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Sample records for vesiculated smooth endoplasmic

  1. Control of sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic-reticulum Ca2+ pump expression in cardiac and smooth muscle.

    OpenAIRE

    Misquitta, C M; A Sing; Grover, A. K.

    1999-01-01

    Cardiac muscle expresses sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic-reticulum Ca2+ pump isoform SERCA2a; stomach smooth muscle expresses SERCA2b. In 2-day-old rabbits, cardiac muscle contained levels of SERCA2 protein that were 100-200-fold those in the stomach smooth muscle. In nuclear run-on assays, the rate of SERCA2 gene transcription in heart nuclei was not significantly higher than in the stomach smooth-muscle nuclei. However, the SERCA2 mRNA levels (mean+/-S.E.M.) were (29+/-4)-fold higher in the heart....

  2. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Arterial Smooth Muscle Cells: A Novel Regulator of Vascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furmanik, Malgorzata; Shanahan, Catherine M.

    2017-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease continues to be the leading cause of death in industrialised societies. The idea that the arterial smooth muscle cell (ASMC) plays a key role in regulating many vascular pathologies has been gaining importance, as has the realisation that not enough is known about the pathological cellular mechanisms regulating ASMC function in vascular remodelling. In the past decade endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and the unfolded protein response (UPR) have been recognised as a stress response underlying many physiological and pathological processes in various vascular cell types. Here we summarise what is known about how ER stress signalling regulates phenotypic switching, trans/dedifferentiation and apoptosis of ASMCs and contributes to atherosclerosis, hypertension, aneurysms and vascular calcification.

  3. Isolation of a plasma-membrane fraction from gastric smooth muscle. Comparison of the calcium uptake with that in endoplasmic reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raeymaekers, L; Wuytack, F; Eggermont, J; De Schutter, G; Casteels, R

    1983-01-01

    1. A plasma-membrane fraction was isolated from the smooth muscle of the pig stomach by using differential and sucrose-density-gradient centrifugations. When the centrifugation was carried out after preloading the crude microsomal fraction with Ca2+ in the presence of oxalate, the contamination of the plasma-membrane fraction by endoplasmic reticulum was decreased and a fraction enriched in endoplasmic reticulum vesicles filled with calcium oxalate crystals was obtained. 2. The plasmalemmal and endoplasmic-reticulum membranes could be distinguished by differences in the activity of marker enzymes and in the cholesterol content and by their different permeability to oxalate and phosphate. Oxalate and phosphate stimulated the Ca2+ uptake in the endoplasmic reticulum much more than in the plasmalemmal vesicles. In the plasma-membrane vesicles 40 mM-phosphate was more effective for stimulating the Ca2+ uptake than was 5 mM-oxalate, but the reverse was seen in the endoplasmic reticulum. 3. The high cholesterol/phospholipid ratio of the crude microsomal fraction are of the majority of the vesicles present in the crude microsomal fraction are of plasmalemmal origin. 4. The Ca2+ pump of the plasmalemmal and endoplasmic-reticulum vesicles could be differentiated by their different sensitivities to calmodulin. However, the two Ca2+-transport ATPases did not differ by their sensitivity to vanadate nor by the energization of the Ca2+ transport by different nucleoside triphosphates. PMID:6860302

  4. Birbeck granule-like "organized smooth endoplasmic reticulum" resulting from the expression of a cytoplasmic YFP-tagged langerin.

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    Cédric Lenormand

    Full Text Available Langerin is required for the biogenesis of Birbeck granules (BGs, the characteristic organelles of Langerhans cells. We previously used a Langerin-YFP fusion protein having a C-terminal luminal YFP tag to dynamically decipher the molecular and cellular processes which accompany the traffic of Langerin. In order to elucidate the interactions of Langerin with its trafficking effectors and their structural impact on the biogenesis of BGs, we generated a YFP-Langerin chimera with an N-terminal, cytosolic YFP tag. This latter fusion protein induced the formation of YFP-positive large puncta. Live cell imaging coupled to a fluorescence recovery after photobleaching approach showed that this coalescence of proteins in newly formed compartments was static. In contrast, the YFP-positive structures present in the pericentriolar region of cells expressing Langerin-YFP chimera, displayed fluorescent recovery characteristics compatible with active membrane exchanges. Using correlative light-electron microscopy we showed that the coalescent structures represented highly organized stacks of membranes with a pentalaminar architecture typical of BGs. Continuities between these organelles and the rough endoplasmic reticulum allowed us to identify the stacks of membranes as a form of "Organized Smooth Endoplasmic Reticulum" (OSER, with distinct molecular and physiological properties. The involvement of homotypic interactions between cytoplasmic YFP molecules was demonstrated using an A206K variant of YFP, which restored most of the Langerin traffic and BG characteristics observed in Langerhans cells. Mutation of the carbohydrate recognition domain also blocked the formation of OSER. Hence, a "double-lock" mechanism governs the behavior of YFP-Langerin, where asymmetric homodimerization of the YFP tag and homotypic interactions between the lectin domains of Langerin molecules participate in its retention and the subsequent formation of BG-like OSER. These

  5. Lipocalin-2 Promotes Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Proliferation by Augmenting Intracellular Iron in Human Pulmonary Arterial Smooth Muscle Cells.

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    Wang, Guoliang; Liu, Shenghua; Wang, Li; Meng, Liukun; Cui, Chuanjue; Zhang, Hao; Hu, Shengshou; Ma, Ning; Wei, Yingjie

    2017-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, a feature of many conditions associated with pulmonary hypertension (PH), is increasingly recognized as a common response to promote proliferation in the walls of pulmonary arteries. Increased expression of Lipocalin-2 in PH led us to test the hypothesis that Lipocalin-2, a protein known to sequester iron and regulate it intracellularly, might facilitate the ER stress and proliferation in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs). In this study, we observed greatly increased Lcn2 expression accompanied with increased ATF6 cleavage in a standard rat model of pulmonary hypertension induced by monocrotaline. In cultured human PASMCs, Lcn2 significantly promoted ER stress (determined by augmented cleavage and nuclear localization of ATF6, up-regulated transcription of GRP78 and NOGO, increased expression of SOD2, and mild augmented mitochondrial membrane potential) and proliferation (assessed by Ki67 staining and BrdU incorporation). Lcn2 promoted ER stress accompanied with augmented intracellular iron levels in human PASMCs. Treatment human PASMCs with FeSO4 induced the similar ER stress and proliferation response and iron chelator (deferoxamine) abrogated the ER stress and proliferation induced by Lcn2 in cultured human PASMCs. In conclusion, Lcn2 significantly promoted human PASMC ER stress and proliferation by augmenting intracellular iron. The up-regulation of Lcn2 probably involved in the pathogenesis and progression of PH.

  6. Clinical outcomes after IVF or ICSI using human blastocysts derived from oocytes containing aggregates of smooth endoplasmic reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoi, Fumiaki; Asano, Yukiko; Shimizu, Masashi; Nagai, Rika; Saitou, Kanako; Honnma, Hiroyuki; Murata, Yasutaka

    2017-04-01

    In this study the clinical and neo-natal outcomes after transfer of blastocysts derived from oocytes containing aggregates of smooth endoplasmic reticulum (SER) were compared between IVF and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) cycles. Clinical and neo-natal outcomes of blastocysts in cycles with at least one SER metaphase II oocyte (SER + MII; SER + cycles) did not significantly differ between the two insemination methods. When SER + MII were cultured to day 5/6, fertilization, embryo cleavage and blastocyst rates were not significantly different between IVF and ICSI cycles. In vitrified-warmed blastocyst transfer cycles, the clinical pregnancy rates from SER + MII in IVF and ICSI did not significantly differ. In this study, 52 blastocysts (27 IVF and 25 ICSI) derived from SER + MII were transferred, yielding 15 newborns (5 IVF and 10 ICSI) and no malformations. Moreover, 300 blastocysts (175 IVF and 125 ICSI) derived from SER-MII were transferred, yielding 55 newborns (24 IVF and 31 ICSI cycles). Thus, blastocysts derived from SER + cycles exhibited an acceptable ongoing pregnancy rate after IVF (n = 125) or ICSI (n = 117) cycles. In conclusion, blastocysts from SER + MII in both IVF and ICSI cycles yield adequate ongoing pregnancy rates with neo-natal outcomes that do not differ from SER-MII. Copyright © 2017 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Birbeck Granule-Like “Organized Smooth Endoplasmic Reticulum” Resulting from the Expression of a Cytoplasmic YFP-Tagged Langerin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenormand, Cédric; Spiegelhalter, Coralie; Cinquin, Bertrand; Bardin, Sabine; Bausinger, Huguette; Angénieux, Catherine; Eckly, Anita; Proamer, Fabienne; Wall, David; Lich, Ben; Tourne, Sylvie; Hanau, Daniel; Schwab, Yannick; Salamero, Jean; de la Salle, Henri

    2013-01-01

    Langerin is required for the biogenesis of Birbeck granules (BGs), the characteristic organelles of Langerhans cells. We previously used a Langerin-YFP fusion protein having a C-terminal luminal YFP tag to dynamically decipher the molecular and cellular processes which accompany the traffic of Langerin. In order to elucidate the interactions of Langerin with its trafficking effectors and their structural impact on the biogenesis of BGs, we generated a YFP-Langerin chimera with an N-terminal, cytosolic YFP tag. This latter fusion protein induced the formation of YFP-positive large puncta. Live cell imaging coupled to a fluorescence recovery after photobleaching approach showed that this coalescence of proteins in newly formed compartments was static. In contrast, the YFP-positive structures present in the pericentriolar region of cells expressing Langerin-YFP chimera, displayed fluorescent recovery characteristics compatible with active membrane exchanges. Using correlative light-electron microscopy we showed that the coalescent structures represented highly organized stacks of membranes with a pentalaminar architecture typical of BGs. Continuities between these organelles and the rough endoplasmic reticulum allowed us to identify the stacks of membranes as a form of “Organized Smooth Endoplasmic Reticulum” (OSER), with distinct molecular and physiological properties. The involvement of homotypic interactions between cytoplasmic YFP molecules was demonstrated using an A206K variant of YFP, which restored most of the Langerin traffic and BG characteristics observed in Langerhans cells. Mutation of the carbohydrate recognition domain also blocked the formation of OSER. Hence, a “double-lock” mechanism governs the behavior of YFP-Langerin, where asymmetric homodimerization of the YFP tag and homotypic interactions between the lectin domains of Langerin molecules participate in its retention and the subsequent formation of BG-like OSER. These observations

  8. NAD(P)H Oxidase Nox-4 Mediates 7-Ketocholesterol-Induced Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Apoptosis in Human Aortic Smooth Muscle Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedruzzi, Eric; Guichard, Cécile; Ollivier, Véronique; Driss, Fathi; Fay, Michèle; Prunet, Céline; Marie, Jean-Claude; Pouzet, Cécile; Samadi, Mohammad; Elbim, Carole; O'Dowd, Yvonne; Bens, Marcelle; Vandewalle, Alain; Gougerot-Pocidalo, Marie-Anne; Lizard, Gérard; Ogier-Denis, Eric

    2004-01-01

    The mechanisms involved in the cytotoxic action of oxysterols in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis still remain poorly understood. Among the major oxysterols present in oxidized low-density lipoprotein, we show here that 7-ketocholesterol (7-Kchol) induces oxidative stress and/or apoptotic events in human aortic smooth muscle cells (SMCs). This specific effect of 7-Kchol is mediated by a robust upregulation (threefold from the basal level) of Nox-4, a reactive oxygen species (ROS)-generating NAD(P)H oxidase homologue. This effect was highlighted by silencing Nox-4 expression with a specific small interfering RNA, which significantly reduced the 7-Kchol-induced production of ROS and abolished apoptotic events. Furthermore, the 7-Kchol activating pathway included an early triggering of endoplasmic reticulum stress, as assessed by transient intracellular Ca2+ oscillations, and the induction of the expression of the cell death effector CHOP and of GRP78/Bip chaperone via the activation of IRE-1, all hallmarks of the unfolded protein response (UPR). We also showed that 7-Kchol activated the IRE-1/Jun-NH2-terminal kinase (JNK)/AP-1 signaling pathway to promote Nox-4 expression. Silencing of IRE-1 and JNK inhibition downregulated Nox-4 expression and subsequently prevented the UPR-dependent cell death induced by 7-Kchol. These findings demonstrate that Nox-4 plays a key role in 7-Kchol-induced SMC death, which is consistent with the hypothesis that Nox-4/oxysterols are involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. PMID:15572675

  9. Red blood cell vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemia

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    Amr eAlaarg

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary hemolytic anemia encompasses a heterogeneous group of anemias characterised by decreased red blood cell survival because of inherited membrane, enzyme, or hemoglobin disorders. Affected red blood cells are more fragile, less deformable, and more susceptible to shear stress and oxidative damage, and show increased vesiculation. Red blood cells, as essentially all cells, constitutively release phospholipid extracellular vesicles in vivo and in vitro in a process known as vesiculation. These extracellular vesicles comprise a heterogeneous group of vesicles of different sizes and intracellular origins. They are described in literature as exosomes if they originate from multi-vesicular bodies, or as microvesicles when formed by a one-step budding process directly from the plasma membrane. Extracellular vesicles contain a multitude of bioactive molecules that are implicated in intercellular communication and in different biological and pathophysiological processes. Mature red blood cells release in principle only microvesicles. In hereditary hemolytic anemias, the underlying molecular defect affects and determines red blood cell vesiculation, resulting in shedding microvesicles of different compositions and concentrations. Despite extensive research into red blood cell biochemistry and physiology, little is known about red cell deformability and vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemias, and the associated pathophysiological role is incompletely asessed. In this review, we discuss recent progress in understanding extracellular vesicles biology, with focus on red blood cell vesiculation. Also, we review recent scientific findings on the molecular defects of hereditary hemolytic anemias, and their correlation with red blood cell deformability and vesiculation. Integrating bio-analytical findings on abnormalities of red blood cells and their microvesicles will be critical for a better understanding of the pathophysiology of hereditary

  10. Red blood cell vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaarg, Amr; Schiffelers, Raymond M.; van Solinge, Wouter W.; van Wijk, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary hemolytic anemia encompasses a heterogeneous group of anemias characterized by decreased red blood cell survival because of inherited membrane, enzyme, or hemoglobin disorders. Affected red blood cells are more fragile, less deformable, and more susceptible to shear stress and oxidative damage, and show increased vesiculation. Red blood cells, as essentially all cells, constitutively release phospholipid extracellular vesicles in vivo and in vitro in a process known as vesiculation. These extracellular vesicles comprise a heterogeneous group of vesicles of different sizes and intracellular origins. They are described in literature as exosomes if they originate from multi-vesicular bodies, or as microvesicles when formed by a one-step budding process directly from the plasma membrane. Extracellular vesicles contain a multitude of bioactive molecules that are implicated in intercellular communication and in different biological and pathophysiological processes. Mature red blood cells release in principle only microvesicles. In hereditary hemolytic anemias, the underlying molecular defect affects and determines red blood cell vesiculation, resulting in shedding microvesicles of different compositions and concentrations. Despite extensive research into red blood cell biochemistry and physiology, little is known about red cell deformability and vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemias, and the associated pathophysiological role is incompletely assessed. In this review, we discuss recent progress in understanding extracellular vesicles biology, with focus on red blood cell vesiculation. Also, we review recent scientific findings on the molecular defects of hereditary hemolytic anemias, and their correlation with red blood cell deformability and vesiculation. Integrating bio-analytical findings on abnormalities of red blood cells and their microvesicles will be critical for a better understanding of the pathophysiology of hereditary hemolytic anemias. PMID

  11. Increased vesiculability of platelets in 24 patients with gastrointestinal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Ogorevc

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cell nanovesicles (NVs are small (mostly nano-sized membrane-enclosed cell fragments that are pinched off from the cell due to rearrangement of its constituents. We have determined concentration of NVs in isolates from blood in populations of patients with gastrointestinal cancer, patients with other gastrointestinal diseases and in healthy subjects. To study whether NVs derive from platelets, we considered correlations between the concentration of platelets in blood and the concentration of NVs in isolates from blood, and between vesiculability of platelets and concentration of NVs in isolates from blood.Methods: Blood samples were collected from 24 patients with gastrointestinal cancer, 28 patients with other gastrointestinal diseases and 49 healthy volunteers. NVs were isolated by centrifugation and washing of samples and counted by flow cytometry. Isolation was performed at 37 °C. Platelets were counted by impedance method. Populations were compared by methods of descriptive statistics.Results: In patients with gastrointestinal cancer the concentration of NVs in isolates from blood was considerably (44 % and statistically significantly (p = 0.0005 higher than in healthy subjects and considerably (34 % and statsitically significantly (p = 0.025 higher than in patients with other gastrointestinal diseases. There was no statistically significant correlation between the concentration of NVs in isolates from blood and the concentration of platelets in blood (r = 0.1820, p = 0.0801. We found a statistically significant positive correlation between vesiculability of platelets and concentration of NVs in isolates from blood (r = 0.5690, p = 0,0000.Conclusions: Fragility of platelet membrane in blood is increased in patients with gastrointestinal cancer.

  12. Effect of Lidocaine and Epinephrine on Human Erythrocyte Shape and Vesiculability of Blood Cells

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    Tanja Slokar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of local anesthetic composed of lidocaine and epinephrine on vesiculability of blood cells and erythrocyte shape was studied. Whole blood and plasma were incubated with lidocaine/epinephrine. Extracellular vesicles were isolated by centrifugation and washing and counted by flow cytometry. Lidocaine/epinephrine and each component alone were added to diluted blood. Shape changes were recorded by micrographs. An ensemble of captured frames was analyzed for populations of discocytes, echinocytes, and stomatocytes by using statistical methods. Incubation of whole blood and blood plasma with lidocaine/epinephrine considerably increased concentration of extracellular vesicles in isolates (for an average factor 3.4 in blood and 2.8 in plasma. Lidocaine/epinephrine caused change of erythrocyte shape from mainly discocytic to mainly stomatocytic (higher than 50%. Lidocaine alone had even stronger stomatocytic effect (the percent of stomatocytes was higher than 95% while epinephrine had echinocytic effect (the percent of echinocytes was higher than 80%. The differences were highly statistically significant p<10-8 with statistical power P=1. Lidocaine/epinephrine induced regions of highly anisotropically curved regions indicating that lidocaine and epinephrine interact with erythrocyte membrane. It was concluded that lidocaine/epinephrine interacts with cell membranes and increases vesiculability of blood cells in vitro.

  13. Measurement of bubble size distributions in vesiculated rocks with implications for quantitative estimation of eruption processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toramaru, Atsushi

    1990-10-01

    This paper outlines methods for determining a bubble size distribution (BSD) and the moments of the BSD function in vesiculated clasts produced by volcanic eruptions. It reports the results of applications of the methods to 11 natural samples and discusses the implications for quantitative estimates of eruption processes. The analysis is based on a quantitative morphological (stereological) method for 2-dimensional imaging of cross-sections of samples. One method determines, with some assumptions, the complete shape of the BSD function from the chord lengths cut by bubbles. The other determines the 1st, 2nd and 3rd moments of distribution functions by measurement of the number of bubbles per unit area, the surface area per unit volume, and the volume fraction of bubbles. Comparison of procedures and results of these two distinct methods shows that the latter yields rather more reliable results than the former, though the results coincide in absolute and relative magnitudes. Results of the analysis for vesiculated rocks from eleven subPlinian to Plinian eruptions show some interesting systematic correlations both between moments of the BSD and between a moment and the eruption column height or the SiO 2 content of magma. These correlations are successfully interpreted in terms of the nucleation and growth processes of bubbles in ascending magmas. This suggests that bubble coalescence does not predominate in sub-Plinian to Plinian explosive eruptions. The moment-moment correlations put constraints on the style of the nucleation and growth process of bubbles. The scaling argument suggests that a single nucleation event and subsequent growth with any kind of bubble interaction under continuous depressurization, which leads to an intermediate growth law between the diffusional growth ( R m ∝ t {2}/{3}) at a constant depressurization rate and the Ostwald ripening ( R m ∝ t {1}/{3}) under a constant pressure, where Rm and t are the mean radius of bubble and the

  14. Membrane vesiculation induced by proteins of the dengue virus envelope studied by molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira dos Santos Soares, Ricardo; Oliveira Bortot, Leandro; van der Spoel, David; Caliri, Antonio

    2017-12-01

    Biological membranes are continuously remodeled in the cell by specific membrane-shaping machineries to form, for example, tubes and vesicles. We examine fundamental mechanisms involved in the vesiculation processes induced by a cluster of envelope (E) and membrane (M) proteins of the dengue virus (DENV) using molecular dynamics simulations and a coarse-grained model. We show that an arrangement of three E-M heterotetramers (EM3) works as a bending unit and an ordered cluster of five such units generates a closed vesicle, reminiscent of the virus budding process. In silico mutagenesis of two charged residues of the anchor helices of the envelope proteins of DENV shows that Arg-471 and Arg-60 are fundamental to produce bending stress on the membrane. The fine-tuning between the size of the EM3 unit and its specific bending action suggests this protein unit is an important factor in determining the viral particle size.

  15. Smooth manifolds

    CERN Document Server

    Sinha, Rajnikant

    2014-01-01

    This book offers an introduction to the theory of smooth manifolds, helping students to familiarize themselves with the tools they will need for mathematical research on smooth manifolds and differential geometry. The book primarily focuses on topics concerning differential manifolds, tangent spaces, multivariable differential calculus, topological properties of smooth manifolds, embedded submanifolds, Sard’s theorem and Whitney embedding theorem. It is clearly structured, amply illustrated and includes solved examples for all concepts discussed. Several difficult theorems have been broken into many lemmas and notes (equivalent to sub-lemmas) to enhance the readability of the book. Further, once a concept has been introduced, it reoccurs throughout the book to ensure comprehension. Rank theorem, a vital aspect of smooth manifolds theory, occurs in many manifestations, including rank theorem for Euclidean space and global rank theorem. Though primarily intended for graduate students of mathematics, the book ...

  16. Heterogeneous vesiculation of 2011 El Hierro xeno-pumice revealed by X-ray computed microtomography

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    Berg, S. E.; Troll, V. R.; Deegan, F. M.; Burchardt, S.; Krumbholz, M.; Mancini, L.; Polacci, M.; Carracedo, J. C.; Soler, V.; Arzilli, F.; Brun, F.

    2016-12-01

    During the first week of the 2011 El Hierro submarine eruption, abundant light-coloured pumiceous, high-silica volcanic bombs coated in dark basanite were found floating on the sea. The composition of the light-coloured frothy material (`xeno-pumice') is akin to that of sedimentary rocks from the region, but the textures resemble felsic magmatic pumice, leaving their exact mode of formation unclear. To help decipher their origin, we investigated representative El Hierro xeno-pumice samples using X-ray computed microtomography for their internal vesicle shapes, volumes, and bulk porosity, as well as for the spatial arrangement and size distributions of vesicles in three dimensions (3D). We find a wide range of vesicle morphologies, which are especially variable around small fragments of rock contained in the xeno-pumice samples. Notably, these rock fragments are almost exclusively of sedimentary origin, and we therefore interpret them as relicts an the original sedimentary ocean crust protolith(s). The irregular vesiculation textures observed probably resulted from pulsatory release of volatiles from multiple sources during xeno-pumice formation, most likely by successive release of pore water and mineral water during incremental heating and decompression of the sedimentary protoliths.

  17. Vesiculation, fragmentation and aggregation processes during the 2014-2015 eruption of Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha'apai volcano

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    Colombier, Mathieu; Tost, Manuela; Cronin, Shane; Scheu, Bettina; Dobson, Katharine J.; Hess, Kai U.; Ruthensteiner, Bernhard; Yilmaz, Tim; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2017-04-01

    Surtseyan eruptions are shallow emergent subaqueous explosive volcanic eruptions. Conditions of water-magma interaction along with magma ejection rates and its gas/expansion conditions control eruption styles during progressive emergence of the volcano. In order to better assess the effect of water on processes such as vesiculation, fragmentation, cooling or aggregation, we studied the textural and morphological properties of ash, lapilli and bombs from the deposits of the 2014-2015 surtseyan eruption of Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha'apai volcano, Tonga. We measured the vesicularity, vesicle connectivity, permeability and vesicle size distributions of juvenile lapilli and bombs from the deposits by Helium pycnometry, X-ray micro-computed tomography using Avizo 9.2 software and SEM using FOAMS software to infer the vesiculation processes. We also qualitatively assessed the fragmentation and aggregation mechanisms by analysing aggregates by X-ray micro-computed tomography and 2D textural analysis using BSE images at SEM. Finally, we measured the shape parameters of ash particles of different grain sizes to obtain further insights into the fragmentation processes. The bombs show gradual textural variations with increase of vesicle size and degree of coalescence from rim to core. These textural variations are also observed in the lapilli. The vesicle connectivity in the lapilli and bombs covers a wide range from fully isolated to completely connected. Vesicle connectivity and permeability increase strongly with vesicularity. The percolation threshold, that is the critical vesicularity corresponding to the onset of connectivity and permeability due to system-spanning coalescence is estimated at around 0.2-0.4 and is lower than for scoria from fire fountaining and strombolian eruptions. These variations of connectivity and permeability with vesicularity are likely to reflect post-fragmentation vesiculation interupted at different stages by quenching in water. 2D and 3D images

  18. 4-Phenylbutyric Acid Reveals Good Beneficial Effects on Vital Organ Function via Anti-Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Septic Rats.

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    Liu, Liangming; Wu, Huiling; Zang, JiaTao; Yang, Guangming; Zhu, Yu; Wu, Yue; Chen, Xiangyun; Lan, Dan; Li, Tao

    2016-08-01

    Sepsis and septic shock are the common complications in ICUs. Vital organ function disorder contributes a critical role in high mortality after severe sepsis or septic shock, in which endoplasmic reticulum stress plays an important role. Whether anti-endoplasmic reticulum stress with 4-phenylbutyric acid is beneficial to sepsis and the underlying mechanisms are not known. Laboratory investigation. State Key Laboratory of Trauma, Burns and Combined Injury. Sprague-Dawley rats. Using cecal ligation and puncture-induced septic shock rats, lipopolysaccharide-treated vascular smooth muscle cells, and cardiomyocytes, effects of 4-phenylbutyric acid on vital organ function and the relationship with endoplasmic reticulum stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated inflammation, apoptosis, and oxidative stress were observed. Conventional treatment, including fluid resuscitation, vasopressin, and antibiotic, only slightly improved the hemodynamic variable, such as mean arterial blood pressure and cardiac output, and slightly improved the vital organ function and the animal survival of septic shock rats. Supplementation of 4-phenylbutyric acid (5 mg/kg; anti-endoplasmic reticulum stress), especially administered at early stage, significantly improved the hemodynamic variables, vital organ function, such as liver, renal, and intestinal barrier function, and animal survival in septic shock rats. 4-Phenylbutyric acid application inhibited the endoplasmic reticulum stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress-related proteins, such as CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous protein in vital organs, such as heart and superior mesenteric artery after severe sepsis. Further studies showed that 4-phenylbutyric acid inhibited endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated cytokine release, apoptosis, and oxidative stress via inhibition of nuclear factor-κB, caspase-3 and caspase-9, and increasing glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase expression, respectively. Anti-endoplasmic

  19. Cell death induced by endoplasmic reticulum stress

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Iurlaro, Raffaella; Muñoz‐Pinedo, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    .... Many conditions that impose stress on cells, including hypoxia, starvation, infections and changes in secretory needs, challenge the folding capacity of the cell and promote endoplasmic reticulum stress...

  20. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Raj Kumar; Chae, Soo-Wan; Kim, Hyung-Ryong; Chae, Han Jung

    2014-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the principal organelle responsible for multiple cellular functions including protein folding and maturation and the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. ER stress is activated by a variety of factors and triggers the unfolded protein response (UPR), which restores homeostasis or activates cell death. Multiple studies have clarified the link between ER stress and cancer, and particularly the involvement of the UPR. The UPR seems to adjust the paradoxical microenvironment of cancer and, as such, is one of resistance mechanisms against cancer therapy. This review describes the activity of different UPRs involved in tumorigenesis and resistance to cancer therapy. PMID:25337575

  1. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Erkan

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, the world has seen an alarming increase in obesity and closely associated with insulin resistance which is a state of low-grade inflammation, the latter characterized by elevated levels of proinflammatory cytokines in blood and tissues. A shift in energy balance alters systemic metabolic regulation and the important role that chronic inflammation, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) dysfunction, and activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR) play in this process.Why obesity is so closely associated with insulin resistance and inflammation is not understood well. This suggests that there are probably other causes for obesity-related insulin resistance and inflammation. One of these appears to be endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress.The ER is a vast membranous network responsible for the trafficking of a wide range of proteins and plays a central role in integrating multiple metabolic signals critical in cellular homeostasis. Conditions that may trigger unfolded protein response activation include increased protein synthesis, the presence of mutant or misfolded proteins, inhibition of protein glycosylation, imbalance of ER calcium levels, glucose and energy deprivation, hypoxia, pathogens or pathogen-associated components and toxins. Thus, characterizing the mechanisms contributing to obesity and identifying potential targets for its prevention and treatment will have a great impact on the control of associated conditions, particularly T2D.

  2. Cactus ( Opuntia ficus indica ) extract improves endoplasmic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We reported in this paper the requirement of the extract of cactus (Opuntia ficus indica) for regulating unfolded protein response (UPR) target genes and maintaining endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homeostasis. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a subcellular organelle where many proteins are synthesized and sorted to ...

  3. Dynamic observations of vesiculation reveal the role of silicate crystals in bubble nucleation and growth in andesitic magmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pleše, P.; Higgins, M. D.; Mancini, L.; Lanzafame, G.; Brun, F.; Fife, J. L.; Casselman, J.; Baker, D. R.

    2018-01-01

    Bubble nucleation and growth control the explosivity of volcanic eruptions, and the kinetics of these processes are generally determined from examinations of natural samples and quenched experimental run products. These samples, however, only provide a view of the final state, from which the initial conditions of a time-evolving magmatic system are then inferred. The interpretations that follow are inexact due to the inability of determining the exact conditions of nucleation and the potential detachment of bubbles from their nucleation sites, an uncertainty that can obscure their nucleation location – either homogeneously within the melt or heterogeneously at the interface between crystals and melts. We present results of a series of dynamic, real-time 4D X-ray tomographic microscopy experiments where we observed the development of bubbles in crystal bearing silicate magmas. Experimentally synthesized andesitic glasses with 0.25–0.5 wt% H2O and seed silicate crystals were heated at 1 atm to induce bubble nucleation and track bubble growth and movement. In contrast to previous studies on natural and experimentally produced samples, we found that bubbles readily nucleated on plagioclase and clinopyroxene crystals, that their contact angle changes during growth and that they can grow to sizes many times that of the silicate on whose surface they originated. The rapid heterogeneous nucleation of bubbles at low degrees of supersaturation in the presence of silicate crystals demonstrates that silicates can affect when vesiculation ensues, influencing subsequent permeability development and effusive vs. explosive transition in volcanic eruptions.

  4. Blood Bag Plasticizers Influence Red Blood Cell Vesiculation Rate without Altering the Lipid Composition of the Vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicalho, Beatriz; Serrano, Katherine; dos Santos Pereira, Alberto; Devine, Dana V.; Acker, Jason P.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plasticized with di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is commonly used for blood collection and storage. DEHP has protective effects on RBC membranes, but is also a toxin. Methods A paired study was conducted to investigate the influence of DEHP and two alternative plasticizers, 1,2-cyclohexane-dicarboxylic acid diisononyl ester (DINCH) and n-butyryl-tri-n-hexyl citrate (BTHC), on the preservation of RBCs stored for 42 days in PVC pediatric bags. The RBC membrane was evaluated for supernatant hemoglobin (Hb), release of extracellular microvesicles (EVs), osmotic fragility, deformability, and lipid composition. Results In BTHC-plasticized bags, the supernatant Hb increase during storage was 2 times greater than in DINCH- and DEHP-plasticized bags. By day 21, EV concentrations had doubled from day-5 levels in DINCH- and DEHP-, and trebled in BTHC-plasticized bags. RBC mean cell volumes were greater in BTHC- than in DINCH- or DEHP-plasticized bags (p plasticizers (p plasticizers. Conclusion Membrane stabilization capacity differed among the plasticizers. RBC in BTHC bags stored more poorly, while DEHP and DINCH bags offered better protection against vesiculation, osmotic stress, and Hb loss. PMID:27022319

  5. Endoplasmic reticulum stress in lung disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan J. Marciniak

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to inhaled pollutants, including fine particulates and cigarette smoke is a major cause of lung disease in Europe. While it is established that inhaled pollutants have devastating effects on the genome, it is now recognised that additional effects on protein folding also drive the development of lung disease. Protein misfolding in the endoplasmic reticulum affects the pathogenesis of many diseases, ranging from pulmonary fibrosis to cancer. It is therefore important to understand how cells respond to endoplasmic reticulum stress and how this affects pulmonary tissues in disease. These insights may offer opportunities to manipulate such endoplasmic reticulum stress pathways and thereby cure lung disease.

  6. Modeling of axonal endoplasmic reticulum network by spastic paraplegia proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalçın, Belgin; Zhao, Lu; Stofanko, Martin; O'Sullivan, Niamh C; Kang, Zi Han; Roost, Annika; Thomas, Matthew R; Zaessinger, Sophie; Blard, Olivier; Patto, Alex L; Sohail, Anood; Baena, Valentina; Terasaki, Mark; O'Kane, Cahir J

    2017-07-25

    Axons contain a smooth tubular endoplasmic reticulum (ER) network that is thought to be continuous with ER throughout the neuron; the mechanisms that form this axonal network are unknown. Mutations affecting reticulon or REEP proteins, with intramembrane hairpin domains that model ER membranes, cause an axon degenerative disease, hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP). We show that Drosophila axons have a dynamic axonal ER network, which these proteins help to model. Loss of HSP hairpin proteins causes ER sheet expansion, partial loss of ER from distal motor axons, and occasional discontinuities in axonal ER. Ultrastructural analysis reveals an extensive ER network in axons, which shows larger and fewer tubules in larvae that lack reticulon and REEP proteins, consistent with loss of membrane curvature. Therefore HSP hairpin-containing proteins are required for shaping and continuity of axonal ER, thus suggesting roles for ER modeling in axon maintenance and function.

  7. Integrated endoplasmic reticulum stress responses in cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moenner, Michel; Pluquet, Olivier; Bouchecareilh, Marion; Chevet, Eric

    2007-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) has emerged as a major site of cellular homeostasis regulation, particularly in the unfolded protein response, which is being found to play a major role in cancer and many other diseases...

  8. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Sepsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohammad Moshahid; Yang, Weng-Lang; Wang, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is an enormous public health issue and the leading cause of death in critically ill patients in intensive care units (ICU). Overwhelming inflammation, characterized by cytokine storm, oxidative threats, and neutrophil sequestration is an underlying component of sepsis-associated organ failure. Despite recent advances in sepsis research, there is still no effective treatment available beyond the standard of care and supportive therapy. To reduce sepsis-related mortality, a better understanding of the biological mechanism associated with the sepsis is essential. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER), a subcellular organelle is responsible for the facilitation of protein folding and assembly and involved in several other physiological activities. Under the stress and inflammation condition, ER loses the homeostasis in its function, which is termed as ER stress. During ER stress, unfolded protein response (UPR) is activated to restore ER function to its normal balance. However, once the stress is beyond the compensatory capacity of UPR or protracted, the apoptosis would be initiated by triggering cell injuries, even to cell death. As such, ER stress and UPR are reported to be implicated in several pathological and inflammatory conditions. Although the detrimental role of ER stress during infections has been demonstrated, there is growing evidences that ER stress participate in the pathogenesis of sepsis. In this review, we summarize the current research in the context of ER stress and UPR signaling associated with sepsis and its related clinical conditions, such as trauma- hemorrhage, and ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. We also discuss the potential implication of ER stress as a novel therapeutic target and prognostic marker in patients with sepsis. PMID:26125088

  9. Cell death induced by endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iurlaro, Raffaella; Muñoz-Pinedo, Cristina

    2016-07-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum is an organelle with multiple functions. The synthesis of transmembrane proteins and proteins that are to be secreted occurs in this organelle. Many conditions that impose stress on cells, including hypoxia, starvation, infections and changes in secretory needs, challenge the folding capacity of the cell and promote endoplasmic reticulum stress. The cellular response involves the activation of sensors that transduce signaling cascades with the aim of restoring homeostasis. This is known as the unfolded protein response, which also intersects with the integrated stress response that reduces protein synthesis through inactivation of the initiation factor eIF2α. Central to the unfolded protein response are the sensors PERK, IRE1 and ATF6, as well as other signaling nodes such as c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1 (JNK) and the downstream transcription factors XBP1, ATF4 and CHOP. These proteins aim to restore homeostasis, but they can also induce cell death, which has been shown to occur by necroptosis and, more commonly, through the regulation of Bcl-2 family proteins (Bim, Noxa and Puma) that leads to mitochondrial apoptosis. In addition, endoplasmic reticulum stress and proteotoxic stress have been shown to induce TRAIL receptors and activation of caspase-8. Endoplasmic reticulum stress is a common feature in the pathology of numerous diseases because it plays a role in neurodegeneration, stroke, cancer, metabolic diseases and inflammation. Understanding how cells react to endoplasmic reticulum stress can accelerate discovery of drugs against these diseases. © 2015 FEBS.

  10. Smooth polyhedral surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Günther, Felix

    2017-03-15

    Polyhedral surfaces are fundamental objects in architectural geometry and industrial design. Whereas closeness of a given mesh to a smooth reference surface and its suitability for numerical simulations were already studied extensively, the aim of our work is to find and to discuss suitable assessments of smoothness of polyhedral surfaces that only take the geometry of the polyhedral surface itself into account. Motivated by analogies to classical differential geometry, we propose a theory of smoothness of polyhedral surfaces including suitable notions of normal vectors, tangent planes, asymptotic directions, and parabolic curves that are invariant under projective transformations. It is remarkable that seemingly mild conditions significantly limit the shapes of faces of a smooth polyhedral surface. Besides being of theoretical interest, we believe that smoothness of polyhedral surfaces is of interest in the architectural context, where vertices and edges of polyhedral surfaces are highly visible.

  11. An Experimental View on the Vesiculation-Driven Fragmentation of Viscoelastic Media and its Implications for Plinian-Style Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taddeucci, J.; Spieler, O.; Ichihara, M.; Dingwell, D. B.; Scarlato, P.

    2003-12-01

    -accelerating part of the sample, with geometries ranging from sub-horizontal in experiments with no lubricant to complex patterns in those with glycerin. The cracks rarely cut the whole sample into fragments, but mostly remain confined and, as the sample keeps on expanding, tend to heal. Using the video images we calculate the following parameters as a function of time: velocity of the sample front, porosity of the sample, and elongational strain rate: peak values are 1 ms-1, 0.9, and 13 s-1, respectively. From the length of sample that vesiculates and the saturation duration we estimate the diffusion coefficient of gas in the sample to be in the order of 5x10-9 m2s-1. Brittle fragmentation of the polymer implies a solid-like behavior. The measured peak elongational strain rate is of a time scale significantly shorter than the relaxation time of the polymer, which, during the acceleration phase, is thus forced to cross a rheological boundary. At this point the unrelaxed sample cannot flow any longer and, on overcoming the material tensile strength, velocity differentials are accommodated by fracturing. Note that after the acceleration phase the strain rate drops below 5 s-1 and the fractures in the now relaxed sample starts to heal. A process similar to the one described above has been suggested for the fragmentation of magma during Plinian-style eruptions and has received confirmation by numerical simulations. Our experiments support this mechanism and have the potential to further parameterize the process.

  12. Protein transport into the human endoplasmic reticulum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dudek, Johanna; Pfeffer, Stefan; Lee, Po-Hsien; Jung, Martin; Cavalié, Adolfo; Helms, Volkhard; Förster, Friedrich; Zimmermann, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Protein transport into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is essential for all eukaryotic cells and evolutionary related to protein transport into and across the cytoplasmic membrane of eubacteria and archaea. It is based on amino-terminal signal peptides in the precursor polypeptides plus various

  13. [Medicinal vesiculation combined with quick cupping at Shenque (CV 8) for allergic rhinitis with syndrome of yang deficiency: a randomized controlled trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Zheng-hua; Long, Sheng-hua

    2014-09-01

    To compare the clinical efficacy differences between medicinal vesiculation combined with quick cupping at Shenque (CV 8) and regular medication for allergic rhinitis with syndrome of yang deficiency. Eighty-two cases were randomly divided into an observation group (42 cases) and a control group (40 cases). The observation group was treated with medicinal vesiculation combined with quick cupping at Shenque (CV 8). The medicinal vesiculation was applied at Feishu (BL 13), Gaohuang (BL 43), Fengmen (BL 12), Mingmen (GV 4) on the dog days in the summer, one treatment on the 1st dog-day, 2nd dog-day and last dog-day respectively with an interval of 10 days between two treatments. Three treatments were taken as one course, and totally one course was given. The quick cupping was applied at Shenque (CV 8), once a day, ten treatments were taken as one course, and totally three courses was given. The control group was treated with oral administration of loratadine and nasal spray of budesonide. The loratadine was given 10 mg per time, once a day for continuous 14 days; budesonide was given once a day, ten treatments were taken as one course, and totally three courses was given. The clinical efficacy in two groups after treatment was observed, and the contents of immune globulin E (IgE), interleukin-4 (IL-4), interleukin-5 (IL-5) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in peripheral serum were measured before and after the treatments. Of all the 82 patients, 79 cases completed the treatment, and 1 patient in the observation group and 2 patients in the control group dropped out. The effective rate was 87.8% (36/41) in the observation group, which was superior to 78.9% (30/38) in the control group (Ptreatment, both groups effectively reduced the contents of IgE, IL-4, IL-5 and TNF-α, and the observation group had superior effect on reducing IgE and IL-4 to the control group (Pcupping at Shenque (CV 8) have better effect for allergic rhinitis with syndrome of yang deficiency

  14. Human airway smooth muscle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C. de Jongste (Johan)

    1987-01-01

    textabstractThe function of airway smooth muscle in normal subjects is not evident. Possible physiological roles include maintenance of optimal regional ventilation/perfusion ratios, reduction of anatomic dead space, stabilisation of cartilaginous bronchi, defense against impurities and, less

  15. Laplacians on smooth distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordyukov, Yu. A.

    2017-10-01

    Let M be a compact smooth manifold equipped with a positive smooth density μ and let H be a smooth distribution endowed with a fibrewise inner product g. We define the Laplacian Δ_H associated with (H,μ,g) and prove that it gives rise to an unbounded self-adjoint operator in L^2(M,μ). Then, assuming that H generates a singular foliation \\mathscr F, we prove that, for any function \\varphi in the Schwartz space \\mathscr S( R), the operator \\varphi(Δ_H) is a smoothing operator in the scale of longitudinal Sobolev spaces associated with \\mathscr F. The proofs are based on pseudodifferential calculus on singular foliations, which was developed by Androulidakis and Skandalis, and on subelliptic estimates for Δ_H. Bibliography: 35 titles.

  16. smoothG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-12-12

    smoothG is a collection of parallel C++ classes/functions that algebraically constructs reduced models of different resolutions from a given high-fidelity graph model. In addition, smoothG also provides efficient linear solvers for the reduced models. Other than pure graph problem, the software finds its application in subsurface flow and power grid simulations in which graph Laplacians are found

  17. Human airway smooth muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Jongste, Johan

    1987-01-01

    textabstractThe function of airway smooth muscle in normal subjects is not evident. Possible physiological roles include maintenance of optimal regional ventilation/perfusion ratios, reduction of anatomic dead space, stabilisation of cartilaginous bronchi, defense against impurities and, less likely, squeezing mucus out of mucous glands and pulling open the alveoli next to the airways1 . Any role of airway smooth muscle is necessarily limited, because an important degree of contraction will l...

  18. Involvement of endoplasmic stress protein C/EBP homologous protein in arteriosclerosis acceleration with augmented biological stress responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Junhong; Ishigaki, Yasushi; Yamada, Tetsuya; Kondo, Keiichi; Yamaguchi, Suguru; Imai, Junta; Uno, Kenji; Hasegawa, Yutaka; Sawada, Shojiro; Ishihara, Hisamitsu; Oyadomari, Seiichi; Mori, Masataka; Oka, Yoshitomo; Katagiri, Hideki

    2011-08-16

    The processes of arteriosclerosis, including atherosclerosis and vascular remodeling, are affected by interactions among numerous biological pathways such as responses to inflammation, oxidative stress, and endoplasmic reticulum stress. C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), which is well known to induce cellular apoptosis in response to severe endoplasmic reticulum stress, is reportedly upregulated in plaque lesions. We examined the effects of CHOP deficiency on 2 types of arteriosclerosis: cuff injury-induced neointimal formation and hypercholesterolemia-induced atherosclerosis. Cuff injury-induced neointimal formation was markedly inhibited in CHOP(-/-) mice with suppressed aortic expression of inflammatory factors and smooth muscle cell proliferation-related proteins. A CHOP deficiency also inhibited aortic plaque formation in hypercholesterolemic apolipoprotein E(-/-) mice with suppressed aortic expression of inflammatory factors and oxidative stress markers. Bone marrow transplantation experiments revealed that recipient CHOP deficiency significantly suppressed both cuff injury-induced neointimal formation and hypercholesterolemia-induced atherosclerotic plaque formation to a greater extent than donor CHOP deficiency, suggesting the importance of CHOP in vascular cells for arteriosclerosis progression. Furthermore, in our in vitro experiments, in not only macrophages but also endothelial and smooth muscle cell lines, endoplasmic reticulum stress inducers upregulated inflammation-, adhesion-, or smooth muscle cell proliferation-related proteins, whereas decreased CHOP expression remarkably suppressed endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced upregulation of these proteins. In addition to the well-known signaling for apoptosis induction, CHOP may play important roles in augmenting potentially pathological biological stress responses. This noncanonical role of CHOP, especially that expressed in vascular cells, may contribute to the progression of vascular remodeling and

  19. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Associated ROS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeeshan, Hafiz Maher Ali; Lee, Geum Hwa; Kim, Hyung-Ryong; Chae, Han-Jung

    2016-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a fascinating network of tubules through which secretory and transmembrane proteins enter unfolded and exit as either folded or misfolded proteins, after which they are directed either toward other organelles or to degradation, respectively. The ER redox environment dictates the fate of entering proteins, and the level of redox signaling mediators modulates the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Accumulating evidence suggests the interrelation of ER stress and ROS with redox signaling mediators such as protein disulfide isomerase (PDI)-endoplasmic reticulum oxidoreductin (ERO)-1, glutathione (GSH)/glutathione disuphide (GSSG), NADPH oxidase 4 (Nox4), NADPH-P450 reductase (NPR), and calcium. Here, we reviewed persistent ER stress and protein misfolding-initiated ROS cascades and their significant roles in the pathogenesis of multiple human disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases, diabetes mellitus, atherosclerosis, inflammation, ischemia, and kidney and liver diseases. PMID:26950115

  20. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Associated ROS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafiz Maher Ali Zeeshan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The endoplasmic reticulum (ER is a fascinating network of tubules through which secretory and transmembrane proteins enter unfolded and exit as either folded or misfolded proteins, after which they are directed either toward other organelles or to degradation, respectively. The ER redox environment dictates the fate of entering proteins, and the level of redox signaling mediators modulates the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Accumulating evidence suggests the interrelation of ER stress and ROS with redox signaling mediators such as protein disulfide isomerase (PDI-endoplasmic reticulum oxidoreductin (ERO-1, glutathione (GSH/glutathione disuphide (GSSG, NADPH oxidase 4 (Nox4, NADPH-P450 reductase (NPR, and calcium. Here, we reviewed persistent ER stress and protein misfolding-initiated ROS cascades and their significant roles in the pathogenesis of multiple human disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases, diabetes mellitus, atherosclerosis, inflammation, ischemia, and kidney and liver diseases.

  1. Protein Secretion and the Endoplasmic Reticulum

    OpenAIRE

    Benham, Adam M.

    2012-01-01

    In a complex multicellular organism, different cell types engage in specialist functions, and as a result, the secretory output of cells and tissues varies widely. Whereas some quiescent cell types secrete minor amounts of proteins, tissues like the pancreas, producing insulin and other hormones, and mature B cells, producing antibodies, place a great demand on their endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Our understanding of how protein secretion in general is controlled in the ER is now quite sophisti...

  2. Smoothness of limit functors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Annual Meetings · Mid Year Meetings · Discussion Meetings · Public Lectures · Lecture Workshops · Refresher Courses · Symposia · Live Streaming. Home; Journals; Proceedings – Mathematical Sciences; Volume 125; Issue 2. Smoothness of limit functors. Benedictus Margaux. Volume 125 Issue 2 May 2015 pp 161-165 ...

  3. Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamic Simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-10-05

    This code is a highly modular framework for developing smoothed particle hydrodynamic (SPH) simulations running on parallel platforms. The compartmentalization of the code allows for rapid development of new SPH applications and modifications of existing algorithms. The compartmentalization also allows changes in one part of the code used by many applications to instantly be made available to all applications.

  4. Generalizing smooth transition autoregressions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chini, Emilio Zanetti

    We introduce a variant of the smooth transition autoregression - the GSTAR model - capable to parametrize the asymmetry in the tails of the transition equation by using a particular generalization of the logistic function. A General-to-Specific modelling strategy is discussed in detail...

  5. Smoothness of limit functors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Indian Acad. Sci. (Math. Sci.) Vol. 125, No. 2, May 2015, pp. 161–165. c Indian Academy of Sciences. Smoothness of limit functors. BENEDICTUS MARGAUX. Laboratoire de Recherche “Princess .... On the same vein, the coaction cλ : A[X] → A[X][t±1] is defined 'at a finite level', that is, there exists α1 ≥ α0 and a Aα1 ...

  6. Smoothed Cox regression

    OpenAIRE

    Dabrowska, Dorota M.

    1997-01-01

    Nonparametric regression was shown by Beran and McKeague and Utikal to provide a flexible method for analysis of censored failure times and more general counting processes models in the presence of covariates. We discuss application of kernel smoothing towards estimation in a generalized Cox regression model with baseline intensity dependent on a covariate. Under regularity conditions we show that estimates of the regression parameters are asymptotically normal at rate root-n, and we also dis...

  7. Endoplasmic reticulum stress and diabetic retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki Oshitari

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Toshiyuki Oshitari1,2, Natsuyo Hata1, Shuichi Yamamoto11Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba City, Chiba, Japan; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Kimitsu Central Hospital, Kisarazu City, Chiba, JapanAbstract: Endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress is involved in the pathogenesis of several diseases including Alzheimer disease and Parkinson disease. Many recent studies have shown that ER stress is related to the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus, and with the death of pancreatic β-cells, insulin resistance, and the death of the vascular cells in the retina. Diabetic retinopathy is a major complication of diabetes and results in death of both neural and vascular cells. Because the death of the neurons directly affects visual function, the precise mechanism causing the death of neurons in early diabetic retinopathy must be determined. The ideal therapy for preventing the onset and the progression of diabetic retinopathy would be to treat the factors involved with both the vascular and neuronal abnormalities in diabetic retinopathy. In this review, we present evidence that ER stress is involved in the death of both retinal neurons and vascular cells in diabetic eyes, and thus reducing or blocking ER stress may be a potential therapy for preventing the onset and the progression of diabetic retinopathy.Keywords: endoplasmic reticulum stress, diabetic retinopathy, vascular cell death, neuronal cell death

  8. Smoothly Varying Bright Blazars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Alfen, Nicholas; Hindman, Lauren; Moody, Joseph Ward; Biancardi, Rochelle; Whipple, Parkes; Gaunt, Caleb

    2018-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly apparent that blazar light can vary sinusoidally with periods of hundreds of days to tens of years. Such behavior is expected of, among other things, jets coming from binary black holes. To look for general variability in lesser-known blazars and AGN, in 2015-2016 we monitored 182 objects with Johnson V-band magnitudes reported as being < 16. In all, this campaign generated 22,000 frames from 2,000 unique pointings. We find that approximately one dozen of these objects show evidence of smooth variability consistent with sinusoidal periods. We report on the entire survey sample, highlighting those that show sinusoidal variations.

  9. Endoplasmic reticulum: ER stress regulates mitochondrial bioenergetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Roberto; Gutierrez, Tomás; Paredes, Felipe; Gatica, Damián; Rodriguez, Andrea E.; Pedrozo, Zully; Chiong, Mario; Parra, Valentina; Quest, Andrew F.G.; Rothermel, Beverly A.; Lavandero, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress activates an adaptive unfolded protein response (UPR) that facilitates cellular repair, however, under prolonged ER stress, the UPR can ultimately trigger apoptosis thereby terminating damaged cells. The molecular mechanisms responsible for execution of the cell death program are relatively well characterized, but the metabolic events taking place during the adaptive phase of ER stress remain largely undefined. Here we discuss emerging evidence regarding the metabolic changes that occur during the onset of ER stress and how ER influences mitochondrial function through mechanisms involving calcium transfer, thereby facilitating cellular adaptation. Finally, we highlight how dysregulation of ER–mitochondrial calcium homeostasis during prolonged ER stress is emerging as a novel mechanism implicated in the onset of metabolic disorders. PMID:22064245

  10. Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) Stress and Endocrine Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariyasu, Daisuke; Yoshida, Hiderou; Hasegawa, Yukihiro

    2017-02-11

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the organelle where secretory and membrane proteins are synthesized and folded. Unfolded proteins that are retained within the ER can cause ER stress. Eukaryotic cells have a defense system called the "unfolded protein response" (UPR), which protects cells from ER stress. Cells undergo apoptosis when ER stress exceeds the capacity of the UPR, which has been revealed to cause human diseases. Although neurodegenerative diseases are well-known ER stress-related diseases, it has been discovered that endocrine diseases are also related to ER stress. In this review, we focus on ER stress-related human endocrine disorders. In addition to diabetes mellitus, which is well characterized, several relatively rare genetic disorders such as familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (FNDI), Wolfram syndrome, and isolated growth hormone deficiency type II (IGHD2) are discussed in this article.

  11. Targeting endoplasmic reticulum stress in liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fa-Ling; Liu, Wen-Yue; Van Poucke, Sven; Braddock, Martin; Jin, Wei-Min; Xiao, Jian; Li, Xiao-Kun; Zheng, Ming-Hua

    2016-09-01

    The accumulation of unfolded protein in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) initiates an unfolded protein response (UPR) via three signal transduction cascades, which involve protein kinase RNA-like ER kinase (PERK), inositol requiring enzyme-1α (IRE1α) and activating transcription factor-6α (ATF6α). An ER stress response is observed in nearly all physiologies related to acute and chronic liver disease and therapeutic targeting of the mechanisms implicated in UPR signaling have attracted considerable attention. This review focuses on the correlation between ER stress and liver disease and the possible targets which may drive the potential for novel therapeutic intervention. Expert Commentary: We describe pathways which are involved in UPR signaling and their potential correlation with various liver diseases and underlying mechanisms which may present opportunities for novel therapeutic strategies are discussed.

  12. Endoplasmic-Reticulum Calcium Depletion and Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekahli, Djalila; Bultynck, Geert; Parys, Jan B.; De Smedt, Humbert; Missiaen, Ludwig

    2011-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) as an intracellular Ca2+ store not only sets up cytosolic Ca2+ signals, but, among other functions, also assembles and folds newly synthesized proteins. Alterations in ER homeostasis, including severe Ca2+ depletion, are an upstream event in the pathophysiology of many diseases. On the one hand, insufficient release of activator Ca2+ may no longer sustain essential cell functions. On the other hand, loss of luminal Ca2+ causes ER stress and activates an unfolded protein response, which, depending on the duration and severity of the stress, can reestablish normal ER function or lead to cell death. We will review these various diseases by mainly focusing on the mechanisms that cause ER Ca2+ depletion. PMID:21441595

  13. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Back, Sung Hoon; Kaufman, Randal J.

    2013-01-01

    Given the functional importance of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), an organelle that performs folding, modification, and trafficking of secretory and membrane proteins to the Golgi compartment, the maintenance of ER homeostasis in insulin-secreting β-cells is very important. When ER homeostasis is disrupted, the ER generates adaptive signaling pathways, called the unfolded protein response (UPR), to maintain homeostasis of this organelle. However, if homeostasis fails to be restored, the ER initiates death signaling pathways. New observations suggest that both chronic hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia, known as important causative factors of type 2 diabetes (T2D), disrupt ER homeostasis to induce unresolvable UPR activation and β-cell death. This review examines how the UPR pathways, induced by high glucose and free fatty acids (FFAs), interact to disrupt ER function and cause β-cell dysfunction and death. PMID:22443930

  14. Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER Stress and Endocrine Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Ariyasu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The endoplasmic reticulum (ER is the organelle where secretory and membrane proteins are synthesized and folded. Unfolded proteins that are retained within the ER can cause ER stress. Eukaryotic cells have a defense system called the “unfolded protein response” (UPR, which protects cells from ER stress. Cells undergo apoptosis when ER stress exceeds the capacity of the UPR, which has been revealed to cause human diseases. Although neurodegenerative diseases are well-known ER stress-related diseases, it has been discovered that endocrine diseases are also related to ER stress. In this review, we focus on ER stress-related human endocrine disorders. In addition to diabetes mellitus, which is well characterized, several relatively rare genetic disorders such as familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (FNDI, Wolfram syndrome, and isolated growth hormone deficiency type II (IGHD2 are discussed in this article.

  15. Endoplasmic Reticulum Malfunction in the Nervous System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Michalak

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases often have multifactorial causes and are progressive diseases. Some are inherited while others are acquired, and both vary greatly in onset and severity. Impaired endoplasmic reticulum (ER proteostasis, involving Ca2+ signaling, protein synthesis, processing, trafficking, and degradation, is now recognized as a key risk factor in the pathogenesis of neurological disorders. Lipidostasis involves lipid synthesis, quality control, membrane assembly as well as sequestration of excess lipids or degradation of damaged lipids. Proteostasis and lipidostasis are maintained by interconnected pathways within the cellular reticular network, which includes the ER and Ca2+ signaling. Importantly, lipidostasis is important in the maintenance of membranes and luminal environment that enable optimal protein processing. Accumulating evidence suggest that the loss of coordinate regulation of proteostasis and lipidostasis has a direct and negative impact on the health of the nervous system.

  16. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Ethanol Neurotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanmuyi Yang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Ethanol abuse affects virtually all organ systems and the central nervous system (CNS is particularly vulnerable to excessive ethanol exposure. Ethanol exposure causes profound damages to both the adult and developing brain. Prenatal ethanol exposure induces fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD which is associated with mental retardation and other behavioral deficits. A number of potential mechanisms have been proposed for ethanol-induced brain damage; these include the promotion of neuroinflammation, interference with signaling by neurotrophic factors, induction of oxidative stress, modulation of retinoid acid signaling, and thiamine deficiency. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER regulates posttranslational protein processing and transport. The accumulation of unfolded or misfolded proteins in the ER lumen triggers ER stress and induces unfolded protein response (UPR which are mediated by three transmembrane ER signaling proteins: pancreatic endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK, inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1, and activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6. UPR is initiated to protect cells from overwhelming ER protein loading. However, sustained ER stress may result in cell death. ER stress has been implied in various CNS injuries, including brain ischemia, traumatic brain injury, and aging-associated neurodegeneration, such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD, Huntington’s disease (HD, Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, and Parkinson’s disease (PD. However, effects of ethanol on ER stress in the CNS receive less attention. In this review, we discuss recent progress in the study of ER stress in ethanol-induced neurotoxicity. We also examine the potential mechanisms underlying ethanol-mediated ER stress and the interaction among ER stress, oxidative stress and autophagy in the context of ethanol neurotoxicity.

  17. Peralkaline Rhyolite Achneliths with Evidence of Post-Emplacement Vesiculation at Aluto Volcano, Main Ethiopian Rift: What can these unusual pyroclasts tell us?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calder, E.; Clarke, B. A.; Cortes, J. A.; Butler, I. B.; Yirgu, G.

    2016-12-01

    In peralkaline rhyolitic melts, Na+ and K+ combined with halogens act to disrupt silicate polymers reducing melt viscosity in comparison to other melts of equivalent silica content. As a result, such magmas are often associated with somewhat unusual deposits for which the associated eruptive behaviours are relatively poorly understood. We have discovered unusual globule-shaped clasts within an unconsolidated pyroclastic succession associated with a pumice cone at Aluto volcano in the Main Ethiopian Rift. The clasts are lapilli to ash sized, often have a droplet-like morphology and are characterised by a distinctive obsidian skin indicative of having been shaped by surface tension. We adopt Walker's term achneliths for these clasts. These achneliths however, unlike their mafic counterparts, are highly vesicular ( 78 vol %), and the glassy skin often shows a bread-crusted texture. Importantly, there is strong evidence for post-depositional, in-situ, inflation, including expanding against other clasts and in some cases fusing together. The unconsolidated nature of the deposit at Aluto means that these peralkaline achneliths are easily separated and investigated in 3D, providing an unprecedented opportunity to study their features in detail through the use of µCT, SEM and EPMA. Textural observations and preliminary 3D vesicle size distribution data suggest that surface tension is an important factor in shaping these clasts, and that vesiculation and degassing occurs over a prolonged period post-emplacement. MELTS model calculations on the EPMA analyses assuming dry conditions, suggest maximum liquidus temperatures of 1030 °C and minimum viscosities of 6 Log(poise). These observations have important implications for understanding the nature of late stage degassing, fragmentation and eruption style in peralkaline rhyolite systems as well as incipient welding in peralkaline pyroclastic units.

  18. Development of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress during Experimental Oxalate Nephrolithiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motin, Yu G; Lepilov, A V; Bgatova, N P; Zharikov, A Yu; Motina, N V; Lapii, G A; Lushnikova, E L; Nepomnyashchikh, L M

    2016-01-01

    Morphological and ultrastructural study of the kidney was performed in rats with oxalate nephrolithiasis. Specific features of endoplasmic reticulum stress were evaluated during nephrolithiasis and treatment with α-tocopherol. We observed the signs of endoplasmic reticulum stress with activation of proapoptotic pathways and injury to the cell lining in nephron tubules and collecting ducts. Ultrastructural changes were found in the organelles, nuclei, and cell membranes of epitheliocytes. A relationship was revealed between endoplasmic reticulum stress and oxidative damage, which developed at the early state of lithogenesis.

  19. Thapsigargin induces apoptosis in cultured human aortic smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiró, C; Vallejo, S; Cercas, E; Llergo, J L; Lafuente, N; Matesanz, N; Rodríguez-Mañas, L; Sánchez-Ferrer, C F

    2000-11-01

    Vascular remodeling is a key feature of many pathologic states, including atherosclerosis, or hypertension. Vascular smooth muscle cells participate in determining the vessel structure by several mechanisms such as cell migration, cell growth, or cell death (necrosis or apoptosis). Here we report that thapsigargin, an inhibitor of endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ -adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase), is able to induce apoptosis in human vascular smooth muscle cells (HVSMCs). Apoptosis was assessed by three different methods: differential chromatin binding dye staining. cytoplasmic histone-associated DNA fragments detection by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and terminal deoxyribonucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL). When HVSMCs were treated for 1 h with thapsigargin (100 nM-10 microM), there was a concentration-dependent increase in both parameters 24 h after the thapsigargin pulse. When a time-course experiment was performed, both parameters were significantly enhanced from 3 to 6 h after the exposure to thapsigargin. We conclude that thapsigargin promotes apoptosis in HVSMCs, providing a useful tool for the study of programmed cell death in human vascular smooth muscle.

  20. Classification of smooth Fano polytopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øbro, Mikkel

    A simplicial lattice polytope containing the origin in the interior is called a smooth Fano polytope, if the vertices of every facet is a basis of the lattice. The study of smooth Fano polytopes is motivated by their connection to toric varieties. The thesis concerns the classification of smooth...... Fano polytopes up to isomorphism. A smooth Fano -polytope can have at most vertices. In case of vertices an explicit classification is known. The thesis contains the classification in case of vertices. Classifications of smooth Fano -polytopes for fixed exist only for . In the thesis an algorithm...... for the classification of smooth Fano -polytopes for any given is presented. The algorithm has been implemented and used to obtain the complete classification for ....

  1. Endoplasmic reticulum stress sensing in the unfolded protein response

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gardner, Brooke M; Pincus, David; Gotthardt, Katja; Gallagher, Ciara M; Walter, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Secretory and transmembrane proteins enter the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) as unfolded proteins and exit as either folded proteins in transit to their target organelles or as misfolded proteins targeted for degradation...

  2. Activation of autophagy by unfolded proteins during endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaochen; Srivastava, Renu; Howell, Stephen H; Bassham, Diane C

    2016-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum stress is defined as the accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum, and is caused by conditions such as heat or agents that cause endoplasmic reticulum stress, including tunicamycin and dithiothreitol. Autophagy, a major pathway for degradation of macromolecules in the vacuole, is activated by these stress agents in a manner dependent on inositol-requiring enzyme 1b (IRE1b), and delivers endoplasmic reticulum fragments to the vacuole for degradation. In this study, we examined the mechanism for activation of autophagy during endoplasmic reticulum stress in Arabidopsis thaliana. The chemical chaperones sodium 4-phenylbutyrate and tauroursodeoxycholic acid were found to reduce tunicamycin- or dithiothreitol-induced autophagy, but not autophagy caused by unrelated stresses. Similarly, over-expression of BINDING IMMUNOGLOBULIN PROTEIN (BIP), encoding a heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) molecular chaperone, reduced autophagy. Autophagy activated by heat stress was also found to be partially dependent on IRE1b and to be inhibited by sodium 4-phenylbutyrate, suggesting that heat-induced autophagy is due to accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum. Expression in Arabidopsis of the misfolded protein mimics zeolin or a mutated form of carboxypeptidase Y (CPY*) also induced autophagy in an IRE1b-dependent manner. Moreover, zeolin and CPY* partially co-localized with the autophagic body marker GFP-ATG8e, indicating delivery to the vacuole by autophagy. We conclude that accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum is a trigger for autophagy under conditions that cause endoplasmic reticulum stress. © 2015 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Endoplasmic reticulum stress implicated in chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucke-Wold, Brandon P; Turner, Ryan C; Logsdon, Aric F; Nguyen, Linda; Bailes, Julian E; Lee, John M; Robson, Matthew J; Omalu, Bennet I; Huber, Jason D; Rosen, Charles L

    2016-03-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by neurofibrillary tau tangles following repetitive neurotrauma. The underlying mechanism linking traumatic brain injury to chronic traumatic encephalopathy has not been elucidated. The authors investigate the role of endoplasmic reticulum stress as a link between acute neurotrauma and chronic neurodegeneration. The authors used pharmacological, biochemical, and behavioral tools to assess the role of endoplasmic reticulum stress in linking acute repetitive traumatic brain injury to the development of chronic neurodegeneration. Data from the authors' clinically relevant and validated rodent blast model were compared with those obtained from postmortem human chronic traumatic encephalopathy specimens from a National Football League player and World Wrestling Entertainment wrestler. The results demonstrated strong correlation of endoplasmic reticulum stress activation with subsequent tau hyperphosphorylation. Various endoplasmic reticulum stress markers were increased in human chronic traumatic encephalopathy specimens, and the endoplasmic reticulum stress response was associated with an increase in the tau kinase, glycogen synthase kinase-3β. Docosahexaenoic acid, an endoplasmic reticulum stress inhibitor, improved cognitive performance in the rat model 3 weeks after repetitive blast exposure. The data showed that docosahexaenoic acid administration substantially reduced tau hyperphosphorylation (t = 4.111, p chronic traumatic encephalopathy. Docosahexaenoic acid therefore warrants further investigation as a potential therapeutic agent for the prevention of chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

  4. Dynamics of smooth muscle contraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.A. van Kloeveringe (Gommert)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractSmooth muscle can economically maintain tonus for a long time and in many organs, its purpose is to maintain organ dimensions. It is however relatively slow and also inefficient as far as mechanical work is concerned. Smooth muscle is found in the majority of organs in the human body. It

  5. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Apoptosis Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.Seyda Seydel

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Thhe endoplasmic reticulum (ER is the principal site for the synthesis, folding and maturation of most secreted proteins in the cell and essential for most cellular activities. Conditions that impair the folding capacity of the ER cause ER stress and induce a set of signaling pathways termed the unfolded protein response (UPR. If the protective mechanism activated by the UPR is not sufficient to restore normal ER function, cells die by apoptosis mechanism. Recent research suggests that ER stress and UPR play important roles in the metabolic disorders such as diabetes and obesity, cancer, immune response and in some neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer, Parkinson, Huntington. Further studies on ER stress and UPR are necessary to clarify the exact role of this physiological mechanism and provide novel avenues to potential therapies. This review will provide an overview of ER stress, the UPR signaling pathways and ER stress induced apoptosis mechanism. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2012; 21(4.000: 221-235

  6. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Reproductive Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang-sheng LIU

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Normal folding requires that unique conditions should be maintained within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER lumen, and nascent proteins are initially bound to Ca2+dependent chaperone proteins. Proteins synthesized in the ER are properly folded with the assistance of ER chaperones. misfolded proteins are disposed by ER-associated protein degradation. Accumulation of misfolded proteins in the ER triggers an adaptive ER stress response, which leads to activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR, a conserved pathway that transmits signals to restore homeostasis or eliminate the irreparably damaged cells. It has been shown that ER stress involves in pathophysiological development of many diseases, including neurological diseases. However, nowadays, a few studies have begun to focus on the possibility that the accumulation of misfolded proteins can also contribute to reproductive diseases. In this article, we mainly introduced the involvement of ER stress response in preimplantation embryos, placental development, intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR and testicular germ cells so as to provide important insights for the molecular mechanisms of ER stress-induced apoptosis in reproductive diseases.

  7. Endoplasmic reticulum proteostasis impairment in aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Gabriela; Duran-Aniotz, Claudia; Cabral-Miranda, Felipe; Vivar, Juan P; Hetz, Claudio

    2017-08-01

    Perturbed neuronal proteostasis is a salient feature shared by both aging and protein misfolding disorders. The proteostasis network controls the health of the proteome by integrating pathways involved in protein synthesis, folding, trafficking, secretion, and their degradation. A reduction in the buffering capacity of the proteostasis network during aging may increase the risk to undergo neurodegeneration by enhancing the accumulation of misfolded proteins. As almost one-third of the proteome is synthetized at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), maintenance of its proper function is fundamental to sustain neuronal function. In fact, ER stress is a common feature of most neurodegenerative diseases. The unfolded protein response (UPR) operates as central player to maintain ER homeostasis or the induction of cell death of chronically damaged cells. Here, we discuss recent evidence placing ER stress as a driver of brain aging, and the emerging impact of neuronal UPR in controlling global proteostasis at the whole organismal level. Finally, we discuss possible therapeutic interventions to improve proteostasis and prevent pathological brain aging. © 2017 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kemal Ergin

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress, which results from different stimuli, is an important cellular event. There are different types of response to ER stress. One of them is evolutionarily conserved unfolded protein response (UPR. UPR has three sensors for further activation of molecules. These sensors are inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1, activated transcription factor 6 (ATF6, and ER-resident protein kinase RNA (PKR-like ER kinase (PERK. In the absence of ER stress, these sensors are maintained in an inactive state. However, under ER stress conditions, they became activated and induce the downstream targets. As a consequence of ER stress, the cell may stay alive or became dead. Several studies have shown that ER stress is associated with different types of diseases such as diabetes mellitus, Alzheimer’s disease, prion disease, and cancer. As a cancer type, it has been shown that pancreatic cancer is also associated with ER stress. Pancreatic cancer has a low cure potential with its late diagnosis. Its association with ER stress is seen as a new therapeutic approach. The aim of this is review is to provide an overview of the mechanisms of ER stress and its relationship with pancreatic cancer, one of the diseases in which ER stress affects pathogenesis.

  9. Insights into Alternanthera mosaic virus TGB3 functions: interactions with Nicotiana benthamiana PsbO correlate with chloroplast vesiculation and veinal necrosis caused by TGB3 overexpression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chanyong eJang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Alternanthera mosaic virus (AltMV triple gene block 3 (TGB3 protein is involved in viral movement. AltMV TGB3 subcellular localization was previously shown to be distinct from that of Potato virus X (PVX TGB3, and a chloroplast binding domain identified; veinal necrosis and chloroplast vesiculation were observed in Nicotiana benthamiana when AltMV TGB3 was over-expressed from PVX. Plants with over-expressed TGB3 showed more lethal damage under dark conditions than under light. Yeast-two-hybrid analysis and bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC reveal that A. thaliana PsbO1 has strong interactions with TGB3; N. benthamiana PsbO (NbPsbO also showed obvious interaction signals with TGB3 through BiFC. These results demonstrate an important role for TGB3 in virus cell-to-cell movement and virus-host plant interactions. The Photosystem II oxygen-evolving complex protein PsbO interaction with TGB3 is presumed to have a crucial role in symptom development and lethal damage under dark conditions. In order to further examine interactions between AtPsbO1, NbPsbO and TGB3, and to identify the binding domain(s in TGB3 protein, BiFC assays were performed between AtPsbO1 or NbPsbO and various mutants of TGB3. Interactions with C-terminally deleted TGB3 were significantly weaker than those with wild-type TGB3, and both N-terminally deleted TGB3 and a TGB3 mutant previously shown to lose chloroplast interactions failed to interact detectably with PsbO in BiFC. To gain additional information about TGB3 interactions in AltMV-susceptible plants, we cloned 12 natural AltMV TGB3 sequence variants into a PVX expression vector to examine differences in symptom development in N. benthamiana. Symptom differences were observed on PVX over-expression, with all AltMV TGB3 variants showing more severe symptoms than the WT PVX control, but without obvious correlation to sequence differences.

  10. Smooth analysis in Banach spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Hájek, Petr

    2014-01-01

    This bookis aboutthe subject of higher smoothness in separable real Banach spaces.It brings together several angles of view on polynomials, both in finite and infinite setting.Also a rather thorough and systematic view of the more recent results, and the authors work is given. The book revolves around two main broad questions: What is the best smoothness of a given Banach space, and its structural consequences? How large is a supply of smooth functions in the sense of approximating continuous functions in the uniform topology, i.e. how does the Stone-Weierstrass theorem generalize into in

  11. Smooth Sailing with Contract Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fickes, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Discusses how to make the contract services relationship work smoothly for educational facilities. Covers topics of food, child care, and transportation services, along with a brief explanation of the benefits of outsourcing on-campus amenities. (GR)

  12. on gastro intestinal smooth muscle

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    , Kaduna State. Correspondence author: am.huguma@yahoo.com. ABSTRACT. The effects of the aqueous leaf extract of Combretum micranthum were studied on gastro intestinal smooth muscle of rodents. The extract was screened using ...

  13. Aging and gastrointestinal smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitar, Khalil N; Patil, Suresh B

    2004-12-01

    The present review is an attempt to put into perspective the available information on the putative changes in cellular mechanisms of the contractile properties of the aging gastrointestinal (GI) smooth muscle. Information on smooth muscle of the GI tract is scanty. Smooth muscle cells from old rats (32 months old) exhibit limited cell length distribution and diminished contractility. The observed reduced contractile response may be due to the effect of aging on signal transduction pathways, especially an inhibition of the tyrosine kinase-Src kinase pathway, a reduced activation of the PKCalpha pathway, a reduced association of contractile proteins (HSP27-tropomyosin, HSP27-actin, and actin-myosin). Levels of HSP27-phosphorylation are also reduced compared to adult rats. Regulation of GI motility is a complex mechanism of signal transduction and interaction of signaling and contractile proteins. It is suggested that further studies to elucidate the role of HSP27 in aging smooth muscle of the GI tract are needed.

  14. Smooth Nonparametric Bernstein Vine Copulas

    OpenAIRE

    Weiß, Gregor; Scheffer, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    We propose to use nonparametric Bernstein copulas as bivariate pair-copulas in high-dimensional vine models. The resulting smooth and nonparametric vine copulas completely obviate the error-prone need for choosing the pair-copulas from parametric copula families. By means of a simulation study and an empirical analysis of financial market data, we show that our proposed smooth nonparametric vine copula model is superior to competing parametric vine models calibrated via Akaike's Information C...

  15. Radar data smoothing filter study

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, J. V.

    1984-01-01

    The accuracy of the current Wallops Flight Facility (WFF) data smoothing techniques for a variety of radars and payloads is examined. Alternative data reduction techniques are given and recommendations are made for improving radar data processing at WFF. A data adaptive algorithm, based on Kalman filtering and smoothing techniques, is also developed for estimating payload trajectories above the atmosphere from noisy time varying radar data. This algorithm is tested and verified using radar tracking data from WFF.

  16. Exotic smoothness and quantum gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asselmeyer-Maluga, T, E-mail: torsten.asselmeyer-maluga@dlr.d [German Aerospace Center, Berlin, Germany and Loyola University, New Orleans, LA (United States)

    2010-08-21

    Since the first work on exotic smoothness in physics, it was folklore to assume a direct influence of exotic smoothness to quantum gravity. Thus, the negative result of Duston (2009 arXiv:0911.4068) was a surprise. A closer look into the semi-classical approach uncovered the implicit assumption of a close connection between geometry and smoothness structure. But both structures, geometry and smoothness, are independent of each other. In this paper we calculate the 'smoothness structure' part of the path integral in quantum gravity assuming that the 'sum over geometries' is already given. For that purpose we use the knot surgery of Fintushel and Stern applied to the class E(n) of elliptic surfaces. We mainly focus our attention to the K3 surfaces E(2). Then we assume that every exotic smoothness structure of the K3 surface can be generated by knot or link surgery in the manner of Fintushel and Stern. The results are applied to the calculation of expectation values. Here we discuss the two observables, volume and Wilson loop, for the construction of an exotic 4-manifold using the knot 5{sub 2} and the Whitehead link Wh. By using Mostow rigidity, we obtain a topological contribution to the expectation value of the volume. Furthermore, we obtain a justification of area quantization.

  17. Endoplasmic reticulum oxidoreductin 1α mediates hepatic endoplasmic reticulum stress in homocysteine-induced atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaoling; Xu, Hua; Hao, Yinju; Zhao, Li; Cai, Xin; Tian, Jue; Zhang, Minghao; Han, Xuebo; Ma, Shengchao; Cao, Jun; Jiang, Yideng

    2014-10-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is emerging as an important modulator of different pathological process and as a mechanism contributing to homocysteine (Hcy)-induced hepar injury. However, the molecular event that Hcy-induced ER stress in the hepar under the atherosclerosis background is currently unknown. Endoplasmic reticulum oxidoreductin 1α (ERO1α) plays a crucial role in maintaining ER stress function. In this study, we determined the expression of ERO1α in the hepar in hyperhomocysteinemia and the effect of ERO1α in hepacytes ER stress in the presence of Hcy. HHcy model was established by feeding the methionine diet in apolipoprotein-E-deficient (ApoE-/-) mice, and the hepatocytes were incubated with folate and different concentrations of Hcy. Our results showed that Hcy triggered ER stress characterized by an increased contents of glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), protein kinase RNA-like ER kinase (PERK), activating transcription factor (ATF) 6 and X-box binding protein-1 (XBP-1). The ERO1α expressions in HHcy mice and Hcy-treated hepatocytes were decreased compared with those in ApoE-/- group and control hepacytes (P stress. Meanwhile, the expressions of ER stress-related factor including GRP78, PERK, ATF6 and XBP-1, were significantly decreased when the ERO1α gene was over-expressed in hepacytes. Our results suggested that ERO1α may be involved in Hcy-induced hepar ER stress, and the inhibition of ERO1α expression can accelerate this process. © The Author 2014. Published by ABBS Editorial Office in association with Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  18. Lipid Transport between the Endoplasmic Reticulum and Mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flis, Vid V.

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria are partially autonomous organelles that depend on the import of certain proteins and lipids to maintain cell survival and membrane formation. Although phosphatidylglycerol, cardiolipin, and phosphatidylethanolamine are synthesized by mitochondrial enzymes, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylserine, and sterols need to be imported from other organelles. The origin of most lipids imported into mitochondria is the endoplasmic reticulum, which requires interaction of these two subcellular compartments. Recently, protein complexes that are involved in membrane contact between endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria were identified, but their role in lipid transport is still unclear. In the present review, we describe components involved in lipid translocation between the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria and discuss functional as well as regulatory aspects that are important for lipid homeostasis. PMID:23732475

  19. A luminal flavoprotein in endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riemer, Jan; Appenzeller-Herzog, Christian; Johansson, Linda

    2009-01-01

    The quality control system of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) discriminates between native and nonnative proteins. The latter are degraded by the ER-associated degradation (ERAD) pathway. Whereas many cytosolic and membrane components of this system are known, only few luminal players have been id...

  20. Region-specific vulnerability to endoplasmic reticulum stress ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-11-06

    Nov 6, 2013 ... Region-specific vulnerability to endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced neuronal death in rat brain after status epilepticus. JING CHEN. †,*. , HU GUO. †. , GUO ZHENG and ZHONG-NAN SHI. Department of Neurology, Nanjing Children's Hospital Affiliated to Nanjing Medical. University, No. 72, Guangzhou ...

  1. How are proteins reduced in the endoplasmic reticulum?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellgaard, Lars; Sevier, Carolyn S.; Bulleid, Neil J.

    2018-01-01

    The reversal of thiol oxidation in proteins within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is crucial for protein folding, degradation, chaperone function, and the ER stress response. Our understanding of this process is generally poor but progress has been made. Enzymes performing the initial reduction o...

  2. Sulfatase modifying factor 1 trafficking through the cells: from endoplasmic reticulum to the endoplasmic reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zito, Ester; Buono, Mario; Pepe, Stefano; Settembre, Carmine; Annunziata, Ida; Surace, Enrico Maria; Dierks, Thomas; Monti, Maria; Cozzolino, Marianna; Pucci, Piero; Ballabio, Andrea; Cosma, Maria Pia

    2007-05-16

    Sulfatase modifying factor 1 (SUMF1) is the gene mutated in multiple sulfatase deficiency (MSD) that encodes the formylglycine-generating enzyme, an essential activator of all the sulfatases. SUMF1 is a glycosylated enzyme that is resident in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), although it is also secreted. Here, we demonstrate that upon secretion, SUMF1 can be taken up from the medium by several cell lines. Furthermore, the in vivo engineering of mice liver to produce SUMF1 shows its secretion into the blood serum and its uptake into different tissues. Additionally, we show that non-glycosylated forms of SUMF1 can still be secreted, while only the glycosylated SUMF1 enters cells, via a receptor-mediated mechanism. Surprisingly, following its uptake, SUMF1 shuttles from the plasma membrane to the ER, a route that has to date only been well characterized for some of the toxins. Remarkably, once taken up and relocalized into the ER, SUMF1 is still active, enhancing the sulfatase activities in both cultured cells and mice tissues.

  3. Non-smooth dynamical systems

    CERN Document Server

    2000-01-01

    The book provides a self-contained introduction to the mathematical theory of non-smooth dynamical problems, as they frequently arise from mechanical systems with friction and/or impacts. It is aimed at applied mathematicians, engineers, and applied scientists in general who wish to learn the subject.

  4. Income smoothing by Dutch hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boterenbrood, D.R.

    2014-01-01

    Research indicates that hospitals manage their earnings. However, these findings might be influenced by methodological issues. In this study, I exploit specific features of Dutch hospitals to study income smoothing while limiting these methodological issues. The managers of Dutch hospitals have the

  5. Panel Smooth Transition Regression Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    González, Andrés; Terasvirta, Timo; Dijk, Dick van

    We introduce the panel smooth transition regression model. This new model is intended for characterizing heterogeneous panels, allowing the regression coefficients to vary both across individuals and over time. Specifically, heterogeneity is allowed for by assuming that these coefficients are bou...

  6. Interstitial cells of Cajal in human small intestine. Ultrastructural identification and organization between the main smooth muscle layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J; Thuneberg, L

    1991-01-01

    studied. Freshly resected intestine was examined by light and electron microscopy. The interstitial cells of Cajal resembled modified smooth muscle cells. They had caveolae and dense bodies, an incomplete basal lamina, a very well-developed smooth endoplasmic reticulum, and abundant intermediate (10 nm......Previous morphological and electrophysiological studies have supported the hypothesis that interstitial cells of Cajal have important regulatory (pacemaker) functions in the gut. In the current study, interstitial cells of Cajal associated with Auerbach's plexus in human small intestine were...... of bundles containing processes of two to seven cells with fibroblastlike cells interspersed in the bundles. The bundles were innervated by nerve elements of Auerbach's plexus and extended into both layers of smooth muscle, between muscle cells, and into septa. The bundles were closely associated...

  7. Parallel analysis of tagged deletion mutants efficiently identifies genes involved in endoplasmic reticulum biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Robin; Parrish, Mark L; Cadera, Emily; Larson, Lynnelle; Matson, Clinton K; Garrett-Engele, Philip; Armour, Chris; Lum, Pek Yee; Shoemaker, Daniel D

    2003-07-30

    Increased levels of HMG-CoA reductase induce cell type- and isozyme-specific proliferation of the endoplasmic reticulum. In yeast, the ER proliferations induced by Hmg1p consist of nuclear-associated stacks of smooth ER membranes known as karmellae. To identify genes required for karmellae assembly, we compared the composition of populations of homozygous diploid S. cerevisiae deletion mutants following 20 generations of growth with and without karmellae. Using an initial population of 1,557 deletion mutants, 120 potential mutants were identified as a result of three independent experiments. Each experiment produced a largely non-overlapping set of potential mutants, suggesting that differences in specific growth conditions could be used to maximize the comprehensiveness of similar parallel analysis screens. Only two genes, UBC7 and YAL011W, were identified in all three experiments. Subsequent analysis of individual mutant strains confirmed that each experiment was identifying valid mutations, based on the mutant's sensitivity to elevated HMG-CoA reductase and inability to assemble normal karmellae. The largest class of HMG-CoA reductase-sensitive mutations was a subset of genes that are involved in chromatin structure and transcriptional regulation, suggesting that karmellae assembly requires changes in transcription or that the presence of karmellae may interfere with normal transcriptional regulation. Copyright 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Smooth paths of conditional expectations

    OpenAIRE

    Andruchow, Esteban; Larotonda, Gabriel

    2010-01-01

    Let A be a von Neumann algebra with a finite trace $\\tau$, represented in $H=L^2(A,\\tau)$, and let $B_t\\subset A$ be sub-algebras, for $t$ in an interval $I$. Let $E_t:A\\to B_t$ be the unique $\\tau$-preserving conditional expectation. We say that the path $t\\mapsto E_t$ is smooth if for every $a\\in A$ and $v \\in H$, the map $$ I\

  9. Beam smoothing and temporal effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hora, H.; Aydin, M.; Eliezer, S.; Goldsworthy, M.P.; Min, G.; Gahatak, A.K.; Lalousis, P.; Stening, R.J.; Szichman, H. [University of Technology, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Boreham, B.W. [Queensland Inst. of Tech., Gardens Point, QLD (Australia). Dept. of Physics; Luther-Davies, B.; Baldwin, K.G.H.; Rode, A.V. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia)

    1995-05-01

    Until recently, and in spite of the introduction of smoothing methods, direct drive laser fusion received lots of setbacks from experiments, this being due to nonlinear and anomalous phenomena. This report deals with a method of analysis which, as self-generated von-Laue gratings, preventing the propagation of laser radiation through the outermost plasma corona, and preventing energy deposition. (TEC). 36 refs., 5 figs.

  10. The endoplasmic reticulum stress response: A link with tuberculosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yongyong; Zhao, Deming; Barrow, Paul Andrew; Zhou, Xiangmei

    2016-03-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major cause of mortality and morbidity in the worldwide. The endoplasmic-reticulum stress (ERS) response constitutes a cellular process that is triggered by mycobacterial infection that disturbs the folding of proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The unfolded protein response (UPR) is induced to suspend the synthesis of early proteins and reduce the accumulation of unfolded- or misfolded proteins in the ER restoring normal physiological cell function. Prolonged or uncontrolled ERS leads to the activation of three signaling pathways (IRE1, PERK and ATF6) which directs the cell towards apoptosis. The absence of this process facilitates spread of the mycobacteria within the body. We summarize here recent advances in understanding the signaling pathway diversity governing ERS in relation to TB. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation of glycoproteins in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia eHüttner

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In all eukaryotes the endoplasmic reticulum (ER has a central role in protein folding and maturation of secretory and membrane proteins. Upon translocation into the ER polypeptides are immediately subjected to folding and modifications involving the formation of disulfide bridges, assembly of subunits to multi-protein complexes and glycosylation. During these processes incompletely folded, terminally misfolded and unassembled proteins can accumulate which endanger the cellular homeostasis and subsequently the survival of cells and tissues. Consequently, organisms have developed a quality control system to cope with this problem and remove the unwanted protein load from the ER by a process collectively referred to as endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD pathway. Recent studies in Arabidopsis have identified plant ERAD components involved in the degradation of aberrant proteins and evidence was provided for a specific role in abiotic stress tolerance. In this short review we discuss our current knowledge about this important cellular pathway.

  12. Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD), an endoplasmic reticulum storage disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skagen, Peter Storgaard; Horn, T; Kruse, H A

    2011-01-01

    Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) fragments, cartilage and blood from four patients were used for morphological and molecular analysis. Controls included articular cartilage and blood samples from healthy individuals. Light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed abnormalities...... in chondrocytes and extracellular matrix of cartilage from OCD patients. Abnormal type II collagen heterofibrils in "bundles" and chondrocytes with abnormal accumulation of matrix proteins in distended rough endoplasmic reticulum were typical findings. Further, Von Kossa staining and TEM showed empty lacunae...... polymorphism was found within the COL2A1 gene for one patient. We suggest that OCD lesions are caused by an alteration in chondrocyte matrix synthesis causing an endoplasmic reticulum storage disease phenotype, which disturbs or abrupts endochondral ossification....

  13. Prediction of endoplasmic reticulum resident proteins using fragmented amino acid composition and support vector machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravindra Kumar

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background The endoplasmic reticulum plays an important role in many cellular processes, which includes protein synthesis, folding and post-translational processing of newly synthesized proteins. It is also the site for quality control of misfolded proteins and entry point of extracellular proteins to the secretory pathway. Hence at any given point of time, endoplasmic reticulum contains two different cohorts of proteins, (i proteins involved in endoplasmic reticulum-specific function, which reside in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum, called as endoplasmic reticulum resident proteins and (ii proteins which are in process of moving to the extracellular space. Thus, endoplasmic reticulum resident proteins must somehow be distinguished from newly synthesized secretory proteins, which pass through the endoplasmic reticulum on their way out of the cell. Approximately only 50% of the proteins used in this study as training data had endoplasmic reticulum retention signal, which shows that these signals are not essentially present in all endoplasmic reticulum resident proteins. This also strongly indicates the role of additional factors in retention of endoplasmic reticulum-specific proteins inside the endoplasmic reticulum. Methods This is a support vector machine based method, where we had used different forms of protein features as inputs for support vector machine to develop the prediction models. During training leave-one-out approach of cross-validation was used. Maximum performance was obtained with a combination of amino acid compositions of different part of proteins. Results In this study, we have reported a novel support vector machine based method for predicting endoplasmic reticulum resident proteins, named as ERPred. During training we achieved a maximum accuracy of 81.42% with leave-one-out approach of cross-validation. When evaluated on independent dataset, ERPred did prediction with sensitivity of 72.31% and specificity of 83

  14. Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD), an endoplasmic reticulum storage disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skagen, Peter Storgaard; Horn, T; Kruse, H A

    2011-01-01

    and aggrecan indicating that hypertrophic chondrocytes express a phenotype of bone cells during endochondral ossification. Types I, VI and X collagens were also present across the entire dissecates suggesting that chondrocytes were dedifferentiated. DNA sequencings were non-conclusive, only single nucleotide...... polymorphism was found within the COL2A1 gene for one patient. We suggest that OCD lesions are caused by an alteration in chondrocyte matrix synthesis causing an endoplasmic reticulum storage disease phenotype, which disturbs or abrupts endochondral ossification....

  15. Fluoride induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and calcium overload in ameloblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Zhang, KaiQiang; Ma, Lin; Gu, HeFeng; Li, Jian; Lei, Shuang

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the involvement of endoplasmic reticulum stress and intracellular calcium overload on the development of dental fluorosis. We cultured and exposed rat ameloblast HAT-7 cells to various concentrations of fluoride and measured apoptosis with flow cytometry and intracellular Ca2+ changes using confocal microscopy, investigated the protein levels of GRP78, calreticulin, XBP1 and CHOP by western blotting, and their transcriptional levels with RT-PCR. We also created an in vivo model of dental fluorosis by exposing animals to various concentrations of fluoride. Subsequently, thin dental tissue slices were analyzed with H&E staining, immunohistochemical staining, and transmission electron microscopy, TUNEL assay was also performed on dental tissue slices for assessment of apoptosis. High fluoride concentration was associated with decreased ameloblast proliferation, elevated ameloblast apoptosis, and increased intracellular Ca2+ in vitro. The translation and transcription of the proteins associated with endoplasmic reticulum stress were significantly elevated with high concentrations of fluoride. Based on immunohistochemical staining, these proteins were also highly expressed in animals exposed to high fluoride concentrations. Histologically, we found significant fluorosis-like changes in tissues from animals exposed to high fluoride concentrations. Transmission electron microscopy cytology indicated significant apoptotic changes in tissues exposed to high concentrations of fluoride. These results indicate that exposure to high levels of fluoride led to endoplasmic reticulum stress which induced apoptosis in cultured ameloblasts and in vivo rat model, suggesting an important role of calcium overload and endoplasmic reticulum stress triggered by high concentrations of fluoride in the development of dental fluorosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Skeletal Muscle Homeostasis and Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Rayavarapu, Sree; Coley, William; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina

    2012-01-01

    Our appreciation of the role of endoplasmic reticulum(ER) stress pathways in both skeletal muscle homeostasis and the progression of muscle diseases is gaining momentum. This review provides insight into ER stress mechanisms during physiologic and pathological disturbances in skeletal muscle. The role of ER stress in the response to dietary alterations and acute stressors, including its role in autoimmune and genetic muscle disorders, has been described. Recent studies identifying ER stress m...

  17. Endoplasmic reticulum stress: implications for inflammatory bowel disease pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaser, Arthur; Martínez-Naves, Eduardo; Blumberg, Richard S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review To provide an overview of the emerging role of cellular stress responses in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Recent findings The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a primitive cellular pathway that is engaged when responding to endoplasmic reticulum stress and regulates autophagy. Highly secretory cells such as Paneth cells and goblet cells in the intestines are particularly susceptible to endoplasmic reticulum stress and are exceedingly dependent upon a properly functioning UPR to maintain cellular viability and homeostasis. Primary genetic abnormalities within the components of the UPR (e.g. XBP1, ARG2, ORMDL3), genes that encode proteins reliant upon a robust secretory pathway (e.g. MUC2, HLAB27) and environmental factors that create disturbances in the UPR (e.g. microbial products and inflammatory cytokines) are important factors in the primary development and/or perpetuation of intestinal inflammation. Summary Endoplasmic reticulum stress is an important new pathway involved in the development of intestinal inflammation associated with IBD and likely other intestinal inflammatory disorders. PMID:20495455

  18. Momordicacharantia: A New Strategic Vision to Improve the Therapy of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Wai Chin; Gundamaraju, Rohit; Vemuri, Ravichandra; Scotti, Marcus T; Scotti, Luciana

    2017-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum is the major site for protein biosynthesis. Any perturbation in the endoplasmic reticulum will compromise its functions and reduce its efficiency in protein biosynthesis. As a result, misfolded proteins are produced and accumulated in the endoplasmic reticulum. This will result in endoplasmic reticulum stress, which reduces the quantity and quality of the functional protein synthesized from the cell. Besides that, the protein biosynthesis is also highly affected by oxidative stress. Oxidative stress is a condition where the cell has excessive exogenous and endogenous radical oxygen species overwhelming the human body's antioxidant mechanisms. Recent researches have shown that endoplasmic reticulum stress has a strong relationship with oxidative stress and both of them can form a vicious cycle that exacerbates endoplasmic reticulum stress and oxidative stress. Endoplasmic reticulum stress and oxidative stress are harmful to human health since they can disrupt cellular homoeostasis and damage cells. This work reported several studies that demonstrate that endoplasmic reticulum stress and oxidative stress have a vital role in the pathogenesis of several diseases, such as diabetes and colitis. Further research is needed to develop the therapeutic strategies that resolve endoplasmic reticulum stress and oxidative stress in order to treat these diseases. Currently, Momordicacharantia attracts worldwide attentions due to its various beneficial effects as the functional foods and can possibly help in treating endoplasmic reticulum stress and oxidative stress. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  19. When does the H∞ fixed-lag smoothing saturate for finite smoothing lag

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mirkin, Leonid; Meinsma, Gjerrit

    2004-01-01

    A notable difference between the H∞ smoothing is that the achievable performance in the latter problem might "saturate" as the function of the smoothing lag in the sense that there might exist a finite smoothing lag for which the achievable performance level is the same as for the infinite smoothing

  20. s-SMOOTH: Sparsity and Smoothness Enhanced EEG Brain Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Li

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available EEG source imaging enables us to reconstruct current density in the brain from the electrical measurements with excellent temporal resolution (~ms. The corresponding EEG inverse problem is an ill-posed one that has infinitely many solutions. This is due to the fact that the number of EEG sensors is usually much smaller than that of the potential dipole locations, as well as noise contamination in the recorded signals. To obtain a unique solution, regularizations can be incorporated to impose additional constraints on the solution. An appropriate choice of regularization is critically important for the reconstruction accuracy of the brain image. In this paper, we propose a novel Sparsity and SMOOthness enhanced brain TomograpHy (s-SMOOTH method to improve the reconstruction accuracy by integrating two recently proposed regularization techniques: Total Generalized Variation (TGV regularization and l_(1-2 regularization. TGV is able to preserve the source edge and recover the spatial distribution of the source intensity with high accuracy. Compared to the relevant total variation (TV regularization, TGV enhances the smoothness of the image and reduces staircasing artifacts. The traditional TGV defined on a 2D image has been widely used in image processing field. In order to handle 3D EEG source images, we propose a voxel-based TGV (vTGV regularization that extends the definition of second-order TGV from 2D planar image to 3D irregular surfaces such as cortex surface. In addition, the l_(1-2 regularization is utilized to promote sparsity on the current density itself. We demonstrate that l_(1-2 regularization is able to enhance sparsity and accelerate computations than l_1 regularization. The proposed model is solved by an efficient and robust algorithm based on the difference of convex functions algorithm (DCA and the alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM. Numerical experiments using synthetic data demonstrate the advantages of the

  1. s-SMOOTH: Sparsity and Smoothness Enhanced EEG Brain Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Qin, Jing; Hsin, Yue-Loong; Osher, Stanley; Liu, Wentai

    2016-01-01

    EEG source imaging enables us to reconstruct current density in the brain from the electrical measurements with excellent temporal resolution (~ ms). The corresponding EEG inverse problem is an ill-posed one that has infinitely many solutions. This is due to the fact that the number of EEG sensors is usually much smaller than that of the potential dipole locations, as well as noise contamination in the recorded signals. To obtain a unique solution, regularizations can be incorporated to impose additional constraints on the solution. An appropriate choice of regularization is critically important for the reconstruction accuracy of a brain image. In this paper, we propose a novel Sparsity and SMOOthness enhanced brain TomograpHy (s-SMOOTH) method to improve the reconstruction accuracy by integrating two recently proposed regularization techniques: Total Generalized Variation (TGV) regularization and ℓ1-2 regularization. TGV is able to preserve the source edge and recover the spatial distribution of the source intensity with high accuracy. Compared to the relevant total variation (TV) regularization, TGV enhances the smoothness of the image and reduces staircasing artifacts. The traditional TGV defined on a 2D image has been widely used in the image processing field. In order to handle 3D EEG source images, we propose a voxel-based Total Generalized Variation (vTGV) regularization that extends the definition of second-order TGV from 2D planar images to 3D irregular surfaces such as cortex surface. In addition, the ℓ1-2 regularization is utilized to promote sparsity on the current density itself. We demonstrate that ℓ1-2 regularization is able to enhance sparsity and accelerate computations than ℓ1 regularization. The proposed model is solved by an efficient and robust algorithm based on the difference of convex functions algorithm (DCA) and the alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM). Numerical experiments using synthetic data demonstrate the

  2. Detection and quantification of endoplasmic reticulum stress in living cells using the fluorescent compound, Thioflavin T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beriault, Daniel R; Werstuck, Geoff H

    2013-10-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) plays a central role in the co- and post-translational modification of many proteins. Disruption of these processes can lead to the accumulation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum - a condition known as endoplasmic reticulum stress. In recent years, the association of endoplasmic reticulum stress with a number of disease pathologies has increased interest in the study of this condition. Current methods to detect endoplasmic reticulum stress are indirect and retrospective. Here we describe a new method to detect and quantify endoplasmic reticulum stress in live cells using Thioflavin T (ThT), a small molecule that exhibits enhanced fluorescence when it binds to protein aggregates. We show that enhanced ThT-fluorescence correlates directly with established indicators of unfolded protein response activation. Furthermore, enhanced ThT-fluorescence can be detected in living cells within 20 min of application of an endoplasmic reticulum stress-inducing agent. ThT is capable of detecting endoplasmic reticulum stress induced by distinctly different conditions and compounds, in different cultured cell types as well as in mouse tissue samples. Pre-treatment with a potent endoplasmic reticulum stress-reducing agent, 4-phenylbutyric acid, mitigates the enhanced ThT signal. This new tool will be useful in future research investigating the role of protein misfolding in the development and/or progression of human diseases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Smooth Adaptation by Sigmoid Shrinkage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atto AbdourrahmaneM

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the properties of a subclass of sigmoid-based shrinkage functions: the non zeroforcing smooth sigmoid-based shrinkage functions or SigShrink functions. It provides a SURE optimization for the parameters of the SigShrink functions. The optimization is performed on an unbiased estimation risk obtained by using the functions of this subclass. The SURE SigShrink performance measurements are compared to those of the SURELET (SURE linear expansion of thresholds parameterization. It is shown that the SURE SigShrink performs well in comparison to the SURELET parameterization. The relevance of SigShrink is the physical meaning and the flexibility of its parameters. The SigShrink functions performweak attenuation of data with large amplitudes and stronger attenuation of data with small amplitudes, the shrinkage process introducing little variability among data with close amplitudes. In the wavelet domain, SigShrink is particularly suitable for reducing noise without impacting significantly the signal to recover. A remarkable property for this class of sigmoid-based functions is the invertibility of its elements. This propertymakes it possible to smoothly tune contrast (enhancement, reduction.

  4. [Effect of endoplasmic reticulum stress-responsive protein glucose-regulated protein 78, 94 and endoplasmic reticulum apoptosis factor caspase-12 in trophocyte on the pathogenesis of preeclampsia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Li-Zhou; Ma, Xiao-Tian; Ge, Zhi-Ping; Han, Ping

    2010-12-01

    To evaluate the relationship between pathogenesis of preeclampsia (PE) and the ultrastructure change of the endoplasmic reticulum in trophocyte, mRNA and protein expression levels of endoplasmic reticulum molecular chaperone glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), glucose-regulated protein 94 (GRP94), endoplasmic reticulum apoptosis factor cysteine protease protein 12 (caspase-12). Sixty-five pregnant women who were hospitalized in the First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University from July 2008 to January 2010, were selected as the subject. Thirty pregnancy women diagnosed with PE were divided into PE group and 35 normal pregnant women were used as control group. Electron Microscopy was used to measure ultrastructure change of the endoplasmic reticulum in placenta trophocyte. Reverse transcription (RT) PCR and western blot were used to investigute the expression levels of GRP78, GRP94, caspase-12 mRNA and protein in placenta. (1) In control group the volume of endoplasmic reticulum does not increase; no swelling and no expansion of endoplasmic reticulum was found. In PE group the edema number of endoplasmic reticulum was reduced; the volume of endoplasmic reticulum increased; expansion and vacuolation of cavity and degranulation of the endoplasmic reticulum was observed significantly. (2) The mRNA and protein expression levels of GRP78 in placenta of PE group (2.59 ± 0.09 and 0.81 ± 0.31) were significantly higher than those in placenta of control group (1.16 ± 0.07 and 0.40 ± 0.10, P apoptosis may be involved in the pathophysiological processes of PE.

  5. Acrolein induces endoplasmic reticulum stress and causes airspace enlargement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiaki Kitaguchi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Given the relative abundance and toxic potential of acrolein in inhaled cigarette smoke, it is surprising how little is known about the pulmonary and systemic effects of acrolein. Here we test the hypothesis whether systemic administration of acrolein could cause endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress, and lung cell apoptosis, leading to the enlargement of the alveolar air spaces in rats. METHODS: Acute and chronic effects of intraperitoneally administered acrolein were tested. Mean alveolar airspace area was measured by using light microscopy and imaging system software. TUNEL staining and immunohistochemistry (IHC for active caspase 3 and Western blot analysis for active caspase 3, and caspase 12 were performed to detect apoptosis. The ER-stress related gene expression in the lungs was determined by Quantitative real-time PCR analysis. Acrolein-protein adducts in the lung tissue were detected by IHC. RESULTS: Acute administration of acrolein caused a significant elevation of activated caspase 3, upregulation of VEGF expression and induced ER stress proteins in the lung tissue. The chronic administration of acrolein in rats led to emphysematous lung tissue remodeling. TUNEL staining and IHC for cleaved caspase 3 showed a large number of apoptotic septal cells in the acrolein-treated rat lungs. Chronic acrolein administration cause the endoplasmic reticulum stress response manifested by significant upregulation of ATF4, CHOP and GADd34 expression. In smokers with COPD there was a considerable accumulation of acrolein-protein adducts in the inflammatory, airway and vascular cells. CONCLUSIONS: Systemic administration of acrolein causes endoplasmic reticulum stress response, lung cell apoptosis, and chronic administration leads to the enlargement of the alveolar air spaces and emphysema in rats. The substantial accumulation of acrolein-protein adducts in the lungs of COPD patients suggest a role of acrolein in the pathogenesis of emphysema.

  6. The role of the endoplasmic reticulum stress response following cerebral ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadley, Gina; Neuhaus, Ain A; Couch, Yvonne; Beard, Daniel J; Adriaanse, Bryan A; Vekrellis, Kostas; DeLuca, Gabriele C; Papadakis, Michalis; Sutherland, Brad A; Buchan, Alastair M

    2017-01-01

    Background Cornu ammonis 3 (CA3) hippocampal neurons are resistant to global ischemia, whereas cornu ammonis (CA1) 1 neurons are vulnerable. Hamartin expression in CA3 neurons mediates this endogenous resistance via productive autophagy. Neurons lacking hamartin demonstrate exacerbated endoplasmic reticulum stress and increased cell death. We investigated endoplasmic reticulum stress responses in CA1 and CA3 regions following global cerebral ischemia, and whether pharmacological modulation of endoplasmic reticulum stress or autophagy altered neuronal viability . Methods In vivo: male Wistar rats underwent sham or 10 min of transient global cerebral ischemia. CA1 and CA3 areas were microdissected and endoplasmic reticulum stress protein expression quantified at 3 h and 12 h of reperfusion. In vitro: primary neuronal cultures (E18 Wistar rat embryos) were exposed to 2 h of oxygen and glucose deprivation or normoxia in the presence of an endoplasmic reticulum stress inducer (thapsigargin or tunicamycin), an endoplasmic reticulum stress inhibitor (salubrinal or 4-phenylbutyric acid), an autophagy inducer ([4'-(N-diethylamino) butyl]-2-chlorophenoxazine (10-NCP)) or autophagy inhibitor (3-methyladenine). Results In vivo, decreased endoplasmic reticulum stress protein expression (phospho-eIF2α and ATF4) was observed at 3 h of reperfusion in CA3 neurons following ischemia, and increased in CA1 neurons at 12 h of reperfusion. In vitro, endoplasmic reticulum stress inducers and high doses of the endoplasmic reticulum stress inhibitors also increased cell death. Both induction and inhibition of autophagy also increased cell death. Conclusion Endoplasmic reticulum stress is associated with neuronal cell death following ischemia. Neither reduction of endoplasmic reticulum stress nor induction of autophagy demonstrated neuroprotection in vitro, highlighting their complex role in neuronal biology following ischemia.

  7. Wall-crossing made smooth

    CERN Document Server

    Pioline, Boris

    2015-01-01

    In $D=4,N=2$ theories on $R^{3,1}$, the index receives contributions not only from single-particle BPS states, counted by the BPS indices, but also from multi-particle states made of BPS constituents. In a recent work [arXiv:1406.2360], a general formula expressing the index in terms of the BPS indices was proposed, which is smooth across walls of marginal stability and reproduces the expected single-particle contributions. In this note, I analyze the two-particle contributions predicted by this formula, and show agreement with the spectral asymmetry of the continuum of scattering states in the supersymmetric quantum mechanics of two non-relativistic, mutually non-local dyons. This provides a physical justification for the error function profile used in the mathematics literature on indefinite theta series, and in the physics literature on black hole partition functions.

  8. Smooth ergodic theory for endomorphisms

    CERN Document Server

    Qian, Min; Zhu, Shu

    2009-01-01

    This volume presents a general smooth ergodic theory for deterministic dynamical systems generated by non-invertible endomorphisms, mainly concerning the relations between entropy, Lyapunov exponents and dimensions. The authors make extensive use of the combination of the inverse limit space technique and the techniques developed to tackle random dynamical systems. The most interesting results in this book are (1) the equivalence between the SRB property and Pesin’s entropy formula; (2) the generalized Ledrappier-Young entropy formula; (3) exact-dimensionality for weakly hyperbolic diffeomorphisms and for expanding maps. The proof of the exact-dimensionality for weakly hyperbolic diffeomorphisms seems more accessible than that of Barreira et al. It also inspires the authors to argue to what extent the famous Eckmann-Ruelle conjecture and many other classical results for diffeomorphisms and for flows hold true. After a careful reading of the book, one can systematically learn the Pesin theory for endomorphis...

  9. Autoregressive smoothing of GOMOS transmittances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fussen, D.; Vanhellemont, F.; Bingen, C.; Kyrölä, B.; Tamminen, J.; Sofieva, V.; Hassinen, S.; Seppälä, A.; Verronen, P. T.; Bertaux, J. L.; Hauchecorne, A.; Dalaudier, F.; d'Andon, O. Fanton; Barrot, G.; Mangin, A.; Theodore, B.; Guirlet, M.; Renard, J. B.; Fraisse, R.; Snoeij, P.; Koopman, R.; Saavedra, L.

    GOMOS is a stellar occultation instrument onboard ENVISAT. It has already measured several hundreds of thousands occultations since March 2002. In some circumstances, the obliqueness of the star setting causes the remote sounding of possible horizontal turbulence that cannot be adequately corrected by using the fast photometer signals, leading to the presence of residual scintillation in the atmospheric transmittance. We investigate the mechanism that produces this spurious signal that may cause the retrieval of wavy constituent profiles. A special algorithm of vertical autoregressive smoothing (VAS) is proposed that takes into account the physical correlation between adjacent measurements at different tangent altitudes. A regularization parameter of the method may be optimized on basis of the minimal correlation between the residuals as prescribed by the Durbin-Watson statistics. The improvements obtained in the retrieval of both O 3 and NO 2 number density profiles is presented and discussed with respect to the results of the official data processing model.

  10. Properties of the extremal infinite smooth words

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srecko Brlek

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Smooth words are connected to the Kolakoski sequence. We construct the maximal and the minimal infinite smooth words, with respect to the lexicographical order. The naive algorithm generating them is improved by using a reduction of the De Bruijn graph of their factors. We also study their Lyndon factorizations. Finally, we show that the minimal smooth word over the alphabet {1,3} belongs to the orbit of the Fibonacci word.

  11. Smoothed analysis of complex conic condition numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Buergisser, Peter; Cucker, Felipe; Lotz, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Smoothed analysis of complexity bounds and condition numbers has been done, so far, on a case by case basis. In this paper we consider a reasonably large class of condition numbers for problems over the complex numbers and we obtain smoothed analysis estimates for elements in this class depending only on geometric invariants of the corresponding sets of ill-posed inputs. These estimates are for a version of smoothed analysis proposed in this paper which, to the best of our knowledge, appears ...

  12. Crucial role for endoplasmic reticulum stress during megakaryocyte maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Jose J; Palazzo, Alberta; Chaabane, Chiraz; Albarran, Letizia; Polidano, Evelyne; Lebozec, Kristell; Dally, Saoussen; Nurden, Paquita; Enouf, Jocelyne; Debili, Najet; Bobe, Régis

    2013-12-01

    Apoptotic-like phase is an essential step for the platelet formation from megakaryocytes. How controlled is this signaling pathway remained poorly understood. The aim of this study was to determine whether endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-induced apoptosis occurs during thrombopoiesis. Investigation of ER stress and maturation markers in different models of human thrombopoiesis (CHRF, DAMI, MEG-01 cell lines, and hematopoietic stem cells: CD34(+)) as well as in immature pathological platelets clearly indicated that ER stress occurs transiently during thrombopoiesis. Direct ER stress induction by tunicamycin, an inhibitor of N-glycosylation, or by sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase type 3b overexpression, which interferes with reticular calcium, leads to some degree of maturation in megakaryocytic cell lines. On the contrary, exposure to salubrinal, a phosphatase inhibitor that prevents eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α-P dephosphorylation and inhibits ER stress-induced apoptosis, decreased both expression of maturation markers in MEG-01 and CD34(+) cells as well as numbers of mature megakaryocytes and proplatelet formation in cultured CD34(+) cells. Taken as a whole, our research suggests that transient ER stress activation triggers the apoptotic-like phase of the thrombopoiesis process.

  13. Mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum crosstalk in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfredi, Giovanni; Kawamata, Hibiki

    2016-06-01

    Physical and functional interactions between mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) are crucial for cell life. These two organelles are intimately connected and collaborate to essential processes, such as calcium homeostasis and phospholipid biosynthesis. The connections between mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum occur through structures named mitochondria associated membranes (MAMs), which contain lipid rafts and a large number of proteins, many of which serve multiple functions at different cellular sites. Growing evidence strongly suggests that alterations of ER-mitochondria interactions are involved in neurodegenerative disorders, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a devastating and rapidly fatal motor neuron disease. Mutations in proteins that participate in ER-mitochondria interactions and MAM functions are increasingly being associated with genetic forms of ALS and other neurodegenerative diseases. This evidence strongly suggests that, rather than considering the two organelles separately, a better understanding of the disease process can derive from studying the alterations in their crosstalk. In this review we discuss normal and pathological ER-mitochondria interactions and the evidence that link them to ALS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Ghrelin Ameliorates Asthma by Inhibiting Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Tian; Wang, Lei; Zeng, Qingdi; Zhang, Yan; Sheng, Baowei; Han, Liping

    2017-12-01

    This study aimed to confirm the ameliorative effect of ghrelin on asthma and investigate its mechanism. The murine model of asthma was induced by ovalbumin (OVA) treatment and assessed by histological pathology and airway responsiveness to methacholine. The total and differential leukocytes were counted. Tumor necrosis factor α, interferon γ, interleukin-5 and interleukin-13 levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were quantified by commercial kits. The protein levels in pulmonary tissues were measured by Western blot analysis. Ghrelin ameliorated the histological pathology and airway hyperresponsiveness in the OVA-induced asthmatic mouse model. Consistently, OVA-increased total and differential leukocytes and levels of tumor necrosis factor α, interferon γ, interleukin-5 and interleukin-13 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were significantly attenuated by ghrelin. Ghrelin prevented the increased protein levels of the endoplasmic reticulum stress markers glucose regulated protein 78 and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein homologous protein and reversed the reduced levels of p-Akt in asthmatic mice. Ghrelin might prevent endoplasmic reticulum stress activation by stimulating the Akt signaling pathway, which attenuated inflammation and ameliorated asthma in mice. Ghrelin might be a new target for asthma therapy. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. The Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Protein Calreticulin in Diabetic Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0203 TITLE: The Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Protein Calreticulin in Diabetic Chronic Kidney Disease PRINCIPAL...1 July 2015- 30 June 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Protein Calreticulin in Diabetic Chronic Kidney Disease 5a... chronic kidney disease , diabetic nephropathy, calreticulin, TGF-beta, ER stress, ultrasound, tubulointerstitial fibrosis 5 3. ACCOMPLISHMENTS a. WHAT

  16. Role of endoplasmic reticulum stress signalling in diabetic endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yunzhou; Fernandes, Conrad; Liu, Yanjun; Wu, Yong; Wu, Hao; Brophy, Megan L; Deng, Lin; Song, Kai; Wen, Aiyun; Wong, Scott; Yan, Daoguang; Towner, Rheal; Chen, Hong

    2017-01-01

    It is well established that diabetes mellitus accelerates atherosclerotic vascular disease. Endothelial injury has been proposed to be the initial event in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Endothelium not only acts as a semi-selective barrier but also serves physiological and metabolic functions. Diabetes or high glucose in circulation triggers a series of intracellular responses and organ damage such as endothelial dysfunction and apoptosis. One such response is high glucose-induced chronic endoplasmic reticulum stress in the endothelium. The unfolded protein response is an acute reaction that enables cells to overcome endoplasmic reticulum stress. However, when chronically persistent, endoplasmic reticulum stress response could ultimately lead to endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis. Herein, we discuss the scientific advances in understanding endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced endothelial dysfunction, the pathogenesis of diabetes-accelerated atherosclerosis and endoplasmic reticulum stress as a potential target in therapies for diabetic atherosclerosis. © The Author(s) 2016.

  17. Cell Death and Survival Through the Endoplasmic Reticulum-Mitochondrial Axis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo-Sagua, R.; Rodriguez, A.E.; Kuzmicic, J.; Gutierrez, T.; Lopez-Crisosto, C.; Quiroga, C.; Díaz-Elizondo, J.; Chiong, M.; Gillette, T.G.; Rothermel, B.A.; Lavandero, S.

    2014-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum has a central role in biosynthesis of a variety of proteins and lipids. Mitochondria generate ATP, synthesize and process numerous metabolites, and are key regulators of cell death. The architectures of endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria change continually via the process of membrane fusion, fission, elongation, degradation, and renewal. These structural changes correlate with important changes in organellar function. Both organelles are capable of moving along the cytoskeleton, thus changing their cellular distribution. Numerous studies have demonstrated coordination and communication between mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum. A focal point for these interactions is a zone of close contact between them known as the mitochondrial–associated endoplasmic reticulum membrane (MAM), which serves as a signaling juncture that facilitates calcium and lipid transfer between organelles. Here we review the emerging data on how communication between endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria can modulate organelle function and determine cellular fate. PMID:23228132

  18. Endoplasmic reticulum stress in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy: a potential target for therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montague, Karli; Malik, Bilal; Gray, Anna L; La Spada, Albert R; Hanna, Michael G; Szabadkai, Gyorgy; Greensmith, Linda

    2014-07-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy is an X-linked degenerative motor neuron disease caused by an abnormal expansion in the polyglutamine encoding CAG repeat of the androgen receptor gene. There is evidence implicating endoplasmic reticulum stress in the development and progression of neurodegenerative disease, including polyglutamine disorders such as Huntington's disease and in motor neuron disease, where cellular stress disrupts functioning of the endoplasmic reticulum, leading to induction of the unfolded protein response. We examined whether endoplasmic reticulum stress is also involved in the pathogenesis of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy. Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy mice that carry 100 pathogenic polyglutamine repeats in the androgen receptor, and develop a late-onset neuromuscular phenotype with motor neuron degeneration, were studied. We observed a disturbance in endoplasmic reticulum-associated calcium homeostasis in cultured embryonic motor neurons from spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy mice, which was accompanied by increased endoplasmic reticulum stress. Furthermore, pharmacological inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum stress reduced the endoplasmic reticulum-associated cell death pathway. Examination of spinal cord motor neurons of pathogenic mice at different disease stages revealed elevated expression of markers for endoplasmic reticulum stress, confirming an increase in this stress response in vivo. Importantly, the most significant increase was detected presymptomatically, suggesting that endoplasmic reticulum stress may play an early and possibly causal role in disease pathogenesis. Our results therefore indicate that the endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway could potentially be a therapeutic target for spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy and related polyglutamine diseases. © The Author (2014). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain.

  19. Smooth horizons and quantum ripples

    CERN Document Server

    Golovnev, Alexey

    2014-01-01

    Black Holes are unique objects which allow for meaningful theoretical studies of strong gravity and even quantum gravity effects. An infalling and a distant observer would have very different views on the structure of the world. However, a careful analysis has shown that it entails no genuine contradictions for physics, and the paradigm of observer complementarity has been coined. Recently this picture was put into doubt. In particular, it was argued that in old Black Holes a firewall must form in order to protect the basic principles of quantum mechanics. This AMPS paradox has already been discussed in a vast number of papers with different attitudes and conclusions. Here we want to argue that a possible source of confusion is neglection of quantum gravity effects. Contrary to widespread perception, it does not necessarily mean that effective field theory is inapplicable in rather smooth neighbourhoods of large Black Hole horizons. The real offender might be an attempt to consistently use it over the huge di...

  20. Local Transfer Coefficient, Smooth Channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. T. Kukreja

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Naphthalene sublimation technique and the heat/mass transfer analogy are used to determine the detailed local heat/mass transfer distributions on the leading and trailing walls of a twopass square channel with smooth walls that rotates about a perpendicular axis. Since the variation of density is small in the flow through the channel, buoyancy effect is negligible. Results show that, in both the stationary and rotating channel cases, very large spanwise variations of the mass transfer exist in he turn and in the region immediately downstream of the turn in the second straight pass. In the first straight pass, the rotation-induced Coriolis forces reduce the mass transfer on the leading wall and increase the mass transfer on the trailing wall. In the turn, rotation significantly increases the mass transfer on the leading wall, especially in the upstream half of the turn. Rotation also increases the mass transfer on the trailing wall, more in the downstream half of the turn than in the upstream half of the turn. Immediately downstream of the turn, rotation causes the mass transfer to be much higher on the trailing wall near the downstream corner of the tip of the inner wall than on the opposite leading wall. The mass transfer in the second pass is higher on the leading wall than on the trailing wall. A slower flow causes higher mass transfer enhancement in the turn on both the leading and trailing walls.

  1. Smoothing a Piecewise-Smooth: An Example from Plankton Population Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piltz, Sofia Helena

    2016-01-01

    In this work we discuss a piecewise-smooth dynamical system inspired by plankton observations and constructed for one predator switching its diet between two different types of prey. We then discuss two smooth formulations of the piecewise-smooth model obtained by using a hyperbolic tangent...

  2. The smoothness criterion as a trend diagnostic

    OpenAIRE

    P. Fogarty; Weber, N.C.

    2006-01-01

    The smoothness criterion is used in the design of symmetric moving average trend filters in time series and in graduation in actuarial studies. This measure of smoothness is used to motivate a diagnostic for determining the order of local polynomial trend.

  3. Very smooth points of spaces of operators

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Proceedings – Mathematical Sciences; Volume 113; Issue 1 ... We show that when the space of compact operators is an -ideal in the space of bounded operators, a very smooth operator attains its norm at a unique vector (up to a constant multiple) and ( ) is a very smooth point of the range space.

  4. Smoothed Analysis of Local Search Algorithms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manthey, Bodo; Dehne, Frank; Sack, Jörg-Rüdiger; Stege, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    Smoothed analysis is a method for analyzing the performance of algorithms for which classical worst-case analysis fails to explain the performance observed in practice. Smoothed analysis has been applied to explain the performance of a variety of algorithms in the last years. One particular class of

  5. Income and Consumption Smoothing among US States

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent; Yosha, Oved

    within regions but not between regions. This suggests that capital markets transcend regional barriers while credit markets are regional in their nature. Smoothing within the club of rich states is accomplished mainly via capital markets whereas consumption smoothing is dominant within the club of poor...

  6. The smoothness criterion as a trend diagnostic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The smoothness criterion is used in the design of symmetric moving average trend filters in time series and in graduation in actuarial studies. This measure of smoothness is used to motivate a diagnostic for determining the order of local polynomial trend.

  7. The smoothness criterion as a trend diagnostic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. C. Weber

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available The smoothness criterion is used in the design of symmetric moving average trend filters in time series and in graduation in actuarial studies. This measure of smoothness is used to motivate a diagnostic for determining the order of local polynomial trend.

  8. Very smooth points of spaces of operators

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    or Y has the compact metric approximation property (CMAP), then it is easy to see that K (X, Y ) ⊂ L(X, Y ) satisfies the above condition (see [R6]). Thus for a compact operator that is a very smooth point, directional derivatives exist in the direction of all bounded operators. Smooth points of operator spaces has been ...

  9. Homotypic fusion of endoplasmic reticulum membranes in plant cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junjie eHu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The endoplasmic reticulum (ER is a membrane-bounded organelle whose membrane comprises a network of tubules and sheets. The formation of these characteristic shapes and maintenance of their continuity through homotypic membrane fusion appears to be critical for the proper functioning of the ER. The atlastins (ATLs, a family of ER-localized dynamin-like GTPases, have been identified as fusogens of the ER membranes in metazoans. Mutations of the ATL proteins in mammalian cells cause morphological defects in the ER, and purified Drosophila ATL mediates membrane fusion in vitro. Plant cells do not possess ATL, but a family of similar GTPases, named root hair defective 3 (RHD3, are likely the functional orthologs of ATLs. In this review, we summarize recent advances in our understanding of how RHD3 proteins play a role in homotypic ER fusion. We also discuss the possible physiological significance of forming a tubular ER network in plant cells.

  10. Induction of Apoptosis by Hypertension Via Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingying Sun

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress is one of the intrinsic apoptosis pathways, and cardiac apoptosis can occur in cardiovascular diseases, such as hypertension. However, the mechanisms by which ER stress leads to apoptosis remain enigmatic, particularly in the progression from cardiac hypertrophy to diastolic heart failure due to hypertension. Methods: We used spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs to investigate possible signalling pathways for ER stress. Results: We found that cardiac protein and mRNA levels of glucose-regulated protein 78 were up-regulated. In addition, the CHOP- and caspase-12-dependent pathways, but not that of JNK, were activated in the SHR rats. Conclusions: These results suggest that ER stress can contribute to myocardial apoptosis during hypertensive disease.

  11. Plant transducers of the endoplasmic reticulum unfolded protein response

    KAUST Repository

    Iwata, Yuji

    2012-12-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) activates a set of genes to overcome accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), a condition termed ER stress, and constitutes an essential part of ER protein quality control that ensures efficient maturation of secretory and membrane proteins in eukaryotes. Recent studies on Arabidopsis and rice identified the signaling pathway in which the ER membrane-localized ribonuclease IRE1 (inositol-requiring enzyme 1) catalyzes unconventional cytoplasmic splicing of mRNA, thereby producing the active transcription factor Arabidopsis bZIP60 (basic leucine zipper 60) and its ortholog in rice. Here we review recent findings identifying the molecular components of the plant UPR, including IRE1/bZIP60 and the membrane-bound transcription factors bZIP17 and bZIP28, and implicating its importance in several physiological phenomena such as pathogen response. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Related Inflammation and Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomomi Gotoh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The endoplasmic reticulum (ER is the site of synthesis and maturation of proteins designed for secretion or for localization on the cell membrane. Various types of stress from both inside and outside cells disturb ER function, thus causing unfolded or misfolded proteins to accumulate in the ER. To improve and maintain the ER functions against such stresses, the ER stress response pathway is activated. However, when the stress is prolonged or severe, apoptosis pathways are activated to remove damaged cells. It was recently reported that the ER stress pathway is also involved in the inflammatory response, whereby inflammation induces ER stress, and ER stress induces an inflammatory response. Therefore, the ER stress response pathway is involved in various diseases, including cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis and ischemic diseases, in various ways. The ER stress pathway may represent a novel target for the treatment of these diseases.

  13. Plant Endoplasmic Reticulum-Plasma Membrane Contact Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pengwei; Hawes, Chris; Hussey, Patrick J

    2017-04-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) acts as a superhighway with multiple sideroads that connects the different membrane compartments including the ER to the plasma membrane (PM). ER-PM contact sites (EPCSs) are a common feature in eukaryotic organisms, but have not been studied well in plants owing to the lack of molecular markers and to the difficulty in resolving the EPCS structure using conventional microscopy. Recently, however, plant protein complexes required for linking the ER and PM have been identified. This is a further step towards understanding the structure and function of plant EPCSs. We highlight some recent studies in this field and suggest several hypotheses that relate to the possible function of EPCSs in plants. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. How Are Proteins Reduced in the Endoplasmic Reticulum?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellgaard, Lars; Sevier, Carolyn S; Bulleid, Neil J

    2018-01-01

    The reversal of thiol oxidation in proteins within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is crucial for protein folding, degradation, chaperone function, and the ER stress response. Our understanding of this process is generally poor but progress has been made. Enzymes performing the initial reduction of client proteins, as well as the ultimate electron donor in the pathway, have been identified. Most recently, a role for the cytosol in ER protein reduction has been revealed. Nevertheless, how reducing equivalents are transferred from the cytosol to the ER lumen remains an open question. We review here why proteins are reduced in the ER, discuss recent data on catalysis of steps in the pathway, and consider the implications for redox homeostasis within the early secretory pathway. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Related Factors Protect against Diabetic Retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Kun Hu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The endoplasmic reticulum (ER is a principal mediator of signal transduction in the cell, and disruption of its normal function (a mechanism known as ER stress has been associated with the pathogenesis of several diseases. ER stress has been demonstrated to contribute to onset and progression of diabetic retinopathy (DR by induction of multiple inflammatory signaling pathways. Recent studies have begun to describe the gene expression profile of ER stress-related genes in DR; moreover, genes that play a protective role against DR have been identified. P58IPK was determined to be able to reduce retinal vascular leakage under high glucose conditions, thus protecting retinal cells. It has also been found by our lab that ER-associated protein degradation factors exhibit significantly different expression patterns in rat retinas under sustained high glucose conditions. Future research based upon these collective genomic findings will contribute to our overall understanding of DR pathogenesis as well as identify potential therapeutic targets.

  16. Arc Interacts with the Integral Endoplasmic Reticulum Protein, Calnexin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig Myrum

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein, Arc, is a major regulator of long-term synaptic plasticity and memory formation. Here we reveal a novel interaction partner of Arc, a resident endoplasmic reticulum transmembrane protein, calnexin. We show an interaction between recombinantly-expressed GST-tagged Arc and endogenous calnexin in HEK293, SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma and PC12 cells. The interaction was dependent on the central linker region of the Arc protein that is also required for endocytosis of AMPA-type glutamate receptors. High-resolution proximity-ligation assays (PLAs demonstrate molecular proximity of endogenous Arc with the cytosolic C-terminus, but not the lumenal N-terminus of calnexin. In hippocampal neuronal cultures treated with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, Arc interacted with calnexin in the perinuclear cytoplasm and dendritic shaft. Arc also interacted with C-terminal calnexin in the adult rat dentate gyrus (DG. After induction of long-term potentiation (LTP in the perforant path projection to the DG of adult anesthetized rats, enhanced interaction between Arc and calnexin was obtained in the dentate granule cell layer (GCL. Although Arc and calnexin are both implicated in the regulation of receptor endocytosis, no modulation of endocytosis was detected in transferrin uptake assays. Previous work showed that Arc interacts with multiple protein partners to regulate synaptic transmission and nuclear signaling. The identification of calnexin as a binding partner further supports the role of Arc as a hub protein and extends the range of Arc function to the endoplasmic reticulum, though the function of the Arc/calnexin interaction remains to be defined.

  17. The evolutionary history of sarco(endoplasmic calcium ATPase (SERCA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ianina Altshuler

    Full Text Available Investigating the phylogenetic relationships within physiologically essential gene families across a broad range of taxa can reveal the key gene duplication events underlying their family expansion and is thus important to functional genomics studies. P-Type II ATPases represent a large family of ATP powered transporters that move ions across cellular membranes and includes Na(+/K(+ transporters, H(+/K(+ transporters, and plasma membrane Ca(2+ pumps. Here, we examine the evolutionary history of one such transporter, the Sarco(endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA, which maintains calcium homeostasis in the cell by actively pumping Ca(2+ into the sarco(endoplasmic reticulum. Our protein-based phylogenetic analyses across Eukaryotes revealed two monophyletic clades of SERCA proteins, one containing animals, fungi, and plants, and the other consisting of plants and protists. Our analyses suggest that the three known SERCA proteins in vertebrates arose through two major gene duplication events after the divergence from tunicates, but before the separation of fishes and tetrapods. In plants, we recovered two SERCA clades, one being the sister group to Metazoa and the other to Apicomplexa clade, suggesting an ancient duplication in an early eukaryotic ancestor, followed by subsequent loss of one copy in Opisthokonta, the other in protists, and retention of both in plants. We also report relatively recent and independent gene duplication events within invertebrate taxa including tunicates and the leech Helobdella robusta. Thus, it appears that both ancient and recent gene duplication events have played an important role in the evolution of this ubiquitous gene family across the eukaryotic domain.

  18. Spline-Based Smoothing of Airfoil Curvatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W.; Krist, S.

    2008-01-01

    Constrained fitting for airfoil curvature smoothing (CFACS) is a splinebased method of interpolating airfoil surface coordinates (and, concomitantly, airfoil thicknesses) between specified discrete design points so as to obtain smoothing of surface-curvature profiles in addition to basic smoothing of surfaces. CFACS was developed in recognition of the fact that the performance of a transonic airfoil is directly related to both the curvature profile and the smoothness of the airfoil surface. Older methods of interpolation of airfoil surfaces involve various compromises between smoothing of surfaces and exact fitting of surfaces to specified discrete design points. While some of the older methods take curvature profiles into account, they nevertheless sometimes yield unfavorable results, including curvature oscillations near end points and substantial deviations from desired leading-edge shapes. In CFACS as in most of the older methods, one seeks a compromise between smoothing and exact fitting. Unlike in the older methods, the airfoil surface is modified as little as possible from its original specified form and, instead, is smoothed in such a way that the curvature profile becomes a smooth fit of the curvature profile of the original airfoil specification. CFACS involves a combination of rigorous mathematical modeling and knowledge-based heuristics. Rigorous mathematical formulation provides assurance of removal of undesirable curvature oscillations with minimum modification of the airfoil geometry. Knowledge-based heuristics bridge the gap between theory and designers best practices. In CFACS, one of the measures of the deviation of an airfoil surface from smoothness is the sum of squares of the jumps in the third derivatives of a cubicspline interpolation of the airfoil data. This measure is incorporated into a formulation for minimizing an overall deviation- from-smoothness measure of the airfoil data within a specified fitting error tolerance. CFACS has been

  19. Lunar Smooth Plains Identification and Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, A. K.; Robinson, M. S.; Mahanti, P.; Lawrence, S. J.; Spudis, P.; Jolliff, B. L.

    2012-12-01

    Smooth plains are widespread on the Moon and have diverse origins. The maria comprise the majority of the smooth plains and are volcanic in origin. Highland smooth plains are patchy, and tend to fill large craters and basins; their origins have eluded unambiguous classification. Prior to the Apollo 16 mission, many workers thought that highland plains were volcanic, possibly more silicic than the maria. However, as the Apollo 16 samples are mostly impact breccias, the highland smooth plains were re-interpreted basin impact ejecta, most likely from the Imbrium and possibly Orientale basins. Conversely, some known non-mare volcanic units, such as the Apennine Bench Formation, contain light plains. These interpretations do not rule out alternate origins for a subset of highland smooth plains, including impact melt or volcanic origins (effusive or pyroclastic). We developed an algorithm to identify smooth plains using topographic parameters from the WAC Global Lunar Digital Terrain Model (DTM) (GLD100), sampled at 333 m/pixel. We classify the smooth plains using the Clementine UVVIS FeO map and photometrically corrected Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) Wide Angle Camera (WAC) images. Terrain with slopes less than 2° (1 km baseline) and standard deviation of slope less than 0.75° (1 km x 1 km box, n=9) are defined as smooth plains. Highland smooth plains are distinguished from basaltic smooth plains using the following criteria: LROC WAC 643 nm normalized reflectance > 0.056, LROC WAC 321 nm / 415 nm ratio 0.77 is termed blue maria and a ratio ≤ 0.77 is termed red maria. The automatic classification was limited to the 87% of the Moon covered by photometrically normalized WAC data (60°S to 60°N). The differences between the maria and highland smooth plains deposits were more ambiguous in regions where the Clementine data had gores and albedo of the maria was elevated (i.e. Mare Frigoris and eastern Imbrium basin). For example, Schickard crater hosts a

  20. Endoplasmic reticulum stress mediates the arsenic trioxide-induced apoptosis in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin-Yu; Yang, Shu-Meng; Zhang, Hao-Peng; Yang, Yue; Sun, Shi-Bo; Chang, Jian-Ping; Tao, Xuan-Chen; Yang, Tuo-Yun; Liu, Chun; Yang, Yan-Mei

    2015-11-01

    Arsenic trioxide has been proven to trigger apoptosis in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells. Endoplasmic reticulum stress has been known to be involved in apoptosis through the induction of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous protein. However, it is unknown whether endoplasmic reticulum stress mediates arsenic trioxide-induced apoptosis in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells. Our data showed that arsenic trioxide significantly induced apoptosis in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells. Furthermore, arsenic trioxide triggered endoplasmic reticulum stress, as indicated by endoplasmic reticulum dilation, upregulation of glucose-regulated protein 78 and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous protein. We further found that 4-phenylbutyric acid, an inhibitor of endoplasmic reticulum stress, alleviated arsenic trioxide-induced expression of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous protein. More important, knockdown of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous protein by siRNA or inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum stress by 4-phenylbutyric acid alleviated apoptosis induced by arsenic trioxide. Consequently, our results suggested that arsenic trioxide could induce endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptosis in hepatocellular carcinoma cells, and that CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous protein might play an important role in this process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Autophagy modulates endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced cell death in podocytes: a protective role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yu-Chi; Chang, Jer-Ming; Chen, Chien-An; Chen, Hung-Chun

    2015-04-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum stress occurs in a variety of patho-physiological mechanisms and there has been great interest in managing this pathway for the treatment of clinical diseases. Autophagy is closely interconnected with endoplasmic reticulum stress to counteract the possible injurious effects related with the impairment of protein folding. Studies have shown that glomerular podocytes exhibit high rate of autophagy to maintain as terminally differentiated cells. In this study, podocytes were exposed to tunicamycin and thapsigargin to induce endoplasmic reticulum stress. Thapsigargin/tunicamycin treatment induced a significant increase in endoplasmic reticulum stress and of cell death, represented by higher GADD153 and GRP78 expression and propidium iodide flow cytometry, respectively. However, thapsigargin/tunicamycin stimulation also enhanced autophagy development, demonstrated by monodansylcadaverine assay and LC3 conversion. To evaluate the regulatory effects of autophagy on endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced cell death, rapamycin (Rap) or 3-methyladenine (3-MA) was added to enhance or inhibit autophagosome formation. Endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced cell death was decreased at 6 h, but was not reduced at 24 h after Rap+TG or Rap+TM treatment. In contrast, endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced cell death increased at 6 and 24 h after 3-MA+TG or 3-MA+TM treatment. Our study demonstrated that thapsigargin/tunicamycin treatment induced endoplasmic reticulum stress which resulted in podocytes death. Autophagy, which counteracted the induced endoplasmic reticulum stress, was simultaneously enhanced. The salvational role of autophagy was supported by adding Rap/3-MA to mechanistically regulate the expression of autophagy and autophagosome formation. In summary, autophagy helps the podocytes from cell death and may contribute to sustain the longevity as a highly differentiated cell lineage. © 2014 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  2. Progress in smooth particle hydrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wingate, C.A.; Dilts, G.A.; Mandell, D.A.; Crotzer, L.A.; Knapp, C.E.

    1998-07-01

    Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) is a meshless, Lagrangian numerical method for hydrodynamics calculations where calculational elements are fuzzy particles which move according to the hydrodynamic equations of motion. Each particle carries local values of density, temperature, pressure and other hydrodynamic parameters. A major advantage of SPH is that it is meshless, thus large deformation calculations can be easily done with no connectivity complications. Interface positions are known and there are no problems with advecting quantities through a mesh that typical Eulerian codes have. These underlying SPH features make fracture physics easy and natural and in fact, much of the applications work revolves around simulating fracture. Debris particles from impacts can be easily transported across large voids with SPH. While SPH has considerable promise, there are some problems inherent in the technique that have so far limited its usefulness. The most serious problem is the well known instability in tension leading to particle clumping and numerical fracture. Another problem is that the SPH interpolation is only correct when particles are uniformly spaced a half particle apart leading to incorrect strain rates, accelerations and other quantities for general particle distributions. SPH calculations are also sensitive to particle locations. The standard artificial viscosity treatment in SPH leads to spurious viscosity in shear flows. This paper will demonstrate solutions for these problems that they and others have been developing. The most promising is to replace the SPH interpolant with the moving least squares (MLS) interpolant invented by Lancaster and Salkauskas in 1981. SPH and MLS are closely related with MLS being essentially SPH with corrected particle volumes. When formulated correctly, JLS is conservative, stable in both compression and tension, does not have the SPH boundary problems and is not sensitive to particle placement. The other approach to

  3. Smoothing properties for Hirota-Satsuma systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Jimenez

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available We study local existence and smoothing properties for the initial value problem associated to Hirota-Satsuma systems that describes an interaction of two long waves with different dispersion relations.

  4. Smooth surfaces from rational bilinear patches

    KAUST Repository

    Shi, Ling

    2014-01-01

    Smooth freeform skins from simple panels constitute a challenging topic arising in contemporary architecture. We contribute to this problem area by showing how to approximate a negatively curved surface by smoothly joined rational bilinear patches. The approximation problem is solved with help of a new computational approach to the hyperbolic nets of Huhnen-Venedey and Rörig and optimization algorithms based on it. We also discuss its limits which lie in the topology of the input surface. Finally, freeform deformations based on Darboux transformations are used to generate smooth surfaces from smoothly joined Darboux cyclide patches; in this way we eliminate the restriction to surfaces with negative Gaussian curvature. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  5. Smoothed generalized free energies for thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meer, Remco; Ng, Nelly Huei Ying; Wehner, Stephanie

    2017-12-01

    In the study of thermodynamics for nanoscale quantum systems, a family of quantities known as generalized free energies have been derived as necessary and sufficient conditions that govern state transitions. These free energies become important especially in the regime where the system of interest consists of only a few (quantum) particles. In this work, we introduce a family of smoothed generalized free energies, by constructing explicit smoothing procedures that maximize or minimize the free energy over an ɛ ball of quantum states. In contrast to previously known smoothed free energies, these quantities now allow us to make an operational statement for approximate thermodynamic state transitions. We show that these smoothed quantities converge to the standard free energy in the thermodynamic limit.

  6. Doing smooth pursuit paradigms in Windows 7

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilms, Inge Linda

    Smooth pursuit eye movements are interesting to study as they reflect the subject’s ability to predict movement of external targets, keep focus and move the eyes appropriately. The process of smooth pursuit requires collaboration between several systems in the brain and the resulting action may p...... in Windows 7 with live capturing of eye movements using a Tobii TX300 eye tracker. In particular, the poster describes the challenges and limitations created by the hardware and the software...

  7. Kalman Filter Desing, Smoothing and Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Cederkvist, Henrik Rene

    2001-01-01

    Thesis is based on three different aspects of Kalman filtering. >Kalman filters for navigation. Investigate the difference between a Extended Kalman Filter and a Linearized Kalman Filter with feedback. And show how different system models relate to these Kalman Filters when implemented in a filter. >Smoothing. Investigate how much there is to be gained from smoothing. We will only look at the fixed-interval smoother, using the method of forward and backward filtering. ...

  8. Smooth embeddings with Stein surface images

    OpenAIRE

    Gompf, Robert E.

    2011-01-01

    A simple characterization is given of open subsets of a complex surface that smoothly perturb to Stein open subsets. As applications, complex 2-space C^2 contains domains of holomorphy (Stein open subsets) that are exotic R^4's, and others homotopy equivalent to the 2-sphere but cut out by smooth, compact 3-manifolds. Pseudoconvex embeddings of Brieskorn spheres and other 3-manifolds into complex surfaces are constructed, as are pseudoconcave holomorphic fillings (with disagreeing contact and...

  9. Some splines produced by smooth interpolation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Segeth, Karel

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 319, 15 February (2018), s. 387-394 ISSN 0096-3003 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-02067S Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : smooth data approximation * smooth data interpolation * cubic spline Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.738, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0096300317302746?via%3Dihub

  10. Beam-smoothing investigation on Heaven I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Yi-huai; Gao, Zhi-xing; Tong, Xiao-hui; Dai, Hui; Tang, Xiu-zhang; Shan, Yu-sheng

    2007-01-01

    Directly driven targets for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) require laser beams with extremely smooth irradiance profiles to prevent hydrodynamic instabilities that destroy the spherical symmetry of the target during implosion. Such instabilities can break up and mix together the target's wall and fuel material, preventing it from reaching the density and temperature required for fusion ignition. 1,2 Measurements in the equation of state (EOS) experiments require laser beams with flat-roofed profiles to generate uniform shockwave 3. Some method for beam smooth, is thus needed. A technique called echelon-free induced spatial incoherence (EFISI) is proposed for producing smooth target beam profiles with large KrF lasers. The idea is basically an image projection technique that projects the desired time-averaged spatial profile onto the target via the laser system, using partially coherent broadband lighe. Utilize the technique, we developing beam- smoothing investigation on "Heaven I". At China Institute of Atomic Energy , a new angular multiplexing providing with beam-smoothing function has been developed, the total energy is 158J, the stability of energy is 4%, the pulse duration is 25ns, the effective diameter of focusing spot is 400um, and the ununiformity is about 1.6%, the power density on the target is about 3.7×10 12W/cm2. At present, the system have provided steady and smooth laser irradiation for EOS experiments.

  11. Activating transcription factor 4 is involved in endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptosis contributing to vascular calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Xiao-Hui; Chang, Jin-Rui; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Bao-Hong; Li, Yu-Lin; Teng, Xu; Zhu, Yi; Du, Jie; Tang, Chao-Shu; Qi, Yong-Fen

    2013-09-01

    Our previous work reported that endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS)-mediated apoptosis was activated during vascular calcification (VC). Activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) is a critical transcription factor in osteoblastogenesis and ERS-induced apoptosis. However, whether ATF4 is involved in ERS-mediated apoptosis contributing to VC remains unclear. In the present study, in vivo VC was induced in rats by administering vitamin D3 plus nicotine. Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) calcification in vitro was induced by incubation in calcifying media containing β-glycerophosphate and CaCl2. ERS inhibitors taurine or 4-phenylbutyric acid attenuated ERS and VSMC apoptosis in calcified rat arteries, reduced calcification and retarded the VSMC contractile phenotype transforming into an osteoblast-like phenotype in vivo. Inhibition of ERS retarded the VSMC phenotypic transition into an osteoblast-like cell phenotype and reduced VSMC calcification and apoptosis in vitro. Interestingly, ATF4 was activated in calcified aortas and calcified VSMCs in vitro. ATF4 knockdown attenuated ERS-induced apoptosis in calcified VSMCs. ATF4 deficiency blocked VSMC calcification and negatively regulated the osteoblast phenotypic transition of VSMCs in vitro. Our results demonstrate that ATF4 was involved at least in part in the process of ERS-mediated apoptosis contributing to VC.

  12. Respiratory metabolism and calorie restriction relieve persistent endoplasmic reticulum stress induced by calcium shortage in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busti, Stefano; Mapelli, Valeria; Tripodi, Farida

    2016-01-01

    Calcium homeostasis is crucial to eukaryotic cell survival. By acting as an enzyme cofactor and a second messenger in several signal transduction pathways, the calcium ion controls many essential biological processes. Inside the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium concentration is carefully...

  13. Toll-like receptor 4-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress contributes to endothelial dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Impairment of vasodilator action of insulin is associated with endothelial dysfunction and insulin resistance. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is implicated as one of the mechanisms for pathophysiology of various cardiometabolic syndromes, including insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction. ...

  14. Placental endoplasmic reticulum stress and acidosis: relevant aspects in gestational diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawerbaum, Alicia

    2016-10-01

    In this issue, Yung and colleagues (doi: 10.1007/s00125-016-4040-2 ) report endoplasmic reticulum stress in the placenta of patients with gestational diabetes mellitus. With the use of a trophoblast-like cell line, these authors identify putative mechanisms involved in, and treatments to prevent the induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress. Here, the relevance and possible implications of these findings and areas for further research are discussed.

  15. Analysis of endoplasmic reticulum stress in placentas of HIV-infected women treated with protease inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brüning, Ansgar; Kimmich, Tanja; Brem, German J; Buchholtz, Marie L; Mylonas, Ioannis; Kost, Bernd; Weizsäcker, Katharina; Gingelmaier, Andrea

    2014-12-01

    Combined antiretroviral therapy has proven efficacy in decreasing vertical HIV transmission. However, endoplasmic reticulum stress is a known side effect of HIV protease inhibitors. We investigated endoplasmic reticulum stress in placentas of HIV-infected and uninfected mothers by PCR-based splicing analysis of the specific endoplasmic reticulum stress marker XBP1 in post-delivery placental samples of uninfected mothers and in HIV-infected mothers taking antiretroviral therapy. No elevated XBP1 splicing could be detected in placentas of uninfected mothers and most of the mothers receiving combined anti-retroviral therapy. However, markedly elevated XBP1 splicing was found in the placentas of three individuals on combined antiviral therapy, all receiving lopinavir or atazanavir. In vitro experiments confirmed induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress by lopinavir and atazanavir in trophoblast-derived cell lines. Since endoplasmic reticulum stress occurred in selective patients only, individual differences in susceptibility of HIV-infected mothers to protease inhibitor induced endoplasmic reticulum stress can be postulated. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Oxidative Stress: A Vicious Nexus Implicated in Bowel Disease Pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Wai Chin; Shastri, Madhur D; Eri, Rajaraman

    2017-04-05

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a complex protein folding and trafficking organelle. Alteration and discrepancy in the endoplasmic reticulum environment can affect the protein folding process and hence, can result in the production of misfolded proteins. The accumulation of misfolded proteins causes cellular damage and elicits endoplasmic reticulum stress. Under such stress conditions, cells exhibit reduced functional synthesis, and will undergo apoptosis if the stress is prolonged. To resolve the ER stress, cells trigger an intrinsic mechanism called an unfolded protein response (UPR). UPR is an adaptive signaling process that triggers multiple pathways through the endoplasmic reticulum transmembrane transducers, to reduce and remove misfolded proteins and improve the protein folding mechanism, in order to improve and maintain endoplasmic reticulum homeostasis. An increasing number of studies support the view that oxidative stress has a strong connection with ER stress. During the protein folding process, reactive oxygen species are produced as by-products, leading to impaired reduction-oxidation (redox) balance conferring oxidative stress. As the protein folding process is dependent on redox homeostasis, the oxidative stress can disrupt the protein folding mechanism and enhance the production of misfolded proteins, causing further ER stress. It is proposed that endoplasmic reticulum stress and oxidative stress together play significant roles in the pathophysiology of bowel diseases.

  17. Essential Role of X-Box Binding Protein-1 during Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Podocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Hossam; Tian, Xuefei; Inoue, Kazunori; Chai, Nathan; Liu, Chang; Soda, Keita; Moeckel, Gilbert; Tufro, Alda; Lee, Ann-Hwee; Somlo, Stefan; Fedeles, Sorin; Ishibe, Shuta

    2016-04-01

    Podocytes are terminally differentiated epithelial cells that reside along the glomerular filtration barrier. Evidence suggests that after podocyte injury, endoplasmic reticulum stress response is activated, but the molecular mechanisms involved are incompletely defined. In a mouse model, we confirmed that podocyte injury induces endoplasmic reticulum stress response and upregulated unfolded protein response pathways, which have been shown to mitigate damage by preventing the accumulation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum. Furthermore, simultaneous podocyte-specific genetic inactivation of X-box binding protein-1 (Xbp1), a transcription factor activated during endoplasmic reticulum stress and critically involved in the untranslated protein response, and Sec63, a heat shock protein-40 chaperone required for protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum, resulted in progressive albuminuria, foot process effacement, and histology consistent with ESRD. Finally, loss of both Sec63 and Xbp1 induced apoptosis in podocytes, which associated with activation of the JNK pathway. Collectively, our results indicate that an intact Xbp1 pathway operating to mitigate stress in the endoplasmic reticulum is essential for the maintenance of a normal glomerular filtration barrier. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  18. [Research on olaquindox induced endoplasmic reticulum stress related apoptosis on nephrotoxicity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhongsheng; Yu, Changyan; Chen, Xiao; Zhang, Bin; Cao, Peng; Li, Bin; Xiao, Jingwei

    2015-05-01

    Renal tubular epithelial cell were exposed to olaquindox and detected the ROS and apoptosis related proteins, to investigate the renal tubular epithelial cell apoptosis through endoplasmic reticulum stress mediated pathway induced by olaquindox. MTT assay (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7and 8 μmol/ml olaquindox exposure) was used to detect the effects of olaquindox on renal tubular epithelial cell proliferation to determine test concentrations. Hoechst-33258 was used to detect morphological changes on apoptotic cells in each group. Flow cytometry method was applied to detect the apoptosis rate and intracellular reactive oxygen, and western blot assay was performed to detect the levels of endoplasmic reticulum stress-related apoptosis proteins, GRP78, GRP94 and CHOP. According to results of the MTT test, 1, 2, 3 and 4 μmol/ml olaquindox concentrations were determined for apoptosis analysis. With the increase of olaquindox concentration, apoptosis rate and levels of endoplasmic reticulum stress related apoptosis pathway protein GRP78, GRP94 and CHOP increased, levels of ROS were increased in every groups (P endoplasmic reticulum stress related apoptosis pathway protein GRP78 and GRP94 increased in 12 and 24 h olaquindox exposure groups, whereas in groups of olaquindox exposed for 6, 12 and 24 h, levels of ROS and endoplasmic reticulum stress related apoptosis pathway protein CHOP increased (P endoplasmic reticulum stress-related apoptosis maybe the associated toxicity pathway.

  19. Estrogen protects SGC7901 cells from endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced apoptosis by the Akt pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    FU, ZHENGQI; ZOU, FENG; DENG, HAO; ZHOU, HONGYAN; LIU, LIJIANG

    2014-01-01

    Several previous studies have demonstrated that estrogen may protect cancer cells from endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced apoptosis. However, the molecular mechanisms involved are not fully understood. In the present study, human gastric adenocarcinoma SGC7901 cells were treated with tunicamycin (TM) to induce endoplasmic reticulum stress. This was demonstrated by increased glucose-regulated protein 78 expression and enhanced phosphorylation of protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase. Endoplasmic reticulum stress induced caspase-3-mediated apoptosis with the inhibition of Akt; the latter of which was measured by the activity-dependent phosphorylation at Ser473 of Akt. Simultaneous treatment of 10−9 M 17β-estradiol (E2) with TM may protect SGC7901 cells from endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced apoptosis by counteracting the inhibitory effect of TM on Akt, causing an increase in the phosphorylation of Ser473-Akt. It was concluded that low concentrations of E2 may counteract endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced inactivation of Akt to block caspase-3-mediated apoptosis. PMID:24396487

  20. The overexpression of nuclear envelope protein Lap2β induces endoplasmic reticulum reorganisation via membrane stacking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina G. Volkova

    2012-06-01

    Some nuclear envelope proteins are localised to both the nuclear envelope and the endoplasmic reticulum; therefore, it seems plausible that even small amounts of these proteins can influence the organisation of the endoplasmic reticulum. A simple method to study the possible effects of nuclear envelope proteins on endoplasmic reticulum organisation is to analyze nuclear envelope protein overexpression. Here, we demonstrate that Lap2β overexpression can induce the formation of cytoplasmic vesicular structures derived from endoplasmic reticulum membranes. Correlative light and electron microscopy demonstrated that these vesicular structures were composed of a series of closely apposed membranes that were frequently arranged in a circular fashion. Although stacked endoplasmic reticulum cisternae were highly ordered, Lap2β could readily diffuse into and out of these structures into the surrounding reticulum. It appears that low-affinity interactions between cytoplasmic domains of Lap2β can reorganise reticular endoplasmic reticulum into stacked cisternae. Although the effect of one protein may be insignificant at low concentrations, the cumulative effect of many non-specialised proteins may be significant.

  1. Arachidonoyl-specific diacylglycerol kinase ε and the endoplasmic reticulum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoyuki Nakano

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The endoplasmic reticulum (ER comprises an interconnected membrane network, which is made up of lipid bilayer and associated proteins. This organelle plays a central role in the protein synthesis and sorting. In addition, it represents the synthetic machinery of phospholipids, the major constituents of the biological membrane. In this process, phosphatidic acid (PA serves as a precursor of all phospholipids, suggesting that PA synthetic activity is closely associated with the ER function. One enzyme responsible for PA synthesis is diacylglycerol kinase (DGK that phosphorylates diacylglycerol (DG to PA. DGK is composed of a family of enzymes with distinct features assigned to each isozyme in terms of structure, enzymology and subcellular localization. Of DGKs, DGKε uniquely exhibits substrate specificity toward arachidonate-containing DG and is shown to reside in the ER. Arachidonic acid, a precursor of bioactive eicosanoids, is usually acylated at the sn-2 position of phospholipids, being especially enriched in phosphoinositide. In this review, we focus on arachidonoyl-specific DGKε with respect to the historical context, molecular basis of the substrate specificity and ER-targeting, and functional implications in the ER.

  2. Emerging role of the endoplasmic reticulum in peroxisome biogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav eAgrawal

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available During the past few years, we have witnessed a paradigm shift in our long-standing concept of peroxisome biogenesis. Recent biochemical and morphological studies have revealed a primary role of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER in the de novo formation of peroxisomes, thus challenging the prevalent model invoking growth and division of pre-existing peroxisomes. Importantly, a novel sorting process has been recently defined at the ER that segregates and assembles specific sets of peroxisomal membrane proteins into distinct pre-peroxisomal vesicular carriers (ppVs that later undergo heterotypic fusion to form mature peroxisomes. Consequently, the emerging model has redefined the function of many peroxins (most notably Pex3, Pex19 and Pex25 and assigned them novel roles in vesicular budding and subsequent peroxisome assembly. These advances establish a novel intracellular membrane trafficking route between the ER and peroxisomes, but the components remain elusive. This review will provide a historical perspective and focus on recent developments in the emerging role of the ER in peroxisome biogenesis.

  3. ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM STRESS AS A PRO-FIBROTIC STIUMULUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanjore, Harikrishna; Lawson, William E.; Blackwell, Timothy S.

    2013-01-01

    Current evidence suggests a prominent role for endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR) in fibrotic conditions affecting a number of internal organs, including the lungs, liver, GI tract, kidney, and heart. ER stress enhances the susceptibility of structural cells, in most cases the epithelium, to pro-fibrotic stimuli. Studies suggest that ER stress facilitates fibrotic remodeling through activation of pro-apoptotic pathways, induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and promotion of inflammatory responses. While genetic mutations that lead to ER stress underlie some cases of fibrosis, including lung fibrosis secondary to mutations in surfactant protein C (SFTPC), a variety of other factors can cause ER stress. These ER stress inducing factors include metabolic abnormalities, oxidative stress, viruses, and environmental exposures. Interestingly, the ability of the ER to maintain homeostasis under stress diminishes with age, potentially contributing to the fact that fibrotic disorders increase in incidence with aging. Taken together, underlying ER stress and UPR pathways are emerging as important determinants of fibrotic remodeling in different forms of tissue fibrosis. Further work is needed to better define the mechanisms by which ER stress facilitates progressive tissue fibrosis. In addition, it remains to be seen whether targeting ER stress and the UPR could have therapeutic benefit. PMID:23201247

  4. The Role of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Human Pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakes, Scott A.; Papa, Feroz R.

    2017-01-01

    Numerous genetic and environmental insults impede the ability of cells to properly fold and posttranslationally modify secretory and transmembrane proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), leading to a buildup of misfolded proteins in this organelle—a condition called ER stress. ER-stressed cells must rapidly restore protein-folding capacity to match protein-folding demand if they are to survive. In the presence of high levels of misfolded proteins in the ER, an intracellular signaling pathway called the unfolded protein response (UPR) induces a set of transcriptional and translational events that restore ER homeostasis. However, if ER stress persists chronically at high levels, a terminal UPR program ensures that cells commit to self-destruction. Chronic ER stress and defects in UPR signaling are emerging as key contributors to a growing list of human diseases, including diabetes, neurodegeneration, and cancer. Hence, there is much interest in targeting components of the UPR as a therapeutic strategy to combat these ER stress–associated pathologies. PMID:25387057

  5. The endoplasmic reticulum stress response and diabetic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Kumar

    2011-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) folds and modifies proteins; however, during conditions of cellular stress, unfolded proteins accumulate in the ER and activate the unfolded protein response (UPR). The UPR, also referred to as the ER stress response, activates three distinct signaling cascades that are designed to globally reduce transcription and translation. The three major arms of the mammalian UPR include 1) protein kinase RNA (PKR)-like ER kinase (PERK), 2) inositol-requiring protein-1 (IRE1α), and 3) activating transcription factor-6 (ATF6) pathways. The PERK pathway rapidly attenuates protein translation, whereas the ATF6 and IRE1α cascades transcriptionally upregulate ER chaperone genes that promote proper folding and ER-associated degradation (ERAD) of proteins. This integrated response in turn allows the folding machinery of the ER to catch up with the backlog of unfolded proteins. The ER stress response plays a role in a number of pathophysiological processes, including pancreatic β-cell failure and apoptosis. The goals of the current review are to familiarize investigators with cellular and tissue activation of this response in the rodent and human diabetic kidney. Additionally, we will review therapeutic modulators of the ER stress response and discuss their efficacy in models of diabetic kidney disease. The ER stress response has both protective and deleterious features. A better understanding of the molecular pathways regulated during this process in a cell- and disease-specific manner could reveal novel therapeutic strategies in chronic renal diseases, including diabetic kidney disease. PMID:21345978

  6. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress, Unfolded Protein Response, and Cancer Cell Fate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corazzari, Marco; Gagliardi, Mara; Fimia, Gian Maria; Piacentini, Mauro

    2017-01-01

    Perturbation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homeostasis results in a stress condition termed “ER stress” determining the activation of a finely regulated program defined as unfolded protein response (UPR) and whose primary aim is to restore this organelle’s physiological activity. Several physiological and pathological stimuli deregulate normal ER activity causing UPR activation, such as hypoxia, glucose shortage, genome instability, and cytotoxic compounds administration. Some of these stimuli are frequently observed during uncontrolled proliferation of transformed cells, resulting in tumor core formation and stage progression. Therefore, it is not surprising that ER stress is usually induced during solid tumor development and stage progression, becoming an hallmark of such malignancies. Several UPR components are in fact deregulated in different tumor types, and accumulating data indicate their active involvement in tumor development/progression. However, although the UPR program is primarily a pro-survival process, sustained and/or prolonged stress may result in cell death induction. Therefore, understanding the mechanism(s) regulating the cell survival/death decision under ER stress condition may be crucial in order to specifically target tumor cells and possibly circumvent or overcome tumor resistance to therapies. In this review, we discuss the role played by the UPR program in tumor initiation, progression and resistance to therapy, highlighting the recent advances that have improved our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that regulate the survival/death switch. PMID:28491820

  7. Role of endoplasmic reticulum stress in endothelial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimellaro, A; Perticone, M; Fiorentino, T V; Sciacqua, A; Hribal, M L

    2016-10-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is implicated in the pathogenesis of several human disorders, including cardiovascular disease (CVD). CVD recognizes endothelial dysfunction (ED) as its pathogenetic primum movens; interestingly a large body of evidence has identified the unchecked ER stress response as a main actor in vascular damage elicited by various cardio-metabolic risk factors. In the present Review, we summarize findings from experimental studies on the ER stress-related ED, focusing on the mechanisms underlying this association. Different noxious agents, such as hyperhomocysteinemia, hyperlipidemia, hyperglycemia and chronic inflammation, induce ED promoting an amplified ER stress response as demonstrated by several studies in animal models, as well as in human primary and immortalized endothelial cells. ER stress represents therefore a key mediator of vascular damage, operating in a setting of increased inflammatory burden and oxidative stress, thus contributing to foster a vicious pathogenic cycle. Experimental studies summarized in this Review strongly suggest that an unchecked ER stress response plays a central role in the pathogenesis of ED and, consequently, CVD. Counteracting ER stress may thus represent a promising, even if largely unexplored as-yet, therapeutic approach aimed to prevent vascular damage, slowing the progression from ED to cardiovascular events. Copyright © 2016 The Italian Society of Diabetology, the Italian Society for the Study of Atherosclerosis, the Italian Society of Human Nutrition, and the Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A Molecular Web: Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress, Inflammation, and Oxidative Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhari, Namrata; Talwar, Priti; Parimisetty, Avinash; Lefebvre d’Hellencourt, Christian; Ravanan, Palaniyandi

    2014-01-01

    Execution of fundamental cellular functions demands regulated protein folding homeostasis. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is an active organelle existing to implement this function by folding and modifying secretory and membrane proteins. Loss of protein folding homeostasis is central to various diseases and budding evidences suggest ER stress as being a major contributor in the development or pathology of a diseased state besides other cellular stresses. The trigger for diseases may be diverse but, inflammation and/or ER stress may be basic mechanisms increasing the severity or complicating the condition of the disease. Chronic ER stress and activation of the unfolded-protein response (UPR) through endogenous or exogenous insults may result in impaired calcium and redox homeostasis, oxidative stress via protein overload thereby also influencing vital mitochondrial functions. Calcium released from the ER augments the production of mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS). Toxic accumulation of ROS within ER and mitochondria disturbs fundamental organelle functions. Sustained ER stress is known to potentially elicit inflammatory responses via UPR pathways. Additionally, ROS generated through inflammation or mitochondrial dysfunction could accelerate ER malfunction. Dysfunctional UPR pathways have been associated with a wide range of diseases including several neurodegenerative diseases, stroke, metabolic disorders, cancer, inflammatory disease, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, and others. In this review, we have discussed the UPR signaling pathways, and networking between ER stress-induced inflammatory pathways, oxidative stress, and mitochondrial signaling events, which further induce or exacerbate ER stress. PMID:25120434

  9. Endoplasmic reticulum stress in insulin resistance and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero-Hernández, Agustin; Leon-Aparicio, Daniel; Chavez-Reyes, Jesus; Olivares-Reyes, Jesus A; DeJesus, Silvia

    2014-11-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum is the main intracellular Ca(2+) store for Ca(2+) release during cell signaling. There are different strategies to avoid ER Ca(2+) depletion. Release channels utilize first Ca(2+)-bound to proteins and this minimizes the reduction of the free luminal [Ca(2+)]. However, if release channels stay open after exhaustion of Ca(2+)-bound to proteins, then the reduction of the free luminal ER [Ca(2+)] (via STIM proteins) activates Ca(2+) entry at the plasma membrane to restore the ER Ca(2+) load, which will work provided that SERCA pump is active. Nevertheless, there are several noxious conditions that result in decreased activity of the SERCA pump such as oxidative stress, inflammatory cytokines, and saturated fatty acids, among others. These conditions result in a deficient restoration of the ER [Ca(2+)] and lead to the ER stress response that should facilitate recovery of the ER. However, if the stressful condition persists then ER stress ends up triggering cell death and the ensuing degenerative process leads to diverse pathologies; particularly insulin resistance, diabetes and several of the complications associated with diabetes. This scenario suggests that limiting ER stress should decrease the incidence of diabetes and the mobility and mortality associated with this illness. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress, Unfolded Protein Response, and Cancer Cell Fate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Corazzari

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Perturbation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER homeostasis results in a stress condition termed “ER stress” determining the activation of a finely regulated program defined as unfolded protein response (UPR and whose primary aim is to restore this organelle’s physiological activity. Several physiological and pathological stimuli deregulate normal ER activity causing UPR activation, such as hypoxia, glucose shortage, genome instability, and cytotoxic compounds administration. Some of these stimuli are frequently observed during uncontrolled proliferation of transformed cells, resulting in tumor core formation and stage progression. Therefore, it is not surprising that ER stress is usually induced during solid tumor development and stage progression, becoming an hallmark of such malignancies. Several UPR components are in fact deregulated in different tumor types, and accumulating data indicate their active involvement in tumor development/progression. However, although the UPR program is primarily a pro-survival process, sustained and/or prolonged stress may result in cell death induction. Therefore, understanding the mechanism(s regulating the cell survival/death decision under ER stress condition may be crucial in order to specifically target tumor cells and possibly circumvent or overcome tumor resistance to therapies. In this review, we discuss the role played by the UPR program in tumor initiation, progression and resistance to therapy, highlighting the recent advances that have improved our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that regulate the survival/death switch.

  11. Endoplasmic Reticulum-Mediated Protein Quality Control in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianming eLi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A correct three-dimensional structure is crucial for the physiological functions of a protein, yet the folding of proteins to acquire native conformation is a fundamentally error-prone process. Eukaryotic organisms have evolved a highly conserved endoplasmic reticulum-mediated protein quality control (ERQC mechanism to monitor folding processes of secretory and membrane proteins, allowing export of only correctly folded proteins to their physiological destinations, retaining incompletely/mis-folded ones in the ER for additional folding attempts, marking and removing terminally-misfolded ones via a unique multiple-step degradation process known as ER-associate degradation (ERAD. Most of our current knowledge on ERQC and ERAD came from genetic and biochemical investigations in yeast and mammalian cells. Recent studies in the reference plant Arabidopsis thaliana uncovered homologous components and similar mechanisms in plants for monitoring protein folding and for retaining, repairing, and removing misfolded proteins. These studies also revealed critical roles of the plant ERQC/ERAD systems in regulating important biochemical/physiological processes, such as abiotic stress tolerance and plant defense. In this review, we discuss our current understanding about the molecular components and biochemical mechanisms of the plant ERQC/ERAD system in comparison to yeast and mammalian systems.

  12. Endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria junction is required for iron homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yong; Schmollinger, Stefan; Attar, Narsis; Campos, Oscar A; Vogelauer, Maria; Carey, Michael F; Merchant, Sabeeha S; Kurdistani, Siavash K

    2017-08-11

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-mitochondria encounter structure (ERMES) is a protein complex that physically tethers the two organelles to each other and creates the physical basis for communication between them. ERMES functions in lipid exchange between the ER and mitochondria, protein import into mitochondria, and maintenance of mitochondrial morphology and genome. Here, we report that ERMES is also required for iron homeostasis. Loss of ERMES components activates an Aft1-dependent iron deficiency response even in iron-replete conditions, leading to accumulation of excess iron inside the cell. This function is independent of known ERMES roles in calcium regulation, phospholipid biosynthesis, or effects on mitochondrial morphology. A mutation in the vacuolar protein sorting 13 ( VPS13 ) gene that rescues the glycolytic phenotype of ERMES mutants suppresses the iron deficiency response and iron accumulation. Our findings reveal that proper communication between the ER and mitochondria is required for appropriate maintenance of cellular iron levels. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria calcium signaling in hepatic metabolic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieusset, Jennifer

    2017-06-01

    The liver plays a central role in glucose homeostasis, and both metabolic inflexibility and insulin resistance predispose to the development of hepatic metabolic diseases. Mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER), which play a key role in the control of hepatic metabolism, also interact at contact points defined as mitochondria-associated membranes (MAM), in order to exchange metabolites and calcium (Ca 2+ ) and regulate cellular homeostasis and signaling. Here, we overview the role of the liver in the control of glucose homeostasis, mainly focusing on the independent involvement of mitochondria, ER and Ca 2+ signaling in both healthy and pathological contexts. Then we focus on recent data highlighting MAM as important hubs for hormone and nutrient signaling in the liver, thus adapting mitochondria physiology and cellular metabolism to energy availability. Lastly, we discuss how chronic ER-mitochondria miscommunication could participate to hepatic metabolic diseases, pointing MAM interface as a potential therapeutic target for metabolic disorders. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: ECS Meeting edited by Claus Heizmann, Joachim Krebs and Jacques Haiech. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Chlorpyrifos induces endoplasmic reticulum stress in JEG-3 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyna, Luciana; Flores-Martín, Jésica; Ridano, Magali E; Panzetta-Dutari, Graciela M; Genti-Raimondi, Susana

    2017-04-01

    Chlorpyrifos (CPF) is an organophosphorous pesticide widely used in agricultural, industrial, and household applications. We have previously shown that JEG-3 cells are able to attenuate the oxidative stress induced by CPF through the adaptive activation of the Nrf2/ARE pathway. Considering that there is a relationship between oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress (ER), herein we investigated whether CPF also induces ER stress in JEG-3 cells. Cells were exposed to 50μM or 100μM CPF during 24h in conditions where cell viability was not altered. Western blot and PCR assays were used to explore the protein and mRNA levels of ER stress biomarkers, respectively. CPF induced an increase of the typical ER stress-related proteins, such as GRP78/BiP and IRE1α, a sensor for the unfolded protein response, as well as in phospho-eIF2α and XBP1 mRNA splicing. Additionally, CPF led to a decrease in p53 protein expression. The downregulation of p53 levels induced by CPF was partially blocked when cells were exposed to CPF in the presence of the proteasome inhibitor MG132. Altogether, these findings point out that CPF induces ER stress in JEG-3 cells; however these cells are able to attenuate it downregulating the levels of the pro-apoptotic protein p53. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Proteomic analysis of endoplasmic reticulum stress responses in rice seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Dandan; Tian, Lihong; Qu, Leqing

    2015-09-23

    The defects in storage proteins secretion in the endosperm of transgenic rice seeds often leads to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, which produces floury and shrunken seeds, but the mechanism of this response remains unclear. We used an iTRAQ-based proteomics analysis of ER-stressed rice seeds due to the endosperm-specific suppression of OsSar1 to identify changes in the protein levels in response to ER stress. ER stress changed the expression of 405 proteins in rice seed by >2.0- fold compared with the wild-type control. Of these proteins, 140 were upregulated and 265 were downregulated. The upregulated proteins were mainly involved in protein modification, transport and degradation, and the downregulated proteins were mainly involved in metabolism and stress/defense responses. A KOBAS analysis revealed that protein-processing in the ER and degradation-related proteasome were the predominant upregulated pathways in the rice endosperm in response to ER stress. Trans-Golgi protein transport was also involved in the ER stress response. Combined with bioinformatic and molecular biology analyses, our proteomic data will facilitate our understanding of the systemic responses to ER stress in rice seeds.

  16. Coordination of Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) Signaling During Maize Seed Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boston, Rebecca S.

    2010-11-20

    Seed storage reserves represent one of the most important sources of renewable fixed carbon and nitrogen found in nature. Seeds are well-adapted for diverting metabolic resources to synthesize storage proteins as well as enzymes and structural proteins needed for their transport and packaging into membrane bound storage protein bodies. Our underlying hypothesis is that the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response provides the critical cellular control of metabolic flux required for optimal accumulation of storage reserves in seeds. This highly conserved response is a cellular mechanism to monitor the protein folding environment of the ER and restore homeostasis in the presence of unfolded or misfolded proteins. In seeds, deposition of storage proteins in protein bodies is a highly specialized process that takes place even in the presence of mutant proteins that no longer fold and package properly. The capacity of the ER to deposit these aberrant proteins in protein bodies during a period that extends several weeks provides an excellent model for deconvoluting the ER stress response of plants. We have focused in this project on the means by which the ER senses and responds to functional perturbations and the underlying intracellular communication that occurs among biosynthetic, trafficking and degradative pathways for proteins during seed development.

  17. Methods to Study PTEN in Mitochondria and Endoplasmic Reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missiroli, Sonia; Morganti, Claudia; Giorgi, Carlotta; Pinton, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Although PTEN has been widely described as a nuclear and cytosolic protein, in the last 2 years, alternative organelles, such as the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), pure mitochondria, and mitochondria-associated membranes (MAMs), have been recognized as pivotal targets of PTEN activity.Here, we describe different methods that have been used to highlight PTEN subcellular localization.First, a protocol to extract nuclear and cytosolic fractions has been described to assess the "canonical" PTEN localization. Moreover, we describe a protocol for mitochondria isolation with proteinase K (PK) to further discriminate whether PTEN associates with the outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) or resides within the mitochondria. Finally, we focus our attention on a subcellular fractionation protocol of cells that permits the isolation of MAMs containing unique regions of ER membranes attached to the outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) and mitochondria without contamination from other organelles. In addition to biochemical fractionations, immunostaining can be used to determine the subcellular localization of proteins; thus, a detailed protocol to obtain good immunofluorescence (IF) is described. The employment of these methodological approaches could facilitate the identification of different PTEN localizations in several physiopathological contexts.

  18. Heme oxygenase-1 comes back to endoplasmic reticulum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hong Pyo [School of Biological Sciences, Ulsan University (Korea, Republic of); Pae, Hyun-Ock [Department of Immunology, Wonkwang University School of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Back, Sung Hun; Chung, Su Wol [School of Biological Sciences, Ulsan University (Korea, Republic of); Woo, Je Moon [Department of Opthalmology, Ulasn University Hospital (Korea, Republic of); Son, Yong [Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Wonkwang University School of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Hun-Taeg, E-mail: chung@ulsan.ac.kr [School of Biological Sciences, Ulsan University (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Although multiple compartmentalization of HO-1 has been documented, the functional implication of this enzyme at these subcellular organelles is only partially elucidated. {yields} HO-1 expression at ER is induced by a diverse set of conditions that cause ER stressors. {yields} CO may induce HO-1 expression in human ECs by activating Nrf2 through PERK phosphorylation in a positive-feedback manner. {yields} ER-residing HO-1 and its cytoprotective activity against ER stress is discussed. -- Abstract: Originally identified as a rate-limiting enzyme for heme catabolism, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) has expanded its roles in anti-inflammation, anti-apoptosis and anti-proliferation for the last decade. Regulation of protein activity by location is well appreciated. Even though multiple compartmentalization of HO-1 has been documented, the functional implication of this enzyme at these subcellular organelles is only partially elucidated. In this review we discuss the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-residing HO-1 and its cytoprotective activity against ER stress.

  19. Endoplasmic-reticulum-mediated microtubule alignment governs cytoplasmic streaming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Kenji; Mamane, Alexandre; Sasaki, Tohru; Sato, Kohta; Takagi, Jun; Niwayama, Ritsuya; Hufnagel, Lars; Shimamoto, Yuta; Joanny, Jean-François; Uchida, Seiichi; Kimura, Akatsuki

    2017-04-01

    Cytoplasmic streaming refers to a collective movement of cytoplasm observed in many cell types. The mechanism of meiotic cytoplasmic streaming (MeiCS) in Caenorhabditis elegans zygotes is puzzling as the direction of the flow is not predefined by cell polarity and occasionally reverses. Here, we demonstrate that the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) network structure is required for the collective flow. Using a combination of RNAi, microscopy and image processing of C. elegans zygotes, we devise a theoretical model, which reproduces and predicts the emergence and reversal of the flow. We propose a positive-feedback mechanism, where a local flow generated along a microtubule is transmitted to neighbouring regions through the ER. This, in turn, aligns microtubules over a broader area to self-organize the collective flow. The proposed model could be applicable to various cytoplasmic streaming phenomena in the absence of predefined polarity. The increased mobility of cortical granules by MeiCS correlates with the efficient exocytosis of the granules to protect the zygotes from osmotic and mechanical stresses.

  20. The endoplasmic reticulum in plant immunity and cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick eSchäfer

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The endoplasmic reticulum (ER is a highly dynamic organelle in eukaryotic cells and a major production site of proteins destined for vacuoles, the plasma membrane or apoplast in plants. At the ER, these secreted proteins undergo multiple processing steps, which are supervised and conducted by the ER quality control system. Notably, processing of secreted proteins can considerably elevate under stress conditions and exceed ER folding capacities. The resulting accumulation of unfolded proteins is defined as ER stress. The efficiency of cells to re-establish proper ER function is crucial for stress adaptation. Besides delivering proteins directly antagonizing and resolving stress conditions, the ER monitors synthesis of immune receptors. This indicates the significance of the ER for the establishment and function of the plant immune system. Recent studies point out the fragility of the entire system and highlight the ER as initiator of programmed cell death (PCD in plants as was reported for vertebrates. This review summarizes current knowledge on the impact of the ER on immune and PCD signalling. Understanding the integration of stress signals by the ER bears a considerable potential to optimize development and to enhance stress resistance of plants.

  1. Stress responses from the endoplasmic reticulum in cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hironori eKato

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The endoplasmic reticulum (ER is a dynamic organelle that is essential for multiple cellular functions. During cellular stress conditions, including nutrient deprivation and dysregulation of protein synthesis, unfolded/misfolded proteins accumulate in the ER lumen, resulting in activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR. The UPR also contributes to the regulation of various intracellular signalling pathways such as calcium signalling and lipid signalling. More recently, the mitochondria-associated ER membrane (MAM, which is a site of close contact between the ER and mitochondria, has been shown to function as a platform for various intracellular stress responses including apoptotic signalling, inflammatory signalling, the autophagic response, and the UPR. Interestingly, in cancer, these signalling pathways from the ER are often dysregulated, contributing to cancer cell metabolism. Thus, the signalling pathway from the ER may be a novel therapeutic target for various cancers. In this review, we discuss recent research on the roles of stress responses from the ER, including the MAM.

  2. Glycolaldehyde induces endoplasmic reticulum stress and apoptosis in Schwann cells

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    Keisuke Sato

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Schwann cell injury is caused by diabetic neuropathy. The apoptosis of Schwann cells plays a pivotal role in diabetic nerve dysfunction. Glycolaldehyde is a precursor of advanced glycation end products that contribute to the pathogenesis of diabetic neuropathy. In this study, we examined whether glycolaldehyde induces endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress and apoptosis in rat Schwann cells. Schwann cells treated with 500 μM glycolaldehyde showed morphological changes characteristic of apoptosis. Glycolaldehyde activated apoptotic signals, such as caspase-3 and caspase-8. Furthermore, it induced ER stress response involving RNA-dependent protein kinase-like ER kinase (PERK, inositol-requiring ER-to-nucleus signal kinase 1α (IRE1α, and eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (eIF2α. In addition, glycolaldehyde activated CCAAT/enhancer-binding homologous protein (CHOP, an ER stress response factor crucial to executing apoptosis. Knockdown of nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2, which is involved in the promotion of cell survival following ER stress, enhanced glycolaldehyde-induced cytotoxicity, indicating that Nrf2 plays a protective role in the cytotoxicity caused by glycolaldehyde. Taken together, these findings indicate that glycolaldehyde is capable of inducing apoptosis and ER stress in Schwann cells. The ER stress induced by glycolaldehyde may trigger the glycolaldehyde-induced apoptosis in Schwann cells. This study demonstrated for the first time that glycolaldehyde induced ER stress.

  3. Connecting the cytoskeleton to the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurel, Pinar S; Hatch, Anna L; Higgs, Henry N

    2014-07-21

    A tendency in cell biology is to divide and conquer. For example, decades of painstaking work have led to an understanding of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi structure, dynamics, and transport. In parallel, cytoskeletal researchers have revealed a fantastic diversity of structure and cellular function in both actin and microtubules. Increasingly, these areas overlap, necessitating an understanding of both organelle and cytoskeletal biology. This review addresses connections between the actin/microtubule cytoskeletons and organelles in animal cells, focusing on three key areas: ER structure and function; ER-to-Golgi transport; and Golgi structure and function. Making these connections has been challenging for several reasons: the small sizes and dynamic characteristics of some components; the fact that organelle-specific cytoskeletal elements can easily be obscured by more abundant cytoskeletal structures; and the difficulties in imaging membranes and cytoskeleton simultaneously, especially at the ultrastructural level. One major concept is that the cytoskeleton is frequently used to generate force for membrane movement, with two potential consequences: translocation of the organelle, or deformation of the organelle membrane. While initially discussing issues common to metazoan cells in general, we subsequently highlight specific features of neurons, since these highly polarized cells present unique challenges for organellar distribution and dynamics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Homocysteine inhibits hepatocyte proliferation via endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Yu

    Full Text Available Homocysteine is an independent risk factor for coronary, cerebral, and peripheral vascular diseases. Recent studies have shown that levels of homocysteine are elevated in patients with impaired hepatic function, but the precise role of homocysteine in the development of hepatic dysfunction is unclear. In this study, we examined the effect of homocysteine on hepatocyte proliferation in vitro. Our results demonstrated that homocysteine inhibited hepatocyte proliferation by up-regulating protein levels of p53 as well as mRNA and protein levels of p21(Cip1 in primary cultured hepatocytes. Homocysteine induced cell growth arrest in p53-positive hepatocarcinoma cell line HepG2, but not in p53-null hepatocarcinoma cell line Hep3B. A p53 inhibitor pifithrin-α inhibited the expression of p21(Cip1 and attenuated homocysteine-induced cell growth arrest. Homocysteine induced TRB3 expression via endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway, resulting in Akt dephosphorylation. Knock-down of endogenous TRB3 significantly suppressed the inhibitory effect of homocysteine on cell proliferation and the phosphorylation of Akt. LiCl reversed homocysteine-mediated cell growth arrest by inhibiting TRB3-mediated Akt dephosphorylation. These results demonstrate that both TRB3 and p21(Cip1 are critical molecules in the homocysteine signaling cascade and provide a mechanistic explanation for impairment of liver regeneration in hyperhomocysteinemia.

  5. Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Milagros; Diaz-Morales, Noelia; Rovira-Llopis, Susana; Escribano-Lopez, Irene; Bañuls, Celia; Hernandez-Mijares, Antonio; Diamanti-Kandarakis, Evanthia; Victor, Victor M

    2016-01-01

    It is generally accepted that mitochondrial dysfunction and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress are related to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Mitochondria use substrates from lipid and glucose metabolism in order to generate ATP, and when mitochondrial O2 consumption is decreased due to an altered metabolism there is an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) that can impair different types of molecules and cells, especially in β- cells during type 2 diabetes. Furthermore, the maintenance of ER function in insulin-secreting β-cells is crucial, and when ER homeostasis is disrupted, the ER develops an unfolded protein response (UPR) in order to maintain the homeostasis of this organelle. However, when homeostasis fails in mitochondria and ER, these organelles can initiate death signalling pathways. New research has suggested that hyperlipidemia and hyperliglucaemia, known as key factors of type 2 diabetes (T2D), disrupt mitochondrial activity and ER homeostasis, thus triggering a disruption of energy metabolism, unresolvable UPR activation and β-cell death. This review explains the mechanisms of mitochondrial function and ER stress related to the pathological effects of type 2 diabetes in different tissues.

  6. Apoptosis, autophagy & endoplasmic reticulum stress in diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirtas, Levent; Guclu, Aydin; Erdur, Fatih Mehmet; Akbas, Emin Murat; Ozcicek, Adalet; Onk, Didem; Turkmen, Kultigin

    2016-10-01

    The prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) is increasing secondary to increased consumption of food and decreased physical activity worldwide. Hyperglycaemia, insulin resistance and hypertrophy of pancreatic beta cells occur in the early phase of diabetes. However, with the progression of diabetes, dysfunction and loss of beta cells occur in both types 1 and 2 DM. Programmed cell death also named apoptosis is found to be associated with diabetes, and apoptosis of beta cells might be the main mechanism of relative insulin deficiency in DM. Autophagic cell death and apoptosis are not entirely distinct programmed cell death mechanisms and share many of the regulator proteins. These processes can occur in both physiologic and pathologic conditions including DM. Besides these two important pathways, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) also acts as a cell sensor to monitor and maintain cellular homeostasis. ER stress has been found to be associated with autophagy and apoptosis. This review was aimed to describe the interactions between apoptosis, autophagy and ER stress pathways in DM.

  7. Sphingolipids activate the endoplasmic reticulum stress surveillance pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piña, Francisco; Yagisawa, Fumi; Obara, Keisuke; Gregerson, J D; Kihara, Akio; Niwa, Maho

    2018-01-09

    Proper inheritance of functional organelles is vital to cell survival. In the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress surveillance (ERSU) pathway ensures that daughter cells inherit a functional ER. Here, we show that the ERSU pathway is activated by phytosphingosine (PHS), an early biosynthetic sphingolipid. Multiple lines of evidence support this: (1) Reducing PHS levels with myriocin diminishes the ability of cells to induce ERSU phenotypes. (2) Aureobasidin A treatment, which blocks conversion of early intermediates to downstream complex sphingolipids, induces ERSU. (3) orm1Δorm2Δ cells, which up-regulate PHS, show an ERSU response even in the absence of ER stress. (4) Lipid analyses confirm that PHS levels are indeed elevated in ER-stressed cells. (5) Lastly, the addition of exogenous PHS is sufficient to induce all ERSU phenotypes. We propose that ER stress elevates PHS, which in turn activates the ERSU pathway to ensure future daughter-cell viability. © 2018 Piña et al.

  8. Nonequilibrium flows with smooth particle applied mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kum, Oyeon [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    1995-07-01

    Smooth particle methods are relatively new methods for simulating solid and fluid flows through they have a 20-year history of solving complex hydrodynamic problems in astrophysics, such as colliding planets and stars, for which correct answers are unknown. The results presented in this thesis evaluate the adaptability or fitness of the method for typical hydrocode production problems. For finite hydrodynamic systems, boundary conditions are important. A reflective boundary condition with image particles is a good way to prevent a density anomaly at the boundary and to keep the fluxes continuous there. Boundary values of temperature and velocity can be separately controlled. The gradient algorithm, based on differentiating the smooth particle expression for (uρ) and (Tρ), does not show numerical instabilities for the stress tensor and heat flux vector quantities which require second derivatives in space when Fourier`s heat-flow law and Newton`s viscous force law are used. Smooth particle methods show an interesting parallel linking to them to molecular dynamics. For the inviscid Euler equation, with an isentropic ideal gas equation of state, the smooth particle algorithm generates trajectories isomorphic to those generated by molecular dynamics. The shear moduli were evaluated based on molecular dynamics calculations for the three weighting functions, B spline, Lucy, and Cusp functions. The accuracy and applicability of the methods were estimated by comparing a set of smooth particle Rayleigh-Benard problems, all in the laminar regime, to corresponding highly-accurate grid-based numerical solutions of continuum equations. Both transient and stationary smooth particle solutions reproduce the grid-based data with velocity errors on the order of 5%. The smooth particle method still provides robust solutions at high Rayleigh number where grid-based methods fails.

  9. Physiology and pathology of extracellular vesicules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Panteleev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This year marks the 50th anniversary of the first publication about blood plasma microparticles. Initially considered as cell fragments or “platelet dust”, extracellular vesicles currently attracted the attention of biochemists, biophysicists, physicians, pharmacists around the world. They are heterogeneous in structure and derived from many cell types, express different antigen and contain variety of biomolecules that determines wide range of biological activity, including procoagulant, regenerative, immunomodulating, and others. They play an important role in the pathophysiology of different diseases and conditions – from infarction, injuries and pregnancies to the “graft versus host” disease. The vesicles as medicaments and their carriers, as well as the drugs that affect them, are a rapidly developing field of research.

  10. Vesiculation of platelets during in vitro aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode, A P; Orton, S M; Frye, M J; Udis, B J

    1991-02-15

    Membranous microparticles (MP) appearing in the supernatant plasma of stored platelet concentrates (PC) were analyzed by flow cytometry. Two populations of MP were arbitrarily delineated by light scatter as larger or smaller than 0.5 micron fluorescent beads. An estimate of MP concentration was obtained by adding a known amount of fluorescent beads to each sample before analysis of a set number of counts on the flow cytometer. The addition of platelet activation inhibitors (prostaglandin E-1, theophylline, and aprotinin) to the anticoagulant during preparation of PC combined with a reduction in surface area of the storage container caused approximately a 40% reduction in the number of MP appearing during storage relative to donor-matched controls. In addition, the inhibited concentrates had 84% less platelet factor 3 (PF3) activity in the supernatant and 61% less released lactic dehydrogenase. A reduction in surface area of the container in the controls partially offset these differences. A significant correlation was found (rs = .748) between PF3 levels and the concentration of larger MP. The inhibitors did not reduce the small number of MP found in stored platelet-poor plasma. Surface antigen analysis showed that the majority of MP in PC were platelet-derived; most were positive for glycoprotein (GP) IIbIIIa (73%) and/or for GPIb (43% to 46%). We conclude that procoagulant MP are released from platelets during storage as a result of platelet activation augmented by interaction of platelets with the bag wall.

  11. The Pathogen-Occupied Vacuoles of Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Anaplasma marginale Interact with the Endoplasmic Reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truchan, Hilary K; Cockburn, Chelsea L; Hebert, Kathryn S; Magunda, Forgivemore; Noh, Susan M; Carlyon, Jason A

    2016-01-01

    The genus Anaplasma consists of tick-transmitted obligate intracellular bacteria that invade white or red blood cells to cause debilitating and potentially fatal infections. A. phagocytophilum, a human and veterinary pathogen, infects neutrophils to cause granulocytic anaplasmosis. A. marginale invades bovine erythrocytes. Evidence suggests that both species may also infect endothelial cells in vivo. In mammalian and arthropod host cells, A. phagocytophilum and A. marginale reside in host cell derived pathogen-occupied vacuoles (POVs). While it was recently demonstrated that the A. phagocytophilum-occupied vacuole (ApV) intercepts membrane traffic from the trans-Golgi network, it is unclear if it or the A. marginale-occupied vacuole (AmV) interacts with other secretory organelles. Here, we demonstrate that the ApV and AmV extensively interact with the host endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in endothelial, myeloid, and/or tick cells. ER lumen markers, calreticulin, and protein disulfide isomerase, and the ER membrane marker, derlin-1, were pronouncedly recruited to the peripheries of both POVs. ApV association with the ER initiated early and continued throughout the infection cycle. Both the ApV and AmV interacted with the rough ER and smooth ER. However, only derlin-1-positive rough ER derived vesicles were delivered into the ApV lumen where they localized with intravacuolar bacteria. Transmission electron microscopy identified multiple ER-POV membrane contact sites on the cytosolic faces of both species' vacuoles that corresponded to areas on the vacuoles' lumenal faces where intravacuolar Anaplasma organisms closely associated. A. phagocytophilum is known to hijack Rab10, a GTPase that regulates ER dynamics and morphology. Yet, ApV-ER interactions were unhindered in cells in which Rab10 had been knocked down, demonstrating that the GTPase is dispensable for the bacterium to parasitize the ER. These data establish the ApV and AmV as pathogen-host interfaces that directly

  12. Manual tracking enhances smooth pursuit eye movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niehorster, Diederick C; Siu, Wilfred W F; Li, Li

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have reported that concurrent manual tracking enhances smooth pursuit eye movements only when tracking a self-driven or a predictable moving target. Here, we used a control-theoretic approach to examine whether concurrent manual tracking enhances smooth pursuit of an unpredictable moving target. In the eye-hand tracking condition, participants used their eyes to track a Gaussian target that moved randomly along a horizontal axis. In the meantime, they used their dominant hand to move a mouse to control the horizontal movement of a Gaussian cursor to vertically align it with the target. In the eye-alone tracking condition, the target and cursor positions recorded in the eye-hand tracking condition were replayed, and participants only performed eye tracking of the target. Catch-up saccades were identified and removed from the recorded eye movements, allowing for a frequency-response analysis of the smooth pursuit response to unpredictable target motion. We found that the overall smooth pursuit gain was higher and the number of catch-up saccades made was less when eye tracking was accompanied by manual tracking than when not. We conclude that concurrent manual tracking enhances smooth pursuit. This enhancement is a fundamental property of eye-hand coordination that occurs regardless of the predictability of the target motion.

  13. Interstitial Cells: Regulators of Smooth Muscle Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Kenton M.; Ward, Sean M.; Koh, Sang Don

    2014-01-01

    Smooth muscles are complex tissues containing a variety of cells in addition to muscle cells. Interstitial cells of mesenchymal origin interact with and form electrical connectivity with smooth muscle cells in many organs, and these cells provide important regulatory functions. For example, in the gastrointestinal tract, interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) and PDGFRα+ cells have been described, in detail, and represent distinct classes of cells with unique ultrastructure, molecular phenotypes, and functions. Smooth muscle cells are electrically coupled to ICC and PDGFRα+ cells, forming an integrated unit called the SIP syncytium. SIP cells express a variety of receptors and ion channels, and conductance changes in any type of SIP cell affect the excitability and responses of the syncytium. SIP cells are known to provide pacemaker activity, propagation pathways for slow waves, transduction of inputs from motor neurons, and mechanosensitivity. Loss of interstitial cells has been associated with motor disorders of the gut. Interstitial cells are also found in a variety of other smooth muscles; however, in most cases, the physiological and pathophysiological roles for these cells have not been clearly defined. This review describes structural, functional, and molecular features of interstitial cells and discusses their contributions in determining the behaviors of smooth muscle tissues. PMID:24987007

  14. Phenotypic modulation of corpus cavernosum smooth muscle cells in a rat model of cavernous neurectomy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Yang

    Full Text Available Patients undergoing radical prostatectomy (RP are at high risk for erectile dysfunction (ED due to potential cavernous nerve (CN damage during surgery. Penile hypoxia after RP is thought to significantly contribute to ED pathogenesis.We previously showed that corpora cavernosum smooth muscle cells (CCSMCs undergo phenotypic modulation under hypoxic conditions in vitro. Here, we studied such changes in an in vivo post-RP ED model by investigating CCSMCs in bilateral cavernous neurectomy (BCN rats.Sprague-Dawley rats underwent sham (n = 12 or BCN (n = 12 surgery. After 12 weeks, they were injected with apomorphine to determine erectile function. The penile tissues were harvested and assessed for fibrosis using Masson trichrome staining and for molecular markers of phenotypic modulation using immunohistochemistry and western blotting. CCSMC morphological structure was evaluated by hematoxylin-eosin (H&E staining and transmission electron microscopy (TEM.Erectile function was significantly lower in BCN rats than in sham rats. BCN increased hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and collagen protein expression in corpora cavernous tissue. H&E staining and TEM showed that CCSMCs in BCN rats underwent hypertrophy and showed rough endoplasmic reticulum formation. The expression of CCSMC phenotypic markers, such as smooth muscle α-actin, smooth muscle myosin heavy chain, and desmin, was markedly lower, whereas vimentin protein expression was significantly higher in BCN rats than in control rats.CCSMCs undergo phenotype modulation in rats with cavernous neurectomy. The results have unveiled physiological transformations that occur at the cellular and molecular levels and have helped characterize CN injury-induced ED.

  15. Phenotypic modulation of corpus cavernosum smooth muscle cells in a rat model of cavernous neurectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Zhao, Jian F; Shou, Qi Y; Huang, Xiao J; Chen, Gang; Yang, Ke B; Zhang, Shi G; Lv, Bo D; Fu, Hui Y

    2014-01-01

    Patients undergoing radical prostatectomy (RP) are at high risk for erectile dysfunction (ED) due to potential cavernous nerve (CN) damage during surgery. Penile hypoxia after RP is thought to significantly contribute to ED pathogenesis. We previously showed that corpora cavernosum smooth muscle cells (CCSMCs) undergo phenotypic modulation under hypoxic conditions in vitro. Here, we studied such changes in an in vivo post-RP ED model by investigating CCSMCs in bilateral cavernous neurectomy (BCN) rats. Sprague-Dawley rats underwent sham (n = 12) or BCN (n = 12) surgery. After 12 weeks, they were injected with apomorphine to determine erectile function. The penile tissues were harvested and assessed for fibrosis using Masson trichrome staining and for molecular markers of phenotypic modulation using immunohistochemistry and western blotting. CCSMC morphological structure was evaluated by hematoxylin-eosin (H&E) staining and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Erectile function was significantly lower in BCN rats than in sham rats. BCN increased hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and collagen protein expression in corpora cavernous tissue. H&E staining and TEM showed that CCSMCs in BCN rats underwent hypertrophy and showed rough endoplasmic reticulum formation. The expression of CCSMC phenotypic markers, such as smooth muscle α-actin, smooth muscle myosin heavy chain, and desmin, was markedly lower, whereas vimentin protein expression was significantly higher in BCN rats than in control rats. CCSMCs undergo phenotype modulation in rats with cavernous neurectomy. The results have unveiled physiological transformations that occur at the cellular and molecular levels and have helped characterize CN injury-induced ED.

  16. Endoplasmic reticulum redox state is not perturbed by pharmacological or pathological endoplasmic reticulum stress in live pancreatic β-cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irmgard Schuiki

    Full Text Available Accumulation of unfolded, misfolded and aggregated proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER causes ER stress. ER stress can result from physiological situations such as acute increases in secretory protein biosynthesis or pathological conditions that perturb ER homeostasis such as alterations in the ER redox state. Here we monitored ER redox together with transcriptional output of the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR in INS-1 insulinoma cells stably expressing eroGFP (ER-redox-sensor and mCherry protein driven by a GRP78 promoter (UPR-sensor. Live cell imaging, flow cytometry and biochemical characterization were used to examine these parameters in response to various conditions known to induce ER stress. As expected, treatment of the cells with the reducing agent dithiothreitol caused a decrease in the oxidation state of the ER accompanied by an increase in XBP-1 splicing. Unexpectedly however, other treatments including tunicamycin, thapsigargin, DL-homocysteine, elevated free fatty acids or high glucose had essentially no influence on the ER redox state, despite inducing ER stress. Comparable results were obtained with dispersed rat islet cells expressing eroGFP. Thus, unlike in yeast cells, ER stress in pancreatic β-cells is not associated with a more reducing ER environment.

  17. Endoplasmic reticulum stress affects the transport of phosphatidylethanolamine from mitochondria to the endoplasmic reticulum in S.cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, Muthukumar; Sivaprakasam, Chinnarasu; Prinz, William A; Nachiappan, Vasanthi

    2016-12-01

    Phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) are two of the most abundant phospholipids in cells. Although both lipids can be synthesized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), in S. cerevisiae PE can also be produced in mitochondria and endosomes; this PE can be transported back to the ER where it is converted to PC. In this study we found that dithiothreitol (DTT), which induces ER stress, decreases PE export from mitochondria to the ER. This results in decreased levels of total cellular PC and mitochondrial PC. These decreases were not caused by changes in levels of PC synthesizing or degrading enzymes. PE export from mitochondria to the ER during ER stress was further reduced in cells lacking Mdm10p, a component of an ER-mitochondrial tethering complex that may facilitated lipid exchange between these compartments. We also found that reducing mitochondrial PC levels induces mitophagy. In conclusion, we show that ER stress affected PE export from mitochondria to ER and the Mdm10p is important for this process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Smooth muscle actin and myosin expression in cultured airway smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, J Z; Woodcock-Mitchell, J; Mitchell, J; Rippetoe, P; White, S; Absher, M; Baldor, L; Evans, J; McHugh, K M; Low, R B

    1998-05-01

    In this study, the expression of smooth muscle actin and myosin was examined in cultures of rat tracheal smooth muscle cells. Protein and mRNA analyses demonstrated that these cells express alpha- and gamma-smooth muscle actin and smooth muscle myosin and nonmuscle myosin-B heavy chains. The expression of the smooth muscle specific actin and myosin isoforms was regulated in the same direction when growth conditions were changed. Thus, at confluency in 1 or 10% serum-containing medium as well as for low-density cells (50-60% confluent) deprived of serum, the expression of the smooth muscle forms of actin and myosin was relatively high. Conversely, in rapidly proliferating cultures at low density in 10% serum, smooth muscle contractile protein expression was low. The expression of nonmuscle myosin-B mRNA and protein was more stable and was upregulated only to a small degree in growing cells. Our results provide new insight into the molecular basis of differentiation and contractile function in airway smooth muscle cells.

  19. Cardiac, Skeletal, and smooth muscle mitochondrial respiration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, Song-Young; Gifford, Jayson R; Andtbacka, Robert H I

    2014-01-01

    , skeletal, and smooth muscle was harvested from a total of 22 subjects (53±6 yrs) and mitochondrial respiration assessed in permeabilized fibers. Complex I+II, state 3 respiration, an index of oxidative phosphorylation capacity, fell progressively from cardiac, skeletal, to smooth muscle (54±1; 39±4; 15......±1 pmol•s(-1)•mg (-1), pindex of mitochondrial density, also fell progressively from cardiac, skeletal, to smooth muscle (222±13; 115±2; 48±2 umol•g(-1)•min(-1), p... per mitochondrial content), oxidative phosphorylation capacity was no longer different between the three muscle types. Interestingly, Complex I state 2 normalized for CS activity, an index of non-phosphorylating respiration per mitochondrial content, increased progressively from cardiac, skeletal...

  20. Smoothing of Fused Spectral Consistent Satellite Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sveinsson, Johannes; Aanæs, Henrik; Benediktsson, Jon Atli

    2006-01-01

    Several widely used methods have been proposed for fusing high resolution panchromatic data and lower resolution multi-channel data. However, many of these methods fail to maintain spectral consistency of the fused high resolution image, which is of high importance to many of the applications based...... in a statistically meaningful way. The fusion method was called spectral consistent panshapen- ing (SC) and it was shown that spectral consistency was a direct consequence of imaging physics and hence guaranteed by the SCP. In this paper exploit this framework and investigate two smoothing methods of the fused image...... obtain by SCP. The first smoothing method is based on Markov random field (MRF) model, while the second method uses wavelet domain hidden Markov models (HMM) for smoothing of the SCP fused image....

  1. Multiple predictor smoothing methods for sensitivity analysis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helton, Jon Craig; Storlie, Curtis B.

    2006-08-01

    The use of multiple predictor smoothing methods in sampling-based sensitivity analyses of complex models is investigated. Specifically, sensitivity analysis procedures based on smoothing methods employing the stepwise application of the following nonparametric regression techniques are described: (1) locally weighted regression (LOESS), (2) additive models, (3) projection pursuit regression, and (4) recursive partitioning regression. The indicated procedures are illustrated with both simple test problems and results from a performance assessment for a radioactive waste disposal facility (i.e., the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant). As shown by the example illustrations, the use of smoothing procedures based on nonparametric regression techniques can yield more informative sensitivity analysis results than can be obtained with more traditional sensitivity analysis procedures based on linear regression, rank regression or quadratic regression when nonlinear relationships between model inputs and model predictions are present.

  2. ibr: Iterative bias reduction multivariate smoothing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hengartner, Nicholas W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cornillon, Pierre-andre [AGRO-SUP, FRANCE; Matzner - Lober, Eric [RENNES 2, FRANCE

    2009-01-01

    Regression is a fundamental data analysis tool for relating a univariate response variable Y to a multivariate predictor X {element_of} E R{sup d} from the observations (X{sub i}, Y{sub i}), i = 1,...,n. Traditional nonparametric regression use the assumption that the regression function varies smoothly in the independent variable x to locally estimate the conditional expectation m(x) = E[Y|X = x]. The resulting vector of predicted values {cflx Y}{sub i} at the observed covariates X{sub i} is called a regression smoother, or simply a smoother, because the predicted values {cflx Y}{sub i} are less variable than the original observations Y{sub i}. Linear smoothers are linear in the response variable Y and are operationally written as {cflx m} = X{sub {lambda}}Y, where S{sub {lambda}} is a n x n smoothing matrix. The smoothing matrix S{sub {lambda}} typically depends on a tuning parameter which we denote by {lambda}, and that governs the tradeoff between the smoothness of the estimate and the goodness-of-fit of the smoother to the data by controlling the effective size of the local neighborhood over which the responses are averaged. We parameterize the smoothing matrix such that large values of {lambda} are associated to smoothers that averages over larger neighborhood and produce very smooth curves, while small {lambda} are associated to smoothers that average over smaller neighborhood to produce a more wiggly curve that wants to interpolate the data. The parameter {lambda} is the bandwidth for kernel smoother, the span size for running-mean smoother, bin smoother, and the penalty factor {lambda} for spline smoother.

  3. The Hypothermic Influence on CHOP and Ero1-α in an Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Model of Cerebral Ischemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poone, Gagandip K.; Hasseldam, Henrik; Munkholm, Nina

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia induced endoplasmic reticulum stress causes accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum and activates the unfolded protein response,resulting in apoptosis through CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP) activation. In an in vitro and in vivo model...... (p endoplasmic reticulum stress induced apoptosis in stroke. Ashypothermia further...... globalischemia. A stable increase in CHOP expression was observed throughout the time course (p stressed PC12 cells resulted in a decreased expression of CHOP after three, six and twelve hours...

  4. Endoplasmic reticulum stress inhibition reduces hypertension through the preservation of resistance blood vessel structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlisle, Rachel E; Werner, Kaitlyn E; Yum, Victoria; Lu, Chao; Tat, Victor; Memon, Muzammil; No, Yejin; Ask, Kjetil; Dickhout, Jeffrey G

    2016-08-01

    Our purpose was to determine if endoplasmic reticulum stress inhibition lowers blood pressure (BP) in hypertension by correcting vascular dysfunction. The spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) was used as a model of human essential hypertension with its normotensive control, the Wistar Kyoto rat. Animals were subjected to endoplasmic reticulum stress inhibition with 4-phenylbutyric acid (4-PBA; 1 g/kg per day, orally) for 5 weeks from 12 weeks of age. BP was measured weekly noninvasively and at endpoint with carotid arterial cannulation. Small mesenteric arteries were removed for vascular studies. Function was assessed with a Mulvany-Halpern style myograph, and structure was assessed by measurement of medial-to-lumen ratio in perfusion fixed vessels as well as three-dimensional confocal reconstruction of vessel wall components. Endoplasmic reticulum stress was assessed by quantitative real time-PCR and western blotting; oxidative stress was assessed by 3-nitrotyrosine and dihydroethidium staining. 4-PBA significantly lowered BP in SHR (vehicle 206.1 ± 4.3 vs. 4-PBA 178.9 ± 3.1, systolic) but not Wistar Kyoto. 4-PBA diminished contractility and augmented endothelial-dependent vasodilation in SHR small mesenteric arteries, as well as reducing media-to-lumen ratio. 4-PBA significantly reduced endoplasmic reticulum stress in SHR resistance vessels. Normotensive resistance vessels, treated with the endoplasmic reticulum stress-inducing agent, tunicamycin, show decreased endothelial-dependent vasodilation; this was improved with 4-PBA treatment. 3-Nitrotyrosine and dihydroethidium staining indicated that endoplasmic reticulum stress leads to reactive oxygen species generation resolvable by 4-PBA treatment. Endoplasmic reticulum stress caused endothelial-mediated vascular dysfunction contributing to elevated BP in the SHR model of human essential hypertension.

  5. Local smoothness for global optical flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rakêt, Lars Lau

    2012-01-01

    by this technique and work on local-global optical flow we propose a simple method for fusing optical flow estimates of different smoothness by evaluating interpolation quality locally by means of L1 block match on the corresponding set of gradient images. We illustrate the method in a setting where optical flows...... are estimated by a TV-L1 energy. On average this procedure reduces the average endpoint error by 15% over flows estimated using the OPP, and gives flow fields that are consistently better than the single best flows with a fixed smoothness parameter....

  6. Production of super-smooth articles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duchane, D.V.

    1981-05-29

    Super-smooth rounded or formed articles made of thermoplastic materials including various poly(methyl methacrylate) or acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene copolymers are produced by immersing the articles into a bath, the composition of which is slowly changed with time. The starting composition of the bath is made up of at least one solvent for the polymer and a diluent made up of at least one nonsolvent for the polymer and optional materials which are soluble in the bath. The resulting extremely smooth articles are useful as mandrels for laser fusion and should be useful for a wide variety of other purposes, for example lenses.

  7. Analysis of Two Advanced Smoothing Algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-09-01

    equations 1.3 19 - and 1.4. The problem with this method is that the smoothing program may have to be run several times with each run containing a...uruie 48iOsragtln thog pont in wido Fi I ..ea .n to enpont an eta on :7-" - - . . . .I SUNIXY NC.1.XSZ O (3.10) For each I=1, ., (MNWNSZ-1), the right...smoothed point values were plotted, the plot would show too many peaks and would appear very jagged. In order to alleviate this problem , these

  8. Mitochondria-Endoplasmic Reticulum Contact Sites Mediate Innate Immune Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misawa, Takuma; Takahama, Michihiro; Saitoh, Tatsuya

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) are fundamental organelles that coordinate high-order cell functions. Mitochondria are centers of energy production, whereas the ER is responsible for folding, transport, and degradation of proteins. In addition to their specific functions, mitochondria and ER actively communicate with each other to promote a variety of cellular events, such as material transfer and signal transduction. Recent studies have shown the critical involvement of these organelles in regulation of the innate immune system, which functions in host defense. The innate immune system utilizes a wide range of germ-line-encoded pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) to recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) and induces inflammatory and antiviral responses. Contact sites between mitochondria and the ER function in assembly of the NLR family pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3)-inflammasome to promote the inflammatory response. The NLRP3-inflammasome is a protein complex composed of the receptor NLRP3 on the ER side and the adaptor apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD on the mitochondrial side; it induces caspase-1-dependent maturation of proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-18. Furthermore, ER-mitochondria contact sites function in initiation and mediation of signal transduction pathways downstream of intracellular PRRs, such as retinoic acid-inducible gene I-like receptor and cyclic GMP-AMP synthase, to promote the antiviral response. Therefore, ER-mitochondria contact sites, also known as mitochondria-associated membranes, play key roles in regulation of innate immune responses.

  9. Endoplasmic reticulum stress: key promoter of rosacea pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnik, Bodo C

    2014-12-01

    Recent scientific interest in the pathogenesis of rosacea focuses on abnormally high facial skin levels of cathelicidin and the trypsin-like serine protease kallikrein 5 (KLK5) that cleaves the cathelicidin precursor protein into the bioactive fragment LL-37, which exerts crucial proinflammatory, angiogenic and antimicrobial activities. Furthermore, increased expression of toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) has been identified in rosacea skin supporting the participation of the innate immune system. Notably, TLRs are expressed on sensory neurons and increase neuronal excitability linking TLR signalling to the transmission of neuroinflammatory responses. It is the intention of this viewpoint to present a unifying concept that links all known clinical trigger factors of rosacea such as UV irradiation, heat, skin irritants and special foods to one converging point: enhanced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress that activates the unfolded protein response (UPR). ER stress via upregulation of transcription factor ATF4 increases TLR2 expression, resulting in enhanced production of cathelicidin and KLK5 mediating downstream proinflammatory, angiogenic and antimicrobial signalling. The presented concept identifies rosacea trigger factors as environmental stressors that enhance the skin's ER stress response. Exaggerated cutaneous ER stress that stimulates the TLR2-driven inflammatory response may involve sebocytes, keratinocytes, monocyte-macrophages and sensory cutaneous neurons. Finally, all antirosacea drugs are proposed to attenuate the ER stress signalling cascade at some point. Overstimulated ER stress signalling may have evolutionarily evolved as a compensatory mechanism to balance impaired vitamin D-driven LL-37-mediated antimicrobial defenses due to lower exposure of UV-B irradiation of the northern Celtic population. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Transcriptional analysis implicates endoplasmic reticulum stress in bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Tang

    Full Text Available Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE is a fatal, transmissible, neurodegenerative disease of cattle. To date, the disease process is still poorly understood. In this study, brain tissue samples from animals naturally infected with BSE were analysed to identify differentially regulated genes using Affymetrix GeneChip Bovine Genome Arrays. A total of 230 genes were shown to be differentially regulated and many of these genes encode proteins involved in immune response, apoptosis, cell adhesion, stress response and transcription. Seventeen genes are associated with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER and 10 of these 17 genes are involved in stress related responses including ER chaperones, Grp94 and Grp170. Western blotting analysis showed that another ER chaperone, Grp78, was up-regulated in BSE. Up-regulation of these three chaperones strongly suggests the presence of ER stress and the activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR in BSE. The occurrence of ER stress was also supported by changes in gene expression for cytosolic proteins, such as the chaperone pair of Hsp70 and DnaJ. Many genes associated with the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and the autophagy-lysosome system were differentially regulated, indicating that both pathways might be activated in response to ER stress. A model is presented to explain the mechanisms of prion neurotoxicity using these ER stress related responses. Clustering analysis showed that the differently regulated genes found from the naturally infected BSE cases could be used to predict the infectious status of the samples experimentally infected with BSE from the previous study and vice versa. Proof-of-principle gene expression biomarkers were found to represent BSE using 10 genes with 94% sensitivity and 87% specificity.

  11. Analysis of nelfinavir-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brüning, Ansgar

    2011-01-01

    Nelfinavir (Viracept®) is an HIV protease inhibitor that has been shown to induce the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress reaction in human cancer cells. Although the presumed drug doses needed for an efficient ER stress reaction and ensuing apoptosis in cancer cells is somewhat higher than those prescribed for HIV-infected persons, nelfinavir represents one of the few clinically applicable ER stress-inducing agents, and is currently being tested in clinical studies on cancer patients. Therefore, this chapter describes how to obtain and use nelfinavir for in vitro and in vivo studies. In addition, methods are described that might facilitate the analysis and monitoring of the nelfinavir-induced ER stress response either in cancer cells in cell culture or in cancer tissue biopsies. These methods include various fluorescence-based ER staining techniques and the expression analysis of primary and secondary ER stress markers by immunoblotting and RT-PCR analysis. Among the several methods presented, the analysis of an unconventional XBP1 splicing, caused by the ER stress sensor IRE1, is shown to present the most sensitive and most specific marker for nelfinavir-induced ER stress. Primers and PCR conditions suitable for XBP1 PCR and splicing analysis are presented. Such a PCR-based XBP1 splicing analysis might not only be suitable to monitor nelfinavir-induced ER stress, but could also be applied in drug screening programs to test for other ER stress-inducing agents with similar activities or synergistic activities with nelfinavir. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Alginate Oligosaccharide Prevents Acute Doxorubicin Cardiotoxicity by Suppressing Oxidative Stress and Endoplasmic Reticulum-Mediated Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jun-Jie; Ma, Lei-Lei; Shi, Hong-Tao; Zhu, Jian-Bing; Wu, Jian; Ding, Zhi-Wen; An, Yi; Zou, Yun-Zeng; Ge, Jun-Bo

    2016-12-20

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is a highly potent chemotherapeutic agent, but its usage is limited by dose-dependent cardiotoxicity. DOX-induced cardiotoxicity involves increased oxidative stress and activated endoplasmic reticulum-mediated apoptosis. Alginate oligosaccharide (AOS) is a non-immunogenic, non-toxic and biodegradable polymer, with anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory and anti-endoplasmic reticulum stress properties. The present study examined whether AOS pretreatment could protect against acute DOX cardiotoxicity, and the underlying mechanisms focused on oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum-mediated apoptosis. We found that AOS pretreatment markedly increased the survival rate of mice insulted with DOX, improved DOX-induced cardiac dysfunction and attenuated DOX-induced myocardial apoptosis. AOS pretreatment mitigated DOX-induced cardiac oxidative stress, as shown by the decreased expressions of gp91 (phox) and 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE). Moreover, AOS pretreatment significantly decreased the expression of Caspase-12, C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) (markers for endoplasmic reticulum-mediated apoptosis) and Bax (a downstream molecule of CHOP), while up-regulating the expression of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. Taken together, these findings identify AOS as a potent compound that prevents acute DOX cardiotoxicity, at least in part, by suppression of oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum-mediated apoptosis.

  13. Ibutilide protects against cardiomyocytes injury via inhibiting endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondrial stress pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Wang, Yi-Li; Huang, Xia; Yang, Yang; Zhao, Ya-Jun; Wei, Cheng-Xi; Zhao, Ming

    2017-02-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a complex disease with multiple inter-relating causes culminating in rapid atrial activation and atrial structural remodeling. The contribution of endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria stress to AF has been highlighted. As the class III antiarrhythmic agent, ibutilide are widely used to AF. This study was designed to explore whether ibutilide could treat AF by inhibiting endoplasmic reticulum stress pathways and mitochondria stress. The neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were isolated and exposed to H2O2, ibutilide was add to the culture medium 12 h. Then the cell viability, oxidative stress levels and apoptotic rate were analyzed. In addition, endoplasmic reticulum stress related protein (GRP78, GRP94, CHOP), mitochondria-dependent protein (Bax, Bcl-2) and caspase-3/9/12 were identified by real-time PCR and western blot analysis. In our results, remarkable decreased cell viability and oxidative stress levels were detected in cardiomyocytes after treating with H2O2. The apoptotic rate and the expression of proteins involved in mitochondrial stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress pathways increased. While ibutilide significantly inhibited these changes. These data suggested that ibutilide serves a protective role against H2O2-induced apoptosis of neonatal rat cardiomyocytes, and the mechanism is related to suppression of mitochondrial stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress.

  14. Endoplasmic reticulum stress in pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy and effect of calcium dobesilate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Min Gui

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the mechanism of endoplasmic reticulum stress in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy and effect of calcium dobesilate. Methods: A total of 120 diabetic retinopathy patients treated in our hospital from January 2010 to September 2015 were enrolled in this article. The serum endoplasmic reticulum stress protein and interleukin protein expression levels were analyzed before and after calcium dobesilate treatment. A total of 55 cases of healthy subjects receiving physical examination in our hospital during the same period were taken as control group. Results: Serum endoplasmic reticulum stress proteins PERK, CHOP and IRE as well as interleukin proteins IL1, IL2, IL6 and IL10 expression significantly increased, serum MDA level significantly increased while SOD, CAT and GSHpx levels significantly decreased in diabetic retinopathy patients, and compared with control group (P<0.01; after calcium dobesilate treatment, above factors were significantly restored (P<0.01. Conclusions: Diabetic retinopathy is closely related to endoplasmic reticulum stress and calcium dobesilate treatment may improve diabetic retinopathy by inhibiting endoplasmic reticulum stress.

  15. PARM-1 is an endoplasmic reticulum molecule involved in endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced apoptosis in rat cardiac myocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Isodono

    Full Text Available To identify novel transmembrane and secretory molecules expressed in cardiac myocytes, signal sequence trap screening was performed in rat neonatal cardiac myocytes. One of the molecules identified was a transmembrane protein, prostatic androgen repressed message-1 (PARM-1. While PARM-1 has been identified as a gene induced in prostate in response to castration, its function is largely unknown. Our expression analysis revealed that PARM-1 was specifically expressed in hearts and skeletal muscles, and in the heart, cardiac myocytes, but not non-myocytes expressed PARM-1. Immunofluorescent staining showed that PARM-1 was predominantly localized in endoplasmic reticulum (ER. In Dahl salt-sensitive rats, high-salt diet resulted in hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy and subsequent heart failure, and significantly stimulated PARM-1 expression in the hearts, with a concomitant increase in ER stress markers such as GRP78 and CHOP. In cultured cardiac myocytes, PARM-1 expression was stimulated by proinflammatory cytokines, but not by hypertrophic stimuli. A marked increase in PARM-1 expression was observed in response to ER stress inducers such as thapsigargin and tunicamycin, which also induced apoptotic cell death. Silencing PARM-1 expression by siRNAs enhanced apoptotic response in cardiac myocytes to ER stresses. PARM-1 silencing also repressed expression of PERK and ATF6, and augmented expression of CHOP without affecting IRE-1 expression and JNK and Caspase-12 activation. Thus, PARM-1 expression is induced by ER stress, which plays a protective role in cardiac myocytes through regulating PERK, ATF6 and CHOP expression. These results suggested that PARM-1 is a novel ER transmembrane molecule involved in cardiac remodeling in hypertensive heart disease.

  16. Autophagic regulation of smooth muscle cell biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua K. Salabei

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy regulates the metabolism, survival, and function of numerous cell types, including those comprising the cardiovascular system. In the vasculature, changes in autophagy have been documented in atherosclerotic and restenotic lesions and in hypertensive vessels. The biology of vascular smooth muscle cells appears particularly sensitive to changes in the autophagic program. Recent evidence indicates that stimuli or stressors evoked during the course of vascular disease can regulate autophagic activity, resulting in modulation of VSMC phenotype and viability. In particular, certain growth factors and cytokines, oxygen tension, and pharmacological drugs have been shown to trigger autophagy in smooth muscle cells. Importantly, each of these stimuli has a redox component, typically associated with changes in the abundance of reactive oxygen, nitrogen, or lipid species. Collective findings support the hypothesis that autophagy plays a critical role in vascular remodeling by regulating smooth muscle cell phenotype transitions and by influencing the cellular response to stress. In this graphical review, we summarize current knowledge on the role of autophagy in the biology of the smooth muscle cell in (pathophysiology.

  17. Interval Forecast for Smooth Transition Autoregressive Model ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, we propose a simple method for constructing interval forecast for smooth transition autoregressive (STAR) model. This interval forecast is based on bootstrapping the residual error of the estimated STAR model for each forecast horizon and computing various Akaike information criterion (AIC) function. This new ...

  18. Full Waveform Inversion Using Nonlinearly Smoothed Wavefields

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Y.

    2017-05-26

    The lack of low frequency information in the acquired data makes full waveform inversion (FWI) conditionally converge to the accurate solution. An initial velocity model that results in data with events within a half cycle of their location in the observed data was required to converge. The multiplication of wavefields with slightly different frequencies generates artificial low frequency components. This can be effectively utilized by multiplying the wavefield with itself, which is nonlinear operation, followed by a smoothing operator to extract the artificially produced low frequency information. We construct the objective function using the nonlinearly smoothed wavefields with a global-correlation norm to properly handle the energy imbalance in the nonlinearly smoothed wavefield. Similar to the multi-scale strategy, we progressively reduce the smoothing width applied to the multiplied wavefield to welcome higher resolution. We calculate the gradient of the objective function using the adjoint-state technique, which is similar to the conventional FWI except for the adjoint source. Examples on the Marmousi 2 model demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed FWI method to mitigate the cycle-skipping problem in the case of a lack of low frequency information.

  19. Smooth rank one perturbations of selfadjoint operators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hassi, Seppo; Snoo, H.S.V. de; Willemsma, A.D.I.

    Let A be a selfadjoint operator in a Hilbert space aleph with inner product [.,.]. The rank one perturbations of A have the form A+tau [.,omega]omega, tau epsilon R, for some element omega epsilon aleph. In this paper we consider smooth perturbations, i.e. we consider omega epsilon dom \\A\\(k/2) for

  20. Role of Smooth Muscle in Intestinal Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen M Collins

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The notion that smooth muscle function is altered in inflammation is prompted by clinical observations of altered motility in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. While altered motility may reflect inflammation-induced changes in intrinsic or extrinsic nerves to the gut, changes in gut hormone release and changes in muscle function, recent studies have provided in vitro evidence of altered muscle contractility in muscle resected from patients with ulcerative colitis or Crohn’s disease. In addition, the observation that smooth muscle cells are more numerous and prominent in the strictured bowel of IBD patients compared with controls suggests that inflammation may alter the growth of intestinal smooth muscle. Thus, inflammation is associated with changes in smooth muscle growth and contractility that, in turn, contribute to important symptoms of IBD including diarrhea (from altered motility and pain (via either altered motility or stricture formation. The involvement of smooth muscle in this context may be as an innocent bystander, where cells and products of the inflammatory process induce alterations in muscle contractility and growth. However, it is likely that intestinal muscle cells play a more active role in the inflammatory process via the elaboration of mediators and trophic factors, including cytokines, and via the production of collagen. The concept of muscle cells as active participants in the intestinal inflammatory process is a new concept that is under intense study. This report summarizes current knowledge as it relates to these two aspects of altered muscle function (growth and contractility in the inflamed intestine, and will focus on mechanisms underlying these changes, based on data obtained from animal models of intestinal inflammation.

  1. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Homeostasis in Reproductive Physiology and Pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzel, Elif; Arlier, Sefa; Guzeloglu-Kayisli, Ozlem; Tabak, Mehmet Selcuk; Ekiz, Tugba; Semerci, Nihan; Larsen, Kellie; Schatz, Frederick; Lockwood, Charles Joseph; Kayisli, Umit Ali

    2017-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER), comprises 60% of the total cell membrane and interacts directly or indirectly with several cell organelles i.e., Golgi bodies, mitochondria and proteasomes. The ER is usually associated with large numbers of attached ribosomes. During evolution, ER developed as the specific cellular site of synthesis, folding, modification and trafficking of secretory and cell-surface proteins. The ER is also the major intracellular calcium storage compartment that maintains cellular calcium homeostasis. During the production of functionally effective proteins, several ER-specific molecular steps sense quantity and quality of synthesized proteins as well as proper folding into their native structures. During this process, excess accumulation of unfolded/misfolded proteins in the ER lumen results in ER stress, the homeostatic coping mechanism that activates an ER-specific adaptation program, (the unfolded protein response; UPR) to increase ER-associated degradation of structurally and/or functionally defective proteins, thus sustaining ER homeostasis. Impaired ER homeostasis results in aberrant cellular responses, contributing to the pathogenesis of various diseases. Both female and male reproductive tissues undergo highly dynamic cellular, molecular and genetic changes such as oogenesis and spermatogenesis starting in prenatal life, mainly controlled by sex-steroids but also cytokines and growth factors throughout reproductive life. These reproductive changes require ER to provide extensive protein synthesis, folding, maturation and then their trafficking to appropriate cellular location as well as destroying unfolded/misfolded proteins via activating ER-associated degradation mediated proteasomes. Many studies have now shown roles for ER stress/UPR signaling cascades in the endometrial menstrual cycle, ovarian folliculogenesis and oocyte maturation, spermatogenesis, fertilization, pre-implantation embryo development and pregnancy and parturition

  2. The Role of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Unfolded Protein Response in Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, Ekaterina A; Orekhov, Alexander N

    2016-02-01

    Pathogenesis of atherosclerosis is a complex process involving several metabolic and signalling pathways. Accumulating evidence demonstrates that endoplasmic reticulum stress and associated apoptosis can be induced in the pathological conditions of atherosclerotic lesions and contribute to the disease progression. Notably, they may play a role in the development of vulnerable plaques that induce thrombosis and are therefore especially dangerous. Endoplasmic reticulum stress response is regulated by several signaling mechanisms that involve protein kinases and transcription factors. Some of these molecules can be regarded as potential therapeutic targets to improve treatment of atherosclerosis. In this review we will discuss the role of endoplasmic reticulum stress and apoptosis in atherosclerosis development in different cell types and summarize the current knowledge on potential therapeutic agents targeting molecules regulating these pathways and their possible use for anti-atherosclerotic therapy.

  3. Cloning of sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ -ATPase (SERCA) from Caribbean spiny lobster Panulirus argus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, A; Arunachalam, S C; Meleshkevitch, E A; Mandal, P K; Boudko, D Y; Ahearn, G A

    2009-02-01

    We have previously reported on calcium transport mechanisms in American lobster, Homarus americanus, using (45)Ca(2+) coupled with vesicle preparations of hepatopancreatic endoplasmic reticulum. The active transport of calcium across membranes bordering calcium-sequestering stores such as sarcoplasmic or endoplasmic reticulum is catalyzed by membrane-spanning proteins, the sarco-endoplasmic Ca(2+)-ATPases (SERCAs). In the study described here we used advanced bioinformatics and molecular techniques to clone SERCA from the economically important Caribbean spiny lobster, Panulirus argus. We report the complete cloning of a full-length SERCA from P. argus antenna cDNA (GenBank accession number AY702617). This cDNA has a 1020-amino acid residue open reading frame which is 90% identical to published sequences of other crustacean SERCA proteins. Our data support the hypothesis that one crustacean and three vertebrate genes controlling calcium transport were derived from a common ancestral gene.

  4. Penfluridol induces endoplasmic reticulum stress leading to autophagy in pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, Alok; German, Nadezhda; Mikelis, Constantinos; Srivenugopal, Kalkunte; Srivastava, Sanjay K

    2017-06-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive and difficult to treat cancers. Experimental and clinical evidence suggests that high basal state autophagy in pancreatic tumors could induce resistance to chemotherapy. Recently, we have demonstrated that penfluridol suppresses pancreatic tumor growth by autophagy-mediated apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo; however, the mechanism of autophagy induction by penfluridol was not clear. Several studies have established that endoplasmic reticulum stress could lead to autophagy and inhibit tumor progression. In this study, we demonstrated that penfluridol induced endoplasmic reticulum stress in BxPC-3, AsPC-1, and Panc-1 pancreatic cancer cell lines as indicated by upregulation of endoplasmic reticulum stress markers such as binding protein (BIP), C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) and inositol requiring 1α (IRE1α) after treatment with penfluridol in a concentration-dependent manner. Inhibiting endoplasmic reticulum stress by pretreatment with pharmacological inhibitors such as sodium phenylbutyrate and mithramycin or by silencing CHOP using CHOP small interfering RNA, blocked penfluridol-induced autophagy. These results clearly indicate that penfluridol-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress lead to autophagy in our model. Western blot analysis of subcutaneously implanted AsPC-1 and BxPC-3 tumors as well as orthotopically implanted Panc-1 tumors demonstrated upregulation of BIP, CHOP, and IRE1α expression in the tumor lysates from penfluridol-treated mice as compared to tumors from control mice. Altogether, our study establishes that penfluridol-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress leads to autophagy resulting in reduced pancreatic tumor growth. Our study opens a new therapeutic target for advanced chemotherapies against pancreatic cancer.

  5. Neuroprotective effects of atorvastatin against cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury through the inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jian-Wen; Hu, Zhi-Ping

    2015-08-01

    Cerebral ischemia triggers secondary ischemia/reperfusion injury and endoplasmic reticulum stress initiates cell apoptosis. However, the regulatory mechanism of the signaling pathway remains unclear. We hypothesize that the regulatory mechanisms are mediated by the protein kinase-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase/eukaryotic initiation factor 2α in the endoplasmic reticulum stress signaling pathway. To verify this hypothesis, we occluded the middle cerebral artery in rats to establish focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion model. Results showed that the expression levels of protein kinase-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase and caspase-3, as well as the phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2α, were increased after ischemia/reperfusion. Administration of atorvastatin decreased the expression of protein kinase-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase, caspase-3 and phosphorylated eukaryotic initiation factor 2α, reduced the infarct volume and improved ultrastructure in the rat brain. After salubrinal, the specific inhibitor of phosphorylated eukaryotic initiation factor 2α was given into the rats intragastrically, the expression levels of caspase-3 and phosphorylated eukaryotic initiation factor 2α in the were decreased, a reduction of the infarct volume and less ultrastructural damage were observed than the untreated, ischemic brain. However, salubrinal had no impact on the expression of protein kinase-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase. Experimental findings indicate that atorvastatin inhibits endoplasmic reticulum stress and exerts neuroprotective effects. The underlying mechanisms of attenuating ischemia/reperfusion injury are associated with the protein kinase-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase/eukaryotic initiation factor 2α/caspase-3 pathway.

  6. Endoplasmic reticulum proteins quality control and the unfolded protein response: the regulative mechanism of organisms against stress injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xi Ling; Gao, Dong Sheng

    2014-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum is the cellular compartment in which secretory proteins are synthesized and folded. Perturbations of endoplasmic reticulum homeostasis lead to the accumulation of unfolded proteins. The activation of the unfolded protein response during endoplasmic reticulum stress transmits information about the status of protein folding to the cytosol and nucleus. The unfolded protein response leads to the upregulation of genes encoding endoplasmic reticulum chaperones, attenuation of translation, and initiation of the endoplasmic reticulum quality control system to restore endoplasmic reticulum homeostasis. When the unfolded protein response is insufficient to rebuild the steady state in endoplasmic reticulum, the programmed cell death or apoptosis would be initiated, by triggering cell injuries, even to cell death through apoptosis signals. In this review, we briefly outline research on the chaperones and foldases conserved in eukaryotes and plants, and describe the general principles and mechanisms of the endoplasmic reticulum quality control and the unfolded protein response. We describe the current models for the molecular mechanism of the unfolded protein response in plants, and emphasize the role of inositol requiring enzyme-1-dependent network in the unfolded protein response. Finally, we give a general overview of the directions for future research on the unfolded protein response in plants and its role in the response to environmental stresses. © 2014 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  7. Proliferation and Morphogenesis of the Endoplasmic Reticulum Driven by the Membrane Domain of 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase in Plant Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrero, Sergi; Grados-Torrez, Ricardo Enrique; Leivar, Pablo; Antolín-Llovera, Meritxell; López-Iglesias, Carmen; Cortadellas, Nuria; Ferrer, Joan Carles; Campos, Narciso

    2015-07-01

    The enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) has a key regulatory role in the mevalonate pathway for isoprenoid biosynthesis and is composed of an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-anchoring membrane domain with low sequence similarity among eukaryotic kingdoms and a conserved cytosolic catalytic domain. Organized smooth endoplasmic reticulum (OSER) structures are common formations of hypertrophied tightly packed ER membranes devoted to specific biosynthetic and secretory functions, the biogenesis of which remains largely unexplored. We show that the membrane domain of plant HMGR suffices to trigger ER proliferation and OSER biogenesis. The proliferating membranes become highly enriched in HMGR protein, but they do not accumulate sterols, indicating a morphogenetic rather than a metabolic role for HMGR. The N-terminal MDVRRRPP motif present in most plant HMGR isoforms is not required for retention in the ER, which was previously proposed, but functions as an ER morphogenic signal. Plant OSER structures are morphologically similar to those of animal cells, emerge from tripartite ER junctions, and mainly build up beside the nuclear envelope, indicating conserved OSER biogenesis in high eukaryotes. Factors other than the OSER-inducing HMGR construct mediate the tight apposition of the proliferating membranes, implying separate ER proliferation and membrane association steps. Overexpression of the membrane domain of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) HMGR leads to ER hypertrophy in every tested cell type and plant species, whereas the knockout of the HMG1 gene from Arabidopsis, encoding its major HMGR isoform, causes ER aggregation at the nuclear envelope. Our results show that the membrane domain of HMGR contributes to ER morphogenesis in plant cells. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  8. A Systems Biological View of Life-and-Death Decision with Respect to Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress—The Role of PERK Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margita Márton

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Accumulation of misfolded/unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER leads to the activation of three branches (Protein kinase (RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase [PERK], Inositol requiring protein 1 [IRE-1] and Activating trascription factor 6 [ATF6], respectively of unfolded protein response (UPR. The primary role of UPR is to try to drive back the system to the former or a new homeostatic state by self-eating dependent autophagy, while excessive level of ER stress results in apoptotic cell death. Our study focuses on the role of PERK- and IRE-1-induced arms of UPR in life-or-death decision. Here we confirm that silencing of PERK extends autophagy-dependent survival, whereas the IRE-1-controlled apoptosis inducer is downregulated during ER stress. We also claim that the proper order of surviving and self-killing mechanisms is controlled by a positive feedback loop between PERK and IRE-1 branches. This regulatory network makes possible a smooth, continuous activation of autophagy with respect to ER stress, while the induction of apoptosis is irreversible and switch-like. Using our knowledge of molecular biological techniques and systems biological tools we give a qualitative description about the dynamical behavior of PERK- and IRE-1-controlled life-or-death decision. Our model claims that the two arms of UPR accomplish an altered upregulation of autophagy and apoptosis inducers during ER stress. Since ER stress is tightly connected to aging and age-related degenerative disorders, studying the signaling pathways of UPR and their role in maintaining ER proteostasis have medical importance.

  9. Role of epidermal growth factor receptor and endoplasmic reticulum stress in vascular remodeling induced by angiotensin II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayanagi, Takehiko; Kawai, Tatsuo; Forrester, Steven J; Obama, Takashi; Tsuji, Toshiyuki; Fukuda, Yamato; Elliott, Katherine J; Tilley, Douglas G; Davisson, Robin L; Park, Joon-Young; Eguchi, Satoru

    2015-06-01

    The mechanisms by which angiotensin II (AngII) elevates blood pressure and enhances end-organ damage seem to be distinct. However, the signal transduction cascade by which AngII specifically mediates vascular remodeling such as medial hypertrophy and perivascular fibrosis remains incomplete. We have previously shown that AngII-induced epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) transactivation is mediated by disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain 17 (ADAM17), and that this signaling is required for vascular smooth muscle cell hypertrophy but not for contractile signaling in response to AngII. Recent studies have implicated endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in hypertension. Interestingly, EGFR is capable of inducing ER stress. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that activation of EGFR and ER stress are critical components required for vascular remodeling but not hypertension induced by AngII. Mice were infused with AngII for 2 weeks with or without treatment of EGFR inhibitor, erlotinib, or ER chaperone, 4-phenylbutyrate. AngII infusion induced vascular medial hypertrophy in the heart, kidney and aorta, and perivascular fibrosis in heart and kidney, cardiac hypertrophy, and hypertension. Treatment with erlotinib as well as 4-phenylbutyrate attenuated vascular remodeling and cardiac hypertrophy but not hypertension. In addition, AngII infusion enhanced ADAM17 expression, EGFR activation, and ER/oxidative stress in the vasculature, which were diminished in both erlotinib-treated and 4-phenylbutyrate-treated mice. ADAM17 induction and EGFR activation by AngII in vascular cells were also prevented by inhibition of EGFR or ER stress. In conclusion, AngII induces vascular remodeling by EGFR activation and ER stress via a signaling mechanism involving ADAM17 induction independent of hypertension. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Semiparametric smoothing of discrete failure time data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Prakash N; Bagkavos, Dimitrios

    2012-01-01

    An estimator of the hazard rate function from discrete failure time data is obtained by semiparametric smoothing of the (nonsmooth) maximum likelihood estimator, which is achieved by repeated multiplication of a Markov chain transition-type matrix. This matrix is constructed so as to have a given standard discrete parametric hazard rate model, termed the vehicle model, as its stationary hazard rate. As with the discrete density estimation case, the proposed estimator gives improved performance when the vehicle model is a good one and otherwise provides a nonparametric method comparable to the only purely nonparametric smoother discussed in the literature. The proposed semiparametric smoothing approach is then extended to hazard models with covariates and is illustrated by applications to simulated and real data sets. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Tame geometry with application in smooth analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Yomdin, Yosef

    2004-01-01

    The Morse-Sard theorem is a rather subtle result and the interplay between the high-order analytic structure of the mappings involved and their geometry rarely becomes apparent. The main reason is that the classical Morse-Sard theorem is basically qualitative. This volume gives a proof and also an "explanation" of the quantitative Morse-Sard theorem and related results, beginning with the study of polynomial (or tame) mappings. The quantitative questions, answered by a combination of the methods of real semialgebraic and tame geometry and integral geometry, turn out to be nontrivial and highly productive. The important advantage of this approach is that it allows the separation of the role of high differentiability and that of algebraic geometry in a smooth setting: all the geometrically relevant phenomena appear already for polynomial mappings. The geometric properties obtained are "stable with respect to approximation", and can be imposed on smooth functions via polynomial approximation.

  12. Cortex phellodendri Extract Relaxes Airway Smooth Muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Qiu-Ju Jiang; Weiwei Chen; Hong Dan; Li Tan; He Zhu; Guangzhong Yang; Jinhua Shen; Yong-Bo Peng; Ping Zhao; Lu Xue; Meng-Fei Yu; Liqun Ma; Xiao-Tang Si; Zhuo Wang; Jiapei Dai

    2016-01-01

    Cortex phellodendri is used to reduce fever and remove dampness and toxin. Berberine is an active ingredient of C. phellodendri. Berberine from Argemone ochroleuca can relax airway smooth muscle (ASM); however, whether the nonberberine component of C. phellodendri has similar relaxant action was unclear. An n-butyl alcohol extract of C. phellodendri (NBAECP, nonberberine component) was prepared, which completely inhibits high K+- and acetylcholine- (ACH-) induced precontraction of airway smoo...

  13. Endoplasmic reticulum stress sensor protein kinase R-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) protects against pressure overload-induced heart failure and lung remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoyu; Kwak, Dongmin; Lu, Zhongbing; Xu, Xin; Fassett, John; Wang, Huan; Wei, Yidong; Cavener, Douglas R; Hu, Xinli; Hall, Jennifer; Bache, Robert J; Chen, Yingjie

    2014-10-01

    Studies have reported that development of congestive heart failure is associated with increased endoplasmic reticulum stress. Double stranded RNA-activated protein kinase R-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) is a major transducer of the endoplasmic reticulum stress response and directly phosphorylates eukaryotic initiation factor 2α, resulting in translational attenuation. However, the physiological effect of PERK on congestive heart failure development is unknown. To study the effect of PERK on ventricular structure and function, we generated inducible cardiac-specific PERK knockout mice. Under unstressed conditions, cardiac PERK knockout had no effect on left ventricular mass, or its ratio to body weight, cardiomyocyte size, fibrosis, or left ventricular function. However, in response to chronic transverse aortic constriction, PERK knockout mice exhibited decreased ejection fraction, increased left ventricular fibrosis, enhanced cardiomyocyte apoptosis, and exacerbated lung remodeling in comparison with wild-type mice. PERK knockout also dramatically attenuated cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase expression in response to aortic constriction. Our findings suggest that PERK is required to protect the heart from pressure overload-induced congestive heart failure. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. On the thermodynamics of smooth muscle contraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stålhand, Jonas; McMeeking, Robert M.; Holzapfel, Gerhard A.

    2016-09-01

    Cell function is based on many dynamically complex networks of interacting biochemical reactions. Enzymes may increase the rate of only those reactions that are thermodynamically consistent. In this paper we specifically treat the contraction of smooth muscle cells from the continuum thermodynamics point of view by considering them as an open system where matter passes through the cell membrane. We systematically set up a well-known four-state kinetic model for the cross-bridge interaction of actin and myosin in smooth muscle, where the transition between each state is driven by forward and reverse reactions. Chemical, mechanical and energy balance laws are provided in local forms, while energy balance is also formulated in the more convenient temperature form. We derive the local (non-negative) production of entropy from which we deduce the reduced entropy inequality and the constitutive equations for the first Piola-Kirchhoff stress tensor, the heat flux, the ion and molecular flux and the entropy. One example for smooth muscle contraction is analyzed in more detail in order to provide orientation within the established general thermodynamic framework. In particular the stress evolution, heat generation, muscle shorting rate and a condition for muscle cooling are derived.

  15. Brain endoplasmic reticulum stress mechanistically distinguishes the saline-intake and hypertensive response to deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Fusakazu; Jo, Hiromi; Hilzendeger, Aline M; Thompson, Anthony P; Cassell, Martin D; Rutkowski, D Thomas; Davisson, Robin L; Grobe, Justin L; Sigmund, Curt D

    2015-06-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum stress has become an important mechanism in hypertension. We examined the role of endoplasmic reticulum stress in mediating the increased saline-intake and hypertensive effects in response to deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-salt. Intracerebroventricular delivery of the endoplasmic reticulum stress-reducing chemical chaperone tauroursodeoxycholic acid did not affect the magnitude of hypertension, but markedly decreased saline-intake in response to DOCA-salt. Increased saline-intake returned after tauroursodeoxycholic acid was terminated. Decreased saline-intake was also observed after intracerebroventricular infusion of 4-phenylbutyrate, another chemical chaperone. Immunoreactivity to CCAAT homologous binding protein, a marker of irremediable endoplasmic reticulum stress, was increased in the subfornical organ and supraoptic nucleus of DOCA-salt mice, but the signal was absent in control and CCAAT homologous binding protein-deficient mice. Electron microscopy revealed abnormalities in endoplasmic reticulum structure (decrease in membrane length, swollen membranes, and decreased ribosome numbers) in the subfornical organ consistent with endoplasmic reticulum stress. Subfornical organ-targeted adenoviral delivery of GRP78, a resident endoplasmic reticulum chaperone, decreased DOCA-salt-induced saline-intake. The increase in saline-intake in response to DOCA-salt was blunted in CCAAT homologous binding protein-deficient mice, but these mice exhibited a normal hypertensive response. We conclude that (1) brain endoplasmic reticulum stress mediates the saline-intake, but not blood pressure response to DOCA-salt, (2) DOCA-salt causes endoplasmic reticulum stress in the subfornical organ, which when attenuated by GRP78 blunts saline-intake, and (3) CCAAT homologous binding protein may play a functional role in DOCA-salt-induced saline-intake. The results suggest a mechanistic distinction between the importance of endoplasmic reticulum stress in

  16. How Do Families Smooth Household Heads` Earnings Volatility?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ki Seong Park; ; Dong Gyun Shin

    2010-01-01

    ...` earnings is almost entirely smoothed. The most effective measure of smoothing heads` earnings volatility is income from self-employment, with the next most effective being labor income of other family members...

  17. Smoothed nonparametric estimation for current status competing risks data

    OpenAIRE

    Chenxi Li; Jason P. Fine

    2013-01-01

    We study the nonparametric estimation of the cumulative incidence function and the cause-specific hazard function for current status data with competing risks via kernel smoothing. A smoothed naive nonparametric maximum likelihood estimator and a smoothed full nonparametric maximum likelihood estimator are shown to have pointwise asymptotic normality and faster convergence rates than the corresponding unsmoothed nonparametric likelihood estimators. Using the smoothed estimators and the plug-i...

  18. Smooth Fano polytopes can not be inductively constructed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øbro, Mikkel

    2008-01-01

    We examine a concrete smooth Fano 5-polytope $P$ with 8 vertices with the following properties: There does not exist a smooth Fano 5-polytope $Q$ with 7 vertices such that $P$ contains $Q$, and there does not exist a smooth Fano 5-polytope $R$ with 9 vertices such that $R$ contains $P$. As the po...

  19. Assembly of rat hepatic very low density lipoproteins in the endoplasmic reticulum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rusiñol, A; Verkade, H; Vance, J E

    1993-01-01

    The intracellular site of assembly of hepatic very low density lipoproteins has been investigated. Two endoplasmic reticulum fractions and Golgi vesicles (relatively free from endosomal contamination) were isolated from rat liver and the luminal contents were released. The apoB-containing entities

  20. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Unfolded Protein Response in Cartilage Pathophysiology; Contributing Factors to Apoptosis and Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandria Hughes

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Chondrocytes of the growth plate undergo apoptosis during the process of endochondral ossification, as well as during the progression of osteoarthritis. Although the regulation of this process is not completely understood, alterations in the precisely orchestrated programmed cell death during development can have catastrophic results, as exemplified by several chondrodystrophies which are frequently accompanied by early onset osteoarthritis. Understanding the mechanisms that underlie chondrocyte apoptosis during endochondral ossification in the growth plate has the potential to impact the development of therapeutic applications for chondrodystrophies and associated early onset osteoarthritis. In recent years, several chondrodysplasias and collagenopathies have been recognized as protein-folding diseases that lead to endoplasmic reticulum stress, endoplasmic reticulum associated degradation, and the unfolded protein response. Under conditions of prolonged endoplasmic reticulum stress in which the protein folding load outweighs the folding capacity of the endoplasmic reticulum, cellular dysfunction and death often occur. However, unfolded protein response (UPR signaling is also required for the normal maturation of chondrocytes and osteoblasts. Understanding how UPR signaling may contribute to cartilage pathophysiology is an essential step toward therapeutic modulation of skeletal disorders that lead to osteoarthritis.

  1. Lipid-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Beek, Malu-Clair; Ofman, Rob; Dijkstra, Inge; Wijburg, Frits; Engelen, Marc; Wanders, Ronald; Kemp, Stephan

    2017-09-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that is caused by mutations in the ABCD1 gene and characterized by elevated levels of very long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA) in plasma and tissues, with the most pronounced increase in the central nervous system. Virtually all male patients develop adrenal insufficiency and myelopathy (adrenomyeloneuropathy), but a subset develops a fatal cerebral demyelinating disease (known as cerebral ALD). Female patients may also develop myelopathy, but adrenal insufficiency or leukodystrophy are very rare. ALD has been associated with mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress and bioenergetic failure, but the mechanism by which VLCFA accumulation triggers these effects has not been resolved thus far. In this study, we used primary human fibroblasts from normal subjects and ALD patients to investigate whether VLCFA can induce endoplasmic reticulum stress. We show that saturated VLCFA (C26:0) induce endoplasmic reticulum stress in fibroblasts from ALD patients, but not in controls. Furthermore, there is a clear correlation between the chain-length of the fatty acid and the induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress. Exposure of ALD fibroblasts to C26:0, resulted in increased expression of additional endoplasmic reticulum stress markers (EDEM1, GADD34 and CHOP) and in lipoapoptosis. This new insight into the underlying mechanism of VLCFA-induced toxicity is of great importance for the development of a disease modifying treatment for ALD aimed at the normalization of VLCFA levels in tissues. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Role of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Silica-induced Apoptosis in RAW264.7 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yong Bin; Wu, Xia; Qin, Xiao Feng; Wang, Lei; Pan, Pin Hua

    2017-08-01

    We investigated the role of endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) in silica-induced apoptosis in alveolar macrophages in vitro. RAW264.7 cells were incubated with 200 μg/mL silica for different time periods. Cell viability was assayed by the MTT assay. Cell apoptosis was evaluated by DAPI staining, flow cytometry analysis, and Western blot analysis of caspase-3. Morphological changes in the endoplasmic reticulum were observed by transmission electron microscopy. The expression of ERS markers binding protein (BiP) and CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP) was examined by Western blotting and real-time PCR. As an inhibitor of ERS, 4-phenylbutyric acid (4-PBA) was used in the experiments. Silica exposure induced nuclear condensation and caspase-3 expression in RAW264.7 cells. The number of apoptotic cells increased after silica exposure in a time-dependent manner. Silica treatment induced expansion of the endoplasmic reticulum. In addition, the expression of BiP and CHOP increased in silica-stimulated cells. Furthermore, 4-PBA treatment inhibited silica-induced endoplasmic reticulum expansion and the expression of BiP and CHOP. Moreover, 4-PBA treatment attenuated nuclear condensation, reduced apoptotic cells, and downregulated caspase-3 expression in silica-stimulated cells. Silica-induced ERS is involved in the apoptosis of alveolar macrophages. Copyright © 2017 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by China CDC. All rights reserved.

  3. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Unfolded Protein Response in Cartilage Pathophysiology; Contributing Factors to Apoptosis and Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Alexandria; Oxford, Alexandra E; Tawara, Ken; Jorcyk, Cheryl L; Oxford, Julia Thom

    2017-03-20

    Chondrocytes of the growth plate undergo apoptosis during the process of endochondral ossification, as well as during the progression of osteoarthritis. Although the regulation of this process is not completely understood, alterations in the precisely orchestrated programmed cell death during development can have catastrophic results, as exemplified by several chondrodystrophies which are frequently accompanied by early onset osteoarthritis. Understanding the mechanisms that underlie chondrocyte apoptosis during endochondral ossification in the growth plate has the potential to impact the development of therapeutic applications for chondrodystrophies and associated early onset osteoarthritis. In recent years, several chondrodysplasias and collagenopathies have been recognized as protein-folding diseases that lead to endoplasmic reticulum stress, endoplasmic reticulum associated degradation, and the unfolded protein response. Under conditions of prolonged endoplasmic reticulum stress in which the protein folding load outweighs the folding capacity of the endoplasmic reticulum, cellular dysfunction and death often occur. However, unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling is also required for the normal maturation of chondrocytes and osteoblasts. Understanding how UPR signaling may contribute to cartilage pathophysiology is an essential step toward therapeutic modulation of skeletal disorders that lead to osteoarthritis.

  4. Protein translocation across the endoplasmic reticulum membrane in cold-adapted organisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Römisch, Karin; Collie, Nicola; Soto, Nelyn; Logue, James; Lindsay, Margaret; Scheper, Wiep; Cheng, Chi-Hing C.

    2003-01-01

    Secretory proteins enter the secretory pathway by translocation across the membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) via a channel formed primarily by the Sec61 protein. Protein translocation is highly temperature dependent in mesophilic organisms. We asked whether the protein translocation

  5. Ceramide transport from endoplasmic reticulum to Golgi apparatus is not vesicle-mediated

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, JW; Babia, T; Klappe, K; Egea, G; Hoekstra, D

    1998-01-01

    Ceramide (Cer) transfer from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the Golgi apparatus was measured under conditions that block vesicle-mediated protein transfer. This was done either in intact cells by reducing the incubation temperature to 15 degrees C, or in streptolysin O-permeabilized cells by

  6. Grab a Golgi: Laser trapping of golgi bodies reveals in vivo Interactions with the endoplasmic reticulum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sparkes, I.A.; Ketelaar, T.; Ruijter, de N.C.A.; Hawes, C.

    2009-01-01

    In many vacuolate plant cells individual Golgi bodies appear to be attached to tubules of the pleiomorphic cortical endoplasmic reticulum (ER) network. Such observations culminated in the controversial mobile secretory unit hypothesis to explain transport of cargo from the ER to Golgi via Golgi

  7. Endoplasmic reticulum stress suppressive compounds from the edible mushroom Mycoleptodonoides aitchisonii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jae-Hoon; Suzuki, Tomohiro; Okumura, Hiroshi; Noguchi, Keiichi; Kondo, Mitsuru; Nagai, Kaoru; Hirai, Hirofumi; Kawagishi, Hirokazu

    2014-07-25

    Two novel compounds, 1 and 7, along with six known compounds (2-6 and 8), were isolated from the edible mushroom Mycoleptodonoides aitchisonii (bunaharitake in Japanese). The structures of the new compounds were determined by the interpretation of spectroscopic data. Compounds 1-4 and 6-8 showed protective activity against endoplasmic reticulum stress-dependent cell death.

  8. Hyperactivity of the Ero1α Oxidase Elicits Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress but No Broad Antioxidant Response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Henning Gram; Schmidt, Jonas Damgard; Soltoft, Cecilie Lutzen

    2012-01-01

    Oxidizing equivalents for the process of oxidative protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of mammalian cells are mainly provided by the Ero1α oxidase. The molecular mechanisms that regulate Ero1α activity in order to harness its oxidative power are quite well understood. However, the o...

  9. Increased endoplasmic reticulum stress in mouse osteocytes with aging alters Cox-2 response to mechanical stimuli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chalil, S.; Jaspers, R.T.; Manders, R.J.; Klein-Nulend, J.; Bakker, A.D.; Deldicque, L.

    2015-01-01

    Aging reduces bone mass as well as the anabolic response of bone to mechanical stimuli, resulting in osteopenia. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress impairs the response of myogenic cells to anabolic stimuli, and is involved in sarcopenia, but whether ER stress also contributes to osteopenia is

  10. Management of the endoplasmic reticulum stress by activation of the heat shock response in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Jin; Tang, Hongting; Liu, Zihe

    2014-01-01

    In yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, accumulation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) causes ER stress and activates the unfolded protein response (UPR), which is mediated by Hac1p. The heat shock response (HSR) mediated by Hsf1p, mainly regulates cytosolic processes and protects...

  11. Mitochondrial metabolism and the control of vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario eChiong

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Differentiation and dedifferentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs are essential processes of vascular development. VSMCs have biosynthetic, proliferative and contractile roles in the vessel wall. Alterations in the differentiated state of the VSMCs play a critical role in the pathogenesis of a variety of cardiovascular diseases, including atherosclerosis, hypertension and vascular stenosis. This review provides an overview of the current state of knowledge of molecular mechanisms involved in the control of VSMC proliferation, with particular focus on mitochondrial metabolism. Mitochondrial activity can be controlled by regulating mitochondrial dynamics, i.e. mitochondrial fusion and fission, and by regulating mitochondrial calcium handling through the interaction with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. Alterations in both VSMC proliferation and mitochondrial function can be triggered by dysregulation of mitofusin-2, a small GTPase associated with mitochondrial fusion and mitochondrial-ER interaction. Several lines of evidence highlight the relevance of mitochondrial metabolism in the control of VSMC proliferation, indicating a new area to be explored in the treatment of vascular diseases.

  12. Sources of calcium in agonist-induced contraction of rat distal colon smooth muscle in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hua; Kong, De-Hu; Pan, Qun-Wan; Wang, Hai-Hua

    2008-02-21

    To study the origin of calcium necessary for agonist-induced contraction of the distal colon in rats. The change in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) evoked by elevating external Ca2+ was detected by fura 2/AM fluorescence. Contractile activity was measured with a force displacement transducer. Tension was continuously monitored and recorded using a Powerlab 4/25T data acquisition system with an ML110 bridge bioelectric physiographic amplifier. Store depletion induced Ca2+ influx had an effect on [Ca2+]i. In nominally Ca2+-free medium, the sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase inhibitor thapsigargin (1 mumol/L) increased [Ca2+]i from 68 to 241 nmol/L, and to 458 (P source of activator Ca2+ for the contractile response to agonist is extracellular Ca2+, and intracellular Ca2+ has little role to play in mediating excitation-contraction coupling by agonists in rat distal colon smooth muscle in vitro. The influx of extracellular Ca2+ is mainly mediated through voltage-, receptor- and store-operated Ca2+ channels, which can be used as an alternative to develop new drugs targeted on the dysfunction of digestive tract motility.

  13. [Effect of endoplasmic reticulum stress in trophocytes on the pathogenesis of intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Y; Zhou, C L; Yu, T T; Han, X J; Shi, H Y; Wang, H Z; Shen, J J; He, J

    2017-06-25

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of endoplasmic reticulum stress in trophocytes, in patients with intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP). Methods: Sixty-one pregnant women who were hospitalized in Women's Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University from January to December 2015 were recruited. Thirty-one women who were diagnosed as ICP were defined as the ICP group and 30 healthy pregnant women were defined as the control group. The localization and expression intensity of glucose regulated protein 78 (GRP-78) in placental tissues were detected by immunohistochemistry technique. Electronic microscope was used to observe ultra-microstructure change of the endoplasmic reticulum in trophocytes and cell line Swan71. Reverse transcription (RT)-PCR and western blot were used to investigate the expression of GRP-78 mRNA and protein in Swan 71 cell. Results: (1) GRP-78 protein was mainly expressed in the cytoplasm of cytotrophoblasts and syncytiotrophoblasts. The protein expression of GRP-78 in placentas of the ICP group (13.2±2.4) was significantly higher than that in the control group (7.8±1.3, Preticulum did not increase and the microvilli developed well, with no swelling and no expansion of endoplasmic reticulum in the control group.In the ICP group, microvilli injury, endoplasmic reticulum edema were found; the volume of endoplasmic reticulum increased, with dilation, vacuolation and significant degranulation. After treated with 100 μmol/L cholyglycine for 24 hours, universal dilatation of the endoplasmic reticulum were seen in the Swan71 cells. (3) In Swan71 cells, cholylglycine displayed a concentration-dependent up-regulation on the expression of GRP-78. The expressions of GRP-78 mRNA in 0, 25, 50, 100 μmol/L cholylglycine experimental group were 1.01±0.17, 2.17±0.16, 5.47±0.36, 5.65±0.82, respectively. The expression of GRP-78 protein in 0, 25, 50, 100 μmol/L cholylglycine experimental group were 1.01±0.04, 1.17±0.15, 1.33±0.13, 1.73±0

  14. Brucella Rough Mutant Induce Macrophage Death via Activating IRE1α Pathway of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress by Enhanced T4SS Secretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Li

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Brucella is a Gram-negative facultative intracellular pathogen that causes the worldwide zoonosis, known as brucellosis. Brucella virulence relies mostly on its ability to invade and replicate within phagocytic cells. The type IV secretion system (T4SS and lipopolysaccharide are two major Brucella virulence factors. Brucella rough mutants reportedly induce the death of infected macrophages, which is T4SS dependent. However, the underlying molecular mechanism remains unclear. In this study, the T4SS secretion capacities of Brucella rough mutant and its smooth wild-type strain were comparatively investigated, by constructing the firefly luciferase fused T4SS effector, BPE123 and VceC. In addition, quantitative real-time PCR and western blotting were used to analyze the T4SS expression. The results showed that T4SS expression and secretion were enhanced significantly in the Brucella rough mutant. We also found that the activity of the T4SS virB operon promoter was notably increased in the Brucella rough mutant, which depends on quorum sensing-related regulators of VjbR upregulation. Cell infection and cell death assays revealed that deletion of vjbR in the Brucella rough mutant absolutely abolished cytotoxicity within macrophages by downregulating T4SS expression. This suggests that up-regulation of T4SS promoted by VjbR in rough mutant ΔrfbE contribute to macrophage death. In addition, we found that the Brucella rough mutant induce macrophage death via activating IRE1α pathway of endoplasmic reticulum stress. Taken together, our study provide evidence that in comparison to the Brucella smooth wild-type strain, VjbR upregulation in the Brucella rough mutant increases transcription of the virB operon, resulting in overexpression of the T4SS gene, accompanied by the over-secretion of effecter proteins, thereby causing the death of infected macrophages via activating IRE1α pathway of endoplasmic reticulum stress, suggesting novel insights into the

  15. Smoothed Analysis for the Conjugate Gradient Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Govind; Trogdon, Thomas

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to establish bounds on the rate of convergence of the conjugate gradient algorithm when the underlying matrix is a random positive definite perturbation of a deterministic positive definite matrix. We estimate all finite moments of a natural halting time when the random perturbation is drawn from the Laguerre unitary ensemble in a critical scaling regime explored in Deift et al. (2016). These estimates are used to analyze the expected iteration count in the framework of smoothed analysis, introduced by Spielman and Teng (2001). The rigorous results are compared with numerical calculations in several cases of interest.

  16. Smooth leading edge transition in hypersonic flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaillard, L.; Benard, E.; Alziary de Roquefort, T. [CEAT, Poitiers (France). Lab. d`Etudes Aerodynamiques

    1999-01-01

    The boundary layer transition along the attachment line of a smooth swept circular cylinder in hypersonic flow is investigated in a blowdown wind tunnel. A wide range of spanwise Mach numbers Me (3.28 to 6.78) is covered with the help of different models at several sweep angles (60 {<=}{Lambda}{<=}80 ). The transition is indirectly detected by means of heat flux measurements. The influence of the wall to stagnation temperature ratio is investigated by cooling the model with liquid nitrogen. (orig.) With 9 figs., 2 tabs., 30 refs.

  17. Vestibular activation, smooth pursuit tracking, and psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A M; Pivik, R T

    1985-04-01

    Pursuit tracking and vestibular activation procedures were combined in an investigation to determine if smooth pursuit tracking deficits could be related to abnormalities of visual-vestibular interaction in psychiatric patients. In actively psychotic patients, but not in comparison groups of schizophrenic outpatients with remitted symptomatology or normal controls, a significant failure of visual fixation to suppress caloric nystagmus was related to a higher incidence of disordered tracking during both baseline and postirrigation conditions. Other vestibular irregularities including dysrhythmia and reduced fast phase velocity were observed in these same patients. The results are supportive of a central deficit in visual-vestibular interaction that may contribute to pursuit tracking deficits in psychosis.

  18. Smooth Nanowire/Polymer Composite Transparent Electrodes

    KAUST Repository

    Gaynor, Whitney

    2011-04-29

    Smooth composite transparent electrodes are fabricated via lamination of silver nanowires into the polymer poly-(4,3-ethylene dioxythiophene): poly(styrene-sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS). The surface roughness is dramatically reduced compared to bare nanowires. High-efficiency P3HT:PCBM organic photovoltaic cells can be fabricated using these composites, reproducing the performance of cells on indium tin oxide (ITO) on glass and improving the performance of cells on ITO on plastic. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Smooth nanowire/polymer composite transparent electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaynor, Whitney; McGehee, Michael D. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Burkhard, George F. [Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Peumans, Peter [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2011-07-12

    Smooth composite transparent electrodes are fabricated via lamination of silver nanowires into the polymer poly-(4,3-ethylene dioxythiophene):poly(styrene-sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS). The surface roughness is dramatically reduced compared to bare nanowires. High-efficiency P3HT:PCBM organic photovoltaic cells can be fabricated using these composites, reproducing the performance of cells on indium tin oxide (ITO) on glass and improving the performance of cells on ITO on plastic. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  20. Smooth Decomposition of Generalized Fatou Set Explains Smooth Structure in Generalized Mandelbrot Set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peinke, J.; Parisi, J.; Röhricht, B.; Rössler, O. E.; Metzler, W.

    1988-01-01

    Generalized Mandelbrot sets arise in perturbed (non-analytic) versions of the complex logistic map. Numerically, it contains smooth portions as shown previously. To exclude that this result is specific to particular initial conditions only, the structure of the analogue to the Fatou set is looked at in the region in question. The set of non-divergent points is being "eaten up" by a smooth invading boundary. Therefore, the same type of decomposition applies independent of position in parameter space, in the region in question.

  1. Coupling of smooth particle hydrodynamics with PRONTO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Attaway, S.W.; Heinstein, M.W.; Mello, F.J.; Swegle, J.W.

    1993-08-01

    A gridless numerical technique called smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) has been coupled to the transient dynamics finite element code, PRONTO. In this paper, a new weighted residual derivation for the SPH method will be presented, and the methods used to embed SPH within PRONTO will be outlined. Example SPH-PRONTO calculations will also be presented. One major difficulty associated with the Lagrangian finite element method is modeling materials with no shear strength; for example, gases, fluids and explosive bi-products. Typically these materials can be modeled for only a short time with a Lagrangian finite element code. Large distortions cause tangling of the mesh, which will eventually lead to numerical difficulties such as negative element area or ``bow tie`` elements. Remeshing will allow the problem to continue for a short while, but the large distortions can prevent a complete analysis. Smooth particle hydrodynamics is a gridless Lagrangian technique. Requiring no mesh, SPH has the potential to model material fracture, large shear flows, and penetration. SPH computes the strain rate and the stress divergence based on the nearest neighbors of a particle, which are determined using an efficient particle sorting technique. Embedding the SPH method within PRONTO allows part of the problem to be modeled with quadrilateral finite elements while other parts are modeled with the gridless SPH method. SPH elements are coupled to the quadrilateral elements through a contact like algorithm.

  2. Cortex phellodendri Extract Relaxes Airway Smooth Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu-Ju Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cortex phellodendri is used to reduce fever and remove dampness and toxin. Berberine is an active ingredient of C. phellodendri. Berberine from Argemone ochroleuca can relax airway smooth muscle (ASM; however, whether the nonberberine component of C. phellodendri has similar relaxant action was unclear. An n-butyl alcohol extract of C. phellodendri (NBAECP, nonberberine component was prepared, which completely inhibits high K+- and acetylcholine- (ACH- induced precontraction of airway smooth muscle in tracheal rings and lung slices from control and asthmatic mice, respectively. The contraction induced by high K+ was also blocked by nifedipine, a selective blocker of L-type Ca2+ channels. The ACH-induced contraction was partially inhibited by nifedipine and pyrazole 3, an inhibitor of TRPC3 and STIM/Orai channels. Taken together, our data demonstrate that NBAECP can relax ASM by inhibiting L-type Ca2+ channels and TRPC3 and/or STIM/Orai channels, suggesting that NBAECP could be developed to a new drug for relieving bronchospasm.

  3. Cortex phellodendri Extract Relaxes Airway Smooth Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Qiu-Ju; Chen, Weiwei; Dan, Hong; Tan, Li; Zhu, He; Yang, Guangzhong; Shen, Jinhua; Peng, Yong-Bo; Zhao, Ping; Xue, Lu; Yu, Meng-Fei; Ma, Liqun; Si, Xiao-Tang; Wang, Zhuo; Dai, Jiapei; Qin, Gangjian; Zou, Chunbin; Liu, Qing-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Cortex phellodendri is used to reduce fever and remove dampness and toxin. Berberine is an active ingredient of C. phellodendri. Berberine from Argemone ochroleuca can relax airway smooth muscle (ASM); however, whether the nonberberine component of C. phellodendri has similar relaxant action was unclear. An n-butyl alcohol extract of C. phellodendri (NBAECP, nonberberine component) was prepared, which completely inhibits high K+- and acetylcholine- (ACH-) induced precontraction of airway smooth muscle in tracheal rings and lung slices from control and asthmatic mice, respectively. The contraction induced by high K+ was also blocked by nifedipine, a selective blocker of L-type Ca2+ channels. The ACH-induced contraction was partially inhibited by nifedipine and pyrazole 3, an inhibitor of TRPC3 and STIM/Orai channels. Taken together, our data demonstrate that NBAECP can relax ASM by inhibiting L-type Ca2+ channels and TRPC3 and/or STIM/Orai channels, suggesting that NBAECP could be developed to a new drug for relieving bronchospasm. PMID:27239213

  4. REACTIVE POWER COMPENSATOR WITH SMOOTH CONTROL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Burlaka

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Reactive power compensation devices are widely used: thyristor-control reactors (TCR and thyristor-switched capacitors (TSC. The TCR disadvantages are discussed. The TSC disadvantages are: influence of higher harmonics on nonsinusoidal voltage power system, the inability to ensure the smooth regulation. The proposed reactive power compensator consists of series with active filter and capacitors with step switch. Reactive power compensator’s control system is proposed. Hysteretic control of the inverter with current feedback is applied. DC-voltage regulator provides balance of active power. The control system allows overcompensation or undercompensation of reactive power modes. Reactive power distribution regulator performs the redistribution of power between switching capacitors and active filter. Minimization condition of this regulator is active filter’s power. Adjustment properties of reactive power compensator are analyzed. The choice of relations between the capacitors TSC steps to minimize the installed capacity of the active filter and the number of stages in TSC is considered. The approach that makes possible to «isolate» capacitors from harmonic currents and provide smooth control of reactive power is proposed

  5. Smooth manifold structure for extreme channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iten, Raban; Colbeck, Roger

    2018-01-01

    A quantum channel from a system A of dimension dA to a system B of dimension dB is a completely positive trace-preserving map from complex dA × dA to dB × dB matrices, and the set of all such maps with Kraus rank r has the structure of a smooth manifold. We describe this set in two ways. First, as a quotient space of (a subset of) the rdB × dA dimensional Stiefel manifold. Second, as the set of all Choi-states of a fixed rank r. These two descriptions are topologically equivalent. This allows us to show that the set of all Choi-states corresponding to extreme channels from system A to system B of a fixed Kraus rank r is a smooth submanifold of dimension 2 r dAdB-dA2-r2 of the set of all Choi-states of rank r. As an application, we derive a lower bound on the number of parameters required for a quantum circuit topology to be able to approximate all extreme channels from A to B arbitrarily well.

  6. Smoothness without smoothing: why Gaussian naive Bayes is not naive for multi-subject searchlight studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raizada, Rajeev D S; Lee, Yune-Sang

    2013-01-01

    Spatial smoothness is helpful when averaging fMRI signals across multiple subjects, as it allows different subjects' corresponding brain areas to be pooled together even if they are slightly misaligned. However, smoothing is usually not applied when performing multivoxel pattern-based analyses (MVPA), as it runs the risk of blurring away the information that fine-grained spatial patterns contain. It would therefore be desirable, if possible, to carry out pattern-based analyses which take unsmoothed data as their input but which produce smooth images as output. We show here that the Gaussian Naive Bayes (GNB) classifier does precisely this, when it is used in "searchlight" pattern-based analyses. We explain why this occurs, and illustrate the effect in real fMRI data. Moreover, we show that analyses using GNBs produce results at the multi-subject level which are statistically robust, neurally plausible, and which replicate across two independent data sets. By contrast, SVM classifiers applied to the same data do not generate a replication, even if the SVM-derived searchlight maps have smoothing applied to them. An additional advantage of GNB classifiers for searchlight analyses is that they are orders of magnitude faster to compute than more complex alternatives such as SVMs. Collectively, these results suggest that Gaussian Naive Bayes classifiers may be a highly non-naive choice for multi-subject pattern-based fMRI studies.

  7. Smoothness without smoothing: why Gaussian naive Bayes is not naive for multi-subject searchlight studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeev D S Raizada

    Full Text Available Spatial smoothness is helpful when averaging fMRI signals across multiple subjects, as it allows different subjects' corresponding brain areas to be pooled together even if they are slightly misaligned. However, smoothing is usually not applied when performing multivoxel pattern-based analyses (MVPA, as it runs the risk of blurring away the information that fine-grained spatial patterns contain. It would therefore be desirable, if possible, to carry out pattern-based analyses which take unsmoothed data as their input but which produce smooth images as output. We show here that the Gaussian Naive Bayes (GNB classifier does precisely this, when it is used in "searchlight" pattern-based analyses. We explain why this occurs, and illustrate the effect in real fMRI data. Moreover, we show that analyses using GNBs produce results at the multi-subject level which are statistically robust, neurally plausible, and which replicate across two independent data sets. By contrast, SVM classifiers applied to the same data do not generate a replication, even if the SVM-derived searchlight maps have smoothing applied to them. An additional advantage of GNB classifiers for searchlight analyses is that they are orders of magnitude faster to compute than more complex alternatives such as SVMs. Collectively, these results suggest that Gaussian Naive Bayes classifiers may be a highly non-naive choice for multi-subject pattern-based fMRI studies.

  8. Smoothness without Smoothing: Why Gaussian Naive Bayes Is Not Naive for Multi-Subject Searchlight Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raizada, Rajeev D. S.; Lee, Yune-Sang

    2013-01-01

    Spatial smoothness is helpful when averaging fMRI signals across multiple subjects, as it allows different subjects' corresponding brain areas to be pooled together even if they are slightly misaligned. However, smoothing is usually not applied when performing multivoxel pattern-based analyses (MVPA), as it runs the risk of blurring away the information that fine-grained spatial patterns contain. It would therefore be desirable, if possible, to carry out pattern-based analyses which take unsmoothed data as their input but which produce smooth images as output. We show here that the Gaussian Naive Bayes (GNB) classifier does precisely this, when it is used in “searchlight” pattern-based analyses. We explain why this occurs, and illustrate the effect in real fMRI data. Moreover, we show that analyses using GNBs produce results at the multi-subject level which are statistically robust, neurally plausible, and which replicate across two independent data sets. By contrast, SVM classifiers applied to the same data do not generate a replication, even if the SVM-derived searchlight maps have smoothing applied to them. An additional advantage of GNB classifiers for searchlight analyses is that they are orders of magnitude faster to compute than more complex alternatives such as SVMs. Collectively, these results suggest that Gaussian Naive Bayes classifiers may be a highly non-naive choice for multi-subject pattern-based fMRI studies. PMID:23922740

  9. An earthquake rate forecast for Europe based on smoothed seismicity and smoothed fault contribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiemer, Stefan; Woessner, Jochen; Basili, Roberto; Wiemer, Stefan

    2013-04-01

    The main objective of project SHARE (Seismic Hazard Harmonization in Europe) is to develop a community-based seismic hazard model for the Euro-Mediterranean region. The logic tree of earthquake rupture forecasts comprises several methodologies including smoothed seismicity approaches. Smoothed seismicity thus represents an alternative concept to express the degree of spatial stationarity of seismicity and provides results that are more objective, reproducible, and testable. Nonetheless, the smoothed-seismicity approach suffers from the common drawback of being generally based on earthquake catalogs alone, i.e. the wealth of knowledge from geology is completely ignored. We present a model that applies the kernel-smoothing method to both past earthquake locations and slip rates on mapped crustal faults and subductions. The result is mainly driven by the data, being independent of subjective delineation of seismic source zones. The core parts of our model are two distinct location probability densities: The first is computed by smoothing past seismicity (using variable kernel smoothing to account for varying data density). The second is obtained by smoothing fault moment rate contributions. The fault moment rates are calculated by summing the moment rate of each fault patch on a fully parameterized and discretized fault as available from the SHARE fault database. We assume that the regional frequency-magnitude distribution of the entire study area is well known and estimate the a- and b-value of a truncated Gutenberg-Richter magnitude distribution based on a maximum likelihood approach that considers the spatial and temporal completeness history of the seismic catalog. The two location probability densities are linearly weighted as a function of magnitude assuming that (1) the occurrence of past seismicity is a good proxy to forecast occurrence of future seismicity and (2) future large-magnitude events occur more likely in the vicinity of known faults. Consequently

  10. Sodium Butyrate Induces Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Autophagy in Colorectal Cells: Implications for Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jintao; Yi, Man; Zha, Longying; Chen, Siqiang; Li, Zhijia; Li, Cheng; Gong, Mingxing; Deng, Hong; Chu, Xinwei; Chen, Jiehua; Zhang, Zheqing; Mao, Limei; Sun, Suxia

    2016-01-01

    Butyrate, a short-chain fatty acid derived from dietary fiber, inhibits proliferation and induces cell death in colorectal cancer cells. However, clinical trials have shown mixed results regarding the anti-tumor activities of butyrate. We have previously shown that sodium butyrate increases endoplasmic reticulum stress by altering intracellular calcium levels, a well-known autophagy trigger. Here, we investigated whether sodium butyrate-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress mediated autophagy, and whether there was crosstalk between autophagy and the sodium butyrate-induced apoptotic response in human colorectal cancer cells. Human colorectal cancer cell lines (HCT-116 and HT-29) were treated with sodium butyrate at concentrations ranging from 0.5-5mM. Cell proliferation was assessed using MTT tetrazolium salt formation. Autophagy induction was confirmed through a combination of Western blotting for associated proteins, acridine orange staining for acidic vesicles, detection of autolysosomes (MDC staining), and electron microscopy. Apoptosis was quantified by flow cytometry using standard annexinV/propidium iodide staining and by assessing PARP-1 cleavage by Western blot. Sodium butyrate suppressed colorectal cancer cell proliferation, induced autophagy, and resulted in apoptotic cell death. The induction of autophagy was supported by the accumulation of acidic vesicular organelles and autolysosomes, and the expression of autophagy-associated proteins, including microtubule-associated protein II light chain 3 (LC3-II), beclin-1, and autophagocytosis-associated protein (Atg)3. The autophagy inhibitors 3-methyladenine (3-MA) and chloroquine inhibited sodium butyrate induced autophagy. Furthermore, sodium butyrate treatment markedly enhanced the expression of endoplasmic reticulum stress-associated proteins, including BIP, CHOP, PDI, and IRE-1a. When endoplasmic reticulum stress was inhibited by pharmacological (cycloheximide and mithramycin) and genetic (si

  11. Sodium Butyrate Induces Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Autophagy in Colorectal Cells: Implications for Apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jintao Zhang

    Full Text Available Butyrate, a short-chain fatty acid derived from dietary fiber, inhibits proliferation and induces cell death in colorectal cancer cells. However, clinical trials have shown mixed results regarding the anti-tumor activities of butyrate. We have previously shown that sodium butyrate increases endoplasmic reticulum stress by altering intracellular calcium levels, a well-known autophagy trigger. Here, we investigated whether sodium butyrate-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress mediated autophagy, and whether there was crosstalk between autophagy and the sodium butyrate-induced apoptotic response in human colorectal cancer cells.Human colorectal cancer cell lines (HCT-116 and HT-29 were treated with sodium butyrate at concentrations ranging from 0.5-5mM. Cell proliferation was assessed using MTT tetrazolium salt formation. Autophagy induction was confirmed through a combination of Western blotting for associated proteins, acridine orange staining for acidic vesicles, detection of autolysosomes (MDC staining, and electron microscopy. Apoptosis was quantified by flow cytometry using standard annexinV/propidium iodide staining and by assessing PARP-1 cleavage by Western blot.Sodium butyrate suppressed colorectal cancer cell proliferation, induced autophagy, and resulted in apoptotic cell death. The induction of autophagy was supported by the accumulation of acidic vesicular organelles and autolysosomes, and the expression of autophagy-associated proteins, including microtubule-associated protein II light chain 3 (LC3-II, beclin-1, and autophagocytosis-associated protein (Atg3. The autophagy inhibitors 3-methyladenine (3-MA and chloroquine inhibited sodium butyrate induced autophagy. Furthermore, sodium butyrate treatment markedly enhanced the expression of endoplasmic reticulum stress-associated proteins, including BIP, CHOP, PDI, and IRE-1a. When endoplasmic reticulum stress was inhibited by pharmacological (cycloheximide and mithramycin and genetic

  12. Three-dimensional ultrastructure of feeding tubes and interconnected endoplasmic reticulum in root-knot nematode-induced giant cells in rose balsam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyashita, Nao; Koga, Hironori

    2017-09-01

    We investigated the three-dimensional ultrastructure of feeding tubes and the surrounding region in giant cells induced in rose balsam (Impatiens balsamina L.) roots by the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita, using osmium maceration coupled with field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). In the roots of 35-day-old galled rose balsam plants, adult nematodes induced the formation of giant cells containing feeding tubes and numerous organelles, including tubular endoplasmic reticulum (ER), cisternal ER, and mitochondria. The feeding tubes were surrounded by fine tubular structures (20-50 nm in diameter), which were in turn surrounded by tubular ER (approximately 120 nm in diameter). The termini of the fine tubular structures appeared to be connected to the surface of the feeding tubes, suggesting that the fine tubular structures were continuous with narrow channels in the feeding tubes. The tubular ER arose from cisternal ER. Large bundles of tubular ER were present near the feeding tube, in the centers of the giant cells, and in the peripheral regions of the giant cells, such as cell wall ingrowths, while smaller bundles of tubular ER formed networks in the giant cells. These observations suggest that tubular ER functions as vascular bundles in giant cells, facilitating the transport of nutrients. We identified capsule-shaped structures (30 μm in diameter) in the giant cells that consisted of smooth, repeatedly branched ER tubules wrapped in several layers of cisternal ER. We propose that lipids and steroids are synthesized at the smooth branched ER and stored in these capsules until needed by the nematode.

  13. An analysis of smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swegle, J.W.; Attaway, S.W.; Heinstein, M.W.; Mello, F.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hicks, D.L. [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States)

    1994-03-01

    SPH (Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics) is a gridless Lagrangian technique which is appealing as a possible alternative to numerical techniques currently used to analyze high deformation impulsive loading events. In the present study, the SPH algorithm has been subjected to detailed testing and analysis to determine its applicability in the field of solid dynamics. An important result of the work is a rigorous von Neumann stability analysis which provides a simple criterion for the stability or instability of the method in terms of the stress state and the second derivative of the kernel function. Instability, which typically occurs only for solids in tension, results not from the numerical time integration algorithm, but because the SPH algorithm creates an effective stress with a negative modulus. The analysis provides insight into possible methods for removing the instability. Also, SPH has been coupled into the transient dynamics finite element code PRONTO, and a weighted residual derivation of the SPH equations has been obtained.

  14. Clip art rendering of smooth isosurfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroila, Matei; Eisemann, Elmar; Hart, John

    2008-01-01

    Clip art is a simplified illustration form consisting of layered filled polygons or closed curves used to convey 3D shape information in a 2D vector graphics format. This paper focuses on the problem of direct conversion of smooth surfaces, ranging from the free-form shapes of art and design to the mathematical structures of geometry and topology, into a clip art form suitable for illustration use in books, papers and presentations. We show how to represent silhouette, shadow, gleam and other surface feature curves as the intersection of implicit surfaces, and derive equations for their efficient interrogation via particle chains. We further describe how to sort, orient, identify and fill the closed regions that overlay to form clip art. We demonstrate the results with numerous renderings used to illustrate the paper itself.

  15. On the dynamic smoothing of mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonetti, S.; Porporato, A.

    2017-06-01

    After their formation, mountainous landscapes gradually evolve toward smoother geometries controlled by the interplay of erosion and sedimentation. The statistical mechanical properties of this process and the link between topography and geology have remained largely unexplored. We analyze the slope statistics of different mountains worldwide, showing that landscape age is fingerprinted in their distribution tails. Data reveal a universal relaxation process, through an algebraic decay progressively replaced by an exponential one, with exponents described by a global monotonic function. We then investigate the dominant components of this dynamic smoothing using a landscape evolution model, showing that the time evolution of slope statistics results from a delicate balance between diffusive soil creep, noise, and advective river incision, with the relaxation phase mainly dominated by diffusion. Results may suggest ways to formulate reduced order topographic evolution models for geomorphological and climatological applications, and to explore similarities in surface evolution in different contexts.

  16. Video tonal stabilization via color states smoothing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yinting; Tao, Dacheng; Li, Xiang; Song, Mingli; Bu, Jiajun; Tan, Ping

    2014-11-01

    We address the problem of removing video color tone jitter that is common in amateur videos recorded with hand-held devices. To achieve this, we introduce color state to represent the exposure and white balance state of a frame. The color state of each frame can be computed by accumulating the color transformations of neighboring frame pairs. Then, the tonal changes of the video can be represented by a time-varying trajectory in color state space. To remove the tone jitter, we smooth the original color state trajectory by solving an L1 optimization problem with PCA dimensionality reduction. In addition, we propose a novel selective strategy to remove small tone jitter while retaining extreme exposure and white balance changes to avoid serious artifacts. Quantitative evaluation and visual comparison with previous work demonstrate the effectiveness of our tonal stabilization method. This system can also be used as a preprocessing tool for other video editing methods.

  17. Adaptively Smoothed Seismicity Earthquake Forecasts for Italy

    CERN Document Server

    Werner, M J; Jackson, D D; Kagan, Y Y; Wiemer, S

    2010-01-01

    We present a model for estimating the probabilities of future earthquakes of magnitudes m > 4.95 in Italy. The model, a slightly modified version of the one proposed for California by Helmstetter et al. (2007) and Werner et al. (2010), approximates seismicity by a spatially heterogeneous, temporally homogeneous Poisson point process. The temporal, spatial and magnitude dimensions are entirely decoupled. Magnitudes are independently and identically distributed according to a tapered Gutenberg-Richter magnitude distribution. We estimated the spatial distribution of future seismicity by smoothing the locations of past earthquakes listed in two Italian catalogs: a short instrumental catalog and a longer instrumental and historical catalog. The bandwidth of the adaptive spatial kernel is estimated by optimizing the predictive power of the kernel estimate of the spatial earthquake density in retrospective forecasts. When available and trustworthy, we used small earthquakes m>2.95 to illuminate active fault structur...

  18. Numerical quadrature over smooth surfaces with boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeger, Jonah A.; Fornberg, Bengt

    2018-02-01

    This paper describes a high order accurate method to calculate integrals over curved surfaces with boundaries. Given data locations that are arbitrarily distributed over the surface, together with some functional description of the surface and its boundary, the algorithm produces matching quadrature weights. This extends on the authors' earlier methods for integrating over the surface of a sphere and over arbitrarily shaped smooth closed surfaces by also considering domain boundaries. The core approach consists again of combining RBF-FD (radial basis function-generated finite difference) approximations for curved surface triangles, which together make up the full surface. The provided examples include both curved and flat domains. In the highly special case of equi-spaced nodes over a regular interval in 1-D, the method provides a new opportunity for improving on the classical Gregory enhancements of the trapezoidal rule.

  19. Smooth Pursuit of Flicker-Defined Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Jeffrey B.; Stevenson, Scott B.

    2014-01-01

    We examined the pursuit response to stimuli defined by space-variant flicker of a dense random dot carrier pattern. On each frame, every element of the pattern could change polarity, with a probability given by a two-dimensional Gaussian distribution. A normal distribution produces a circular region of twinkle, while inverting the distribution results in a spot of static texture in a twinkling surround. In this latter case, the carrier texture could be stationary, or could move with the twinkle modulator, thereby producing first-order motion in the region of the spot. While the twinkle-defined spot produces a strong sensation of motion, the complementary stimulus defined by the absence of twinkle does not, when viewed peripherally, it appears to move in steps even when the generating distribution moves smoothly. We examined pursuit responses to these stimuli using two techniques: 1) the eye movement correlogram, obtained by cross-correlating eye velocity with the velocity of a randomly-moving stimulus; and 2) delayed visual feedback, where transient stabilization of a target can produce spontaneous oscillations of the eye, with a period empirically observed to vary linearly with the applied delay. Both techniques provide an estimate of the internal processing time, which can be as short as 100 milliseconds for a first-order target. Assessed by the correlogram method, the response to flicker-defined motion is delayed by more than 100 milliseconds, and significantly weaker (especially in the vertical dimension). When initially presented in the delayed feedback condition, purely saccadic oscillation is observed. One subject eventually developed smooth oscillations (albeit with significant saccadic intrusions), showing a period-versus-delay slope similar to that observed for first-order targets. This result is somewhat surprising, given that we interpret the slope of the period-versus-delay-function as reflecting the balance between position- and velocity

  20. An Involvement of Oxidative Stress in Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Its Associated Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandary, Bidur; Marahatta, Anu; Kim, Hyung-Ryong; Chae, Han-Jung

    2013-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the major site of calcium storage and protein folding. It has a unique oxidizing-folding environment due to the predominant disulfide bond formation during the process of protein folding. Alterations in the oxidative environment of the ER and also intra-ER Ca2+ cause the production of ER stress-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS). Protein disulfide isomerases, endoplasmic reticulum oxidoreductin-1, reduced glutathione and mitochondrial electron transport chain proteins also play crucial roles in ER stress-induced production of ROS. In this article, we discuss ER stress-associated ROS and related diseases, and the current understanding of the signaling transduction involved in ER stress. PMID:23263672

  1. CSB ablation induced apoptosis is mediated by increased endoplasmic reticulum stress response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Caputo

    Full Text Available The DNA repair protein Cockayne syndrome group B (CSB has been recently identified as a promising anticancer target. Suppression, by antisense technology, of this protein causes devastating effects on tumor cells viability, through a massive induction of apoptosis, while being non-toxic to non-transformed cells. To gain insights into the mechanisms underlying the pro-apoptotic effects observed after CSB ablation, global gene expression patterns were determined, to identify genes that were significantly differentially regulated as a function of CSB expression. Our findings revealed that response to endoplasmic reticulum stress and response to unfolded proteins were ranked top amongst the cellular processes affected by CSB suppression. The major components of the endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptosis pathway, including pro-apoptotic factors downstream of the ATF3-CHOP cascade, were dramatically up-regulated. Altogether our findings add new pieces to the understanding of CSB mechanisms of action and to the molecular basis of CS syndrome.

  2. CSB ablation induced apoptosis is mediated by increased endoplasmic reticulum stress response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputo, Manuela; Balzerano, Alessio; Arisi, Ivan; D'Onofrio, Mara; Brandi, Rossella; Bongiorni, Silvia; Brancorsini, Stefano; Frontini, Mattia; Proietti-De-Santis, Luca

    2017-01-01

    The DNA repair protein Cockayne syndrome group B (CSB) has been recently identified as a promising anticancer target. Suppression, by antisense technology, of this protein causes devastating effects on tumor cells viability, through a massive induction of apoptosis, while being non-toxic to non-transformed cells. To gain insights into the mechanisms underlying the pro-apoptotic effects observed after CSB ablation, global gene expression patterns were determined, to identify genes that were significantly differentially regulated as a function of CSB expression. Our findings revealed that response to endoplasmic reticulum stress and response to unfolded proteins were ranked top amongst the cellular processes affected by CSB suppression. The major components of the endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptosis pathway, including pro-apoptotic factors downstream of the ATF3-CHOP cascade, were dramatically up-regulated. Altogether our findings add new pieces to the understanding of CSB mechanisms of action and to the molecular basis of CS syndrome.

  3. Protein accumulation in the endoplasmic reticulum as a non-equilibrium phase transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budrikis, Zoe; Costantini, Giulio; La Porta, Caterina A M; Zapperi, Stefano

    2014-04-11

    Several neurological disorders are associated with the aggregation of aberrant proteins, often localized in intracellular organelles such as the endoplasmic reticulum. Here we study protein aggregation kinetics by mean-field reactions and three dimensional Monte carlo simulations of diffusion-limited aggregation of linear polymers in a confined space, representing the endoplasmic reticulum. By tuning the rates of protein production and degradation, we show that the system undergoes a non-equilibrium phase transition from a physiological phase with little or no polymer accumulation to a pathological phase characterized by persistent polymerization. A combination of external factors accumulating during the lifetime of a patient can thus slightly modify the phase transition control parameters, tipping the balance from a long symptomless lag phase to an accelerated pathological development. The model can be successfully used to interpret experimental data on amyloid-β clearance from the central nervous system.

  4. [Effect of fluoride on the expression of endoplasmic reticulum chaperone in ameloblast of rat incisor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai-qiang; Zhang, Ying; Liu, Lu; Gu, He-feng; Ma, Lin

    2013-10-01

    To investigate the effect of different concentrations of fluoride on the expression of endoplasmic reticulum chaperone, and to explore the mechanism of dental fluorosis in rat. Thirty Wistar rats were randomly divided into 3 groups. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect the expression of CRT, GRP78, XBP-1 and caspase-12 in rat incisors. Metamorph microscope images analysis system and SPSS 13.0 software package was used to analyze the data. Typical features of dental fluorosis were found in the fluoride group. Results of immunohistochemistry showed that CRT (F=238.6, Pameloblasts and in status of endoplasmic reticulum stress and caspase-12 plays an important role during ameloblast apoptosis. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (81072245) and Natural Science Foundation of Liaoning Province (20102278).

  5. A turn-on fluorescent probe for endogenous formaldehyde in the endoplasmic reticulum of living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yonghe; Ma, Yanyan; Xu, An; Xu, Gaoping; Lin, Weiying

    2017-06-01

    As the simplest aldehyde compounds, formaldehyde (FA) is implicated in nervous system diseases and cancer. Endoplasmic reticulum is an organelle that plays important functions in living cells. Accordingly, the development of efficient methods for FA detection in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is of great biomedical importance. In this work, we developed the first ER-targeted fluorescent FA probe Na-FA-ER. The detection is based on the condensation reaction of the hydrazine group and FA to suppress the photo-induced electron transfer (PET) pathway, resulting in a fluorescence increase. The novel Na-FA-ER showed high sensitivity to FA. In addition, the Na-FA-ER enabled the bio-imaging of exogenous and endogenous FA in living HeLa cells. Most significantly, the new Na-FA-ER was employed to visualize the endogenous FA in the ER in living cells for the first time.

  6. Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles Induce Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Mediated Autophagic Cell Death via Mitochondria-Associated Endoplasmic Reticulum Membrane Disruption in Normal Lung Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyeong-Nam Yu

    Full Text Available Nanomaterials are used in diverse fields including food, cosmetic, and medical industries. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NP are widely used, but their effects on biological systems and mechanism of toxicity have not been elucidated fully. Here, we report the toxicological mechanism of TiO2-NP in cell organelles. Human bronchial epithelial cells (16HBE14o- were exposed to 50 and 100 μg/mL TiO2-NP for 24 and 48 h. Our results showed that TiO2-NP induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress in the cells and disrupted the mitochondria-associated endoplasmic reticulum membranes (MAMs and calcium ion balance, thereby increasing autophagy. In contrast, an inhibitor of ER stress, tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA, mitigated the cellular toxic response, suggesting that TiO2-NP promoted toxicity via ER stress. This novel mechanism of TiO2-NP toxicity in human bronchial epithelial cells suggests that further exhaustive research on the harmful effects of these nanoparticles in relevant organisms is needed for their safe application.

  7. Attenuation of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress–Related Myocardial Apoptosis by SERCA2a Gene Delivery in Ischemic Heart Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Xin, Wei; Lu, Xiaochun; Li, Xiaoying; Niu, Kun; Cai, Jimei

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies suggested that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress–associated apoptosis plays an important role in the pathogenesis of ischemic heart disease. Gene transfer of sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase 2a (SERCA2a) attenuates myocardial apoptosis in a variety of heart failure models. This study is to investigate the effects of SERCA2a gene delivery on the myocardial apoptosis and ER stress pathway in a porcine ischemic heart disease model. Eighteen pigs were either subjected to a...

  8. Anisotropic Smoothing Improves DT-MRI-Based Muscle Fiber Tractography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda K W Buck

    Full Text Available To assess the effect of anisotropic smoothing on fiber tracking measures, including pennation angle, fiber tract length, and fiber tract number in the medial gastrocnemius (MG muscle in healthy subjects using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI.3T DW-MRI data were used for muscle fiber tractography in the MG of healthy subjects. Anisotropic smoothing was applied at three levels (5%, 10%, 15%, and pennation angle, tract length, fiber tract number, fractional anisotropy, and principal eigenvector orientation were quantified for each smoothing level.Fiber tract length increased with pre-fiber tracking smoothing, and local heterogeneities in fiber direction were reduced. However, pennation angle was not affected by smoothing.Modest anisotropic smoothing (10% improved fiber-tracking results, while preserving structural features.

  9. GADD34 Keeps the mTOR Pathway Inactivated in Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Related Autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holczer, Marianna; Bánhegyi, Gábor; Kapuy, Orsolya

    2016-01-01

    The balance of protein synthesis and proteolysis (i.e. proteostasis) is maintained by a complex regulatory network in which mTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin serine/threonine kinase) pathway and unfolded protein response are prominent positive and negative actors. The interplay between the two systems has been revealed; however the mechanistic details of this crosstalk are largely unknown. The aim of the present study was to investigate the elements of crosstalk during endoplasmic reticulum stress and to verify the key role of GADD34 in the connection with the mTOR pathway. Here, we demonstrate that a transient activation of autophagy is present in endoplasmic reticulum stress provoked by thapsigargin or tunicamycin, which is turned into apoptotic cell death. The transient phase can be characterized by the elevation of the autophagic marker LC3II/I, by mTOR inactivation, AMP-activated protein kinase activation and increased GADD34 level. The switch from autophagy to apoptosis is accompanied with the appearance of apoptotic markers, mTOR reactivation, AMP-activated protein kinase inactivation and a decrease in GADD34. Inhibition of autophagy by 3-methyladenine shortens the transient phase, while inhibition of mTOR by rapamycin or resveratrol prolongs it. Inhibition of GADD34 by guanabenz or transfection of the cells with siGADD34 results in down-regulation of autophagy-dependent survival and a quick activation of mTOR, followed by apoptotic cell death. The negative effect of GADD34 inhibition is diminished when guanabenz or siGADD34 treatment is combined with rapamycin or resveratrol addition. These data confirm that GADD34 constitutes a mechanistic link between endoplasmic reticulum stress and mTOR inactivation, therefore promotes cell survival during endoplasmic reticulum stress.

  10. Disruption of calpain reduces lipotoxicity-induced cardiac injury by preventing endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shengcun; Zhang, Lulu; Ni, Rui; Cao, Ting; Zheng, Dong; Xiong, Sidong; Greer, Peter A; Fan, Guo-Chang; Peng, Tianqing

    2016-11-01

    Diabetes and obesity are prevalent in westernized countries. In both conditions, excessive fatty acid uptake by cardiomyocytes induces cardiac lipotoxicity, an important mechanism contributing to diabetic cardiomyopathy. This study investigated the effect of calpain disruption on cardiac lipotoxicity. Cardiac-specific capns1 knockout mice and their wild-type littermates (male, age of 4weeks) were fed a high fat diet (HFD) or normal diet for 20weeks. HFD increased body weight, altered blood lipid profiles and impaired glucose tolerance comparably in both capns1 knockout mice and their wild-type littermates. Calpain activity, cardiomyocyte cross-sectional areas, collagen deposition and triglyceride were significantly increased in HFD-fed mouse hearts, and these were accompanied by myocardial dysfunction and up-regulation of hypertrophic and fibrotic collagen genes as well as pro-inflammatory cytokines. These effects of HFD were attenuated by disruption of calpain in capns1 knockout mice. Mechanistically, deletion of capns1 in HFD-fed mouse hearts and disruption of calpain with calpain inhibitor-III, silencing of capn1, or deletion of capns1 in palmitate-stimulated cardiomyocytes prevented endoplasmic reticulum stress, apoptosis, cleavage of caspase-12 and junctophilin-2, and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. Pharmacological inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum stress diminished palmitate-induced apoptosis and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in cardiomyocytes. In summary, disruption of calpain prevents lipotoxicity-induced apoptosis in cardiomyocytes and cardiac injury in mice fed a HFD. The role of calpain is mediated, at least partially, through endoplasmic reticulum stress. Thus, calpain/endoplasmic reticulum stress may represent a new mechanism and potential therapeutic targets for cardiac lipotoxicity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The quality control of glycoprotein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum, a trip from trypanosomes to mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.J. Parodi

    1998-05-01

    Full Text Available The present review deals with the stages of synthesis and processing of asparagine-linked oligosaccharides occurring in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum and their relationship to the acquisition by glycoproteins of their proper tertiary structures. Special emphasis is placed on reactions taking place in trypanosomatid protozoa since their study has allowed the detection of the transient glucosylation of glycoproteins catalyzed by UDP-Glc:glycoprotein glucosyltransferase and glucosidase II. The former enzyme has the unique property of covalently tagging improperly folded conformations by catalyzing the formation of protein-linked Glc1Man7GlcNAc2, Glc1Man8GlcNac2 and Glc1Man9GlcNAc2 from the unglucosylated proteins. Glucosyltransferase is a soluble protein of the endoplasmic reticulum that recognizes protein domains exposed in denatured but not in native conformations (probably hydrophobic amino acids and the innermost N-acetylglucosamine unit that is hidden from macromolecular probes in most native glycoproteins. In vivo, the glucose units are removed by glucosidase II. The influence of oligosaccharides in glycoprotein folding is reviewed as well as the participation of endoplasmic reticulum chaperones (calnexin and calreticulin that recognize monoglucosylated species in the same process. A model for the quality control of glycoprotein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum, i.e., the mechanism by which cells recognize the tertiary structure of glycoproteins and only allow transit to the Golgi apparatus of properly folded species, is discussed. The main elements of this control are calnexin and calreticulin as retaining components, the UDP-Glc:glycoprotein glucosyltransferase as a sensor of tertiary structures and glucosidase II as the releasing agent.

  12. Two distinct calcium pools in the endoplasmic reticulum of HEK-293T cells

    OpenAIRE

    Aulestia, Francisco J.; Rodríguez-García, Arancha; Alonso, María Teresa; García-Sancho, Javier

    2011-01-01

    Agonist-sensitive intracellular Ca2+ stores may be heterogeneous and exhibit distinct functional features. We have studied the properties of intracellular Ca2+ stores using targeted aequorins for selective measurements in different subcellular compartments. Both, HEK-293T [HEK (human embryonic kidney)-293 cells expressing the large T-antigen of SV40 (simian virus 40)] and HeLa cells accumulated Ca2+ into the ER (endoplasmic reticulum) to near millimolar concentrations and the IP3-generating a...

  13. Endoplasmic Reticulum-Associated Degradation Factor ERLIN2: Oncogenic Roles and Molecular Targeting of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    factor-independent proliferation in insulin-like growth factor-deficient media . To further examine the effects of ERLIN2 in a context that more... media . Oncogenesis-associated conditions, such as nutrient or growth factor depletion, can cause pathophysiologic ER stress [22,23]. When MCF10A cells...activated protein kinase signaling pathways that confer resistance to endoplasmic reticulum stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae . Mol Cancer Res 2005; 3

  14. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress: Its Role in Disease and Novel Prospects for Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Schönthal, Axel H.

    2012-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a multifunctional organelle required for lipid biosynthesis, calcium storage, and protein folding and processing. A number of physiological and pathological conditions, as well as a variety of pharmacological agents, are able to disturb proper ER function and thereby cause ER stress, which severely impairs protein folding and therefore poses the risk of proteotoxicity. Specific triggers for ER stress include, for example, particular intracellul...

  15. Endoplasmic reticulum stress is induced in the human placenta during labour

    OpenAIRE

    Veerbeek, J.H.W.; Tissot Van Patot, M.C.; Burton, G.J.; Yung, H.W.

    2014-01-01

    Placental endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has been postulated in the pathophysiology of pre-eclampsia (PE) and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), but its activation remains elusive. Oxidative stress induced by ischaemia/hypoxia-reoxygenation activates ER stress in?vitro. Here, we explored whether exposure to labour represents an in?vivo model for the study of acute placental ER stress. ER stress markers, GRP78, P-eIF2? and XBP-1, were significantly higher in laboured placentas than in ...

  16. Hesperidin inhibits ovarian cancer cell viability through endoplasmic reticulum stress signaling pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Jun; Li, Yali; Gao, Jinfang; De, Yinshan

    2017-01-01

    Hesperidin is a vitamin P flavonoid compound primarily present in citrus fruits. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether hesperidin inhibits ovarian cancer cell viability via endoplasmic reticulum stress signaling pathways. A2780 cells were treated with various doses of hesperidin for 6, 12 or 24 h, and the viability of A2780 cells was assessed using the MTT assay. Hesperidin decreased the viability of A2780 cells and increased cytotoxicity in a dose- and time-dependent manner...

  17. The liver isoform of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 is not targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum.

    OpenAIRE

    Broadway, Neil M; Pease, Richard J.; Birdsey, Graeme; Shayeghi, Majid; Turner, Nigel A; David Saggerson, E

    2003-01-01

    Liver microsomal fractions contain a malonyl-CoA-inhibitable carnitine acyltransferase (CAT) activity. It has been proposed [Fraser, Corstorphine, Price and Zammit (1999) FEBS Lett. 446, 69-74] that this microsomal CAT activity is due to the liver form of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (L-CPT1) being targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane as well as to mitochondria, possibly by an N-terminal signal sequence [Cohen, Guillerault, Girard and Prip-Buus (2001) J. Biol. Chem. 276, 54...

  18. Changes of smooth muscle contractile filaments in small bowel atresia

    OpenAIRE

    Gfrörer, Stefan; Fiegel, Henning; Ramachandran, Priya; Rolle, Udo; Metzger, Roman

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate morphological changes of intestinal smooth muscle contractile fibres in small bowel atresia patients. METHODS: Resected small bowel specimens from small bowel atresia patients (n = 12) were divided into three sections (proximal, atretic and distal). Standard histology hematoxylin-eosin staining and enzyme immunohistochemistry was performed to visualize smooth muscle contractile markers α-smooth muscle actin (SMA) and desmin using conventional paraffin sections of the proxi...

  19. Caveolin-3 promotes a vascular smooth muscle contractile phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge L. Gutierrez-Pajares

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies have demonstrated the importance of cardiovascular diseases in Western countries. Among the cell types associated with a dysfunctional vasculature, smooth muscle cells are believed to play an essential role in the development of these illnesses. Vascular smooth muscle cells are key regulators of the vascular tone and also have an important function in the development of atherosclerosis and restenosis. While in the normal vasculature contractile smooth muscle cells are predominant, in atherosclerotic vascular lesions, synthetic cells migrate toward the neointima, proliferate, and synthetize extracellular matrix proteins. In the present study, we have examined the role of caveolin-3 in the regulation of smooth muscle cell phenotype. Caveolin-3 is expressed in vivo in normal arterial smooth muscle cells, but its expression appears to be lost in cultured smooth muscle cells. Our data show that caveolin-3 expression in the A7r5 smooth muscle cell line is associated with increased expression of contractility markers such as smooth muscle  actin, smooth muscle myosin heavy chain but decreased expression of the synthetic phenotype markers such as p-Elk and Klf4. Moreover, we also show that caveolin-3 expression can reduce proliferation upon treatment with LDL or PDGF. Finally, we show that caveolin-3-expressing smooth muscle cells are less sensitive to apoptosis than control cells upon treatment with oxidized LDL. Taken together, our data suggest that caveolin-3 can regulate the phenotypic switch between contractile and synthetic smooth muscle cells. A better understanding of the factors regulating caveolin-3 expression and function in this cell type will permit the development of a better comprehension of the factors regulating smooth muscle function in atherosclerosis and restenosis.

  20. Modifying the double smoothing bandwidth selector in nonparametric regression

    OpenAIRE

    Beran, Jan; Feng, Yuanhua; Heiler, Siegfried

    2000-01-01

    In this paper a modified double smoothing bandwidth selector, ^h MDS , based on a new criterion, which combines the plug-in and the double smoothing ideas, is proposed. A self-complete iterative double smoothing rule ( ^ h IDS ) is introduced as a pilot method. The asymptotic properties of both ^ h IDS and ^ h MDS are investigated. It is shown that ^ h MDS performs asymptotically very well. Moreover, it is asymptotically negatively correlated with h ASE , the minimizer of the averaged squared...

  1. Recursive Robot-Arm Dynamics via Filtering and Smoothing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Guillermo

    1987-01-01

    Forward and inverse dynamics solved using Kalman filtering and Bryson-Frazier smoothing. Dynamics of serial-link robot arm solved by using recursive techniques from linear filtering and smoothing theory. Solutions of dynamical equations give forces, moments, and accelerations at joints between links, and multilink inertia matrix and its inverse. Theoretical developments lay foundation for use of filtering and smoothing techniques in design of robot controls.

  2. Robust forecasting with exponential and Holt-Winters smoothing.

    OpenAIRE

    Gelper, SEC Sarah; Fried, R; Croux, C.

    2007-01-01

    Robust versions of the exponential and Holt-Winters smoothing method for forecasting are presented. They are suitable for forecasting univariate time series in presence of outliers. The robust exponential and Holt-Winters smoothing methods are presented as a recursive updating scheme. Both the update equation and the selection of the smoothing parameters are robustied. This robust method is equivalent to a particular form of the robust Kalman lter in a local linear trend model. A simulation s...

  3. Effect of NB-UVB on cytokines and endoplasmic reticulum stress in psoriasis vulgaris lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Yan Sun1

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of NB-UVB on cytokines and endoplasmic reticulum stress in psoriasis vulgaris lesions. Methods: Patients with psoriasis vulgaris who received NB-UVB therapy in People’s Hospital of Beijing Daxing District between May 2014 and January 2017 were selected, proper amount of skin lesion tissue was collected before treatment as well as 4 weeks and 8 weeks after treatment respectively to extract the protein in it, and the protein expression levels of inflammatory cytokines, transcription factors and endoplasmic reticulum stress molecules in tissue protein were determined. Results: 4 weeks and 8 weeks after treatment, IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-17, Runx3 and RORγt expression in lesions were significantly lower than those before treatment while IL-4, IL-10, Foxp3, IRE-1α, XBP1, ATF6, CHOP and GADD34 expression were significantly higher than those before treatment; 8 weeks after treatment, IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-17, Runx3 and RORγt expression in lesions were significantly lower than those 4 weeks after treatment while IL-4, IL-10, Foxp3, IRE-1α, XBP1, ATF6, CHOP and GADD34 expression were significantly higher than those 4 weeks after treatment. Conclusion: NB-UVB can regulate the differentiation and maturation of CD4+ T cell subsets Th1/Th2 and Th17/Treg as well as the apoptosis mediated by endoplasmic reticulum stress in psoriasis vulgaris lesions.

  4. Sarcolipin expression is repressed by endoplasmic reticulum stress in C2C12 myotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Nobuhiko; Kimura, Atsushi P; Naito, Sumiyoshi; Yoshida, Mika; Kumano, Osamu; Suzuki, Takeshi; Itaya, Satoshi; Moriya, Mitsuru; Tsuji, Masahiro; Ieko, Masahiro

    2017-11-01

    Sarcolipin is a transmembrane protein expressed in the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum of skeletal and atrial muscles in large animals. Sarcolipin plays crucial roles in heat production through modifying the function of sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase, thereby being involved in thermogenesis and systemic metabolism. In skeletal muscle, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has been implicated in several conditions, such as insulin resistance, muscle diseases, and hypo/hyper-contraction. Here, we investigated the effect of ER stress on sarcolipin expression in skeletal muscle cells, C2C12 myotubes. First, gene expression of sarcolipin was confirmed in the cells during myogenesis. Then, ER stress was induced in C2C12 myotubes by treatment with tunicamycin or thapsigargin. Sarcolipin messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression were significantly reduced by ER stress induction. The reduction was independent of inositol-requiring element 1 (IRE1), which is activated by ER stress and has potent endonuclease activity, when evaluated by treatment with an IRE1 inhibitor, 4μ8C. On the other hand, sarcolipin mRNA stability was reduced under the ER stress when evaluated by treatment with actinomycin D. In conclusion, these results show that ER stress represses sarcolipin expression due to changes in mRNA stability in C2C12 myotubes.

  5. Endoplasmic reticulum stress: a novel mechanism and therapeutic target for cardiovascular diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mei-qing; Chen, Zhe; Chen, Lin-xi

    2016-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum is a principal organelle responsible for folding, post-translational modifications and transport of secretory, luminal and membrane proteins, thus palys an important rale in maintaining cellular homeostasis. Endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) is a condition that is accelerated by accumulation of unfolded/misfolded proteins after endoplasmic reticulum environment disturbance, triggered by a variety of physiological and pathological factors, such as nutrient deprivation, altered glycosylation, calcium depletion, oxidative stress, DNA damage and energy disturbance, etc. ERS may initiate the unfolded protein response (UPR) to restore cellular homeostasis or lead to apoptosis. Numerous studies have clarified the link between ERS and cardiovascular diseases. This review focuses on ERS-associated molecular mechanisms that participate in physiological and pathophysiological processes of heart and blood vessels. In addition, a number of drugs that regulate ERS was introduced, which may be used to treat cardiovascular diseases. This review may open new avenues for studying the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases and discovering novel drugs targeting ERS. PMID:26838072

  6. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Mediates Methamphetamine-Induced Blood-Brain Barrier Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qie, Xiaojuan; Wen, Di; Guo, Hongyan; Xu, Guanjie; Liu, Shuai; Shen, Qianchao; Liu, Yi; Zhang, Wenfang; Cong, Bin; Ma, Chunling

    2017-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) abuse causes serious health problems worldwide, and long-term use of METH disrupts the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Herein, we explored the potential mechanism of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in METH-induced BBB endothelial cell damage in vitro and the therapeutic potential of endoplasmic reticulum stress inhibitors for METH-induced BBB disruption in C57BL/6J mice. Exposure of immortalized BMVEC (bEnd.3) cells to METH significantly decreased cell viability, induced apoptosis, and diminished the tightness of cell monolayers. METH activated ER stress sensor proteins, including PERK, ATF6, and IRE1, and upregulated the pro-apoptotic protein CHOP. The ER stress inhibitors significantly blocked the upregulation of CHOP. Knockdown of CHOP protected bEnd.3 cells from METH-induced cytotoxicity. Furthermore, METH elevated the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and induced the dysfunction of mitochondrial characterized by a Bcl2/Bax ratio decrease, mitochondrial membrane potential collapse, and cytochrome c. ER stress release was partially reversed by ROS inhibition, and cytochrome c release was partially blocked by knockdown of CHOP. Finally, PBA significantly attenuated METH-induced sodium fluorescein (NaFluo) and Evans Blue leakage, as well as tight junction protein loss, in C57BL/6J mice. These data suggest that BBB endothelial cell damage was caused by METH-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress, which further induced mitochondrial dysfunction, and that PBA was an effective treatment for METH-induced BBB disruption.

  7. Selected terpenoids from medicinal plants modulate endoplasmic reticulum stress in metabolic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beukes, Natasha; Levendal, Ruby-Ann; Frost, Carminita L

    2014-11-01

    The majority of research performed on cellular stress and apoptosis focuses on mitochondrial dysfunction; however, the importance of the endoplasmic reticulum dysfunction and the link to metabolic diseases has gained a substantial interest. This review focuses on the potential of terpenoids to influence endoplasmic reticulum stress and the possible role terpenoids play as the treatment of metabolic diseases. Metabolic diseases develop as a result of a cascade of cellular pathways. In most cases, cells are able to compensate for the disruption of the cellular homeostasis although the initiation of response pathways; however, chronic stress initiates apoptotic pathways. This reviewed (1) showed the importance of phytoterpenoids to influence endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and homeostasis, (2) showed how regulating ER stress affect the cell survival and death, and (3) highlighted some examples of how the progression of metabolic diseases can be influenced by ER. Due to the substantial number of terpenoids that have been identified in literature, this review gave examples of 21 terpenoids that have been documented to have an effect on the different proteins associated with ER stress, how these plant terpenoids influence ER dysfunction and metabolic diseases such as diabetes, cancer, liver, and neurological diseases and parasitic infections. © 2014 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  8. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Mediates Methamphetamine-Induced Blood–Brain Barrier Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojuan Qie

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Methamphetamine (METH abuse causes serious health problems worldwide, and long-term use of METH disrupts the blood–brain barrier (BBB. Herein, we explored the potential mechanism of endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress in METH-induced BBB endothelial cell damage in vitro and the therapeutic potential of endoplasmic reticulum stress inhibitors for METH-induced BBB disruption in C57BL/6J mice. Exposure of immortalized BMVEC (bEnd.3 cells to METH significantly decreased cell viability, induced apoptosis, and diminished the tightness of cell monolayers. METH activated ER stress sensor proteins, including PERK, ATF6, and IRE1, and upregulated the pro-apoptotic protein CHOP. The ER stress inhibitors significantly blocked the upregulation of CHOP. Knockdown of CHOP protected bEnd.3 cells from METH-induced cytotoxicity. Furthermore, METH elevated the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS and induced the dysfunction of mitochondrial characterized by a Bcl2/Bax ratio decrease, mitochondrial membrane potential collapse, and cytochrome c. ER stress release was partially reversed by ROS inhibition, and cytochrome c release was partially blocked by knockdown of CHOP. Finally, PBA significantly attenuated METH-induced sodium fluorescein (NaFluo and Evans Blue leakage, as well as tight junction protein loss, in C57BL/6J mice. These data suggest that BBB endothelial cell damage was caused by METH-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress, which further induced mitochondrial dysfunction, and that PBA was an effective treatment for METH-induced BBB disruption.

  9. Hydrochlorothiazide Potentiates Contractile Activity of Mouse Cavernosal Smooth Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Gagliano-Jucá, MD, PhD

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion: Hydrochlorothiazide potentiates contraction of smooth muscle from mouse CC. These findings could explain why diuretics such as hydrochlorothiazide are associated with erectile dysfunction.

  10. How Do Families Smooth Household Heads` Earnings Volatility?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ki Seong Park; ; Dong Gyun Shin

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the extent to which household heads` earnings volatility is translated into household consumption volatility, and, in the process, identify measures of smoothing idiosyncratic earnings variation...

  11. I-spline Smoothing for Calibrating Predictive Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuan; Jiang, Xiaoqian; Kim, Jihoon; Ohno-Machado, Lucila

    2012-01-01

    We proposed the I-spline Smoothing approach for calibrating predictive models by solving a nonlinear monotone regression problem. We took advantage of I-spline properties to obtain globally optimal solutions while keeping the computational cost low. Numerical studies based on three data sets showed the empirical evidences of I-spline Smoothing in improving calibration (i.e.,1.6x, 1.4x, and 1.4x on the three datasets compared to the average of competitors-Binning, Platt Scaling, Isotonic Regression, Monotone Spline Smoothing, Smooth Isotonic Regression) without deterioration of discrimination.

  12. Nuclear fusion-independent smooth muscle differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells induced by a smooth muscle environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rong; Jack, Gregory S; Rao, Nagesh; Zuk, Patricia; Ignarro, Louis J; Wu, Benjamin; Rodríguez, Larissa V

    2012-03-01

    Human adipose-derived stem cells hASC have been isolated and were shown to have multilineage differentiation capacity. Although both plasticity and cell fusion have been suggested as mechanisms for cell differentiation in vivo, the effect of the local in vivo environment on the differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells has not been evaluated. We previously reported the in vitro capacity of smooth muscle differentiation of these cells. In this study, we evaluate the effect of an in vivo smooth muscle environment in the differentiation of hASC. We studied this by two experimental designs: (a) in vivo evaluation of smooth muscle differentiation of hASC injected into a smooth muscle environment and (b) in vitro evaluation of smooth muscle differentiation capacity of hASC exposed to bladder smooth muscle cells. Our results indicate a time-dependent differentiation of hASC into mature smooth muscle cells when these cells are injected into the smooth musculature of the urinary bladder. Similar findings were seen when the cells were cocultured in vitro with primary bladder smooth muscle cells. Chromosomal analysis demonstrated that microenvironment cues rather than nuclear fusion are responsible for this differentiation. We conclude that cell plasticity is present in hASCs, and their differentiation is accomplished in the absence of nuclear fusion. Copyright © 2011 AlphaMed Press.

  13. An implicit Smooth Particle Hydrodynamic code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, Charles E. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2000-05-01

    An implicit version of the Smooth Particle Hydrodynamic (SPH) code SPHINX has been written and is working. In conjunction with the SPHINX code the new implicit code models fluids and solids under a wide range of conditions. SPH codes are Lagrangian, meshless and use particles to model the fluids and solids. The implicit code makes use of the Krylov iterative techniques for solving large linear-systems and a Newton-Raphson method for non-linear corrections. It uses numerical derivatives to construct the Jacobian matrix. It uses sparse techniques to save on memory storage and to reduce the amount of computation. It is believed that this is the first implicit SPH code to use Newton-Krylov techniques, and is also the first implicit SPH code to model solids. A description of SPH and the techniques used in the implicit code are presented. Then, the results of a number of tests cases are discussed, which include a shock tube problem, a Rayleigh-Taylor problem, a breaking dam problem, and a single jet of gas problem. The results are shown to be in very good agreement with analytic solutions, experimental results, and the explicit SPHINX code. In the case of the single jet of gas case it has been demonstrated that the implicit code can do a problem in much shorter time than the explicit code. The problem was, however, very unphysical, but it does demonstrate the potential of the implicit code. It is a first step toward a useful implicit SPH code.

  14. An Improved Sequential Smoothing Particle Filtering Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cao Shijie

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to cope with the challenges of non-cooperative targets such as stealth targets to modern radar, especially when traditional threshold detection and tracking methods can hardly detect fast-moving stealth targets, technological innovation has long been required. In this paper we have proposed a new algorithm which can reduce computational cost and improve tracking accuracy. Firstly, the number of particles in the traditional particle filter is reduced and a small number of sampling points are derived from the possible distribution of the target to be tracked, each given a proper weight. Then, the transformed sampling points are sequentially smoothed. And finally, the target positions are estimated. The simulation results show that the proposed algorithm is more accurate than the traditional particle filter algorithm and has lower computational complexity. In the case when SNR is between 0dB to 15dB, a total of 100 Monte Carlo simulations are carried out, obtaining a high detection probability. The detection probability of the improved algorithm is higher than that of the existing particle filter at 7dB. Also, the computational cost is lower than the existing particle filter algorithm.

  15. Drop splash on a smooth, dry surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riboux, Guillaume; Gordillo, Jose Manuel; Korobkin, Alexander

    2013-11-01

    It is our purpose here to determine the conditions under which a drop of a given liquid with a known radius R impacting against a smooth impermeable surface at a velocity V, will either spread axisymmetrically onto the substrate or will create a splash, giving rise to usually undesired star-shaped patterns. In our experimental setup, drops are generated injecting low viscosity liquids falling under the action of gravity from a stainless steel hypodermic needle. The experimental observations using two high speed cameras operating simultaneously and placed perpendicularly to each other reveal that, initially, the drop deforms axisymmetrically, with A (T) the radius of the wetted area. For high enough values of the drop impact velocity, a thin sheet of liquid starts to be ejected from A (T) at a velocity Vjet > V for instants of time such that T >=Tc . If Vjet is above a certain threshold, which depends on the solid wetting properties as well as on the material properties of both the liquid and the atmospheric gas, the rim of the lamella dewets the solid to finally break into drops. Using Wagner's theory we demonstrate that A (T) =√{ 3 RVT } and our results also reveal that Tc We - 1 / 2 =(ρV2 R / σ) - 1 / 2 and Vjet We 1 / 4 .

  16. Dynamics of wetting on smooth and rough surfaces.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cazabat, A.M.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    The rate of spreading of non-volatile liquids on smooth and on rough surfaces was investigated. The radius of the wetted spot was found to agree with recently proposed scaling laws (t 1/10 for capillarity driven andt 1/8 for gravity driven spreading) when the surface was smooth. However, the

  17. Three-phase electric drive with modified electronic smoothing inductor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Yash Veer; Rasmussen, Peter Omand; Andersen, Torben Ole

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a three-phase electric drive with a modified electronic smoothing inductor (MESI) having reduced size of passive components. The classical electronic smoothing inductor (ESI) is able to control a diode bridge output current and also reduce not only mains current harmonics...

  18. Genetic Programming with Smooth Operators for Arithmetic Expressions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ursem, Rasmus Kjær; Krink, Thiemo

    2002-01-01

    This paper introduces the smooth operators for arithmetic expressions as an approach to smoothening the search space in Genetic Programming (GP). Smooth operator GP interpolates between arithmetic operators such as * and /, thereby allowing a gradual adaptation to the problem. The suggested...

  19. Altered extracellular magnesium and variations in vascular smooth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: There is a paucity of information on the heterogeneity of vascular smooth muscles in their responses to agonists following exposure to varying extracellular magnesium, [Mg2+]0. The present study was designed to examine, comparatively, the influence of variations in [Mg2+]0 on vascular smooth muscles of ...

  20. Estimate of K-functionals and modulus of smoothness constructed ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Using a generalized spherical mean operator, we define generalized modulus of smoothness in the space L k 2 ( R d ) . Based on the Dunkl operator we define Sobolev-type space and -functionals. The main result of the paper is the proof of the equivalence theorem for a -functional and a modulus of smoothness for the ...

  1. Smooth surfaces from bilinear patches: Discrete affine minimal surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Käferböck, Florian

    2013-06-01

    Motivated by applications in freeform architecture, we study surfaces which are composed of smoothly joined bilinear patches. These surfaces turn out to be discrete versions of negatively curved affine minimal surfaces and share many properties with their classical smooth counterparts. We present computational design approaches and study special cases which should be interesting for the architectural application. 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  2. Bandwidth selection in smoothing functions | Kibua | East African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... inexpensive and, hence, worth adopting. We argue that the bandwidth parameter is determined by two factors: the kernel function and the length of the smoothing region. We give an illustrative example of its application using real data. Keywords: Kernel, Smoothing functions, Bandwidth > East African Journal of Statistics ...

  3. Smooth maps of a foliated manifold in a symplectic manifold

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Let be a smooth manifold with a regular foliation F and a 2-form which induces closed forms on the leaves of F in the leaf topology. A smooth map f : ( M , F ) ⟶ ( N , ) in a symplectic manifold ( N , ) is called a foliated symplectic immersion if restricts to an immersion on each leaf of the foliation and further, the ...

  4. A Monte-Carlo weighted moving average process for smoothing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A Monte-Carlo weighted moving average process for smoothing time series data. N Ekhosuehi, DEA Omorogbe. Abstract. A Monte-Carlo weighted moving average procedure was developed for smoothing time series data. The applicability of the method was demonstrated by using two economic time series data set to ...

  5. Airway structural components drive airway smooth muscle remodeling in asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekkers, Bart G J; Maarsingh, Harm; Meurs, Herman; Gosens, Reinoud

    2009-01-01

    Chronic asthma is an inflammatory airways disease characterized by pathological changes in the airway smooth muscle (ASM) bundle that contribute to airway obstruction and hyperresponsiveness. Remodeling of the ASM is associated with an increased smooth muscle mass, involving components of cellular

  6. A generalized relative total variation method for image smoothing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Qiegen; Xiong, Biao; Yang, Dingcheng; Zhang, Minghui

    2016-01-01

    Recently, two piecewise smooth models L0smoothing and relative total variation (RTV) have been proposed for feature/structure-preserving filtering. One is very efficient for tackling image with little texture patterns and the other has appearance performance on image with abundant uniform textural

  7. On smoothed analysis of quicksort and Hoare's find

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fouz, Mahmoud; Kufleitner, Manfred; Manthey, Bodo; Zeini Jahromi, Nima; Ngo, H.Q.

    2009-01-01

    We provide a smoothed analysis of Hoare’s find algorithm and we revisit the smoothed analysis of quicksort. Hoare’s find algorithm – often called quickselect – is an easy-to-implement algorithm for finding the $k$-th smallest element of a sequence. While the worst-case number of comparisons that

  8. Dissimilarity for functional data clustering based on smoothing parameter commutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzeng, ShengLi; Hennig, Christian; Li, Yu-Fen; Lin, Chien-Ju

    2017-01-01

    Many studies measure the same type of information longitudinally on the same subject at multiple time points, and clustering of such functional data has many important applications. We propose a novel and easy method to implement dissimilarity measure for functional data clustering based on smoothing splines and smoothing parameter commutation. This method handles data observed at regular or irregular time points in the same way. We measure the dissimilarity between subjects based on varying curve estimates with pairwise commutation of smoothing parameters. The intuition is that smoothing parameters of smoothing splines reflect the inverse of the signal-to-noise ratios and that when applying an identical smoothing parameter the smoothed curves for two similar subjects are expected to be close. Our method takes into account the estimation uncertainty using smoothing parameter commutation and is not strongly affected by outliers. It can also be used for outlier detection. The effectiveness of our proposal is shown by simulations comparing it to other dissimilarity measures and by a real application to methadone dosage maintenance levels.

  9. Regeneration and Maintenance of Intestinal Smooth Muscle Phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walthers, Christopher M.

    Tissue engineering is an emerging field of biomedical engineering that involves growing artificial organs to replace those lost to disease or injury. Within tissue engineering, there is a demand for artificial smooth muscle to repair tissues of the digestive tract, bladder, and vascular systems. Attempts to develop engineered smooth muscle tissues capable of contracting with sufficient strength to be clinically relevant have so far proven unsatisfactory. The goal of this research was to develop and sustain mature, contractile smooth muscle. Survival of implanted SMCs is critical to sustain the benefits of engineered smooth muscle. Survival of implanted smooth muscle cells was studied with layered, electrospun polycaprolactone implants with lasercut holes ranging from 0--25% porosity. It was found that greater angiogenesis was associated with increased survival of implanted cells, with a large increase at a threshold between 20% and 25% porosity. Heparan sulfate coatings improved the speed of blood vessel infiltration after 14 days of implantation. With these considerations, thicker engineered tissues may be possible. An improved smooth muscle tissue culture technique was utilized. Contracting smooth muscle was produced in culture by maintaining the native smooth muscle tissue organization, specifically by sustaining intact smooth muscle strips rather than dissociating tissue in to isolated smooth muscle cells. Isolated cells showed a decrease in maturity and contained fewer enteric neural and glial cells. Muscle strips also exhibited periodic contraction and regular fluctuation of intracellular calclium. The muscle strip maturity persisted after implantation in omentum for 14 days on polycaprolactone scaffolds. A low-cost, disposable bioreactor was developed to further improve maturity of cultured smooth muscle cells in an environment of controlled cyclical stress.The bioreactor consistently applied repeated mechanical strain with controllable inputs for strain

  10. Tacrolimus regulates endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated osteoclastogenesis and inflammation: in vitro and collagen-induced arthritis mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Won-Seok; Jeong, Ji-Hyeon; Lee, Eun-Gyeong; Jung-Choi, Yun; Kim, Jin-Hee; Kim, Hang-Rae; Yoo, Wan-Hee

    2017-08-22

    Tacrolimus is an immunosuppressive drug that inhibits the release of inflammatory cytokines involved in rheumatoid arthritis development by blocking T cell activation. "Endoplasmic reticulum stress," an imbalance between protein folding load and capacity leading to the accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum lumen, has been implicated in rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory and metabolic diseases. We aimed to investigate the effect of tacrolimus on endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated osteoclastogenesis and inflammation and elucidate the underlying mechanisms. in vitro studies were performed using mouse bone marrow cells that were cultured with or without interleukin-1β, thapsigargin, or tacrolimus to induce osteoclast differentiation. A mouse model of arthritis was established by immunizing mice with bovine type II collagen. Tacrolimus was orally administered to mice from day 20 to 45 following the initial immunization, and histopathological changes and expression of specific biomarkers of endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated inflammatory signaling pathways were examined. in vitro, tacrolimus inhibited receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand-mediated osteoclast formation augmented by interleukin-11β, thapsigargin, or both. Furthermore, tacrolimus inhibited glucose-regulated protein (GRP78), protein kinase R-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase, inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE 1), and activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6) augmented by interleukin-11β, thapsigargin, or both. Tacrolimus significantly ameliorated osteolysis and endoplasmic reticulum stress intensity in mice. Simultaneously, it reduced inflammatory cell infiltration, osteoclastogenesis, and inflammatory responses by inhibiting GRP78, IRE 1, and ATF6. These findings suggest that tacrolimus exhibits an anti-inflammation effect in rheumatoid arthritis and might inhibit joint damage progression by inhibiting endoplasmic reticulum stress. This article is protected

  11. LUM Smoother with Smooth Control for Noisy Image Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukàč Rastislav

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on adaptive structure of LUM (lower-upper-middle smoothers for noisy image sequences. For the balance between noise suppression and signal-detail preservation, the LUM smoothers are widely used in smoothing applications. The amount of smoothing done by LUM smoothers is controlled by tuning parameter. However, the smoothing level is fixed for whole image. Thus, the excessive or insufficient smoothing can be performed. This problem is solved by a new method based on the adaptive controlled level of smoothing. A new method has excellent performance of the noise reduction in the environments corrupted by the impulse noise. In addition, minimal signal-detail and motion blurring can be observed. The performance of proposed method is evaluated through objective criteria and compared with traditional temporal, spatial, and spatiotemporal LUM smoothers.

  12. Moving least-squares corrections for smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciro Del Negro

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available First-order moving least-squares are typically used in conjunction with smoothed particle hydrodynamics in the form of post-processing filters for density fields, to smooth out noise that develops in most applications of smoothed particle hydrodynamics. We show how an approach based on higher-order moving least-squares can be used to correct some of the main limitations in gradient and second-order derivative computation in classic smoothed particle hydrodynamics formulations. With a small increase in computational cost, we manage to achieve smooth density distributions without the need for post-processing and with higher accuracy in the computation of the viscous term of the Navier–Stokes equations, thereby reducing the formation of spurious shockwaves or other streaming effects in the evolution of fluid flow. Numerical tests on a classic two-dimensional dam-break problem confirm the improvement of the new approach.

  13. The effect of robot dynamics on smoothness during wrist pointing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwin, Andrew; Pezent, Evan; Bradley, Joshua; O'Malley, Marcia K

    2017-07-01

    The improvement of movement smoothness over the course of therapy is one of the positive outcomes observed during robotic rehabilitation. Although movements are generally robust to disturbances, certain perturbations might disrupt an individual's ability to produce these smooth movements. In this paper, we explore how a rehabilitation robot's inherent dynamics impact movement smoothness during pointing tasks. Able-bodied participants made wrist pointing movements under four different operating conditions. Despite the relative transparency of the device, inherent dynamic characteristics negatively impacted movement smoothness. Active compensation for Coulomb friction effects failed to mitigate the degradation in smoothness. Assessment of movements that involved coupled motions of the robot's joints reduced the bias seen in single degree of freedom movements. When using robotic devices for assessment of movement quality, the impact of the inherent dynamics must be considered.

  14. Protein Kinase C as Regulator of Vascular Smooth Muscle Function and Potential Target in Vascular Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringvold, H C; Khalil, R A

    2017-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle (VSM) plays an important role in maintaining vascular tone. In addition to Ca2+-dependent myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation, protein kinase C (PKC) is a major regulator of VSM function. PKC is a family of conventional Ca2+-dependent α, β, and γ, novel Ca2+-independent δ, ɛ, θ, and η, and atypical ξ, and ι/λ isoforms. Inactive PKC is mainly cytosolic, and upon activation it undergoes phosphorylation, maturation, and translocation to the surface membrane, the nucleus, endoplasmic reticulum, and other cell organelles; a process facilitated by scaffold proteins such as RACKs. Activated PKC phosphorylates different substrates including ion channels, pumps, and nuclear proteins. PKC also phosphorylates CPI-17 leading to inhibition of MLC phosphatase, increased MLC phosphorylation, and enhanced VSM contraction. PKC could also initiate a cascade of protein kinases leading to phosphorylation of the actin-binding proteins calponin and caldesmon, increased actin-myosin interaction, and VSM contraction. Increased PKC activity has been associated with vascular disorders including ischemia-reperfusion injury, coronary artery disease, hypertension, and diabetic vasculopathy. PKC inhibitors could test the role of PKC in different systems and could reduce PKC hyperactivity in vascular disorders. First-generation PKC inhibitors such as staurosporine and chelerythrine are not very specific. Isoform-specific PKC inhibitors such as ruboxistaurin have been tested in clinical trials. Target delivery of PKC pseudosubstrate inhibitory peptides and PKC siRNA may be useful in localized vascular disease. Further studies of PKC and its role in VSM should help design isoform-specific PKC modulators that are experimentally potent and clinically safe to target PKC in vascular disease. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Subacute toxicity study on sup(99m)Tc stannous glucoheptonate injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belbeck, L.; Bowen, B.M.; Jeu, J.; Richardson, M. (McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada))

    1981-07-01

    A subacute toxicity study on sup(99m)Tc stannous glucoheptonate was performed with rats, dogs and rabbits, injected intravenously at ten to 100 times the human dose on a body weight basis. There were no abnormalities in the clinical status of any of the animals. No changes were found in urinalysis, blood chemistry or hematology in the rabbits nor in gross examination, renal histology or bone marrow smears in rats and rabbits. Hepatic histology was also done. A focal area of necrosis in a liver of one rabbit that had been injected with 100 times the human dose was observed using light microscopy. Examination by electron microscopy in another group of rats and rabbits was prompted by the observation of that lesion. This revealed vacuolated and dilated smooth endoplasmic reticulum and degranulated and vesiculated rough endoplasmic reticulum in all the test livers. X-ray microanalysis indicates that the ultrastructural changes are linked to the deposition of tin.

  16. ON THE DERIVATIVE OF SMOOTH MEANINGFUL FUNCTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjo Zlobec

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The derivative of a function f in n variables at a point x* is one of the most important tools in mathematical modelling. If this object exists, it is represented by the row n-tuple f(x* = [∂f/∂xi(x*] called the gradient of f at x*, abbreviated: “the gradient”. The evaluation of f(x* is usually done in two stages, first by calculating the n partials and then their values at x = x*. In this talk we give an alternative approach. We show that one can characterize the gradient without differentiation! The idea is to fix an arbitrary row n-tuple G and answer the following question: What is a necessary and sufficient condition such that G is the gradient of a given f at a given x*? The answer is given after adjusting the quadratic envelope property introduced in [3]. We work with smooth, i.e., continuously differentiable, functions with a Lipschitz derivative on a compact convex set with a non-empty interior. Working with this class of functions is not a serious restriction. In fact, loosely speaking, “almost all” smooth meaningful functions used in modelling of real life situations are expected to have a bounded “acceleration” hence they belong to this class. In particular, the class contains all twice differentiable functions [1]. An important property of the functions from this class is that every f can be represented as the difference of some convex function and a convex quadratic function. This decomposition was used in [3] to characterize the zero derivative points. There we obtained reformulations and augmentations of some well known classic results on optimality such as Fermats extreme value theorem (known from high school and the Lagrange multiplier theorem from calculus [2, 3]. In this talk we extend the results on zero derivative points to characterize the relation G = f(x*, where G is an arbitrary n-tuple. Some special cases: If G = O, we recover the results on zero derivative points. For functions of a single

  17. Adaptively smoothed seismicity earthquake forecasts for Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Y. Kagan

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a model for estimation of the probabilities of future earthquakes of magnitudes m ≥ 4.95 in Italy. This model is a modified version of that proposed for California, USA, by Helmstetter et al. [2007] and Werner et al. [2010a], and it approximates seismicity using a spatially heterogeneous, temporally homogeneous Poisson point process. The temporal, spatial and magnitude dimensions are entirely decoupled. Magnitudes are independently and identically distributed according to a tapered Gutenberg-Richter magnitude distribution. We have estimated the spatial distribution of future seismicity by smoothing the locations of past earthquakes listed in two Italian catalogs: a short instrumental catalog, and a longer instrumental and historic catalog. The bandwidth of the adaptive spatial kernel is estimated by optimizing the predictive power of the kernel estimate of the spatial earthquake density in retrospective forecasts. When available and reliable, we used small earthquakes of m ≥ 2.95 to reveal active fault structures and 29 probable future epicenters. By calibrating the model with these two catalogs of different durations to create two forecasts, we intend to quantify the loss (or gain of predictability incurred when only a short, but recent, data record is available. Both forecasts were scaled to five and ten years, and have been submitted to the Italian prospective forecasting experiment of the global Collaboratory for the Study of Earthquake Predictability (CSEP. An earlier forecast from the model was submitted by Helmstetter et al. [2007] to the Regional Earthquake Likelihood Model (RELM experiment in California, and with more than half of the five-year experimental period over, the forecast has performed better than the others.

  18. Bronchial Smooth Muscle Remodeling in Nonsevere Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girodet, Pierre-Olivier; Allard, Benoit; Thumerel, Matthieu; Begueret, Hugues; Dupin, Isabelle; Ousova, Olga; Lassalle, Régis; Maurat, Elise; Ozier, Annaig; Trian, Thomas; Marthan, Roger; Berger, Patrick

    2016-03-15

    Increased bronchial smooth muscle (BSM) mass is a key feature of airway remodeling that classically distinguishes severe from nonsevere asthma. Proliferation of BSM cells involves a specific mitochondria-dependent pathway in individuals with severe asthma. However, BSM remodeling and mitochondrial biogenesis have not been examined in nonsevere asthma. We aimed to assess whether an increase in BSM mass was also implicated in nonsevere asthma and its relationship with mitochondria and clinical outcomes. We enrolled 34 never-smoker subjects with nonsevere asthma. In addition, we recruited 56 subjects with nonsevere asthma and 19 subjects with severe asthma as comparative groups (COBRA cohort [Cohorte Obstruction Bronchique et Asthme; Bronchial Obstruction and Asthma Cohort; sponsored by the French National Institute of Health and Medical Research, INSERM]). A phenotypic characterization was performed using questionnaires, atopy and pulmonary function testing, exhaled nitric oxide measurement, and blood collection. Bronchial biopsy specimens were processed for immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy analysis. After BSM remodeling assessment, subjects were monitored over a 12-month period. We identified characteristic features of remodeling (BSM area >26.6%) and increased mitochondrial number within BSM in a subgroup of subjects with nonsevere asthma. The number of BSM mitochondria was positively correlated with BSM area (r = 0.78; P asthma with high BSM had worse asthma control and a higher rate of exacerbations per year compared with subjects with low BSM. This study reveals that BSM remodeling and mitochondrial biogenesis may play a critical role in the natural history of nonsevere asthma (Mitasthme study). Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT00808730).

  19. Endoplasmic reticulum stress and eIF2α phosphorylation: The Achilles heel of pancreatic β cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cnop, Miriam; Toivonen, Sanna; Igoillo-Esteve, Mariana; Salpea, Paraskevi

    2017-09-01

    Pancreatic β cell dysfunction and death are central in the pathogenesis of most if not all forms of diabetes. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying β cell failure is important to develop β cell protective approaches. Here we review the role of endoplasmic reticulum stress and dysregulated endoplasmic reticulum stress signaling in β cell failure in monogenic and polygenic forms of diabetes. There is substantial evidence for the presence of endoplasmic reticulum stress in β cells in type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Direct evidence for the importance of this stress response is provided by an increasing number of monogenic forms of diabetes. In particular, mutations in the PERK branch of the unfolded protein response provide insight into its importance for human β cell function and survival. The knowledge gained from different rodent models is reviewed. More disease- and patient-relevant models, using human induced pluripotent stem cells differentiated into β cells, will further advance our understanding of pathogenic mechanisms. Finally, we review the therapeutic modulation of endoplasmic reticulum stress and signaling in β cells. Pancreatic β cells are sensitive to excessive endoplasmic reticulum stress and dysregulated eIF2α phosphorylation, as indicated by transcriptome data, monogenic forms of diabetes and pharmacological studies. This should be taken into consideration when devising new therapeutic approaches for diabetes.

  20. Endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced apoptosis in the penumbra aggravates secondary damage in rats with traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Guo-Zhu; Gao, Fen-Fei; Zhao, Zong-Mao; Sun, Hai; Xu, Wei; Wu, Li-Wei; He, Yong-Chang

    2016-08-01

    Neuronal apoptosis is mediated by intrinsic and extrinsic signaling pathways such as the membrane-mediated, mitochondrial, and endoplasmic reticulum stress pathways. Few studies have examined the endoplasmic reticulum-mediated apoptosis pathway in the penumbra after traumatic brain injury, and it remains unclear whether endoplasmic reticulum stress can activate the caspase-12-dependent apoptotic pathway in the traumatic penumbra. Here, we established rat models of fluid percussion-induced traumatic brain injury and found that protein expression of caspase-12, caspase-3 and the endoplasmic reticulum stress marker 78 kDa glucose-regulated protein increased in the traumatic penumbra 6 hours after injury and peaked at 24 hours. Furthermore, numbers of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling-positive cells in the traumatic penumbra also reached peak levels 24 hours after injury. These findings suggest that caspase-12-mediated endoplasmic reticulum-related apoptosis is activated in the traumatic penumbra, and may play an important role in the pathophysiology of secondary brain injury.

  1. The involvement of SMILE/TMTC3 in endoplasmic reticulum stress response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maud Racapé

    Full Text Available The state of operational tolerance has been detected sporadically in some renal transplanted patients that stopped immunosuppressive drugs, demonstrating that allograft tolerance might exist in humans. Several years ago, a study by Brouard et al. identified a molecular signature of several genes that were significantly differentially expressed in the blood of such patients compared with patients with other clinical situations. The aim of the present study is to analyze the role of one of these molecules over-expressed in the blood of operationally tolerant patients, SMILE or TMTC3, a protein whose function is still unknown.We first confirmed that SMILE mRNA is differentially expressed in the blood of operationally tolerant patients with drug-free long term graft function compared to stable and rejecting patients. Using a yeast two-hybrid approach and a colocalization study by confocal microscopy we furthermore report an interaction of SMILE with PDIA3, a molecule resident in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. In accordance with this observation, SMILE silencing in HeLa cells correlated with the modulation of several transcripts involved in proteolysis and a decrease in proteasome activity. Finally, SMILE silencing increased HeLa cell sensitivity to the proteasome inhibitor Bortezomib, a drug that induces ER stress via protein overload, and increased transcript expression of a stress response protein, XBP-1, in HeLa cells and keratinocytes.In this study we showed that SMILE is involved in the endoplasmic reticulum stress response, by modulating proteasome activity and XBP-1 transcript expression. This function of SMILE may influence immune cell behavior in the context of transplantation, and the analysis of endoplasmic reticulum stress in transplantation may reveal new pathways of regulation in long-term graft acceptance thereby increasing our understanding of tolerance.

  2. Colistin-Induced Nephrotoxicity in Mice Involves the Mitochondrial, Death Receptor, and Endoplasmic Reticulum Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Chongshan; Li, Jichang; Tang, Shusheng

    2014-01-01

    Nephrotoxicity is the dose-limiting factor for colistin, but the exact mechanism is unknown. This study aimed to investigate the roles of the mitochondrial, death receptor, and endoplasmic reticulum pathways in colistin-induced nephrotoxicity. Mice were intravenously administered 7.5 or 15 mg of colistin/kg of body weight/day (via a 3-min infusion and divided into two doses) for 7 days. Renal function, oxidative stress, and apoptosis were measured. Representative biomarkers involved in the mitochondrial, death receptor, and endoplasmic reticulum pathways were investigated, and the key markers involved in apoptosis and autophagy were examined. After 7-day colistin treatment, significant increase was observed with blood urea nitrogen, serum creatinine, and malondialdehyde, while activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase decreased in the kidneys. Acute tubular necrosis and mitochondrial dysfunction were detected, and colistin-induced apoptosis was characterized by DNA fragmentation, cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP-1), increase of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), and activation of caspases (caspase-8, -9, and -3). It was evident that colistin-induced apoptosis involved the mitochondrial pathway (downregulation of Bcl-2 and upregulation of cytochrome C [cytC] and Bax), death receptor pathway (upregulation of Fas, FasL, and Fas-associated death domain [FADD]), and endoplasmic reticulum pathway (upregulation of Grp78/Bip, ATF6, GADD153/CHOP, and caspase-12). In the 15-mg/kg/day colistin group, expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) and phosphorylated JNK (p-JNK) significantly increased (P colistin group, a large number of autophagolysosomes and classic autophagy were observed. Western blot results of Beclin-1 and LC3B indicated that autophagy may play a protective role in colistin-induced nephrotoxicity. In conclusion, this is the first study to demonstrate that all three major apoptosis pathways and autophagy are involved in

  3. An invertebrate smooth muscle with striated muscle myosin filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulbarán, Guidenn; Alamo, Lorenzo; Pinto, Antonio; Márquez, Gustavo; Méndez, Franklin; Padrón, Raúl; Craig, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Muscle tissues are classically divided into two major types, depending on the presence or absence of striations. In striated muscles, the actin filaments are anchored at Z-lines and the myosin and actin filaments are in register, whereas in smooth muscles, the actin filaments are attached to dense bodies and the myosin and actin filaments are out of register. The structure of the filaments in smooth muscles is also different from that in striated muscles. Here we have studied the structure of myosin filaments from the smooth muscles of the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni. We find, surprisingly, that they are indistinguishable from those in an arthropod striated muscle. This structural similarity is supported by sequence comparison between the schistosome myosin II heavy chain and known striated muscle myosins. In contrast, the actin filaments of schistosomes are similar to those of smooth muscles, lacking troponin-dependent regulation. We conclude that schistosome muscles are hybrids, containing striated muscle-like myosin filaments and smooth muscle-like actin filaments in a smooth muscle architecture. This surprising finding has broad significance for understanding how muscles are built and how they evolved, and challenges the paradigm that smooth and striated muscles always have distinctly different components. PMID:26443857

  4. Smooth pursuit eye movements and schizophrenia: literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, J G; de Pablo, J; Gaviria, A M; Sepúlveda, E; Vilella, E

    2014-09-01

    To review the scientific literature about the relationship between impairment on smooth pursuit eye movements and schizophrenia. Narrative review that includes historical articles, reports about basic and clinical investigation, systematic reviews, and meta-analysis on the topic. Up to 80% of schizophrenic patients have impairment of smooth pursuit eye movements. Despite the diversity of test protocols, 65% of patients and controls are correctly classified by their overall performance during this pursuit. The smooth pursuit eye movements depend on the ability to anticipate the target's velocity and the visual feedback, as well as on learning and attention. The neuroanatomy implicated in smooth pursuit overlaps to some extent with certain frontal cortex zones associated with some clinical and neuropsychological characteristics of the schizophrenia, therefore some specific components of smooth pursuit anomalies could serve as biomarkers of the disease. Due to their sedative effect, antipsychotics have a deleterious effect on smooth pursuit eye movements, thus these movements cannot be used to evaluate the efficacy of the currently available treatments. Standardized evaluation of smooth pursuit eye movements on schizophrenia will allow to use specific aspects of that pursuit as biomarkers for the study of its genetics, psychopathology, or neuropsychology. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. Efficient computation of smoothing splines via adaptive basis sampling

    KAUST Repository

    Ma, Ping

    2015-06-24

    © 2015 Biometrika Trust. Smoothing splines provide flexible nonparametric regression estimators. However, the high computational cost of smoothing splines for large datasets has hindered their wide application. In this article, we develop a new method, named adaptive basis sampling, for efficient computation of smoothing splines in super-large samples. Except for the univariate case where the Reinsch algorithm is applicable, a smoothing spline for a regression problem with sample size n can be expressed as a linear combination of n basis functions and its computational complexity is generally O(n3). We achieve a more scalable computation in the multivariate case by evaluating the smoothing spline using a smaller set of basis functions, obtained by an adaptive sampling scheme that uses values of the response variable. Our asymptotic analysis shows that smoothing splines computed via adaptive basis sampling converge to the true function at the same rate as full basis smoothing splines. Using simulation studies and a large-scale deep earth core-mantle boundary imaging study, we show that the proposed method outperforms a sampling method that does not use the values of response variables.

  6. Nuclear Receptors Resolve Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress to Improve Hepatic Insulin Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Chronic endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress culminating in proteotoxicity contributes to the development of insulin resistance and progression to type 2 diabetes mellitus. Pharmacologic interventions targeting several different nuclear receptors have emerged as potential treatments for insulin resistance. The mechanistic basis for these antidiabetic effects has primarily been attributed to multiple metabolic and inflammatory functions. Here we review recent advances in our understanding of the association of ER stress with insulin resistance and the role of nuclear receptors in promoting ER stress resolution and improving insulin resistance in the liver. PMID:28236381

  7. [From endoplasmic reticulum to Golgi apparatus: a secretory pathway controlled by signal molecules].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiasheng; Luo, Jianhong; Zhang, Xiaomin

    2013-07-01

    Protein transport from endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to Golgi apparatus has long been known to be a central process for protein quality control and sorting. Recent studies have revealed that a large number of signal molecules are involved in regulation of membrane trafficking through ER, ER-Golgi intermediate compartment and Golgi apparatus. These molecules can significantly change the transport rate of proteins by regulating vesicle budding and fusion. Protein transport from ER to Golgi apparatus is not only controlled by signal pathways triggered from outside the cell, it is also regulated by feedback signals from the transport pathway.

  8. The metabolomic signature of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy reveals endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao de la Barca, Juan Manuel; Simard, Gilles; Amati-Bonneau, Patrizia; Safiedeen, Zainab; Prunier-Mirebeau, Delphine; Chupin, Stéphanie; Gadras, Cédric; Tessier, Lydie; Gueguen, Naïg; Chevrollier, Arnaud; Desquiret-Dumas, Valérie; Ferré, Marc; Bris, Céline; Kouassi Nzoughet, Judith; Bocca, Cinzia; Leruez, Stéphanie; Verny, Christophe; Miléa, Dan; Bonneau, Dominique; Lenaers, Guy; Martinez, M Carmen; Procaccio, Vincent; Reynier, Pascal

    2016-11-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (MIM#535000), the commonest mitochondrial DNA-related disease, is caused by mutations affecting mitochondrial complex I. The clinical expression of the disorder, usually occurring in young adults, is typically characterized by subacute, usually sequential, bilateral visual loss, resulting from the degeneration of retinal ganglion cells. As the precise action of mitochondrial DNA mutations on the overall cell metabolism in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy is unknown, we investigated the metabolomic profile of the disease. High performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry was used to quantify 188 metabolites in fibroblasts from 16 patients with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy and eight healthy control subjects. Latent variable-based statistical methods were used to identify discriminating metabolites. One hundred and twenty-four of the metabolites were considered to be accurately quantified. A supervised orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis model separating patients with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy from control subjects showed good predictive capability (Q 2cumulated = 0.57). Thirty-eight metabolites appeared to be the most significant variables, defining a Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy metabolic signature that revealed decreased concentrations of all proteinogenic amino acids, spermidine, putrescine, isovaleryl-carnitine, propionyl-carnitine and five sphingomyelin species, together with increased concentrations of 10 phosphatidylcholine species. This signature was not reproduced by the inhibition of complex I with rotenone or piericidin A in control fibroblasts. The importance of sphingomyelins and phosphatidylcholines in the Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy signature, together with the decreased amino acid pool, suggested an involvement of the endoplasmic reticulum. This was confirmed by the significantly increased phosphorylation of PERK and eIF2α, as well as

  9. Diet-induced Obesity Induces Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress And Insulin Resistance In The Amygdala Of Rats.

    OpenAIRE

    Castro G; C. Areias M.F.; Weissmann L.; Quaresma P.G.F.; Katashima C.K.; Saad M.J.A.; Prada P.O.

    2013-01-01

    Insulin acts in the hypothalamus, decreasing food intake (FI) by the IR/PI3K/Akt pathway. This pathway is impaired in obese animals and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and low-grade inflammation are possible mechanisms involved in this impairment. Here, we highlighted the amygdala as an important brain region for FI regulation in response to insulin. This regulation was dependent on PI3K/AKT pathway similar to the hypothalamus. Insulin was able to decrease neuropeptide Y (NPY) and increase ...

  10. The endoplasmic reticulum exerts control over organelle streaming during cell expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefano, Giovanni; Renna, Luciana; Brandizzi, Federica

    2014-03-01

    Cytoplasmic streaming is crucial for cell homeostasis and expansion but the precise driving forces are largely unknown. In plants, partial loss of cytoplasmic streaming due to chemical and genetic ablation of myosins supports the existence of yet-unknown motors for organelle movement. Here we tested a role of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) as propelling force for cytoplasmic streaming during cell expansion. Through quantitative live-cell analyses in wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana cells and mutants with compromised ER structure and streaming, we demonstrate that cytoplasmic streaming undergoes profound changes during cell expansion and that it depends on motor forces co-exerted by the ER and the cytoskeleton.

  11. Analysis of site-specific N-glycan remodeling in the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hang, Ivan; Lin, Chia-wei; Grant, Oliver C; Fleurkens, Susanna; Villiger, Thomas K; Soos, Miroslav; Morbidelli, Massimo; Woods, Robert J; Gauss, Robert; Aebi, Markus

    2015-01-01

    The hallmark of N-linked protein glycosylation is the generation of diverse glycan structures in the secretory pathway. Dynamic, non-template-driven processes of N-glycan remodeling in the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi provide the cellular setting for structural diversity. We applied newly developed mass spectrometry-based analytics to quantify site-specific N-glycan remodeling of the model protein Pdi1p expressed in insect cells. Molecular dynamics simulation, mutational analysis, kinetic studies of in vitro processing events and glycan flux analysis supported the defining role of the protein in N-glycan processing. PMID:26240167

  12. Super-smooth polishing on aspherical surfaces (II): achievement of a super-smooth polishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Manabu; Negishi, Mahito; Takimoto, Masafumi; Deguchi, Akinobu; Nakamura, Nobuo

    1995-08-01

    This paper discusses super-smooth polishing technology for excimer lasers, soft X-rays, and other short-wavelength light applications. Short-wavelength light elements require surface quality and contour accuracy superior to traditional specifications, as well as free-form contours. For this reason, our target for free-form contours of a 500 mm diameter was set to 0.08 mm PV for contour accuracy, and 0.2 nm RMS for surface roughness. To improve surface quality we employed local pitch polishing, utilizing a flexible tool laminated with an elastic sheet, which adapts well to various contours. For greater contour accuracy, we developed the CSSP (Canon Super-Smooth Polisher), which polishes 500 mm diameter optical elements. The CSSP polishing process achieves a contour accuracy of 0.078 mm PV and a surface roughness of 0.13 nm RMS on a 500 mm diameter fused silica toroidal mirror. We also fabricated both CaF2 and CVD-SiC, materials widely used in short-wavelength light elements.

  13. Smooth muscle phenotypic modulation--a personal experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Julie H; Campbell, Gordon R

    2012-08-01

    The idea that smooth muscle cells can exist in multiple phenotypic states depending on the functional demands placed upon them has been around for >5 decades. However, much of the literature today refers to only recent articles, giving the impression that it is a new idea. At the same time, the current trend is to delve deeper and deeper into transcriptional regulation of smooth muscle genes, and much of the work describing the change in biology of the cells in the different phenotypic states does not appear to be known. This loss of historical perspective regarding the biology of smooth muscle phenotypic modulation is what the current article has tried to mitigate.

  14. Stabilizing S.P.H. with conservative smoothing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, Y.; Hicks, D.L. [Michigan Tech. Univ., Houghton, MI (United States); Swegle, J.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-08-01

    There is an instability in certain S.P.H. (Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics method) material dynamics computations. Evidence from analyses and experiments suggests that the instabilities in S.P.H. are not removable with artificial viscosities. However, the analysis shows that a type of conservative smoothing does remove the instability. Also, numerical experiments, on certain test problems, show that SPHCS, and S.P.H. code with conservative smoothing, compares well in accuracy with computations based on the von Neumann-Richtmyer method.

  15. EXCHANGE-RATES FORECASTING: EXPONENTIAL SMOOTHING TECHNIQUES AND ARIMA MODELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dezsi Eva

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Exchange rates forecasting is, and has been a challenging task in finance. Statistical and econometrical models are widely used in analysis and forecasting of foreign exchange rates. This paper investigates the behavior of daily exchange rates of the Romanian Leu against the Euro, United States Dollar, British Pound, Japanese Yen, Chinese Renminbi and the Russian Ruble. Smoothing techniques are generated and compared with each other. These models include the Simple Exponential Smoothing technique, as the Double Exponential Smoothing technique, the Simple Holt-Winters, the Additive Holt-Winters, namely the Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average model.

  16. A wave smoothing algorithm and applications to the financial markets

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Omar Ait Hellal; Gerald H Meyer

    2014-01-01

      In this paper we present an algorithm that can be implemented recursively or iteratively, to smooth waves by filtering out "noise" until the base case is reached, a canonical form that we call the wave's imprint...

  17. Calcium-sensitivity of smooth muscle contraction in the isolated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sensitivity of smooth muscle contraction were studied in the isolated perfused rat tail artery, employing the activators noradrenaline (NA) (3ìM) sand potassium chloride (KC1) (100mM). Experiments were conduced in Ca2+ - buffered saline.

  18. Modeling Free-surface Solitary Waves with Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Balázs Tóth

    2017-01-01

    A three-dimensional weakly compressible Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) solver is presented and applied to simulate free-surface solitary waves generated in a quasi two dimensional dam-break experiment...

  19. Iterative Bias Reduction Multivariate Smoothing in R: The ibr Package

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre-André Cornillon

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In multivariate nonparametric analysis curse of dimensionality forces one to use large smoothing parameters. This leads to a biased smoother. Instead of focusing on optimally selecting the smoothing parameter, we fix it to some reasonably large value to ensure an over-smoothing of the data. The resulting base smoother has a small variance but a substantial bias. In this paper, we propose an R package named ibr to iteratively correct the initial bias of the (base estimator by an estimate of the bias obtained by smoothing the residuals. After a brief description of iterated bias reduction smoothers, we examine the base smoothers implemented in the package: Nadaraya-Watson kernel smoothers, Duchon splines smoothers and their low rank counterparts. Then, we explain the stopping rules available in the package and their implementation. Finally we illustrate the package on two examples: a toy example in R2 and the original Los Angeles ozone dataset.

  20. Functional consequences of human airway smooth muscle phenotype plasticity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekkers, Bart G J; Bos, I Sophie T; Zaagsma, Johan; Meurs, Herman

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Airway smooth muscle (ASM) phenotype plasticity, characterized by reversible switching between contractile and proliferative phenotypes, is considered to contribute to increased ASM mass and airway hyper-responsiveness in asthma. Further, increased expression of collagen I

  1. Derivatives of Multivariate Bernstein Operators and Smoothness with Jacobi Weights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianjun Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Using the modulus of smoothness, directional derivatives of multivariate Bernstein operators with weights are characterized. The obtained results partly generalize the corresponding ones for multivariate Bernstein operators without weights.

  2. A robust Kalman framework with resampling and optimal smoothing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kautz, Thomas; Eskofier, Bjoern M

    2015-01-01

    .... We introduce a novel Kalman-based analysis procedure that encompasses robustness towards outliers, Kalman smoothing and real-time conversion from non-uniformly sampled inputs to a constant output rate...

  3. Estimation of UAV Position with Use of Smoothing Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaniewski Piotr

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents methods of on-line and off-line estimation of UAV position on the basis of measurements from its integrated navigation system. The navigation system installed on board UAV contains an INS and a GNSS receiver. The UAV position, as well as its velocity and orientation are estimated with the use of smoothing algorithms. For off-line estimation, a fixed-interval smoothing algorithm has been applied. On-line estimation has been accomplished with the use of a fixed-lag smoothing algorithm. The paper includes chosen results of simulations demonstrating improvements of accuracy of UAV position estimation with the use of smoothing algorithms in comparison with the use of a Kalman filter.

  4. Methods for monitoring endoplasmic reticulum stress and the unfolded protein response.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Samali, Afshin

    2010-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the site of folding of membrane and secreted proteins in the cell. Physiological or pathological processes that disturb protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum cause ER stress and activate a set of signaling pathways termed the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR). The UPR can promote cellular repair and sustained survival by reducing the load of unfolded proteins through upregulation of chaperones and global attenuation of protein synthesis. Research into ER stress and the UPR continues to grow at a rapid rate as many new investigators are entering the field. There are also many researchers not working directly on ER stress, but who wish to determine whether this response is activated in the system they are studying: thus, it is important to list a standard set of criteria for monitoring UPR in different model systems. Here, we discuss approaches that can be used by researchers to plan and interpret experiments aimed at evaluating whether the UPR and related processes are activated. We would like to emphasize that no individual assay is guaranteed to be the most appropriate one in every situation and strongly recommend the use of multiple assays to verify UPR activation.

  5. Endoplasmic Reticulum Oxidative Stress Triggers Tgf-Beta-Dependent Muscle Dysfunction by Accelerating Ascorbic Acid Turnover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzer, Diego; Favellato, Mariagrazia; Bolis, Marco; Invernizzi, Roberto William; Solagna, Francesca; Blaauw, Bert; Zito, Ester

    2017-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and oxidative stress are two related phenomena that have important metabolic consequences. As many skeletal muscle diseases are triggered by oxidative stress, we explored the chain of events linking a hyperoxidized ER (which causes ER and oxidative stress) with skeletal muscle dysfunction. An unbiased exon expression array showed that the combined genetic modulation of the two master ER redox proteins, selenoprotein N (SEPN1) and endoplasmic oxidoreductin 1 (ERO1), led to an SEPN1-related myopathic phenotype due to excessive signalling of transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta. The increased TGF-beta activity in the genetic mutants was caused by accelerated turnover of the ER localized (anti-oxidant) ascorbic acid that affected collagen deposition in the extracellular matrix. In a mouse mutant of SEPN1, which is dependent on exogenous ascorbic acid, a limited intake of ascorbic acid revealed a myopathic phenotype as a consequence of an altered TGF-beta signalling. Indeed, systemic antagonism of TGF-beta re-established skeletal muscle function in SEPN1 mutant mice. In conclusion, this study sheds new light on the molecular mechanism of SEPN1-related myopathies and indicates that the TGF-beta/ERO1/ascorbic acid axis offers potential for their treatment. PMID:28106121

  6. Lipid homeostasis is involved in plasma membrane and endoplasmic reticulum stress in Pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meng; Yu, Qilin; Liang, Chen; Zhang, Biao; Li, Mingchun

    2016-09-16

    Maintaining cellular lipid composition is essential for many cell processes. Our previous study has demonstrated that Spt23 is an important transcription factor within the cell and responsible for the regulation of fatty acid desaturase genes. Disruption of SPT23 results in increased lipid saturation. In the present study, we found that lipid saturation caused by SPT23 deletion exhibited a growth defect under ethanol stress and increased chitin contents. Ergosterol synthesis-related genes were up-regulated to protect cells from plasma membrane damage in the presence of ethanol. The cell wall stress caused by increased chitin contents could not be attenuated by up-regulation of phospholipids synthesis-related genes in spt23Δ. Besides, lipid saturation induced expression of unfolded protein response (UPR) genes and reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation followed by activation of the cellular antioxidant system, which is associated with endoplasmic reticulum functions. Taken together, our data suggested that lipid homeostasis has a close connection with cell responses to both plasma membrane stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Grape seed proanthocyanidin protects liver against ischemia/reperfusion injury by attenuating endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhen-Chao; Yin, Jie; Zhou, Bo; Liu, Yu-Ting; Yu, Yue; Li, Guo-Qiang

    2015-06-28

    To explore the effect of grape seed proanthocyanidin (GSP) in liver ischemia/reperfusion (IR) injury and alleviation of endoplasmic reticulum stress. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (220-250 g) were divided into three groups, namely, sham, IR, and GSP groups (n = 8 each). A liver IR (70%) model was established and reperfused for 6 h. Prior to reperfusion, the GSP group was administered with GSP (100 mg/kg) for 15 d, and liver histology was then investigated. Serum aminotransferase and inflammatory mediators coupled with superoxide dismutase and methane dicarboxylic aldehyde were detected. Western blot was conducted to analyze the expression of glucose-regulated protein 78, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous protein, activating transcription factor-4, inositol-requiring enzyme-1, procaspase-12, and nuclear factor-κb. Apoptotic cells were detected by TUNEL staining. The serum aminotransferase, apoptotic cells, and Suzuki scores decreased in the GSP group compared with the IR group (Ps endoplasmic reticulum stress through regulation of related signaling pathways to protect the liver against IR injury.

  8. Lipotoxicity-Induced PRMT1 Exacerbates Mesangial Cell Apoptosis via Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Min-Jung; Han, Ho Jae; Kim, Dong-Il

    2017-07-03

    Lipotoxicity-induced mesangial cell apoptosis is implicated in the exacerbation of diabetic nephropathy (DN). Protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) have been known to regulate a variety of biological functions. Recently, it was reported that PRMT1 expression is increased in proximal tubule cells under diabetic conditions. However, their roles in mesangial cells remain unexplored. Thus, we examined the pathophysiological roles of PRMTs in mesangial cell apoptosis. Treatment with palmitate, which mimics cellular lipotoxicity, induced mesangial cell apoptosis via protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) and ATF6-mediated endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress signaling. Palmitate treatment increased PRMT1 expression and activity in mesangial cells as well. Moreover, palmitate-induced ER stress activation and mesangial cell apoptosis was diminished by PRMT1 knockdown. In the mice study, high fat diet-induced glomerular apoptosis was attenuated in PRMT1 haploinsufficient mice. Together, these results provide evidence that lipotoxicity-induced PRMT1 expression promotes ER stress-mediated mesangial cell apoptosis. Strategies to regulate PRMT1 expression or activity could be used to prevent the exacerbation of DN.

  9. Lipotoxicity-Induced PRMT1 Exacerbates Mesangial Cell Apoptosis via Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Jung Park

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Lipotoxicity-induced mesangial cell apoptosis is implicated in the exacerbation of diabetic nephropathy (DN. Protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs have been known to regulate a variety of biological functions. Recently, it was reported that PRMT1 expression is increased in proximal tubule cells under diabetic conditions. However, their roles in mesangial cells remain unexplored. Thus, we examined the pathophysiological roles of PRMTs in mesangial cell apoptosis. Treatment with palmitate, which mimics cellular lipotoxicity, induced mesangial cell apoptosis via protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK and ATF6-mediated endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress signaling. Palmitate treatment increased PRMT1 expression and activity in mesangial cells as well. Moreover, palmitate-induced ER stress activation and mesangial cell apoptosis was diminished by PRMT1 knockdown. In the mice study, high fat diet-induced glomerular apoptosis was attenuated in PRMT1 haploinsufficient mice. Together, these results provide evidence that lipotoxicity-induced PRMT1 expression promotes ER stress-mediated mesangial cell apoptosis. Strategies to regulate PRMT1 expression or activity could be used to prevent the exacerbation of DN.

  10. Sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ (SERCA)-pumps: link to heart beats and calcium waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misquitta, C M; Mack, D P; Grover, A K

    1999-04-01

    Mobilization of endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ is pivotal to the ability of a cell to send or respond to stimuli. Ca(2+)-Mg(2+)-ATPases, termed SERCA pumps, sequester Ca2+ into the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum. There are several SERCA protein isoforms encoded by three genes. This paper summarizes the structure, function, tissue and subcellular distribution, and regulation of various SERCA isoforms. Then it attempts to link divergence in the signal transduction processes of cells to the types and levels of SERCA proteins they express and to how the cells regulate their SERCA pump activity. The paper examines possible linkages between SERCA pumps and receptor-activated Ca2+ entry, SERCA isoform localization and Ca(2+)-waves, and the role of SERCA pumps in nuclear Ca2+ in cell proliferation and apoptosis. Then it uses available information on cardiac function and chronic stimulation of the fast-twitch muscle to answer a series of basic questions on the regulation of SERCA activity and expression and their linkage to signal transduction. Finally, it discusses the possibility that neurons exhibit complex Ca(2+)-waves whose interactions have the potential to explain the operational basis of neural networks. A series of unanswered questions emerge based on this synthesis, including the unsettling issue of whether all the isoforms are needed to achieve the divergence in signal transduction or if there is a degree of redundancy in the system.

  11. Roles of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in NECA-Induced Cardioprotection against Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengmei Xing

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study aimed to investigate whether the nonselective A2 adenosine receptor agonist NECA induces cardioprotection against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R injury via glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β and the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP through inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS. Methods and Results. H9c2 cells were exposed to H2O2 for 20 minutes. NECA significantly prevented H2O2-induced TMRE fluorescence reduction, indicating that NECA inhibited the mPTP opening. NECA blocked H2O2-induced GSK-3β phosphorylation and GRP94 expression. NECA increased GSK-3β phosphorylation and decreased GRP94 expression, which were prevented by both ERS inductor 2-DG and PKG inhibitor KT5823, suggesting that NECA may induce cardioprotection through GSK-3β and cGMP/PKG via ERS. In isolated rat hearts, both NECA and the ERS inhibitor TUDCA decreased myocardial infarction, increased GSK-3β phosphorylation, and reversed GRP94 expression at reperfusion, suggesting that NECA protected the heart by inhibiting GSK-3β and ERS. Transmission electron microscopy showed that NECA and TUDCA reduced mitochondrial swelling and endoplasmic reticulum expansion, further supporting that NECA protected the heart by preventing the mPTP opening and ERS. Conclusion. These data suggest that NECA prevents the mPTP opening through inactivation of GSK-3β via ERS inhibition. The cGMP/PKG signaling pathway is responsible for GSK-3β inactivation by NECA.

  12. Insulin Dissociates the Effects of Liver X Receptor on Lipogenesis, Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress, and Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaowei; Haas, Mary E; Miao, Ji; Mehta, Abhiruchi; Graham, Mark J; Crooke, Rosanne M; Pais de Barros, Jean-Paul; Wang, Jian-Guo; Aikawa, Masanori; Masson, David; Biddinger, Sudha B

    2016-01-15

    Diabetes is characterized by increased lipogenesis as well as increased endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and inflammation. The nuclear hormone receptor liver X receptor (LXR) is induced by insulin and is a key regulator of lipid metabolism. It promotes lipogenesis and cholesterol efflux, but suppresses endoplasmic reticulum stress and inflammation. The goal of these studies was to dissect the effects of insulin on LXR action. We used antisense oligonucleotides to knock down Lxrα in mice with hepatocyte-specific deletion of the insulin receptor and their controls. We found, surprisingly, that knock-out of the insulin receptor and knockdown of Lxrα produced equivalent, non-additive effects on the lipogenic genes. Thus, insulin was unable to induce the lipogenic genes in the absence of Lxrα, and LXRα was unable to induce the lipogenic genes in the absence of insulin. However, insulin was not required for LXRα to modulate the phospholipid profile, or to suppress genes in the ER stress or inflammation pathways. These data show that insulin is required specifically for the lipogenic effects of LXRα and that manipulation of the insulin signaling pathway could dissociate the beneficial effects of LXR on cholesterol efflux, inflammation, and ER stress from the negative effects on lipogenesis. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Involvement of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Capsaicin-Induced Apoptosis of Human Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengzhang Lin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Capsaicin, main pungent ingredient of hot chilli peppers, has been shown to have anticarcinogenic effect on various cancer cells through multiple mechanisms. In this study, we investigated the apoptotic effect of capsaicin on human pancreatic cancer cells in both in vitro and in vivo systems, as well as the possible mechanisms involved. In vitro, treatment of both the pancreatic cancer cells (PANC-1 and SW1990 with capsaicin resulted in cells growth inhibition, G0/G1 phase arrest, and apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Knockdown of growth arrest- and DNA damage-inducible gene 153 (GADD153, a marker of the endoplasmic-reticulum-stress- (ERS- mediated apoptosis pathway, by specific siRNA attenuated capsaicin-induced apoptosis both in PANC-1 and SW1990 cells. Moreover, in vivo studies capsaicin effectively inhibited the growth and metabolism of pancreatic cancer and prolonged the survival time of pancreatic cancer xenograft tumor-induced mice. Furthermore, capsaicin increased the expression of some key ERS markers, including glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78, phosphoprotein kinase-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (phosphoPERK, and phosphoeukaryotic initiation factor-2α (phospho-eIF2α, activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4 and GADD153 in tumor tissues. In conclusion, we for the first time provide important evidence to support the involvement of ERS in the induction of apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells by capsaicin.

  14. Exercise training protects human and rodent β cells against endoplasmic reticulum stress and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paula, Flavia M M; Leite, Nayara C; Borck, Patricia C; Freitas-Dias, Ricardo; Cnop, Miriam; Chacon-Mikahil, Mara P T; Cavaglieri, Claudia R; Marchetti, Piero; Boschero, Antonio C; Zoppi, Claudio C; Eizirik, Decio L

    2017-11-13

    Prolonged exercise has positive metabolic effects in obese or diabetic individuals. These effects are usually ascribed to improvements in insulin sensitivity. We evaluated whether exercise also generates circulating signals that protect human and rodent β cells against endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and apoptosis. For this purpose, we obtained serum from humans or mice before and after an 8 wk training period. Exposure of human islets or mouse or rat β cells to human or rodent sera, respectively, obtained from trained individuals reduced cytokine (IL-1β+IFN-γ)- or chemical ER stressor-induced β-cell ER stress and apoptosis, at least in part via activation of the transcription factor STAT3. These findings indicate that exercise training improves human and rodent β-cell survival under diabetogenic conditions and support lifestyle interventions as a protective approach for both type 1 and 2 diabetes.-Paula, F. M. M., Leite, N. C., Borck, P. C., Freitas-Dias, R., Cnop, M., Chacon-Mikahil, M. P. T., Cavaglieri, C. R., Marchetti, P., Boschero, A. C., Zoppi, C. C., Eizirik, D. L. Exercise training protects human and rodent β cells against endoplasmic reticulum stress and apoptosis. © FASEB.

  15. [Study on endoplasmic reticulum localization of CpTI protein in sck transgenic rice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Zhuo, Qin; Piao, Jianhua; Yang, Xiaoguang

    2008-05-01

    To study the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) localization of CpTI protein in sck transgenic rice. Immunohistochemistry and immune electron microscopy (IEM) were used to observe the localization of CpTI protein of root and leaf cell in sck transgenic rice. The endoplasmic reticulum localization of CpTI protein were observed by IEM. Colloidal gold granules were found in ER of root cell of sck transgenic rice and in root cells of the control plant colloidal gold granules were not observed. In plastid, chloroplast, cytoplasm, karyon of root cell of sck transgenic rice, a little of colloidal gold granules were also observed. The ER in the leaf cell was not observed because of the presence of vacuole, but some colloidal gold granules in cytoplasm, karyon and plastid of leaf cells were observed in sck transgenic rice. Colloidal gold granules were not observed in leaf cells of the control plant. It seemed that CpTI protein was mainly localized in the ER of the cell from sck transgenic rice and in other organelles there was also a little CpTI protein.

  16. GRP94: An HSP90-like protein specialized for protein folding and quality control in the endoplasmic reticulum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marzec, Michal; Eletto, Davide; Argon, Yair

    2012-01-01

    Glucose-regulated protein 94 is the HSP90-like protein in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum and therefore it chaperones secreted and membrane proteins. It has essential functions in development and physiology of multicellular organisms, at least in part because of this unique clientele. GRP94...... shares many biochemical features with other HSP90 proteins, in particular its domain structure and ATPase activity, but also displays distinct activities, such as calcium binding, necessitated by the conditions in the endoplasmic reticulum. GRP94's mode of action varies from the general HSP90 theme...

  17. Interference between smooth pursuit and color working memory

    OpenAIRE

    Yue, Shulin; Jin, Zhenlan; Fan, Chenggui; Zhang, Qian; Li, Ling

    2017-01-01

    Spatial working memory (WM) and spatial attention are closely related, but the relationship between non-spatial WM and spatial attention still remains unclear. The present study aimed to investigate the interaction between color WM and smooth pursuit eye movements. A modified delayed-match-to-sample paradigm (DMS) was applied with 2 or 4 items presented in each visual field. Subjects memorized the colors of items in the cued visual field and smoothly moved eyes towards or away from memorized ...

  18. Ureter smooth muscle cell orientation in rat is predominantly longitudinal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spronck, Bart; Merken, Jort J; Reesink, Koen D; Kroon, Wilco; Delhaas, Tammo

    2014-01-01

    In ureter peristalsis, the orientation of the contracting smooth muscle cells is essential, yet current descriptions of orientation and composition of the smooth muscle layer in human as well as in rat ureter are inconsistent. The present study aims to improve quantification of smooth muscle orientation in rat ureters as a basis for mechanistic understanding of peristalsis. A crucial step in our approach is to use two-photon laser scanning microscopy and image analysis providing objective, quantitative data on smooth muscle cell orientation in intact ureters, avoiding the usual sectioning artifacts. In 36 rat ureter segments, originating from a proximal, middle or distal site and from a left or right ureter, we found close to the adventitia a well-defined longitudinal smooth muscle orientation. Towards the lamina propria, the orientation gradually became slightly more disperse, yet the main orientation remained longitudinal. We conclude that smooth muscle cell orientation in rat ureter is predominantly longitudinal, though the orientation gradually becomes more disperse towards the proprial side. These findings do not support identification of separate layers. The observed longitudinal orientation suggests that smooth muscle contraction would rather cause local shortening of the ureter, than cause luminal constriction. However, the net-like connective tissue of the ureter wall may translate local longitudinal shortening into co-local luminal constriction, facilitating peristalsis. Our quantitative, minimally invasive approach is a crucial step towards more mechanistic insight into ureter peristalsis, and may also be used to study smooth muscle cell orientation in other tube-like structures like gut and blood vessels.

  19. Smooth maps of a foliated manifold in a symplectic manifold

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Let M be a smooth manifold with a regular foliation F and a 2-form ω which induces closed forms on the leaves of F in the leaf topology. A smooth map f : (M, F) −→ (N,σ) in a symplectic manifold (N,σ) is called a foliated symplectic immersion if f restricts to an immersion on each leaf of the foliation and further, the.

  20. Global smoothness preservation and the variation-diminishing property

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavrea Ioan

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available In the center of our paper are two counterexamples showing the independence of the concepts of global smoothness preservation and variation diminution for sequences of approximation operators. Under certain additional assumptions it is shown that the variation-diminishing property is the stronger one. It is also demonstrated, however, that there are positive linear operators giving an optimal pointwise degree of approximation, and which preserve global smoothness, monotonicity and convexity, but are not variation-diminishing.

  1. The evolutionary origin of bilaterian smooth and striated myocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunet, Thibaut; Fischer, Antje HL; Steinmetz, Patrick RH; Lauri, Antonella; Bertucci, Paola; Arendt, Detlev

    2016-01-01

    The dichotomy between smooth and striated myocytes is fundamental for bilaterian musculature, but its evolutionary origin is unsolved. In particular, interrelationships of visceral smooth muscles remain unclear. Absent in fly and nematode, they have not yet been characterized molecularly outside vertebrates. Here, we characterize expression profile, ultrastructure, contractility and innervation of the musculature in the marine annelid Platynereis dumerilii and identify smooth muscles around the midgut, hindgut and heart that resemble their vertebrate counterparts in molecular fingerprint, contraction speed and nervous control. Our data suggest that both visceral smooth and somatic striated myocytes were present in the protostome-deuterostome ancestor and that smooth myocytes later co-opted the striated contractile module repeatedly – for example, in vertebrate heart evolution. During these smooth-to-striated myocyte conversions, the core regulatory complex of transcription factors conveying myocyte identity remained unchanged, reflecting a general principle in cell type evolution. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19607.001 PMID:27906129

  2. Understanding Symmetric Smoothing Filters: A Gaussian Mixture Model Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Stanley H.; Zickler, Todd; Lu, Yue M.

    2017-11-01

    Many patch-based image denoising algorithms can be formulated as applying a smoothing filter to the noisy image. Expressed as matrices, the smoothing filters must be row normalized so that each row sums to unity. Surprisingly, if we apply a column normalization before the row normalization, the performance of the smoothing filter can often be significantly improved. Prior works showed that such performance gain is related to the Sinkhorn-Knopp balancing algorithm, an iterative procedure that symmetrizes a row-stochastic matrix to a doubly-stochastic matrix. However, a complete understanding of the performance gain phenomenon is still lacking. In this paper, we study the performance gain phenomenon from a statistical learning perspective. We show that Sinkhorn-Knopp is equivalent to an Expectation-Maximization (EM) algorithm of learning a Gaussian mixture model of the image patches. By establishing the correspondence between the steps of Sinkhorn-Knopp and the EM algorithm, we provide a geometrical interpretation of the symmetrization process. This observation allows us to develop a new denoising algorithm called Gaussian mixture model symmetric smoothing filter (GSF). GSF is an extension of the Sinkhorn-Knopp and is a generalization of the original smoothing filters. Despite its simple formulation, GSF outperforms many existing smoothing filters and has a similar performance compared to several state-of-the-art denoising algorithms.

  3. Stimulation of aortic smooth muscle cell mitogenesis by serotonin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemecek, G.M.; Coughlin, S.R.; Handley, D.A.; Moskowitz, M.A.

    1986-02-01

    Bovine aortic smooth muscle cells in vitro responded to 1 nM to 10 ..mu..M serotonin with increased incorporation of (/sup 3/H)thymidine into DNA. The mitogenic effect of serotonin was half-maximal at 80 nM and maximal above 1 ..mu..M. At a concentration of 1 ..mu..M, serotonin stimulated smooth muscle cell mitogenesis to the same extent as human platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) at 12 ng/ml. Tryptamine was approx. = 1/10th as potent as serotonin as a mitogen for smooth muscle cells. Other indoles that are structurally related to serotonin (D- and L-tryptophan, 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan, N-acetyl-5-hydroxytryptamine, melatonin, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, and 5-hydroxytryptophol) and quipazine were inactive. The stimulatory effect of serotonin on smooth muscle cell DNA synthesis required prolonged (20-24 hr) exposure to the agonist and was attenuated in the presence of serotonin D receptor antagonists. When smooth muscle cells were incubated with submaximal concentrations of serotonin and PDGF, synergistic rather than additive mitogenic responses were observed. These data indicate that serotonin has a significant mitogenic effect on smooth muscle cells in vitro, which appears to be mediated by specific plasma membrane receptors.

  4. Understanding Symmetric Smoothing Filters: A Gaussian Mixture Model Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Stanley H; Zickler, Todd; Lu, Yue M

    2017-11-01

    Many patch-based image denoising algorithms can be formulated as applying a smoothing filter to the noisy image. Expressed as matrices, the smoothing filters must be row normalized, so that each row sums to unity. Surprisingly, if we apply a column normalization before the row normalization, the performance of the smoothing filter can often be significantly improved. Prior works showed that such performance gain is related to the Sinkhorn-Knopp balancing algorithm, an iterative procedure that symmetrizes a row-stochastic matrix to a doubly stochastic matrix. However, a complete understanding of the performance gain phenomenon is still lacking. In this paper, we study the performance gain phenomenon from a statistical learning perspective. We show that Sinkhorn-Knopp is equivalent to an expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm of learning a Gaussian mixture model of the image patches. By establishing the correspondence between the steps of Sinkhorn-Knopp and the EM algorithm, we provide a geometrical interpretation of the symmetrization process. This observation allows us to develop a new denoising algorithm called Gaussian mixture model symmetric smoothing filter (GSF). GSF is an extension of the Sinkhorn-Knopp and is a generalization of the original smoothing filters. Despite its simple formulation, GSF outperforms many existing smoothing filters and has a similar performance compared with several state-of-the-art denoising algorithms.

  5. Arabidopsis SYT1 maintains stability of cortical endoplasmic reticulum networks and VAP27-1-enriched endoplasmic reticulum–plasma membrane contact sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siao, Wei; Wang, Pengwei; Voigt, Boris; Hussey, Patrick J.; Baluska, Frantisek

    2016-01-01

    Arabidopsis synaptotagmin 1 (SYT1) is localized on the endoplasmic reticulum–plasma membrane (ER–PM) contact sites in leaf and root cells. The ER–PM localization of Arabidopsis SYT1 resembles that of the extended synaptotagmins (E-SYTs) in animal cells. In mammals, E-SYTs have been shown to regulate calcium signaling, lipid transfer, and endocytosis. Arabidopsis SYT1 was reported to be essential for maintaining cell integrity and virus movement. This study provides detailed insight into the subcellular localization of SYT1 and VAP27-1, another ER–PM-tethering protein. SYT1 and VAP27-1 were shown to be localized on distinct ER–PM contact sites. The VAP27-1-enriched ER–PM contact sites (V-EPCSs) were always in contact with the SYT1-enriched ER–PM contact sites (S-EPCSs). The V-EPCSs still existed in the leaf epidermal cells of the SYT1 null mutant; however, they were less stable than those in the wild type. The polygonal networks of cortical ER disassembled and the mobility of VAP27-1 protein on the ER–PM contact sites increased in leaf cells of the SYT1 null mutant. These results suggest that SYT1 is responsible for stabilizing the ER network and V-EPCSs. PMID:27811083

  6. Arabidopsis SYT1 maintains stability of cortical endoplasmic reticulum networks and VAP27-1-enriched endoplasmic reticulum-plasma membrane contact sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siao, Wei; Wang, Pengwei; Voigt, Boris; Hussey, Patrick J; Baluska, Frantisek

    2016-11-01

    Arabidopsis synaptotagmin 1 (SYT1) is localized on the endoplasmic reticulum-plasma membrane (ER-PM) contact sites in leaf and root cells. The ER-PM localization of Arabidopsis SYT1 resembles that of the extended synaptotagmins (E-SYTs) in animal cells. In mammals, E-SYTs have been shown to regulate calcium signaling, lipid transfer, and endocytosis. Arabidopsis SYT1 was reported to be essential for maintaining cell integrity and virus movement. This study provides detailed insight into the subcellular localization of SYT1 and VAP27-1, another ER-PM-tethering protein. SYT1 and VAP27-1 were shown to be localized on distinct ER-PM contact sites. The VAP27-1-enriched ER-PM contact sites (V-EPCSs) were always in contact with the SYT1-enriched ER-PM contact sites (S-EPCSs). The V-EPCSs still existed in the leaf epidermal cells of the SYT1 null mutant; however, they were less stable than those in the wild type. The polygonal networks of cortical ER disassembled and the mobility of VAP27-1 protein on the ER-PM contact sites increased in leaf cells of the SYT1 null mutant. These results suggest that SYT1 is responsible for stabilizing the ER network and V-EPCSs. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  7. Immersed Boundary Smooth Extension: A high-order method for solving PDE on arbitrary smooth domains using Fourier spectral methods

    OpenAIRE

    Stein, David B.; Guy, Robert D; Thomases, Becca

    2015-01-01

    The Immersed Boundary method is a simple, efficient, and robust numerical scheme for solving PDE in general domains, yet it only achieves first-order spatial accuracy near embedded boundaries. In this paper, we introduce a new high-order numerical method which we call the Immersed Boundary Smooth Extension (IBSE) method. The IBSE method achieves high-order accuracy by smoothly extending the unknown solution of the PDE from a given sm...

  8. Trehalose activates autophagy and decreases proteasome inhibitor-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and oxidative stress-mediated cytotoxicity in hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honma, Yuichi; Sato-Morita, Miyuki; Katsuki, Yuka; Mihara, Hitomi; Baba, Ryoko; Harada, Masaru

    2017-03-11

    Endoplasmic reticulum stress is associated with the pathophysiology of various liver diseases. Endoplasmic reticulum stress mediates the accumulation of abnormal proteins and leads to oxidative stress, cytoplasmic inclusion body formation, and apoptosis in hepatocytes. Autophagy is a bulk degradation pathway for long-lived cytoplasmic proteins or damaged organelles and is also a major degradation pathway for many aggregate-prone and disease-causing proteins. We previously reported that rapamycin, a mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor, activated autophagy and decreased proteasome inhibitor-mediated ubiquitinated protein accumulation, cytoplasmic inclusion body formation, and apoptosis in hepatocytes. Trehalose is a non-reducing disaccharide that has been shown to activate autophagy. It has been reported to decrease aggregate-prone proteins and ameliorate cytotoxicity in neurodegenerative disease models. However, the effects of trehalose in hepatocytes are unclear. We show here that trehalose activated autophagy and reduced endoplasmic reticulum stress, cytoplasmic inclusion body formation, and apoptosis in proteasome inhibitor-treated liver-derived cultured cells. To our knowledge, this is the first report showing that trehalose activates autophagy and has cytoprotective effects in hepatocytes. Our findings suggest that trehalose can become a therapeutic agent for endoplasmic reticulum stress-related liver diseases. © 2017 The Japan Society of Hepatology.

  9. Nuclear receptor LRH-1/NR5A2 is required and targetable for liver endoplasmic reticulum stress resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress results in toxicity that contributes to multiple human disorders. We report a stress resolution pathway initiated by the nuclear receptor LRH-1 that is independent of known unfolded protein response (UPR) pathways. Like mice lacking primary UPR components, h...

  10. The endoplasmic reticulum stress/unfolded protein response in gliomagenesis, tumor progression and as a therapeutic target in glioblastoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peñaranda Fajardo, Natalia; Meijer, Coby; Kruyt, Frank A. E.

    2016-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress disrupts among others protein homeostasis in cells leading to the activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR) that is crucial for restoring this balance and cell survival. Hypoxia, reactive oxygen species and nutrient deprivation, conditions commonly present

  11. Endoplasmic reticulum stress inhibits collagen synthesis independent of collagen-modifying enzymes in different chondrocyte populations and dermal fibroblasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonk, Lucienne A.; Doulabi, Behrouz Zandieh; Huang, Chun-Ling; Helder, Marco N.; Everts, Vincent; Bank, Ruud A.

    Chondrocytes respond to glucose deprivation with a decreased collagen synthesis due to disruption of a proper functioning of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER): ER stress. Since the mechanisms involved in the decreased synthesis are unknown, we have investigated whether chaperones and collagen-modifying

  12. Endoplasmic reticulum stress inhibits collagen synthesis independent of collagen-modifying enzymes in different chondrocyte populations and dermal fibroblasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonk, L.A.; Doulabi, B.Z.; Huang, C.L.; Helder, M.N.; Everts, V.; Bank, R.A.

    2010-01-01

    Chondrocytes respond to glucose deprivation with a decreased collagen synthesis due to disruption of a proper functioning of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER): ER stress. Since the mechanisms involved in the decreased synthesis are unknown, we have investigated whether chaperones and collagen-modifying

  13. Regulation of the endoplasmic reticulum calcium storage during the unfolded protein response--significance in tissue ischemia?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Treiman, Marek

    2002-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is an organelle intimately involved in control of cell activities through Ca(2+) signaling, as well as in post-translational protein folding and maturation. Ca(2+) storage within the ER is required for both of these functions. Several of the ER-resident proteins essenti...

  14. Endoplasmic reticulum chaperone gp96 in macrophages is essential for protective immunity during Gram-negative pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anas, Adam A.; de Vos, Alex F.; Hoogendijk, Arie J.; van Lieshout, Miriam H. P.; van Heijst, Jeroen W. J.; Florquin, Sandrine; Li, Zihai; van 't Veer, Cornelis; van der Poll, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is among the most common Gram-negative bacteria that cause pneumonia. Gp96 is an endoplasmic reticulum chaperone that is essential for the trafficking and function of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and integrins. To determine the role of gp96 in myeloid cells in host defence during

  15. Organelle-cytoskeleton relationships in fibroblasts: mitochondria, Golgi apparatus, and endoplasmic reticulum in phases of movement and growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; Rees, D A

    1982-01-01

    by the actions of both colchicine and dihydrocytochalasin B showing that orientation and translocation depend on a co-ordinate interaction of microtubules and microfilamentous meshwork around the centrioles as origin. The Golgi apparatus and endoplasmic reticulum do not rearrange dramatically during...

  16. Intermittent Smoothing Approaches for Wind Power Output: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Jabir

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Wind energy is one of the most common types of renewable energy resource. Due to its sustainability and environmental benefits, it is an emerging source for electric power generation. Rapid and random changes of wind speed makes it an irregular and inconsistent power source when connected to the grid, causing different technical problems in protection, power quality and generation dispatch control. Due to these problems, effective intermittent smoothing approaches for wind power output are crucially needed to minimize such problems. This paper reviews various intermittent smoothing approaches used in smoothing the output power fluctuations caused by wind energy. Problems associated with the inclusion of wind energy resources to grid are also briefly reviewed. From this review, it has been found that battery energy storage system is the most suitable and effective smoothing approach, provided that an effective control strategy is available for optimal utilization of battery energy system. This paper further demonstrates different control strategies built for battery energy storage system to obtain the smooth output wind power.

  17. Geographic smoothing of solar PV: results from Gujarat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klima, Kelly; Apt, Jay

    2015-10-01

    We examine the potential for geographic smoothing of solar photovoltaic (PV) electricity generation using 13 months of observed power production from utility-scale plants in Gujarat, India. To our knowledge, this is the first published analysis of geographic smoothing of solar PV using actual generation data at high time resolution from utility-scale solar PV plants. We use geographic correlation and Fourier transform estimates of the power spectral density (PSD) to characterize the observed variability of operating solar PV plants as a function of time scale. Most plants show a spectrum that is linear in the log-log domain at high frequencies f, ranging from {f}-1.23 to {f}-1.56 (slopes of -1.23 and -1.56), thus exhibiting more relative variability at high frequencies than exhibited by wind plants. PSDs for large PV plants have a steeper slope than those for small plants, hence more smoothing at short time scales. Interconnecting 20 Gujarat plants yields a {f}-1.66 spectrum, reducing fluctuations at frequencies corresponding to 6 h and 1 h by 23% and 45%, respectively. Half of this smoothing can be obtained through connecting 4-5 plants; reaching marginal improvement of 1% per added plant occurs at 12-14 plants. The largest plant (322 MW) showed an {f}-1.76 spectrum. This suggests that in Gujarat the potential for smoothing is limited to that obtained by one large plant.

  18. Accuracy of eye position for saccades and smooth pursuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanidze, Natela; Ghahghaei, Saeideh; Verghese, Preeti

    2016-12-01

    In this study, we address the question of whether a target is foveated during smooth pursuit. Specifically, we examine whether smooth pursuit eye movements land near the center-of-mass of the target, as is the case for saccades. To that end, we instructed eight untrained, healthy participants to follow moving targets, presented monocularly in a scanning laser ophthalmoscope. Stimuli moved either in a modified step-ramp (smooth pursuit), or made a single step (saccade), stepping 6° from the center. Targets were ring-shaped and either 0.6° or 1.7° in diameter. In an additional set of experiments, two participants collected more extensive data on smooth pursuit and saccades for a larger range of target sizes (0.6°, 1.7°, or 4.3°). During pursuit, eyes were rarely placed at target center, even when participants' fixational stability was taken into account. Furthermore, there was a clear tendency for distance from target center to increase with target size. This outcome was in contrast to saccades, where there was no effect of target size across participants. The difference in foveal placement between the two types of eye movements is consistent with their different purposes: closer inspection of the target for saccades versus maintenance of the target in the visual field for smooth pursuit.

  19. A Molecular Fluorescent Probe for Targeted Visualization of Temperature at the Endoplasmic Reticulum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Satoshi; Lee, Sung-Chan; Zhai, Duanting; Suzuki, Madoka; Chang, Young Tae

    2014-10-01

    The dynamics of cellular heat production and propagation remains elusive at a subcellular level. Here we report the first small molecule fluorescent thermometer selectively targeting the endoplasmic reticulum (ER thermo yellow), with the highest sensitivity reported so far (3.9%/°C). Unlike nanoparticle thermometers, ER thermo yellow stains the target organelle evenly without the commonly encountered problem of aggregation, and successfully demonstrates the ability to monitor intracellular temperature gradients generated by external heat sources in various cell types. We further confirm the ability of ER thermo yellow to monitor heat production by intracellular Ca2+ changes in HeLa cells. Our thermometer anchored at nearly-zero distance from the ER, i.e. the heat source, allowed the detection of the heat as it readily dissipated, and revealed the dynamics of heat production in real time at a subcellular level.

  20. Secretion of Adipsin as an Assay to Measure Flux from the Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumfield, Alexandria; Chaudhary, Natasha; McGraw, Timothy E

    2017-04-05

    In this protocol we describe a quantitative biochemical assay to assess the efficiency of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to Golgi protein transport in adipocytes (Bruno et al., 2016). The assay takes advantage of the fact that adipocytes secrete various bioactive proteins, known as adipokines. As a measure of ER to Golgi flux we determine the rate of bulk secretion of the adipokine adipsin post washout of Brefeldin A (BFA) treatment using immunoblotting. Because BFA treatment results in an accumulation of adipsin in the ER, the exit of adipsin from the ER upon BFA washout is synchronized across cells and experimental conditions. Thus, using this simple assay one can robustly determine if perturbations, such as knocking down a protein, have an effect on ER to Golgi protein transport.

  1. Role of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Atherosclerosis and Diabetic Macrovascular Complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chistiakov, Dmitry A.; Sobenin, Igor A.; Orekhov, Alexander N.; Bobryshev, Yuri V.

    2014-01-01

    Age-related changes in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) are associated with stress of this cell organelle. Unfolded protein response (UPR) is a normal physiological reaction of a cell in order to prevent accumulation of unfolded and misfolded proteins in the ER and improve the normal ER function. However, in pathologic conditions such as atherosclerosis, obesity, and diabetes, ER function becomes impaired, leading to the development of ER stress. In chronic ER stress, defective posttranslational protein folding results in deposits of aberrantly folded proteins in the ER and the induction of cell apoptosis mediated by UPR sensors C/EBPα-homologous protein (CHOP) and inositol requiring protein-1 (IRE1). Since ER stress and ER-induced cell death play a nonredundant role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and diabetic macrovascular complications, pharmaceutical targeting of ER stress components and pathways may be beneficial in the treatment and prevention of cardiovascular pathology. PMID:25061609

  2. Targeting the hallmarks of cancer with therapy-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Abhishek D; Maes, Hannelore; van Vliet, Alexander R; Agostinis, Patrizia

    2015-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is at the center of a number of vital cellular processes such as cell growth, death, and differentiation, crosstalk with immune or stromal cells, and maintenance of proteostasis or homeostasis, and ER functions have implications for various pathologies including cancer. Recently, a number of major hallmarks of cancer have been delineated that are expected to facilitate the development of anticancer therapies. However, therapeutic induction of ER stress as a strategy to broadly target multiple hallmarks of cancer has been seldom discussed despite the fact that several primary or secondary ER stress-inducing therapies have been found to exhibit positive clinical activity in cancer patients. In the present review we provide a brief historical overview of the major discoveries and milestones in the field of ER stress biology with important implications for anticancer therapy. Furthermore, we comprehensively discuss possible strategies enabling the targeting of multiple hallmarks of cancer with therapy-induced ER stress. PMID:27308392

  3. Soluble forms of polyQ-expanded huntingtin rather than large aggregates cause endoplasmic reticulum stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitman, Julia; Ulrich Hartl, F.; Lederkremer, Gerardo Z.

    2013-11-01

    In Huntington’s disease, as in other neurodegenerative diseases, it was initially thought that insoluble protein aggregates are the toxic species. However, growing evidence implicates soluble oligomeric polyglutamine-expanded huntingtin in cytotoxicity. Here we show that pathogenic huntingtin inhibits endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation and induces ER stress before its aggregation into visible inclusions. All three branches of the unfolded protein response are activated. ER stress can be compensated by overexpression of p97/VCP, suggesting its sequestration by pathogenic huntingtin as a main cause. Stress correlates with the presence of huntingtin oligomers and is independent of continual huntingtin synthesis. Stress levels, measured in striatal neurons, are stabilized but only slowly subside on huntingtin aggregation into inclusions. Our results can be explained by the constant conversion of huntingtin monomers to toxic oligomers; large aggregates sequester the former, precluding further conversion, whereas pre-existing toxic oligomers are only gradually depleted.

  4. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Signaling in Mammalian Oocytes and Embryos: Life in the Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latham, Keith E.

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian oocytes and embryos are exquisitely sensitive to a wide range of insults related to physical stress, chemical exposure, and exposures to adverse maternal nutrition or health status. Although cells manifest specific responses to various stressors, many of these stressors intersect at the endoplasmic reticulum, where disruptions in protein folding and production of reactive oxygen species initiate downstream signaling events. These signals modulate mRNA translation and gene transcription, leading to recovery, activation of autophagy, or with severe and prolonged stress, apoptosis. ER stress signaling has recently come to the fore as a major contributor to embryo demise. Accordingly, agents that modulate or inhibit ER stress signaling have yielded beneficial effects on embryo survival and long-term developmental potential. We review here the mechanisms of ER stress signaling, their connections to mammalian oocytes and embryos, and the promising indications that interventions in this pathway may provide new opportunities for improving mammalian reproduction and health. PMID:25805126

  5. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and the Unfolded Protein Response in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentile, Christopher L.; Frye, Melinda

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The underlying causes of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are unclear, although recent evidence has implicated the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in both the development of steatosis and progression to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Disruption of ER homeostasis, often termed “ER stress,” has been observed in liver and adipose tissue of humans with NAFLD and/or obesity. Importantly, the signaling pathway activated by disruption of ER homeostasis, the unfolded protein response, has been linked to lipid biosynthesis, insulin action, inflammation, and apoptosis. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms that disrupt ER homeostasis in NAFLD and the role of ER-mediated signaling have become topics of intense investigation. The present review will examine the ER and the unfolded protein response in the context of NAFLD. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 15, 505–521. PMID:21128705

  6. Endoplasmic reticulum transport of glutathione by Sec61 is regulated by Ero1 and Bip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ponsero, Alise J.; Igbaria, Aeid; Darch, Maxwell A.

    2017-01-01

    In the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), Ero1 catalyzes disulfide bond formation and promotes glutathione (GSH) oxidation to GSSG. Since GSSG cannot be reduced in the ER, maintenance of the ER glutathione redox state and levels likely depends on ER glutathione import and GSSG export. We used quantitative...... GSH and GSSG biosensors to monitor glutathione import into the ER of yeast cells. We found that glutathione enters the ER by facilitated diffusion through the Sec61 protein-conducting channel, while oxidized Bip (Kar2) inhibits transport. Increased ER glutathione import triggers H2O2-dependent Bip...... oxidation through Ero1 reductive activation, which inhibits glutathione import in a negative regulatory loop. During ER stress, transport is activated by UPR-dependent Ero1 induction, and cytosolic glutathione levels increase. Thus, the ER redox poise is tuned by reciprocal control of glutathione import...

  7. Cell biology of the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi apparatus through proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirle, Jeffrey; Au, Catherine E; Jain, Michael; Dejgaard, Kurt; Nilsson, Tommy; Bergeron, John

    2013-01-01

    Enriched endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi membranes subjected to mass spectrometry have uncovered over a thousand different proteins assigned to the ER and Golgi apparatus of rat liver. This, in turn, led to the uncovering of several hundred proteins of poorly understood function and, through hierarchical clustering, showed that proteins distributed in patterns suggestive of microdomains in cognate organelles. This has led to new insights with respect to their intracellular localization and function. Another outcome has been the critical testing of the cisternal maturation hypothesis showing overwhelming support for a predominant role of COPI vesicles in the transport of resident proteins of the ER and Golgi apparatus (as opposed to biosynthetic cargo). Here we will discuss new insights gained and also highlight new avenues undertaken to further explore the cell biology of the ER and the Golgi apparatus through tandem mass spectrometry.

  8. The endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria coupling in health and disease: Molecules, functions and significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filadi, Riccardo; Theurey, Pierre; Pizzo, Paola

    2017-03-01

    The close apposition between endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria represents a key platform, capable to regulate different fundamental cellular pathways. Among these, Ca 2+ signaling and lipid homeostasis have been demonstrated over the last years to be deeply modulated by ER-mitochondria cross-talk. Given its importance in cell life/death decisions, increasing evidence suggests that alterations of the ER-mitochondria axis could be responsible for the onset and progression of several diseases, including neurodegeneration, cancer and obesity. However, the molecular identity of the proteins controlling this inter-organelle apposition is still debated. In this review, we summarize the main cellular pathways controlled by ER-mitochondria appositions, focusing on the principal molecules reported to be involved in this interplay and on those diseases for which alterations in organelles communication have been reported. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Lipotoxic endoplasmic reticulum stress, β cell failure, and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biden, Trevor J; Boslem, Ebru; Chu, Kwan Yi; Sue, Nancy

    2014-08-01

    Failure of the unfolded protein response (UPR) to maintain optimal folding of pro-insulin in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) leads to unresolved ER stress and β cell death. This contributes not only to some rare forms of diabetes, but also to type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Many key findings, elaborated over the past decade, are based on the lipotoxicity model, entailing chronic exposure of β cells to elevated levels of fatty acids (FAs). Here, we update recent progress on how FAs initiate ER stress, particularly via disruption of protein trafficking, and how this leads to apoptosis. We also highlight differences in how β cells are impacted by the classic UPR, versus the more selective UPR that arises as part of a broader response to lipotoxicity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Endothelial Dysfunction in Diabetes Mellitus: Possible Involvement of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basma Basha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The vascular complications of diabetes mellitus impose a huge burden on the management of this disease. The higher incidence of cardiovascular complications and the unfavorable prognosis among diabetic individuals who develop such complications have been correlated to the hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress and associated endothelial dysfunction. Although antioxidants may be considered as effective therapeutic agents to relieve oxidative stress and protect the endothelium, recent clinical trials involving these agents have shown limited therapeutic efficacy in this regard. In the recent past experimental evidence suggest that endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress in the endothelial cells might be an important contributor to diabetes-related vascular complications. The current paper contemplates the possibility of the involvement of ER stress in endothelial dysfunction and diabetes-associated vascular complications.

  11. Endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 2 is highly expressed in papillary thyroid microcarcinoma with cervical lymph node metastasis

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    Woo Young Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The cervical lymph node metastasis (CLNM of papillary thyroid microcarcinoma (PTMC is not uncommon. However, prophylactic cervical lymph node dissection in all PTMC is debatable. Molecular markers of predicting CLNM would help to decide to either do or not do cervical lymph node dissection which might increase morbidities. Aims: We aimed to characterize gene expression profiles and molecular markers of CLNM in PTMC. Settings and Design: The thyroid frozen tissues were obtained with from six PTMC patients, who underwent total thyroidectomy. Methods: We performed oligonucleotide microarray analysis with three PTMCs with CLNM and three without CLNM. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was used to validate the gene. Statistical Analysis Used: We used linear models for microarray data. Results: We identified 12 differentially expressed gene, and most one is endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 2 (ERAP2. Conclusion: ERAP2 might be associated with CLNM in PTMC.

  12. Pekinenin E Inhibits the Growth of Hepatocellular Carcinoma by Promoting Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Mediated Cell Death

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    Lu Fan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is a malignant primary liver cancer with poor prognosis. In the present study, we report that pekinenin E (PE, a casbane diterpenoid derived from the roots of Euphorbia pekinensis, has a strong antitumor activity against human HCC cells both in vitro and in vivo. PE suppressed the growth of human HCC cells Hep G2 and SMMC-7721. In addition, PE-mediated endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress caused increasing expressions of C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP, leading to apoptosis in HCC cells both in vitro and in vivo. Inhibition of ER stress with CHOP small interfering RNA or 4-phenyl-butyric acid partially reversed PE-induced cell death. Furthermore, PE induced S cell cycle arrest, which could also be partially reversed by CHOP knockdown. In all, these findings suggest that PE causes ER stress-associated cell death and cell cycle arrest, and it may serve as a potent agent for curing human HCC.

  13. XBP1 may determine the size of the ameloblast endoplasmic reticulum.

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    Tsuchiya, M; Tye, C E; Sharma, R; Smith, C E; Bartlett, J D

    2008-11-01

    Ameloblasts progress through defined stages of development as enamel forms on teeth. Pre-secretory ameloblasts give rise to tall columnar secretory ameloblasts that direct the enamel to achieve its full thickness. During the maturation stage, the ameloblasts shorten and direct the enamel to achieve its final hardened form. Here we ask how the volume of selected ameloblast organelles changes (percent volume per ameloblast) as ameloblasts progress through six defined developmental stages. We demonstrate that mitochondria volume peaks during late maturation, indicating that maturation-stage ameloblasts maintain a high level of metabolic activity. Also, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) volume changes significantly as a function of developmental stage. This prompted us to ask if X-box-binding protein-1 (XBP1) plays a role in regulating ameloblast ER volume, as has been previously demonstrated for secretory acinar cells and for plasma cell differentiation. We demonstrate that Xbp1 expression correlates positively with percent volume of ameloblast ER.

  14. Inhibition of protein translocation at the endoplasmic reticulum promotes activation of the unfolded protein response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKibbin, Craig; Mares, Alina; Piacenti, Michela; Williams, Helen; Roboti, Peristera; Puumalainen, Marjo; Callan, Anna C; Lesiak-Mieczkowska, Karolina; Linder, Stig; Harant, Hanna; High, Stephen; Flitsch, Sabine L; Whitehead, Roger C; Swanton, Eileithyia

    2012-03-15

    Selective small-molecule inhibitors represent powerful tools for the dissection of complex biological processes. ES(I) (eeyarestatin I) is a novel modulator of ER (endoplasmic reticulum) function. In the present study, we show that in addition to acutely inhibiting ERAD (ER-associated degradation), ES(I) causes production of mislocalized polypeptides that are ubiquitinated and degraded. Unexpectedly, our results suggest that these non-translocated polypeptides promote activation of the UPR (unfolded protein response), and indeed we can recapitulate UPR activation with an alternative and quite distinct inhibitor of ER translocation. These results suggest that the accumulation of non-translocated proteins in the cytosol may represent a novel mechanism that contributes to UPR activation.

  15. Endoplasmic reticulum generates calcium signalling microdomains around the nucleus and spindle in syncytial Drosophila embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, H; McDougall, A; Whitaker, M

    2006-06-01

    Cell cycle calcium signals are generated by inositol trisphosphate-mediated release of calcium from internal stores [Ciapa, Pesando, Wilding and Whitaker (1994) Nature (London) 368, 875-878; Groigno and Whitaker (1998) Cell 92, 193-204]. The major internal calcium store is the ER (endoplasmic reticulum): the spatial organization of the ER during mitosis is important in defining a microdomain around the nucleus and mitotic spindle in early Drosophila embryos [Parry, McDougall and Whitaker (2005) J. Cell Biol. 171, 47-59]. Nuclear divisions in syncytial Drosophila embryos are accompanied by both cortical and nuclear localized calcium transients. Mitosis is prevented by the InsP(3) antagonists Xestospongin C and heparin. Nuclear-localized transients and cortical transients rely on extraembryonic calcium, suggesting that ER calcium levels are maintained by calcium influx.

  16. Obesity induces hypothalamic endoplasmic reticulum stress and impairs proopiomelanocortin (POMC) post-translational processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakir, Isin; Cyr, Nicole E; Perello, Mario; Litvinov, Bogdan Patedakis; Romero, Amparo; Stuart, Ronald C; Nillni, Eduardo A

    2013-06-14

    It was shown previously that abnormal prohormone processing or inactive proconverting enzymes that are responsible for this processing cause profound obesity. Our laboratory demonstrated earlier that in the diet-induced obesity (DIO) state, the appetite-suppressing neuropeptide α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) is reduced, yet the mRNA of its precursor protein proopiomelanocortin (POMC) remained unaltered. It was also shown that the DIO condition promotes the development of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and leptin resistance. In the current study, using an in vivo model combined with in vitro experiments, we demonstrate that obesity-induced ER stress obstructs the post-translational processing of POMC by decreasing proconverting enzyme 2, which catalyzes the conversion of adrenocorticotropin to α-MSH, thereby decreasing α-MSH peptide production. This novel mechanism of ER stress affecting POMC processing in DIO highlights the importance of ER stress in regulating central energy balance in obesity.

  17. Endoplasmic reticulum stress is induced in the human placenta during labour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veerbeek, J H W; Tissot Van Patot, M C; Burton, G J; Yung, H W

    2015-01-01

    Placental endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has been postulated in the pathophysiology of pre-eclampsia (PE) and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), but its activation remains elusive. Oxidative stress induced by ischaemia/hypoxia-reoxygenation activates ER stress in vitro. Here, we explored whether exposure to labour represents an in vivo model for the study of acute placental ER stress. ER stress markers, GRP78, P-eIF2α and XBP-1, were significantly higher in laboured placentas than in Caesarean-delivered controls localised mainly in the syncytiotrophoblast. The similarities to changes observed in PE/IUGR placentas suggest exposure to labour can be used to investigate induction of ER stress in pathological placentas. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Rapid regulation of endoplasmic reticulum dynamics in dendritic spines by NMDA receptor activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Ai Na; Doherty, Andrew J; Lombroso, Paul J; Emptage, Nigel J; Collingridge, Graham L

    2014-08-19

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is motile within dendritic spines, but the mechanisms underlying its regulation are poorly understood. To address this issue, we have simultaneously imaged morphology and ER content of dendritic spines in cultured dissociated mouse hippocampal neurons. Over a 10 min period, spines were highly dynamic, with spines both increasing and decreasing in volume. ER was present in approximately 50% of spines and was also highly dynamic, with a net increase over this period of time. Inhibition of the endogenous activation of NMDA receptors resulted in a reduction in ER growth. Conversely, augmentation of the synaptic activation of NMDA receptors, by elimination of striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP), resulted in enhanced ER growth. Therefore, NMDA receptors rapidly regulate spine ER dynamics.

  19. Vesicular trafficking of incoming human papillomavirus 16 to the Golgi apparatus and endoplasmic reticulum requires γ-secretase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Kazakov, Teymur; Popa, Andreea; DiMaio, Daniel

    2014-09-16

    The route taken by papillomaviruses from the cell surface to the nucleus during infection is incompletely understood. Here, we developed a novel human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) pseudovirus in which the carboxy terminus of the minor capsid protein L2 is exposed on the exterior of the intact capsid prior to cell binding. With this pseudovirus, we used the proximity ligation assay immune detection technique to demonstrate that during entry HPV16 L2 traffics into and out of the early endosome prior to Golgi localization, and we demonstrated that L2 enters the endoplasmic reticulum during entry. The cellular membrane-associated protease, γ-secretase, is required for infection by HPV16 pseudovirus and authentic HPV16. We also showed that inhibition of γ-secretase does not interfere substantively with virus internalization, initiation of capsid disassembly, entry into the early endosome, or exit from this compartment, but γ-secretase is required for localization of L2 and viral DNA to the Golgi apparatus and the endoplasmic reticulum. These results show that incoming HPV16 traffics sequentially from the cell surface to the endosome and then to the Golgi apparatus and the endoplasmic reticulum prior to nuclear entry. The human papillomaviruses are small nonenveloped DNA viruses responsible for approximately 5% of all human cancer deaths, but little is known about the process by which these viruses transit from the cell surface to the nucleus. Here we show that incoming HPV16, the most common high-risk HPV, traffics though a series of vesicular compartments during infectious entry, including the endosome, Golgi apparatus, and endoplasmic reticulum. Furthermore, we show that γ-secretase, a cellular membrane-associated protease, is required for entry of the L2 minor capsid protein and viral DNA into the Golgi apparatus and endoplasmic reticulum. These studies reveal a new pathway of cell entry by DNA viruses and suggest that components of this pathway are candidate

  20. HMGB1 induces an inflammatory response in endothelial cells via the RAGE-dependent endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway

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    Luo, Ying [Department of Geriatric Medicine, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410078 (China); Li, Shu-Jun [Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410078 (China); Yang, Jian [Department of Geriatric Medicine, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410078 (China); Qiu, Yuan-Zhen [Department of Otolaryngology, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410078 (China); Chen, Fang-Ping, E-mail: xychenfp@163.com [Department of Hematology, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410078 (China)

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •Mechanisms of inflammatory response induced by HMGB1 are incompletely understood. •We found that endoplasmic reticulum stress mediate the inflammatory response induced by HMGB1. •RAGE-mediated ERS pathways are involved in those processes. •We reported a new mechanism for HMGB1 induced inflammatory response. -- Abstract: The high mobility group 1B protein (HMGB1) mediates chronic inflammatory responses in endothelial cells, which play a critical role in atherosclerosis. However, the underlying mechanism is unknown. The goal of our study was to identify the effects of HMGB1 on the RAGE-induced inflammatory response in endothelial cells and test the possible involvement of the endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway. Our results showed that incubation of endothelial cells with HMGB1 (0.01–1 μg/ml) for 24 h induced a dose-dependent activation of endoplasmic reticulum stress transducers, as assessed by PERK and IRE1 protein expression. Moreover, HMGB1 also promoted nuclear translocation of ATF6. HMGB1-mediated ICAM-1 and P-selectin production was dramatically suppressed by PERK siRNA or IRE1 siRNA. However, non-targeting siRNA had no such effects. HMGB1-induced increases in ICAM-1 and P-selectin expression were also inhibited by a specific eIF2α inhibitor (salubrinal) and a specific JNK inhibitor (SP600125). Importantly, a blocking antibody specifically targeted against RAGE (anti-RAGE antibody) decreased ICAM-1, P-selectin and endoplasmic reticulum stress molecule (PERK, eIF2α, IRE1 and JNK) protein expression levels. Collectively, these novel findings suggest that HMGB1 promotes an inflammatory response by inducing the expression of ICAM-1 and P-selectin via RAGE-mediated stimulation of the endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway.

  1. Inhibin beta E is upregulated by drug-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress as a transcriptional target gene of ATF4

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    Brüning, Ansgar, E-mail: ansgar.bruening@med.uni-muenchen.de; Matsingou, Christina; Brem, German Johannes; Rahmeh, Martina; Mylonas, Ioannis

    2012-10-15

    Inhibins and activins are gonadal peptide hormones of the transforming growth factor-β super family with important functions in the reproductive system. By contrast, the recently identified inhibin βE subunit, primarily expressed in liver cells, appears to exert functions unrelated to the reproductive system. Previously shown downregulation of inhibin βE in hepatoma cells and anti-proliferative effects of ectopic inhibin βE overexpression indicated growth-regulatory effects of inhibin βE. We observed a selective re-expression of the inhibin βE subunit in HepG2 hepatoblastoma cells, MCF7 breast cancer cells, and HeLa cervical cancer cells under endoplasmic reticulum stress conditions induced by tunicamycin, thapsigargin, and nelfinavir. Analysis of XPB1 splicing and ATF4 activation revealed that inhibin βE re-expression was associated with induction of the endoplasmic reticulum stress reaction by these drugs. Transfection of an ATF4 expression plasmid specifically induced inhibin βE expression in HeLa cells and indicates inhibin βE as a hitherto unidentified target gene of ATF4, a key transcription factor of the endoplasmic reticulum stress response. Therefore, the inhibin βE subunit defines not only a new player but also a possible new marker for drug-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress. -- Highlights: ► Endoplasmic reticulum stress induces inhibin beta E expression. ► Inhibin beta E is regulated by the transcription factor ATF4. ► Inhibin beta E expression can be used as a marker for drug-induced ER stress.

  2. Sarco/Endoplasmic Reticulum Ca2+-ATPases (SERCA) Contribute to GPCR-Mediated Taste Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iguchi, Naoko; Ohkuri, Tadahiro; Slack, Jay P.; Zhong, Ping; Huang, Liquan

    2011-01-01

    The sense of taste is important for providing animals with valuable information about the qualities of food, such as nutritional or harmful nature. Mammals, including humans, can recognize at least five primary taste qualities: sweet, umami (savory), bitter, sour, and salty. Recent studies have identified molecules and mechanisms underlying the initial steps of tastant-triggered molecular events in taste bud cells, particularly the requirement of increased cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]c) for normal taste signal transduction and transmission. Little, however, is known about the mechanisms controlling the removal of elevated [Ca2+]c from the cytosol of taste receptor cells (TRCs) and how the disruption of these mechanisms affects taste perception. To investigate the molecular mechanism of Ca2+ clearance in TRCs, we sought the molecules involved in [Ca2+]c regulation using a single-taste-cell transcriptome approach. We found that Serca3, a member of the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA) family that sequesters cytosolic Ca2+ into endoplasmic reticulum, is exclusively expressed in sweet/umami/bitter TRCs, which rely on intracellular Ca2+ release for signaling. Serca3-knockout (KO) mice displayed significantly increased aversive behavioral responses and greater gustatory nerve responses to bitter taste substances but not to sweet or umami taste substances. Further studies showed that Serca2 was mainly expressed in the T1R3-expressing sweet and umami TRCs, suggesting that the loss of function of Serca3 was possibly compensated by Serca2 in these TRCs in the mutant mice. Our data demonstrate that the SERCA family members play an important role in the Ca2+ clearance in TRCs and that mutation of these proteins may alter bitter and perhaps sweet and umami taste perception. PMID:21829714

  3. Sarco/Endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPases (SERCA contribute to GPCR-mediated taste perception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoko Iguchi

    Full Text Available The sense of taste is important for providing animals with valuable information about the qualities of food, such as nutritional or harmful nature. Mammals, including humans, can recognize at least five primary taste qualities: sweet, umami (savory, bitter, sour, and salty. Recent studies have identified molecules and mechanisms underlying the initial steps of tastant-triggered molecular events in taste bud cells, particularly the requirement of increased cytosolic free Ca(2+ concentration ([Ca(2+](c for normal taste signal transduction and transmission. Little, however, is known about the mechanisms controlling the removal of elevated [Ca(2+](c from the cytosol of taste receptor cells (TRCs and how the disruption of these mechanisms affects taste perception. To investigate the molecular mechanism of Ca(2+ clearance in TRCs, we sought the molecules involved in [Ca(2+](c regulation using a single-taste-cell transcriptome approach. We found that Serca3, a member of the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+-ATPase (SERCA family that sequesters cytosolic Ca(2+ into endoplasmic reticulum, is exclusively expressed in sweet/umami/bitter TRCs, which rely on intracellular Ca(2+ release for signaling. Serca3-knockout (KO mice displayed significantly increased aversive behavioral responses and greater gustatory nerve responses to bitter taste substances but not to sweet or umami taste substances. Further studies showed that Serca2 was mainly expressed in the T1R3-expressing sweet and umami TRCs, suggesting that the loss of function of Serca3 was possibly compensated by Serca2 in these TRCs in the mutant mice. Our data demonstrate that the SERCA family members play an important role in the Ca(2+ clearance in TRCs and that mutation of these proteins may alter bitter and perhaps sweet and umami taste perception.

  4. Increased endoplasmic reticulum stress response is involved in clopidogrel-induced apoptosis of gastric epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Lu Wu

    Full Text Available The widespread use of clopidogrel alone or in combination with aspirin may result in gastrointestinal mucosal injury, clinically represented as recurrent ulceration and bleeding complications. Our recent work suggested that clopidogrel significantly induced human gastric epithelial cell (GES-1 apoptosis and disrupted gastric mucosal barrier, and that a p38 MAPK inhibitor could attenuate such injury. However, their exact mechanisms are largely unknown.The GES-1 cells were used as a model system, the effects of clopidogrel on the whole gene expression profile were evaluated by human gene expression microarray and gene ontology analysis, changes of the mRNA and protein expression were determined by real-time PCR and Western blot analysis, and cell viability and apoptosis were measured by MTT assay and flow cytometry analysis, respectively.Gene microarray analysis identified 79 genes that were differentially expressed (P3 when cells were treated with or without clopidogrel. Gene ontology analysis revealed that response to stress and cell apoptosis dysfunction were ranked in the top 10 cellular events being affected, and that the major components of endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptosis pathway - CHOP and TRIB3- were up-regulated in a concentration- and time-dependent manner when cells were treated with clopidogrel. Pathway analysis demonstrated that multiple MAPK kinases were phosphorylated in clopidogrel-treated GES-1 cells, but that only SB-203580 (a p38-specific MAPK inhibitor attenuated cell apoptosis and CHOP over-expression, both of which were induced by clopidogrel.Increased endoplasmic reticulum stress response is involved in clopidogrel-induced gastric mucosal injury, acting through p38 MAPK activation.

  5. PERK induces resistance to cell death elicited by endoplasmic reticulum stress and chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salaroglio, Iris C; Panada, Elisa; Moiso, Enrico; Buondonno, Ilaria; Provero, Paolo; Rubinstein, Menachem; Kopecka, Joanna; Riganti, Chiara

    2017-05-12

    Nutrient deprivation, hypoxia, radiotherapy and chemotherapy induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, which activates the so-called unfolded protein response (UPR). Extensive and acute ER stress directs the UPR towards activation of death-triggering pathways. Cancer cells are selected to resist mild and prolonged ER stress by activating pro-survival UPR. We recently found that drug-resistant tumor cells are simultaneously resistant to ER stress-triggered cell death. It is not known if cancer cells adapted to ER stressing conditions acquire a chemoresistant phenotype. To investigate this issue, we generated human cancer cells clones with acquired resistance to ER stress from ER stress-sensitive and chemosensitive cells. ER stress-resistant cells were cross-resistant to multiple chemotherapeutic drugs: such multidrug resistance (MDR) was due to the overexpression of the plasma-membrane transporter MDR related protein 1 (MRP1). Gene profiling analysis unveiled that cells with acquired resistance to ER stress and chemotherapy share higher expression of the UPR sensor protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK), which mediated the erythroid-derived 2-like 2 (Nrf2)-driven transcription of MRP1. Disrupting PERK/Nrf2 axis reversed at the same time resistance to ER stress and chemotherapy. The inducible silencing of PERK reduced tumor growth and restored chemosensitivity in resistant tumor xenografts. Our work demonstrates for the first time that the adaptation to ER stress in cancer cells produces a MDR phenotype. The PERK/Nrf2/MRP1 axis is responsible for the resistance to ER stress and chemotherapy, and may represent a good therapeutic target in aggressive and resistant tumors.

  6. Tributyltin-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and its Ca{sup 2+}-mediated mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isomura, Midori; Kotake, Yaichiro, E-mail: yaichiro@hiroshima-u.ac.jp; Masuda, Kyoichi; Miyara, Masatsugu; Okuda, Katsuhiro; Samizo, Shigeyoshi; Sanoh, Seigo; Hosoi, Toru; Ozawa, Koichiro; Ohta, Shigeru

    2013-10-01

    Organotin compounds, especially tributyltin chloride (TBT), have been widely used in antifouling paints for marine vessels, but exhibit various toxicities in mammals. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a multifunctional organelle that controls post-translational modification and intracellular Ca{sup 2+} signaling. When the capacity of the quality control system of ER is exceeded under stress including ER Ca{sup 2+} homeostasis disruption, ER functions are impaired and unfolded proteins are accumulated in ER lumen, which is called ER stress. Here, we examined whether TBT causes ER stress in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. We found that 700 nM TBT induced ER stress markers such as CHOP, GRP78, spliced XBP1 mRNA and phosphorylated eIF2α. TBT also decreased the cell viability both concentration- and time-dependently. Dibutyltin and monobutyltin did not induce ER stress markers. We hypothesized that TBT induces ER stress via Ca{sup 2+} depletion, and to test this idea, we examined the effect of TBT on intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration using fura-2 AM, a Ca{sup 2+} fluorescent probe. TBT increased intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration in a TBT-concentration-dependent manner, and Ca{sup 2+} increase in 700 nM TBT was mainly blocked by 50 μM dantrolene, a ryanodine receptor antagonist (about 70% inhibition). Dantrolene also partially but significantly inhibited TBT-induced GRP78 expression and cell death. These results suggest that TBT increases intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration by releasing Ca{sup 2+} from ER, thereby causing ER stress. - Highlights: • We established that tributyltin induces endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. • Tributyltin induces ER stress markers in a concentration-dependent manner. • Tributyltin increases Ca{sup 2+} release from ER, thereby causing ER stress. • Dibutyltin and monobutyltin did not increase GRP78 or intracellular Ca{sup 2+}.

  7. Identification and functional characterization of an endoplasmic reticulum oxidoreductin 1-α gene in Litopenaeus vannamei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ze-Zhi; Yuan, Kai; Yue, Hai-Tao; Yuan, Feng-Hua; Bi, Hai-Tao; Weng, Shao-Ping; He, Jian-Guo; Chen, Yi-Hong

    2016-04-01

    In the current study, full-length sequence of endoplasmic reticulum oxidoreductin 1-α (LvERO1-α) was cloned from Litopenaeus vannamei. Real-time RT-PCR results showed that LvERO1-α was highly expressed in hemocytes, gills, and intestines. White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) challenge was performed, and the expression of LvERO1-α and two other downstream genes of the double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase-like ER kinase-eIF2α (PERK-α) pathway, namely, homocysteine-induced endoplasmic reticulum protein (LvHERP) and acylamino-acid-releasing enzyme (LvAARE), strongly increased in the hemocytes. Flow cytometry assay results indicated that the apoptosis rate of L. vannamei hemocytes in the LvERO1-α knockdown group was significantly lower than that of the controls. Moreover, shrimps with knockdown expression of LvERO1-α exhibited decreased cumulative mortality upon WSSV infection. Downregulation of L. vannamei immunoglobulin-binding protein (LvBip), which had been proven to induce unfolded protein response (UPR) in L. vannamei, did not only upregulate LvERO1-α, LvHERP, and LvAARE in hemocytes, but also increased their apoptosis rate, as well as the shrimp cumulative mortality. Furthermore, reporter gene assay results showed that the promoter of LvERO1-α was activated by L. vannamei activating transcription factor 4, thereby confirming that LvERO1-α was regulated by the PERK-eIF2α pathway. These results suggested that LvERO1-α plays a critical role in WSSV-induced apoptosis, which likely occurs through the WSSV-activated PERK-eIF2α pathway. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Induction of Apurinic Endonuclease 1 Overexpression by Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Hepatoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsung-Lin Cheng

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is one of the most common malignancies worldwide with poor prognosis due to resistance to conventional chemotherapy and limited efficacy of radiotherapy. Previous studies have noted the induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress or apurinic endonuclease 1 (APE1 expression in many tumors. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress and APE1 in hepatocellular carcinoma. Here we investigate the expression of APE1 during ER stress in HepG2 and Huh-7 cell lines. Tunicamycin or brefeldin A, two ER stress inducers, increased APE1 and GRP78, an ER stress marker, expression in HepG2 and Huh-7 cells. Induction of APE1 expression was observed through transcription level in response to ER stress. APE1 nuclear localization during ER stress was determined using immunofluorescence assays in HepG2 cells. Furthermore, expression of Hepatitis B virus pre-S2∆ large mutant surface protein (pre-S2∆, an ER stress-induced protein, also increased GRP78 and APE1 expression in the normal hepatocyte NeHepLxHT cell line. Similarly, tumor samples showed higher expression of APE1 in ER stress-correlated liver cancer tissue in vivo. Our results demonstrate that ER stress and HBV pre-S2∆ increased APE1 expression, which may play an important role in resistance to chemotherapeutic agents or tumor development. Therefore, these data provide an important chemotherapeutic strategy in ER stress and HBV pre-S2∆-associated tumors.

  9. Long-chain bases from sea cucumber mitigate endoplasmic reticulum stress and inflammation in obesity mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shiwei; Wang, Jinhui; Wang, Jingfeng; Xue, Changhu; Wang, Yuming

    2017-07-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and inflammation can induce hyperglycemia. Long-chain bases (LCBs) from sea cucumber exhibit antihyperglycemic activities. However, their effects on ER stress and inflammation are unknown. We investigated the effects of LCBs on ER stress and inflammatory response in high-fat, fructose diet-induced obesity mice. Reactive oxygen species and free fatty acids were measured. Inflammatory cytokines in serum and their mRNA expressions in epididymal adipose tissues were investigated. Hepatic ER stress-related key genes were detected. c-Jun NH 2 -terminal kinase and nuclear factor κB inflammatory pathways were also evaluated in the liver. Results showed that LCBs reduced serum and hepatic reactive oxygen species and free fatty acids concentrations. LCBs decreased serum proinflammatory cytokines levels, namely interleukin (IL)-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-6, macrophage inflammatory protein 1, and c-reactive protein, and increased anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 concentration. The mRNA and protein expressions of these cytokines in epididymal adipose tissues were regulated by LCBs as similar to their circulatory contents. LCBs inhibited phosphorylated c-Jun NH 2 -terminal kinase and inhibitor κ kinase β, and nuclear factor κB nuclear translocation. LCBs also inhibited mRNA expression of ER stress markers glucose regulated protein, activating transcription factor 6, double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase, and X-box binding protein 1, and phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor-α and inositol requiring enzyme 1α. These results indicate that LCBs can alleviate ER stress and inflammatory response. Nutritional supplementation with LCBs may offer an adjunctive therapy for RE stress-associated inflammation. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Excessive training is associated with endoplasmic reticulum stress but not apoptosis in the hypothalamus of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Ana Paula; da Rocha, Alisson Luiz; Pereira, Bruno Cesar; Oliveira, Luciana da Costa; Morais, Gustavo Paroschi; Moura, Leandro Pereira; Ropelle, Eduardo Rochete; Pauli, José Rodrigo; da Silva, Adelino Sanchez Ramos

    2017-04-01

    Downhill running-based overtraining model increases the hypothalamic levels of IL-1β, TNF-α, SOCS3, and pSAPK-JNK. The aim of the present study was to verify the effects of 3 overtraining protocols on the levels of BiP, pIRE-1 (Ser724), pPERK (Thr981), pelF2α (Ser52), ATF-6, GRP-94, caspase 4, caspase 12, pAKT (Ser473), pmTOR (Ser2448), and pAMPK (Thr172) proteins in the mouse hypothalamus. The mice were randomized into the control, overtrained by downhill running (OTR/down), overtrained by uphill running (OTR/up), and overtrained by running without inclination (OTR) groups. After the overtraining protocols (i.e., at the end of week 8), hypothalamus was removed and used for immunoblotting. The OTR/down group exhibited increased levels of all of the analyzed endoplasmic reticulum stress markers in the hypothalamus at the end of week 8. The OTR/up and OTR groups exhibited increased levels of BiP, pIRE-1 (Ser724), and pPERK (Thr981) in the hypothalamus at the end of week 8. There were no significant differences in the levels of caspase 4, caspase 12, pAKT (Ser473), pmTOR (Ser2448), and pAMPK (Thr172) between the experimental groups at the end of week 8. In conclusion, the 3 overtraining protocols increased the endoplasmic reticulum stress at the end of week 8.

  11. Glucose-6-phosphate reduces calcium accumulation in rat brain endoplasmic reticulum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Thomas Cole

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Brain cells expend large amounts of energy sequestering calcium (Ca2+, while loss of Ca2+ compartmentalization leads to cell damage or death. Upon cell entry, glucose is converted to glucose-6-phosphate (G6P, a parent substrate to several metabolic major pathways, including glycolysis. In several tissues, G6P alters the ability of the endoplasmic reticulum to sequester Ca2+. This led to the hypothesis that G6P regulates Ca2+ accumulation by acting as an endogenous ligand for sarco-endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA. Whole brain ER microsomes were pooled from adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Using radio-isotopic assays, 45Ca2+ accumulation was quantified following incubation with increasing amounts of G6P, in the presence or absence of thapsigargin, a potent SERCA inhibitor. To qualitatively assess SERCA activity, the simultaneous release of inorganic phosphate (Pi coupled with Ca2+ accumulation was quantified. Addition of G6P significantly and decreased Ca2+ accumulation in a dose-dependent fashion (1-10 mM. The reduction in Ca2+ accumulation was not significantly different that seen with addition of thapsigargin. Addition of glucose-1-phosphate or fructose-6-phosphate, or other glucose metabolic pathway intermediates, had no effect on Ca2+ accumulation. Further, the release of Pi was markedly decreased, indicating G6P-mediated SERCA inhibition as the responsible mechanism for reduced Ca2+ uptake. Simultaneous addition of thapsigargin and G6P did decrease inorganic phosphate in comparison to either treatment alone, which suggests that the two treatments have different mechanisms of action. Therefore, G6P may be a novel, endogenous regulator of SERCA activity. Additionally, pathological conditions observed during disease states that disrupt glucose homeostasis, may be attributable to Ca2+ dystasis caused by altered G6P regulation of SERCA activity

  12. Increased Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Response Is Involved in Clopidogrel-Induced Apoptosis of Gastric Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zong-Dan; Cao, Wei-Jun; Wang, Zhi-Bing; Hu, Ke-Wei; Gao, Xin; Wang, Shu-Kui; He, Bang-Shun; Zhang, Zhen-Yu; Xie, Hong-Guang

    2013-01-01

    Background The widespread use of clopidogrel alone or in combination with aspirin may result in gastrointestinal mucosal injury, clinically represented as recurrent ulceration and bleeding complications. Our recent work suggested that clopidogrel significantly induced human gastric epithelial cell (GES-1) apoptosis and disrupted gastric mucosal barrier, and that a p38 MAPK inhibitor could attenuate such injury. However, their exact mechanisms are largely unknown. Methods The GES-1 cells were used as a model system, the effects of clopidogrel on the whole gene expression profile were evaluated by human gene expression microarray and gene ontology analysis, changes of the mRNA and protein expression were determined by real-time PCR and Western blot analysis, and cell viability and apoptosis were measured by MTT assay and flow cytometry analysis, respectively. Results Gene microarray analysis identified 79 genes that were differentially expressed (P3) when cells were treated with or without clopidogrel. Gene ontology analysis revealed that response to stress and cell apoptosis dysfunction were ranked in the top 10 cellular events being affected, and that the major components of endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptosis pathway – CHOP and TRIB3– were up-regulated in a concentration- and time-dependent manner when cells were treated with clopidogrel. Pathway analysis demonstrated that multiple MAPK kinases were phosphorylated in clopidogrel-treated GES-1 cells, but that only SB-203580 (a p38-specific MAPK inhibitor) attenuated cell apoptosis and CHOP over-expression, both of which were induced by clopidogrel. Conclusions Increased endoplasmic reticulum stress response is involved in clopidogrel-induced gastric mucosal injury, acting through p38 MAPK activation. PMID:24058556

  13. Smoothing-Norm Preconditioning for Regularizing Minimum-Residual Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Per Christian; Jensen, Toke Koldborg

    2006-01-01

    When GMRES (or a similar minimum-residual algorithm such as RRGMRES, MINRES, or MR-II) is applied to a discrete ill-posed problem with a square matrix, in some cases the iterates can be considered as regularized solutions. We show how to precondition these methods in such a way that the iterations...... take into account a smoothing norm for the solution. This technique is well established for CGLS, but it does not immediately carry over to minimum-residual methods when the smoothing norm is a seminorm or a Sobolev norm. We develop a new technique which works for any smoothing norm of the form $\\|L......\\,x\\|_2$ and which preserves symmetry if the coefficient matrix is symmetric. We also discuss the efficient implementation of our preconditioning technique, and we demonstrate its performance with numerical examples in one and two dimensions....

  14. Return Smoothing Mechanisms in Life and Pension Insurance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montserrat, Guillén; Jørgensen, Peter Løchte; Nielsen, Jens Perch

    2006-01-01

    Traditional with-profits pension saving schemes have been criticized for their opacity, plagued by embedded options and guarantees, and have recently created enormous problems for the solvency of the life insurance and pension industry. This has fueled creativity in the industry's product...... development departments, and this paper analyzes a representative member of a family of new pension schemes that have been introduced in the new millennium to alleviate these problems. The complete transparency of the new scheme's smoothing mechanism means that it can be analyzed using contingent claims...... pricing theory. We explore the properties of this pension scheme in detail and find that in terms of market value, smoothing is an illusion, but also that the return smoothing mechanism implies a dynamic asset allocation strategy which corresponds with traditional pension saving advice...

  15. Smoothing the payoff for efficient computation of Basket option prices

    KAUST Repository

    Bayer, Christian

    2017-07-22

    We consider the problem of pricing basket options in a multivariate Black–Scholes or Variance-Gamma model. From a numerical point of view, pricing such options corresponds to moderate and high-dimensional numerical integration problems with non-smooth integrands. Due to this lack of regularity, higher order numerical integration techniques may not be directly available, requiring the use of methods like Monte Carlo specifically designed to work for non-regular problems. We propose to use the inherent smoothing property of the density of the underlying in the above models to mollify the payoff function by means of an exact conditional expectation. The resulting conditional expectation is unbiased and yields a smooth integrand, which is amenable to the efficient use of adaptive sparse-grid cubature. Numerical examples indicate that the high-order method may perform orders of magnitude faster than Monte Carlo or Quasi Monte Carlo methods in dimensions up to 35.

  16. Disturbance of smooth muscle regulatory function by Eisenia foetida toxin lysenin: insight into the mechanism of smooth muscle contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czuryło, Edward A; Kulikova, Natalia; Sobota, Andrzej

    2008-05-01

    Lysenin, a toxin present in the coelomic fluid of the earthworm Eisenia foetida, is known to cause a long-lasting contraction of rat aorta smooth muscle strips. We addressed the mechanisms underlying its action on smooth muscle cells and present the first report demonstrating a completely new property of lysenin unrelated to its basic sphingomyelin-binding ability. Here we report lysenin enhancement effect on smooth muscle actomyosin ATPase activity and the ability of networking the actin filaments. The maximum enhancement of the ATPase activity of actomyosin at 120 mM KCl was observed at a molar ratio of lysenin to actin of about 1:10(5), while at 70 mM KCl at the ratio of about 1:10(6). The effect of lysenin became most pronounced only when both smooth muscle regulatory proteins, tropomyosin and caldesmon, were present. Co-sedimentation experiments indicated that lysenin did not displace neither tropomyosin nor caldesmon from the thin filament. Thus, the lysenin-dependent abolishment of the inhibitory effect of caldesmon on the ATPase activity was related rather to the modification of the filament structure. The ability of the toxin to exert its stimulatory effect at extremely low concentrations (as low as one molecule of lysenin per 10(6) actin molecules) may result from the long-range cooperative transitions in the entire thin filament with an involvement of smooth muscle tropomyosin, while the role of caldesmon may be limited exclusively to the inhibition of ATPase activity.

  17. Chlamydia pneumoniae induces aponecrosis in human aortic smooth muscle cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walch Michael

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The intracellular bacterium Chlamydia pneumoniae is suspected to play a role in formation and progression of atherosclerosis. Many studies investigated cell death initiation versus inhibition by Chlamydia pneumoniae in established cell lines but nothing is known in primary human aortic smooth muscle cells, a cell type among others known to be involved in the formation of the atherosclerotic plaque. Type of cell death was analyzed by various methods in primary aortic smooth muscle cells after infection with Chlamydia pneumoniae to investigate a possible pathogenic link in atherosclerosis. Results Chlamydiae were found to be localized up to 72 h post infection in aortic smooth muscle cells either as single bacteria or inside of large inclusions. Quantification of host cell death by lactate dehydrogenase release assay revealed strictly dose and time dependent lysis for all tested isolates of Chlamydia pneumoniae. Phosphatidylserine exposure was detected by flow cytometry in Chlamydia pneumoniae infected cells. Ultrastructure of Chlamydia pneumoniae infected human aortic smooth muscle cells showed extensive membrane- and organelle damage, chromatin condensation but no nuclear fragmentation. DNA fragmentation as well as cell membrane permeability was analyzed by TUNEL and NHS-biotin staining and occurred exclusively in cells carrying Chlamydia pneumoniae spots but not in smooth muscle cells with inclusions. These morphological features of cell death were not accompanied by an activation of caspase-3 as revealed by analysis of enzyme activity but involved mitochondrial membrane depolarization as shown by TMRE uptake and release of cytochrome c from mitochondria. Conclusion This study provides evidence that Chlamydia pneumoniae induce a spot like infection in human aortic smooth muscle cells, which results in a chimeric cell death with both apoptotic and necrotic characteristics. This aponecrotic cell death may assist chronic

  18. The Initiation of Smooth Pursuit is Delayed in Anisometropic Amblyopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raashid, Rana Arham; Liu, Ivy Ziqian; Blakeman, Alan; Goltz, Herbert C; Wong, Agnes M F

    2016-04-01

    Several behavioral studies have shown that the reaction times of visually guided movements are slower in people with amblyopia, particularly during amblyopic eye viewing. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the initiation of smooth pursuit eye movements, which are responsible for accurately keeping moving objects on the fovea, is delayed in people with anisometropic amblyopia. Eleven participants with anisometropic amblyopia and 14 visually normal observers were asked to track a step-ramp target moving at ±15°/s horizontally as quickly and as accurately as possible. The experiment was conducted under three viewing conditions: amblyopic/nondominant eye, binocular, and fellow/dominant eye viewing. Outcome measures were smooth pursuit latency, open-loop gain, steady state gain, and catch-up saccade frequency. Participants with anisometropic amblyopia initiated smooth pursuit significantly slower during amblyopic eye viewing (206 ± 20 ms) than visually normal observers viewing with their nondominant eye (183 ± 17 ms, P = 0.002). However, mean pursuit latency in the anisometropic amblyopia group during binocular and monocular fellow eye viewing was comparable to the visually normal group. Mean open-loop gain, steady state gain, and catch-up saccade frequency were similar between the two groups, but participants with anisometropic amblyopia exhibited more variable steady state gain (P = 0.045). This study provides evidence of temporally delayed smooth pursuit initiation in anisometropic amblyopia. After initiation, the smooth pursuit velocity profile in anisometropic amblyopia participants is similar to visually normal controls. This finding differs from what has been observed previously in participants with strabismic amblyopia who exhibit reduced smooth pursuit velocity gains with more catch-up saccades.

  19. Histomorphometry of penile smooth muscle fiber in severe erectile dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquim de Almeida Claro

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Smooth muscle fiber has fundamental importance in erection. Alterations in its function or quantity may be associated with erectile dysfunction. The study objective was to assess the proportion of penile smooth muscle fiber in patients with severe erectile dysfunction. DESIGN AND SETTING: Clinical study, in the Sexual Dysfunction Group, Universidade Federal de São Paulo (Unifesp, and in the Anatomy Laboratory, Universidade Estadual do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ. METHODS: Twenty patients with severe erectile dysfunction were selected to form two groups of ten patients: one with normal arterial flow (age range: 44 to 78 years and the other with altered arterial flow (age range: 38 to 67 years. These groups were compared with a group formed by ten cadavers aged 18 to 25 years that were presumed to have been potent. Quantification of the smooth muscle fibers was done by means of an immunohistochemical study. RESULTS: The proportion of smooth muscle fiber found was 41.15% for the control group. The patients with erectile dysfunction and normal arterial flow presented 27.24% and those with altered arterial flow presented 25.74%; 19 patients presented at least one chronic disease or risk factor for erectile dysfunction, with prominence for diabetes mellitus, systemic arterial hypertension and smoking. CONCLUSION: Among patients with severe erectile dysfunction, the arterial flow on its own does not present interference in the proportion of smooth muscle fiber. The diminution of the proportion of smooth muscle fiber may result from chronic diseases and vascular risk factors.

  20. Motion dependence of smooth pursuit eye movements in the marmoset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Jude F; Priebe, Nicholas J; Miller, Cory T

    2015-06-01

    Smooth pursuit eye movements stabilize slow-moving objects on the retina by matching eye velocity with target velocity. Two critical components are required to generate smooth pursuit: first, because it is a voluntary eye movement, the subject must select a target to pursue to engage the tracking system; and second, generating smooth pursuit requires a moving stimulus. We examined whether this behavior also exists in the common marmoset, a New World primate that is increasingly attracting attention as a genetic model for mental disease and systems neuroscience. We measured smooth pursuit in two marmosets, previously trained to perform fixation tasks, using the standard Rashbass step-ramp pursuit paradigm. We first measured the aspects of visual motion that drive pursuit eye movements. Smooth eye movements were in the same direction as target motion, indicating that pursuit was driven by target movement rather than by displacement. Both the open-loop acceleration and closed-loop eye velocity exhibited a linear relationship with target velocity for slow-moving targets, but this relationship declined for higher speeds. We next examined whether marmoset pursuit eye movements depend on an active engagement of the pursuit system by measuring smooth eye movements evoked by small perturbations of motion from fixation or during pursuit. Pursuit eye movements were much larger during pursuit than from fixation, indicating that pursuit is actively gated. Several practical advantages of the marmoset brain, including the accessibility of the middle temporal (MT) area and frontal eye fields at the cortical surface, merit its utilization for studying pursuit movements. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  1. Adaptive control of energy storage systems for power smoothing applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meng, Lexuan; Dragicevic, Tomislav; Guerrero, Josep M.

    2017-01-01

    for systems with multiple ESS units to realize several objectives simultaneously including SoC limiting, SoC balancing and power smoothing. Experiment is conducted considering a pulsed load profile. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposal concerning the mentioned control objectives.......Energy storage systems (ESSs) are desired and widely applied for power smoothing especially in systems with renewable generation and pulsed loads. High-pass-filter (HPF) is commonly applied in those applications in which the HPF extracts the high frequency fluctuating power and uses...

  2. Modelling conditional correlations of asset returns: A smooth transition approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silvennoinen, Annastiina; Teräsvirta, Timo

    In this paper we propose a new multivariate GARCH model with time-varying conditional correlation structure. The time-varying conditional correlations change smoothly between two extreme states of constant correlations according to a predetermined or exogenous transition variable. An LM-test is d......In this paper we propose a new multivariate GARCH model with time-varying conditional correlation structure. The time-varying conditional correlations change smoothly between two extreme states of constant correlations according to a predetermined or exogenous transition variable. An LM...

  3. Porcine Stomach Smooth Muscle Force Depends on History-Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Tomalka

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The stomach serves as food reservoir, mixing organ and absorption area for certain substances, while continually varying its position and size. Large dimensional changes during ingestion and gastric emptying of the stomach are associated with large changes in smooth muscle length. These length changes might induce history-effects, namely force depression (FD following active muscle shortening and force enhancement (FE following active muscle stretch. Both effects have impact on the force generating capacity of the stomach, and thus functional relevance. However, less is known about history-effects and active smooth muscle properties of stomach smooth muscle. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate biomechanical muscle properties as force-length and force-velocity relations (FVR of porcine stomach smooth muscle strips, extended by the analysis of history-effects on smooth muscle force. Therefore, in total n = 54 tissue strips were dissected in longitudinal direction from the ventral fundus of porcine stomachs. Different isometric, isotonic, and isokinetic contraction protocols were performed during electrical muscle stimulation. Cross-sectional areas (CSA of smooth muscles were determined from cryo-histological sections stained with Picrosirius Red. Results revealed that maximum smooth muscle tension was 10.4 ± 2.6 N/cm2. Maximum shortening velocity (Vmax and curvature factor (curv of the FVR were 0.04 ± 0.01 [optimum muscle length/s] and 0.36 ± 0.15, respectively. The findings of the present study demonstrated significant (P < 0.05 FD [up to 32% maximum muscle force (Fim] and FE (up to 16% Fim of gastric muscle tissue, respectively. The FE- and FD-values increased with increasing ramp amplitude. This outstanding muscle behavior is not accounted for in existing models so far and strongly supports the idea of a holistic reflection of distinct stomach structure and function. For the first time this study provides a comprehensive set of

  4. Airway smooth muscle excitation-contraction coupling and airway hyperresponsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirota, Simon; Helli, Peter B; Catalli, Adriana; Chew, Allyson; Janssen, Luke J

    2005-01-01

    The primary complaints from patients with asthma pertain to function of airway smooth muscle (ASM) function including shortness of breath, wheezing, and coughing. Thus, it is imperative to better understand the mechanisms underlying excitation-contraction coupling in ASM. Here, we review the various signaling pathways underlying contraction in ASM, and then examine how these are altered in asthma and airway hyperresponsiveness (a hallmark feature of asthma). Throughout, we highlight how studies of vascular smooth muscle have helped or hindered progress in understanding ASM physiology and pathophysiology.

  5. Methods and electrolytes for electrodeposition of smooth films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiguang; Xu, Wu; Graff, Gordon L; Chen, Xilin; Ding, Fei; Shao, Yuyan

    2015-03-17

    Electrodeposition involving an electrolyte having a surface-smoothing additive can result in self-healing, instead of self-amplification, of initial protuberant tips that give rise to roughness and/or dendrite formation on the substrate and/or film surface. For electrodeposition of a first conductive material (C1) on a substrate from one or more reactants in an electrolyte solution, the electrolyte solution is characterized by a surface-smoothing additive containing cations of a second conductive material (C2), wherein cations of C2 have an effective electrochemical reduction potential in the solution lower than that of the reactants.

  6. The smooth entropy formalism for von Neumann algebras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berta, Mario, E-mail: berta@caltech.edu [Institute for Quantum Information and Matter, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Furrer, Fabian, E-mail: furrer@eve.phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan and Institute for Theoretical Physics, Leibniz University Hanover, Hanover (Germany); Scholz, Volkher B., E-mail: scholz@phys.ethz.ch [Institute for Theoretical Physics, ETH Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2016-01-15

    We discuss information-theoretic concepts on infinite-dimensional quantum systems. In particular, we lift the smooth entropy formalism as introduced by Renner and collaborators for finite-dimensional systems to von Neumann algebras. For the smooth conditional min- and max-entropy, we recover similar characterizing properties and information-theoretic operational interpretations as in the finite-dimensional case. We generalize the entropic uncertainty relation with quantum side information of Tomamichel and Renner and discuss applications to quantum cryptography. In particular, we prove the possibility to perform privacy amplification and classical data compression with quantum side information modeled by a von Neumann algebra.

  7. Inhibitory action of relaxin on human cervical smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norström, A; Bryman, I; Wiqvist, N; Sahni, S; Lindblom, B

    1984-09-01

    The influence of purified porcine relaxin on contractility of human cervical smooth muscle was investigated in vitro. Strips of cervical tissue were obtained by needle biopsy from pregnant and nonpregnant women and were mounted in a superfused organ chamber for isometric measurement of contractile activity. Relaxin (0.005-25 micrograms/ml) inhibited the spontaneous contractions in cervical strips from 18% of nonpregnant, 68% of early pregnant, and in 100% of term pregnant women. These results indicate that relaxin has an inhibitory action on cervical smooth muscle and that this effect is more constantly detected as pregnancy proceeds.

  8. Smooth torque speed characteristic of switched reluctance motors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Hui; Chen, Zhe; Chen, Hao

    2014-01-01

    The torque ripple of switched reluctance motors (SRMs) is the main disadvantage that limits the industrial application of these motors. Although several methods for smooth-toque operation (STO) have been proposed, STO works well only within a certain torque and speed range because of the constrai......The torque ripple of switched reluctance motors (SRMs) is the main disadvantage that limits the industrial application of these motors. Although several methods for smooth-toque operation (STO) have been proposed, STO works well only within a certain torque and speed range because...

  9. Flow and Transport in Smooth and Rough Unsaturated Wide Aperture Fractures with Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordilla, J.; Tartakovsky, A. M.; Geyer, T.

    2014-12-01

    Unsaturated flow in fractured porous media exhibits highly complex flow dynamics and a wide range of intermittent flow processes. Especially in wide aperture fractures, flow processes may be dominated by gravitational instead of capillary forces leading to a deviation from the classical volume effective approaches (Richard's equation, Van Genuchten type relationships). The existence of various flow modes such as droplets, rivulets, turbulent and adsorbed films is well known, however, their spatial and temporal distribution within fracture networks is still an open question partially due to the lack of appropriate modeling tools. With our work we want to gain a deeper understanding of the underlying flow and transport dynamics in unsaturated fractured media in order to support the development of more refined upscaled methods, applicable on catchment scales. We present pore- and fracture-scale flow simulations obtained with a Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) model. The model allows to simulate free-surface flow dynamics including the effect of surface tension for a wide range of wetting conditions. Several empirical and semi-analytical solutions are used to verify the model. We show that our results satisfy the empirical scaling laws for droplet velocity and critical contact angle. Due to the efficient generation of surface tension via particle-particle interaction forces the dynamic wetting of surfaces as well as the velocity enhancement of droplets on saturated surfaces can readily be obtained. Furthermore, we study the effect of surface roughness on droplet velocities. Lastly, we present flow and transport simulations in the presence of an adjacent porous matrix in order to investigate its influence on the fracture surface flow dynamics and transport across the matrix-fracture interface.

  10. Type 2 diabetes mellitus induces congenital heart defects in murine embryos by increasing oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yanqing; Reece, E Albert; Zhong, Jianxiang; Dong, Daoyin; Shen, Wei-Bin; Harman, Christopher R; Yang, Peixin

    2016-09-01

    Maternal type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus are strongly associated with high rates of severe structural birth defects, including congenital heart defects. Studies in type 1 diabetic embryopathy animal models have demonstrated that cellular stress-induced apoptosis mediates the teratogenicity of maternal diabetes leading to congenital heart defect formation. However, the mechanisms underlying maternal type 2 diabetes mellitus-induced congenital heart defects remain largely unknown. We aim to determine whether oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and excessive apoptosis are the intracellular molecular mechanisms underlying maternal type 2 diabetes mellitus-induced congenital heart defects. A mouse model of maternal type 2 diabetes mellitus was established by feeding female mice a high-fat diet (60% fat). After 15 weeks on the high-fat diet, the mice showed characteristics of maternal type 2 diabetes mellitus. Control dams were either fed a normal diet (10% fat) or the high-fat diet during pregnancy only. Female mice from the high-fat diet group and the 2 control groups were mated with male mice that were fed a normal diet. At E12.5, embryonic hearts were harvested to determine the levels of lipid peroxides and superoxide, endoplasmic reticulum stress markers, cleaved caspase 3 and 8, and apoptosis. E17.5 embryonic hearts were harvested for the detection of congenital heart defect formation using India ink vessel patterning and histological examination. Maternal type 2 diabetes mellitus significantly induced ventricular septal defects and persistent truncus arteriosus in the developing heart, along with increasing oxidative stress markers, including superoxide and lipid peroxidation; endoplasmic reticulum stress markers, including protein levels of phosphorylated-protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase, phosphorylated-IRE1α, phosphorylated-eIF2α, C/EBP homologous protein, and binding immunoglobulin protein; endoplasmic reticulum chaperone gene

  11. Operational calculus and differential equations with infinitely smooth coefficients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Nemzer

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available A subring MF of the field of Mikusiński operators is constructed as a countable union space. Some topological properties of MF are investigated. Then, the product of an infinitely differentiable function and an element of MF is given and is used to investigate operational equations with infinitely smooth coefficients.

  12. Suppression of vascular smooth muscle cells' proliferation and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study aimed to determine the effects of valsartan on the proliferation and migration of isolated rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and the expression of phospho-p42/44 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) promoted by angiotensin II (Ang II). VSMCs from the rat thoracic aorta were cultured by ...

  13. [Intrarenal smooth muscle: histology of a complex urodymamic machine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, L F; Ortiz-Arango, N

    2013-03-01

    To know better the microscopic arrangement of the bundles of smooth muscle in the human renal parenchyma, their distribution and anatomical relationships, trying to make a reconstruction of this muscular system. Five adult human kidneys and one fetal kidney were processed "in toto" with cross sections every 300μm. In the histological sections we identify the smooth muscle fibers trying to determine its insertion, course and anatomical relationship with other structures of the kidney tissue. There are bundles of smooth muscle fibers of variable thickness parallel to the edges of the medullary pyramids, bundles that surrounding the medulla in a spiral course, and bundles that accompany arcuate vessels, the latter being the most abundant and easy to identify. These groups of muscle fibers do not have a precise or constant insertion site, their periodicity is not homogeneous and they are not a direct extension of the muscle of the renal pelvis, although some bundles are in contact with it. There are also unusual and inconstant small muscle fibers no associated to vessels in the interstitium of the cortex and, exceptionally, in the medulla. There is a complex microscopic system of smooth muscle fibers that partially surround the renal medulla and are related to renal pelvic muscles without a direct continuity with them. Although this small muscular system is under-recognized, could be very important in urodynamics. Copyright © 2012 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  14. Wide-band array signal processing via spectral smoothing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guanghan; Kailath, Thomas

    1989-01-01

    A novel algorithm for the estimation of direction-of-arrivals (DOA) of multiple wide-band sources via spectral smoothing is presented. The proposed algorithm does not require an initial DOA estimate or a specific signal model. The advantages of replacing the MUSIC search with an ESPRIT search are discussed.

  15. Smooth Rényi Entropy of Ergodic Quantum Information Sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoenmakers, Berry; Tjoelker, Jilles; Tuyls, Pim; Verbitskiy, Evgeny

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the recently introduced notion of smooth Rényi entropy for the case of ergodic information sources, thereby generalizing previous work which concentrated mainly on i.i.d. information sources. We will actually consider ergodic quantum information sources, of which ergodic classical

  16. Smoothing depth maps for improved steroscopic image quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Wa James; Alain, Guillaume; Zhang, Liang; Martin, Taali; Renaud, Ronald

    2004-10-01

    A technique to improve the image quality of stereoscopic pictures generated from depth maps (depth image based rendering or DIBR) is examined. In general, there are two fundamental problems with DIBR: a depth map could contain artifacts (e.g., noise or "blockiness") and there is no explicit information on how to render newly exposed regions ("holes") in the rendered image as a result of new virtual camera positions. We hypothesized that smoothing depth maps before rendering will not only minimize the effects of noise and distortions in the depth maps but will also reduce areas of newly exposed regions where potential artifacts can arise. A formal subjective assessment of four stereoscopic sequences of natural scenes was conducted with 23 viewers. The stereoscopic sequences consisted of source images for the left-eye view and rendered images for the right-eye view. The depth maps were smoothed with a Gaussian blur filter at different levels of strength before depth image based rendering. Results indicated that ratings of perceived image quality improved with increasing levels of smoothing of the depth maps. Even though the depth maps were smoothed, a negative effect on ratings of overall perceived depth quality was not found.

  17. Wave Forces on a Vertical Smooth Cylinder in Directional Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgedal, M.; Skourup, J.; Burcharth, H. F.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper the results from physical experiments with an instrumented cylinder conducted in laboratory environments are presented. The primary aim of the study has been to investigate the effect from wave directionality on the local and depth integrated maximum wave forces on a smooth vertical...

  18. Smooth plains on Mercury. A comparison with Vesta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambon, F.; Capaccioni, F.; Carli, C.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Filacchione, G.; Giacomini, L.

    Mercury, the closest planet to the Sun, has been visited by the MESSENGER spacecraft \\citet{solomon2007}. After 3 years of orbit around Mercury a global coverage of the surface has been done revealing that ∼27% of Mercury's surface is covered by smooth plains \\citet{denevi2013}. Large part of Mercury's smooth plain (SP) seems to have volcanic origin. Different composition has been observed, most of the SP have a magnesian alkali-basalt-like composition, while some of them have been interpreted as ultramafic. A further 2% of smooth plains have been identified as Odin-type plains and represent the knobby and hummocky plains surrounding the Caloris basin \\citet{denevi2013}. Application of classification methods \\citet{adams2006} applied to color image data of the MESSENGER wide angle camera (MDIS-WAC) \\citet{MDIS} and a spectral analysis of the spec- trometer data (MASCS-VIRS) \\citet{MASCS} are useful to highlight the differences in composition of the smooth planes. A compa rison between Mercury's SP and those of other solar system bodies, such as Vesta \\citet{desanctis2012}, reveals useful to obtain information on the origin and the evolution of this bodies.

  19. SMOOTH SPALLATION RESULTING FROM COLLISIONS OF COPPER PLATES

    OpenAIRE

    Zakharenko, I.

    1988-01-01

    The author examines the processes occuring during the collision of the metal plates with the speed 800-400 m/s. The experiment showed the formation of smooth cracks due to the collision of heat-treated copper plates with equal thickness.

  20. Airway smooth muscle and fibroblasts in the pathogenesis of asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johnson, Peter R A; Burgess, Janette K

    2004-01-01

    Asthma is a disease characterized by marked structural changes within the airway wall. These changes include deposition of extracellular matrix proteins and an increase in the numbers of airway smooth muscle cells and subepithelial fibroblasts. Both these cell types possess properties that would

  1. A Semiclassical Calculation of Scars for a Smooth Potential

    CERN Document Server

    Provost, D; Provost, Daniel; Baranger, Michel

    1993-01-01

    Bogomolny's formula for energy-smoothed scars is applied for the first time to a non-specific, non-scalable Hamiltonian, a 2-D anharmonic oscillator. The semiclassical theory reproduces well the exact quantal results over a large spatial and energy range.

  2. On a class of smooth Frechet subalgebras of C -algebras

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Proc. Indian Acad. Sci. (Math. Sci.) Vol. 123, No. 3, August 2013, pp. 393–413. c Indian Academy of Sciences. On a class of smooth Frechet subalgebras of C. ∗ ... Department of Mathematics, Sardar Patel University, Vallabh Vidyanagar, .... which was further developed in [5] at the level of generality of the present definition.

  3. Launch Environment Water Flow Simulations Using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Bruce T.; Berg, Jared J.; Harris, Michael F.; Crespo, Alejandro C.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the use of Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) to simulate the water flow from the rainbird nozzle system used in the sound suppression system during pad abort and nominal launch. The simulations help determine if water from rainbird nozzles will impinge on the rocket nozzles and other sensitive ground support elements.

  4. Water Flow Simulation using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Bruce; Berg, Jared; Harris, Michael F.

    2014-01-01

    Simulation of water flow from the rainbird nozzles has been accomplished using the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH). The advantage of using SPH is that no meshing is required, thus the grid quality is no longer an issue and accuracy can be improved.

  5. Postprocessing Fourier spectral methods: The case of smooth solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Archilla, B. [Univ. Autonoma de Madrid (Spain). Dept. de Matematicas; Novo, J. [Univ. de Valladolid (Spain). Dept. de Matematica Aplicada y Computacion; Titi, E.S. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    1998-11-01

    A postprocessing technique to improve the accuracy of Galerkin methods, when applied to dissipative partial differential equations, is examined in the particular case of smooth solutions. Pseudospectral methods are shown to perform poorly. This performance is analyzed and a refined postprocessing technique is proposed.

  6. Comparative Analysis for Robust Penalized Spline Smoothing Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Smoothing noisy data is commonly encountered in engineering domain, and currently robust penalized regression spline models are perceived to be the most promising methods for coping with this issue, due to their flexibilities in capturing the nonlinear trends in the data and effectively alleviating the disturbance from the outliers. Against such a background, this paper conducts a thoroughly comparative analysis of two popular robust smoothing techniques, the M-type estimator and S-estimation for penalized regression splines, both of which are reelaborated starting from their origins, with their derivation process reformulated and the corresponding algorithms reorganized under a unified framework. Performances of these two estimators are thoroughly evaluated from the aspects of fitting accuracy, robustness, and execution time upon the MATLAB platform. Elaborately comparative experiments demonstrate that robust penalized spline smoothing methods possess the capability of resistance to the noise effect compared with the nonrobust penalized LS spline regression method. Furthermore, the M-estimator exerts stable performance only for the observations with moderate perturbation error, whereas the S-estimator behaves fairly well even for heavily contaminated observations, but consuming more execution time. These findings can be served as guidance to the selection of appropriate approach for smoothing the noisy data.

  7. beta-Catenin regulates airway smooth muscle contraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Sepp R.; Van Ziel, Anna M.; Baarsma, Hoeke A.; Gosens, Reinoud

    Jansen SR, Van Ziel AM, Baarsma HA, Gosens R. beta-Catenin regulates airway smooth muscle contraction. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol 299: L204-L214, 2010. First published May 14, 2010; doi:10.1152/ajplung.00020.2010.-beta-Catenin is an 88-kDa member of the armadillo family of proteins that is

  8. Technique for smoothing free-flight oscillation data.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Beyers, ME

    1975-01-01

    Full Text Available A technique based on superposition of tricyclic solutions has been proposed for smoothing free-flight angular motion. When incorporated into a conventional tricyclic data reduction program, the method is convenient to use and does not require a...

  9. Adaptive Smoothed Finite Elements (ASFEM) for history dependent material models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quak, W.; van den Boogaard, Antonius H.; Menary, Gary

    2011-01-01

    A successful simulation of a bulk forming process with finite elements can be difficult due to distortion of the finite elements. Nodal smoothed Finite Elements (NSFEM) are an interesting option for such a process since they show good distortion insensitivity and moreover have locking-free behavior

  10. Congenital smooth muscle hamartoma of the palpebral conjunctiva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, L Evelyn; Rodríguez-Reyes, Abelardo A; Vera, Ana M; Rubio, Rosa Isela; Mayorquín-Ruiz, Mariana; Salcedo, Guillermo

    2012-01-01

    Smooth muscle hamartoma is defined as a disorganized focus or an overgrowth of mature smooth muscle, generally with low capacity of autonomous growth and benign behavior. The implicated tissues are mature and proliferate in a disorganized fashion. A healthy 5-day-old Mexican boy was referred to the authors' hospital in México city for evaluation of a "cystic" lesion of the right eye that had been noted since birth. The pregnancy and delivery were unremarkable. On physical examination, there was a reddish-pink soft lesion with a tender "cystic" appearance, which was probably emerging from the upper eyelid conjunctiva, which measured 2.7 cm in its widest diameter and transilluminated. Ultrasound imaging revealed an anterior "cystic" lesion with normally formed phakic eye. An excisional biopsy was performed, and the lesion was dissected from the upper tarsal subconjunctival space. Subsequent histologic and immunohistochemical findings were consistent with the diagnosis of congenital smooth muscle hamartoma (CSMH) of the tarsal conjunctiva. The authors' research revealed that only one case of CSMH localized in the conjunctiva (Roper GJ, Smith MS, Lueder GT. Congenital smooth muscle hamartoma of the conjunctival fornix. Am J Ophthalmol. 1999;128:643-4) has been reported to date in the literature. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this current case would be the second case reported of CSMH in this anatomic location. Therefore, the authors' recommendation is to include CSMH in the differential diagnosis of a cystic mass that presents in the fornix and palpebral conjunctiva.

  11. Smooth and rough boundaries in turbulent Taylor-Couette flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Th.H.; Doering, Charles R.; Lohse, Detlef; Lathrop, Daniel P.

    2003-01-01

    We examine the torque required to drive the smooth or rough cylinders in turbulent Taylor-Couette flow. With rough inner and outer walls the scaling of the dimensionless torque G is found to be consistent with pure Kolmogorov scaling G~Re2. The results are interpreted within the Grossmann-Lohse

  12. Vascular smooth muscle sensitivity to varying oxygen tensions, Bay ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    I this our study, using rat tail artery activate by nordrenaline and potassium chloride in thepresence of Bay K. 8644 and nifedipine at different oxygen levels, we showed that desensitization of the responses of the vscular smooth muscle occurred. It was evident that the underlying basis of vascular reponses observed with ...

  13. Peptostreptococcus micros smooth and rough genotypes in periodontitis and gingivitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kremer, BHA; Loos, BG; van der Velden, U; van Winkelhoff, AJ; Craandijk, J; Bulthuis, HM; Hutter, J; Varoufaki, AS; van Steenbergen, TJM

    Background: Two genotypes can be distinguished within the species Peptostreptococcus micros: a smooth (Sm) and a rough (Rg) type. To date no systematic study has been performed on the prevalence and proportion of both types in untreated periodontitis patients and subjects without destructive

  14. An adaptive filter for smoothing noisy radar images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, V. S.; Stiles, J. A.; Shanmugam, K. S.; Holtzman, J. C.; Smith, S. A.

    1981-01-01

    A spatial domain adaptive Wiener filter for smoothing radar images corrupted by multiplicative noise is presented. The filter is optimum in a minimum mean squared error sense, computationally efficient, and preserves edges in the image better than other filters. The proposed algorithm can also be used for processing optical images with illumination variations that have a multiplicative effect.

  15. Upsilon-quaternion splines for the smooth interpolation of orientations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielson, Gregory M

    2004-01-01

    We present a new method for smoothly interpolating orientation matrices. It is based upon quaternions and a particular construction of upsilon-spline curves. The new method has tension parameters and variable knot (time) spacing which both prove to be effective in designing and controlling key frame animations.

  16. Smoothed analysis of partitioning algorithms for Euclidean functionals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bläser, Markus; Manthey, Bodo; Rao, B.V. Raghavendra

    2013-01-01

    Euclidean optimization problems such as TSP and minimum-length matching admit fast partitioning algorithms that compute near-optimal solutions on typical instances. In order to explain this performance, we develop a general framework for the application of smoothed analysis to partitioning

  17. Smoothed analysis of partitioning algorithms for Euclidean functionals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bläser, Markus; Manthey, Bodo; Rao, B.V. Raghavendra; Dehne, F.; Iacono, J.; Sack, J.-R.

    2011-01-01

    Euclidean optimization problems such as TSP and minimum-length matching admit fast partitioning algorithms that compute near-optimal solutions on typical instances. We develop a general framework for the application of smoothed analysis to partitioning algorithms for Euclidean optimization problems.

  18. Mechanism of kolaviron-induced relaxation of rabbit aortic smooth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mechanism of kolaviron-induced relaxation of rabbit aortic smooth muscle. 1Uche O.K.* Baseerah E.B. 2Anukam C.K.. 1Department of Physiology and 2TWAS Genomic Research Unit, Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences,. School of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Benin, PMB 1154 Benin City, Nigeria.

  19. An Error Detection and Smoothing Algorithm for Infrared Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-04-01

    34A Dynamic Programming Technique for Nonlinear ’R. L. Lucke, A. P. Schaum , J. C. Kershenstein, J. Michalo- Smoothing", Proc. IEEE International Conf...UNIVERSITY APPLIED PHYSICS LABORATORY LAUREL. MARYLAND REFERENCES 1R. L. Lucke, A. P. Schaum , J. C. Kershenstein, J. 7 H. Ney, "A Dynamic Programming

  20. Smooth transition autoregressive models - A survey of recent developments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.J.C. van Dijk (Dick); T. Terasvirta; Ph.H.B.F. Franses (Philip Hans)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractThis paper surveys recent developments related to the smooth transition autoregressive [STAR] time series model and several of its variants. We put emphasis on new methods for testing for STAR nonlinearity, model evaluation, and forecasting. Several useful extensions of the basic STAR

  1. Vascular effects of 3-carbomethoxypyridine on rabbit aortic smooth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: 3-Carbomethoxypyridine (3-CMP) is a methyl nicotinate that has been isolated and characterized from one of the alkaloidal fractions of Pyrenacantha staudtii. No literature is available on its vascular action. The goal of this study was to characterize the mechanism of action of 3-CMP on rabbit aortic smooth ...

  2. Estimate of K-functionals and modulus of smoothness constructed ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Introduction and preliminaries. In [2], Belkina and Platonov proved the equivalence theorem for a K-functional and a modulus of smoothness for the Dunkl transform in the Hilbert space L2(R, |x|2α+1. ), α > −1/2, using a Dunkl translation operator. In this paper, we prove the analog of this result (see [2]) in the Hilbert space.

  3. Association of smooth muscle cell tissue factor with caveolae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, AB; Smit, JW; Bom, VJJ; Blom, NR; Ruiters, MHJ; Halie, MR; vanderMeer, J

    1996-01-01

    There is still no satisfactory explanation for the low catalytic activity of tissue factor (TF)/factor VII(a) complexes towards coagulation factor X, as found on the apical surface side of cell layers. It has been hypothesized that TF exists in a latent form. Layers of cultured human smooth muscle

  4. Conditional electron confinement in graphene via smooth magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Dai-Nam; Le, Van-Hoang; Roy, Pinaki

    2018-02-01

    In this article we discuss confinement of electrons in graphene via smooth magnetic fields which are finite everywhere on the plane. We shall consider two types of magnetic fields leading to systems which are conditionally exactly solvable and quasi exactly solvable. The bound state energies and wavefunctions in both cases have been found exactly.

  5. Morinda lucida reduces contractility of isolated uterine smooth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present work investigated the effect of Morinda lucida (M. lucida) extract on isolated uterine smooth muscle of pregnant and non-pregnant mice. Pregnant and non-pregnant mice were pretreated with oral stilboesterol (0.1mg/kg body weight) and killed by cervical dislocation. Thin strips of the uterus were cut and ...

  6. Evaluation of eigenvalues of a smooth potential via Schroedinger ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Evaluation of eigenvalues of a smooth potential via Schroedinger transmission across multi-step potential. BASUDEB SAHU1,∗, BIDHUBHUSAN SAHU1 and SANTOSH K AGARWALLA2. 1Department of Physics, North Orissa University, Baripada 757 003, India. 2Department of Applied Physics and Ballistics, Fakir Mohan ...

  7. Improving convergence in smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations without pairing instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehnen, Walter; Aly, Hossam

    2012-09-01

    The numerical convergence of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) can be severely restricted by random force errors induced by particle disorder, especially in shear flows, which are ubiquitous in astrophysics. The increase in the number NH of neighbours when switching to more extended smoothing kernels at fixed resolution (using an appropriate definition for the SPH resolution scale) is insufficient to combat these errors. Consequently, trading resolution for better convergence is necessary, but for traditional smoothing kernels this option is limited by the pairing (or clumping) instability. Therefore, we investigate the suitability of the Wendland functions as smoothing kernels and compare them with the traditional B-splines. Linear stability analysis in three dimensions and test simulations demonstrate that the Wendland kernels avoid the pairing instability for all NH, despite having vanishing derivative at the origin (disproving traditional ideas about the origin of this instability; instead, we uncover a relation with the kernel Fourier transform and give an explanation in terms of the SPH density estimator). The Wendland kernels are computationally more convenient than the higher order B-splines, allowing large NH and hence better numerical convergence (note that computational costs rise sublinear with NH). Our analysis also shows that at low NH the quartic spline kernel with NH ≈ 60 obtains much better convergence than the standard cubic spline.

  8. Mechanism of kolaviron-induced relaxation of rabbit aortic smooth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    induced relaxation on contractile responses in ring preparations of vascular smooth muscle (VSM) of the rabbit aorta in vitro, in standard laboratory organ bath procedure. Following Phenylephrine (PE) (10-7M), or high-K+ (80 mMK+) PSS induced ...

  9. A remark on smooth images of Banach spaces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hájek, Petr Pavel; Johanis, M.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 458, č. 2 (2018), s. 1307-1313 ISSN 0022-247X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA16-07378S Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : smooth surjections Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.064, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022247X17309186?via%3Dihub

  10. Smoothed analysis of left-to-right maxima with applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damerow, Valentina; Manthey, Bodo; Meyer auf der Heide, Friedhelm; Räcke, Heide Harald; Scheideler, Christian; Sohler, Christian; Tantau, Till

    A left-to-right maximum in a sequence of n numbers $s_1, ..., s_n$ is a number that is strictly larger than all preceding numbers. In this paper we present a smoothed analysis of the number of left-to-right maxima in the presence of additive random noise. We show that for every sequence of $n$

  11. Particle motions in oscillatory flow over a smooth bed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Karsten Lindegård; Sumer, B. Mutlu; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates particle motions near the bed in an oscillating tunnel with a smooth bed. Trajectories of a heavy particle were recorded in two dimensions (horizontal and vertical) and in time. The wave boundary layer Reynolds number is Re = 520000. Kinematical quantities such as the prob...

  12. Phenotype modulation of airway smooth muscle in asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wright, David B.; Trian, Thomas; Siddiqui, Sana; Pascoe, Chris D.; Johnson, Jill R.; Dekkers, Bart G. J.; Dakshinamurti, Shyamala; Bagchi, Rushita; Burgess, Janette K.; Kanabar, Varsha; Ojo, Oluwaseun O.

    The biological responses of airway smooth muscle (ASM) are diverse, in part due to ASM phenotype plasticity. ASM phenotype plasticity refers to the ability of ASM cells to change the degree of a variety of functions, including contractility, proliferation, migration and secretion of inflammatory

  13. Airway smooth muscle cells : regulators of airway inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuyderduyn, Suzanne

    2007-01-01

    Airways from asthmatic subjects are more responsive to bronchoconstrictive stimuli than airways from healthy subjects. Airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells mediate contraction of the airways by responding to the bronchoconstrictive stimuli, which was thought to be the primary role of ASM cells. In this

  14. Airway smooth muscle dysfunction in Pompe (Gaa-/- ) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeler, Allison M; Liu, Donghai; Zieger, Marina; Xiong, Lang; Salemi, Jeffrey; Bellvé, Karl; Byrne, Barry J; Fuller, David D; ZhuGe, Ronghua; ElMallah, Mai K

    2017-06-01

    Pompe disease is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a deficiency of acid α-glucosidase (GAA), an enzyme responsible for hydrolyzing lysosomal glycogen. Deficiency of GAA leads to systemic glycogen accumulation in the lysosomes of skeletal muscle, motor neurons, and smooth muscle. Skeletal muscle and motor neuron pathology are known to contribute to respiratory insufficiency in Pompe disease, but the role of airway pathology has not been evaluated. Here we propose that GAA enzyme deficiency disrupts the function of the trachea and bronchi and this lower airway pathology contributes to respiratory insufficiency in Pompe disease. Using an established mouse model of Pompe disease, the Gaa-/- mouse, we compared histology, pulmonary mechanics, airway smooth muscle (ASM) function, and calcium signaling between Gaa-/- and age-matched wild-type (WT) mice. Lysosomal glycogen accumulation was observed in the smooth muscle of both the bronchi and the trachea in Gaa-/- but not WT mice. Furthermore, Gaa-/- mice had hyporesponsive airway resistance and bronchial ring contraction to the bronchoconstrictive agents methacholine (MCh) and potassium chloride (KCl) and to a bronchodilator (albuterol). Finally, calcium signaling during bronchiolar smooth muscle contraction was impaired in Gaa-/- mice indicating impaired extracellular calcium influx. We conclude that GAA enzyme deficiency leads to glycogen accumulation in the trachea and bronchi and impairs the ability of lower ASM to regulate calcium and respond appropriately to bronchodilator or constrictors. Accordingly, ASM dysfunction may contribute to respiratory impairments in Pompe disease. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  15. HSP20 phosphorylation and airway smooth muscle relaxation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariam Ba

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Mariam Ba1, Cherie A Singer1, Manoj Tyagi2, Colleen Brophy3, Josh E Baker4, Christine Cremo4, Andrew Halayko5, William T Gerthoffer21Department of Pharmacology, University of Nevada School of Medicine, Reno, NV, USA; 2Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of South Alabama, Mobile, AL, USA; 3Harrington Department of Biochemistry, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA; 4Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Nevada, Reno, NV, USA; 5Departments of Physiology and Internal Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, CanadaAbstract: HSP20 (HSPB6 is a small heat shock protein expressed in smooth muscles that is hypothesized to inhibit contraction when phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase. To investigate this hypothesis in airway smooth muscle (ASM we showed that HSP20 was constitutively expressed as well as being inducible in cultured hASM cells by treatment with 1 µM isoproterenol or 10 µM salmeterol. In contrast, a mixture of proinflammatory mediators (interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor α, and interferon γ inhibited expression of HSP20 by about 50% in 48 hours. To determine whether phosphorylation of HSP20 is sufficient to induce relaxation, canine tracheal smooth muscle was treated with a cell permeant phosphopeptide that mimics the phosphorylation of HSP20. The HSP20 phosphopeptide antagonized carbacholinduced contraction by 60% with no change in myosin light chain phosphorylation. Recombinant full length HSP20 inhibited skeletal actin binding to smooth muscle myosin subfragment 1 (S1, and recombinant cell permeant TAT-HSP20 S16D mutant reduced F-actin filaments in cultured hASM cells. Carbachol stimulation of canine tracheal smooth muscle tissue caused redistribution of HSP20 from large macromolecular complexes (200–500 kDa to smaller complexes (<60 kDa. The results are consistent with HSP20 expression and macromolecular structure being dynamically regulated in airway

  16. Cloning and characterization of sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) from crayfish axial muscle. Sarco/Endoplasmic Reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z; Chen, D; Wheatly, M G

    2000-11-01

    The discontinuous pattern of muscle growth during the moulting cycle of a freshwater crustacean (the crayfish Procambarus clarkii) was used as a model system to examine the regulation of the expression of Sarco/Endoplasmic Reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA). We describe the cloning, sequencing and characterization of a novel SERCA cDNA (3856 bp) obtained from crayfish axial abdominal muscle by reverse transcription/polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) followed by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). This complete sequence contains a 145 base pair (bp) noncoding region at the 5' end, a 3006 bp open reading frame coding for 1002 amino acid residues with a molecular mass of 110 kDa and 705 bp of untranslated region at the 3' end. This enzyme contains all the conserved domains found in 'P'-type ATPases, and the hydropathy profile suggests a transmembrane organization typical of other SERCAs. It exhibits 80% amino acid identity with Drosophila melanogaster SERCA, 79% identity with Artemia franciscana SERCA, 72% identity with rabbit fast-twitch muscle neonatal isoform SERCA1b, 71% identity with slow-twitch muscle isoform SERCA2 and 67% identity with SERCA3. Sequence alignment revealed that regions anchoring the cytoplasmic domain in the membrane were highly conserved and that most differences were in the NH(2) terminus, the central loop region and the COOH terminus. Northern analysis of total RNA from crayfish tissues probed with the 460 bp fragment initially isolated showed four bands (7.6, 7.0, 5.8 and 4.5 kilobases) displaying tissue-specific expression. SERCA was most abundant in muscle (axial abdominal, cardiac and stomach), where it is involved in Ca(2+) resequestration during relaxation, and in eggs, where it may be implicated in early embryogenesis. The level of SERCA mRNA expression in axial abdominal muscle varied during the moulting cycle as determined by slot-blot analysis. SERCA expression was greatest during intermoult and decreased to approximately 50% of

  17. Smoothed Spectra, Ogives, and Error Estimates for Atmospheric Turbulence Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Nelson Luís

    2017-09-01

    A systematic evaluation is conducted of the smoothed spectrum, which is a spectral estimate obtained by averaging over a window of contiguous frequencies. The technique is extended to the ogive, as well as to the cross-spectrum. It is shown that, combined with existing variance estimates for the periodogram, the variance—and therefore the random error—associated with these estimates can be calculated in a straightforward way. The smoothed spectra and ogives are biased estimates; with simple power-law analytical models, correction procedures are devised, as well as a global constraint that enforces Parseval's identity. Several new results are thus obtained: (1) The analytical variance estimates compare well with the sample variance calculated for the Bartlett spectrum and the variance of the inertial subrange of the cospectrum is shown to be relatively much larger than that of the spectrum. (2) Ogives and spectra estimates with reduced bias are calculated. (3) The bias of the smoothed spectrum and ogive is shown to be negligible at the higher frequencies. (4) The ogives and spectra thus calculated have better frequency resolution than the Bartlett spectrum, with (5) gradually increasing variance and relative error towards the low frequencies. (6) Power-law identification and extraction of the rate of dissipation of turbulence kinetic energy are possible directly from the ogive. (7) The smoothed cross-spectrum is a valid inner product and therefore an acceptable candidate for coherence and spectral correlation coefficient estimation by means of the Cauchy-Schwarz inequality. The quadrature, phase function, coherence function and spectral correlation function obtained from the smoothed spectral estimates compare well with the classical ones derived from the Bartlett spectrum.

  18. Full-waveform inversion using a nonlinearly smoothed wavefield

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yuanyuan

    2017-12-08

    Conventional full-waveform inversion (FWI) based on the least-squares misfit function faces problems in converging to the global minimum when using gradient methods because of the cycle-skipping phenomena. An initial model producing data that are at most a half-cycle away from the observed data is needed for convergence to the global minimum. Low frequencies are helpful in updating low-wavenumber components of the velocity model to avoid cycle skipping. However, low enough frequencies are usually unavailable in field cases. The multiplication of wavefields of slightly different frequencies adds artificial low-frequency components in the data, which can be used for FWI to generate a convergent result and avoid cycle skipping. We generalize this process by multiplying the wavefield with itself and then applying a smoothing operator to the multiplied wavefield or its square to derive the nonlinearly smoothed wavefield, which is rich in low frequencies. The global correlation-norm-based objective function can mitigate the dependence on the amplitude information of the nonlinearly smoothed wavefield. Therefore, we have evaluated the use of this objective function when using the nonlinearly smoothed wavefield. The proposed objective function has much larger convexity than the conventional objective functions. We calculate the gradient of the objective function using the adjoint-state technique, which is similar to that of the conventional FWI except for the adjoint source. We progressively reduce the smoothing width applied to the nonlinear wavefield to naturally adopt the multiscale strategy. Using examples on the Marmousi 2 model, we determine that the proposed FWI helps to generate convergent results without the need for low-frequency information.

  19. Glucosamine-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress affects GLUT4 expression via activating transcription factor 6 in rat and human skeletal muscle cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raciti, G A; Iadicicco, C; Ulianich, L

    2010-01-01

    Glucosamine, generated during hyperglycaemia, causes insulin resistance in different cells. Here we sought to evaluate the possible role of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in the induction of insulin resistance by glucosamine in skeletal muscle cells....

  20. Prodigiosin activates endoplasmic reticulum stress cell death pathway in human breast carcinoma cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Mu-Yun [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Shen, Yuh-Chiang [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); National Research Institute of Chinese Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lu, Chien-Hsing [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, National Yang-Ming University School of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Yang, Shu-Yi [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Ho, Tsing-Fen [Department of Medical Laboratory Science and Biotechnology, Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Peng, Yu-Ta [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Chang, Chia-Che, E-mail: chia_che@dragon.nchu.edu.tw [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Agricultural Biotechnology Center, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Basic Medical Science, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China)

    2012-12-15

    Prodigiosin is a bacterial tripyrrole pigment with potent cytotoxicity against diverse human cancer cell lines. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is initiated by accumulation of unfolded or misfolded proteins in the ER lumen and may induce cell death when irremediable. In this study, the role of ER stress in prodigiosin-induced cytotoxicity was elucidated for the first time. Comparable to the ER stress inducer thapsigargin, prodigiosin up-regulated signature ER stress markers GRP78 and CHOP in addition to activating the IRE1, PERK and ATF6 branches of the unfolded protein response (UPR) in multiple human breast carcinoma cell lines, confirming prodigiosin as an ER stress inducer. Prodigiosin transcriptionally up-regulated CHOP, as evidenced by its promoting effect on the CHOP promoter activity. Of note, knockdown of CHOP effectively lowered prodigiosin's capacity to evoke PARP cleavage, reduce cell viability and suppress colony formation, highlighting an essential role of CHOP in prodigiosin-induced cytotoxic ER stress response. In addition, prodigiosin down-regulated BCL2 in a CHOP-dependent manner. Importantly, restoration of BCL2 expression blocked prodigiosin-induced PARP cleavage and greatly enhanced the survival of prodigiosin-treated cells, suggesting that CHOP-dependent BCL2 suppression mediates prodigiosin-elicited cell death. Moreover, pharmacological inhibition of JNK by SP600125 or dominant-negative blockade of PERK-mediated eIF2α phosphorylation impaired prodigiosin-induced CHOP up-regulation and PARP cleavage. Collectively, these results identified ER stress-mediated cell death as a mode-of-action of prodigiosin's tumoricidal effect. Mechanistically, prodigiosin engages the IRE1–JNK and PERK–eIF2α branches of the UPR signaling to up-regulate CHOP, which in turn mediates BCL2 suppression to induce cell death. Highlights: ► Prodigiosin is a bacterial tripyrrole pigment with potent anticancer effect. ► Prodigiosin is herein identified