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Sample records for vesicular stomatitis viruses

  1. Understanding and altering cell tropism of vesicular stomatitis virus

    OpenAIRE

    Hastie, Eric; Cataldi, Marcela; Marriott, Ian; Valery Z Grdzelishvili

    2013-01-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is a prototypic nonsegmented negative-strand RNA virus. VSV’s broad cell tropism makes it a popular model virus for many basic research applications. In addition, a lack of preexisting human immunity against VSV, inherent oncotropism and other features make VSV a widely used platform for vaccine and oncolytic vectors. However, VSV’s neurotropism that can result in viral encephalitis in experimental animals needs to be addressed for the use of the virus as a sa...

  2. Lassa-vesicular stomatitis chimeric virus safely destroys brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollmann, Guido; Drokhlyansky, Eugene; Davis, John N; Cepko, Connie; van den Pol, Anthony N

    2015-07-01

    High-grade tumors in the brain are among the deadliest of cancers. Here, we took a promising oncolytic virus, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), and tested the hypothesis that the neurotoxicity associated with the virus could be eliminated without blocking its oncolytic potential in the brain by replacing the neurotropic VSV glycoprotein with the glycoprotein from one of five different viruses, including Ebola virus, Marburg virus, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV), rabies virus, and Lassa virus. Based on in vitro infections of normal and tumor cells, we selected two viruses to test in vivo. Wild-type VSV was lethal when injected directly into the brain. In contrast, a novel chimeric virus (VSV-LASV-GPC) containing genes from both the Lassa virus glycoprotein precursor (GPC) and VSV showed no adverse actions within or outside the brain and targeted and completely destroyed brain cancer, including high-grade glioblastoma and melanoma, even in metastatic cancer models. When mice had two brain tumors, intratumoral VSV-LASV-GPC injection in one tumor (glioma or melanoma) led to complete tumor destruction; importantly, the virus moved contralaterally within the brain to selectively infect the second noninjected tumor. A chimeric virus combining VSV genes with the gene coding for the Ebola virus glycoprotein was safe in the brain and also selectively targeted brain tumors but was substantially less effective in destroying brain tumors and prolonging survival of tumor-bearing mice. A tropism for multiple cancer types combined with an exquisite tumor specificity opens a new door to widespread application of VSV-LASV-GPC as a safe and efficacious oncolytic chimeric virus within the brain. Many viruses have been tested for their ability to target and kill cancer cells. Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) has shown substantial promise, but a key problem is that if it enters the brain, it can generate adverse neurologic consequences, including death. We tested a series of

  3. Asymmetric packaging of polymerases within vesicular stomatitis virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodges, Jeffery; Tang, Xiaolin; Landesman, Michael B. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah (United States); Center for Cell and Genome Science, University of Utah (United States); Ruedas, John B. [Dept. of Biology, San Diego State University (United States); Ghimire, Anil [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah (United States); Gudheti, Manasa V. [Vutara, Inc., Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Dept. of Biology, University of Utah (United States); Perrault, Jacques [Dept. of Biology, San Diego State University (United States); Jorgensen, Erik M. [Howard Hughes Medical Institute (United States); Dept. of Biology, University of Utah (United States); Gerton, Jordan M. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah (United States); Dept. of Bioengineering, University of Utah (United States); Saffarian, Saveez, E-mail: saffarian@physics.utah.edu [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah (United States); Center for Cell and Genome Science, University of Utah (United States); Dept. of Biology, University of Utah (United States)

    2013-10-18

    Highlights: •The VSV polymerases (L proteins) are localized to the blunt end of the virus. •The VSV phosphoproteins (P proteins) are localized to the blunt end of the virus. •Each VSV virion packages a variable number of P and L proteins. -- Abstract: Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is a prototypic negative sense single-stranded RNA virus. The bullet-shape appearance of the virion results from tightly wound helical turns of the nucleoprotein encapsidated RNA template (N-RNA) around a central cavity. Transcription and replication require polymerase complexes, which include a catalytic subunit L and a template-binding subunit P. L and P are inferred to be in the cavity, however lacking direct observation, their exact position has remained unclear. Using super-resolution fluorescence imaging and atomic force microscopy (AFM) on single VSV virions, we show that L and P are packaged asymmetrically towards the blunt end of the virus. The number of L and P proteins varies between individual virions and they occupy 57 ± 12 nm of the 150 nm central cavity of the virus. Our finding positions the polymerases at the opposite end of the genome with respect to the only transcriptional promoter.

  4. Understanding and altering cell tropism of vesicular stomatitis virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastie, Eric; Cataldi, Marcela; Marriott, Ian; Grdzelishvili, Valery Z.

    2013-01-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is a prototypic nonsegmented negative-strand RNA virus. VSV’s broad cell tropism makes it a popular model virus for many basic research applications. In addition, a lack of preexisting human immunity against VSV, inherent oncotropism and other features make VSV a widely used platform for vaccine and oncolytic vectors. However, VSV’s neurotropism that can result in viral encephalitis in experimental animals needs to be addressed for the use of the virus as a safe vector. Therefore, it is very important to understand the determinants of VSV tropism and develop strategies to alter it. VSV glycoprotein (G) and matrix (M) protein play major roles in its cell tropism. VSV G protein is responsible for VSV broad cell tropism and is often used for pseudotyping other viruses. VSV M affects cell tropism via evasion of antiviral responses, and M mutants can be used to limit cell tropism to cell types defective in interferon signaling. In addition, other VSV proteins and host proteins may function as determinants of VSV cell tropism. Various approaches have been successfully used to alter VSV tropism to benefit basic research and clinically relevant applications. PMID:23796410

  5. Understanding and altering cell tropism of vesicular stomatitis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastie, Eric; Cataldi, Marcela; Marriott, Ian; Grdzelishvili, Valery Z

    2013-09-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is a prototypic nonsegmented negative-strand RNA virus. VSV's broad cell tropism makes it a popular model virus for many basic research applications. In addition, a lack of preexisting human immunity against VSV, inherent oncotropism and other features make VSV a widely used platform for vaccine and oncolytic vectors. However, VSV's neurotropism that can result in viral encephalitis in experimental animals needs to be addressed for the use of the virus as a safe vector. Therefore, it is very important to understand the determinants of VSV tropism and develop strategies to alter it. VSV glycoprotein (G) and matrix (M) protein play major roles in its cell tropism. VSV G protein is responsible for VSV broad cell tropism and is often used for pseudotyping other viruses. VSV M affects cell tropism via evasion of antiviral responses, and M mutants can be used to limit cell tropism to cell types defective in interferon signaling. In addition, other VSV proteins and host proteins may function as determinants of VSV cell tropism. Various approaches have been successfully used to alter VSV tropism to benefit basic research and clinically relevant applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Vesicular stomatitis virus-based vaccines against Lassa and Ebola viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzi, Andrea; Feldmann, Friederike; Geisbert, Thomas W; Feldmann, Heinz; Safronetz, David

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrated that previous vaccination with a vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-based Lassa virus vaccine does not alter protective efficacy of subsequent vaccination with a VSV-based Ebola virus vaccine. These findings demonstrate the utility of VSV-based vaccines against divergent viral pathogens, even when preexisting immunity to the vaccine vector is present.

  7. Molecular architecture of the vesicular stomatitis virus RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmeh, Amal A; Schenk, Andreas D; Danek, Eric I; Kranzusch, Philip J; Liang, Bo; Walz, Thomas; Whelan, Sean P J

    2010-11-16

    Nonsegmented negative-strand (NNS) RNA viruses initiate infection by delivering into the host cell a highly specialized RNA synthesis machine comprising the genomic RNA completely encapsidated by the viral nucleocapsid protein and associated with the viral polymerase. The catalytic core of this protein-RNA complex is a 250-kDa multifunctional large (L) polymerase protein that contains enzymatic activities for nucleotide polymerization as well as for each step of mRNA cap formation. Working with vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), a prototype of NNS RNA viruses, we used negative stain electron microscopy (EM) to obtain a molecular view of L, alone and in complex with the viral phosphoprotein (P) cofactor. EM analysis, combined with proteolytic digestion and deletion mapping, revealed the organization of L into a ring domain containing the RNA polymerase and an appendage of three globular domains containing the cap-forming activities. The capping enzyme maps to a globular domain, which is juxtaposed to the ring, and the cap methyltransferase maps to a more distal and flexibly connected globule. Upon P binding, L undergoes a significant rearrangement that may reflect an optimal positioning of its functional domains for transcription. The structural map of L provides new insights into the interrelationship of its various domains, and their rearrangement on P binding that is likely important for RNA synthesis. Because the arrangement of conserved regions involved in catalysis is homologous, the structural insights obtained for VSV L likely extend to all NNS RNA viruses.

  8. Redistributive properties of the vesicular stomatitis virus polymerase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helfman, W.B.; Perrault, J. (San Diego State Univ., CA (USA))

    1989-08-01

    The template for transcription of the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) genome consists of a negative-strand RNA (approximately 11 kb) tightly associated with approximately 1250 copies of the nucleocapsid or N protein (N-RNA template). The interaction between the virion-associated polymerase and this template was probed with a novel assay using purified N-RNA complexes added to detergent-disrupted uv-irradiated standard virions or unirradiated defective interfering (DI) particles. In contrast to the well-known stability of assembled cellular transcription complexes, the VSV polymerase copied exogenously added templates efficiently and yielded products indistinguishable from control virus transcription. Addition of uv-irradiated N-RNA templates to unirradiated virus effectively competed for transcription of endogenous template indicating that most or all of the polymerase can freely redistribute. Furthermore preincubation of virus and added templates at high ionic strength to solubilize L and NS polymerase proteins did not release additional active enzyme for redistribution. Pretranscription of virus also had little or no effect on redistributed activity indicating that polymerase complexes are capable of multiple rounds of synthesis beginning at the 3' end promoter. Unexpectedly, titration with saturating amounts of added N-RNA showed that active polymerase complexes are only in slight excess relative to template in standard or DI particles despite the large surplus of packaged L and NS polypeptides. Moreover, added standard virus templates competed equally well for the redistributing polymerase from DI particles or standard virus indicating no significant polymerase-binding preference for interfering templates. These findings bear important implications regarding mechanisms of VSV transcription and replication.

  9. Pseudotype formation of murine leukemia virus with the G protein of vesicular stomatitis virus.

    OpenAIRE

    Emi, N; Friedmann, T; Yee, J K

    1991-01-01

    Mixed infection of a cell by vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and retroviruses results in the production of progeny virions bearing the genome of one virus encapsidated by the envelope proteins of the other. The mechanism for the phenomenon of pseudotype formation is not clear, although specific recognition of a viral envelope protein by the nucleocapsid of an unrelated virus is presumably involved. In this study, we used Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV)-based retroviral vectors encoding...

  10. Inhibition of cellular DNA synthesis by vesicular stomatitis virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGowan, J.J.; Wagner, R.R.

    1981-04-01

    DNA synthesis in mouse myeloma (MPC-11) cells and L cells was rapidly and progressively inhibited by infection with vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). No significant difference in cellular DNA synthesis inhibition was noted between synchronized and unsynchronized cells, nor did synchronized cells vary in their susceptibility to VSV infection after release from successive thymidine and hydroxyurea blocks. Cellular RNA synthesis was inhibited to about the same extent as DNA synthesis, but cellular protein synthesis was less affected by VSV at the same multiplicity of infection. The effect of VSV on cellular DNA synthesis could not be attributed to degradation of existing DNA or to decreased uptake of deoxynucleoside triphosphates, nor were DNA polymerase and thymidine kinase activities significantly different in VSV-infected and uninfected cell extracts. Analysis by alkaline sucrose gradients of DNA in pulse-labeled uninfected and VSV-infected cells indicated that VSV infection did not appear to influence DNA chain elongation. Cellular DNA synthesis was not significantly inhibited by infection with the VSV polymerase mutant tsG114(I) at the restrictive temperature or by infection with defective-interfering VSV DI-011 (5' end of the genome), but DI-HR-LT (3' end of genome) exhibited initially rapid but not prolonged inhibition of MPC-11 cell DNA synthesis. DNA synthesis inhibitory activity of wild-type VSV was only slowly and partially inactivated by very large doses of UV irradiation. These data suggest that, as in the effect of VSV on cellular RNA synthesis inhibition of cellular DNA synthesis by VSV requires transcription of a small segment of the viral genome.

  11. Protective efficacy of a recombinant Newcastle disease virus expressing glycoprotein of vesicular stomatitis virus in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Minmin; Ge, Jinying; Li, Xiaofang; Chen, Weiye; Wang, Xijun; Wen, Zhiyuan; Bu, Zhigao

    2016-01-01

    Background Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) causes severe losses to the animal husbandry industry. In this study, a recombinant Newcastle disease virus (NDV) expressing the glycoprotein (G) of VSV (rL-VSV-G) was constructed and its pathogenicity and immune protective efficacy in mouse were evaluated. Results In pathogenicity evaluation test, the analysis of the viral distribution in mouse organs and body weight change showed that rL-VSV-G was safe in mice. In immune protection assay, the reco...

  12. Pseudotyping of vesicular stomatitis virus with the envelope glycoproteins of highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Gert; Locher, Samira; Berger Rentsch, Marianne; Halbherr, Stefan J

    2014-08-01

    Pseudotype viruses are useful for studying the envelope proteins of harmful viruses. This work describes the pseudotyping of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) with the envelope glycoproteins of highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses. VSV lacking the homotypic glycoprotein (G) gene (VSVΔG) was used to express haemagglutinin (HA), neuraminidase (NA) or the combination of both. Propagation-competent pseudotype viruses were only obtained when HA and NA were expressed from the same vector genome. Pseudotype viruses containing HA from different H5 clades were neutralized specifically by immune sera directed against the corresponding clade. Fast and sensitive reading of test results was achieved by vector-mediated expression of GFP. Pseudotype viruses expressing a mutant VSV matrix protein showed restricted spread in IFN-competent cells. This pseudotype system will facilitate the detection of neutralizing antibodies against virulent influenza viruses, circumventing the need for high-level biosafety containment. © 2014 The Authors.

  13. TNF-mediated survival of CD169(+) cells promotes immune activation during vesicular stomatitis virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shinde, Prashant V; Xu, Haifeng C; Maney, Sathish Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Innate immune activation is essential to mount an effective antiviral response and to prime adaptive immunity. Although a crucial role of CD169(+) cells during vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) infections is increasingly recognized, factors regulating CD169(+) cells during viral infections remain ...

  14. Neurovirulence properties of recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus vectors in non-human primates

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, J. Erik; Nasar, Farooq; Coleman, John W.; Price, Roger E; Javadian, Ali; Draper, Kenneth; Lee, Margaret; Reilly, Patricia A.; Clarke, David K.; Hendry, R. Michael; Udem, Stephen A.

    2007-01-01

    Although vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) neurovirulence and pathogenicity in rodents have been well studied, little is known about VSV pathogenicity in non-human primates. To address this question, we measured VSV viremia, shedding, and neurovirulence in macaques. Following intranasal inoculation, macaques shed minimal recombinant VSV (rVSV) in nasal washes for one day post-inoculation; viremia was not detected. Following intranasal inoculation of macaques, wild type (wt) VSV, rVSV, and two ...

  15. Production of vesicular stomatitis virus by antigen- or mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes and continuous lymphoblastoid lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowakowski, M.; Feldman, J.D.; Kano, S.; Bloom, B.R.

    1973-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore at the ultrastructural level the nature of the cells engaged in the production of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) in different lymphoid cell populations, particularly after stimulation with several different agents. Specifically, we have examined (a) lymph node cells from guinea pigs with delayed hypersensitivity activated by specific antigen, (b) murine spleen cells activated by selective B cell and T cell mitogens, and (c) cells of human and murine continuous lymphoblastoid or lymphoma lines.

  16. Cutting Edge: Innate Immune Augmenting Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Expressing Zika Virus Proteins Confers Protective Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betancourt, Dillon; de Queiroz, Nina M G P; Xia, Tianli; Ahn, Jeonghyun; Barber, Glen N

    2017-04-15

    Zika virus (ZIKV) has become a serious public health concern because of its link to brain damage in developing human fetuses. Recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (rVSV) was shown to be a highly effective and safe vector for the delivery of foreign immunogens for vaccine purposes. In this study, we generated rVSVs (wild-type and attenuated VSV with mutated matrix protein [VSVm] versions) that express either the full length ZIKV envelope protein (ZENV) alone or include the ZENV precursor to the membrane protein upstream of the envelope protein, and our rVSV-ZIKV constructs showed efficient immunogenicity in murine models. We also demonstrated maternal protective immunity in challenged newborn mice born to female mice vaccinated with VSVm-ZENV containing the transmembrane domain. Our data indicate that rVSVm may be a suitable strategy for the design of effective vaccines against ZIKV. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  17. Cytopathogenesis of Vesicular Stomatitis virus is regulated by the PSAP motif of M protein in a species-dependent manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is an important vector-borne pathogen of bovine and equine species, causing a reportable vesicular disease. The matrix (M) protein of VSV is multifunctional and plays a key role in cytopathogenesis, apoptosis, host protein shut-off, and virion assembly/budding. Our ...

  18. Radiation inactivation analysis of fusion and hemolysis by vesicular stomatitis virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bundo-Morita, K.; Gibson, S.; Lenard, J.

    1988-04-01

    Radiation inactivation analysis was used to determine the size of the functional unit responsible for fusion of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) with cardiolipin or phosphatidylcholine-phosphatidylethanolamine (1:1) liposomes, and for VSV-induced hemolysis. When radiation-insensitive background values were subtracted, the calculated functional units for all three activities were similar, ranging from 866 to 957 kDa, equivalent to about 15 G protein molecules. This is in striking contrast to results of similar studies with influenza and Sendai viruses, in which the functional unit corresponded in size to a single fusion protein monomer, and suggests that VSV fusion may occur by a different mechanism.

  19. Chikungunya, Influenza, Nipah, and Semliki Forest Chimeric Viruses with Vesicular Stomatitis Virus: Actions in the Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Pol, Anthony N; Mao, Guochao; Chattopadhyay, Anasuya; Rose, John K; Davis, John N

    2017-03-15

    Recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-based chimeric viruses that include genes from other viruses show promise as vaccines and oncolytic viruses. However, the critical safety concern is the neurotropic nature conveyed by the VSV glycoprotein. VSVs that include the VSV glycoprotein (G) gene, even in most recombinant attenuated strains, can still show substantial adverse or lethal actions in the brain. Here, we test 4 chimeric viruses in the brain, including those in which glycoprotein genes from Nipah, chikungunya (CHIKV), and influenza H5N1 viruses were substituted for the VSV glycoprotein gene. We also test a virus-like vesicle (VLV) in which the VSV glycoprotein gene is expressed from a replicon encoding the nonstructural proteins of Semliki Forest virus. VSVΔG-CHIKV, VSVΔG-H5N1, and VLV were all safe in the adult mouse brain, as were VSVΔG viruses expressing either the Nipah F or G glycoprotein. In contrast, a complementing pair of VSVΔG viruses expressing Nipah G and F glycoproteins were lethal within the brain within a surprisingly short time frame of 2 days. Intranasal inoculation in postnatal day 14 mice with VSVΔG-CHIKV or VLV evoked no adverse response, whereas VSVΔG-H5N1 by this route was lethal in most mice. A key immune mechanism underlying the safety of VSVΔG-CHIKV, VSVΔG-H5N1, and VLV in the adult brain was the type I interferon response; all three viruses were lethal in the brains of adult mice lacking the interferon receptor, suggesting that the viruses can infect and replicate and spread in brain cells if not blocked by interferon-stimulated genes within the brain.IMPORTANCE Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) shows considerable promise both as a vaccine vector and as an oncolytic virus. The greatest limitation of VSV is that it is highly neurotropic and can be lethal within the brain. The neurotropism can be mostly attributed to the VSV G glycoprotein. Here, we test 4 chimeric viruses of VSV with glycoprotein genes from Nipah

  20. PEGylation of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Extends Virus Persistence in Blood Circulation of Passively Immunized Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesfay, Mulu Z.; Kirk, Amber C.; Hadac, Elizabeth M.; Griesmann, Guy E.; Federspiel, Mark J.; Barber, Glen N.; Henry, Stephen M.; Peng, Kah-Whye

    2013-01-01

    We are developing oncolytic vesicular stomatitis viruses (VSVs) for systemic treatment of multiple myeloma, an incurable malignancy of antibody-secreting plasma cells that are specifically localized in the bone marrow. One of the presumed advantages for using VSV as an oncolytic virus is that human infections are rare and preexisting anti-VSV immunity is typically lacking in cancer patients, which is very important for clinical success. However, our studies show that nonimmune human and mouse serum can neutralize clinical-grade VSV, reducing the titer by up to 4 log units in 60 min. In addition, we show that neutralizing anti-VSV antibodies negate the antitumor efficacy of VSV, a concern for repeat VSV administration. We have investigated the potential use of covalent modification of VSV with polyethylene glycol (PEG) or a function-spacer-lipid (FSL)–PEG construct to inhibit serum neutralization and to limit hepatosplenic sequestration of systemically delivered VSV. We report that in mice passively immunized with neutralizing anti-VSV antibodies, PEGylation of VSV improved the persistence of VSV in the blood circulation, maintaining a more than 1-log-unit increase in VSV genome copies for up to 1 h compared to the genome copy numbers for the non-PEGylated virus, which was mostly cleared within 10 min after intravenous injection. We are currently investigating if this increase in PEGylated VSV circulating half-life can translate to increased virus delivery and better efficacy in mouse models of multiple myeloma. PMID:23325695

  1. The lipidomes of vesicular stomatitis virus, semliki forest virus, and the host plasma membrane analyzed by quantitative shotgun mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalvodova, Lucie; Sampaio, Julio L; Cordo, Sandra

    2009-01-01

    Although enveloped virus assembly in the host cell is a crucial step in the virus life cycle, it remains poorly understood. One issue is how viruses include lipids in their membranes during budding from infected host cells. To analyze this issue, we took advantage of the fact that baby hamster...... kidney cells can be infected by two different viruses, namely, vesicular stomatitis virus and Semliki Forest virus, from the Rhabdoviridae and Togaviridae families, respectively. We purified the host plasma membrane and the two different viruses after exit from the host cells and analyzed the lipid...

  2. Durability of a vesicular stomatitis virus-based marburg virus vaccine in nonhuman primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad E Mire

    Full Text Available The filoviruses, Marburg virus (MARV and Ebola virus, causes severe hemorrhagic fever with high mortality in humans and nonhuman primates. A promising filovirus vaccine under development is based on a recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (rVSV that expresses individual filovirus glycoproteins (GPs in place of the VSV glycoprotein (G. These vaccines have shown 100% efficacy against filovirus infection in nonhuman primates when challenge occurs 28-35 days after a single injection immunization. Here, we examined the ability of a rVSV MARV-GP vaccine to provide protection when challenge occurs more than a year after vaccination. Cynomolgus macaques were immunized with rVSV-MARV-GP and challenged with MARV approximately 14 months after vaccination. Immunization resulted in the vaccine cohort of six animals having anti-MARV GP IgG throughout the pre-challenge period. Following MARV challenge none of the vaccinated animals showed any signs of clinical disease or viremia and all were completely protected from MARV infection. Two unvaccinated control animals exhibited signs consistent with MARV infection and both succumbed. Importantly, these data are the first to show 100% protective efficacy against any high dose filovirus challenge beyond 8 weeks after final vaccination. These findings demonstrate the durability of VSV-based filovirus vaccines.

  3. Initiation and Direction of RNA Transcription by Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Virion Transcriptase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Polly; Bishop, D. H. L.

    1973-01-01

    The initiation of RNA transcription by the virion-bound RNA transcriptase of vesicular stomatitis virus has been examined. Multiple initiation sequences have been observed, two of which have been characterized (pppApCpGp... and pppGpCp...) suggestive of a transcription process which can start at different sites along the template RNA. By the use of sequential labeling techniques and exonucleases, it has been determined that there is a 5′ to 3′ direction of product RNA synthesis. PMID:4349490

  4. Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Infection Promotes Immune Evasion by Preventing NKG2D-Ligand Surface Expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Helle; Andresen, Lars; Nielsen, Jens

    2011-01-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) has recently gained attention for its oncolytic ability in cancer treatment. Initially, we hypothesized that VSV infection could increase immune recognition of cancer cells through induction of the immune stimulatory NKG2D-ligands. Here we show that VSV infection......D-ligand expression at an early post-transcriptional level. Our results show that VSV possess an escape mechanism, which could affect the immune recognition of VSV infected cancer cells. This may also have implications for immune recognition of cancer cells after combined treatment with VSV...

  5. Pseudotyping Vesicular Stomatitis Virus with Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus Glycoproteins Enhances Infectivity for Glioma Cells and Minimizes Neurotropism▿†

    OpenAIRE

    Muik, Alexander; Kneiske, Inna; Werbizki, Marina; Wilflingseder, Doris; Giroglou, Tsanan; Ebert, Oliver; Kraft, Anna; Dietrich, Ursula; Zimmer, Gert; Momma, Stefan; von Laer, Dorothee

    2011-01-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-based oncolytic virotherapy has the potential to significantly improve the prognosis of aggressive malignancies such as brain cancer. However, VSV's inherent neurotoxicity has hindered clinical development so far. Given that this neurotropism is attributed to the glycoprotein VSV-G, VSV was pseudotyped with the nonneurotropic envelope glycoprotein of the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV-GP→VSV-GP). Compared to VSV, VSV-GP showed enhanced infectivity fo...

  6. Leucine-rich repeat-containing G protein-coupled receptor 4 facilitates vesicular stomatitis virus infection by binding vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Na; Huang, Hongjun; Tan, Binghe; Wei, Yinglei; Xiong, Qingqing; Yan, Yan; Hou, Lili; Wu, Nannan; Siwko, Stefan; Cimarelli, Andrea; Xu, Jianrong; Han, Honghui; Qian, Min; Liu, Mingyao; Du, Bing

    2017-10-06

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and rabies and Chandipura viruses belong to the Rhabdovirus family. VSV is a common laboratory virus to study viral evolution and host immune responses to viral infection, and recombinant VSV-based vectors have been widely used for viral oncolysis, vaccination, and gene therapy. Although the tropism of VSV is broad, and its envelope glycoprotein G is often used for pseudotyping other viruses, the host cellular components involved in VSV infection remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate that the host protein leucine-rich repeat-containing G protein-coupled receptor 4 (Lgr4) is essential for VSV and VSV-G pseudotyped lentivirus (VSVG-LV) to infect susceptible cells. Accordingly, Lgr4-deficient mice had dramatically decreased VSV levels in the olfactory bulb. Furthermore, Lgr4 knockdown in RAW 264.7 cells also significantly suppressed VSV infection, and Lgr4 overexpression in RAW 264.7 cells enhanced VSV infection. Interestingly, only VSV infection relied on Lgr4, whereas infections with Newcastle disease virus, influenza A virus (A/WSN/33), and herpes simplex virus were unaffected by Lgr4 status. Of note, assays of virus entry, cell ELISA, immunoprecipitation, and surface plasmon resonance indicated that VSV bound susceptible cells via the Lgr4 extracellular domain. Pretreating cells with an Lgr4 antibody, soluble LGR4 extracellular domain, or R-spondin 1 blocked VSV infection by competitively inhibiting VSV binding to Lgr4. Taken together, the identification of Lgr4 as a VSV-specific host factor provides important insights into understanding VSV entry and its pathogenesis and lays the foundation for VSV-based gene therapy and viral oncolytic therapeutics. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Oncolytic efficacy of recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus and myxoma virus in experimental models of rhabdoid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yushui; Lun, Xueqing; Zhou, Hongyuan; Wang, Limei; Sun, Beichen; Bell, John C; Barrett, John W; McFadden, Grant; Biegel, Jaclyn A; Senger, Donna L; Forsyth, Peter A

    2008-02-15

    Rhabdoid tumors are highly aggressive pediatric tumors that are usually refractory to available treatments. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic potential of two oncolytic viruses, myxoma virus (MV) and an attenuated vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV(DeltaM51)), in experimental models of human rhabdoid tumor. Four human rhabdoid tumor cell lines were cultured in vitro and treated with live or inactivated control virus. Cytopathic effect, viral gene expression, infectious viral titers, and cell viability were examined at various time points after infection. To study viral oncolysis in vivo, human rhabdoid tumor cells were implanted s.c. in the hind flank or intracranially in CD-1 nude mice and treated with intratumoral (i.t.) or i.v. injections of live or UV-inactivated virus. Viral distribution and effects on tumor size and survival were assessed. All rhabdoid tumor cell lines tested in vitro were susceptible to productive lethal infections by MV and VSV(DeltaM51). I.t. injection of live MV or VSV(DeltaM51) dramatically reduced the size of s.c. rhabdoid tumor xenografts compared with control animals. I.v. administration of VSV(DeltaM51) or i.t. injection of MV prolonged the median survival of mice with brain xenografts compared with controls (VSV(DeltaM51): 25 days versus 21 days, log-rank test, P = 0.0036; MV: median survival not reached versus 21 days, log-rank test, P = 0.0007). Most of the MV-treated animals (4 of 6; 66.7%) were alive and apparently "cured" when the experiment was arbitrarily ended (>180 days). These results suggest that VSV(DeltaM51) and MV could be novel effective therapies against human rhabdoid tumor.

  8. Oncolytic recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is nonpathogenic and non-transmissible in pigs, a natural host of VSV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is a negative stranded RNA virus that naturally causes disease in agricultural livestock including horses, cattle and pigs. The two main identified VSV strains are the New Jersey (VSNJV) and Indiana (VSIV) strains. VSV is a rapidly replicating, potently immunogenic v...

  9. Evaluation of the Protective Efficacy of Recombinant Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Vectors Against Marburg Hemorrhagic Fever in Nonhuman Primate Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-19

    VSV (Simon, Cardomone et al. 1990), borna disease virus (Formella, Jehle et al. 2000), and Sinbis virus (Karpf, Lenches et al. 1997). The...C., et al. (2000). "Sequence variability of Borna disease virus : resistance to superinfection may contribute to high genome stability in...Marburg virus disease ". S Afr Med J 66(2):50-4 Roberts, A., L. Buonocore, et al. (1999). "Attenuated vesicular stomatitis viruses as vaccine vectors." J

  10. Repeatable population dynamics among vesicular stomatitis virus lineages evolved under high co-infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth S.C.P. Williams

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Parasites and hosts can experience oscillatory cycles, where the densities of these interacting species dynamically fluctuate through time. Viruses with different replication strategies can also interact to produce cyclical dynamics. Frequent cellular co-infection can select for defective-interfering particles (DIPs: cheater viruses with shortened genomes that interfere with intracellular replication of full-length (ordinary viruses. DIPs are positively selected when rare because they out-replicate ordinary viruses during co-infection, but DIPs are negatively selected when common because ordinary viruses become unavailable for intracellular exploitation via cheating. Here we tested whether oscillatory dynamics of ordinary viruses were similar across independently evolved populations of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV. Results showed identical cyclical dynamics across populations in the first 10 experimental passages, which transitioned to repeatable dampened oscillations by passage 20. Genomic analyses revealed parallel molecular substitutions across populations, particularly novel mutations that became dominant by passage 10. Our study showed that oscillatory dynamics and molecular evolution of interacting viruses were highly repeatable in VSV populations passaged under frequent co-infection. Furthermore, our data suggested that frequent co-infection with DIPs caused lowered performance of full-length viruses, by reducing their population densities by orders of magnitude compared to reproduction of ordinary viruses during strictly clonal infections.

  11. Impact of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus M Proteins on Different Cellular Functions.

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    Natalia Redondo

    Full Text Available Three different matrix (M proteins termed M1, M2 and M3 have been described in cells infected with vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV. Individual expression of VSV M proteins induces an evident cytopathic effect including cell rounding and detachment, in addition to a partial inhibition of cellular protein synthesis, likely mediated by an indirect mechanism. Analogous to viroporins, M1 promotes the budding of new virus particles; however, this process does not produce an increase in plasma membrane permeability. In contrast to M1, M2 and M3 neither interact with the cellular membrane nor promote the budding of double membrane vesicles at the cell surface. Nonetheless, all three species of M protein interfere with the transport of cellular mRNAs from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and also modulate the redistribution of the splicing factor. The present findings indicate that all three VSV M proteins share some activities that interfere with host cell functions.

  12. Pathogenesis of experimental vesicular stomatitis virus (New Jersey serotype) infection in the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornish, T E; Stallknecht, D E; Brown, C C; Seal, B S; Howerth, E W

    2001-07-01

    The pathogenesis of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) infection has not been investigated previously in native New World rodents that may have a role in the epidemiology of the disease. In the present study, 45 juvenile and 80 adult deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) were inoculated intranasally with VSV New Jersey serotype (VSV-NJ) and examined sequentially over a 7-day period. Virus was detected by means of immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization in all tissues containing histologic lesions. Viral antigen and mRNA were observed initially in olfactory epithelium neurons, followed by olfactory bulbs and more caudal olfactory pathways in the brain. Virus also was detected throughout the ventricular system in the brain and central canal of the spinal cord. These results support both viral retrograde transneuronal transport and viral spread within the ventricular system. Other tissues containing viral antigen included airway epithelium and macrophages in the lungs, cardiac myocytes, and macrophages in cervical lymph nodes. In a second experiment, 15 adult, 20 juvenile, and 16 nestling deer mice were inoculated intradermally with VSV-NJ. Adults were refractory to infection by this route; however, nestlings and juveniles developed disseminated central nervous system infections. Viral antigen also was detected in cardiac myocytes and lymph node macrophages in these animals. Viremia was detected by virus isolation in 35/72 (49%) intranasally inoculated juvenile and adult mice and in 17/36 (47%) intradermally inoculated nestlings and juveniles from day 1 to day 3 postinoculation. The documentation of viremia in these animals suggests that they may have a role in the epidemiology of vector-borne vesicular stomatitis.

  13. Oncolytic vesicular stomatitis virus expressing interferon-σ has enhanced therapeutic activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Claude Bourgeois-Daigneault

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic viruses are known to stimulate the antitumor immune response by specifically replicating in tumor cells. This is believed to be an important aspect of the durable responses observed in some patients and the field is rapidly moving toward immunotherapy. As a further means to engage the immune system, we engineered a virus, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV, to encode the proinflammatory cytokine interferon-σ. We used the 4T1 mammary adenocarcinoma as well as other murine tumor models to characterize immune responses in tumor-bearing animals generated by treatment with our viruses. The interferon-σ-encoding virus demonstrated greater activation of dendritic cells and drove a more profound secretion of proinflammatory cytokines compared to the parental virus. From a therapeutic point of view, the interferon-σ virus slowed tumor growth, minimized lung tumors, and prolonged survival in several murine tumor models. The improved efficacy was lost in immunocompromized animals; hence the mechanism appears to be T-cell-mediated. Taken together, these results demonstrate the ability of oncolytic viruses to act as immune stimulators to drive antitumor immunity as well as their potential for targeted gene therapy.

  14. Vesicular stomatitis virus as an oncolytic agent against pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Andrea M; Besmer, Dahlia M; Moerdyk-Schauwecker, Megan; Moestl, Natascha; Ornelles, David A; Mukherjee, Pinku; Grdzelishvili, Valery Z

    2012-03-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is a promising oncolytic agent against a variety of cancers. However, it has never been tested in any pancreatic cancer model. Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is the most common and aggressive form of pancreatic cancer. In this study, the oncolytic potentials of several VSV variants were analyzed in a panel of 13 clinically relevant human PDA cell lines and compared to conditionally replicative adenoviruses (CRAds), Sendai virus and respiratory syncytial virus. VSV variants showed oncolytic abilities superior to those of other viruses, and some cell lines that exhibited resistance to other viruses were successfully killed by VSV. However, PDA cells were highly heterogeneous in their susceptibility to virus-induced oncolysis, and several cell lines were resistant to all tested viruses. Resistant cells showed low levels of very early VSV RNA synthesis, indicating possible defects at initial stages of infection. In addition, unlike permissive PDA cell lines, most of the resistant cell lines were able to both produce and respond to interferon, suggesting that intact type I interferon responses contributed to their resistance phenotype. Four cell lines that varied in their permissiveness to VSV-ΔM51 and CRAd dl1520 were tested in mice, and the in vivo results closely mimicked those in vitro. While our results demonstrate that VSV is a promising oncolytic agent against PDA, further studies are needed to better understand the molecular mechanisms of resistance of some PDAs to oncolytic virotherapy.

  15. LDL receptor and its family members serve as the cellular receptors for vesicular stomatitis virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelshtein, Danit; Werman, Ariel; Novick, Daniela; Barak, Sara; Rubinstein, Menachem

    2013-01-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) exhibits a remarkably robust and pantropic infectivity, mediated by its coat protein, VSV-G. Using this property, recombinant forms of VSV and VSV-G-pseudotyped viral vectors are being developed for gene therapy, vaccination, and viral oncolysis and are extensively used for gene transduction in vivo and in vitro. The broad tropism of VSV suggests that it enters cells through a highly ubiquitous receptor, whose identity has so far remained elusive. Here we show that the LDL receptor (LDLR) serves as the major entry port of VSV and of VSV-G-pseudotyped lentiviral vectors in human and mouse cells, whereas other LDLR family members serve as alternative receptors. The widespread expression of LDLR family members accounts for the pantropism of VSV and for the broad applicability of VSV-G-pseudotyped viral vectors for gene transduction. PMID:23589850

  16. Spectrum of Text Information Content in the RNA Sequence of the Vesicular Stomatitis Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filyukov, Alexander A.

    A new strategy to recognize patterns in the DNA sequences with functional significance is proposed. The strategy is based on the general definition of any individual organism as a Gibbsian ensemble of identical personal DNA molecules. This approach provides application of the methods of statistical thermodynamics of irreversible steady processes to genome informatics. The random processes theory and its Markov chains approximation lead in this approach directly to the definition of the generalized concept of evolution entropy and to the genuine measure of text information content in the sequences. Computer-assisted proofs of the existence of the nonequilibrium steady state conditions in genome molecule were obtained by investigation of the special type balance relations in the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) RNA sequence. The main maxima of the text information content were decoded and denominated. The established coding principles are connected with deviations from equilibrium conditions and from equipartition.

  17. Tumor Necrosis Factor-Mediated Survival of CD169+ Cells Promotes Immune Activation during Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shinde, Prashant V; Xu, Haifeng C; Maney, Sathish Kumar

    2018-01-01

    Innate immune activation is essential to mount an effective antiviral response and to prime adaptive immunity. Although a crucial role of CD169(+) cells during vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) infections is increasingly recognized, factors regulating CD169(+) cells during viral infections remain...... defense against viral pathogens. CD169(+) macrophages are shown to activate innate and adaptive immunity via "enforced virus replication" a controlled amplification of virus particles. However, factors regulating the CD169(+) macrophages remain to be studied. In this paper, we show that after Vesicular...... stomatitis virus infection, phagocytes produce tumor necrosis factor (TNF) which signals via TNFR1 and promote "enforced virus replication" in CD169(+) macrophages. Consequently, lack of TNF or TNFR1 resulted in defective immune activation and VSV clearance....

  18. Changes in Susceptibility to Oncolytic Vesicular Stomatitis Virus during Progression of Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Nanmeng; Puckett, Shelby; Antinozzi, Peter A; Cramer, Scott D; Lyles, Douglas S

    2015-05-01

    A major challenge to oncolytic virus therapy is that individual cancers vary in their sensitivity to oncolytic viruses, even when these cancers arise from the same tissue type. Variability in response may arise due to differences in the initial genetic lesions leading to cancer development. Alternatively, susceptibility to viral oncolysis may change during cancer progression. These hypotheses were tested using cells from a transgenic mouse model of prostate cancer infected with vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). Primary cultures from murine cancers derived from prostate-specific Pten deletion contained a mixture of cells that were susceptible and resistant to VSV. Castration-resistant cancers contained a higher percentage of susceptible cells than cancers from noncastrated mice. These results indicate both susceptible and resistant cells can evolve within the same tumor. The role of Pten deletion was further investigated using clonal populations of murine prostate epithelial (MPE) progenitor cells and tumor-derived Pten(-/-) cells. Deletion of Pten in MPE progenitor cells using a lentivirus vector resulted in cells that responded poorly to interferon and were susceptible to VSV infection. In contrast, tumor-derived Pten(-/-) cells expressed higher levels of the antiviral transcription factor STAT1, activated STAT1 in response to VSV, and were resistant to VSV infection. These results suggest that early in tumor development following Pten deletion, cells are primarily sensitive to VSV, but subsequent evolution in tumors leads to development of cells that are resistant to VSV infection. Further evolution in castration-resistant tumors leads to tumors in which cells are primarily sensitive to VSV. There has been a great deal of progress in the development of replication-competent viruses that kill cancer cells (oncolytic viruses). However, a major problem is that individual cancers vary in their sensitivity to oncolytic viruses, even when these cancers arise from the

  19. Structure of the L Protein of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus from Electron Cryomicroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Bo; Li, Zongli; Jenni, Simon; Rahmeh, Amal A; Morin, Benjamin M; Grant, Timothy; Grigorieff, Nikolaus; Harrison, Stephen C; Whelan, Sean P J

    2015-07-16

    The large (L) proteins of non-segmented, negative-strand RNA viruses, a group that includes Ebola and rabies viruses, catalyze RNA-dependent RNA polymerization with viral ribonucleoprotein as template, a non-canonical sequence of capping and methylation reactions, and polyadenylation of viral messages. We have determined by electron cryomicroscopy the structure of the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) L protein. The density map, at a resolution of 3.8 Å, has led to an atomic model for nearly all of the 2109-residue polypeptide chain, which comprises three enzymatic domains (RNA-dependent RNA polymerase [RdRp], polyribonucleotidyl transferase [PRNTase], and methyltransferase) and two structural domains. The RdRp resembles the corresponding enzymatic regions of dsRNA virus polymerases and influenza virus polymerase. A loop from the PRNTase (capping) domain projects into the catalytic site of the RdRp, where it appears to have the role of a priming loop and to couple product elongation to large-scale conformational changes in L. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Structure of the L-protein of vesicular stomatitis virus from electron cryomicroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Bo; Li, Zongli; Jenni, Simon; Rahmeh, Amal A.; Morin, Benjamin M.; Grant, Tim; Grigorieff, Nikolaus; Harrison, Stephen C.; Whelan, Sean P.J.

    2015-01-01

    The large (L) proteins of non-segmented, negative-strand RNA viruses, a group that includes Ebola and rabies viruses, catalyze RNA-dependent RNA polymerization with viral ribonucleoprotein as template, a noncanonical sequence of capping and methylation reactions, and polyadenylation of viral messages. We have determined by electron cryomicroscopy the structure of the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) L protein. The density map, at a resolution of 3.8 Å, has led to an atomic model for nearly all of the 2109-residue polypeptide chain, which comprises three enzymatic domains [RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), polyribonucleotidyl transferase (PRNTase), and methyl transferase] and two structural domains. The RdRp resembles the corresponding enzymatic regions of dsRNA virus polymerases and influenza virus polymerase. A loop from the PRNTase (capping) domain projects into the catalytic site of the RdRp, where it appears to have the role of a priming loop and to couple product elongation to large-scale conformational changes in L. PMID:26144317

  1. Vesicular stomatitis virus as a flexible platform for oncolytic virotherapy against cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastie, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Oncolytic virus (OV) therapy is an emerging anti-cancer approach that utilizes viruses to preferentially infect and kill cancer cells, while not harming healthy cells. Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is a prototypic non-segmented, negative-strand RNA virus with inherent OV qualities. Antiviral responses induced by type I interferon pathways are believed to be impaired in most cancer cells, making them more susceptible to VSV than normal cells. Several other factors make VSV a promising OV candidate for clinical use, including its well-studied biology, a small, easily manipulated genome, relative independence of a receptor or cell cycle, cytoplasmic replication without risk of host-cell transformation, and lack of pre-existing immunity in humans. Moreover, various VSV-based recombinant viruses have been engineered via reverse genetics to improve oncoselectivity, safety, oncotoxicity and stimulation of tumour-specific immunity. Alternative delivery methods are also being studied to minimize premature immune clearance of VSV. OV treatment as a monotherapy is being explored, although many studies have employed VSV in combination with radiotherapy, chemotherapy or other OVs. Preclinical studies with various cancers have demonstrated that VSV is a promising OV; as a result, a human clinical trial using VSV is currently in progress. PMID:23052398

  2. [Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) as a vaccine vector for immunization against viral infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomczyk, Tomasz; Orzechowska, Beata

    2013-01-11

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), a member of the Rhabdoviridae family, is a promising candidate for potential use in construction of antiviral vaccines. In the natural environment VSV is a pathogen of wild ungulates and livestock. Some of the features that make VSV an excellent platform for the development of a range of viral therapeutics includes its immunogenicity and ability to grow to high titers in cell lines approved for vaccine use. Infection in humans is rare and usually asymptomatic, with mild flu-like symptoms. Moreover, due to affinity of VSV envelope glycoprotein to the LDL (low-density lipoprotein) receptor, VSV is effective at targeting a variety of tissues in vivo. A series of research results confirm the possibility of developing VSV-based vaccines against human papilloma viruses (HPV), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV) and filoviruses (MARV, ZEBOV and SEBOV), as well as the potential use of a successfully developed vaccine against hepatitis C virus (HCV). VSV is neurotropic and infection can cause a viral encephalitis in experimental animals. Therefore, intensive studies are being undertaken to achieve satisfactory expression of the viral antigens while maintaining the safety of the constructed vectors.

  3. Recent advances in vesicular stomatitis virus-based oncolytic virotherapy: a 5-year update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felt, Sébastien A; Grdzelishvili, Valery Z

    2017-11-16

    Oncolytic virus (OV) therapy is an anti-cancer approach that uses viruses that preferentially infect, replicate in and kill cancer cells. Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV, a rhabdovirus) is an OV that is currently being tested in the USA in several phase I clinical trials against different malignancies. Several factors make VSV a promising OV: lack of pre-existing human immunity against VSV, a small and easy to manipulate genome, cytoplasmic replication without risk of host cell transformation, independence of cell cycle and rapid growth to high titres in a broad range of cell lines facilitating large-scale virus production. While significant advances have been made in VSV-based OV therapy, room for improvement remains. Here we review recent studies (published in the last 5 years) that address 'old' and 'new' challenges of VSV-based OV therapy. These studies focused on improving VSV safety, oncoselectivity and oncotoxicity; breaking resistance of some cancers to VSV; preventing premature clearance of VSV; and stimulating tumour-specific immunity. Many of these approaches were based on combining VSV with other therapeutics. This review also discusses another rhabdovirus closely related to VSV, Maraba virus, which is currently being tested in Canada in phase I/II clinical trials.

  4. Genetic Inactivation of COPI Coatomer Separately Inhibits Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Entry and Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdeinick-Kerr, Rebeca

    2012-01-01

    Viruses coopt cellular membrane transport to invade cells, establish intracellular sites of replication, and release progeny virions. Recent genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi) screens revealed that genetically divergent viruses require biosynthetic membrane transport by the COPI coatomer complex for efficient replication. Here we found that disrupting COPI function by RNAi inhibited an early stage of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) replication. To dissect which replication stage(s) was affected by coatomer inactivation, we used visual and biochemical assays to independently measure the efficiency of viral entry and gene expression in hamster (ldlF) cells depleted of the temperature-sensitive ε-COP subunit. We show that ε-COP depletion for 12 h caused a primary block to virus internalization and a secondary defect in viral gene expression. Using brefeldin A (BFA), a chemical inhibitor of COPI function, we demonstrate that short-term (1-h) BFA treatments inhibit VSV gene expression, while only long-term (12-h) treatments block virus entry. We conclude that prolonged coatomer inactivation perturbs cellular endocytic transport and thereby indirectly impairs VSV entry. Our results offer an explanation of why COPI coatomer is frequently identified in screens for cellular factors that support cell invasion by microbial pathogens. PMID:22072764

  5. N-Myc expression enhances the oncolytic effects of vesicular stomatitis virus in human neuroblastoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan C Corredor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available N-myc oncogene amplification is associated but not present in all cases of high-risk neuroblastoma (NB. Since oncogene expression could often modulate sensitivity to oncolytic viruses, we wanted to examine if N-myc expression status would determine virotherapy efficacy to high-risk NB. We showed that induction of exogenous N-myc in a non-N-myc-amplified cell line background (TET-21N increased susceptibility to oncolytic vesicular stomatitis virus (mutant VSVδM51 and alleviated the type I IFN-induced antiviral state. Cells with basal N-myc, on the other hand, were less susceptible to virus-induced oncolysis and established a robust IFN-mediated antiviral state. The same effects were also observed in NB cell lines with and without N-myc amplification. Microarray analysis showed that N-myc overexpression in TET-21N cells downregulated IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs with known antiviral functions. Furthermore, virus infection caused significant changes in global gene expression in TET-21N cells overexpressing N-myc. Such changes involved ISGs with various functions. Therefore, the present study showed that augmented susceptibility to VSVδM51 by N-myc at least involves downregulation of ISGs with antiviral functions and alleviation of the IFN-stimulated antiviral state. Our studies suggest the potential utility of N-myc amplification/overexpression as a predictive biomarker of virotherapy response for high-risk NB using IFN-sensitive oncolytic viruses.

  6. Vesicular stomatitis virus as a flexible platform for oncolytic virotherapy against cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastie, Eric; Grdzelishvili, Valery Z

    2012-12-01

    Oncolytic virus (OV) therapy is an emerging anti-cancer approach that utilizes viruses to preferentially infect and kill cancer cells, while not harming healthy cells. Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is a prototypic non-segmented, negative-strand RNA virus with inherent OV qualities. Antiviral responses induced by type I interferon pathways are believed to be impaired in most cancer cells, making them more susceptible to VSV than normal cells. Several other factors make VSV a promising OV candidate for clinical use, including its well-studied biology, a small, easily manipulated genome, relative independence of a receptor or cell cycle, cytoplasmic replication without risk of host-cell transformation, and lack of pre-existing immunity in humans. Moreover, various VSV-based recombinant viruses have been engineered via reverse genetics to improve oncoselectivity, safety, oncotoxicity and stimulation of tumour-specific immunity. Alternative delivery methods are also being studied to minimize premature immune clearance of VSV. OV treatment as a monotherapy is being explored, although many studies have employed VSV in combination with radiotherapy, chemotherapy or other OVs. Preclinical studies with various cancers have demonstrated that VSV is a promising OV; as a result, a human clinical trial using VSV is currently in progress.

  7. Induction of apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells by vesicular stomatitis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felt, Sébastien A; Moerdyk-Schauwecker, Megan J; Grdzelishvili, Valery Z

    2015-01-01

    Effective oncolytic virus (OV) therapy is dependent on the ability of replication-competent viruses to kill infected cancer cells. We previously showed that human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cell lines are highly heterogeneous in their permissiveness to vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), in part due to differences in type I interferon (IFN) signaling. Here, using 10 human PDAC cell lines and three different VSV recombinants (expressing ΔM51 or wild type matrix protein), we examined cellular and viral factors affecting VSV-mediated apoptosis activation in PDACs. In most cell lines, VSVs activated both extrinsic and intrinsic apoptosis pathways, and VSV-ΔM51 primarily activated the type II extrinsic pathway. In cells with defective IFN signaling, all VSV recombinants induced robust apoptosis, whereas VSV-ΔM51 was a more effective apoptosis activator in PDACs with virus-inducible IFN signaling. Three cell lines constitutively expressing high levels of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) were resistant to apoptosis under most experimental conditions, even when VSV replication levels were dramatically increased by Jak inhibitor I treatment. Two of these cell lines also poorly activated apoptosis when treated with Fas activating antibody, suggesting a general defect in apoptosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Characteristics of oncolytic vesicular stomatitis virus displaying tumor-targeting ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammayappan, Arun; Peng, Kah-Whye; Russell, Stephen J

    2013-12-01

    We sought proof of principle that tumor-targeting ligands can be displayed on the surface of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) by engineering its glycoprotein. Here, we successfully rescued VSVs displaying tumor vasculature-targeting ligands. By using a rational approach, we investigated various feasible insertion sites on the G protein of VSV (VSV-G) for display of tumor vasculature-targeting ligands, cyclic RGD (cRGD) and echistatin. We found seven sites on VSV-G that tolerated insertion of the 9-residue cRGD peptide, two of which could tolerate insertion of the 49-amino acid echistatin domain. All of the ligand-displaying viruses replicated as well as the parental virus. In vitro studies demonstrated that the VSV-echistatin viruses specifically bound to targeted integrins. Since the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) was recently identified as a major receptor for VSV, we investigated the entry of ligand-displaying viruses after masking LDLR. The experiment showed that the modified viruses can enter the cell independently of LDLR, whereas entry of unmodified virus is significantly blocked by a specific monoclonal antibody against LDLR. Both parental and ligand-displaying viruses displayed equal oncolytic efficacies in a syngeneic mouse myeloma model. We further demonstrated that single-chain antibody fragments against tumor-specific antigens can be inserted at the N terminus of the G protein and that corresponding replication-competent VSVs can be rescued efficiently. Overall, we demonstrated that functional tumor-targeting ligands can be displayed on replication-competent VSVs without perturbing viral growth and oncolytic efficacy. This study provides a rational foundation for the future development of fully retargeted oncolytic VSVs.

  9. Antibodies against vesicular stomatitis virus in horses from southern, midwestern and northeastern Brazilian States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinícius Leobet Lunkes

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV is the agent of a vesicular disease that affects many animal species and may be clinically confounded with foot-and-mouth disease in ruminant and swine. Horses are especially susceptible to VSV and may serve as sentinels for virus circulation. The present study investigated the presence of neutralizing antibodies against VSV Indiana III (VSIV-3 in serum samples of 3,626 horses from six states in three Brazilian regions: Southern (RS, n = 1,011, Midwest (GO/DF, n = 1,767 and Northeast (PB, PE, RN and CE, n = 848 collected between 2013 and 2014. Neutralizing antibodies against VSIV-3 (titers ≥40 were detected in 641 samples (positivity of 17.7%; CI95%:16.5-19.0%, being 317 samples from CE (87.3%; CI95%: 83.4-90.5 %; 109 from RN (65.7%; CI95%: 57.8 -72.7%; 124 from PB (45.4%; CI95%: 39.4-51.5%; 78 from GO/DF (4.4%; CI95%: 3.5-5.5% and nine samples of RS (0.9%; CI95%: 0.4-1.7%. Several samples from the Northeast and Midwest harbored high neutralizing titers, indicating a recent exposure to the virus. In contrast, samples from RS had low titers, possibly due to a past remote exposure. Several positive samples presented neutralizing activity against other VSV serotypes (Indiana I and New Jersey, yet in lower titers, indicating the specificity of the response to VSIV-3. These results demonstrated a relatively recent circulation of VSIV-3 in northeastern Brazilian States, confirming clinical findings and demonstrating the sanitary importance of this infection.

  10. Vesicular stomatitis virus polymerase's strong affinity to its template suggests exotic transcription models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolin Tang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV is the prototype for negative sense non segmented (NNS RNA viruses which include potent human and animal pathogens such as Rabies, Ebola and measles. The polymerases of NNS RNA viruses only initiate transcription at or near the 3' end of their genome template. We measured the dissociation constant of VSV polymerases from their whole genome template to be 20 pM. Given this low dissociation constant, initiation and sustainability of transcription becomes nontrivial. To explore possible mechanisms, we simulated the first hour of transcription using Monte Carlo methods and show that a one-time initial dissociation of all polymerases during entry is not sufficient to sustain transcription. We further show that efficient transcription requires a sliding mechanism for non-transcribing polymerases and can be realized with different polymerase-polymerase interactions and distinct template topologies. In conclusion, we highlight a model in which collisions between transcribing and sliding non-transcribing polymerases result in release of the non-transcribing polymerases allowing for redistribution of polymerases between separate templates during transcription and suggest specific experiments to further test these mechanisms.

  11. Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Variants Selectively Infect and Kill Human Melanomas but Not Normal Melanocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollmann, Guido; Davis, John N.; Bosenberg, Marcus W.

    2013-01-01

    Metastatic malignant melanoma remains one of the most therapeutically challenging forms of cancer. Here we test replication-competent vesicular stomatitis viruses (VSV) on 19 primary human melanoma samples and compare these infections with those of normal human melanocyte control cells. Even at a low viral concentration, we found a strong susceptibility to viral oncolysis in over 70% of melanomas. In contrast, melanocytes displayed strong resistance to virus infection and showed complete protection by interferon. Several recombinant VSVs were compared, and all infected and killed most melanomas with differences in the time course with increasing rates of melanoma infection, as follows: VSV-CT9-M51 VSV-M51 VSV-G/GFP VSV-rp30. VSV-rp30 sequencing revealed 2 nonsynonymous mutations at codon positions P126 and L223, both of which appear to be required for the enhanced phenotype. VSV-rp30 showed effective targeting and infection of multiple subcutaneous and intracranial melanoma xenografts in SCID mice after tail vein virus application. Sequence analysis of mutations in the melanomas used revealed that BRAF but not NRAS gene mutation status was predictive for enhanced susceptibility to infection. In mouse melanoma models with specific induced gene mutations including mutations of the Braf, Pten, and Cdkn2a genes, viral infection correlated with the extent of malignant transformation. Similar to human melanocytes, mouse melanocytes resisted VSV-rp30 infection. This study confirms the general susceptibility of the majority of human melanoma types for VSV-mediated oncolysis. PMID:23552414

  12. Vesicular stomatitis virus variants selectively infect and kill human melanomas but not normal melanocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollmann, Guido; Davis, John N; Bosenberg, Marcus W; van den Pol, Anthony N

    2013-06-01

    Metastatic malignant melanoma remains one of the most therapeutically challenging forms of cancer. Here we test replication-competent vesicular stomatitis viruses (VSV) on 19 primary human melanoma samples and compare these infections with those of normal human melanocyte control cells. Even at a low viral concentration, we found a strong susceptibility to viral oncolysis in over 70% of melanomas. In contrast, melanocytes displayed strong resistance to virus infection and showed complete protection by interferon. Several recombinant VSVs were compared, and all infected and killed most melanomas with differences in the time course with increasing rates of melanoma infection, as follows: VSV-CT9-M51 VSV-M51 VSV-G/GFP VSV-rp30. VSV-rp30 sequencing revealed 2 nonsynonymous mutations at codon positions P126 and L223, both of which appear to be required for the enhanced phenotype. VSV-rp30 showed effective targeting and infection of multiple subcutaneous and intracranial melanoma xenografts in SCID mice after tail vein virus application. Sequence analysis of mutations in the melanomas used revealed that BRAF but not NRAS gene mutation status was predictive for enhanced susceptibility to infection. In mouse melanoma models with specific induced gene mutations including mutations of the Braf, Pten, and Cdkn2a genes, viral infection correlated with the extent of malignant transformation. Similar to human melanocytes, mouse melanocytes resisted VSV-rp30 infection. This study confirms the general susceptibility of the majority of human melanoma types for VSV-mediated oncolysis.

  13. Preimplantation bovine embryos: Pathobiology of Haemophilus somnus exposure and resistance mechanisms to vesicular stomatitis virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomson, M.S.

    1988-01-01

    Preimplantation bovine embryos were exposed in vitro to H. somnus to determine if the bacteria would adhere to zona pellucida-intact (ZP-I) embryos or adhere to or infect ZP-free embryos. The effect of H. somnus on embryonic development in vitro was also investigated. Electrophoretic comparisons of outer membrane proteins of H. somnus revealed 2 major protein bands common to 10 H. somnus isolates. A monoclonal antibody produced against the outer membrane proteins reacted to one of the major protein bands. The sensitivity of a nucleic acid probe for detection of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) was validated in cells in culture and used to determine if the synthetic double-stranded complex of polyriboinosinic and polyribocytidylic acids (poly I:C) would induce viral resistance in cultured bovine embryos. Two {sup 32}P-nick translated probes of high specific activity prepared from plasmids containing nucleic acid sequences of VSV virus were employed for viral mRNA detection in the tissue culture cells using a DNA-hybridization dot-blot technique. Using one of the probes, the technique was applied to detect differences in viral replication between four groups of bovine embryos (nonexposed, exposed to VSV virus, poly I:C-treated, and poly I:C-treated and exposed to VSV). The nucleic acid probe was sufficiently sensitive to detect differences in quantities of VSV mRNA among embryo treatment groups, resulting in the demonstration that resistance to viral infection was induced in day 9 bovine embryos.

  14. Vesicular stomatitis virus enables gene transfer and transsynaptic tracing in a wide range of organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundell, Nathan A.; Beier, Kevin T.; Pan, Y. Albert; Lapan, Sylvain W.; Göz Aytürk, Didem; Berezovskii, Vladimir K.; Wark, Abigail R.; Drokhlyansky, Eugene; Bielecki, Jan; Born, Richard T.; Schier, Alexander F.

    2015-01-01

    Current limitations in technology have prevented an extensive analysis of the connections among neurons, particularly within nonmammalian organisms. We developed a transsynaptic viral tracer originally for use in mice, and then tested its utility in a broader range of organisms. By engineering the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) to encode a fluorophore and either the rabies virus glycoprotein (RABV‐G) or its own glycoprotein (VSV‐G), we created viruses that can transsynaptically label neuronal circuits in either the retrograde or anterograde direction, respectively. The vectors were investigated for their utility as polysynaptic tracers of chicken and zebrafish visual pathways. They showed patterns of connectivity consistent with previously characterized visual system connections, and revealed several potentially novel connections. Further, these vectors were shown to infect neurons in several other vertebrates, including Old and New World monkeys, seahorses, axolotls, and Xenopus. They were also shown to infect two invertebrates, Drosophila melanogaster, and the box jellyfish, Tripedalia cystophora, a species previously intractable for gene transfer, although no clear evidence of transsynaptic spread was observed in these species. These vectors provide a starting point for transsynaptic tracing in most vertebrates, and are also excellent candidates for gene transfer in organisms that have been refractory to other methods. J. Comp. Neurol. 523:1639–1663, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25688551

  15. Triptolide-mediated inhibition of interferon signaling enhances vesicular stomatitis virus-based oncolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Yebdri, Fethia; Van Grevenynghe, Julien; Tang, Vera A; Goulet, Marie-Line; Wu, Jian Hui; Stojdl, David F; Hiscott, John; Lin, Rongtuan

    2013-11-01

    Preclinical and clinical trials demonstrated that use of oncolytic viruses (OVs) is a promising new therapeutic approach to treat multiple types of cancer. To further improve their viral oncolysis, experimental strategies are now combining OVs with different cytotoxic compounds. In this study, we investigated the capacity of triptolide - a natural anticancer molecule - to enhance vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) oncolysis in OV-resistant cancer cells. Triptolide treatment increased VSV replication in the human prostate cancer cell line PC3 and in other VSV-resistant cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistically, triptolide (TPL) inhibited the innate antiviral response by blocking type I interferon (IFN) signaling, downstream of IRF3 activation. Furthermore, triptolide-enhanced VSV-induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent fashion in VSV-resistant cells, as measured by annexin-V, cleaved caspase-3, and B-cell lymphoma 2 staining. In vivo, using the TSA mammary adenocarcinoma and PC3 mouse xenograft models, combination treatment with VSV and triptolide delayed tumor growth and prolonged survival of tumor-bearing animals by enhancing viral replication. Together, these results demonstrate that triptolide inhibition of IFN production sensitizes prostate cancer cells to VSV replication and virus-mediated apoptosis.

  16. Recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus vaccine vectors expressing filovirus glycoproteins lack neurovirulence in nonhuman primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad E Mire

    Full Text Available The filoviruses, Marburg virus and Ebola virus, cause severe hemorrhagic fever with high mortality in humans and nonhuman primates. Among the most promising filovirus vaccines under development is a system based on recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (rVSV that expresses an individual filovirus glycoprotein (GP in place of the VSV glycoprotein (G. The main concern with all replication-competent vaccines, including the rVSV filovirus GP vectors, is their safety. To address this concern, we performed a neurovirulence study using 21 cynomolgus macaques where the vaccines were administered intrathalamically. Seven animals received a rVSV vector expressing the Zaire ebolavirus (ZEBOV GP; seven animals received a rVSV vector expressing the Lake Victoria marburgvirus (MARV GP; three animals received rVSV-wild type (wt vector, and four animals received vehicle control. Two of three animals given rVSV-wt showed severe neurological symptoms whereas animals receiving vehicle control, rVSV-ZEBOV-GP, or rVSV-MARV-GP did not develop these symptoms. Histological analysis revealed major lesions in neural tissues of all three rVSV-wt animals; however, no significant lesions were observed in any animals from the filovirus vaccine or vehicle control groups. These data strongly suggest that rVSV filovirus GP vaccine vectors lack the neurovirulence properties associated with the rVSV-wt parent vector and support their further development as a vaccine platform for human use.

  17. Highly Attenuated Recombinant Vesicular Stomatitis Virus VSV-12′GFP Displays Immunogenic and Oncolytic Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, John N.

    2013-01-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) has shown considerable promise both as an immunization vector and as an oncolytic virus. In both applications, an important concern is the safety profile of the virus. To generate a highly attenuated virus, we added two reporter genes to the 3′ end of the VSV genome, thereby shifting the NPMGL genes from positions 1 to 5 to positions 3 to 7. The resulting virus (VSV-12′GFP) was highly attenuated, generating smaller plaques than four other attenuated VSVs. In one-step growth curves, VSV-12′GFP displayed the slowest growth kinetics. The mechanism of attenuation appears to be due to reduced expression of VSV genes downstream of the reporter genes, as suggested by a 10.4-fold reduction in L-protein RNA transcript. Although attenuated, VSV-12′GFP was highly effective at generating an immune response, indicated by a high-titer antibody response against the green fluorescent protein (GFP) expressed by the virus. Although VSV-12′GFP was more attenuated than other VSVs on both normal and cancer cells, it nonetheless showed a greater level of infection of human cancer cells (glioma and melanoma) than of normal cells, and this effect was magnified in glioma by interferon application, indicating selective oncolysis. Intravenous VSV-12′GFP selectively infected human gliomas implanted into SCID mice subcutaneously or intracranially. All postnatal day 16 mice given intranasal VSV-12′GFP survived, whereas only 10% of those given VSV-G/GFP survived, indicating reduced neurotoxicity. Intratumoral injection of tumors with VSV-12′GFP dramatically suppressed tumor growth and enhanced survival. Together these data suggest this recombinant virus merits further study for its oncolytic and vaccine potential. PMID:23135719

  18. Enhanced immunosurveillance for animal morbilliviruses using vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) pseudotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Nicola; Dundon, William G; Diallo, Adama; Baron, Michael D; James Nyarobi, M; Cleaveland, Sarah; Keyyu, Julius; Fyumagwa, Robert; Hosie, Margaret J; Willett, Brian J

    2016-11-11

    The measurement of virus-specific neutralising antibodies represents the "gold-standard" for diagnostic serology. For animal morbilliviruses, such as peste des petits ruminants (PPRV) or rinderpest virus (RPV), live virus-based neutralisation tests require high-level biocontainment to prevent the accidental escape of the infectious agents. In this study, we describe the adaptation of a replication-defective vesicular stomatitis virus (VSVΔG) based pseudotyping system for the measurement of neutralising antibodies against animal morbilliviruses. By expressing the haemagglutinin (H) and fusion (F) proteins of PPRV on VSVΔG pseudotypes bearing a luciferase marker gene, neutralising antibody titres could be measured rapidly and with high sensitivity. Serological responses against the four distinct lineages of PPRV could be measured simultaneously and cross-neutralising responses against other morbilliviruses compared. Using this approach, we observed that titres of neutralising antibodies induced by vaccination with live attenuated PPRV were lower than those induced by wild type virus infection and the level of cross-lineage neutralisation varied between vaccinates. By comparing neutralising responses from animals infected with either PPRV or RPV, we found that responses were highest against the homologous virus, indicating that retrospective analyses of serum samples could be used to confirm the nature of the original pathogen to which an animal had been exposed. Accordingly, when screening sera from domestic livestock and wild ruminants in Tanzania, we detected evidence of cross-species infection with PPRV, canine distemper virus (CDV) and a RPV-related bovine morbillivirus, suggesting that exposure to animal morbilliviruses may be more widespread than indicated previously using existing diagnostic techniques. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Highly attenuated recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus VSV-12'GFP displays immunogenic and oncolytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Pol, Anthony N; Davis, John N

    2013-01-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) has shown considerable promise both as an immunization vector and as an oncolytic virus. In both applications, an important concern is the safety profile of the virus. To generate a highly attenuated virus, we added two reporter genes to the 3' end of the VSV genome, thereby shifting the NPMGL genes from positions 1 to 5 to positions 3 to 7. The resulting virus (VSV-12'GFP) was highly attenuated, generating smaller plaques than four other attenuated VSVs. In one-step growth curves, VSV-12'GFP displayed the slowest growth kinetics. The mechanism of attenuation appears to be due to reduced expression of VSV genes downstream of the reporter genes, as suggested by a 10.4-fold reduction in L-protein RNA transcript. Although attenuated, VSV-12'GFP was highly effective at generating an immune response, indicated by a high-titer antibody response against the green fluorescent protein (GFP) expressed by the virus. Although VSV-12'GFP was more attenuated than other VSVs on both normal and cancer cells, it nonetheless showed a greater level of infection of human cancer cells (glioma and melanoma) than of normal cells, and this effect was magnified in glioma by interferon application, indicating selective oncolysis. Intravenous VSV-12'GFP selectively infected human gliomas implanted into SCID mice subcutaneously or intracranially. All postnatal day 16 mice given intranasal VSV-12'GFP survived, whereas only 10% of those given VSV-G/GFP survived, indicating reduced neurotoxicity. Intratumoral injection of tumors with VSV-12'GFP dramatically suppressed tumor growth and enhanced survival. Together these data suggest this recombinant virus merits further study for its oncolytic and vaccine potential.

  20. Trojan horse lymphocytes: a vesicular stomatitis virus-specific T-cell clone lyses target cells by carrying virus.

    OpenAIRE

    Hom, R C; Soman, G; Finberg, R

    1989-01-01

    We have isolated a vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-specific CD4+ CD8- murine T-cell clone. This clone proliferates only in response to VSV and lyses infected tumor cells bearing class II major histocompatibility antigens in short-term chromium release assays. In addition, the cell has VSV antigens on its surface and is capable of killing uninfected tumor cells without major histocompatibility antigen restriction in a 2-day assay. This latter cytolytic activity is eliminated by anti-VSV antib...

  1. In Vitro and In Vivo Attenuation of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV) by Phosphoprotein Deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongthida, Phonphimon; Jengarn, Juggragarn; Narkpuk, Jaraspim; Koonyosying, Pongpisid; Srisutthisamphan, Kanjana; Wanitchang, Asawin; Leaungwutiwong, Pornsawan; Teeravechyan, Samaporn; Jongkaewwattana, Anan

    2016-01-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is highly immunogenic and able to stimulate both innate and adaptive immune responses. However, its ability to induce adverse effects has held back the use of VSV as a potential vaccine vector. In this study we developed VSV-ΔP, a safe yet potent replication-defective recombinant VSV in which the phosphoprotein (P) gene was deleted. VSV-ΔP replicated only in supporting cells expressing P (BHK-P cells) and at levels more than 2 logs lower than VSV. In vivo studies indicated that the moderate replication of VSV-ΔP in vitro was associated with the attenuation of this virus in the mouse model, whereas mice intracranially injected with VSV succumbed to neurotoxicity. Furthermore, we constructed VSV and VSV-ΔP expressing a variety of antigens including hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) from Newcastle disease virus (NDV), hemagglutinin (HA) from either a 2009 H1N1 pandemic influenza virus (pdm/09) or the avian H7N9. VSV and VSV-ΔP incorporated the foreign antigens on their surface resulting in induction of robust neutralizing antibody, serum IgG, and hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) titers against their corresponding viruses. These results indicated that VSV with P gene deletion was attenuated in vitro and in vivo, and possibly expressed the foreign antigen on its surface. Therefore, the P gene-deletion strategy may offer a potentially useful and safer approach for attenuating negative-sense RNA viruses which use phosphoprotein as a cofactor for viral replication.

  2. In Vitro and In Vivo Attenuation of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV by Phosphoprotein Deletion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phonphimon Wongthida

    Full Text Available Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV is highly immunogenic and able to stimulate both innate and adaptive immune responses. However, its ability to induce adverse effects has held back the use of VSV as a potential vaccine vector. In this study we developed VSV-ΔP, a safe yet potent replication-defective recombinant VSV in which the phosphoprotein (P gene was deleted. VSV-ΔP replicated only in supporting cells expressing P (BHK-P cells and at levels more than 2 logs lower than VSV. In vivo studies indicated that the moderate replication of VSV-ΔP in vitro was associated with the attenuation of this virus in the mouse model, whereas mice intracranially injected with VSV succumbed to neurotoxicity. Furthermore, we constructed VSV and VSV-ΔP expressing a variety of antigens including hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN from Newcastle disease virus (NDV, hemagglutinin (HA from either a 2009 H1N1 pandemic influenza virus (pdm/09 or the avian H7N9. VSV and VSV-ΔP incorporated the foreign antigens on their surface resulting in induction of robust neutralizing antibody, serum IgG, and hemagglutination inhibition (HAI titers against their corresponding viruses. These results indicated that VSV with P gene deletion was attenuated in vitro and in vivo, and possibly expressed the foreign antigen on its surface. Therefore, the P gene-deletion strategy may offer a potentially useful and safer approach for attenuating negative-sense RNA viruses which use phosphoprotein as a cofactor for viral replication.

  3. Cellular proteins associated with the interior and exterior of vesicular stomatitis virus virions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moerdyk-Schauwecker, Megan; Hwang, Sun-Il; Grdzelishvili, Valery Z

    2014-01-01

    Virus particles (virions) often contain not only virus-encoded but also host-encoded proteins. Some of these host proteins are enclosed within the virion structure, while others, in the case of enveloped viruses, are embedded in the host-derived membrane. While many of these host protein incorporations are likely accidental, some may play a role in virus infectivity, replication and/or immunoreactivity in the next host. Host protein incorporations may be especially important in therapeutic applications where large numbers of virus particles are administered. Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is the prototypic rhabdovirus and a candidate vaccine, gene therapy and oncolytic vector. Using mass spectrometry, we previously examined cell type dependent host protein content of VSV virions using intact ("whole") virions purified from three cell lines originating from different species. Here we aimed to determine the localization of host proteins within the VSV virions by analyzing: i) whole VSV virions; and ii) whole VSV virions treated with Proteinase K to remove all proteins outside the viral envelope. A total of 257 proteins were identified, with 181 identified in whole virions and 183 identified in Proteinase K treated virions. Most of these proteins have not been previously shown to be associated with VSV. Functional enrichment analysis indicated the most overrepresented categories were proteins associated with vesicles, vesicle-mediated transport and protein localization. Using western blotting, the presence of several host proteins, including some not previously shown in association with VSV (such as Yes1, Prl1 and Ddx3y), was confirmed and their relative quantities in various virion fractions determined. Our study provides a valuable inventory of virion-associated host proteins for further investigation of their roles in the replication cycle, pathogenesis and immunoreactivity of VSV.

  4. Cellular proteins associated with the interior and exterior of vesicular stomatitis virus virions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Moerdyk-Schauwecker

    Full Text Available Virus particles (virions often contain not only virus-encoded but also host-encoded proteins. Some of these host proteins are enclosed within the virion structure, while others, in the case of enveloped viruses, are embedded in the host-derived membrane. While many of these host protein incorporations are likely accidental, some may play a role in virus infectivity, replication and/or immunoreactivity in the next host. Host protein incorporations may be especially important in therapeutic applications where large numbers of virus particles are administered. Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV is the prototypic rhabdovirus and a candidate vaccine, gene therapy and oncolytic vector. Using mass spectrometry, we previously examined cell type dependent host protein content of VSV virions using intact ("whole" virions purified from three cell lines originating from different species. Here we aimed to determine the localization of host proteins within the VSV virions by analyzing: i whole VSV virions; and ii whole VSV virions treated with Proteinase K to remove all proteins outside the viral envelope. A total of 257 proteins were identified, with 181 identified in whole virions and 183 identified in Proteinase K treated virions. Most of these proteins have not been previously shown to be associated with VSV. Functional enrichment analysis indicated the most overrepresented categories were proteins associated with vesicles, vesicle-mediated transport and protein localization. Using western blotting, the presence of several host proteins, including some not previously shown in association with VSV (such as Yes1, Prl1 and Ddx3y, was confirmed and their relative quantities in various virion fractions determined. Our study provides a valuable inventory of virion-associated host proteins for further investigation of their roles in the replication cycle, pathogenesis and immunoreactivity of VSV.

  5. Inducible vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) L cell line for packaging of recombinant VSV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seong-Karp; Jung, Yong-Tae; Park, Seung-Won; Paik, Soon-Young

    2005-10-01

    Recently, recombinant vesicular stomatitis viruses (VSV) have been developed as high-level expression vectors which serve as effective vaccine vectors in animals. An ideal approach for VSV vector production would be the development of stable packaging cell lines that can produce vector particles without transfection step. In this report, we describe generation of an inducible cell line that expresses the VSV polymerase gene (L) under the control of the reverse tetracycline-controlled transactivator (rtTA) system as a first step to make VSV-based packaging cell lines. Integrated polymerase (L) gene was controlled by an rtetR-dependent promoter in the rtTA-producing BHK cell line. When the cell lines were cultured in the presence of tet (tetracycline) or tetracycline derivative doxycycline, the recombinant VSV and wild type VSV were replicated, whereas in the absence of tet or tetracycline derivative doxycycline, the recombinant VSV was not replicated. Viral supernatants were harvested, diluted, and monitored by plaque assay for the presence of infectious VSV. Plaques of VSV containing an additional sequence encoding the EGFP protein allowed rapid detection of infection. Our results suggest wide applications of other surrogate viruses based on VSV. The availability of stable packaging cell lines represents a step toward the use of a VSV vector delivery system that can allow scale-up production of vector-stocks for gene therapy.

  6. Different effect of proteasome inhibition on vesicular stomatitis virus and poliovirus replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nickolay Neznanov

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Proteasome activity is an important part of viral replication. In this study, we examined the effect of proteasome inhibitors on the replication of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV and poliovirus. We found that the proteasome inhibitors significantly suppressed VSV protein synthesis, virus accumulation, and protected infected cells from toxic effect of VSV replication. In contrast, poliovirus replication was delayed, but not diminished in the presence of the proteasome inhibitors MG132 and Bortezomib. We also found that inhibition of proteasomes stimulated stress-related processes, such as accumulation of chaperone hsp70, phosphorylation of eIF2alpha, and overall inhibition of translation. VSV replication was sensitive to this stress with significant decline in replication process. Poliovirus growth was less sensitive with only delay in replication. Inhibition of proteasome activity suppressed cellular and VSV protein synthesis, but did not reduce poliovirus protein synthesis. Protein kinase GCN2 supported the ability of proteasome inhibitors to attenuate general translation and to suppress VSV replication. We propose that different mechanisms of translational initiation by VSV and poliovirus determine their sensitivity to stress induced by the inhibition of proteasomes. To our knowledge, this is the first study that connects the effect of stress induced by proteasome inhibition with the efficiency of viral infection.

  7. Fabrication of Photofunctional Nanoporous Membrane and Its Photoinactivation Effect of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang-Kyun Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fabrication and photophysical study of photofunctional nanoporous alumina membrane (PNAM were performed, and its application of photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT was investigated. Nanoporous alumina membrane (NAM was fabricated by two-step aluminium anodic oxidation process. Surface of the fabricated NAM was modified with organo-silane agent to induce covalent bonding between NAM and a photosensitizer (PtCP: [5,10,15-triphenyl-20-(4-methoxycarbonylphenyl-porphyrin] platinum. PtCP was covalently bonded to the surface of the modified NAM by nucleophilic acyl substitution reaction process. The morphology and the photophysical properties of the fabricated PNAM were confirmed with field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM, steady-state spectroscopies, and nanosecond laser-induced time-resolved spectroscopy. For the efficacy study of PNAM in PACT, an enveloped animal virus, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV, was utilized as a target organism. Antiviral effect of the PNAM-PACT was measured by the extent of suppression of plaque-forming units (PFU after the light irradiation. In the cultures inoculated with PACT-treated VSV, the suppression of PFU was prominent, which demonstrates that PNAM is a potential bio clean-up tool.

  8. Mutations in the glycoprotein of vesicular stomatitis virus affect cytopathogenicity: potential for oncolytic virotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janelle, Valérie; Brassard, Frédérick; Lapierre, Pascal; Lamarre, Alain; Poliquin, Laurent

    2011-07-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) has been widely used to characterize cellular processes, viral resistance, and cytopathogenicity. Recently, VSV has also been used for oncolytic virotherapy due to its capacity to selectively lyse tumor cells. Mutants of the matrix (M) protein of VSV have generally been preferred to the wild-type virus for oncolysis because of their ability to induce type I interferon (IFN) despite causing weaker cytopathic effects. However, due to the large variability of tumor types, it is quite clear that various approaches and combinations of multiple oncolytic viruses will be needed to effectively treat most cancers. With this in mind, our work focused on characterizing the cytopathogenic profiles of four replicative envelope glycoprotein (G) VSV mutants. In contrast to the prototypic M mutant, VSV G mutants are as efficient as wild-type virus at inhibiting cellular transcription and host protein translation. Despite being highly cytopathic, the mutant G(6R) triggers type I interferon secretion as efficiently as the M mutant. Importantly, most VSV G mutants are more effective at killing B16 and MC57 tumor cells in vitro than the M mutant or wild-type virus through apoptosis induction. Taken together, our results demonstrate that VSV G mutants retain the high cytopathogenicity of wild-type VSV, with G(6R) inducing type I IFN secretion at levels similar to that of the M mutant. VSV G protein mutants could therefore prove to be highly valuable for the development of novel oncolytic virotherapy strategies that are both safe and efficient for the treatment of various types of cancer.

  9. Resistance of pancreatic cancer cells to oncolytic vesicular stomatitis virus: role of type I interferon signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moerdyk-Schauwecker, Megan; Shah, Nirav R; Murphy, Andrea M; Hastie, Eric; Mukherjee, Pinku; Grdzelishvili, Valery Z

    2013-02-05

    Oncolytic virus (OV) therapy takes advantage of common cancer characteristics, such as defective type I interferon (IFN) signaling, to preferentially infect and kill cancer cells with viruses. Our recent study (Murphy et al., 2012. J. Virol. 86, 3073-87) found human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) cells were highly heterogeneous in their permissiveness to vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and suggested at least some resistant cell lines retained functional type I IFN responses. Here we examine cellular responses to infection by the oncolytic VSV recombinant VSV-ΔM51-GFP by analyzing a panel of 11 human PDA cell lines for expression of 33 genes associated with type I IFN pathways. Although all cell lines sensed infection by VSV-ΔM51-GFP and most activated IFN-α and β expression, only resistant cell lines displayed constitutive high-level expression of the IFN-stimulated antiviral genes MxA and OAS. Inhibition of JAK/STAT signaling decreased levels of MxA and OAS and increased VSV infection, replication and oncolysis, further implicating IFN responses in resistance. Unlike VSV, vaccinia and herpes simplex virus infectivity and killing of PDA cells was independent of the type I IFN signaling profile, possibly because these two viruses are better equipped to evade type I IFN responses. Our study demonstrates heterogeneity in the type I IFN signaling status of PDA cells and suggests MxA and OAS as potential biomarkers for PDA resistance to VSV and other OVs sensitive to type I IFN responses. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Type III interferon attenuates a vesicular stomatitis virus-based vaccine vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guayasamin, Ryann C; Reynolds, Tracy D; Wei, Xin; Fujiwara, Mai; Robek, Michael D

    2014-09-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) has been extensively studied as a vaccine vector and oncolytic agent. Nevertheless, safety concerns have limited its widespread use in humans. The type III lambda interferon (IFN-λ) family of cytokines shares common signaling pathways with the IFN-α/β family and thus evokes similar antiviral activities. However, IFN-λ signals through a distinct receptor complex that is expressed in a cell type-specific manner, which restricts its activity to epithelial barriers, particularly those corresponding to the respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts. In this study, we determined how IFN-λ expression from recombinant VSV would influence vector replication, spread, and immunogenicity. We demonstrate that IFN-λ expression severely attenuates VSV in cell culture. In vivo, IFN-λ limits VSV replication in the mouse lung after intranasal administration and reduces virus spread to other organs. Despite this attenuation, however, the vector retains its capacity to induce protective CD8 T cell and antibody responses after a single immunization. These findings demonstrate a novel method of viral vector attenuation that could be used in both vaccine and oncolytic virus applications. Viruses such as VSV that are used as vaccine vectors can induce protective T cell and antibody responses after a single dose. Additionally, IFN-λ is a potent antiviral agent that has certain advantages for clinical use compared to IFN-α/β, such as fewer patient side effects. Here, we demonstrate that IFN-λ attenuates VSV replication and spread following intranasal virus delivery but does not reduce the ability of VSV to induce potent protective immune responses. These findings demonstrate that the type III IFN family may have widespread applicability for improving the safety and efficacy of viral vaccine and oncolytic vectors. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Some Attenuated Variants of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Show Enhanced Oncolytic Activity against Human Glioblastoma Cells relative to Normal Brain Cells▿

    OpenAIRE

    Wollmann, Guido; Rogulin, Vitaliy; Simon, Ian; Rose, John K.; van den Pol, Anthony N.

    2009-01-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) has been shown in laboratory studies to be effective against a variety of tumors, including malignant brain tumors. However, attenuation of VSV may be necessary to balance the potential toxicity toward normal cells, particularly when targeting brain tumors. Here we compared 10 recombinant VSV variants resulting from different attenuation strategies. Attenuations included gene shifting (VSV-p1-GFP/RFP), M protein mutation (VSV-M51), G protein cytoplasmic tail t...

  12. mRNA cap methylation influences pathogenesis of vesicular stomatitis virus in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yuanmei; Wei, Yongwei; Zhang, Xiaodong; Zhang, Yu; Cai, Hui; Zhu, Yang; Shilo, Konstantin; Oglesbee, Michael; Krakowka, Steven; Whelan, Sean P J; Li, Jianrong

    2014-03-01

    One role of mRNA cap guanine-N-7 (G-N-7) methylation is to facilitate the efficient translation of mRNA. The role of mRNA cap ribose 2'-O methylation is enigmatic, although recent work has implicated this as a signature to avoid detection of RNA by the innate immune system (S. Daffis, K. J. Szretter, J. Schriewer, J. Q. Li, S. Youn, J. Errett, T. Y. Lin, S. Schneller, R. Zust, H. P. Dong, V. Thiel, G. C. Sen, V. Fensterl, W. B. Klimstra, T. C. Pierson, R. M. Buller, M. Gale, P. Y. Shi, M. S. Diamond, Nature 468:452-456, 2010, doi:10.1038/nature09489). Working with vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), we previously showed that a panel of recombinant VSVs carrying mutations at a predicted methyltransferase catalytic site (rVSV-K1651A, -D1762A, and -E1833Q) or S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) binding site (rVSV-G1670A, -G1672A, and -G4A) were defective in cap methylation and were also attenuated for growth in cell culture. Here, we analyzed the virulence of these recombinants in mice. We found that rVSV-K1651A, -D1762A, and -E1833Q, which are defective in both G-N-7 and 2'-O methylation, were highly attenuated in mice. All three viruses elicited a high level of neutralizing antibody and provided full protection against challenge with the virulent VSV. In contrast, mice inoculated with rVSV-G1670A and -G1672A, which are defective only in G-N-7 methylation, were attenuated in vivo yet retained a low level of virulence. rVSV-G4A, which is completely defective in both G-N-7 and 2'-O methylation, also exhibited low virulence in mice despite the fact that productive viral replication was not detected in lung and brain. Taken together, our results suggest that abrogation of viral mRNA cap methylation can serve as an approach to attenuate VSV, and perhaps other nonsegmented negative-strand RNA viruses, for potential application as vaccines and viral vectors. Nonsegmented negative-sense (NNS) RNA viruses include a wide range of significant human, animal, and plant pathogens. For many

  13. Glycoprotein cytoplasmic domain sequences required for rescue of a vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein mutant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitt, M.A.; Chong, L.; Rose, J.K. (Yale Univ. School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (USA))

    1989-09-01

    The authors have used transient expression of the wild-type vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) glycoprotein (G protein) from cloned cDNA to rescue a temperature-sensitive G protein mutant of VSV in cells at the nonpermissive temperature. Using cDNAs encoding G proteins with deletions in the normal 29-amino-acid cytoplasmic domain, they determined that the presence of either the membrane-proximal 9 amino acids or the membrane-distal 12 amino acids was sufficient for rescue of the temperature-sensitive mutant. G proteins with cytoplasmic domains derived from other cellular or viral G proteins did not rescue the mutant, nor did G proteins with one or three amino acids of the normal cytoplasmic domain. Rescue correlated directly with the ability of the G proteins to be incorporated into virus particles. This was shown by analysis of radiolabeled particles separated on sucrose gradients as well as by electron microscopy of rescued virus after immunogold labeling. Quantitation of surface expression showed that all of the mutated G proteins were expressed less efficiently on the cell surface than was wild-type G protein. However, they were able to correct for differences in rescue efficiency resulting from differences in the level of surface expression by reducing wild-type G protein expression to levels equivalent to those observed for the mutated G proteins. The results provide evidence that at least a portion of the cytoplasmic domain is required for efficient assembly of the VSV G protein into virions during virus budding.

  14. Interference of CD40L-mediated tumor immunotherapy by oncolytic vesicular stomatitis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galivo, Feorillo; Diaz, Rosa Maria; Thanarajasingam, Uma; Jevremovic, Dragan; Wongthida, Phonphimon; Thompson, Jill; Kottke, Timothy; Barber, Glen N; Melcher, Alan; Vile, Richard G

    2010-04-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy can be achieved in two ways: (1) by exploiting an innate ability of certain viruses to selectively replicate in tumor tissues, and (2) by using viruses to deliver toxic or immunostimulatory genes to tumors. Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) selectively replicates in tumors lacking adequate type I interferon response. The efficacy of oncolytic virotherapy using VSV against B16 melanomas in C57BL/6 mice is dependent on CD8(+) T and natural killer cells. Because immunotherapies that prime specific CD8(+) T cells against melanocyte/melanoma antigens can generate significant therapeutic responses, we hypothesized that engineering VSV to express the potent T cell costimulatory molecule CD40 ligand (VSV-CD40L) would enhance virotherapy with concomitant priming of melanoma-specific T cells. However, we observed no difference in antitumor efficacy between the parental VSV-GFP and VSV-CD40L. In contrast, intratumoral injection of a replication-defective adenovirus expressing CD40L (Ad-CD40L) consistently produced significantly greater therapy than either replication-competent VSV-GFP or VSV-CD40L. The Ad-CD40L-mediated tumor regressions were associated with specific T cell responses against tumor-associated antigens (TAAs), which took several days to develop, whereas VSV-CD40L rapidly induced high levels of T cell activation without specificity for TAAs. These data suggest that the high levels of VSV-associated immunogenicity distracted immune responses away from priming of tumor-specific T cells, even in the presence of potent costimulatory signals. In contrast, a replication-defective Ad-CD40L allowed significant priming of T cells directed against TAAs. These observations suggest that an efficiently primed antitumor T cell response can produce similar, if not better, therapy against an established melanoma compared with intratumoral injection of a replication-competent oncolytic virus.

  15. Vesicular stomatitis virus-based ebola vaccine is well-tolerated and protects immunocompromised nonhuman primates.

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    Thomas W Geisbert

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Ebola virus (EBOV is a significant human pathogen that presents a public health concern as an emerging/re-emerging virus and as a potential biological weapon. Substantial progress has been made over the last decade in developing candidate preventive vaccines that can protect nonhuman primates against EBOV. Among these prospects, a vaccine based on recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV is particularly robust, as it can also confer protection when administered as a postexposure treatment. A concern that has been raised regarding the replication-competent VSV vectors that express EBOV glycoproteins is how these vectors would be tolerated by individuals with altered or compromised immune systems such as patients infected with HIV. This is especially important as all EBOV outbreaks to date have occurred in areas of Central and Western Africa with high HIV incidence rates in the population. In order to address this concern, we evaluated the safety of the recombinant VSV vector expressing the Zaire ebolavirus glycoprotein (VSVDeltaG/ZEBOVGP in six rhesus macaques infected with simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV. All six animals showed no evidence of illness associated with the VSVDeltaG/ZEBOVGP vaccine, suggesting that this vaccine may be safe in immunocompromised populations. While one goal of the study was to evaluate the safety of the candidate vaccine platform, it was also of interest to determine if altered immune status would affect vaccine efficacy. The vaccine protected 4 of 6 SHIV-infected macaques from death following ZEBOV challenge. Evaluation of CD4+ T cells in all animals showed that the animals that succumbed to lethal ZEBOV challenge had the lowest CD4+ counts, suggesting that CD4+ T cells may play a role in mediating protection against ZEBOV.

  16. Comparative oncology evaluation of intravenous recombinant oncolytic Vesicular Stomatitis Virus therapy in spontaneous canine cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Shruthi; Galyon, Gina D; Jenks, Nathan J; Steele, Michael B; Miller, Amber C; Allstadt, Sara D; Suksanpaisan, Lukkana; Peng, Kah Whye; Federspiel, Mark J; Russell, Stephen J; LeBlanc, Amy K

    2017-11-20

    Clinical translation of intravenous therapies to treat disseminated or metastatic cancer is imperative. Comparative oncology, the evaluation of novel cancer therapies in animals with spontaneous cancer, can be utilized to inform and accelerate clinical translation. Preclinical murine studies demonstrate that single shot systemic therapy with a VSV-IFNβ-NIS, a novel recombinant oncolytic Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), can induce curative remission in tumor bearing mice. Clinical translation of VSV-IFNβ-NIS therapy is dependent on comprehensive assessment of clinical toxicities, virus shedding, pharmacokinetics, and efficacy in clinically relevant models. Dogs spontaneously develop cancer with comparable etiology, clinical progression and response to therapy as human malignancies. A comparative oncology study was carried out to investigate feasibility and tolerability of intravenous oncolytic VSV-IFNβ-NIS therapy in pet dogs with spontaneous cancer. Nine dogs with various malignancies were treated with a single intravenous dose of VSV-IFNβ-NIS. Two dogs with high-grade peripheral T-cell lymphoma had rapid but transient remission of disseminated disease and transient hepatotoxicity that resolved spontaneously. There was no shedding of infectious virus. Correlative pharmacokinetic studies revealed elevated levels of VSV RNA in blood in dogs with measurable disease remission. This is the first evaluation of intravenous oncolytic virus therapy for spontaneous canine cancer, demonstrating that VSV-IFNβ-NIS is well-tolerated and safe in dogs with advanced or metastatic disease. This approach has informed clinical translation, including dose and target indication selection, leading to a clinical investigation of intravenous VSV-IFNβ-NIS therapy, and provided preliminary evidence of clinical efficacy, and potential biomarkers that correlate with therapeutic response. Copyright ©2017, American Association for Cancer Research.

  17. [Antitumor effects of matrix protein of vesicular stomatic virus on EL4 lymphoma mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shi-jia; Yu, Qin-mei; Meng, Wen-tong; Wen, Yan-jun; Chen, Li-juan; Niu, Ting

    2011-03-01

    To explore antitumor effects of plasmid pcDNA3. 1-MP encoding matrix protein of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) complexed with cationic liposome (DOTAP:CHOL) in mice with EL4 lymphoma. C57BL/6 mouse model with EL4 lymphoma was established. Sixty mice bearing EL4 lymphoma were divided randomly into five groups including Lip-MP, Lip-pVAX, Lip, ADM and NS groups, which were intravenously injected with liposome-pcDNA 3. 1-MP complex, liposome-pVAX complex, empty liposome, Adriamycin and normal saline respectively every three days. Tumor volumes and survival time were monitored. Microvessel density and tumor proliferative index in tumor tissues were determined by CD31, Ki-67 immunohistochemistry staining, meanwhile the tumor apoptosis index was measured by TUNEL method. From 6 days after treatments on, the tumor volume in Lip-MP group was much smaller than that in Lip-pVAX, Lip and NS group (P EL4 tumor cells in vivo (P EL4 lymphoma, which may be related to the induction of tumor cell apoptosis, inhibition of tumor angiogenesis, and suppression of tumor cell proliferation.

  18. Vesicular stomatitis virus infection promotes immune evasion by preventing NKG2D-ligand surface expression.

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    Helle Jensen

    Full Text Available Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV has recently gained attention for its oncolytic ability in cancer treatment. Initially, we hypothesized that VSV infection could increase immune recognition of cancer cells through induction of the immune stimulatory NKG2D-ligands. Here we show that VSV infection leads to a robust induction of MICA mRNA expression, however the subsequent surface expression is potently hindered. Thus, VSV lines up with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV and adenovirus, which actively subvert the immune system by negatively affecting NKG2D-ligand surface expression. VSV infection caused an active suppression of NKG2D-ligand surface expression, affecting both endogenous and histone deacetylase (HDAC-inhibitor induced MICA, MICB and ULBP-2 expression. The classical immune escape mechanism of VSV (i.e., the M protein blockade of nucleocytoplasmic mRNA transport was not involved, as the VSV mutant strain, VSV(ΔM51, which possess a defective M protein, prevented MICA surface expression similarly to wild-type VSV. The VSV mediated down modulation of NKG2D-ligand expression did not involve apoptosis. Constitutive expression of MICA bypassed the escape mechanism, suggesting that VSV affect NKG2D-ligand expression at an early post-transcriptional level. Our results show that VSV possess an escape mechanism, which could affect the immune recognition of VSV infected cancer cells. This may also have implications for immune recognition of cancer cells after combined treatment with VSV and chemotherapeutic drugs.

  19. Antagonistic Effects of Cellular Poly(C) Binding Proteins on Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Gene Expression ▿

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    Dinh, Phat X.; Beura, Lalit K.; Panda, Debasis; Das, Anshuman; Pattnaik, Asit K.

    2011-01-01

    Immunoprecipitation and subsequent mass spectrometry analysis of the cellular proteins from cells expressing the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) P protein identified the poly(C) binding protein 2 (PCBP2) as one of the P protein-interacting proteins. To investigate the role of PCBP2 in the viral life cycle, we examined the effects of depletion or overexpression of this protein on VSV growth. Small interfering RNA-mediated silencing of PCBP2 promoted VSV replication. Conversely, overexpression of PCBP2 in transfected cells suppressed VSV growth. Further studies revealed that PCBP2 negatively regulates overall viral mRNA accumulation and subsequent genome replication. Coimmunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence microscopic studies showed that PCBP2 interacts and colocalizes with VSV P protein in virus-infected cells. The P-PCBP2 interaction did not result in reduced levels of protein complex formation with the viral N and L proteins, nor did it induce degradation of the P protein. In addition, PCBP1, another member of the poly(C) binding protein family with homology to PCBP2, was also found to interact with the P protein and inhibit the viral mRNA synthesis at the level of primary transcription without affecting secondary transcription or genome replication. The inhibitory effects of PCBP1 on VSV replication were less pronounced than those of PCBP2. Overall, the results presented here suggest that cellular PCBP2 and PCBP1 antagonize VSV growth by affecting viral gene expression and highlight the importance of these two cellular proteins in restricting virus infections. PMID:21752917

  20. Semireplication-competent vesicular stomatitis virus as a novel platform for oncolytic virotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muik, Alexander; Dold, Catherine; Geiß, Yvonne; Volk, Andreas; Werbizki, Marina; Dietrich, Ursula; von Laer, Dorothee

    2012-08-01

    Among oncolytic viruses, the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is especially potent and a highly promising agent for the treatment of cancer. But, even though effective against multiple tumor entities in preclinical animal models, replication-competent VSV exhibits inherent neurovirulence, which has so far hindered clinical development. To overcome this limitation, replication-defective VSV vectors for cancer gene therapy have been tested and proven to be safe. However, gene delivery was inefficient and only minor antitumor efficacy was observed. Here, we present semireplication-competent vector systems for VSV (srVSV), composed of two trans-complementing, propagation-deficient VSV vectors. The de novo generated deletion mutants of the two VSV polymerase proteins P (phosphoprotein) and L (large catalytic subunit), VSVΔP and VSVΔL respectively, were used mutually or in combination with VSVΔG vectors. These srVSV systems copropagated in vitro and in vivo without recombinatory reversion to replication-competent virus. The srVSV systems were highly lytic for human glioblastoma cell lines, spheroids, and subcutaneous xenografts. Especially the combination of VSVΔG/VSVΔL vectors was as potent as wild-type VSV (VSV-WT) in vitro and induced long-term tumor regression in vivo without any associated adverse effects. In contrast, 90% of VSV-WT-treated animals succumbed to neurological disease shortly after tumor clearance. Most importantly, even when injected into the brain, VSVΔG/VSVΔL did not show any neurotoxicity. In conclusion, srVSV is a promising platform for virotherapeutic approaches and also for VSV-based vector vaccines, combining improved safety with an increased coding capacity for therapeutic transgenes, potentially allowing for multipronged approaches.

  1. Vesicular stomatitis virus-based vaccines protect nonhuman primates against Bundibugyo ebolavirus.

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    Chad E Mire

    Full Text Available Ebola virus (EBOV causes severe and often fatal hemorrhagic fever in humans and nonhuman primates (NHPs. Currently, there are no licensed vaccines or therapeutics for human use. Recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (rVSV-based vaccine vectors, which encode an EBOV glycoprotein in place of the VSV glycoprotein, have shown 100% efficacy against homologous Sudan ebolavirus (SEBOV or Zaire ebolavirus (ZEBOV challenge in NHPs. In addition, a single injection of a blend of three rVSV vectors completely protected NHPs against challenge with SEBOV, ZEBOV, the former Côte d'Ivoire ebolavirus, and Marburg virus. However, recent studies suggest that complete protection against the newly discovered Bundibugyo ebolavirus (BEBOV using several different heterologous filovirus vaccines is more difficult and presents a new challenge. As BEBOV caused nearly 50% mortality in a recent outbreak any filovirus vaccine advanced for human use must be able to protect against this new species. Here, we evaluated several different strategies against BEBOV using rVSV-based vaccines. Groups of cynomolgus macaques were vaccinated with a single injection of a homologous BEBOV vaccine, a single injection of a blended heterologous vaccine (SEBOV/ZEBOV, or a prime-boost using heterologous SEBOV and ZEBOV vectors. Animals were challenged with BEBOV 29-36 days after initial vaccination. Macaques vaccinated with the homologous BEBOV vaccine or the prime-boost showed no overt signs of illness and survived challenge. In contrast, animals vaccinated with the heterologous blended vaccine and unvaccinated control animals developed severe clinical symptoms consistent with BEBOV infection with 2 of 3 animals in each group succumbing. These data show that complete protection against BEBOV will likely require incorporation of BEBOV glycoprotein into the vaccine or employment of a prime-boost regimen. Fortunately, our results demonstrate that heterologous rVSV-based filovirus vaccine

  2. Trojan horse lymphocytes: a vesicular stomatitis virus-specific T-cell clone lyses target cells by carrying virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hom, R C; Soman, G; Finberg, R

    1989-10-01

    We have isolated a vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-specific CD4+ CD8- murine T-cell clone. This clone proliferates only in response to VSV and lyses infected tumor cells bearing class II major histocompatibility antigens in short-term chromium release assays. In addition, the cell has VSV antigens on its surface and is capable of killing uninfected tumor cells without major histocompatibility antigen restriction in a 2-day assay. This latter cytolytic activity is eliminated by anti-VSV antibody, indicating that its lytic activity is provided by the virus. [35S]methionine labeling and immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that viral protein translation is initiated after incubation of the clone with a tumor target cell, defining this as the mechanism of its cytolytic activity.

  3. Reovirus FAST Protein Enhances Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Oncolytic Virotherapy in Primary and Metastatic Tumor Models

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    Fabrice Le Boeuf

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The reovirus fusion-associated small transmembrane (FAST proteins are the smallest known viral fusogens (∼100–150 amino acids and efficiently induce cell-cell fusion and syncytium formation in multiple cell types. Syncytium formation enhances cell-cell virus transmission and may also induce immunogenic cell death, a form of apoptosis that stimulates immune recognition of tumor cells. These properties suggest that FAST proteins might serve to enhance oncolytic virotherapy. The oncolytic activity of recombinant VSVΔM51 (an interferon-sensitive vesicular stomatitis virus [VSV] mutant encoding the p14 FAST protein (VSV-p14 was compared with a similar construct encoding GFP (VSV-GFP in cell culture and syngeneic BALB/c tumor models. Compared with VSV-GFP, VSV-p14 exhibited increased oncolytic activity against MCF-7 and 4T1 breast cancer spheroids in culture and reduced primary 4T1 breast tumor growth in vivo. VSV-p14 prolonged survival in both primary and metastatic 4T1 breast cancer models, and in a CT26 metastatic colon cancer model. As with VSV-GFP, VSV-p14 preferentially replicated in vivo in tumors and was cleared rapidly from other sites. Furthermore, VSV-p14 increased the numbers of activated splenic CD4, CD8, natural killer (NK, and natural killer T (NKT cells, and increased the number of activated CD4 and CD8 cells in tumors. FAST proteins may therefore provide a multi-pronged approach to improving oncolytic virotherapy via syncytium formation and enhanced immune stimulation.

  4. Analysis of virion associated host proteins in vesicular stomatitis virus using a proteomics approach

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    Hwang Sun-Il

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV is the prototypic rhabdovirus and the best studied member of the order Mononegavirales. There is now compelling evidence that enveloped virions released from infected cells carry numerous host (cellular proteins some of which may play an important role in viral replication. Although several cellular proteins have been previously shown to be incorporated into VSV virions, no systematic study has been done to reveal the host protein composition for virions of VSV or any other member of Mononegavirales. Results Here we used a proteomics approach to identify cellular proteins within purified VSV virions, thereby creating a "snapshot" of one stage of virus/host interaction that can guide future experiments aimed at understanding molecular mechanisms of virus-cell interactions. Highly purified preparations of VSV virions from three different cell lines of human, mouse and hamster origin were analyzed for the presence of cellular proteins using mass spectrometry. We have successfully confirmed the presence of several previously-identified cellular proteins within VSV virions and identified a number of additional proteins likely to also be present within the virions. In total, sixty-four cellular proteins were identified, of which nine were found in multiple preparations. A combination of immunoblotting and proteinase K protection assay was used to verify the presence of several of these proteins (integrin β1, heat shock protein 90 kDa, heat shock cognate 71 kDa protein, annexin 2, elongation factor 1a within the virions. Conclusion This is, to our knowledge, the first systematic study of the host protein composition for virions of VSV or any other member of the order Mononegavirales. Future experiments are needed to determine which of the identified proteins have an interaction with VSV and whether these interactions are beneficial, neutral or antiviral with respect to VSV replication. Identification

  5. Efficacy of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus-Ebola Virus Postexposure Treatment in Rhesus Macaques Infected With Ebola Virus Makona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzi, Andrea; Hanley, Patrick W; Haddock, Elaine; Martellaro, Cynthia; Kobinger, Gary; Feldmann, Heinz

    2016-10-15

    The Ebola virus (EBOV) epidemic in West Africa increased the focus on vaccine development against this hemorrhagic fever-causing pathogen, and as a consequence human clinical trials for a few selected platforms were accelerated. One of these vaccines is vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-EBOV, also known as rVSV-ZEBOV, a fast-acting vaccine against EBOV and so far the only vaccine with reported efficacy against EBOV infections in humans in phase III clinical trials. In this study, we analyzed the potential of VSV-EBOV for postexposure treatment of rhesus macaques infected with EBOV-Makona. We treated groups of animals with 1 dose of VSV-EBOV either in a single injection at 1 or 24 hours after EBOV exposure or with 2 injections, half the dose at each time point; 1 control group received the same dose of the VSV-based Marburg virus vaccine at both time points; another group remained untreated. Although all untreated animals succumbed to EBOV infection, 33%-67% of the animals in each treatment group survived the infection, including the group treated with the VSV-based Marburg virus vaccine. This result suggests that protection from postexposure vaccination may be antigen unspecific and due rather to an early activation of the innate immune system. In conclusion, VSV-EBOV remains a potent and fast-acting prophylactic vaccine but demonstrates only limited efficacy in postexposure treatment. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2016. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  6. Molecular Determinants of Susceptibility to Oncolytic Vesicular Stomatitis Virus in Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackham, Aaron U; Northrup, Scott A; Willingham, Mark; Sirintrapun, Joseph; Russell, Greg B; Lyles, Douglas S; Stewart, John H

    2014-01-01

    Background M protein mutant vesicular stomatitis virus (M51R-VSV) has oncolytic properties against many cancers. However, some cancer cells are resistant to M51R-VSV. Herein, we evaluate the molecular determinants of VSV resistance in pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells. Methods Cell viability and the effect of β-interferon (IFN) was analyzed using MTS assay. Gene expression was evaluated via microarray analysis. Cell infectability was measured by flow cytometry. Xenografts were established in athymic nude mice and treated with intratumoral M51R-VSV. Results Four of five pancreatic cancer cell lines were sensitive to M51R-VSV, while Panc03.27 cells remained resistant (81±3% viability 72-hours after single cycle infection). Comparing sensitive MiaPaCa2 to resistant Panc03.27 cells, significant differences in gene expression was found relating to IFN signaling (p=2×10-5), viral entry (p=3×10-4) and endocytosis (p=7×10-4). MiaPaCa2 cells permitted high levels of VSV infection, while Panc03.27 cells were capable of resisting VSV cell entry even at high MOIs. Extrinsic β-IFN overcame apparent defects in IFN-mediated pathways in MiaPaCa2 cells conferring VSV resistance. In contrast, β-IFN decreased cell viability in Panc3.27 cells suggesting intact anti-viral mechanisms. VSV treated xenografts exhibited reduced tumor growth relative to controls in both MiaPaCa2 (1423 ± 345% vs 164 ± 136%, pVSV treated Panc03.27 xenografts. Conclusions Inhibition of VSV endocytosis and intact IFN-mediated defenses are responsible for M51R-VSV resistance in pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells. M51R-VSV treatment appears to induce anti-tumor cellular immunity in vivo which may expand its clinical efficacy. PMID:24252853

  7. Interation of mRNA with proteins in vesicular stomatitis virus-infected cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adam, S.A.; Choi, Y.D.; Dreyfuss, G.

    1986-02-01

    The interaction of mRNA with proteins in vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-infected cells was studied by photochemical cross-linking in intact cells. The major (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled proteins which became cross-linked by UV light to mRNA in uninfected and in VSV-infected HeLa cells were similar and had apparent mobilities in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis corresponding to 135, 93, 72, 68, 53, 50, 43, and 36 kilodaltons. The proteins which were cross-linked in vivo specifically to the five mRNAs of VSV were labeled through radioactive nucleotides incorporated only into VSV mRNAs under conditions in which only VSV mRNAs are labeled. The same major mRNP proteins that became cross-linked to host mRNAs also became cross-linked to VSV mRNAs, although several quantitative differences were detected. Photochemical cross-linking and immunoblotting of cross-linked mRNPs with VSV antiserum demonstrated that in addition to host proteins VSV mRNAs also became cross-linked to the VSV-encoded N protein. The poly(A) segment of both host and VSV mRNAs was associated in vivo selectively with the 72-kilodalton polypeptide. The major proteins of mRNA-ribonucleoprotein complexes are therefore ubiquitous and common to different mRNAs. Furthermore, since the major messenger ribonucleoproteins interact also with VSV mRNAs even though these mRNAs are transcribed in the cytoplasm, it appears that nuclear transcription and nucleocytoplasmic transport are not necessary for mRNA to interact with these proteins.

  8. Induction of Stress Granule-Like Structures in Vesicular Stomatitis Virus-Infected Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinh, Phat X.; Beura, Lalit K.; Das, Phani B.; Panda, Debasis; Das, Anshuman

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies from our laboratory revealed that cellular poly(C) binding protein 2 (PCBP2) downregulates vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) gene expression. We show here that VSV infection induces the formation of granular structures in the cytoplasm containing cellular RNA-binding proteins, including PCBP2, T-cell-restricted intracellular antigen 1 (TIA1), and TIA1-related protein (TIAR). Depletion of TIA1 via small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), but not depletion of TIAR, results in enhanced VSV growth and gene expression. The VSV-induced granules appear to be similar to the stress granules (SGs) generated in cells triggered by heat shock or oxidative stress but do not contain some of the bona fide SG markers, such as eukaryotic initiation factor 3 (eIF3) or eIF4A, or the processing body (PB) markers, such as mRNA-decapping enzyme 1A (DCP1a), and thus may not represent canonical SGs or PBs. Our results revealed that the VSV-induced granules, called SG-like structures here, contain the viral replicative proteins and RNAs. The formation and maintenance of the SG-like structures required viral replication and ongoing protein synthesis, but an intact cytoskeletal network was not necessary. These results suggest that cells respond to VSV infection by aggregating the antiviral proteins, such as PCBP2 and TIA1, to form SG-like structures. The functional significance of these SG-like structures in VSV-infected cells is currently under investigation. PMID:23077311

  9. Retargeting Oncolytic Vesicular Stomatitis Virus to Human T-Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1-Associated Adult T-Cell Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betancourt, Dillon; Ramos, Juan Carlos

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) is an aggressive cancer of CD4/CD25+ T lymphocytes, the etiological agent of which is human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1). ATL is highly refractory to current therapies, making the development of new treatments a high priority. Oncolytic viruses such as vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) are being considered as anticancer agents since they readily infect transformed cells compared to normal cells, the former appearing to exhibit defective innate immune responses. Here, we have evaluated the efficacy and safety of a recombinant VSV that has been retargeted to specifically infect and replicate in transformed CD4+ cells. This was achieved by replacing the single VSV glycoprotein (G) with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gp160 to create a hybrid fusion protein, gp160G. The resultant virus, VSV-gp160G, was found to only target cells expressing CD4 and retained robust oncolytic activity against HTLV-1 actuated ATL cells. VSV-gp160G was further noted to be highly attenuated and did not replicate efficiently in or induce significant cell death of primary CD4+ T cells. Accordingly, VSV-gp160G did not elicit any evidence of neurotoxicity even in severely immunocompromised animals such as NOD/Shi-scid, IL-2Rγ-c-null (NSG) mice. Importantly, VSV-gp160G effectively exerted potent oncolytic activity in patient-derived ATL transplanted into NSG mice and facilitated a significant survival benefit. Our data indicate that VSV-gp160G exerts potent oncolytic efficacy against CD4+ malignant cells and either alone or in conjunction with established therapies may provide an effective treatment in patients displaying ATL. IMPORTANCE Adult T cell leukemia (ATL) is a serious form of cancer with a high mortality rate. HTLV-1 infection is the etiological agent of ATL and, unfortunately, most patients succumb to the disease within a few years. Current treatment options have failed to significantly improve survival rate. In

  10. Retargeting Oncolytic Vesicular Stomatitis Virus to Human T-Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1-Associated Adult T-Cell Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betancourt, Dillon; Ramos, Juan Carlos; Barber, Glen N

    2015-12-01

    Adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) is an aggressive cancer of CD4/CD25(+) T lymphocytes, the etiological agent of which is human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1). ATL is highly refractory to current therapies, making the development of new treatments a high priority. Oncolytic viruses such as vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) are being considered as anticancer agents since they readily infect transformed cells compared to normal cells, the former appearing to exhibit defective innate immune responses. Here, we have evaluated the efficacy and safety of a recombinant VSV that has been retargeted to specifically infect and replicate in transformed CD4(+) cells. This was achieved by replacing the single VSV glycoprotein (G) with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gp160 to create a hybrid fusion protein, gp160G. The resultant virus, VSV-gp160G, was found to only target cells expressing CD4 and retained robust oncolytic activity against HTLV-1 actuated ATL cells. VSV-gp160G was further noted to be highly attenuated and did not replicate efficiently in or induce significant cell death of primary CD4(+) T cells. Accordingly, VSV-gp160G did not elicit any evidence of neurotoxicity even in severely immunocompromised animals such as NOD/Shi-scid, IL-2Rγ-c-null (NSG) mice. Importantly, VSV-gp160G effectively exerted potent oncolytic activity in patient-derived ATL transplanted into NSG mice and facilitated a significant survival benefit. Our data indicate that VSV-gp160G exerts potent oncolytic efficacy against CD4(+) malignant cells and either alone or in conjunction with established therapies may provide an effective treatment in patients displaying ATL. Adult T cell leukemia (ATL) is a serious form of cancer with a high mortality rate. HTLV-1 infection is the etiological agent of ATL and, unfortunately, most patients succumb to the disease within a few years. Current treatment options have failed to significantly improve survival rate. In this study, we

  11. Inactivation of a Human Norovirus Surrogate, Human Norovirus Virus-Like Particles, and Vesicular Stomatitis Virus by Gamma Irradiation ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Kurtis; Divers, Erin; Ma, Yuanmei; Li, Jianrong

    2011-01-01

    Gamma irradiation is a nonthermal processing technology that has been used for the preservation of a variety of food products. This technology has been shown to effectively inactivate bacterial pathogens. Currently, the FDA has approved doses of up to 4.0 kGy to control food-borne pathogens in fresh iceberg lettuce and spinach. However, whether this dose range effectively inactivates food-borne viruses is less understood. We have performed a systematic study on the inactivation of a human norovirus surrogate (murine norovirus 1 [MNV-1]), human norovirus virus-like particles (VLPs), and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) by gamma irradiation. We demonstrated that MNV-1 and human norovirus VLPs were resistant to gamma irradiation. For MNV-1, only a 1.7- to 2.4-log virus reduction in fresh produce at the dose of 5.6 kGy was observed. However, VSV was more susceptible to gamma irradiation, and a 3.3-log virus reduction at a dose of 5.6 kGy in Dulbecco's modified Eagle medium (DMEM) was achieved. We further demonstrated that gamma irradiation disrupted virion structure and degraded viral proteins and genomic RNA, which resulted in virus inactivation. Using human norovirus VLPs as a model, we provide the first evidence that the capsid of human norovirus has stability similar to that of MNV-1 after exposure to gamma irradiation. Overall, our results suggest that viruses are much more resistant to irradiation than bacterial pathogens. Although gamma irradiation used to eliminate the virus contaminants in fresh produce by the FDA-approved irradiation dose limits seems impractical, this technology may be practical to inactivate viruses for other purposes, such as sterilization of medical equipment. PMID:21441330

  12. Attenuation of vesicular stomatitis virus infection of brain using antiviral drugs and an adeno-associated virus-interferon vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollmann, Guido; Paglino, Justin C.; Maloney, Patrick R; Ahmadi, Sebastian A; van den Pol, Anthony N

    2015-01-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) shows promise as vaccine-vector and oncolytic virus. However, reports of neurotoxicity of VSV remain a concern. We compared 12 antiviral compounds to control infection of VSV-CT9-M51 and VSV-rp30 using murine and human brain cultures, and in vivo mouse models. Inhibition of replication, cytotoxicity and infectivity was strongest with ribavirin and IFN-α and to some extent with mycophenolic acid, chloroquine, and adenine 9-β-D-arabinofuranoside. To generate continuous IFN exposure, we made an adeno-associated virus vector expressing murine IFN; AAV-mIFN-β protected mouse brain cells from VSV, as did a combination of ribavirin and chloroquine. Intracranial AAV-mIFN-β protected the brain against VSV-CT9-M51. In SCID mice bearing human glioblastoma, AAV-mIFN-β moderately enhanced survival. VSV-CT9-M51 doubled median survival when administered after AAV-mIFN-β; some surviving mice showed complete tumor destruction. Together, these data suggest that AAV-IFN or IFN with ribavirin and chloroquine provide an optimal anti-virus combination against VSV in the brain. PMID:25462341

  13. Efficient generation of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-pseudotypes bearing morbilliviral glycoproteins and their use in quantifying virus neutralising antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Nicola; McMonagle, Elizabeth; Drew, Angharad A; Takahashi, Emi; McDonald, Michael; Baron, Michael D; Gilbert, Martin; Cleaveland, Sarah; Haydon, Daniel T; Hosie, Margaret J; Willett, Brian J

    2016-02-03

    Morbillivirus neutralising antibodies are traditionally measured using either plaque reduction neutralisation tests (PRNTs) or live virus microneutralisation tests (micro-NTs). While both test formats provide a reliable assessment of the strength and specificity of the humoral response, they are restricted by the limited number of viral strains that can be studied and often present significant biological safety concerns to the operator. In this study, we describe the adaptation of a replication-defective vesicular stomatitis virus (VSVΔG) based pseudotyping system for the measurement of morbillivirus neutralising antibodies. By expressing the haemagglutinin (H) and fusion (F) proteins of canine distemper virus (CDV) on VSVΔG pseudotypes bearing a luciferase marker gene, neutralising antibody titres could be measured rapidly and with high sensitivity. Further, by exchanging the glycoprotein expression construct, responses against distinct viral strains or species may be measured. Using this technique, we demonstrate cross neutralisation between CDV and peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV). As an example of the value of the technique, we demonstrate that UK dogs vary in the breadth of immunity induced by CDV vaccination; in some dogs the neutralising response is CDV-specific while, in others, the neutralising response extends to the ruminant morbillivirus PPRV. This technique will facilitate a comprehensive comparison of cross-neutralisation to be conducted across the morbilliviruses. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Attenuation of vesicular stomatitis virus infection of brain using antiviral drugs and an adeno-associated virus-interferon vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollmann, Guido; Paglino, Justin C; Maloney, Patrick R; Ahmadi, Sebastian A; van den Pol, Anthony N

    2015-01-15

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) shows promise as a vaccine-vector and oncolytic virus. However, reports of neurotoxicity of VSV remain a concern. We compared 12 antiviral compounds to control infection of VSV-CT9-M51 and VSV-rp30 using murine and human brain cultures, and in vivo mouse models. Inhibition of replication, cytotoxicity and infectivity was strongest with ribavirin and IFN-α and to some extent with mycophenolic acid, chloroquine, and adenine 9-β-d-arabinofuranoside. To generate continuous IFN exposure, we made an adeno-associated virus vector expressing murine IFN; AAV-mIFN-β protected mouse brain cells from VSV, as did a combination of IFN, ribavirin and chloroquine. Intracranial AAV-mIFN-β protected the brain against VSV-CT9-M51. In SCID mice bearing human glioblastoma, AAV-mIFN-β moderately enhanced survival. VSV-CT9-M51 doubled median survival when administered after AAV-mIFN-β; some surviving mice showed complete tumor destruction. Together, these data suggest that AAV-IFN or IFN with ribavirin and chloroquine provide an optimal anti-virus combination against VSV in the brain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Cooperation of B cells and T cells is required for survival of mice infected with vesicular stomatitis virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Allan Randrup; Nansen, A; Andersen, C

    1997-01-01

    To define the role of T cells and B cells in resistance to vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) infection, knockout mice with different specific immune defects on an identical background were infected i.v. and the outcome of infection was compared; in this way a more complete picture of the relative...... antibodies are pivotal for survival in the early phase of VSV infection, T cells are required for long-term survival, with CD4+ T cells being more effective in controlling this infection than CD8+ T cells....

  16. Quantitative multiplex assay for simultaneous detection and identification of Indiana and New Jersey serotypes of vesicular stomatitis virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun; Uttenthal, Åse; Fernandez, Jovita

    2005-01-01

    In order to establish a rapid and reliable system for the detection of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), we developed a quantitative reverse transcription-PCR assay for the detection, quantification, and differentiation of the major serotypes, VSV Indiana and VSV New Jersey, using a closed......-tube multiplex format. The detection system is based on the recently invented primer-probe energy transfer (PriProET) system. A region of the gene encoding the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase was amplified by using VSV-specific primers in the presence of two serotype-specific fluorescent probes. By incorporating...... identification of VSV....

  17. Large-population passages of vesicular stomatitis virus in interferon-treated cells select variants of only limited resistance.

    OpenAIRE

    Novella, I S; Cilnis, M; Elena, S F; Kohn, J.; Moya, A; Domingo, E; Holland, J J

    1996-01-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) populations were repeatedly passaged in L-929 cells treated with alpha interferon (IFN-alpha) at levels of 25 U/ml. This IFN-alpha concentration induced a 99.9% inhibition of viral yield in standard infections. Analysis of viral fitness (overall replicative ability measured in direct competition with a reference wild-type VSV) after 21 passages in IFN-treated cells showed only a limited increase or no increase in fitness, compared with the greater increase upo...

  18. Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Pseudotyped with Ebola Virus Glycoprotein Serves as a Highly Protective, Non-infectious Vaccine Against Ebola Virus Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    parainfluenza virus type 3, 62 rabies virus and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) (reviewed in (7, 11)). Surprisingly, EBOV GP 63 pseudovirions have not been...Modified Eagle Medium (DMEM) with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) and 1% 111 penicillin/streptomycin. The pcDNA3.1 expression plasmids for EBOV GP...198 bovine serum albumin (BSA), incubated with serial dilutions (1:1000, 1:10,000 and 1:1000,000) 199 of serum for overnight at 4°C, probed with 1

  19. Effects of microwave exposure on the hamster immune system. III. Macrophage resistance to vesicular stomatitis virus infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, G.R.; Cain, C.A.; Tompkins, W.A.

    1984-01-01

    Exposure of hamsters to microwave (MW) energy (2.45 GHz, 25 mW/cm2, 1 h) resulted in activation of peritoneal macrophages (PM) to a viricidal state restricting the replication of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). The PM from MW-exposed hamsters were viricidal as early as 1 day after exposure and remained active for 5 days. Immunization of hamsters with vaccinia virus induced viricidal PM by 3 to 4 days and they remained active for 7 days. To test the hypothesis that thermogenic MW exposure results in the release of endotoxin across the intestinal epithelium which subsequently activates PM, hamsters were injected with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and their viricidal activity was studied. Lipopolysaccharide in vitro (0.2 microgram) and in vivo (0.5 microgram) activated macrophages to a viricidal state. When administered in vivo, LPS (0.5 microgram) activated macrophages as early as 1 day and the activity remained for 3 days. While MW exposure of PM in vitro failed to induce viricidal activity, exposure of PM to LPS in vitro induced strong viricidal activity. This suggests that the in vivo response of PM to MW is an indirect one, which is consistent with the hypothesis that MW-induced PM viricidal activity may be mediated via LPS. In preliminary experiments, MW exposure resulted in extended survival time for hamsters challenged with a lethal dose of vesicular stomatitis virus, supporting the concept that MW-activated PM may be a useful therapeutic modality.

  20. Inhibition of various steps in the replication cycle of vesicular stomatitis virus contributes to its photoinactivation by AlPcS4 or Pc4 and red light

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moor, ACE; Wagenaars-van Gompel, AE; Hermanns, RCA; van der Meulen, J; Smit, J; Wilschut, J; Brand, A; Dubbelman, TMAR; VanSteveninck, J

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) was used as a model virus to study the processes involved in photoinactivation by aluminum phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate (AIPcS(4),) or silicon phthalocyanine HOSiPcOSi(CH3)(2)(CH2)(3)N(CH3)(2) (Pc4) and red light. Previously a very rapid decrease in the

  1. Interferon induction by viruses. XV. Biological characteristics of interferon induction-suppressing particles of vesicular stomatitis virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcus, P.I.; Sekellick, M.J.

    1987-06-01

    A single interferon (IFN) induction-suppressing particle (ISP) of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) blocked completely the yield of IFN in a cell otherwise programmed to produce IFN. With mouse L cells as hosts, one lethal hit of UV radiation (D37 = 52.5 ergs/mm2) to the VSV genome sufficed to inactivate ISP activity; however, with ''aged'' primary chick embryo cells as hosts, it took 198 lethal hits (D37 = 10,395 ergs/mm2). ISP expression in chick cells did not require virus replication or amplified RNA synthesis, but did involve functional virion-associated L protein. ISP in chick cells also were capable of inhibiting, in a multiplicity-dependent manner, the plaquing efficiency of two viruses that require cellular polymerase II (pol II) for replication, e.g., pseudorabies and influenza. The refractory state to IFN inducibility that resulted from infection of chick cells with ISP (VSV tsO5 (UV = 100 hits)) was still extant after 6 days. In contrast, the plaquing efficiency of pseudorabies virus returned to control levels by 5 h after ISP infection. Chick cells infected with UV ISP remained viable, served as hosts for the replication of other viruses, and could be subcultured. Models are presented to account for these contrasting effects. The involvement of viral plus-strand leader RNA as an inhibitor of cellular pol II-dependent RNA synthesis, and the multifunctional activities of the virion-associated L protein, are discussed as possible molecules involved in the action of ISP in chick cells.

  2. Recoding of the vesicular stomatitis virus L gene by computer-aided design provides a live, attenuated vaccine candidate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bingyin; Yang, Chen; Tekes, Gergely; Mueller, Steffen; Paul, Aniko; Whelan, Sean P J; Wimmer, Eckard

    2015-03-31

    Codon pair bias (CPB), which has been observed in all organisms, is a neglected genomic phenomenon that affects gene expression. CPB results from synonymous codons that are paired more or less frequently in ORFeomes regardless of codon bias. The effect of an individual codon pair change is usually small, but when it is amplified by large-scale genome recoding, strikingly altered biological phenotypes are observed. The utility of codon pair bias in the development of live attenuated vaccines was recently demonstrated by recodings of poliovirus (a positive-strand RNA virus) and influenza virus (a negative-strand segmented RNA virus). Here, the L gene of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), a nonsegmented negative-sense RNA virus, was partially recoded based on codon pair bias. Totals of 858 and 623 silent mutations were introduced into a 5'-terminal segment of the viral L gene (designated L1) to create sequences containing either overrepresented or underrepresented codon pairs, designated L1(sdmax) and L1(min), respectively. Analysis revealed that recombinant VSV containing the L1(min) sequence could not be recovered, whereas the virus with the sdmax sequence showed a modest level of attenuation in cell culture. More strikingly, in mice the L1(sdmax) virus was almost as immunogenic as the parental strain but highly attenuated. Taken together, these results open a new road to attain a balance between VSV virulence and immunogenicity, which could serve as an example for the attenuation of other negative-strand, nonsegmented RNA viruses. Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is the prototypic rhabdovirus in the order Mononegavirales. A wide range of human pathogens belong to this family. Using a unique computer algorithm and large-scale genome synthesis, we attempted to develop a live attenuated vaccine strain for VSV, which could be used as an antigen delivery platform for humans. Recombinant VSVs with distinct codon pair biases were rationally designed, constructed, and

  3. Intrinsic innate immunity fails to control herpes simplex virus and vesicular stomatitis virus replication in sensory neurons and fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosato, Pamela C; Leib, David A

    2014-09-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) establishes lifelong latent infections in the sensory neurons of the trigeminal ganglia (TG), wherein it retains the capacity to reactivate. The interferon (IFN)-driven antiviral response is critical for the control of HSV-1 acute replication. We therefore sought to further investigate this response in TG neurons cultured from adult mice deficient in a variety of IFN signaling components. Parallel experiments were also performed in fibroblasts isolated concurrently. We showed that HSV-1 replication was comparable in wild-type (WT) and IFN signaling-deficient neurons and fibroblasts. Unexpectedly, a similar pattern was observed for the IFN-sensitive vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). Despite these findings, TG neurons responded to IFN-β pretreatment with STAT1 nuclear localization and restricted replication of both VSV and an HSV-1 strain deficient in γ34.5, while wild-type HSV-1 replication was unaffected. This was in contrast to fibroblasts in which all viruses were restricted by the addition of IFN-β. Taken together, these data show that adult TG neurons can mount an effective antiviral response only if provided with an exogenous source of IFN-β, and HSV-1 combats this response through γ34.5. These results further our understanding of the antiviral response of neurons and highlight the importance of paracrine IFN-β signaling in establishing an antiviral state. Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is a ubiquitous virus that establishes a lifelong latent infection in neurons. Reactivation from latency can cause cold sores, blindness, and death from encephalitis. Humans with deficiencies in innate immunity have significant problems controlling HSV infections. In this study, we therefore sought to elucidate the role of neuronal innate immunity in the control of viral infection. Using neurons isolated from mice, we found that the intrinsic capacity of neurons to restrict virus replication was unaffected by the presence or absence of

  4. Enhancement of immunostimulatory properties of exosomal vaccines by incorporation of fusion-competent G protein of vesicular stomatitis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temchura, Vladimir V; Tenbusch, Matthias; Nchinda, Godwin; Nabi, Ghulam; Tippler, Bettina; Zelenyuk, Maryna; Wildner, Oliver; Uberla, Klaus; Kuate, Seraphin

    2008-07-04

    Exosomes have been proposed as candidates for therapeutic immunization. The present study demonstrates that incorporation of the G protein of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV-G) into exosome-like vesicles (ELVs) enhances their uptake and induces the maturation of dendritic cells. Targeting of VSV-G and ovalbumin as a model antigen to the same ELVs increased the cross-presentation of ovalbumin via an endosomal acidification mechanism. Immunization of mice with VSV-G and ovalbumin containing ELVs led to an increased IgG2a antibody response, expansion of antigen-specific CD8 T cells, strong in vivo CTL responses, and protection from challenge with ovalbumin expressing tumor cells. Thus, incorporation of VSV-G and targeting of antigens to ELVs are attractive strategies to improve exosomal vaccines.

  5. Oncolytic Vesicular Stomatitis Virus as a Viro-Immunotherapy: Defeating Cancer with a “Hammer” and “Anvil”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Karl Melzer

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic viruses have gained much attention in recent years, due, not only to their ability to selectively replicate in and lyse tumor cells, but to their potential to stimulate antitumor immune responses directed against the tumor. Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV, a negative-strand RNA virus, is under intense development as an oncolytic virus due to a variety of favorable properties, including its rapid replication kinetics, inherent tumor specificity, and its potential to elicit a broad range of immunomodulatory responses to break immune tolerance in the tumor microenvironment. Based on this powerful platform, a multitude of strategies have been applied to further improve the immune-stimulating potential of VSV and synergize these responses with the direct oncolytic effect. These strategies include: 1. modification of endogenous virus genes to stimulate interferon induction; 2. virus-mediated expression of cytokines or immune-stimulatory molecules to enhance anti-tumor immune responses; 3. vaccination approaches to stimulate adaptive immune responses against a tumor antigen; 4. combination with adoptive immune cell therapy for potentially synergistic therapeutic responses. A summary of these approaches will be presented in this review.

  6. Digital sensing and sizing of vesicular stomatitis virus pseudotypes in complex media: a model for Ebola and Marburg detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daaboul, George G; Lopez, Carlos A; Chinnala, Jyothsna; Goldberg, Bennett B; Connor, John H; Ünlü, M Selim

    2014-06-24

    Rapid, sensitive, and direct label-free capture and characterization of nanoparticles from complex media such as blood or serum will broadly impact medicine and the life sciences. We demonstrate identification of virus particles in complex samples for replication-competent wild-type vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), defective VSV, and Ebola- and Marburg-pseudotyped VSV with high sensitivity and specificity. Size discrimination of the imaged nanoparticles (virions) allows differentiation between modified viruses having different genome lengths and facilitates a reduction in the counting of nonspecifically bound particles to achieve a limit-of-detection (LOD) of 5 × 10(3) pfu/mL for the Ebola and Marburg VSV pseudotypes. We demonstrate the simultaneous detection of multiple viruses in a single sample (composed of serum or whole blood) for screening applications and uncompromised detection capabilities in samples contaminated with high levels of bacteria. By employing affinity-based capture, size discrimination, and a "digital" detection scheme to count single virus particles, we show that a robust and sensitive virus/nanoparticle sensing assay can be established for targets in complex samples. The nanoparticle microscopy system is termed the Single Particle Interferometric Reflectance Imaging Sensor (SP-IRIS) and is capable of high-throughput and rapid sizing of large numbers of biological nanoparticles on an antibody microarray for research and diagnostic applications.

  7. Interferon-induced protein Ifit2 protects mice from infection of the peripheral nervous system by vesicular stomatitis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fensterl, Volker; Wetzel, Jaime L; Sen, Ganes C

    2014-09-01

    The interferon system provides the first line of host defense against virus infection. Mouse pathogenesis studies have revealed the importance of specific interferon-induced proteins in providing protection against specific viruses. We have previously reported that one such protein, Ifit2, protects neurons of the central nervous system from intranasal infection by the neurotropic rhabdovirus, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). Here, we demonstrate that Ifit2 protects the peripheral nervous system from VSV infection as well. In Ifit2(-/-) mice, VSV, injected subcutaneously into the footpad, entered the proximal lymph node, where it replicated and infected the nodal nerve endings. The infection spread to the sciatic nerve, the spinal cord, and the brain, causing paralysis. In contrast, in the wild-type mice, although VSV replicated equally well in the lymph node, infection of the sciatic nerve and the rest of the nervous system was impaired, thus preventing paralysis. Ifit2 protected only the nervous system from VSV infection; other tissues were well protected even in Ifit2(-/-) mice. These results indicate that Ifit2 is the interferon-induced protein that prevents VSV infection of neurons of both the peripheral and the central nervous systems, thus inhibiting the consequent neuropathy, but it is dispensable for protecting the cells of other tissues from VSV infection. Although viral infection is quite common, the immune system effectively protects us from viral diseases. A major part of this protection is mediated by interferon, the antiviral cytokine secreted by virus-infected cells. To empower the neighboring uninfected cells in combating the oncoming infection, interferon induces the synthesis of more than 200 new proteins, many of which have antiviral activities. The virus studied here, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), like its relative, rabies virus, can cause neuropathy in mice if it enters the peripheral nervous system through skin lesions; however

  8. Oncolytic Vesicular Stomatitis Virus in an Immunocompetent Model of MUC1-Positive or MUC1-Null Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastie, Eric; Besmer, Dahlia M.; Shah, Nirav R.; Murphy, Andrea M.; Moerdyk-Schauwecker, Megan; Molestina, Carlos; Roy, Lopamudra Das; Curry, Jennifer M.; Mukherjee, Pinku

    2013-01-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is a promising oncolytic agent against various malignancies. Here, for the first time, we tested VSV in vitro and in vivo in a clinically relevant, immunocompetent mouse model of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA). Our system allows the study of virotherapy against PDA in the context of overexpression (80% of PDA patients) or no expression of human mucin 1 (MUC1), a major marker for poor prognosis in patients. In vitro, we tested three VSV recombinants, wild-type VSV, VSV-green fluorescent protein (VSV-GFP), and a safe oncolytic VSV-ΔM51-GFP, against five mouse PDA cell lines that either expressed human MUC1 or were MUC1 null. All viruses demonstrated significant oncolytic abilities independent of MUC1 expression, although VSV-ΔM51-GFP was somewhat less effective in two PDA cell lines. In vivo administration of VSV-ΔM51-GFP resulted in significant reduction of tumor growth for tested mouse PDA xenografts (+MUC1 or MUC1 null), and antitumor efficacy was further improved when the virus was combined with the chemotherapeutic drug gemcitabine. The antitumor effect was transient in all tested groups. The developed system can be used to study therapies involving various oncolytic viruses and chemotherapeutics, with the goal of inducing tumor-specific immunity while preventing premature virus clearance. PMID:23864625

  9. Oncolytic vesicular stomatitis virus in an immunocompetent model of MUC1-positive or MUC1-null pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastie, Eric; Besmer, Dahlia M; Shah, Nirav R; Murphy, Andrea M; Moerdyk-Schauwecker, Megan; Molestina, Carlos; Roy, Lopamudra Das; Curry, Jennifer M; Mukherjee, Pinku; Grdzelishvili, Valery Z

    2013-09-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is a promising oncolytic agent against various malignancies. Here, for the first time, we tested VSV in vitro and in vivo in a clinically relevant, immunocompetent mouse model of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA). Our system allows the study of virotherapy against PDA in the context of overexpression (80% of PDA patients) or no expression of human mucin 1 (MUC1), a major marker for poor prognosis in patients. In vitro, we tested three VSV recombinants, wild-type VSV, VSV-green fluorescent protein (VSV-GFP), and a safe oncolytic VSV-ΔM51-GFP, against five mouse PDA cell lines that either expressed human MUC1 or were MUC1 null. All viruses demonstrated significant oncolytic abilities independent of MUC1 expression, although VSV-ΔM51-GFP was somewhat less effective in two PDA cell lines. In vivo administration of VSV-ΔM51-GFP resulted in significant reduction of tumor growth for tested mouse PDA xenografts (+MUC1 or MUC1 null), and antitumor efficacy was further improved when the virus was combined with the chemotherapeutic drug gemcitabine. The antitumor effect was transient in all tested groups. The developed system can be used to study therapies involving various oncolytic viruses and chemotherapeutics, with the goal of inducing tumor-specific immunity while preventing premature virus clearance.

  10. Dynamics of melanoma tumor therapy with vesicular stomatitis virus: explaining the variability in outcomes using mathematical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rommelfanger, D M; Offord, C P; Dev, J; Bajzer, Z; Vile, R G; Dingli, D

    2012-05-01

    Tumor selective, replication competent viruses are being tested for cancer gene therapy. This approach introduces a new therapeutic paradigm due to potential replication of the therapeutic agent and induction of a tumor-specific immune response. However, the experimental outcomes are quite variable, even when studies utilize highly inbred strains of mice and the same cell line and virus. Recognizing that virotherapy is an exercise in population dynamics, we utilize mathematical modeling to understand the variable outcomes observed when B16ova malignant melanoma tumors are treated with vesicular stomatitis virus in syngeneic, fully immunocompetent mice. We show how variability in the initial tumor size and the actual amount of virus delivered to the tumor have critical roles on the outcome of therapy. Virotherapy works best when tumors are small, and a robust innate immune response can lead to superior tumor control. Strategies that reduce tumor burden without suppressing the immune response and methods that maximize the amount of virus delivered to the tumor should optimize tumor control in this model system.

  11. Ruxolitinib and Polycation Combination Treatment Overcomes Multiple Mechanisms of Resistance of Pancreatic Cancer Cells to Oncolytic Vesicular Stomatitis Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felt, Sébastien A; Droby, Gaith N; Grdzelishvili, Valery Z

    2017-08-15

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is a promising oncolytic virus (OV). Although VSV is effective against a majority of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cell (PDAC) cell lines, some PDAC cell lines are highly resistant to VSV, and the mechanisms of resistance are still unclear. JAK1/2 inhibitors (such as ruxolitinib and JAK inhibitor I) strongly stimulate VSV replication and oncolysis in all resistant cell lines but only partially improve the susceptibility of resistant PDACs to VSV. VSV tumor tropism is generally dependent on the permissiveness of malignant cells to viral replication rather than on receptor specificity, with several ubiquitously expressed cell surface molecules playing a role in VSV attachment to host cells. However, as VSV attachment to PDAC cells has never been tested before, here we examined if it was possibly inhibited in resistant PDAC cells. Our data show a dramatically weaker attachment of VSV to HPAF-II cells, the most resistant human PDAC cell line. Although sequence analysis of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor (LDLR) mRNA did not reveal any amino acid substitutions in this cell line, HPAF-II cells displayed the lowest level of LDLR expression and dramatically lower LDL uptake. Treatment of cells with various statins strongly increased LDLR expression levels but did not improve VSV attachment or LDL uptake in HPAF-II cells. However, LDLR-independent attachment of VSV to HPAF-II cells was dramatically improved by treating cells with Polybrene or DEAE-dextran. Moreover, combining VSV with ruxolitinib and Polybrene or DEAE-dextran successfully broke the resistance of HPAF-II cells to VSV by simultaneously improving VSV attachment and replication.IMPORTANCE Oncolytic virus (OV) therapy is an anticancer approach that uses viruses that selectively infect and kill cancer cells. This study focuses on oncolytic vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) against pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells. Although VSV is effective against most PDAC

  12. Cytopathogenesis of vesicular stomatitis virus is regulated by the PSAP motif of M protein in a species-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irie, Takashi; Liu, Yuliang; Drolet, Barbara S; Carnero, Elena; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Harty, Ronald N

    2012-09-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is an important vector-borne pathogen of bovine and equine species, causing a reportable vesicular disease. The matrix (M) protein of VSV is multifunctional and plays a key role in cytopathogenesis, apoptosis, host protein shut-off, and virion assembly/budding. Our previous findings indicated that mutations of residues flanking the (37)PSAP(40) motif within the M protein resulted in VSV recombinants having attenuated phenotypes in mice. In this report, we characterize the phenotype of VSV recombinant PS > A4 (which harbors four alanines (AAAA) in place of the PSAP motif without disruption of flanking residues) in both mice, and in Aedes albopictus C6/36 mosquito and Culicoides sonorensis KC cell lines. The PS > A4 recombinant displayed an attenuated phenotype in infected mice as judged by weight loss, mortality, and viral titers measured from lung and brain samples of infected animals. However, unexpectedly, the PS > A4 recombinant displayed a robust cytopathic phenotype in insect C6/36 cells compared to that observed with control viruses. Notably, titers of recombinant PS > A4 were approximately 10-fold greater than those of control viruses in infected C6/36 cells and in KC cells from Culicoides sonorensis, a known VSV vector species. In addition, recombinant PS > A4 induced a 25-fold increase in the level of C3 caspase activity in infected C6/36 cells. These findings indicate that the PSAP motif plays a direct role in regulating cytopathogenicity in a species-dependent manner, and suggest that the intact PSAP motif may be important for maintaining persistence of VSV in an insect host.

  13. H-2K/sup bm3/ mutation decreases the anti-vesicular stomatitis virus cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowman, M.R.; Lyles, D.; Parce, J.W.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have identified the substrain of mouse possessing the H-2K/sup bm3/ mutation as expressing a low anti-Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV) cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) response upon secondary in vitro elicitation with ultraviolet light-inactivated virus. The CTL elicited from both the mutant, M505 (bm3), and the parental strain, C57B1/6(B6), kill B6 targets better than bm3 targets. Likewise, in cold target inhibition assays, unlabeled B6 cells inhibited better than unlabeled bm3 cells the recognition of /sup 51/Cr-labeled B6 targets regardless of whether B6 or bm3 CTL effector cells were used. CTL from both B6 and bm3 mice are H-2 restricted, virus specific, and possess the Thyl, Lyt2,3 phenotype. In addition, the effector cells use the H-2K molecule as the major restricting element. Both B6 and bm3 cells were shown by radiolabeling and immunoprecipitation to express an equivalent amount of G protein, the major viral surface glycoprotein, as well as equivalent amounts of H-2K. These data suggest the bm3 mutation in H-2K alters the association of H-2K with either the G protein or with a molecule on the CTL required for secondary in vitro elicitation.

  14. Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Has Extensive Oncolytic Activity against Human Sarcomas: Rare Resistance Is Overcome by Blocking Interferon Pathways ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paglino, Justin C.; van den Pol, Anthony N.

    2011-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses have been tested against many carcinomas of ectodermal and endodermal origin; however, sarcomas, arising from mesoderm, have received relatively little attention. Using 13 human sarcomas representing seven tumor types, we assessed the efficiency of infection, cytolysis, and replication of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and its oncolytically enhanced mutant VSV-rp30a. Both viruses efficiently infected and killed 12 of 13 sarcomas. VSV-rp30a showed a faster rate of infection and replication. In vitro and in vivo, VSV was selective for sarcomas compared with normal mesoderm. A single intravenous injection of VSV-rp30a selectively infected all subcutaneous human sarcomas tested in mice and arrested the growth of tumors that otherwise grew 11-fold. In contrast to other sarcomas, synovial sarcoma SW982 demonstrated remarkable resistance, even to high titers of virus (multiplicity of infection [MOI] of 100). We found no dysfunction in VSV binding or internalization. SW982 also resisted infection by human cytomegalovirus and Sindbis virus, suggesting a virus resistance mechanism based on an altered antiviral state. Quantitative reverse transcriptase (qRT)-PCR analysis revealed a heightened basal expression of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs). Pretreatment, but not cotreatment, with interferon attenuators valproate, Jak1 inhibitor, or vaccinia virus B18R protein rendered SW982 highly susceptible, and this correlated with downregulation of ISG expression. Jak1 inhibitor pretreatment also enhanced susceptibility in moderately VSV-resistant liposarcoma and bladder carcinoma. Overall, we find that the potential efficacy of VSV as an oncolytic agent extends to nonhematologic mesodermal tumors and that unusually strong resistance to VSV oncolysis can be overcome with interferon attenuators. PMID:21734048

  15. Effects of intravenously administered recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV(deltaM51)) on multifocal and invasive gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lun, XueQing; Senger, Donna L; Alain, Tommy; Oprea, Andra; Parato, Kelley; Stojdl, Dave; Lichty, Brian; Power, Anthony; Johnston, Randal N; Hamilton, Mark; Parney, Ian; Bell, John C; Forsyth, Peter A

    2006-11-01

    An ideal virus for the treatment of cancer should have effective delivery into multiple sites within the tumor, evade immune responses, produce rapid viral replication, spread within the tumor, and infect multiple tumors. Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) has been shown to be an effective oncolytic virus in a variety of tumor models, and mutations in the matrix (M) protein enhance VSV's effectiveness in animal models. We evaluated the susceptibility of 14 glioma cell lines to infection and killing by mutant strain VSV(deltaM51), which contains a single-amino acid deletion in the M protein. We also examined the activity and safety of this strain against the U87 and U118 experimental models of human malignant glioma in nude mice and analyzed the distribution of the virus in the brains of U87 tumor-bearing mice using fluorescence labeling. Finally, we examined the effect of VSV(deltaM51) on 15 primary human gliomas cultured from surgical specimens. All statistical tests were two-sided. All 14 glioma cell lines were susceptible to VSV(deltaM51) infection and killing. Intratumoral administration of VSV(deltaM51) produced marked regression of malignant gliomas in nude mice. When administered systemically, live VSV(deltaM51) virus, as compared with dead virus, statistically significantly prolonged survival of mice with unilateral U87 tumors (median survival: 113 versus 46 days, P = .0001) and bilateral U87 tumors (median survival: 73 versus 46 days, P = .0025). VSV(deltaM51) infected multifocal gliomas, invasive glioma cells that migrated beyond the main glioma, and all 15 primary human gliomas. There was no evidence of toxicity. Systemically delivered VSV(deltaM51) was an effective and safe oncolytic agent against laboratory models of multifocal and invasive malignant gliomas, the most challenging clinical manifestations of this disease.

  16. Mediators of protection against lethal systemic vesicular stomatitis virus infection in hamsters: defective interfering particles, polyinosinate-polycytidylate, and interferon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fultz, P.N.; Shadduck, J.A.; Kang, C.Y.; Streilein, J.W.

    1982-08-01

    Homologous defective interfering (DI) particles protected adult Syrian hamsters against lethal systemic infection with vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) serotype Indiana. The DI particles had to be biologically active, but did not have to be administered at the same inoculation site as the infectious virus. Serum and tissue levels of VSV postinoculation were significantly lower in DI-protected animals than in unprotected controls, suggesting that true autointerference was occurring. However, some aspects of protection also must be mediated through nonspecific mechanisms, since susceptible hamsters could be protected against VSV Indiana by coinjection with heterologous DI particles prepared from VSV serotype New Jersey or by simultaneous administration of polyinosinic acid-polycytidylic acid. By measuring serum levels of putative hamster interferon (type 1), we found that animals coinjected with VSV and DI particles or polyinosinic acid-polycytidylic acid produced significant levels of interferon. Since similarly high serum levels of interferon were measured in recipients of VSV alone (animals that eventually died from infection), there appeared to be no correlation between protection against lethal disease and induced levels of serum interferon. Instead, serum interferon levels correlated positively with amounts of VSV PFU found in serum and tissues of infected animals, the lowest levels being found in serum of animals protected with homologous DI particles. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that autointerference by DI particles as well as various host defense mechanisms (possibly including induction of interferon) participates in protecting hamsters against lethal VSV infection.

  17. Oncolytic Recombinant Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV) Is Nonpathogenic and Nontransmissible in Pigs, a Natural Host of VSV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velazquez-Salinas, Lauro; Naik, Shruthi; Pauszek, Steven J; Peng, Kah-Whye; Russell, Stephen J; Rodriguez, Luis L

    2017-06-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is a negative-stranded RNA virus that naturally causes disease in livestock including horses, cattle and pigs. The two main identified VSV serotypes are New Jersey (VSNJV) and Indiana (VSIV). VSV is a rapidly replicating, potently immunogenic virus that has been engineered to develop novel oncolytic therapies for cancer treatment. Swine are a natural host for VSV and provide a relevant and well-established model, amenable to biological sampling to monitor virus shedding and neutralizing antibodies. Previous reports have documented the pathogenicity and transmissibility of wild-type isolates and recombinant strains of VSIV and VSNJV using the swine model. Oncolytic VSV engineered to express interferon-beta (IFNβ) and the sodium iodide symporter (NIS), VSV-IFNβ-NIS, has been shown to be a potent new therapeutic agent inducing rapid and durable tumor remission following systemic therapy in preclinical mouse models. VSV-IFNβ-NIS is currently undergoing clinical evaluation for the treatment of advanced cancer in human and canine patients. To support clinical studies and comprehensively assess the risk of transmission to susceptible species, we tested the pathogenicity and transmissibility of oncolytic VSV-IFNβ-NIS using the swine model. Following previously established protocols to evaluate VSV pathogenicity, intradermal inoculation with 107 TCID50 VSV-IFNβ-NIS caused no observable symptoms in pigs. There was no detectable shedding of infectious virus in VSV-IFNβ-NIS in biological excreta of inoculated pigs or exposed naive pigs kept in direct contact throughout the experiment. VSV-IFNβ-NIS inoculated pigs became seropositive for VSV antibodies, while contact pigs displayed no symptoms of VSV infection, and importantly did not seroconvert. These data indicate that oncolytic VSV is both nonpathogenic and not transmissible in pigs, a natural host. These findings support further clinical development of oncolytic VSV-IFNβ-NIS as a

  18. Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein K Supports Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Replication by Regulating Cell Survival and Cellular Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinh, Phat X.; Das, Anshuman; Franco, Rodrigo

    2013-01-01

    The heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) is a member of the family of hnRNPs and was recently shown in a genome-wide small interfering RNA (siRNA) screen to support vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) growth. To decipher the role of hnRNP K in VSV infection, we conducted studies which suggest that the protein is required for VSV spreading. Virus binding to cells, entry, and nucleocapsid uncoating steps were not adversely affected in the absence of hnRNP K, whereas viral genome transcription and replication were reduced slightly. These results indicate that hnRNP K is likely involved in virus assembly and/or release from infected cells. Further studies showed that hnRNP K suppresses apoptosis of virus-infected cells, resulting in increased cell survival during VSV infection. The increased survival of the infected cells was found to be due to the suppression of proapoptotic proteins such as Bcl-XS and Bik in a cell-type-dependent manner. Additionally, depletion of hnRNP K resulted in not only significantly increased levels of T-cell-restricted intracellular antigen 1 (TIA1) but also switching of the expression of the two isoforms of the protein (TIA1a and TIA1b), both of which inhibited VSV replication. hnRNP K was also found to support expression of several cellular proteins known to be required for VSV infection. Overall, our studies demonstrate hnRNP K to be a multifunctional protein that supports VSV infection via its role(s) in suppressing apoptosis of infected cells, inhibiting the expression of antiviral proteins, and maintaining the expression of proteins required for the virus. PMID:23843646

  19. The length of vesicular stomatitis virus particles dictates a need for actin assembly during clathrin-dependent endocytosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David K Cureton

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Microbial pathogens exploit the clathrin endocytic machinery to enter host cells. Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV, an enveloped virus with bullet-shaped virions that measure 70 x 200 nm, enters cells by clathrin-dependent endocytosis. We showed previously that VSV particles exceed the capacity of typical clathrin-coated vesicles and instead enter through endocytic carriers that acquire a partial clathrin coat and require local actin filament assembly to complete vesicle budding and internalization. To understand why the actin system is required for VSV uptake, we compared the internalization mechanisms of VSV and its shorter (75 nm long defective interfering particle, DI-T. By imaging the uptake of individual particles into live cells, we found that, as with parental virions, DI-T enters via the clathrin endocytic pathway. Unlike VSV, DI-T internalization occurs through complete clathrin-coated vesicles and does not require actin polymerization. Since VSV and DI-T particles display similar surface densities of the same attachment glycoprotein, we conclude that the physical properties of the particle dictate whether a virus-containing clathrin pit engages the actin system. We suggest that the elongated shape of a VSV particle prevents full enclosure by the clathrin coat and that stalling of coat assembly triggers recruitment of the actin machinery to finish the internalization process. Since some enveloped viruses have pleomorphic particle shapes and sizes, our work suggests that they may use altered modes of endocytic uptake. More generally, our findings show the importance of cargo geometry for specifying cellular entry modes, even when the receptor recognition properties of a ligand are maintained.

  20. The Immune Response to a Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Vaccine Vector Is Independent of Particulate Antigen Secretion and Protein Turnover Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobleigh, Melissa A.; Bradfield, Clinton; Liu, Yuanjie; Mehta, Anand

    2012-01-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is a highly cytopathic virus being developed as a vaccine vector due to its ability to induce strong protective T cell and antibody responses after a single dose. However, little is known regarding the mechanisms underlying the potent immune responses elicited by VSV. We previously generated a VSV vector expressing the hepatitis B virus middle envelope surface glycoprotein (MS) that induces strong MS-specific T cell and antibody responses in mice. After synthesis in the cytoplasm, the MS protein translocates to the endoplasmic reticulum, where it forms subviral particles that are secreted from the cell. To better understand the contributions of secreted and intracellular protein to the VSV-induced immune response, we produced a vector expressing a secretion-deficient MS mutant (MSC69A) and compared the immunogenicity of this vector to that of the wild-type VSV-MS vector in mice. As expected, the MSC69A protein was not secreted from VSV-infected cells and displayed enhanced proteasome-mediated degradation. Surprisingly, despite these differences in intracellular protein processing, the T cell and antibody responses generated to MSC69A were comparable to those elicited by virus expressing wild-type MS protein. Therefore, when it is expressed from VSV, the immune responses to MS are independent of particulate antigen secretion and the turnover rate of cytoplasmic protein. These results are consistent with a model in which the immune responses to VSV are strongly influenced by the replication cycle of the vector and demonstrate that characteristics of the vector have the capacity to affect vaccine efficacy more than do the properties of the antigen itself. PMID:22345454

  1. The Length of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Particles Dictates a Need for Actin Assembly during Clathrin-Dependent Endocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cureton, David K.; Massol, Ramiro H.; Whelan, Sean P. J.; Kirchhausen, Tomas

    2010-01-01

    Microbial pathogens exploit the clathrin endocytic machinery to enter host cells. Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), an enveloped virus with bullet-shaped virions that measure 70×200 nm, enters cells by clathrin-dependent endocytosis. We showed previously that VSV particles exceed the capacity of typical clathrin-coated vesicles and instead enter through endocytic carriers that acquire a partial clathrin coat and require local actin filament assembly to complete vesicle budding and internalization. To understand why the actin system is required for VSV uptake, we compared the internalization mechanisms of VSV and its shorter (75 nm long) defective interfering particle, DI-T. By imaging the uptake of individual particles into live cells, we found that, as with parental virions, DI-T enters via the clathrin endocytic pathway. Unlike VSV, DI-T internalization occurs through complete clathrin-coated vesicles and does not require actin polymerization. Since VSV and DI-T particles display similar surface densities of the same attachment glycoprotein, we conclude that the physical properties of the particle dictate whether a virus-containing clathrin pit engages the actin system. We suggest that the elongated shape of a VSV particle prevents full enclosure by the clathrin coat and that stalling of coat assembly triggers recruitment of the actin machinery to finish the internalization process. Since some enveloped viruses have pleomorphic particle shapes and sizes, our work suggests that they may use altered modes of endocytic uptake. More generally, our findings show the importance of cargo geometry for specifying cellular entry modes, even when the receptor recognition properties of a ligand are maintained. PMID:20941355

  2. Single-dose, therapeutic vaccination of mice with vesicular stomatitis virus expressing human papillomavirus type 16 E7 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, John B; Publicover, Jean; Rose, John K; DiMaio, Daniel

    2008-05-01

    We are developing recombinant attenuated vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) as a vaccine vector to generate humoral and cell-mediated immune responses. Here, we explore the use of VSV vaccines for cancer immunotherapy. Immunotherapy targeting high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) lesions has the potential to benefit HPV-infected individuals and cervical cancer patients by generating cytotoxic T cells that kill tumor cells that express viral antigens. A single dose of VSV expressing the HPV type 16 (HPV16) E7 oncogene was used for therapeutic vaccination of mice bearing TC-1 syngeneic tumors, which express HPV16 E7. HPV16 E7-specific T cells were generated and displayed cytotoxic activity against the tumor cells. By 14 days postvaccination, average tumor volumes were 10-fold less in the vaccinated group than in mice that received the empty-vector VSV, and regression of preexisting tumors occurred in some cases. This antitumor effect was CD8 T-cell dependent. Our results demonstrate antitumor responses to HPV16 E7 and suggest that recombinant-VSV-based vaccination should be explored as a therapeutic strategy for cervical carcinoma and other HPV-associated cancers.

  3. Preparation of vesicular stomatitis virus-G (VSV-G) conjugate and its use in gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyanohara, Atsushi

    2012-04-01

    The fusiogenic envelope G glycoprotein of the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV-G) that has been used to pseudotype retrovirus and lentivirus vectors can be used alone as an efficient vehicle for gene transfer. VSV-G protein is secreted into the culture medium as sendimentable vesicles from cells transfected with a VSV-G expression plasmid in the absence of other viral components. The VSV-G vesicles in the conditioned medium can be partially purified by pelleting through sucrose cushion ultracentrifugation. Protein-DNA complexes are formed by mixing the VSV-G vesicles with naked plasmid DNA. Such complexes show markedly enhanced transfection efficiency when added to the culture medium of recipient cells. The cell tropism of VSV-G-DNA complex-mediated gene transfer resembles that of VSV-G-pseudotyped retrovirus and lentivirus vectors, and the complex is therefore particularly useful for transfection of cells that are refractory to other methods. Still, some cells are refractory to VSV-G-mediated transfection. It should also be noted that overdose of VSV-G can be quite toxic to the recipient cells. The primitive complexes formed by mixing a viral fusiogenic envelope protein with naked DNA may represent a step toward fusing useful features of viral and nonviral vectors for safer and more efficient gene transfer. This protocol describes simple methods for preparation of VSV-G and for gene transfer with DNA-VSV-G complexes.

  4. Faster replication and higher expression levels of viral glycoproteins give the vesicular stomatitis virus/measles virus hybrid VSV-FH a growth advantage over measles virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala-Breton, Camilo; Russell, Luke O J; Russell, Stephen J; Peng, Kah-Whye

    2014-08-01

    VSV-FH is a hybrid vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) with a deletion of its G glycoprotein and encoding the measles virus (MV) fusion (F) and hemagglutinin (H) envelope glycoproteins. VSV-FH infects cells expressing MV receptors and is fusogenic and effective against myeloma xenografts in mice. We evaluated the fusogenic activities of MV and VSV-FH in relationship to the density of receptor on the target cell surface and the kinetics of F and H expression in infected cells. Using a panel of cells expressing increasing numbers of the MV receptor CD46, we evaluated syncytium size in MV- or VSV-FH-infected cells. VSV-FH is not fusogenic at low CD46 density but requires less CD46 for syncytium formation than MV. The size of each syncytium is larger in VSV-FH-infected cells at a specific CD46 density. While syncytium size reached a plateau and did not increase further in MV-infected CHO cells expressing ≥4,620 CD46 copies/cell, there was a corresponding increase in syncytium size with increases in CD46 levels in VSV-FH-infected CD46-expressing CHO (CHO-CD46) cells. Further analysis in VSV-FH-infected cell lines shows earlier and higher expression of F and H mRNAs and protein. However, VSV-FH cytotoxic activity was reduced by pretreatment of the cells with type I interferon. In contrast, the cytopathic effects are not affected in MV-infected cells. In summary, VSV-FH has significant advantages over MV as an oncolytic virus due to its higher viral yield, faster replication kinetics, and larger fusogenic capabilities but should be used in cancer types with defective interferon signaling pathways. We studied the cytotoxic activity of a vesicular stomatitis/measles hybrid virus (VSV-FH), which is superior to that of measles virus (MV), in different cancer cell lines. We determined that viral RNA and protein were produced faster and in higher quantities in VSV-FH-infected cells. This resulted in the formation of larger syncytia, higher production of infectious particles, and

  5. Strains of Lentinula edodes suppress growth of phytopathogenic fungi and inhibit Alagoas serotype of vesicular stomatitis virus Linhagens de Lentinula edodes inibem fungos fitopatogênicos e o vírus da estomatite vesicular, sorotipo Alagoas

    OpenAIRE

    Sasaki, Selma H.; Rosa E.C. Linhares; Nozawa,Carlos M.; Ricardo Montalván; Paccola-Meirelles,Luzia D.

    2001-01-01

    Four Lentinula edodes strains (Le10, 46, K2, Assai) were assessed for their antagonistic effect on four filamentous fungus species of agricultural importance (Helminthosporium euphorbiae, Helminthosporium sp, Fusarium solani and Phomopsis sojae) and on Alagoas serotype of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSA). The L. edodes strains studied had variable effects on the filamentous fungi and on VSA. The K2 and Le10 strains were antagonistic on the fungi assessed and the 46 and K2 strains were efficie...

  6. Vesicular stomatitis virus expressing interferon-? is oncolytic and promotes antitumor immune responses in a syngeneic murine model of non-small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Manish R.; Jacobson, Blake A.; Ji, Yan; Drees, Jeremy; Tang, Shaogeng; Xiong, Kerry; Wang, Hengbing; Prigge, Jennifer E.; Dash, Alexander S.; Kratzke, Andrea K.; Mesev, Emily; Etchison, Ryan; Federspiel, Mark J.; Russell, Stephen J; Kratzke, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is a potent oncolytic virus for many tumors. VSV that produces interferon-? (VSV-IFN?) is now in early clinical testing for solid tumors. Here, the preclinical activity of VSV and VSV-IFN? against non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is reported. NSCLC cell lines were treated in vitro with VSV expressing green fluorescence protein (VSV-GFP) and VSV-IFN?. VSV-GFP and VSV-IFN? were active against NSCLC cells. JAK/STAT inhibition with ruxolitinib re-sensitized resi...

  7. 5'-Phospho-RNA Acceptor Specificity of GDP Polyribonucleotidyltransferase of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus in mRNA Capping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogino, Minako; Ogino, Tomoaki

    2017-03-15

    The GDP polyribonucleotidyltransferase (PRNTase) domain of the multifunctional L protein of rhabdoviruses, such as vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and rabies virus, catalyzes the transfer of 5'-phospho-RNA (pRNA) from 5'-triphospho-RNA (pppRNA) to GDP via a covalent enzyme-pRNA intermediate to generate a 5'-cap structure (GpppA). Here, using an improved oligo-RNA capping assay with the VSV L protein, we showed that the Michaelis constants for GDP and pppAACAG (VSV mRNA-start sequence) are 0.03 and 0.4 μM, respectively. A competition assay between GDP and GDP analogues in the GpppA formation and pRNA transfer assay using GDP analogues as pRNA acceptors indicated that the PRNTase domain recognizes the C-2-amino group, but not the C-6-oxo group, N-1-hydrogen, or N-7-nitrogen, of GDP for the cap formation. 2,6-Diaminopurine-riboside (DAP), 7-deazaguanosine (7-deaza-G), and 7-methylguanosine (m7G) diphosphates efficiently accepted pRNA, resulting in the formation of DAPpppA, 7-deaza-GpppA, and m7GpppA (cap 0), respectively. Furthermore, either the 2'- or 3'-hydroxyl group of GDP was found to be required for efficient pRNA transfer. A 5'-diphosphate form of antiviral ribavirin weakly inhibited the GpppA formation but did not act as a pRNA acceptor. These results indicate that the PRNTase domain has a unique guanosine-binding mode different from that of eukaryotic mRNA capping enzyme, guanylyltransferase. IMPORTANCE mRNAs of nonsegmented negative-strand (NNS) RNA viruses, such as VSV, possess a fully methylated cap structure, which is required for mRNA stability, efficient translation, and evasion of antiviral innate immunity in host cells. GDP polyribonucleotidyltransferase (PRNTase) is an unconventional mRNA capping enzyme of NNS RNA viruses that is distinct from the eukaryotic mRNA capping enzyme, guanylyltransferase. In this study, we studied the pRNA acceptor specificity of VSV PRNTase using various GDP analogues and identified chemical groups of GDP as essential

  8. A freeze frame view of vesicular stomatitis virus transcription defines a minimal length of RNA for 5' processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekes, Gergely; Rahmeh, Amal A; Whelan, Sean P J

    2011-06-01

    The RNA synthesis machinery of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) comprises the genomic RNA encapsidated by the viral nucleocapsid protein (N) and associated with the RNA dependent RNA polymerase, the viral components of which are a large protein (L) and an accessory phosphoprotein (P). The 241 kDa L protein contains all the enzymatic activities necessary for synthesis of the viral mRNAs, including capping, cap methylation and polyadenylation. Those RNA processing reactions are intimately coordinated with nucleotide polymerization such that failure to cap results in termination of transcription and failure to methylate can result in hyper polyadenylation. The mRNA processing reactions thus serve as a critical check point in viral RNA synthesis which may control the synthesis of incorrectly modified RNAs. Here, we report the length at which viral transcripts first gain access to the capping machinery during synthesis. By reconstitution of transcription in vitro with highly purified recombinant polymerase and engineered templates in which we omitted sites for incorporation of UTP, we found that transcripts that were 30-nucleotides in length were uncapped, whereas those that were 31-nucleotides in length contained a cap structure. The minimal RNA length required for mRNA cap addition was also sufficient for methylation since the 31-nucleotide long transcripts were methylated at both ribose-2'-O and guanine-N-7 positions. This work provides insights into the spatial relationship between the active sites for the RNA dependent RNA polymerase and polyribonucleotidyltransferase responsible for capping of the viral RNA. We combine the present findings with our recently described electron microscopic structure of the VSV polymerase and propose a model of how the spatial arrangement of the capping activities of L may influence nucleotide polymerization.

  9. Acute reactogenicity after intramuscular immunization with recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus is linked to production of IL-1β.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Athearn

    Full Text Available Vaccines based on live viruses are attractive because they are immunogenic, cost-effective, and can be delivered by multiple routes. However, live virus vaccines also cause reactogenic side effects such as fever, myalgia, and injection site pain that have reduced their acceptance in the clinic. Several recent studies have linked vaccine-induced reactogenic side effects to production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β (IL-1β in humans. Our objective was therefore to determine whether IL-1β contributed to pathology after immunization with recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (rVSV vaccine vectors, and if so, to identify strategies by which IL-1β mediated pathology might be reduced without compromising immunogenicity. We found that an rVSV vaccine induced local and systemic production of IL-1β in vivo, and that accumulation of IL-1β correlated with acute pathology after rVSV immunization. rVSV-induced pathology was reduced in mice deficient in the IL-1 receptor Type I, but the IL-1R-/- mice were fully protected from lethal rechallenge with a high dose of VSV. This result demonstrated that IL-1 contributed to reactogenicity of the rVSV, but was dispensable for induction of protective immunity. The amount of IL-1β detected in mice deficient in either caspase-1 or the inflammasome adaptor molecule ASC after rVSV immunization was not significantly different than that produced by wild type animals, and caspase-1-/- and ASC-/- mice were only partially protected from rVSV-induced pathology. Those data support the idea that some of the IL-1β expressed in vivo in response to VSV may be activated by a caspase-1 and ASC-independent mechanism. Together these results suggest that rVSV vectors engineered to suppress the induction of IL-1β, or signaling through the IL-1R would be less reactogenic in vivo, but would retain their immunogenicity and protective capacity. Such rVSV would be highly desirable as either vaccine vectors or

  10. A spatio-temporal analysis of matrix protein and nucleocapsid trafficking during vesicular stomatitis virus uncoating.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad E Mire

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available To study VSV entry and the fate of incoming matrix (M protein during virus uncoating we used recombinant viruses encoding M proteins with a C-terminal tetracysteine tag that could be fluorescently labeled using biarsenical (Lumio compounds. We found that uncoating occurs early in the endocytic pathway and is inhibited by expression of dominant-negative (DN Rab5, but is not inhibited by DN-Rab7 or DN-Rab11. Uncoating, as defined by the separation of nucleocapsids from M protein, occurred between 15 and 20 minutes post-entry and did not require microtubules or an intact actin cytoskeleton. Unexpectedly, the bulk of M protein remained associated with endosomal membranes after uncoating and was eventually trafficked to recycling endosomes. Another small, but significant fraction of M distributed to nuclear pore complexes, which was also not dependent on microtubules or polymerized actin. Quantification of fluorescence from high-resolution confocal micrographs indicated that after membrane fusion, M protein diffuses across the endosomal membrane with a concomitant increase in fluorescence from the Lumio label which occurred soon after the release of RNPs into the cytoplasm. These data support a new model for VSV uncoating in which RNPs are released from M which remains bound to the endosomal membrane rather than the dissociation of M protein from RNPs after release of the complex into the cytoplasm following membrane fusion.

  11. Identification of a new region in the vesicular stomatitis virus L polymerase protein which is essential for mRNA cap methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grdzelishvili, Valery Z; Smallwood, Sherin; Tower, Dallas; Hall, Richard L; Hunt, D Margaret; Moyer, Sue A

    2006-07-05

    The vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) L polymerase protein possesses two methyltransferase (MTase) activities, which catalyze the methylation of viral mRNA cap structures at the guanine-N7 and 2'-O-adenosine positions. To identify L sequences required for the MTase activities, we analyzed a host range (hr) and temperature-sensitive (ts) mutant of VSV, hr8, which was defective in mRNA cap methylation. Sequencing hr8 identified five amino acid substitutions, all residing in the L protein. Recombinant VSV were generated with each of the identified L mutations, and the presence of a single G1481R substitution in L, located between conserved domains V and VI, was sufficient to produce a dramatic reduction (about 90%) in overall mRNA methylation. Cap analysis showed residual guanine-N7 methylation and reduced 2'-O-adenosine methylation, identical to that of the original hr8 virus. When recombinant viruses were tested for virus growth under conditions that were permissive and nonpermissive for the hr8 mutant, the same single L mutation, G1481R, was solely responsible for both the hr and ts phenotypes. A spontaneous suppressor mutant of the rG1481R virus that restored both growth on nonpermissive cells and cap methylation was identified and mapped to a single change, L1450I, in L. Site-directed mutagenesis of the region between domains V and VI, amino acids 1419-1672 of L, followed by the rescue of recombinant viruses identified five additional virus mutants, K1468A, R1478A/D1479A, G1481A, G1481N, and G1672A, that were all hr and defective in mRNA cap methylation. Thus, in addition to the previously characterized domain VI [Grdzelishvili, V.Z., Smallwood, S., Tower, D., Hall, R.L., Hunt, D.M., Moyer, S.A., 2005. A single amino acid change in the L-polymerase protein of vesicular stomatitis virus completely abolishes viral mRNA cap methylation. J. Virol. 79, 7327-7337; Li, J., Fontaine-Rodriguez, E.C., Whelan, S.P., 2005. Amino acid residues within conserved domain VI of the

  12. Vesicular stomatitis forecasting based on Google Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yi; Zhou, GuangYa; Chen, Qin

    2018-01-01

    Background Vesicular stomatitis (VS) is an important viral disease of livestock. The main feature of VS is irregular blisters that occur on the lips, tongue, oral mucosa, hoof crown and nipple. Humans can also be infected with vesicular stomatitis and develop meningitis. This study analyses 2014 American VS outbreaks in order to accurately predict vesicular stomatitis outbreak trends. Methods American VS outbreaks data were collected from OIE. The data for VS keywords were obtained by inputting 24 disease-related keywords into Google Trends. After calculating the Pearson and Spearman correlation coefficients, it was found that there was a relationship between outbreaks and keywords derived from Google Trends. Finally, the predicted model was constructed based on qualitative classification and quantitative regression. Results For the regression model, the Pearson correlation coefficients between the predicted outbreaks and actual outbreaks are 0.953 and 0.948, respectively. For the qualitative classification model, we constructed five classification predictive models and chose the best classification predictive model as the result. The results showed, SN (sensitivity), SP (specificity) and ACC (prediction accuracy) values of the best classification predictive model are 78.52%,72.5% and 77.14%, respectively. Conclusion This study applied Google search data to construct a qualitative classification model and a quantitative regression model. The results show that the method is effective and that these two models obtain more accurate forecast. PMID:29385198

  13. A recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus-based Lassa fever vaccine protects guinea pigs and macaques against challenge with geographically and genetically distinct Lassa viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safronetz, David; Mire, Chad; Rosenke, Kyle; Feldmann, Friederike; Haddock, Elaine; Geisbert, Thomas; Feldmann, Heinz

    2015-04-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) is endemic in several West African countries and is the etiological agent of Lassa fever. Despite the high annual incidence and significant morbidity and mortality rates, currently there are no approved vaccines to prevent infection or disease in humans. Genetically, LASV demonstrates a high degree of diversity that correlates with geographic distribution. The genetic heterogeneity observed between geographically distinct viruses raises concerns over the potential efficacy of a "universal" LASV vaccine. To date, several experimental LASV vaccines have been developed; however, few have been evaluated against challenge with various genetically unique Lassa virus isolates in relevant animal models. Here we demonstrate that a single, prophylactic immunization with a recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) expressing the glycoproteins of LASV strain Josiah from Sierra Leone protects strain 13 guinea pigs from infection / disease following challenge with LASV isolates originating from Liberia, Mali and Nigeria. Similarly, the VSV-based LASV vaccine yields complete protection against a lethal challenge with the Liberian LASV isolate in the gold-standard macaque model of Lassa fever. Our results demonstrate the VSV-based LASV vaccine is capable of preventing morbidity and mortality associated with non-homologous LASV challenge in two animal models of Lassa fever. Additionally, this work highlights the need for the further development of disease models for geographical distinct LASV strains, particularly those from Nigeria, in order to comprehensively evaluate potential vaccines and therapies against this prominent agent of viral hemorrhagic fever.

  14. A recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus-based Lassa fever vaccine protects guinea pigs and macaques against challenge with geographically and genetically distinct Lassa viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Safronetz

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Lassa virus (LASV is endemic in several West African countries and is the etiological agent of Lassa fever. Despite the high annual incidence and significant morbidity and mortality rates, currently there are no approved vaccines to prevent infection or disease in humans. Genetically, LASV demonstrates a high degree of diversity that correlates with geographic distribution. The genetic heterogeneity observed between geographically distinct viruses raises concerns over the potential efficacy of a "universal" LASV vaccine. To date, several experimental LASV vaccines have been developed; however, few have been evaluated against challenge with various genetically unique Lassa virus isolates in relevant animal models.Here we demonstrate that a single, prophylactic immunization with a recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV expressing the glycoproteins of LASV strain Josiah from Sierra Leone protects strain 13 guinea pigs from infection / disease following challenge with LASV isolates originating from Liberia, Mali and Nigeria. Similarly, the VSV-based LASV vaccine yields complete protection against a lethal challenge with the Liberian LASV isolate in the gold-standard macaque model of Lassa fever.Our results demonstrate the VSV-based LASV vaccine is capable of preventing morbidity and mortality associated with non-homologous LASV challenge in two animal models of Lassa fever. Additionally, this work highlights the need for the further development of disease models for geographical distinct LASV strains, particularly those from Nigeria, in order to comprehensively evaluate potential vaccines and therapies against this prominent agent of viral hemorrhagic fever.

  15. Vesicular stomatitis virus replicon expressing the VP2 outer capsid protein of bluetongue virus serotype 8 induces complete protection of sheep against challenge infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochinger, Stefanie; Renevey, Nathalie; Hofmann, Martin A; Zimmer, Gert

    2014-06-13

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) is an arthropod-borne pathogen that causes an often fatal, hemorrhagic disease in ruminants. Different BTV serotypes occur throughout many temperate and tropical regions of the world. In 2006, BTV serotype 8 (BTV-8) emerged in Central and Northern Europe for the first time. Although this outbreak was eventually controlled using inactivated virus vaccines, the epidemic caused significant economic losses not only from the disease in livestock but also from trade restrictions. To date, BTV vaccines that allow simple serological discrimination of infected and vaccinated animals (DIVA) have not been approved for use in livestock. In this study, we generated recombinant RNA replicon particles based on single-cycle vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) vectors. Immunization of sheep with infectious VSV replicon particles expressing the outer capsid VP2 protein of BTV-8 resulted in induction of BTV-8 serotype-specific neutralizing antibodies. After challenge with a virulent BTV-8 strain, the vaccinated animals neither developed signs of disease nor showed viremia. In contrast, immunization of sheep with recombinant VP5 - the second outer capsid protein of BTV - did not confer protection. Discrimination of infected from vaccinated animals was readily achieved using an ELISA for detection of antibodies against the VP7 antigen. These data indicate that VSV replicon particles potentially represent a safe and efficacious vaccine platform with which to control future outbreaks by BTV-8 or other serotypes, especially in previously non-endemic regions where discrimination between vaccinated and infected animals is crucial.

  16. Experimental transmission of vesicular stomatitis New Jersey virus from Simulium vittatum to cattle: clinical outcome is influenced by site of insect feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mead, D G; Lovett, K Rainwater; Murphy, M D; Pauszek, S J; Smoliga, G; Gray, E W; Noblet, R; Overmyer, J; Rodriguez, L L

    2009-07-01

    Vesicular stomatitis New Jersey virus (VSNJV) is an insect-transmitted Rhabdovirus causing vesicular disease in domestic livestock including cattle, horses, and pigs. Natural transmission during epidemics remains poorly understood, particularly in cattle, one of the most affected species during outbreaks. This study reports the first successful transmission of VSNJV to cattle by insect bite resulting in clinical disease. When infected black flies (Simulium vittatum Zetterstedt) fed at sites where VS lesions are usually observed (mouth, nostrils, and foot coronary band), infection occurred, characterized by local viral replication, vesicular lesions, and high neutralizing antibody titers (> 1: 256). Viral RNA was detected up to 9 d postinfection in tissues collected during necropsy from lesion sites and lymph nodes draining those sites. Interestingly, when flies were allowed to feed on flank or neck skin, viral replication was poor, lesions were not observed, and low levels of neutralizing antibodies (range, 1:8-1:32) developed. Viremia was never observed in any of the animals and infectious virus was not recovered from tissues on necropsies performed between 8 and 27 d postinfection. Demonstration that VSNJV transmission to cattle by infected black flies can result in clinical disease contributes to a better understanding of the epidemiology and potential prevention and control methods for this important disease.

  17. Vesicular Stomatitis Virus G Glycoprotein and ATRA Enhanced Bystander Killing of Chemoresistant Leukemic Cells by Herpes Simplex Virus Thymidine Kinase/Ganciclovir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chenxi; Chen, Zheng; Zhao, Wenjun; Wei, Lirong; Zheng, Yanwen; He, Chao; Zeng, Yan; Yin, Bin

    2014-02-01

    Refractoriness of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells to chemotherapeutics represents a major clinical barrier. Suicide gene therapy for cancer has been attractive but with limited clinical efficacy. In this study, we investigated the potential application of herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase/ganciclovir (HSV-TK/GCV) based system to inhibit chemoresistant AML cells. We first generated Ara-C resistant K562 cells and doxorubicin-resistant THP-1 cells. We found that the HSV-TK/GCV anticancer system suppressed drug resistant leukemic cells in culture. Chemoresistant AML cell lines displayed similar sensitivity to HSV-TK/GCV. Moreover, HSV-TK/GCV killing of leukemic cells was augmented to a mild but significant extent by all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) with concomitant upregulation of Connexin 43, a major component of gap junctions. Interestingly, HSV-TK/GCV killing was enhanced by expression of vesicular stomatitis virus G glycoprotein (VSV-G), a fusogenic membrane protein, which also increased leukemic cell fusion. Co-culture resistant cells expressing HSV-TK and cells stably transduced with VSV-G showed that expression of VSV-G could promote the bystander killing effect of HSV-TK/GCV. Furthermore, combination of HSV-TK/GCV with VSV-G plus ATRA produced more pronounced antileukemia effect. These results suggest that the HSV-TK/GCV system in combination with fusogenic membrane proteins and/or ATRA could provide a strategy to mitigate the chemoresistance of AML.

  18. Strains of Lentinula edodes suppress growth of phytopathogenic fungi and inhibit Alagoas serotype of vesicular stomatitis virus Linhagens de Lentinula edodes inibem fungos fitopatogênicos e o vírus da estomatite vesicular, sorotipo Alagoas

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    Selma H. Sasaki

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Four Lentinula edodes strains (Le10, 46, K2, Assai were assessed for their antagonistic effect on four filamentous fungus species of agricultural importance (Helminthosporium euphorbiae, Helminthosporium sp, Fusarium solani and Phomopsis sojae and on Alagoas serotype of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSA. The L. edodes strains studied had variable effects on the filamentous fungi and on VSA. The K2 and Le10 strains were antagonistic on the fungi assessed and the 46 and K2 strains were efficient on the Vesicular Stomatitis Virus. The results widened the list of beneficial effects of L. edodes on the control and prevention of animal pathogenic virus and filamentous fungi.Quatro linhagens de Lentinula edodes (Le10, 46, K2, ASSAI foram avaliadas quanto ao seu efeito inibitório sobre quatro espécies de fungos filamentosos de importância agrícola (Helminthosporium euphorbiae, Helminthosporium sp., Fusarium solani, Phomopsis sojae e sobre o sorotipo Alagoas vírus da estomatite vesicular (VSA. Foi observado que as linhagens de L. edodes estudadas apresentaram variabilidade quanto ao seu efeito, tanto sobre os fungos filamentosos quanto sobre o vírus VSA. As linhagens K2 e Le10 apresentaram-se antagônicas sobre os fungos e as linhagens 46 e K2 foram eficientes na inibição do vírus VSA. Os resultados obtidos permitem ampliar a lista de efeitos benéficos de algumas linhagens de L. edodes no controle e prevenção de vírus patogênicos animais e de fungos filamentosos.

  19. Development of monoclonal antibody-linked ELISA for sero-diagnosis of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV-IN) using baculovirus expressed glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kweon, Chang Hee; Kwon, Byung Joon; Kim, In Joong; Lee, Se Young; Ko, Young Joon

    2005-12-01

    The gene encoding the envelope glycoprotein (GP) of vesicular stomatitis virus serotype, Indiana (VSV-IN), was expressed under the polyhedron promoter of baculovirus. The recombinant GP was applied as a diagnostic antigen for the detection of cattle and horse antibodies to VSV. In addition, the neutralizing monoclonal antibody (Mab) to GP of VSV-IN was used as trapping antibody in a Mab-linked indirect ELISA (MLI-ELISA) or detecting antibody in a Mab-linked competitive ELISA (MLC-ELISA). The diagnostic efficiencies of MLI-ELISA and MLC-ELISA were evaluated with currently available C-ELISA from OIE reference laboratory for vesicular stomatitis as a gold standard by using VSV-positive equine sera and negative bovine sera vaccinated against foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) in the field. When naturally infected equine sera and FMDV vaccinated bovine sera were tested, MLI-ELISA and MLC-ELISA showed relative sensitivities of 80% and 95% with relative specificity of 97% and 99%, respectively. However, both ELISAs cross-reacted with equine sera against New Jersey (VSV-NJ) serotype. The comparison of the two ELISAs revealed that MLC-ELISA was relatively more sensitive and specific than MLI-ELISA, indicating that MLC-ELISA can be applied to sero-diagnosis for VSV-IN infection.

  20. Alteration of vesicular stomatitis virus L and NS proteins by uv irradiation: implications for the mechanism of host cell shut-off

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitaker-Dowling, P.; Youngner, J.S.

    1988-05-01

    When purified, (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) was exposed to ultraviolet light, an irradiation-induced change in the viral proteins was detected by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting. With dose of uv irradiation in the same range as that required to inactivate VSV leader RNA, a loss occurred in the bands corresponding to the L and NS proteins concomitant with the appearance of several new bands of radioactivity throughout the gel. This alteration of viral proteins correlated with the loss of ability of the virus to inhibit host macromolecular synthesis. In light of these results, the role that has been ascribed to the VSV leader RNA in VSV-mediated host shut-off needs to be reevaluated.

  1. Phylogeographic characteristics of vesicular stomatitis New Jersey viruses circulating in Mexico from 2005 to 2011 and their relationship to epidemics in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velazquez-Salinas, Lauro; Pauszek, Steven J; Zarate, Selene; Basurto-Alcantara, Francisco J; Verdugo-Rodriguez, Antonio; Perez, Andres M; Rodriguez, Luis L

    2014-01-20

    We analyzed the phylogenetic and time-space relationships (phylodynamics) of 181 isolates of vesicular stomatitis New Jersey virus (VSNJV) causing disease in Mexico and the United States (US) from 2005 through 2012. We detail the emergence of a genetic lineage in southern Mexico causing outbreaks in central Mexico spreading into northern Mexico and eventually into the US. That emerging lineage showed higher nucleotide sequence identity (99.5%) than that observed for multiple lineages circulating concurrently in southern Mexico (96.8%). Additionally, we identified 58 isolates from Mexico that, unlike previous isolates from Mexico, grouped with northern Central America clade II viruses. This study provides the first direct evidence for the emergence and northward migration of a specific VSNJV genetic lineage from endemic areas in Mexico causing VS outbreaks in the US. In addition we document the emergence of a Central American VSNJV genetic lineage moving northward and causing outbreaks in central Mexico. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Plasma membrane phosphatidylinositol 4,5 bisphosphate is required for internalization of foot-and-mouth disease virus and vesicular stomatitis virus.

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    Angela Vázquez-Calvo

    Full Text Available Phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate, PI(4,5P(2, is a phospholipid which plays important roles in clathrin-mediated endocytosis. To investigate the possible role of this lipid on viral entry, two viruses important for animal health were selected: the enveloped vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV - which uses a well characterized clathrin mediated endocytic route - and two different variants of the non-enveloped foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV with distinct receptor specificities. The expression of a dominant negative dynamin, a PI(4,5P(2 effector protein, inhibited the internalization and infection of VSV and both FMDV isolates. Depletion of PI(4,5P(2 from plasma membrane using ionomycin or an inducible system, and inhibition of its de novo synthesis with 1-butanol revealed that VSV as well as FMDV C-S8c1, which uses integrins as receptor, displayed a high dependence on PI(4,5P(2 for internalization. Expression of a kinase dead mutant (KD of phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate-5-kinase Iα (PIP5K-Iα, an enzyme responsible for PI(4,5P(2 synthesis that regulates clathrin-dependent endocytosis, also impaired entry and infection of VSV and FMDV C-S8c1. Interestingly FMDV MARLS variant that uses receptors other than integrins for cell entry was less sensitive to PI(4,5P(2 depletion, and was not inhibited by the expression of the KD PIP5K-Iα mutant suggesting the involvement of endocytic routes other than the clathrin-mediated on its entry. These results highlight the role of PI(4,5P(2 and PIP5K-Iα on clathrin-mediated viral entry.

  3. Attenuation of Recombinant Vesicular Stomatitis Virus-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Vaccine Vectors by Gene Translocations and G Gene Truncation Reduces Neurovirulence and Enhances Immunogenicity in Mice▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, David; Wright, Kevin J.; Calderon, Priscilla C.; Guo, Min; Nasar, Farooq; Johnson, J. Erik; Coleman, John W.; Lee, Margaret; Kotash, Cheryl; Yurgelonis, Irene; Natuk, Robert J.; Hendry, R. Michael; Udem, Stephen A.; Clarke, David K.

    2008-01-01

    Recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (rVSV) has shown great potential as a new viral vector for vaccination. However, the prototypic rVSV vector described previously was found to be insufficiently attenuated for clinical evaluation when assessed for neurovirulence in nonhuman primates. Here, we describe the attenuation, neurovirulence, and immunogenicity of rVSV vectors expressing human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Gag. These rVSV vectors were attenuated by combinations of the following manipulations: N gene translocations (N4), G gene truncations (CT1 or CT9), noncytopathic M gene mutations (Mncp), and positioning of the gag gene into the first position of the viral genome (gag1). The resulting N4CT1-gag1, N4CT9-gag1, and MncpCT1-gag1 vectors demonstrated dramatically reduced neurovirulence in mice following direct intracranial inoculation. Surprisingly, in spite of a very high level of attenuation, the N4CT1-gag1 and N4CT9-gag1 vectors generated robust Gag-specific immune responses following intramuscular immunization that were equivalent to or greater than immune responses generated by the more virulent prototypic vectors. MncpCT1-gag1 also induced Gag-specific immune responses following intramuscular immunization that were equivalent to immune responses generated by the prototypic rVSV vector. Placement of the gag gene in the first position of the VSV genome was associated with increased in vitro expression of Gag protein, in vivo expression of Gag mRNA, and enhanced immunogenicity of the vector. These findings demonstrate that through directed manipulation of the rVSV genome, vectors that have reduced neurovirulence and enhanced immunogenicity can be made. PMID:17942549

  4. In Vivo Replication and Pathogenesis of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Recombinant M40 Containing Ebola Virus L-Domain Sequences

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    Takashi Irie

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The M40 VSV recombinant was engineered to contain overlapping PTAP and PPxY L-domain motifs and flanking residues from the VP40 protein of Ebola virus. Replication of M40 in cell culture is virtually indistinguishable from that of control viruses. However, the presence of the Ebola PTAP motif in the M40 recombinant enabled this virus to interact with and recruit host Tsg101, which was packaged into M40 virions. In this brief report, we compared replication and the pathogenic profiles of M40 and the parental virus M51R in mice to determine whether the presence of the Ebola L-domains and flanking residues altered in vivo characteristics of the virus. Overall, the in vivo characteristics of M40 were similar to those of the parental M51R virus, indicating that the Ebola sequences did not alter pathogenesis of VSV in this small animal model of infection.

  5. Enhancing the Oncolytic Activity of CD133-Targeted Measles Virus: Receptor Extension or Chimerism with Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Are Most Effective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinlützum, Dina; Hanauer, Julia D. S.; Muik, Alexander; Hanschmann, Kay-Martin; Kays, Sarah-Katharina; Ayala-Breton, Camilo; Peng, Kah-Whye; Mühlebach, Michael D.; Abel, Tobias; Buchholz, Christian J.

    2017-01-01

    Therapy resistance and tumor recurrence are often linked to a small refractory and highly tumorigenic subpopulation of neoplastic cells, known as cancer stem cells (CSCs). A putative marker of CSCs is CD133 (prominin-1). We have previously described a CD133-targeted oncolytic measles virus (MV-CD133) as a promising approach to specifically eliminate CD133-positive tumor cells. Selectivity was introduced at the level of cell entry by an engineered MV hemagglutinin (H). The H protein was blinded for its native receptors and displayed a CD133-specific single-chain antibody fragment (scFv) as targeting domain. Interestingly, MV-CD133 was more active in killing CD133-positive tumors than the unmodified MV-NSe despite being highly selective for its target cells. To further enhance the antitumoral activity of MV-CD133, we here pursued arming technologies, receptor extension, and chimeras between MV-CD133 and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). All newly generated viruses including VSV-CD133 were highly selective in eliminating CD133-positive cells. MV-CD46/CD133 killed in addition CD133-negative cells being positive for the MV receptors. In an orthotopic glioma model, MV-CD46/CD133 and MVSCD-CD133, which encodes the super cytosine deaminase, were most effective. Notably, VSV-CD133 caused fatal neurotoxicity in this tumor model. Use of CD133 as receptor could be excluded as being causative. In a subcutaneous tumor model of hepatocellular cancer, VSV-CD133 revealed the most potent oncolytic activity and also significantly prolonged survival of the mice when injected intravenously. Compared to MV-CD133, VSV-CD133 infected a more than 104-fold larger area of the tumor within the same time period. Our data not only suggest new concepts and approaches toward enhancing the oncolytic activity of CD133-targeted oncolytic viruses but also raise awareness about careful toxicity testing of novel virus types. PMID:28695108

  6. Cholesterol Supplementation During Production Increases the Infectivity of Retroviral and Lentiviral Vectors Pseudotyped with the Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Glycoprotein (VSV-G).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong; Ott, Christopher J; Townsend, Kay; Subbaiah, Papasani; Aiyar, Ashok; Miller, William M

    2009-05-15

    Cholesterol, a major component of plasma membrane lipid rafts, is important for assembly and budding of enveloped viruses, including influenza and HIV-1. Cholesterol depletion impairs virus assembly and infectivity. This study examined the effects of exogenous cholesterol addition (delivered as a complex with methyl beta cyclodextrin) on the production of Molony murine leukemia virus retroviral vector and HIV-1-based lentiviral vector pseudotyped with the vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSV-G). Cholesterol supplementation before and during vector production enhanced the infectivity of retroviral and lentiviral vectors up to 4-fold and 6-fold, respectively. In contrast, the amount of retroviral vector produced was unchanged, and that of lentiviral vector was increased less than two-fold. Both free cholesterol and cholesterol ester content in 293-gag-pol producer cells increased with cholesterol addition. In contrast, the phospholipids headgroup composition was essentially unchanged by cholesterol supplementation in 293-gag-pol packaging cells. Based on these results, it is proposed that cholesterol supplementation increases the infectivity of VSV-G-pseudotyped retroviral and lentiviral vectors, possibly by altering the composition of the producer cell membrane where the viral vectors are assembled and bud, and/or by changing the lipid composition of the viral vectors.

  7. Enhanced vesicular stomatitis virus (VSVΔ51 targeting of head and neck cancer in combination with radiation therapy or ZD6126 vascular disrupting agent

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    Alajez Nehad M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC is the 5th most common cancer worldwide. Locally advanced HNSCC are treated with either radiation or chemo-radiotherapy, but still associated with high mortality rate, underscoring the need to develop novel therapies. Oncolytic viruses have been garnering increasing interest as anti-cancer agents due to their preferential killing of transformed cells. In this study, we evaluated the therapeutic potential of mutant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSVΔ51 against the human hypopharyngeal FaDu tumour model in vitro and in vivo. Results Our data demonstrated high toxicity of the virus against FaDu cells in vitro, which was associated with induction of apoptosis. In vivo, systemic injection of 1 × 109 pfu had minimal effect on tumour growth; however, when combined with two doses of ionizing radiation (IR; 5 Gy each or a single injection of the vascular disrupting agent (ZD6126, the virus exhibited profound suppression of tumour growth, which translated to a prolonged survival in the treated mice. Concordantly, VSVΔ51 combined with ZD6126 led to a significant increase in viral replication in these tumours. Conclusions Our data suggest that the combinations of VSVΔ51 with either IR or ZD6126 are potentially novel therapeutic opportunities for HNSCC.

  8. Breaking resistance of pancreatic cancer cells to an attenuated vesicular stomatitis virus through a novel activity of IKK inhibitor TPCA-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataldi, Marcela; Shah, Nirav R; Felt, Sébastien A; Grdzelishvili, Valery Z

    2015-11-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is an effective oncolytic virus against most human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cell lines. However, some PDAC cell lines are highly resistant to oncolytic VSV-ΔM51 infection. To better understand the mechanism of resistance, we tested a panel of 16 small molecule inhibitors of different cellular signaling pathways, and identified TPCA-1 (IKK-β inhibitor) and ruxolitinib (JAK1/2 inhibitor), as strong enhancers of VSV-ΔM51 replication and virus-mediated oncolysis in all VSV-resistant PDAC cell lines. Both TPCA-1 and ruxolitinib similarly inhibited STAT1 and STAT2 phosphorylation and decreased expression of antiviral genes MxA and OAS. Moreover, an in situ kinase assay provided biochemical evidence that TPCA-1 directly inhibits JAK1 kinase activity. Together, our data demonstrate that TPCA-1 is a unique dual inhibitor of IKK-β and JAK1 kinase, and provide a new evidence that upregulated type I interferon signaling plays a major role in resistance of pancreatic cancer cells to oncolytic viruses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Interferon Beta and Interferon Alpha 2a Differentially Protect Head and Neck Cancer Cells from Vesicular Stomatitis Virus-Induced Oncolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westcott, Marlena M; Liu, Jingfang; Rajani, Karishma; D'Agostino, Ralph; Lyles, Douglas S; Porosnicu, Mercedes

    2015-08-01

    Oncolytic viruses (OV) preferentially kill cancer cells due in part to defects in their antiviral responses upon exposure to type I interferons (IFNs). However, IFN responsiveness of some tumor cells confers resistance to OV treatment. The human type I IFNs include one IFN-β and multiple IFN-α subtypes that share the same receptor but are capable of differentially inducing biological responses. The role of individual IFN subtypes in promoting tumor cell resistance to OV is addressed here. Two human IFNs which have been produced for clinical use, IFN-α2a and IFN-β, were compared for activity in protecting human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) lines from oncolysis by vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). Susceptibility of HNSCC lines to killing by VSV varied. VSV infection induced increased production of IFN-β in resistant HNSCC cells. When added exogenously, IFN-β was significantly more effective at protecting HNSCC cells from VSV oncolysis than was IFN-α2a. In contrast, normal keratinocytes and endothelial cells were protected equivalently by both IFN subtypes. Differential responsiveness of tumor cells to IFN-α and -β was further supported by the finding that autocrine IFN-β but not IFN-α promoted survival of HNSCC cells during persistent VSV infection. Therefore, IFN-α and -β differentially affect VSV oncolysis, justifying the evaluation and comparison of IFN subtypes for use in combination with VSV therapy. Pairing VSV with IFN-α2a may enhance selectivity of oncolytic VSV therapy for HNSCC by inhibiting VSV replication in normal cells without a corresponding inhibition in cancer cells. There has been a great deal of progress in the development of oncolytic viruses. However, a major problem is that individual cancers vary in their sensitivity to oncolytic viruses. In many cases this is due to differences in their production and response to interferons (IFNs). The experiments described here compared the responses of head and neck squamous

  10. In vivo Biodistribution of a Highly Attenuated Recombinant Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Expressing HIV-1 Gag Following Intramuscular, Intranasal, or Intravenous Inoculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, J. Erik; Coleman, John W.; Kalyan, Narender K.; Calderon, Priscilla; Wright, Kevin J.; Obregon, Jennifer; Ogin-Wilson, Eleanor; Natuk, Robert J.; Clarke, David K.; Udem, Stephen A.; Cooper, David; Hendry, R. Michael

    2009-01-01

    Recombinant vesicular stomatitis viruses (rVSVs) are being developed as potential HIV-1 vaccine candidates. To characterize the in vivo replication and dissemination of rVSV vectors in mice, high doses of a highly attenuated vector expressing HIV-1 Gag, rVSVIN- N4CT9-Gag1, and a prototypic reference virus, rVSVIN-HIVGag5, were delivered intramuscularly (IM), intranasally (IN), or intravenously (IV). We used quantitative, real-time RT-PCR (Q-PCR) and standard plaque assays to measure the temporal dissemination of these viruses to various tissues. Following IM inoculation, both viruses were detected primarily at the injection site as well as in draining lymph nodes; neither virus induced significant weight loss, pathologic signs, or evidence of neuroinvasion. In contrast, following IN inoculation, the prototypic virus was detected in all tissues tested and caused significant weight loss leading to death. IN administration of rVSVIN- N4CT9-Gag1 resulted in detection in numerous tissues (brain, lung, nasal turbinates, and lymph nodes) albeit in significantly reduced levels, which caused little or no weight loss nor any mortality. Following IV inoculation, both prototypic and attenuated viruses were detected by Q-PCR in all tissues tested. In contrast to the prototype, rVSVIN-N4CT9-Gag1 viral loads were significantly lower in all organs tested, and no infectious virus was detected in the brain following IV inoculation, despite the presence of viral RNA. These studies demonstrated significant differences in the biodistribution patterns of and the associated pathogenicity engendered by the prototypic and attenuated vectors in a highly susceptible host. PMID:19428903

  11. Live virus vaccines based on a vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) backbone: Standardized template with key considerations for a risk/benefit assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, David K; Hendry, R Michael; Singh, Vidisha; Rose, John K; Seligman, Stephen J; Klug, Bettina; Kochhar, Sonali; Mac, Lisa Marie; Carbery, Baevin; Chen, Robert T

    2016-12-12

    The Brighton Collaboration Viral Vector Vaccines Safety Working Group (V3SWG) was formed to evaluate the safety of live, recombinant viral vaccines incorporating genes from heterologous viral and other microbial pathogens in their genome (so-called "chimeric virus vaccines"). Many such viral vector vaccines are now at various stages of clinical evaluation. Here, we introduce an attenuated form of recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (rVSV) as a potential chimeric virus vaccine for HIV-1, with implications for use as a vaccine vector for other pathogens. The rVSV/HIV-1 vaccine vector was attenuated by combining two major genome modifications. These modifications acted synergistically to greatly enhance vector attenuation and the resulting rVSV vector demonstrated safety in sensitive mouse and non-human primate neurovirulence models. This vector expressing HIV-1 gag protein has completed evaluation in two Phase I clinical trials. In one trial the rVSV/HIV-1 vector was administered in a homologous two-dose regimen, and in a second trial with pDNA in a heterologous prime boost regimen. No serious adverse events were reported nor was vector detected in blood, urine or saliva post vaccination in either trial. Gag specific immune responses were induced in both trials with highest frequency T cell responses detected in the prime boost regimen. The rVSV/HIV-1 vector also demonstrated safety in an ongoing Phase I trial in HIV-1 positive participants. Additionally, clinical trial material has been produced with the rVSV vector expressing HIV-1 env, and Phase I clinical evaluation will initiate in the beginning of 2016. In this paper, we use a standardized template describing key characteristics of the novel rVSV vaccine vectors, in comparison to wild type VSV. The template facilitates scientific discourse among key stakeholders by increasing transparency and comparability of information. The Brighton Collaboration V3SWG template may also be useful as a guide to the

  12. Inactivation of a Human Norovirus Surrogate, Human Norovirus Virus-Like Particles, and Vesicular Stomatitis Virus by Gamma Irradiation ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, Kurtis; Divers, Erin; Ma, Yuanmei; Li, Jianrong

    2011-01-01

    Gamma irradiation is a nonthermal processing technology that has been used for the preservation of a variety of food products. This technology has been shown to effectively inactivate bacterial pathogens. Currently, the FDA has approved doses of up to 4.0 kGy to control food-borne pathogens in fresh iceberg lettuce and spinach. However, whether this dose range effectively inactivates food-borne viruses is less understood. We have performed a systematic study on the inactivation of a human nor...

  13. Interferon induction by viruses. VIII. Vesicular stomatitis virus: (+-)DI-011 particles induce interferon in the absence of standard virions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekellick, M.J.; Marcus, P.I.

    1982-02-01

    Evidence was presented that VSV (+-)DI-011 particles, which contain a genome of covalently linked totally self-complementary RNA, were excellent inducers of interferon (IFN) - by virtue of the dsRNA presumed to form within an infected cell, and that one molecule of that dsRNA per cell sufficed to induce a quantum yield of IFN. While the IFN-inducing capacity of (+-)DI-011 particle preparations has been confirmed, some researchers contend that DIP by themselves cannot induce IFN and that induction requires the presence of coinfecting (contaminating) standard VSV PFP. Consequently, we reexamined this question and now report that under five different conditions where the function of contaminating standard virus is reduced markedly, or eliminated, there was no diminution of the interferon-inducing particle (IFP) activity in preparations of (+-)DI-011 particles. Thus, inactivation of contaminating PFP by uv radiation or heat, the elimination (during induction) of cycling infection through the use of anti-serum (in the case of mouse L cells), and the reduction of PFP by four successive velocity sedimentation-gradient purifications had no adverse affect on the IFN-inducing capacity of DI-011 in either ''aged'' primary chick embryo cells or in mouse L(Y) cells. Furthermore, dilutions of DI-011 stocks which precluded the presence of even a single PFP still induced IFN in ''aged'' chick embryo cells. In concert these data demonstrate convincingly that IFN induction by DI-011 particles does not require coinfection with standard virus. It follows that DI-011 particles are intrinsically capable of inducing IFN.

  14. Interferon regulatory factor-1 protects from fatal neurotropic infection with vesicular stomatitis virus by specific inhibition of viral replication in neurons.

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    Sharmila Nair

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The innate immune system protects cells against invading viral pathogens by the auto- and paracrine action of type I interferon (IFN. In addition, the interferon regulatory factor (IRF-1 can induce alternative intrinsic antiviral responses. Although both, type I IFN and IRF-1 mediate their antiviral action by inducing overlapping subsets of IFN stimulated genes, the functional role of this alternative antiviral action of IRF-1 in context of viral infections in vivo remains unknown. Here, we report that IRF-1 is essential to counteract the neuropathology of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV. IFN- and IRF-1-dependent antiviral responses act sequentially to create a layered antiviral protection program against VSV infections. Upon intranasal infection, VSV is cleared in the presence or absence of IRF-1 in peripheral organs, but IRF-1-/- mice continue to propagate the virus in the brain and succumb. Although rapid IFN induction leads to a decline in VSV titers early on, viral replication is re-enforced in the brains of IRF-1-/- mice. While IFN provides short-term protection, IRF-1 is induced with delayed kinetics and controls viral replication at later stages of infection. IRF-1 has no influence on viral entry but inhibits viral replication in neurons and viral spread through the CNS, which leads to fatal inflammatory responses in the CNS. These data support a temporal, non-redundant antiviral function of type I IFN and IRF-1, the latter playing a crucial role in late time points of VSV infection in the brain.

  15. Vesicular stomatitis virus expressing interferon-β is oncolytic and promotes antitumor immune responses in a syngeneic murine model of non-small cell lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Manish R.; Jacobson, Blake A.; Ji, Yan; Drees, Jeremy; Tang, Shaogeng; Xiong, Kerry; Wang, Hengbing; Prigge, Jennifer E.; Dash, Alexander S.; Kratzke, Andrea K.; Mesev, Emily; Etchison, Ryan; Federspiel, Mark J.; Russell, Stephen J.; Kratzke, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is a potent oncolytic virus for many tumors. VSV that produces interferon-β (VSV-IFNβ) is now in early clinical testing for solid tumors. Here, the preclinical activity of VSV and VSV-IFNβ against non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is reported. NSCLC cell lines were treated in vitro with VSV expressing green fluorescence protein (VSV-GFP) and VSV-IFNβ. VSV-GFP and VSV-IFNβ were active against NSCLC cells. JAK/STAT inhibition with ruxolitinib re-sensitized resistant H838 cells to VSV-IFNβ mediated oncolysis. Intratumoral injections of VSV-GFP and VSV-IFNβ reduced tumor growth and weight in H2009 nude mouse xenografts (p VSV-IFNβ intratumorally. Treatment of LM2 tumors with VSV-IFNβ resulted in tumor regression, prolonged survival (p VSV-IFNβ resulted in decreased tumor-infiltrating regulatory T cells (Treg) and increased CD8+ T cells. Tumor cell expression of PDL-1 was increased after VSV-IFNβ treatment. VSV-IFNβ has potent antitumor effects and promotes systemic antitumor immunity. These data support further clinical investigation of VSV-IFNβ for NSCLC. PMID:26431376

  16. Radioiodide imaging and radiovirotherapy of multiple myeloma using VSV(Delta51)-NIS, an attenuated vesicular stomatitis virus encoding the sodium iodide symporter gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Apollina; Carlson, Stephanie K; Classic, Kelly L; Greiner, Suzanne; Naik, Shruthi; Power, Anthony T; Bell, John C; Russell, Stephen J

    2007-10-01

    Multiple myeloma is a radiosensitive malignancy that is currently incurable. Here, we generated a novel recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus [VSV(Delta51)-NIS] that has a deletion of methionine 51 in the matrix protein and expresses the human sodium iodide symporter (NIS) gene. VSV(Delta51)-NIS showed specific oncolytic activity against myeloma cell lines and primary myeloma cells and was able to replicate to high titers in myeloma cells in vitro. Iodide uptake assays showed accumulation of radioactive iodide in VSV(Delta51)-NIS-infected myeloma cells that was specific to the function of the NIS transgene. In bg/nd/xid mice with established subcutaneous myeloma tumors, administration of VSV(Delta51)-NIS resulted in high intratumoral virus replication and tumor regression. VSV-associated neurotoxicity was not observed. Intratumoral spread of the infection was monitored noninvasively by serial gamma camera imaging of (123)I-iodide biodistribution. Dosimetry calculations based on these images pointed to the feasibility of combination radiovirotherapy with VSV(Delta51)-NIS plus (131)I. Immunocompetent mice with syngeneic 5TGM1 myeloma tumors (either subcutaneous or orthotopic) showed significant enhancements of tumor regression and survival when VSV(Delta51)-NIS was combined with (131)I. These results show that VSV(Delta51)-NIS is a safe oncolytic agent with significant therapeutic potential in multiple myeloma.

  17. Vesicular stomatitis virus expressing interferon-β is oncolytic and promotes antitumor immune responses in a syngeneic murine model of non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Manish R; Jacobson, Blake A; Ji, Yan; Drees, Jeremy; Tang, Shaogeng; Xiong, Kerry; Wang, Hengbing; Prigge, Jennifer E; Dash, Alexander S; Kratzke, Andrea K; Mesev, Emily; Etchison, Ryan; Federspiel, Mark J; Russell, Stephen J; Kratzke, Robert A

    2015-10-20

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is a potent oncolytic virus for many tumors. VSV that produces interferon-β (VSV-IFNβ) is now in early clinical testing for solid tumors. Here, the preclinical activity of VSV and VSV-IFNβ against non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is reported. NSCLC cell lines were treated in vitro with VSV expressing green fluorescence protein (VSV-GFP) and VSV-IFNβ. VSV-GFP and VSV-IFNβ were active against NSCLC cells. JAK/STAT inhibition with ruxolitinib re-sensitized resistant H838 cells to VSV-IFNβ mediated oncolysis. Intratumoral injections of VSV-GFP and VSV-IFNβ reduced tumor growth and weight in H2009 nude mouse xenografts (p VSV-IFNβ intratumorally. Treatment of LM2 tumors with VSV-IFNβ resulted in tumor regression, prolonged survival (p VSV-IFNβ resulted in decreased tumor-infiltrating regulatory T cells (Treg) and increased CD8+ T cells. Tumor cell expression of PDL-1 was increased after VSV-IFNβ treatment. VSV-IFNβ has potent antitumor effects and promotes systemic antitumor immunity. These data support further clinical investigation of VSV-IFNβ for NSCLC.

  18. Specific antiviral activity of a poly(L-lysine)-conjugated oligodeoxyribonucleotide sequence complementary to vesicular stomatitis virus N protein mRNA initiation site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemaitre, M.; Bayard, B.; Lebleu, B.

    1987-02-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides represent an interesting tool for selective inhibition of gene expression, but their efficient introduction within intact cells provide to be difficult to realize. As a step toward this goal, small (13- or 15-mer) synthetic (/sup 14/C)-oligodeoxyribonucleotides have been coupled at their 3' ends to epsilon-amino groups of lysine residues of poly(L-lysine) (M/sub r/, 14,000). A 15-mer oligonucleotide-poly(L-Lysine) conjugate complementary to the initiation region of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) N-protein mRNA specifically inhibits the synthesis of VSV proteins and exerts an antiviral activity against the VSV when added in the cell culture medium at doses as low as 100 nM. Neither synthesis of cellular proteins nor multiplication of encephalomyocarditis virus was affected significantly by this oligonucleotide conjugate. The data suggest that oligonucleotide-poly(L-lysine) conjugates might become effective for studies on gene expression regulation and for antiviral chemotherapy.

  19. Characterization of the mutations responsible for the electrophoretic mobility differences in the NS proteins of vesicular stomatitis virus New Jersey complementation group E mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rae, B P; Elliott, R M

    1986-12-01

    Temperature-sensitive (ts) mutants of vesicular stomatitis virus, New Jersey serotype, classified in complementation group E contain lesions in the NS gene, which manifest as marked electrophoretic mobility differences of the mutant NS proteins in SDS-polyacrylamide gels. We have cloned full-length cDNA copies of the mutant NS mRNAs, and have determined their nucleotide sequences. tsE1 and tsE3 had single nucleotide changes, and tsE2 had two nucleotide changes, compared to the wild-type NS gene. Three of the mutations were clustered in a region of 18 nucleotides. All the nucleotide differences resulted in amino acid substitutions, which in each case changed the charge of the amino acid concerned. Analysis of the wild-type and mutant NS protein sequences by the method of Chou & Fasman indicated that single amino acid substitutions can radically alter the predicted secondary structure, and these data are discussed in relation to the observed electrophoretic mobility differences.

  20. Resistance of human leukocytes to vesicular stomatitis virus infection as one of the innate antiviral immune activities; participation of cell subpopulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danuta Duś

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Among reactions of innate immunity, resistance of human peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL to viral infection seems important. The purpose of our study was to find, which of the subpopulations of PBL is the most responsible for the innate antiviral immunity of these cells. The innate immunity was measured by using the direct method of infection of leukocytes with vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV. The lack of VSV replication by infected leukocytes (0-1 log TCID50 was taken as an indicator for complete immunity; a low level of VSV (2-3 log for partial immunity; and high VSV titer (more than 4 log for no immunity. The resistance/innate immunity of whole PBL and subpopulations such as: adherent cells, fractions enriched in lymphocytes T, and lymphocytes B (separated on column with nylon wool, NK(+ and NK(- (separated by microbeads activated cell sorting MACS differ from each other. All fractions express higher resistance/innate immunity than the whole PBL. NK(+ cells were found the most resistant fraction of PBL to VSV infection. The results indicate that among the leukocytes in PBL the regulation mechanisms of innate immunity exist. The study on the mechanism of innate immunity regulation as well as the role of NK in innate immunity of PBL must be continued.

  1. N-Terminal Phosphorylation of Phosphoprotein of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Is Required for Preventing Nucleoprotein from Binding to Cellular RNAs and for Functional Template Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Longyun; Zhang, Shengwei; Banerjee, Amiya K.

    2013-01-01

    The phosphoprotein (P) of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) plays essential roles in viral RNA synthesis. It associates with nascent nucleoprotein (N) to form N0-P (free of RNAs), thereby preventing the N from binding to cellular RNAs and maintaining the N in a viral genomic RNA encapsidation-competent form for transcription and replication. The contributions of phosphorylation of P to transcription and replication have been studied intensively, but a concrete mechanism of action still remains unclear. In this study, using a VSV minigenome system, we demonstrated that a mutant of P lacking N-terminal phosphorylation (P3A), in which the N-terminal phosphate acceptor sites are replaced with alanines (S60/A, T62/A, and S64/A), does not support transcription and replication. However, results from protein interaction assays showed that P3A self-associates and interacts with N and the large protein (L) as efficiently as P does. Furthermore, purified recombinant P3A from Sf21 cells supported transcription in an in vitro transcription reconstitution assay. We also proved that P3A is not distributed intranuclearly in vivo. CsCl gradient centrifugation showed that P3A is incapable of preventing N from binding to cellular RNAs and therefore prevents functional template formation. Taken together, our results demonstrate that N-terminal phosphorylation is indispensable for P to prevent N from binding to nonviral RNAs and to maintain the N-specific encapsidation of viral genomic RNA for functional template formation. PMID:23283948

  2. A vesicular stomatitis virus replicon-based bioassay for the rapid and sensitive determination of multi-species type I interferon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne Berger Rentsch

    Full Text Available Type I interferons (IFN comprise a family of cytokines that signal through a common cellular receptor to induce a plethora of genes with antiviral and other activities. Recombinant IFNs are used for the treatment of hepatitis C virus infection, multiple sclerosis, and certain malignancies. The capability of type I IFN to suppress virus replication and resultant cytopathic effects is frequently used to measure their bioactivity. However, these assays are time-consuming and require appropriate biosafety containment. In this study, an improved IFN assay is presented which is based on a recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV replicon encoding two reporter proteins, firefly luciferase and green fluorescent protein. The vector lacks the essential envelope glycoprotein (G gene of VSV and is propagated on a G protein-expressing transgenic cell line. Several mammalian and avian cells turned out to be susceptible to infection with the complemented replicon particles. Infected cells readily expressed the reporter proteins at high levels five hours post infection. When human fibroblasts were treated with serial dilutions of human IFN-β prior to infection, reporter expression was accordingly suppressed. This method was more sensitive and faster than a classical IFN bioassay based on VSV cytopathic effects. In addition, the antiviral activity of human IFN-λ (interleukin-29, a type III IFN, was determined on Calu-3 cells. Both IFN-β and IFN-λ were acid-stable, but only IFN-β was resistant to alkaline treatment. The antiviral activities of canine, porcine, and avian type I IFN were analysed with cell lines derived from the corresponding species. This safe bioassay will be useful for the rapid and sensitive quantification of multi-species type I IFN and potentially other antiviral cytokines.

  3. Vesicular stomatitis virus (indiana 2 serotype as experimental model to study acute encephalitis – morphological features Vírus da estomatite vesicular (sorotipo indiana 2 como modelo experimental para o estudo de encefalite aguda – aspectos morfológicos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florêncio Figueiredo Cavalcanti Neto

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available The Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV is a Vesiculovirus of the Rhabdoviridae family that infects mammals and causes vesicular lesions similar to those of foot-and-mouth disease. VSV experimental encephalitis can be induced in rodents and the symptoms are similar to those observed in rabies. However, the lesions observed in the animals´ encephalon are different. Inclusion bodies are not observed. There is necrosis, particularly in the region of the olfactory bulb, and, in some cases, ventriculitis. It was observed that the time pattern of VSV dissemination and the morphological aspects of the lesions are similar to those described in literature. The virus seems to be disseminated through the brain ventricles, being multiplied in the ependyma cells and in the neurons, besides using retrograde and anterograde transport. It was noticed that, due to the facility of virus manipulation, this experimental model has been used in innumerable research studies in several fields. If, on the one hand there are plenty of reports on the infection pathogenesis, on the other hand there are many gaps involving, for instance, aspects about virus transmission, recovery of infected animals and participation of glial cells in the acute as well as in the recovery phases.   O vírus da estomatite vesicular (VEV é um Vesiculovírus da família Rhabdoviridae que infecta mamíferos e causa lesões vesiculares semelhantes às observadas na febre aftosa. A encefalite experimental pode ser induzida em roedores e os sintomas são semelhantes aos observados na raiva; entretanto, as lesões observadas no encéfalo dos animais são diferentes. Corpúsculos de inclusão não são observados, há necrose especialmente da região do bulbo olfatório e em alguns casos, ventriculite. Observamos que o padrão temporal de disseminação do VEV e os aspectos morfológicos das lesões são similares aos descritos na literatura. O vírus parece se disseminar através dos ventr

  4. The inhibition of mouse L-cell 45 S ribosomal RNA processing is a highly uv-resistant property of vesicular stomatitis virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zan, M.; Evans, P.; Lucas-Lenard, J. (Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs (USA))

    1990-07-01

    In mouse L cells infected with vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), the synthesis of 45 S rRNA and its conversion to 28 S and 18 S rRNA are inhibited during the course of infection. Evidence is presented that the lack of accumulation of stable rRNA species results not only from the decreased transcription and processing of 45 S rRNA, but also from an increased breakdown of pre-rRNA or stable rRNA during processing. In cells prelabeled with (3H)uridine and then infected, the 28 S and 18 S rRNA species remain unaffected. Studies using uv-irradiated VSV indicate that the viral function involved in rRNA synthesis inhibition is slightly more sensitive to uv irradiation than the function involved in processing inhibition. These results suggest that the VSV functions involved in 45 S rRNA synthesis and processing inhibition may be related, or overlapping, but not identical. In cells infected by VSV mutant T1026R1, total RNA synthesis is inhibited, but the distribution of precursor and stable rRNA species remains nearly normal for up to 5 hr after infection. The function of the mutant virus involved in the inhibition of rRNA processing appears to be defective. In mengovirus-infected L cells, 45 S rRNA synthesis, but not processing, is severely inhibited soon after infection, indicating that a decrease in rRNA transcription is not necessarily accompanied by a decrease in processing.

  5. A novel, live-attenuated vesicular stomatitis virus vector displaying conformationally intact, functional HIV-1 envelope trimers that elicits potent cellular and humoral responses in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Rabinovich

    Full Text Available Though vaccination with live-attenuated SIV provides the greatest protection from progressive disease caused by SIV challenge in rhesus macaques, attenuated HIV presents safety concerns as a vaccine; therefore, live viral vectors carrying HIV immunogens must be considered. We have designed a replication-competent vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV displaying immunogenic HIV-1 Env trimers and attenuating quantities of the native surface glycoprotein (G. The clade B Env immunogen is an Env-VSV G hybrid (EnvG in which the transmembrane and cytoplasmic tail regions are derived from G. Relocation of the G gene to the 5'terminus of the genome and insertion of EnvG into the natural G position induced a ∼1 log reduction in surface G, significant growth attenuation compared to wild-type, and incorporation of abundant EnvG. Western blot analysis indicated that ∼75% of incorporated EnvG was a mature proteolytically processed form. Flow cytometry showed that surface EnvG bound various conformationally- and trimer-specific antibodies (Abs, and in-vitro growth assays on CD4+CCR5+ cells demonstrated EnvG functionality. Neither intranasal (IN or intramuscular (IM administration in mice induced any observable pathology and all regimens tested generated potent Env-specific ELISA titers of 10(4-10(5, with an IM VSV prime/IN VSV boost regimen eliciting the highest binding and neutralizing Ab titers. Significant quantities of Env-specific CD4+ T cells were also detected, which were augmented as much as 70-fold by priming with IM electroporated plasmids encoding EnvG and IL-12. These data suggest that our novel vector can achieve balanced safety and immunogenicity and should be considered as an HIV vaccine platform.

  6. Display of disparate transcription phenotype by the phosphorylation negative P protein mutants of vesicular stomatitis virus, Indiana serotype, expressed in E. coli and eucaryotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, M; Das, T; Chen, J L; Chattopadhyay, D; Banerjee, A K

    1997-01-01

    The phosphoprotein (P) of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is a subunit of the RNA polymerase (L) that transcribes the negative strand genome RNA into mRNAs both in vitro and in vivo. We have recently shown that the P protein of VSV, New Jersey serotype (PNJ), expressed in E. coli, is biologically inactive unless phosphorylated at specific serine residues by cellular casein kinase II (CKII). In the present work, we are studying the role of phosphorylation in the activation of the P protein of Indiana serotype (PIND), which is highly nonhomologous in amino acid sequence yet structurally similar to its New Jersey counterpart. Despite the fact that E. coli-expressed PIND required phosphorylation by CKII for activation, the phosphorylation negative P protein mutants generated by altering the phosphate acceptors S and T to alanine, surprisingly, showed transcription activity similar to wild-type in vitro. Alteration of S and T residues to phenylalanine, similarly, supported substantial transcription activity (approx. 60% of wild-type), whereas substitution with arginine residue abrogated transcription (approx. 5% of wild-type). In contrast, the same mutants, when expressed in eucaryotic cells, exhibited greatly reduced transcription activity in vitro. This disparate display of transcription phenotype by the PIND mutants expressed in bacteria and eucaryotic cells suggests that these mutants are unique in assuming different secondary structure or conformation when synthesized in two different cellular milieu. The findings that, unless phosphorylated by CKII, the bacterially expressed unphosphorylated (P0) form of PIND, as well as the phosphorylation negative mutants expressed in eucaryotic cells, demonstrates transcription negative phenotype indicate that, like PNJ, phosphorylation of PIND is essential for its activity.

  7. Ribose 2'-O methylation of the vesicular stomatitis virus mRNA cap precedes and facilitates subsequent guanine-N-7 methylation by the large polymerase protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmeh, Amal A; Li, Jianrong; Kranzusch, Philip J; Whelan, Sean P J

    2009-11-01

    During conventional mRNA cap formation, two separate methyltransferases sequentially modify the cap structure, first at the guanine-N-7 (G-N-7) position and subsequently at the ribose 2'-O position. For vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), a prototype of the nonsegmented negative-strand RNA viruses, the two methylase activities share a binding site for the methyl donor S-adenosyl-l-methionine and are inhibited by individual amino acid substitutions within the C-terminal domain of the large (L) polymerase protein. This led to the suggestion that a single methylase domain functions for both 2'-O and G-N-7 methylations. Here we report a trans-methylation assay that recapitulates both ribose 2'-O and G-N-7 modifications by using purified recombinant L and in vitro-synthesized RNA. Using this assay, we demonstrate that VSV L typically modifies the 2'-O position of the cap prior to the G-N-7 position and that G-N-7 methylation is diminished by pre-2'-O methylation of the substrate RNA. Amino acid substitutions in the C terminus of L that prevent all cap methylation in recombinant VSV (rVSV) partially retain the ability to G-N-7 methylate a pre-2'-O-methylated RNA, therefore uncoupling the effect of substitutions in the C terminus of the L protein on the two methylations. In addition, we show that the 2'-O and G-N-7 methylase activities act specifically on RNA substrates that contain the conserved elements of a VSV mRNA start at the 5' terminus. This study provides new mechanistic insights into the mRNA cap methylase activities of VSV L, demonstrates that 2'-O methylation precedes and facilitates subsequent G-N-7 methylation, and reveals an RNA sequence and length requirement for the two methylase activities. We propose a model of regulation of the activity of the C terminus of L protein in 2'-O and G-N-7 methylation of the cap structure.

  8. Lack of Correlation between Virus Barosensitivity and the Presence of a Viral Envelope during Inactivation of Human Rotavirus, Vesicular Stomatitis Virus, and Avian Metapneumovirus by High-Pressure Processing▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Fangfei; Neetoo, Hudaa; Li, Junan; Chen, Haiqiang; Li, Jianrong

    2011-01-01

    High-pressure processing (HPP) is a nonthermal technology that has been shown to effectively inactivate a wide range of microorganisms. However, the effectiveness of HPP on inactivation of viruses is relatively less well understood. We systematically investigated the effects of intrinsic (pH) and processing (pressure, time, and temperature) parameters on the pressure inactivation of a nonenveloped virus (human rotavirus [HRV]) and two enveloped viruses (vesicular stomatitis virus [VSV] and avian metapneumovirus [aMPV]). We demonstrated that HPP can efficiently inactivate all tested viruses under optimal conditions, although the pressure susceptibilities and the roles of temperature and pH substantially varied among these viruses regardless of the presence of a viral envelope. We found that VSV was much more stable than most food-borne viruses, whereas aMPV was highly susceptible to HPP. When viruses were held for 2 min under 350 MPa at 4°C, 1.1-log, 3.9-log, and 5.0-log virus reductions were achieved for VSV, HRV, and aMPV, respectively. Both VSV and aMPV were more susceptible to HPP at higher temperature and lower pH. In contrast, HRV was more easily inactivated at higher pH, although temperature did not have a significant impact on inactivation. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the damage of virion structure by disruption of the viral envelope and/or capsid is the primary mechanism underlying HPP-induced viral inactivation. In addition, VSV glycoprotein remained antigenic although VSV was completely inactivated. Taken together, our findings suggest that HPP is a promising technology to eliminate viral contaminants in high-risk foods, water, and other fomites. PMID:22003028

  9. A Confocal and Electron Microscopic Comparison of Interferon β–Induced Changes in Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Infection of Neuroblastoma and Nonneuronal Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agostino, Paul M.

    2010-01-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) replication is highly sensitive to interferon (IFN)-induced antiviral responses. Pretreatment of sensitive cultured cells with IFNβ results in a 104-fold reduction in the release of infectious VSV particles. However, differences exist between the mechanisms of reduced infectious particle titers in cell lines of neuroblastoma and nonneuronal lineage. In L929-fibroblast-derived cells, using immunofluorescence confocal microscopy, infection under control conditions reveals the accumulation of VSV matrix, phosphoprotein (P), and nucleocapsid (N) proteins over time, with induced cellular morphological changes indicative of cytopathic effects (CPEs). Upon observing L929 cells that had been pretreated with IFNβ, neither detectable VSV proteins nor CPEs were seen, consistent with type I IFN antiviral protection. When using the same techniques to observe VSV infections of NB41A3 cells, a neuroblastoma cell line, aside from similar viral progression in the untreated control cells, IFNβ-treated cells illustrated a severely attenuated VSV infection. Attenuated VSV progression was observed through detection of VSV matrix, P, and N proteins in isolated cells during the first 8 h of infection. However, by 18–24 h postinfection all neuroblastomas had succumbed to the viral infection. Finally, upon closer inspection of IFNβ-treated NB41A3 cells, no detectable changes in VSV protein localization were identified compared with untreated, virally infected neuroblastomas. Next, to extend our study to test our hypothesis that virion assembly is compromised within type I IFN-treated neuroblastoma cells, we employed electron microscopy to examine our experimental conditions at the ultrastructural level. Using VSV-specific antibodies in conjunction with immuno-gold reagents, we observed several similarities between the two cell lines, such as identification of viroplasmic regions containing VSV N and P proteins and signs of stress-induced CPEs of

  10. Translation of mRNAs from vesicular stomatitis virus and vaccinia virus is differentially blocked in cells with depletion of eIF4GI and/or eIF4GII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welnowska, Ewelina; Castelló, Alfredo; Moral, Pablo; Carrasco, Luis

    2009-12-04

    Cytolytic viruses abrogate host protein synthesis to maximize the translation of their own mRNAs. In this study, we analyzed the eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 4G requirement for translation of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and vaccinia virus (VV) mRNAs in HeLa cells using two different strategies: eIF4G depletion by small interfering RNAs or cleavage of eIF4G by expression of poliovirus 2A protease. Depletion of eIF4GI or eIF4GII moderately inhibits cellular protein synthesis, whereas silencing of both factors has only a slightly higher effect. Under these conditions, the extent of VSV protein synthesis is similar to that of nondepleted control cells, whereas VV expression is substantially reduced. Similar results were obtained when eIF4E was depleted. On the other hand, eIF4G cleavage by poliovirus 2A protease strongly inhibits translation of VV protein expression, whereas translation directed by VSV mRNAs is not abrogated, even though VSV mRNAs are capped. Therefore, the requirement for eIF4F activity is different for VV and VSV, suggesting that the molecular mechanism by which their mRNAs initiate their translation is also different. Consistent with these findings, eIF4GI does not colocalize with ribosomes in VSV-infected cells, while eIF2alpha locates at perinuclear sites coincident with ribosomes.

  11. A single amino acid change resulting in loss of fluorescence of eGFP in a viral fusion protein confers fitness and growth advantage to the recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinh, Phat X.; Panda, Debasis; Das, Phani B.; Das, Subash C.; Das, Anshuman; Pattnaik, Asit K.

    2012-01-01

    Using a recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus encoding eGFP fused in-frame with an essential viral replication protein, the phosphoprotein P, we show that during passage in culture, the virus mutates the nucleotide C289 within eGFP of the fusion protein PeGFP to A or T, resulting in R97S/C amino acid substitution and loss of fluorescence. The resultant non-fluorescent virus exhibits increased fitness and growth advantage over its fluorescent counterpart. The growth advantage of the non-fluorescent virus appears to be due to increased transcription and replication activities of the PeGFP protein carrying the R97S/C substitution. Further, our results show that the R97S/C mutation occurs prior to accumulation of mutations that can result in loss of expression of the gene inserted at the G-L gene junction. These results suggest that fitness gain is more important for the recombinant virus than elimination of expression of the heterologous gene. PMID:22832124

  12. Immunogenicity of viral vector, prime-boost SIV vaccine regimens in infant rhesus macaques: attenuated vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) recombinant SIV vaccines compared to live-attenuated SIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Rompay, Koen K A; Abel, Kristina; Earl, Patricia; Kozlowski, Pamela A; Easlick, Juliet; Moore, Joseph; Buonocore-Buzzelli, Linda; Schmidt, Kimberli A; Wilson, Robert L; Simon, Ian; Moss, Bernard; Rose, Nina; Rose, John; Marthas, Marta L

    2010-02-10

    In a previously developed infant macaque model mimicking HIV infection by breast-feeding, we demonstrated that intramuscular immunization with recombinant poxvirus vaccines expressing simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) structural proteins provided partial protection against infection following oral inoculation with virulent SIV. In an attempt to further increase systemic but also local antiviral immune responses at the site of viral entry, we tested the immunogenicity of different orally administered, replicating vaccines. One group of newborn macaques received an oral prime immunization with a recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus expressing SIVmac239 gag, pol and env (VSV-SIVgpe), followed 2 weeks later by an intramuscular boost immunization with MVA-SIV. Another group received two immunizations with live-attenuated SIVmac1A11, administered each time both orally and intravenously. Control animals received mock immunizations or non-SIV VSV and MVA control vectors. Analysis of SIV-specific immune responses in blood and lymphoid tissues at 4 weeks of age demonstrated that both vaccine regimens induced systemic antibody responses and both systemic and local cell-mediated immune responses. The safety and immunogenicity of the VSV-SIVgpe+MVA-SIV immunization regimen described in this report provide the scientific incentive to explore the efficacy of this vaccine regimen against virulent SIV exposure in the infant macaque model. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Rapid diagnosis of vesicular stomatitis virus in Ecuador by the use of polymerase chain reaction Diagnóstico rápido do vírus da estomatite vesicular no Equador mediante o uso da reação em cadeia da polimerase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lya Madureira Sepúlveda

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Vesicular Stomatitis (VS is a viral disease that has a great impact in animal health, as infected animals present marked decrease in meat and milk production. Its presence is a limiting factor for international animal trade. Besides the damage in the livestock productivity, such disease assumes an important role in animal health programs since it is clinically indistinguishable from Foot-and-Mouth Disease. The diagnosis of the VS has been made, mainly, through Complement Fixation, ELISA and Virus Neutralization tests, assays that allow not only for viral detection but also for differentiation of the two serotypes described for Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV: New Jersey (NJ and Indiana (Ind. In this work, a molecular diagnostic approach, the polymerase chain reaction performed after reverse transcription (RT - PCR, based on the specific partial amplification of NS gene of VSV was used, as an alternative method for the detection of the virus. A total of 10 VSV reference samples and 12 specimens collected from animals with clinical signs of vesicular disease obtained from field episodes in Ecuador were tested. The method allowed for the specific partial amplification of the region coding for protein P, both for VSV serotypes New Jersey (642 bp and Indiana 1 (614 bp. The results were compatible with data obtained by Complement Fixation test and the identity of the amplified products was confirmed by nucleotide sequencing.A Estomatite Vesicular (EV é uma enfermidade viral de grande impacto na saúde animal. O animal enfermo apresenta queda na produtividade em rebanho de carne e na produção leiteira, sendo um fator limitante para o comércio internacional de animais. Além dos danos à produtividade essa enfermidade assume importante papel nos programas de saúde animal por ser indistinguível clinicamente da Febre Aftosa. As técnicas para o diagnóstico da EV são, principalmente, a Fixação de Complemento, a ELISA e a Virusneutraliza

  14. Rescue at nonpermissive temperature of complementation group II temperature-sensitive mutants of vesicular stomatitis virus by uv-irradiated VSV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deutsch, V.; Brun, G.

    1978-06-01

    Rescue is group-characteristic. The helper virus can be either the wt strain or a mutant belonging to any group of ts mutants except group II. With regard to genotype, the rescue progeny virus is temperature-sensitive and belongs to group II, and its ts II parent (ts O52(II)) can be characterized. As for phenotype, the in vitro thermal stability of rescue virions is intermediate between that of parental ts O52(II) and uv-irradiated wt virus, suggesting incorporation of some wt protein II molecules in the rescue virions. Different slopes (zero or different from zero) were seen in dose-effect curves representing rescue obtained by structural protein molecules, suggesting that protein II structural role could be distinguished from its functional role(s) by uv sensitivity. Differences in efficiency of the rescue of ts O52(II) by ts I mutants irradiated with low uv fluence may reflect their different transcribing capabilities at 39.6/sup 0/. The results are discussed taking into account the fact that the phenotype of group II mutants is characterized by an unstable nucleocapsid.

  15. Ribose 2′-O Methylation of the Vesicular Stomatitis Virus mRNA Cap Precedes and Facilitates Subsequent Guanine-N-7 Methylation by the Large Polymerase Protein▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmeh, Amal A.; Li, Jianrong; Kranzusch, Philip J.; Whelan, Sean P. J.

    2009-01-01

    During conventional mRNA cap formation, two separate methyltransferases sequentially modify the cap structure, first at the guanine-N-7 (G-N-7) position and subsequently at the ribose 2′-O position. For vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), a prototype of the nonsegmented negative-strand RNA viruses, the two methylase activities share a binding site for the methyl donor S-adenosyl-l-methionine and are inhibited by individual amino acid substitutions within the C-terminal domain of the large (L) polymerase protein. This led to the suggestion that a single methylase domain functions for both 2′-O and G-N-7 methylations. Here we report a trans-methylation assay that recapitulates both ribose 2′-O and G-N-7 modifications by using purified recombinant L and in vitro-synthesized RNA. Using this assay, we demonstrate that VSV L typically modifies the 2′-O position of the cap prior to the G-N-7 position and that G-N-7 methylation is diminished by pre-2′-O methylation of the substrate RNA. Amino acid substitutions in the C terminus of L that prevent all cap methylation in recombinant VSV (rVSV) partially retain the ability to G-N-7 methylate a pre-2′-O-methylated RNA, therefore uncoupling the effect of substitutions in the C terminus of the L protein on the two methylations. In addition, we show that the 2′-O and G-N-7 methylase activities act specifically on RNA substrates that contain the conserved elements of a VSV mRNA start at the 5′ terminus. This study provides new mechanistic insights into the mRNA cap methylase activities of VSV L, demonstrates that 2′-O methylation precedes and facilitates subsequent G-N-7 methylation, and reveals an RNA sequence and length requirement for the two methylase activities. We propose a model of regulation of the activity of the C terminus of L protein in 2′-O and G-N-7 methylation of the cap structure. PMID:19710136

  16. DNA Priming Increases Frequency of T-Cell Responses to a Vesicular Stomatitis Virus HIV Vaccine with Specific Enhancement of CD8+ T-Cell Responses by Interleukin-12 Plasmid DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuying S; Kochar, Nidhi K; Elizaga, Marnie; Hay, Christine M; Wilson, Gregory J; Cohen, Kristen W; De Rosa, Stephen C; Xu, Rong; Ota-Setlik, Ayuko; Morris, Daryl; Finak, Greg; Allen, Mary; Tieu, Hong-Van; Frank, Ian; Sobieszczyk, Magdalena E; Hannaman, Drew; Gottardo, Raphael; Gilbert, Peter B; Tomaras, Georgia D; Corey, Lawrence; Clarke, David K; Egan, Michael A; Eldridge, John H; McElrath, M Juliana; Frahm, Nicole

    2017-11-01

    The HIV Vaccine Trials Network (HVTN) 087 vaccine trial assessed the effect of increasing doses of pIL-12 (interleukin-12 delivered as plasmid DNA) adjuvant on the immunogenicity of an HIV-1 multiantigen (MAG) DNA vaccine delivered by electroporation and boosted with a vaccine comprising an attenuated vesicular stomatitis virus expressing HIV-1 Gag (VSV-Gag). We randomized 100 healthy adults to receive placebo or 3 mg HIV-MAG DNA vaccine (ProfectusVax HIV-1 gag/pol or ProfectusVax nef/tat/vif, env) coadministered with pIL-12 at 0, 250, 1,000, or 1,500 μg intramuscularly by electroporation at 0, 1, and 3 months followed by intramuscular inoculation with 3.4 × 107 PFU VSV-Gag vaccine at 6 months. Immune responses were assessed after the prime and boost and 6 months after the last vaccination. High-dose pIL-12 increased the magnitude of CD8+ T-cell responses postboost compared to no pIL-12 (P = 0.02), while CD4+ T-cell responses after the prime were higher in the absence of pIL-12 than with low- and medium-dose pIL-12 (P ≤ 0.05). The VSV boost increased Gag-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses in all groups (P T cells), inducing a median of four Gag epitopes in responders. Six to 9 months after the boost, responses decreased in magnitude, but CD8+ T-cell response rates were maintained. The addition of a DNA prime dramatically improved responses to the VSV vaccine tested previously in the HVTN 090 trial, leading to broad epitope targeting and maintained CD8+ T-cell response rates at early memory. The addition of high-dose pIL-12 given with a DNA prime by electroporation and boosted with VSV-Gag increased the CD8+ T-cell responses but decreased the CD4+ responses. This approach may be advantageous in reshaping the T-cell responses to a variety of chronic infections or tumors. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01578889.). Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  17. Current good manufacturing practice production of an oncolytic recombinant vesicular stomatitis viral vector for cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ausubel, L J; Meseck, M; Derecho, I; Lopez, P; Knoblauch, C; McMahon, R; Anderson, J; Dunphy, N; Quezada, V; Khan, R; Huang, P; Dang, W; Luo, M; Hsu, D; Woo, S L C; Couture, L

    2011-04-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is an oncolytic virus currently being investigated as a promising tool to treat cancer because of its ability to selectively replicate in cancer cells. To enhance the oncolytic property of the nonpathologic laboratory strain of VSV, we generated a recombinant vector [rVSV(MΔ51)-M3] expressing murine gammaherpesvirus M3, a secreted viral chemokine-binding protein that binds to a broad range of mammalian chemokines with high affinity. As previously reported, when rVSV(MΔ51)-M3 was used in an orthotopic model of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in rats, it suppressed inflammatory cell migration to the virus-infected tumor site, which allowed for enhanced intratumoral virus replication leading to increased tumor necrosis and substantially prolonged survival. These encouraging results led to the development of this vector for clinical translation in patients with HCC. However, a scalable current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP)-compliant manufacturing process has not been described for this vector. To produce the quantities of high-titer virus required for clinical trials, a process that is amenable to GMP manufacturing and scale-up was developed. We describe here a large-scale (50-liter) vector production process capable of achieving crude titers on the order of 10(9) plaque-forming units (PFU)/ml under cGMP. This process was used to generate a master virus seed stock and a clinical lot of the clinical trial agent under cGMP with an infectious viral titer of approximately 2 × 10(10) PFU/ml (total yield, 1 × 10(13) PFU). The lot has passed all U.S. Food and Drug Administration-mandated release testing and will be used in a phase 1 clinical translational trial in patients with advanced HCC.

  18. O polietilenoglicol aumenta a penetração do vírus da diarréia viral bovina, do vírus da estomatite vesicular e do vírus sincicial respiratório bovino em células de cultivo Polyethylene glycol increases the penetration of bovine viral diarrhea virus, vesicular stomatitis virus and bovine respiratory syncytial virus in cultured cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Dezengrini

    2009-06-01

    bovine enveloped viruses in culture cells. Penetration efficiency was measured by counting the number of viral plaques produced in bovine kidney cells (MDBK. The addition of 5% PEG (molecular weight 6.000 to the viral inoculum containing 100 TCID50 mL-1 (tissue culture median infectious dosis of each virus, during adsorption for 2h at 37°C, resulted in a significant increase in the number of plaques for bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV (increase of 3.4-fold, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV (2.2-fold and bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV (1.5-fold. The addition of 5% PEG to the inoculum of bovine herpesviruses 1, 2 and 5 (BoHV-1, BoHV-2 and BoHV-5 did not increase the number of viral plaques. On the other hand, PEG produced a reduction in the number of plaques by bovine parainfluenza virus (bPI-3V (1.4-fold. Furthermore, the addition of 5% PEG produced a 10- to 1000-fold increase in the sensitivity of BVDV detection in the serum of three persistently infected calves; and doubled the sensitivity of detection of BRSV in nasal secretions of two experimentally infected sheep. These results demonstrate that PEG enhances the efficiency of infection by BVDV, VSV and BRSV in cultured bovine cells and therefore may be used to increase the sensitivity of virus detection in clinical samples (viral isolation, and/or to increase virus titers in cell cultures.

  19. Plant virus infections control stomatal development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Rose R.; Emblow, Mark S. M.; Hetherington, Alistair M.; Foster, Gary D.

    2016-09-01

    Stomata are important regulators of carbon dioxide uptake and transpirational water loss. They also represent points of vulnerability as bacterial and fungal pathogens utilise this natural opening as an entry portal, and thus have an increasingly complex relationship. Unlike the situation with bacterial and fungal pathogens, we know very little about the role of stomata in viral infection. Here we report findings showing that viral infection influences stomatal development in two susceptible host systems (Nicotiana tabacum with TMV (Tobacco mosaic virus), and Arabidopsis thaliana with TVCV (Turnip vein-clearing virus)), but not in resistant host systems (Nicotiana glutinosa and Chenopodium quinoa with TMV). Virus infected plants had significantly lower stomatal indices in systemic leaves of susceptible systems; N. tabacum 9.8% reduction and A. thaliana 12.3% reduction, but not in the resistant hosts. Stomatal density in systemic leaves was also significantly reduced in virus infected A. thaliana by 19.6% but not in N. tabacum or the resistant systems. In addition, transpiration rate was significantly reduced in TMV infected N. tabacum.

  20. CD4(+) T cell-mediated protection against a lethal outcome of systemic infection with vesicular stomatitis virus requires CD40 ligand expression, but not IFN-gamma or IL-4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, C; Jensen, T; Nansen, A

    1999-01-01

    experiments using B cell- and T cell-deficient recipients revealed that no protection could be obtained in the absence of B cells, whereas treatment with virus-specific immune (IgG) serum controlled viral spreading to the central nervous system (CNS), but did not necessarily accomplish virus elimination...... the capacity to secrete both IFN-gamma and perforin completely resisted disease. Similar results were obtained using IL-4 knockout mice, indicating that neither cell-mediated nor T(h)2-dependent effector systems were required. In contrast, mice deficient in expression of CD40 ligand were more susceptible than...... wild-type mice, and residual resistance in these mice was almost completely abrogated by depletion of CD8(+) T cells. In keeping with this, mice lacking both MHC class I and class II expression succumbed to the infection, whereas most class II-deficient mice normally survive. Adoptive transfer...

  1. Vesicular exanthema of swine virus: isolation and serotyping of field samples.

    OpenAIRE

    Edwards, J F; Yedloutschnig, R J; Dardiri, A H; Callis, J. J.

    1987-01-01

    Virus isolation was attempted from 262 field samples of vesicular material collected during the outbreaks of vesicular exanthema of swine in the U.S.A. from 1952-54. Using primary swine kidney culture, viral cytopathogenic agents were isolated from 76.3% of the samples. However, an overall recovery rate of 82.1% was obtained after samples negative in tissue culture were inoculated intradermally in susceptible swine. All vesicular exanthema of swine virus isolates were identified as serotype B...

  2. Vesicular exanthema of swine virus: isolation and serotyping of field samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, J F; Yedloutschnig, R J; Dardiri, A H; Callis, J J

    1987-01-01

    Virus isolation was attempted from 262 field samples of vesicular material collected during the outbreaks of vesicular exanthema of swine in the U.S.A. from 1952-54. Using primary swine kidney culture, viral cytopathogenic agents were isolated from 76.3% of the samples. However, an overall recovery rate of 82.1% was obtained after samples negative in tissue culture were inoculated intradermally in susceptible swine. All vesicular exanthema of swine virus isolates were identified as serotype B51 using complement fixation and serum neutralization tests. Two isolates did not react with antisera to known vesicular agents of swine and failed to produce vesicles or clinical signs of disease upon inoculation in swine. One vesicular exanthema of swine virus isolate from tissue of equine origin was pathogenic for swine but produced limited vesiculation at the site of intradermalingual inoculation in the tongue of a pony infected experimentally. Type B51 virus was reisolated from lesions produced in the pony and the pony became seropositive for virus type B51. PMID:3651889

  3. Historia natural del virus de la estomatitis vesicular en zonas enzoóticas de Antioquia

    OpenAIRE

    John Arboleda; Andrés Londoño; Víctor Quiroz; Carlos Trujillo

    2003-01-01

    La Estomatitis Vesicular (EV) es una enfermedad producida
    por el virus de la Estomatitis Vesicular, serotipos New Jersey (VSV-NJ) e Indiana (VSV-IN), afecta bovinos y equinos, porcinos y causa infección natural en humanos, principalmente granjeros, ordeñadores y personal de laboratorio.
    Se caracteriza por producir vesículas en las membranas mucosas
    de la boca (epitelio de la lengua y el paladar), bandas coronarias,
    pezones y tejidos blandos...

  4. Analysis of VSV pseudotype virus infection mediated by rubella virus envelope proteins

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Masafumi Sakata; Hideki Tani; Masaki Anraku; Michiyo Kataoka; Noriyo Nagata; Fumio Seki; Maino Tahara; Noriyuki Otsuki; Kiyoko Okamoto; Makoto Takeda; Yoshio Mori

    2017-01-01

    .... To establish an infection the host cells must be susceptible and permissible. To assess the susceptibility of individual cell lines, we generated a pseudotype vesicular stomatitis virus bearing RV envelope proteins (VSV-RV/CE2E1...

  5. ANTICUERPOS CONTRA EL VIRUS DE ESTOMATITIS VESICULAR EN HUANGANAS (Tayassu pecari) EN MADRE DE DIOS, PERÚ

    OpenAIRE

    Carruitero H., Susan; Laboratorio de Microbiología y Parasitología Veterinaria, Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima; Rivera G., Hermelinda; Laboratorio de Microbiología y Parasitología Veterinaria, Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima Perú.; Ramírez V., Mercy; Laboratorio de Microbiología y Parasitología Veterinaria, Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima; More B., Juan; Laboratorio de Microbiología y Parasitología Veterinaria, Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima.; Zúñiga H., Alfonso; Proyecto ÁREAS–Amazonía de la World Wildlife Fund (WWF-Peru); Romero S., Mónica; Proyecto ÁREAS–Amazonía de la World Wildlife Fund (WWF-Peru)

    2013-01-01

    El objetivo del presente estudio fue determinar la presencia de anticuerpos neutralizantes contra los serotipos New Jersey (NJ) e Indiana subtipo 1 (IND-1) del virus Estomatitis Vesicular (VEV) en huanganas (Tayassu pecari) de vida libre de las localidades de Boca de Manu (n=30), Concesión para la Conservación Los Amigos (n=10) y La Reserva Nacional Tambopata/Parque Nacional Bahuaja Sonene (n=48) en el departamento de Madre de Dios. La presencia de anticuerpos contra el VEV fue determinado me...

  6. Methylation of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) mRNA 5'-cap structures in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammond, D.C.; Lesnaw, J.A.

    1987-05-01

    Monocistronic VSV mRNAs synthesized by subviral particles in vitro display the methylated 5'-cap structure m'G(5')ppp(5')Am. The authors have detected both monomethylated cap structures, m/sup 7/G(5')ppp(5')A and G(5')Am, in reactions containing suboptimal concentrations of AdoMet. To assess the putative precursor roles of these cap structures the authors devised dual label pulse-chase analyses employing S-(CH/sub 3/-/sup 3/H)-AdoMet and (..beta..-/sup 32/P)GTP. The labeled cap structures were analyzed by HPLC. The simultaneous chasing of both radiolabeled substrates allowed 1) the isolation of a specific set of caps labeled as (..beta..-/sup 32/P)-R/sup 7/G(5')ppp(5')AR (R=H or CH/sub 3/) and 2) the determination of the transcriptive fate of each intermediate cap structure within the set. The results demonstrated that both monomethylated cap structures serve as intermediates for the dimethylated cap and that the order of cap methylation is non-compulsory. These data, coupled with previous observations of hypomethylated cap structures in polyadenylated RNAs, have suggested that methylation occurs in a chain length dependent window.

  7. Interactions of macrophages with probiotic bacteria lead to increased antiviral response against vesicular stomatitis virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ivec, Martin; Botic, Tanja; Koren, Srecko

    2007-01-01

    and by producing chemokines and immunoregulatory cytokines that enable the adaptive immune response to recognize infected cells and perform antiviral effector functions. Probiotics, as a part of the normal gut intestinal flora, are important in supporting a functional yet balanced immune system. Improving our...

  8. Orf virus interferes with MHC class I surface expression by targeting vesicular transport and Golgi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohde Jörg

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Orf virus (ORFV, a zoonotic Parapoxvirus, causes pustular skin lesions in small ruminants (goat and sheep. Intriguingly, ORFV can repeatedly infect its host, despite the induction of a specific immunity. These immune modulating and immune evading properties are still unexplained. Results Here, we describe that ORFV infection of permissive cells impairs the intracellular transport of MHC class I molecules (MHC I as a result of structural disruption and fragmentation of the Golgi apparatus. Depending on the duration of infection, we observed a pronounced co-localization of MHC I and COP-I vesicular structures as well as a reduction of MHC I surface expression of up to 50%. These subversion processes are associated with early ORFV gene expression and are accompanied by disturbed carbohydrate trimming of post-ER MHC I. The MHC I population remaining on the cell surface shows an extended half-life, an effect that might be partially controlled also by late ORFV genes. Conclusions The presented data demonstrate that ORFV down-regulates MHC I surface expression in infected cells by targeting the late vesicular export machinery and the structure and function of the Golgi apparatus, which might aid to escape cellular immune recognition.

  9. Didelphis marsupialis como un reservorio potencial u hospedero amplificador del virus de la estomatitis vesicular, serotipo new jersey en Antioquia

    OpenAIRE

    John Arboleda; Carlos Trujillo

    2004-01-01

    La Estomatitis Vesicular (EV) es una enfermedad viral, aguda
    y autolimitante que afecta principalmente bovinos, equinos y
    porcinos. Es producida por el virus de estomatitis vesicular (VEV), serotipos New Jersey (VEV-NJ) e Indiana (VEV-IN), que son los as importantes epidemiológicamente (1). Los estudios serológicos demuestran que VEV-NJ y VEV-IN infectan en forma natural una gran variedad de animales silvestres, que están posiblemente implicados en la  coepizoot...

  10. Spatial transmission of Swine Vesicular Disease virus in the 2006-2007 epidemic in Lombardy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Nassuato

    Full Text Available In 2006 and 2007 pig farming in the region of Lombardy, in the north of Italy, was struck by an epidemic of Swine Vesicular Disease virus (SVDV. In fact this epidemic could be viewed as consisting of two sub-epidemics, as the reported outbreaks occurred in two separate time periods. These periods differed in terms of the provinces or municipalities that were affected and also in terms of the timing of implementation of movement restrictions. Here we use a simple mathematical model to analyse the epidemic data, quantifying between-farm transmission probability as a function of between-farm distance. The results show that the distance dependence of between-farm transmission differs between the two periods. In the first period transmission over relatively long distances occurred with higher probability than in the second period, reflecting the effect of movement restrictions in the second period. In the second period however, more intensive transmission occurred over relatively short distances. Our model analysis explains this in terms of the relatively high density of pig farms in the area most affected in this period, which exceeds a critical farm density for between-farm transmission. This latter result supports the rationale for the additional control measure taken in 2007 of pre-emptively culling farms in that area.

  11. Drug Targets in Infections With Ebola and Marburg Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) virus -like replicon (VRP), adenovirus 5 (AdS), vesicular stomatitis virus ( VSV )-based vaccines, and virus -like... virus itself may prove to be a very effective way to clear or prevent virus infection, an inherent flaw in this method does exist for several viruses ...immunofluorescence and ELISA. Rab9 siRNA also decreased replication of HIV and measles virus . This was not observed in non~enveloped viruses , which

  12. Historia natural del virus de la estomatitis vesicular en zonas enzoóticas de Antioquia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Arboleda

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available

    La Estomatitis Vesicular (EV es una enfermedad producida
    por el virus de la Estomatitis Vesicular, serotipos New Jersey (VSV-NJ e Indiana (VSV-IN, afecta bovinos y equinos, porcinos y causa infección natural en humanos, principalmente granjeros, ordeñadores y personal de laboratorio.
    Se caracteriza por producir vesículas en las membranas mucosas
    de la boca (epitelio de la lengua y el paladar, bandas coronarias,
    pezones y tejidos blandos de los cascos; hay pérdida de peso y decrecimiento en la producción de leche. Está clasificada en la Lista A de la Organización Internacional de Epizootias, debido a su gran poder de difusión, a las graves consecuencias socioeconómicas y a las restricciones comerciales. Además, clínicamente la EV es indistinguible de la Fiebre Aftosa (FA (1.
    La enfermedad se presenta por ciclos estacionales; la mayoría
    de ellos ocurre en las épocas de transición de los períodos de lluvias a los de verano y viceversa (2. Estudios serológicos realizados en áreas endémicas han demostrado que VSV-NJ y VSV-IN infectan en forma natural una amplia variedad de animales silvestres, los cuales están posiblemente implicados en la ecozootiología de la EV, bien como hospederos portadores, amplificadores o reservorios. Igualmente, dos especies de artrópodos, Lutzomyia shannoni y Simulium vittatum son infectados naturalmente, replican y transmiten experimentalmente
    el VSV, convirtiéndolos en posibles vectores y/o reservorios.
    Sin embargo, en ningún animal se produce la viremia necesaria para infectar los artrópodos hematófagos. El reservorio natural nunca ha sido encontrado entre los animales domésticos y silvestres investigados (3.

    El objetivo es identificar los factores ecológicos (cobertura
    vegetal, temperatura promedio, pluviosidad y humedad relativa, los vectores artrópodos y los mamíferos reservorios asociados con el antenimiento y transmisión de la VSV en

  13. Safety of recombinant VSV-Ebola virus vaccine vector in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wit, Emmie; Marzi, Andrea; Bushmaker, Trenton; Brining, Doug; Scott, Dana; Richt, Juergen A; Geisbert, Thomas W; Feldmann, Heinz

    2015-04-01

    The ongoing Ebola outbreak in West Africa has resulted in fast-track development of vaccine candidates. We tested a vesicular stomatitis virus vector expressing Ebola virus glycoprotein for safety in pigs. Inoculation did not cause disease and vaccine virus shedding was minimal, which indicated that the vaccine virus does not pose a risk of dissemination in pigs.

  14. Isolation of a virus with rhabdovirus morphology from a white-beaked dolphin (Lagenorhynchus albirostris).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); H.W.J. Broeders; K.S. Teppema; T. Kuiken (Thijs); J.A. House; H.W. Vos (Helma); I.K.G. Visser (Ilona)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractA virus with rhabdovirus morphology which proved to be antigenically distinct from rabies virus and vesicular stomatitis virus was isolated from a dolphin that had beached on the Dutch coast. Neutralizing antibodies to this virus were found in several European marine mammal species.

  15. Comparación de la técnica seroneutralización con la inmunoenzimática competitiva en la detección de anticuerpos contra el virus de la estomatitis vesicular (serotipos New Jersey e Indiana) en equinos de Costa Rica

    OpenAIRE

    von Koeckritz-Blickwede, Maren; Dolz Wiedner, Gaby; Vinicio Herrero, Marco

    2015-01-01

    A competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (c-ELISA) was compared to the serum neutralization test (SNT) for the detection of antibodies against vesicular stomatitis virus, New Jersey (VSV-NJ) and Indiana (VSV-IN) serotypes, using 214 equine serum samples from Costa Rica. In the c-ELISA for VSV-NJ 109 (50.93%) equine sera reacted positive, whereas in the SNT 138 (64.48%) serum samples reacted positive to VSV-NJ. In the c-ELISA for VSV-IN 26 (12.15%) sera reacted positive, whereas in the ...

  16. Viruses budding from either the apical or the basolateral plasma membrane domain of MDCK cells have unique phospholipid compositions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Meer, G.; Simons, K.

    1982-01-01

    Influenza virus and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) obtain their lipid envelope by budding through the plasma membrane of infected cells. When monolayers of Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, a polarized epithelial cell line, are infected with fowl plague virus (FPV), an avian influenza virus,

  17. Detection of three porcine vesicular viruses using multiplex real-time primer-probe energy transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun; Uttenthal, Åse; Aguero, M.

    2006-01-01

    Rapid identification of the etiologic agent in infected animals is important for the control of an outbreak of vesicular disease in livestock. We have in the present study developed a multiplex real-time reverse transcription-PCR, based on primer-probe energy transfer (PriProET), for simultaneous...

  18. Antiviral effects of bovine interferons on bovine respiratory tract viruses.

    OpenAIRE

    Fulton, R W; Downing, M M; Cummins, J M

    1984-01-01

    The antiviral effects of bovine interferons on the replication of bovine respiratory tract viruses were studied. Bovine turbinate monolayer cultures were treated with bovine interferons and challenged with several bovine herpesvirus 1 strains, bovine viral diarrhea virus, parainfluenza type 3 virus, goat respiratory syncytial virus, bovine respiratory syncytial virus, bovine adenovirus type 7, or vesicular stomatitis virus. Treatment with bovine interferons reduced viral yield for each of the...

  19. Didelphis marsupialis como un reservorio potencial u hospedero amplificador del virus de la estomatitis vesicular, serotipo new jersey en Antioquia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Arboleda

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available

    La Estomatitis Vesicular (EV es una enfermedad viral, aguda
    y autolimitante que afecta principalmente bovinos, equinos y
    porcinos. Es producida por el virus de estomatitis vesicular (VEV, serotipos New Jersey (VEV-NJ e Indiana (VEV-IN, que son los as importantes epidemiológicamente (1. Los estudios serológicos demuestran que VEV-NJ y VEV-IN infectan en forma natural una gran variedad de animales silvestres, que están posiblemente implicados en la  coepizootiología de la EV, como hospederos portadores, mplificadores o reservorios (2.

    La zarigüeya (Didelphis marsupialis es un buen candidato
    para cumplir esta función, debido a que es la especie silvestre
    mayormente capturada en zonas enzoóticas; presenta altos
    porcentajes de infección natural (3, resiste la antropización y
    además, su comportamiento le permite interactuar con
    diferentes poblaciones de vectores u otros reservorios en los
    bosques y servir como fuente de infección para las especies
    domésticas susceptibles.

     

     

  20. Detection of early infection of swine vesicular disease virus in porcine cells and skin sections. A comparison of immunohistochemistry and in-situ hybridization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, W.A.M.; Poelwijk, van F.; Moormann, R.J.M.; Reus, B.; Kok, G.L.; Pol, J.M.A.; Dekker, A.

    1997-01-01

    Sensitive methods are required to study the early pathogenesis of swine vesicular diseases (SVD). Therefore, two new methods, immunohistochemistry (IHC) and in-situ hybridization (ISH), were developed and tested for their specificity and sensitivity. With these methods the SVD virus (SVDV) infection

  1. Structure of swine vesicular disease virus: mapping of changes occurring during adaptation of human coxsackie B5 virus to infect swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdaguer, Núria; Jimenez-Clavero, Miguel A; Fita, Ignacio; Ley, Victoria

    2003-09-01

    The structure of swine vesicular disease virus (SVDV) was solved and refined at a 3.0-A resolution by X-ray crystallography to gain information about the role of sequence changes that occurred as this virus evolved from the parental human pathogen coxsackievirus B5 (CVB5). These amino acid substitutions can be clustered in five distinct regions: (i) the antigenic sites, (ii) the hydrophobic pocket of the VP1 beta-sandwich, (iii) the putative CAR binding site, (iv) the putative heparan sulfate binding site, and (v) the fivefold axis. The VP1 pocket is occupied by a branched pocket factor, apparently different from that present in the closely related virus CVB3 and in other picornaviruses. This finding may be relevant for the design of new antiviral compounds against this site. Density consistent with the presence of ions was observed on the fivefold and threefold axes. The structure also provided an accurate description of the putative receptor binding sites.

  2. In silico and in vitro studies of cytotoxic activity of different peptides derived from vesicular stomatitis virus G protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fereshte Ghandehari

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: The results confirmed that P26 and P7 peptides might induce membrane damage and initiate apoptosis. The present study suggested that P26 and P7 peptides could be appropriate candidates for further studies as cytotoxic agents and modifications in the residue at positions 70-280 might potentially produce a more efficient VSVG protein in gene therapy.

  3. Single-Domain Antibodies as Tools to Perturb and Study RNA Viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hanke, Leo

    2017-01-01

    In this thesis, I describe the generation and characterization of alpaca-derived, antiviral, single-domain antibody fragments (VHHs). The antiviral targets of the described VHHs are the nuclear proteins of influenza A virus (IAV) and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). The described VHHs protect cells

  4. Aptamer-facilitated Protection of Oncolytic Virus from Neutralizing Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muharemagic, Darija; Zamay, Anna; Ghobadloo, Shahrokh M; Evgin, Laura; Savitskaya, Anna; Bell, John C; Berezovski, Maxim V

    2014-06-03

    Oncolytic viruses promise to significantly improve current cancer treatments through their tumor-selective replication and multimodal attack against cancer cells. However, one of the biggest setbacks for oncolytic virus therapy is the intravenous delivery of the virus, as it can be cleared from the bloodstream by neutralizing antibodies before it reaches the tumor cells. We have selected DNA aptamers against an oncolytic virus, vesicular stomatitis virus, using a competitive binding approach, as well as against the antigen binding fragment (Fab) of antivesicular stomatitis virus polyclonal antibodies, in order to shield the virus from nAbs and enhance its in vivo survival. We used flow cytometry to identify these aptamers and evaluated their efficiency to shield vesicular stomatitis virus in a cell-based plaque forming assay. These oligonucleotides were then modified to obtain multivalent binders, which led to a decrease of viral aggregation, an increase in its infectivity and an increase in its stability in serum. The aptamers were also incubated in nondiluted serum, showing their effectiveness under conditions mimicking those in vivo. With this approach, we were able to increase viral infectivity by more than 70% in the presence of neutralizing antibodies. Thus, this method has the potential to enhance the delivery of vesicular stomatitis virus through the bloodstream without compromising the patient's immune system.

  5. Development of a minor groove binder assay for real-time one-step RT-PCR detection of swine vesicular disease virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMenamy, M J; McKillen, J; Reid, S M; Hjertner, B; King, D P; Adair, B; Allan, G

    2011-01-01

    The design and development of a 5' conjugated minor groove binder (MGB) probe real-time RT-PCR assay are described for rapid, sensitive and specific detection of swine vesicular disease virus (SVDV) RNA. The assay is designed to target the 2C gene of the SVDV genome and is capable of detecting 2×10(2) copies of an RNA standard per reaction. It does not detect any of the other RNA viruses that cause vesicular disease in pigs, or the human enterovirus, Coxsackie B5 virus (CVB5) which is closely related antigenically to SVDV. The linear range of this test was from 2×10(2) to 2×10(8) copies/μl. The assay is rapid and can detect SVDV RNA in just over 3.5 h including the time required for nucleic acid extraction. The development of this assay provides a useful tool for the differential diagnosis of SVD or for the detection of SVDV in research applications. This study demonstrates the suitability of MGB probes as a real-time PCR chemistry for the diagnosis of swine vesicular disease. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Respuesta de Sigmodon hispidus (Rodentia: Muridae) a la inoculación experimental con el virus de la estomatitis vesicular serotipo New Jersey

    OpenAIRE

    Rodriguez, Julia; Dolz, Gaby; Jimenez, Ana Eugenia; Herrero, Marco Vinicio; Salman, Mo

    2013-01-01

    Se han reportado anticuerpos contra el Virus de Estomatitis Vesicular, serotipo New Jersey (VEV-NJ), en Sigmodon hispidus (rata algodonera) libres en Costa Rica. Con el fin de evaluar su respuesta ante el virus y su potencial rol como reservorio, treinta ratas algodoneras adultas, criadas en laboratorio, fueron inoculadas experimentalmente con 107 TCID50/ml VEV-NJ de la siguiente manera: 10 vía subcutánea (grupo A), 10 por abrasión oral (grupo B) y 10 por vía intranasal (grupo C). Se incluyer...

  7. Irsogladine maleate for the treatment of recurrent aphthous stomatitis in hepatitis C virus patients on pegylated-interferon and ribavirin: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Nobuhiko; George, Joseph; Shiroeda, Hisakazu; Saito, Takashi; Toshikuni, Nobuyuki; Tsuchishima, Mutsumi; Arisawa, Tomiyasu; Tsutsumi, Mikihiro

    2013-06-01

    Aphthous stomatitis is one of the adverse effects associated with interferon (IFN) that forces dose reduction of IFN and there is no established therapy. This study was aimed to investigate whether irsogladine maleate, which enhances the functions of intercellular communication through the gap junctions, is effective for the treatment of aphthous stomatitis developed in hepatitis C virus (HCV) patients on pegylated-interferon (PEG-IFN) and ribavirin. Nineteen patients with HCV were treated with PEG-IFN and ribavirin for 48 weeks. Ten out of 19 patients developed aphthous stomatitis during treatment with PEG-IFN and ribavirin. Within 1-2 weeks after development of aphthous stomatitis, 4 mg irsogladine maleate was orally administered daily to all patients and the therapeutic and adverse effects of irsogladine maleate were examined on every week. The degree of aphthous stomatitis was evaluated by Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) version 4.0. Out of 10 patients, aphthous stomatitis was evaluated as grade 3 in three patients (30%) and grade 2 in seven patients (70%) by CTCAE. CTCAE grade was improved to 0 after 1 week in six patients, after 2 weeks in two patients, and after 3 weeks in two patients after the start of administration of irsogladine maleate. Aphthous stomatitis has not recurred in patients who had been on irsogladine maleate continuously during treatment of PEG-IFN and ribavirin. Irsogladine maleate is effective for the treatment of aphthous stomatitis developing during PEG-IFN and ribavirin administration in HCV patients. © 2013 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  8. Genetic relatedness of the caliciviruses: San Miguel sea lion and vesicular exanthema of swine viruses constitute a single genotype within the Caliciviridae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neill, J D; Meyer, R F; Seal, B S

    1995-01-01

    The San Miguel sea lion viruses (SMSV) and vesicular exanthema of swine viruses (VESV) are related morphologically and antigenically, but little has been done to determine their genotypic relationship to each other and to other caliciviruses. To examine this relationship, reverse transcriptase PCRs were performed by using oligonucleotide primer sets designed to amplify portions of the 2C RNA helicase-like and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase regions with total cellular RNA purified from virus-infected cell cultures as a template. The 2C RNA helicase primers directed the amplification of this region from eight SMSV serotypes, five VESV serotypes, and four related viruses. The RNA polymerase primer sets amplified products from all these viruses except one. Phylogenetic comparison of the caliciviruses demonstrated that SMSV, VESV, and four related viruses are closely related while being distinct from feline calicivirus, the human caliciviruses (small, round-structured viruses), and rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus and that they should be classified as a single genotype within the Caliciviridae. PMID:7769708

  9. Protection of Nonhuman Primates Against Two Species of Ebola Virus Infection With a Single Complex Adenovirus Vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    first effective multivalent filovirus vaccine (33), a mixture of vesicular stomatitis virus ( VSV )-EBOV chimeric viruses has recently been demonstrated...to provide protection against mul- tiple filoviruses (14). These attenuated chimeric VSV -EBOV viruses were constructed by insertion of the filovirus...glycopro- tein gene into the VSV background, thus requiring a separate chimeric virus to express each glycoprotein antigen (19). In contrast, the CAdVax

  10. Host Cell Cathepsins Potentiate Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus Infection▿

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Pankaj; Nachagari, Deepa; Fields, Carolyn; Franks, John; Albritton, Lorraine M.

    2007-01-01

    The roles of cellular proteases in Moloney murine leukemia virus (MLV) infection were investigated using MLV particles pseudotyped with vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) G glycoprotein as a control for effects on core MLV particles versus effects specific to Moloney MLV envelope protein (Env). The broad-spectrum inhibitors cathepsin inhibitor III and E-64d gave comparable dose-dependent inhibition of Moloney MLV Env and VSV G pseudotypes, suggesting that the decrease did not involve the envelo...

  11. Outbreaks of vesicular disease caused by Vaccinia virus in dairy cattle from Goiás State, Brazil (2010-2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiano J.F. de Sant'Ana

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Cases of vesicular and exanthematic disease by Vaccinia virus (VACV have been reported in dairy herds of several Brazilian regions, occasionally also affecting humans. The present article describes eight outbreaks of vesicular disease caused by VACV in dairy herds of six counties of Goiás state, Midwestern Brazil (2010-2012, involving a total of 122 cows, 12 calves and 11 people. Dairy cows (3 to 9 years old were affected in all cases and calves (2 to 9 months old were affected in five outbreaks, presenting oral lesions. The morbidity ranged between 8 and 100% in cows, and 1.5 to 31% in calves. In the cows, the clinical signs started with vesicles (2-7mm, painful and coalescent papules (3-8 mm, which resulted in ulcers (5-25mm and scabs in teats, and, occasionally, in the muzzle. The clinical course lasted from 16 to 26 days. The histopathology of bovine skin samples revealed superficial perivascular inflammatory infiltrate of lymphocytes, plasma cells, neutrophils, macrophages and multifocal areas of acanthosis, spongiosis, hipergranulosis and parakeratotic or orthokeratotic hyperkeratosis with adjacent focally extensive ulcers. Eosinophilic inclusion bodies were noted in the cytoplasm of the keratinocytes. PCR to vgf gene of Orthopoxvirus was positive in samples collected from all outbreaks, and in some cases, genomic VACV sequences were identified by nucleotide sequencing of the PCR amplicons. Infectious virus was isolated in cell culture from scabs from one outbreak. Antibodies to Orthopoxvirus were detected in at least 3 or 4 animals in most outbreaks, by ELISA (outbreaks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 7 or virus-neutralization (outbreak 6. Neutralizing titers ranging from 8 to 64 in outbreak 6. In all outbreaks, VACV infection was suspected based on the clinical and pathological findings and it was confirmed by laboratory tests. Upon the etiological confirmation, other agents associated with vesicular disease were discarded. In all outbreaks, at least

  12. More recent swine vesicular disease virus isolates retain binding to coxsackie-adenovirus receptor, but have lost the ability to bind human decay-accelerating factor (CD55).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Clavero, Miguel A; Escribano-Romero, Estela; Ley, Victoria; Spiller, O Brad

    2005-05-01

    Swine vesicular disease virus (SVDV) evolved from coxsackie B virus serotype 5 (CVB5) in the recent past, crossing the species barrier from humans to pigs. Here, SVDV isolates from early and recent outbreaks have been compared for their capacity to utilize the progenitor virus receptors coxsackie-adenovirus receptor (CAR) and decay-accelerating factor (DAF; CD55). Virus titre of CVB5 and SVDV isolates It'66 and UK'72 on human HeLa cells was reduced by pre-incubation with either anti-DAF or anti-CAR antibodies; however, recent SVDV isolates R1072, R1120 and SPA'93 did not infect HeLa cells lytically. CVB5 and SVDV infection of the pig cell line IB-RS-2 was inhibited completely by anti-CAR antibodies for all isolates, and no reduction was observed following pre-incubation of cells with anti-pig DAF antibodies. Expression of human DAF in the pig cell line IB-RS-2 enhanced the virus titre of early SVDV isolates by 25-fold, but had no effect on recent SVDV isolate titre. Binding of radiolabelled CVB5 to IB-RS-2 cells was increased seven- to eightfold by expression of human DAF and binding of early SVDV isolates was increased 1.2-1.3-fold, whereas no increase in binding by recent SVDV isolates was mediated by human DAF expression. Addition of soluble hDAF-Fc inhibited CVB5, but not SVDV, infection of pig cells. Pre-incubation of all viruses with soluble hCAR-Fc blocked infection of IB-RS-2 pig cells completely; titration of the amount of soluble hCAR-Fc required to block infection revealed that early isolate UK'72 was the least susceptible to inhibition, and the most recent isolate, SPA'93, was the most susceptible.

  13. Generation of VSV Pseudotypes Using Recombinant ΔG-VSV for Studies on Virus Entry, Identification of Entry Inhibitors, and Immune Responses to Vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Whitt, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is a prototypic enveloped animal virus that has been used extensively to study virus entry, replication and assembly due to its broad host range and robust replication properties in a wide variety of mammalian and insect cells. Studies on VSV assembly led to the creation of a recombinant VSV in which the glycoprotein (G) gene was deleted. This recombinant (rVSV-ΔG) has been used to produce VSV pseudotypes containing the envelope glycoproteins of heterologous v...

  14. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells as a Trojan horse: A cellular vehicle for the delivery of oncolytic viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Ping-Ying; Chen, Hui-Ming; Chen, Shu-Hsia

    2013-08-01

    We have recently demonstrated that oncolytic vesicular stomatitis viruses can be efficiently and selectively delivered to neoplastic lesions by myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). Importantly, the loading of viruses onto MDSCs inhibited their immunosuppressive properties and endowed them with immunostimulatory and tumoricidal functions. Our study demonstrates the potential use of MDSCs as a Trojan horse for the tumor-targeted delivery of various anticancer therapeutics.

  15. Inhibition of EHMT2 induces a robust antiviral response against Foot-and-Mouth Disease and Vesicular Stomatitis Virus infections in bovine cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    The genetic regulatory network controlling the innate immune system is well understood in many species. However, the role of the epigenetic mechanisms underlying the expression of immunoregulatory genes is less clear, especially in livestock species. Histone H3 lysine 9 dimethylation (H3K9me2) is an...

  16. Near-complete genome sequencing of swine vesicular disease virus using the Roche GS FLX sequencing platform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sandra Cathrine Abel; Bruhn, Christian Anders Wathne; Samaniego Castruita, Jose Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    that is suitable for sequencing the complete protein-encoding sequences of SVDV isolates in which the RNA is relatively intact. The approach couples a single PCR amplification reaction, using only a single PCR primer set to amplify the near-complete SVDV genome, with deep-sequencing using a small fraction...... with significant genetic distances within the same species of viruses. All reference mappings used an iterative method to avoid bias. Further verification was achieved through phylogenetic analysis against published SVDV genomes and additional Enterovirus B sequences. This approach allows high confidence...... of the capacity of a Roche GS FLX sequencing platform. Sequences were initially verified through one of two criteria; either a match between a de novo assembly and a reference mapping, or a match between all of five different reference mappings performed against a fixed set of starting reference genomes...

  17. Herpetic stomatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cool, bland, easy-to-swallow foods such as frozen pops, ice cream, mashed potatoes, gelatin, or applesauce. ... child's recovery. Your child will have the herpes virus for life. In most people, the virus stays ...

  18. Virus infection speeds: Theory versus experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amor, Daniel R.; Fort, Joaquim

    2010-12-01

    In order to explain the speed of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV) infections, we develop a simple model that improves previous approaches to the propagation of virus infections. For VSV infections, we find that the delay time elapsed between the adsorption of a viral particle into a cell and the release of its progeny has a very important effect. Moreover, this delay time makes the adsorption rate essentially irrelevant in order to predict VSV infection speeds. Numerical simulations are in agreement with the analytical results. Our model satisfactorily explains the experimentally measured speeds of VSV infections.

  19. Cytokine production by virus-specific CD8(+) T cells varies with activation state and localization, but not with TCR avidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Nanna Ny; Madsen, Andreas Nygaard; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    2004-01-01

    (peritoneum) and generally increased with transition into the memory phase; however, GM-CSF producing cells were only present transiently. Concerning factors predicted to influence the distribution of cytokine-producing subsets, IFN-gamma and IL-12 did not play a role, nor was extensive virus replication......The ability of virus-specific CD8(+) T cells to produce cytokines was studied in mice infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus and vesicular stomatitis virus. Intracellular staining was used to visualize cytokine-producing CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells. Overall, virus-specific CD8(+) T cells...

  20. Vaccinia Virus Recombinants: Expression of VSV Genes and Protective Immunization of Mice and Cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackett, M.; Yilma, T.; Rose, J. K.; Moss, B.

    1985-01-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) causes a contagious disease of horses, cattle, and pigs. When DNA copies of messenger RNA's for the G or N proteins of VSV were linked to a vaccinia virus promoter and inserted into the vaccinia genome, the recombinants retained infectivity and synthesized VSV polypeptides. After intradermal vaccination with live recombinant virus expressing the G protein, mice produced VSV-neutralizing antibodies and were protected against lethal encephalitis upon intravenous challenge with VSV. In cattle, the degree of protection against intradermalingually injected VSV was correlated with the level of neutralizing antibody produced following vaccination.

  1. Effect of proteolytic digestion on the function of vesicular stomatitis ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    globulin-G (IgG) followed by antibody to swine-antigoat IgG conjugated to horseradish peroxidase. The proteins were visualized by the color reaction with the substrate 4- chloro-1-napthol. Protein kinase assay. The reaction mixture contained chymotrypsin-treated or untreated N-RNA template. (27 µg), Tris-HCl, pH 8·0, ...

  2. Correlación entre resistencia de cultivos de células de bovinos a infección con virus vesiculares y expresión del receptor o inducción de apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Eliécer Ossa Londoño

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuestro grupo demostró que cultivos primarios de células de
    ganado BON (CPCB, infectados con los subtipos A24 y O1 del virus
    de fiebre aftosa (VFA o serotipos Indiana (I y New Jersey (NJ d el
    virus de la estomatitis vesicular (VEV, presentan polimorfismo en
    resistencia/susceptibilidad (R/S a la infección. La R/S se correlaciona
    con la producción de interferón inducida por A24 en un 50% y 60%
    para O1. Se ha demostrado que la resistencia a enfermedades virales se debe a la baja expresión de receptores en la célula hospedera (1 o por inducción de apoptosis (2. Este estudio pretende: 1. Determinar in vitro si existe correlación entre R/S a VFA en CPCB y diversidad de expresión del receptor viral integrina av-b3. 2. Correlacionar la diversidad fenotípica en R/S al VEV con apoptosis como mecanismo de resistencia.

  3. [Stomatitis in childhood, not always benign].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oudshoorn, A M; Ramaker, C

    2000-10-14

    Two boys of 1 and 16 year had painful buccal lesions and were admitted for dehydration. The younger had finger and toe blisters; the older, severely ill, had conjunctivitis, urethritis and skin lesions. Only symptomatic treatment with lidocaine gel and paracetamol gave good recovery. A 5-year-old Turkish girl had recurrent painful buccal ulcers which each time cleared up spontaneously. Stomatitis is common in childhood. Viral infections are the most common causes of stomatitis, in particular infections with herpes simplex virus (herpes gingivostomatitis), Coxsackie virus (herpangina, hand-foot-mouth-disease), chickenpox and infectious mononucleosis. Bacterial infections are rare and mostly secondary to the viral infections. In infants oral candidiasis (thrush) is a common cause of stomatitis. Most infections are self-limiting and reassurance of parents is important. Dehydration is a common complication and admission to hospital can be prevented by analgesics. The most important non-infectious conditions that cause stomatitis in children are recurrent aphthous stomatitis, erythema multiforme major (Stevens-Johnson syndrome), Behçet's disease, malignancy (leukaemia), immune-mediated disorders (agranulocytosis, cyclic neutropenia), traumata, blistering disorders of the skin and lichen planus. A complete history and a thorough physical examination usually give the correct diagnosis and further investigations are seldom necessary.

  4. Single-dose replication-defective VSV-based Nipah virus vaccines provide protection from lethal challenge in Syrian hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Michael K; Bird, Brian H; Chattopadhyay, Anasuya; Drew, Clifton P; Martin, Brock E; Coleman, Joann D; Rose, John K; Nichol, Stuart T; Spiropoulou, Christina F

    2014-01-01

    Nipah virus (NiV) continues to cause outbreaks of fatal human encephalitis due to spillover from its bat reservoir. We determined that a single dose of replication-defective vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-based vaccine vectors expressing either the NiV fusion (F) or attachment (G) glycoproteins protected hamsters from over 1000 times LD50 NiV challenge. This highly effective single-dose protection coupled with an enhanced safety profile makes these candidates ideal for potential use in livestock and humans. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Permissivity of the NCI-60 cancer cell lines to oncolytic Vaccinia Virus GLV-1h68

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bedognetti Davide

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oncolytic viral therapy represents an alternative therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cancer. We previously described GLV-1h68, a modified Vaccinia Virus with exclusive tropism for tumor cells, and we observed a cell line-specific relationship between the ability of GLV-1h68 to replicate in vitro and its ability to colonize and eliminate tumor in vivo. Methods In the current study we surveyed the in vitro permissivity to GLV-1h68 replication of the NCI-60 panel of cell lines. Selected cell lines were also tested for permissivity to another Vaccinia Virus and a vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV strain. In order to identify correlates of permissity to viral infection, we measured transcriptional profiles of the cell lines prior infection. Results We observed highly heterogeneous permissivity to VACV infection amongst the cell lines. The heterogeneity of permissivity was independent of tissue with the exception of B cell derivation. Cell lines were also tested for permissivity to another Vaccinia Virus and a vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV strain and a significant correlation was found suggesting a common permissive phenotype. While no clear transcriptional pattern could be identified as predictor of permissivity to infection, some associations were observed suggesting multifactorial basis permissivity to viral infection. Conclusions Our findings have implications for the design of oncolytic therapies for cancer and offer insights into the nature of permissivity of tumor cells to viral infection.

  6. Solubilization of glycoproteins of envelope viruses by detergents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berezin, V.E.; Zaides, V.M.; Artamsnov, A.F.; Isaeva, E.S.; Zhdanov, V.M.

    1986-11-20

    The action of a number of known ionic and nonionic detergents, as well as the new nonionic detergent MESK, on envelope viruses was investigated. It was shown that the nonionic detergents MESK, Triton X-100, and octyl-..beta..-D-glucopyranoside selectively solubilize the outer glycoproteins of the virus particles. The nonionic detergent MESK has the mildest action. Using MESK, purified glycoproteins of influenza, parainfluenza, Venezuelan equine encephalomyelitis, vesicular stomatitis, rabies, and herpes viruses were obtained. The procedure for obtaining glycoproteins includes incubation of the virus suspension with the detergent MESK, removal of subvirus structures by centrifuging, and purification of glycoproteins from detergents by dialysis. Isolated glycoproteins retain a native structure and biological activity and possess high immunogenicity. The detergent MESK is promising for laboratory tests and with respect to the production of subunit vaccines.

  7. 3D rotating wall vessel and 2D cell culture of four veterinary virus pathogens: A comparison of virus yields, portions of infectious particles and virus growth curves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malenovská, Hana

    2016-02-01

    Only very few comparative studies have been performed that evaluate general trends of virus growth under 3D in comparison with 2D cell culture conditions. The aim of this study was to investigate differences when four animal viruses are cultured in 2D and 3D. Suid herpesvirus 1 (SuHV-1), Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSIV), Bovine adenovirus (BAdV) and Bovine parainfluenza 3 virus (BPIV-3) were cultivated in 3D rotating wall vessels (RWVs) and conventional 2D cultures. The production of virus particles, the portion of infectious particles, and the infectious growth curves were compared. For all viruses, the production of virus particles (related to cell density), including the non-infectious ones, was lower in 3D than in 2D culture. The production of only infectious particles was significantly lower in BAdV and BPIV-3 in 3D cultures in relation to cell density. The two cultivation approaches resulted in significantly different virus particle-to-TCID50 ratios in three of the four viruses: lower in SuHV-1 and BPIV-3 and higher in BAdV in 3D culture. The infectious virus growth rates were not significantly different in all viruses. Although 3D RWV culture resulted in lower production of virus particles compared to 2D systems, the portion of infectious particles was higher for some viruses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Dissecting virus entry: replication-independent analysis of virus binding, internalization, and penetration using minimal complementation of β-galactosidase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Burkard

    Full Text Available Studies of viral entry into host cells often rely on the detection of post-entry parameters, such as viral replication or the expression of a reporter gene, rather than on measuring entry per se. The lack of assays to easily detect the different steps of entry severely hampers the analysis of this key process in virus infection. Here we describe novel, highly adaptable viral entry assays making use of minimal complementation of the E. coli β-galactosidase in mammalian cells. Enzyme activity is reconstituted when a small intravirion peptide (α-peptide is complementing the inactive mutant form ΔM15 of β-galactosidase. The method allows to dissect and to independently detect binding, internalization, and fusion of viruses during host cell entry. Here we use it to confirm and extend current knowledge on the entry process of two enveloped viruses: vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV and murine hepatitis coronavirus (MHV.

  9. Competitive virus assay method for titration of noncytopathogenic bovine viral diarrhea viruses (END⁺ and END⁻ viruses).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhsen, Mahmod; Ohi, Kota; Aoki, Hiroshi; Ikeda, Hidetoshi; Fukusho, Akio

    2013-03-01

    A new, reliable and secure virus assay method, named the competitive virus assay (CVA) method, has been established for the titration of bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDVs) that either show the exaltation of Newcastle disease virus (END) phenomenon or heterologous interference phenomenon (but not the END phenomenon). This method is based on the principle of (1) homologous interference between BVDVs, by using BVDV RK13/E(-) or BVDV RK13/E(+) strains as competitor virus, and (2) END phenomenon and heterologous interference, by using attenuated Newcastle disease virus (NDV) TCND strain as challenge virus. In titration of BVDV END(+) and BVDV END(-) viruses, no significant difference in estimated virus titer was observed between CVA and conventional methods. CVA method demonstrated comparable levels of sensitivity and accuracy as conventional END and interference methods, which require the use of a velogenic Miyadera strain of NDV and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), both of which are agents of high-risk diseases. As such, the CVA method is a safer alternative, with increased bio-safety and bio-containment, through avoidance of virulent strains that are commonly employed with conventional methods. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Role of CD28 co-stimulation in generation and maintenance of virus-specific T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jeanette Erbo; Christensen, Jan P; Kristensen, Nanna N

    2002-01-01

    . For this reason antiviral CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses in CD28-deficient mice were studied using two different viruses [vesicular stomatitis virus and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV)]. Intracellular cytokine staining and/or MHC-peptide tetramers were used to enumerate antigen-specific T cells....... In addition, we used DNA constructs encoding viral epitopes to probe the importance of the epitope itself. Our results reveal that while the context of antigen presentation (live virus versus DNA construct) is a critical factor in determining the requirement for CD28 co-stimulation, epitope and virus dose...... is essential for the host to respond optimally over a broad set of conditions, and our results may imply that the relatively CD28 independent activation of LCMV-specific CD8(+) T cells may represent an extreme situation related to the non-cytolytic nature of this virus allowing the delivery of a uniquely...

  11. ACUTE STOMATITIS IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.N. Drobot’ko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of diseases of mucous membrane of oral cavity is one of the main ones in dentistry. Special attention in this problem should be given to the acute herpetic stomatitis. 80% of all cases of mucous membrane of oral cavity in children are herpetic stomatitis. Local immunity in children with acute stomatitis is closely related to the character of course of pathology. An administration of immunomodulatory treatment is pathogenetically grounded. Bacterial lysates mixture causes etiotropical and pathogenetical effect and increases the activity of immune system resulting in relapses prophylaxis.Key words: children, acute herpetic stomatitis, bacterial lysates mixture.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2010;9(2:146-149

  12. Coexpression of Tyrosine Hydroxylase, GTP Cyclohydrolase I, Aromatic Amino Acid Decarboxylase, and Vesicular Monoamine Transporter 2 from a Helper Virus-Free Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Vector Supports High-Level, Long-Term Biochemical and Behavioral Correction of a Rat Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    SUN, MEI; KONG, LINGXIN; WANG, XIAODAN; HOLMES, COURTNEY; GAO, QINGSHENG; ZHANG, GUO-RONG; PFEILSCHIFTER, JOSEF; GOLDSTEIN, DAVID S.; GELLER, ALFRED I.

    2006-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease is due to the selective loss of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons. Consequently, many therapeutic strategies have focused on restoring striatal dopamine levels, including direct gene transfer to striatal cells, using viral vectors that express specific dopamine biosynthetic enzymes. The central hypothesis of this study is that coexpression of four dopamine biosynthetic and transporter genes in striatal neurons can support the efficient production and regulated, vesicular release of dopamine: tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) converts tyrosine to l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (l -DOPA), GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTP CH I) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of the cofactor for TH, aromatic amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) converts l -DOPA to dopamine, and a vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT-2) transports dopamine into synaptic vesicles, thereby supporting regulated, vesicular release of dopamine and relieving feedback inhibition of TH by dopamine. Helper virus-free herpes simplex virus type 1 vectors that coexpress the three dopamine biosynthetic enzymes (TH, GTP CH I, and AADC; 3-gene-vector) or these three dopamine biosynthetic enzymes and the vesicular monoamine transporter (TH, GTP CH I, AADC, and VMAT-2; 4-gene-vector) were compared. Both vectors supported production of dopamine in cultured fibroblasts. These vectors were microinjected into the striatum of 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats. These vectors carry a modified neurofilament gene promoter, and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic neuron-specific gene expression was maintained for 14 months after gene transfer. The 4-gene-vector supported higher levels of correction of apomorphine-induced rotational behavior than did the 3-gene-vector, and this correction was maintained for 6 months. Proximal to the injection sites, the 4-gene-vector, but not the 3-gene-vector, supported extracellular levels of dopamine and dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) that were similar to those observed in

  13. Foot & Mouth Disease & Ulcerative/Vesicular Rule-outs: Challenges Encountered in Recent Outbreaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hullinger, P

    2008-01-28

    development and subsequent rupturing of vesicles at the coronary band and in the oral cavity. Vesicles and ulcerations can also occur on the mammary gland. Recovery in adult animals usually occurs in 8-15 days. Clinical signs for most serotypes are less dramatic in sheep and goats. Swine can develop very severe coronary band lesions and high mortality in piglets has been observed. One of the challenges of diagnosing FMD is that it may be clinically similar to several other vesicular or ulcerative diseases. FMD is clinically indistinguishable from Vesicular stomatitis, Swine vesicular disease and Vesicular exanthema of swine. It may also resemble Bovine viral diarrhea, Mucosal disease, Infectious bovine rhinotracheitis, Bluetongue, Bovine papular stomatitis, Bovine mammillitis and Rinderpest.

  14. Determination of the In Vitro and In Vivo Activity of Compounds Tested Against Punta Toro Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-12-29

    cells were grown in minimum essential medium (MEM; GIBCO Labs, Grand Island, NY) containing 5% fetal bovine serum (FBS; HyClone Labs, Logan, UT) and 0.1... bovine serum (FBS, HyClone Labs, Logan, UT) and 0.1% NaHCO3 without antibiotics. All were determined to be mycoplasma-free. Test Compounds: All...influenza, parainfluenza , rhino, vesicular stomatitis, bluetongue, reo and rota viruses (3-6). The compound was only slightly effective vs PTV in vitro (VR

  15. Critical role for the chemokine receptor CXCR6 in NK cell-mediated antigen-specific memory of haptens and viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paust, Silke; Gill, Harvinder S; Wang, Bao-Zhong; Flynn, Michael P; Moseman, E Ashley; Senman, Balimkiz; Szczepanik, Marian; Telenti, Amalio; Askenase, Philip W; Compans, Richard W; von Andrian, Ulrich H

    2010-12-01

    Hepatic natural killer (NK) cells mediate antigen-specific contact hypersensitivity (CHS) in mice deficient in T cells and B cells. We report here that hepatic NK cells, but not splenic or naive NK cells, also developed specific memory of vaccines containing antigens from influenza, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) or human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Adoptive transfer of virus-sensitized NK cells into naive recipient mice enhanced the survival of the mice after lethal challenge with the sensitizing virus but not after lethal challenge with a different virus. NK cell memory of haptens and viruses depended on CXCR6, a chemokine receptor on hepatic NK cells that was required for the persistence of memory NK cells but not for antigen recognition. Thus, hepatic NK cells can develop adaptive immunity to structurally diverse antigens, an activity that requires NK cell-expressed CXCR6.

  16. Influenza infection modulates vesicular trafficking and induces Golgi complex disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Vibha; Panganiban, Antonito T; Honer Zu Bentrup, Kerstin; Voss, Thomas G

    2016-12-01

    Influenza A virus (IFV) replicates its genome in the nucleus of infected cells and uses the cellular protein transport system for genome trafficking from the nucleus to the plasma membrane. However, many details of the mechanism of this process, and its relationship to subsequent cytoplasmic virus trafficking, have not been elucidated. We examined the effect of nuclear transport inhibitors Leptomycin B (LB), 5,6 dichloro-1-β-d-ribofuranosyl-benzimidazole (DRB), the vesicular transport inhibitor Brefeldin A (BFA), the caspase inhibitor ZWEHD, and microtubule inhibitor Nocodazole (NOC) on virus replication and intracellular trafficking of viral nucleoprotein (NP) from the nucleus to the ER and Golgi. Also, we carried out complementary studies to determine the effect of IFV on intracellular membranes. Inhibition of the CRM1 and TAP-P15 nuclear transport pathways by DRB and LB blocked completely the export of virus. Inhibition of vesicular trafficking by BFA, NOC, and ZWEHD also affected influenza infection. Interestingly, IFV infection induced fragmentation of the Golgi complex resulting in diffuse distribution of large and small vesicles throughout the cytoplasm. Live-cell microscopy revealed expansion of Golgi localization signals indicating progressive dispersion of Golgi positive structures, resulting in the disassembly of the Golgi ribbon structure. Other vesicular components (Rab1b, ARF1 and GBF1) were also found to be required for IFV infection. Furthermore, the exact step at which IFV infection disrupts vesicle trafficking was identified as the ER-Golgi intermediate compartment. These findings suggest that IFV NP is trafficked from the nucleus via the CRM1 and TAP pathways. IFV modulates vesicular trafficking inducing disruption of the Golgi complex. These studies provide insight on the ways in which IFV affects intracellular trafficking of different host proteins and will facilitate identification of useful pharmaceutical targets to abrogate virus

  17. A single vertebrate DNA virus protein disarms invertebrate immunity to RNA virus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gammon, Don B; Duraffour, Sophie; Rozelle, Daniel K; Hehnly, Heidi; Sharma, Rita; Sparks, Michael E; West, Cara C; Chen, Ying; Moresco, James J; Andrei, Graciela; Connor, John H; Conte, Darryl; Gundersen-Rindal, Dawn E; Marshall, William L; Yates, John R; Silverman, Neal; Mello, Craig C

    2014-01-01

    Virus-host interactions drive a remarkable diversity of immune responses and countermeasures. We found that two RNA viruses with broad host ranges, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and Sindbis virus (SINV), are completely restricted in their replication after entry into Lepidopteran cells. This restriction is overcome when cells are co-infected with vaccinia virus (VACV), a vertebrate DNA virus. Using RNAi screening, we show that Lepidopteran RNAi, Nuclear Factor-κB, and ubiquitin-proteasome pathways restrict RNA virus infection. Surprisingly, a highly conserved, uncharacterized VACV protein, A51R, can partially overcome this virus restriction. We show that A51R is also critical for VACV replication in vertebrate cells and for pathogenesis in mice. Interestingly, A51R colocalizes with, and stabilizes, host microtubules and also associates with ubiquitin. We show that A51R promotes viral protein stability, possibly by preventing ubiquitin-dependent targeting of viral proteins for destruction. Importantly, our studies reveal exciting new opportunities to study virus-host interactions in experimentally-tractable Lepidopteran systems. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02910.001 PMID:24966209

  18. Buckwheat stomatal traits under aluminium toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Oleksandr E. Smirnov; Anatoliy M. Kosyan; Oksana I. Kosyk; Natalia Yu. Taran

    2014-01-01

    Aluminium influence on some stomatal parameters of common buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench.) was studied. Significant changes in stomatal density, stomatal index and stomatal shape coefficient under aluminium treatment were revealed. Stomatal closure and no difference in total stomatal potential conductance index of treatment plants were suggested as aluminium resistance characteristics.

  19. Buckwheat stomatal traits under aluminium toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleksandr E. Smirnov

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Aluminium influence on some stomatal parameters of common buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench. was studied. Significant changes in stomatal density, stomatal index and stomatal shape coefficient under aluminium treatment were revealed. Stomatal closure and no difference in total stomatal potential conductance index of treatment plants were suggested as aluminium resistance characteristics.

  20. Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgar, Natalie Rose; Saleh, Dahlia; Miller, Richard A

    2017-03-01

    Aphthous stomatitis is a painful and often recurrent inflammatory process of the oral mucosa that can appear secondary to various well-defined disease processes. Idiopathic recurrent aphthous stomatitis is referred to as recurrent aphthous stomatitis. The differential diagnosis for recurrent aphthous ulcerations is extensive and ranges from idiopathic benign causes to inherited fever syndromes, to connective tissue disease, or even inflammatory bowel diseases. A thorough history and review of systems can assist the clinician in determining whether it is related to a systemic inflammatory process or truly idiopathic. Management of aphthous stomatitis is challenging. For recurrent aphthous stomatitis or recalcitrant aphthous stomatitis from underlying disease, first-line treatment consists of topical medications with use of systemic medications as necessary. Herein, the authors discuss the differential diagnosis and treatment ladder of aphthous stomatitis as described in the literature.

  1. A fusion-inhibiting peptide against Rift Valley fever virus inhibits multiple, diverse viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey W Koehler

    Full Text Available For enveloped viruses, fusion of the viral envelope with a cellular membrane is critical for a productive infection to occur. This fusion process is mediated by at least three classes of fusion proteins (Class I, II, and III based on the protein sequence and structure. For Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV, the glycoprotein Gc (Class II fusion protein mediates this fusion event following entry into the endocytic pathway, allowing the viral genome access to the cell cytoplasm. Here, we show that peptides analogous to the RVFV Gc stem region inhibited RVFV infectivity in cell culture by inhibiting the fusion process. Further, we show that infectivity can be inhibited for diverse, unrelated RNA viruses that have Class I (Ebola virus, Class II (Andes virus, or Class III (vesicular stomatitis virus fusion proteins using this single peptide. Our findings are consistent with an inhibition mechanism similar to that proposed for stem peptide fusion inhibitors of dengue virus in which the RVFV inhibitory peptide first binds to both the virion and cell membranes, allowing it to traffic with the virus into the endocytic pathway. Upon acidification and rearrangement of Gc, the peptide is then able to specifically bind to Gc and prevent fusion of the viral and endocytic membranes, thus inhibiting viral infection. These results could provide novel insights into conserved features among the three classes of viral fusion proteins and offer direction for the future development of broadly active fusion inhibitors.

  2. MAPK Phosphatase 5 Expression Induced by Influenza and Other RNA Virus Infection Negatively Regulates IRF3 Activation and Type I Interferon Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharmy J. James

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The type I interferon system is essential for antiviral immune response and is a primary target of viral immune evasion strategies. Here, we show that virus infection induces the expression of MAPK phosphatase 5 (MKP5, a dual-specificity phosphatase (DUSP, in host cells. Mice deficient in MKP5 were resistant to H1N1 influenza infection, which is associated with increased IRF3 activation and type I interferon expression in comparison with WT mice. Increased type I interferon responses were also observed in MKP5-deficient cells and animals upon other RNA virus infection, including vesicular stomatitis virus and sendai virus. These observations were attributed to the ability of MKP5 to interact with and dephosphorylate IRF3. Our study reveals a critical function of a DUSP in negative regulation of IRF3 activity and demonstrates a mechanism by which influenza and other RNA viruses inhibit type I interferon response in the host through MKP5.

  3. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akintoye, Sunday O; Greenberg, Martin S

    2005-01-01

    The cause of recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) remains unknown despite considerable research. This article reviews the evidence for current theories regarding this disorder, including possible suspected relationships with microbial and immunologic factors, and presents medical diseases that mimic RAS lesions in certain patients. Topical management of the common form of minor RAS is described along with systemic therapy currently available to patients with severe forms of this disease.

  4. Stomatal Development in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillitteri, Lynn Jo; Dong, Juan

    2013-01-01

    Stomata consist of two guard cells that function as turgor-operated valves that regulate gas exchange in plants. In Arabidopsis, a dedicated cell lineage is initiated and undergoes a series of cell divisions and cell-state transitions to produce a stoma. A set of basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors regulates the transition and differentiation events through the lineage, while the placement of stomata relative to each other is controlled by intercellular signaling via peptide ligands, transmembrane receptors, and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) modules. Some genes involved in regulating stomatal differentiation or density are also involved in hormonal and environmental stress responses, which may provide a link between modulation of stomatal development or function in response to changes in the environment. Premitotic polarlylocalized proteins provide an added layer of regulation, which can be addressed more thoroughly with the identification of additional proteins in this pathway. Linking the networks that control stomatal development promises to bring advances to our understanding of signal transduction, cell polarity, and cell-fate specification in plants. PMID:23864836

  5. Differential sensitivity of bat cells to infection by enveloped RNA viruses: coronaviruses, paramyxoviruses, filoviruses, and influenza viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Hoffmann

    Full Text Available Bats (Chiroptera host major human pathogenic viruses including corona-, paramyxo, rhabdo- and filoviruses. We analyzed six different cell lines from either Yinpterochiroptera (including African flying foxes and a rhinolophid bat or Yangochiroptera (genera Carollia and Tadarida for susceptibility to infection by different enveloped RNA viruses. None of the cells were sensitive to infection by transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV, a porcine coronavirus, or to infection mediated by the Spike (S protein of SARS-coronavirus (SARS-CoV incorporated into pseudotypes based on vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV. The resistance to infection was overcome if cells were transfected to express the respective cellular receptor, porcine aminopeptidase N for TGEV or angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 for SARS-CoV. VSV pseudotypes containing the S proteins of two bat SARS-related CoV (Bg08 and Rp3 were unable to infect any of the six tested bat cell lines. By contrast, viral pseudotypes containing the surface protein GP of Marburg virus from the family Filoviridae infected all six cell lines though at different efficiency. Notably, all cells were sensitive to infection by two paramyxoviruses (Sendai virus and bovine respiratory syncytial virus and three influenza viruses from different subtypes. These results indicate that bat cells are more resistant to infection by coronaviruses than to infection by paramyxoviruses, filoviruses and influenza viruses. Furthermore, these results show a receptor-dependent restriction of the infection of bat cells by CoV. The implications for the isolation of coronaviruses from bats are discussed.

  6. A new permanent cell line derived from the bank vole (Myodes glareolus) as cell culture model for zoonotic viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Approximately 60% of emerging viruses are of zoonotic origin, with three-fourths derived from wild animals. Many of these zoonotic diseases are transmitted by rodents with important information about their reservoir dynamics and pathogenesis missing. One main reason for the gap in our knowledge is the lack of adequate cell culture systems as models for the investigation of rodent-borne (robo) viruses in vitro. Therefore we established and characterized a new cell line, BVK168, using the kidney of a bank vole, Myodes glareolus, the most abundant member of the Arvicolinae trapped in Germany. Results BVK168 proved to be of epithelial morphology expressing tight junctions as well as adherence junction proteins. The BVK168 cells were analyzed for their infectability by several arbo- and robo-viruses: Vesicular stomatitis virus, vaccinia virus, cowpox virus, Sindbis virus, Pixuna virus, Usutu virus, Inkoo virus, Puumalavirus, and Borna disease virus (BDV). The cell line was susceptible for all tested viruses, and most interestingly also for the difficult to propagate BDV. Conclusion In conclusion, the newly established cell line from wildlife rodents seems to be an excellent tool for the isolation and characterization of new rodent-associated viruses and may be used as in vitro-model to study properties and pathogenesis of these agents. PMID:21729307

  7. A new permanent cell line derived from the bank vole (Myodes glareolus as cell culture model for zoonotic viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herzog Sibylle

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Approximately 60% of emerging viruses are of zoonotic origin, with three-fourths derived from wild animals. Many of these zoonotic diseases are transmitted by rodents with important information about their reservoir dynamics and pathogenesis missing. One main reason for the gap in our knowledge is the lack of adequate cell culture systems as models for the investigation of rodent-borne (robo viruses in vitro. Therefore we established and characterized a new cell line, BVK168, using the kidney of a bank vole, Myodes glareolus, the most abundant member of the Arvicolinae trapped in Germany. Results BVK168 proved to be of epithelial morphology expressing tight junctions as well as adherence junction proteins. The BVK168 cells were analyzed for their infectability by several arbo- and robo-viruses: Vesicular stomatitis virus, vaccinia virus, cowpox virus, Sindbis virus, Pixuna virus, Usutu virus, Inkoo virus, Puumalavirus, and Borna disease virus (BDV. The cell line was susceptible for all tested viruses, and most interestingly also for the difficult to propagate BDV. Conclusion In conclusion, the newly established cell line from wildlife rodents seems to be an excellent tool for the isolation and characterization of new rodent-associated viruses and may be used as in vitro-model to study properties and pathogenesis of these agents.

  8. Amalgamating Oncolytic Viruses to Enhance Their Safety, Consolidate Their Killing Mechanisms, and Accelerate Their Spread

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala-Breton, Camilo; Suksanpaisan, Lukkana; Mader, Emily K; Russell, Stephen J; Peng, Kah-Whye

    2013-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses are structurally and biologically diverse, spreading through tumors and killing them by various mechanisms and with different kinetics. Here, we created a hybrid vesicular stomatitis/measles virus (VSV/MV) that harnesses the safety of oncolytic MV, the speed of VSV, and the tumor killing mechanisms of both viruses. Oncolytic MV targets CD46 and kills by forcing infected cells to fuse with uninfected neighbors, but propagates slowly. VSV spreads rapidly, directly lysing tumor cells, but is neurotoxic and loses oncolytic potency when neuroattenuated by conventional approaches. The hybrid VSV/MV lacks neurotoxicity, replicates rapidly with VSV kinetics, and selectively targets CD46 on tumor cells. Its in vivo performance in a myeloma xenograft model was substantially superior to either MV or widely used recombinant oncolytic VSV-M51. PMID:23842448

  9. Amalgamating oncolytic viruses to enhance their safety, consolidate their killing mechanisms, and accelerate their spread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala-Breton, Camilo; Suksanpaisan, Lukkana; Mader, Emily K; Russell, Stephen J; Peng, Kah-Whye

    2013-10-01

    Oncolytic viruses are structurally and biologically diverse, spreading through tumors and killing them by various mechanisms and with different kinetics. Here, we created a hybrid vesicular stomatitis/measles virus (VSV/MV) that harnesses the safety of oncolytic MV, the speed of VSV, and the tumor killing mechanisms of both viruses. Oncolytic MV targets CD46 and kills by forcing infected cells to fuse with uninfected neighbors, but propagates slowly. VSV spreads rapidly, directly lysing tumor cells, but is neurotoxic and loses oncolytic potency when neuroattenuated by conventional approaches. The hybrid VSV/MV lacks neurotoxicity, replicates rapidly with VSV kinetics, and selectively targets CD46 on tumor cells. Its in vivo performance in a myeloma xenograft model was substantially superior to either MV or widely used recombinant oncolytic VSV-M51.

  10. Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Edgar, Natalie Rose; Saleh, Dahlia; Miller, Richard A.

    2017-01-01

    Aphthous stomatitis is a painful and often recurrent inflammatory process of the oral mucosa that can appear secondary to various well-defined disease processes. Idiopathic recurrent aphthous stomatitis is referred to as recurrent aphthous stomatitis. The differential diagnosis for recurrent aphthous ulcerations is extensive and ranges from idiopathic benign causes to inherited fever syndromes, to connective tissue disease, or even inflammatory bowel diseases. A thorough history and review of...

  11. Development and Characterization of a Multiplexed RT-PCR Species Specific Assay for Bovine and one for Porcine Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Rule-Out Supplemental Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, S; Danganan, L; Tammero, L; Lenhoff, R; Naraghi-arani, P; Hindson, B

    2007-08-06

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), in collaboration with the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Animal and Plant Health Inspection Services (APHIS) has developed advanced rapid diagnostics that may be used within the National Animal Health Laboratory Network (NAHLN), the National Veterinary Services Laboratory (Ames, Iowa) and the Plum Island Animal Disease Center (PIADC). This effort has the potential to improve our nation's ability to discriminate between foreign animal diseases and those that are endemic using a single assay, thereby increasing our ability to protect animal populations of high economic importance in the United States. Under 2005 DHS funding we have developed multiplexed (MUX) nucleic-acid-based PCR assays that combine foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) detection with rule-out tests for two other foreign animal diseases Vesicular Exanthema of Swine (VESV) and Swine Vesicular Disease (SVD) and four other domestic viral diseases Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus (BVDV), Bovine Herpes Virus 1 (BHV-1 or Infectious Bovine Rhinotracheitus IBR), Bluetongue virus (BTV) and Parapox virus complex (which includes Bovine Papular Stomatitis Virus BPSV, Orf of sheep, and Pseudocowpox). Under 2006 funding we have developed a Multiplexed PCR [MUX] porcine assay for detection of FMDV with rule out tests for VESV and SVD foreign animal diseases in addition to one other domestic vesicular animal disease vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and one domestic animal disease of swine porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS). We have also developed a MUX bovine assay for detection of FMDV with rule out tests for the two bovine foreign animal diseases malignant catarrhal fever (MCF), rinderpest virus (RPV) and the domestic diseases vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), infectious bovine rhinotracheitus virus (BHV-1), bluetongue virus (BTV), and the Parapox

  12. Analyses of Entry Mechanisms of Novel Emerging Viruses Using Pseudotype VSV System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Hideki

    2014-06-01

    Emerging infectious diseases include newly identified diseases caused by previously unknown organisms or diseases found in new and expanding geographic areas. Viruses capable of causing clinical disease associated with fever and bleeding are referred to as viral hemorrhagic fevers (VHFs). Arenaviruses and Bunyaviruses, both belonging to families classified as VHFs are considered major etiologies of hemorrhagic fevers caused by emerging viruses; having significant clinical and public health impact. Because these viruses are categorized as Biosafety Level (BSL) 3 and 4 pathogens, restricting their use, biological studies including therapeutic drug and vaccine development have been impeded. Due to these restrictions and the difficulties in handling such live viruses, pseudotype viruses bearing envelope proteins of VHF viruses have been developed using vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) as a surrogate system. Here, we report the successful developments of two pseudotype VSV systems; bearing the envelope proteins of Lujo virus and severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) virus, both recently identified viruses of the family Arenaviridae and Bunyaviridae, respectively. My presentation will summarize the characterization of the envelope proteins of Lujo virus including its cellular receptor use and cell entry mechanisms. In addition, I will also present a brief introduction of SFTS reported in Japan and the diagnostic studies in progress using these newly pseudotype VSV system.

  13. Inactivation of pathogenic viruses by plant-derived tannins: strong effects of extracts from persimmon (Diospyros kaki on a broad range of viruses.

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    Kyoko Ueda

    Full Text Available Tannins, plant-derived polyphenols and other related compounds, have been utilized for a long time in many fields such as the food industry and manufacturing. In this study, we investigated the anti-viral effects of tannins on 12 different viruses including both enveloped viruses (influenza virus H3N2, H5N3, herpes simplex virus-1, vesicular stomatitis virus, Sendai virus and Newcastle disease virus and non-enveloped viruses (poliovirus, coxsachievirus, adenovirus, rotavirus, feline calicivirus and mouse norovirus. We found that extracts from persimmon (Diospyros kaki, which contains ca. 22% of persimmon tannin, reduced viral infectivity in more than 4-log scale against all of the viruses tested, showing strong anti-viral effects against a broad range of viruses. Other tannins derived from green tea, acacia and gallnuts were effective for some of the viruses, while the coffee extracts were not effective for any of the virus. We then investigated the mechanism of the anti-viral effects of persimmon extracts by using mainly influenza virus. Persimmon extracts were effective within 30 seconds at a concentration of 0.25% and inhibited attachment of the virus to cells. Pretreatment of cells with the persimmon extracts before virus infection or post-treatment after virus infection did not inhibit virus replication. Protein aggregation seems to be a fundamental mechanism underlying the anti-viral effect of persimmon tannin, since viral proteins formed aggregates when purified virions were treated with the persimmon extracts and since the anti-viral effect was competitively inhibited by a non-specific protein, bovine serum albumin. Considering that persimmon tannin is a food supplement, it has a potential to be utilized as a safe and highly effective anti-viral reagent against pathogenic viruses.

  14. Effects of ozone and sulfur dioxide on virus growth in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fairchild, G.A.

    1977-01-01

    Inhalation of ozone and sulfur dioxide inhibited influenza virus growth in the nose of mice. Ozone inhalation caused the more pronounced inhibition of influenza virus growth: 0.6 ppM ozone for 3 hours post-virus exposure almost completely inhibited influenza virus growth in the nose, whereas sulfur dioxide (6 ppM for 7 days) caused only partial inhibition of influenza growth in the nose. Neither gas altered the propagation of influenza virus in the lungs of mice. Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) growth was either unaffected by exposure to ozone (0.9 ppM for 3 hours) or, when ozone exposure preceded VSV exposure, the virus may have grown to slightly higher titer. The inhibitory effect of ozone and sulfur dioxide on influenza virus growth in nasal epithelium suggests a competitive interaction between the chemical inhalant, the virus, and host tissues, with net consequences for the pathogenesis of this disease. If the effects of these inhalants are to be properly interpreted, they should be determined for all major regions of virus growth and inhalant deposition.

  15. Ebolavirus Vaccines: Progress in the Fight Against Ebola Virus Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiao-Xin; Yao, Hang-Ping; Wu, Nan-Ping; Gao, Hai-Nv; Wu, Hai-Bo; Jin, Chang-Zhong; Lu, Xiang-Yun; Xie, Tian-Shen; Li, Lan-Juan

    2015-01-01

    Ebolaviruses are highly infectious pathogens that cause lethal Ebola virus disease (EVD) in humans and non-human primates (NHPs). Due to their high pathogenicity and transmissibility, as well as the potential to be misused as a bioterrorism agent, ebolaviruses would threaten the health of global populations if not controlled. In this review, we describe the origin and structure of ebolaviruses and the development of vaccines from the beginning of the 1980s, including conventional ebolavirus vaccines, DNA vaccines, Ebola virus-like particles (VLPs), vaccinia virus-based vaccines, Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV)-like replicon particles, Kunjin virus-based vaccine, recombinant Zaire Ebolavirusx2206;VP30, recombinant cytomegalovirus (CMV)-based vaccines, recombinant rabies virus (RABV)-based vaccines, recombinant paramyxovirus-based vaccines, adenovirus-based vaccines and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-based vaccines. No licensed vaccine or specific treatment is currently available to counteract ebolavirus infection, although DNA plasmids and several viral vector approaches have been evaluated as promising vaccine platforms. These vaccine candidates have been confirmed to be successful in protecting NHPs against lethal infection. Moreover, these vaccine candidates were successfully advanced to clinical trials. The present review provides an update of the current research on Ebola vaccines, with the aim of providing an overview on current prospects in the fight against EVD. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. [Recurrent aphthous stomatitis in Rheumatology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riera Matute, Gabriel; Riera Alonso, Elena

    2011-01-01

    Recurrent aphthous stomatitis consists on recurring oral ulcers of unknown etiology. Oral ulcers may be different in number and size depending on the clinical presentation, which also determines the time needed for healing. Moreover, there are factors associated to outbreaks but not implicated in its etiopathogenesis. When oral aphthosis has a known etiology, it is not considered as recurrent aphthous stomatitis. The severity and the clinical presentation helps in the differential diagnosis. Treatment is symptomatic in recurrent aphthous stomatitis while, if there is an underlying systemic disease, the treatment of such disease is need in addition to topical treatment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  17. Antiviral activity of gliotoxin, gentian violet and brilliant green against Nipah and Hendra virus in vitro

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    Meyer Adam G

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Using a recently described monolayer assay amenable to high throughput screening format for the identification of potential Nipah virus and Hendra virus antivirals, we have partially screened a low molecular weight compound library (>8,000 compounds directly against live virus infection and identified twenty eight promising lead molecules. Initial single blind screens were conducted with 10 μM compound in triplicate with a minimum efficacy of 90% required for lead selection. Lead compounds were then further characterised to determine the median efficacy (IC50, cytotoxicity (CC50 and the in vitro therapeutic index in live virus and pseudotype assay formats. Results While a number of leads were identified, the current work describes three commercially available compounds: brilliant green, gentian violet and gliotoxin, identified as having potent antiviral activity against Nipah and Hendra virus. Similar efficacy was observed against pseudotyped Nipah and Hendra virus, vesicular stomatitis virus and human parainfluenza virus type 3 while only gliotoxin inhibited an influenza A virus suggesting a non-specific, broad spectrum activity for this compound. Conclusion All three of these compounds have been used previously for various aspects of anti-bacterial and anti-fungal therapy and the current results suggest that while unsuitable for internal administration, they may be amenable to topical antiviral applications, or as disinfectants and provide excellent positive controls for future studies.

  18. Inhibitory effects of bee venom and its components against viruses in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Md Bashir; Lee, Byeong-Hoon; Nikapitiya, Chamilani; Kim, Jae-Hoon; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Lee, Hyun-Cheol; Kim, Choul Goo; Lee, Jong-Soo; Kim, Chul-Joong

    2016-12-01

    Bee venom (BV) from honey bee (Apis Melifera L.) contains at least 18 pharmacologically active components including melittin (MLT), phospholipase A2 (PLA2), and apamin etc. BV is safe for human treatments dose dependently and proven to possess different healing properties including antibacterial and antiparasitidal properties. Nevertheless, antiviral properties of BV have not well investigated. Hence, we identified the potential antiviral properties of BV and its component against a broad panel of viruses. Co-incubation of non-cytotoxic amounts of BV and MLT, the main component of BV, significantly inhibited the replication of enveloped viruses such as Influenza A virus (PR8), Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV), Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV), and Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV). Additionally, BV and MLT also inhibited the replication of non-enveloped viruses such as Enterovirus-71 (EV-71) and Coxsackie Virus (H3). Such antiviral properties were mainly explained by virucidal mechanism. Moreover, MLT protected mice which were challenged with lethal doses of pathogenic influenza A H1N1 viruses. Therefore, these results provides the evidence that BV and MLT could be a potential source as a promising antiviral agent, especially to develop as a broad spectrum antiviral agent.

  19. EXPLORING THE ANTITUMOR EFFECT OF VIRUS IN MALIGNANT GLIOMA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Dipongkor; Ahmed, Seemin S; Rabkin, Samuel D

    Malignant gliomas are the most common type of primary malignant brain tumor with no effective treatments. Current conventional therapies (surgical resection, radiation therapy, temozolomide (TMZ), and bevacizumab administration) typically fail to eradicate the tumors resulting in the recurrence of treatment-resistant tumors. Therefore, novel approaches are needed to improve therapeutic outcomes. Oncolytic viruses (OVs) are excellent candidates as a more effective therapeutic strategy for aggressive cancers like malignant gliomas since OVs have a natural preference or have been genetically engineered to selectively replicate in and kill cancer cells. OVs have been used in numerous preclinical studies in malignant glioma, and a large number of clinical trials using OVs have been completed or are underway that have demonstrated safety, as well as provided indications of effective antiglioma activity. In this review, we will focus on those OVs that have been used in clinical trials for the treatment of malignant gliomas (herpes simplex virus, adenovirus, parvovirus, reovirus, poliovirus, Newcastle disease virus, measles virus, and retrovirus) and OVs examined preclinically (vesicular stomatitis virus and myxoma virus), and describe how these agents are being used.

  20. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Ricky Z; Bruce, Alison J; Rogers, Roy S

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is the most common acute oral ulcerative condition in North America. RAS is divided into a mild, common form, simple aphthosis, and a severe, less common form, complex aphthosis. Aphthosis is a reactive condition. The lesions of RAS can represent the mucosal manifestation of a variety of conditions. These include conditions with oral and genital aphthae such as ulcus vulvae acutum, reactive nonsexually related acute genital ulcers, and Behçet disease. The mouth is the beginning of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, and the lesions of RAS can be a manifestation of GI diseases such as gluten-sensitive enteropathy, ulcerative colitis, and Crohn disease. Complex aphthosis may also have correctable causes. The clinician should seek these in a careful evaluation. Successful management of both simple and complex aphthosis depends on accurate diagnosis, proper classification, recognition of provocative factors, and the identification of associated diseases. The outlook for patients with both simple and complex aphthosis is positive. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Complementing defective viruses that express separate paramyxovirus glycoproteins provide a new vaccine vector approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Anasuya; Rose, John K

    2011-03-01

    Replication-defective vaccine vectors based on vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) lacking its envelope glycoprotein gene (G) are highly effective in animal models. However, such ΔG vectors are difficult to grow because they require complementation with the VSV G protein. In addition, the complementing G protein induces neutralizing antibodies in animals and thus limits multiple vector applications. In the process of generating an experimental Nipah virus (a paramyxovirus) vaccine, we generated two defective VSVΔG vectors, each expressing one of the two Nipah virus (NiV) glycoproteins (G and F) that are both required for virus entry to host cells. These replication-defective VSV vectors were effective at generating NiV neutralizing antibody in mice. Most interestingly, we found that these two defective viruses could be grown together and passaged in tissue culture cells in the absence of VSV G complementation. This mixture of complementing defective viruses was also highly effective at generating NiV neutralizing antibody in animals. This novel approach to growing and producing a vaccine from two defective viruses could be generally applicable to vaccine production for other paramyxoviruses or for other viruses where the expression of at least two different proteins is required for viral entry. Such an approach minimizes biosafety concerns that could apply to single, replication-competent VSV recombinants expressing all proteins required for infection.

  2. The ex vivo purge of cancer cells using oncolytic viruses: recent advances and clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsang JJ

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Jovian J Tsang,1,2 Harold L Atkins2,3 1Department of Biochemistry, University of Ottawa, 2Cancer Therapeutics, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, 3Blood and Marrow Transplant Program, The Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, ON, Canada Abstract: Hematological malignancies are treated with intensive high-dose chemotherapy, with or without radiation. This is followed by hematopoietic stem cell (HSC transplantation (HSCT to rescue or reconstitute hematopoiesis damaged by the anticancer therapy. Autologous HSC grafts may contain cancer cells and purging could further improve treatment outcomes. Similarly, allogeneic HSCT may be improved by selectively purging alloreactive effector cells from the graft rather than wholesale immune cell depletion. Viral agents that selectively replicate in specific cell populations are being studied in experimental models of cancer and immunological diseases and have potential applications in the context of HSC graft engineering. This review describes preclinical studies involving oncolytic virus strains of adenovirus, herpes simplex virus type 1, myxoma virus, and reovirus as ex vivo purging agents for HSC grafts, as well as in vitro and in vivo experimental studies using oncolytic coxsackievirus, measles virus, parvovirus, vaccinia virus, and vesicular stomatitis virus to eradicate hematopoietic malignancies. Alternative ex vivo oncolytic virus strategies are also outlined that aim to reduce the risk of relapse following autologous HSCT and mitigate morbidity and mortality due to graft-versus-host disease in allogeneic HSCT. Keywords: hematopoietic stem cells, oncolytic virus, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, stem cell graft purging, hematopoietic malignancy, graft vs host disease

  3. RNAi screening reveals requirement for host cell secretory pathway in infection by diverse families of negative-strand RNA viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Debasis; Das, Anshuman; Dinh, Phat X.; Subramaniam, Sakthivel; Nayak, Debasis; Barrows, Nicholas J.; Pearson, James L.; Thompson, Jesse; Kelly, David L.; Ladunga, Istvan; Pattnaik, Asit K.

    2011-01-01

    Negative-strand (NS) RNA viruses comprise many pathogens that cause serious diseases in humans and animals. Despite their clinical importance, little is known about the host factors required for their infection. Using vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), a prototypic NS RNA virus in the family Rhabdoviridae, we conducted a human genome-wide siRNA screen and identified 72 host genes required for viral infection. Many of these identified genes were also required for infection by two other NS RNA viruses, the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus of the Arenaviridae family and human parainfluenza virus type 3 of the Paramyxoviridae family. Genes affecting different stages of VSV infection, such as entry/uncoating, gene expression, and assembly/release, were identified. Depletion of the proteins of the coatomer complex I or its upstream effectors ARF1 or GBF1 led to detection of reduced levels of VSV RNA. Coatomer complex I was also required for infection of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus and human parainfluenza virus type 3. These results highlight the evolutionarily conserved requirements for gene expression of diverse families of NS RNA viruses and demonstrate the involvement of host cell secretory pathway in the process. PMID:22065774

  4. Effects of stomatal development on stomatal conductance and on stomatal limitation of photosynthesis in Syringa oblata and Euonymus japonicus Thunb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bing-Jie; Chow, Wah Soon; Liu, Yu-Jun; Shi, Lei; Jiang, Chuang-Dao

    2014-12-01

    During leaf development, the increase in stomatal conductance cannot meet photosynthetic demand for CO2, thus leading to stomatal limitation of photosynthesis (Ls). Considering the crucial influences of stomatal development on stomatal conductance, we speculated whether stomatal development limits photosynthesis to some extent. To test this hypothesis, stomatal development, stomatal conductance and photosynthesis were carefully studied in both Syringa oblata (normal greening species) and Euonymus japonicus Thunb (delayed greening species). Our results show that the size of stomata increased gradually with leaf expansion, resulting in increased stomatal conductance up to the time of full leaf expansion. During this process, photosynthesis also increased steadily. Compared to that in S. oblata, the development of chloroplasts in E. japonicus Thunb was obviously delayed, leading to a delay in the improvement of photosynthetic capacity. Further analysis revealed that before full leaf expansion, stomatal limitation increased rapidly in both S. oblata and E. japonicus Thunb; after full leaf expansion, stomatal limitation continually increased in E. japonicus Thunb. Accordingly, we suggested that the enhancement of photosynthetic capacity is the main factor leading to stomatal limitation during leaf development but that stomatal development can alleviate stomatal limitation with the increase of photosynthesis by controlling gas exchange. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Enhanced light microscopy visualization of virus particles from Zika virus to filamentous ebolaviruses.

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    George G Daaboul

    Full Text Available Light microscopy is a powerful tool in the detection and analysis of parasites, fungi, and prokaryotes, but has been challenging to use for the detection of individual virus particles. Unlabeled virus particles are too small to be visualized using standard visible light microscopy. Characterization of virus particles is typically performed using higher resolution approaches such as electron microscopy or atomic force microscopy. These approaches require purification of virions away from their normal millieu, requiring significant levels of expertise, and can only enumerate small numbers of particles per field of view. Here, we utilize a visible light imaging approach called Single Particle Interferometric Reflectance Imaging Sensor (SP-IRIS that allows automated counting and sizing of thousands of individual virions. Virions are captured directly from complex solutions onto a silicon chip and then detected using a reflectance interference imaging modality. We show that the use of different imaging wavelengths allows the visualization of a multitude of virus particles. Using Violet/UV illumination, the SP-IRIS technique is able to detect individual flavivirus particles (~40 nm, while green light illumination is capable of identifying and discriminating between vesicular stomatitis virus and vaccinia virus (~360 nm. Strikingly, the technology allows the clear identification of filamentous infectious ebolavirus particles and virus-like particles. The ability to differentiate and quantify unlabeled virus particles extends the usefulness of traditional light microscopy and can be embodied in a straightforward benchtop approach allowing widespread applications ranging from rapid detection in biological fluids to analysis of virus-like particles for vaccine development and production.

  6. EBOLA VACCINE. VSV-EBOV rapidly protects macaques against infection with the 2014/15 Ebola virus outbreak strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzi, Andrea; Robertson, Shelly J; Haddock, Elaine; Feldmann, Friederike; Hanley, Patrick W; Scott, Dana P; Strong, James E; Kobinger, Gary; Best, Sonja M; Feldmann, Heinz

    2015-08-14

    The latest Ebola virus (EBOV) epidemic spread rapidly through Guinea, Sierra Leone, and Liberia, creating a global public health crisis and accelerating the assessment of experimental therapeutics and vaccines in clinical trials. One of those vaccines is based on recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus expressing the EBOV glycoprotein (VSV-EBOV), a live-attenuated vector with marked preclinical efficacy. Here, we provide the preclinical proof that VSV-EBOV completely protects macaques against lethal challenge with the West African EBOV-Makona strain. Complete and partial protection was achieved with a single dose given as late as 7 and 3 days before challenge, respectively. This indicates that VSV-EBOV may protect humans against EBOV infections in West Africa with relatively short time to immunity, promoting its use for immediate public health responses. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  7. Absence of xenotropic murine leukaemia virus-related virus in UK patients with chronic fatigue syndrome

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    Breuer Judith

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Detection of a retrovirus, xenotropic murine leukaemia virus-related virus (XMRV, has recently been reported in 67% of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome. We have studied a total of 170 samples from chronic fatigue syndrome patients from two UK cohorts and 395 controls for evidence of XMRV infection by looking either for the presence of viral nucleic acids using quantitative PCR (limit of detection Results We have not identified XMRV DNA in any samples by PCR (0/299. Some serum samples showed XMRV neutralising activity (26/565 but only one of these positive sera came from a CFS patient. Most of the positive sera were also able to neutralise MLV particles pseudotyped with envelope proteins from other viruses, including vesicular stomatitis virus, indicating significant cross-reactivity in serological responses. Four positive samples were specific for XMRV. Conclusions No association between XMRV infection and CFS was observed in the samples tested, either by PCR or serological methodologies. The non-specific neutralisation observed in multiple serum samples suggests that it is unlikely that these responses were elicited by XMRV and highlights the danger of over-estimating XMRV frequency based on serological assays. In spite of this, we believe that the detection of neutralising activity that did not inhibit VSV-G pseudotyped MLV in at least four human serum samples indicates that XMRV infection may occur in the general population, although with currently uncertain outcomes.

  8. Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus entry into host cells occurs through the multivesicular body and requires ESCRT regulators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olena Shtanko

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV is a tick-borne bunyavirus causing outbreaks of severe disease in humans, with a fatality rate approaching 30%. There are no widely accepted therapeutics available to prevent or treat the disease. CCHFV enters host cells through clathrin-mediated endocytosis and is subsequently transported to an acidified compartment where the fusion of virus envelope with cellular membranes takes place. To better understand the uptake pathway, we sought to identify host factors controlling CCHFV transport through the cell. We demonstrate that after passing through early endosomes in a Rab5-dependent manner, CCHFV is delivered to multivesicular bodies (MVBs. Virus particles localized to MVBs approximately 1 hour after infection and affected the distribution of the organelle within cells. Interestingly, blocking Rab7 activity had no effect on association of the virus with MVBs. Productive virus infection depended on phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K activity, which meditates the formation of functional MVBs. Silencing Tsg101, Vps24, Vps4B, or Alix/Aip1, components of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT pathway controlling MVB biogenesis, inhibited infection of wild-type virus as well as a novel pseudotyped vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV bearing CCHFV glycoprotein, supporting a role for the MVB pathway in CCHFV entry. We further demonstrate that blocking transport out of MVBs still allowed virus entry while preventing vesicular acidification, required for membrane fusion, trapped virions in the MVBs. These findings suggest that MVBs are necessary for infection and are the sites of virus-endosome membrane fusion.

  9. Virus inhibition induced by polyvalent nanoparticles of different sizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonnemann, Jonathan; Sieben, Christian; Wolff, Christopher; Ludwig, Kai; Böttcher, Christoph; Herrmann, Andreas; Haag, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    The development of antiviral agents is one of the major challenges in medical science. So far, small monovalent molecular drugs that inhibit the late steps in the viral replication cycle, i.e., virus budding, have not worked well which emphasizes the need for alternative approaches. Polyvalently presented viral receptors, however, show potential as good inhibitors of virus-cell binding, which is the first step in the viral infection cycle. By gradually increasing the size of ligand functionalized gold nanoparticles, up to virus-like dimensions, we are now able to quantify the polyvalent enhancement of virus-cell binding inhibition and to identify varying mechanisms of virus inhibition with different efficacies: by employing a new binding assay we found that surface area-normalized polysulfated gold nanoparticles of diameters equal to and larger than the virus diameter (>50 nm) more efficiently inhibit the binding of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) to cells than smaller particles. On a per particle basis, larger sized gold nanoparticles were surprisingly shown to inhibit the viral infection up to two orders of magnitude more efficiently than smaller particles, which suggests different mechanisms of virus inhibition. Based on complementary electron microscopic data, we noticed that larger gold nanoparticles act as efficient cross-linkers between virions, whereas smaller gold nanoparticles decorate the surface of individual virus particles. Our systematic study accentuates the need for the design of biodegradable, virus-sized inhibitors capitalizing on polyvalent binding.The development of antiviral agents is one of the major challenges in medical science. So far, small monovalent molecular drugs that inhibit the late steps in the viral replication cycle, i.e., virus budding, have not worked well which emphasizes the need for alternative approaches. Polyvalently presented viral receptors, however, show potential as good inhibitors of virus-cell binding, which is the

  10. Synergistic interaction between oncolytic viruses augments tumor killing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Boeuf, Fabrice; Diallo, Jean-Simon; McCart, J Andrea; Thorne, Steve; Falls, Theresa; Stanford, Marianne; Kanji, Femina; Auer, Rebecca; Brown, Christopher W; Lichty, Brian D; Parato, Kelley; Atkins, Harold; Kirn, David; Bell, John C

    2010-05-01

    A major barrier to all oncolytic viruses (OVs) in clinical development is cellular innate immunity, which is variably active in a spectrum of human malignancies. To overcome the heterogeneity of tumor response, we combined complementary OVs that attack cancers in distinct ways to improve therapeutic outcome. Two genetically distinct viruses, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and vaccinia virus (VV), were used to eliminate the risk of recombination. The combination was tested in a variety of tumor types in vitro, in immunodeficient and immunocompetent mouse tumor models, and ex vivo, in a panel of primary human cancer samples. We found that VV synergistically enhanced VSV antitumor activity, dependent in large part on the activity of the VV B18R gene product. A recombinant version of VSV expressing the fusion-associated small-transmembrane (p14FAST) protein also further enhanced the ability of VV to spread through an infected monolayer, resulting in a "ping pong" oncolytic effect wherein each virus enhanced the ability of the other to replicate and/or spread in tumor cells. Our strategy is the first example where OVs are rationally combined to utilize attributes of different OVs to overcome the heterogeneity of malignancies and demonstrates the feasibility of combining complementary OVs to improve therapeutic outcome.

  11. The biological effects of ozone on representative members of five groups of animal viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolton, D.C.; Zee, Y.C.; Osebold, J.W.

    1982-04-01

    In an effort to establish the biological relevance of the reactions of ozone with soluble proteins and lipid bilayer membrane systems, representative viruses from five major virus groups were exposed to moderate concentrations of ozone. The virus suspensions were exposed at 37/sup 0/C to 0.00, 0.16, and 0.64 ppm ozone in the gas phase. The ozone reacted with the virus suspensions as a thin film of fluid on the surface of a rotating culture bottle as the gas was drawn through the bottle at a flow rate of 2 liters/min. The three enveloped viruses tested exhibited different susceptibilities to ozone inactivation which correlated with their thermolability in the absence of ozone. The order of susceptibility to ozone inactivation of the enveloped viruses was vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) (Rhabdoviridae) > influenza A virus (WSN strain) (Orthomyxoviridae) > infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus (IBRV) (Herpesviridae). The inactivation reactions of the enveloped viruses with ozone showed pseudo-first-order kinetics. A simple reaction model was used to derive a reaction rate expression from which rate constrants and reaction stoichiometry were estimated. In contrast to the enveloped viruses, the two nonenveloped viruses examined were relatively resistant to ozone inactivation. Polio virus type I (Picornaviridae) was found to be completely resistant to ozone inactivation after 60 hr exposure to either ozone concentration, while infectious canine hepatitis virus (Adenoviridae) showed only slight inactivation after exposure to 0.64 ppm ozone for 66 hr. The significance of these results with regard to the reactions of ozone with cell membranes and other components is discussed.

  12. A Viable Recombinant Rhabdovirus Lacking Its Glycoprotein Gene and Expressing Influenza Virus Hemagglutinin and Neuraminidase Is a Potent Influenza Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryder, Alex B.; Buonocore, Linda; Vogel, Leatrice; Nachbagauer, Raffael; Krammer, Florian

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The emergence of novel influenza viruses that cause devastating human disease is an ongoing threat and serves as an impetus for the continued development of novel approaches to influenza vaccines. Influenza vaccine development has traditionally focused on producing humoral and/or cell-mediated immunity, often against the viral surface glycoproteins hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA). Here, we describe a new vaccine candidate that utilizes a replication-defective vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) vector backbone that lacks the native G surface glycoprotein gene (VSVΔG). The expression of the H5 HA of an H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV), A/Vietnam/1203/04 (VN1203), and the NA of the mouse-adapted H1N1 influenza virus A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PR8) in the VSVΔG vector restored the ability of the recombinant virus to replicate in cell culture, without the requirement for the addition of trypsin. We show here that this recombinant virus vaccine candidate was nonpathogenic in mice when given by either the intramuscular or intranasal route of immunization and that the in vivo replication of VSVΔG-H5N1 is profoundly attenuated. This recombinant virus also provided protection against lethal H5N1 infection after a single dose. This novel approach to vaccination against HPAIVs may be widely applicable to other emerging strains of influenza virus. IMPORTANCE Preparation for a potentially catastrophic influenza pandemic requires novel influenza vaccines that are safe, can be produced and administered quickly, and are effective, both soon after administration and for a long duration. We have created a new influenza vaccine that utilizes an attenuated vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) vector, to deliver and express influenza virus proteins against which vaccinated animals develop potent antibody responses. The influenza virus hemagglutinin and neuraminidase proteins, expressed on the surface of VSV particles, allowed this vaccine to grow in cell

  13. A viable recombinant rhabdovirus lacking its glycoprotein gene and expressing influenza virus hemagglutinin and neuraminidase is a potent influenza vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryder, Alex B; Buonocore, Linda; Vogel, Leatrice; Nachbagauer, Raffael; Krammer, Florian; Rose, John K

    2015-03-01

    The emergence of novel influenza viruses that cause devastating human disease is an ongoing threat and serves as an impetus for the continued development of novel approaches to influenza vaccines. Influenza vaccine development has traditionally focused on producing humoral and/or cell-mediated immunity, often against the viral surface glycoproteins hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA). Here, we describe a new vaccine candidate that utilizes a replication-defective vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) vector backbone that lacks the native G surface glycoprotein gene (VSVΔG). The expression of the H5 HA of an H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV), A/Vietnam/1203/04 (VN1203), and the NA of the mouse-adapted H1N1 influenza virus A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PR8) in the VSVΔG vector restored the ability of the recombinant virus to replicate in cell culture, without the requirement for the addition of trypsin. We show here that this recombinant virus vaccine candidate was nonpathogenic in mice when given by either the intramuscular or intranasal route of immunization and that the in vivo replication of VSVΔG-H5N1 is profoundly attenuated. This recombinant virus also provided protection against lethal H5N1 infection after a single dose. This novel approach to vaccination against HPAIVs may be widely applicable to other emerging strains of influenza virus. Preparation for a potentially catastrophic influenza pandemic requires novel influenza vaccines that are safe, can be produced and administered quickly, and are effective, both soon after administration and for a long duration. We have created a new influenza vaccine that utilizes an attenuated vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) vector, to deliver and express influenza virus proteins against which vaccinated animals develop potent antibody responses. The influenza virus hemagglutinin and neuraminidase proteins, expressed on the surface of VSV particles, allowed this vaccine to grow in cell culture and induced a

  14. Hendra and Nipah viruses: pathogenesis, animal models and recent breakthroughs in vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weingartl HM

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Hana M Weingartl National Centre for Foreign Animal Disease, Canadian Food Inspection Agency, Winnipeg, MB, Canada Abstract: Hendra and Nipah viruses are two highly pathogenic zoonotic members of the genus Henipavirus, family Paramyxoviridae, requiring work under biosafety level 4 conditions due to a lack of effective therapy and human vaccines. Several vaccine candidates were protective in animal models: recombinant vaccinia virus expressing Nipah virus (NiV F and G proteins in hamsters against NiV; recombinant ALVAC–NiV F and G in swine against NiV; recombinant Hendra virus (HeV soluble G protein (sGHeV against HeV and NiV in cats, ferrets, horses, and African green monkeys (AGM; recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus-based vectors expressing NiV F or G against NiV in hamsters and ferrets; measles virus-based NiV G vaccine candidate in hamsters and AGMs against NiV; and adenoassociated virus expressing NiG protein, which protected hamsters against NiV. The sGHeV was licensed for use in horses (Equivac HeV® in 2012. It is the first vaccine candidate licensed against a biosafety level 4 agent. With the development of suitable animal models (ferret, hamster and, importantly, AGM, progress can be made toward development of a human vaccine.Keywords: henipavirus, equine, swine, human infection, animal models, vaccine candidates

  15. Spontaneous Mutation Rate of Measles Virus: Direct Estimation Based on Mutations Conferring Monoclonal Antibody Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrag, Stephanie J.; Rota, Paul A.; Bellini, William J.

    1999-01-01

    High mutation rates typical of RNA viruses often generate a unique viral population structure consisting of a large number of genetic microvariants. In the case of viral pathogens, this can result in rapid evolution of antiviral resistance or vaccine-escape mutants. We determined a direct estimate of the mutation rate of measles virus, the next likely target for global elimination following poliovirus. In a laboratory tissue culture system, we used the fluctuation test method of estimating mutation rate, which involves screening a large number of independent populations initiated by a small number of viruses each for the presence or absence of a particular single point mutation. The mutation we focused on, which can be screened for phenotypically, confers resistance to a monoclonal antibody (MAb 80-III-B2). The entire H gene of a subset of mutants was sequenced to verify that the resistance phenotype was associated with single point mutations. The epitope conferring MAb resistance was further characterized by Western blot analysis. Based on this approach, measles virus was estimated to have a mutation rate of 9 × 10−5 per base per replication and a genomic mutation rate of 1.43 per replication. The mutation rates we estimated for measles virus are comparable to recent in vitro estimates for both poliovirus and vesicular stomatitis virus. In the field, however, measles virus shows marked genetic stability. We briefly discuss the evolutionary implications of these results. PMID:9847306

  16. Smac mimetics and oncolytic viruses synergize in driving anticancer T-cell responses through complementary mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae-Sun; Dastidar, Himika; Zhang, Chunfen; Zemp, Franz J; Lau, Keith; Ernst, Matthias; Rakic, Andrea; Sikdar, Saif; Rajwani, Jahanara; Naumenko, Victor; Balce, Dale R; Ewanchuk, Ben W; Taylor, Pankaj; Yates, Robin M; Jenne, Craig; Gafuik, Chris; Mahoney, Douglas J

    2017-08-24

    Second mitochondrial activator of caspase (Smac)-mimetic compounds and oncolytic viruses were developed to kill cancer cells directly. However, Smac-mimetic compound and oncolytic virus therapies also modulate host immune responses in ways we hypothesized would complement one another in promoting anticancer T-cell immunity. We show that Smac-mimetic compound and oncolytic virus therapies synergize in driving CD8 + T-cell responses toward tumors through distinct activities. Smac-mimetic compound treatment with LCL161 reinvigorates exhausted CD8 + T cells within immunosuppressed tumors by targeting tumor-associated macrophages for M1-like polarization. Oncolytic virus treatment with vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV ΔM51 ) promotes CD8 + T-cell accumulation within tumors and CD8 + T-cell activation within the tumor-draining lymph node. When combined, LCL161 and VSV ΔM51 therapy engenders CD8 + T-cell-mediated tumor control in several aggressive mouse models of cancer. Smac-mimetic compound and oncolytic virus therapies are both in clinical development and their combination therapy represents a promising approach for promoting anticancer T-cell immunity.Oncolytic viruses (OV) and second mitochondrial activator of caspase (Smac)-mimetic compounds (SMC) synergistically kill cancer cells directly. Here, the authors show that SMC and OV therapies combination also synergize in vivo by promoting anticancer immunity through an increase in CD8 + T-cell response.

  17. The ex vivo purge of cancer cells using oncolytic viruses: recent advances and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Jovian J; Atkins, Harold L

    2015-01-01

    Hematological malignancies are treated with intensive high-dose chemotherapy, with or without radiation. This is followed by hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation (HSCT) to rescue or reconstitute hematopoiesis damaged by the anticancer therapy. Autologous HSC grafts may contain cancer cells and purging could further improve treatment outcomes. Similarly, allogeneic HSCT may be improved by selectively purging alloreactive effector cells from the graft rather than wholesale immune cell depletion. Viral agents that selectively replicate in specific cell populations are being studied in experimental models of cancer and immunological diseases and have potential applications in the context of HSC graft engineering. This review describes preclinical studies involving oncolytic virus strains of adenovirus, herpes simplex virus type 1, myxoma virus, and reovirus as ex vivo purging agents for HSC grafts, as well as in vitro and in vivo experimental studies using oncolytic coxsackievirus, measles virus, parvovirus, vaccinia virus, and vesicular stomatitis virus to eradicate hematopoietic malignancies. Alternative ex vivo oncolytic virus strategies are also outlined that aim to reduce the risk of relapse following autologous HSCT and mitigate morbidity and mortality due to graft-versus-host disease in allogeneic HSCT.

  18. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis. An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ship, J A

    1996-02-01

    Recurrent aphthous ulceration or recurrent aphthous stomatitis is the most common oral mucosal disease known to human beings. Despite much clinical and research attention, the causes remain poorly understood, the ulcers are not preventable, and treatment is symptomatic. The most common presentation is minor recurrent aphthous stomatitis: recurrent, round, clearly defined, small, painful ulcers that heal in 10 to 14 days without scarring. Major recurrent aphthous stomatitis lesions are larger (greater than 5 mm), can last for 6 weeks or longer, and frequently scar. The third variety of recurrent aphthous stomatitis is herpetiform ulcers, which present as multiple small clusters of pinpoint lesions that can coalesce to form large irregular ulcers and last 7 to 10 days. Diagnosis of all varieties is usually made after clinical examination. Many local and systemic factors have been associated with these conditions, and there is evidence that there may be a genetic and immunopathogenic basis for recurrent aphthous ulceration. Management of this condition depends on the clinical presentation and symptoms and includes analgesic, antimicrobial, and immunomodulatory drugs. As dental clinicians and researchers become better trained in oral medicine and stomatology, it is anticipated that the pathophysiology, prevention, and treatment of recurrent aphthous ulceration will improve in the future.

  19. Prosthetic stomatitis with removable dentures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rozalieva Yu.Yu.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The Research Objective: To study patients with prosthetic stomatitis, who use the removable laminar dentures. Materials: The consultations and treatment of 79 patients aged 47-65 years have been conducted. The patients have been divided into two clinical groups. The first clinical group (39 persons with the performance of immediate prosthet-ics; the second control clinical group (40 persons — the permanent dentures were produced without the preliminary instruction. Results: All the patients, having the laminar dentures without the preliminary use of immediate constructions of dentures, in spite of repeated correction of them, have had changes of dentures and transitory fold. Patients have been exposed to prosthetic stomatitis of different etiology (without trauma; the single-shot or multiple correction of dentures by the method of rebasing with using of cold cure plastics has been made. Conclusion: Structural and functional changes of dentition during the prosthetic stomatitis lead to disorders, associated by the mucositis. Use of the term of «prosthetic stomatitis» reflects etiological and pathogenetic component of changes in the denture-supporting tissues

  20. Virus-induced non-specific signals cause cell cycle progression of primed CD8(+) T cells but do not induce cell differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørding Andreasen, Susanne; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Marker, O

    1999-01-01

    inducer poly(I:C), proliferation of memory (CD44(hi)) CD8(+) T cells but no phenotypic or functional activation was observed. Following injection of an unrelated virus [vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)], naive TCR transgenic cells did not become significantly activated with respect to any...... of the parameters investigated. In contrast, memory TCR transgenic cells were found to proliferate extensively early after VSV infection (day 0-3), whereas limited proliferation was observed later (day 3-6) when proliferation of non-transgenic CD8(+) T cells is maximal. This aborted response did not result from...... anergy to TCR stimulation, as memory TCR transgenic cells proliferated vigorously upon stimulation with their nominal peptide. Despite the massive proliferation of memory cells observed early after VSV infection, no phenotypic or functional activation was observed. Together these findings indicate...

  1. Stomatal complex types, stomatal density, and the stomatal index in some species of dioscorea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulrahaman A.A.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Dioscorea alata L. has three stomatal complex types, namely, paracytic, anisocytic, and tetracytic stomata, with percentage frequency values of 50, 18, and 32, respectively. Dioscorea bulbifera has paracytic and anisocytic stomata, with percentage frequency values of 87.60 and 12.40, respectively. Dioscorea cayenensis has anisocytic stomata, with a percent­age frequency value of 100. Dioscorea dumetorum has tetracytic and paractytic stomata, with percentage frequency values of 91.05 and 8.95, respectively. Both D. esculenta and D. rotundata have paracytic stomata, with a percentage frequency of 100. The range of variation of stomatal density is from 10 (lowest value in D. alata and D. dumentorum to 27 (highest value in D. bulbifera. The stomatal index also varies, from 24 in D. alata to 47 in D. cayenensis. The size of stomata in all species is small, varying in length from 0.74 μm in D. alata to 1.79 μm in D. dumentorum. An indented dichotomous key based on stomatal features was constructed to distinguish and identify the species.

  2. MEK kinase 1 is a negative regulator of virus-specific CD8(+) T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Labuda, Tord; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Rasmussen, Susanne

    2006-01-01

    in the generation of a virus-specific immune response. Mekk1(DeltaKD) mice challenged with vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) showed a fourfold increase in splenic CD8(+) T cell numbers. In contrast, the number of splenic T cells in infected WT mice was only marginally increased. The CD8(+) T cell expansion in Mekk1......(DeltaKD) mice following VSV infection is virus-specific and the frequency of virus-specific T cells is significantly higher (more than threefold) in Mekk1(DeltaKD) as compared to WT animals. Moreover, the hyper-expansion of T cells seen in Mekk1(DeltaKD) mice after VSV infection is a result of increased...... proliferation, since a significantly higher percentage of virus-specific Mekk1(DeltaKD) CD8(+) T cells incorporated BrdU as compared to virus-specific WT CD8(+) T cells. In contrast, similar levels of apoptosis were detected in Mekk1(DeltaKD) and WT T cells following VSV infection. These results strongly...

  3. TCR down-regulation controls virus-specific CD8+ T cell responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonefeld, Charlotte Menné; Haks, Mariëlle; Nielsen, Bodil

    2008-01-01

    The CD3gamma di-leucine-based motif plays a central role in TCR down-regulation. However, little is understood about the role of the CD3gamma di-leucine-based motif in physiological T cell responses. In this study, we show that the expansion in numbers of virus-specific CD8(+) T cells is impaired...... in mice with a mutated CD3gamma di-leucine-based motif. The CD3gamma mutation did not impair early TCR signaling, nor did it compromise recruitment or proliferation of virus-specific T cells, but it increased the apoptosis rate of the activated T cells by increasing down-regulation of the antiapoptotic...... molecule Bcl-2. This resulted in a 2-fold reduction in the clonal expansion of virus-specific CD8(+) T cells during the acute phase of vesicular stomatitis virus and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infections. These results identify an important role of CD3gamma-mediated TCR down-regulation in virus...

  4. Bat airway epithelial cells: a novel tool for the study of zoonotic viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabella Eckerle

    Full Text Available Bats have been increasingly recognized as reservoir of important zoonotic viruses. However, until now many attempts to isolate bat-borne viruses in cell culture have been unsuccessful. Further, experimental studies on reservoir host species have been limited by the difficulty of rearing these species. The epithelium of the respiratory tract plays a central role during airborne transmission, as it is the first tissue encountered by viral particles. Although several cell lines from bats were established recently, no well-characterized, selectively cultured airway epithelial cells were available so far. Here, primary cells and immortalized cell lines from bats of the two important suborders Yangochiroptera and Yinpterochiroptera, Carollia perspicillata (Seba's short-tailed bat and Eidolon helvum (Straw-colored fruit bat, were successfully cultured under standardized conditions from both fresh and frozen organ specimens by cell outgrowth of organ explants and by the use of serum-free primary cell culture medium. Cells were immortalized to generate permanent cell lines. Cells were characterized for their epithelial properties such as expression of cytokeratin and tight junctions proteins and permissiveness for viral infection with Rift-Valley fever virus and vesicular stomatitis virus Indiana. These cells can serve as suitable models for the study of bat-borne viruses and complement cell culture models for virus infection in human airway epithelial cells.

  5. Generalized selection to overcome innate immunity selects for host breadth in an RNA virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasik, Brian R; Muñoz-Rojas, Andrés R; Okamoto, Kenichi W; Miller-Jensen, Kathryn; Turner, Paul E

    2016-02-01

    Virus-host coevolution has selected for generalized host defense against viruses, exemplified by interferon production/signaling and other innate immune function in eukaryotes such as humans. Although cell-surface binding primarily limits virus infection success, generalized adaptation to counteract innate immunity across disparate hosts may contribute to RNA virus emergence potential. We examined this idea using vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) populations previously evolved on strictly immune-deficient (HeLa) cells, strictly immune competent (MDCK) cells, or on alternating deficient/competent cells. By measuring viral fitness in unselected human cancer cells of differing innate immunity, we confirmed that HeLa-adapted populations were specialized for innate immune-deficient hosts, whereas MDCK-adapted populations were relatively more generalized for fitness on hosts of differing innate immune capacity and of different species origin. We also confirmed that HeLa-evolved populations maintained fitness in immune-deficient nonhuman primate cells. These results suggest that innate immunity is more prominent than host species in determining viral fitness at the host-cell level. Finally, our prediction was inexact that selection on alternating deficient/competent hosts should produce innate viral generalists. Rather, fitness differences among alternating host-evolved VSV populations indicated variable capacities to evade innate immunity. Our results suggest that the evolutionary history of innate immune selection can affect whether RNA viruses evolve greater host-breadth. © 2016 The Author(s). Evolution © 2016 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  6. Bat airway epithelial cells: a novel tool for the study of zoonotic viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckerle, Isabella; Ehlen, Lukas; Kallies, René; Wollny, Robert; Corman, Victor M; Cottontail, Veronika M; Tschapka, Marco; Oppong, Samuel; Drosten, Christian; Müller, Marcel A

    2014-01-01

    Bats have been increasingly recognized as reservoir of important zoonotic viruses. However, until now many attempts to isolate bat-borne viruses in cell culture have been unsuccessful. Further, experimental studies on reservoir host species have been limited by the difficulty of rearing these species. The epithelium of the respiratory tract plays a central role during airborne transmission, as it is the first tissue encountered by viral particles. Although several cell lines from bats were established recently, no well-characterized, selectively cultured airway epithelial cells were available so far. Here, primary cells and immortalized cell lines from bats of the two important suborders Yangochiroptera and Yinpterochiroptera, Carollia perspicillata (Seba's short-tailed bat) and Eidolon helvum (Straw-colored fruit bat), were successfully cultured under standardized conditions from both fresh and frozen organ specimens by cell outgrowth of organ explants and by the use of serum-free primary cell culture medium. Cells were immortalized to generate permanent cell lines. Cells were characterized for their epithelial properties such as expression of cytokeratin and tight junctions proteins and permissiveness for viral infection with Rift-Valley fever virus and vesicular stomatitis virus Indiana. These cells can serve as suitable models for the study of bat-borne viruses and complement cell culture models for virus infection in human airway epithelial cells.

  7. TCR Down-Regulation Controls Virus-Specific CD8+ T Cell Responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonefeld, Charlotte Menné; Haks, Mariëlle; Nielsen, Bodil

    2008-01-01

    The CD3gamma di-leucine-based motif plays a central role in TCR down-regulation. However, little is understood about the role of the CD3gamma di-leucine-based motif in physiological T cell responses. In this study, we show that the expansion in numbers of virus-specific CD8(+) T cells is impaired...... in mice with a mutated CD3gamma di-leucine-based motif. The CD3gamma mutation did not impair early TCR signaling, nor did it compromise recruitment or proliferation of virus-specific T cells, but it increased the apoptosis rate of the activated T cells by increasing down-regulation of the antiapoptotic...... molecule Bcl-2. This resulted in a 2-fold reduction in the clonal expansion of virus-specific CD8(+) T cells during the acute phase of vesicular stomatitis virus and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infections. These results identify an important role of CD3gamma-mediated TCR down-regulation in virus...

  8. GB Virus Type C Envelope Protein E2 Elicits Antibodies That React with a Cellular Antigen on HIV-1 Particles and Neutralize Diverse HIV-1 Isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Emma L.; Xiang, Jinhua; McLinden, James H.; Kaufman, Thomas M.; Chang, Qing; Montefiori, David C.; Klinzman, Donna; Stapleton, Jack T.

    2012-01-01

    Broadly neutralizing Abs to HIV-1 are well described; however, identification of Ags that elicit these Abs has proven difficult. Persistent infection with GB virus type C (GBV-C) is associated with prolonged survival in HIV-1–infected individuals, and among those without HIV-1 viremia, the presence of Ab to GBV-C glycoprotein E2 is also associated with survival. GBV-C E2 protein inhibits HIV-1 entry, and an antigenic peptide within E2 interferes with gp41-induced membrane perturbations in vitro, suggesting the possibility of structural mimicry between GBV-C E2 protein and HIV-1 particles. Naturally occurring human and experimentally induced GBV-C E2 Abs were examined for their ability to neutralize infectious HIV-1 particles and HIV-1–enveloped pseudovirus particles. All GBV-C E2 Abs neutralized diverse isolates of HIV-1 with the exception of rabbit anti-peptide Abs raised against a synthetic GBV-C E2 peptide. Rabbit anti–GBV-C E2 Abs neutralized HIV-1–pseudotyped retrovirus particles but not HIV-1–pseudotyped vesicular stomatitis virus particles, and E2 Abs immune-precipitated HIV-1 gag particles containing the vesicular stomatitis virus type G envelope, HIV-1 envelope, GBV-C envelope, or no viral envelope. The Abs did not neutralize or immune-precipitate mumps or yellow fever viruses. Rabbit GBV-C E2 Abs inhibited HIV attachment to cells but did not inhibit entry following attachment. Taken together, these data indicate that the GBV-C E2 protein has a structural motif that elicits Abs that cross-react with a cellular Ag present on retrovirus particles, independent of HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins. The data provide evidence that a heterologous viral protein can induce HIV-1–neutralizing Abs. PMID:20826757

  9. Variation in RNA virus mutation rates across host cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marine Combe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that RNA viruses exhibit higher rates of spontaneous mutation than DNA viruses and microorganisms. However, their mutation rates vary amply, from 10(-6 to 10(-4 substitutions per nucleotide per round of copying (s/n/r and the causes of this variability remain poorly understood. In addition to differences in intrinsic fidelity or error correction capability, viral mutation rates may be dependent on host factors. Here, we assessed the effect of the cellular environment on the rate of spontaneous mutation of the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV, which has a broad host range and cell tropism. Luria-Delbrück fluctuation tests and sequencing showed that VSV mutated similarly in baby hamster kidney, murine embryonic fibroblasts, colon cancer, and neuroblastoma cells (approx. 10(-5 s/n/r. Cell immortalization through p53 inactivation and oxygen levels (1-21% did not have a significant impact on viral replication fidelity. This shows that previously published mutation rates can be considered reliable despite being based on a narrow and artificial set of laboratory conditions. Interestingly, we also found that VSV mutated approximately four times more slowly in various insect cells compared with mammalian cells. This may contribute to explaining the relatively slow evolution of VSV and other arthropod-borne viruses in nature.

  10. RNA induced polymerization of the Borna disease virus nucleoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hock, Miriam; Kraus, Ina; Schoehn, Guy; Jamin, Marc; Andrei-Selmer, Cornelia; Garten, Wolfgang; Weissenhorn, Winfried

    2010-02-05

    The Borna disease virus (BDV) nucleoprotein (N) monomer resembles the nucleoprotein structures from rabies virus (RABV) and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). We show that BDV N assembles into ring- and string-like structures in the presence of 5' genomic BDV RNA. RNA induced polymerization is partly RNA-specific since polymerization is inefficient in the presence of 3' genomic BDV RNA or E. coli RNA. Mutagenesis of basic residues located in the cleft made up by the N- and C-terminal domains of N abrogate RNA-induced polymerization indicating that BDV N binds RNA similarly as observed in case of RABV and VSV N-RNA complexes. Bound RNA is not protected and sensitive to degradation. N-RNA polymers form complexes with the phosphoprotein P as required for functional transcription or replication units. Our data indicate that BDV N utilizes similar structural principles for N-RNA and N-P-RNA complex formation as observed for related negative strand RNA viruses. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Inactivation of model viruses suspended in fresh frozen plasma using novel methylene blue based device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elikaei, Ameneh; Sharifi, Zohreh; Hosseini, Seyed Masoud; Latifi, Hamid; Musavi Hosseini, Mir Kamaran

    2014-02-01

    There is a concern on safety of human Fresh Frozen Plasma (FFP) as it is a source of some medicinal products. The possibility of transmission of blood-borne are reported often due to emerging viruses. There are some Pathogen Reduction Technologies (PRT) to inactivate viruses. Methylene Blue (MB) based method is one of them. The aim of this study was to examine new designated device to inactivate model viruses. Four model viruses were used in this study:Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), Herpes Simplex Virus I (HSV-1), Bovine Viral DiarrheaVirus(BVDV) and Polio Virus.50% Tissue Culture Infective Dose (TCID 50) and Reed-Muench Methods were used to titer the viruses. MB in two final concentration of 0.1 μM and 1 μM and illumination in about 627nm with red LED (Lamp Emitting Diode) for 15, 30, 45 and 60 minutes were used. Three replicates employed for each experiments. 1μMconcentration of MB showed more effective than 0.1μMin all designed illumination period for inactivation of HSV, VSV and BVDV. This method also demonstrated best results for enveloped model viruses. The most Log reduction for HSV, VSV and BVDV were6.28, 5.54 and 6.22, respectively. For HSV and BVDV inactivation, the best illumination period was 45 minutes. Model viruses showed sensitivity combination of MB and illumination using red LEDs. As results show this device could inactivate model viruses and reduce their titer very close to approved commercial devices, in compare.

  12. Membrane fusion-competent virus-like proteoliposomes and proteinaceous supported bilayers made directly from cell plasma membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, Deirdre A; Hsia, Chih-Yun; Millet, Jean K; Porri, Teresa; Daniel, Susan

    2013-05-28

    Virus-like particles are useful materials for studying virus-host interactions in a safe manner. However, the standard production of pseudovirus based on the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) backbone is an intricate procedure that requires trained laboratory personnel. In this work, a new strategy for creating virus-like proteoliposomes (VLPLs) and virus-like supported bilayers (VLSBs) is presented. This strategy uses a cell blebbing technique to induce the formation of nanoscale vesicles from the plasma membrane of BHK cells expressing the hemagglutinin (HA) fusion protein of influenza X-31. These vesicles and supported bilayers contain HA and are used to carry out single particle membrane fusion events, monitored using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. The results of these studies show that the VLPLs and VLSBs contain HA proteins that are fully competent to carry out membrane fusion, including the formation of a fusion pore and the release of fluorophores loaded into vesicles. This new strategy for creating spherical and planar geometry virus-like membranes has many potential applications. VLPLs could be used to study fusion proteins of virulent viruses in a safe manner, or they could be used as therapeutic delivery particles to transport beneficial proteins coexpressed in the cells to a target cell. VLSBs could facilitate high throughput screening of antiviral drugs or pathogen-host cell interactions.

  13. Inhibition of Lassa virus glycoprotein cleavage and multicycle replication by site 1 protease-adapted alpha(1-antitrypsin variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maisa

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Proteolytic processing of the Lassa virus envelope glycoprotein precursor GP-C by the host proprotein convertase site 1 protease (S1P is a prerequisite for the incorporation of the subunits GP-1 and GP-2 into viral particles and, hence, essential for infectivity and virus spread. Therefore, we tested in this study the concept of using S1P as a target to block efficient virus replication.We demonstrate that stable cell lines inducibly expressing S1P-adapted alpha(1-antitrypsin variants inhibit the proteolytic maturation of GP-C. Introduction of the S1P recognition motifs RRIL and RRLL into the reactive center loop of alpha(1-antitrypsin resulted in abrogation of GP-C processing by endogenous S1P to a similar level observed in S1P-deficient cells. Moreover, S1P-specific alpha(1-antitrypsins significantly inhibited replication and spread of a replication-competent recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus expressing the Lassa virus glycoprotein GP as well as authentic Lassa virus. Inhibition of viral replication correlated with the ability of the different alpha(1-antitrypsin variants to inhibit the processing of the Lassa virus glycoprotein precursor.Our data suggest that glycoprotein cleavage by S1P is a promising target for the development of novel anti-arenaviral strategies.

  14. Acute infection with venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles catalyzes a systemic antiviral state and protects from lethal virus challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konopka, Jennifer L; Thompson, Joseph M; Whitmore, Alan C; Webb, Drue L; Johnston, Robert E

    2009-12-01

    The host innate immune response provides a critical first line of defense against invading pathogens, inducing an antiviral state to impede the spread of infection. While numerous studies have documented antiviral responses within actively infected tissues, few have described the earliest innate response induced systemically by infection. Here, utilizing Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEE) replicon particles (VRP) to limit infection to the initially infected cells in vivo, a rapid activation of the antiviral response was demonstrated not only within the murine draining lymph node, where replication was confined, but also within distal tissues. In the liver and brain, expression of interferon-stimulated genes was detected by 1 to 3 h following VRP footpad inoculation, reaching peak expression of >100-fold over that in mock-infected animals. Moreover, mice receiving a VRP footpad inoculation 6, 12, or 24 h prior to an otherwise lethal VEE footpad challenge were completely protected from death, including a drastic reduction in challenge virus titers. VRP pretreatment also provided protection from intranasal VEE challenge and extended the average survival time following intracranial challenge. Signaling through the interferon receptor was necessary for antiviral gene induction and protection from VEE challenge. However, VRP pretreatment failed to protect mice from a heterologous, lethal challenge with vesicular stomatitis virus, yet conferred protection following challenge with influenza virus. Collectively, these results document a rapid modulation of the host innate response within hours of infection, capable of rapidly alerting the entire animal to pathogen invasion and leading to protection from viral disease.

  15. Allergic Stomatitis From Orthodontic Adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Mark R; Wong, Priscilla H; Dickson, Scott D; Coop, Christopher A

    2017-03-01

    We report a case of a type IV hypersensitivity reaction causing oral stomatitis, presumed to be the result of common dental adhesives. The case was diagnosed using patch testing to the dental adhesives that were used in the patient. Both of the adhesives tested contained a form of acrylate that is being seen more frequently in the literature as a cause of type IV hypersensitivity reactions. Metals can cause allergic reactions; however, other contact items need to be considered as a cause of oral allergic reactions. Cases of allergic stomatitis are rising and there is question if all-in-one adhesives may be contributing to this rise. Reprint & Copyright © 2017 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  16. Inactivation of viruses by pasteurization at 60 °C for 10 h with and without 40% glucose as stabilizer during a new manufacturing process of α2-Macroglobulin from Cohn Fraction IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huangfu, Chaoji; Ma, Yuyuan; Jia, Junting; Lv, Maomin; Zhu, Fengxuan; Ma, Xiaowei; Zhao, Xiong; Zhang, Jingang

    2017-03-01

    Pasteurization is regularly used to inactivate viruses for the safety of plasma derivatives. Influence of pasteurization at 60 °C for 10 h on α2-Macroglobulin activity and virus inactivation were studied. With 40% sugar as stabilizers more than 70% α2-Macroglobulin activity was reserved after pasteurization compared with 20% in control. Glucose presented a better activity protection effect than sucrose and maltose. By pasteurization without stabilizer the virus titers of pseudorabies virus, Sindbis virus, porcine parvovirus and encephalomyocarditis virus were reduced more than 5.88 log10, 7.50 log10, 4.88 log10, and 5.63 log10 respectively within 2 h. By pasteurization with 40% glucose vesicular stomatitis virus was inactivated more than 5.88 log10 within 1 h. Only 2.71 log10 reduction was achieved for encephalomyocarditis virus after 10 h. 40% glucose protected α2-M activity and viruses simultaneously from pasteurization. Other viral inactivation methods need to be incorporated to ensure viral safety of this manufacturing process of α2-Macroglobulin. Copyright © 2017 International Alliance for Biological Standardization. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. An Attempt to Partition Stomatal and Non-stomatal Ozone Deposition Parts on a Short Grassland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváth, L.; Koncz, P.; Móring, A.; Nagy, Z.; Pintér, K.; Weidinger, T.

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate the damaging effect of tropospheric ozone on vegetation, it is important to evaluate the stomatal uptake of ozone. Although the stomatal flux is a dominant pathway of ozone deposition onto vegetated surfaces, non-stomatal uptake mechanisms such as soil and cuticular deposition also play a vital role, especially when the leaf area index {LAI}model. We then derived the stomatal conductance of ozone using the Penman-Monteith (PM) theory based on the similarity to water vapour conductance. The non-stomatal conductance was calculated by subtracting the stomatal conductance from the canopy conductance derived from directly-measured fluxes. Our results show that for short vegetation (LAI = 0.25) dry deposition of ozone was dominated by the non-stomatal flux, which exceeded the stomatal flux even during the daytime. At night the stomatal uptake of ozone was found to be negligibly small. In the case of vegetation with {LAI}≈ 1 , the daytime stomatal and non-stomatal fluxes were of the same order of magnitude. These results emphasize that non-stomatal processes must be considered even in the case of well-developed vegetation where cuticular uptake is comparable in magnitude with stomatal uptake, and especially in the case of vegetated surfaces with {LAI}ozone deposition.

  18. 5-(Perylen-3-yl)ethynyl-arabino-uridine (aUY11), an arabino-based rigid amphipathic fusion inhibitor, targets virion envelope lipids to inhibit fusion of influenza virus, hepatitis C virus, and other enveloped viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colpitts, Che C; Ustinov, Alexey V; Epand, Raquel F; Epand, Richard M; Korshun, Vladimir A; Schang, Luis M

    2013-04-01

    Entry of enveloped viruses requires fusion of viral and cellular membranes. Fusion requires the formation of an intermediate stalk structure, in which only the outer leaflets are fused. The stalk structure, in turn, requires the lipid bilayer of the envelope to bend into negative curvature. This process is inhibited by enrichment in the outer leaflet of lipids with larger polar headgroups, which favor positive curvature. Accordingly, phospholipids with such shape inhibit viral fusion. We previously identified a compound, 5-(perylen-3-yl)ethynyl-2'-deoxy-uridine (dUY11), with overall shape and amphipathicity similar to those of these phospholipids. dUY11 inhibited the formation of the negative curvature necessary for stalk formation and the fusion of a model enveloped virus, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). We proposed that dUY11 acted by biophysical mechanisms as a result of its shape and amphipathicity. To test this model, we have now characterized the mechanisms against influenza virus and HCV of 5-(perylen-3-yl)ethynyl-arabino-uridine (aUY11), which has shape and amphipathicity similar to those of dUY11 but contains an arabino-nucleoside. aUY11 interacted with envelope lipids to inhibit the infectivity of influenza virus, hepatitis C virus (HCV), herpes simplex virus 1 and 2 (HSV-1/2), and other enveloped viruses. It specifically inhibited the fusion of influenza virus, HCV, VSV, and even protein-free liposomes to cells. Furthermore, aUY11 inhibited the formation of negative curvature in model lipid bilayers. In summary, the arabino-derived aUY11 and the deoxy-derived dUY11 act by the same antiviral mechanisms against several enveloped but otherwise unrelated viruses. Therefore, chemically unrelated compounds of appropriate shape and amphipathicity target virion envelope lipids to inhibit formation of the negative curvature required for fusion, inhibiting infectivity by biophysical, not biochemical, mechanisms.

  19. Protons Regulate Vesicular Glutamate Transporters through an Allosteric Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksen, Jacob; Chang, Roger; McGregor, Matt; Silm, Katlin; Suzuki, Toshiharu; Edwards, Robert H

    2016-05-18

    The quantal nature of synaptic transmission requires a mechanism to transport neurotransmitter into synaptic vesicles without promoting non-vesicular efflux across the plasma membrane. Indeed, the vesicular transport of most classical transmitters involves a mechanism of H(+) exchange, which restricts flux to acidic membranes such as synaptic vesicles. However, vesicular transport of the principal excitatory transmitter glutamate depends primarily on membrane potential, which would drive non-vesicular efflux, and the role of protons is unclear. Adapting electrophysiology to record currents associated with the vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs), we characterize a chloride conductance that is gated by lumenal protons and chloride and supports glutamate uptake. Rather than coupling stoichiometrically to glutamate flux, lumenal protons and chloride allosterically activate vesicular glutamate transport. Gating by protons serves to inhibit what would otherwise be substantial non-vesicular glutamate efflux at the plasma membrane, thereby restricting VGLUT activity to synaptic vesicles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Epizootic of vesicular disease in pigs caused by coxsackievirus B4 in the Soviet Union in 1975.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomakina, Natalia F; Shustova, Elena; Strizhakova, Olga M; Drexler, Felix; Lukashev, Alexander N

    2016-01-01

    Swine vesicular disease virus (SVDV) emerged around 1960 from a human enterovirus ancestor, coxsackievirus B5 (CVB5), and caused a series of epizootics in Europe and Asia. We characterized a coxsackievirus B4 strain that caused an epizootic involving 24 488 pigs in the Soviet Union in 1975. Phylogenetic evidence suggested that the swine virus emerged from a human ancestor between 1945 and 1975, almost simultaneously with the transfer of CVB5.

  1. Microtubule arrays and Arabidopsis stomatal development

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jessica R. Lucas; Jeanette A. Nadeau; Fred D. Sack

    Microtubule arrays in living cells were analysed during Arabidopsis stomatal development in order to more closely define stages in the pathway and contexts where intercellular signalling might operate...

  2. Neutralization-resistant variants of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus have altered virulence and tissue tropism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, C.H.; Winton, J.R.; Leong, J.C.

    1994-01-01

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is a rhabdovirus that causes an acute disease in salmon and trout. In this study, a correlation between changes in tissue tropism and specific changes in the virus genome appeared to be made by examining four IHNV neutralization-resistant variants (RB-1, RB-2, RB-3, and RB-4) that had been selected with the glycoprotein (G)-specific monoclonal antibody RB/B5. These variants were compared with the parental strain (RB-76) for their virulence and pathogenicity in rainbow trout after waterborne challenge. Variants RB-2, RB-3, and RB-4 were only slightly attenuated and showed distributions of viral antigen in the livers and hematopoietic tissues of infected fish similar to those of the parental strain. Variant RB-1, however, was highly attenuated and the tissue distribution of viral antigen in RB-1-infected fish was markedly different, with more viral antigen in brain tissue. The sequences of the G genes of all four variants and RB-76 were determined. No significant changes were found for the slightly attenuated variants, but RB-1 G had two changes at amino acids 78 and 218 that dramatically altered its predicted secondary structure. These changes are thought to be responsible for the altered tissue tropism of the virus. Thus, IHNV G, like that of rabies virus and vesicular stomatitis virus, plays an integral part in the pathogenesis of viral infection.

  3. Inactivation of RNA Viruses by Gamma Irradiation: A Study on Mitigating Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam J. Hume

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Effective inactivation of biosafety level 4 (BSL-4 pathogens is vital in order to study these agents safely. Gamma irradiation is a commonly used method for the inactivation of BSL-4 viruses, which among other advantages, facilitates the study of inactivated yet morphologically intact virions. The reported values for susceptibility of viruses to inactivation by gamma irradiation are sometimes inconsistent, likely due to differences in experimental protocols. We analyzed the effects of common sample attributes on the inactivation of a recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus expressing the Zaire ebolavirus glycoprotein and green fluorescent protein. Using this surrogate virus, we found that sample volume and protein content of the sample modulated viral inactivation by gamma irradiation but that air volume within the sample container and the addition of external disinfectant surrounding the sample did not. These data identify several factors which alter viral susceptibility to inactivation and highlight the usefulness of lower biosafety level surrogate viruses for such studies. Our results underscore the need to validate inactivation protocols of BSL-4 pathogens using “worst-case scenario” procedures to ensure complete sample inactivation.

  4. Amiodarone and metabolite MDEA inhibit Ebola virus infection by interfering with the viral entry process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salata, Cristiano; Baritussio, Aldo; Munegato, Denis; Calistri, Arianna; Ha, Huy Riem; Bigler, Laurent; Fabris, Fabrizio; Parolin, Cristina; Palù, Giorgio; Mirazimi, Ali

    2015-07-01

    Ebola virus disease (EVD) is one of the most lethal transmissible infections characterized by a high fatality rate, and a treatment has not been developed yet. Recently, it has been shown that cationic amphiphiles, among them the antiarrhythmic drug amiodarone, inhibit filovirus infection. In the present work, we investigated how amiodarone interferes with Ebola virus infection. Wild-type Sudan ebolavirus and recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus, pseudotyped with the Zaire ebolavirus glycoprotein, were used to gain further insight into the ability of amiodarone to affect Ebola virus infection. We show that amiodarone decreases Ebola virus infection at concentrations close to those found in the sera of patients treated for arrhythmias. The drug acts by interfering with the fusion of the viral envelope with the endosomal membrane. We also show that MDEA, the main amiodarone metabolite, contributes to the antiviral activity. Finally, studies with amiodarone analogues indicate that the antiviral activity is correlated with drug ability to accumulate into and interfere with the endocytic pathway. Considering that it is well tolerated, especially in the acute setting, amiodarone appears to deserve consideration for clinical use in EVD. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. 78 FR 77107 - Notice of Availability for Exclusive, Non-Exclusive, or Partially-Exclusive Licensing of an...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-20

    ... virus (VSV), and agricultural pathogen with limited therapeutic availability. Brenda S. Bowen, Army... of an Invention Concerning Therapeutic Peptides That Inhibit Rift Valley Fever Virus, Ebola Virus, Andes Virus and Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Infectivity, Compositions and Methods AGENCY: Department of...

  6. UVRAG is required for virus entry through combinatorial interaction with the class C-Vps complex and SNAREs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirooz, Sara Dolatshahi; He, Shanshan; Zhang, Tian; Zhang, Xiaowei; Zhao, Zhen; Oh, Soohwan; O'Connell, Douglas; Khalilzadeh, Payam; Amini-Bavil-Olyaee, Samad; Farzan, Michael; Liang, Chengyu

    2014-02-18

    Enveloped viruses exploit the endomembrane system to enter host cells. Through a cascade of membrane-trafficking events, virus-bearing vesicles fuse with acidic endosomes and/or lysosomes mediated by SNAREs triggering viral fusion. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this process remain elusive. Here, we found that UV-radiation resistance-associated gene (UVRAG), an autophagic tumor suppressor, is required for the entry of the prototypic negative-strand RNA virus, including influenza A virus and vesicular stomatitis virus, by a mechanism independent of IFN and autophagy. UVRAG mediates viral endocytic transport and membrane penetration through interactions with the class C vacuolar protein sorting (C-Vps) tethering complex and endosomal glutamine-containing SNAREs [syntaxin 7 (STX7), STX8, and vesicle transport through t-SNARE homolog 1B (Vti1b)], leading to the assembly of a fusogenic trans-SNARE complex involving vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP8), but not VAMP7. Indeed, UVRAG stimulates VAMP8 translocation to virus-bearing endosomes. Inhibition of VAMP8, but not VAMP7, significantly reduces viral entry. Our data indicate that UVRAG, in concert with C-Vps, regulates viral entry by assembling a specific fusogenic SNARE complex. Thus, UVRAG governs downstream viral entry, highlighting an important pathway capable of potential antiviral therapeutics.

  7. MEJORAMIENTO DE LA PRODUCCIÓN DE UNA VACUNA OLEOSA CONTRA ESTOMATITIS VESICULAR BIVALENTE

    OpenAIRE

    Arbeláez, Gustavo; Departamento de Microbiología, Facultad de Ciencias, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Cra. 7 Nº 43 - 82, Bogotá; Mondragón, Nestor; Empresa Colombiana de Productos Veterinarios Vecol S.A., Bogotá; Turriago, Clara; Empresa Colombiana de Productos Veterinarios Vecol S.A., Bogotá; Mora, Nelson; Empresa Colombiana de Productos Veterinarios Vecol S.A., Bogotá; Méndez, María; Empresa Colombiana de Productos Veterinarios Vecol S.A., Bogotá

    2008-01-01

    El presente estudio calculó diferentes MI (Multiplicidad de Infección) para la producción de cultivos industriales de virus de Estomatitis Vesicular (EV) y evaluó el efecto de la cantidad de glicoproteína G en la inducción de respuesta de anticuerpos neutralizantes contra el virus de EV en cobayos inmunizados con una vacuna oleosa bivalente (Indiana (I) y New Jersey (NJ)). Al establecer el MI más eficiente se logró mejorar la cinética de infección de los cultivos industriales disminuyendo los...

  8. Generation of VSV pseudotypes using recombinant ΔG-VSV for studies on virus entry, identification of entry inhibitors, and immune responses to vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitt, Michael A

    2010-11-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is a prototypic enveloped animal virus that has been used extensively to study virus entry, replication and assembly due to its broad host range and robust replication properties in a wide variety of mammalian and insect cells. Studies on VSV assembly led to the creation of a recombinant VSV in which the glycoprotein (G) gene was deleted. This recombinant (rVSV-ΔG) has been used to produce VSV pseudotypes containing the envelope glycoproteins of heterologous viruses, including viruses that require high-level biocontainment; however, because the infectivity of rVSV-ΔG pseudotypes is restricted to a single round of replication the analysis can be performed using biosafety level 2 (BSL-2) containment. As such, rVSV-ΔG pseudotypes have facilitated the analysis of virus entry for numerous viral pathogens without the need for specialized containment facilities. The pseudotypes also provide a robust platform to screen libraries for entry inhibitors and to evaluate the neutralizing antibody responses following vaccination. This manuscript describes methods to produce and titer rVSV-ΔG pseudotypes. Procedures to generate rVSV-ΔG stocks and to quantify virus infectivity are also described. These protocols should allow any laboratory knowledgeable in general virological and cell culture techniques to produce successfully replication-restricted rVSV-ΔG pseudotypes for subsequent analysis. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Identification of a vesicular aspartate transporter

    OpenAIRE

    Miyaji, Takaaki; Echigo, Noriko; Hiasa, Miki; Senoh, Shigenori; Omote, Hiroshi; Moriyama, Yoshinori

    2008-01-01

    Aspartate is an excitatory amino acid that is costored with glutamate in synaptic vesicles of hippocampal neurons and synaptic-like microvesicles (SLMVs) of pinealocytes and is exocytosed and stimulates neighboring cells by binding to specific cell receptors. Although evidence increasingly supports the occurrence of aspartergic neurotransmission, this process is still debated because the mechanism for the vesicular storage of aspartate is unknown. Here, we show that sialin, a lysosomal H+/sia...

  10. Chikungunya Virus Vaccines: Viral Vector-Based Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsauer, Katrin; Tangy, Frédéric

    2016-12-15

    In 2013, a major chikungunya virus (CHIKV) epidemic reached the Americas. In the past 2 years, >1.7 million people have been infected. In light of the current epidemic, with millions of people in North and South America at risk, efforts to rapidly develop effective vaccines have increased. Here, we focus on CHIKV vaccines that use viral-vector technologies. This group of vaccine candidates shares an ability to potently induce humoral and cellular immune responses by use of highly attenuated and safe vaccine backbones. So far, well-described vectors such as modified vaccinia virus Ankara, complex adenovirus, vesicular stomatitis virus, alphavirus-based chimeras, and measles vaccine Schwarz strain (MV/Schw) have been described as potential vaccines. We summarize here the recent data on these experimental vaccines, with a focus on the preclinical and clinical activities on the MV/Schw-based candidate, which is the first CHIKV-vectored vaccine that has completed a clinical trial. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Recent advances in the development of vaccines for Ebola virus disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohimain, Elijah Ige

    2016-01-04

    Ebola virus is one of the most dangerous microorganisms in the world causing hemorrhagic fevers in humans and non-human primates. Ebola virus (EBOV) is a zoonotic infection, which emerges and re-emerges in human populations. The 2014 outbreak was caused by the Zaire strain, which has a kill rate of up to 90%, though 40% was recorded in the current outbreak. The 2014 outbreak is larger than all 20 outbreaks that have occurred since 1976, when the virus was first discovered. It is the first time that the virus was sustained in urban centers and spread beyond Africa into Europe and USA. Thus far, over 22,000 cases have been reported with about 50% mortality in one year. There are currently no approved therapeutics and preventive vaccines against Ebola virus disease (EVD). Responding to the devastating effe1cts of the 2014 outbreak and the potential risk of global spread, has spurred research for the development of therapeutics and vaccines. This review is therefore aimed at presenting the progress of vaccine development. Results showed that conventional inactivated vaccines produced from EBOV by heat, formalin or gamma irradiation appear to be ineffective. However, novel vaccines production techniques have emerged leading to the production of candidate vaccines that have been demonstrated to be effective in preclinical trials using small animal and non-human primates (NHP) models. Some of the promising vaccines have undergone phase 1 clinical trials, which demonstrated their safety and immunogenicity. Many of the candidate vaccines are vector based such as Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV), Rabies Virus (RABV), Adenovirus (Ad), Modified Vaccinia Ankara (MVA), Cytomegalovirus (CMV), human parainfluenza virus type 3 (HPIV3) and Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus (VEEV). Other platforms include virus like particle (VLP), DNA and subunit vaccines. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Rapid Titration of Measles and Other Viruses: Optimization with Determination of Replication Cycle Length

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigorov, Boyan; Rabilloud, Jessica; Lawrence, Philip; Gerlier, Denis

    2011-01-01

    Background Measles virus (MV) is a member of the Paramyxoviridae family and an important human pathogen causing strong immunosuppression in affected individuals and a considerable number of deaths worldwide. Currently, measles is a re-emerging disease in developed countries. MV is usually quantified in infectious units as determined by limiting dilution and counting of plaque forming unit either directly (PFU method) or indirectly from random distribution in microwells (TCID50 method). Both methods are time-consuming (up to several days), cumbersome and, in the case of the PFU assay, possibly operator dependent. Methods/Findings A rapid, optimized, accurate, and reliable technique for titration of measles virus was developed based on the detection of virus infected cells by flow cytometry, single round of infection and titer calculation according to the Poisson's law. The kinetics follow up of the number of infected cells after infection with serial dilutions of a virus allowed estimation of the duration of the replication cycle, and consequently, the optimal infection time. The assay was set up to quantify measles virus, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) using antibody labeling of viral glycoprotein, virus encoded fluorescent reporter protein and an inducible fluorescent-reporter cell line, respectively. Conclusion Overall, performing the assay takes only 24–30 hours for MV strains, 12 hours for VSV, and 52 hours for HIV-1. The step-by-step procedure we have set up can be, in principle, applicable to accurately quantify any virus including lentiviral vectors, provided that a virus encoded gene product can be detected by flow cytometry. PMID:21915289

  13. Analysis of VSV pseudotype virus infection mediated by rubella virus envelope proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, Masafumi; Tani, Hideki; Anraku, Masaki; Kataoka, Michiyo; Nagata, Noriyo; Seki, Fumio; Tahara, Maino; Otsuki, Noriyuki; Okamoto, Kiyoko; Takeda, Makoto; Mori, Yoshio

    2017-09-14

    Rubella virus (RV) generally causes a systemic infection in humans. Viral cell tropism is a key determinant of viral pathogenesis, but the tropism of RV is currently poorly understood. We analyzed various human cell lines and determined that RV only establishes an infection efficiently in particular non-immune cell lines. To establish an infection the host cells must be susceptible and permissible. To assess the susceptibility of individual cell lines, we generated a pseudotype vesicular stomatitis virus bearing RV envelope proteins (VSV-RV/CE2E1). VSV-RV/CE2E1 entered cells in an RV envelope protein-dependent manner, and thus the infection was neutralized completely by an RV-specific antibody. The infection was Ca2+-dependent and inhibited by endosomal acidification inhibitors, further confirming the dependency on RV envelope proteins for the VSV-RV/CE2E1 infection. Human non-immune cell lines were mostly susceptible to VSV-RV/CE2E1, while immune cell lines were much less susceptible than non-immune cell lines. However, susceptibility of immune cells to VSV-RV/CE2E1 was increased upon stimulation of these cells. Our data therefore suggest that immune cells are generally less susceptible to RV infection than non-immune cells, but the susceptibility of immune cells is enhanced upon stimulation.

  14. Optimal stomatal behaviour around the world

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Yan-Shih; Medlyn, Belinda E.; Duursma, Remko A.

    2015-01-01

    , a globalscale database and an associated globally applicable model of gs that allow predictions of stomatal behaviour are lacking. Here,we present a database of globally distributed gs obtained in the field for a wide range of plant functional types (PFTs) and biomes. We find that stomatal behaviour diers among...

  15. Urban legends: recurrent aphthous stomatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccaglini, L; Lalla, R V; Bruce, A J; Sartori-Valinotti, J C; Latortue, M C; Carrozzo, M; Rogers, R S

    2011-11-01

    Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is the most common idiopathic intraoral ulcerative disease in the USA. Aphthae typically occur in apparently healthy individuals, although an association with certain systemic diseases has been reported. Despite the unclear etiopathogenesis, new drug trials are continuously conducted in an attempt to reduce pain and dysfunction. We investigated four controversial topics: (1) Is complex aphthosis a mild form of Behçet's disease (BD)? (2) Is periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and adenitis (PFAPA) syndrome a distinct medical entity? (3) Is RAS associated with other systemic diseases [e.g., celiac disease (CD) and B12 deficiency]? (4) Are there any new RAS treatments? Results from extensive literature searches, including a systematic review of RAS trials, suggested the following: (1) Complex aphthosis is not a mild form of BD in North America or Western Europe; (2) Diagnostic criteria for PFAPA have low specificity and the characteristics of the oral ulcers warrant further studies; (3) Oral ulcers may be associated with CD; however, these ulcers may not be RAS; RAS is rarely associated with B12 deficiency; nevertheless, B12 treatment may be beneficial, via mechanisms that warrant further study; (4) Thirty-three controlled trials published in the past 6 years reported some effectiveness, although potential for bias was high. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  16. Histopathological study of stomatitis nicotina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, C R; Kameswari, V R; Ramulu, C; Reddy, P G

    1971-09-01

    One hundred and thirteen biopsies of the palate in people accustomed to smoking cigars, most of them with the burning end of the cigar inside the mouth, have been studied.Thirty-eight of these showed mild to severe atypical changes in the epithelium. There were 19 lesions showing orthokeratosis and 53 showing hyperorthokeratosis.The earliest atypical change is seen in the mouths of the ducts of the glands.There were 3 cases showing microinvasive carcinomas.Pigmentation is a prominent feature in these cases.The papules with umbilication could be due to hyperplasia of the mucous glands.It is suggested that stomatitis nicotina occurring in men and women with the habit of reverse smoking is probably precancerous because of the presence of atypical changes in the epithelium and also the finding of 3 microinvasive carcinomas without any macroscopic evidence.There is no acceptable explanation why the soft palate escapes getting either stomatitis nicotina lesion or carcinoma in reverse smokers.

  17. Neonatal Mortality, Vesicular Lesions and Lameness Associated with Senecavirus A in a U.S. Sow Farm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canning, P; Canon, A; Bates, J L; Gerardy, K; Linhares, D C L; Piñeyro, P E; Schwartz, K J; Yoon, K J; Rademacher, C J; Holtkamp, D; Karriker, L

    2016-08-01

    A 300-sow farrow-to-finish swine operation in the United States experienced a sudden and severe increase in mortality in neonatal piglets with high morbidity followed by vesicular lesions on the snout and feet of adult females and males. Affected live piglets were submitted for diagnostic investigation. Samples tested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) negative for foot-and-mouth disease virus, porcine delta coronavirus, porcine epidemic diarrhoea virus, porcine rotavirus types A, B and C, transmissible gastroenteritis virus, and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus. Senecavirus A (SV-A) formerly known as Seneca Valley virus was detected by real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) from serum, skin and faeces of piglets and from serum and faeces of sows. SV-A was isolated in cell culture from piglet samples. SV-A VP1 gene region sequencing from piglet tissues was also successful. A biosecurity and disease entry evaluation was conducted and identified potential biosecurity risks factors for the entry of new pathogens into the operation. This is the first case report in the United States associating SV-A with a clinical course of severe but transient neonatal morbidity and mortality followed by vesicular lesions in breeding stock animals. Veterinarians and animal caretakers must remain vigilant for vesicular foreign animal diseases and report suspicious clinical signs and lesions to state animal health authorities for diagnostic testing and further investigation. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  18. Computational fitness landscape for all gene-order permutations of an RNA virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang-il Lim

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available How does the growth of a virus depend on the linear arrangement of genes in its genome? Answering this question may enhance our basic understanding of virus evolution and advance applications of viruses as live attenuated vaccines, gene-therapy vectors, or anti-tumor therapeutics. We used a mathematical model for vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV, a prototype RNA virus that encodes five genes (N-P-M-G-L, to simulate the intracellular growth of all 120 possible gene-order variants. Simulated yields of virus infection varied by 6,000-fold and were found to be most sensitive to gene-order permutations that increased levels of the L gene transcript or reduced levels of the N gene transcript, the lowest and highest expressed genes of the wild-type virus, respectively. Effects of gene order on virus growth also depended upon the host-cell environment, reflecting different resources for protein synthesis and different cell susceptibilities to infection. Moreover, by computationally deleting intergenic attenuations, which define a key mechanism of transcriptional regulation in VSV, the variation in growth associated with the 120 gene-order variants was drastically narrowed from 6,000- to 20-fold, and many variants produced higher progeny yields than wild-type. These results suggest that regulation by intergenic attenuation preceded or co-evolved with the fixation of the wild type gene order in the evolution of VSV. In summary, our models have begun to reveal how gene functions, gene regulation, and genomic organization of viruses interact with their host environments to define processes of viral growth and evolution.

  19. An unexpected inhibition of antiviral signaling by virus-encoded tumor suppressor p53 in pancreatic cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastie, Eric; Cataldi, Marcela; Steuerwald, Nury; Grdzelishvili, Valery Z.

    2015-01-01

    Virus-encoded tumor suppressor p53 transgene expression has been successfully used in vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and other oncolytic viruses (OVs) to enhance their anticancer activities. However, p53 is also known to inhibit virus replication via enhanced type I interferon (IFN) antiviral responses. To examine whether p53 transgenes enhance antiviral signaling in human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells, we engineered novel VSV recombinants encoding human p53 or the previously described chimeric p53-CC, which contains the coiled-coil (CC) domain from breakpoint cluster region (BCR) protein and evades the dominant-negative activities of endogenously expressed mutant p53. Contrary to an expected enhancement of antiviral signaling by p53, our global analysis of gene expression in PDAC cells showed that both p53 and p53-CC dramatically inhibited type I IFN responses. Our data suggest that this occurs through p53-mediated inhibition of the NF-κB pathway. Importantly, VSV-encoded p53 or p53-CC did not inhibit antiviral signaling in non-malignant human pancreatic ductal cells, which retain their resistance to all VSV recombinants. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of p53-mediated inhibition of antiviral signaling, and it suggests that OV-encoded p53 can simultaneously produce anticancer activities while assisting, rather than inhibiting, virus replication in cancer cells. PMID:25965802

  20. A fast and biocompatible living virus labeling method based on sialic acid-phenylboronic acid recognition system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Li-Li; Jin, Yong-Jie; Zhao, Dongxu; Yu, Chao; Hao, Jian; Xie, Hai-Yan

    2014-04-01

    The sialic acid (SA)-phenylboronic acid (PBA) recognition system is of particular interest in the bioconjugation field, because it is simple, fast, efficient, and biocompatible. In this paper, we report a novel method for reversibly labeling living virus with quantum dots (QDs) by taking advantage of this SA-PBA recognition system. The QDs were initially modified with PBA (QDs-PBA) to target them to the surface of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), which has abundant with SA on its envelope. The QDs-PBA was of good monodispersity and strong fluorescence, and could be conjugated with VSV by simply incubating with native VSV for 10 min at 37 °C, producing QDs-VSV that was capable of being imaged at the single virion level. The labeling efficiency attained 83 ± 4.3 % (mean ± SD); meanwhile, the activity and recognition ability of the labeled virus were minimally affected. This method was simple, rapid, and reversible. This work promotes the virus labeling development to a new step. That is, native viruses can be reversibly labeled without any modification.

  1. An unexpected inhibition of antiviral signaling by virus-encoded tumor suppressor p53 in pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastie, Eric; Cataldi, Marcela; Steuerwald, Nury; Grdzelishvili, Valery Z

    2015-09-01

    Virus-encoded tumor suppressor p53 transgene expression has been successfully used in vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and other oncolytic viruses (OVs) to enhance their anticancer activities. However, p53 is also known to inhibit virus replication via enhanced type I interferon (IFN) antiviral responses. To examine whether p53 transgenes enhance antiviral signaling in human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells, we engineered novel VSV recombinants encoding human p53 or the previously described chimeric p53-CC, which contains the coiled-coil (CC) domain from breakpoint cluster region (BCR) protein and evades the dominant-negative activities of endogenously expressed mutant p53. Contrary to an expected enhancement of antiviral signaling by p53, our global analysis of gene expression in PDAC cells showed that both p53 and p53-CC dramatically inhibited type I IFN responses. Our data suggest that this occurs through p53-mediated inhibition of the NF-κB pathway. Importantly, VSV-encoded p53 or p53-CC did not inhibit antiviral signaling in non-malignant human pancreatic ductal cells, which retained their resistance to all tested VSV recombinants. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of p53-mediated inhibition of antiviral signaling, and it suggests that OV-encoded p53 can simultaneously produce anticancer activities while assisting, rather than inhibiting, virus replication in cancer cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Uptake of rabies virus into epithelial cells by clathrin-mediated endocytosis depends upon actin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccinotti, Silvia; Kirchhausen, Tomas; Whelan, Sean P J

    2013-11-01

    Rabies virus (RABV) causes a fatal zoonotic encephalitis. Disease symptoms require replication and spread of the virus within neuronal cells; however, in infected animals as well as in cell culture the virus replicates in a broad range of cell types. Here we use a single-cycle RABV and a recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (rVSV) in which the glycoprotein (G) was replaced with that of RABV (rVSV RABV G) to examine RABV uptake into the African green monkey kidney cell line BS-C-1. Combining biochemical studies and real-time spinning-disk confocal fluorescence microscopy, we show that the predominant entry pathway of RABV particles into BS-C-1 cells is clathrin dependent. Viral particles enter cells in pits with elongated structures and incomplete clathrin coats which depend upon actin to complete the internalization process. By measuring the time of internalization and the abundance of the clathrin adaptor protein AP2, we further show that the pits that internalize RABV particles are similar to those that internalize VSV particles. Pharmacological perturbations of dynamin or of actin polymerization inhibit productive infection, linking our observations on particle uptake with viral infectivity. This work extends to RABV particles the finding that clathrin-mediated endocytosis of rhabdoviruses proceeds through incompletely coated pits which depend upon actin.

  3. Structure of a trimeric variant of the Epstein-Barr virus glycoprotein B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backovic, Marija [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Longnecker, Richard [Northwestern Univ., Chicago, IL (United States); Jardetzky, Theodore S [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    2009-03-16

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a herpesvirus that is associated with development of malignancies of lymphoid tissue. EBV infections are life-long and occur in >90% of the population. Herpesviruses enter host cells in a process that involves fusion of viral and cellular membranes. The fusion apparatus is comprised of envelope glycoprotein B (gB) and a heterodimeric complex made of glycoproteins H and L. Glycoprotein B is the most conserved envelope glycoprotein in human herpesviruses, and the structure of gB from Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is available. Here, we report the crystal structure of the secreted EBV gB ectodomain, which forms 16-nm long spike-like trimers, structurally homologous to the postfusion trimers of the fusion protein G of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). Comparative structural analyses of EBV gB and VSV G, which has been solved in its pre and postfusion states, shed light on gB residues that may be involved in conformational changes and membrane fusion. Also, the EBV gB structure reveals that, despite the high sequence conservation of gB in herpesviruses, the relative orientations of individual domains, the surface charge distributions, and the structural details of EBV gB differ from the HSV-1 protein, indicating regions and residues that may have important roles in virus-specific entry.

  4. Antiviral activity of Petiveria alliacea against the bovine viral diarrhea virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffa, M J; Perusina, M; Alfonso, V; Wagner, M L; Suriano, M; Vicente, C; Campos, R; Cavallaro, L

    2002-07-01

    Natural products are a relevant source of antiviral drugs. Five medicinal plants used in Argentina have been assayed to detect inhibition of viral growth. Antiviral activity of the infusions and methanolic extracts of Aristolochia macroura, Celtis spinosa, Plantago major, Schinus areira, Petiveria alliacea and four extracts obtained from the leaves and stems of the last plant were evaluated by the plaque assay. P. alliacea, unlike A. macroura, C. spinosa, P. major and S. areira, inhibited bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) replication. Neither P. alliacea nor the assays of the other plants were active against herpes simplex virus type 1, poliovirus type 1, adenovirus serotype 7 and vesicular stomatitis virus type 1. Four extracts of P. alliacea were assayed to detect anti-BVDV activity. Ethyl acetate (EC(50) of 25 microg/ml) and dichloromethane (EC(50) of 43 microg/ml) extracts were active; moreover, promising SI (IC(50)/EC(50)) values were obtained. BVDV is highly prevalent in the cattle population, there are no antiviral compounds available; additionally, it is a viral model of the hepatitis C virus. For these reasons and in view of the results obtained, the isolation and characterization of the antiviral components present in the P. alliacea extracts is worth carrying out in the future. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  5. Antagonism of the Sodium-Potassium ATPase Impairs Chikungunya Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison W. Ashbrook

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Chikungunya virus (CHIKV is a reemerging alphavirus that has caused epidemics of fever, arthralgia, and rash worldwide. There are currently no licensed vaccines or antiviral therapies available for the prevention or treatment of CHIKV disease. We conducted a high-throughput, chemical compound screen that identified digoxin, a cardiac glycoside that blocks the sodium-potassium ATPase, as a potent inhibitor of CHIKV infection. Treatment of human cells with digoxin or a related cardiac glycoside, ouabain, resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in infection by CHIKV. Inhibition by digoxin was cell type-specific, as digoxin treatment of either murine or mosquito cells did not diminish CHIKV infection. Digoxin displayed antiviral activity against other alphaviruses, including Ross River virus and Sindbis virus, as well as mammalian reovirus and vesicular stomatitis virus. The digoxin-mediated block to CHIKV and reovirus infection occurred at one or more postentry steps, as digoxin inhibition was not bypassed by fusion of CHIKV at the plasma membrane or infection with cell surface-penetrating reovirus entry intermediates. Selection of digoxin-resistant CHIKV variants identified multiple mutations in the nonstructural proteins required for replication complex formation and synthesis of viral RNA. These data suggest a role for the sodium-potassium ATPase in promoting postentry steps of CHIKV replication and provide rationale for modulation of this pathway as a broad-spectrum antiviral strategy.

  6. Partial Protection against Porcine Influenza A Virus by a Hemagglutinin-Expressing Virus Replicon Particle Vaccine in the Absence of Neutralizing Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricklin, Meret E; Vielle, Nathalie J; Python, Sylvie; Brechbühl, Daniel; Zumkehr, Beatrice; Posthaus, Horst; Zimmer, Gert; Summerfield, Artur

    2016-01-01

    This work was initiated by previous reports demonstrating that mismatched influenza A virus (IAV) vaccines can induce enhanced disease, probably mediated by antibodies. Our aim was, therefore, to investigate if a vaccine inducing opsonizing but not neutralizing antibodies against the hemagglutinin (HA) of a selected heterologous challenge virus would enhance disease or induce protective immune responses in the pig model. To this end, we immunized pigs with either whole inactivated virus (WIV)-vaccine or HA-expressing virus replicon particles (VRP) vaccine based on recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). Both types of vaccines induced virus neutralizing and opsonizing antibodies against homologous virus as shown by a highly sensitive plasmacytoid dendritic cell-based opsonization assay. Opsonizing antibodies showed a broader reactivity against heterologous IAV compared with neutralizing antibodies. Pigs immunized with HA-recombinant VRP vaccine were partially protected from infection with a mismatched IAV, which was not neutralized but opsonized by the immune sera. The VRP vaccine reduced lung lesions, lung inflammatory cytokine responses, serum IFN-α responses, and viral loads in the airways. Only the VRP vaccine was able to prime IAV-specific IFNγ/TNFα dual secreting CD4(+) T cells detectable in the peripheral blood. In summary, this work demonstrates that with the virus pair selected, a WIV vaccine inducing opsonizing antibodies against HA which lack neutralizing activity, is neither protective nor does it induce enhanced disease in pigs. In contrast, VRP-expressing HA is efficacious vaccines in swine as they induced both potent antibodies and T-cell immunity resulting in a broader protective value.

  7. Stomatal conductance increases with rising temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Josef; Ingwers, Miles; McGuire, Mary Anne; Teskey, Robert O

    2017-08-03

    Stomatal conductance directly modifies plant water relations and photosynthesis. Many environmental factors affecting the stomatal conductance have been intensively studied but temperature has been largely neglected, even though it is one of the fastest changing environmental variables and it is rising due to climate change. In this study, we describe how stomata open when the temperature increases. Stomatal conductance increased by ca 40% in a broadleaf and a coniferous species, poplar (Populus deltoides x nigra) and loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) when temperature was increased by 10 °C, from 30 °C to 40 °C at a constant vapor pressure deficit of 1 kPa. The mechanism of regulating stomatal conductance by temperature was, at least partly, independent of other known mechanisms linked to water status and carbon metabolism. Stomatal conductance increased with rising temperature despite the decrease in leaf water potential, increase in transpiration, increase in intercellular CO2 concentration and was decoupled from photosynthesis. Increase in xylem and mesophyll hydraulic conductance coming from lower water viscosity may to some degree explain temperature dependent opening of stomata. The direct stomatal response to temperature allows plants to benefit from increased evaporative cooling during the heat waves and from lower stomatal limitations to photosynthesis but they may be jeopardized by faster depletion of soil water.

  8. Comparison of Heterologous Prime-Boost Strategies against Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Gag Using Negative Stranded RNA Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Tessa M; Wanjalla, Celestine N; Gomme, Emily A; Wirblich, Christoph; Gatt, Anthony; Carnero, Elena; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Lyles, Douglas S; McGettigan, James P; Schnell, Matthias J

    2013-01-01

    This study analyzed a heterologous prime-boost vaccine approach against HIV-1 using three different antigenically unrelated negative-stranded viruses (NSV) expressing HIV-1 Gag as vaccine vectors: rabies virus (RABV), vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and Newcastle disease virus (NDV). We hypothesized that this approach would result in more robust cellular immune responses than those achieved with the use of any of the vaccines alone in a homologous prime-boost regimen. To this end, we primed BALB/c mice with each of the NSV-based vectors. Primed mice were rested for thirty-five days after which we administered a second immunization with the same or heterologous NSV-Gag viruses. The magnitude and quality of the Gag-specific CD8(+) T cells in response to these vectors post boost were measured. In addition, we performed challenge experiments using vaccinia virus expressing HIV-1 Gag (VV-Gag) thirty-three days after the boost inoculation. Our results showed that the choice of the vaccine used for priming was important for the detected Gag-specific CD8(+) T cell recall responses post boost and that NDV-Gag appeared to result in a more robust recall of CD8(+) T cell responses independent of the prime vaccine used. However, the different prime-boost strategies were not distinct for the parameters studied in the challenge experiments using VV-Gag but did indicate some benefits compared to single immunizations. Taken together, our data show that NSV vectors can individually stimulate HIV-Gag specific CD8(+) T cells that are effectively recalled by other NSV vectors in a heterologous prime-boost approach. These results provide evidence that RABV, VSV and NDV can be used in combination to develop vaccines needing prime-boost regimens to stimulate effective immune responses.

  9. Comparison of Heterologous Prime-Boost Strategies against Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Gag Using Negative Stranded RNA Viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tessa M Lawrence

    Full Text Available This study analyzed a heterologous prime-boost vaccine approach against HIV-1 using three different antigenically unrelated negative-stranded viruses (NSV expressing HIV-1 Gag as vaccine vectors: rabies virus (RABV, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV and Newcastle disease virus (NDV. We hypothesized that this approach would result in more robust cellular immune responses than those achieved with the use of any of the vaccines alone in a homologous prime-boost regimen. To this end, we primed BALB/c mice with each of the NSV-based vectors. Primed mice were rested for thirty-five days after which we administered a second immunization with the same or heterologous NSV-Gag viruses. The magnitude and quality of the Gag-specific CD8(+ T cells in response to these vectors post boost were measured. In addition, we performed challenge experiments using vaccinia virus expressing HIV-1 Gag (VV-Gag thirty-three days after the boost inoculation. Our results showed that the choice of the vaccine used for priming was important for the detected Gag-specific CD8(+ T cell recall responses post boost and that NDV-Gag appeared to result in a more robust recall of CD8(+ T cell responses independent of the prime vaccine used. However, the different prime-boost strategies were not distinct for the parameters studied in the challenge experiments using VV-Gag but did indicate some benefits compared to single immunizations. Taken together, our data show that NSV vectors can individually stimulate HIV-Gag specific CD8(+ T cells that are effectively recalled by other NSV vectors in a heterologous prime-boost approach. These results provide evidence that RABV, VSV and NDV can be used in combination to develop vaccines needing prime-boost regimens to stimulate effective immune responses.

  10. Identification of a vesicular aspartate transporter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyaji, Takaaki; Echigo, Noriko; Hiasa, Miki; Senoh, Shigenori; Omote, Hiroshi; Moriyama, Yoshinori

    2008-01-01

    Aspartate is an excitatory amino acid that is costored with glutamate in synaptic vesicles of hippocampal neurons and synaptic-like microvesicles (SLMVs) of pinealocytes and is exocytosed and stimulates neighboring cells by binding to specific cell receptors. Although evidence increasingly supports the occurrence of aspartergic neurotransmission, this process is still debated because the mechanism for the vesicular storage of aspartate is unknown. Here, we show that sialin, a lysosomal H+/sialic acid cotransporter, is present in hippocampal synaptic vesicles and pineal SLMVs. RNA interference of sialin expression decreased exocytosis of aspartate and glutamate in pinealocytes. Proteoliposomes containing purified sialin actively accumulated aspartate and glutamate to a similar extent when inside positive membrane potential is imposed as the driving force. Sialin carrying a mutation found in people suffering from Salla disease (R39C) was completely devoid of aspartate and glutamate transport activity, although it retained appreciable H+/sialic acid cotransport activity. These results strongly suggest that sialin possesses dual physiological functions and acts as a vesicular aspartate/glutamate transporter. It is possible that people with Salla disease lose aspartergic (and also the associated glutamatergic) neurotransmission, and this could provide an explanation for why Salla disease causes severe neurological defects. PMID:18695252

  11. Suramin is a potent inhibitor of Chikungunya and Ebola virus cell entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henß, Lisa; Beck, Simon; Weidner, Tatjana; Biedenkopf, Nadine; Sliva, Katja; Weber, Christopher; Becker, Stephan; Schnierle, Barbara S

    2016-08-31

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-transmitted alphavirus that causes high fever, rash, and recurrent arthritis in humans. It has efficiently adapted to Aedes albopictus, which also inhabits temperate regions and currently causes large outbreaks in the Caribbean and Latin America. Ebola virus (EBOV) is a member of the filovirus family. It causes the Ebola virus disease (EDV), formerly known as Ebola hemorrhagic fever in humans and has a mortality rate of up to 70 %. The last outbreak in Western Africa was the largest in history and has caused approximately 25,000 cases and 10,000 deaths. For both viral infections no specific treatment or licensed vaccine is currently available. The bis-hexasulfonated naphthylurea, suramin, is used as a treatment for trypanosome-caused African river blindness. As a competitive inhibitor of heparin, suramin has been described to have anti-viral activity. We tested the activity of suramin during CHIKV or Ebola virus infection, using CHIKV and Ebola envelope glycoprotein pseudotyped lentiviral vectors and wild-type CHIKV and Ebola virus. Suramin efficiently inhibited CHIKV and Ebola envelope-mediated gene transfer while vesicular stomatitis virus G protein pseudotyped vectors were only marginally affected. In addition, suramin was able to inhibit wild-type CHIKV and Ebola virus replication in vitro. Inhibition occurred at early time points during CHIKV infection. Suramin, also known as Germanin or Bayer-205, is a market-authorized drug, however shows significant side effects, which probably prevents its use as a CHIKV drug, but due to the high lethality of Ebola virus infections, suramin might be valuable against Ebola infections.

  12. TREATMENT OF APHTHOUS STOMATITIS IN ADOLESCENTS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    L. M. Kozlova; O. A. Zorina; N. B. Petrukhina

    2014-01-01

    ...) has been in use in clinical practice for years. The study was aimed at comparing the clinical efficacy of the drug based on the listed active substances and other stomatological agents in adolescents with aphthous stomatitis. Results...

  13. Windows of opportunity for Ebola virus infection treatment and vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Van Kinh; Hernandez-Vargas, Esteban A

    2017-08-21

    Ebola virus (EBOV) infection causes a high death toll, killing a high proportion of EBOV-infected patients within 7 days. Comprehensive data on EBOV infection are fragmented, hampering efforts in developing therapeutics and vaccines against EBOV. Under this circumstance, mathematical models become valuable resources to explore potential controlling strategies. In this paper, we employed experimental data of EBOV-infected nonhuman primates (NHPs) to construct a mathematical framework for determining windows of opportunity for treatment and vaccination. Considering a prophylactic vaccine based on recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus expressing the EBOV glycoprotein (rVSV-EBOV), vaccination could be protective if a subject is vaccinated during a period from one week to four months before infection. For the case of a therapeutic vaccine based on monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), a single dose might resolve the invasive EBOV replication even if it was administrated as late as four days after infection. Our mathematical models can be used as building blocks for evaluating therapeutic and vaccine modalities as well as for evaluating public health intervention strategies in outbreaks. Future laboratory experiments will help to validate and refine the estimates of the windows of opportunity proposed here.

  14. Relating Stomatal Conductance to Leaf Functional Traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kröber, Wenzel; Plath, Isa; Heklau, Heike; Bruelheide, Helge

    2015-10-12

    Leaf functional traits are important because they reflect physiological functions, such as transpiration and carbon assimilation. In particular, morphological leaf traits have the potential to summarize plants strategies in terms of water use efficiency, growth pattern and nutrient use. The leaf economics spectrum (LES) is a recognized framework in functional plant ecology and reflects a gradient of increasing specific leaf area (SLA), leaf nitrogen, phosphorus and cation content, and decreasing leaf dry matter content (LDMC) and carbon nitrogen ratio (CN). The LES describes different strategies ranging from that of short-lived leaves with high photosynthetic capacity per leaf mass to long-lived leaves with low mass-based carbon assimilation rates. However, traits that are not included in the LES might provide additional information on the species' physiology, such as those related to stomatal control. Protocols are presented for a wide range of leaf functional traits, including traits of the LES, but also traits that are independent of the LES. In particular, a new method is introduced that relates the plants' regulatory behavior in stomatal conductance to vapor pressure deficit. The resulting parameters of stomatal regulation can then be compared to the LES and other plant functional traits. The results show that functional leaf traits of the LES were also valid predictors for the parameters of stomatal regulation. For example, leaf carbon concentration was positively related to the vapor pressure deficit (vpd) at the point of inflection and the maximum of the conductance-vpd curve. However, traits that are not included in the LES added information in explaining parameters of stomatal control: the vpd at the point of inflection of the conductance-vpd curve was lower for species with higher stomatal density and higher stomatal index. Overall, stomata and vein traits were more powerful predictors for explaining stomatal regulation than traits used in the LES.

  15. Oncolytic potency of HER-2 retargeted VSV-FH hybrid viruses: the role of receptor ligand affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala Breton, Camilo; Wikan, Nitwara; Abbuhl, Arinda; Smith, Duncan R; Russell, Stephen J; Peng, Kah-Whye

    2015-01-01

    The hybrid oncolytic vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV-FH) deleted for its G glycoprotein and displaying the measles virus (MV) envelope glycoproteins (hemagglutinin H and fusion F) is fusogenic, infects cells via any of the three MV receptors and has potent oncolytic activity against subcutaneous and disseminated myeloma tumors. To tailor VSV-FH as an oncolytic virus for ovarian cancer, we ablated its natural tropism and retargeted the virus by display of a single-chain antibody (scFv) with specificity to the HER-2/neu receptor. A panel of six VSVFH-αHER2 viruses displaying anti-HER2 scFv that bind to the same HER2 epitope but with different K d (10(-6) to 10(-11) M, VSVFH-αHER2#6 to #11, respectively) were rescued and characterized. A K d of at least 10(-8) M is required for infection of HER-2 positive SKOV3ip.1 cells. The higher affinity viruses (>10(-8) M) were able to infect and fuse SKOV3ip.1 cells more efficiently, inducing more extensive cytopathic effects. We next compared the antitumor potency of the viruses against SKOV3ip.1 tumor xenografts. In contrast to the saline-treated animals, one intratumoral injection of VSVFH-αHER2#9, #10, or #11 resulted in efficient tumor control. There was no significant difference between viruses with an affinity higher than 10(-9) M in terms of oncolytic potency. VSVFH-αHER2 virus may be a promising agent for the treatment of HER-2 positive malignancies.

  16. Vaccination with recombinant RNA replicon particles protects chickens from H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbherr, Stefan J; Brostoff, Terza; Tippenhauer, Merve; Locher, Samira; Berger Rentsch, Marianne; Zimmer, Gert

    2013-01-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAIV) of subtype H5N1 not only cause a devastating disease in domestic chickens and turkeys but also pose a continuous threat to public health. In some countries, H5N1 viruses continue to circulate and evolve into new clades and subclades. The rapid evolution of these viruses represents a problem for virus diagnosis and control. In this work, recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) vectors expressing HA of subtype H5 were generated. To comply with biosafety issues the G gene was deleted from the VSV genome. The resulting vaccine vector VSV*ΔG(HA) was propagated on helper cells providing the VSV G protein in trans. Vaccination of chickens with a single intramuscular dose of 2×10⁸ infectious replicon particles without adjuvant conferred complete protection from lethal H5N1 infection. Subsequent application of the same vaccine strongly boosted the humoral immune response and completely prevented shedding of challenge virus and transmission to sentinel birds. The vaccine allowed serological differentiation of infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA) by employing a commercially available ELISA. Immunized chickens produced antibodies with neutralizing activity against multiple H5 viruses representing clades 1, 2.2, 2.5, and low-pathogenic avian influenza viruses (classical clade). Studies using chimeric H1/H5 hemagglutinins showed that the neutralizing activity was predominantly directed against the globular head domain. In summary, these results suggest that VSV replicon particles are safe and potent DIVA vaccines that may help to control avian influenza viruses in domestic poultry.

  17. Vaccination with recombinant RNA replicon particles protects chickens from H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan J Halbherr

    Full Text Available Highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAIV of subtype H5N1 not only cause a devastating disease in domestic chickens and turkeys but also pose a continuous threat to public health. In some countries, H5N1 viruses continue to circulate and evolve into new clades and subclades. The rapid evolution of these viruses represents a problem for virus diagnosis and control. In this work, recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV vectors expressing HA of subtype H5 were generated. To comply with biosafety issues the G gene was deleted from the VSV genome. The resulting vaccine vector VSV*ΔG(HA was propagated on helper cells providing the VSV G protein in trans. Vaccination of chickens with a single intramuscular dose of 2×10⁸ infectious replicon particles without adjuvant conferred complete protection from lethal H5N1 infection. Subsequent application of the same vaccine strongly boosted the humoral immune response and completely prevented shedding of challenge virus and transmission to sentinel birds. The vaccine allowed serological differentiation of infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA by employing a commercially available ELISA. Immunized chickens produced antibodies with neutralizing activity against multiple H5 viruses representing clades 1, 2.2, 2.5, and low-pathogenic avian influenza viruses (classical clade. Studies using chimeric H1/H5 hemagglutinins showed that the neutralizing activity was predominantly directed against the globular head domain. In summary, these results suggest that VSV replicon particles are safe and potent DIVA vaccines that may help to control avian influenza viruses in domestic poultry.

  18. Genome rearrangement affects RNA virus adaptability on prostate cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kendra ePesko

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Gene order is often highly conserved within taxonomic groups, such that organisms with rearranged genomes tend to be less fit than wildtype gene orders, and suggesting natural selection favors genome architectures that maximize fitness. But it is unclear whether rearranged genomes hinder adaptability: capacity to evolutionarily improve in a new environment. Negative-sense nonsegmented RNA viruses (order Mononegavirales have specific genome architecture: 3′ UTR – core protein genes – envelope protein genes – RNA-dependent RNA-polymerase gene – 5′ UTR. To test how genome architecture affects RNA virus evolution, we examined vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV variants with the nucleocapsid (N gene moved sequentially downstream in the genome. Because RNA polymerase stuttering in VSV replication causes greater mRNA production in upstream genes, N-gene translocation towards the 5’ end leads to stepwise decreases in N transcription, viral replication and progeny production, and also impacts the activation of type 1 interferon mediated antiviral responses. We evolved VSV gene-order variants in two prostate cancer cell lines: LNCap cells deficient in innate immune response to viral infection, and PC3 cells that mount an IFN stimulated anti-viral response to infection. We observed that gene order affects phenotypic adaptability (reproductive growth; viral suppression of immune function, especially on PC3 cells that strongly select against virus infection. Overall, populations derived from the least-fit ancestor (most-altered N position architecture adapted fastest, consistent with theory predicting populations with low initial fitness should improve faster in evolutionary time. Also, we observed correlated responses to selection, where viruses improved across both hosts, rather than suffer fitness trade-offs on unselected hosts. Whole genomics revealed multiple mutations in evolved variants, some of which were conserved across selective

  19. AIDS and Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miziara, Ivan Dieb; Araujo Filho, Bernardo Cunha; Weber, Raimar

    2005-01-01

    The immunodeficiency state in HIV infected patients has been the cause of severe episodes of Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis (RAS). Our study aims to establish correlation between the manifestations of RAS and the immunosuppression state caused by HIV infection, through counting of CD4+ cells, CD8+ cells, CD4+:CD8+ cells ratio and viral load. Series study. Ninety-four HIV infected patients (25 women and 69 men) with RAS were evaluated in the ENT Department of the University of Sao Paulo-Medical School from January 1998 to December 2003. The age ranged between 19 and 63 years (mean = 35.3 years). The patients were divided in two groups: AIDS group and HIV infected group. The patients with AIDS and HIV infection presented, respectively, eight ulcers and two ulcers by outbreaks. Similarly, patients with major RAS presented smaller counting of cells CD8+, CD4+ and CD4+/CD8+ cells, and higher mean value of viral load than the patients with herpetiform and minor RAS. Between patients with minor and herpetiform RAS there were no statistical differences. The emergence of the lesions, mainly in major RAS, is directly related to the immunological state of the HIV infected patient. These patients frequently present nutritional deficits and worsening in life style. Thus, diagnosis and treatment of RAS is a challenge that should not be neglected.

  20. Human antibody repertoire after VSV-Ebola vaccination identifies novel targets and virus-neutralizing IgM antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurana, Surender; Fuentes, Sandra; Coyle, Elizabeth M; Ravichandran, Supriya; Davey, Richard T; Beigel, John H

    2016-12-01

    Development of an effective vaccine against Ebola virus is of high priority. However, knowledge about potential correlates of protection and the durability of immune response after vaccination is limited. Here, we elucidate the human antibody repertoire after administration of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-Ebola vaccine at 3 million, 20 million and 100 million plaque-forming units (PFU) and homologous VSV-Ebola vaccine boost in healthy adult volunteers. Whole genome-fragment phage display libraries, expressing linear and conformational epitopes of Ebola glycoprotein (GP), showed higher diversity of antibody epitopes in individuals vaccinated with 20 million PFU than in those vaccinated with 3 million or 100 million PFU. Surface plasmon resonance kinetics showed higher levels of GP-binding antibodies after a single vaccination with 20 million or 100 million PFU than with 3 million PFU, and these correlated strongly with neutralization titers. A second vaccination did not boost antibody or virus neutralization titers, which declined rapidly, and induced only minimal antibody affinity maturation. Isotype analysis revealed a predominant IgM response even after the second vaccination, which contributed substantially to virus neutralization in vitro. These findings may help identify new vaccine targets and aid development and evaluation of effective countermeasures against Ebola.

  1. Effect of rutin on virus inactivation by AMT in combination with ultraviolet-A irradiation in platelet concentrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Yoshiko; Abe, Hideki; Ikebuchi, Kenji; Sekiguchi, Sadayoshi [Hokkaido Red Cross Blood Center, Sapporo (Japan)

    1999-10-01

    Treatment with psoralens and ultraviolet-A (UVA) irradiation have been found to be effective for virus sterilization of platelet concentrates (PCs). We report here a virus inactivation method using a combination of psoralen derivative 4'-aminomethyl-4,5', 8-trimethylpsoralen (AMT) and UVA irradiation (AMT/UVA). Further, we also investigated the effect of rutin, a radical scavenger, on the inactivation of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) as a model virus administered in PCs and platelet functions were investigated. Spiked VSV (about 5log{sub 10}) in PCs was inactivated by a combination of AMT (50 {mu}g/ml) and 5.2 J/cm{sup 2} UVA irradiation in the absence of rutin. To obtain equivalent levels of VSV kill in the presence of 0.35 mM rutin, treatment with 13.0 J/cm{sup 2} of UVA irradiation with AMT was performed. When PCs were treated under each condition in which 5log{sub 10} VSV was inactivated by AMT/UVA with or without rutin, platelet aggregation function was maintained for more than 80% of untreated platelets. These findings indicate that the presence of rutin during AMT/UVA treatment conferred no beneficial effect. In addition, overnight storage of PCs with AMT induced 40% loss of platelet aggregation in response to 10{mu}M ADP. The findings suggest that UVA irradiation is required immediately after the addition of AMT. (author)

  2. Identification of host factors involved in borna disease virus cell entry through a small interfering RNA functional genetic screen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemente, Roberto; Sisman, Eugene; Aza-Blanc, Pedro; de la Torre, Juan C

    2010-04-01

    Borna disease virus (BDV), the prototypic member of the Bornaviridae family, within the order Mononegavirales, is highly neurotropic and constitutes an important model system for the study of viral persistence in the central nervous system (CNS) and associated disorders. The virus surface glycoprotein (G) has been shown to direct BDV cell entry via receptor-mediated endocytosis, but the mechanisms governing cell tropism and propagation of BDV within the CNS are unknown. We developed a small interfering RNA (siRNA)-based screening to identify cellular genes and pathways that specifically contribute to BDV G-mediated cell entry. Our screen relied on silencing-mediated increased survival of cells infected with rVSVDeltaG*/BDVG, a cytolytic recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus expressing BDV G that mimics the cell tropism and entry pathway of bona fide BDV. We identified 24 cellular genes involved in BDV G-mediated cell entry. Identified genes are known to participate in a broad range of distinct cellular functions, revealing a complex process associated with BDV cell entry. The siRNA-based screening strategy we have developed should be applicable to identify cellular genes contributing to cell entry mediated by surface G proteins of other viruses.

  3. DEAD-Box Helicase DDX25 Is a Negative Regulator of Type I Interferon Pathway and Facilitates RNA Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingting Feng

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Dengue is a mosquito-borne viral disease that rapidly spread in tropic and subtropic area in recent years. DEAD (Glu-Asp-Ala-Glu-box RNA helicases have been reported to play important roles in viral infection, either as cytosolic sensors of viral nucleic acids or as essential host factors for the replication of different viruses. In this study, we reported that DDX25, a DEAD-box RNA helicase, plays a proviral role in DENV infection. The expression levels of DDX25 mRNA and protein were upregulated in DENV infected cells. During DENV infection, the intracellular viral loads were significantly lower in DDX25 silenced cells and higher in DDX25 overexpressed cells. Meanwhile, the expression level of type I interferon (IFN was increased in DDX25 siRNA treated cells during viral infection. Consistent with the in vitro findings, the Ddx25-transgenic mice have an increased susceptibility to lethal vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV virus challenge. The viremia was significantly higher while the anti-viral cytokine levels were lower in Ddx25-transgenic mice. Further, DDX25 modulated RIG-I signaling pathway and blocked IFNβ production, by interrupting IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3 and NFκB activation. Thus, DDX25 is a novel negative regulator of IFN pathway and facilitates RNA virus infection.

  4. Quantitative Proteomics Identifies Serum Response Factor Binding Protein 1 as a Host Factor for Hepatitis C Virus Entry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisa Gerold

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV enters human hepatocytes through a multistep mechanism involving, among other host proteins, the virus receptor CD81. How CD81 governs HCV entry is poorly characterized, and CD81 protein interactions after virus binding remain elusive. We have developed a quantitative proteomics protocol to identify HCV-triggered CD81 interactions and found 26 dynamic binding partners. At least six of these proteins promote HCV infection, as indicated by RNAi. We further characterized serum response factor binding protein 1 (SRFBP1, which is recruited to CD81 during HCV uptake and supports HCV infection in hepatoma cells and primary human hepatocytes. SRFBP1 facilitates host cell penetration by all seven HCV genotypes, but not of vesicular stomatitis virus and human coronavirus. Thus, SRFBP1 is an HCV-specific, pan-genotypic host entry factor. These results demonstrate the use of quantitative proteomics to elucidate pathogen entry and underscore the importance of host protein-protein interactions during HCV invasion.

  5. Role of Intermediate Filaments in Vesicular Traffic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azzurra Margiotta

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Intermediate filaments are an important component of the cellular cytoskeleton. The first established role attributed to intermediate filaments was the mechanical support to cells. However, it is now clear that intermediate filaments have many different roles affecting a variety of other biological functions, such as the organization of microtubules and microfilaments, the regulation of nuclear structure and activity, the control of cell cycle and the regulation of signal transduction pathways. Furthermore, a number of intermediate filament proteins have been involved in the acquisition of tumorigenic properties. Over the last years, a strong involvement of intermediate filament proteins in the regulation of several aspects of intracellular trafficking has strongly emerged. Here, we review the functions of intermediate filaments proteins focusing mainly on the recent knowledge gained from the discovery that intermediate filaments associate with key proteins of the vesicular membrane transport machinery. In particular, we analyze the current understanding of the contribution of intermediate filaments to the endocytic pathway.

  6. Fullerene Derivatives Strongly Inhibit HIV-1 Replication by Affecting Virus Maturation without Impairing Protease Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Zachary S.; Castro, Edison; Seong, Chang-Soo; Cerón, Maira R.

    2016-01-01

    Three compounds (1, 2, and 3) previously reported to inhibit HIV-1 replication and/or in vitro activity of reverse transcriptase were studied, but only fullerene derivatives 1 and 2 showed strong antiviral activity on the replication of HIV-1 in human CD4+ T cells. However, these compounds did not inhibit infection by single-round infection vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein G (VSV-G)-pseudotyped viruses, indicating no effect on the early steps of the viral life cycle. In contrast, analysis of single-round infection VSV-G-pseudotyped HIV-1 produced in the presence of compound 1 or 2 showed a complete lack of infectivity in human CD4+ T cells, suggesting that the late stages of the HIV-1 life cycle were affected. Quantification of virion-associated viral RNA and p24 indicates that RNA packaging and viral production were unremarkable in these viruses. However, Gag and Gag-Pol processing was affected, as evidenced by immunoblot analysis with an anti-p24 antibody and the measurement of virion-associated reverse transcriptase activity, ratifying the effect of the fullerene derivatives on virion maturation of the HIV-1 life cycle. Surprisingly, fullerenes 1 and 2 did not inhibit HIV-1 protease in an in vitro assay at the doses that potently blocked viral infectivity, suggesting a protease-independent mechanism of action. Highlighting the potential therapeutic relevance of fullerene derivatives, these compounds block infection by HIV-1 resistant to protease and maturation inhibitors. PMID:27431232

  7. The Role of Conserved N-Linked Glycans on Ebola Virus Glycoprotein 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennemann, Nicholas J; Walkner, Madeline; Berkebile, Abigail R; Patel, Neil; Maury, Wendy

    2015-10-01

    N-linked glycosylation is a common posttranslational modification found on viral glycoproteins (GPs) and involved in promoting expression, cellular attachment, protection from proteases, and antibody evasion. The GP subunit GP2 of filoviruses contains 2 completely conserved N-linked glycosylation sites (NGSs) at N563 and N618, suggesting that they have been maintained through selective pressures. We assessed mutants lacking these glycans for expression and function to understand the role of these sites during Ebola virus entry. Elimination of either GP2 glycan individually had a modest effect on GP expression and no impact on antibody neutralization of vesicular stomatitis virus pseudotyped with Ebola virus GP. However, loss of the N563 glycan enhanced entry by 2-fold and eliminated GP detection by a well-characterized monoclonal antibody KZ52. Loss of both sites dramatically decreased GP expression and abolished entry. Surprisingly, a GP that retained a single NGS at N563, eliminating the remaining 16 NGSs from GP1 and GP2, had detectable expression, a modest increase in entry, and pronounced sensitivity to antibody neutralization. Our findings support the importance of the GP2 glycans in GP expression/structure, transduction efficiency, and antibody neutralization, particularly when N-linked glycans are also removed from GP1. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Inhibition of influenza virus infection and hemagglutinin cleavage by the protease inhibitor HAI-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, Brian S.; Chung, Changik; Cyphers, Soreen Y.; Rinaldi, Vera D.; Marcano, Valerie C.; Whittaker, Gary R., E-mail: grw7@cornell.edu

    2014-07-25

    Highlights: • Biochemical and cell biological analysis of HAI-2 as an inhibitor of influenza HA cleavage activation. • Biochemical and cell biological analysis of HAI-2 as an inhibitor of influenza virus infection. • Comparative analysis of HAI-2 for vesicular stomatitis virus and human parainfluenza virus type-1. • Analysis of the activity of HAI-2 in a mouse model of influenza. - Abstract: Influenza virus remains a significant concern to public health, with the continued potential for a high fatality pandemic. Vaccination and antiviral therapeutics are effective measures to circumvent influenza virus infection, however, multiple strains have emerged that are resistant to the antiviral therapeutics currently on the market. With this considered, investigation of alternative antiviral therapeutics is being conducted. One such approach is to inhibit cleavage activation of the influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA), which is an essential step in the viral replication cycle that permits viral-endosome fusion. Therefore, targeting trypsin-like, host proteases responsible for HA cleavage in vivo may prove to be an effective therapeutic. Hepatocyte growth factor activator inhibitor 2 (HAI-2) is naturally expressed in the respiratory tract and is a potent inhibitor of trypsin-like serine proteases, some of which have been determined to cleave HA. In this study, we demonstrate that HAI-2 is an effective inhibitor of cleavage of HA from the human-adapted H1 and H3 subtypes. HAI-2 inhibited influenza virus H1N1 infection in cell culture, and HAI-2 administration showed protection in a mouse model of influenza. HAI-2 has the potential to be an effective, alternative antiviral therapeutic for influenza.

  9. Comorbidity of recurrent aphthous stomatitis and polyps ventriculi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokupec, Josipa Sanja Gruden; Lukenda, Dolores Biocina

    2013-03-01

    As it is known, many diseases of gastric system cause changes in the oral cavity, with either pathological findings or subjective impressions. When these changes are of pathological nature, the most common finding is recurrent aphthous stomatitis on the tongue, which emerges as a consequence of gastric diseases. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis is a disorder characterised by recurrent ulcerations limited to the oral mucosa, without any other signs of diseases. According to their clinical form, they may be big, small and hyperform. Etiology of recurrent aphthae is genetic predisposition, systemic diseases (virus, certain vitamin deficiency, gastric disorders), and autoimmune disorder and psychogenesis. The symptoms include a prodromal burning sensation and ulceration emerging within 24-48 hours as round symmetrical lesions inflicting the entire oral cavity except for palate and gingiva. Polyps ventriculi are tumours on the gastric mucosa. They can lie on a broad background or hang on the stem, and may be both individual and clustered at the same time. They are more common with elderly male population. They may have a malignant alteration. According to WHO, they have been classified as hyperplastic and neoplastic polyps. Etiology of polyps is atrophic gastritis or H. pylori.

  10. Characterization of the Bas-Congo virus glycoprotein and its function in pseudotyped viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, Imke; Liss, Nathan M; Schneider, Bradley S; Fair, Joseph N; Chiu, Charles Y; Simmons, Graham

    2013-09-01

    Bas-Congo virus (BASV) is a novel rhabdovirus recently identified from a patient with acute hemorrhagic fever in the Bas-Congo province of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). Here we show that the BASV glycoprotein (BASV-G) can be successfully used to pseudotype glycoprotein-deficient vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), allowing studies of BASV-G-driven membrane fusion and viral entry into target cells without replication-competent virus. BASV-G displayed broad tissue and species tropism in vitro, and BASV-G-mediated membrane fusion was pH dependent. The conformational changes induced in BASV-G by acidification were fully reversible and did not lead to inactivation of the viral fusion protein. Our data combined with comparative sequence similarity analyses suggest that BASV-G shares structural and functional features with other rhabdovirus glycoproteins and falls into the group of class III viral fusion proteins. However, activation of BASV-G-driven fusion required a lower pH and higher temperatures than did VSV-G-mediated fusion. Moreover, in contrast to VSV-G, mature BASV-G in VSV pseudotypes consists of a mixture of high-mannose and complex glycans that enables it to bind to certain C-type lectins, thereby enhancing its attachment to target cells. Taken together, the results presented in this study will facilitate future investigations of BASV-G-mediated cell entry and its inhibition in the absence of an infectious cell culture assay for BASV and at lower biosafety levels. Moreover, serology testing based on BASV-G pseudotype neutralization can be used to uncover the prevalence and importance of BASV as a potential novel human pathogen in the DRC and throughout Central Africa.

  11. Caracterización epidemiológica de las áreas endémicas de estomatitis vesicular en México (1981-2012)

    OpenAIRE

    Roberto Navarro López; Lauro Vázquez Salinas; Susana Arellano Chávez; Irene López González; César Luis Villarreal Chávez; Juan Antonio Montaño Hirose

    2015-01-01

    El presente estudio se diseñó para mejorar el sistema de vigilancia de las enfermedades vesiculares en México,bajo el sistema de planeación estratégica, identificando las zonas endémicas a través de la estabilidad de linajesvirales del serotipo Nueva Jersey, y analizando epidemiológicamente la información generada en 32 años devigilancia e investigación. Se presentan los resultados que permitieron caracterizar epidemiológicamente lasáreas donde se mantiene el virus de estomatitis vesicular de...

  12. Stomatal and non-stomatal factors regulated the photosynthesis of soybean seedlings in the present of exogenous bisphenol A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Liya; Wang, Lihong; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua

    2017-11-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an emerging environmental endocrine disruptor that has toxic effects on plants growth. Photosynthesis supplies the substances and energy required for plant growth, and regulated by stomatal and non-stomatal factors. Therefore, in this study, to reveal how BPA affects photosynthesis in soybean seedlings (Glycine max L.) from the perspective of stomatal and non-stomatal factors, the stomatal factors (stomatal conductance and behaviours) and non-stomatal factors (Hill reaction, apparent quantum efficiency, Rubisco activity, carboxylation efficiency, the maximum Rubisco carboxylation velocity, ribulose-1,5-bisphospate regeneration capacities mediated by maximum electron transport rates, and triose phosphate utilization rate) were investigated using a portable photosynthesis system. Moreover, the pollution of BPA in the environment was simulated. The results indicate that low-dose BPA enhanced net photosynthetic rate (Pn) primarily by promoting stomatal factors, resulting in increased relative growth rates and accelerated soybean seedling growth. High-dose BPA decreases the Pn by simultaneously inhibiting stomatal and non-stomatal factors, and this inhibition decreases the relative growth rates further reducing soybean seedling growth. Following the withdrawal of BPA, all of the indices were restored to varying degrees. In conclusion, low-dose BPA increased the Pn by promoting stomatal factors while high-dose BPA decreased the Pn by simultaneously inhibiting stomatal and non-stomatal factors. These findings provide a model (or, hypothesis) for the effects of BPA on plant photosynthesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Vesicular secretion of auxin: Evidences and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baluska, Frantisek; Schlicht, Markus; Volkmann, Dieter; Mancuso, Stefano

    2008-04-01

    The plant hormone auxin is secreted in root apices via phospholipase Dzeta2 (PLDzeta2) activity which produces specific population of phosphatidic acid that stimulates secretion of vesicles enriched with auxin. These vesicles were reported to be localized at plant synapses which are active in auxin secretion, especially at the transition zone of the root apex. There are several implications of this vesicular secretion of auxin. In root apices, auxin emerges as plant neurotransmitter-like signal molecule which coordinates activities of adjacent cells via electric and chemical signaling. Putative quantal release of auxin after electrical stimulation, if confirmed, would be part of neuronal communication between plant cells. As auxin transport across plant synapses is tightly linked with integrated sensory perception of environment, especially of omnipresent gravity and light, this process is proposed to mediate the plant perception of environment. These neuronal features allow sessile plants to integrate multitude of sensory signals into the adaptive behavior of whole plants and the animal-like exploratory behavior of growing roots.

  14. Inactivation of viruses in platelet suspensions that retain their in vitro characteristics: Comparison of psoralen-ultraviolet A and merocyanine 540-visible light methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodd, R.Y.; Moroff, G.; Wagner, S.; Dabay, M.H.; Dorfman, E.; George, V.; Ribeiro, A.; Shumaker, J.; Benade, L.E. (Jerome H. Holland Laboratory, American Red Cross, Rockville, MD (USA))

    1991-07-01

    The ability of two fundamentally different photochemical procedures to inactivate model viruses in platelet suspensions was compared. Merocyanine 540 (MC 540) with visible light was used as an example of an oxygen-dependent chemical-directed at the viral membrane, and aminomethyl trimethyl psoralen (AMT) with ultraviolet A light (UVA) was used as an example of a nucleic acid-directed system. Antiviral conditions in petri dishes were identified and the effects of these procedures on platelet suspensions in plastic storage containers were studied. Concentrations of photochemicals in the 10 to 150 mumol range with 30 to 60 minutes of visible light (MC 540) or 1 to 2 minutes of UVA (AMT) readily inactivated 5 to 6 log10 of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and other model viruses in platelet suspensions, provided the plasma concentration was reduced to about 15 percent by the use of a synthetic platelet storage medium. Extracellular pH, morphology scores, and aggregation response dropped markedly when platelets were treated with MC 540 and visible light. However, treatment with 136 mumol per L of AMT and 1 to 3 minutes of UVA could inactivate 5 log10 of VSV in platelet suspensions with retention of platelet characteristics for 4 days, particularly if oxygen levels were reduced during treatment. These studies demonstrate that AMT-UVA treatment meets the initial requirements for virus inactivation in platelet suspensions.

  15. Development and Characterization of A Multiplexed RT-PCR Species Specific Assay for Bovine and one for Porcine Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Rule-Out

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, S M; Danganan, L; Tammero, L; Vitalis, B; Lenhoff, R; Naraghi-arani, P; Hindson, B

    2007-08-06

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), in collaboration with the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Animal and Plant Health Inspection Services (APHIS) has developed candidate multiplexed assays that may potentially be used within the National Animal Health Laboratory Network (NAHLN), the National Veterinary Services Laboratory (Ames, Iowa) and the Plum Island Animal Disease Center (PIADC). This effort has the ability to improve our nation's capability to discriminate between foreign animal diseases and those that are endemic using a single assay, thereby increasing our ability to protect food and agricultural resources with a diagnostic test which could enhance the nation's capabilities for early detection of a foreign animal disease. In FY2005 with funding from the DHS, LLNL developed the first version (Version 1.0) of a multiplexed (MUX) nucleic-acid-based RT-PCR assay that included signatures for foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) detection with rule-out tests for two other foreign animal diseases (FADs) of swine, Vesicular Exanthema of Swine (VESV) and Swine Vesicular Disease Virus (SVDV), and four other domestic viral diseases Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus (BVDV), Bovine Herpes Virus 1 (BHV-1), Bluetongue virus (BTV) and Parapox virus complex (which includes Bovine Papular Stomatitis Virus [BPSV], Orf of sheep, and Pseudocowpox). In FY06, LLNL has developed Bovine and Porcine species-specific panel which included existing signatures from Version 1.0 panel as well as new signatures. The MUX RT-PCR porcine assay for detection of FMDV includes the FADs, VESV and SVD in addition to vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS). LLNL has also developed a MUX RT-PCR bovine assay for detection of FMDV with rule out tests for the two bovine FADs malignant catarrhal fever (MCF), rinderpest virus (RPV) and the domestic diseases vesicular stomatitis

  16. Development of a recombinase polymerase amplification combined with lateral-flow dipstick assay for detection of bovine ephemeral fever virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Peili; Zhao, Guimin; Wang, Hongmei; He, Chengqiang; Huan, Yanjun; He, Hongbin

    2017-12-26

    Bovine ephemeral fever virus (BEFV), identified as the causative pathogen of bovine ephemeral fever (BEF), is responsible for increasing numbers of epidemics/outbreaks and has a significant harmful effect on the livestock industry. Therefore, a rapid detection assay is imperative for BEFV diagnosis. In this study, we described the development of lateral-flow dipstick isothermal recombinase polymerase amplification (LFD-RPA) assays for detection of BEFV. RPA primers and LF probes were designed by targeting the specific G gene, and the amplification product can be visualized on a simple lateral flow dipstick with the naked eyes. The amplification reaction was performed at 38 °C for 20 min and LFD incubation time within 5 min. The detection limit of this assay was 8 copies per reaction, and there was no cross-reactivity with other bovine infectious viruses such as bovine viral diarrhea virus, infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus, bovine respiratory syncytial virus, bovine coronavirus, bovine parainfluenza virus type 3, bovine vesicular stomatitis virus. In addition, the assay was performed with total 128 clinical specimens and the diagnostic results were compared with conventional RT-PCR, real-time quantative(q) PCR. The result showed that the coincidence rate of BEFV LFD-RPA and real-time qPCR was 96.09% (123/128), which was higher than conventional RT-PCR. The RPA combined with LFD assay probably provides a rapid and sensitive alternative for diagnosis of BEFV infections outbreak. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. HERP Binds TBK1 To Activate Innate Immunity and Repress Virus Replication in Response to Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Maolin; Luo, Zhen; Qiao, Zhi; Zhou, Yao; Cheng, Xin; Geng, Qibin; Cai, Yanyan; Wan, Pin; Xiong, Ying; Liu, Fang; Wu, Kailang; Liu, Yingle; Wu, Jianguo

    2017-11-01

    Host innate immunity is crucial for cellular responses against viral infection sensed by distinct pattern recognition receptors and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a causative agent of hand, foot, and mouth disease and neurological diseases. However, the exact mechanism underlying the link between ER stress induced by EV71 infection and host innate immunity is largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrated that EV71 infection induces the homocysteine-induced ER protein (HERP), a modulator of the ER stress response which is dependent on the participation of MAVS. Virus-induced HERP subsequently stimulates host innate immunity to repress viral replication by promoting type-I IFNs (IFN-α and IFN-β) and type-III IFN (IFN-λ1) expression. Through interacting with TANK-binding kinase 1, HERP amplifies the MAVS signaling and facilitates the phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of IFN regulatory factor 3 and NF-κB to enhance the expression of IFNs, which leads to a broad inhibition of the replication of RNA viruses, including EV71, Sendai virus, influenza A virus, and vesicular stomatitis virus. Therefore, we demonstrated that HERP plays an important role in the regulation of host innate immunity in response to ER stress during the infection of RNA viruses. These findings provide new insights into the mechanism underlying the replication of RNA viruses and the production of IFNs, and also demonstrate a new role of HERP in the regulation of host innate immunity in response to viral infection. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  18. Tratamiento actual de la litiasis vesicular Current treatment of vesicular lithiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar García Rodríguez

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available El tratamiento quirúrgico de la litiasis vesicular ha cambiado en los últimos años. La incorporación de las nuevas conductas en la práctica médica diaria no siempre es inmediata. Se argumentan las razones relativas a cuándo operar a un paciente con cálculos en la vesícula biliar, y se documenta cómo este procedimiento se reserva fundamentalmente para los pacientes sintomáticos, considerando el dolor como el síntoma por excelencia. También se expone cómo se ha enfrentado este cambio.Surgical treatment of vesicular lithiasis has changed in past years. The addition of the new techniques in daily medical practice not always is immediate. Reasons relative to when to operate a patient presenting with gall bladder calculi are argued and documenting how this procedure is mainly reserved for symptomatic patients where pain is considered as a symptom par excellence . Also, it is exposed how this change has been faced.

  19. Optimal stomatal behaviour around the world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yan-Shih; Medlyn, Belinda E.; Duursma, Remko A.; Prentice, I. Colin; Wang, Han; Baig, Sofia; Eamus, Derek; de Dios, Victor Resco; Mitchell, Patrick; Ellsworth, David S.; de Beeck, Maarten Op; Wallin, Göran; Uddling, Johan; Tarvainen, Lasse; Linderson, Maj-Lena; Cernusak, Lucas A.; Nippert, Jesse B.; Ocheltree, Troy W.; Tissue, David T.; Martin-Stpaul, Nicolas K.; Rogers, Alistair; Warren, Jeff M.; de Angelis, Paolo; Hikosaka, Kouki; Han, Qingmin; Onoda, Yusuke; Gimeno, Teresa E.; Barton, Craig V. M.; Bennie, Jonathan; Bonal, Damien; Bosc, Alexandre; Löw, Markus; Macinins-Ng, Cate; Rey, Ana; Rowland, Lucy; Setterfield, Samantha A.; Tausz-Posch, Sabine; Zaragoza-Castells, Joana; Broadmeadow, Mark S. J.; Drake, John E.; Freeman, Michael; Ghannoum, Oula; Hutley, Lindsay B.; Kelly, Jeff W.; Kikuzawa, Kihachiro; Kolari, Pasi; Koyama, Kohei; Limousin, Jean-Marc; Meir, Patrick; Lola da Costa, Antonio C.; Mikkelsen, Teis N.; Salinas, Norma; Sun, Wei; Wingate, Lisa

    2015-05-01

    Stomatal conductance (gs) is a key land-surface attribute as it links transpiration, the dominant component of global land evapotranspiration, and photosynthesis, the driving force of the global carbon cycle. Despite the pivotal role of gs in predictions of global water and carbon cycle changes, a global-scale database and an associated globally applicable model of gs that allow predictions of stomatal behaviour are lacking. Here, we present a database of globally distributed gs obtained in the field for a wide range of plant functional types (PFTs) and biomes. We find that stomatal behaviour differs among PFTs according to their marginal carbon cost of water use, as predicted by the theory underpinning the optimal stomatal model and the leaf and wood economics spectrum. We also demonstrate a global relationship with climate. These findings provide a robust theoretical framework for understanding and predicting the behaviour of gs across biomes and across PFTs that can be applied to regional, continental and global-scale modelling of ecosystem productivity, energy balance and ecohydrological processes in a future changing climate.

  20. The contribution of epistasis to the architecture of fitness in an RNA virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanjuán, Rafael; Moya, Andrés; Elena, Santiago F.

    2004-01-01

    The tendency for genetic architectures to exhibit epistasis among mutations plays a central role in the modern synthesis of evolutionary biology and in theoretical descriptions of many evolutionary processes. Nevertheless, few studies unquestionably show whether, and how, mutations typically interact. Beneficial mutations are especially difficult to identify because of their scarcity. Consequently, epistasis among pairs of this important class of mutations has, to our knowledge, never before been explored. Interactions among genome components should be of special relevance in compacted genomes such as those of RNA viruses. To tackle these issues, we first generated 47 genotypes of vesicular stomatitis virus carrying pairs of nucleotide substitution mutations whose separated and combined deleterious effects on fitness were determined. Several pairs exhibited significant interactions for fitness, including antagonistic and synergistic epistasis. Synthetic lethals represented 50% of the latter. In a second set of experiments, 15 genotypes carrying pairs of beneficial mutations were also created. In this case, all significant interactions were antagonistic. Our results show that the architecture of the fitness depends on complex interactions among genome components. PMID:15492220

  1. Inducible costimulator protein (ICOS) controls T helper cell subset polarization after virus and parasite infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopf, M; Coyle, A J; Schmitz, N; Barner, M; Oxenius, A; Gallimore, A; Gutierrez-Ramos, J C; Bachmann, M F

    2000-07-03

    It has been shown that certain pathogens can trigger efficient T cell responses in the absence of CD28, a key costimulatory receptor expressed on resting T cells. Inducible costimulator protein (ICOS) is an inducible costimulator structurally and functionally related to CD28. Here, we show that in the absence of CD28 both T helper cell type 1 (Th1) and Th2 responses were impaired but not abrogated after infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV), vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), and the nematode Nippostrongylus brasiliensis. Inhibition of ICOS in CD28-deficient mice further reduced Th1/Th2 polarization. Blocking of ICOS alone had a limited but significant capacity to downregulate Th subset development. In contrast, cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses, which are regulated to a minor and major extent by CD28 after LCMV and VSV infection, respectively, remained unaffected by blocking ICOS. Together, our results demonstrate that ICOS regulates both CD28-dependent and CD28-independent CD4(+) subset (Th1 and Th2) responses but not CTL responses in vivo.

  2. Brassinosteroids modulate ABA-induced stomatal closure in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Yunmi; Shang, Yun; Nam, Kyoung Hee

    2016-12-01

    Stomatal movement in response to water availability is an important physiological process in the survival of land plants. The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) and brassinosteroids (BRs) regulate stomatal closure. The physiological functions of ABA and BRs, including germination, cell elongation and stomatal movement, are generally known to be antagonistic. Here, we investigated how BRs affect stomatal movement alone and in combination with ABA. We demonstrate that brassinoslide (BL), the most active BR, promotes stomatal closure in an ABA-independent manner. Interestingly, BL also inhibited ABA-induced stomatal closure when a high concentration of BL was added to ABA. Furthermore, we found that the induction of some genes for reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation by ABA (AtrbohD, NIA1 and NIA2) and subsequent ROS production were repressed by BL treatment. The BR signaling mutant bri1-301 failed to inhibit ABA-induced stomatal closure upon BL treatment. However, BRI1-overexpressing transgenic plants were hypersensitive to ABA during stomatal closure, and BL reversed ABA-induced stomatal closure more completely than in wild type plants. Taken together, these results suggest that BRs can positively and negatively modulate ABA-induced stomatal closure. Therefore, interactions between ABA and BR signaling are important for the regulation of stomatal closure. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  3. Tratamiento actual de la litiasis vesicular Current treatment of vesicular lithiasis

    OpenAIRE

    Oscar García Rodríguez

    2010-01-01

    El tratamiento quirúrgico de la litiasis vesicular ha cambiado en los últimos años. La incorporación de las nuevas conductas en la práctica médica diaria no siempre es inmediata. Se argumentan las razones relativas a cuándo operar a un paciente con cálculos en la vesícula biliar, y se documenta cómo este procedimiento se reserva fundamentalmente para los pacientes sintomáticos, considerando el dolor como el síntoma por excelencia. También se expone cómo se ha enfrentado este cambio.Surgical t...

  4. Psoralen-mediated virus photoinactivation in platelet concentrates: enhanced specificity of virus kill in the absence of shorter UVA wavelengths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margolis-Nunno, Henrietta; Robinson, Richard; Horowitz, Bernard; Ben-Hur, Ehud [New York Blood Center, NY (United States); Geacintov, N.E. [New York Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1995-11-01

    Treatments with psoralens and long-wavelength ultraviolet radiation (UVA, 320-400 nm; PUVA) have shown efficacy for virus sterilization of platelet concentrates (PC). We have employed the psoralen derivative 4`-aminomethyl-4,5`,8-trimethylpsoralen (AMT), and have found that platelet integrity is best preserved when rutin, a flavonoid that quenches multiple reactive oxygen species, is present during AMT/UVA treatment of PC. In this report, we examine the effects of different UVA spectra under our standard PC treatment conditions (i.e. 50 {mu}g/mL AMT, 0.35 mM rutin and 38 J/cm{sup 2} UVA). Added vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV; {>=} 5.5 log{sub 10}) was completely inactivated with the simultaneous maintenance of the platelet aggregation response (> 90% of control) when a UVA light source with transmission mainly between 360 and 370 nm (narrow UVA1) was used. In contrast, with a broad-band UVA (320-400 nm; broad UVA) light source, the aggregation response was greatly compromised (< 50% of control) with only a minor increase in the rate of VSV kill. With this lamp, platelet function could be improved to about 75% of the control by adding a long-pass filter, which reduced the transmission of shorter ({<=} 345 nm) UVA wavelengths (340-400 nm; UVA1). At equivalent levels of virus kill, aggregation function was always best preserved when narrow UVA1 was used for PUVA treatment. Even in the absence of AMT, and with or without rutin present, narrow UVA1 irradiation was better tolerated by platelets than was broad UVA. (author).

  5. VIRUSES

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and-mouth disease in livestock was an infectious particle smaller than any bacteria. This was the first clue to the nature of viruses, genetic entities that lie somewhere in the gray area between living and non-living states.

  6. Inactivation of model viruses and bacteria in human fresh frozen plasma using riboflavin and long wave ultraviolet rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elikaei, Ameneh; Hosseini, Seyed Masoud; Sharifi, Zohreh

    2017-02-01

    Pathogen reduction technologies are among methods to eliminate transfusion transmitted infections. Mirasol method using riboflavin in combination with ultraviolet rays is one of them. The aims of this study were to investigate the effectiveness of Mirasol method to inactivate some model pathogens as well as examination of the sensitivity of plasma proteins after treatment. Riboflavin in 50μM concentration and ultraviolet (365 nm) in three different energy doses (3.6, 7.2, and 10.8 j/cm2) were employed to inactivate model pathogens. Four standard viruses were used in this study including Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV), Herpes Simplex Virus1 (HSV-1), Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus (BVDV) and Polio Virus. 50% Tissue Culture Infectious Dose (TCID50) and Reed-Muench Methods were used to estimate viruses' titers. E. coli and Staphylococcus aureus were used as bacterial models. Four plasma proteins including factor V, VIII, fibrinogen and antithromin were used to determine their sensitivity to pathogen inactivation treatment. The most pathogen reduction titre was determined for 15 minutes irradiation period equal to 10.8 J/cm2 that is corresponding to Log 6.10 for BVDV, Log 6.09 for HSV-1, Log 6.62 for VSV and Log 3.36 for Polio. Bacterial reduction titer was Log 6.94 for E. coli and Log 7.00 for S. aureus. Indicator proteins for plasma activity were determined to be 75% for factor V, 88% for factor VIII, 52% for fibrinogen and 94% for antithrombin. Results showed that the employed method can inactivate most of the pathogens in fresh frozen plasma. The acceptable activities of selected plasma proteins remained after treatment.

  7. Molecular physiology of vesicular glutamate transporters in the digestive system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Li; Fayez K. Ghishan; Liqun Bai

    2005-01-01

    Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS). Packaging and storage of glutamate into glutamatergic neuronal vesicles require ATP-dependent vesicular glutamate uptake systems, which utilize the electrochemical proton gradient as a driving force. Three vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUT1-3) have been recently identified from neuronal tissue where they play a key role to maintain the vesicular glutamate level. Recently, it has been demonstrated that glutamate signaling is also functional in peripheral neuronal and non-neuronal tissues, and occurs in sites of pituitary, adrenal, pineal glands, bone, GI tract, pancreas,skin, and testis. The glutamate receptors and VGLUTs in digestivesystem have been found in both neuronal and endocrinal cells. The glutamate signaling in the digestive system may have significant relevance to diabetes and GI tract motility disorders. This review will focus on the most recent update of molecular physiology of digestive VGLUTs.

  8. [How to cope with recurrent aphthous stomatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrid, C; Jaques, B; Bouferrrache, K; Broome, M

    2010-10-06

    Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is the most common oral mucosa ailment. This condition is frequently considered as idiopathic due to the doubts about its etiology, probably related to a minor immunological dysregulation in a context of genetic predisposition. However, ulcers that resemble recurrent aphthous stomatitis in some respects can be found in systemic disorders that must be ruled out for the differential diagnosis of SAR, particularly when they appear after adolescence and/or when associated lesions exist out of the oral cavity. SAR management lies on the elimination of predisposing factors (drugs, oral trauma, food allergies...) and if needed, topical corticosteroids are the first choice regimen. More severe cases may require systemic regimens.

  9. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis: genetic aspects of etiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szponar, Elżbieta; Kowalska, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS; recurrent aphthous ulcers – RAU; canker sores) is a chronic inflammatory, ulcerative condition of the oral mucosa. Its prevalence in the general population ranges between 5% and 20%, depending on the method and group studied. The etiopathogenesis of the disease is considered to be multifactorial, but remains still not fully understood. In patients with RAS, an enhanced immunologic response occurs to some trigger factors that may include: mechanical injury, stress or bacterial and viral antigens. Higher prevalence of aphthae in relatives may also indicate the genetic background of the condition. The inheritance of some specific gene polymorphisms, especially those encoding proinflammatory cytokines, which play a role in the formation of aphthous ulcer, may predispose family members to RAS. The purpose of this paper was to present the main clinical features of recurrent aphthous stomatitis, epidemiologic data and crucial etiopathogenetic factors with a special emphasis on genetic background of the condition. PMID:24278055

  10. STUDY REGARDING STOMATAL DENSITY IN MAGNOLIA SP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoleta-Valentina GROZA

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to reveal the structural aspects of the leaf as occurring in the genus Magnolia. The leaves are bifacial and hypostomatic. Secretory oil cells are a constant presence. We have revealed significant dissimilarities in stomatal density and size as occurring in three ornamental species: Magnolia kobus, Magnolia x soulangeana “Soulange-Bodin” (M. denudata x M. liliiflora and Magnolia x “Susan” (M. kobus var. stellata “Rosea” x M. liliiflora “Nigra”. The highest stomatal density was recorded in the diploid species Magnolia kobus. The stomata are significantly elongated in Magnolia x soulangeana “Soul.-Bod.” and wide in Magnolia kobus.

  11. Induction of antigen-specific immune responses in mice by recombinant baculovirus expressing premembrane and envelope proteins of West Nile virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Bibo

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background West Nile Virus (WNV is an emerging arthropod-born flavivirus with increasing distribution worldwide that is responsible for a large proportion of viral encephalitis in humans and horses. Given that there are no effective antiviral drugs available for treatment of the disease, efforts have been directed to develop vaccines to prevent WNV infection. Recently baculovirus has emerged as a novel and attractive gene delivery vehicle for mammalian cells. Results In the present study, recombinant baculoviruses expressing WNV premembrane (prM and envelope (E proteins under the cytomegalovirus (CMV promoter with or without vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSV/G were constructed. The recombinant baculoviruses designated Bac-G-prM/E and Bac-prM/E, efficiently express E protein in mammalian cells. Intramuscular injection of the two recombinant baculoviruses (at doses of 108 or 109 PFU/mouse induced the production of WNV-specific antibodies, neutralizing antibodies as well as gamma interferon (IFN-γ in a dose-dependent pattern. Interestingly, the recombinant baculovirus Bac-G-prM/E was found to be a more efficient immunogen than Bac-prM/E to elicit a robust immune response upon intramuscular injection. In addition, inoculation of baculovirus resulted in the secretion of inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α, IL-2 and IL-6. Conclusions These recombinant baculoviruses are capable of eliciting robust humoral and cellular immune responses in mice, and may be considered as novel vaccine candidates for West Nile Virus.

  12. Equine Arteritis Virus Does Not Induce Interferon Production in Equine Endothelial Cells: Identification of Nonstructural Protein 1 as a Main Interferon Antagonist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Young Go

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of equine arteritis virus (EAV on type I interferon (IFN production. Equine endothelial cells (EECs were infected with the virulent Bucyrus strain (VBS of EAV and expression of IFN-β was measured at mRNA and protein levels by quantitative real-time RT-PCR and IFN bioassay using vesicular stomatitis virus expressing the green fluorescence protein (VSV-GFP, respectively. Quantitative RT-PCR results showed that IFN-β mRNA levels in EECs infected with EAV VBS were not increased compared to those in mock-infected cells. Consistent with quantitative RT-PCR, Sendai virus- (SeV- induced type I IFN production was inhibited by EAV infection. Using an IFN-β promoter-luciferase reporter assay, we subsequently demonstrated that EAV nsps 1, 2, and 11 had the capability to inhibit type I IFN activation. Of these three nsps, nsp1 exhibited the strongest inhibitory effect. Taken together, these data demonstrate that EAV has the ability to suppress the type I IFN production in EECs and nsp1 may play a critical role to subvert the equine innate immune response.

  13. Systemic Virus Infections Differentially Modulate Cell Cycle State and Functionality of Long-Term Hematopoietic Stem Cells In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Hirche

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Quiescent long-term hematopoietic stem cells (LT-HSCs are efficiently activated by type I interferon (IFN-I. However, this effect remains poorly investigated in the context of IFN-I-inducing virus infections. Here we report that both vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV and murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV infection induce LT-HSC activation that substantially differs from the effects triggered upon injection of synthetic IFN-I-inducing agents. In both infections, inflammatory responses had to exceed local thresholds within the bone marrow to confer LT-HSC cell cycle entry, and IFN-I receptor triggering was not critical for this activation. After resolution of acute MCMV infection, LT-HSCs returned to phenotypic quiescence. However, non-acute MCMV infection induced a sustained inflammatory milieu within the bone marrow that was associated with long-lasting impairment of LT-HSC function. In conclusion, our results show that systemic virus infections fundamentally affect LT-HSCs and that also non-acute inflammatory stimuli in bone marrow donors can affect the reconstitution potential of bone marrow transplants.

  14. Stochastic Model of Maturation and Vesicular Exchange in Cellular Organelles

    CERN Document Server

    Vagne, Quentin

    2016-01-01

    The dynamical organization of membrane-bound organelles along intracellular transport pathways relies on vesicular exchange between organelles and on biochemical maturation of the organelle content by specific enzymes. The relative importance of each mechanism in controlling organelle dynamics remains controversial, in particular for transport through the Golgi apparatus. Using a stochastic model, we show that full maturation of membrane-bound compartments can be seen as the stochastic escape from a steady-state in which export is dominated by vesicular exchange. We show that full maturation can contribute a significant fraction of the total out-flux for small organelles such as endosomes and Golgi cisternae.

  15. Virus replicon particles expressing porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus proteins elicit immune priming but do not confer protection from viremia in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eck, Melanie; Durán, Margarita García; Ricklin, Meret E; Locher, Samira; Sarraseca, Javier; Rodríguez, María José; McCullough, Kenneth C; Summerfield, Artur; Zimmer, Gert; Ruggli, Nicolas

    2016-02-19

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is the causative agent of one of the most devastating and economically significant viral disease of pigs worldwide. The vaccines currently available on the market elicit only limited protection. Recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) replicon particles (VRP) have been used successfully to induce protection against influenza A virus (IAV) in chickens and bluetongue virus in sheep. In this study, VSV VRP expressing the PRRSV envelope proteins GP5, M, GP4, GP3, GP2 and the nucleocapsid protein N, individually or in combination, were generated and evaluated as a potential vector vaccine against PRRSV infection. High level expression of the recombinant PRRSV proteins was demonstrated in cell culture. However, none of the PRRSV antigens expressed from VRP, with the exception of the N protein, did induce any detectable antibody response in pigs before challenge infection with PRRSV. After challenge however, the antibody responses against GP5, GP4 and GP3 appeared in average 2 weeks earlier than in pigs vaccinated with the empty control VRP. No reduction of viremia was observed in the vaccinated group compared with the control group. When pigs were co-vaccinated with VRP expressing IAV antigens and VRP expressing PRRSV glycoproteins, only antibody responses to the IAV antigens were detectable. These data show that the VSV replicon vector can induce immune responses to heterologous proteins in pigs, but that the PRRSV envelope proteins expressed from VSV VRP are poorly immunogenic. Nevertheless, they prime the immune system for significantly earlier B-cell responses following PRRSV challenge infection.

  16. State-of-the-Art Workshops on Medical Countermeasures Potentially Available for Human Use Following Accidental Exposures to Ebola Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahrling, Peter B; Hensley, Lisa E; Barrett, Kevin; Lane, Henry Clifford; Davey, Richard T

    2015-10-01

    The ongoing outbreak of Ebola in West Africa has raised a general awareness that at present there are no Ebola-specific medical countermeasures (MCMs) with proven effectiveness. This paper recapitulates discussions held at the 6th International Filovirus Symposium in March 2014 as well as the subsequent design of a randomized clinical trial design for treating Ebola virus-infected patients evacuated from West Africa to the United States. A number of different drugs or biologics were critically reviewed and 3 different postexposure strategies were identified as being farthest along in development; passive immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, postexposure vaccination with constructs involving viral vectors (such as vesicular stomatitis virus), and antisense compounds directly targeting the viral genome such as modified phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer-based compounds and small interfering RNA products. At the time of the meetings, there were no investigational new drugs (INDs) in place for the candidate MCMs. Developers and sponsors of these candidate products were strongly encouraged to prepare pre-IND packets and submit pre-IND meeting requests to the Food and Drug Administration. Some of these investigational products have already been used under emergency authorizations to treat patients in Africa as well as patients evacuated to the United States or Western Europe. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2015. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  17. Amphotropic murine leukemia virus is preferentially attached to cholesterol-rich microdomains after binding to mouse fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedersen Lene

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have recently shown that amphotropic murine leukemia virus (A-MLV can enter the mouse fibroblast cell line NIH3T3 via caveola-dependent endocytosis. But due to the size and omega-like shape of caveolae it is possible that A-MLV initially binds cells outside of caveolae. Rafts have been suggested to be pre-caveolae and we here investigate whether A-MLV initially binds to its receptor Pit2, a sodium-dependent phosphate transporter, in rafts or caveolae or outside these cholesterol-rich microdomains. Results Here, we show that a high amount of cell-bound A-MLV was attached to large rafts of NIH3T3 at the time of investigation. These large rafts were not enriched in caveolin-1, a major structural component of caveolae. In addition, they are rather of natural occurrence in NIH3T3 cells than a result of patching of smaller rafts by A-MLV. Thus cells incubated in parallel with vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSV-G pseudotyped MLV particles showed the same pattern of large rafts as cells incubated with A-MLV, but VSV-G pseudotyped MLV particles did not show any preference to attach to these large microdomains. Conclusion The high concentration of A-MLV particles bound to large rafts of NIH3T3 cells suggests a role of these microdomains in early A-MLV binding events.

  18. Preferential labeling of inhibitory and excitatory cortical neurons by endogenous tropism of adeno-associated virus and lentivirus vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathanson, J L; Yanagawa, Y; Obata, K; Callaway, E M

    2009-06-30

    Despite increasingly widespread use of recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) and lentiviral (LV) vectors for transduction of neurons in a wide range of brain structures and species, the diversity of cell types within a given brain structure is rarely considered. For example, the ability of a vector to transduce neurons within a brain structure is often assumed to indicate that all neuron types within the structure are transduced. We have characterized the transduction of mouse somatosensory cortical neuron types by recombinant AAV pseudotyped with serotype 1 capsid (rAAV2/1) and by recombinant lentivirus pseudotyped with the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) glycoprotein. Both vectors used human synapsin (hSyn) promoter driving DsRed-Express. We demonstrate that high titer rAAV2/1-hSyn efficiently transduces both cortical excitatory and inhibitory neuronal populations, but use of lower titers exposes a strong preference for transduction of cortical inhibitory neurons and layer 5 pyramidal neurons. In contrast, we find that VSV-G-LV-hSyn principally labels excitatory cortical neurons at the highest viral titer generated. These findings demonstrate that endogenous tropism of rAAV2/1 and VSV-G-LV can be used to obtain preferential gene expression in mouse somatosensory cortical inhibitory and excitatory neuron populations, respectively.

  19. MINYAK GOSOK DAPAT MENGOBATI STOMATITIS APTOSA REKUREN SECARA TOPIKAL

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Yusran; Donald RN

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have been done to get the right material in the treatment of recurrent minor aphthous stomatitis, but the result still unsatisfied. The aim ofthistudy was to know the influence application of rubbing oil against the healing and comportable at recurrent minor aphthous stomatitis. This study was a clinical observasionally and healing was resulted in about four days. The use of topical rubbing oil in the treatment of recurrent minor aphthous stomatitis could...

  20. Vesicular signalling and immune modulation as hedonic fingerprints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Christina F; Bak, Steffen; Christensen, Trine

    2012-01-01

    ) differential gel electrophoresis (DIGE) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The majority of the proteins we identified were enzymes involved in different metabolic activities. Additional proteins were functionally classified as vesicular proteins and immune system proteins. Rab GDP dissociation inhibitor...

  1. Formulation and evaluation of a transfersomal vesicular carrier ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AF1 was investigated. NIPRD-AF1 is a phytomedicine derived from the leaves of an indigenous plant, for use in the treatment of fungal infections. A transfersomal vesicular carrier system of NIPRD-AF1 was formulated and evaluated for topical ...

  2. Effect of vesicular arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The symbiotic association between certain plants and microorganisms plays an important role in soil fertilization, and improves their growth and mineral nutrition. The symbiotic association between vesicular arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) fungi and roots provides a significant contribution to plant nutrition and growth.

  3. Renal epithelial cells can release ATP by vesicular fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randi G Bjaelde

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Renal epithelial cells have the ability to release nucleotides as paracrine factors. In the intercalated cells of the collecting duct, ATP is released by connexin30 (cx30, which is selectively expressed in this cell type. However, ATP is released by virtually all renal epithelia and the aim of the present study was to identify possible alternative nucleotide release pathways in a renal epithelial cell model. We used MDCK (type1 cells to screen for various potential ATP release pathways. In these cells, inhibition of the vesicular H+-ATPases (bafilomycin reduced both the spontaneous and hypotonically (80%-induced nucleotide release. Interference with vesicular fusion using N-ethylamide markedly reduced the spontaneous nucleotide release, as did interference with trafficking from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi apparatus (brefeldin A1 and vesicular transport (nocodazole. These findings were substantiated using a siRNA directed against SNAP-23, which significantly reduced spontaneous ATP release. Inhibition of pannexin and connexins did not affect the spontaneous ATP release in this cell type, which consists of ∼90% principal cells. TIRF-microscopy of either fluorescently-labeled ATP (MANT-ATP or quinacrine-loaded vesicles, revealed that spontaneous release of single vesicles could be promoted by either hypoosmolality (50% or ionomycin. This vesicular release decreased the overall cellular fluorescence by 5.8% and 7.6% respectively. In summary, this study supports the notion that spontaneous and induced ATP release can occur via exocytosis in renal epithelial cells.

  4. The vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis | Quilambo | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi are associated with the majority ot the terrestrial plants. Their function ranges from stress alleviation to bioremediation in soils polluted with heavy metals. However, our knowledge about this symbiosis is still limited. For the semi-arid tropics, where some african countries are located, ...

  5. Influence of vesicular arbuscular mycorrhiza (VAM) and phosphate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A field experiment was carried out to find out the effect of biofertilizers, vesicular arbuscular mycorrhiza (VAM), and phosphate solubilising bacteria (PSB) individually and in combination on growth and physiological attributing properties of Marsdenia volubilis plant under nursery conditions. The plant seedlings were ...

  6. Mutational Analysis of Lassa Virus Glycoprotein Highlights Regions Required for Alpha-Dystroglycan Utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acciani, Marissa; Alston, Jacob T; Zhao, Guohui; Reynolds, Hayley; Ali, Afroze M; Xu, Brian; Brindley, Melinda A

    2017-09-15

    Lassa virus (LASV) is an enveloped RNA virus endemic to West Africa and responsible for severe cases of hemorrhagic fever. Virus entry is mediated by the glycoprotein complex consisting of a stable-signal peptide, a receptor-binding subunit, GP1, and a viral-host membrane fusion subunit, GP2. Several cellular receptors can interact with the GP1 subunit and mediate viral entry, including alpha-dystroglycan (αDG) and lysosome-associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP1). In order to define the regions within GP1 that interact with the cellular receptors, we implemented insertional mutagenesis, carbohydrate shielding, and alanine scanning mutagenesis. Eighty GP constructs were engineered and evaluated for GP1-GP2 processing, surface expression, and the ability to mediate cell-to-cell fusion after low-pH exposure. To examine virus-to-cell entry, 49 constructs were incorporated onto vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) pseudoparticles and transduction efficiencies were monitored in HAP1 and HAP1-ΔDAG1 cells that differentially produce the αDG cell surface receptor. Seven constructs retained efficient transduction in HAP1-ΔDAG1 cells yet poorly transduced HAP1 cells, suggesting that they are involved in αDG utilization. Residues H141, N146, F147, and Y150 cluster at the predicted central core of the trimeric interface and are important for GP-αDG interaction. Additionally, H92A-H93A, 150HA, 172HA, and 230HA displayed reduced transduction in both HAP1 and HAP1-ΔDAG1 cells, despite efficient cell-to-cell fusion activity. These mutations may interfere with interactions with the endosomal receptor LAMP1 or interfere at another stage in entry that is common to both cell lines. Insight gained from these data can aid in the development of more-effective entry inhibitors by blocking receptor interactions. IMPORTANCE Countries in which Lassa virus is endemic, such as Nigeria, Sierra Leone, Guinea, and Liberia, usually experience a seasonal outbreak of the virus from December to March

  7. Drought induces alterations in the stomatal development program in Populus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Malcolm M

    2012-01-01

    Much is known about the physiological control of stomatal aperture as a means by which plants adjust to water availability. By contrast, the role played by the modulation of stomatal development to limit water loss has received much less attention. The control of stomatal development in response to water deprivation in the genus Populus is explored here. Drought induced declines in stomatal conductance as well as an alteration in stomatal development in two genotypes of Populus balsamifera. Leaves that developed under water-deficit conditions had lower stomatal indices than leaves that developed under well-watered conditions. Transcript abundance of genes that could hypothetically underpin drought-responsive changes in stomatal development was examined, in two genotypes, across six time points, under two conditions, well-watered and with water deficit. Populus homologues of STOMAGEN, ERECTA (ER), STOMATA DENSITY AND DISTRIBUTION 1 (SDD1), and FAMA had variable transcript abundance patterns congruent with their role in the modulation of stomatal development in response to drought. Conversely, there was no significant variation in transcript abundance between genotypes or treatments for the Populus homologues of YODA (YDA) and TOO MANY MOUTHS (TMM). The findings highlight the role that could be played by stomatal development during leaf expansion as a longer term means by which to limit water loss from leaves. Moreover, the results point to the key roles played by the regulation of the homologues of STOMAGEN, ER, SDD1, and FAMA in the control of this response in poplar. PMID:22760471

  8. Plant water potential improves prediction of empirical stomatal models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William R L Anderegg

    Full Text Available Climate change is expected to lead to increases in drought frequency and severity, with deleterious effects on many ecosystems. Stomatal responses to changing environmental conditions form the backbone of all ecosystem models, but are based on empirical relationships and are not well-tested during drought conditions. Here, we use a dataset of 34 woody plant species spanning global forest biomes to examine the effect of leaf water potential on stomatal conductance and test the predictive accuracy of three major stomatal models and a recently proposed model. We find that current leaf-level empirical models have consistent biases of over-prediction of stomatal conductance during dry conditions, particularly at low soil water potentials. Furthermore, the recently proposed stomatal conductance model yields increases in predictive capability compared to current models, and with particular improvement during drought conditions. Our results reveal that including stomatal sensitivity to declining water potential and consequent impairment of plant water transport will improve predictions during drought conditions and show that many biomes contain a diversity of plant stomatal strategies that range from risky to conservative stomatal regulation during water stress. Such improvements in stomatal simulation are greatly needed to help unravel and predict the response of ecosystems to future climate extremes.

  9. Stomatal Blue Light Response Is Present in Early Vascular Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Michio; Kitagawa, Yuki; Shimazaki, Ken-ichiro

    2015-10-01

    Light is a major environmental factor required for stomatal opening. Blue light (BL) induces stomatal opening in higher plants as a signal under the photosynthetic active radiation. The stomatal BL response is not present in the fern species of Polypodiopsida. The acquisition of a stomatal BL response might provide competitive advantages in both the uptake of CO2 and prevention of water loss with the ability to rapidly open and close stomata. We surveyed the stomatal opening in response to strong red light (RL) and weak BL under the RL with gas exchange technique in a diverse selection of plant species from euphyllophytes, including spermatophytes and monilophytes, to lycophytes. We showed the presence of RL-induced stomatal opening in most of these species and found that the BL responses operated in all euphyllophytes except Polypodiopsida. We also confirmed that the stomatal opening in lycophytes, the early vascular plants, is driven by plasma membrane proton-translocating adenosine triphosphatase and K(+) accumulation in guard cells, which is the same mechanism operating in stomata of angiosperms. These results suggest that the early vascular plants respond to both RL and BL and actively regulate stomatal aperture. We also found three plant species that absolutely require BL for both stomatal opening and photosynthetic CO2 fixation, including a gymnosperm, C. revoluta, and the ferns Equisetum hyemale and Psilotum nudum. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Analysis of Stomatal Patterning in Selected Mutants of MAPK Pathways

    KAUST Repository

    Felemban, Abrar

    2016-05-01

    Stomata are cellular valves in plants that play an essential role in the regulation of gas exchange and are distributed in the epidermis of aerial organs. In Arabidopsis thaliana, stomatal production and development are coordinated by the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling pathway, which modulates a variety of other processes, including cell proliferation, regulation of cytokinesis, programed cell death, and response to abiotic and biotic stress. The environment also plays a role in stomatal development, by influencing the frequency at which stomata develop in leaves. This thesis presents an analysis of stomatal development in Arabidopsis mutants in two MAPK pathways: MEKK1-MKK1/MKK2-MPK4, and MAP3K17/18-MKK3. Obtained results demonstrate the effect of stress conditions on stomatal development and specify the involvement of analysed MAPK in stomatal patterning. First, both analysed pathways modulate stomatal patterning in Arabidopsis cotyledons. Second, plant growth-promoting bacteria tested enhance stomatal density and affect guard cell morphology. Third, the sucrose or mannitol treatment increases defects in stomatal patterning. Finally, salt stress or high temperature can suppress stomatal defects in mutants of the MEKK1-MKK1/MKK2-MPK4 pathway.

  11. Oncolytic viruses sensitize human tumor cells for NY-ESO-1 tumor antigen recognition by CD4+ effector T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaunay, Tiphaine; Violland, Mathilde; Boisgerault, Nicolas; Dutoit, Soizic; Vignard, Virginie; Münz, Christian; Gannage, Monique; Dréno, Brigitte; Vaivode, Kristine; Pjanova, Dace; Labarrière, Nathalie; Wang, Yaohe; Chiocca, E Antonio; Boeuf, Fabrice Le; Bell, John C; Erbs, Philippe; Tangy, Frédéric; Grégoire, Marc; Fonteneau, Jean-François

    2018-01-01

    Oncolytic immunotherapy using oncolytic viruses (OV) has been shown to stimulate the antitumor immune response by inducing the release of tumor-associated antigens (TAA) and danger signals from the dying infected tumor cells. In this study, we sought to determine if the lysis of tumor cells induced by different OV: measles virus, vaccinia virus, vesicular stomatitis virus, herpes simplex type I virus, adenovirus or enterovirus, has consequences on the capacity of tumor cells to present TAA, such as NY-ESO-1. We show that the co-culture of NY-ESO-1 neg /HLA-DP4 pos melanoma cells with NY-ESO-1 pos /HLA-DP4 neg melanoma cells infected and killed by different OV induces an intercellular transfer of NY-ESO-1 that allows the recognition of NY-ESO-1 neg /HLA-DP4 pos tumor cells by an HLA-DP4/NY-ESO-1 (157-170) -specific CD4+ cytotoxic T cell clone, NY67. We then confirmed this result in a second model with an HLA-DP4+ melanoma cell line that expresses a low amount of NY-ESO-1. Recognition of this cell line by the NY67 clone is largely increased in the presence of OV productive infection. Altogether, our results show for the first time another mechanism of stimulation of the anti-tumor immune response by OV, via the loading of tumor cells with TAA that sensitizes them for direct recognition by specific effector CD4+ T cells, supporting the use of OV for cancer immunotherapy.

  12. A novel borna disease virus vector system that stably expresses foreign proteins from an intercistronic noncoding region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daito, Takuji; Fujino, Kan; Honda, Tomoyuki; Matsumoto, Yusuke; Watanabe, Yohei; Tomonaga, Keizo

    2011-12-01

    Borna disease virus (BDV), a nonsegmented, negative-strand RNA virus, infects a wide variety of mammalian species and readily establishes a long-lasting, persistent infection in brain cells. Therefore, this virus could be a promising candidate as a novel RNA virus vector enabling stable gene expression in the central nervous system (CNS). Previous studies demonstrated that the 5' untranslated region of the genome is the only site for insertion and expression of a foreign gene. In this study, we established a novel BDV vector in which an additional transcription cassette has been inserted into an intercistronic noncoding region between the viral phosphoprotein (P) and matrix (M) genes. The recombinant BDV (rBDV) carrying green fluorescent protein (GFP) between the P and M genes, rBDV P/M-GFP, expressed GFP efficiently in cultured cells and rodent brains for a long period of time without attenuation. Furthermore, we generated a nonpropagating rBDV, ΔGLLP/M, which lacks the envelope glycoprotein (G) and a splicing intron within the polymerase gene (L), by the transcomplementation system with either transient or stable expression of the G gene. Interestingly, rBDV ΔGLLP/M established a persistent infection in cultured cells with stable expression of GFP in the absence of the expression of G. Using persistently infected rBDV ΔGLLP/M-infected cells, we determined the amino acid region in the cytoplasmic tail (CT) of BDV G important for the release of infectious rBDV particles and also demonstrated that the CT region may be critical for the generation of pseudotyped rBDV having vesicular stomatitis virus G protein. Our results revealed that the newly established BDV vector constitutes an alternative tool not only for stable expression of foreign genes in the CNS but also for understanding the mechanism of the release of enveloped virions.

  13. A Novel Borna Disease Virus Vector System That Stably Expresses Foreign Proteins from an Intercistronic Noncoding Region▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daito, Takuji; Fujino, Kan; Honda, Tomoyuki; Matsumoto, Yusuke; Watanabe, Yohei; Tomonaga, Keizo

    2011-01-01

    Borna disease virus (BDV), a nonsegmented, negative-strand RNA virus, infects a wide variety of mammalian species and readily establishes a long-lasting, persistent infection in brain cells. Therefore, this virus could be a promising candidate as a novel RNA virus vector enabling stable gene expression in the central nervous system (CNS). Previous studies demonstrated that the 5′ untranslated region of the genome is the only site for insertion and expression of a foreign gene. In this study, we established a novel BDV vector in which an additional transcription cassette has been inserted into an intercistronic noncoding region between the viral phosphoprotein (P) and matrix (M) genes. The recombinant BDV (rBDV) carrying green fluorescent protein (GFP) between the P and M genes, rBDV P/M-GFP, expressed GFP efficiently in cultured cells and rodent brains for a long period of time without attenuation. Furthermore, we generated a nonpropagating rBDV, ΔGLLP/M, which lacks the envelope glycoprotein (G) and a splicing intron within the polymerase gene (L), by the transcomplementation system with either transient or stable expression of the G gene. Interestingly, rBDV ΔGLLP/M established a persistent infection in cultured cells with stable expression of GFP in the absence of the expression of G. Using persistently infected rBDV ΔGLLP/M-infected cells, we determined the amino acid region in the cytoplasmic tail (CT) of BDV G important for the release of infectious rBDV particles and also demonstrated that the CT region may be critical for the generation of pseudotyped rBDV having vesicular stomatitis virus G protein. Our results revealed that the newly established BDV vector constitutes an alternative tool not only for stable expression of foreign genes in the CNS but also for understanding the mechanism of the release of enveloped virions. PMID:21937656

  14. Large-scale purification of high purity α1-antitrypsin from Cohn Fraction IV with virus inactivation by solvent/detergent and dry-heat treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huangfu, Chaoji; Zhang, Jinchao; Ma, Yuyuan; Jia, Junting; Li, Jingxuan; Lv, Maomin; Ma, Xiaowei; Zhao, Xiong; Zhang, Jingang

    2017-10-26

    α1-Antitrypsin (AAT) is widely used to treat patients with congenital AAT deficiency. Cohn Fraction IV (Cohn F IV) is normally discarded during the manufacturing process of albumin but contains approximately 33% of plasma AAT. We established a new process for large-scale purification of AAT from it. liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry and high-performance liquid chromatography were applied for qualitative identification and composition analysis, respectively. Stabilizers were optimized for AAT activity protection during lyophilization and dry-heat. Virus inactivation by dry-heat and solvent/detergent (S/D) was validated on a range of viruses. AAT with purity of 95.54%, specific activity of 3,938.5 IU/mg, and yield of 26.79%, was achieved. More than 95% activity was reserved after S/D. More than 96% activity was obtained after lyophilization or dry-heat. After S/D, pseudorabies virus (PRV) and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) were inactivated below detectable level within 1 H. Virus titer reductions of more than 5.50 log 10 and 5.38 log 10 were achieved for PRV and VSV, respectively. Porcine parvovirus and encephalomyocarditis virus were inactivated by 3.17 log 10 and 5.88 log 10 reduction after dry-heat. The advantages of this process, including suitability for large-scale production, high purity, better utilization of human plasma, viral safety, commercial and inexpensive chromatography medium, may facilitate its further application. © 2017 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Caracterización epidemiológica de las áreas endémicas de estomatitis vesicular en México (1981-2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Navarro López

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available El presente estudio se diseñó para mejorar el sistema de vigilancia de las enfermedades vesiculares en México,bajo el sistema de planeación estratégica, identificando las zonas endémicas a través de la estabilidad de linajesvirales del serotipo Nueva Jersey, y analizando epidemiológicamente la información generada en 32 años devigilancia e investigación. Se presentan los resultados que permitieron caracterizar epidemiológicamente lasáreas donde se mantiene el virus de estomatitis vesicular de manera secular en México, y con ello, loscomponentes necesarios para la construcción de la Matriz de Indicadores para Resultados (MIR para elprograma de vigilancia de las enfermedades vesiculares en México, que pueden también servir para otros paísesafectados por esta enfermedad. Adicionalmente se aportan elementos para la prevención de la enfermedad, asícomo mejorar el comercio internacional de animales de países endémicos de estomatitis vesicular.

  16. Helper virus-free HSV-1 vectors packaged both in the presence of VSV G protein and in the absence of HSV-1 glycoprotein B support gene transfer into neurons in the rat striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, J; Yang, T; Ghosh, H P; Geller, A I

    2001-12-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) vectors have potential for gene transfer into quiescent cells, but the gene transfer process could be more efficient. In other vector systems, both the titers and the efficiency of gene transfer have been enhanced by pseudotyping the vector particles with vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) G protein. In this report, we pseudotyped helper virus-free HSV-1 plasmid vectors with VSV G protein. Packaging was performed in the presence of both VSV G protein and a deletion in an essential HSV-1 glycoprotein, gB. The resulting vector stocks supported gene transfer into both fibroblast and neuronal cell lines. VSV G protein was required for gene transfer because preincubation of these vector stocks with antibodies directed against either VSV G protein or VSV reduced the titer to undetectable levels. Although the titers were lower than those obtained using the unmodified vector system, the titers were not increased by use of chimeric proteins that contain the extracellular domain of VSV G protein and the transmembrane and/or cytoplasmic domains of specific HSV-1 glycoproteins. Also, the titers were not increased by performing the packaging in the presence of deletions in multiple HSV-1 glycoproteins. Nonetheless, pHSVlac pseudotyped with VSV G protein supported gene transfer into striatal neurons in the rat brain. Thus, HSV-1 vectors pseudotyped with VSV G protein may be useful for specific gene transfer studies.

  17. Long-Distance Interferon Signaling within the Brain Blocks Virus Spread

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Siyuan

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Serious permanent neurological or psychiatric dysfunction may result from virus infections in the central nervous system (CNS). Olfactory sensory neurons are in direct contact with the external environment, making them susceptible to infection by viruses that can enter the brain via the olfactory nerve. The rarity of full brain viral infections raises the important question of whether unique immune defense mechanisms protect the brain. Here we show that both RNA (vesicular stomatitis virus [VSV]) and DNA (cytomegalovirus [CMV]) virus inoculations of the nasal mucosa leading to olfactory bulb (OB) infection activate long-distance signaling that upregulates antiviral interferon (IFN)-stimulated gene (ISG) expression in uninfected remote regions of the brain. This signaling mechanism is dependent on IFN-α/β receptors deep within the brain, leading to the activation of a distant antiviral state that prevents infection of the caudal brain. In normal mice, VSV replication is limited to the OB, and these animals typically survive the infection. In contrast, mice lacking the IFN-α/β receptor succumbed to the infection, with VSV spreading throughout the brain. Chemical destruction of the olfactory sensory neurons blocked both virus trafficking into the OB and the IFN response in the caudal brain, indicating a direct signaling within the brain after intranasal infection. Most signaling within the brain occurs across the 20-nm synaptic cleft. The unique long-distance IFN signaling described here occurs across many millimeters within the brain and is critical for survival and normal brain function. IMPORTANCE The olfactory mucosa can serve as a conduit for a number of viruses to enter the brain. Yet infections in the CNS rarely occur. The mechanism responsible for protecting the brain from viruses that successfully invade the OB, the first site of infection subsequent to infection of the nasal mucosa, remains elusive. Here we demonstrate that the protection is

  18. Total antioxidant status and oxidative stress in recurrent aphthous stomatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tugrul, Selahattin; Koçyiğit, Abdurrahim; Doğan, Remzi; Eren, Sabri Baki; Senturk, Erol; Ozturan, Orhan; Ozar, Omer Faruk

    2016-03-01

    Recurrent aphthous stomatitis is an idiopathic, chronic, recurrent inflammatory disease of the oral mucosa. It is thought that oxidative stress caused by systemic inflammation plays a basic role in the etiopathogenesis of recurrent aphthous stomatitis. The aim of this study is to review oxidative status and DNA damage in recurrent aphthous stomatitis. The study included 42 patients with an active recurrent aphthous stomatitis lesion and 39 healthy volunteers with similar demographic characteristics. DNA damage was analyzed using alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay). Plasma levels of total antioxidant status and total oxidative status were determined by using an automated measurement method. Oxidative stress index was calculated as total oxidative status/total antioxidant status and × 100. The total oxidative status and oxidative stress index values were significantly higher in the recurrent aphthous stomatitis group compared to the control group, while total antioxidant status values were significantly lower. In the recurrent aphthous stomatitis group, DNA damage was observed to be significantly higher than the control group. In correlation analysis, significant correlation was found between DNA damage and the oxidative stress index and total oxidative status values in the recurrent aphthous stomatitis group. This is the first report in the literature that demonstrates association of recurrent aphthous stomatitis with increased oxidative status. © 2015 The International Society of Dermatology.

  19. Stomatal characteristics of Eucalyptus grandis clonal hybrids in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim was to investigate the degree to which stomatal conductance (gs) and stomatal density differ between the clonal hybrids across seasons and in response to water stress. Plants from one E. grandis x E. camaldulensis (GC) and two E. grandis x E. urophylla (GU1 and GU2) clones were grown for 18 months in 80 l ...

  20. Dynamic changes of stomatal characteristics during the flower, fruit ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results showed that there were stomata on the median region of exocarps, adaxial and abaxial epidermis of the petals and leaf midribs. The petal and fruit epidermal cells were polygonal in shape, while leaf epidermal cells were strip. The leaf stomatal index and stomatal density were the largest in the surfaces ...

  1. Quantitative trait loci mapping for stomatal traits in interspecific ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dr.YASODHA

    Cartographer v 2.5 (Wang et al. 2007) to identify QTLs for stomatal density, stomatal area and pore length in adaxial and abaxial leaf surfaces adopting backcross model. The LOD threshold was determined by permutation analysis with 1000 repetitions. The size of the analysis window was maintained at 10 cM with a walk ...

  2. Urban Legends Series: Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccaglini, Lorena; Lalla, Rajesh V.; Bruce, Alison J.; Sartori-Valinotti, Julio C.; Latortue, Marie C.; Carrozzo, Marco; Rogers, Roy S.

    2011-01-01

    Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is the most common idiopathic intraoral ulcerative disease in the USA. Aphthae typically occur in apparently healthy individuals, although an association with certain systemic diseases has been reported. Despite the unclear etiopathogenesis, new drug trials are continuously conducted in an attempt to reduce pain and dysfunction. We investigated four controversial topics: (1) Is complex aphthosis a mild form of Behçet’s disease (BD)? (2) Is periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and adenitis (PFAPA) syndrome a distinct medical entity? (3) Is RAS associated with other systemic diseases (e.g., celiac disease and B12 deficiency)? (4) Are there any new RAS treatments? Results from extensive literature searches, including a systematic review of RAS trials, suggested that: (1) Complex aphthosis is not a mild form of BD in North America or Western Europe; (2) Diagnostic criteria for PFAPA have low specificity and the characteristics of the oral ulcers warrant further studies; (3) Oral ulcers may be associated with celiac disease; however, these ulcers may not be RAS; RAS is rarely associated with B12 deficiency; nevertheless, B12 treatment may be beneficial, via mechanisms that warrant further study; (4) Thirty-three controlled trials published in the past 6 years reported some effectiveness, though potential for bias was high. PMID:21812866

  3. The distribution of fitness effects caused by single-nucleotide substitutions in an RNA virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanjuán, Rafael; Moya, Andrés; Elena, Santiago F.

    2004-01-01

    Little is known about the mutational fitness effects associated with single-nucleotide substitutions on RNA viral genomes. Here, we used site-directed mutagenesis to create 91 single mutant clones of vesicular stomatitis virus derived from a common ancestral cDNA and performed competition experiments to measure the relative fitness of each mutant. The distribution of nonlethal deleterious effects was highly skewed and had a long, flat tail. As expected, fitness effects depended on whether mutations were chosen at random or reproduced previously described ones. The effect of random deleterious mutations was well described by a log-normal distribution, with -19% reduction of average fitness; the effects distribution of preobserved deleterious mutations was better explained by a β model. The fit of both models was improved when combined with a uniform distribution. Up to 40% of random mutations were lethal. The proportion of beneficial mutations was unexpectedly high. Beneficial effects followed a γ distribution, with expected fitness increases of 1% for random mutations and 5% for preobserved mutations. PMID:15159545

  4. [Vesicular and pronuclear glycoproteins in the pathogenesis of cholesterol lithiasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirsa, M; Smíd, F; Marecek, Z

    1998-01-26

    Several biliary proteins have been known to accelerate fusion of cholesterol rich phospholipid vesicles. Some of them are present in vesicular membrane, localisation of other proteins is unknown. Biliary glycoprotein has not been studied in consequence with pathogenesis of cholesterol lithiasis. Low molecular extravesicular proteins were separated from vesicles by gel filtration on a 1200mm column of Sephacryl S-300 HR. Immunoglobulins IgM, IgA, haptoglobin, biliary glycoprotein I (BGP I) and nonspecific crossreactive antigen were eluted along with vesicles. Albumin and alpha 1-acid glycoprotein were eluted later and must be extravesicular. Fact that BGP I (85 kDa membrane glycoprotein) eluted along with vesicles and not in albumin fraction suggests that it might be bound in vesicular membrane. As a known adhesion molecule it could thus play an important role in pathogenesis of cholesterol cholelithiasis.

  5. Type III IFN interleukin-28 mediates the antitumor efficacy of oncolytic virus VSV in immune-competent mouse models of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongthida, Phonphimon; Diaz, Rosa Maria; Galivo, Feorillo; Kottke, Timothy; Thompson, Jill; Pulido, Jose; Pavelko, Kevin; Pease, Larry; Melcher, Alan; Vile, Richard

    2010-06-01

    Innate immune effector mechanisms triggered by oncolytic viruses may contribute to the clearance of both infected and uninfected tumor cells in immunocompetent murine hosts. Here, we developed an in vitro tumor cell/bone marrow coculture assay and used it to dissect innate immune sensor and effector responses to intratumoral vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). We found that the type III IFN interleukin-28 (IL-28) was induced by viral activation of innate immune-sensing cells, acting as a key mediator of VSV-mediated virotherapy of B16ova melanomas. Using tumor variants which differentially express the IL-28 receptor, we showed that IL-28 induced by VSV within the tumor microenvironment sensitizes tumor cells to natural killer cell recognition and activation. These results revealed new insights into the immunovirological mechanisms associated with oncolytic virotherapy in immune-competent hosts. Moreover, they defined a new class of tumor-associated mutation, such as acquired loss of responsiveness to IL-28 signaling, which confers insensitivity to oncolytic virotherapy through a mechanism independent of viral replication in vitro. Lastly, the findings suggested new strategies to manipulate immune signals that may enhance viral replication, along with antitumor immune activation, and improve the efficacy of oncolytic virotherapies. Copyright 2010 AACR.

  6. Expression of Vesicular Nucleotide Transporter in Rat Odontoblasts

    OpenAIRE

    Ikeda, Erina; Goto, Tetsuya; Gunjigake, Kaori; Kuroishi, Kayoko; Ueda, Masae; Kataoka, Shinji; Toyono, Takashi; Nakatomi, Mitsushiro; Seta, Yuji; Kitamura, Chiaki; Nishihara, Tatsuji; Kawamoto, Tatsuo

    2016-01-01

    Several theories have been proposed regarding pain transmission mechanisms in tooth. However, the exact signaling mechanism from odontoblasts to pulp nerves remains to be clarified. Recently, ATP-associated pain transmission has been reported, but it is unclear whether ATP is involved in tooth pain transmission. In the present study, we focused on the vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT), a transporter of ATP into vesicles, and examined whether VNUT was involved in ATP release from odontob...

  7. Development of a GeXP-multiplex PCR assay for the simultaneous detection and differentiation of six cattle viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Fan

    Full Text Available Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV, Bluetongue virus (BTV, Vesicular stomatitis Virus (VSV, Bovine viral diarrheal (BVDV, Bovine rotavirus (BRV, and Bovine herpesvirus 1 (IBRV are common cattle infectious viruses that cause a great economic loss every year in many parts of the world. A rapid and high-throughput GenomeLab Gene Expression Profiler (GeXP analyzer-based multiplex PCR assay was developed for the simultaneous detection and differentiation of these six cattle viruses. Six pairs of chimeric primers consisting of both the gene-specific primer and a universal primer were designed and used for amplification. Then capillary electrophoresis was used to separate the fluorescent labeled PCR products according to the amplicons size. The specificity of GeXP-multiplex PCR assay was examined with samples of the single template and mixed template of six viruses. The sensitivity was evaluated using the GeXP-multiplex PCR assay on serial 10-fold dilutions of ssRNAs obtained via in vitro transcription. To further evaluate the reliability, 305 clinical samples were tested by the GeXP-multiplex PCR assay. The results showed that the corresponding virus specific fragments of genes were amplified. The detection limit of the GeXP-multiplex PCR assay was 100 copies/μL in a mixed sample of ssRNAs containing target genes of six different cattle viruses, whereas the detection limit for the Gexp-mono PCR assay for a single target gene was 10 copies/μL. In detection of viruses in 305 clinical samples, the results of GeXP were consistent with simplex real-time PCR. Analysis of positive samples by sequencing demonstrated that the GeXP-multiplex PCR assay had no false positive samples of nonspecific amplification. In conclusion, this GeXP-multiplex PCR assay is a high throughput, specific, sensitive, rapid and simple method for the detection and differentiation of six cattle viruses. It is an effective tool that can be applied for the rapid differential diagnosis

  8. Expression of RNA virus proteins by RNA polymerase II dependent expression plasmids is hindered at multiple steps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Überla Klaus

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteins of human and animal viruses are frequently expressed from RNA polymerase II dependent expression cassettes to study protein function and to develop gene-based vaccines. Initial attempts to express the G protein of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV and the F protein of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV by eukaryotic promoters revealed restrictions at several steps of gene expression. Results Insertion of an intron flanked by exonic sequences 5'-terminal to the open reading frames (ORF of VSV-G and RSV-F led to detectable cytoplasmic mRNA levels of both genes. While the exonic sequences were sufficient to stabilise the VSV-G mRNA, cytoplasmic mRNA levels of RSV-F were dependent on the presence of a functional intron. Cytoplasmic VSV-G mRNA levels led to readily detectable levels of VSV-G protein, whereas RSV-F protein expression remained undetectable. However, RSV-F expression was observed after mutating two of four consensus sites for polyadenylation present in the RSV-F ORF. Expression levels could be further enhanced by codon optimisation. Conclusion Insufficient cytoplasmic mRNA levels and premature polyadenylation prevent expression of RSV-F by RNA polymerase II dependent expression plasmids. Since RSV replicates in the cytoplasm, the presence of premature polyadenylation sites and elements leading to nuclear instability should not interfere with RSV-F expression during virus replication. The molecular mechanisms responsible for the destabilisation of the RSV-F and VSV-G mRNAs and the different requirements for their rescue by insertion of an intron remain to be defined.

  9. Prime-boost using separate oncolytic viruses in combination with checkpoint blockade improves anti-tumour therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilett, E; Kottke, T; Thompson, J; Rajani, K; Zaidi, S; Evgin, L; Coffey, M; Ralph, C; Diaz, R; Pandha, H; Harrington, K; Selby, P; Bram, R; Melcher, A; Vile, R

    2017-01-01

    The anti-tumour effects associated with oncolytic virus therapy are mediated significantly through immune-mediated mechanisms, which depend both on the type of virus and the route of delivery. Here, we show that intra-tumoral oncolysis by Reovirus induced the priming of a CD8+, Th1-type anti-tumour response. By contrast, systemically delivered Vesicular Stomatitis Virus expressing a cDNA library of melanoma antigens (VSV-ASMEL) promoted a potent anti-tumour CD4+ Th17 response. Therefore, we hypothesised that combining the Reovirus-induced CD8+ T cell response, with the VSV-ASMEL CD4+ Th17 helper response, would produce enhanced anti-tumour activity. Consistent with this, priming with intra-tumoral Reovirus, followed by an intra-venous VSV-ASMEL Th17 boost, significantly improved survival of mice bearing established subcutaneous B16 melanoma tumours. We also show that combination of either therapy alone with anti-PD-1 immune checkpoint blockade augmented both the Th1 response induced by systemically delivered Reovirus in combination with GM-CSF, and also the Th17 response induced by VSV-ASMEL. Significantly, anti-PD-1 also uncovered an anti-tumour Th1 response following VSV-ASMEL treatment that was not seen in the absence of checkpoint blockade. Finally, the combination of all three treatments (priming with systemically delivered Reovirus, followed by double boosting with systemic VSV-ASMEL and anti-PD-1) significantly enhanced survival, with long-term cures, compared to any individual, or double, combination therapies, associated with strong Th1 and Th17 responses to tumour antigens. Our data show that it is possible to generate fully systemic, highly effective anti-tumour immunovirotherapy by combining oncolytic viruses, along with immune checkpoint blockade, to induce complementary mechanisms of anti-tumour immune responses.

  10. Singleton reactors in the diagnosis of swine vesicular disease: the role of coxsackievirus B5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moonen, P; Van Poelwijk, F; Moormann, R; Dekker, A

    2000-10-01

    Swine vesicular disease virus (SVDV) and Coxsackie B5 virus (CVB5) are closely related viruses that can infect swine and man and give rise to cross-reacting serum antibodies. It is, therefore, possible that SVD antibodies found in serologic screenings of pigs are induced by CVB5. Single positive animals found in screening programmes are generally referred to as singleton reactors (SR). To determine whether SR in SVDV screenings are induced by CVB5 infection, virus neutralisation tests (VNTs) and radioimmunoprecipitation assays (RIPA) were carried out on sera of SR, sera of pigs experimentally infected with SVDV, and sera from pigs vaccinated with CVB5 isolates. The SR sera reacted repeatedly positive in the SVDV UKG/27/72 VNT, but reacted differently in three other VNTs (SVDV NET/1/92, CVB5A, and CVB5B). The VNT titres obtained with the SR sera revealed a correlation between both SVDV strains, and also between both CVB5 stains, but no correlation was found between SVD and CVB5 VNT titres. Sera of experimentally infected (SVDV) or vaccinated (CVB5) pigs showed titres in all four neutralisation tests. In the RIPA, the reaction patterns of the SR sera varied considerably with all four antigens used, in contrast to sera from pigs experimentally infected with SVDV that reacted with all antigens used, and sera from pigs vaccinated with CVB5 that reacted only with CVB5 antigens. The results presented in this paper show that neither CVB5 nor SVDV infections are the only cause of the SR phenomenon. Testing for CVB5 specific antibodies can reduce the number of SR sera in the serodiagnosis of SVDV.

  11. Fullerene Derivatives Strongly Inhibit HIV-1 Replication by Affecting Virus Maturation without Impairing Protease Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Zachary S; Castro, Edison; Seong, Chang-Soo; Cerón, Maira R; Echegoyen, Luis; Llano, Manuel

    2016-10-01

    Three compounds (1, 2, and 3) previously reported to inhibit HIV-1 replication and/or in vitro activity of reverse transcriptase were studied, but only fullerene derivatives 1 and 2 showed strong antiviral activity on the replication of HIV-1 in human CD4(+) T cells. However, these compounds did not inhibit infection by single-round infection vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein G (VSV-G)-pseudotyped viruses, indicating no effect on the early steps of the viral life cycle. In contrast, analysis of single-round infection VSV-G-pseudotyped HIV-1 produced in the presence of compound 1 or 2 showed a complete lack of infectivity in human CD4(+) T cells, suggesting that the late stages of the HIV-1 life cycle were affected. Quantification of virion-associated viral RNA and p24 indicates that RNA packaging and viral production were unremarkable in these viruses. However, Gag and Gag-Pol processing was affected, as evidenced by immunoblot analysis with an anti-p24 antibody and the measurement of virion-associated reverse transcriptase activity, ratifying the effect of the fullerene derivatives on virion maturation of the HIV-1 life cycle. Surprisingly, fullerenes 1 and 2 did not inhibit HIV-1 protease in an in vitro assay at the doses that potently blocked viral infectivity, suggesting a protease-independent mechanism of action. Highlighting the potential therapeutic relevance of fullerene derivatives, these compounds block infection by HIV-1 resistant to protease and maturation inhibitors. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  12. Switchable aptamers for biosensing and bioseparation of viruses (SwAps-V).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehbe, Mohamed; Labib, Mahmoud; Muharemagic, Darija; Zamay, Anna S; Berezovski, Maxim V

    2015-05-15

    There is a widespread interest in the development of aptamer-based affinity chromatographic methods for purification of biomolecules. Regardless of the many advantages exhibited by aptamers when compared to other recognition elements, the lack of an efficient regeneration technique that can be generalized to all targets has encumbered further integration of aptamers into affinity-based purification methods. Here we offer switchable aptamers (SwAps) that have been developed to solve this problem and move aptamer-based chromatography forward. SwAps are controlled-affinity aptamers, which have been employed here to purify vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) as a model case, however this technique can be extended to all biologically significant molecules. VSV is one oncolytic virus out of an arsenal of potential candidates shown to provide selective destruction of cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. These SwAps were developed in the presence of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) ions where they cannot bind to their target VSV in absence of these cations. Upon addition of EDTA and EGTA, the divalent cations were sequestered from the stabilized aptameric structure causing a conformational change and subsequently release of the virus. Both flow cytometry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were employed to estimate the binding affinities between the selected SwAps and VSV and to determine the coefficient of switching (CoS) upon elution. Among fifteen sequenced SwAps, four have exhibited high affinity to VSV and ability to switch upon elution and thus were further integrated into streptavidin-coated magnetic beads for purification of VSV. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Mapping the neutralizing epitopes on the glycoprotein of infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus, a fish rhabdovirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, C.; Chien, M.S.; Landolt, M.L.; Batts, W.; Winton, J.

    1996-01-01

    Twelve neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the fish rhabdovirus, infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), were used to select 20 MAb escape mutants. The nucleotide sequence of the entire glycoprotein (G) gene was determined for six mutants representing differing cross-neutralization patterns and each had a single nucleotide change leading to a single amino acid substitution within one of three regions of the protein. These data were used to design nested PCR primers to amplify portions of the G gene of the 14 remaining mutants. When the PCR products from these mutants were sequenced, they also had single nucleotide substitutions coding for amino acid substitutions at the same, or nearby, locations. Of the 20 mutants for which all or part of the glycoprotein gene was sequenced, two MAbs selected mutants with substitutions at amino acids 230-231 (antigenic site I) and the remaining MAbs selected mutants with substitutions at amino acids 272-276 (antigenic site II). Two MAbs that selected mutants mapping to amino acids 272-276, selected other mutants that mapped to amino acids 78-81, raising the possibility that this portion of the N terminus of the protein was part of a discontinuous epitope defining antigenic site II. CLUSTAL alignment of the glycoproteins of rabies virus, vesicular stomatitis virus and IHNV revealed similarities in the location of the neutralizing epitopes and a high degree of conservation among cysteine residues, indicating that the glycoproteins of three different genera of animal rhabdoviruses may share a similar three-dimensional structure in spite of extensive sequence divergence.

  14. Management of Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery-Cranny, Jodie A; Wallace, Ann; Rogers, Helen J; Hughes, Sophie C; Hegarty, Anne M; Zaitoun, Halla

    2015-01-01

    Recurrent oral ulceration is common and may present in childhood. Causes of recurrent oral ulceration are numerous and there may be an association with underlying systemic disease. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is the most common underlying diagnosis in children. The discomfort of oral ulcers can impact negatively on quality of life of a child, interfering with eating, speaking and may result in missed school days. The role of the general dental practitioner is to identify patients who can be treated with simple measures in primary dental care and those who require assessment and treatment in secondary care. Management may include topical agents for symptomatic relief, topical corticosteroids and, in severe recalcitrant cases, systemic agents may be necessary.

  15. Haematological parameters and recurrent aphthous stomatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Nabiha Farasat; Saeed, Mohammad; Chaudhary, Saima; Khan, Nabiha Farasat

    2013-02-01

    To find out the relationship between recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) with deficiencies of haemoglobin, haematocrit, serum vitamin B12, serum Ferritin and red blood cells (RBC) Folate level. An analytical cross-sectional study. Department of Oral Health Sciences, Shaikh Zayed Federal Postgraduate Medical Complex, Lahore, from February to July 2008. Sixty consecutive subjects with active RAS were taken as the aphthous group; 60 age and gender matched subjects without RAS were as the Non-Aphthous group. Five milliliter blood was taken from both groups to evaluate the levels of serum B12, and RBC Folate through radio immuno assay and serum ferritin with enzyme linked immuno-sorbent assay tests. Complete blood count was carried out to determine the level of haemoglobin and haematocrit in both groups. Proportion of subjects with lower values was compared using 2 text of proportions with significance at p aphthous group.

  16. A Mouse Model to Investigate Postmenopausal Biology as an Etiology of Ovarian Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-01

    We investigated the potential use of genetically engineered Vesicular Stomatitis Virus ( VSV ) to treat ovarian cancer using the Wv mouse models. We...l e i n f oArticle history: Received 2 September 2009 Available online x Keywords: Ovarian Cancer Therapy Oncolytic virus VSV Tumor mouse models...cancer is an urgent agenda. We investigated the potential use of genetically engineered Vesicular Stomatitis Virus ( VSV ) to treat ovarian cancer patients

  17. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis and Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Carolina-Cavaliéri; Gomez, Ricardo-Santiago; Zina, Lívia-Guimarães; Amaral, Fabrício-Rezende

    2016-03-01

    Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is a recurrent painful ulcerative disorder that commonly affects the oral mucosa. Local and systemic factors such as trauma, food sensitivity, nutritional deficiencies, systemic conditions, immunological disorders and genetic polymorphisms are associated with the development of the disease. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a gram-negative, microaerophile bacteria, that colonizes the gastric mucosa and it was previously suggested to be involved in RAS development. In the present paper we reviewed all previous studies that investigated the association between RAS and H. pylori. A search in Pubmed (MEDLINE) databases was made of articles published up until July 2015 using the following keywords: Helicobacter Pylori or H. pylori and RAS or Recurrent aphthous stomatitis. Fifteen experimental studies that addressed the relationship between infection with H. pylori and the presence of RAS and three reviews, including a systematic review and a meta-analysis were included in this review. The studies reviewed used different methods to assess this relationship, including PCR, nested PCR, culture, ELISA and urea breath test. A large variation in the number of patients included in each study, as well as inclusion criteria and laboratorial methods was observed. H. pylori can be detected in the oral mucosa or ulcerated lesion of some patients with RAS. The quality of the all studies included in this review was assessed using levels of evidence based on the University of Oxford's Center for Evidence Based Medicine Criteria. Although the eradication of the infection may affect the clinical course of the oral lesions by undetermined mechanisms, RAS ulcers are not associated with the presence of the bacteria in the oral cavity and there is no evidence that H. pylori infection drives RAS development.

  18. Origins and Evolution of Stomatal Development1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The fossil record suggests stomata-like pores were present on the surfaces of land plants over 400 million years ago. Whether stomata arose once or whether they arose independently across newly evolving land plant lineages has long been a matter of debate. In Arabidopsis, a genetic toolbox has been identified that tightly controls stomatal development and patterning. This includes the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors SPEECHLESS (SPCH), MUTE, FAMA, and ICE/SCREAMs (SCRMs), which promote stomatal formation. These factors are regulated via a signaling cascade, which includes mobile EPIDERMAL PATTERNING FACTOR (EPF) peptides to enforce stomatal spacing. Mosses and hornworts, the most ancient extant lineages to possess stomata, possess orthologs of these Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) stomatal toolbox genes, and manipulation in the model bryophyte Physcomitrella patens has shown that the bHLH and EPF components are also required for moss stomatal development and patterning. This supports an ancient and tightly conserved genetic origin of stomata. Here, we review recent discoveries and, by interrogating newly available plant genomes, we advance the story of stomatal development and patterning across land plant evolution. Furthermore, we identify potential orthologs of the key toolbox genes in a hornwort, further supporting a single ancient genetic origin of stomata in the ancestor to all stomatous land plants. PMID:28356502

  19. Role of Sucrose in Emerging Mechanisms of Stomatal Aperture Regulation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Outlaw, W. H.

    2000-09-15

    Focused on the second of 2 hypotheses that were proposed for testing that transpiration rate determines the extent to which suc accumulates in the GC wall providing a mechanism for regulating stomatal aperture size.

  20. Endobronchial tuberculosis presented as multiple endobronchial vesicular lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farah Idrees

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Endobronchial tuberculosis (EBTB is a tuberculous infection of the tracheobronchial tree with microbiological and histopathological evidence, with or without parenchymal involvement. EBTB commonly presents as acute or insidious onset cough, wheeze, low grade fever, and constitutional symptoms. In elderly patients, other differentials like malignancy and pneumonia may lead to misdiagnosis. Hence, bronchoscopy is essential for confirmation of EBTB. Here we report a rare presentation of EBTB in a 65 year old patient who presented with 3 months history of fever and cough and have multiple endobronchial vesicular lesions on bronchoscopy.

  1. Vesicular-Arbuscular Mycorrhiza in Field-Grown Crops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Iver

    1986-01-01

    The importance of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhiza (VAM) and P fertilizer for P nutrition and dry matter production in field peas (Pisum sativum L.) was studied in moderately P-deficient soil. Half of the experimental plots were fumigated to reduce the level of VAM infection. Shoots and 0 to 30 cm...... in fumigated plots, although both it and P uptake were increased by adding P fertilizer. The possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed. A supplementary survey on infection development at five other field sites showed that peas are extensively colonized by VAM fungi, even in soils where a standard...

  2. The acclimation of Tilia cordata stomatal opening in response to light, and stomatal anatomy to vegetational shade and its components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasamaa, Krõõt; Aphalo, Pedro José

    2017-02-01

    Stomatal anatomical traits and rapid responses to several components of visible light were measured in Tilia cordata Mill. seedlings grown in an open, fully sunlit field (C-set), or under different kinds of shade. The main questions were: (i) stomatal responses to which visible light spectrum regions are modified by growth-environment shade and (ii) which separate component of vegetational shade is most effective in eliciting the acclimation effects of the full vegetational shade. We found that stomatal opening in response to red or green light did not differ between the plants grown in the different environments. Stomatal response to blue light was increased (in comparison with that of C-set) in the leaves grown in full vegetational shade (IABW-set), in attenuated UVAB irradiance (AB-set) or in decreased light intensity (neutral shade) plus attenuated UVAB irradiance (IAB-set). In all sets, the addition of green light-two or four times stronger-into induction light barely changed the rate of the blue-light-stimulated stomatal opening. In the AB-set, stomatal response to blue light equalled the strong IABW-set response. In attenuated UVB-grown leaves, stomatal response fell midway between IABW- and C-set results. Blue light response by neutral shade-grown leaves did not differ from that of the C-set, and the response by the IAB-set did not differ from that of the AB-set. Stomatal size was not modified by growth environments. Stomatal density and index were remarkably decreased only in the IABW- and IAB-sets. It was concluded that differences in white light responses between T. cordata leaves grown in different light environments are caused only by their different blue light response. Differences in stomatal sensitivity are not dependent on altered stomatal anatomy. Attenuated UVAB irradiance is the most efficient component of vegetational shade in stimulating acclimation of stomata, whereas decreased light intensity plays a minor role. © The Author 2016. Published

  3. Sequences within both the 5' UTR and Gag are required for optimal in vivo packaging and propagation of mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV genomic RNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farah Mustafa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: This study mapped regions of genomic RNA (gRNA important for packaging and propagation of mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV. MMTV is a type B betaretrovirus which preassembles intracellularly, a phenomenon distinct from retroviruses that assemble the progeny virion at cell surface just before budding such as the type C human and feline immunodeficiency viruses (HIV and FIV. Studies of FIV and Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (MPMV, a type D betaretrovirus with similar intracellular virion assembly processes as MMTV, have shown that the 5' untranslated region (5' UTR and 5' end of gag constitute important packaging determinants for gRNA. METHODOLOGY: Three series of MMTV transfer vectors containing incremental amounts of gag or 5' UTR sequences, or incremental amounts of 5' UTR in the presence of 400 nucleotides (nt of gag were constructed to delineate the extent of 5' sequences that may be involved in MMTV gRNA packaging. Real time PCR measured the packaging efficiency of these vector RNAs into MMTV particles generated by co-transfection of MMTV Gag/Pol, vesicular stomatitis virus envelope glycoprotein (VSV-G Env, and individual transfer vectors into human 293T cells. Transfer vector RNA propagation was monitored by measuring transduction of target HeLaT4 cells following infection with viral particles containing a hygromycin resistance gene expression cassette on the packaged RNA. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: MMTV requires the entire 5' UTR and a minimum of ~120 nucleotide (nt at the 5' end of gag for not only efficient gRNA packaging but also propagation of MMTV-based transfer vector RNAs. Vector RNAs without the entire 5' UTR were defective for both efficient packaging and propagation into target cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results reveal that the 5' end of MMTV genome is critical for both gRNA packaging and propagation, unlike the recently delineated FIV and MPMV packaging determinants that have been shown to be of bipartite nature.

  4. Sequences within both the 5' UTR and Gag are required for optimal in vivo packaging and propagation of mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) genomic RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Farah; Al Amri, Dhuha; Al Ali, Farah; Al Sari, Noor; Al Suwaidi, Sarah; Jayanth, Preethi; Philips, Pretty S; Rizvi, Tahir A

    2012-01-01

    This study mapped regions of genomic RNA (gRNA) important for packaging and propagation of mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV). MMTV is a type B betaretrovirus which preassembles intracellularly, a phenomenon distinct from retroviruses that assemble the progeny virion at cell surface just before budding such as the type C human and feline immunodeficiency viruses (HIV and FIV). Studies of FIV and Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (MPMV), a type D betaretrovirus with similar intracellular virion assembly processes as MMTV, have shown that the 5' untranslated region (5' UTR) and 5' end of gag constitute important packaging determinants for gRNA. Three series of MMTV transfer vectors containing incremental amounts of gag or 5' UTR sequences, or incremental amounts of 5' UTR in the presence of 400 nucleotides (nt) of gag were constructed to delineate the extent of 5' sequences that may be involved in MMTV gRNA packaging. Real time PCR measured the packaging efficiency of these vector RNAs into MMTV particles generated by co-transfection of MMTV Gag/Pol, vesicular stomatitis virus envelope glycoprotein (VSV-G Env), and individual transfer vectors into human 293T cells. Transfer vector RNA propagation was monitored by measuring transduction of target HeLaT4 cells following infection with viral particles containing a hygromycin resistance gene expression cassette on the packaged RNA. MMTV requires the entire 5' UTR and a minimum of ~120 nucleotide (nt) at the 5' end of gag for not only efficient gRNA packaging but also propagation of MMTV-based transfer vector RNAs. Vector RNAs without the entire 5' UTR were defective for both efficient packaging and propagation into target cells. These results reveal that the 5' end of MMTV genome is critical for both gRNA packaging and propagation, unlike the recently delineated FIV and MPMV packaging determinants that have been shown to be of bipartite nature.

  5. Helicobacter pylori DNA in recurrent aphthous stomatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victória, Júnia Maria Netto; Kalapothakis, Evanguedes; Silva, Jeane de Fátima Correia; Gomez, Ricardo Santiago

    2003-04-01

    Considering not only the fact that recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) and stomach ulcers are immunologically mediated ulcers associated with Helicobacter pylori, but also the recent evidence that anaemia can be associated with both diseases, and the discovery of H. pylori in the oral mucosa led us to hypothesize that this bacteria may be related to RAS pathogenesis. Thirty-six consecutive subjects affected by minor and major forms of RAS and 48 healthy volunteers were included in the present study. The nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique was used to detect the presence of H. pylori in the oral lesion, the normal contralateral mucosa of patients affected by RAS and the oral mucosa of control subjects. The chi2- and Fisher's tests were used for statistical analysis. No association between RAS lesions and H. pylori was observed. However, 14 out of 36 (38.9%) of the patients with RAS were found to show the presence of H. pylori DNA in the lesion and/or contralateral mucosa. Sixteen out of 48 (33.3%) of the patients without RAS (control subjects) were positive (P > 0.05). The present study does not give support to the assumption that H. pylori could be involved in RAS development.

  6. Oxidative stress and recurrent aphthous stomatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagan, Jose; Saez, Guillermo; Tormos, Carmen; Gavalda, Carmen; Sanchis, Jose M; Bagan, Leticia; Scully, Crispian

    2014-11-01

    This study analyzed the oxidative stress status in patients with recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) in the presence and absence of active ulceration. Oxidative stress was analyzed in peripheral mononuclear cells of 28 RAS patients with active ulceration and 29 controls. A further blood sample was collected from nine subjects randomly selected from the 28 RAS cases, during the period in which the patients did not have active oral ulceration. The reduced glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA), and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) levels were measured in these samples. The mean MDA and GSSG levels were significantly higher in patients with active RAS than in the controls, while GSH was lower in the RAS group (p < 0.01). There was a nonsignificant tendency toward higher MDA and GSSG levels in patients with major RAS compared with minor RAS. On comparing the serum findings in the nine RAS patients in the presence and absence of lesions, the presence of ulceration was associated with even higher MDA and GSSG levels and lower GSH concentrations (p < 0.05) CONCLUSIONS: Oxidative stress was detected in our RAS patients.

  7. Psychological stress and recurrent aphthous stomatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila de Barros Gallo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVES: Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS is the most common type of ulcerative disease of the oral mucosa. Despite its worldwide occurrence and the extensive amount of research that has been devoted to the subject, the etiology of RAS remains unclear. Nevertheless, several hereditary, nutritional, infectious and psychological factors have been associated with RAS. The aim of this case-control study was to assess the influence of psychological stress on the manifestation of RAS. METHOD: Fifty patients were enrolled in the trial. Twenty-five RAS patients constituted the study group and another 25 non-RAS patients who were similarly matched for sex, age and socioeconomic status constituted the control group. Each patient was evaluated in terms of the four domains of stress (emotional, physical, social and cognitive using an internationally validated questionnaire, which was comprised of 59 items and measured the frequency and intensity of stress symptoms. The RAS group was interviewed during an active RAS episode. Completed questionnaires were submitted to proper analytical software and interpreted by an expert psychologist. RESULTS: There was a higher level of psychological stress among RAS group patients when compared to the control group (P < 0.05. CONCLUSION: Psychological stress may play a role in the manifestation of RAS; it may serve as a trigger or a modifying factor rather than being a cause of the disease.

  8. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiomara Serpa-Romero

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent aphthosus stomatitis is an alteration of the oral mucosa in some cases associated with depression of the immune system that affects the tissue response at the level of the epithelium, triggering repetitive clinical picture of small and medium ulcers (3-5 mm which necrotic presented erythematous background and lasting no more than 15 days. The picture becomes recurrent, symptomatic, compromising the health of the patient who consults again with the same characteristics in oral cavity. The literature associates the process with hormonal changes, trauma, prolonged intake of medications, and stress. A case of female patient 53, who attends the service of dentistry to present multiple oral thrush that hard to swallow, drooling and feverish marked presents in Santa Marta, at the Center for Implantology and Oral Rehabilitation. According to the interrogation and clinical examination it is associated with a reactive inflammatory process caused by the intake of drugs to treat infectious or viral process, which is given the presumptive diagnosis of erythema drug. Any medication intake was suspended and additional tests are ordered antinuclear antibodies

  9. Stomatal malfunctioning under low VPD conditions: induced by alterations in stomatal morphology and leaf anatomy or in the ABA signaling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliniaeifard, Sasan; Malcolm Matamoros, Priscila; van Meeteren, Uulke

    2014-12-01

    Exposing plants to low VPD reduces leaf capacity to maintain adequate water status thereafter. To find the impact of VPD on functioning of stomata, stomatal morphology and leaf anatomy, fava bean plants were grown at low (L, 0.23 kPa) or moderate (M, 1.17 kPa) VPDs and some plants that developed their leaves at moderate VPD were then transferred for 4 days to low VPD (M→L). Part of the M→L-plants were sprayed with ABA (abscisic acid) during exposure to L. L-plants showed bigger stomata, larger pore area, thinner leaves and less spongy cells compared with M-plants. Stomatal morphology (except aperture) and leaf anatomy of the M→L-plants were almost similar to the M-plants, while their transpiration rate and stomatal conductance were identical to that of L-plants. The stomatal response to ABA was lost in L-plants, but also after 1-day exposure of M-plants to low VPD. The level of foliar ABA sharply decreased within 1-day exposure to L, while the level of ABA-GE (ABA-glucose ester) was not affected. Spraying ABA during the exposure to L prevented loss of stomatal closing response thereafter. The effect of low VPD was largely depending on exposure time: the stomatal responsiveness to ABA was lost after 1-day exposure to low VPD, while the responsiveness to desiccation was gradually lost during 4-day exposure to low VPD. Leaf anatomical and stomatal morphological alterations due to low VPD were not the main cause of loss of stomatal closure response to closing stimuli. © 2014 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  10. RNase L Mediates the Antiviral Effect of Interferon through a Selective Reduction in Viral RNA during Encephalomyocarditis Virus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Ling; Blackford, John A.; Hassel, Bret A.

    1998-01-01

    The 2′,5′-oligoadenylate (2-5A) system is an RNA degradation pathway which plays an important role in the antipicornavirus effects of interferon (IFN). RNase L, the terminal component of the 2-5A system, is thought to mediate this antiviral activity through the degradation of viral RNA; however, the capacity of RNase L to selectively target viral RNA has not been carefully examined in intact cells. Therefore, the mechanism of RNase L-mediated antiviral activity was investigated following encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) infection of cell lines in which expression of transfected RNase L was induced or endogenous RNase L activity was inhibited. RNase L induction markedly enhanced the anti-EMCV activity of IFN via a reduction in EMCV RNA. Inhibition of endogenous RNase L activity inhibited this reduction in viral RNA. RNase L had no effect on IFN-mediated protection from vesicular stomatitis virus. RNase L induction reduced the rate of EMCV RNA synthesis, suggesting that RNase L may target viral RNAs involved in replication early in the virus life cycle. The RNase L-mediated reduction in viral RNA occurred in the absence of detectable effects on specific cellular mRNAs and without any global alteration in the cellular RNA profile. Extensive rRNA cleavage, indicative of high levels of 2-5A, was not observed in RNase L-induced, EMCV-infected cells; however, transfection of 2-5A into cells resulted in widespread degradation of cellular RNAs. These findings provide the first demonstration of the selective capacity of RNase L in intact cells and link this selective activity to cellular levels of 2-5A. PMID:9525594

  11. Distribution of vesicular glutamate transporters in the human brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika eVigneault

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Glutamate is the major excitatory transmitter in the brain. Vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUT1-3 are responsible for uploading glutamate into synaptic vesicles. VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 are considered as specific markers of canonical glutamatergic neurons, while VGLUT3 is found in neurons previously shown to use other neurotransmitters than glutamate. Although there exists a rich literature on the localization of these glutamatergic markers in the rodent brain, little is currently known about the distribution of VGLUT1-3 in the human brain. In the present study, using subtype specific probes and antisera, we examined the localization of the three vesicular glutamate transporters in the human brain by in situ hybridization, immunoautoradiography and immunohistochemistry. We found that the VGLUT1 transcript was highly expressed in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum, whereas VGLUT2 mRNA was mainly found in the thalamus and brainstem. VGLUT3 mRNA was localized in scarce neurons within the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, striatum and raphe nuclei. Following immunoautoradiographic labeling, intense VGLUT1- and VGLUT2-immunoreactivities were observed in all regions investigated (cerebral cortex, hippocampus, caudate-putamen, cerebellum, thalamus, amygdala, substantia nigra, raphe while VGLUT3 was absent from the thalamus and cerebellum. This extensive mapping of VGLUT1-3 in human brain reveals distributions that correspond for the most part to those previously described in rodent brains.

  12. Spontaneous Mutation at Amino Acid 544 of the Ebola Virus Glycoprotein Potentiates Virus Entry and Selection in Tissue Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruedas, John B; Ladner, Jason T; Ettinger, Chelsea R; Gummuluru, Suryaram; Palacios, Gustavo; Connor, John H

    2017-08-01

    Ebolaviruses have a surface glycoprotein (GP1,2) that is required for virus attachment and entry into cells. Mutations affecting GP1,2 functions can alter virus growth properties. We generated a recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus encoding Ebola virus Makona variant GP1,2 (rVSV-MAK-GP) and observed emergence of a T544I mutation in the Makona GP1,2 gene during tissue culture passage in certain cell lines. The T544I mutation emerged within two passages when VSV-MAK-GP was grown on Vero E6, Vero, and BS-C-1 cells but not when it was passaged on Huh7 and HepG2 cells. The mutation led to a marked increase in virus growth kinetics and conferred a robust growth advantage over wild-type rVSV-MAK-GP on Vero E6 cells. Analysis of complete viral genomes collected from patients in western Africa indicated that this mutation was not found in Ebola virus clinical samples. However, we observed the emergence of T544I during serial passage of various Ebola Makona isolates on Vero E6 cells. Three independent isolates showed emergence of T544I from undetectable levels in nonpassaged virus or virus passaged once to frequencies of greater than 60% within a single passage, consistent with it being a tissue culture adaptation. Intriguingly, T544I is not found in any Sudan, Bundibugyo, or Tai Forest ebolavirus sequences. Furthermore, T544I did not emerge when we serially passaged recombinant VSV encoding GP1,2 from these ebolaviruses. This report provides experimental evidence that the spontaneous mutation T544I is a tissue culture adaptation in certain cell lines and that it may be unique for the species Zaire ebolavirusIMPORTANCE The Ebola virus (Zaire) species is the most lethal species of all ebolaviruses in terms of mortality rate and number of deaths. Understanding how the Ebola virus surface glycoprotein functions to facilitate entry in cells is an area of intense research. Recently, three groups independently identified a polymorphism in the Ebola glycoprotein (I544) that

  13. Vesicular disease in 9-week-old pigs experimentally infected with Senecavirus A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction: Senecavirus A (SVA), a picornavirus, has been infrequently associated with cases of idiopathic vesicular disease (IVD) in pigs in the US and Canada since 1988. In 2014 and 2015 there was surge of IVD cases in Brazil and US, respectively. SVA was identified in serum, vesicular fluid, an...

  14. H-aggregation of azobenzene-substituted amphiphiles in vesicular membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiper, JM; Engberts, JBFN

    2004-01-01

    Photochemical switching has been studied of double-tailed phosphate amphiphiles containing azobenzene units in both tails in aqueous vesicular dispersions and in mixed vesicular systems with 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC). Since the ease of switching depends on the strength of the

  15. Chronic gingivitis and aphthous stomatitis relationship hypothesis: A neuroimmunobiological approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiquita Prahasanti

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Traumatic injuries to the oral mucosa in fixed orthodontic patients are common, especially in the first week of bracket placement, and occasionally lead to the development of aphthous stomatitis or ulcers. Nevertheless, these lesions are selflimiting. Purpose: The objective of this study is to reveal the connection between chronic gingivitis and aphthous stomatitis which is still unclear. Case: A patient with a persistent lesion for more than six months. Case Management: RAS was treated with scaling procedure, the gingival inflammation was healed. However, in this case report, despite the appropriate management procedures had been done, the lesion still worsen and became more painful. Moreover, the symptoms did not heal for more than two weeks. Actually, they had been undergone orthodontic treatment more than six months and rarely suffered from aphthous stomatitis. Coincidentally, at that time they also suffered from chronic gingivitis. It was interesting that after scaling procedures, the ulcer subsides in two days. Conclusion: Recently, the neuroimmunobiological researches which involved neurotransmitters and cytokines on cell-nerve signaling, and heat shock proteins in gingivitis and stomatitis are in progress. Nevertheless, they were done separately, thus do not explain the interrelationship. This proposed new concept which based on an integrated neuroimmunobiological approach could explain the benefit of periodontal treatment, especially scaling procedures, for avoiding prolonged painful episodes and unnecessary medications in aphthous stomatitis. However, for widely acceptance of the chronic gingivitis and aphthous stomatitis relationship, further clinical and laboratory study should be done. Regarding to the relatively fast healing after scaling procedures in this case report; it was concluded that the connection between chronic gingivitis and aphthous stomatitis is possible.

  16. Multivitamin therapy for recurrent aphthous stomatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalla, Rajesh V.; Choquette, Linda E.; Feinn, Richard S.; Zawistowski, Harriet; Latortue, Marie C.; Kelly, Edward T.; Baccaglini, Lorena

    2013-01-01

    Background Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is a painful condition of unknown etiology, affecting more than 2.5 billion people worldwide. Vitamin deficiencies have been implicated as a possible cause. Methods The authors conducted a single-center, randomized, parallel-arm, double-masked, placebo-controlled study to examine the effect of daily multivitamin supplementation on the number and duration of RAS episodes. The authors randomly assigned 160 adults who had a validated history of at least three episodes of idiopathic minor RAS within the previous 12 months to one of two groups: the first group (n = 83) received a once-daily multivitamin containing 100 percent of the U.S. reference daily intake (RDI) of essential vitamins, and the second group (n = 77) received once-daily placebo for up to 365 days. Results The results showed no significant difference in the mean number of new RAS episodes between the multivitamin (4.19 episodes) and placebo (4.60 episodes) arms during the study period (P = .69). The mean duration of new RAS episodes also was similar for the multivitamin (8.66 days) and placebo (8.99 days) arms (P = .60). Furthermore, the authors found no differences between the two arms with regard to mouth pain, normalcy of diet or compliance with the study medication regimen. Conclusion Daily multivitamin supplementation, with the RDI of essential vitamins, did not result in a reduction in the number or duration of RAS episodes. Clinical Implications Clinicians should not recommend multi-vitamin supplementation routinely as prophylaxis for RAS. PMID:22467697

  17. [Serological examinations for swine vesicular disease (SVD) in a closed pig breeding herd using ELISA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannwitz, Gunter; Haas, Bernd; Hoffmann, Bernd; Fischer, Sebastian

    2009-01-01

    In a closed pig establishment housing about 18,000 pigs, 2895 gilts were tested pre-export for SVD (swine vesicular disease) antibodies using Ceditest/PrioCHECK SVDV-AB ELISA. 130 gilts (4.5%) tested positive. In addition, 561 animals of this farm were sampled per random for SVD serology. One in 241 weaners (0.4%), eight in 150 gilts (5.3%) and 18 in 170 (10.6%) pregnant sows tested ELISA SVD-antibody positive. Of the ELISA positive samples, 23 tested positive in VNT (virus neutralization test). Of these, 20 VNT-positive animals were re-sampled two weeks later and re-tested via ELISA and VNT in different laboratories, displaying falling titres with one to two animals remaining VNT-positive. Epidemiological investigations and clinical examinations on site did not yield any evidence for SVD. 745 faecal samples taken from individual pigs and collected from pens tested negative in SVDV-RNA-PCR. 40 of these samples tested negative in virus isolation on cell culture. Pathological examinations on fallen pigs did not reveal any evidence for SVD either. After comparing our ELISA results with data recorded in the ELISA validation by Chenard et al. (1998), we propose that the published test performance is perhaps not currently applicable for the commercial test. Provided that SVD-antibody negative pigs were tested, a specificity of 99.6% in weaners, 95.5% in gilts and 89.4% in pregnant sows would appear to be more appropriate for the Ceditest/PrioCHECK SVDV-AB ELISA. Details are provided for all examined pigs regarding husbandry, breed, age, weeks pregnant and previous vaccinations. The results of other serological tests on the same sera are given. Possible clusterings of false-positive SVD-ELISA results are discussed.

  18. A putative vesicular transporter expressed in Drosophila mushroom bodies that mediates sexual behavior may define a novel neurotransmitter system

    OpenAIRE

    Brooks, Elizabeth S.; Greer, Christina L.; Romero-Calderón, Rafael; Serway, Christine N.; Grygoruk, Anna; Haimovitz, Jasmine M.; Bac T. Nguyen; Najibi, Rod; Tabone, Christopher J; de Belle, J. Steven; Krantz, David E.

    2011-01-01

    Storage and release of classical and amino acid neurotransmitters requires vesicular transporters. Some neurons lack known vesicular transporters, suggesting additional neurotransmitter systems remain unidentified. Insect mushroom bodies (MBs) are critical for several behaviors, including learning, but the neurotransmitters released by the intrinsic Kenyon cells (KCs) remain unknown. Likewise, KCs do not express a known vesicular transporter. We report the identification of a novel Drosophila...

  19. Evolutionary Conservation of ABA Signaling for Stomatal Closure1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuqing; Dai, Fei; Franks, Peter J.; Nevo, Eviatar; Soltis, Douglas E.; Soltis, Pamela S.; Xue, Dawei; Zhang, Guoping; Pogson, Barry J.

    2017-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA)-driven stomatal regulation reportedly evolved after the divergence of ferns, during the early evolution of seed plants approximately 360 million years ago. This hypothesis is based on the observation that the stomata of certain fern species are unresponsive to ABA, but exhibit passive hydraulic control. However, ABA-induced stomatal closure was detected in some mosses and lycophytes. Here, we observed that a number of ABA signaling and membrane transporter protein families diversified over the evolutionary history of land plants. The aquatic ferns Azolla filiculoides and Salvinia cucullata have representatives of 23 families of proteins orthologous to those of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and all other land plant species studied. Phylogenetic analysis of the key ABA signaling proteins indicates an evolutionarily conserved stomatal response to ABA. Moreover, comparative transcriptomic analysis has identified a suite of ABA-responsive genes that differentially expressed in a terrestrial fern species, Polystichum proliferum. These genes encode proteins associated with ABA biosynthesis, transport, reception, transcription, signaling, and ion and sugar transport, which fit the general ABA signaling pathway constructed from Arabidopsis and Hordeum vulgare. The retention of these key ABA-responsive genes could have had a profound effect on the adaptation of ferns to dry conditions. Furthermore, stomatal assays have shown the primary evidence for ABA-induced closure of stomata in two terrestrial fern species P. proliferum and Nephrolepis exaltata. In summary, we report, to our knowledge, new molecular and physiological evidence for the presence of active stomatal control in ferns. PMID:28232585

  20. A new role for human dyskerin in vesicular trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Maio, Nunzia; Vicidomini, Rosario; Angrisani, Alberto; Belli, Valentina; Furia, Maria; Turano, Mimmo

    2017-10-01

    Dyskerin is an essential, conserved, multifunctional protein found in the nucleolus, whose loss of function causes the rare genetic diseases X-linked dyskeratosis congenita and Hoyeraal-Hreidarsson syndrome. To further investigate the wide range of dyskerin's biological roles, we set up stable cell lines able to trigger inducible protein knockdown and allow a detailed analysis of the cascade of events occurring within a short time frame. We report that dyskerin depletion quickly induces cytoskeleton remodeling and significant alterations in endocytic Ras-related protein Rab-5A/Rab11 trafficking. These effects arise in different cell lines well before the onset of telomere shortening, which is widely considered the main cause of dyskerin-related diseases. Given that vesicular trafficking affects many homeostatic and differentiative processes, these findings add novel insights into the molecular mechanisms underlining the pleiotropic manifestation of the dyskerin loss-of-function phenotype.

  1. [CORRELATION MATRIX OF CHARACTERISTICS OF CHRONIC RECURRENT APHTHOUS STOMATITIS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koridze, Kh; Aladashvili, L; Taboridze, I

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of the present work is to study the correlation between the risk factors of chronic recurrent aphthous stomatitis. The research was conducted on 62 patients between ages of 40 and 70 years at Tbilisi Hospital for Veterans of War. The analysis was carried out by Spearman's Rank Correlation method using the statistical package SPSS 11.5. We investigated: harmful habits, professional factors, background and accompanying illnesses, pathology of teeth, focal infection, emotional stress, genetic factors. Correlation matrix between the significant risk factors of chronic recurrent aphthous stomatitis is defined. Multiple correlations have the following factors: industrial dust, focal infections, emotional stress, anemia. Correlation diagram of etiological factors of chronic recurrent aphthous stomatitis is helpful for providing professional and expert services.

  2. Incidence of Helicobacter Pylori in oral aphthous stomatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surender Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The aim of this study was to determine probable HP infection in oral aphthous samples by RUT in patients with recurrent aphthous stomatitis. Materials and Methods: This in vivo cross-sectional study was approved by the Ethics Committee of Swami Devi Dayal Dental College and Hospital according to the ethical standards. A total of 30 patients with minor recurrent aphthous stomatitis and 20 healthy control groups were included in the study. Results: Out of 30 patients with minor recurrent aphthous stomatitis, including 17 male and 13 female patients, with mean age of 47 and 38 years respectively, 21 patients (70% were RUT (positive. Out of 20 healthy control groups, 12 males and 8 females, 2 (10% were RUT (positive [Table 1]. Conclusion: HP may play a role in the etiology of RAS; also it is likely that RUT may be rapid and reliable for investigation of HP in RAS lesions.

  3. Treatment of radiation- and chemotherapy-induced stomatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carnel, S.B.; Blakeslee, D.B.; Oswald, S.G.; Barnes, M. (Fitzsimons Army Medical Center, Aurora, CO (USA))

    1990-04-01

    Severe stomatitis is a common problem encountered during either radiation therapy or chemotherapy. Most therapeutic regimens are empirical, with no scientific basis. The purpose of this study is to determine the efficacy of various topical solutions in the treatment of radiation- or chemotherapy-induced stomatitis. Eighteen patients were entered into a prospective double-blinded study to test several topical solutions: (1) viscous lidocaine with 1% cocaine; (2) dyclonine hydrochloride 1.0% (Dyclone); (3) kaolin-pectin solution, diphenhydramine plus saline (KBS); and (4) a placebo solution. Degree of pain relief, duration of relief, side effects, and palatability were evaluated. The results showed that Dyclone provided the most pain relief. Dyclone and viscous lidocaine with 1% cocaine provided the longest pain relief, which averaged 50 minutes This study provides objective data and defines useful guidelines for treatment of stomatitis.

  4. Are vesicular neurotransmitter transporters potential treatment targets for temporal lobe epilepsy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joeri eVan Liefferinge

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The vesicular neurotransmitter transporters (VNTs are small proteins responsible for packing synaptic vesicles with neurotransmitters thereby determining the amount of neurotransmitter released per vesicle through fusion in both neurons and glial cells. Each transporter subtype was classically seen as a specific neuronal marker of the respective nerve cells containing that particular neurotransmitter or structurally related neurotransmitters. More recently, however, it has become apparent that common neurotransmitters can also act as co-transmitters, adding complexity to neurotransmitter release and suggesting intriguing roles for VNTs therein. We will first describe the current knowledge on vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUT1/2/3, the vesicular excitatory amino acid transporter (VEAT, the vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT, vesicular monoamine transporters (VMAT1/2, the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT and the vesicular γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA transporter (VGAT in the brain. We will focus on evidence regarding transgenic mice with disruptions in VNTs in different models of seizures and epilepsy. We will also describe the known alterations and reorganizations in the expression levels of these VNTs in rodent models for temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE and in human tissue resected for epilepsy surgery. Finally, we will discuss perspectives on opportunities and challenges for VNTs as targets for possible future epilepsy therapies.

  5. Vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT): appearance of an actress on the stage of purinergic signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriyama, Yoshinori; Hiasa, Miki; Sakamoto, Shohei; Omote, Hiroshi; Nomura, Masatoshi

    2017-06-14

    Vesicular storage of ATP is one of the processes initiating purinergic chemical transmission. Although an active transport mechanism was postulated to be involved in the processes, a transporter(s) responsible for the vesicular storage of ATP remained unidentified for some time. In 2008, SLC17A9, the last identified member of the solute carrier 17 type I inorganic phosphate transporter family, was found to encode the vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT) that is responsible for the vesicular storage of ATP. VNUT transports various nucleotides in a membrane potential-dependent fashion and is expressed in the various ATP-secreting cells. Mice with knockout of the VNUT gene lose vesicular storage and release of ATP from neurons and neuroendocrine cells, resulting in blockage of the initiation of purinergic chemical transmission. Thus, VNUT plays an essential role in the vesicular storage and release of ATP. The VNUT knockout mice exhibit resistance for neuropathic pain and a therapeutic effect against diabetes by way of increased insulin sensitivity. Thus, VNUT inhibitors and suppression of VNUT gene expression may be used for therapeutic purposes through suppression of purinergic chemical transmission. This review summarizes the studies to date on VNUT and discusses what we have learned about the relevance of vesicular ATP release as a potential drug target.

  6. Stomatal Opening Involves Polar, Not Radial, Stiffening Of Guard Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Ross; Woolfenden, Hugh; Baillie, Alice; Amsbury, Sam; Carroll, Sarah; Healicon, Eleanor; Sovatzoglou, Spyros; Braybrook, Sioban; Gray, Julie E; Hobbs, Jamie; Morris, Richard J; Fleming, Andrew J

    2017-10-09

    It has long been accepted that differential radial thickening of guard cells plays an important role in the turgor-driven shape changes required for stomatal pore opening to occur [1-4]. This textbook description derives from an original interpretation of structure rather than measurement of mechanical properties. Here we show, using atomic force microscopy, that although mature guard cells display a radial gradient of stiffness, this is not present in immature guard cells, yet young stomata show a normal opening response. Finite element modeling supports the experimental observation that radial stiffening plays a very limited role in stomatal opening. In addition, our analysis reveals an unexpected stiffening of the polar regions of the stomata complexes, both in Arabidopsis and other plants, suggesting a widespread occurrence. Combined experimental data (analysis of guard cell wall epitopes and treatment of tissue with cell wall digesting enzymes, coupled with bioassay of guard cell function) plus modeling lead us to propose that polar stiffening reflects a mechanical, pectin-based pinning down of the guard cell ends, which restricts increase of stomatal complex length during opening. This is predicted to lead to an improved response sensitivity of stomatal aperture movement with respect to change of turgor pressure. Our results provide new insight into the mechanics of stomatal function, both negating an established view of the importance of radial thickening and providing evidence for a significant role for polar stiffening. Improved stomatal performance via altered cell-wall-mediated mechanics is likely to be of evolutionary and agronomic significance. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and cervical adenitis (pfapa) syndrome in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semianchuk, Vira B

    Periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and cervical adenitis (PFAPA) syndrome refers to a group of primary immunodeficiencies, namely autoinflammatory diseases. Most pediatricians and otolaryngologists do not suspect PFAPA syndrome when treating recurrent pharyngitis (according to Ukrainian classification - tonsillitis) and stomatitis. Therefore, patients with a given syndrome receive unnecessary treatment (antibiotic therapy or antiviral drugs) and the diagnosis is made late. The aim of the research was to provide pediatricians, family physicians and otolaryngologists with information on the importance of early diagnosis of PFAPA syndrome. The analysis of the prevalence and diagnosis of PFAPA syndrome in Ukraine and worldwide has been made as well as a late diagnosis of PFAPA syndrome in a child living in Ivano-Frankivsk, Ukraine has been described (case report). The Сase report 7-year-old boy, who grows and develops normally. The symptoms of pharyngitis including high body temperature (>40 º С), sore throat and white spots on the tonsils appeared for the first time at the age of two years. The boy received antibacterial drugs about 10 times a year. During a four-year period of recurrent episodes of the disease antimicrobial susceptibility testing to determine susceptibility of the oropharyngeal flora to the antibiotics were continuously performed, different blood tests for herpes viruses, Epstein-Barr virus infection and cytomegalovirus in particular were made using the enzyme immunoassay (EIA) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in addition to long-term treatment. An example of late diagnosing PFAPA syndrome (four years after the onset of first symptoms) resulting in regular examinations, medical manoeuvres, outpatient and inpatient treatment, use of antibiotic therapy including intravenous injections on a monthly basis has been studied.

  8. Modeling stomatal conductance and ozone uptake of Fagus crenata grown under different nitrogen loads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuchi, Fumika; Kinose, Yoshiyuki; Matsumura, Tomoe; Kanomata, Tomoaki; Uehara, Yui; Kobayashi, Ayumi; Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Izuta, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    A multiplicative stomatal conductance model was constructed to estimate stomatal O3 uptake of Fagus crenata exposed to O3 under different N loads to the soil. Our stomatal conductance model included environmental functions such as the stomatal responses of F. crenata to diurnal changes, chronic O3 stress (AOT0), acute O3 stress (O3 concentration), and nitrogen load to soil. The model could explain 62% of the variability in stomatal conductance. We suggest therefore that stomatal closure induced by O3 and N load-induced soil acidification must be taken into account in developing a stomatal conductance model for estimating stomatal O3 uptake for future risk assessment of O3 impact on Japanese forest tree species such as F. crenata. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Measurement of Stomatal Aperture by Digital Image Processing

    OpenAIRE

    Kenji, Omasa; Morio, Onoe; Division of Engineering The National Institute for Environmental Studies; Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo

    1984-01-01

    We developed a new digital image processing technique for exactly measuring the degree of stomatal opening, that is, the ratio of the width to the maximum length of a stomatal pore, and the pore area. We applied this technique to evaluate responses to SO_2 of neighboring stomata in a small region of an intact attached leaf, with the following results: 1) The pore region could be exactly extracted even when the original digital image was of poor quality. The standard errors in the evaluation o...

  10. Optimal Stomatal Behaviour Around the World: Synthesis of a Global Stomatal Conductance Database and Scaling from Leaf to Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Y. S.; Medlyn, B. E.; Duursma, R.; Prentice, I. C.; Wang, H.

    2014-12-01

    Stomatal conductance (gs) is a key land surface attribute as it links transpiration, the dominant component of global land evapotranspiration and a key element of the global water cycle, and photosynthesis, the driving force of the global carbon cycle. Despite the pivotal role of gs in predictions of global water and carbon cycles, a global scale database and an associated globally applicable model of gs that allow predictions of stomatal behaviour are lacking. We present a unique database of globally distributed gs obtained in the field for a wide range of plant functional types (PFTs) and biomes. We employed a model of optimal stomatal conductance to assess differences in stomatal behaviour, and estimated the model slope coefficient, g1, which is directly related to the marginal carbon cost of water, for each dataset. We found that g1 varies considerably among PFTs, with evergreen savanna trees having the largest g1 (least conservative water use), followed by C3 grasses and crops, angiosperm trees, gymnosperm trees, and C4 grasses. Amongst angiosperm trees, species with higher wood density had a higher marginal carbon cost of water, as predicted by the theory underpinning the optimal stomatal model. There was an interactive effect between temperature and moisture availability on g1: for wet environments, g1 was largest in high temperature environments, indicated by high mean annual temperature during the period when temperature above 0oC (Tm), but it did not vary with Tm across dry environments. We examine whether these differences in leaf-scale behaviour are reflected in ecosystem-scale differences in water-use efficiency. These findings provide a robust theoretical framework for understanding and predicting the behaviour of stomatal conductance across biomes and across PFTs that can be applied to regional, continental and global-scale modelling of productivity and ecohydrological processes in a future changing climate.

  11. Synthesis of Nucleoside Analogues with Potential Antiviral Activity against Negative Strand RNA Virus Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-11-01

    ye Paramyxovirus Human parainfluenza , mumps Morbillivirus Measles, Rinderpest (cattle) 9 canine distemper viruses Pneumovirus Respiratory syncytial...significant effect on man include Rabies virus1 0 and Vesicular Stomatitus virus (VSV) in the Americas and Bovine Ephemeral Fever virus in Australasia. Of the...structurally related to neplanocin A, namely 9-(trans-2’,trans-3’-dihydroxycyclo- pent-4’-enyl) derivatives, 4 and 5, are potent inhibitors of bovine liver

  12. Spatial heterogeneity in stomatal features during leaf elongation: an analysis using Rosa hybrida

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fanourakis, D.; Heuvelink, E.; Carvalho, S.M.P.

    2015-01-01

    Within-leaf heterogeneity in stomatal traits poses a key uncertainty in determining a representative value for the whole leaf. Accounting for this heterogeneity, we studied stomatal initiation on expanding leaves and estimated stomatal conductance (gs) of mature leaves. The entire lamina was

  13. Jasmonate-mediated stomatal closure under elevated CO2 revealed by time-resolved metabolomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foliar stomatal movements are critical for regulating plant water status and gas exchange. Elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations are known to induce stomatal closure. However, current knowledge on CO2 signal transduction in stomatal guard cells is limited. Here we report the metabolomic respo...

  14. Mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor-associated stomatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boers-Doets, Christine B.; Raber-Durlacher, Judith E.; Treister, Nathaniel S.; Epstein, Joel B.; Arends, Anniek B. P.; Wiersma, Diede R.; Lalla, Rajesh V.; Logan, Richard M.; van Erp, Nielka P.; Gelderblom, Hans

    2013-01-01

    With the recent introduction of inhibitors of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in oncology, distinct cutaneous and oral adverse events have been identified. In fact, stomatitis and rash are documented as the most frequent and potentially dose-limiting side effects. Clinically, mTOR

  15. Detection of salivary interleukin-2 in recurrent aphthous stomatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalpana, R; Thubashini, M; Sundharam, B Sivapatha

    2014-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to estimate and compare salivary interleukin-2 (IL-2) levels in patients with recurrent aphthous stomatitis, among healthy controls and their variation with age and sex. Saliva was collected from 60 patients within the age range of 16-60 years which included 30 patients (17 Females and 13 Males) with recurrent aphthous stomatitis and healthy control group consisted of 30 participants (18 Females and 12 Males). IL-2 estimation was done in both the groups using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Statistical analysis of the data was done using Independent 't' test. The results showed increased salivary IL-2 levels in patients with recurrent aphthous stomatitis compared to the healthy controls. The IL-2 levels were also increased in patients with the age group of 16-30 years compared to other age groups. Similar increase of IL-2 was also seen in female patients. Age related and sex related alterations of IL-2 in recurrent aphthous stomatitis patients were observed.

  16. mechanisms of drought resistance in grain ii:.stomatal regulation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    whereby photosythesis was reduced by 75% in common bean but only by 20% in chickpea. Significant ... induced stomatal closure, thereby a decrease in the ... 7 or 15 days at soil water content of 40% (-0.15 MPa. SWP). ... chamber were kept constant with a light intensity ... determination of highway distances on maps. At.

  17. Influence of climate variables on Cyperus papyrus stomatal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cyperus papyrus forms highly productive wetlands in tropical Africa, but the environmental control of transpirational water loss in wetlands is poorly understood. The influence of climate variables on papyrus stomatal conductance in dry and wet seasons of the year was investigated in a wetland in Kampala, Uganda, ...

  18. Effects of Moisture and Mycorrhiza on Stomatal Conductance and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    acer

    Both the ecto and endo mycorrhizae significantly (P<0.05)affected the Stomatal Conductance and Xylem Pressure Potential of the plant even under stressed conditions. The use of mycorrhiza is thus recommended as a strategy for efficient water utilization and water conservation. KEYWORDS: Faidherbia albida, mycorrhiza, ...

  19. Linking stomatal sensitivity and whole-tree hydraulic architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katherine A. McCulloh; David R. Woodruff

    2012-01-01

    Despite the complexity of the relationship between stomatal sensitivity, water loss and vulnerability to embolism, the goal of teasing apart the subtleties is a necessary one. As Litvak et al. (2012) mention, determining transpiration patterns based on vulnerability to embolism would be much easier than the lengthy and potentially expensive processes involved in sap...

  20. Improvement of herpetic stomatitis therapy in patients with chronic tonsillitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lepilin А.V.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The research goal is to determine the clinical and pathogenetic efficacy of Cycloferon liniment in the combined therapy in patients with herpetic stomatitis accompanied by chronic tonsillitis. Materials and methods: Medical examination and treatment of 60 patients have been carried out. The marker of endogenous intoxication, infectious severity and immunity has been investigated. Results. It has been established that use of Cycloferon liniment in the combined therapy in patients with herpetic stomatitis accompanied by chronic tonsillitis has allowed to decrease infectious severity in par-odontal recess and evidence of local inflammation, to normalize immunity indices and reduce the level of endogenous intoxication that has been liable for acceleration of recuperation processes and lowering of frequency of stomatitis recurrences. Conclusion. The clinical efficacy of Cycloferon liniment in the therapy in patients with herpetic stomatitis accompanied by chronic tonsillitis conditioned by the decreasing of activity of local inflammatory process according to the reducing of level pro-inflammatory cytokines, infectious burden of the mouth cavity, endogenous intoxication

  1. Comparison of different stomatal conductance algorithms for ozone flux modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Büker, P.; Emberson, L.D.; Ashmore, M.R.; Gerosa, G.; Jacobs, C.M.J.; Massman, W.J.; Müller, J.; Nikolov, N.; Novak, K.; Oksanen, E.; Torre, de la D.; Tuovinen, J.P.

    2007-01-01

    A multiplicative and a semi-mechanistic, BWB-type [Ball, J.T., Woodrow, I.E., Berry, J.A., 1987. A model predicting stomatal conductance and its contribution to the control of photosynthesis under different environmental conditions. In: Biggens, J. (Ed.), Progress in Photosynthesis Research, vol.

  2. Comparison of different stomatal conductance algorithms for ozone flux modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    P. Buker; L.D. Emberson; M. R. Ashmore; H. M. Cambridge; C. M. Jacobs; W. J. Massman; J. Muller; N. Nikolov; K. Novak; E. Oksanen; M. Schaub; D. de la Torre

    2007-01-01

    A multiplicative and a semi-mechanistic, BWB-type [Ball, J.T., Woodrow, I.E., Berry, J.A., 1987. A model predicting stomatal conductance and its contribution to the control of photosynthesis under different environmental conditions. In: Biggens, J. (Ed.), Progress in Photosynthesis Research, vol. IV. Martinus Nijhoff, Dordrecht, pp. 221-224.] algorithm for calculating...

  3. Evolutionary Conservation of ABA Signaling for Stomatal Closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Shengguan; Chen, Guang; Wang, Yuanyuan; Huang, Yuqing; Marchant, D Blaine; Wang, Yizhou; Yang, Qian; Dai, Fei; Hills, Adrian; Franks, Peter J; Nevo, Eviatar; Soltis, Douglas E; Soltis, Pamela S; Sessa, Emily; Wolf, Paul G; Xue, Dawei; Zhang, Guoping; Pogson, Barry J; Blatt, Michael R; Chen, Zhong-Hua

    2017-06-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA)-driven stomatal regulation reportedly evolved after the divergence of ferns, during the early evolution of seed plants approximately 360 million years ago. This hypothesis is based on the observation that the stomata of certain fern species are unresponsive to ABA, but exhibit passive hydraulic control. However, ABA-induced stomatal closure was detected in some mosses and lycophytes. Here, we observed that a number of ABA signaling and membrane transporter protein families diversified over the evolutionary history of land plants. The aquatic ferns Azolla filiculoides and Salvinia cucullata have representatives of 23 families of proteins orthologous to those of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and all other land plant species studied. Phylogenetic analysis of the key ABA signaling proteins indicates an evolutionarily conserved stomatal response to ABA. Moreover, comparative transcriptomic analysis has identified a suite of ABA-responsive genes that differentially expressed in a terrestrial fern species, Polystichum proliferum These genes encode proteins associated with ABA biosynthesis, transport, reception, transcription, signaling, and ion and sugar transport, which fit the general ABA signaling pathway constructed from Arabidopsis and Hordeum vulgare The retention of these key ABA-responsive genes could have had a profound effect on the adaptation of ferns to dry conditions. Furthermore, stomatal assays have shown the primary evidence for ABA-induced closure of stomata in two terrestrial fern species Pproliferum and Nephrolepis exaltata In summary, we report, to our knowledge, new molecular and physiological evidence for the presence of active stomatal control in ferns. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Expression of Vesicular Nucleotide Transporter in Rat Odontoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Erina; Goto, Tetsuya; Gunjigake, Kaori; Kuroishi, Kayoko; Ueda, Masae; Kataoka, Shinji; Toyono, Takashi; Nakatomi, Mitsushiro; Seta, Yuji; Kitamura, Chiaki; Nishihara, Tatsuji; Kawamoto, Tatsuo

    2016-02-27

    Several theories have been proposed regarding pain transmission mechanisms in tooth. However, the exact signaling mechanism from odontoblasts to pulp nerves remains to be clarified. Recently, ATP-associated pain transmission has been reported, but it is unclear whether ATP is involved in tooth pain transmission. In the present study, we focused on the vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT), a transporter of ATP into vesicles, and examined whether VNUT was involved in ATP release from odontoblasts. We examined the expression of VNUT in rat pulp by RT-PCR and immunostaining. ATP release from cultured odontoblast-like cells with heat stimulation was evaluated using ATP luciferase methods. VNUT was expressed in pulp tissue, and the distribution of VNUT-immunopositive vesicles was confirmed in odontoblasts. In odontoblasts, some VNUT-immunopositive vesicles were colocalized with membrane fusion proteins. Additionally P2X3, an ATP receptor, immunopositive axons were distributed between odontoblasts. The ATP release by thermal stimulation from odontoblast-like cells was inhibited by the addition of siRNA for VNUT. These findings suggest that cytosolic ATP is transported by VNUT and that the ATP in the vesicles is then released from odontoblasts to ATP receptors on axons. ATP vesicle transport in odontoblasts seems to be a key mechanism for signal transduction from odontoblasts to axons in the pulp.

  5. Transferosomes - A vesicular transdermal delivery system for enhanced drug permeation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reshmy Rajan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Transdermal administration of drugs is generally limited by the barrier function of the skin. Vesicular systems are one of the most controversial methods for transdermal delivery of active substances. The interest in designing transdermal delivery systems was relaunched after the discovery of elastic vesicles like transferosomes, ethosomes, cubosomes, phytosomes, etc. This paper presents the composition, mechanisms of penetration, manufacturing and characterization methods of transferosomes as transdermal delivery systems of active substances. For a drug to be absorbed and distributed into organs and tissues and eliminated from the body, it must pass through one or more biological membranes/barriers at various locations. Such a movement of drug across the membrane is called as drug transport. For the drugs to be delivered to the body, they should cross the membranous barrier. The concept of these delivery systems was designed in an attempt to concentrate the drug in the tissues of interest, while reducing the amount of drug in the remaining tissues. Hence, surrounding tissues are not affected by the drug. In addition, loss of drug does not happen due to localization of drug, leading to get maximum efficacy of the medication. Therefore, the phospholipid based carrier systems are of considerable interest in this era.

  6. Transferosomes - A vesicular transdermal delivery system for enhanced drug permeation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Reshmy; Jose, Shoma; Mukund, V. P. Biju; Vasudevan, Deepa T.

    2011-01-01

    Transdermal administration of drugs is generally limited by the barrier function of the skin. Vesicular systems are one of the most controversial methods for transdermal delivery of active substances. The interest in designing transdermal delivery systems was relaunched after the discovery of elastic vesicles like transferosomes, ethosomes, cubosomes, phytosomes, etc. This paper presents the composition, mechanisms of penetration, manufacturing and characterization methods of transferosomes as transdermal delivery systems of active substances. For a drug to be absorbed and distributed into organs and tissues and eliminated from the body, it must pass through one or more biological membranes/barriers at various locations. Such a movement of drug across the membrane is called as drug transport. For the drugs to be delivered to the body, they should cross the membranous barrier. The concept of these delivery systems was designed in an attempt to concentrate the drug in the tissues of interest, while reducing the amount of drug in the remaining tissues. Hence, surrounding tissues are not affected by the drug. In addition, loss of drug does not happen due to localization of drug, leading to get maximum efficacy of the medication. Therefore, the phospholipid based carrier systems are of considerable interest in this era. PMID:22171309

  7. [Safety of laparoscopic cholecystectomy in complicated vesicular disease].