patients compared to HC subjects, especially in the temporal lobes. dMMN current density in the frontal lobe was positively correlated with working memory performance in patients. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study to identify brain regions showing smaller dMMN current density in early schizophrenia. Further, poor working memory was associated with decreased dMMN current density in patients. These results are likely to help understand the neural basis for cognitive impairment of schizophrenia.

  19. Association of Aortic Compliance and Brachial Endothelial Function with Cerebral Small Vessel Disease in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients: Assessment with High-Resolution MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Shan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess the possible association of aortic compliance and brachial endothelial function with cerebral small vessel disease in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2 patients by using 3.0 T high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging. Methods. Sixty-two clinically confirmed DM2 patients (25 women and 37 men; mean age: 56.8±7.5 years were prospectively enrolled for noninvasive MR examinations of the aorta, brachial artery, and brain. Aortic arch pulse wave velocity (PWV, flow-mediated dilation (FMD of brachial artery, lacunar brain infarcts, and periventricular and deep white matter hyperintensities (WMHs were assessed. Pearson and Spearman correlation analysis were performed to analyze the association between PWV and FMD with clinical data and biochemical test results. Univariable logistic regression analyses were used to analyze the association between PWV and FMD with cerebral small vessel disease. Multiple logistic regression analyses were used to find out the independent predictive factors of cerebral small vessel disease. Results. Mean PWV was 6.73±2.00 m/s and FMD was 16.67±9.11%. After adjustment for compounding factors, PWV was found significantly associated with lacunar brain infarcts (OR = 2.00; 95% CI: 1.14–3.2; P<0.05 and FMD was significantly associated with periventricular WMHs (OR = 0.82; 95% CI: 0.71–0.95; P<0.05. Conclusions. Quantitative evaluation of aortic compliance and endothelial function by using high-resolution MRI may be potentially useful to stratify DM2 patients with risk of cerebral small vessel disease.

  20. Licensing experiences, risk assessment, demonstration test on nuclear fuel packages and design criteria for sea going vessel carrying spent fuel in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, S.; Ikeda, K.

    1978-01-01

    In Japan spent fuels from nuclear power plants shall be shipped to reprocessing plants by sea-going vessels. Atomic Energy Committee has initiated a board of experts to implement the assessment of environmental safety for sea transport. As a part of the assessment a study has been conducted by Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry under sponsorship of Nuclear Safety Bureau, which is intended to guarantee the safety of sea transport. Nuclear Safety Bureau also has a program to carry out a long term demonstration test on spent fuel package using full scale package models. The test consists of drop, heat transfer, fire, collapse under high external pressure, immersion, shielding and subcritical test. The purpose of this test is to obtain the public acceptance and also to verify the adequacy of the safety analysis for nuclear fuel packages. In order to secure the safety of sea transport, the Ministry of Transportation has provided for the design criteria for sea-going vessel in the case of full load shipping, which aims to make minimum the probability of sinking at collision, grounding and other unforeseen accidents on the sea and also to retain the radiation exposure to crews as low as possible. The design criteria consists of the following items: (1) structural strength of vessel, (2) collision protective structure, (3) arrangement of holds, (4) stability after damage, (5) grounding protective structure, (6) cooling system, (7) tie-down equipment, (8) radiation inspection apparatus, (9) decontamination facilities, (10) emergency water flooding equipment for ship fire, (11) emergency electric sources, etc. Based on the design criteria a sea-going vessel names HINOURA-MARU has been reconstructed to transport spent fuel packages from nuclear power stations to the reprocessing plant

  1. Protein single-model quality assessment by feature-based probability density functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Renzhi; Cheng, Jianlin

    2016-04-04

    Protein quality assessment (QA) has played an important role in protein structure prediction. We developed a novel single-model quality assessment method-Qprob. Qprob calculates the absolute error for each protein feature value against the true quality scores (i.e. GDT-TS scores) of protein structural models, and uses them to estimate its probability density distribution for quality assessment. Qprob has been blindly tested on the 11th Critical Assessment of Techniques for Protein Structure Prediction (CASP11) as MULTICOM-NOVEL server. The official CASP result shows that Qprob ranks as one of the top single-model QA methods. In addition, Qprob makes contributions to our protein tertiary structure predictor MULTICOM, which is officially ranked 3rd out of 143 predictors. The good performance shows that Qprob is good at assessing the quality of models of hard targets. These results demonstrate that this new probability density distribution based method is effective for protein single-model quality assessment and is useful for protein structure prediction. The webserver of Qprob is available at: http://calla.rnet.missouri.edu/qprob/. The software is now freely available in the web server of Qprob.

  2. Development and application of surrogate model for assessment of ex-vessel debris bed dryout probability - 15157

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakush, S.E.; Lubchenko, N.T.; Kudinov, P.

    2015-01-01

    In this work we consider a water-cooled power reactor severe accident scenario with pressure vessel failure and subsequent release of molten corium. A surrogate model for prediction of dryout heat flux for ex-vessels debris beds of different shapes is developed. Functional form of dryout heat flux dependence on problem parameters is developed by the analysis of coolability problem in non-dimensional variables. It is shown that for a flat debris bed the dryout heat flux can be represented in terms of three 1-dimensional functions for which approximating formulas are found. For two-dimensional debris beds (cylindrical, conical, Gaussian heap, mound-shaped), an additional function taking into account the bed shape geometry is obtained from numerical simulations using DECOSIM code as a full model. With the surrogate model in hand, risk analysis of debris bed coolability is carried out by Monte Carlo sampling of the input parameters within selected ranges, with assumed distribution functions

  3. Cruise ship environmental hygiene and the risk of norovirus infection outbreaks: an objective assessment of 56 vessels over 3 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carling, Philip C; Bruno-Murtha, Lou Ann; Griffiths, Jeffrey K

    2009-11-01

    Norovirus infection outbreaks (NoVOs) occur frequently in closed populations, such as cruise ship passengers. Environmental contamination is believed to play an important role in NoVO propagation. Trained health care professionals covertly evaluated the thoroughness of disinfection cleaning (TDC) of 6 standardized objects (toilet seat, flush handle or button, toilet stall inner handhold, stall inner door handle, restroom inner door handle, and baby changing table surfaces) with high potential for fecal contamination in cruise ship public restrooms, by means of a previously validated novel targeting method. Fifty-six cruise ships (approximately 30% of 180 vessels operated by 9 large cruise lines) were evaluated from July 2005 through August 2008. Overall, 37% (range, 4%-100%; 95% confidence interval, 29.2%-45.4%) of 8344 objects in 273 randomly selected public restrooms were cleaned daily. The TDC did not differ by cruise line and did not correlate with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Vessel Sanitation Program inspection scores (r(2), .002; P = .75). More than half the vessels had overall TDC scores ships had near-perfect CDC sanitation scores. The mean TDC of the 3 ships evaluated within 4 months before a NoVO (10.3%) was substantially less than the mean TDC of the 40 ships that did not experience NoVOs (40.4%) (P ships found that only 37% of selected toilet area objects were cleaned on a daily basis. Low TDC scores may predict subsequent NoVO-prone vessels. Enhanced public restroom cleaning may prevent or moderate NoVOs on cruise ships.

  4. Long-lasting ergot lipids as new biomarkers for assessing the presence of cereals and cereal products in archaeological vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucejko, Jeannette J; La Nasa, Jacopo; Porta, Francesca; Vanzetti, Alessandro; Tanda, Giuseppa; Mangiaracina, Claudio Filippo; Corretti, Alessandro; Colombini, Maria Perla; Ribechini, Erika

    2018-03-02

    Cereals were very important in ancient diets, however evidence from archaeological sites of the vessels used for processing or storing cereals is comparatively rare. Micro-organisms, as well as chemical-physical effects can easily degrade cereals during the burial period. This can lead to a complete cereal decay and to serious difficulties in estimating the intensity of use of the cereals by ancient populations. Here, we present a novel biomarker approach entailing the detection of secondary lipid metabolites produced by ergot fungi (genus Claviceps), which are common cereal pests. The aim was to identify the original presence of Gramineae and to indirectly establish if vessels were used for cereal storage/processing. The fatty acid and TAG-estolide profiles of the remains from more than 30 archaeological vessels were investigated by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and high performance liquid chromatography/high resolution mass spectrometry (HPLC/ESI-Q-ToF). The detection of lipids derived from ergot in archaeological and historic contexts rests on its complex chemistry, providing a unique and relatively recalcitrant chemical signature for cereals. This research demonstrated that the combination of our innovative biomarker approach along with environmental and archaeological evidence can provide unprecedented insights into the incidence of cereals and related processing activities in ancient societies.

  5. Immunohistochemical Assessment of Mast Cells and Small Blood Vessels in Dentigerous Cyst, Odontogenic Keratocyst, and Periapical Cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouhsoltani, Maryam; Moradzadeh Khiavi, Monir; Jamali, Golshan; Farnia, Samira

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to verify the density of mast cells (MCs) and microvessels in odontogenic cysts. Furthermore, the correlation between MCs and microvessels was evaluated to assess the contribution of MCs to angiogenesis and growth of odontogenic cysts. This approach may be a basis for the development of future pharmaceuticals addressed to MCs performance to manage odontogenic cysts. To our knowledge, no study investigating the correlation between MCs and microvessels has been performed to date. 60 cases of odontogenic cysts consisting of 20 radicular cysts (RCs), 20 odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs) and 20 dentigerous cysts (DCs) were included in this study. Five high power fields in superficial connective tissue and five high power fields in deep connective tissue were counted for each sample. Moreover, a total mean of ten fields was calculated. RC showed the highest mean numbers of MCs and microvessels (pcysts contained more MCs and microvessels compared to the deeper zones. A statistically significant correlation between the numbers of MCs and microvessels was not observed (r=0.00, p=0.49). Although the number of MCs was not significantly associated with microvessels, these cells may be related to the growth of odontogenic lesions, particularly RCs. Further studies on the in vivo functions of MCs will make the concept more clear.

  6. DEMARCATE: Density-based magnetic resonance image clustering for assessing tumor heterogeneity in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Abhijoy; Banerjee, Sayantan; Kurtek, Sebastian; Narang, Shivali; Lee, Joonsang; Rao, Ganesh; Martinez, Juan; Bharath, Karthik; Rao, Arvind U K; Baladandayuthapani, Veerabhadran

    2016-01-01

    Tumor heterogeneity is a crucial area of cancer research wherein inter- and intra-tumor differences are investigated to assess and monitor disease development and progression, especially in cancer. The proliferation of imaging and linked genomic data has enabled us to evaluate tumor heterogeneity on multiple levels. In this work, we examine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with brain cancer to assess image-based tumor heterogeneity. Standard approaches to this problem use scalar summary measures (e.g., intensity-based histogram statistics) that do not adequately capture the complete and finer scale information in the voxel-level data. In this paper, we introduce a novel technique, DEMARCATE (DEnsity-based MAgnetic Resonance image Clustering for Assessing Tumor hEterogeneity) to explore the entire tumor heterogeneity density profiles (THDPs) obtained from the full tumor voxel space. THDPs are smoothed representations of the probability density function of the tumor images. We develop tools for analyzing such objects under the Fisher-Rao Riemannian framework that allows us to construct metrics for THDP comparisons across patients, which can be used in conjunction with standard clustering approaches. Our analyses of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) based Glioblastoma dataset reveal two significant clusters of patients with marked differences in tumor morphology, genomic characteristics and prognostic clinical outcomes. In addition, we see enrichment of image-based clusters with known molecular subtypes of glioblastoma multiforme, which further validates our representation of tumor heterogeneity and subsequent clustering techniques.

  7. Assessment of peripheral vessels and of the lymphatic system by means of gamma-camera scintiscan (gamma-scintigraphy of the whole body)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ennis, J T

    1981-01-01

    For diagnosing pathologies of the peripheric vessels or of the lymphatic system, albumin aggregates marked with sup(99m) technetium (MAA) or antimonocolloids were used. The radionuclide venography is useful in diagnosing thrombosis, venous insufficiency, and permits a high degree of accuracy, comparable with that of phlebography. In the most cases the radionuclide lymphoscintigraphy is required for the diagnosis of lymphoedema and allows by distribution analysis an adequate morphological representation of the lymphatic ducts and glands. Contrary to lymphography, lymphoscintigraphy presents a completely physiological radionuclide transport and does not cause any reactive lymphatic node hyperplasia by contrast media. Increased capillary perfusion is found in collateral vessel formation in cases of arterial obstruction and ischaemic ulcus, whereas hypoperfusion is seen in obstructions of the larger arteries having no collateral vessels, and in bad circulatory states. Particularly in diabetics with microangiopathy, a peripheral distribution with hyperfusion of the skon presents itself as piece-meal necrosis. The importance and relevance of the perfusion scans of the extremities for the diagnostic assessment within the field of resection surgery is explained.

  8. Pressure vessel integrity 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhandari, S.; Doney, R.O.; McDonald, M.S.; Jones, D.P.; Wilson, W.K.; Pennell, W.E.

    1991-01-01

    This volume contains papers relating to the structural integrity assessment of pressure vessels and piping, with special emphasis on nuclear industry applications. The papers were prepared for technical sessions developed under the sponsorship of the ASME Pressure Vessels and Piping Division Committees for Codes and Standards, Computer Technology, Design and Analysis, and Materials Fabrication. They were presented at the 1991 Pressure Vessels and Piping Division Conference in San Diego, California, June 23-27. The primary objective of the sponsoring organization is to provide a forum for the dissemination and discussion of information on development and application of technology for the structural integrity assessment of pressure vessels and piping. This publication includes contributions from authors from Australia, France, Japan, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and the United States. The papers here are organized in six sections, each with a particular emphasis as indicated in the following section titles: Fracture Technology Status and Application Experience; Crack Initiation, Propagation and Arrest; Ductile Tearing; Constraint, Stress State, and Local-Brittle-Zones Effects; Computational Techniques for Fracture and Corrosion Fatigue; and Codes and Standards for Fatigue, Fracture and Erosion/Corrosion

  9. Comparing Visually Assessed BI-RADS Breast Density and Automated Volumetric Breast Density Software: A Cross-Sectional Study in a Breast Cancer Screening Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Waal, Daniëlle; den Heeten, Gerard J; Pijnappel, Ruud M; Schuur, Klaas H; Timmers, Johanna M H; Verbeek, André L M; Broeders, Mireille J M

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to compare different methods for measuring breast density, both visual assessments and automated volumetric density, in a breast cancer screening setting. These measures could potentially be implemented in future screening programmes, in the context of personalised screening or screening evaluation. Digital mammographic exams (N = 992) of women participating in the Dutch breast cancer screening programme (age 50-75y) in 2013 were included. Breast density was measured in three different ways: BI-RADS density (5th edition) and with two commercially available automated software programs (Quantra and Volpara volumetric density). BI-RADS density (ordinal scale) was assessed by three radiologists. Quantra (v1.3) and Volpara (v1.5.0) provide continuous estimates. Different comparison methods were used, including Bland-Altman plots and correlation coefficients (e.g., intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC]). Based on the BI-RADS classification, 40.8% of the women had 'heterogeneously or extremely dense' breasts. The median volumetric percent density was 12.1% (IQR: 9.6-16.5) for Quantra, which was higher than the Volpara estimate (median 6.6%, IQR: 4.4-10.9). The mean difference between Quantra and Volpara was 5.19% (95% CI: 5.04-5.34) (ICC: 0.64). There was a clear increase in volumetric percent dense volume as BI-RADS density increased. The highest accuracy for predicting the presence of BI-RADS c+d (heterogeneously or extremely dense) was observed with a cut-off value of 8.0% for Volpara and 13.8% for Quantra. Although there was no perfect agreement, there appeared to be a strong association between all three measures. Both volumetric density measures seem to be usable in breast cancer screening programmes, provided that the required data flow can be realized.

  10. Airspace Dimension Assessment with nanoparticles reflects lung density as quantified by MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsson, Jonas K; Löndahl, Jakob; Olsson, Lars E; Diaz, Sandra; Zackrisson, Sophia; Wollmer, Per

    2018-01-01

    Background Airspace Dimension Assessment with inhaled nanoparticles is a novel method to determine distal airway morphology. This is the first empirical study using Airspace Dimension Assessment with nanoparticles (AiDA) to estimate distal airspace radius. The technology is relatively simple and potentially accessible in clinical outpatient settings. Method Nineteen never-smoking volunteers performed nanoparticle inhalation tests at multiple breath-hold times, and the difference in nanoparticle concentration of inhaled and exhaled gas was measured. An exponential decay curve was fitted to the concentration of recovered nanoparticles, and airspace dimensions were assessed from the half-life of the decay. Pulmonary tissue density was measured using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Results The distal airspace radius measured by AiDA correlated with lung tissue density as measured by MRI (ρ = −0.584; p = 0.0086). The linear intercept of the logarithm of the exponential decay curve correlated with forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) (ρ = 0.549; p = 0.0149). Conclusion The AiDA method shows potential to be developed into a tool to assess conditions involving changes in distal airways, eg, emphysema. The intercept may reflect airway properties; this finding should be further investigated.

  11. Gait analysis, bone and muscle density assessment for patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedikt Magnússon

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Total hip arthroplasty (THA is performed with or without the use of bone cement. Facing the lack of reliable clinical guidelines on decision making whether a patient should receive THA with or without bone cement, a joint clinical and engineering approach is proposed here with the objective to assess patient recovery developing monitoring techniques based on gait analysis, measurements of bone mineral density and structural and functional changes of quadriceps muscles. A clinical trial was conducted with 36 volunteer patients that were undergoing THA surgery for the first time: 18 receiving cemented implant and 18 receiving non-cemented implant. The patients are scanned with Computer Tomographic (CT modality prior-, immediately- and 12 months post-surgery. The CT data are further processed to segment muscles and bones for calculating bone mineral density (BMD. Quadriceps muscle density Hounsfield (HU based value is calculated from the segmented file on healthy and operated leg before and after THA surgery. Furthermore clinical assessment is performed using gait analysis technologies such as a sensing carpet, wireless electrodes and video. Patients undergo these measurements prior-, 6 weeks post - and 52 weeks post-surgery. The preliminary results indicate computational tools and methods that are able to quantitatively analyze patient’s condition pre and post-surgery: The spatial parameters such as step length and stride length increase 6 weeks post op in the patient group receiving cemented implant while the angle in the toe in/out parameter decrease in both patient groups.

  12. Semi-automatic assessment of skin capillary density: proof of principle and validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronenschild, E H B M; Muris, D M J; Schram, M T; Karaca, U; Stehouwer, C D A; Houben, A J H M

    2013-11-01

    Skin capillary density and recruitment have been proven to be relevant measures of microvascular function. Unfortunately, the assessment of skin capillary density from movie files is very time-consuming, since this is done manually. This impedes the use of this technique in large-scale studies. We aimed to develop a (semi-) automated assessment of skin capillary density. CapiAna (Capillary Analysis) is a newly developed semi-automatic image analysis application. The technique involves four steps: 1) movement correction, 2) selection of the frame range and positioning of the region of interest (ROI), 3) automatic detection of capillaries, and 4) manual correction of detected capillaries. To gain insight into the performance of the technique, skin capillary density was measured in twenty participants (ten women; mean age 56.2 [42-72] years). To investigate the agreement between CapiAna and the classic manual counting procedure, we used weighted Deming regression and Bland-Altman analyses. In addition, intra- and inter-observer coefficients of variation (CVs), and differences in analysis time were assessed. We found a good agreement between CapiAna and the classic manual method, with a Pearson's correlation coefficient (r) of 0.95 (Pdifferences between the two methods, with an intercept of the Deming regression of 1.75 (-6.04; 9.54), while the Bland-Altman analysis showed a mean difference (bias) of 2.0 (-13.5; 18.4) capillaries/mm(2). The intra- and inter-observer CVs of CapiAna were 2.5% and 5.6% respectively, while for the classic manual counting procedure these were 3.2% and 7.2%, respectively. Finally, the analysis time for CapiAna ranged between 25 and 35min versus 80 and 95min for the manual counting procedure. We have developed a semi-automatic image analysis application (CapiAna) for the assessment of skin capillary density, which agrees well with the classic manual counting procedure, is time-saving, and has a better reproducibility as compared to the

  13. Methodology for the analytical assessment of defects of detected in pressure vessels during the in-service inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Marrero, Leonel

    1996-01-01

    This work analyses the principal phenomena that can give rise to breakage during the service of the vessels of component owing to a degradation of the structure of the materials that cause or provoke cracking and which are the result of effort and fatigue and corrosion. Also appear the most frequent places in which cracking occurs, and its characteristics. Furthermore, an analysis is made of the different factors-metallurgical and mechanical-which influence on the temperature of transition as well as some criteria to evaluate the fragile behaviour

  14. Applying Multi-Class Support Vector Machines for performance assessment of shipping operations: The case of tanker vessels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagoropoulos, Aris; Møller, Anders H.; McAloone, Tim C.

    2017-01-01

    of feature selection algorithms. Afterwards, a model based on Multi- Class Support Vector Machines (SVM) was constructed and the efficacy of the approach is shown through the application of a test set. The results demonstrate the importance and benefits of machine learning algorithms in driving energy....... Identifying the potential of behavioural savings can be challenging, due to the inherent difficulty in analysing the data and operationalizing energy efficiency within the dynamic operating environment of the vessels. This article proposes a supervised learning model for identifying the presence of energy...

  15. T1 weighted brain images at 7 Tesla unbiased for Proton Density, T2* contrast and RF coil receive B1 sensitivity with simultaneous vessel visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Moortele, Pierre-François; Auerbach, Edwards J; Olman, Cheryl; Yacoub, Essa; Uğurbil, Kâmil; Moeller, Steen

    2009-06-01

    At high magnetic field, MR images exhibit large, undesirable signal intensity variations commonly referred to as "intensity field bias". Such inhomogeneities mostly originate from heterogeneous RF coil B(1) profiles and, with no appropriate correction, are further pronounced when utilizing rooted sum of square reconstruction with receive coil arrays. These artifacts can significantly alter whole brain high resolution T(1)-weighted (T(1)w) images that are extensively utilized for clinical diagnosis, for gray/white matter segmentation as well as for coregistration with functional time series. In T(1) weighted 3D-MPRAGE sequences, it is possible to preserve a bulk amount of T(1) contrast through space by using adiabatic inversion RF pulses that are insensitive to transmit B(1) variations above a minimum threshold. However, large intensity variations persist in the images, which are significantly more difficult to address at very high field where RF coil B(1) profiles become more heterogeneous. Another characteristic of T(1)w MPRAGE sequences is their intrinsic sensitivity to Proton Density and T(2)(*) contrast, which cannot be removed with post-processing algorithms utilized to correct for receive coil sensitivity. In this paper, we demonstrate a simple technique capable of producing normalized, high resolution T(1)w 3D-MPRAGE images that are devoid of receive coil sensitivity, Proton Density and T(2)(*) contrast. These images, which are suitable for routinely obtaining whole brain tissue segmentation at 7 T, provide higher T(1) contrast specificity than standard MPRAGE acquisitions. Our results show that removing the Proton Density component can help in identifying small brain structures and that T(2)(*) induced artifacts can be removed from the images. The resulting unbiased T(1)w images can also be used to generate Maximum Intensity Projection angiograms, without additional data acquisition, that are inherently registered with T(1)w structural images. In addition

  16. T1 weighted Brain Images at 7 Tesla Unbiased for Proton Density, T2* contrast and RF Coil Receive B1 Sensitivity with Simultaneous Vessel Visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Moortele, Pierre-François; Auerbach, Edwards J.; Olman, Cheryl; Yacoub, Essa; Uğurbil, Kâmil; Moeller, Steen

    2009-01-01

    At high magnetic field, MR images exhibit large, undesirable signal intensity variations commonly referred to as “intensity field bias”. Such inhomogeneities mostly originate from heterogeneous RF coil B1 profiles and, with no appropriate correction, are further pronounced when utilizing rooted sum of square reconstruction with receive coil arrays. These artifacts can significantly alter whole brain high resolution T1-weighted (T1w) images that are extensively utilized for clinical diagnosis, for gray/white matter segmentation as well as for coregistration with functional time series. In T1 weighted 3D-MPRAGE sequences, it is possible to preserve a bulk amount of T1 contrast through space by using adiabatic inversion RF pulses that are insensitive to transmit B1 variations above a minimum threshold. However, large intensity variations persist in the images, which are significantly more difficult to address at very high field where RF coil B1 profiles become more heterogeneous. Another characteristic of T1w MPRAGE sequences is their intrinsic sensitivity to Proton Density and T2* contrast, which cannot be removed with post-processing algorithms utilized to correct for receive coil sensitivity. In this paper, we demonstrate a simple technique capable of producing normalized, high resolution T1w 3D-MPRAGE images that are devoid of receive coil sensitivity, Proton Density and T2* contrast. These images, which are suitable for routinely obtaining whole brain tissue segmentation at 7 Tesla, provide higher T1 contrast specificity than standard MPRAGE acquisitions. Our results show that removing the Proton Density component can help identifying small brain structures and that T2* induced artifacts can be removed from the images. The resulting unbiased T1w images can also be used to generate Maximum Intensity Projection angiograms, without additional data acquisition, that are inherently registered with T1w structural images. In addition, we introduce a simple technique

  17. Tumor Vessel Compression Hinders Perfusion of Ultrasonographic Contrast Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirco Galiè

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS is an advanced approach to in vivo assessment of tumor vascularity and is being increasingly adopted in clinical oncology. It is based on 1- to 10 μm-sized gas microbubbles, which can cross the capillary beds of the lungs and are effective echo enhancers. It is known that high cell density, high transendothelial fluid exchange, and poorly functioning lymphatic circulation all provoke solid stress, which compresses vessels and drastically reduces tumor blood flow. Given their size, we supposed that the perfusion of microbubbles is affected by anatomic features of tumor vessels more than are contrast agents traditionally used in dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI. Here, we compared dynamic information obtained from CEUS and DCE-MRI on two experimental tumor models exhibiting notable differences in vessel anatomy. We found that tumors with small, flattened vessels show a much higher resistance to microbubble perfusion than to MRI contrast agents, and appear scarcely vascularized at CEUS examination, despite vessel volume adequate for normal function. Thus, whereas CEUS alone could induce incorrect diagnosis when tumors have small or collapsed vessels, integrated analysis using CEUS and DCE-MRI allows in vivo identification of tumors with a vascular profile frequently associated with malignant phenotypes.

  18. Tumor Vessel Compression Hinders Perfusion of Ultrasonographic Contrast Agents1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galiè, Mirco; D'Onofrio, Mirko; Montani, Maura; Amici, Augusto; Calderan, Laura; Marzola, Pasquina; Benati, Donatella; Merigo, Flavia; Marchini, Cristina; Sbarbati, Andrea

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) is an advanced approach to in vivo assessment of tumor vascularity and is being increasingly adopted in clinical oncology. It is based on 1- to 10 µm-sized gas microbubbles, which can cross the capillary beds of the lungs and are effective echo enhancers. It is known that high cell density, high transendothelial fluid exchange, and poorly functioning lymphatic circulation all provoke solid stress, which compresses vessels and drastically reduces tumor blood flow. Given their size, we supposed that the perfusion of microbubbles is affected by anatomic features of tumor vessels more than are contrast agents traditionally used in dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). Here, we compared dynamic information obtained from CEUS and DCE-MRI on two experimental tumor models exhibiting notable differences in vessel anatomy. We found that tumors with small, flattened vessels show a much higher resistance to microbubble perfusion than to MRI contrast agents, and appear scarcely vascularized at CEUS examination, despite vessel volume adequate for normal function. Thus, whereas CEUS alone could induce incorrect diagnosis when tumors have small or collapsed vessels, integrated analysis using CEUS and DCE-MRI allows in vivo identification of tumors with a vascular profile frequently associated with malignant phenotypes. PMID:15967105

  19. Power probability density function control and performance assessment of a nuclear research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abharian, Amir Esmaeili; Fadaei, Amir Hosein

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • In this paper, the performance assessment of static PDF control system is discussed. • The reactor PDF model is set up based on the B-spline functions. • Acquaints of Nu, and Th-h. equations solve concurrently by reformed Hansen’s method. • A principle of performance assessment is put forward for the PDF of the NR control. - Abstract: One of the main issues in controlling a system is to keep track of the conditions of the system function. The performance condition of the system should be inspected continuously, to keep the system in reliable working condition. In this study, the nuclear reactor is considered as a complicated system and a principle of performance assessment is used for analyzing the performance of the power probability density function (PDF) of the nuclear research reactor control. First, the model of the power PDF is set up, then the controller is designed to make the power PDF for tracing the given shape, that make the reactor to be a closed-loop system. The operating data of the closed-loop reactor are used to assess the control performance with the performance assessment criteria. The modeling, controller design and the performance assessment of the power PDF are all applied to the control of Tehran Research Reactor (TRR) power in a nuclear process. In this paper, the performance assessment of the static PDF control system is discussed, the efficacy and efficiency of the proposed method are investigated, and finally its reliability is proven

  20. A complete life cycle assessment of high density polyethylene plastic bottle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treenate, P.; Limphitakphong, N.; Chavalparit, O.

    2017-07-01

    This study was aimed to determine environmental performances of a lubricant oil bottle made from high density polyethylene and to develop potential measures for reducing its impacts. A complete life cycle assessment was carried out to understand a whole effect on the environment from acquiring, processing, using, and disposing the product. Two scenarios of disposal phase; recycle and incineration: were examined to quantify a lesser degree on environmental impact. The results illustrated that major impacts of the two scenarios were at the same categories with the highest contributor of raw material acquisition and pre-processing. However, all impacts in case of recycling provided a lower point than that in case of incineration, except mineral extraction. Finally, feasible measures for reducing the environmental impact of high density polyethylene plastic bottle were proposed in accordance with 3Rs concept.

  1. Assessment of bone density in patients with scoliosis neuromuscular secondary to cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charbel Jacob Júnior

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate bone mineral density in patients with neuromuscular scoliosis secondary to spastic quadriplegic cerebral palsy. METHODS: A prospective descriptive study in which, in addition to bone densitometry, the anthropometric data of the patients were assessed. As inclusion criterion we adopted patients with spastic quadriplegic cerebral palsy, wheelchair users, aged between 10 and 20 years and with neuromuscular scoliosis. RESULTS: We evaluated 31 patients, 20 female, whose average age was 14.2 years. The mean bone density was -3.2 standard deviation (Z-score, with mean biceps circumference of 19.4 cm, calf circumference 18.6 cm and BMI of 13.6 kg/m². CONCLUSION: There is a high incidence of osteoporosis in patients with neuromuscular scoliosis secondary to spastic quadriplegic cerebral palsy.

  2. Isobaric-Isothermal Molecular Dynamics Utilizing Density Functional Theory: An Assessment of the Structure and Density of Water at Near-Ambient Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, J.; VandeVondele, J.; Kuo, I.W.; Sebastiani, D.; Siepmann, J.I.; Hutter, J.; Mundy, C.J.

    2009-01-01

    We present herein a comprehensive density functional theory study toward assessing the accuracy of two popular gradient-corrected exchange correlation functionals on the structure and density of liquid water at near ambient conditions in the isobaric-isothermal ensemble. Our results indicate that both PBE and BLYP functionals under predict the density and over structure the liquid. Adding the dispersion correction due to Grimme(1, 2) improves the predicted densities for both BLYP and PBE in a significant manner. Moreover, the addition of the dispersion correction for BLYP yields an oxygen-oxygen radial distribution function in excellent agreement with experiment. Thus, we conclude that one can obtain a very satisfactory model for water using BLYP and a correction for dispersion.

  3. Extrapolating cetacean densities to quantitatively assess human impacts on populations in the high seas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannocci, Laura; Roberts, Jason J; Miller, David L; Halpin, Patrick N

    2017-06-01

    As human activities expand beyond national jurisdictions to the high seas, there is an increasing need to consider anthropogenic impacts to species inhabiting these waters. The current scarcity of scientific observations of cetaceans in the high seas impedes the assessment of population-level impacts of these activities. We developed plausible density estimates to facilitate a quantitative assessment of anthropogenic impacts on cetacean populations in these waters. Our study region extended from a well-surveyed region within the U.S. Exclusive Economic Zone into a large region of the western North Atlantic sparsely surveyed for cetaceans. We modeled densities of 15 cetacean taxa with available line transect survey data and habitat covariates and extrapolated predictions to sparsely surveyed regions. We formulated models to reduce the extent of extrapolation beyond covariate ranges, and constrained them to model simple and generalizable relationships. To evaluate confidence in the predictions, we mapped where predictions were made outside sampled covariate ranges, examined alternate models, and compared predicted densities with maps of sightings from sources that could not be integrated into our models. Confidence levels in model results depended on the taxon and geographic area and highlighted the need for additional surveying in environmentally distinct areas. With application of necessary caution, our density estimates can inform management needs in the high seas, such as the quantification of potential cetacean interactions with military training exercises, shipping, fisheries, and deep-sea mining and be used to delineate areas of special biological significance in international waters. Our approach is generally applicable to other marine taxa and geographic regions for which management will be implemented but data are sparse. © 2016 The Authors. Conservation Biology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Society for Conservation Biology.

  4. Automated classification and quantitative analysis of arterial and venous vessels in fundus images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Minhaj; Son, Taeyoon; Toslak, Devrim; Lim, Jennifer I.; Yao, Xincheng

    2018-02-01

    It is known that retinopathies may affect arteries and veins differently. Therefore, reliable differentiation of arteries and veins is essential for computer-aided analysis of fundus images. The purpose of this study is to validate one automated method for robust classification of arteries and veins (A-V) in digital fundus images. We combine optical density ratio (ODR) analysis and blood vessel tracking algorithm to classify arteries and veins. A matched filtering method is used to enhance retinal blood vessels. Bottom hat filtering and global thresholding are used to segment the vessel and skeleton individual blood vessels. The vessel tracking algorithm is used to locate the optic disk and to identify source nodes of blood vessels in optic disk area. Each node can be identified as vein or artery using ODR information. Using the source nodes as starting point, the whole vessel trace is then tracked and classified as vein or artery using vessel curvature and angle information. 50 color fundus images from diabetic retinopathy patients were used to test the algorithm. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy metrics were measured to assess the validity of the proposed classification method compared to ground truths created by two independent observers. The algorithm demonstrated 97.52% accuracy in identifying blood vessels as vein or artery. A quantitative analysis upon A-V classification showed that average A-V ratio of width for NPDR subjects with hypertension decreased significantly (43.13%).

  5. Brief report: The Brief Alcohol Social Density Assessment (BASDA): convergent, criterion-related, and incremental validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKillop, James; Acker, John D; Bollinger, Jared; Clifton, Allan; Miller, Joshua D; Campbell, W Keith; Goodie, Adam S

    2013-09-01

    Alcohol misuse is substantially influenced by social factors, but systematic assessments of social network drinking are typically lengthy. The goal of the present study was to provide further validation of a brief measure of social network alcohol use, the Brief Alcohol Social Density Assessment (BASDA), in a sample of emerging adults. Specifically, the study sought to examine the BASDA's convergent, criterion, and incremental validity in relation to well-established measures of drinking motives and problematic drinking. Participants were 354 undergraduates who were assessed using the BASDA, the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT), and the Drinking Motives Questionnaire. Significant associations were observed between the BASDA index of alcohol-related social density and alcohol misuse, social motives, and conformity motives, supporting convergent validity. Criterion-related validity was supported by evidence that significantly greater alcohol involvement was present in the social networks of individuals scoring at or above an AUDIT score of 8, a validated criterion for hazardous drinking. Finally, the BASDA index was significantly associated with alcohol misuse above and beyond drinking motives in relation to AUDIT scores, supporting incremental validity. Taken together, these findings provide further support for the BASDA as an efficient measure of drinking in an individual's social network. Methodological considerations as well as recommendations for future investigations in this area are discussed.

  6. White matter microstructural damage in small vessel disease is associated with Montreal cognitive assessment but not with mini mental state examination performances: vascular mild cognitive impairment Tuscany study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasi, Marco; Salvadori, Emilia; Poggesi, Anna; Ciolli, Laura; Del Bene, Alessandra; Marini, Sandro; Nannucci, Serena; Pescini, Francesca; Valenti, Raffaella; Ginestroni, Andrea; Toschi, Nicola; Diciotti, Stefano; Mascalchi, Mario; Inzitari, Domenico; Pantoni, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) has been proposed as a screening tool in vascular cognitive impairment. Diffusion tensor imaging is sensitive to white matter microstructural damage. We investigated if diffusion tensor imaging-derived indices are more strongly associated with performances on MoCA or on the widely used mini mental state examination in patients with mild cognitive impairment and small vessel disease. Mild cognitive impairment patients with moderate/severe degrees of white matter hyperintensities on MRI were enrolled. Lacunar infarcts, cortical atrophy, medial temporal lobe atrophy and median values of mean diffusivity and fractional anisotropy of the cerebral white matter were studied and correlated with cognitive tests performances. Seventy-six patients (mean age 75.1±6.8 years, mean years of education 8.0±4.3) were assessed. In univariate analyses, a significant association of both MoCA and mini mental state examination scores with age, education, cortical atrophy, and medial temporal lobe atrophy was found, whereas mean diffusivity and fractional anisotropy were associated with MoCA. In partial correlation analyses, adjusting for all demographic and neuroimaging variables, both mean diffusivity and fractional anisotropy were associated only with MoCA (mean diffusivity: r= -0.275, P=0.023; fractional anisotropy: r=0.246, P=0.043). In patients with mild cognitive impairment and small vessel disease, diffusion tensor imaging-measured white matter microstructural damage is more related to MoCA than mini mental state examination performances. MoCA is suited for the cognitive screening of patients with small vessel disease. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van de Velde, J.; Fabry, A.; Van Walle, E.; Chaoudi, R

    1998-07-01

    SCK-CEN's R and D programme on Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) Steels in performed in support of the RVP integrity assessment. Its main objectives are: (1) to develop enhanced surveillance concepts by applying micromechanics and fracture-toughness tests to small specimens, and by performing damage modelling and microstructure characterization; (2) to demonstrate the applied methodology on a broad database; (3) to achieve regulatory acceptance and industrial use. Progress and achievements in 1999 are reported.

  8. Data description and quality assessment of ionospheric electron density profiles for ARPA modeling project. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conkright, R.O.

    1977-03-01

    This report presents a description of the automated method used to produce electron density (N(h)) profiles from ionograms recorded on 35mm film and an assessment of the resulting data base. A large data base of about 30,000 profiles was required for an ionospheric modeling project. This motivated a search for an automated method of producing profiles. The automated method used is fully described, the resulting data are given a quality grade, and the noon and midnight profiles are presented. Selected portions of this data base are compared with profiles produced by the standard profiling method in use by the Environmental Data Service at Boulder, Colorado

  9. AUTOMATED ASSESSMENT OF EPIDERMAL THICKNESS AND VASCULAR DENSITY OF PORT WINE STAINS OCT IMAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHENGMING WANG

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Optical coherence tomography (OCT enables in vivo imaging of port wine stains (PWS lesions. The knowledge of vascular structure and epidermal thickness (ET of PWS may aid the objective diagnosis and optimal treatment. To obtain the structural parameters more rapidly and avoid user intervention, an automated algorithm of energy map is introduced based on intensity and edge information to extract the skin surface using dynamic programming method. Subsequently, an averaged A-scan analysis is performed to obtain the mean ET and the relative intensity of dermis indicating the corresponding vascular density. This approach is currently successfully applied in clinical diagnosis and shows promising guidance and assessment of PDT treatment.

  10. Fully automated bone mineral density assessment from low-dose chest CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuang; Gonzalez, Jessica; Zulueta, Javier; de-Torres, Juan P.; Yankelevitz, David F.; Henschke, Claudia I.; Reeves, Anthony P.

    2018-02-01

    A fully automated system is presented for bone mineral density (BMD) assessment from low-dose chest CT (LDCT). BMD assessment is central in the diagnosis and follow-up therapy monitoring of osteoporosis, which is characterized by low bone density and is estimated to affect 12.3 million US population aged 50 years or older, creating tremendous social and economic burdens. BMD assessment from DXA scans (BMDDXA) is currently the most widely used and gold standard technique for the diagnosis of osteoporosis and bone fracture risk estimation. With the recent large-scale implementation of annual lung cancer screening using LDCT, great potential emerges for the concurrent opportunistic osteoporosis screening. In the presented BMDCT assessment system, each vertebral body is first segmented and labeled with its anatomical name. Various 3D region of interest (ROI) inside the vertebral body are then explored for BMDCT measurements at different vertebral levels. The system was validated using 76 pairs of DXA and LDCT scans of the same subject. Average BMDDXA of L1-L4 was used as the reference standard. Statistically significant (p-value correlation is obtained between BMDDXA and BMDCT at all vertebral levels (T1 - L2). A Pearson correlation of 0.857 was achieved between BMDDXA and average BMDCT of T9-T11 by using a 3D ROI taking into account of both trabecular and cortical bone tissue. These encouraging results demonstrate the feasibility of fully automated quantitative BMD assessment and the potential of opportunistic osteoporosis screening with concurrent lung cancer screening using LDCT.

  11. Uncertainty and Sensitivity of Alternative Rn-222 Flux Density Models Used in Performance Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greg J. Shott, Vefa Yucel, Lloyd Desotell

    2007-06-01

    Performance assessments for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site on the Nevada Test Site have used three different mathematical models to estimate Rn-222 flux density. This study describes the performance, uncertainty, and sensitivity of the three models which include the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory Guide 3.64 analytical method and two numerical methods. The uncertainty of each model was determined by Monte Carlo simulation using Latin hypercube sampling. The global sensitivity was investigated using Morris one-at-time screening method, sample-based correlation and regression methods, the variance-based extended Fourier amplitude sensitivity test, and Sobol's sensitivity indices. The models were found to produce similar estimates of the mean and median flux density, but to have different uncertainties and sensitivities. When the Rn-222 effective diffusion coefficient was estimated using five different published predictive models, the radon flux density models were found to be most sensitive to the effective diffusion coefficient model selected, the emanation coefficient, and the radionuclide inventory. Using a site-specific measured effective diffusion coefficient significantly reduced the output uncertainty. When a site-specific effective-diffusion coefficient was used, the models were most sensitive to the emanation coefficient and the radionuclide inventory.

  12. Uncertainty and Sensitivity of Alternative Rn-222 Flux Density Models Used in Performance Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greg J. Shott, Vefa Yucel, Lloyd Desotell Non-Nstec Authors: G. Pyles and Jon Carilli

    2007-01-01

    Performance assessments for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site on the Nevada Test Site have used three different mathematical models to estimate Rn-222 flux density. This study describes the performance, uncertainty, and sensitivity of the three models which include the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory Guide 3.64 analytical method and two numerical methods. The uncertainty of each model was determined by Monte Carlo simulation using Latin hypercube sampling. The global sensitivity was investigated using Morris one-at-time screening method, sample-based correlation and regression methods, the variance-based extended Fourier amplitude sensitivity test, and Sobol's sensitivity indices. The models were found to produce similar estimates of the mean and median flux density, but to have different uncertainties and sensitivities. When the Rn-222 effective diffusion coefficient was estimated using five different published predictive models, the radon flux density models were found to be most sensitive to the effective diffusion coefficient model selected, the emanation coefficient, and the radionuclide inventory. Using a site-specific measured effective diffusion coefficient significantly reduced the output uncertainty. When a site-specific effective-diffusion coefficient was used, the models were most sensitive to the emanation coefficient and the radionuclide inventory

  13. Vessel noise pollution as a human threat to fish: assessment of the stress response in gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata, Linnaeus 1758).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celi, Monica; Filiciotto, Francesco; Maricchiolo, Giulia; Genovese, Lucrezia; Quinci, Enza Maria; Maccarrone, Vincenzo; Mazzola, Salvatore; Vazzana, Mirella; Buscaino, Giuseppa

    2016-04-01

    This study examined the effects of boat noise pollution on the stress indices of gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata, Linnaeus 1758). To assess the stress response in these fish, biometric values and plasma parameters such as ACTH, cortisol, glucose, lactate, haematocrit, Hsp70, total protein, cholesterol, triglycerides and osmolarity were analysed. After acclimatization of the animals, the experiment was carried out in a tank fitted with underwater speakers where the fish were exposed to sound treatments (in duplicate) consisting of: 10 days of no sound (control treatment; the animals were only exposed to the experimental tank's background noise) and 10 days of noise derived from original recordings of motor boats, including recreational boats, hydrofoil, fishing boat and ferry boat (vessel noise treatment). The exposure to noise produced significant variations in almost all the plasma parameters assessed, but no differences were observed in weights and fork lengths. A PERMANOVA analysis highlighted significantly increased values (p < 0.05) of ACTH, cortisol, glucose, lactate, haematocrit, Hsp70, cholesterol, triglycerides and osmolarity in the fish exposed to vessel noise for 10 days. This study clearly highlights that anthropogenic noise negatively affects fish, and they are valuable targets for detailed investigations into the effects of this global pollutant. Finally, these experimental studies could represent part of the science that is able to improve the quality of the policies related to management plans for maritime spaces (Marine Strategy Framework Directive 56/2008 CE) that are aimed at stemming this pollutant phenomenon.

  14. Comparative assessment of cyclic J-R curve determination by different methods in a pressure vessel steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chowdhury, Tamshuk, E-mail: tamshuk@gmail.com [Deep Sea Technologies, National Institute of Ocean Technology, Chennai, 600100 (India); Sivaprasad, S.; Bar, H.N.; Tarafder, S. [Fatigue & Fracture Group, Materials Science and Technology Division, CSIR-National Metallurgical Laboratory, Jamshedpur, 831007 (India); Bandyopadhyay, N.R. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Engineering, Science and Technology, Shibpur, Howrah, 711103 (India)

    2016-04-15

    Cyclic J-R behaviour of a reactor pressure vessel steel using different methods available in literature has been examined to identify the best suitable method for cyclic fracture problems. Crack opening point was determined by moving average method. The η factor was experimentally determined for cyclic loading conditions and found to be similar to that of ASTM value. Analyses showed that adopting a procedure analogous to the ASTM standard for monotonic fracture is reasonable for cyclic fracture problems, and makes the comparison to monotonic fracture results straightforward. - Highlights: • Different methods of cyclic J-R evaluation compared. • A moving average method for closure point proposed. • η factor for cyclic J experimentally validated. • Method 1 is easier, provides a lower bound and direct comparison to monotonic fracture.

  15. Assessment of the bone mineral density in the lumbar vertebrae of newborns by quantitative computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braillon, P.M.; Lapillonne, A.; Ho, P.S.; Bouvier, R.; Bochu, M.; Salle, B.L.

    1996-01-01

    Objective. To assess the true mineral density (BMD, in g/cm 3 ) of the lumbar spine in newborns. Design and patients. A post-mortem analysis of five infants with gestational ages ranging from 35 to 40 weeks, and birth weights from 2765 to 3200 g, was conducted using dual-energy quantitative computed tomography (QCT; Siemens Somatom DR). A 2 or 4 mm thick slice was obtained for each lumbar vertebra from L1 to L4. The density measured in these vertebrae was corrected by reference to a solid phantom (Osteo-CT) measured simultaneously. A three-dimensional image of the spine (Elscint CT Twin), as well as a photomicrograph of histological preparation from L2 vertebra, were also obtained in another term baby for comparison with the CT results. Results and conclusions. In the range of values studied, the vertebral densities were not dependent on birth weight. BMD values measured in L2, L3 and L4 were not significantly different, but were 10% lower than in L1 in four of five infants. The spatial resolution of the QCT protocol used (0.4 mm) did not permit the differentiation of trabecular and cortical bone, and the vertebral bodies appeared very homogeneous and dense, with a mean density value of 210±30 mg Ca/cm 3 , which is 2.5 times higher than the mean maximum value found in young normal adults. These preliminary results highlight the potential of QCT in neonatology. Special protocols will, however, need to be developed for in vivo measurements in this particular paediatric field. (orig.). With 4 figs., 2 tabs

  16. Assessment of Silt Density Index (SDI) as Fouling Propensity Parameter in Reverse Osmosis Desalination

    KAUST Repository

    Rachman, Rinaldi

    2011-07-01

    Reverse osmosis operations are facing persistent fouling phenomenon that has challenged the integrity of these processes. Prediction of fouling potential by measuring a fouling index toward feed water is essential to ensure robust operation. Moreover, employing a reliable fouling index with good reproducibility and precision is necessary. Silt density index (SDI) is considered insufficient in terms of reliability and empirical theory, among other limitations. Nevertheless due its simplicity, SDI measurement is utilized extensively in RO desalination systems. The aim of this research is to assess the reliability of SDI. Methods include the investigation of different SDI membranes and study of the nature of the SDI filtration. Results demonstrate the existence of the membrane properties\\' variation within manufacturers, which then causes a lack of accuracy in fouling risk estimation. The nature of particles during SDI filtration provides information that particle concentration and size play a significant role on SDI quantification with substantial representation given by particles with size close to membrane nominal pore size. Moreover, turbidity assisted SDI measurements along with determination of UF pretreated and clean water fouling potential, establishes the indication of non-fouling related phenomena involved on SDI measurement such as a natural organic matter adsorption and hydrodynamic condition that alters during filtration. Additionally, it was found that the latter affects the sensitivity of SDI by being represented by some portions of SDI value. Keywords: Reverse Osmosis, Fouling index, Particulate Fouling, Silt Density Index (SDI), and Assessment of SDI.

  17. Vessel Operator System

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Operator cards are required for any operator of a charter/party boat and or a commercial vessel (including carrier and processor vessels) issued a vessel permit from...

  18. Integration of Density Dependence and Concentration Response Models Provides an Ecologically Relevant Assessment of Populations Exposed to Toxicants

    Science.gov (United States)

    The assessment of toxic exposure on wildlife populations involves the integration of organism level effects measured in toxicity tests (e.g., chronic life cycle) and population models. These modeling exercises typically ignore density dependence, primarily because information on ...

  19. Osteoporosis risk prediction for bone mineral density assessment of postmenopausal women using machine learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Tae Keun; Kim, Sung Kean; Kim, Deok Won; Choi, Joon Yul; Lee, Wan Hyung; Oh, Ein; Park, Eun-Cheol

    2013-11-01

    A number of clinical decision tools for osteoporosis risk assessment have been developed to select postmenopausal women for the measurement of bone mineral density. We developed and validated machine learning models with the aim of more accurately identifying the risk of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women compared to the ability of conventional clinical decision tools. We collected medical records from Korean postmenopausal women based on the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys. The training data set was used to construct models based on popular machine learning algorithms such as support vector machines (SVM), random forests, artificial neural networks (ANN), and logistic regression (LR) based on simple surveys. The machine learning models were compared to four conventional clinical decision tools: osteoporosis self-assessment tool (OST), osteoporosis risk assessment instrument (ORAI), simple calculated osteoporosis risk estimation (SCORE), and osteoporosis index of risk (OSIRIS). SVM had significantly better area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver operating characteristic than ANN, LR, OST, ORAI, SCORE, and OSIRIS for the training set. SVM predicted osteoporosis risk with an AUC of 0.827, accuracy of 76.7%, sensitivity of 77.8%, and specificity of 76.0% at total hip, femoral neck, or lumbar spine for the testing set. The significant factors selected by SVM were age, height, weight, body mass index, duration of menopause, duration of breast feeding, estrogen therapy, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, osteoarthritis, and diabetes mellitus. Considering various predictors associated with low bone density, the machine learning methods may be effective tools for identifying postmenopausal women at high risk for osteoporosis.

  20. Assessment of Workers' Exposure to Grain Dust and Bioaerosols During the Loading of Vessels' Hold: An Example at a Port in the Province of Québec.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand, Geneviève; Gardette, Marie; Nguyen, Kiet; Amano, Valérie; Neesham-Grenon, Eve; Debia, Maximilien

    2017-08-01

    Longshoremen are exposed to large amounts of grain dust while loading of grain into the holds of vessels. Grain dust inhalation has been linked to respiratory diseases such as chronic bronchitis, hypersensitivity, pneumonitis, and toxic pneumonitis. Our objective was to characterize the exposure of longshoremen to inhalable and total dust, endotoxins, and cultivable bacteria and fungi during the loading of grain in a vessel's hold at the Port of Montreal in order to assess the potential health risks. Sampling campaigns were conducted during the loading of two different types of grain (wheat and corn). Environmental samples of microorganisms (bacteria, fungus, and actinomycetes) were taken near the top opening of the ship's holds while personal breathing zone measurements of dust and endotoxins were sampled during the worker's 5-hour shifts. Our study show that all measurements are above the recommendations with concentration going up to 390 mg m-3 of total dust, 89 mg m-3 of inhalable fraction, 550 000 EU m-3 of endotoxins, 20 000 CFU m-3 of bacteria, 61 000 CFU m-3 of fungus and 2500 CFU m-3 of actinomycetes. In conclusion, longshoremen are exposed to very high levels of dust and of microorganisms and their components during grain loading work. Protective equipment needs to be enforced for all workers during such tasks in order to reduce their exposure. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Occupational Hygiene Society.

  1. Time-resolved assessment of collateral flow using 4D CT angiography in large-vessel occlusion stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froelich, Andreas M.J.; Wolff, Sarah Lena; Psychogios, Marios N.; Schramm, Ramona; Knauth, Michael; Schramm, Peter; Klotz, Ernst; Wasser, Katrin

    2014-01-01

    In acute stroke patients with large vessel occlusion, collateral blood flow affects tissue fate and patient outcome. The visibility of collaterals on computed tomography angiography (CTA) strongly depends on the acquisition phase, but the optimal time point for collateral imaging is unknown. We analysed collaterals in a time-resolved fashion using four-dimensional (4D) CTA in 82 endovascularly treated stroke patients, aiming to determine which acquisition phase best depicts collaterals and predicts outcome. Early, peak and late phases as well as temporally fused maximum intensity projections (tMIP) were graded using a semiquantitative regional leptomeningeal collateral score, compared with conventional single-phase CTA and correlated with functional outcome. The total extent of collateral flow was best visualised on tMIP. Collateral scores were significantly lower on early and peak phase as well as on single-phase CTA. Collateral grade was associated with favourable functional outcome and the strength of this relationship increased from earlier to later phases, with collaterals on tMIP showing the strongest correlation with outcome. Temporally fused tMIP images provide the best depiction of collateral flow. Our findings suggest that the total extent of collateral flow, rather than the velocity of collateral filling, best predicts clinical outcome. (orig.)

  2. Neutron fluence determination for operation effectiveness assessment and prediction of WWER pressure vessel lifetime at the Kozloduy NPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apostolov, T; Ilieva, K; Belousov, S; Petrova, T; Antonov, S; Ivanov, K; Prodanova, R; Penev, I; Taskaev, E [Bylgarska Akademiya na Naukite, Sofia (Bulgaria). Inst. za Yadrena Izsledvaniya i Yadrena Energetika; Ivanov, I; Tsokov, P; Nelov, N; Lilkov, B; Tsocheva, V; Monev, M; Velichkov, V; Kharalampieva, Ts [Kombinat Atomna Energetika, Kozloduj (Bulgaria)

    1996-12-31

    Embrittlement processes in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) metal have been investigated by neutron dosimetry. A software package for fluence calculations has been developed and used for evaluation of the accumulated neutron fluence, the critical temperature of radiation embrittlement and the RPV lifetime. A digital reactivity meter DR-8 has been introduced for continuous neutron fluence monitoring. Estimates of the neutron fluence and the radiation state of all 6 units of the Kozloduy NPP are presented. The Unit 4 RPV is in the best state regarding metal embrittlement, while the Units 2 and 3 can be safely operated up to the end of their design lifetime only using dummy cassettes. The neutron fluence accumulation in the Unit 1 RPV is quite big and can not be reduced with annealing. Activity measurements of the Unit 1 internal wall shavings are made after the 14-th cycle which show a good agreement with calculated values (1.10{sup 5} Bq/g). The critical embrittlement temperature of the Units 1 - 4 is estimated as a function of the working cycles. 11 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Assessment of risk factors bone mineral density decrease in adolescents with dentoalveolar anomalies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. A. Kalinichenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to investigate the prevalence of osteopenia and its relationship with combined orthodontic and somatic disorders in adolescents to build a working model of the formation of osteopenia, identifying the most significant risk factors.Materials and methods. 525 grade 5–10 schoolchildren from Lugansk’ secondary schools and orphans school aged 12–17 years were examined. We assessed the state of dental hard tissues and periodontal tissues, the state of oral health, the prevalence of different types of dentoalveolar anomalies (DAA and chronic diseases of the gastrointestinal tract (CDGIT. Bone mineral density was assessed by ultrasound osteodensitometry (SONOST-2000. The level of mineralization of the skeleton was assessed by speed of sound (SOS, m/s, it depends on the degree of elasticity and density of the bone tissue. We analyzed the performance – Broadband Ultrasound Attenuation (BUA – broadband absorption, dB/MHz, it’s characterized by loss of the intensity of the ultrasound in the absorption medium, as well as the number, size and spatial orientation of the trabecular bone. The statistical processing of the obtained results was carried out with application program package Statistic 6.0.Results. During study the combined pathology as the dentoalveolar anomalies and chronic diseases of the gastrointestinal tract were identified in 68,4% of adolescents. Light form of osteopenia met in every third patient with combined pathology. Certain combinations of factors that have a negative effect to bone mineral density were discovered, and we have created the model of osteopenia in adolescents. Underweight is one of the leading factors in the osteopenia development, the highest incidence of osteopenia were in children who had weight deficit (69,5%, and children with a harmonic age loss of the weight and growth parameters (70,7%.Conclusion. Adolescents with DAA and chronic diseases of the gastrointestinal

  4. Assessment of the Density of Suppression to Identify Risk of Intractable Diplopia in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newsham, David; O'Connor, Anna R

    2016-06-01

    Occlusion used to treat amblyopia towards the end of the developmental component of the critical period gives a risk of inducing intractable diplopia. In the United Kingdom, the density of suppression is assessed via the Sbisa/Bagolini filter bar, but there is very little research evidence to guide clinical practice or interpretation of the tests used. The aims of this study were to determine current practice and estimate the incidence of intractable diplopia following amblyopia treatment. Current practice and incidence of intractable diplopia following amblyopia were determined via a questionnaire distributed to head orthoptists in every eye department in the United Kingdom. The questionnaire explored testing and test conditions, interpretation of the test results, and cases of intractable diplopia over the last 5 years. There was considerable variation in clinical practice of the measurement of the density of suppression and interpretation of the results to guide the treatment of amblyopia. The minimum age of patients taking the test ranged from 2 to 8 years and the minimum filter considered still safe to continue treatment ranged from 4 to 17. It is estimated there were 24 cases of intractable diplopia over the last 5 years. The issue of intractable diplopia and amblyopia treatment is likely to become increasingly important as there appears to be greater plasticity and scope to treat amblyopia in teenagers and adults than was previously thought. Lack of knowledge of how to evaluate the risk may lead to more cases of intractable diplopia or alternatively treatment being withheld unnecessarily.

  5. Assessment of Different Sampling Methods for Measuring and Representing Macular Cone Density Using Flood-Illuminated Adaptive Optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Shu; Gale, Michael J; Fay, Jonathan D; Faridi, Ambar; Titus, Hope E; Garg, Anupam K; Michaels, Keith V; Erker, Laura R; Peters, Dawn; Smith, Travis B; Pennesi, Mark E

    2015-09-01

    To describe a standardized flood-illuminated adaptive optics (AO) imaging protocol suitable for the clinical setting and to assess sampling methods for measuring cone density. Cone density was calculated following three measurement protocols: 50 × 50-μm sampling window values every 0.5° along the horizontal and vertical meridians (fixed-interval method), the mean density of expanding 0.5°-wide arcuate areas in the nasal, temporal, superior, and inferior quadrants (arcuate mean method), and the peak cone density of a 50 × 50-μm sampling window within expanding arcuate areas near the meridian (peak density method). Repeated imaging was performed in nine subjects to determine intersession repeatability of cone density. Cone density montages could be created for 67 of the 74 subjects. Image quality was determined to be adequate for automated cone counting for 35 (52%) of the 67 subjects. We found that cone density varied with different sampling methods and regions tested. In the nasal and temporal quadrants, peak density most closely resembled histological data, whereas the arcuate mean and fixed-interval methods tended to underestimate the density compared with histological data. However, in the inferior and superior quadrants, arcuate mean and fixed-interval methods most closely matched histological data, whereas the peak density method overestimated cone density compared with histological data. Intersession repeatability testing showed that repeatability was greatest when sampling by arcuate mean and lowest when sampling by fixed interval. We show that different methods of sampling can significantly affect cone density measurements. Therefore, care must be taken when interpreting cone density results, even in a normal population.

  6. Dual Energy X Ray Absorptiometry for Bone Mineral Density and Body Composition Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The IAEA assists Member States in their efforts to develop effective evidence based interventions to combat malnutrition in all its forms using nuclear techniques. The unique characteristics of nuclear techniques in nutrition, in particular stable isotope techniques and dual energy X ray absorptiometry (DXA), make these methods highly suitable for development and evaluation of interventions to address the double burden of malnutrition, i.e. 'undernutrition' and 'overnutrition', globally. This publication provides information on the theoretical background and practical application of state of the art methodology for bone mineral density (BMD) measurements and body composition assessment by DXA. The IAEA has contributed to the development and transfer of technical expertise in the use of DXA in Member States through support to national and regional nutrition projects via the technical cooperation programme and coordinated research projects addressing priority areas in nutrition. This book will be an important part of the IAEA's efforts to transfer technology and to contribute to capacity building in this field

  7. A case-control study assessing bone mineral density in severe haemophilia A in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, A J; McLaughlin, P; Simmonds, J V; Prouse, P J; Prelevic, G; Gill, S; Chowdary, P

    2015-01-01

    It has been shown that bone mineral density (BMD) may be lower in patients with haemophilia (PWH). A comparison to control subjects is required to thoroughly assess current BMD in PWH in the UK. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that BMD is lower in PWH than in controls, and in patients with more severely affected joints or lower activity levels. In this case-control study, 37 patients with severe haemophilia A were recruited from two haemophilia centres in the UK. A group of 37 age, gender and ethnicity-matched control participants were recruited. All participants had a bone density scan, a musculoskeletal assessment, a blood test for vitamin D and completed a functional activity questionnaire. Of the case group, 5% had osteoporosis and 24% had BMD lower than expected for age. No control participants had osteoporosis, 3% had osteopenia and 14% had BMD lower than expected for age. Ninety one per cent of case participants and 92% of control participants had reduced 25(OH)D levels. Case participants had significantly lower BMD than control participants, and case participants with more severely affected joints, lower activity levels, HIV, history of hepatitis C or lower BMI had significantly lower BMD. Patients with severe haemophilia have a higher risk of low BMD than men without haemophilia. Patients with more severely affected joints and lower activity levels have lower BMD. It remains unclear whether patients with low BMD reached adequate peak bone mass. Low vitamin D may be present in the majority of PWH. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Calibrating a large slab vessel: A battle of the bulge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, I.R.

    1993-01-01

    Slab tanks (critically-safe-by-geometry vessels) were proposed for the storage of concentrated, highly-enriched uranium solution in the design of the Fuel Processing Restoration (FPR) Facility at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). Currently, measurements of bulk mass in ICPP annular vessels have standard deviations on the order of 0.2%, or less. ICPP personnel felt that their inexperience with the aforementioned expansions would prevent them from attaining comparable precision with slab tanks. To help assess the measurement accuracy of slab vessels, a full-scale mockup of those proposed for the FPR Facility was installed for test calibrations. These calibrations were designed to detect vessel expansion under differing conditions. This paper will compare the base-line, water calibrations with those of the higher-density aluminum nitrate, and any observed deflection will be described using vessel calibration techniques. The calibration using water at an elevated temperature was not performed due to the difficulty of maintaining the elevated temperature. This calibration probably will not be conducted because the construction of the FPR Facility has been halted

  9. The value of [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET in the diagnosis of large-vessel vasculitis and the assessment of activity and extent of disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walter, Martin A.; Mueller-Brand, Jan; Nitzsche, Egbert U. [University Hospital Basel, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Basel (Switzerland); Melzer, Ralph A.; Tyndall, Alan [University Hospital Basel, Division of Rheumatology (Switzerland); Schindler, Christian [University Hospital Basel, Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine (Switzerland)

    2005-06-01

    This study was performed to investigate the value of{sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ([{sup 18}F]FDG-PET) in the diagnosis of large-vessel vasculitis and the assessment of activity and extent of disease. Twenty-six consecutive patients (21 females, 5 males; median age - years, range 17-86 years) with giant cell arteritis or Takayasu's arteritis were examined with [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET. Follow-up scans were performed in four patients. Twenty-six age- and gender-matched controls (21 females, 5 males; median age 71 years, range 17-86 years) were included. The severity of large-vessel [{sup 18}F]FDG uptake was visually graded using a four-point scale. C-reactive protein (CRP) and the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) were measured and correlated with [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET results by logistic regression. [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET revealed pathological findings in 18 of 26 patients. Three scans were categorised as grade I, 12 as grade II and 3 as grade III arteritis. Visual grade was significantly correlated with both CRP and ESR levels (p=0.002 and 0.007 respectively; grade I: CRP 4.0 mg/l, ESR 6 mm/h; grade II: CRP 37 mg/l, ESR 46 mm/h; grade III: CRP 172 mg/l, ESR 90 mm/h). Overall sensitivity was 60% (95% CI 40.6-77.3%), specificity 99.8% (95% CI 89.1-100%), positive predictive value 99.7% (95% CI 77-100%), negative predictive value 67.9% (95% CI 49.8-80.9%) and accuracy 78.6% (95% CI 65.6-88.4%). In patients presenting with a CRP <12 mg/l or an ESR <12 mm/h, logistic regression revealed a sensitivity of less than 50%. In patients with high CRP/ESR levels, sensitivity was 95.5%/80.7%. [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET is highly effective in assessing the activity and the extent of large-vessel vasculitis. Visual grading was validated as representing the severity of inflammation. Its use is simple and provides high specificity, while high sensitivity is achieved by scanning in the state of active inflammation. (orig.)

  10. The value of [18F]FDG-PET in the diagnosis of large-vessel vasculitis and the assessment of activity and extent of disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, Martin A.; Mueller-Brand, Jan; Nitzsche, Egbert U.; Melzer, Ralph A.; Tyndall, Alan; Schindler, Christian

    2005-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the value of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ([ 18 F]FDG-PET) in the diagnosis of large-vessel vasculitis and the assessment of activity and extent of disease. Twenty-six consecutive patients (21 females, 5 males; median age - years, range 17-86 years) with giant cell arteritis or Takayasu's arteritis were examined with [ 18 F]FDG-PET. Follow-up scans were performed in four patients. Twenty-six age- and gender-matched controls (21 females, 5 males; median age 71 years, range 17-86 years) were included. The severity of large-vessel [ 18 F]FDG uptake was visually graded using a four-point scale. C-reactive protein (CRP) and the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) were measured and correlated with [ 18 F]FDG-PET results by logistic regression. [ 18 F]FDG-PET revealed pathological findings in 18 of 26 patients. Three scans were categorised as grade I, 12 as grade II and 3 as grade III arteritis. Visual grade was significantly correlated with both CRP and ESR levels (p=0.002 and 0.007 respectively; grade I: CRP 4.0 mg/l, ESR 6 mm/h; grade II: CRP 37 mg/l, ESR 46 mm/h; grade III: CRP 172 mg/l, ESR 90 mm/h). Overall sensitivity was 60% (95% CI 40.6-77.3%), specificity 99.8% (95% CI 89.1-100%), positive predictive value 99.7% (95% CI 77-100%), negative predictive value 67.9% (95% CI 49.8-80.9%) and accuracy 78.6% (95% CI 65.6-88.4%). In patients presenting with a CRP 18 F]FDG-PET is highly effective in assessing the activity and the extent of large-vessel vasculitis. Visual grading was validated as representing the severity of inflammation. Its use is simple and provides high specificity, while high sensitivity is achieved by scanning in the state of active inflammation. (orig.)

  11. Accuracy of 16-slice multi-detector CT to quantify the degree of coronary artery stenosis: Assessment of cross-sectional and longitudinal vessel reconstructions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cury, Ricardo C. [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)]. E-mail: rcury@partners.org; Ferencik, Maros [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Achenbach, Stephan [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Division of Cardiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Internal Medicine II, University of Erlangen (Germany); Pomerantsev, Eugene [Division of Cardiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Nieman, Koen [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Moselewski, Fabian [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Division of Cardiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Abbara, Suhny [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Jang, Ik-Kyung [Division of Cardiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Brady, Thomas J. [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Hoffmann, Udo [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2006-03-15

    Background: Sixteen-slice multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) permits reliable noninvasive detection of significant coronary stenosis based on qualitative visual assessment. The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy of MDCT to quantify the degree of coronary stenosis as compared to quantitative coronary angiography (QCA) using two different reconstruction methods. Methods: We studied 69 coronary artery lesions from 38 consecutive patients that underwent 16-slice MDCT as a part of research study, which enrolled consecutive subjects scheduled for clinically indicated invasive coronary angiography. Nine coronary artery lesions with motion artifacts, heavily calcified plaques or stents were excluded from the analysis. The degree of stenosis was calculated by two independent readers non-blinded to the location of the stenosis, but blinded to the results of the QCA. MDCT luminal diameters were measured in cross-sectional multi-planar reformatted (CS-MPR) images created perpendicular to the centerline of the vessel and in 5 mm thin-slab maximum intensity projections (MIP) parallel to the long axis of the vessel. Both MDCT methods were compared against QCA. Results: The mean degree of stenosis as measured by MDCT was closely correlated to QCA for both methods (CS-MPR versus QCA: 61 {+-} 23% versus 64 {+-} 29%; r {sup 2} = 0.83, p < 0.001 and MIP versus QCA: 64 {+-} 22% versus 64 {+-} 29%; r {sup 2} = 0.84, p < 0.001 for MIP. Bland-Altman analysis demonstrated a negative bias of the degree of stenosis of -2.8 {+-} 12% using CS-MPR and a minimally positive bias of 0.6 {+-} 12% for MIP. In stratified analysis for lesion severity (mild, 0-40%; moderate, 41-70% or severe, >70%) the agreement between both CS-MPR and MIP was high when compared to QCA ({kappa} = 0.74 and 0.71, respectively). Conclusion: Multi-detector spiral CT permits accurate quantitative assessment of the degree of coronary stenosis in selected data sets of sufficient quality using both

  12. Assessment of MRI issues at 3-Tesla for metallic surgical implants: findings applied to 61 additional skin closure staples and vessel ligation clips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Amreeta; Shellock, Frank G

    2012-01-09

    Metallic skin closure staples and vessel ligation clips should be tested at 3-Tesla to characterize MRI issues in order to ensure patient safety. Therefore, metallic surgical implants were assessed at 3-Tesla for magnetic field interactions, MRI-related heating, and artifacts. A skin closure staple (Visistat Skin Stapler, staple, Polytetrafluoroethylene, PTFE, coated 316L/316LVM stainless steel; Teleflex Medical, Durham, NC) and a vessel ligation clip (Hemoclip Traditional, stainless steel; Teleflex Medical, Durham, NC) that represented the largest metallic sizes made from materials with the highest magnetic susceptibilities (i.e., based on material information) among 61 other surgical implants (52 metallic implants, 9 nonmetallic implants) underwent evaluation for magnetic field interactions, MRI-related heating, and artifacts using standardized techniques. MRI-related heating was assessed by placing each implant in a gelled-saline-filled phantom with MRI performed using a transmit/receive RF body coil at an MR system reported, whole body averaged SAR of 2.9-W/kg for 15-min. Artifacts were characterized using T1-weighted, SE and GRE pulse sequences. Each surgical implant showed minor magnetic field interactions (20- and 27-degrees, which is acceptable from a safety consideration). Heating was not substantial (highest temperature change, ≤ 1.6°C). Artifacts may create issues if the area of interest is in the same area or close to the respective surgical implant. The results demonstrated that it would be acceptable for patients with these metallic surgical implants to undergo MRI at 3-Tesla or less. Because of the materials and dimensions of the surgical implants that underwent testing, these findings pertain to 61 additional similar implants.

  13. Assessment of MRI issues at 3-Tesla for metallic surgical implants: findings applied to 61 additional skin closure staples and vessel ligation clips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gill Amreeta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose Metallic skin closure staples and vessel ligation clips should be tested at 3-Tesla to characterize MRI issues in order to ensure patient safety. Therefore, metallic surgical implants were assessed at 3-Tesla for magnetic field interactions, MRI-related heating, and artifacts. Methods A skin closure staple (Visistat Skin Stapler, staple, Polytetrafluoroethylene, PTFE, coated 316L/316LVM stainless steel; Teleflex Medical, Durham, NC and a vessel ligation clip (Hemoclip Traditional, stainless steel; Teleflex Medical, Durham, NC that represented the largest metallic sizes made from materials with the highest magnetic susceptibilities (i.e., based on material information among 61 other surgical implants (52 metallic implants, 9 nonmetallic implants underwent evaluation for magnetic field interactions, MRI-related heating, and artifacts using standardized techniques. MRI-related heating was assessed by placing each implant in a gelled-saline-filled phantom with MRI performed using a transmit/receive RF body coil at an MR system reported, whole body averaged SAR of 2.9-W/kg for 15-min. Artifacts were characterized using T1-weighted, SE and GRE pulse sequences. Results Each surgical implant showed minor magnetic field interactions (20- and 27-degrees, which is acceptable from a safety consideration. Heating was not substantial (highest temperature change, ≤ 1.6°C. Artifacts may create issues if the area of interest is in the same area or close to the respective surgical implant. Conclusions The results demonstrated that it would be acceptable for patients with these metallic surgical implants to undergo MRI at 3-Tesla or less. Because of the materials and dimensions of the surgical implants that underwent testing, these findings pertain to 61 additional similar implants.

  14. Assessment of MRI issues at 3-Tesla for metallic surgical implants: findings applied to 61 additional skin closure staples and vessel ligation clips

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Metallic skin closure staples and vessel ligation clips should be tested at 3-Tesla to characterize MRI issues in order to ensure patient safety. Therefore, metallic surgical implants were assessed at 3-Tesla for magnetic field interactions, MRI-related heating, and artifacts. Methods A skin closure staple (Visistat Skin Stapler, staple, Polytetrafluoroethylene, PTFE, coated 316L/316LVM stainless steel; Teleflex Medical, Durham, NC) and a vessel ligation clip (Hemoclip Traditional, stainless steel; Teleflex Medical, Durham, NC) that represented the largest metallic sizes made from materials with the highest magnetic susceptibilities (i.e., based on material information) among 61 other surgical implants (52 metallic implants, 9 nonmetallic implants) underwent evaluation for magnetic field interactions, MRI-related heating, and artifacts using standardized techniques. MRI-related heating was assessed by placing each implant in a gelled-saline-filled phantom with MRI performed using a transmit/receive RF body coil at an MR system reported, whole body averaged SAR of 2.9-W/kg for 15-min. Artifacts were characterized using T1-weighted, SE and GRE pulse sequences. Results Each surgical implant showed minor magnetic field interactions (20- and 27-degrees, which is acceptable from a safety consideration). Heating was not substantial (highest temperature change, ≤ 1.6°C). Artifacts may create issues if the area of interest is in the same area or close to the respective surgical implant. Conclusions The results demonstrated that it would be acceptable for patients with these metallic surgical implants to undergo MRI at 3-Tesla or less. Because of the materials and dimensions of the surgical implants that underwent testing, these findings pertain to 61 additional similar implants. PMID:22230200

  15. Reactor pressure vessel status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strosnider, J.; Wichman, K.; Elliot, B.

    1994-12-01

    This report gives a brief description of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV), followed by a discussion of the radiation embrittlement of RPV beltline materials and the two indicators for measuring embrittlement, the end-of-license (EOL) reference temperature and the EOL upper-shelf energy. It also summarizes the GL 92-01 effort and presents, for all 37 boiling water reactor plants and 74 pressurized water reactor plants in the United States, the current status of compliance with regulatory requirements related to ensuring RPV integrity. The staff has evaluated the material data needed to predict neutron embrittlement of the reactor vessel beltline materials. These data will be stored in a computer database entitled the reactor vessel integrity database (RVID). This database will be updated annually to reflect the changes made by the licensees in future submittals and will be used by the NRC staff to assess the issues related to vessel structural integrity

  16. Dual Energy X Ray Absorptiometry for Bone Mineral Density and Body Composition Assessment (Arabic Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The IAEA assists Member States in their efforts to develop effective evidence based interventions to combat malnutrition in all its forms using nuclear techniques. The unique characteristics of nuclear techniques in nutrition, in particular stable isotope techniques and dual energy X ray absorptiometry (DXA), make these methods highly suitable for development and evaluation of interventions to address the double burden of malnutrition, i.e. 'undernutrition' and 'overnutrition', globally. This publication provides information on the theoretical background and practical application of state of the art methodology for bone mineral density (BMD) measurements and body composition assessment by DXA. The IAEA has contributed to the development and transfer of technical expertise in the use of DXA in Member States through support to national and regional nutrition projects via the technical cooperation programme and coordinated research projects addressing priority areas in nutrition. This book will be an important part of the IAEA's efforts to transfer technology and to contribute to capacity building in this field. The publication was developed by an international group of experts and is intended for nutritionists, radiation technologists, researchers and health professionals using DXA for BMD measurements and body composition assessment.

  17. Fracture Assessment of PEEK under Static Loading by Means of the Local Strain Energy Density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirco Peron

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Polyetheretherketone (PEEK has gained interest in many industrial applications due to its high strength-to-weight ratio, excellent heat tolerance and high corrosion resistance. Stress concentrators such as notches and geometrical discontinuities are present in many such components necessitating the reliable assessment of notch sensitivity of PEEK in monotonic tension. Here we evaluate the applicability of the strain energy density (SED approach for the assessment of the fracture strength of experimentally tested notched geometries subject to corrosion. The fracture behavior of neat, circumferentially razor-grooved dog-bone specimens and circumferentially U-notched specimens with different notch radii can be predicted with a discrepancy lower than ±10%. Reliable predictions are shown on two previously published datasets employing both computed and published mechanical properties as inputs for the SED calculations. This report presents the first successful application of SED for PEEK as well as the successful prediction of tensile behavior in corrosive environments. This opens the road towards future applications of PEEK in fields its compliant use is of growing popularity.

  18. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: MR imaging of liver proton density fat fraction to assess hepatic steatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, An; Tan, Justin; Sun, Mark; Hamilton, Gavin; Bydder, Mark; Wolfson, Tanya; Gamst, Anthony C; Middleton, Michael; Brunt, Elizabeth M; Loomba, Rohit; Lavine, Joel E; Schwimmer, Jeffrey B; Sirlin, Claude B

    2013-05-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging-estimated proton density fat fraction (PDFF) for assessing hepatic steatosis in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) by using centrally scored histopathologic validation as the reference standard. This prospectively designed, cross-sectional, internal review board-approved, HIPAA-compliant study was conducted in 77 patients who had NAFLD and liver biopsy. MR imaging-PDFF was estimated from magnitude-based low flip angle multiecho gradient-recalled echo images after T2* correction and multifrequency fat modeling. Histopathologic scoring was obtained by consensus of the Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis (NASH) Clinical Research Network Pathology Committee. Spearman correlation, additivity and variance stabilization for regression for exploring the effect of a number of potential confounders, and receiver operating characteristic analyses were performed. Liver MR imaging-PDFF was systematically higher, with higher histologic steatosis grade (P steatosis grade (ρ = 0.69, P steatosis grade 0 (n = 5) from those with grade 1 or higher (n = 72), 0.825 (95% confidence interval: 0.734, 0.915) to distinguish those with grade 1 or lower (n = 31) from those with grade 2 or higher (n = 46), and 0.893 (95% confidence interval: 0.809, 0.977) to distinguish those with grade 2 or lower (n = 58) from those with grade 3 (n = 19). MR imaging-PDFF showed promise for assessment of hepatic steatosis grade in patients with NAFLD. For validation, further studies with larger sample sizes are needed. © RSNA, 2013.

  19. Dual-energy digital radiography for the assessment of bone mineral density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tahvanainen, Paeivi S.; Lammentausta, Eveliina; Tervonen, Osmo; Jaemsae, Timo; Nieminen, Miika T. (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Univ. of Oulu, Oulu (Finland)), e-mail: paivi.tahvanainen@oulu.fi; Pulkkinen, Pasi (Dept. of Medical Technology, Univ. of Oulu, Oulu (Finland))

    2010-06-15

    Background: Bone mineral density (BMD) is usually determined by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Digital radiography (DR) has enabled the application of dual-energy techniques for separating bone and soft tissue, but it is not clear yet whether BMD information can reliably be obtained using DR. Purpose: To determine the ability of dual-energy digital radiography (DEDR) to predict BMD as determined by DXA. Material and Methods: Reindeer femora (n=15) were imaged in a water bath at a typical clinical imaging voltage of 79 kVp and additionally at 100 kVp on a DR system. BMD was determined in four segmented regions (femoral neck, trochanter, inter-trochanter, Ward's triangle) from these images using the DXA calculation principle. BMD results as determined by DEDR were compared with BMD values as determined by DXA. Results: Significant moderate to high linear correlations (0.66-0.76) were observed at the femoral neck, Ward's triangle, and trochanter between BMD values as determined by the two techniques. The coefficient of variation (CVRMS) ranged between 2.2 and 4.7% and 0.2 and 1.8% for DEDR and DXA analyses, respectively. Conclusion: DXA-based BMD information can be obtained with moderate precision and accuracy using DEDR. In future, combining BMD measurements using DEDR with structural and geometrical information available on digital radiographs could enable a more comprehensive assessment of bone . Keywords: BMD, DXA, bone assessment

  20. Preoperative assessment of the cancellous bone mineral density of the proximal humerus using CT data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krappinger, Dietmar; Roth, Tobias; Gschwentner, Martin; Suckert, Armin; Blauth, Michael; Hengg, Clemens; Kralinger, Franz

    2012-01-01

    Osteoporotic fractures of the proximal humerus show an increasing incidence. Osteoporosis not only influences the fracture risk after low-energy trauma, but also affects the mechanical stability of internal fixation. Preoperative assessment of the local bone quality may be useful in the surgical treatment of patients sustaining these injuries. The aim of the present study was to present a method for the preoperative assessment of the local cancellous bone mineral density (BMD) of the proximal humerus using CT data. In the first part of the study, CT scans of 30 patients with unilateral fractures of the proximal humerus after low-energy trauma were used. The local BMD was assessed on the contralateral uninjured side. All 30 patients additionally underwent dual-emission X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) of the lumbar spine, proximal femur, and forearm of the side of the uninjured proximal humerus within 6 weeks after trauma. Three independent trauma surgeons performed measurements on the uninjured proximal humerus twice with a time interval of 4 weeks in order to assess the inter- and intraobserver reliability of the method. In the second part of the study, the local BMD of 507 patients with either proximal humerus fractures or chronic shoulder instability was assessed by a single trauma surgeon. In both parts, the average HU values in standardized ROIs of the humeral head were automatically calculated after correcting for HU values below the water equivalent. A linear calibration equation was computed for the calculation from HU to BMD using a calibration device (EFP). The intra- and interobserver reliability was high (ICC > 0.95). Correlation coefficients between the local BMD of the proximal humerus and other anatomical sites were between 0.35 (lumbar spine) and 0.64 (forearm). We found a high correlation between the local BMD and age. The BMD in the fracture group was significantly lower than in the instability group. These patients were significantly older and more

  1. Preoperative assessment of the cancellous bone mineral density of the proximal humerus using CT data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krappinger, Dietmar; Roth, Tobias; Gschwentner, Martin; Suckert, Armin; Blauth, Michael; Hengg, Clemens; Kralinger, Franz [Innsbruck Medical University, Department of Trauma Surgery and Sports Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria)

    2012-03-15

    Osteoporotic fractures of the proximal humerus show an increasing incidence. Osteoporosis not only influences the fracture risk after low-energy trauma, but also affects the mechanical stability of internal fixation. Preoperative assessment of the local bone quality may be useful in the surgical treatment of patients sustaining these injuries. The aim of the present study was to present a method for the preoperative assessment of the local cancellous bone mineral density (BMD) of the proximal humerus using CT data. In the first part of the study, CT scans of 30 patients with unilateral fractures of the proximal humerus after low-energy trauma were used. The local BMD was assessed on the contralateral uninjured side. All 30 patients additionally underwent dual-emission X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) of the lumbar spine, proximal femur, and forearm of the side of the uninjured proximal humerus within 6 weeks after trauma. Three independent trauma surgeons performed measurements on the uninjured proximal humerus twice with a time interval of 4 weeks in order to assess the inter- and intraobserver reliability of the method. In the second part of the study, the local BMD of 507 patients with either proximal humerus fractures or chronic shoulder instability was assessed by a single trauma surgeon. In both parts, the average HU values in standardized ROIs of the humeral head were automatically calculated after correcting for HU values below the water equivalent. A linear calibration equation was computed for the calculation from HU to BMD using a calibration device (EFP). The intra- and interobserver reliability was high (ICC > 0.95). Correlation coefficients between the local BMD of the proximal humerus and other anatomical sites were between 0.35 (lumbar spine) and 0.64 (forearm). We found a high correlation between the local BMD and age. The BMD in the fracture group was significantly lower than in the instability group. These patients were significantly older and more

  2. Breast-density assessment with hand-held ultrasound: A novel biomarker to assess breast cancer risk and to tailor screening?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanabria, Sergio J; Goksel, Orcun; Martini, Katharina; Forte, Serafino; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Kubik-Huch, Rahel A; Rominger, Marga B

    2018-03-19

    To assess feasibility and diagnostic accuracy of a novel hand-held ultrasound (US) method for breast density assessment that measures the speed of sound (SoS), in comparison to the ACR mammographic (MG) categories. ACR-MG density (a=fatty to d=extremely dense) and SoS-US were assessed in the retromamillary, inner and outer segments of 106 women by two radiographers. A conventional US system was used for SoS-US. A reflector served as timing reference for US signals transmitted through the breasts. Four blinded readers assessed average SoS (m/s), ΔSoS (segment-variation SoS; m/s) and the ACR-MG density. The highest SoS and ΔSoS values of the three segments were used for MG-ACR whole breast comparison. SoS-US breasts were examined in densities a-d were 1,421 m/s (SD 14), 1,432 m/s (SD 17), 1,448 m/s (SD 20) and 1,500 m/s (SD 31), with significant differences between all groups (pdensity was evident (r s =0.622, p=density without discomfort, readers evaluated measurements with high inter-reader agreement, and SoS-US correlated significantly with ACR-MG breast-density categories. • The novel speed-of-sound ultrasound correlated significantly with mammographic ACR breast density categories. • Radiographers measured breast density without women discomfort or radiation. • SoS-US can be implemented on a standard US machine. • SoS-US shows potential for a quantifiable, cost-effective assessment of breast density.

  3. Abnormal myocardial capillary density in apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy can be assessed by myocardial contrast echocardiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Jeonggeun; Cho, In-Jeong; Shim, Chi-Young; Ha, Jong-Won; Jang, Yangsoo; Chung, Namsik; Rim, Se-Joong

    2010-01-01

    Myocardial ischemia and dysfunction can occur in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) because of the high muscle-to-blood ratio, even without significant coronary artery disease. Microbubbles reside only in the intravascular space and myocardial video-intensity during systole results mostly from microbubbles within capillaries. The hypothesis explored in the present study was that an abnormal capillary density in apical HCM (ApHCM) can be demonstrated using myocardial contrast echocardiography (MCE). The 56 patients were investigated (31 males, age 58±9 years; 33 ApHCM, 9 hypertensive left ventricular hypertrophy [LVH], 14 controls). MCE was performed with low-mechanical-index power modulation imaging. Tissue Doppler imaging to assess myocardial contractile function was obtained at the mitral annulus (S'), and 99m Tc-MIBI single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was also performed. All ApHCM patients exhibited perfusion defects at the hypertrophied segments in the systolic phase during MCE, whereas SPECT showed normal or rather increased perfusion at those sites. The cyclic variation of video-intensity was exaggerated in ApHCM when compared with the LVH or control group (% of [systolic video-intensity]/[diastolic video-intensity]: 33.0±12.3%, 88.3±19.2% and 79.4±13.9%, respectively [P<0.05]). Concurrently, MCE cyclic variation and perfusion defect size were related to decreased S' (P<0.05 for all). A perfusion defect at the hypertrophied segment, representing abnormal myocardial capillary density, was observed in ApHCM patients during MCE. The extent of MCE cyclic variation and the perfusion defect size both correlate with decreased myocardial contractile property in ApHCM. (author)

  4. The costs of evaluating species densities and composition of snakes to assess development impacts in amazonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael de Fraga

    Full Text Available Studies leading to decision-making for environmental licensing often fail to provide accurate estimates of diversity. Measures of snake diversity are regularly obtained to assess development impacts in the rainforests of the Amazon Basin, but this taxonomic group may be subject to poor detection probabilities. Recently, the Brazilian government tried to standardize sampling designs by the implementation of a system (RAPELD to quantify biological diversity using spatially-standardized sampling units. Consistency in sampling design allows the detection probabilities to be compared among taxa, and sampling effort and associated cost to be evaluated. The cost effectiveness of detecting snakes has received no attention in Amazonia. Here we tested the effects of reducing sampling effort on estimates of species densities and assemblage composition. We identified snakes in seven plot systems, each standardised with 14 plots. The 250 m long centre line of each plot followed an altitudinal contour. Surveys were repeated four times in each plot and detection probabilities were estimated for the 41 species encountered. Reducing the number of observations, or the size of the sampling modules, caused significant loss of information on species densities and local patterns of variation in assemblage composition. We estimated the cost to find a snake as $ 120 U.S., but general linear models indicated the possibility of identifying differences in assemblage composition for half the overall survey costs. Decisions to reduce sampling effort depend on the importance of lost information to target-issues, and may not be the preferred option if there is the potential for identifying individual snake species requiring specific conservation actions. However, in most studies of human disturbance on species assemblages, it is likely to be more cost-effective to focus on other groups of organisms with higher detection probabilities.

  5. Multifactorial assessment of the risk of falls in low bone density older women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Azevedo Garcia

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Identifying effective assessment instruments for predicting falls, specifically in older women with low bone mineral density (BMD that are more susceptible to fractures remains a challenge. Objective: To evaluate risk factors for falls at baseline, to identify the falls occurrence over six months of follow-up and to investigate the predictive validity of the Quickscreen Clinical Falls Risk Assessment for predicting multiple falls among low BMD older women. Methods: A methodological study with 110 older women with diagnosis of osteoporosis or osteopenia (70.26 ± 6.24 years. The presence of two or more of the eight risk factors assessed by the QuickScreen characterized the risk of falling (baseline and monthly phone calls identified the occurrence of falls during the six months of follow-up. Results: The most prevalent falls risk factors were self-reported previous falls, polypharmacy and impairment in shifting weight and lateral instability. Most of the older women (67.3% had two or more risk factors, 24.5% reported a single fall and 13.6% reported multiple falls over the six months. The QuickScreen (cutoff ≥ 2 risk factors showed good sensitivity (73.3% and high negative predictive value (88.89% for predicting multiple falls among low BMD older women. Conclusions: The results indicated a high frequency of falls among low BMD older women. Additionally, the results highlighted that the QuickScreen instrument was able to predict multiple falls in the six months of follow-up among these older women.

  6. Is the aquatic environment sufficiently protected from chemicals discharged with treated ballast water from vessels worldwide? - A decadal environmental perspective and risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Matej; Linders, Jan; Gollasch, Stephan; David, Jan

    2018-05-24

    Ballast water managements systems (BWMS) installed on vessels may use active substances to inactivate or kill organisms in the ballast water. This paper provides new insights in this global issue - discharge of hazardous disinfection by-products with ballast water and related risk assessment for the environment. Considering the possible extent of this issue, the International Maritime Organization (IMO) engaged the Joint Group of Experts on the Scientific Aspects of Marine Environmental Protection (GESAMP)-Ballast Water Working Group (BWWG) to oversee the evaluation process of BWMS that make use of active substances to prevent negative effects. We analysed all BWMS that received IMO final approval over a decade until 2017 and provide an overview of active substances used for ballast water treatment and disinfection by-products in the discharged ballast water. A risk assessment was conducted using the GESAMP-BWWG methodology for two very different commercial ports (Koper, Slovenia and Hamburg, Germany). Some relevant chemicals (chloropicrin, monochloroacetic acid, and dibromoacetonitrile) and other chemicals (isocyanuric acid and sodium thiosulphate) reached levels of concern, indicating a risk for aquatic organisms after discharge of that ballast water. From this analysis, it became clear GESAMP-BWWG worst-case scenario assumptions do not fully account for the potential environmental risks. We provide recommendations how to make this risk assessment more robust, recommend further research, and urge for policy as well as regulatory responses. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Concurrent monitoring of vessels and water turbidity enhances the strength of evidence in remotely sensed dredging impact assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, G.; Leeuw, de J.; Skidmore, A.K.; Prins, H.H.T.; Liu, Y.

    2007-01-01

    Remotely sensed assessment of dredging impacts on water turbidity is straightforward when turbidity plumes show up in clear water. However, it is more complicated in turbid waters as the spatial or temporal changes in turbidity might be of natural origin. The plausibility of attributing turbidity

  8. Mammographic density and breast cancer risk in breast screening assessment cases and women with a family history of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Stephen W; Morrish, Oliver W E; Allgood, Prue C; Black, Richard; Gillan, Maureen G C; Willsher, Paula; Cooke, Julie; Duncan, Karen A; Michell, Michael J; Dobson, Hilary M; Maroni, Roberta; Lim, Yit Y; Purushothaman, Hema N; Suaris, Tamara; Astley, Susan M; Young, Kenneth C; Tucker, Lorraine; Gilbert, Fiona J

    2018-01-01

    Mammographic density has been shown to be a strong independent predictor of breast cancer and a causative factor in reducing the sensitivity of mammography. There remain questions as to the use of mammographic density information in the context of screening and risk management, and of the association with cancer in populations known to be at increased risk of breast cancer. To assess the association of breast density with presence of cancer by measuring mammographic density visually as a percentage, and with two automated volumetric methods, Quantra™ and VolparaDensity™. The TOMosynthesis with digital MammographY (TOMMY) study of digital breast tomosynthesis in the Breast Screening Programme of the National Health Service (NHS) of the United Kingdom (UK) included 6020 breast screening assessment cases (of whom 1158 had breast cancer) and 1040 screened women with a family history of breast cancer (of whom two had breast cancer). We assessed the association of each measure with breast cancer risk in these populations at enhanced risk, using logistic regression adjusted for age and total breast volume as a surrogate for body mass index (BMI). All density measures showed a positive association with presence of cancer and all declined with age. The strongest effect was seen with Volpara absolute density, with a significant 3% (95% CI 1-5%) increase in risk per 10 cm 3 of dense tissue. The effect of Volpara volumetric density on risk was stronger for large and grade 3 tumours. Automated absolute breast density is a predictor of breast cancer risk in populations at enhanced risk due to either positive mammographic findings or family history. In the screening context, density could be a trigger for more intensive imaging. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Extension of biomass estimates to pre-assessment periods using density dependent surplus production approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Horbowy

    Full Text Available Biomass reconstructions to pre-assessment periods for commercially important and exploitable fish species are important tools for understanding long-term processes and fluctuation on stock and ecosystem level. For some stocks only fisheries statistics and fishery dependent data are available, for periods before surveys were conducted. The methods for the backward extension of the analytical assessment of biomass for years for which only total catch volumes are available were developed and tested in this paper. Two of the approaches developed apply the concept of the surplus production rate (SPR, which is shown to be stock density dependent if stock dynamics is governed by classical stock-production models. The other approach used a modified form of the Schaefer production model that allows for backward biomass estimation. The performance of the methods was tested on the Arctic cod and North Sea herring stocks, for which analytical biomass estimates extend back to the late 1940s. Next, the methods were applied to extend biomass estimates of the North-east Atlantic mackerel from the 1970s (analytical biomass estimates available to the 1950s, for which only total catch volumes were available. For comparison with other methods which employs a constant SPR estimated as an average of the observed values, was also applied. The analyses showed that the performance of the methods is stock and data specific; the methods that work well for one stock may fail for the others. The constant SPR method is not recommended in those cases when the SPR is relatively high and the catch volumes in the reconstructed period are low.

  10. Life cycle assessment of medium-density fiberboard (MDF) manufacturing process in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piekarski, Cassiano Moro; de Francisco, Antonio Carlos; da Luz, Leila Mendes; Kovaleski, João Luiz; Silva, Diogo Aparecido Lopes

    2017-01-01

    Brazil is one of the largest producers of medium-density fibreboard (MDF) in the world, and also the MDF has the highest domestic consumption and production rate in the country. MDF applications are highlighted into residential and commercial furniture design and also a wide participation in the building sector. This study aimed to propose ways of improving the environmental cradle-to-gate life-cycle of one cubic meter MDF panel by means of a life-cycle assessment (LCA) study. Complying with requirements of ISO 14040 and 14,044 standards, different MDF manufacturing scenarios were modelled using Umberto® v.5.6 software and the Ecoinvent v.2.2 life-cycle inventory (LCI) database for the Brazilian context. Environmental and human health impacts were assessed by using the CML (2001) and USEtox (2008) methods. The evaluated impact categories were: acidification, global warming, ozone layer depletion, abiotic resource depletion, photochemical formation of tropospheric ozone, ecotoxicity, eutrophication and human toxicity. Results identified the following hotspots: gas consumption at the thermal plant, urea-formaldehyde resin, power consumption, wood chip consumption and wood chip transportation to the plant. The improvement scenario proposals comprised the following actions: eliminate natural gas consumption at the thermal plant, reduce electrical power consumption, reduce or replace urea-formaldehyde resin consumption, reduce wood consumption and minimize the distance to wood chip suppliers. The proposed actions were analysed to verify the influence of each action on the set of impact categories. Among the results, it can be noted that a joint action of the proposed improvements can result in a total reduction of up to 38.5% of impacts to OD, 34.4% to AD, 31.2% to ET, and 30.4% to HT. Finally, MDF was compared with particleboard production in Brazil, and additional opportunities to improve the MDF environmental profile were identified. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B

  11. Multiple shell pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wedellsborg, B.W.

    1988-01-01

    A method is described of fabricating a pressure vessel comprising the steps of: attaching a first inner pressure vessel having means defining inlet and outlet openings to a top flange, placing a second inner pressure vessel, having means defining inlet and outlet opening, concentric with and spaced about the first inner pressure vessel and attaching the second inner pressure vessel to the top flange, placing an outer pressure vessel, having inlet and outlet openings, concentric with and spaced apart about the second inner pressure vessel and attaching the outer pressure vessel to the top flange, attaching a generally cylindrical inner inlet conduit and a generally cylindrical inner outlet conduit respectively to the inlet and outlet openings in the first inner pressure vessel, attaching a generally cylindrical outer inlet conduit and a generally cylindrical outer outlet conduit respectively to the inlet and outlet opening in the second inner pressure vessel, heating the assembled pressure vessel to a temperature above the melting point of a material selected from the group, lead, tin, antimony, bismuth, potassium, sodium, boron and mixtures thereof, filling the space between the first inner pressure vessel and the second inner pressure vessel with material selected from the group, filling the space between the second inner pressure vessel and the outer pressure vessel with material selected from the group, and pressurizing the material filling the spaces between the pressure vessels to a predetermined pressure, the step comprising: pressurizing the spaces to a pressure whereby the wall of the first inner pressure vessel is maintained in compression during steady state operation of the pressure vessel

  12. Assessment of silt density index (SDI) as fouling propensity parameter in reverse osmosis (RO) desalination systems

    KAUST Repository

    Rachman, Rinaldi; Ghaffour, NorEddine; Wali, F.; Amy, Gary L.

    2013-01-01

    Due to its simplicity, silt density index (SDI) is extensively used in reverse osmosis systems despite its limitations in predicting membrane fouling. Employing a reliable fouling index with good reproducibility and precision is necessary. The aim of this investigation is to assess the reliability of SDI in order to understand the reasons for the low level of precision and accuracy. Different commercial SDI membranes and feed water quality were used in this study. Results showed the existence of membrane properties' variation within manufacturers, which then causes a lack of accuracy in fouling risk estimation. The nature of particles during SDI filtration provides information that particle concentration and size play a significant role in SDI quantification with substantial representation given by particles with size close to membrane nominal pore size. Moreover, turbidity-assisted SDI measurements along with determination of ultrafiltration permeate and clean water fouling potential, establish the indication of nonfouling-related phenomena involved on SDI measurement such as natural organic matter adsorption and hydrodynamic conditions that alters during filtration. Additionally, it was found that the latter affects the sensitivity of SDI by being represented by some portions of SDI values. © 2013 Desalination Publications.

  13. Assessment of silt density index (SDI) as fouling propensity parameter in reverse osmosis (RO) desalination systems

    KAUST Repository

    Rachman, Rinaldi

    2013-01-01

    Due to its simplicity, silt density index (SDI) is extensively used in reverse osmosis systems despite its limitations in predicting membrane fouling. Employing a reliable fouling index with good reproducibility and precision is necessary. The aim of this investigation is to assess the reliability of SDI in order to understand the reasons for the low level of precision and accuracy. Different commercial SDI membranes and feed water quality were used in this study. Results showed the existence of membrane properties\\' variation within manufacturers, which then causes a lack of accuracy in fouling risk estimation. The nature of particles during SDI filtration provides information that particle concentration and size play a significant role in SDI quantification with substantial representation given by particles with size close to membrane nominal pore size. Moreover, turbidity-assisted SDI measurements along with determination of ultrafiltration permeate and clean water fouling potential, establish the indication of nonfouling-related phenomena involved on SDI measurement such as natural organic matter adsorption and hydrodynamic conditions that alters during filtration. Additionally, it was found that the latter affects the sensitivity of SDI by being represented by some portions of SDI values. © 2013 Desalination Publications.

  14. Assessing a learning process with functional ANOVA estimators of EEG power spectral densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, David; Ramírez-Moreno, Mauricio A

    2016-04-01

    We propose to assess the process of learning a task using electroencephalographic (EEG) measurements. In particular, we quantify changes in brain activity associated to the progression of the learning experience through the functional analysis-of-variances (FANOVA) estimators of the EEG power spectral density (PSD). Such functional estimators provide a sense of the effect of training in the EEG dynamics. For that purpose, we implemented an experiment to monitor the process of learning to type using the Colemak keyboard layout during a twelve-lessons training. Hence, our aim is to identify statistically significant changes in PSD of various EEG rhythms at different stages and difficulty levels of the learning process. Those changes are taken into account only when a probabilistic measure of the cognitive state ensures the high engagement of the volunteer to the training. Based on this, a series of statistical tests are performed in order to determine the personalized frequencies and sensors at which changes in PSD occur, then the FANOVA estimates are computed and analyzed. Our experimental results showed a significant decrease in the power of [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] rhythms for ten volunteers during the learning process, and such decrease happens regardless of the difficulty of the lesson. These results are in agreement with previous reports of changes in PSD being associated to feature binding and memory encoding.

  15. Assessing food appeal and desire to eat: the effects of portion size & energy density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Kyle S; Cornier, Marc A; Ingebrigtsen, Jan; Johnson, Susan L

    2011-09-25

    Visual presentation of food provides considerable information such as its potential for palatability and availability, both of which can impact eating behavior. We investigated the subjective ratings for food appeal and desire to eat when exposed to food pictures in a fed sample (n=129) using the computer paradigm ImageRate. Food appeal and desire to eat were analyzed for the effects of food group, portion size and energy density of the foods presented as well as by participant characteristics. Food appeal ratings were significantly higher than those for desire to eat (57.9±11.6 v. 44.7±18.0; pappeal. Food category analyses revealed that fruit was the highest rated food category for both appeal and desire, followed by discretionary foods. Additionally, overweight individuals reported higher ratings of desire to eat large portions of food compared to smaller portions (pappeal and desire (r's=-0.27; p'sappeal and desire to eat foods when assessing these ratings using the same type of metric. Additionally, relations among food appeal and desire to eat ratings and body mass show overweight individuals could be more responsive to visual foods cues in a manner that contributes to obesity.

  16. Assessing food appeal and desire to eat: the effects of portion size & energy density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornier Marc A

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Visual presentation of food provides considerable information such as its potential for palatability and availability, both of which can impact eating behavior. Methods We investigated the subjective ratings for food appeal and desire to eat when exposed to food pictures in a fed sample (n = 129 using the computer paradigm ImageRate. Food appeal and desire to eat were analyzed for the effects of food group, portion size and energy density of the foods presented as well as by participant characteristics. Results Food appeal ratings were significantly higher than those for desire to eat (57.9 ± 11.6 v. 44.7 ± 18.0; p r = 0.20; p p r's = - 0.27; p's Conclusions Results support the hypothesis that individuals differentiate between food appeal and desire to eat foods when assessing these ratings using the same type of metric. Additionally, relations among food appeal and desire to eat ratings and body mass show overweight individuals could be more responsive to visual foods cues in a manner that contributes to obesity.

  17. The factors controlling species density in herbaceous plant communities: An assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, J.B.

    1999-01-01

    This paper evaluates both the ideas and empirical evidence pertaining to the control of species density in herbaceous plant communities. While most theoretical discussions of species density have emphasized the importance of habitat productivity and disturbance regimes, many other factors (e.g. species pools, plant litter accumulation, plant morphology) have been proposed to be important. A review of literature presenting observations on the density of species in small plots (in the vicinity of a few square meters or less), as well as experimental studies, suggests several generalizations: (1) Available data are consistent with an underlying unimodal relationship between species density and total community biomass. While variance in species density is often poorly explained by predictor variables, there is strong evidence that high levels of community biomass are antagonistic to high species density. (2) Community biomass is just one of several factors affecting variations in species density. Multivariate analyses typically explain more than twice as much variance in species density as can be explained by community biomass alone. (3) Disturbance has important and sometimes complex effects on species density. In general, the evidence is consistent with the intermediate disturbance hypothesis but exceptions exist and effects can be complex. (4) Gradients in the species pool can have important influences on patterns of species density. Evidence is mounting that a considerable amount of the observed variability in species density within a landscape or region may result from environmental effects on the species pool. (5) Several additional factors deserve greater consideration, including time lags, species composition, plant morphology, plant density and soil microbial effects. Based on the available evidence, a conceptual model of the primary factors controlling species density is presented here. This model suggests that species density is controlled by the effects of

  18. Design of A Vibration and Stress Measurement System for an Advanced Power Reactor 1400 Reactor Vessel Internals Comprehensive Vibration Assessment Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Doyoung; Kim, Kyuhyung

    2013-01-01

    In accordance with the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC), Regulatory Guide 1.20, the reactor vessel internals comprehensive vibration assessment program (RVI CVAP) has been developed for an Advanced Power Reactor 1400 (APR1400). The purpose of the RVI CVAP is to verify the structural integrity of the reactor internals to flow-induced loads prior to commercial operation. The APR1400 RVI CVAP consists of four programs (analysis, measurement, inspection, and assessment). Thoughtful preparation is essential to the measurement program, because data acquisition must be performed only once. The optimized design of a vibration and stress measurement system for the RVI CVAP is essential to verify the integrity of the APR1400 RVI. We successfully designed a vibration and stress measurement system for the APR1400 RVI CVAP based on the design materials, the hydraulic and structural analysis results, and performance tests of transducers in an extreme environment. The measurement system designed in this paper will be utilized for the APR1400 RVI CVAP as part of the first construction project in Korea

  19. DESIGN OF A VIBRATION AND STRESS MEASUREMENT SYSTEM FOR AN ADVANCED POWER REACTOR 1400 REACTOR VESSEL INTERNALS COMPREHENSIVE VIBRATION ASSESSMENT PROGRAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DO-YOUNG KO

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In accordance with the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC, Regulatory Guide 1.20, the reactor vessel internals comprehensive vibration assessment program (RVI CVAP has been developed for an Advanced Power Reactor 1400 (APR1400. The purpose of the RVI CVAP is to verify the structural integrity of the reactor internals to flow-induced loads prior to commercial operation. The APR1400 RVI CVAP consists of four programs (analysis, measurement, inspection, and assessment. Thoughtful preparation is essential to the measurement program, because data acquisition must be performed only once. The optimized design of a vibration and stress measurement system for the RVI CVAP is essential to verify the integrity of the APR1400 RVI. We successfully designed a vibration and stress measurement system for the APR1400 RVI CVAP based on the design materials, the hydraulic and structural analysis results, and performance tests of transducers in an extreme environment. The measurement system designed in this paper will be utilized for the APR1400 RVI CVAP as part of the first construction project in Korea.

  20. Assessment of MARS for downcomer multi-dimensional thermal hydraulics during LBLOCA reflood using KAERI air-water direct vessel injection tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Won-Jae, Lee; Kwi-Seok, Ha; Chul-Hwa, Song [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-07-01

    The MARS code has been assessed for the downcomer multi-dimensional thermal hydraulics during a large break loss-of-coolant accident (LBLOCA) reflood of Korean Next Generation Reactor (KNGR) that adopted an upper direct vessel injection (DVI) design. Direct DVI bypass and downcomer level sweep-out tests carried out at 1/50-scale air-water DVI test facility are simulated to examine the capability of MARS. Test conditions are selected such that they represent typical reflood conditions of KNGR, that is, DVI injection velocities of 1.0 {approx} 1.6 m/sec and air injection velocities of 18.0 {approx} 35.0 m/sec, for single and double DVI configurations. MARS calculation is first adjusted to the experimental DVI film distribution that largely affects air-water interaction in a scaled-down downcomer, then, the code is assessed for the selected test matrix. With some improvements of MARS thermal-hydraulic (T/H) models, it has been demonstrated that the MARS code is capable of simulating the direct DVI bypass and downcomer level sweep-out as well as the multi-dimensional thermal hydraulics in downcomer, where condensation effect is excluded. (authors)

  1. A preliminary assessment of the effects of heat flux distribution and penetration on the creep rupture of a reactor vessel lower head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, T.Y.; Bentz, J.; Simpson, R.; Witt, R.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of the Lower Head Failure (LHF) Experiment Program is to experimentally investigate and characterize the failure of the reactor vessel lower head due to thermal and pressure loads under severe accident conditions. The experiment is performed using 1/5-scale models of a typical PWR pressure vessel. Experiments are performed for various internal pressure and imposed heat flux distributions with and without instrumentation guide tube penetrations. The experimental program is complemented by a modest modeling program based on the application of vessel creep rupture codes developed in the TMI Vessel Investigation Project. The first three experiments under the LHF program investigated the creep rupture of simulated reactor pressure vessels without penetrations. The heat flux distributions for the three experiments are uniform (LHF-1), center-peaked (LHF-2), and side-peaked (LHF-3), respectively. For all the experiments, appreciable vessel deformation was observed to initiate at vessel wall temperatures above 900K and the vessel typically failed at approximately 1000K. The size of failure was always observed to be smaller than the heated region. For experiments with non-uniform heat flux distributions, failure typically occurs in the region of peak temperature. A brief discussion of the effect of penetration is also presented

  2. Comparison of variability in breast density assessment by BI-RADS category according to the level of experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Hye-Joung; Cha, Joo Hee; Kang, Ji-Won; Choi, Woo Jung; Kim, Han Jun; Go, EunChae

    2018-05-01

    Background Only few studies have assessed variability in the results obtained by the readers with different experience levels in comparison with automated volumetric breast density measurements. Purpose To examine the variations in breast density assessment according to BI-RADS categories among readers with different experience levels and to compare it with the results of automated quantitative measurements. Material and Methods Density assignment was done for 1000 screening mammograms by six readers with three different experience levels (breast-imaging experts, general radiologists, and students). Agreement level between the results obtained by the readers and the Volpara automated volumetric breast density measurements was assessed. The agreement analysis using two categories-non-dense and dense breast tissue-was also performed. Results Intra-reader agreement for experts, general radiologists, and students were almost perfect or substantial (k = 0.74-0.95). The agreement between visual assessments of the breast-imaging experts and volumetric assessments by Volpara was substantial (k = 0.77). The agreement was moderate between the experts and general radiologists (k = 0.67) and slight between the students and Volpara (k = 0.01). The agreement for the two category groups (nondense and dense) was almost perfect between the experts and Volpara (k = 0.83). The agreement was substantial between the experts and general radiologists (k = 0.78). Conclusion We observed similar high agreement levels between visual assessments of breast density performed by radiologists and the volumetric assessments. However, agreement levels were substantially lower for the untrained readers.

  3. Using Prediction Markets to Generate Probability Density Functions for Climate Change Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boslough, M.

    2011-12-01

    Climate-related uncertainty is traditionally presented as an error bar, but it is becoming increasingly common to express it in terms of a probability density function (PDF). PDFs are a necessary component of probabilistic risk assessments, for which simple "best estimate" values are insufficient. Many groups have generated PDFs for climate sensitivity using a variety of methods. These PDFs are broadly consistent, but vary significantly in their details. One axiom of the verification and validation community is, "codes don't make predictions, people make predictions." This is a statement of the fact that subject domain experts generate results using assumptions within a range of epistemic uncertainty and interpret them according to their expert opinion. Different experts with different methods will arrive at different PDFs. For effective decision support, a single consensus PDF would be useful. We suggest that market methods can be used to aggregate an ensemble of opinions into a single distribution that expresses the consensus. Prediction markets have been shown to be highly successful at forecasting the outcome of events ranging from elections to box office returns. In prediction markets, traders can take a position on whether some future event will or will not occur. These positions are expressed as contracts that are traded in a double-action market that aggregates price, which can be interpreted as a consensus probability that the event will take place. Since climate sensitivity cannot directly be measured, it cannot be predicted. However, the changes in global mean surface temperature are a direct consequence of climate sensitivity, changes in forcing, and internal variability. Viable prediction markets require an undisputed event outcome on a specific date. Climate-related markets exist on Intrade.com, an online trading exchange. One such contract is titled "Global Temperature Anomaly for Dec 2011 to be greater than 0.65 Degrees C." Settlement is based

  4. Visually assessed breast density, breast cancer risk and the importance of the craniocaudal view.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duffy, S.W.; Nagtegaal, I.D.; Astley, S.M.; Gillan, M.G.; McGee, M.A.; Boggis, C.R.; Wilson, M.; Beetles, U.M.; Griffiths, M.A.; Jain, A.K.; Johnson, J.; Roberts, R.; Deans, H.; Duncan, K.A.; Iyengar, G.; Griffiths, P.M.; Warwick, J.; Cuzick, J.; Gilbert, F.J.

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Mammographic density is known to be a strong risk factor for breast cancer. A particularly strong association with risk has been observed when density is measured using interactive threshold software. This, however, is a labour-intensive process for large-scale studies. METHODS: Our

  5. Using ultrasonic measurements and a two-phase composite model to assess radiation damage in reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    Ultrasonic methods used in the study of radiation damage and recovery in single crystals appear to also be useful for similar studies on polycrystalline alloys. Ultrasonic methods have demonstrated a sensitivity to radiation damage as affected by neutron fluence, irradiation temperature, large changes in composition, and possibly, as well, by neutron energy spectrum. On the microstructure defect evolution, only the residual defects created through the radiation event will contribute to the final macroscopic material property change. From a microstructure point, it is generally accepted that radiation hardening and embrittlement in metals are caused by clusters of vacancies, interstitial, and solute atoms that impede the motion of slip dislocations. Although vacancy-type defects are a major contributor to the material hardening, they also indicate the presence of other interstitial defects. Thus the total volume change of vacancy-type defects before and after irradiation can serve as a direct index to the final material property changes. The volume change of the vacancy-type defects can be determined by utilizing the two -phase composite model (matrix and void-type inclusion) to interpret wave velocities of baseline and irradiated specimens that are obtained from the ultrasonic wave experiment. This is a relatively economic and straightforward procedure. The correlation of the volume change of the vacancy-type defects with the existing destructive mechanical test results may play an important role in the future for the prediction of the radiation embrittlement and remaining plant lifetime, especially for the older plants on the verge of exhausting all the available mechanical test specimens loaded in the surveillance capsules. The above hypothesis was supported by the limited irradiated data analyzed and presented in his paper. The proposed ultrasonic methodology also has a potential application to assess creep damage in fossil power plants

  6. Assessment of the densities of local anesthetics and their combination with adjuvants: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbelloni, Luiz Eduardo; Moreira, Adriano Dias; Gaspar, Flávia Cunha; Gouveia, Marildo A; Cordeiro, José Antônio

    2009-01-01

    The relative density of a local anesthetic in relation to that of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) at 37 degrees C is one of the most important physical properties that affect the level of analgesia obtained after the subarachnoid administration of the drug. The objective of this study was to determine the density of local anesthetic solutions, with and without glucose, and the combination of the local anesthetic with adjuvants at 20 degrees C, 25 degrees C, and 37 degrees C. The density (g.mL(-1)) was determined by using a DMA 450 densimeter with a sensitivity of +/- 0.00001 g.mL(-1). The densities, and variations, according to the temperature were obtained for all local anesthetics and their combination with opioids at 20 degrees C, 25 degrees C, and 37 degrees C. The solution is hyperbaric if its density exceeds 1.00099, hypobaric when its density is lower than 1.00019, and isobaric when its density is greater than 1.00019 and lower than 1.00099. The densities of both local anesthetics and adjuvants decrease with the increase in temperature. At 37 degrees C, all glucose-containing solutions are hyperbaric. In the absence of glucose, all solutions are hypobaric. At 37 degrees C, morphine, fentanyl, sufentanil, and clonidine are hypobaric. The densities of local anesthetics and adjuvants decrease with the increase in temperature and increase when glucose is added. The knowledge of the relative density helps select the most adequate local anesthetic to be administered in the subarachnoid space.

  7. Improvement to reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    The vessel described includes a prestressed concrete vessel containing a chamber and a removable cover closing this chamber. The cover is in concrete and is kept in its closed position by main and auxiliary retainers, comprising fittings integral with the concrete of the vessel. The auxiliary retainers pass through the concrete of the cover. This improvement may be applied to BWR, PWR and LMFBR type reactor vessel [fr

  8. ALICE HMPID Radiator Vessel

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    View of the radiator vessels of the ALICE/HMPID mounted on the support frame. Each HMPID module is equipped with 3 indipendent radiator vessels made out of neoceram and fused silica (quartz) windows glued together. The spacers inside the vessel are needed to stand the hydrostatic pressure. http://alice-hmpid.web.cern.ch/alice-hmpid

  9. Motor unit properties of biceps brachii in chronic stroke patients assessed with high-density surface EMG

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kallenberg, L.A.C.; Hermens, Hermanus J.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate motor unit (MU) characteristics of the biceps brachii in post-stroke patients, using high-density surface electromyography (sEMG). Eighteen chronic hemiparetic stroke patients took part. The Fugl-Meyer score for the upper extremity was assessed. Subjects

  10. Bone geometry, volumetric density, microarchitecture, and estimated bone strength assessed by HR-pQCT in Klinefelter syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shanbhogue, Vikram V; Hansen, Stinus; Jørgensen, Niklas Rye

    2014-01-01

    Although the expected skeletal manifestations of testosterone deficiency in Klinefelter's syndrome (KS) are osteopenia and osteoporosis, the structural basis for this is unclear. The aim of this study was to assess bone geometry, volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD), microarchitecture...

  11. A Comparative Study of Quantitative Assessment of Bone Mineral Density of Mandible

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Won Kyl; Choi, Eui Hwan; Kim, Jae Duk

    1999-01-01

    This study was performed to compare the bone mineral densities measured at mandibular premolar area by copper-equivalent image and hydroxyapatite phantom with those measured at radius by dual energy absorptiometry and to evaluate the clinical usefulness of Digital system with slide scanner, copper-equivalent image, and hydroxyapatite phantom. For experiment, intraoral radiograms of 15 normal subjects ranged from 20 years old to 67 old were taken with copper-step wedge at mandibular premolar area and bone mineral densities calculated by conversion equation to bone mineral density of hydroxyapatite were compared with those measured at radius distal 1/3 area by Hologic QDR-1000. Obtained results as follows: 1) The conversion equation was Y=5.97X-0.25 and its determination coefficient was 0.9967. The coefficient of variation in the measurement of copper-equivalent value ranged from 4% to 8% and showed high reproducibility. 2) The coefficient of variation in the measurement of bone mineral density by the equation ranged from 7% to 8% and showed high reproducibility. 3) The bone mineral densities ranged from 0.35 to 0.79 g/cm 2 at mandibular premolar area. 4) The correlation coefficient between bone mineral densities at mandibular premolar area and those at radius distal 1/3 area was 0.8965. As summary, digital image analyzing system using copper-equivalent image and hydroxyapatite phantom appeared to be clinically useful to measure the bone mineral density at dental area.

  12. Clinical assessment of the early myocardial Tc-99m-PYP uptake as an indicator of successful recanalization in the acutely infarcted vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Makoto; Yuzuki, Yousuke; Miyazaki, Yukio; Kurose, Takesi; Matsunaga, Kazuhiko; Simono, Yukio

    1986-01-01

    A noninvasive useful method is required to early ascertain the effect of intracoronary thrombolysis (ICT) currently performed for acute myocardial infarction (AMI). In the present study, Tc-99m-pyrophosphate (PYP) scintigraphy was performed early (2.8 - 9.3 hr) after the onset of symptoms in 34 patients undergoing ICT. Of 27 patients in whom favorable recanalization was obtained, 24 had positive early scintigrams. In the other 7 patients in whom ICT was unsuccessful, scintigrams were negative. In 3 of them, favorable collateral circulation was seen. The findings were compared with those within 16 hr after the onset for the peak levels of creatine kinase (CK) and MB-CK. Early PYP scintigraphy had a sensitivity of 89 %, specificity of 100 %, and predictive accuracy of 91 % in assessing the recanalization in the infarcted vessels. The corresponding figiures were 70 %, 86 %, and 74 % for CK levels; and 70 %, 71 %, and 71 % for MB-CK levels. The results indicate that PYP scintigraphy may be a useful aid in the diagnosis of recanalization. The mechanism for PYP uptake on early scintigrams may be explained by the passage of excessive Ca ion into the ischemic myocardial cells through the rapid recanalization, resulting in accelerated cell death (reperfusion necrosis). (Namekawa, K.)

  13. Aortic stiffness is associated with cardiac function and cerebral small vessel disease in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus: assessment by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elderen, Saskia G.C. van; Brandts, A.; Westenberg, J.J.M.; Grond, J. van der; Buchem, M.A. van; Kroft, L.J.M.; Roos, A. de [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Leiden (Netherlands); Tamsma, J.T.; Romijn, J.A.; Smit, J.W.A. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Endocrinology, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2010-05-15

    To evaluate, with the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), whether aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) is associated with cardiac left ventricular (LV) function and mass as well as with cerebral small vessel disease in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM). We included 86 consecutive type 1 DM patients (49 male, mean age 46.9 {+-} 11.7 years) in a prospective, cross-sectional study. Exclusion criteria included aortic/heart disease and general MRI contra-indications. MRI of the aorta, heart and brain was performed for assessment of aortic PWV, as a marker of aortic stiffness, systolic LV function and mass, as well as for the presence of cerebral white matter hyperintensities (WMHs), microbleeds and lacunar infarcts. Multivariate linear or logistic regression was performed to analyse the association between aortic PWV and outcome parameters, with covariates defined as age, gender, mean arterial pressure, heart rate, BMI, smoking, DM duration and hypertension. Mean aortic PWV was 7.1 {+-} 2.5 m/s. Aortic PWV was independently associated with LV ejection fraction (ss= -0.406, P = 0.006), LV stroke volume (ss=-0.407, P = 0.001), LV cardiac output (ss= -0.458, P = 0.001), and with cerebral WMHs (P < 0.05). There were no independent associations between aortic stiffness and LV mass, cerebral microbleeds or lacunar infarcts. Aortic stiffness is independently associated with systolic LV function and cerebral WMHs in patients with type 1 DM. (orig.)

  14. Clinical assessment of the early myocardial Tc-99m-PYP uptake as an indicator of successful recanalization in the acutely infarcted vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondo, Makoto; Yuzuki, Yousuke; Miyazaki, Yukio; Kurose, Takesi; Matsunaga, Kazuhiko; Simono, Yukio

    1986-11-01

    A noninvasive useful method is required to early ascertain the effect of intracoronary thrombolysis (ICT) currently performed for acute myocardial infarction (AMI). In the present study, Tc-99m-pyrophosphate (PYP) scintigraphy was performed early (2.8 - 9.3 hr) after the onset of symptoms in 34 patients undergoing ICT. Of 27 patients in whom favorable recanalization was obtained, 24 had positive early scintigrams. In the other 7 patients in whom ICT was unsuccessful, scintigrams were negative. In 3 of them, favorable collateral circulation was seen. The findings were compared with those within 16 hr after the onset for the peak levels of creatine kinase (CK) and MB-CK. Early PYP scintigraphy had a sensitivity of 89 %, specificity of 100 %, and predictive accuracy of 91 % in assessing the recanalization in the infarcted vessels. The corresponding figiures were 70 %, 86 %, and 74 % for CK levels; and 70 %, 71 %, and 71 % for MB-CK levels. The results indicate that PYP scintigraphy may be a useful aid in the diagnosis of recanalization. The mechanism for PYP uptake on early scintigrams may be explained by the passage of excessive Ca ion into the ischemic myocardial cells through the rapid recanalization, resulting in accelerated cell death (reperfusion necrosis). (Namekawa, K.).

  15. Aortic stiffness is associated with cardiac function and cerebral small vessel disease in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus: assessment by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elderen, Saskia G.C. van; Brandts, A.; Westenberg, J.J.M.; Grond, J. van der; Buchem, M.A. van; Kroft, L.J.M.; Roos, A. de; Tamsma, J.T.; Romijn, J.A.; Smit, J.W.A.

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate, with the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), whether aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) is associated with cardiac left ventricular (LV) function and mass as well as with cerebral small vessel disease in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM). We included 86 consecutive type 1 DM patients (49 male, mean age 46.9 ± 11.7 years) in a prospective, cross-sectional study. Exclusion criteria included aortic/heart disease and general MRI contra-indications. MRI of the aorta, heart and brain was performed for assessment of aortic PWV, as a marker of aortic stiffness, systolic LV function and mass, as well as for the presence of cerebral white matter hyperintensities (WMHs), microbleeds and lacunar infarcts. Multivariate linear or logistic regression was performed to analyse the association between aortic PWV and outcome parameters, with covariates defined as age, gender, mean arterial pressure, heart rate, BMI, smoking, DM duration and hypertension. Mean aortic PWV was 7.1 ± 2.5 m/s. Aortic PWV was independently associated with LV ejection fraction (ss= -0.406, P = 0.006), LV stroke volume (ss=-0.407, P = 0.001), LV cardiac output (ss= -0.458, P = 0.001), and with cerebral WMHs (P < 0.05). There were no independent associations between aortic stiffness and LV mass, cerebral microbleeds or lacunar infarcts. Aortic stiffness is independently associated with systolic LV function and cerebral WMHs in patients with type 1 DM. (orig.)

  16. Preliminary Assessment of the Impact on Reactor Vessel dpa Rates Due to Installation of a Proposed Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) Core in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daily, Charles R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-10-01

    An assessment of the impact on the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) reactor vessel (RV) displacements-per-atom (dpa) rates due to operations with the proposed low enriched uranium (LEU) core described by Ilas and Primm has been performed and is presented herein. The analyses documented herein support the conclusion that conversion of HFIR to low-enriched uranium (LEU) core operations using the LEU core design of Ilas and Primm will have no negative impact on HFIR RV dpa rates. Since its inception, HFIR has been operated with highly enriched uranium (HEU) cores. As part of an effort sponsored by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), conversion to LEU cores is being considered for future HFIR operations. The HFIR LEU configurations analyzed are consistent with the LEU core models used by Ilas and Primm and the HEU balance-of-plant models used by Risner and Blakeman in the latest analyses performed to support the HFIR materials surveillance program. The Risner and Blakeman analyses, as well as the studies documented herein, are the first to apply the hybrid transport methods available in the Automated Variance reduction Generator (ADVANTG) code to HFIR RV dpa rate calculations. These calculations have been performed on the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Institutional Cluster (OIC) with version 1.60 of the Monte Carlo N-Particle 5 (MCNP5) computer code.

  17. Welfare aspects of stocking density in farmed rainbow trout, assessed by behavioural and physiological methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Danielle Caroline

    level was established that showed indications of crowding. The results revealed that a level of aversion to crowding had been reached at an absolute density of approximately 140 kg m–3. Additionally, the influence of the established density limit on physiological indicators of welfare and performance...... were investigated. At this density of 140 kg m–3, the lower oxygen consumption rates and lower quantity of scale loss collected from the tanks suggested reduced levels of social hierarchy related aggressive encounters. Higher brain serotonergic activity in the brain stem of individuals held...

  18. 78 FR 40651 - Regulated Navigation Area; Special Buzzards Bay Vessel Regulation, Buzzards Bay, MA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-08

    ... Carrier Program RNA Regulated Navigation Area RA Technical Risk Assessment VMRS Vessel Movement Reporting... avoid the fragmentation of regulatory regimes as a vessel transits across State [[Page 40652

  19. Vessel architecture in human knee cartilage in children: an in vivo susceptibility-weighted imaging study at 7 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, Alexander; Robinson, Simon; Stelzeneder, David; Schreiner, Markus; Chiari, Catharina; Windhager, Reinhard; Trattnig, Siegfried; Bohndorf, Klaus

    2018-02-26

    To evaluate the clinical feasibility of ultrahigh field 7-T SWI to visualize vessels and assess their density in the immature epiphyseal cartilage of human knee joints. 7-T SWI of 12 knees (six healthy volunteers, six patients with osteochondral abnormalities; mean age 10.7 years; 3 female, 9 male) were analysed by two readers, classifying intracartilaginous vessel densities (IVD) in three grades (no vessels, low IVD and high IVD) in defined femoral, tibial and patellar zones. Differences between patients and volunteers, IVDs in different anatomic locations, differences between cartilage overlying osteochondral abnormalities and corresponding normal zones, and differences in age groups were analysed. Interrater reliability showed moderate agreement between the two readers (κ = 0.58, p < 0.001). The comparison of IVDs between patients and volunteers revealed no significant difference (p = 0.706). The difference between zones in the cartilage overlying osteochondral abnormalities to corresponding normal zones showed no significant difference (p = 0.564). IVDs were related to anatomic location, with decreased IVDs in loading areas (p = 0.003). IVD was age dependent, with more vessels present in the younger participants (p = 0.001). The use of SWI in conjunction with ultrahigh field MRI makes the in vivo visualization of vessels in the growing cartilage of humans feasible, providing insights into the role of the vessel network in acquired disturbances. • SWI facilitates in vivo visualization of vessels in the growing human cartilage. • Interrater reliability of the intracartilaginous vessel grading was moderate. • Intracartilaginous vessel densities are dependent on anatomical location and age.

  20. Assessing the functional properties of high-density lipoproteins : an emerging concept in cardiovascular research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Triolo, Michela; Annema, Wijtske; Dullaart, Robin P. F.; Tietge, Uwe J. F.

    Although plasma concentrations of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol correlate inversely with the incidence of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, results from recent epidemiological, genetic and pharmacological intervention studies resulted in a shift of concept. Rather than HDL

  1. Project of integrity assessment of flawed components with structural discontinuity (IAF). Data book for estimation stress intensity factor. Surface crack on ICM housing for penetration in reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-12-01

    The project of Integrity Assessment of Flawed Components with Structural Discontinuity (IAF) was entrusted to Japan Power Engineering and Inspection Corporation (JAPEIC) from Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency (NISA) and started from FY 2001. And then, it was taken over to Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization (JNES) which was established in October 2003 and carried out until FY 2007. In the IAF project, weld joints between nickel based alloys and low alloy steels around penetrations in reactor vessel, safe-end of nozzles and shroud supports were selected from among components and pipe arrangements in nuclear power plants, where high residual stresses were generated due to welding and complex structure. Residual stresses around of the weld joints were estimated by finite element analysis method (FEM) with a general modeling method, then the reasonability and the conservativeness was evaluated. In addition, for postulated surface crack of stress corrosion cracking (SCC), a simple calculation method of stress intensity factor (K) required to estimate the crack growth was proposed and the effectiveness was confirmed. JNES compiled results of the IAF project into Data Books of Residual Stress Analysis of Weld Joint, and Data Book of Simplified Stress Intensity Factor Calculation for Penetration of Reactor as typical Structure Discontinuity, respectively. Data Books of Residual Stress Analysis in Weld Joint. 1. Butt Weld Joint of Small Diameter Cylinder (4B Sch40) (JNES-RE-2012-0005), 2. Dissimilar Metal Weld Joint in Safe End (One-Side Groove Joint (JNES-RE-2012-0006), 3. Dissimilar Metal Weld Joint in Safe End (Large Diameter Both-Side Groove Joint) (JNES-RE-2012-0007), 4. Weld Joint around Penetrations in Reactor Vessel (Insert Joint) (JNES-RE-2012-0008), 5. Weld Joint in Shroud Support (H8, H9, H10 and H11 Welds) (JNES-RE-2012-0009), 6. Analysis Model of Dissimilar Metal Weld Joint Applied Post Weld Heat Treatment (PWHT) (JNES-RE-2012-0010). Data Book of

  2. Assessment of density-functional approximations: Long-range correlations and self-interaction effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, J.; Alvarellos, J.E.; Garcia-Gonzalez, P.; Godby, R.W.

    2004-01-01

    The complex nature of electron-electron correlations is made manifest in the very simple but nontrivial problem of two electrons confined within a sphere. The description of highly nonlocal correlation and self-interaction effects by widely used local and semilocal exchange-correlation energy density functionals is shown to be unsatisfactory in most cases. Even the best such functionals exhibit significant errors in the Kohn-Sham potentials and density profiles

  3. Primary stability and self-tapping blades: biomechanical assessment of dental implants in medium-density bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yung-Soo; Lim, Young-Jun

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this biomechanical study was to assess the influence of self-tapping blades in terms of primary implant stability between implants with self-tapping blades and implants without self-tapping blades using five different analytic methods, especially in medium-density bone. Two different types of dental implants (4 × 10 mm) were tested: self-tapping and non-self-tapping. The fixture design including thread profiles was exactly the same between the two groups; the only difference was the presence of cutting blades on one half of the apical portion of the implant body. Solid rigid polyurethane blocks with corresponding densities were selected to simulate medium-density bone. Five mechanical assessments (insertion torque, resonance frequency analysis [RFA], reverse torque, pull-out and push in test) were performed for primary stability. Implants without self-tapping blades showed significantly higher values (P0.05). The outcomes of the present study indicate that the implant body design without self-tapping blades has a good primary stability compared with that with self-tapping blades in medium-density bone. Considering the RFA, a distinct layer of cortical bone on marginal bone will yield implant stability quotient values similar to those in medium-bone density when implants have the same diameter. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  4. Large vessel imaging using cosmic-ray muons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenneson, P.M.

    2004-01-01

    Cosmic-ray muons are assessed for their practical use in the tomographic imaging of the internal composition of large vessels over 2 m in diameter. The technique is based on the attenuation and scattering of cosmic-ray muons passing through a vessel and has advantages over photon-based methods of tomography that it is extendable to object containing high-density materials over many tens of metres. The main disadvantage is the length of time required to produce images of sufficient resolution and hence cosmic ray muon tomography will be most suited to the imaging of large structures whose internal composition is effectively static for the duration of the imaging period. Simulation and theoretical results are presented here which demonstrate the feasibility of cosmic ray muon tomography

  5. Assessment of the effect of three-dimensional mantle density heterogeneity on earth rotation in tidal frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lanbo; Chao, Benjamin F; Sun, Wenke; Kuang, Weijia

    2016-11-01

    In this paper we report the assessment of the effect of the three-dimensional (3D) density heterogeneity in the mantle on Earth Orientation Parameters (EOP) (i.e., the polar motion, or PM, and the length of day, or LOD) in the tidal frequencies. The 3D mantle density model is estimated based upon a global S-wave velocity tomography model (S16U6L8) and the mineralogical knowledge derived from laboratory experiment. The lateral density variation is referenced against the Preliminary Reference Earth Model (PREM). Using this approach the effects of the heterogeneous mantle density variation in all three tidal frequencies (zonal long periods, tesseral diurnal, and sectorial semidiurnal) are estimated in both PM and LOD. When compared with mass or density perturbations originated on the earth's surface such as the oceanic and barometric changes, the heterogeneous mantle only contributes less than 10% of the total variation in PM and LOD in tidal frequencies. Nevertheless, including the 3D variation of the density in the mantle into account explained a substantial portion of the discrepancy between the observed signals in PM and LOD extracted from the lump-sum values based on continuous space geodetic measurement campaigns (e.g., CONT94) and the computed contribution from ocean tides as predicted by tide models derived from satellite altimetry observations (e.g., TOPEX/Poseidon). In other word, the difference of the two, at all tidal frequencies (long-periods, diurnals, and semi-diurnals) contains contributions of the lateral density heterogeneity of the mantle. Study of the effect of mantle density heterogeneity effect on torque-free earth rotation may provide useful constraints to construct the Reference Earth Model (REM), which is the next major objective in global geophysics research beyond PREM.

  6. Mammographic density and structural features can individually and jointly contribute to breast cancer risk assessment in mammography screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkel, Rikke Rass; von Euler-Chelpin, My Catarina; Nielsen, Mads

    2016-01-01

    and jointly with density can improve the ability to identify screening women at increased risk of breast cancer. METHODS: The study included 121 cases and 259 age- and time matched controls based on a cohort of 14,736 women with negative screening mammograms from a population-based screening programme...... in Denmark in 2007 (followed until 31 December 2010). Mammograms were assessed using the Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) density classification, Tabár's classification on parenchymal patterns and a fully automated texture quantification technique. The individual and combined association...

  7. An experimental study on feasibility of ex-vessel cooling through the external guide vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Kyoung-Ho; Kim, Jong-Hwan; Park, Rae-Jun; Kim, Sang-Baik

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a series of experiments for assessing the efficacy of ex-vessel cooling through the external guide vessel during a severe accident. Four tests were performed in the LAVA test facility at KAERI, varying the boundary conditions at the outer surface of the vessel. The first test was a dry condition test conducted without cooling the outside of the vessel. On the other hand, in the second test, the cooling of the vessel surface was produced by gravity-driven forced injection of water along the annular gap of 25 mm between the vessel and the external guide vessel. Water flow rate was about 0.85 kg/s and total mass of available water was 300 kg. For the evaluation of the water flow rate effect, the third test was performed with a pool type cooling in the annulus without any circulation of water. These two external cooling tests were performed under elevated pressure of about 1.6 MPa. Finally, the fourth test was conducted under atmospheric pressure to evaluate the effect of system pressure on boiling heat transfer characteristics. In the dry test and the pool type ex-vessel cooling test performed under atmospheric pressure, the vessel was failed by a melt penetration at about 40 degree upper position from the vessel bottom, which is coincident with the boundary of the Al 2 O 3 /Fe melt separated layers. On the other hand, in both of the ex-vessel cooling tests conducted under elevated pressure of about 1.6 MPa, the vessel didn't fail. Compared with the pool boiling test, the vessel experienced effective cooling due to the inlet flow in the forced flow test. Synthesized the results of the tests, it was shown that the heat removal with ex-vessel cooling through the guide vessel is feasible, but the additional evaluations should be performed to guarantee enough thermal margin. (author)

  8. Assessing different parameters estimation methods of Weibull distribution to compute wind power density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammadi, Kasra; Alavi, Omid; Mostafaeipour, Ali; Goudarzi, Navid; Jalilvand, Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Effectiveness of six numerical methods is evaluated to determine wind power density. • More appropriate method for computing the daily wind power density is estimated. • Four windy stations located in the south part of Alberta, Canada namely is investigated. • The more appropriate parameters estimation method was not identical among all examined stations. - Abstract: In this study, the effectiveness of six numerical methods is evaluated to determine the shape (k) and scale (c) parameters of Weibull distribution function for the purpose of calculating the wind power density. The selected methods are graphical method (GP), empirical method of Justus (EMJ), empirical method of Lysen (EML), energy pattern factor method (EPF), maximum likelihood method (ML) and modified maximum likelihood method (MML). The purpose of this study is to identify the more appropriate method for computing the wind power density in four stations distributed in Alberta province of Canada namely Edmonton City Center Awos, Grande Prairie A, Lethbridge A and Waterton Park Gate. To provide a complete analysis, the evaluations are performed on both daily and monthly scales. The results indicate that the precision of computed wind power density values change when different parameters estimation methods are used to determine the k and c parameters. Four methods of EMJ, EML, EPF and ML present very favorable efficiency while the GP method shows weak ability for all stations. However, it is found that the more effective method is not similar among stations owing to the difference in the wind characteristics.

  9. Assessment of soil sample quality used for density evaluations through computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pires, Luiz F.; Arthur, Robson C.J.; Bacchi, Osny O.S.

    2005-01-01

    There are several methods to measure soil bulk density (ρ s ) like the paraffin sealed clod (PS), the volumetric ring (VR), the computed tomography (CT), and the neutron-gamma surface gauge (SG). In order to evaluate by a non-destructive way the possible modifications in soil structure caused by sampling for the PS and VR methods of ρ s evaluation we proposed to use the gamma ray CT method. A first generation tomograph was used having a 241 Am source and a 3 in x 3 in NaI(Tl) scintillation crystal detector coupled to a photomultiplier tube. Results confirm the effect of soil sampler devices on the structure of soil samples, and that the compaction caused during sampling causes significant alterations of soil bulk density. Through the use of CT it was possible to determine the level of compaction and to make a detailed analysis of the soil bulk density distribution within the soil sample. (author)

  10. BONE MINERAL DENSITY IN PHYSICALLY ACTIVE WOMEN ASSESSED BY ULTRASOUND DESINTOMETRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Marijanac

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis is a disease characterized by low bone mass and density. Physical activity has a positive effect on bone tissue, and it is recommended to prevent bone loss which comes with age. Methods: In purpose of determining bone mineral density in women who are physically active we examined 35 women divided into two groups – subjects who are premenopausal (n=20, 43.52 ± 7.56 years, and subjects who are postmenopausal (n=15, 55.89 ± 5.48. The subjects exercised Pilates method twice a week for one hour. Bone mineral density measurements were done by ultrasound densitometer „Sahara“ through the calcaneus. We get the data of the estimated bone density and T-score for right and left foot separate. Results: According to results premenopausal women have normal bone density, and postmenopausal values represent osteopenia, according to the WHO. There is no subjects who established osteoporosis. Discussion: Previous investigations have confirmed that physical activity is important for the preservation of the bone quality. Increasing steps, using simple everyday tasks, can prevent decrease in BMD in postmenopausal women (Muir et al., 2013, Ashe et al, 2008. There’s difference in the density of the calcaneus between physically active and those who are not, measured by ultrasound densitometry (Vainionpää et al, 2005. We use quantitative ultrasound densitometry to describe BMI of women who exercise Pilates and support the finding that physical activity is one of the ways that may prevent the BMD loss. These research was done as a part of long-term project entitled „Impact of physical activity of the working population“ which is co-financed by Provincial Secretariat for Science and Technological Development.

  11. Shannon Entropy in Atoms: A Test for the Assessment of Density Functionals in Kohn-Sham Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Amovilli

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Electron density is used to compute Shannon entropy. The deviation from the Hartree–Fock (HF of this quantity has been observed to be related to correlation energy. Thus, Shannon entropy is here proposed as a valid quantity to assess the quality of an energy density functional developed within Kohn–Sham theory. To this purpose, results from eight different functionals, representative of Jacob’s ladder, are compared with accurate results obtained from diffusion quantum Monte Carlo (DMC computations. For three series of atomic ions, our results show that the revTPSS and the PBE0 functionals are the best, whereas those based on local density approximation give the largest discrepancy from DMC Shannon entropy.

  12. Assessment of gene-by-sex interaction effect on bone mineral density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Ching-Ti; Estrada, Karol; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M

    2012-01-01

    Sexual dimorphism in various bone phenotypes, including bone mineral density (BMD), is widely observed; however, the extent to which genes explain these sex differences is unclear. To identify variants with different effects by sex, we examined gene-by-sex autosomal interactions genome-wide, and ......Sexual dimorphism in various bone phenotypes, including bone mineral density (BMD), is widely observed; however, the extent to which genes explain these sex differences is unclear. To identify variants with different effects by sex, we examined gene-by-sex autosomal interactions genome...

  13. Assessment of the Resistance to External Factors of Low-Density Polyethylene Modified with Natural Fillers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Głogowska

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The study reports the results of investigation of basic processing and thermal properties of low-density polyethylene modified with two types of natural filler: wheat bran and pumpkin seed hulls, their content ranging from 5% to 15% relative to the matrix. In addition, the physical properties of the produced granulates are determined, i.e. the relationship between their density and the applied contents of the tested fillers. Furthermore, the study reports the results concerning the longitudinal shrinkage, abrasion resistance and cold water absorption of injection molded tensile specimens.

  14. Micro-computed tomography assessment of human alveolar bone: bone density and three-dimensional micro-architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoon Jeong; Henkin, Jeffrey

    2015-04-01

    Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) is a valuable means to evaluate and secure information related to bone density and quality in human necropsy samples and small live animals. The aim of this study was to assess the bone density of the alveolar jaw bones in human cadaver, using micro-CT. The correlation between bone density and three-dimensional micro architecture of trabecular bone was evaluated. Thirty-four human cadaver jaw bone specimens were harvested. Each specimen was scanned with micro-CT at resolution of 10.5 μm. The bone volume fraction (BV/TV) and the bone mineral density (BMD) value within a volume of interest were measured. The three-dimensional micro architecture of trabecular bone was assessed. All the parameters in the maxilla and the mandible were subject to comparison. The variables for the bone density and the three-dimensional micro architecture were analyzed for nonparametric correlation using Spearman's rho at the significance level of p architecture parameters were consistently higher in the mandible, up to 3.3 times greater than those in the maxilla. The most linear correlation was observed between BV/TV and BMD, with Spearman's rho = 0.99 (p = .01). Both BV/TV and BMD were highly correlated with all micro architecture parameters with Spearman's rho above 0.74 (p = .01). Two aspects of bone density using micro-CT, the BV/TV and BMD, are highly correlated with three-dimensional micro architecture parameters, which represent the quality of trabecular bone. This noninvasive method may adequately enhance evaluation of the alveolar bone. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Development of a Short-term Failure Assessment of High Density Polyethylene Pipe Welds - Application of the Limit Load Analysis -

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Ho-Wan; Han, Jae-Jun; Kim, Yun-Jae [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong-Sung [Sunchon National University, Suncheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jeong-Hyeon; Jang, Chang-Heui [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    In the US, the number of cases of subterranean water contamination from tritium leaking through a damaged buried nuclear power plant pipe continues to increase, and the degradation of the buried metal piping is emerging as a major issue. A pipe blocked from corrosion and/or degradation can lead to loss of cooling capacity in safety-related piping resulting in critical issues related to the safety and integrity of nuclear power plant operation. The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Codes Committee (BPVC) has recently approved Code Case N-755 that describes the requirements for the use of polyethylene (PE) pipe for the construction of Section III, Division 1 Class 3 buried piping systems for service water applications in nuclear power plants. This paper contains tensile and slow crack growth (SCG) test results for high-density polyethylene (HDPE) pipe welds under the environmental conditions of a nuclear power plant. Based on these tests, the fracture surface of the PENT specimen was analyzed, and the fracture mechanisms of each fracture area were determined. Finally, by using 3D finite element analysis, limit loads of HDPE related to premature failure were verified.

  16. Assessment of adsorbate density models for numerical simulations of zeolite-based heat storage applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmann, Christoph; Beckert, Steffen; Gläser, Roger; Kolditz, Olaf; Nagel, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Characteristic curves fit for binderless Zeolite 13XBFK. • Detailed comparison of adsorbate density models for Dubinin’s adsorption theory. • Predicted heat storage densities robust against choice of density model. • Use of simple linear density models sufficient. - Abstract: The study of water sorption in microporous materials is of increasing interest, particularly in the context of heat storage applications. The potential-theory of micropore volume filling pioneered by Polanyi and Dubinin is a useful tool for the description of adsorption equilibria. Based on one single characteristic curve, the system can be extensively characterised in terms of isotherms, isobars, isosteres, enthalpies etc. However, the mathematical description of the adsorbate density’s temperature dependence has a significant impact especially on the estimation of the energetically relevant adsorption enthalpies. Here, we evaluate and compare different models existing in the literature and elucidate those leading to realistic predictions of adsorption enthalpies. This is an important prerequisite for accurate simulations of heat and mass transport ranging from the laboratory scale to the reactor level of the heat store.

  17. Intraskeletal variation in human cortical osteocyte lacunar density: Implications for bone quality assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randee L. Hunter

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Osteocytes and their lacunocanalicular network have been identified as the regulator of bone quality and function by exerting extensive influence over metabolic processes, mechanical adaptation, and mineral homeostasis. Recent research has shown that osteocyte apoptosis leads to a decrease in bone quality and increase in bone fragility mediated through its effects on remodeling. The purpose of this study is to investigate variation in cortical bone osteocyte lacunar density with respect to major factors including sex, age, and intracortical porosity to establish both regional and systemic trends. Samples from the midshaft femur, midshaft rib and distal one-third diaphysis of the radius were recovered from 30 modern cadaveric individuals (15 males and 15 females ranging from 49 to 100 years old. Thick ground undecalcified histological (80 μm cross-sections were made and imaged under bright field microscopy. Osteocyte lacunar density (Ot.Lc.N/B.Ar and intracortical porosity (%Po.Ar were quantified. No significant sex differences in Ot.Lc.N/B.Ar or %Po.Ar were found in any element. Linear regressions demonstrated a significant decrease in osteocyte lacunar density (Ot.Lc.N/B.Ar and increase in intracortical porosity (%Po.Ar with age for the sex-pooled sample in the femur (R2 = 0.208, 0.297 respectively and radius (R2 = 0.108, 0.545 respectively. Age was unable to significantly predict osteocyte lacunar density or intracortical porosity in the rib (R2 = 0.058, 0.114 respectively. Comparisons of regression coefficients demonstrated a systemic trend in the decrease in osteocyte lacunar density (Ot.Lc.N/B.Ar and increase in intracortical porosity (%Po.Ar with age. In each element, intracortical porosity was significantly negatively correlated with lacunar density for which the radius demonstrated the strongest relationship (r = −0.746. Using pore number (Po.N as a proxy for available vascularity to support the osteocyte population, Po

  18. The Osteoporosis Self-Assessment Tool versus alternative tests for selecting postmenopausal women for bone mineral density assessment: a comparative systematic review of accuracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rud, B; Hilden, J; Hyldstrup, L

    2008-01-01

    for Stiffness Index assessed by calcaneal quantitative ultrasonography than for OST (relative sDOR: 1.9, p = 0.005). Studies were few in Asian and black women. Methodological quality, assessed with the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (QUADAS) checklist, was generally low. CONCLUSIONS: In white......We performed a systematic review of studies comparing the Osteoporosis Self-Assessment Tool (OST) and other tests used to select women for bone mineral density (BMD) assessment. In comparative meta-analyses, we found that the accuracy of OST was similar to other tests that are based on information...... from the medical history. By contrast, assessment by quantitative ultrasonography at the heel was more accurate than OST in discriminating between women with high and low BMD. The methodological quality of the included studies was generally low. INTRODUCTION: Numerous tests are suggested for triaging...

  19. Comparison of Visual Assessment of Breast Density in BI-RADS 4th and 5th Editions With Automated Volumetric Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youk, Ji Hyun; Kim, So Jung; Son, Eun Ju; Gweon, Hye Mi; Kim, Jeong-Ah

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare visual assessments of mammographic breast density by radiologists using BI-RADS 4th and 5th editions in correlation with automated volumetric breast density measurements. A total of 337 consecutive full-field digital mammographic examinations with standard views were retrospectively assessed by two radiologists for mammographic breast density according to BI-RADS 4th and 5th editions. Fully automated measurement of the volume of fibroglandular tissue and total breast and percentage breast density was performed with a commercially available software program. Interobserver and intraobserver agreement was assessed with kappa statistics. The distributions of breast density categories for both editions of BI-RADS were compared and correlated with volumetric data. Interobserver agreement on breast density category was moderate to substantial (κ = 0.58-0.63) with use of BI-RADS 4th edition and substantial (κ = 0.63-0.66) with use of the 5th edition but without significant difference between the two editions. For intraobserver agreement between the two editions, the distributions of density category were significantly different (p density data, including percentage breast density, were significantly different among density categories (p density assessment had good correlation with visual assessment for both editions of BI-RADS.

  20. Pressure vessel design manual

    CERN Document Server

    Moss, Dennis R

    2013-01-01

    Pressure vessels are closed containers designed to hold gases or liquids at a pressure substantially different from the ambient pressure. They have a variety of applications in industry, including in oil refineries, nuclear reactors, vehicle airbrake reservoirs, and more. The pressure differential with such vessels is dangerous, and due to the risk of accident and fatality around their use, the design, manufacture, operation and inspection of pressure vessels is regulated by engineering authorities and guided by legal codes and standards. Pressure Vessel Design Manual is a solutions-focused guide to the many problems and technical challenges involved in the design of pressure vessels to match stringent standards and codes. It brings together otherwise scattered information and explanations into one easy-to-use resource to minimize research and take readers from problem to solution in the most direct manner possible. * Covers almost all problems that a working pressure vessel designer can expect to face, with ...

  1. Tumor Blood Vessel Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munn, Lance

    2009-11-01

    ``Normalization'' of tumor blood vessels has shown promise to improve the efficacy of chemotherapeutics. In theory, anti-angiogenic drugs targeting endothelial VEGF signaling can improve vessel network structure and function, enhancing the transport of subsequent cytotoxic drugs to cancer cells. In practice, the effects are unpredictable, with varying levels of success. The predominant effects of anti-VEGF therapies are decreased vessel leakiness (hydraulic conductivity), decreased vessel diameters and pruning of the immature vessel network. It is thought that each of these can influence perfusion of the vessel network, inducing flow in regions that were previously sluggish or stagnant. Unfortunately, when anti-VEGF therapies affect vessel structure and function, the changes are dynamic and overlapping in time, and it has been difficult to identify a consistent and predictable normalization ``window'' during which perfusion and subsequent drug delivery is optimal. This is largely due to the non-linearity in the system, and the inability to distinguish the effects of decreased vessel leakiness from those due to network structural changes in clinical trials or animal studies. We have developed a mathematical model to calculate blood flow in complex tumor networks imaged by two-photon microscopy. The model incorporates the necessary and sufficient components for addressing the problem of normalization of tumor vasculature: i) lattice-Boltzmann calculations of the full flow field within the vasculature and within the tissue, ii) diffusion and convection of soluble species such as oxygen or drugs within vessels and the tissue domain, iii) distinct and spatially-resolved vessel hydraulic conductivities and permeabilities for each species, iv) erythrocyte particles advecting in the flow and delivering oxygen with real oxygen release kinetics, v) shear stress-mediated vascular remodeling. This model, guided by multi-parameter intravital imaging of tumor vessel structure

  2. Assessment of dietary food and nutrient intake and bone density in children with eczema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, T F; Wang, S S; Kwok, F Yy; Leung, L Ws; Chow, C M; Hon, K L

    2017-10-01

    Dietary restrictions are common among patients with eczema, and such practice may lead to diminished bone mineral density. This study investigated dietary intake and bone mineral density in Hong Kong Chinese children with eczema. This cross-sectional and observational study was conducted in a university-affiliated teaching hospital in Hong Kong. Chinese children aged below 18 years with physician-diagnosed eczema were recruited from our paediatric allergy and dermatology clinics over a 6-month period in 2012. Subjects with stable asthma and/or allergic rhinitis who were free of eczema and food allergy as well as non-allergic children were recruited from attendants at our out-patient clinics as a reference group. Intake of various foods and nutrients was recorded using a food frequency questionnaire that was analysed using Foodworks Professional software. Bone mineral density at the radius and the tibia was measured by quantitative ultrasound bone sonometry, and urinary cross-linked telopeptides were quantified by immunoassay and corrected for creatinine level. Overall, 114 children with eczema and 60 other children as reference group were recruited. Eczema severity of the patients was classified according to the objective SCORing Atopic Dermatitis score. Males had a higher daily energy intake than females (median, 7570 vs 6736 kJ; P=0.035), but intake of any single food item or nutrient did not differ between them. Compared with the reference group, children with eczema had a higher intake of soybeans and miscellaneous dairy products and lower intake of eggs, beef, and shellfish. Children with eczema also consumed less vitamin D, calcium, and iron. The mean (standard deviation) bone mineral density Z-score of children with eczema and those in the reference group were 0.52 (0.90) and 0.55 (1.12) over the radius (P=0.889), and 0.02 (1.03) and -0.01 (1.13) over the tibia (P=0.886), respectively. Urine telopeptide levels were similar between the groups. Calcium intake

  3. Maury Journals - German Vessels

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — German vessels observations, after the 1853 Brussels Conference that set International Maritime Standards, modeled after Maury Marine Standard Observations.

  4. Dopamine transporter density in the basal ganglia assessed with 123I-IPT SPECT in children with Tourette's deosoder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Y. H.; Cheon, K. A.; Yoon, M. J.; Kim, C. H.; Lee, J. D.; Kim, H. H.; Choi, T. H.

    2002-01-01

    Previous studies in patients with Tourette's disorder (TD) provided evidences of presynaptic dopaminergic dysfunction, demonstrating increased dopamine transporter densities. We investigated dopamine transporter densities using 123 I-IPT SPECT in drug-naive children with TD and postulated that dopamine transporter density reflected dopamine concentrations. 9 drug-naive children with ADHD and 8 normal children were included in the study. We performed brain SPECT 2 hours after administration of 123 I-IPT and made both quantitative and qualitative analyses for assessment of specific/nonspecific DAT binding ratio in the BG. We then investigated correlation between the severity of tics in children with TD assessed with the YGTSS and specific/nonspecific binding ratio on BG. Drug-naive children with TD showed a significantly increased specific/nonspecific DAT binding ratio in the BG compared with normal children. We found no significant correlation between severity of tics assessed with YGTSS in children with TD and specific/nonspecific DAT binding ratio in BG. These findings support the hypothesis of dopamine dysregulation in presynaptic dopamine function of BG being involved in pathophysiology of TD

  5. Assessment of the Density Functional Tight Binding Method for Protic Ionic Liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addicoat, Matthew A; Stefanovic, Ryan; Webber, Grant B; Atkin, Rob; Page, Alister J

    2014-10-14

    Density functional tight binding (DFTB), which is ∼100-1000 times faster than full density functional theory (DFT), has been used to simulate the structure and properties of protic ionic liquid (IL) ions, clusters of ions and the bulk liquid. Proton affinities for a wide range of IL cations and anions determined using DFTB generally reproduce G3B3 values to within 5-10 kcal/mol. The structures and thermodynamic stabilities of n -alkyl ammonium nitrate clusters (up to 450 quantum chemical atoms) predicted with DFTB are in excellent agreement with those determined using DFT. The IL bulk structure simulated using DFTB with periodic boundary conditions is in excellent agreement with published neutron diffraction data.

  6. The assessment of reactor pressure vessel defects allowing for crack tip constraint and its effect on the calculation of the onset of the upper shelf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beardsmore, D.W.; Dowling, A.R.; Lidbury, D.P.G.; Sherry, A.H.

    2003-01-01

    The paper shows how a specialised application of the R6 method could be used to calculate a pressure-temperature failure envelope for postulated defects in a reactor pressure vessel (RPV), making due allowance for the distribution of constraint around the crack front. As such, the technique provides a means of estimating a defect-specific onset of upper shelf temperature (OUST). A material's constraint-based toughness behaviour can be described using separate curves to represent the variations of ductile fracture toughness with constraint and cleavage fracture toughness with constraint and temperature. Armed with such a constraint-based material response, and the calculated variation of constraint with pressure determined at different points along the crack front of a defect, the pressure-temperature failure envelope can be estimated by solving equations inherent in the R6 method. The method is illustrated for a spherical RPV fabricated from ferritic steel, with radius 10 m and wall thickness 100 mm, by application to three postulated surface-breaking defects: an extended, circumferential defect; and two semi-elliptical defects. Constraint-based fracture toughness curves can be obtained by applying micro-mechanical models to a series of modified boundary layer Finite Element analyses. For each postulated defect an estimate of the OUST is presented and compared against the value which would be obtained from an assessment of high constraint fracture toughness data. For the 5 mm deep extended, circumferential defect, allowance for loss of constraint resulted in a beneficial shift (i.e. to a lower temperature) in the OUST of about -18.8 deg. C. For the 5 mm deep by 30 mm long surface breaking, semi-elliptical defect, there was a shift in the OUST of -17.8 deg. C, a value which did not change appreciably when residual stresses were allowed for. For the 25 mm deep by 150 mm long surface-breaking, semi-elliptical defect, the OUST was shifted by -19.7 deg. C without

  7. Quantitative Assessment of Mammary Gland Density in Rodents Using Digital Image Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thompson Henry J

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rodent models have been used extensively to study mammary gland development and for studies of toxicology and carcinogenesis. Mammary gland gross morphology can visualized via the excision of intact mammary gland chains following fixation and staining with carmine using a tissue preparation referred to as a whole mount. Methods are described for the automated collection of digital images from an entire mammary gland whole mount and for the interrogation of digital data using a "masking" technique available with Image-Pro® plus image analysis software (Mediacybernetics. Silver Spring, MD. Results Parallel to mammographic analysis in humans, measurements of rodent mammary gland density were derived from area-based or volume-based algorithms and included: total circumscribed mammary fat pad mass, mammary epithelial mass, and epithelium-free fat pad mass. These values permitted estimation of absolute mass of mammary epithelium as well as breast density. The biological plausibility of these measurements was evaluated in mammary whole mounts from rats and mice. During mammary gland development, absolute epithelial mass increased linearly without significant changes in mammographic density. Treatment of rodents with tamoxifen, 9-cis-retinoic acid, or ovariectomy, and occurrence of diet induced obesity decreased both absolute epithelial mass and mammographic density. The area and volumetric methods gave similar results. Conclusions Digital image analysis can be used for screening agents for potential impact on reproductive toxicity or carcinogenesis as well as for mechanistic studies, particularly for cumulative effects on mammary epithelial mass as well as translational studies of mechanisms that explain the relationship between epithelial mass and cancer risk.

  8. Reliability assessment of a bi-material notch: Strain energy density factor approach

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klusák, Jan; Knésl, Zdeněk

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 2 (2010), s. 89-93 ISSN 0167-8442 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP108/10/2049; GA ČR GA101/08/0994 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : crack initiation * bi-material notch * strain energy density factor Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 1.073, year: 2010

  9. Assessment of lesser prairie-chicken lek density relative to landscape characteristics in Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timmer, Jennifer; Butler, Matthew; Ballard, Warren; Boal, Clint; Whitlaw, Heather

    2012-08-31

    My 2.5-yr Master's project accomplished the objectives of estimating lesser prairie-chicken (LPC) lek density and abundance in the Texas occupied range and modeling anthropogenic and landscape features associated with lek density by flying helicopter lek surveys for 2 field seasons and employing a line-transect distance sampling method. This project was important for several reasons. Firstly, wildlife managers and biologists have traditionally monitored LPC populations with road-based surveys that may result in biased estimates and do not provide access to privately-owned or remote property. From my aerial surveys and distance sampling, I was able to provide accurate density and abundance estimates, as well as new leks and I detected LPCs outside the occupied range. Secondly, recent research has indicated that energy development has the potential to impact LPCs through avoidance of tall structures, increased mortality from raptors perching on transmission lines, disturbance to nesting hens, and habitat loss/fragmentation. Given the potential wind energy development in the Texas Panhandle, spatial models of current anthropogenic and vegetative features (such as transmission lines, roads, and percent native grassland) influencing lek density were needed. This information provided wildlife managers and wind energy developers in Texas with guidelines for how change in landscape features could impact LPCs. Lastly, LPC populations have faced range-wide declines over the last century and they are currently listed as a candidate species under the Endangered Species Act. I was able to provide timely information on LPC populations in Texas that will be used during the listing process.

  10. Assessing food appeal and desire to eat: the effects of portion size & energy density

    OpenAIRE

    Cornier Marc A; Burger Kyle S; Ingebrigtsen Jan; Johnson Susan L

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Visual presentation of food provides considerable information such as its potential for palatability and availability, both of which can impact eating behavior. Methods We investigated the subjective ratings for food appeal and desire to eat when exposed to food pictures in a fed sample (n = 129) using the computer paradigm ImageRate. Food appeal and desire to eat were analyzed for the effects of food group, portion size and energy density of the foods presented as well as...

  11. Assessing food appeal and desire to eat: The effects of portion size & energy density

    OpenAIRE

    Burger, Kyle

    2017-01-01

    Background: Visual presentation of food provides considerable information such as its potential for palatability and availability, both of which can impact eating behavior. Methods: We investigated the subjective ratings for food appeal and desire to eat when exposed to food pictures in a fed sample (n=129) using the computer paradigm ImageRate. Food appeal and desire to eat were analyzed for the effects of food group, portion size and energy density of the foods presented as well as by parti...

  12. Parallel Assessment of Bone Mineral Density and RANKL/OPG Ratio in Saudi Females

    OpenAIRE

    AI Hassan; SA Eltarhouny; HE Hashem; SA Algaidi; AR Abdallah; AM Sandokji

    2016-01-01

    Background: Osteoporosis is a significant risk factor for morbidity, and its high prevalence among Saudi women should be considered to be a public health problem. Quantitative ultrasound was recommended for bone mineral density (BMD) screening. Receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG) and their ratio are critical for physiological bone remodelling, and related abnormalities may lead to several osteopathies. Methods: The BMD of 499 Saudi female...

  13. Combining quantitative and qualitative breast density measures to assess breast cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerlikowske, Karla; Ma, Lin; Scott, Christopher G; Mahmoudzadeh, Amir P; Jensen, Matthew R; Sprague, Brian L; Henderson, Louise M; Pankratz, V Shane; Cummings, Steven R; Miglioretti, Diana L; Vachon, Celine M; Shepherd, John A

    2017-08-22

    Accurately identifying women with dense breasts (Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System [BI-RADS] heterogeneously or extremely dense) who are at high breast cancer risk will facilitate discussions of supplemental imaging and primary prevention. We examined the independent contribution of dense breast volume and BI-RADS breast density to predict invasive breast cancer and whether dense breast volume combined with Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium (BCSC) risk model factors (age, race/ethnicity, family history of breast cancer, history of breast biopsy, and BI-RADS breast density) improves identifying women with dense breasts at high breast cancer risk. We conducted a case-control study of 1720 women with invasive cancer and 3686 control subjects. We calculated ORs and 95% CIs for the effect of BI-RADS breast density and Volpara™ automated dense breast volume on invasive cancer risk, adjusting for other BCSC risk model factors plus body mass index (BMI), and we compared C-statistics between models. We calculated BCSC 5-year breast cancer risk, incorporating the adjusted ORs associated with dense breast volume. Compared with women with BI-RADS scattered fibroglandular densities and second-quartile dense breast volume, women with BI-RADS extremely dense breasts and third- or fourth-quartile dense breast volume (75% of women with extremely dense breasts) had high breast cancer risk (OR 2.87, 95% CI 1.84-4.47, and OR 2.56, 95% CI 1.87-3.52, respectively), whereas women with extremely dense breasts and first- or second-quartile dense breast volume were not at significantly increased breast cancer risk (OR 1.53, 95% CI 0.75-3.09, and OR 1.50, 95% CI 0.82-2.73, respectively). Adding continuous dense breast volume to a model with BCSC risk model factors and BMI increased discriminatory accuracy compared with a model with only BCSC risk model factors (C-statistic 0.639, 95% CI 0.623-0.654, vs. C-statistic 0.614, 95% CI 0.598-0.630, respectively; P breasts and fourth

  14. Assessment of bone mineral density in adults with a history of juvenile chronic arthritis: a cross-sectional long-term followup study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zak, M; Hassager, C; Lovell, D J

    1999-01-01

    To assess bone mineral density (BMD) and bone turnover in adults with a history of juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA) or persistent JCA, and to identify predictors of reduced BMD.......To assess bone mineral density (BMD) and bone turnover in adults with a history of juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA) or persistent JCA, and to identify predictors of reduced BMD....

  15. An approach to assess trends of pharmacist workforce production and density rate in Serbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milicevic, Milena Santric; Matejic, Bojana; Terzic-Supic, Zorica; Dedovic, Neveka; Novak, Sonja

    2010-01-01

    The policy dialog on human resource in health care is one of the central issues of the ongoing health care system reform in the Republic of Serbia. Pharmacists are the third largest health care professional group, after nurses and doctors. This study's objective was to analyze population coverage with pharmacists employed in the public sector of health care system of Serbia during 1961 - 2007, and to project their density by 2017. In this respect, additionally, time-series of annual number of enrolled and graduate pharmacy students were modelled. Time trends of routinely collected national statistical data, concerning the pharmacists, were analyzed by join point regression program, according to grid-search method. During the observed period of time, in Serbia, pharmacist workforce production and deployment trends were generally positive, but with different annual dynamic. Key findings were the slow rise of pharmacist workforce density rates per 100,000 population; the insufficient balance between pharmacists workforce supply side (annual number of enrolled and graduated students) and the public health care sector's ability to absorb annual number of pharmacy graduates. For ten years ahead, density rates of publicly active pharmacist workforce would probably increase for 46%, if no policy interventions were planned to adverse trends of pharmacist workforce production and deployment in public health care sector. The study results may be useful for variety of stakeholders to better understand how and why the supply and deployment of pharmacists were changing; and that the coordination among policy interventions is a crucial successes factor for a health workforce development plan implementation. The repercussions of any changes made to the pharmacy workforce, need to be considered carefully in advance.

  16. Reactor vessel sealing plug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dooley, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    This invention relates to an apparatus and method for sealing the cold leg nozzles of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel from a remote location during maintenance and inspection of associated steam generators and pumps while the pressure vessel and refueling canal are filled with water. The apparatus includes a sealing plug for mechanically sealing the cold leg nozzle from the inside of a reactor pressure vessel. The sealing plugs include a primary and a secondary O-ring. An installation tool is suspended within the reactor vessel and carries the sealing plug. The tool telescopes to insert the sealing plug within the cold leg nozzle, and to subsequently remove the plug. Hydraulic means are used to activate the sealing plug, and support means serve to suspend the installation tool within the reactor vessel during installation and removal of the sealing plug

  17. Containment vessel drain system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Scott G.

    2018-01-30

    A system for draining a containment vessel may include a drain inlet located in a lower portion of the containment vessel. The containment vessel may be at least partially filled with a liquid, and the drain inlet may be located below a surface of the liquid. The system may further comprise an inlet located in an upper portion of the containment vessel. The inlet may be configured to insert pressurized gas into the containment vessel to form a pressurized region above the surface of the liquid, and the pressurized region may operate to apply a surface pressure that forces the liquid into the drain inlet. Additionally, a fluid separation device may be operatively connected to the drain inlet. The fluid separation device may be configured to separate the liquid from the pressurized gas that enters the drain inlet after the surface of the liquid falls below the drain inlet.

  18. Bone Density Development of the Temporal Bone Assessed by Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kuniyuki; Morita, Yuka; Ohshima, Shinsuke; Izumi, Shuji; Kubota, Yamato; Horii, Arata

    2017-12-01

    The temporal bone shows regional differences in bone development. The spreading pattern of acute mastoiditis shows age-related differences. In infants, it spreads laterally and causes retroauricular swelling, whereas in older children, it tends to spread medially and causes intracranial complications. We hypothesized that bone maturation may influence the spreading pattern of acute mastoiditis. Eighty participants with normal hearing, aged 3 months to 42 years, participated in this study. Computed tomography (CT) values (Hounsfield unit [HU]) in various regions of the temporal bone, such as the otic capsule (OC), lateral surface of the mastoid cavity (LS), posterior cranial fossa (PCF), and middle cranial fossa (MCF), were measured as markers of bone density. Bone density development curves, wherein CT values were plotted against age, were created for each region. The age at which the CT value exceeded 1000 HU, which is used as an indicator of bone maturation, was calculated from the development curves and compared between the regions. The OC showed mature bone at birth, whereas the LS, PCF, and MCF showed rapid maturation in early childhood. However, there were significant regional differences in the ages of maturation: 1.7, 3.9, and 10.8 years for the LS, PCF, and MCF, respectively. To our knowledge, this is the first report to show regional differences in the maturation of temporal bone, which could partly account for the differences in the spreading pattern of acute mastoiditis in individuals of different ages.

  19. Clinical study on the value of combining neuropsychological tests with auditory event-related potential P300 for cognitive assessment in elderly patients with cerebral small vessel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-ling ZHAO

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the value of combining neuropsychological tests with auditory event-related potential (ERP P300 for cognitive assessment in elderly patients with cerebral small vessel disease (cSVD.  Methods A total of 183 elderly patients with cSVD were enrolled in this study. They were divided into 3 groups according to brain MRI: lacunar infarct (LACI group (N = 62, white matter hyperintensity (WMH group (N = 60 and LACI + WMH group (N = 61. A total of 50 brain MRI normal persons were selected as control group. Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA, Chinese version was used to evaluate the cognitive function, and the amplitude and latency of P300 were measured in each group.  Results Compared with control group, the MoCA total score in LACI, WMH and LACI + WMH groups were significantly lower (P = 0.042, 0.015, 0.000, and the score in LACI + WMH group was significantly lower than that in LACI and WMH groups (P = 0.001, 0.042. In the eight cognitive domains of MoCA scale, the visual space and executive function (P = 0.006, 0.041, 0.035, delayed memory (P = 0.006, 0.012, 0.048, language (P = 0.001, 0.032, 0.047 and calculation (P = 0.009, 0.001, 0.003 in LACI + WMH group were significantly lower than those in control, LACI and WMH groups. The delayed memory in LACI group was significantly lower than that in control group (P = 0.037. The delayed memory (P = 0.005 and language (P = 0.047 in WMH group were significantly lower than those in control group. Compared with control group, the amplitudes of P300 (P = 0.025, 0.033, 0.000 in LACI, WMH and LACI + WMH groups were significantly decreased, and the latencies (P = 0.018, 0.000, 0.000 were significantly prolonged. The amplitude of P300 in LACI + WMH group was significantly lower than that in LACI and WMH groups (P = 0.041, 0.018, and the latency was significantly prolonged (P = 0.000, 0.022.  Conclusions Elderly patients of cSVD all suffer from different degrees of cognitive impairment

  20. BY FRUSTUM CONFINING VESSEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Khazaei

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Helical piles are environmentally friendly and economical deep foundations that, due to environmental considerations, are excellent additions to a variety of deep foundation alternatives available to the practitioner. Helical piles performance depends on soil properties, the pile geometry and soil-pile interaction. Helical piles can be a proper alternative in sensitive environmental sites if their bearing capacity is sufficient to support applied loads. The failure capacity of helical piles in this study was measured via an experimental research program that was carried out by Frustum Confining Vessel (FCV. FCV is a frustum chamber by approximately linear increase in vertical and lateral stresses along depth from top to bottom. Due to special geometry and applied bottom pressure, this apparatus is a proper choice to test small model piles which can simulate field stress conditions. Small scale helical piles are made with either single helix or more helixes and installed in fine grained sand with three various densities. Axial loading tests including compression and tension tests were performed to achieve pile ultimate capacity. The results indicate the helical piles behavior depends essentially on pile geometric characteristics, i.e. helix configuration and soil properties. According to the achievements, axial uplift capacity of helical model piles is about equal to usual steel model piles that have the helixes diameter. Helical pile compression bearing capacity is too sufficient to act as a medium pile, thus it can be substituted other piles in special geoenvironmental conditions. The bearing capacity also depends on spacing ratio, S/D, and helixes diameter.

  1. Degradation assessment of natural weathering on low density polyethylene/thermoplastic soya spent powder blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuradibah, M. A.; Sam, S. T.; Noriman, N. Z.; Ragunathan, S.; Ismail, H.

    2015-07-01

    Soya spent powder was blended with low density polyethylene (LDPE) ranging from 5-25 wt%. Glycerol was added to soya spent powder (SSP) for preparation of thermoplastic soya spent powder (TSSP). Then, the blends were exposed to natural weathering for 6 months. The susceptibility of the LDPE/soya spent powder blends based on its tensile, morphological properties and structural changes was measured every three months. The tensile strength of LDPE/TSSP blends after 6 months of weathering was the lowest compared to the other blends whereas LDPE/SSP blends after 6 months of weathering demonstrated the lowest elongation at break (Eb). Large pore can be seen on the surface of 25 wt% of LDPE/SSP blends.

  2. Noninvasive assessment of diabetic foot ulcers with diffuse photon density wave methodology: pilot human study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papazoglou, Elisabeth S.; Neidrauer, Michael; Zubkov, Leonid; Weingarten, Michael S.; Pourrezaei, Kambiz

    2009-11-01

    A pilot human study is conducted to evaluate the potential of using diffuse photon density wave (DPDW) methodology at near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths (685 to 830 nm) to monitor changes in tissue hemoglobin concentration in diabetic foot ulcers. Hemoglobin concentration is measured by DPDW in 12 human wounds for a period ranging from 10 to 61 weeks. In all wounds that healed completely, gradual decreases in optical absorption coefficient, oxygenated hemoglobin concentration, and total hemoglobin concentration are observed between the first and last measurements. In nonhealing wounds, the rates of change of these properties are nearly zero or slightly positive, and a statistically significant difference (pdiabetic foot ulcers, and indicate that it may have clinical utility in the evaluation of wound healing potential.

  3. Effect of the in- and ex-vessel dual cooling on the retention of an internally heated melt pool in a hemispherical vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, K.I.; Kim, B.S.; Kim, D.H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., Thermal Hydraulic Safety Research, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-07-01

    A concept of in-vessel melt retention (IVMR) by in-vessel reflooding and/or reactor cavity flooding has been considered as one of severe accident management strategies and intensive researches to be performed worldwide. This paper provides some results of analytical investigations on the effect of both in- / ex-vessel cooling on the retention of an internally heated molten pool confined in a hemispherical vessel and the related thermal behavior of the vessel wall. For the present analysis, a scale-down reactor vessel for the KSNP reactor design of 1000 MWe (a large dry PWR) is utilized for a reactor vessel. Aluminum oxide melt simulant is also utilized for a real corium pool. An internal power density in the molten pool is determined by a simple scaling analysis that equates the heat flux on the the scale-down vessel wall to that estimated from KSNP. Well-known temperature-dependent boiling heat transfer curves are applied to the in- and ex-vessel cooling boundaries and radiative heat transfer has been only considered in the case of dry in-vessel. MELTPOOL, which is a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code developed at KAERI, is applied to obtain the time-varying heat flux distribution from a molten pool and the vessel wall temperature distributions with angular positions along the vessel wall. In order to gain further insights on the effectiveness of in- and ex-vessel dual cooling on the in-vessel corium retention, four different boundary conditions has been considered: no water inside the vessel without ex-vessel cooling, water inside the vessel without ex-vessel cooling, no water inside the vessel with ex-vessel cooling, and water inside the vessel with ex-vessel cooling. (authors)

  4. Effect of the in- and ex-vessel dual cooling on the retention of an internally heated melt pool in a hemispherical vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, K.I.; Kim, B.S.; Kim, D.H.

    2001-01-01

    A concept of in-vessel melt retention (IVMR) by in-vessel reflooding and/or reactor cavity flooding has been considered as one of severe accident management strategies and intensive researches to be performed worldwide. This paper provides some results of analytical investigations on the effect of both in- / ex-vessel cooling on the retention of an internally heated molten pool confined in a hemispherical vessel and the related thermal behavior of the vessel wall. For the present analysis, a scale-down reactor vessel for the KSNP reactor design of 1000 MWe (a large dry PWR) is utilized for a reactor vessel. Aluminum oxide melt simulant is also utilized for a real corium pool. An internal power density in the molten pool is determined by a simple scaling analysis that equates the heat flux on the the scale-down vessel wall to that estimated from KSNP. Well-known temperature-dependent boiling heat transfer curves are applied to the in- and ex-vessel cooling boundaries and radiative heat transfer has been only considered in the case of dry in-vessel. MELTPOOL, which is a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code developed at KAERI, is applied to obtain the time-varying heat flux distribution from a molten pool and the vessel wall temperature distributions with angular positions along the vessel wall. In order to gain further insights on the effectiveness of in- and ex-vessel dual cooling on the in-vessel corium retention, four different boundary conditions has been considered: no water inside the vessel without ex-vessel cooling, water inside the vessel without ex-vessel cooling, no water inside the vessel with ex-vessel cooling, and water inside the vessel with ex-vessel cooling. (authors)

  5. Assessment of the effect of three-dimensional mantle density heterogeneity on Earth rotation in tidal frequencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lanbo Liu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we report the assessment of the effect of the three-dimensional (3D density heterogeneity in the mantle on Earth orientation parameters (EOP (i.e., the polar motion, or PM, and the length of day, or LOD in the tidal frequencies. The 3D mantle density model is estimated based upon a global S-wave velocity tomography model (S16U6L8 and the mineralogical knowledge derived from laboratory experiment. The lateral density variation is referenced against the preliminary reference earth model (PREM. Using this approach the effects of the heterogeneous mantle density variation in all three tidal frequencies (zonal long periods, tesseral diurnal, and sectorial semidiurnal are estimated in both PM and LOD. When compared with mass or density perturbations originated on the Earth's surface such as the oceanic and barometric changes, the heterogeneous mantle contributes less than 10% of the total variation in PM and LOD in tidal frequencies. However, this is the gap that has not been explained to close the gap of the observation and modeling in PM and LOD. By computing the PM and LOD caused by 3D heterogeneity of the mantle during the period of continuous space geodetic measurement campaigns (e.g., CONT94 and the contribution from ocean tides as predicted by tide models derived from satellite altimetry observations (e.g., TOPEX/Poseidon in the same period, we got the lump-sum values of PM and LOD. The computed total effects and the observed PM and LOD are generally agree with each other. In another word, the difference of the observed PM and LOD and the model only considering ocean tides, at all tidal frequencies (long periods, diurnals, and semidiurnals contains the contributions of the lateral density heterogeneity of the mantle. Study of the effect of mantle density heterogeneity effect on torque-free Earth rotation may provide useful constraints to construct the reference earth model (REM, which is the next major objective in global

  6. NCSX Vacuum Vessel Fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viola ME; Brown T; Heitzenroeder P; Malinowski F; Reiersen W; Sutton L; Goranson P; Nelson B; Cole M; Manuel M; McCorkle D.

    2005-01-01

    The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) is being constructed at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) in conjunction with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The goal of this experiment is to develop a device which has the steady state properties of a traditional stellarator along with the high performance characteristics of a tokamak. A key element of this device is its highly shaped Inconel 625 vacuum vessel. This paper describes the manufacturing of the vessel. The vessel is being fabricated by Major Tool and Machine, Inc. (MTM) in three identical 120 o vessel segments, corresponding to the three NCSX field periods, in order to accommodate assembly of the device. The port extensions are welded on, leak checked, cut off within 1-inch of the vessel surface at MTM and then reattached at PPPL, to accommodate assembly of the close-fitting modular coils that surround the vessel. The 120 o vessel segments are formed by welding two 60 o segments together. Each 60 o segment is fabricated by welding ten press-formed panels together over a collapsible welding fixture which is needed to precisely position the panels. The vessel is joined at assembly by welding via custom machined 8-inch (20.3 cm) wide spacer ''spool pieces''. The vessel must have a total leak rate less than 5 X 10 -6 t-l/s, magnetic permeability less than 1.02(micro), and its contours must be within 0.188-inch (4.76 mm). It is scheduled for completion in January 2006

  7. Stand density index as a tool to assess the maximization of forest carbon and biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher W. Woodall; Anthony W. D’Amato; John B. Bradford; Andrew O. Finley

    2012-01-01

    Given the ability of forests to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions and provide feedstocks to energy utilities, there is an emerging need to assess forest biomass/carbon accretion opportunities over large areas. Techniques for objectively quantifying stand stocking of biomass/carbon are lacking for large areas given the complexity of tree species composition in the U.S....

  8. Radioactive waste processing vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Masaru; Suzuki, Osamu; Ishizaki, Kanjiro.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain a vessel of a reduced weight and with no external leaching of radioactive materials. Constitution: The vessel main body is constituted, for example, with light weight concretes or foamed concretes, particularly, foamed concretes containing fine closed bubbles in the inside. Then, layers having dense texture made of synthetic resin such as polystylene, vinylchloride resin, etc. or metal plate such as stainless plate are integrally disposed to the inner surface of the vessel main body. The cover member also has the same structure. (Sekiya, K.)

  9. Qualitative Evaluation of Digital Hand X-rays is Not a Reliable Method to Assess Bone Mineral Density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AndrewJ. Miller

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Object: The gold standard for evaluating bone mineral density is dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA.  Prior studies have shown poor reliability using analog wrist X-rays in diagnosing osteoporosis. Our goal was to investigate if there was improved diagnostic value to visual assessment of digital hand X-rays in osteoporosis screening. We hypothesized that similar to analog counterparts, digital hand X-rays have poor correlation and reliability in determining bone mineral density (BMD relative to DEXA.Methods: We prospectively evaluated female patients older than 65 years who presented to our hand clinic with digital hand and wrist X-rays as part of their evaluation over six months. Patients who had a fracture and were without DEXA scans within the past two years were excluded. Five fellowship-trained hand surgeons, blinded to DEXA T-scores, evaluated the x-rays over two assessments separated by four weeks and classified them as osteoporotic, osteopenic, or normal BMD.  Accuracy relative to DEXA T-score, interobserver and intraobserver rates were calculated.Results: Thirty four patients met the inclusion criteria and a total of 340 x-rays reviews were performed.  The assessments were correct in 169 cases (49% as compared to the DEXA T-scores. A mean weighted kappa coefficient of agreement between observers was 0.29 (range 0.02-0.41 reflecting a fair agreement. The first and second assessment for all five physicians was 0.46 (range 0.19-0.78 reflecting a moderate agreement.  Grouping osteoporosis and osteopenia together compared to normal, the accuracy, interobserver and intraobserver rates increased to 63%, 0.42 and 0.54 respectively.Conclusion: Abnormally low BMD is a common occurrence in patients treated for upper extremity disorders. There is poor accuracy relative to DEXA scan and only fair agreement in diagnosing osteoporosis using visual assessments of digital x-rays.

  10. Identification of animal fats via compound specific δ13C values of individual fatty acids: assessments of results for reference fats and lipid extracts of archaeological pottery vessels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard P. Evershed

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of obtaining molecular information from lipid residues associated with archaeological pottery has dramatically increased the potential for deriving new information on the use of ancient vessels and the commodities processed therein. Motivated by the high proportion of the archaeological potsherds that have been shown to contain animal fats, a new approach invol- ving compound specific stable isotope analysis of remnant fats has been developed to retrieve infor- mation which will allow new insights into animal exploitation, dietary preferences and vessel use amongst prehistoric peoples. The new approach uses the δ13C values of the major saturated fatty acid (C16:0 and C18:0 determined by gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC–C–IRMS to characterise the origins of animal fat recovered from archaeological pottery.

  11. Cyclic Crack Growth Testing of an A.O. Smith Multilayer Pressure Vessel with Modal Acoustic Emission Monitoring and Data Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziola, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    Digital Wave Corp. (DWC) was retained by Jacobs ATOM at NASA Ames Research Center to perform cyclic pressure crack growth sensitivity testing on a multilayer pressure vessel instrumented with DWC's Modal Acoustic Emission (MAE) system, with captured wave analysis to be performed using DWCs WaveExplorerTM software, which has been used at Ames since 2001. The objectives were to document the ability to detect and characterize a known growing crack in such a vessel using only MAE, to establish the sensitivity of the equipment vs. crack size and / or relevance in a realistic field environment, and to obtain fracture toughness materials properties in follow up testing to enable accurate crack growth analysis. This report contains the results of the testing.

  12. Assessment of fixed charge density in regenerated cartilage by Gd-DTPA-enhanced MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyata, Shogo; Homma, Kazuhiro; Numano, Tomokazu; Furukawa, Katsuko; Tateishi, Tetsuya; Ushida, Takashi

    2006-01-01

    Applying regenerated cartilage in a clinical setting requires noninvasive evaluation to detect the maturity of cartilage tissue. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of articular cartilage is well accepted and has been applied clinically in recent years. We attempt to establish a noninvasive method to evaluate the maturity of regenerated cartilage tissue using gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging. To reconstruct cartilaginous tissue, we embedded articular chondrocytes harvested from bovine humeral head in agarose gel and cultured the cells in vitro up to 4 weeks. The fixed charge density (FCD) of the cartilage was determined using MRI gadolinium exclusion method. The sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) content was determined by dimethylmethylene blue dye-binding assay. The sGAG content and FCD of the regenerated cartilage increased with duration of culture. In the T 1 Gd maps, the [Gd-DTPA 2- ] in the specimen decreased, and the boundary between the sample disk and the bath solution of phosphate buffered saline (PBS) became clearer as time in culture increased. In the linear regression analysis, FCD and sGAG content correlated significantly. Gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging measurements can be useful predictors of the degree of cartilaginous tissue formation. (author)

  13. Assessing Covalency in Cerium and Uranium Hexachlorides: A Correlated Wavefunction and Density Functional Theory Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reece Beekmeyer

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The electronic structure of a series of uranium and cerium hexachlorides in a variety of oxidation states was evaluated at both the correlated wavefunction and density functional (DFT levels of theory. Following recent experimental observations of covalency in tetravalent cerium hexachlorides, bonding character was studied using topological and integrated analysis based on the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM. This analysis revealed that M–Cl covalency was strongly dependent on oxidation state, with greater covalency found in higher oxidation state complexes. Comparison of M–Cl delocalisation indices revealed a discrepancy between correlated wavefunction and DFT-derived values. Decomposition of these delocalisation indices demonstrated that the origin of this discrepancy lay in ungerade contributions associated with the f-manifold which we suggest is due to self-interaction error inherent to DFT-based methods. By all measures used in this study, extremely similar levels of covalency between complexes of U and Ce in the same oxidation state was found.

  14. Parallel Assessment of Bone Mineral Density and RANKL/OPG Ratio in Saudi Females

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AI Hassan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Osteoporosis is a significant risk factor for morbidity, and its high prevalence among Saudi women should be considered to be a public health problem. Quantitative ultrasound was recommended for bone mineral density (BMD screening. Receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL and osteoprotegerin (OPG and their ratio are critical for physiological bone remodelling, and related abnormalities may lead to several osteopathies. Methods: The BMD of 499 Saudi females aged 20 to 65 years was measured using quantitative ultrasound from the beginning of October 2013 to the end of March 2014 at the female medical unit of Taibah University, Madinah, KSA. Possible associated risk factors for low BMD were studied. Blood RANKL and OPG were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Results: No significant differences were found between participants with normal and low BMD regarding the studied risk factors. However, there was a significant association (p < 0.05 between BMD and regular physical activity among participants aged 20 years to less than 35 years, and women aged 35–50 years with higher body mass index (BMI had higher BMD. The RANKL/OPG ratio was inversely associated (p = 0.04 with BMD. Conclusions: Regular physical activity is crucial for maximizing BMD in young females and decreasing the possibility of developing osteoporosis with ageing. The RANKL/OPG ratio might be considered a useful and easy-to-use tool for the prediction of low BMD.

  15. Density Functional Theory versus the Hartree-Fock Method: Comparative Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amusia, M.Ya.; Shaginyan, V.R.; Msezane, A.Z.

    2003-01-01

    We compare two different approaches to investigations of many-electron systems. The first is the Hartree-Fock (HF) method and the second is the Density Functional Theory (DFT). Overview of the main features and peculiar properties of the HF method are presented. A way to realize the HF method within the Kohn-Sham (KS) approach of the DFT is discussed. We show that this is impossible without including a specific correlation energy, which is defined by the difference between the sum of the kinetic and exchange energies of a system considered within KS and HF, respectively. It is the nonlocal exchange potential entering the HF equations that generates this correlation energy. We show that the total correlation energy of a finite electron system, which has to include this correlation energy, cannot be obtained from considerations of uniform electron systems. The single-particle excitation spectrum of many-electron systems is related to the eigenvalues of the corresponding KS equations. We demonstrate that this spectrum does not coincide in general with the eigenvalues of KS or HF equations

  16. Density Functional Theory versus the Hartree-Fock Method: Comparative Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amusia, M.Ya.; Shaginyan, V.R. [The Hebrew University, Jerusalem (Israel); Msezane, A.Z. [Clark Atlanta Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States). Center for Theoretical Studies of Physical Systems

    2003-12-01

    We compare two different approaches to investigations of many-electron systems. The first is the Hartree-Fock (HF) method and the second is the Density Functional Theory (DFT). Overview of the main features and peculiar properties of the HF method are presented. A way to realize the HF method within the Kohn-Sham (KS) approach of the DFT is discussed. We show that this is impossible without including a specific correlation energy, which is defined by the difference between the sum of the kinetic and exchange energies of a system considered within KS and HF, respectively. It is the nonlocal exchange potential entering the HF equations that generates this correlation energy. We show that the total correlation energy of a finite electron system, which has to include this correlation energy, cannot be obtained from considerations of uniform electron systems. The single-particle excitation spectrum of many-electron systems is related to the eigenvalues of the corresponding KS equations. We demonstrate that this spectrum does not coincide in general with the eigenvalues of KS or HF equations.

  17. Assessing Accuracy in Varying LIDAR Data Point Densities in Digital Elevation Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    describes the project undertaken for delimiting the data collected on the regions and outlines the statistical methodology used to assess research...not hydrologically corrected (to enforce flow- direction) • Generated contours not aesthetically appealing • Lidar returns on water are unreliable...and ground “bottom” returns. In his 21 1984 paper, Krabill concluded that the results of the test over the Wolf River Basin “were sufficient to

  18. Cheboygan Vessel Base

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Cheboygan Vessel Base (CVB), located in Cheboygan, Michigan, is a field station of the USGS Great Lakes Science Center (GLSC). CVB was established by congressional...

  19. High Performance Marine Vessels

    CERN Document Server

    Yun, Liang

    2012-01-01

    High Performance Marine Vessels (HPMVs) range from the Fast Ferries to the latest high speed Navy Craft, including competition power boats and hydroplanes, hydrofoils, hovercraft, catamarans and other multi-hull craft. High Performance Marine Vessels covers the main concepts of HPMVs and discusses historical background, design features, services that have been successful and not so successful, and some sample data of the range of HPMVs to date. Included is a comparison of all HPMVs craft and the differences between them and descriptions of performance (hydrodynamics and aerodynamics). Readers will find a comprehensive overview of the design, development and building of HPMVs. In summary, this book: Focuses on technology at the aero-marine interface Covers the full range of high performance marine vessel concepts Explains the historical development of various HPMVs Discusses ferries, racing and pleasure craft, as well as utility and military missions High Performance Marine Vessels is an ideal book for student...

  20. Pressurized Vessel Slurry Pumping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pound, C.R.

    2001-01-01

    This report summarizes testing of an alternate ''pressurized vessel slurry pumping'' apparatus. The principle is similar to rural domestic water systems and ''acid eggs'' used in chemical laboratories in that material is extruded by displacement with compressed air

  1. Maury Journals - US Vessels

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — U.S. vessels observations, after the 1853 Brussels Conference that set International Maritime Standards, modeled after Maury Marine Standard Observations.

  2. Coastal Logbook Survey (Vessels)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains catch (landed catch) and effort for fishing trips made by vessels that have been issued a Federal permit for the Gulf of Mexico reef fish,...

  3. In-vessel tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Yoshio; Ohya, Kaoru; Ashikawa, Naoko; Ito, Atsushi M.; Kato, Daiji; Kawamura, Gakushi; Takayama, Arimichi; Tomita, Yukihiro; Nakamura, Hiroaki; Ono, Tadayoshi; Kawashima, Hisato; Shimizu, Katsuhiro; Takizuka, Tomonori; Nakano, Tomohide; Nakamura, Makoto; Hoshino, Kazuo; Kenmotsu, Takahiro; Wada, Motoi; Saito, Seiki; Takagi, Ikuji; Tanaka, Yasunori; Tanabe, Tetsuo; Yoshida, Masafumi; Toma, Mitsunori; Hatayama, Akiyoshi; Homma, Yuki; Tolstikhina, Inga Yu.

    2012-01-01

    The in-vessel tritium research is closely related to the plasma-materials interaction. It deals with the edge-plasma-wall interaction, the wall erosion, transport and re-deposition of neutral particles and the effect of neutral particles on the fuel recycling. Since the in-vessel tritium shows a complex nonlinear behavior, there remain many unsolved problems. So far, behaviors of in-vessel tritium have been investigated by two groups A01 and A02. The A01 group performed experiments on accumulation and recovery of tritium in thermonuclear fusion reactors and the A02 group studied theory and simulation on the in-vessel tritium behavior. In the present article, outcomes of the research are reviewed. (author)

  4. Reactor pressure vessel support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butti, J.P.

    1977-01-01

    A link and pin support system provides the primary vertical and lateral support for a nuclear reactor pressure vessel without restricting thermally induced radial and vertical expansion and contraction. (Auth.)

  5. Ocean Station Vessel

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Ocean Station Vessels (OSV) or Weather Ships captured atmospheric conditions while being stationed continuously in a single location. While While most of the...

  6. Vessel Sewage Discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vessel sewage discharges are regulated under Section 312 of the Clean Water Act, which is jointly implemented by the EPA and Coast Guard. This homepage links to information on marine sanitation devices and no discharge zones.

  7. Reactor pressure vessel design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foehl, J.

    1998-01-01

    As a result of the popularity of the Agencies report 'Neutron Irradiation Embrittlement of Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels' of 1975, it was decided that another report on this broad subject would be of use. In this report, background and contemporary views on specially identified areas of the subject are considered as self-contained chapters, written by experts. In chapter 2, the general principles of reactor pressure vessel design are elaborated. Crack and fracture initiation and propagation are treated in some detail

  8. Graywater Discharges from Vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    metals (e.g., cadmium, chromium, lead, copper , zinc, silver, nickel, and mercury), solids, and nutrients (USEPA, 2008b; USEPA 2010). Wastewater from... flotation ), and disinfection (using ultraviolet light) as compared to traditional Type II MSDs that use either simple maceration and chlorination, or...Coliform Naval Vessels Oceanographic Vessels Small Cruise Ships 25a Vendor 2 Hamann AG Biological Treatment with Dissolved Air Flotation and

  9. Impact of chemistry on Standard High Solids Vessel Design mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poirier, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-03-02

    The plan for resolving technical issues regarding mixing performance within vessels of the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Pretreatment Facility directs a chemical impact study to be performed. The vessels involved are those that will process higher (e.g., 5 wt % or more) concentrations of solids. The mixing equipment design for these vessels includes both pulse jet mixers (PJM) and air spargers. This study assesses the impact of feed chemistry on the effectiveness of PJM mixing in the Standard High Solids Vessel Design (SHSVD). The overall purpose of this study is to complement the Properties that Matter document in helping to establish an acceptable physical simulant for full-scale testing. The specific objectives for this study are (1) to identify the relevant properties and behavior of the in-process tank waste that control the performance of the system being tested, (2) to assess the solubility limits of key components that are likely to precipitate or crystallize due to PJM and sparger interaction with the waste feeds, (3) to evaluate the impact of waste chemistry on rheology and agglomeration, (4) to assess the impact of temperature on rheology and agglomeration, (5) to assess the impact of organic compounds on PJM mixing, and (6) to provide the technical basis for using a physical-rheological simulant rather than a physical-rheological-chemical simulant for full-scale vessel testing. Among the conclusions reached are the following: The primary impact of precipitation or crystallization of salts due to interactions between PJMs or spargers and waste feeds is to increase the insoluble solids concentration in the slurries, which will increase the slurry yield stress. Slurry yield stress is a function of pH, ionic strength, insoluble solids concentration, and particle size. Ionic strength and chemical composition can affect particle size. Changes in temperature can affect SHSVD mixing through its effect on properties such as viscosity, yield stress, solubility

  10. Employing a Grinding Technology to Assess the Microbial Density for Encapsulated Organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benardini, James N.; Morales, Fabian; Schubert, Wayne W.; Kazarians, Gayane A.; Koukol, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    Projects that utilize large volumes of nonmetallic materials of planetary protection concern pose a challenge to their bioburden budget, as the most conservative value of 30 spores/cubic cm is typically used. The standard laboratory procedures do not provide any direction into the methodologies to understand the embedded bioburden within such nonmetallic components such as adhesives, insulation, or paint. A tailored, novel, destructive hardware technology employing a household box grater was developed to assess the embedded bioburden within the adhesives, insulation, and paint for the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) project.

  11. Breast Density and Benign Breast Disease: Risk Assessment to Identify Women at High Risk of Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tice, Jeffrey A; Miglioretti, Diana L; Li, Chin-Shang; Vachon, Celine M; Gard, Charlotte C; Kerlikowske, Karla

    2015-10-01

    Women with proliferative breast lesions are candidates for primary prevention, but few risk models incorporate benign findings to assess breast cancer risk. We incorporated benign breast disease (BBD) diagnoses into the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium (BCSC) risk model, the only breast cancer risk assessment tool that uses breast density. We developed and validated a competing-risk model using 2000 to 2010 SEER data for breast cancer incidence and 2010 vital statistics to adjust for the competing risk of death. We used Cox proportional hazards regression to estimate the relative hazards for age, race/ethnicity, family history of breast cancer, history of breast biopsy, BBD diagnoses, and breast density in the BCSC. We included 1,135,977 women age 35 to 74 years undergoing mammography with no history of breast cancer; 17% of the women had a prior breast biopsy. During a mean follow-up of 6.9 years, 17,908 women were diagnosed with invasive breast cancer. The BCSC BBD model slightly overpredicted risk (expected-to-observed ratio, 1.04; 95% CI, 1.03 to 1.06) and had modest discriminatory accuracy (area under the receiver operator characteristic curve, 0.665). Among women with proliferative findings, adding BBD to the model increased the proportion of women with an estimated 5-year risk of 3% or higher from 9.3% to 27.8% (P<.001). The BCSC BBD model accurately estimates women's risk for breast cancer using breast density and BBD diagnoses. Greater numbers of high-risk women eligible for primary prevention after BBD diagnosis are identified using the BCSC BBD model. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  12. Reader performance in visual assessment of breast density using visual analogue scales: Are some readers more predictive of breast cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayner, Millicent; Harkness, Elaine F.; Foden, Philip; Wilson, Mary; Gadde, Soujanya; Beetles, Ursula; Lim, Yit Y.; Jain, Anil; Bundred, Sally; Barr, Nicky; Evans, D. Gareth; Howell, Anthony; Maxwell, Anthony; Astley, Susan M.

    2018-03-01

    Mammographic breast density is one of the strongest risk factors for breast cancer, and is used in risk prediction and for deciding appropriate imaging strategies. In the Predicting Risk Of Cancer At Screening (PROCAS) study, percent density estimated by two readers on Visual Analogue Scales (VAS) has shown a strong relationship with breast cancer risk when assessed against automated methods. However, this method suffers from reader variability. This study aimed to assess the performance of PROCAS readers using VAS, and to identify those most predictive of breast cancer. We selected the seven readers who had estimated density on over 6,500 women including at least 100 cancer cases, analysing their performance using multivariable logistic regression and Receiver Operator Characteristic (ROC) analysis. All seven readers showed statistically significant odds ratios (OR) for cancer risk according to VAS score after adjusting for classical risk factors. The OR was greatest for reader 18 at 1.026 (95% Cl 1.018-1.034). Adjusted Area Under the ROC Curves (AUCs) were statistically significant for all readers, but greatest for reader 14 at 0.639. Further analysis of the VAS scores for these two readers showed reader 14 had higher sensitivity (78.0% versus 42.2%), whereas reader 18 had higher specificity (78.0% versus 46.0%). Our results demonstrate individual differences when assigning VAS scores; one better identified those with increased risk, whereas another better identified low risk individuals. However, despite their different strengths, both readers showed similar predictive abilities overall. Standardised training for VAS may improve reader variability and consistency of VAS scoring.

  13. Correlation test to assess low-level processing of high-density oligonucleotide microarray data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bergh Jonas

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are currently a number of competing techniques for low-level processing of oligonucleotide array data. The choice of technique has a profound effect on subsequent statistical analyses, but there is no method to assess whether a particular technique is appropriate for a specific data set, without reference to external data. Results We analyzed coregulation between genes in order to detect insufficient normalization between arrays, where coregulation is measured in terms of statistical correlation. In a large collection of genes, a random pair of genes should have on average zero correlation, hence allowing a correlation test. For all data sets that we evaluated, and the three most commonly used low-level processing procedures including MAS5, RMA and MBEI, the housekeeping-gene normalization failed the test. For a real clinical data set, RMA and MBEI showed significant correlation for absent genes. We also found that a second round of normalization on the probe set level improved normalization significantly throughout. Conclusion Previous evaluation of low-level processing in the literature has been limited to artificial spike-in and mixture data sets. In the absence of a known gold-standard, the correlation criterion allows us to assess the appropriateness of low-level processing of a specific data set and the success of normalization for subsets of genes.

  14. FFTF and CRBRP reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, R.E.

    1977-01-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) reactor vessel and the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) reactor vessel each serve to enclose a fast spectrum reactor core, contain the sodium coolant, and provide support and positioning for the closure head and internal structure. Each vessel is located in its reactor cavity and is protected by a guard vessel which would ensure continued decay heat removal capability should a major system leak develop. Although the two plants have significantly different thermal power ratings, 400 megawatts for FFTF and 975 megawatts for CRBRP, the two reactor vessels are comparable in size, the CRBRP vessel being approximately 28% longer than the FFTF vessel. The FFTF vessel diameter was controlled by the space required for the three individual In-Vessel Handling Machines and Instrument Trees. Utilization of the triple rotating plug scheme for CRBRP refueling enables packaging of the larger CRBRP core in a vessel the same diameter as the FFTF vessel

  15. Reference genome-independent assessment of mutation density using restriction enzyme-phased sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monson-Miller Jennifer

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The availability of low cost sequencing has spurred its application to discovery and typing of variation, including variation induced by mutagenesis. Mutation discovery is challenging as it requires a substantial amount of sequencing and analysis to detect very rare changes and distinguish them from noise. Also challenging are the cases when the organism of interest has not been sequenced or is highly divergent from the reference. Results We describe the development of a simple method for reduced representation sequencing. Input DNA was digested with a single restriction enzyme and ligated to Y adapters modified to contain a sequence barcode and to provide a compatible overhang for ligation. We demonstrated the efficiency of this method at SNP discovery using rice and arabidopsis. To test its suitability for the discovery of very rare SNP, one control and three mutagenized rice individuals (1, 5 and 10 mM sodium azide were used to prepare genomic libraries for Illumina sequencers by ligating barcoded adapters to NlaIII restriction sites. For genome-dependent discovery 15-30 million of 80 base reads per individual were aligned to the reference sequence achieving individual sequencing coverage from 7 to 15×. We identified high-confidence base changes by comparing sequences across individuals and identified instances consistent with mutations, i.e. changes that were found in a single treated individual and were solely GC to AT transitions. For genome-independent discovery 70-mers were extracted from the sequence of the control individual and single-copy sequence was identified by comparing the 70-mers across samples to evaluate copy number and variation. This de novo "genome" was used to align the reads and identify mutations as above. Covering approximately 1/5 of the 380 Mb genome of rice we detected mutation densities ranging from 0.6 to 4 per Mb of diploid DNA depending on the mutagenic treatment. Conclusions The

  16. Use of commercial vessels in survey augmentation: the size-frequency distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric N. Powell

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The trend towards use of commercial vessels to enhance survey data requires assessment of the advantages and limitations of various options for their use. One application is to augment information on size-frequency distributions obtained in multispecies trawl surveys where stratum boundaries and sampling density are not optimal for all species. Analysis focused on ten recreationally and commercially important species: bluefish, butterfish, Loligo squid, weakfish, summer flounder, winter flounder, silver hake (whiting, black sea bass, striped bass, and scup (porgy. The commercial vessel took 59 tows in the sampled domain south of Long Island, New York and the survey vessel 18. Black sea bass, Loligo squid, and summer flounder demonstrated an onshore-offshore gradient such that smaller fish were caught disproportionately inshore and larger fish offshore. Butterfish, silver hake, and weakfish were characterized by a southwest-northeast gradient such that larger fish were caught disproportionately northeast of the southwestern-most sector. All sizes of scup, striped bass, and bluefish were caught predominately inshore. Winter flounder were caught predominately offshore. The commercial vessel was characterized by an increased frequency of large catches for most species. Consequently, patchiness was assayed to be higher by the commercial vessel in nearly all cases. The size-frequency distribution obtained by the survey vessel for six of the ten species, bluefish, butterfish, Loligo squid, summer flounder, weakfish, and silver hake, could not be obtained by chance from the size-frequency distribution obtained by the commercial vessel. The difference in sample density did not significantly influence the size-frequency distribution. Of the six species characterized by significant differences in size-frequency distribution between boats, all but one was patchy at the population level and all had one or more size classes so characterized. Although the

  17. Dopamine transporter density of the basal ganglia assessed with I-123 IPT SPECT in methamphetamine abusers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Joo Ryung; Ahn, Byeong Cheol; Kewm, Do Hun

    2005-01-01

    Functional imaging of dopamine transporter (DAT) defines integrity of the dopaminergic system, and DAT is the target site of drugs of abuse such as cocaine and methamphetamine. Functional imaging the DAT may be a sensitive and selective indicator of neurotoxic change by the drug. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the clinical implications of qualitative/quantitative analyses of dopamine transporter imaging in methamphetamine abusers. Six detoxified methamphetamine abusers (abuser group) and 4 volunteers (control group) were enrolled in this study. Brain MRI was performed in all of abuser group. Abuser group underwent psychiatric and depression assessment using brief psychiatric rating scale (BPRS) and Hamilton depression rating scale (HAMD), respectively. All of the subjects underwent I-123 IPT SPECT (IPT SPECT). IPT SPECT image was analysed with visual qualitative method and quantitative method using basal ganglia dopamine transporter (DAT) specific/non-specific binding ratio (SBR). Comparison of DAT SBR between abuser and control groups was performed. We also performed correlation tests between psychiatric and depression assessment results and DAT SBR in abuser group. All of abuser group showed normal MRI finding, but had residual psychiatric and depressive symptoms, and psychiatric and depressive symptom scores were exactly correlated (r=1.0, ρ =0.005) each other. Five of them showed abnormal finding on qualitative visual I-123 IPT SPECT. Abuser group had lower basal ganglia DAT SBR than that of control (2.38 ± 0.20 vs 3.04 ± 0.27, ρ =0.000). Psychiatric and depressive symptoms were negatively well correlated with basal ganglia DAT SBR (r=-0.908, ρ =0.012, r=-0.924, ρ =0.009) This results suggest that dopamine transporter imaging using I-123 IPT SPECT may be used to evaluate dopaminergic system of the basal ganglia and the clinical status in methamphetamine abusers

  18. Dopamine transporter density of the basal ganglia assessed with I-123 IPT SPECT in methamphetamine abusers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Joo Ryung; Ahn, Byeong Cheol [Kyungpook National University Medical School, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kewm, Do Hun [National Bugok Mental Hospital, Changryung (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2005-10-15

    Functional imaging of dopamine transporter (DAT) defines integrity of the dopaminergic system, and DAT is the target site of drugs of abuse such as cocaine and methamphetamine. Functional imaging the DAT may be a sensitive and selective indicator of neurotoxic change by the drug. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the clinical implications of qualitative/quantitative analyses of dopamine transporter imaging in methamphetamine abusers. Six detoxified methamphetamine abusers (abuser group) and 4 volunteers (control group) were enrolled in this study. Brain MRI was performed in all of abuser group. Abuser group underwent psychiatric and depression assessment using brief psychiatric rating scale (BPRS) and Hamilton depression rating scale (HAMD), respectively. All of the subjects underwent I-123 IPT SPECT (IPT SPECT). IPT SPECT image was analysed with visual qualitative method and quantitative method using basal ganglia dopamine transporter (DAT) specific/non-specific binding ratio (SBR). Comparison of DAT SBR between abuser and control groups was performed. We also performed correlation tests between psychiatric and depression assessment results and DAT SBR in abuser group. All of abuser group showed normal MRI finding, but had residual psychiatric and depressive symptoms, and psychiatric and depressive symptom scores were exactly correlated (r=1.0, {rho} =0.005) each other. Five of them showed abnormal finding on qualitative visual I-123 IPT SPECT. Abuser group had lower basal ganglia DAT SBR than that of control (2.38 {+-} 0.20 vs 3.04 {+-} 0.27, {rho} =0.000). Psychiatric and depressive symptoms were negatively well correlated with basal ganglia DAT SBR (r=-0.908, {rho} =0.012, r=-0.924, {rho} =0.009) This results suggest that dopamine transporter imaging using I-123 IPT SPECT may be used to evaluate dopaminergic system of the basal ganglia and the clinical status in methamphetamine abusers.

  19. Influence of mammographic density on the diagnostic accuracy of tumor size assessment and association with breast cancer tumor characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fasching, Peter A.; Heusinger, Katharina; Loehberg, Christian R.; Wenkel, Evelyn; Lux, Michael P.; Schrauder, Michael; Koscheck, Thomas; Bautz, Werner; Schulz-Wendtland, Ruediger; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Bani, Mayada R.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The accuracy of breast cancer staging involves the estimation of the tumor size for the initial decision-making in the treatment. We investigated the accuracy of tumor size estimation and the association between tumor characteristics and breast density (BD). Materials and methods: A total of 434 women with a primary diagnosis of breast cancer were included in this prospective study at a specialist breast unit. Estimated tumor characteristics included tumor size, nodal status, estrogen/progesterone receptor status, Ki-67, HER2/neu, vascular invasion. Radiomorphological data included tumor size as assessed by mammography, breast ultrasonography, and clinical examination, and American College of Radiology (ACR) categories for BD. Results: BD did not have a significant impact on the assessment of tumor size using breast ultrasound (deviation from ACR categories 1-4: 0.55-0.68 cm; P = 0.331). The deviation in mammography was significantly different dependent on BD (0.42-0.9 cm; P 2 cm). Conclusion: Breast ultrasonography is more accurate than mammography for assessing tumor size in breasts with a higher BD. The difference in tumor size assessment needs to be taken into consideration in the design of clinical trials and treatment decisions

  20. Thermal Load Analysis of Multilayered Corium in the Lower Head of Reactor Pressure Vessel during Severe Accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whang, Seok Won; Park, Hyun Sun [POSTECH, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Tae Suk [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    In-Vessel Retention (IVR) is one of the severe accident management strategies to terminate or mitigate the severe accident which is also called 'core-melt accident'. The reactor vessel would be cooled by flooding the cavity with water. The molten core mixture is divided into two or three layers due to the density difference. Light metal layer which contains Fe and Zr is on the oxide layer which is consist of UO{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2}. Heavy metal layer which contains U, Fe and Zr is located under the oxide layer. In oxide layer, the crust which is solidified material is formed along the boundary. The assessment of IVR for nuclear power plant has been conducted with lumped parameter method by Theofanous, Rempe and Esmaili. In this paper, the numerical analysis was performed and verified with the Esmaili's work to analyze thermal load of multilayered corium in pressurized reactor vessel and also to examine the condition of in-vessel corium characteristic before the vessel failure that lead to ex-vessel severe accident progression for example, ex-vessel debris bed cooling. The in-vessel coolability analysis for several scenarios is conducted for the plant which has higher power than AP1000. Two sensitivity analyses are conducted, the first is emissivity of light metal layer and the second is the heat transfer coefficient correlations of oxide layer. The effect of three layered system also investigated. In this paper, the numerical analysis was performed and verified with Esmaili's model to analyze thermal load of multilayered corium in pressurized reactor vessel. For two layered system, thermal load was analyzed according to the severe accident scenarios, emissivity of the light metal layer and heat transfer correlations of the.

  1. Midplane neutral density profiles in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stotler, D. P., E-mail: dstotler@pppl.gov; Bell, R. E.; Diallo, A.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Podestà, M.; Roquemore, A. L.; Ross, P. W. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, P. O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543-0451 (United States); Scotti, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Atomic and molecular density data in the outer midplane of NSTX [Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)] are inferred from tangential camera data via a forward modeling procedure using the DEGAS 2 Monte Carlo neutral transport code. The observed Balmer-β light emission data from 17 shots during the 2010 NSTX campaign display no obvious trends with discharge parameters such as the divertor Balmer-α emission level or edge deuterium ion density. Simulations of 12 time slices in 7 of these discharges produce molecular densities near the vacuum vessel wall of 2–8 × 10{sup 17 }m{sup −3} and atomic densities ranging from 1 to 7 × 10{sup 16 }m{sup −3}; neither has a clear correlation with other parameters. Validation of the technique, begun in an earlier publication, is continued with an assessment of the sensitivity of the simulated camera image and neutral densities to uncertainties in the data input to the model. The simulated camera image is sensitive to the plasma profiles and virtually nothing else. The neutral densities at the vessel wall depend most strongly on the spatial distribution of the source; simulations with a localized neutral source yield densities within a factor of two of the baseline, uniform source, case. The uncertainties in the neutral densities associated with other model inputs and assumptions are ≤50%.

  2. Acrylic vessel cleaning tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Earle, D.; Hahn, R.L.; Boger, J.; Bonvin, E.

    1997-01-01

    The acrylic vessel as constructed is dirty. The dirt includes blue tape, Al tape, grease pencil, gemak, the glue or residue form these tapes, finger prints and dust of an unknown composition but probably mostly acrylic dust. This dirt has to be removed and once removed, the vessel has to be kept clean or at least to be easily cleanable at some future stage when access becomes much more difficult. The authors report on the results of a series of tests designed: (a) to prepare typical dirty samples of acrylic; (b) to remove dirt stuck to the acrylic surface; and (c) to measure the optical quality and Th concentration after cleaning. Specifications of the vessel call for very low levels of Th which could come from tape residues, the grease pencil, or other sources of dirt. This report does not address the concerns of how to keep the vessel clean after an initial cleaning and during the removal of the scaffolding. Alconox is recommended as the cleaner of choice. This acrylic vessel will be used in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

  3. Dopamine transporter density assessed with [123]IPT SPECT before and after risperidone treatment in children with tourette's disorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Young Hoon; Kim, Tae Hoon; Ryu, Won Gee

    2004-01-01

    Tourette's disorder (TD), which is characterized by multiple waxing and waning motor tics and one or more vocal tics, is known to be associated with abnormalities in the dopaminergic system. To testify our hypothesis that risperidone would improve tic symptoms of TD patients through the change of the dopaminergic system, we measured the dopamine transporter (DAT) densities between drug-naive children with TD and normal children, and investigated the DAT density before and after treatment with risperidone in drug-naive children with TD, using iodine-123 labelled N-(3-iodopropen-2-yl)-2β-carbomethoxy-3beta-(4-chlorophenyl)tropane ([ 123 I]IPT) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). [ 123I ]IPT SPECT imaging and Yale Global Tic Severity Scale-Korean version (YGTSS-K) for assessing the tic symptom severity were carried out before and after treatment with risperidone for 8 weeks in nine drug-naive children with TD. Eleven normal children also underwent SPECT imaging 2 hours after an intravenous administration of [ 123 I]IPT. Drug-naive children with TD had a significantly greater increase in the specific/nonspecific DAT binding ratio of both basal ganglia compared with the normal children. However, no significant difference in the specific/nonspecific DAT binding ratio of the basal ganglia before and after treatment with risperidone in children with TD was found, although tic symptoms were significantly improved with risperidone. These findings suggest that DAT densities are directly associated with the pathophysiology of TD, however, that the effect of risperidone on tic symptoms in children with TD is not attributed to the change of dopaminergic system

  4. Use of internal references for assessing CT density measurements of the pelvis as replacement for use of an external phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boomsma, Martijn F; Slouwerhof, Inge; van Dalen, Jorn A; Edens, Mireille A; Mueller, Dirk; Milles, Julien; Maas, Mario

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this research is to study the use of an internal reference standard for fat- and muscle as a replacement for an external reference standard with a phantom. By using a phantomless internal reference standard, Hounsfield unit (HU) measurements of various tissues can potentially be assessed in patients with a CT scan of the pelvis without an added phantom at time of CT acquisition. This paves the way for development of a tool for quantification of the change in tissue density in one patient over time and between patients. This could make every CT scan made without contrast available for research purposes. Fifty patients with unilateral metal-on-metal total hip replacements, scanned together with a calibration reference phantom used in bone mineral density measurements, were included in this study. On computed tomography scans of the pelvis without the use of intravenous iodine contrast, reference values for fat and muscle were measured in the phantom as well as within the patient's body. The conformity between the references was examined with the intra-class correlation coefficient. The mean HU (± SD) of reference values for fat for the internal- and phantom references were -91.5 (±7.0) and -90.9 (±7.8), respectively. For muscle, the mean HU (± SD) for the internal- and phantom references were 59.2 (±6.2) and 60.0 (±7.2), respectively. The intra-class correlation coefficients for fat and muscle were 0.90 and 0.84 respectively and show excellent agreement between the phantom and internal references. Internal references can be used with similar accuracy as references from an external phantom. There is no need to use an external phantom to asses CT density measurements of body tissue.

  5. Use of internal references for assessing CT density measurements of the pelvis as replacement for use of an external phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boomsma, Martijn F.; Slouwerhof, Inge; Dalen, Jorn A. van [Isala Hospital, Department of Radiology, Zwolle (Netherlands); Edens, Mireille A. [Isala Hospital, Department of Innovation and Science, Zwolle (Netherlands); Mueller, Dirk [Philips Healthcare systems, Hamburg (Germany); Milles, Julien [Philips Healthcare Benelux, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Maas, Mario [AMC, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-11-15

    The purpose of this research is to study the use of an internal reference standard for fat- and muscle as a replacement for an external reference standard with a phantom. By using a phantomless internal reference standard, Hounsfield unit (HU) measurements of various tissues can potentially be assessed in patients with a CT scan of the pelvis without an added phantom at time of CT acquisition. This paves the way for development of a tool for quantification of the change in tissue density in one patient over time and between patients. This could make every CT scan made without contrast available for research purposes. Fifty patients with unilateral metal-on-metal total hip replacements, scanned together with a calibration reference phantom used in bone mineral density measurements, were included in this study. On computed tomography scans of the pelvis without the use of intravenous iodine contrast, reference values for fat and muscle were measured in the phantom as well as within the patient's body. The conformity between the references was examined with the intra-class correlation coefficient. The mean HU (± SD) of reference values for fat for the internal- and phantom references were -91.5 (±7.0) and -90.9 (±7.8), respectively. For muscle, the mean HU (± SD) for the internal- and phantom references were 59.2 (±6.2) and 60.0 (±7.2), respectively. The intra-class correlation coefficients for fat and muscle were 0.90 and 0.84 respectively and show excellent agreement between the phantom and internal references. Internal references can be used with similar accuracy as references from an external phantom. There is no need to use an external phantom to asses CT density measurements of body tissue. (orig.)

  6. Integrated cryptosporidium assay to determine oocyst density, infectivity, and genotype for risk assessment of source and reuse water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Brendon; Fanok, Stella; Phillips, Renae; Swaffer, Brooke; Monis, Paul

    2015-05-15

    Cryptosporidium continues to be problematic for the water industry, with risk assessments often indicating that treatment barriers may fail under extreme conditions. However, risk analyses have historically used oocyst densities and not considered either oocyst infectivity or species/genotype, which can result in an overestimation of risk if the oocysts are not human infective. We describe an integrated assay for determining oocyst density, infectivity, and genotype from a single-sample concentrate, an important advance that overcomes the need for processing multiple-grab samples or splitting sample concentrates for separate analyses. The assay incorporates an oocyst recovery control and is compatible with standard primary concentration techniques. Oocysts were purified from primary concentrates using immunomagnetic separation prior to processing by an infectivity assay. Plate-based cell culture was used to detect infectious foci, with a monolayer washing protocol developed to allow recovery and enumeration of oocysts. A simple DNA extraction protocol was developed to allow typing of any wells containing infectious Cryptosporidium. Water samples from a variety of source water and wastewater matrices, including a semirural catchment, wastewater, an aquifer recharge site, and storm water, were analyzed using the assay. Results demonstrate that the assay can reliably determine oocyst densities, infectivity, and genotype from single-grab samples for a variety of water matrices and emphasize the varying nature of Cryptosporidium risk extant throughout source waters and wastewaters. This assay should therefore enable a more comprehensive understanding of Cryptosporidium risk for different water sources, assisting in the selection of appropriate risk mitigation measures. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Assessment of the impact that the capsule fill tube has on implosions conducted with high density carbon ablators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, Arthur; Benedetti, L. R.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Clark, D.; Divol, L.; Dewald, E. L.; Fittinghoff, D.; Izumi, N.; Khan, S. F.; Landen, O.; Lepape, S.; Ma, T.; Marley, E.; Nagel, S.; Volegov, P.; Weber, C.; Bradley, D. K.; Callahan, D.; Grim, G.; Hurricane, O. A.; Patel, P.; Schneider, M. B.; Edwards, M. J.

    2017-10-01

    In recent inertial confinement implosion experiments conducted at the National Ignition Facility, bright and spatially localized x-ray emission within the hot spot at stagnation has been observed. This emission is associated with higher Z ablator material that is injected into the hot spot by the hydrodynamic perturbation induced by the 5-10 um diameter capsule fill tube. The reactivity of the DT fuel and subsequent yield of the implosion are strongly dependent on the density, temperature, and confinement time achieved throughout the stagnation of the implosion. Radiative losses from higher Z ablator material that mixes into the hot spot as well as non-uniformities in the compression and confinement induced by the fill tube perturbation can degrade the yield of the implosion. This work will examine the impact to conditions at stagnation that results from the fill tube perturbation. This assessment will be based from a pair of experiments conducted with a high density carbon ablator where the only deliberate change was reduction in fill tube diameter from 10 to 5 um. An estimate of the radiative losses and impact on performance from ablator mix injected into the hot spot by the fill tube perturbation will be presented. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  8. Assessment of patch quality by aphidophagous ladybirds: laboratory study on the minimum density of aphids required for oviposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. C. Das

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Many studies indicate that there is a density of aphids below which ladybirds are unlikely to lay eggs. This is adaptive as theory indicates that a certain minimum population density of aphids is required if hatchling larvae are to survive. The responses of gravid females of the two spot ladybird, Adalia bipunctata (L. (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae, recorded over a period of an hour, to colonies of 5 and 50 pea aphids on bean plants and similar plants each previously infested with the same number of aphids for 48 hours were determined. Proportionally more of the ladybirds on plants with 50 aphids or that were previously infested with the same number of aphids for 48 hours laid eggs and larger clusters of eggs, and were less active than those on plants that were infested with or had previously been infested with five aphids. That is, gravid females showed similar oviposition and activity responses to aphid abundance and different levels of honeydew contamination. This indicates that honeydew contamination may be an important cue used by ladybirds when locating and assessing the abundance of prey in aphid colonies.

  9. Radioactive liquid containing vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurada, Tetsuo; Kawamura, Hironobu.

    1993-01-01

    Cooling jackets are coiled around the outer circumference of a container vessel, and the outer circumference thereof is covered with a surrounding plate. A liquid of good conductivity (for example, water) is filled between the cooling jackets and the surrounding plate. A radioactive liquid is supplied to the container vessel passing through a supply pipe and discharged passing through a discharge pipe. Cooling water at high pressure is passed through the cooling water jackets in order to remove the heat generated from the radioactive liquid. Since cooling water at high pressure is thus passed through the coiled pipes, the wall thickness of the container vessel and the cooling water jackets can be reduced, thereby enabling to reduce the cost. Further, even if the radioactive liquid is leaked, there is no worry of contaminating cooling water, to prevent contamination. (I.N.)

  10. Radiological assessment of breast density by visual classification (BI-RADS) compared to automated volumetric digital software (Quantra): implications for clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regini, Elisa; Mariscotti, Giovanna; Durando, Manuela; Ghione, Gianluca; Luparia, Andrea; Campanino, Pier Paolo; Bianchi, Caterina Chiara; Bergamasco, Laura; Fonio, Paolo; Gandini, Giovanni

    2014-10-01

    This study was done to assess breast density on digital mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis according to the visual Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) classification, to compare visual assessment with Quantra software for automated density measurement, and to establish the role of the software in clinical practice. We analysed 200 digital mammograms performed in 2D and 3D modality, 100 of which positive for breast cancer and 100 negative. Radiological density was assessed with the BI-RADS classification; a Quantra density cut-off value was sought on the 2D images only to discriminate between BI-RADS categories 1-2 and BI-RADS 3-4. Breast density was correlated with age, use of hormone therapy, and increased risk of disease. The agreement between the 2D and 3D assessments of BI-RADS density was high (K 0.96). A cut-off value of 21% is that which allows us to best discriminate between BI-RADS categories 1-2 and 3-4. Breast density was negatively correlated to age (r = -0.44) and positively to use of hormone therapy (p = 0.0004). Quantra density was higher in breasts with cancer than in healthy breasts. There is no clear difference between the visual assessments of density on 2D and 3D images. Use of the automated system requires the adoption of a cut-off value (set at 21%) to effectively discriminate BI-RADS 1-2 and 3-4, and could be useful in clinical practice.

  11. Integrity of Magnox reactor steel pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flewitt, P.E.J.; Williams, G.H.; Wright, M.B.

    1992-01-01

    The background to the safety assessment of the steel reactor pressure vessels for Magnox power stations is reviewed. The evolved philosophy adopted for the 1991 safety cases prepared for the continued operation of four Magnox power stations operated by Nuclear Electric plc is described, together with different aspects of the multi-legged integrity argument. The main revisions to the materials mechanical property data are addressed together with the assessment methodology adopted and their implications for the overall integrity argument formulated for the continued safe operation of these reactor pressure vessels. (author)

  12. Spontaneous development of bilateral subdural hematomas in an infant with benign infantile hydrocephalus: color Doppler assessment of vessels traversing extra-axial spaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amodio, John; Spektor, Vadim; Pramanik, Bidyut; Rivera, Rafael; Pinkney, Lynne; Fefferman, Nancy [New York University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States)

    2005-11-01

    We present an infant with macrocrania, who initially demonstrated prominent extra-axial fluid collections on sonography of the brain, compatible with benign infantile hydrocephalus (BIH). Because of increasing macrocrania, a follow-up sonogram of the brain was performed; it revealed progressive enlargement of the extra-axial spaces, which now had echogenic debris. Color Doppler US showed bridging veins traversing these extra-axial spaces, so it was initially thought that these spaces were subarachnoid in nature (positive cortical vein sign). However, an arachnoid membrane was identified superior to the cortex, and there was compression of true cortical vessels beneath this dural membrane. An MRI of the brain showed the extra-axial spaces to represent bilateral subdural hematomas. The pathogenesis of spontaneous development of the subdural hematomas, in the setting of BIH, is discussed. We also emphasize that visualizing traversing bridging veins through extra-axial spaces does not necessarily imply that these spaces are subarachnoid in origin. (orig.)

  13. Breast Density Estimation with Fully Automated Volumetric Method: Comparison to Radiologists' Assessment by BI-RADS Categories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Tulika; Sharma, Madhurima; Singla, Veenu; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2016-01-01

    The objective of our study was to calculate mammographic breast density with a fully automated volumetric breast density measurement method and to compare it to breast imaging reporting and data system (BI-RADS) breast density categories assigned by two radiologists. A total of 476 full-field digital mammography examinations with standard mediolateral oblique and craniocaudal views were evaluated by two blinded radiologists and BI-RADS density categories were assigned. Using a fully automated software, mean fibroglandular tissue volume, mean breast volume, and mean volumetric breast density were calculated. Based on percentage volumetric breast density, a volumetric density grade was assigned from 1 to 4. The weighted overall kappa was 0.895 (almost perfect agreement) for the two radiologists' BI-RADS density estimates. A statistically significant difference was seen in mean volumetric breast density among the BI-RADS density categories. With increased BI-RADS density category, increase in mean volumetric breast density was also seen (P BI-RADS categories and volumetric density grading by fully automated software (ρ = 0.728, P BI-RADS density category by two observers showed fair agreement (κ = 0.398 and 0.388, respectively). In our study, a good correlation was seen between density grading using fully automated volumetric method and density grading using BI-RADS density categories assigned by the two radiologists. Thus, the fully automated volumetric method may be used to quantify breast density on routine mammography. Copyright © 2016 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Environmental risk assessment of low density polyethylene unit using the method of failure mode and effect analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salati Parinaz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The ninth olefin plan of Arya Sasol Petrochemical Company (A.S.P.C. is regarded the largest gas Olefin Unit located on Pars Special Economic Energy Zone (P.S.E.E.Z. Considering the importance of the petrochemical unit, its environmental assessment seems necessary to identify and reduce potential hazards. For this purpose, after determining the scope of the study area, identification and measurement of the environmental parameters, environmental risk assessment of the unit was carried out using Environment Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (EFMEA. Using the noted method, sources causing environmental risks were identified, rated and prioritized. Beside, the impacts of the environmental aspects derived from the unit activities as well as their consequences were also analyzed. Furthermore, the identified impacts were prioritized based on Risk Priority Number (RPN and severity level of the consequences imposed on the affected environment. After performing statistical calculations, it was found that the environmental aspects owing the risk priority number higher than 15 have a high level of risk. Results obtained from Low Density Polyethylene Unit revealed that the highest risk belongs to the emergency vent system with risk priority number equal to 48. It is occurred due to imperfect performance of the reactor safety system leading to the emissions of ethylene gas, particles, and radioactive steam as well as air and noise pollutions. Results derived from secondary assessment of the environmental aspects, through difference in calculated RPN and activities risk levels showed that employing modern methods and risk assessment are have remarkably reduced the severity of risk and consequently detracted the damages and losses incurred on the environment.

  15. Assessing opportunities for physical activity in the built environment of children: interrelation between kernel density and neighborhood scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Christoph; Kneib, Thomas; Tkaczick, Tobias; Konstabel, Kenn; Pigeot, Iris

    2015-12-22

    Built environment studies provide broad evidence that urban characteristics influence physical activity (PA). However, findings are still difficult to compare, due to inconsistent measures assessing urban point characteristics and varying definitions of spatial scale. Both were found to influence the strength of the association between the built environment and PA. We simultaneously evaluated the effect of kernel approaches and network-distances to investigate the association between urban characteristics and physical activity depending on spatial scale and intensity measure. We assessed urban measures of point characteristics such as intersections, public transit stations, and public open spaces in ego-centered network-dependent neighborhoods based on geographical data of one German study region of the IDEFICS study. We calculated point intensities using the simple intensity and kernel approaches based on fixed bandwidths, cross-validated bandwidths including isotropic and anisotropic kernel functions and considering adaptive bandwidths that adjust for residential density. We distinguished six network-distances from 500 m up to 2 km to calculate each intensity measure. A log-gamma regression model was used to investigate the effect of each urban measure on moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) of 400 2- to 9.9-year old children who participated in the IDEFICS study. Models were stratified by sex and age groups, i.e. pre-school children (2 to kernel approaches. Smallest variation in effect estimates over network-distances was found for kernel intensity measures based on isotropic and anisotropic cross-validated bandwidth selection. We found a strong variation in the association between the built environment and PA of children based on the choice of intensity measure and network-distance. Kernel intensity measures provided stable results over various scales and improved the assessment compared to the simple intensity measure. Considering different spatial

  16. Image-Based Computational Fluid Dynamics in Blood Vessel Models: Toward Developing a Prognostic Tool to Assess Cardiovascular Function Changes in Prolonged Space Flights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzimavroudis, George P.; Spirka, Thomas A.; Setser, Randolph M.; Myers, Jerry G.

    2004-01-01

    One of NASA's objectives is to be able to perform a complete, pre-flight, evaluation of cardiovascular changes in astronauts scheduled for prolonged space missions. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has shown promise as a method for estimating cardiovascular function during reduced gravity conditions. For this purpose, MRI can provide geometrical information, to reconstruct vessel geometries, and measure all spatial velocity components, providing location specific boundary conditions. The objective of this study was to investigate the reliability of MRI-based model reconstruction and measured boundary conditions for CFD simulations. An aortic arch model and a carotid bifurcation model were scanned in a 1.5T Siemens MRI scanner. Axial MRI acquisitions provided images for geometry reconstruction (slice thickness 3 and 5 mm; pixel size 1x1 and 0.5x0.5 square millimeters). Velocity acquisitions provided measured inlet boundary conditions and localized three-directional steady-flow velocity data (0.7-3.0 L/min). The vessel walls were isolated using NIH provided software (ImageJ) and lofted to form the geometric surface. Constructed and idealized geometries were imported into a commercial CFD code for meshing and simulation. Contour and vector plots of the velocity showed identical features between the MRI velocity data, the MRI-based CFD data, and the idealized-geometry CFD data, with less than 10% differences in the local velocity values. CFD results on models reconstructed from different MRI resolution settings showed insignificant differences (less than 5%). This study illustrated, quantitatively, that reliable CFD simulations can be performed with MRI reconstructed models and gives evidence that a future, subject-specific, computational evaluation of the cardiovascular system alteration during space travel is feasible.

  17. The reactor vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilous, W.; Hajewska, E.; Szteke, W.; Przyborska, M.; Wasiak, J.; Wieczorkowski, M.

    2005-01-01

    In the paper the fundamental steels using in the construction of pressure vessel water reactor are discussed. The properties of these steels as well as the influence of neutron irradiation on its degradation in the time of exploitation are also done. (authors)

  18. Vacuum distilling vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reik, H

    1928-12-27

    Vacuum distilling vessel for mineral oil and the like, characterized by the ring-form or polyconal stiffeners arranged inside, suitably eccentric to the casing, being held at a distance from the casing by connecting members of such a height that in the resulting space if necessary can be arranged vapor-distributing pipes and a complete removal of the residue is possible.

  19. Visualization of vessel traffic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, C.M.E.

    2011-01-01

    Moving objects are captured in multivariate trajectories, often large data with multiple attributes. We focus on vessel traffic as a source of such data. Patterns appearing from visually analyzing attributes are used to explain why certain movements have occurred. In this research, we have developed

  20. GOLD PRESSURE VESSEL SEAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A.E.

    1963-11-26

    An improved seal between the piston and die member of a piston-cylinder type pressure vessel is presented. A layer of gold, of sufficient thickness to provide an interference fit between the piston and die member, is plated on the contacting surface of at least one of the members. (AEC)

  1. Reactor vessel stud tensioner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malandra, L.J.; Beer, R.W.; Salton, R.B.; Spiegelman, S.R.; Cognevich, M.L.

    1982-01-01

    A quick-acting stud tensioner, for facilitating the loosening or tightening of a stud nut on a reactor vessel stud, has gripper jaws which when the tensioner is lowered into engagement with the upper end of the stud are moved inwards to grip the upper end and which when the tensioner is lifted move outward to release the upper end. (author)

  2. Study of evaluation methods for in-vessel corium retention through external vessel cooling and safety of reactor cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huh, Hoon; Chang, Soon Heung; Kim, Soo Hyung; Kim, Kee Poong; Lee, Hyoung Wook; Jang, Kwang Keol; Jeong, Yong Hoon; Kim, Sang Jin; Lee, Seong Jin [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jae Hong [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-03-15

    In this work, assessment system for methodology for reactor pressure vessel integrity is developed. Assessment system is make up of severe accident assessment code which can calculate the conditions of plant and structural analysis code which can assess the integrity of reactor vessel using given plant conditions. An assessment of cavity flooding using containment spray system has been done. As a result, by the containment spray, cavity can be flooded successfully and CCI can be reduced. The technical backgrounds for external vessel cooling and corium cooling on the cavity are summarized and provided in this report.

  3. Study of evaluation methods for in-vessel corium retention through external vessel cooling and safety of reactor cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huh, Hoon; Chang, Soon Heung; Kim, Soo Hyung; Kim, Kee Poong; Lee, Hyoung Wook; Jang, Kwang Keol; Jeong, Yong Hoon; Kim, Sang Jin; Lee, Seong Jin; Park, Jae Hong

    2001-03-01

    In this work, assessment system for methodology for reactor pressure vessel integrity is developed. Assessment system is make up of severe accident assessment code which can calculate the conditions of plant and structural analysis code which can assess the integrity of reactor vessel using given plant conditions. An assessment of cavity flooding using containment spray system has been done. As a result, by the containment spray, cavity can be flooded successfully and CCI can be reduced. The technical backgrounds for external vessel cooling and corium cooling on the cavity are summarized and provided in this report

  4. Performance of the Osteoporosis Self-Assessment Tool in ruling out low bone mineral density in postmenopausal women: a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rud, B; Hilden, J; Hyldstrup, L

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY: The Osteoporosis Self-Assessment Tool (OST) is a simple test that may be of clinical value to rule-out low bone mineral density. We performed a systematic review to assess its performance in postmenopausal women. We included 36 studies. OST performed moderately in ruling-out femoral neck T...

  5. Performance of the osteoporosis self-assessment tool in ruling out low bone mineral density in postmenopausal women: A systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rud, B.; Hilden, Jørgen; Hyldstrup, L.

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY: The Osteoporosis Self-Assessment Tool (OST) is a simple test that may be of clinical value to rule-out low bone mineral density. We performed a systematic review to assess its performance in postmenopausal women. We included 36 studies. OST performed moderately in ruling-out femoral neck T...

  6. PDX vacuum vessel stress analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikodem, Z.D.

    1975-01-01

    A stress analysis of PDX vacuum vessel is described and the summary of results is presented. The vacuum vessel is treated as a toroidal shell of revolution subjected to an internal vacuum. The critical buckling pressure is calculated. The effects of the geometrical discontinuity at the juncture of toroidal shell head and cylindrical outside wall, and the concavity of the cylindrical wall are examined. An effect of the poloidal field coil supports and the vessel outside supports on the stress distribution in the vacuum vessel is determined. A method evaluating the influence of circular ports in the vessel wall on the stress level in the vessel is outlined

  7. Dopamine transporter density of the basal ganglia in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder assessed with I-123 IPT SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Won Gee; Kim, Tae Hoon; Ryu, Young Hoon; Yun, Mi Jin; Lee, Jong Doo; Cheon, Keun Ah; Chi, Dae Yoon; Kim, Jong Ho; Choi, Tae Hyun

    2003-01-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has been known as psychiatric disorder in childhood associated with dopamine dysregulation. In present study, we investigated changes in dopamine transporter (DAT) density of the basal ganglias using I-123 N-(3-iodopropen-2-yl) -2-carbomethoxy-3beta-(4-chlorphenyl) tropane (I-123 IPT) SPECT in children with ADHD before and after methylphenidate treatment. Nine drug-naive children with ADHD and seven normal children were included in the study. We performed brain SPECT two hours after the intravenous administration of I-123 IPT and made both quantitative and qualitative analyses using the obtained SPECT data, which were reconstructed for the assessment of specific/nonspecific DAT binding ratios in the basal ganglia. All children with ADHD reperformed (123I)IPT SPECT after treatment with methylphenidate (0.7mg/kg/d) during about 8 weeks. SPECT data reconstructed for the assessment of specific/nonspecific DAT binding ratio of the basal ganglia were compared between before and after treatment methyphenidate. We investigated correlation between the change of ADHD symptom severity assessed with ADHD rating scale-IV and specific/nonspecific DAT binding ratio of basal ganglia. Children with ADHD had a significantly greater specific/nonspecific DAT binding ratio of the basal ganglia comparing to normal children (Right : z = 2.057, p = 0.041 ; Left : z = 2.096, p = 0.032). Under treatment with methylphenidate in all children with ADHD, specific/nonspecific DAT binding ratio of both ganglia decreased significantly greater than before treatment with methylphenidate (Right : t = 3.239, p = 0.018 ; Left : t = 3.133, p 0.020). However, no significant correlation between the change of ADHD symptom severity scores and specific/nonspecific DAT binding ratio of the basal ganglia were found. These findings support the complex dysregulation of the dopaminergic neurotransmitter system in children with ADHD

  8. Dopamine transporter density of the basal ganglia in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder assessed with I-123 IPT SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Won Gee; Kim, Tae Hoon; Ryu, Young Hoon; Yun, Mi Jin; Lee, Jong Doo; Cheon, Keun Ah [College of Medicine, Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chi, Dae Yoon [College of Medicine, Inha Univ., Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong Ho; Choi, Tae Hyun [School of Medicine, Gachon Univ., Gachon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-08-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has been known as psychiatric disorder in childhood associated with dopamine dysregulation. In present study, we investigated changes in dopamine transporter (DAT) density of the basal ganglias using I-123 N-(3-iodopropen-2-yl) -2-carbomethoxy-3beta-(4-chlorphenyl) tropane (I-123 IPT) SPECT in children with ADHD before and after methylphenidate treatment. Nine drug-naive children with ADHD and seven normal children were included in the study. We performed brain SPECT two hours after the intravenous administration of I-123 IPT and made both quantitative and qualitative analyses using the obtained SPECT data, which were reconstructed for the assessment of specific/nonspecific DAT binding ratios in the basal ganglia. All children with ADHD reperformed (123I)IPT SPECT after treatment with methylphenidate (0.7mg/kg/d) during about 8 weeks. SPECT data reconstructed for the assessment of specific/nonspecific DAT binding ratio of the basal ganglia were compared between before and after treatment methyphenidate. We investigated correlation between the change of ADHD symptom severity assessed with ADHD rating scale-IV and specific/nonspecific DAT binding ratio of basal ganglia. Children with ADHD had a significantly greater specific/nonspecific DAT binding ratio of the basal ganglia comparing to normal children (Right : z = 2.057, p = 0.041 ; Left : z = 2.096, p = 0.032). Under treatment with methylphenidate in all children with ADHD, specific/nonspecific DAT binding ratio of both ganglia decreased significantly greater than before treatment with methylphenidate (Right : t = 3.239, p = 0.018 ; Left : t = 3.133, p 0.020). However, no significant correlation between the change of ADHD symptom severity scores and specific/nonspecific DAT binding ratio of the basal ganglia were found. These findings support the complex dysregulation of the dopaminergic neurotransmitter system in children with ADHD.

  9. Bone-composition imaging using coherent-scatter computed tomography: Assessing bone health beyond bone mineral density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batchelar, Deidre L.; Davidson, Melanie T.M.; Dabrowski, Waldemar; Cunningham, Ian A.

    2006-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of bone composition is necessary for the accurate diagnosis and monitoring of metabolic bone diseases. Accurate assessment of the bone mineralization state is the first requirement for a comprehensive analysis. In diagnostic imaging, x-ray coherent scatter depends upon the molecular structure of tissues. Coherent-scatter computed tomography (CSCT) exploits this feature to identify tissue types in composite biological specimens. We have used CSCT to map the distributions of tissues relevant to bone disease (fat, soft tissue, collagen, and mineral) within bone-tissue phantoms and an excised cadaveric bone sample. Using a purpose-built scanner, we have measured hydroxyapatite (bone mineral) concentrations based on coherent-scatter patterns from a series of samples with varying hydroxyapatite content. The measured scatter intensity is proportional to mineral density in true g/cm 3 . Repeated measurements of the hydroxyapatite concentration in each sample were within, at most, 2% of each other, revealing an excellent precision in determining hydroxyapatite concentration. All measurements were also found to be accurate to within 3% of the known values. Phantoms simulating normal, over-, and under-mineralized bone were created by mixing known masses of pure collagen and hydroxyapatite. An analysis of the composite scatter patterns gave the density of each material. For each composite, the densities were within 2% of the known values. Collagen and hydroxyapatite concentrations were also examined in a bone-mimicking phantom, incorporating other bone constituents (fat, soft tissue). Tomographic maps of the coherent-scatter properties of each specimen were reconstructed, from which material-specific images were generated. Each tissue was clearly distinguished and the collagen-mineral ratio determined from this phantom was also within 2% of the known value. Existing bone analysis techniques cannot determine the collagen-mineral ratio in intact specimens

  10. Fabrication Flaw Density and Distribution in Weld Repairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doctor, Steven R.

    2009-01-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing a generalized flaw distribution for the population of nuclear reactor pressure vessels and for piping welds in the U. S. operating reactors. The purpose of the generalized flaw distribution is to predict component-specific flaw densities. The estimates of fabrication flaws are intended for use in fracture mechanics structural integrity assessments. Structural integrity assessments, such as estimating the frequency of loss-of-coolant accidents, are performed by computer codes that require, as input, accurate estimates of flaw densities. Welds from four different cancelled reactor pressure vessels and a collection of archived pipes have been studied to develop empirical estimates of fabrication flaw densities. This paper describes the fabrication flaw distribution and characterization in the repair weld metal of vessels and piping. This work indicates that large flaws occur in these repairs which are complex in composition and sometimes include cracks on the ends of the repair cavities. Parametric analysis using an exponential fit is performed on the data. Construction records where available were reviewed. It is difficult to make conclusions due to the limited number of construction records reviewed. However, the records reviewed to date show a significant change in repair frequency over the years when the components in this study were fabricated. A description of repair flaw morphology is provided with a discussion of fracture mechanics significance.

  11. Report of the experts' mission to review thermal hydraulic and structural analyses for PTS assessment of Kozloduy NPP units 1-4 reactor pressure vessels, Sofia, Bulgaria 3-7 April 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    Based upon a request of the Government of Bulgaria and in order to assist its Regulatory Body, an experts' mission was carried out to Sofia and Kozloduy, 21-25 November 1994 within the framework of the IAEA TC Project BUL/9/013-05 and of the IAEA Extrabudgetary Programme on the Safety of the WWER NPPs. The mission also specified the technical content of further assistance by the IAEA. With respect to the findings and recommendations made in November 1994, WWER-SC-109, a follow-up expert's mission was carried out to Sofia, Bulgaria, April 3-7, 1995. The objective of the mission was to review the selection of transients, thermal hydraulic, stress and fracture mechanics analyses for reactor pressure vessel integrity assessment of Kozloduy unit 1-4. In addition, an update on the activities completed, underway and planned related to unit 1 reactor pressure vessel embrittlement was presented and discussed. The review was carried out by 4 international experts from Finland, France, Russia and IAEA in co-operation with the Bulgarian regulatory body, plant, Energoproject Sofia and Institute of Metals staff. The mission was conducted out within the frame of the IAEA TC Project BUL/9/013-05 and of the IAEA Extrabudgetary Programme on the Safety of the WWER NPPs. 18 refs

  12. Vessels in Transit - Web Tool

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — A web tool that provides real-time information on vessels transiting the Saint Lawrence Seaway. Visitors may sort by order of turn, vessel name, or last location in...

  13. Reactor vessel sealing plug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dooley, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    An apparatus is described for sealing a cold leg nozzle of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel from a remote location comprising: at least one sealing plug for mechanically sealing the nozzle from the inside of the reactor pressure vessel. The sealing plug includes a plate and a cone assembly having an end part receptive in the nozzle, the plate being axially moveable relative to the cone assembly. The plate and cone assembly have confronting bevelled edges defining an opening therebetween. A primary O-ring is disposed about the opening and is supported on the bevelled edges, the plate being guidably mounted to the cone assembly for movement toward the cone assembly to radially expand the primary O-ring into sealing engagement with the nozzle. A means is included for providing relative movement between the outer plate and the cone assembly

  14. Mobile nuclear reactor containment vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, R.E.; Spurrier, F.R.; Jones, A.R.

    1978-01-01

    A containment vessel for use in mobile nuclear reactor installations is described. The containment vessel completely surrounds the entire primary system, and is located as close to the reactor primary system components as is possible in order to minimize weight. In addition to being designed to withstand a specified internal pressure, the containment vessel is also designed to maintain integrity as a containment vessel in case of a possible collision accident

  15. Nuclear reactor vessel inspection apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackstone, E.G.; Lofy, R.A.; Williams, L.P.

    1979-01-01

    Apparatus for the in situ inspection of a nuclear reactor vessel to detect the location and character of flaws in the walls of the vessel, in the welds joining the various sections of the vessel, in the welds joining attachments such as nozzles, elbows and the like to the reactor vessel and in such attachments wherein an inspection head carrying one or more ultrasonic transducers follows predetermined paths in scanning the various reactor sections, welds and attachments

  16. Reactor vessel stud closure system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiegelman, S.R.; Salton, R.B.; Beer, R.W.; Malandra, L.J.; Cognevich, M.L.

    1982-01-01

    A quick-acting stud tensioner apparatus for enabling the loosening or tightening of a stud nut on a reactor vessel stud. The apparatus is adapted to engage the vessel stud by closing a gripper around an upper end of the vessel stud when the apparatus is seated on the stud. Upon lifting the apparatus, the gripper releases the vessel stud so that the apparatus can be removed

  17. Qualitative assessment of bone density at the distal articulating surface of the third metacarpal in Thoroughbred racehorses with and without condylar fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughridge, A B; Hess, A M; Parkin, T D; Kawcak, C E

    2017-03-01

    Changes in subchondral bone density, induced by the repetitive cyclical loading of exercise, may potentiate fatigue damage and the risk of fracture. To use computed tomography (CT) to characterise bone density patterns at the articular surface of the third metacarpal bone in racehorses with and without lateral condylar fractures. Case control METHODS: Computed tomographic images of the distal articulating surface of the third metacarpal bone were obtained from Thoroughbred racehorses subjected to euthanasia in the UK. Third metacarpal bones were divided into 3 groups based on lateral condyle status; fractured (FX, n = 42), nonfractured contralateral condyle (NFX, n = 42) and control condyles from horses subjected to euthanasia for reasons unrelated to the third metacarpal bone (control, n = 94). Colour CT images were generated whereby each colour represented a range of pixel values and thus a relative range of bone density. A density value was calculated qualitatively by estimating the percentage of each colour within a specific region. Subchondral bone density was assessed in 6 regions from dorsal to palmar and 1 mm medial and lateral to the centre of the lateral parasagittal groove in NFX and control condyles and 1 mm medial and lateral to the fracture in FX condyles. Bone density was significantly higher in the FX and NFX condyles compared with control condyles for all 6 regions. A significantly higher bone density was observed in FX condyles relative to NFX condyles in the lateral middle and lateral palmar regions. Fractured condyles had increased heterogeneity in density among the 6 regions of interest compared with control and NFX condyles. Adjacent to the fracture, a focal increase in bone density and increased heterogeneity of density were characteristic of limbs with lateral condylar fractures compared with control and NFX condyles. These differences may represent pathological changes in bone density that increase the risk for lateral condylar fractures in

  18. Development of Multi-physics (Multiphase CFD + MCNP) simulation for generic solution vessel power calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Jun [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Buechler, Cynthia Eileen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-07-17

    The current study aims to predict the steady state power of a generic solution vessel and to develop a corresponding heat transfer coefficient correlation for a Moly99 production facility by conducting a fully coupled multi-physics simulation. A prediction of steady state power for the current application is inherently interconnected between thermal hydraulic characteristics (i.e. Multiphase computational fluid dynamics solved by ANSYS-Fluent 17.2) and the corresponding neutronic behavior (i.e. particle transport solved by MCNP6.2) in the solution vessel. Thus, the development of a coupling methodology is vital to understand the system behavior at a variety of system design and postulated operating scenarios. In this study, we report on the k-effective (keff) calculation for the baseline solution vessel configuration with a selected solution concentration using MCNP K-code modeling. The associated correlation of thermal properties (e.g. density, viscosity, thermal conductivity, specific heat) at the selected solution concentration are developed based on existing experimental measurements in the open literature. The numerical coupling methodology between multiphase CFD and MCNP is successfully demonstrated, and the detailed coupling procedure is documented. In addition, improved coupling methods capturing realistic physics in the solution vessel thermal-neutronic dynamics are proposed and tested further (i.e. dynamic height adjustment, mull-cell approach). As a key outcome of the current study, a multi-physics coupling methodology between MCFD and MCNP is demonstrated and tested for four different operating conditions. Those different operating conditions are determined based on the neutron source strength at a fixed geometry condition. The steady state powers for the generic solution vessel at various operating conditions are reported, and a generalized correlation of the heat transfer coefficient for the current application is discussed. The assessment of multi

  19. Reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van De Velde, J.; Fabry, A.; Van Walle, E.; Chaouuadi, R.

    1998-01-01

    Research and development activities related to reactor pressure vessel steels during 1997 are reported. The objectives of activities of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK/CEN in this domain are: (1) to develop enhanced surveillance concepts by applying micromechanics and fracture-toughness tests to small specimens, and by performing damage modelling and microstructure characterization; (2) to demonstrate a methodology on a broad database; (3) to achieve regulatory acceptance and industrial use

  20. Phenomenological vessel burst investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hippelein, K.W.; Julisch, P.; Muz, J.; Schiedermaier, J.

    1985-07-01

    Fourteen burst experiments have been carried out using vessels with circumferential and longitudinal flaws, for investigation of the fracture behaviour, i.e. the time-related fracture opening. The vessels had dimensions (outer diameter x wall thickness = 800 x 47 mm) which correspond to the dimensions of the main coolant piping of a 1300 MW e PWR. The test specimens had been made of the base-safe material 20 MnMoNi 55 and of a special, 22 NiMoCr 37 base alloy. The experimental conditions with regard to pressure and temperature have been chosen so as to correspond to normal operating conditions of a PWR (p∝17.5 MPa, T∝300 0 C), i.e. the flaws have been so dimensioned that failure was to be expected at a pressure of p∝17.5 MPa. As a rule, water has been used as the pressure medium, or in some cases air, in order to influence the time-dependent pressure decrease. Fluid and structural dynamics calculations have also been made. In order to determine the impact of a fast propagating crack on the leak-to-fracture curve, which normally is defined by quasistationary experiments, suitable tests have been made with large-volume, cylindrical vessels (outer diameter x wall thickness x length = 3000 x 21 x 14000 mm) made of the material WSt E 43. The leak-before-fracture criterion has been confirmed. (orig./HP) [de

  1. Blood Vessels in Allotransplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahimi, P; Liu, R; Pober, J S

    2015-07-01

    Human vascularized allografts are perfused through blood vessels composed of cells (endothelium, pericytes, and smooth muscle cells) that remain largely of graft origin and are thus subject to host alloimmune responses. Graft vessels must be healthy to maintain homeostatic functions including control of perfusion, maintenance of permselectivity, prevention of thrombosis, and participation in immune surveillance. Vascular cell injury can cause dysfunction that interferes with these processes. Graft vascular cells can be activated by mediators of innate and adaptive immunity to participate in graft inflammation contributing to both ischemia/reperfusion injury and allograft rejection. Different forms of rejection may affect graft vessels in different ways, ranging from thrombosis and neutrophilic inflammation in hyperacute rejection, to endothelialitis/intimal arteritis and fibrinoid necrosis in acute cell-mediated or antibody-mediated rejection, respectively, and to diffuse luminal stenosis in chronic rejection. While some current therapies targeting the host immune system do affect graft vascular cells, direct targeting of the graft vasculature may create new opportunities for preventing allograft injury and loss. © Copyright 2015 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  2. Ionizing radiations and blood vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorob'ev, E.I.; Stepanov, R.P.

    1985-01-01

    Data on phenomenology of radiation-induced changes in blood vessels are systematized and authors' experience is generalized. Modern concepts about processes leading to vessel structure injury after irradiation is critically analyzed. Special attention is paid to reparation and compensation of X-ray vessel injury, consideration of which is not yet sufficiently elucidated in literature

  3. Ionizing radiations and blood vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorob'ev, E.I.; Stepanov, R.P.

    1985-01-01

    Data on phenomeology of radiation changes of blood vessels are systemized and the authors' experience is generalyzed. A critical analysis of modern conceptions on processes resulting in vessel structure damage after irradiation, is given. Special attention is paid to reparation and compensation of radiation injury of vessels

  4. A NOVEL APPROACH TO SUPPORT MAJORITY VOTING IN SPATIAL GROUP MCDM USING DENSITY INDUCED OWA OPERATOR FOR SEISMIC VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Moradi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Being one of the most frightening disasters, earthquakes frequently cause huge damages to buildings, facilities and human beings. Although the prediction of characteristics of an earthquake seems to be impossible, its loss and damage is predictable in advance. Seismic loss estimation models tend to evaluate the extent to which the urban areas are vulnerable to earthquakes. Many factors contribute to the vulnerability of urban areas against earthquakes including age and height of buildings, the quality of the materials, the density of population and the location of flammable facilities. Therefore, seismic vulnerability assessment is a multi-criteria problem. A number of multi criteria decision making models have been proposed based on a single expert. The main objective of this paper is to propose a model which facilitates group multi criteria decision making based on the concept of majority voting. The main idea of majority voting is providing a computational tool to measure the degree to which different experts support each other’s opinions and make a decision regarding this measure. The applicability of this model is examined in Tehran metropolitan area which is located in a seismically active region. The results indicate that neglecting the experts which get lower degrees of support from others enables the decision makers to avoid the extreme strategies. Moreover, a computational method is proposed to calculate the degree of optimism in the experts’ opinions.

  5. a Novel Approach to Support Majority Voting in Spatial Group Mcdm Using Density Induced Owa Operator for Seismic Vulnerability Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, M.; Delavar, M. R.; Moshiri, B.; Khamespanah, F.

    2014-10-01

    Being one of the most frightening disasters, earthquakes frequently cause huge damages to buildings, facilities and human beings. Although the prediction of characteristics of an earthquake seems to be impossible, its loss and damage is predictable in advance. Seismic loss estimation models tend to evaluate the extent to which the urban areas are vulnerable to earthquakes. Many factors contribute to the vulnerability of urban areas against earthquakes including age and height of buildings, the quality of the materials, the density of population and the location of flammable facilities. Therefore, seismic vulnerability assessment is a multi-criteria problem. A number of multi criteria decision making models have been proposed based on a single expert. The main objective of this paper is to propose a model which facilitates group multi criteria decision making based on the concept of majority voting. The main idea of majority voting is providing a computational tool to measure the degree to which different experts support each other's opinions and make a decision regarding this measure. The applicability of this model is examined in Tehran metropolitan area which is located in a seismically active region. The results indicate that neglecting the experts which get lower degrees of support from others enables the decision makers to avoid the extreme strategies. Moreover, a computational method is proposed to calculate the degree of optimism in the experts' opinions.

  6. Assessment of the reliability of human corneal endothelial cell-density estimates using a noncontact specular microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doughty, M J; Müller, A; Zaman, M L

    2000-03-01

    We sought to determine the variance in endothelial cell density (ECD) estimates for human corneal endothelia. Noncontact specular micrographs were obtained from white subjects without any history of contact lens wear, or major eye disease or surgery; subjects were within four age groups (children, young adults, older adults, senior citizens). The endothelial image was scanned, and the areas from > or =75 cells measured from an overlay by planimetry. The cell-area values were used to calculate the ECD repeatedly so that the intra- and intersubject variation in an average ECD estimate could be made by using different numbers of cells (5, 10, 15, etc.). An average ECD of 3,519 cells/mm2 (range, 2,598-5,312 cells/mm2) was obtained of counts of 75 cells/ endothelium from individuals aged 6-83 years. Average ECD estimates in each age group were 4,124, 3,457, 3,360, and 3,113 cells/mm2, respectively. Analysis of intersubject variance revealed that ECD estimates would be expected to be no better than +/-10% if only 25 cells were measured per endothelium, but approach +/-2% if 75 cells are measured. In assessing the corneal endothelium by noncontact specular microscopy, cell count should be given, and this should be > or =75/ endothelium for an expected variance to be at a level close to that recommended for monitoring age-, stress-, or surgery-related changes.

  7. Intracranial vessel wall imaging at 7.0 tesla MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kolk, A.G.

    2014-01-01

    Intracranial atherosclerosis is one of the main causes of ischemic stroke. Current conventional imaging techniques assessing intracranial arterial disease in vivo only visualize the vessel wall lumen instead of the pathological vessel wall itself. Therefore, not much is known about the imaging

  8. Vessel diameter measurements in gadolinium contrast-enhanced three-dimensional MRA of peripheral arteries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westenberg, J.J.M.; Geest, van der R.J.; Wasser, M.N.J.M.; Linden, van der E.L.; Walsum, van T.; Assen, van H.C.; Roos, de A.; Vanderschoot, J.; Reiber, J.H.C.

    2000-01-01

    In this study, the possibilities for quantification of vessel diameters of peripheral arteries in gadolinium contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (Gd CE MRA) were evaluated. Absolute vessel diameter measurements were assessed objectively and semi-automatically in maximum intensity

  9. Common-Pressure-Vessel Nickel-Hydrogen Battery Development

    OpenAIRE

    Otzinger, Burton; Wheeler, James

    1991-01-01

    The dual-cell, common-pressure vessel, nickel-hydrogen configuration has recently emerged as an option for small satellite nickel-hydrogen battery application. An important incentive is that the dual-cell, CPV configured battery presents a 30 percent reduction in volume and nearly 50 percent reduction in mounting footprint, when compared with an equivalent battery of individual pressure- vessel (IPV) cells. In addition energy density and cost benefits are significant. Eagle-Picher Industries ...

  10. The Field Assessment Stroke Triage for Emergency Destination (FAST-ED): a Simple and Accurate Pre-Hospital Scale to Detect Large Vessel Occlusion Strokes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Fabricio O.; Silva, Gisele S.; Furie, Karen L.; Frankel, Michael R.; Lev, Michael H.; Camargo, Érica CS; Haussen, Diogo C.; Singhal, Aneesh B.; Koroshetz, Walter J.; Smith, Wade S.; Nogueira, Raul G.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Patients with large vessel occlusion strokes (LVOS) may be better served by direct transfer to endovascular capable centers avoiding hazardous delays between primary and comprehensive stroke centers. However, accurate stroke field triage remains challenging. We aimed to develop a simple field scale to identify LVOS. Methods The FAST-ED scale was based on items of the NIHSS with higher predictive value for LVOS and tested in the STOPStroke cohort, in which patients underwent CT angiography within the first 24 hours of stroke onset. LVOS were defined by total occlusions involving the intracranial-ICA, MCA-M1, MCA-2, or basilar arteries. Patients with partial, bi-hemispheric, and/or anterior + posterior circulation occlusions were excluded. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, sensitivity, specificity, positive (PPV) and negative predictive values (NPV) of FAST-ED were compared with the NIHSS, Rapid Arterial oCclusion Evaluation (RACE) scale and Cincinnati Prehospital Stroke Severity Scale (CPSSS). Results LVO was detected in 240 of the 727 qualifying patients (33%). FAST-ED had comparable accuracy to predict LVO to the NIHSS and higher accuracy than RACE and CPSS (area under the ROC curve: FAST-ED=0.81 as reference; NIHSS=0.80, p=0.28; RACE=0.77, p=0.02; and CPSS=0.75, p=0.002). A FAST-ED ≥4 had sensitivity of 0.60, specificity 0.89, PPV 0.72, and NPV 0.82 versus RACE ≥5 of 0.55, 0.87, 0.68, 0.79 and CPSS ≥2 of 0.56, 0.85, 0.65, 0.78, respectively. Conclusions FAST-ED is a simple scale that if successfully validated in the field may be used by medical emergency professionals to identify LVOS in the pre-hospital setting enabling rapid triage of patients. PMID:27364531

  11. Radiation embrittlement of WWER-1000 reactor vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolaeva, A.V.; Nikolaev, Yu.A.; Kevorkyan, Yu.R.

    2001-01-01

    Results obtained on the blank samples of materials of the WWER-1000 vessels irradiated by low density neutron flux are discussed. Chemical composition of the materials is characterized by the low content of the impurities (copper and phosphorus) and high content of nickel. Dependence of the radiation embrittlement of the WWER-1000 vessel materials on metallurgic variables and damage dose is treated. The research showed that nickel largely enhanced the radiation embrittlement. New dependences for determination of the radiation embrittlement real rate of the WWER-1000 vessel materials and its conservative estimation were developed [ru

  12. Corrosion of vessel steel during its interaction with molten corium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bechta, S.V.; Khabensky, V.B.; Vitol, S.A.; Krushinov, E.V.; Granovsky, V.S.; Lopukh, D.B.; Gusarov, V.V.; Martinov, A.P.; Martinov, V.V.; Fieg, G.; Tromm, W.; Bottomley, D.; Tuomisto, H.

    2006-01-01

    This paper is concerned with corrosion of a cooled vessel steel structure interacting with molten corium in air and neutral (nitrogen) atmospheres during an in-vessel retention scenario. The data on corrosion kinetics at different temperatures on the heated steel surface, heat flux densities and oxygen potential in the system are presented. The post-test physico-chemical and metallographic analyses of melt samples and the corium-specimen ingot have clarified certain mechanisms of steel corrosion taking place during the in-vessel melt interaction

  13. Histomorphometric comparative study of blood vessels and their pattern in follicular cyst, odontogenic keratocyst, and ameloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifi, Safora; Feizi, Farideh; Khafri, Thoraya; Aram, Mehrdad

    2013-03-01

    The present study aimed at assessment and histomorphometric analysis of intratumoral and peritumoral (cystic) blood vessels in odontogenic lesions and their pattern on their clinical behavior by immunohistochemistry and morphometry. In a descriptive and analytical cross-sectional study, 45 paraffin blocks of ameloblastoma, odontogenic keratocyst, and follicular cyst were selected and stained immunohistochemically for CD34. In each slide, images of 3 microscopic fields with the highest microvessel density in intratumoral and peritumoral (cystic) areas were captured at 40× magnification with attached camera system. Inner vascular diameter (IVD) and outer vascular diameter (OVD), cross-sectional area (CSA), and the wall thickness (WT) of the vessels were measured with Motic Plus 2 software. The vascular pattern in odontogenic lesions was analyzed. Outer vascular diameter, IVD, and CSA of the vessels in peritumoral (cystic) areas were greater in ameloblastoma than keratocyst (P = 0.001) and follicular cyst (P keratocyst and follicular cyst. Morphometric specifications of blood vessels (IVD, OVD, CSA) and their pattern in peritumoral (cystic) areas may influence the aggressive clinical behavior of ameloblastoma in comparison with keratocyst and follicular cyst.

  14. TMI-2 Vessel Investigation Project Metallurgical Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diercks, D.R.; Neimark, L.A.

    1990-01-01

    The TMI-2 [Three Mile Island unit 2] Vessel Investigation Project Metallurgical Program at Argonne National Laboratory is a part of the international TMI-2 Vessel Investigation Project being conducted jointly by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). The overall project consists of three phases, namely (1) recovery of material samples from the lower head of the TMI-2 reactor, (2) examination and analysis of the lower head samples and the preparation and testing of archive material subjected to a similar thermal history, and (3) procurement, examination, and analysis of companion core material located adjacent to or near the lower head material. The specific objectives of the ANL Metallurgical Program, which accounts for a major portion of Phase 2, are to prepare metallographic and mechanical test specimen blanks from the TMI-2 lower head material, prepare similar test specimen blanks from suitable archive material subjected to the appropriate thermal processing, determine the mechanical properties of the lower vessel head and archive materials under the conditions of the core-melt accident, and assess the lower head integrity and margin-to-failure during the accident. The ANL work consists of three tasks: (1) archive materials program, (2) fabrication of metallurgical and mechanical test specimens from the TMI-2 pressure vessel samples, and (3) mechanical property characterization of TMI-2 lower pressure vessel head and archive material

  15. Assessing the Frequency and Material Consequences of Collisions with Vessels Lying at an Anchorage in Line with IALA iWrap MkII

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Christoph Burmeister

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a collision model for ships underway and temporary objects as an extension to state-of-the-art maritime risk assessment like IALA iWrap MkII. It gives a brief review of frequency modeling's and consequence calculation theory as well as its applications, before it analogously derives a model to assess the risk of anchorage areas. Subsequently, its benefit is demonstrated by an example scenario.

  16. Influence of radiation therapy on lung tissue in breast cancer patients. CT-assessed density changes 4 years after completion of radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svane, G.; Rotstein, S.; Lax, I.

    1995-01-01

    CT-assessed density changes in lung tissues were measured in 22 disease-free breast cancer patients 4 years after completion of radiation therapy. All patients had previously undergone similar CT-examinations before treatment, 3 months, and 9 months after radiotherapy. In patients with visible areas of increased lung density at earlier CT-examinations a decrease of focal findings was observed at 4 years. In patients without focal findings, an increase in density relative to that before therapy was observed. The difference between the mean lung density values among those with visible radiological