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Sample records for vesicles ceramic bioballs

  1. Vesicle Photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasdekis, A. E.; Scott, E. A.; Roke, S.; Hubbell, J. A.; Psaltis, D.

    2013-07-01

    Amphiphiles, under appropriate conditions, can self-assemble into nanoscale thin membrane vessels (vesicles) that encapsulate and hence protect and transport molecular payloads. Vesicles assemble naturally within cells but can also be artificially synthesized. In this article, we review the mechanisms and applications of light-field interactions with vesicles. By being associated with light-emitting entities (e.g., dyes, fluorescent proteins, or quantum dots), vesicles can act as imaging agents in addition to cargo carriers. Vesicles can also be optically probed on the basis of their nonlinear response, typically from the vesicle membrane. Light fields can be employed to transport vesicles by using optical tweezers (photon momentum) or can directly perturb the stability of vesicles and hence trigger the delivery of the encapsulated payload (photon energy). We conclude with emerging vesicle applications in biology and photochemical microreactors.

  2. Expresión de la proteína E del virus del Oeste del Nilo en callos embriogénicos de maíz, transformados mediante biobalística

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Gómez-Núñez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available La clonación y expresión heteróloga de antígenos de agentes patógenos que afectan humanos y animales, ha demostrado ser una buena alternativa para la obtención de vacunas subunitarias. En este estudio se analiza la expresión estable del gen E que codifica la glicoproteína de envoltura del virus del Oeste del Nilo (VON en callos embriogénicos de maíz, que fueron transformados mediante biobalística empleando el promotor constitutivo CAMV35S. La expresión del transgen fue determinada mediante RT-PCR en los callos embriogénicos de maíz transformados con la secuencia codificante de la glicoproteína E del VON. Para verificar la expresión de la proteína se realizó un Western blot con extractos de la proteína soluble total (PST de los callos transformados. De esta manera se identificó una proteína de 68 kDa. Empleando este sistema de expresión se pudo obtener un 0.86 % de PST. En este estudio por primera vez se analiza la expresión de la glicoproteína E del virus del Oeste del Nilo en callos embriogénicos de maíz. Siendo la glicoproteína E del VON la responsable de la inducción de la inmunidad en contra de este virus, esta investigación representa un avance importante en el diseño de un inmunógeno experimental, que permitiría iniciar estudios en animales de laboratorio, con la finalidad de obtener una vacuna prototipo para la prevención y el control de la infección por el VON.

  3. Synaptic Vesicle Endocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saheki, Yasunori; De Camilli, Pietro

    2012-01-01

    Neurons can sustain high rates of synaptic transmission without exhausting their supply of synaptic vesicles. This property relies on a highly efficient local endocytic recycling of synaptic vesicle membranes, which can be reused for hundreds, possibly thousands, of exo-endocytic cycles. Morphological, physiological, molecular, and genetic studies over the last four decades have provided insight into the membrane traffic reactions that govern this recycling and its regulation. These studies have shown that synaptic vesicle endocytosis capitalizes on fundamental and general endocytic mechanisms but also involves neuron-specific adaptations of such mechanisms. Thus, investigations of these processes have advanced not only the field of synaptic transmission but also, more generally, the field of endocytosis. This article summarizes current information on synaptic vesicle endocytosis with an emphasis on the underlying molecular mechanisms and with a special focus on clathrin-mediated endocytosis, the predominant pathway of synaptic vesicle protein internalization. PMID:22763746

  4. Preparation of large monodisperse vesicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting F Zhu

    Full Text Available Preparation of monodisperse vesicles is important both for research purposes and for practical applications. While the extrusion of vesicles through small pores (approximately 100 nm in diameter results in relatively uniform populations of vesicles, extrusion to larger sizes results in very heterogeneous populations of vesicles. Here we report a simple method for preparing large monodisperse multilamellar vesicles through a combination of extrusion and large-pore dialysis. For example, extrusion of polydisperse vesicles through 5-microm-diameter pores eliminates vesicles larger than 5 microm in diameter. Dialysis of extruded vesicles against 3-microm-pore-size polycarbonate membranes eliminates vesicles smaller than 3 microm in diameter, leaving behind a population of monodisperse vesicles with a mean diameter of approximately 4 microm. The simplicity of this method makes it an effective tool for laboratory vesicle preparation with potential applications in preparing large monodisperse liposomes for drug delivery.

  5. Fusion of Nonionic Vesicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bulut, Sanja; Oskolkova, M. Z.; Schweins, R.

    2010-01-01

    We present an experimental study of vesicle fusion using light and neutron scattering to monitor fusion events. Vesicles are reproducibly formed with an extrusion procedure using an single amphiphile triethylene glycol mono-n-decyl ether in water. They show long-term stability for temperatures ar...... a barrier to fusion changing from 15 k(B)T at T = 26 degrees C to 10k(H) T at T = 35 degrees C. These results are compatible with the theoretical predictions using the stalk model of vesicle fusion....

  6. Ceramic joining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loehman, R.E. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-04-01

    This paper describes the relation between reactions at ceramic-metal interfaces and the development of strong interfacial bonds in ceramic joining. Studies on a number of systems are described, including silicon nitrides, aluminium nitrides, mullite, and aluminium oxides. Joints can be weakened by stresses such as thermal expansion mismatch. Ceramic joining is used in a variety of applications such as solid oxide fuel cells.

  7. How pure are your vesicles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Jason; Clayton, Aled

    2013-01-01

    We propose a straightforward method to estimate the purity of vesicle preparations by comparing the ratio of nano-vesicle counts to protein concentration, using tools such as the increasingly available NanoSight platform and a colorimetric protein assay such as the BCA-assay. Such an approach is simple enough to apply to every vesicle preparation within a given laboratory, assisting researchers as a routine quality control step. Also, the approach may aid in comparing/standardising vesicle purity across diverse studies, and may be of particular importance in evaluating vesicular biomarkers. We herein propose some criteria to aid in the definition of pure vesicles. PMID:24009896

  8. [Ceramic posts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainjot, Amélie; Legros, Caroline; Vanheusden, Alain

    2006-01-01

    As a result of ceramics and all-ceram technologies development esthetic inlay core and abutments flooded the market. Their tooth-colored appearance enhances restoration biomimetism principally on the marginal gingiva area. This article reviews indications and types of cores designed for natural teeth and implants.

  9. The toolbox of vesicle sidedness determination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meszaros, Peter; Hoekstra, Dick; Kok, Jan Willem

    2012-01-01

    Vesicles prepared from cellular plasma membranes are widely used in science for different purposes. The outer membrane leaflet differs from the inner membrane leaflet of the vesicle, and during vesicle preparation procedures two types of vesicles will be generated: right-side-out vesicles, of which

  10. Engineering ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Bengisu, Murat

    2001-01-01

    This is a comprehensive book applying especially to junior and senior engineering students pursuing Materials Science/ Engineering, Ceramic Engineering and Mechanical Engineering degrees. It is also a reference book for other disciplines such as Chemical Engineering, Biomedical Engineering, Nuclear Engineering and Environmental Engineering. Important properties of most engineering ceramics are given in detailed tables. Many current and possible applications of engineering ceramics are described, which can be used as a guide for materials selection and for potential future research. While covering all relevant information regarding raw materials, processing properties, characterization and applications of engineering ceramics, the book also summarizes most recent innovations and developments in this field as a result of extensive literature search.

  11. Vesicles and vesicle gels - structure and dynamics of formation

    CERN Document Server

    Gradzielski, M

    2003-01-01

    Vesicles constitute an interesting morphology formed by self-aggregating amphiphilic molecules. They exhibit a rich structural variety and are of interest both from a fundamental point of view (for studying closed bilayer systems) and from a practical point of view (whenever one is interested in the encapsulation of active molecules). In many circumstances vesicular structures have to be formed by external forces, but of great interest are amphiphilic systems, where they form spontaneously. Here the question arises of whether this means that they are also thermodynamically stable structures, which at least in some systems appears to be the case. If such vesicles are well defined in size, it is possible to pack them densely and thereby form vesicle gels that possess highly elastic properties even for relatively low volume fractions of amphiphile. Conditions for the formation and the microstructure of such vesicle gels have been studied in some detail for the case of unilamellar vesicles. Another important and ...

  12. Preeclampsia and Extracellular Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilani, Sarwat I; Weissgerber, Tracey L; Garovic, Vesna D; Jayachandran, Muthuvel

    2016-09-01

    Preeclampsia is a hypertensive pregnancy disorder characterized by development of hypertension and proteinuria after 20 weeks of gestation that remains a leading cause of maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. While preeclampsia is believed to result from complex interactions between maternal and placental factors, the proximate pathophysiology of this syndrome remains elusive. Cell-to-cell communication is a critical signaling mechanism for feto-placental development in normal pregnancies. One mechanism of cellular communication relates to activated cell-derived sealed membrane vesicles called extracellular vesicles (EVs). The concentrations and contents of EVs in biological fluids depend upon their cells of origin and the stimuli which trigger their production. Research on EVs in preeclampsia has focused on EVs derived from the maternal vasculature (endothelium, vascular smooth muscle) and blood (erythrocytes, leukocytes, and platelets), as well as placental syncytiotrophoblasts. Changes in the concentrations and contents of these EVs may contribute to the pathophysiology of preeclampsia by accentuating the pro-inflammatory and pro-coagulatory states of pregnancy. This review focuses on possible interactions among placental- and maternal-derived EVs and their contents in the initiation and progression of the pathogenesis of preeclampsia. Understanding the contributions of EVs in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia may facilitate their use as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers.

  13. Ceramic Seal.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smartt, Heidi A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Romero, Juan A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Custer, Joyce Olsen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hymel, Ross W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Krementz, Dan [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Gobin, Derek [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Harpring, Larry [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Martinez-Rodriguez, Michael [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Varble, Don [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); DiMaio, Jeff [Tetramer Technologies, Pendleton, SC (United States); Hudson, Stephen [Tetramer Technologies, Pendleton, SC (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Containment/Surveillance (C/S) measures are critical to any verification regime in order to maintain Continuity of Knowledge (CoK). The Ceramic Seal project is research into the next generation technologies to advance C/S, in particular improving security and efficiency. The Ceramic Seal is a small form factor loop seal with improved tamper-indication including a frangible seal body, tamper planes, external coatings, and electronic monitoring of the seal body integrity. It improves efficiency through a self-securing wire and in-situ verification with a handheld reader. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), under sponsorship from the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development (DNN R&D), have previously designed and have now fabricated and tested Ceramic Seals. Tests have occurred at both SNL and SRNL, with different types of tests occurring at each facility. This interim report will describe the Ceramic Seal prototype, the design and development of a handheld standalone reader and an interface to a data acquisition system, fabrication of the seals, and results of initial testing.

  14. ceramic pigment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In contrast, the relatively poor blue colour obtained by dispersing Co2SiO4 into ceramic glazes is mainly attributed to the evolution of Co2+ initially in octahedral coordination of olivine structure to tetrahedral coordination of glassy phase. On the other hand, regarding the growing concern on. Co costs and environmental ...

  15. Extracellular Vesicles in Cardiovascular Theranostics

    OpenAIRE

    Bei, Yihua; Das, Saumya; Rodosthenous, Rodosthenis S.; Holvoet, Paul; Vanhaverbeke, Maarten; Monteiro,Marta Chagas; Monteiro, Valter Vinicius Silva; Radosinska, Jana; Bartekova, Monika; Jansen, Felix; Li, Qian; Rajasingh, Johnson; Xiao, Junjie

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are small bilayer lipid membrane vesicles that can be released by most cell types and detected in most body fluids. EVs exert key functions for intercellular communication via transferring their bioactive cargos to recipient cells or activating signaling pathways in target cells. Increasing evidence has shown the important regulatory effects of EVs in cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). EVs secreted by cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells, fibroblasts, and stem cells pla...

  16. Immunotherapeutic Potential of Extracellular Vesicles

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Bin; Yin, Yijun; Lai, Ruenn Chai; Lim, Sai Kiang

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular vesicle or EV is a term that encompasses all classes of secreted lipid membrane vesicles. Despite being scientific novelties, EVs are gaining importance as a mediator of important physiological and pathological intercellular activities possibly through the transfer of their cargo of protein and RNA between cells. In particular, exosomes, the currently best characterized EVs have been notable for their in vitro and in vivo immunomodulatory activities. Exosomes are nanometer-sized...

  17. RNA in extracellular vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoung Mi; Abdelmohsen, Kotb; Mustapic, Maja; Kapogiannis, Dimitrios; Gorospe, Myriam

    2017-07-01

    Cells release a range of membrane-enclosed extracellular vesicles (EVs) into the environment. Among them, exosomes and microvesicles (collectively measuring 40-1000 nm in diameter) carry proteins, signaling lipids, and nucleic acids from donor cells to recipient cells, and thus have been proposed to serve as intercellular mediators of communication. EVs transport cellular materials in many physiologic processes, including differentiation, stem cell homeostasis, immune responses, and neuronal signaling. EVs are also increasingly recognized as having a direct role in pathologies such as cancer and neurodegeneration. Accordingly, EVs have been the focus of intense investigation as biomarkers of disease, prognostic indicators, and even therapeutic tools. Here, we review the classes of RNAs present in EVs, both coding RNAs (messenger RNAs) and noncoding RNAs (long noncoding RNAs, microRNAs, and circular RNAs). The rising attention to EV-resident RNAs as biomarkers stems from the fact that RNAs can be detected at extremely low quantities using a number of methods. To illustrate the interest in EV biology, we discuss EV RNAs in cancer and neurodegeneration, two major age-associated disease processes. WIREs RNA 2017, 8:e1413. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1413 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  18. Extracellular Vesicles in Renal Pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomatto, Margherita A C; Gai, Chiara; Bussolati, Benedetta; Camussi, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles are a heterogeneous population of microparticles released by virtually all living cells which have been recently widely investigated in different biological fields. They are typically composed of two primary types (exosomes and microvesicles) and are recently commanding increasing attention as mediators of cellular signaling. Indeed, these vesicles can affect recipient cells by carrying and delivering complex cargos of biomolecules (including proteins, lipids and nucleic acids), protected from enzymatic degradation in the environment. Their importance has been demonstrated in the pathophysiology of several organs, in particular in kidney, where different cell types secrete extracellular vesicles that mediate their communication with downstream urinary tract cells. Over the past few years, evidence has been shown that vesicles participate in kidney development and normal physiology. Moreover, EVs are widely demonstrated to be implicated in cellular signaling during renal regenerative and pathological processes. Although many EV mechanisms are still poorly understood, in particular in kidney, the discovery of their role could help to shed light on renal biological processes which are so far elusive. Lastly, extracellular vesicles secreted by renal cells gather in urine, thus becoming a great resource for disease or recovery markers and a promising non-invasive diagnostic instrument for renal disease. In the present review, we discuss the most recent findings on the role of extracellular vesicles in renal physiopathology and their potential implication in diagnosis and therapy.

  19. Extracellular vesicles in renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpman, Diana; Ståhl, Anne-Lie; Arvidsson, Ida

    2017-09-01

    Extracellular vesicles, such as exosomes and microvesicles, are host cell-derived packages of information that allow cell-cell communication and enable cells to rid themselves of unwanted substances. The release and uptake of extracellular vesicles has important physiological functions and may also contribute to the development and propagation of inflammatory, vascular, malignant, infectious and neurodegenerative diseases. This Review describes the different types of extracellular vesicles, how they are detected and the mechanisms by which they communicate with cells and transfer information. We also describe their physiological functions in cellular interactions, such as in thrombosis, immune modulation, cell proliferation, tissue regeneration and matrix modulation, with an emphasis on renal processes. We discuss how the detection of extracellular vesicles could be utilized as biomarkers of renal disease and how they might contribute to disease processes in the kidney, such as in acute kidney injury, chronic kidney disease, renal transplantation, thrombotic microangiopathies, vasculitides, IgA nephropathy, nephrotic syndrome, urinary tract infection, cystic kidney disease and tubulopathies. Finally, we consider how the release or uptake of extracellular vesicles can be blocked, as well as the associated benefits and risks, and how extracellular vesicles might be used to treat renal diseases by delivering therapeutics to specific cells.

  20. Thin shell vesicles composed of hydrophilic plate-like nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Anand; Wan, Jiandi; Gopinath, Arvind; Stone, Howard

    2011-03-01

    Nanopowders of graphene oxide, montmorillonite and laponite spontaneously delaminate into ultrathin nanoscopic plates when dispersed in water. These plates, which are typically ~ 1 nm thick and microns in lateral dimension, have found many uses as precursors to graphene, ceramics, layer-by-layer structures, and as structural modifiers of nanocomposites. Here we show that mechanical forces due to shear in a narrow gap can assemble hydrophilic plate-like particles on air bubbles, forming stable nanoplated armored bubbles. Translucent inorganic vesicles (vesicles defined here as closed thin-shelled structures with the same liquid inside and outside) of these particles are produced when the nanoplated armored bubbles are exposed to common water-miscible organic liquids and surfactants. These inorganic vesicles are mechanically robust, have walls that are about six nanometres thick, and are perforated with pores of submicron dimensions. We characterize the phenomenon and find that a wetting transition at the scale of the nanoparticles is the primary mechanism of formation. The discovery of these novel inorganic structures raises a wealth of questions of fundamental interest in materials and surface science.

  1. Extracellular Vesicles in Lung Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Hiroshi

    2018-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that extracellular vesicles (EVs) play a role in the pathogenesis of lung diseases. These vesicles include exosomes, ectosomes (ie, microparticles, extracellular vesicles, microvesicles, and shedding vesicles), and apoptotic bodies. Exosomes are generated by inward budding of the membrane (endocytosis), subsequent forming of multivesicular bodies, and release by exocytosis. Ectosomes are formed by outward blebbing from the plasma membrane and are then released by proteolytic cleavage from the cell surface. Apoptotic bodies are generated on apoptotic cell shrinkage and death. Extracellular vesicles are released when the cells are activated or undergo apoptosis under inflammatory conditions. The number and types of released EVs are different according to the pathophysiological status of the disease. Therefore, EVs can be novel biomarkers for various lung diseases. EVs contain several molecules, including proteins, mRNA, microRNA, and DNA; they transfer these molecules to distant recipient cells. Circulating EVs modify the targeted cells and influence the microenvironment of the lungs. For this unique capability, EVs are expected to be a new drug delivery system and a novel therapeutic target. Copyright © 2017 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Cystadenoma of the seminal vesicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gil Antônio O.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary tumors of the seminal vesicle are extremely rare. Among them, there is a spectrum of tumors derived from both epithelium and stroma and so classified as epithelial-stromal tumors. Herein, we report a case of a cystadenoma in a 49-year-old asymptomatic man, detected in a routine ultrasonography for liver disease follow-up. The digital rectal examination detected a large mass anterior to rectum and posterior to bladder. Computed tomography scan and magnetic resonance imaging showed a normal prostate and a 9.0 cm cystic tumor, replacing the left seminal vesicle. The gross appearance and microscopic aspect was compatible with cystadenoma of seminal vesicle. Patient's postoperative recovery was uneventful. He is currently alive, 3 years after the diagnosis, with no signs of recurrence.

  3. Monolithic ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbell, Thomas P.; Sanders, William A.

    1992-01-01

    A development history and current development status evaluation are presented for SiC and Si3N4 monolithic ceramics. In the absence of widely sought improvements in these materials' toughness, and associated reliability in structural applications, uses will remain restricted to components in noncritical, nonman-rated aerospace applications such as cruise missile and drone gas turbine engine components. In such high temperature engine-section components, projected costs lie below those associated with superalloy-based short-life/expendable engines. Advancements are required in processing technology for the sake of fewer and smaller microstructural flaws.

  4. When to biopsy seminal vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panach-Navarrete, J; García-Morata, F; Hernández-Medina, J A; Martínez-Jabaloyas, J M

    2015-05-01

    The involvement of seminal vesicles in prostate cancer can affect the prognosis and determine the treatment. The objective of this study was to determine whether we could predict its infiltration at the time of the prostate biopsy to know when to indicate the biopsy of the seminal vesicles. observational retrospective study of 466 patients who underwent seminal vesicle biopsy. The indication for this biopsy was a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level greater than 10 ng/ml or an asymmetric or obliterated prostatoseminal angle. The following variables were included in the analysis: PSA level, PSA density, prostate volume, number of cores biopsied, suspicious rectal examination, and preservation of the prostatoseminal angle, studying its relationship with the involvement of the seminal vesicles. Forty-one patients (8.8%) had infiltrated seminal vesicles and 425 (91.2%) had no involvement. In the univariate analysis, the cases with infiltration had a higher mean PSA level (P 19.60 ng/dL (P < .01) and 2.95 times higher if there is a suspicious rectal examination (P = .014). Furthermore, this probability increases by 1.04 times for each unit of prostate volume lower (P < .01). The ROC curves showed maximum sensitivity and specificity at 19.6 ng/mL for PSA and 0.39 for PSA density. In this series, greater involvement of seminal vesicles was associated with a PSA level ≥20 ng/ml, a suspicious rectal examination and a lack of prostatoseminal angle preservation. Copyright © 2014 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. SMALL VESICLES, BIG VEHICLES: EXOSOMES.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saiz-Lopez P

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Exosomes are small membranous vesicles released by different cell types. Since their discovery, they have evolved from being considered simple vehicles for the liberation of cellular wastes, to become one of the most promising fields in the area of biomedical research, and more specifically in oncology, since the different malignant tumors release exosomes to all biological fluids, being involved in various functions of the neoplastic process. At present, it is possible to study these vesicles by minimally invasive techniques in patients, which approach us to obtain a more detailed diagnosis and prognosis, as well as to the discovery of new antitumoral therapies

  6. Vesicles and vesicle fusion: coarse-grained simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shillcock, Julian C.

    2010-01-01

    Biological cells are highly dynamic, and continually move material around their own volume and between their interior and exterior. Much of this transport encapsulates the material inside phospholipid vesicles that shuttle to and fro, fusing with, and budding from, other membranes. A feature of v...

  7. Ca2+ Dependence of Synaptic Vesicle Endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitz, Jeremy; Kavalali, Ege T

    2016-10-01

    Ca(2+)-dependent synaptic vesicle recycling is essential for structural homeostasis of synapses and maintenance of neurotransmission. Although, the executive role of intrasynaptic Ca(2+) transients in synaptic vesicle exocytosis is well established, identifying the exact role of Ca(2+) in endocytosis has been difficult. In some studies, Ca(2+) has been suggested as an essential trigger required to initiate synaptic vesicle retrieval, whereas others manipulating synaptic Ca(2+) concentrations reported a modulatory role for Ca(2+) leading to inhibition or acceleration of endocytosis. Molecular studies of synaptic vesicle endocytosis, on the other hand, have consistently focused on the roles of Ca(2+)-calmodulin dependent phosphatase calcineurin and synaptic vesicle protein synaptotagmin as potential Ca(2+) sensors for endocytosis. Most studies probing the role of Ca(2+) in endocytosis have relied on measurements of synaptic vesicle retrieval after strong stimulation. Strong stimulation paradigms elicit fusion and retrieval of multiple synaptic vesicles and therefore can be affected by several factors besides the kinetics and duration of Ca(2+) signals that include the number of exocytosed vesicles and accumulation of released neurotransmitters thus altering fusion and retrieval processes indirectly via retrograde signaling. Studies monitoring single synaptic vesicle endocytosis may help resolve this conundrum as in these settings the impact of Ca(2+) on synaptic fusion probability can be uncoupled from its putative role on synaptic vesicle retrieval. Future experiments using these single vesicle approaches will help dissect the specific role(s) of Ca(2+) and its sensors in synaptic vesicle endocytosis. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. Extracellular vesicles in physiological and pathological conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yuana, Yuana; Sturk, Auguste; Nieuwland, Rienk

    2013-01-01

    Body fluids contain surprising numbers of cell-derived vesicles which are now thought to contribute to both physiology and pathology. Tools to improve the detection of vesicles are being developed and clinical applications using vesicles for diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy are under investigation.

  9. Membrane Trafficking and Vesicle Fusion

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 19; Issue 5. Membrane Trafficking and Vesicle Fusion: Post-Palade Era Researchers Win the Nobel Prize. Riddhi Atul Jani Subba Rao Gangi Setty. General Article Volume 19 Issue 5 May 2014 pp 421-445 ...

  10. The readily releasable pool of synaptic vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaeser, Pascal S; Regehr, Wade G

    2017-04-01

    Each presynaptic bouton is densely packed with many vesicles, only a small fraction of which are available for immediate release. These vesicles constitute the readily releasable pool (RRP). The RRP size, and the probability of release of each vesicle within the RRP, together determine synaptic strength. Here, we discuss complications and recent advances in determining the size of the physiologically relevant RRP. We consider molecular mechanisms to generate and regulate the RRP, and discuss the relationship between vesicle docking and the RRP. We conclude that many RRP vesicles are docked, that some docked vesicles may not be part of the RRP, and that undocked vesicles can contribute to the RRP by rapid recruitment to unoccupied, molecularly activated ready-to-release sites. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Phospholipid Vesicles in Materials Science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granick, Steve [Univ. of Illinois, Champaign, IL (United States)

    2016-05-11

    The objective of this research was to develop the science basis needed to deploy phospholipid vesicles as functional materials in energy contexts. Specifically, we sought to: (1) Develop an integrated molecular-level understanding of what determines their dynamical shape, spatial organization, and responsiveness to complex, time-varying environments; and (2) Develop understanding of their active transportation in crowded environments, which our preliminary measurements in cells suggest may hold design principles for targeting improved energy efficiency in new materials systems. The methods to do this largely involved fluorescence imaging and other spectroscopy involving single particles, vesicles, particles, DNA, and endosomes. An unexpected importance outcome was a new method to image light-emitting diodes during actual operation using super-resolution spectroscopy.

  12. Dynamics of endocytic vesicle creation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrais, David; Merrifield, Christien J

    2005-11-01

    Clathrin-mediated endocytosis is the main path for receptor internalization in metazoans and is essential for controlling cell integrity and signaling. It is driven by a large array of protein and lipid interactions that have been deciphered mainly by biochemical and genetic means. To place these interactions into context, and ultimately build a fully operative model of endocytosis at the molecular level, it is necessary to know the kinetic details of the role of each protein in this process. In this review, we describe the recent efforts made, by using live cell imaging, to define clear steps in the formation of endocytic vesicles and to observe the recruitment of key proteins during membrane invagination, the scission of a newly formed vesicle, and its movement away from the plasma membrane.

  13. Extracellular vesicles and blood diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Shosaku

    2017-04-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are small membrane vesicles released from many different cell types by the exocytic budding of the plasma membrane in response to cellular activation or apoptosis. EVs disseminate various bioactive effectors originating from the parent cells and transfer functional RNA and protein between cells, enabling them to alter vascular function and induce biological responses involved in vascular homeostasis. Although most EVs in human blood originate from platelets, EVs are also released from leukocytes, erythrocytes, endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and cancer cells. EVs were initially thought to be small particles with procoagulant activity; however, they can also evoke cellular responses in the immediate microenvironments and transport microRNAs (miRNA) into target cells. In this review, we summarize the recent literature relevant to EVs, including a growing list of clinical disorders that are associated with elevated EV levels. These studies suggest that EVs play roles in various blood diseases.

  14. Immunotherapeutic potential of extracellular vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin eZhang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles or EVs is a term that encompasses all classes of secreted lipid membrane vesicles. Despite being scientific novelties, EVs are gaining importance as a mediator of important physiological and pathological intercellular activities possibly through the transfer of their cargo of protein and RNA between cells. In particular, exosomes the currently best characterized EVs have been notable for their in vitro and in vivo immunomodulatory activities. Exosomes are nanometer-sized endosome-derived vesicles secreted by many cell types and their immunomodulatory potential is independent of their cell source. Besides immune cells such as dendritic cells, macrophages and T cells, cancer and stem cells also secrete immunologically active exosomes that could influence both physiological and pathological processes. The immunological activities of exosomes affect both innate and adaptive immunity and include antigen presentation, T cell activation, T cell polarisation to Tregs, immune suppression and anti-inflammation. As such, exosomes carry much immunotherapeutic potential as a therapeutic agent and a therapeutic target.

  15. Verification of ceramic structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Behar-Lafenetre, S.; Cornillon, L.; Rancurel, M.; Graaf, D. de; Hartmann, P.; Coe, G.; Laine, B.

    2012-01-01

    In the framework of the "Mechanical Design and Verification Methodologies for Ceramic Structures" contract [1] awarded by ESA, Thales Alenia Space has investigated literature and practices in affiliated industries to propose a methodological guideline for verification of ceramic spacecraft and

  16. Ceramic Laser Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Villalobos

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic laser materials have come a long way since the first demonstration of lasing in 1964. Improvements in powder synthesis and ceramic sintering as well as novel ideas have led to notable achievements. These include the first Nd:yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG ceramic laser in 1995, breaking the 1 KW mark in 2002 and then the remarkable demonstration of more than 100 KW output power from a YAG ceramic laser system in 2009. Additional developments have included highly doped microchip lasers, ultrashort pulse lasers, novel materials such as sesquioxides, fluoride ceramic lasers, selenide ceramic lasers in the 2 to 3 μm region, composite ceramic lasers for better thermal management, and single crystal lasers derived from polycrystalline ceramics. This paper highlights some of these notable achievements.

  17. Joining Ceramics By Brazing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiaramonte, Francis P.; Sudsina, Michael W.

    1992-01-01

    Certain ceramic materials tightly bond together by brazing with suitable alloys. Enables fabrication of parts of wide variety of shapes from smaller initial pieces of ceramics produced directly in only limited variety of shapes.

  18. Synaptic vesicle proteins and active zone plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J Kittel

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Neurotransmitter is released from synaptic vesicles at the highly specialized presynaptic active zone. The complex molecular architecture of active zones mediates the speed, precision and plasticity of synaptic transmission. Importantly, structural and functional properties of active zones vary significantly, even for a given connection. Thus, there appear to be distinct active zone states, which fundamentally influence neuronal communication by controlling the positioning and release of synaptic vesicles. Vice versa, recent evidence has revealed that synaptic vesicle components also modulate organizational states of the active zone.The protein-rich cytomatrix at the active zone (CAZ provides a structural platform for molecular interactions guiding vesicle exocytosis. Studies in Drosophila have now demonstrated that the vesicle proteins Synaptotagmin-1 (Syt1 and Rab3 also regulate glutamate release by shaping differentiation of the CAZ ultrastructure. We review these unexpected findings and discuss mechanistic interpretations of the reciprocal relationship between synaptic vesicles and active zone states, which has heretofore received little attention.

  19. Single-vesicle imaging reveals different transport mechanisms between glutamatergic and GABAergic vesicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farsi, Z.; Preobraschenski, J.; Bogaart, G. van den; Riedel, D.; Jahn, R.; Woehler, A.

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic transmission is mediated by the release of neurotransmitters, which involves exo-endocytotic cycling of synaptic vesicles. To maintain synaptic function, synaptic vesicles are refilled with thousands of neurotransmitter molecules within seconds after endocytosis, using the energy provided

  20. Extracellular Vesicles: Evolving Contributors in Autoimmunity

    OpenAIRE

    Katsiougiannis, Stergios

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles, including microvesicles, exosomes and apoptotic bodies are recognized as carriers of pathogen-associated molecules with direct involvement in immune signaling and inflammation. Those observations have enforced the way these membranous vesicles are being considered as promising immunotherapeutic targets. In this review, we discuss the emerging roles of extracellular vesicles in autoimmunity and highlights their potential use as disease biomarkers as well as targets for ...

  1. Exosomes: secreted vesicles and intercellular communications

    OpenAIRE

    Théry, Clotilde

    2011-01-01

    Exosomes are small membrane vesicles of endocytic origin secreted by most cell types, and are thought to play important roles in intercellular communications. Although exosomes were originally described in 1983, interest in these vesicles has really increased dramatically in the last 3 years, after the finding that they contain mRNA and microRNA. This discovery sparked renewed interest for the general field of membrane vesicles involved in intercellular communications, and research on these s...

  2. Trafficking of astrocytic vesicles in hippocampal slices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potokar, Maja; Kreft, Marko [Laboratory of Neuroendocrinology-Molecular Cell Physiology, Institute of Pathophysiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ljubljana, Zaloska 4, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Celica Biomedical Center, Technology Park 24, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Lee, So-Young; Takano, Hajime; Haydon, Philip G. [Department of Neuroscience, Room 215, Stemmler Hall, University of Pennsylvania, School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Zorec, Robert, E-mail: Robert.Zorec@mf.uni-lj.si [Laboratory of Neuroendocrinology-Molecular Cell Physiology, Institute of Pathophysiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ljubljana, Zaloska 4, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Celica Biomedical Center, Technology Park 24, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2009-12-25

    The increasingly appreciated role of astrocytes in neurophysiology dictates a thorough understanding of the mechanisms underlying the communication between astrocytes and neurons. In particular, the uptake and release of signaling substances into/from astrocytes is considered as crucial. The release of different gliotransmitters involves regulated exocytosis, consisting of the fusion between the vesicle and the plasma membranes. After fusion with the plasma membrane vesicles may be retrieved into the cytoplasm and may continue to recycle. To study the mobility implicated in the retrieval of secretory vesicles, these structures have been previously efficiently and specifically labeled in cultured astrocytes, by exposing live cells to primary and secondary antibodies. Since the vesicle labeling and the vesicle mobility properties may be an artifact of cell culture conditions, we here asked whether the retrieving exocytotic vesicles can be labeled in brain tissue slices and whether their mobility differs to that observed in cell cultures. We labeled astrocytic vesicles and recorded their mobility with two-photon microscopy in hippocampal slices from transgenic mice with fluorescently tagged astrocytes (GFP mice) and in wild-type mice with astrocytes labeled by Fluo4 fluorescence indicator. Glutamatergic vesicles and peptidergic granules were labeled by the anti-vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (vGlut1) and anti-atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) antibodies, respectively. We report that the vesicle mobility parameters (velocity, maximal displacement and track length) recorded in astrocytes from tissue slices are similar to those reported previously in cultured astrocytes.

  3. Reversibly formed bilayer vesicles: Energetics and polydispersity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergstöm, M.

    1997-01-01

    orders of magnitude larger than where the local free energy minima of the equilibrium vesicle actually occur. Moreover, according to our analysis, the relative width of a vesicle size distribution, sigma(R)/R-max, is generally at full equilibrium equal to 0.283, independently of the energetic vesicle....... and a statistical-mechanical factor that accounts for the fluctuations in composition, chain packing density and shape. We demonstrate that the free energy required to form a spherical vesicle is made up of two main contributions: the (size-independent) work of bending the constituent monolayers and the work...

  4. Extracellular vesicles in cardiovascular homeostasis and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutcheson, Joshua D; Aikawa, Elena

    2018-02-19

    Extracellular vesicles have emerged as one of the most important means through which cells interact with each other and the extracellular environment, but extracellular vesicle research remains challenging due to their small size, limited amount of material required for traditional molecular biology assays and inconsistency in the methods of their isolation. The advent of new technologies and standards in the field, however, have led to increased mechanistic insight into extracellular vesicle function. Herein, the latest studies on the role of extracellular vesicles in cardiovascular physiology and disease are discussed. Extracellular vesicles help control cardiovascular homeostasis and remodelling by mediating communication between cells and directing alterations in the extracellular matrix to respond to changes in the environment. The message carried from the parent cell to extracellular space can be intended for both local (within the same tissue) and distal (downstream of blood flow) targets. Pathological cargo loaded within extracellular vesicles could further result in various diseases. On the contrary, new studies indicate that injection of extracellular vesicles obtained from cultured cells into diseased tissues can promote restoration of normal tissue function. Extracellular vesicles are an integral part of cell and tissue function, and harnessing the properties inherent to extracellular vesicles may provide a therapeutic strategy to promote tissue regeneration.

  5. Extracellular vesicles in cartilage homeostasis and osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyaki, Shigeru; Lotz, Martin K

    2018-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles carry bioactive molecules that can be transferred between cells and tissues. The purpose of this review is to describe how extracellular vesicles regulate functions of cells in cartilage and other joint tissues. The potential application of extracellular vesicles in the treatment of osteoarthritis and as biomarkers will also be discussed. Extracellular vesicles are found in synovial fluid, in articular cartilage and in the supernatants of synoviocytes and chondrocytes. Extracellular vesicles in cartilage have been proposed to be involved in cross talk between cells in joint tissues and to affect extracellular matrix turnover and inflammation. Extracellular vesicles from arthritic joints can promote abnormal gene expression and changes in cartilage extracellular matrix, including abnormal mineralization. Promising results were obtained in the therapeutic application of mesenchymal stem cell-derived extracellular vesicles for cartilage repair and experimental osteoarthritis. Extracellular vesicles have emerged as vehicles for the exchange of bioactive signaling molecules within cartilage and between joint tissues to promote joint homeostasis and arthritis pathogenesis. As the molecular content of extracellular vesicles can be customized, they offer utility in therapeutic applications.

  6. Creep in ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Pelleg, Joshua

    2017-01-01

    This textbook is one of its kind, since there are no other books on Creep in Ceramics. The book consist of two parts: A and B. In part A general knowledge of creep in ceramics is considered, while part B specifies creep in technologically important ceramics. Part B covers creep in oxide ceramics, carnides and nitrides. While covering all relevant information regarding raw materials and characterization of creep in ceramics, the book also summarizes most recent innovations and developments in this field as a result of extensive literature search.

  7. Thin film ceramic thermocouples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Otto (Inventor); Fralick, Gustave (Inventor); Wrbanek, John (Inventor); You, Tao (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A thin film ceramic thermocouple (10) having two ceramic thermocouple (12, 14) that are in contact with each other in at least on point to form a junction, and wherein each element was prepared in a different oxygen/nitrogen/argon plasma. Since each element is prepared under different plasma conditions, they have different electrical conductivity and different charge carrier concentration. The thin film thermocouple (10) can be transparent. A versatile ceramic sensor system having an RTD heat flux sensor can be combined with a thermocouple and a strain sensor to yield a multifunctional ceramic sensor array. The transparent ceramic temperature sensor that could ultimately be used for calibration of optical sensors.

  8. Ceramic gas turbine shroud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jun; Green, Kevin E.

    2014-07-22

    An example gas turbine engine shroud includes a first annular ceramic wall having an inner side for resisting high temperature turbine engine gasses and an outer side with a plurality of radial slots. A second annular metallic wall is positioned radially outwardly of and enclosing the first annular ceramic wall and has a plurality of tabs in communication with the slot of the first annular ceramic wall. The tabs of the second annular metallic wall and slots of the first annular ceramic wall are in communication such that the first annular ceramic wall and second annular metallic wall are affixed.

  9. Extracellular Vesicles in Cardiovascular Theranostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bei, Yihua; Das, Saumya; Rodosthenous, Rodosthenis S; Holvoet, Paul; Vanhaverbeke, Maarten; Monteiro, Marta Chagas; Monteiro, Valter Vinicius Silva; Radosinska, Jana; Bartekova, Monika; Jansen, Felix; Li, Qian; Rajasingh, Johnson; Xiao, Junjie

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are small bilayer lipid membrane vesicles that can be released by most cell types and detected in most body fluids. EVs exert key functions for intercellular communication via transferring their bioactive cargos to recipient cells or activating signaling pathways in target cells. Increasing evidence has shown the important regulatory effects of EVs in cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). EVs secreted by cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells, fibroblasts, and stem cells play essential roles in pathophysiological processes such as cardiac hypertrophy, cardiomyocyte survival and apoptosis, cardiac fibrosis, and angiogenesis in relation to CVDs. In this review, we will first outline the current knowledge about the physical characteristics, biological contents, and isolation methods of EVs. We will then focus on the functional roles of cardiovascular EVs and their pathophysiological effects in CVDs, as well as summarize the potential of EVs as therapeutic agents and biomarkers for CVDs. Finally, we will discuss the specific application of EVs as a novel drug delivery system and the utility of EVs in the field of regenerative medicine.

  10. Science and Technology of Ceramics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Science and Technology of Ceramics. 2. Functional Ceramics. Sheela Ramasesha. In Part 11 we saw that ceramics could be broadly classified as traditional and advanced ceramics. Traditional ceramics are those made from naturally occurring materials like clays and minerals without requiring much refinement. In this part ...

  11. Illuminating the physiology of extracellular vesicles

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Hongyoon; Lee, Dong Soo

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles play a crucial role in intercellular communication by transmitting biological materials from donor cells to recipient cells. They have pathophysiologic roles in cancer metastasis, neurodegenerative diseases, and inflammation. Extracellular vesicles also show promise as emerging therapeutics, with understanding of their physiology including targeting, distribution, and clearance therefore becoming an important issue. Here, we review recent advances in methods for trackin...

  12. Amyloglucosidase enzymatic reactivity inside lipid vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Jin-Woo

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Efficient functioning of enzymes inside liposomes would open new avenues for applications in biocatalysis and bioanalytical tools. In this study, the entrapment of amyloglucosidase (AMG (EC 3.2.1.3 from Aspergillus niger into dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC multilamellar vesicles (MLVs and large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs was investigated. Negative-stain, freeze-fracture, and cryo-transmission electron microscopy images verified vesicle formation in the presence of AMG. Vesicles with entrapped AMG were isolated from the solution by centrifugation, and vesicle lamellarity was identified using fluorescence laser confocal microscopy. The kinetics of starch hydrolysis by AMG was modeled for two different systems, free enzyme in aqueous solution and entrapped enzyme within vesicles in aqueous suspension. For the free enzyme system, intrinsic kinetics were described by a Michaelis-Menten kinetic model with product inhibition. The kinetic constants, Vmax and Km, were determined by initial velocity measurements, and Ki was obtained by fitting the model to experimental data of glucose concentration-time curves. Predicted concentration-time curves using these kinetic constants were in good agreement with experimental measurements. In the case of the vesicles, the time-dependence of product (glucose formation was experimentally determined and simulated by considering the kinetic behavior of the enzyme and the permeation of substrate into the vesicle. Experimental results demonstrated that entrapped enzymes were much more stable than free enyzme. The entrapped enzyme could be recycled with retention of 60% activity after 3 cycles. These methodologies can be useful in evaluating other liposomal catalysis operations.

  13. Extracellular vesicles in coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulanger, Chantal M; Loyer, Xavier; Rautou, Pierre-Emmanuel; Amabile, Nicolas

    2017-05-01

    Membrane vesicles released in the extracellular space are composed of a lipid bilayer enclosing soluble cytosolic material and nuclear components. Extracellular vesicles include apoptotic bodies, exosomes, and microvesicles (also known previously as microparticles). Originating from different subcellular compartments, the role of extracellular vesicles as regulators of transfer of biological information, acting locally and remotely, is now acknowledged. Circulating vesicles released from platelets, erythrocytes, leukocytes, and endothelial cells contain potential valuable biological information for biomarker discovery in primary and secondary prevention of coronary artery disease. Extracellular vesicles also accumulate in human atherosclerotic plaques, where they affect major biological pathways, including inflammation, proliferation, thrombosis, calcification, and vasoactive responses. Extracellular vesicles also recapitulate the beneficial effect of stem cells to treat cardiac consequences of acute myocardial infarction, and now emerge as an attractive alternative to cell therapy, opening new avenues to vectorize biological information to target tissues. Although interest in microvesicles in the cardiovascular field emerged about 2 decades ago, that for extracellular vesicles, in particular exosomes, started to unfold a decade ago, opening new research and therapeutic avenues. This Review summarizes current knowledge on the role of extracellular vesicles in coronary artery disease, and their emerging potential as biomarkers and therapeutic agents.

  14. Detection of extracellular vesicles: size does matter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Pol, E.

    2015-01-01

    Cells release small sacks filled with fluid, which are called "extracellular vesicles". The diameter of extracellular vesicles (EV) typically ranges from 30 nm to 1 µm. Because cells release EV into their environment, our body fluids contain numerous EV. Cells release EV to remove waste and to

  15. Synaptic vesicle distribution by conveyor belt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moughamian, Armen J; Holzbaur, Erika L F

    2012-03-02

    The equal distribution of synaptic vesicles among synapses along the axon is critical for robust neurotransmission. Wong et al. show that the continuous circulation of synaptic vesicles throughout the axon driven by molecular motors ultimately yields this even distribution. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Urinary extracellular vesicles: biomarkers and beyond

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Salih (Mahdi)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractExtracellular vesicles have been isolated in various body fluids including urine. The cargo of urinary extracellular vesicles (uEVs) is composed of proteins and nucleic acids reflecting the physiological and possibly the pathophysiological state of cells lining the nephron. Because

  17. Fusion Competent Synaptic Vesicles Persist upon Active Zone Disruption and Loss of Vesicle Docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shan Shan H; Held, Richard G; Wong, Man Yan; Liu, Changliang; Karakhanyan, Aziz; Kaeser, Pascal S

    2016-08-17

    In a nerve terminal, synaptic vesicle docking and release are restricted to an active zone. The active zone is a protein scaffold that is attached to the presynaptic plasma membrane and opposed to postsynaptic receptors. Here, we generated conditional knockout mice removing the active zone proteins RIM and ELKS, which additionally led to loss of Munc13, Bassoon, Piccolo, and RIM-BP, indicating disassembly of the active zone. We observed a near-complete lack of synaptic vesicle docking and a strong reduction in vesicular release probability and the speed of exocytosis, but total vesicle numbers, SNARE protein levels, and postsynaptic densities remained unaffected. Despite loss of the priming proteins Munc13 and RIM and of docked vesicles, a pool of releasable vesicles remained. Thus, the active zone is necessary for synaptic vesicle docking and to enhance release probability, but releasable vesicles can be localized distant from the presynaptic plasma membrane. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The friction and wear of ceramic/ceramic and ceramic/metal combinations in sliding contact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sliney, H.E.; Dellacorte, C. (NASA Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, OH (United States))

    1994-07-01

    The tribological characteristics of ceramics sliding on ceramics are compared to those of ceramics sliding on a nickel-based turbine alloy. The friction and wear of oxide ceramics and silicon-based ceramics in air at temperatures from room ambient to 900 C (in a few cases to 1200 C) were measured for a hemispherically-tipped pin on a flat sliding contact geometry. In general, especially at high temperature, friction and wear were lower for ceramic/metal combinations than for ceramic/ceramic combinations. The better tribological performance for ceramic/metal combinations is attributed primarily to the lubricious nature of the oxidized surface of the metal.

  19. Alternative methods for characterization of extracellular vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh eMomen-Heravi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles are nano-sized vesicles released by all cells in vitro as well as in vivo. Their role has been implicated mainly in cell-cell communication, but also in disease biomarkers and more recently in gene delivery. They represent a snapshot of the cell status at the moment of release and carry bioreactive macromolecules such as nucleic acids, proteins and lipids. A major limitation in this emerging new field is the availability/awareness of techniques to isolate and properly characterize Extracellular vesicles. The lack of gold standards makes comparing different studies very difficult and may potentially hinder some Extracellular vesicles -specific evidence. Characterization of Extracellular vesicles has also recently seen many advances with the use of Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis (NTA, flow cytometry, cryo-EM instruments and proteomic technologies. In this review, we discuss the latest developments in translational technologies involving characterization methods including the facts in their support and the challenges they face.

  20. Extracellular vesicles: new players in cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaceb, Abderahim; Martinez, Maria Carmen; Andriantsitohaina, Ramaroson

    2014-05-01

    Extracellular vesicles, particles released by all cell types, represent a new way to convey information between cells such as proteins, second messengers, and genetic information to modify the phenotype and function of the target cells. Recent data suggest that extracellular vesicles play a crucial role in both physiology and pathology, including coagulation, angiogenesis, cell survival, modulation of the immune response, and inflammation. Thus extracellular vesicles participate in the processes of cardiovascular diseases from atherosclerosis, myocardial infarction to heart failure. Consequently, extracellular vesicles can potentially be exploited for therapy, prognosis, and biomarkers for health and disease. This review focuses on the role of extracellular vesicles in the development of cardiovascular diseases, as well as the deleterious and beneficial effects that they may provide in vascular cells and myocardium. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. [Transvesical Removal of Seminal Vesicle Cystadenoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayasu, Kenta; Harada, Jiro; Kawa, Gen; Ota, Syuichi; Sakurai, Takanori

    2015-07-01

    Primary tumors of the seminal vesicles are extremely rare. There have been 25 reports of this tumor from overseas and most cases are cystadenoma. We report a case of seminal vesicle cystadenoma in a 70-year-old man who presented with lower abdominal pain and urinary frequency. A digital rectal examination detected a projecting and hard mass in the right side of the prostate. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a 15 cm multiple cystic mass continuous with the right seminal vesicle. A transrectal needle biopsy revealed benign tissue. The tumor was resected using an open transvesical approach that enabled full exposure of the seminal vesicle without damaging the nerves and blood supply of the bladder. Pathology was consistent with a benign seminal vesicle cystadenoma. We describe the natural history, pathology,and surgical approach in this case.

  2. Pushing synaptic vesicles over the RIM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaeser, Pascal S

    2011-05-01

    In a presynaptic nerve terminal, neurotransmitter release is largely restricted to specialized sites called active zones. Active zones consist of a complex protein network, and they organize fusion of synaptic vesicles with the presynaptic plasma membrane in response to action potentials. Rab3-interacting molecules (RIMs) are central components of active zones. In a recent series of experiments, we have systematically dissected the molecular mechanisms by which RIMs operate in synaptic vesicle release. We found that RIMs execute two critical functions of active zones by virtue of independent protein domains. They tether presyanptic Ca(2+) channels to the active zone, and they activate priming of synaptic vesicles by monomerizing homodimeric, constitutively inactive Munc13. These data indicate that RIMs orchestrate synaptic vesicle release into a coherent process. In conjunction with previous studies, they suggest that RIMs form a molecular platform on which plasticity of synaptic vesicle release can operate.

  3. Apoptotic Bodies: Selective Detection in Extracellular Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Paul; Wang, Sha; Didenko, Vladimir V

    2017-01-01

    Normal and dying cells release various types of membrane-bound vesicles including microvesicles, exosomes, and apoptotic bodies. These vesicles play important roles in intercellular communication and signal transduction. However, their diverse forms and subtypes fluctuate in size and other properties. In result current purification approaches do not fully discriminate between different categories of extracellular vesicles. Here, we present a fluorescence technique that specifically identifies apoptotic bodies in preparations of microvesicles, exosomes, and other extracellular vesicles.The approach exclusively labels the vesicles that contain DNA with 5'PO 4 blunt-ended DNA breaks, such as those produced by the apoptotic CAD nuclease during apoptotic DNA degradation. The technique can be useful in studies of apoptosis involving microvesicles and exosomes.

  4. Monosaccharide transport in protein-depleted vesicles from erythrocyte membranes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    M A Zoccoli; G E Lienhard

    1977-01-01

    .... Based on comparisons between erythrocytes and vesicles with regard to specificity, temparture dependence, and effects of inhibitors, we conclude that sorbose uptake into the vesicles occurs by way...

  5. NDE of ceramics and ceramic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vary, Alex A.; Klima, Stanley J.

    Although nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques for ceramics are fairly well developed, they are difficult to apply in many cases for high probability detection of the minute flaws that can cause failure in monolithic ceramics. Conventional NDE techniques are available for monolithic and fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites, but more exact quantitative techniques needed are still being investigated and developed. Needs range from flaw detection to below 100 micron levels in monolithic ceramics to global imaging of fiber architecture and matrix densification anomalies in ceramic composites. NDE techniques that will ultimately be applicable to production and quality control of ceramic structures are still emerging from the lab. Needs are different depending on the processing stage, fabrication method, and nature of the finished product. NDE techniques are being developed in concert with materials processing research where they can provide feedback information to processing development and quality improvement. NDE techniques also serve as research tools for materials characterization and for understanding failure processes, e.g., during thermomechanical testing.

  6. Antibacterial ceramic for sandbox. Sunabayo kokin ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, K. (Ishizuka Glass Co. Ltd. Nagoya (Japan))

    1993-10-01

    Sands in sandboxes in parks have been called into question of being contaminated by colon bacilli and spawns from ascarides. This paper introduces an antibacterial ceramic for sandbox developed as a new material effective to help reduce the contamination. The ceramic uses natural sand as the main raw material, which is added with borax and silver to contain silver ions that have bacteria and fungus resistance and deodorizing effect. The ceramic has an average grain size ranging from 0.5 mm to 0.7 mm, and is so devised as to match specific gravity, grain size and shape of the sand, hence no separation and segregation can occur. The result of weatherability and antibacterial strength tests on sand for a sandbox mixed with the ceramic at 1% suggests that its efficacy lasts for about three years. Its actual use is under observation. Its efficacy has been verified in a test that measures a survival factor of spawns from dog ascardides contacted with aqueous solution containing the ceramic at 1%. Safety and sanitation tests have proved the ceramic a highly safe product that conforms to the food sanitation law. 5 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Ceramic laser materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikesue, Akio; Aung, Yan Lin

    2008-12-01

    The word 'ceramics' is derived from the Greek keramos, meaning pottery and porcelain. The opaque and translucent cement and clay often used in tableware are not appropriate for optical applications because of the high content of optical scattering sources, that is, defects. Recently, scientists have shown that by eliminating the defects, a new, refined ceramic material - polycrystalline ceramic - can be produced. This advanced ceramic material offers practical laser generation and is anticipated to be a highly attractive alternative to conventional glass and single-crystal laser technologies in the future. Here we review the history of the development of ceramic lasers, the principle of laser generation based on this material, some typical results achieved with ceramic lasers so far, and discuss the potential future outlook for the field.

  8. Analyses of fine paste ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabloff, J A [ed.

    1980-01-01

    Four chapters are included: history of Brookhaven fine paste ceramics project, chemical and mathematical procedures employed in Mayan fine paste ceramics project, and compositional and archaeological perspectives on the Mayan fine paste ceramics. (DLC)

  9. Science and Technology of Ceramics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 5; Issue 2. Science and Technology of Ceramics - Advanced Ceramics: Structural Ceramics and Glasses. Sheela K Ramasesha. Series Article Volume 5 Issue 2 February 2000 pp 4-11 ...

  10. Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-09-01

    Fiber-reinforced ceramic composites demonstrate the high-temperature stability of ceramics--with an increased fracture toughness resulting from the fiber reinforcement of the composite. The material optimization performed under the continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCC) included a series of systematic optimizations. The overall goals were to define the processing window, to increase the robustinous of the process, to increase process yield while reducing costs, and to define the complexity of parts that could be fabricated.

  11. Measuring Fracture Times Of Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlichta, Paul J.; Bister, Leo; Bickler, Donald G.

    1989-01-01

    Electrical measurements complement or replace fast cinematography. Electronic system measures microsecond time intervals between impacts of projectiles on ceramic tiles and fracture tiles. Used in research on ceramics and ceramic-based composite materials such as armor. Hardness and low density of ceramics enable them to disintegrate projectiles more efficiently than metals. Projectile approaches ceramic tile specimen. Penetrating foil squares of triggering device activate display and recording instruments. As ceramic and resistive film break oscilloscope plots increase in electrical resistance of film.

  12. Extracellular vesicles as emerging intercellular communicasomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Yae Jin; Kim, Oh Youn; Gho, Yong Song

    2014-10-01

    All living cells release extracellular vesicles having pleiotropic functions in intercellular communication. Mammalian extracellular vesicles, also known as exosomes and microvesicles, are spherical bilayered proteolipids composed of various bioactive molecules, including RNAs, DNAs, proteins, and lipids. Extracellular vesicles directly and indirectly control a diverse range of biological processes by transferring membrane proteins, signaling molecules, mRNAs, and miRNAs, and activating receptors of recipient cells. The active interaction of extracellular vesicles with other cells regulates various physiological and pathological conditions, including cancer, infectious diseases, and neurodegenerative disorders. Recent developments in high-throughput proteomics, transcriptomics, and lipidomics tools have provided ample data on the common and specific components of various types of extracellular vesicles. These studies may contribute to the understanding of the molecular mechanism involved in vesicular cargo sorting and the biogenesis of extracellular vesicles, and, further, to the identification of disease-specific biomarkers. This review focuses on the components, functions, and therapeutic and diagnostic potential of extracellular vesicles under various pathophysiological conditions.

  13. Structure of Amphiphilic Terpolymer Raspberry Vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingying Guo

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Terpolymer raspberry vesicles contain domains of different chemical affinities. They are potential candidates as multi-compartment cargo carriers. Their efficacy depends on their stability and load capacity. Using a model star terpolymer system in an aqueous solution, a dissipative particle dynamic (DPD simulation is employed to investigate how equilibrium aggregate structures are affected by polymer concentration and pairwise interaction energy in a solution. It is shown that a critical mass of polymer is necessary for vesicle formation. The free energy of the equilibrium aggregates are calculated and the results show that the transition from micelles to vesicles is governed by the interactions between the longest solvophobic block and the solvent. In addition, the ability of vesicles to encapsulate solvent is assessed. It is found that reducing the interaction energy favours solvent encapsulation, although solvent molecules can permeate through the vesicle’s shell when repulsive interactions among monomers are low. Thus, one can optimize the loading capacity and the release rate of the vesicles by turning pairwise interaction energies of the polymer and the solvent. The ability to predict and control these aspects of the vesicles is an essential step towards designing vesicles for specific purposes.

  14. Ceramic Technology Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    The Ceramic Technology Project was developed by the USDOE Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS's Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS's automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the USDOE and NASA advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. These programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. A five-year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. In July 1990 the original plan was updated through the estimated completion of development in 1993. The objective is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on the structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to US industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities.

  15. Illuminating the physiology of extracellular vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hongyoon; Lee, Dong Soo

    2016-04-16

    Extracellular vesicles play a crucial role in intercellular communication by transmitting biological materials from donor cells to recipient cells. They have pathophysiologic roles in cancer metastasis, neurodegenerative diseases, and inflammation. Extracellular vesicles also show promise as emerging therapeutics, with understanding of their physiology including targeting, distribution, and clearance therefore becoming an important issue. Here, we review recent advances in methods for tracking and imaging extracellular vesicles in vivo and critically discuss their systemic distribution, targeting, and kinetics based on up-to-date evidence in the literature.

  16. Classification, Functions, and Clinical Relevance of Extracellular Vesicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Pol, Edwin; Böing, Anita N.; Harrison, Paul; Sturk, Augueste; Nieuwland, Rienk

    2012-01-01

    Both eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells release small, phospholipid-enclosed vesicles into their environment. Why do cells release vesicles? Initial studies showed that eukaryotic vesicles are used to remove obsolete cellular molecules. Although this release of vesicles is beneficial to the cell, the

  17. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2001-02-01

    This is the fifth quarterly report on a new study to develop a ceramic membrane/metal joint. Results of wetting experiments on commercially available Nickel based brazing alloys on perovskite surfaces are described. Additionally, experimental and numerical investigations on the strength of concentric ceramic/metal joints are presented.

  18. Vesicle-MaNiA: extracellular vesicles in liquid biopsy and cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Torrano, Veronica; Royo, Felix; Peinado, Héctor; Loizaga-Iriarte, Ana; Unda, Miguel; Falcón-Perez, Juan M.; Carracedo, Arkaitz

    2016-01-01

    Normal and tumor cells shed vesicles to the environment. Within the large family of extracellular vesicles, exosomes and microvesicles have attracted much attention in the recent years. Their interest ranges from mediators of cancer progression, inflammation, immune regulation and metastatic niche regulation, to non-invasive biomarkers of disease. In this respect, the procedures to purify and analyze extracellular vesicles have quickly evolved and represent a source of variability for data in...

  19. Ceramic heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaHaye, P.G.; Rahman, F.H.; Lebeau, T.P.; Severin, B.K.

    1998-06-16

    A tube containment system is disclosed. The tube containment system does not significantly reduce heat transfer through the tube wall. The contained tube is internally pressurized, and is formed from a ceramic material having high strength, high thermal conductivity, and good thermal shock resistance. The tube containment system includes at least one ceramic fiber braid material disposed about the internally pressurized tube. The material is disposed about the tube in a predetermined axial spacing arrangement. The ceramic fiber braid is present in an amount sufficient to contain the tube if the tube becomes fractured. The tube containment system can also include a plurality of ceramic ring-shaped structures, in contact with the outer surface of the tube, and positioned between the tube and the ceramic fiber braid material, and/or at least one transducer positioned within tube for reducing the internal volume and, therefore, the energy of any shrapnel resulting from a tube fracture. 6 figs.

  20. Hybrid, Nanoscale Phospholipid/Block Copolymer Vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Liedberg

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid phospholipid/block copolymer vesicles, in which the polymeric membrane is blended with phospholipids, display interesting self-assembly behavior, incorporating the robustness and chemical versatility of polymersomes with the softness and biocompatibility of liposomes. Such structures can be conveniently characterized by preparing giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs via electroformation. Here, we are interested in exploring the self-assembly and properties of the analogous nanoscale hybrid vesicles (ca. 100 nm in diameter of the same composition prepared by film-hydration and extrusion. We show that the self-assembly and content-release behavior of nanoscale polybutadiene-b-poly(ethylene oxide (PB-PEO/1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (POPC hybrid phospholipid/block copolymer vesicles can be tuned by the mixing ratio of the amphiphiles. In brief, these hybrids may provide alternative tools for drug delivery purposes and molecular imaging/sensing applications and clearly open up new avenues for further investigation.

  1. Stability of Spherical Vesicles in Electric Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    The stability of spherical vesicles in alternating (ac) electric fields is studied theoretically for asymmetric conductivity conditions across their membranes. The vesicle deformation is obtained from a balance between the curvature elastic energies and the work done by the Maxwell stresses. The present theory describes and clarifies the mechanisms for the four types of morphological transitions observed experimentally on vesicles exposed to ac fields in the frequency range from 500 to 2 × 107 Hz. The displacement currents across the membranes redirect the electric fields toward the membrane normal to accumulate electric charges by the Maxwell−Wagner mechanism. These accumulated electric charges provide the underlying molecular mechanism for the morphological transitions of vesicles as observed on the micrometer scale. PMID:20575588

  2. Kinetic regulation of coated vesicle secretion

    CERN Document Server

    Foret, Lionel

    2008-01-01

    The secretion of vesicles for intracellular transport often rely on the aggregation of specialized membrane-bound proteins into a coat able to curve cell membranes. The nucleation and growth of a protein coat is a kinetic process that competes with the energy-consuming turnover of coat components between the membrane and the cytosol. We propose a generic kinetic description of coat assembly and the formation of coated vesicles, and discuss its implication to the dynamics of COP vesicles that traffic within the Golgi and with the Endoplasmic Reticulum. We show that stationary coats of fixed area emerge from the competition between coat growth and the recycling of coat components, in a fashion resembling the treadmilling of cytoskeletal filaments. We further show that the turnover of coat components allows for a highly sensitive switching mechanism between a quiescent and a vesicle producing membrane, upon a slowing down of the exchange kinetics. We claim that the existence of this switching behaviour, also tri...

  3. Mutations in Synaptojanin Disrupt Synaptic Vesicle Recycling

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, Todd W.; Hartwieg, Erika; Horvitz, H. Robert; Jorgensen, Erik M.

    2000-01-01

    Synaptojanin is a polyphosphoinositide phosphatase that is found at synapses and binds to proteins implicated in endocytosis. For these reasons, it has been proposed that synaptojanin is involved in the recycling of synaptic vesicles. Here, we demonstrate that the unc-26 gene encodes the Caenorhabditis elegans ortholog of synaptojanin. unc-26 mutants exhibit defects in vesicle trafficking in several tissues, but most defects are found at synaptic termini. Specifically, we observed defects in ...

  4. Concentration-Independent Spontaneously Forming Biomimetric Vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieh, M.-P.; Harroun, T. A.; Raghunathan, V. A.; Glinka, C. J.; Katsaras, J.

    2003-10-01

    In this Letter we present small-angle neutron scattering data from a biomimetic system composed of the phospholipids dimyristoyl and dihexanoyl phosphorylcholine (DMPC and DHPC, respectively). Doping DMPC-DHPC multilamellar vesicles with either the negatively charged lipid dimyristoyl phosphorylglycerol (DMPG, net charge -1) or the divalent cation, calcium (Ca2+), leads to the spontaneous formation of energetically stabilized monodisperse unilamellar vesicles whose radii are concentration independent and in contrast with previous experimental observations.

  5. Labeling Extracellular Vesicles for Nanoscale Flow Cytometry

    OpenAIRE

    Aizea Morales-Kastresana; Bill Telford; Musich, Thomas A.; Katherine McKinnon; Cassandra Clayborne; Zach Braig; Ari Rosner; Thorsten Demberg; Watson, Dionysios C.; Karpova, Tatiana S.; Freeman, Gordon J.; DeKruyff, Rosemarie H.; Pavlakis, George N.; Masaki Terabe; Marjorie Robert-Guroff

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs), including exosomes and microvesicles, are 30?800?nm vesicles that are released by most cell types, as biological packages for intercellular communication. Their importance in cancer and inflammation makes EVs and their cargo promising biomarkers of disease and cell-free therapeutic agents. Emerging high-resolution cytometric methods have created a pressing need for efficient fluorescent labeling procedures to visualize and detect EVs. Suitable labels must be brig...

  6. Cellular Phenotype and Extracellular Vesicles: Basic and Clinical Considerations

    OpenAIRE

    Quesenberry, Peter J.; Goldberg, Laura R.; Aliotta, Jason M.; Mark S Dooner; Pereira, Mandy G.; Wen, Sicheng; Camussi, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Early work on platelet and erythrocyte vesicles interpreted the phenomena as a discard of material from cells. Subsequently, vesicles were studied as possible vaccines and, most recently, there has been a focus on the effects of vesicles on cell fate. Recent studies have indicated that extracellular vesicles, previously referred to as microvesicles or exosomes, have the capacity to change the phenotype of neighboring cells. Extensive work has shown that vesicles derived from either the lung o...

  7. Hierarchical unilamellar vesicles of controlled compositional heterogeneity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maik Hadorn

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic life contains hierarchical vesicular architectures (i.e. organelles that are crucial for material production and trafficking, information storage and access, as well as energy production. In order to perform specific tasks, these compartments differ among each other in their membrane composition and their internal cargo and also differ from the cell membrane and the cytosol. Man-made structures that reproduce this nested architecture not only offer a deeper understanding of the functionalities and evolution of organelle-bearing eukaryotic life but also allow the engineering of novel biomimetic technologies. Here, we show the newly developed vesicle-in-water-in-oil emulsion transfer preparation technique to result in giant unilamellar vesicles internally compartmentalized by unilamellar vesicles of different membrane composition and internal cargo, i.e. hierarchical unilamellar vesicles of controlled compositional heterogeneity. The compartmentalized giant unilamellar vesicles were subsequently isolated by a separation step exploiting the heterogeneity of the membrane composition and the encapsulated cargo. Due to the controlled, efficient, and technically straightforward character of the new preparation technique, this study allows the hierarchical fabrication of compartmentalized giant unilamellar vesicles of controlled compositional heterogeneity and will ease the development of eukaryotic cell mimics that resemble their natural templates as well as the fabrication of novel multi-agent drug delivery systems for combination therapies and complex artificial microreactors.

  8. Elastic energy of polyhedral bilayer vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haselwandter, Christoph A; Phillips, Rob

    2011-06-01

    In recent experiments [M. Dubois, B. Demé, T. Gulik-Krzywicki, J.-C. Dedieu, C. Vautrin, S. Désert, E. Perez, and T. Zemb, Nature (London) 411, 672 (2001)] the spontaneous formation of hollow bilayer vesicles with polyhedral symmetry has been observed. On the basis of the experimental phenomenology it was suggested [M. Dubois, V. Lizunov, A. Meister, T. Gulik-Krzywicki, J. M. Verbavatz, E. Perez, J. Zimmerberg, and T. Zemb, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 101, 15082 (2004)] that the mechanism for the formation of bilayer polyhedra is minimization of elastic bending energy. Motivated by these experiments, we study the elastic bending energy of polyhedral bilayer vesicles. In agreement with experiments, and provided that excess amphiphiles exhibiting spontaneous curvature are present in sufficient quantity, we find that polyhedral bilayer vesicles can indeed be energetically favorable compared to spherical bilayer vesicles. Consistent with experimental observations we also find that the bending energy associated with the vertices of bilayer polyhedra can be locally reduced through the formation of pores. However, the stabilization of polyhedral bilayer vesicles over spherical bilayer vesicles relies crucially on molecular segregation of excess amphiphiles along the ridges rather than the vertices of bilayer polyhedra. Furthermore, our analysis implies that, contrary to what has been suggested on the basis of experiments, the icosahedron does not minimize elastic bending energy among arbitrary polyhedral shapes and sizes. Instead, we find that, for large polyhedron sizes, the snub dodecahedron and the snub cube both have lower total bending energies than the icosahedron.

  9. Endothelial Extracellular Vesicles-Promises and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hromada, Carina; Mühleder, Severin; Grillari, Johannes; Redl, Heinz; Holnthoner, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles, including exosomes, microparticles, and apoptotic bodies, are phospholipid bilayer-enclosed vesicles that have once been considered as cell debris lacking biological functions. However, they have recently gained immense interest in the scientific community due to their role in intercellular communication, immunity, tissue regeneration as well as in the onset, and progression of various pathologic conditions. Extracellular vesicles of endothelial origin have been found to play a versatile role in the human body, since they are on the one hand known to contribute to cardiovascular diseases, but on the other hand have also been reported to promote endothelial cell survival. Hence, endothelial extracellular vesicles hold promising therapeutic potential to be used as a new tool to detect as well as treat a great number of diseases. This calls for clinically approved, standardized, and efficient isolation and characterization protocols to harvest and purify endothelial extracellular vesicles. However, such methods and techniques to fulfill stringent requirements for clinical trials have yet to be developed or are not harmonized internationally. In this review, recent advances and challenges in the field of endothelial extracellular vesicle research are discussed and current problems and limitations regarding isolation and characterization are pointed out.

  10. Extracellular Vesicles in Metabolic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, M Carmen; Andriantsitohaina, Ramaroson

    2017-05-12

    Metabolic syndrome defines a cluster of interrelated risk factors for cardiovascular disease and diabetes mellitus. These factors include metabolic abnormalities, such as hyperglycemia, elevated triglyceride levels, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, high blood pressure, and obesity, mainly central adiposity. In this context, extracellular vesicles (EVs) may represent novel effectors that might help to elucidate disease-specific pathways in metabolic disease. Indeed, EVs (a terminology that encompasses microparticles, exosomes, and apoptotic bodies) are emerging as a novel mean of cell-to-cell communication in physiology and pathology because they represent a new way to convey fundamental information between cells. These microstructures contain proteins, lipids, and genetic information able to modify the phenotype and function of the target cells. EVs carry specific markers of the cell of origin that make possible monitoring their fluctuations in the circulation as potential biomarkers inasmuch their circulating levels are increased in metabolic syndrome patients. Because of the mixed components of EVs, the content or the number of EVs derived from distinct cells of origin, the mode of cell stimulation, and the ensuing mechanisms for their production, it is difficult to attribute specific functions as drivers or biomarkers of diseases. This review reports recent data of EVs from different origins, including endothelial, smooth muscle cells, macrophages, hepatocytes, adipocytes, skeletal muscle, and finally, those from microbiota as bioeffectors of message, leading to metabolic syndrome. Depicting the complexity of the mechanisms involved in their functions reinforce the hypothesis that EVs are valid biomarkers, and they represent targets that can be harnessed for innovative therapeutic approaches. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. A two phase field model for tracking vesicle-vesicle adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Rui; Wang, Xiaoqiang; Gunzburger, Max

    2016-11-01

    A multi-phase-field model for simulating the adhesion between two vesicles is constructed. Two phase field functions are introduced to simulate each of the two vesicles. An energy model is defined which accounts for the elastic bending energy of each vesicle and the contact potential energy between the two vesicles; the vesicle volume and surface area constraints are imposed using a penalty method. Numerical results are provided to verify the efficacy of our model and to provide visual illustrations of the different types of contact. The method can be adjusted to solve endocytosis problems by modifying the bending rigidity coefficients of the two elastic bending energies. The method can also be extended to simulate multi-cell adhesions, one example of which is erythrocyte rouleaux. A comparison with laboratory observations demonstrates the effectiveness of the multi-phase field approach.

  12. Insights into the self-reproduction of oleate vesicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stano, P [' Enrico Fermi' Centre, Compendio Viminale, 00184 Rome (Italy); Wehrli, E [Electron Microscopy Centre (EMEZ), Applied Physics Institute, ETH Hoenggerberg, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Luisi, P L [Biology Department, University of RomaTre, Viale Marconi 446, 00146 Rome (Italy)

    2006-08-23

    In view of the importance of vesicles as models for early cells, several groups have started work looking for conditions under which vesicles can undergo growth and division. Evidence for growth and division has been obtained with the help of ferritin-labelled vesicles; furthermore, it has been shown that in such processes the vesicle size distribution is largely conserved. In both cases, the data suggest that the process under study is mainly characterized by vesicle growth and eventually division into daughter vesicles. However, direct evidence for vesicle division has not been obtained. In this paper, mostly based on freeze-fracture electron microscopy, we describe conditions under which for the first time division intermediates can be trapped in the form of twin vesicles. This finding, together with supporting dynamic light scattering and fluorescence investigations, permits us to establish some additional points in the mechanism of vesicle self-reproduction.

  13. Anionic Conducting Oxide Ceramics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dunn, Bruce

    1998-01-01

    This program has emphasized the interrelationships among synthesis, microstructure and properties for oxygen ion conducting ceramics based on copper-substituted bismuth vanadate (Bi V Cu O ), known as BICUVOX...

  14. Making Ceramic Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squibb, Matt

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how to make a clay camera. This idea of creating functional cameras from clay allows students to experience ceramics, photography, and painting all in one unit. (Contains 1 resource and 3 online resources.)

  15. Ceramic fiber filter technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmes, B.L.; Janney, M.A.

    1996-06-01

    Fibrous filters have been used for centuries to protect individuals from dust, disease, smoke, and other gases or particulates. In the 1970s and 1980s ceramic filters were developed for filtration of hot exhaust gases from diesel engines. Tubular, or candle, filters have been made to remove particles from gases in pressurized fluidized-bed combustion and gasification-combined-cycle power plants. Very efficient filtration is necessary in power plants to protect the turbine blades. The limited lifespan of ceramic candle filters has been a major obstacle in their development. The present work is focused on forming fibrous ceramic filters using a papermaking technique. These filters are highly porous and therefore very lightweight. The papermaking process consists of filtering a slurry of ceramic fibers through a steel screen to form paper. Papermaking and the selection of materials will be discussed, as well as preliminary results describing the geometry of papers and relative strengths.

  16. Light emitting ceramic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Paul; Edwards, Doreen D.; Walker, Jr., William John; Slack, Lyle H.; Brown, Wayne Douglas; Osborne, Cathy; Norton, Michael; Begley, Richard

    2010-05-18

    A light-emitting ceramic based panel, hereafter termed "electroceramescent" panel, is herein claimed. The electroceramescent panel is formed on a substrate providing mechanical support as well as serving as the base electrode for the device. One or more semiconductive ceramic layers directly overlay the substrate, and electrical conductivity and ionic diffusion are controlled. Light emitting regions overlay the semiconductive ceramic layers, and said regions consist sequentially of a layer of a ceramic insulation layer and an electroluminescent layer, comprised of doped phosphors or the equivalent. One or more conductive top electrode layers having optically transmissive areas overlay the light emitting regions, and a multi-layered top barrier cover comprising one or more optically transmissive non-combustible insulation layers overlay said top electrode regions.

  17. Mechanics of post-fusion exocytotic vesicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Thomas; Wu, Zhanghan; Liu, Jian

    2017-05-23

    Exocytosis is an important cellular process controlled by metabolic signaling. It involves vesicle fusion to the plasma membrane, followed by the opening of a fusion pore, and the subsequent release of the vesicular lumen content into the extracellular space. While most modeling efforts focus on the events leading to membrane fusion, how the vesicular membrane remodels after fusing to plasma membrane remains unclear. This latter event dictates the nature and the efficiency of exocytotic vesicular secretions, and is thus critical for exocytotic function. We provide a generic membrane mechanical model to systematically study the fate of post-fusion vesicles. We show that while membrane stiffness favors full-collapse vesicle fusion into the plasma membrane, the intravesicular pressure swells the vesicle and causes the fusion pore to shrink. Dimensions of the vesicle and its associated fusion pore further modulate this mechanical antagonism. We systematically define the mechanical conditions that account for the full spectrum of the observed vesicular secretion modes. Our model therefore can serve as a unified theoretical framework that sheds light on the elaborate control mechanism of exocytosis.

  18. Astrocytic Vesicle Mobility in Health and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Zorec

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Astrocytes are no longer considered subservient to neurons, and are, instead, now understood to play an active role in brain signaling. The intercellular communication of astrocytes with neurons and other non-neuronal cells involves the exchange of molecules by exocytotic and endocytotic processes through the trafficking of intracellular vesicles. Recent studies of single vesicle mobility in astrocytes have prompted new views of how astrocytes contribute to information processing in nervous tissue. Here, we review the trafficking of several types of membrane-bound vesicles that are specifically involved in the processes of (i intercellular communication by gliotransmitters (glutamate, adenosine 5'-triphosphate, atrial natriuretic peptide, (ii plasma membrane exchange of transporters and receptors (EAAT2, MHC-II, and (iii the involvement of vesicle mobility carrying aquaporins (AQP4 in water homeostasis. The properties of vesicle traffic in astrocytes are discussed in respect to networking with neighboring cells in physiologic and pathologic conditions, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, multiple sclerosis, and states in which astrocytes contribute to neuroinflammatory conditions.

  19. Mechanics of post-fusion exocytotic vesicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Thomas; Wu, Zhanghan; Liu, Jian

    2017-06-01

    Exocytosis is an important cellular process controlled by metabolic signaling. It involves vesicle fusion to the plasma membrane, followed by the opening of a fusion pore, and the subsequent release of the vesicular lumen content into the extracellular space. While most modeling efforts focus on the events leading to membrane fusion, how the vesicular membrane remodels after fusing to plasma membrane remains unclear. This latter event dictates the nature and the efficiency of exocytotic vesicular secretions, and is thus critical for exocytotic function. We provide a generic membrane mechanical model to systematically study the fate of post-fusion vesicles. We show that while membrane stiffness favors full-collapse vesicle fusion into the plasma membrane, the intravesicular pressure swells the vesicle and causes the fusion pore to shrink. Dimensions of the vesicle and its associated fusion pore further modulate this mechanical antagonism. We systematically define the mechanical conditions that account for the full spectrum of the observed vesicular secretion modes. Our model therefore can serve as a unified theoretical framework that sheds light on the elaborate control mechanism of exocytosis.

  20. EXTRACELLULAR VESICLES: CLASSIFICATION, FUNCTIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Oberemko

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This review presents a generalized definition of vesicles as bilayer extracellular organelles of all celular forms of life: not only eu-, but also prokaryotic. The structure and composition of extracellular vesicles, history of research, nomenclature, their impact on life processes in health and disease are discussed. Moreover, vesicles may be useful as clinical instruments for biomarkers, and they are promising as biotechnological drug. However, many questions in this area are still unresolved and need to be addressed in the future. The most interesting from the point of view of practical health care represents a direction to study the effect of exosomes and microvesicles in the development and progression of a particular disease, the possibility of adjusting the pathological process by means of extracellular vesicles of a particular type, acting as an active ingredient. Relevant is the further elucidation of the role and importance of exosomes to the surrounding cells, tissues and organs at the molecular level, the prospects for the use of non-cellular vesicles as biomarkers of disease.

  1. Porous ceramic membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Biesheuvel, P. M.; Biesheuvel, Pieter Maarten

    2000-01-01

    Synthetic membranes are increasingly used for energy-efficient separation of liquid and gaseous mixtures in household applications, environmental technology and the chemical and energy industry. Besides, membranes are used in component-specific sensors in gas and liquid streams, preferably combined with micro-electronic devices. Ceramic membranes have a large potential over their polymer counterparts for applications at high temperature, pressure and in aggressive environments. Ceramic membra...

  2. Functionally polymerized surfactant vesicles: synthesis and characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tundo, P.; Kippenberger, D.J.; Klahn, P.L.; Prieto, N.E.; Fendler, J.H.

    1982-01-27

    Bis(2-(10-undecenoyloxycarbony bromide, bis(2-(10-undecenoyloxycarbony (2-hydroxyethyl)methylammonium bromide, bis(2-(10-undecenoyloxycarbony acid, bis(2-(10-undecenoyloxycarbony allylbis(2-dodecanoyloxycarbon bromide, and dimethyl-n-hexadecyl (10-(p-vin decyl)ammonium bromide have been synthesized. The predominantly single compartment bilayer vesicles formed from these surfactants could be polymerized either by exposure to ultraviolet irradiation or by the use of azoisobutyronitrile as an initiator. The presence of vesicles (unpolymerized and polymeric) has been demonstrated by electron micrography, H/sup 1/ NMR, gel filtration, phase transition, turbidity changes, substrate entrapment, and permeability. Polymerized vesicles are considerably more stable and less permeable and have reduced rates of turbidity changes compared to their unpolymerized counterparts. 19 references.

  3. Directed vesicle transport by diffusio-osmosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michler, D.; Shahidzadeh, N.; Sprik, R.; Bonn, D.

    2015-04-01

    We present a study on surfactant vesicles that spontaneously move towards an oil droplet that is deposited on a glass substrate. Tracer particles in the surfactant solution show that the motion is not self-propelled: the vesicles are entrained by a macroscopic hydrodynamic flow. Measurements of the flow velocity suggest that the flow is of diffusio-osmotic nature. The surfactant is observed to move into the oil phase which creates a gradient in ion concentration in the vicinity of the droplet. As the diffusion coefficients of the surfactant's co- and counter-ions differ, a charge separation takes place and an electric field arises. This electric field then generates a hydrodynamic flow along the charged glass substrate in which the vesicles are entrained.

  4. Functionalization of Block Copolymer Vesicle Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Meier

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In dilute aqueous solutions certain amphiphilic block copolymers self-assemble into vesicles that enclose a small pool of water with a membrane. Such polymersomes have promising applications ranging from targeted drug-delivery devices, to biosensors, and nanoreactors. Interactions between block copolymer membranes and their surroundings are important factors that determine their potential biomedical applications. Such interactions are influenced predominantly by the membrane surface. We review methods to functionalize block copolymer vesicle surfaces by chemical means with ligands such as antibodies, adhesion moieties, enzymes, carbohydrates and fluorophores. Furthermore, surface-functionalization can be achieved by self-assembly of polymers that carry ligands at their chain ends or in their hydrophilic blocks. While this review focuses on the strategies to functionalize vesicle surfaces, the applications realized by, and envisioned for, such functional polymersomes are also highlighted.

  5. The friction and wear of ceramic/ceramic and ceramic/metal combinations in sliding contracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sliney, H.E.; Dellacorte, C. [NASA Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    1994-07-01

    The tribological characteristics of ceramics sliding on ceramics are compared to those of ceramics sliding on a nickel-based turbine alloy. The friction and wear of oxide ceramics and silicon-based ceramics in air at temperatures from room ambient to 900{degrees}C (in a few cases to 1200{degrees}C) were measured for a hemispherically-tipped pin on a flat sliding contract geometry. In general, especially at high temperature, friction and wear were lower for ceramic/metal combinations than for ceramic/ceramic combinations. The better tribological performance for ceramic/metal combinations is attributed primarily to the lubricious nature of the oxidized surface of the metal. 12 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Electrohydrodynamics of a compound vesicle under an AC electric field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Kumari Priti; Thaokar, Rochish M

    2017-07-12

    Compound vesicles are relevant as simplified models for biological cells as well as in technological applications such as drug delivery. Characterization of these compound vesicles, especially the inner vesicle, remains a challenge. Similarly their response to electric field assumes importance in light of biomedical applications such as electroporation. Fields lower than that required for electroporation cause electrodeformation in vesicles and can be used to characterize their mechanical and electrical properties. A theoretical analysis of the electrohydrodynamics of a compound vesicle with outer vesicle of radius R o and an inner vesicle of radius [Formula: see text], is presented. A phase diagram for the compound vesicle is presented and elucidated using detailed plots of electric fields, free charges and electric stresses. The electrohydrodynamics of the outer vesicle in a compound vesicle shows a prolate-sphere and prolate-oblate-sphere shape transitions when the conductivity of the annular fluid is greater than the outer fluid, and vice-versa respectively, akin to single vesicle electrohydrodynamics reported in the literature. The inner vesicle in contrast shows sphere-prolate-sphere and sphere-prolate-oblate-sphere transitions when the inner fluid conductivity is greater and smaller than the annular fluid, respectively. Equations and methodology are provided to determine the bending modulus and capacitance of the outer as well as the inner membrane, thereby providing an easy way to characterize compound vesicles and possibly biological cells.

  7. Electrohydrodynamics of a compound vesicle under an AC electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priti Sinha, Kumari; Thaokar, Rochish M.

    2017-07-01

    Compound vesicles are relevant as simplified models for biological cells as well as in technological applications such as drug delivery. Characterization of these compound vesicles, especially the inner vesicle, remains a challenge. Similarly their response to electric field assumes importance in light of biomedical applications such as electroporation. Fields lower than that required for electroporation cause electrodeformation in vesicles and can be used to characterize their mechanical and electrical properties. A theoretical analysis of the electrohydrodynamics of a compound vesicle with outer vesicle of radius R o and an inner vesicle of radius λ {{R}o} , is presented. A phase diagram for the compound vesicle is presented and elucidated using detailed plots of electric fields, free charges and electric stresses. The electrohydrodynamics of the outer vesicle in a compound vesicle shows a prolate-sphere and prolate-oblate-sphere shape transitions when the conductivity of the annular fluid is greater than the outer fluid, and vice-versa respectively, akin to single vesicle electrohydrodynamics reported in the literature. The inner vesicle in contrast shows sphere-prolate-sphere and sphere-prolate-oblate-sphere transitions when the inner fluid conductivity is greater and smaller than the annular fluid, respectively. Equations and methodology are provided to determine the bending modulus and capacitance of the outer as well as the inner membrane, thereby providing an easy way to characterize compound vesicles and possibly biological cells.

  8. Vesicle-MaNiA: extracellular vesicles in liquid biopsy and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrano, Veronica; Royo, Felix; Peinado, Héctor; Loizaga-Iriarte, Ana; Unda, Miguel; Falcón-Perez, Juan M; Carracedo, Arkaitz

    2016-08-01

    Normal and tumor cells shed vesicles to the environment. Within the large family of extracellular vesicles, exosomes and microvesicles have attracted much attention in the recent years. Their interest ranges from mediators of cancer progression, inflammation, immune regulation and metastatic niche regulation, to non-invasive biomarkers of disease. In this respect, the procedures to purify and analyze extracellular vesicles have quickly evolved and represent a source of variability for data integration in the field. In this review, we provide an updated view of the potential of exosomes and microvesicles as biomarkers and the available technologies for their isolation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Testing method for ceramic armour and bare ceramic tiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carton, E.P.; Roebroeks, G.H.J.J.

    2016-01-01

    TNO developed an alternative, more configuration independent ceramic test method than the Depth-of-Penetration test method. In this alternative test ceramic tiles and ceramic based armour are evaluated as target without a semi-infinite backing layer. An energy approach is chosen to evaluate and rank

  10. Testing method for ceramic armor and bare ceramic tiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carton, E.P.; Roebroeks, G.H.J.J.

    2014-01-01

    TNO has developed an alternative, more configuration independent ceramic test method than the standard Depth-of-Penetration test method. In this test ceramic tiles and ceramic based armor are evaluated as target without a semi-infinite backing layer. An energy approach is chosen to evaluate and rank

  11. Cooled Ceramic Turbine Vane Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — N&R Engineering will investigate the feasibility of cooled ceramics, such as ceramic matrix composite (CMC) turbine blade concepts that can decrease specific...

  12. The role of extracellular vesicles in malaria biology and pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaio, Natalia Guimaraes; Cheng, Lesley; Eriksson, Emily M

    2017-06-09

    In the past decade, research on the functions of extracellular vesicles in malaria has expanded dramatically. Investigations into the various vesicle types, from both host and parasite origin, has revealed important roles for extracellular vesicles in disease pathogenesis and susceptibility, as well as cell-cell communication and immune responses. Here, work relating to extracellular vesicles in malaria is reviewed, and the areas that remain unknown and require further investigations are highlighted.

  13. Mechanical properties of ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Pelleg, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    This book discusses the mechanical properties of ceramics and aims to provide both a solid background for undergraduate students, as well as serving as a text to bring practicing engineers up to date with the latest developments in this topic so they can use and apply these to their actual engineering work.  Generally, ceramics are made by moistening a mixture of clays, casting it into desired shapes and then firing it to a high temperature, a process known as 'vitrification'. The relatively late development of metallurgy was contingent on the availability of ceramics and the know-how to mold them into the appropriate forms. Because of the characteristics of ceramics, they offer great advantages over metals in specific applications in which hardness, wear resistance and chemical stability at high temperatures are essential. Clearly, modern ceramics manufacturing has come a long way from the early clay-processing fabrication method, and the last two decades have seen the development of sophisticated technique...

  14. Diffusion in ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Pelleg, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    This textbook provides an introduction to changes that occur in solids such as ceramics, mainly at high temperatures, which are diffusion controlled, as well as presenting research data. Such changes are related to the kinetics of various reactions such as precipitation, oxidation and phase transformations, but are also related to some mechanical changes, such as creep. The book is composed of two parts, beginning with a look at the basics of diffusion according to Fick's Laws. Solutions of Fick’s second law for constant D, diffusion in grain boundaries and dislocations are presented along with a look at the atomistic approach for the random motion of atoms. In the second part, the author discusses diffusion in several technologically important ceramics. The ceramics selected are monolithic single phase ones, including: A12O3, SiC, MgO, ZrO2 and Si3N4. Of these, three refer to oxide ceramics (alumina, magnesia and zirconia). Carbide based ceramics are represented by the technologically very important Si-ca...

  15. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2000-10-01

    This is the third quarterly report on oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes. In the following, the report describes the progress made by our university partners in Tasks 1 through 6, experimental apparatus that was designed and built for various tasks of this project, thermodynamic calculations, where applicable and work planned for the future. (Task 1) Design, fabricate and evaluate ceramic to metal seals based on graded ceramic powder/metal braze joints. (Task 2) Evaluate the effect of defect configuration on ceramic membrane conductivity and long term chemical and structural stability. (Task 3) Determine materials mechanical properties under conditions of high temperatures and reactive atmospheres. (Task 4) Evaluate phase stability and thermal expansion of candidate perovskite membranes and develop techniques to support these materials on porous metal structures. (Task 5) Assess the microstructure of membrane materials to evaluate the effects of vacancy-impurity association, defect clusters, and vacancy-dopant association on the membrane performance and stability. (Task 6) Measure kinetics of oxygen uptake and transport in ceramic membrane materials under commercially relevant conditions using isotope labeling techniques.

  16. Adsorption of DOPC vesicles on hydrophobic substrates in the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    In the present study, the interaction between an intact DOPC vesicle and the hydropho- bic surface is mainly through van der Waals interac- tion. In presence of increasing concentrations of electrolytes, counter ions are present in the vicinity of the DOPC vesicle. As the vesicle approaches the solid substrate, the counter ions ...

  17. Single-vesicle imaging reveals different transport mechanisms between glutamatergic and GABAergic vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farsi, Zohreh; Preobraschenski, Julia; van den Bogaart, Geert; Riedel, Dietmar; Jahn, Reinhard; Woehler, Andrew

    2016-02-26

    Synaptic transmission is mediated by the release of neurotransmitters, which involves exo-endocytotic cycling of synaptic vesicles. To maintain synaptic function, synaptic vesicles are refilled with thousands of neurotransmitter molecules within seconds after endocytosis, using the energy provided by an electrochemical proton gradient. However, it is unclear how transmitter molecules carrying different net charges can be efficiently sequestered while maintaining charge neutrality and osmotic balance. We used single-vesicle imaging to monitor pH and electrical gradients and directly showed different uptake mechanisms for glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) operating in parallel. In contrast to glutamate, GABA was exchanged for protons, with no other ions participating in the transport cycle. Thus, only a few components are needed to guarantee reliable vesicle filling with different neurotransmitters. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  18. Role of Outer Membrane Vesicles of Bacteria

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 20; Issue 8. Role of Outer Membrance Vesicles of Bacteria. M V Jagannadham M K Chattopadhyay. General Article Volume 20 Issue 8 ... Keywords. Outer membrane ves ic les (OMVs); secretion; communication; virulence; antibiotic resistance; vaccines.

  19. Vesicle Pools: Lessons from Adrenal Chromaffin Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R Stevens

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The adrenal chromaffin cell serves as a model system to study fast Ca2+-dependent exocytosis. Membrane capacitance measurements in combination with Ca2+ uncaging offers a temporal resolution in the millisecond range and reveals that catecholamine release occurs in three distinct phases. Release of a readily releasable (RRP and a slowly releasable (SRP pool are followed by sustained release, due to maturation and release of vesicles which were not release-ready at the start of the stimulus. Trains of depolarizations, a more physiological stimulus, induce release from a small immediately releasable pool of vesicles residing adjacent to calcium channels, as well as from the RRP. The SRP is poorly activated by depolarization. A sequential model, in which non-releasable docked vesicles are primed to a slowly releasable state, and then further mature to the readily releasable state, has been proposed. The docked state, dependent on membrane proximity, requires SNAP-25, synaptotagmin and syntaxin. The ablation or modification of SNAP-25 and syntaxin, components of the SNARE complex, as well as of synaptotagmin, the calcium sensor, and modulators such complexins and Snapin alter the properties and/or magnitudes of different phases of release, and in particular can ablate the RRP. These results indicate that the composition of the SNARE complex and its interaction with modulatory molecules drives priming and provides a molecular basis for different pools of releasable vesicles.

  20. Extracellular vesicles: fundamentals and clinical relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wael Nassar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available All types of cells of eukaryotic organisms produce and release small nanovesicles into their extracellular environment. Early studies have described these vesicles as ′garbage bags′ only to remove obsolete cellular molecules. Valadi and colleagues, in 2007, were the first to discover the capability of circulating extracellular vesicles (EVs to horizontally transfer functioning gene information between cells. These extracellular vesicles express components responsible for angiogenesis promotion, stromal remodeling, chemoresistance, genetic exchange, and signaling pathway activation through growth factor/receptor transfer. EVs represent an important mode of intercellular communication by serving as vehicles for transfer between cells of membrane and cytosolic proteins, lipids, signaling proteins, and RNAs. They contribute to physiology and pathology, and they have a myriad of potential clinical applications in health and disease. Moreover, vesicles can pass the blood-brain barrier and may perhaps even be considered as naturally occurring liposomes. These cell-derived EVs not only represent a central mediator of the disease microenvironment, but their presence in the peripheral circulation may serve as a surrogate for disease biopsies, enabling real-time diagnosis and disease monitoring. In this review, we′ll be addressing the characteristics of different types of extracellular EVs, as well as their clinical relevance and potential as diagnostic markers, and also define therapeutic options.

  1. Compartmentalization and Transport in Synthetic Vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine eSchmitt

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Nano-scale vesicles have become a popular tool in life sciences. Besides liposomes that are generated from phospholipids of natural origin, polymersomes fabricated of synthetic block copolymers enjoy increasing popularity, as they represent more versatile membrane building blocks that can be selected based on their specific physicochemical properties, like permeability, stability or chemical reactivity.In this review, we focus on the application of simple and nested artificial vesicles in synthetic biology. First, we provide an introduction into the utilization of multi-compartmented vesosomes as compartmentalized nano-scale bioreactors. In the bottom-up development of protocells from vesicular nano-reactors, the specific exchange of pathway intermediates across compartment boundaries represents a bottleneck for future studies. To date, most compartmented bioreactors rely on unspecific exchange of substrates and products. This is either based on changes in permeability of the coblock polymer shell by physicochemical triggers or by the incorporation of unspecific porin proteins into the vesicle membrane. Since the incorporation of membrane transport proteins into simple and nested artificial vesicles offers the potential for specific exchange of substances between subcompartments, it opens new vistas in the design of protocells. Therefore we devote the main part of the review to summarize the technical advances in the use of phospholipids and block copolymers for the reconstitution of membrane proteins.

  2. Towards traceable size determination of extracellular vesicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Varga, Zoltán; Yuana, Yuana; Grootemaat, Anita E.; van der Pol, Edwin; Gollwitzer, Christian; Krumrey, Michael; Nieuwland, Rienk

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) have clinical importance due to their roles in a wide range of biological processes. The detection and characterization of EVs are challenging because of their small size, low refractive index, and heterogeneity. In this manuscript, the size distribution of an

  3. Functional transferred DNA within extracellular vesicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Jin [Department of Cardiology, Daping Hospital, The Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400042 (China); Department of Neurology, Jinling Hospital, Nanjing University School of Medicine, Jiangsu Province (China); Wu, Gengze [Department of Cardiology, Daping Hospital, The Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400042 (China); Jose, Pedro A. [Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine and Physiology, University of Maryland, School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Zeng, Chunyu, E-mail: Chunyuzeng01@163.com [Department of Cardiology, Daping Hospital, The Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400042 (China)

    2016-11-15

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are small membrane vesicles including exosomes and shedding vesicles that mediated a cell-to-cell communication. EVs are released from almost all cell types under both physiological and pathological conditions and incorporate nuclear and cytoplasmic molecules for intercellular delivery. Besides protein, mRNA, and microRNA of these molecules, as recent studies show, specific DNA are prominently packaged into EVs. It appears likely that some of exosomes or shedding vesicles, bearing nuclear molecules are released upon bubble-like blebs. Specific interaction of EVs with susceptible recipients performs the uptake of EVs into the target cells, discharging their cargo including nuclear and cytoplasmic macromolecules into the cytosol. These findings expand the nucleic acid content of EVs to include increased levels of specific DNA. Thus, EVs contain a repertoire of genetic information available for horizontal gene transfer and potential use as blood biomarkers for cancer and atherosclerosis. In this review, the focus is on the characteristics, biological functions, and roles in diseases of DNA within EVs. - Highlights: • This review is focused on the DNA within EVs including its characteristics, biological functions, and roles in diseases. • It is clear that DNA within EVs might have important physiological and pathological roles in various diseases. • Knowledge in this area may provides us alternative methods for disease diagnosis or therapy in the future.

  4. Theory of Disk-to-Vesicle Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianfeng; Shi, An-Chang

    2009-03-01

    Self-assembled membranes from amphiphilic molecules, such as lipids and block copolymers, can assume a variety of morphologies dictated by energy minimization of system. The membrane energy is characterized by a bending modulus (κ), a Gaussian modulus (κG), and the line tension (γ) of the edge. Two basic morphologies of membranes are flat disks that minimize the bending energy at the cost of the edge energy, and enclosed vesicles that minimize the edge energy at the cost of bending energy. In our work, the transition from disk to vesicle is studied theoretically using the string method, which is designed to find the minimum energy path (MEP) or the most probable transition path between two local minima of an energy landscape. Previous studies of disk-to-vesicle transition usually approximate the transitional states by a series of spherical cups, and found that the spherical cups do not correspond to stable or meta-stable states of the system. Our calculation demonstrates that the intermediate shapes along the MEP are very different from spherical cups. Furthermore, some of these transitional states can be meta-stable. The disk-to-vesicle transition pathways are governed by two scaled parameters, κG/κ and γR0/4κ, where R0 is the radius of the disk. In particular, a meta-stable intermediate state is predicted, which may correspond to the open morphologies observed in experiments and simulations.

  5. Characterization of Extracellular Vesicles using Raman Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, Wooje; Nanou, Afroditi; Terstappen, Leonardus Wendelinus Mathias Marie; Rho, Hoon Suk; le Gac, Severine; Offerhaus, Herman L.

    2017-01-01

    In this research, we aim to characterize extracellular vesicles(EVs) with Confocal Raman spectroscopy to reveal relevant spectral lines that signify differences between EVs derived from different cell lines. In the first stage we performed confocal Raman measurements on various EV samples. For these

  6. High flow ceramic pot filters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Halem, D.; van der Laan, H.; Soppe, A. I.A.; Heijman, S.G.J.

    2017-01-01

    Ceramic pot filters are considered safe, robust and appropriate technologies, but there is a general consensus that water revenues are limited due to clogging of the ceramic element. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential of high flow ceramic pot filters to produce more

  7. Verification of Ceramic Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar-Lafenetre, Stephanie; Cornillon, Laurence; Rancurel, Michael; De Graaf, Dennis; Hartmann, Peter; Coe, Graham; Laine, Benoit

    2012-07-01

    In the framework of the “Mechanical Design and Verification Methodologies for Ceramic Structures” contract [1] awarded by ESA, Thales Alenia Space has investigated literature and practices in affiliated industries to propose a methodological guideline for verification of ceramic spacecraft and instrument structures. It has been written in order to be applicable to most types of ceramic or glass-ceramic materials - typically Cesic®, HBCesic®, Silicon Nitride, Silicon Carbide and ZERODUR®. The proposed guideline describes the activities to be performed at material level in order to cover all the specific aspects of ceramics (Weibull distribution, brittle behaviour, sub-critical crack growth). Elementary tests and their post-processing methods are described, and recommendations for optimization of the test plan are given in order to have a consistent database. The application of this method is shown on an example in a dedicated article [7]. Then the verification activities to be performed at system level are described. This includes classical verification activities based on relevant standard (ECSS Verification [4]), plus specific analytical, testing and inspection features. The analysis methodology takes into account the specific behaviour of ceramic materials, especially the statistical distribution of failures (Weibull) and the method to transfer it from elementary data to a full-scale structure. The demonstration of the efficiency of this method is described in a dedicated article [8]. The verification is completed by classical full-scale testing activities. Indications about proof testing, case of use and implementation are given and specific inspection and protection measures are described. These additional activities are necessary to ensure the required reliability. The aim of the guideline is to describe how to reach the same reliability level as for structures made of more classical materials (metals, composites).

  8. Supported microporous ceramic membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Elizabeth; Anderson, Marc

    1993-01-01

    A method for permformation of microporous ceramic membranes onto a porous support includes placing a colloidal suspension of metal or metal oxide particles on one side of the porous support and exposing the other side of the porous support to a drying stream of gas or a reactive gas stream so that the particles are deposited on the drying side of the support as a gel. The gel so deposited can be sintered to form a supported ceramic membrane useful for ultrafiltration, reverse osmosis, or molecular sieving having mean pore sizes less than 100 Angstroms.

  9. Genetically Controlled Fusion, Exocytosis and Fission of Artificial Vesicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bönzli, Eva; Hadorn, Maik; De Lucrezia, Davide

    if a special class of viral proteins, termed fusogenic peptides, were added to the external medium. In the present work, we intend to develop genetically controlled fusion, fission and exocytosis of vesicles by the synthesis of peptides within vesicles. First, we enclosed synthesized peptides in vesicles...... to induce in a next step fusion of adjacent vesicles, fission and exocytosis of nested vesicles. Second, we will replace the peptides by an enclosed cell-free expression system to internally synthesize fusion peptides. To control the gene expression, different mechanisms are available, e.g. addition...... fusion, fission and exocytosis....

  10. Loading of Vesicles into Soft Amphiphilic Nanotubes using Osmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erne, Petra M; van Bezouwen, Laura S; Štacko, Peter; van Dijken, Derk Jan; Chen, Jiawen; Stuart, Marc C A; Boekema, Egbert J; Feringa, Ben L

    2015-12-07

    The facile assembly of higher-order nanoarchitectures from simple building blocks is demonstrated by the loading of vesicles into soft amphiphilic nanotubes using osmosis. The nanotubes are constructed from rigid interdigitated bilayers which are capped with vesicles comprising phospholipid-based flexible bilayers. When a hyperosmotic gradient is applied to these vesicle-capped nanotubes, the closed system loses water and the more flexible vesicle bilayer is pulled inwards. This leads to inclusion of vesicles inside the nanotubes without affecting the tube structure, showing controlled reorganization of the self-assembled multicomponent system upon a simple osmotic stimulus. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Coated vesicles as protein release mechanism in myeloma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trombetta, L D; Lazarus, S S

    An electron microscopic study was undertaken of the protein release mechanism within myeloma cells showing a very high degree of protein production. Smooth surfaced vesicles (50 millimicrons) were seen to originate from the outer margin of the perinuclear cistern. Similar vesicles were also associated with distended Golgi sacs. Possible function of these vesicles could not be determined. Coated vesicles (60 millimicrons) originated as evaginations from endoplasmic reticulum in the transitional region. They were present throughout the cytoplasm and were seen to fuse with the cell membrane discharging an electron dense material. These vesicles are, therefore, thought to transport protein from the rough endoplasmic reticulum and discharge it at the cell surface.

  12. Interaction of insulin with SDS/CTAB catanionic Vesicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tah, Bidisha; Pal, Prabir; Talapatra, G.B., E-mail: spgbt@iacs.res.in

    2014-01-15

    In the present study, a novel method was used for entrapping the protein, insulin into the catanionic SDS/CTAB vesicle membrane. The anionic SDS and cationic CTAB formed catanionic vesicles at particular concentration (35:65 by volume). In this study, vesicle membrane can be considered as model membrane. The vesicle formation and entrapment efficiency depend on the pH of the aqueous solution. The insulin molecules have attached with the vesicular membrane at pH 7.0. However, at acidic pH, the vesicles were ruptured and the insulin did not entrap into the vesicle membrane, whereas at alkaline pH insulin became fibriller. The scanning electron microscope (SEM), Dynamic light scattering (DLS), and Zeta potential studies established the self-assembled structure formation of insulin and catanionic vesicles. To know the protein confirmations, Circular dichroism (CD) was also employed. The temperature dependent steady state and time resolved emission spectroscopy show that at room temperature (25 °C), apart from the 305 nm tyrosine fluorescence, a new emission peak at 450 nm was observed only in case of insulin-vesicle system, and was assigned as the tyrosine phosphorescence. This phosphorescence peak is the signature of the entrapment of insulin into the vesicle membrane. Highlights: • SDS-CTAB based catanionic vesicle has been fabricated. • Insulin has been successfully immobilized on these vesicles. • Immobilized insulin shows room temperature phosphorescence.

  13. Tick-proof ceramics. Bo dani ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimono, F. (Ishizuka Glass Co. Ltd., Nagoya (Japan))

    1993-07-01

    Ishizuka Glass has developed SiO2-B2O3-R2O(RO) based tick-proof ceramics (trade name; Segrocera) in cooperation with Yamato Chemical Industry, insecticide maker. This article is a report on effectiveness of this ceramics. Ticks living indoors are roughly divided into two kinds, namely ticks living in a house itself and ticks which enter the house by parasitizing on animals and plants, and Segrocera has been developed aiming at the former ticks which, irrespective of its kind, need the temperature of 20-30[degree]C and the moisture of 60% or more as its breeding conditions. The tick-proof effect of Segrocera is as excellent as 90-99% and even after keeping its specimen at 75RH for 12 months, it has shown the ratio of inhibiting ticks' breeding of 98-99%. In comparison with that the effect of other tick-proof agent, pyrethroids-based aerosol is limited up to 24 hours, it is the feature of Segrocera that its life is considerably longer. Safety of Segrocera is also very high. 2 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs.

  14. Transformation Toughening of Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-03-01

    chanical twing of ualaneeting Ceramica at High Temperatures. ILondo, Patigue-crack growth in overaged and partially stabi- U.K., 198.""IS. Itoribe... Ceramica " Chapter 18 In Mechanical Prop- ŗR. M. !AcMeeding and A. 0. Evans, ’Mechanics of Transformation ertles of Engineering Ceramics. Edited by W.W

  15. Microporous alumina ceramic membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Marc A.; Sheng, Guangyao

    1993-01-01

    Several methods are disclosed for the preparation microporous alumina ceramic membranes. For the first time, porous alumina membranes are made which have mean pore sizes less than 100 Angstroms and substantially no pores larger than that size. The methods are based on improved sol-gel techniques.

  16. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendfra Nagabhushana

    2001-07-01

    The mechanical properties of model systems were analyzed. A reasonably accurate finite element model was implemented and a rational metric to predict the strength of ceramic/metal concentrical joints was developed. The mode of failure of the ceramic/metal joints was determined and the importance of the mechanical properties of the braze material was assessed. Thermal cycling experiments were performed on the model systems and the results were discussed. Additionally, experiments using the concept of placing diffusion barriers on the ceramic surface to limit the extent of the reaction with the braze were performed. It was also observed that the nature and morphology of the reaction zone depends greatly on the nature of the perovskite structure being used. From the experiments, it is observed that the presence of Cr in the Fe-occupied sites decreases the tendency of Fe to segregate and to precipitate out of the lattice. In these new experiments, Ni was observed to play a major role in the decomposition of the ceramic substrate.

  17. Soft vesicles in the synthesis of hard materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Renhao; Liu, Weimin; Hao, Jingcheng

    2012-04-17

    Vesicles of surfactants in aqueous solution have received considerable attention because of their use as simple model systems for biological membranes and their applications in various fields including colloids, pharmaceuticals, and materials. Because of their architecture, vesicles could prove useful as "soft" templates for the synthesis of "hard materials". The vesicle phase, however, has been challenging and difficult to work with in the construction of hard materials. In the solution-phase synthesis of various inorganic or macromolecular materials, templating methods provide a powerful strategy to control the size, morphology, and composition of the resulting micro- and nanostructures. In comparison with hard templates, soft templates are generally constructed using amphiphilic molecules, especially surfactants and amphiphilic polymers. These types of compounds offer advantages including the wide variety of available templates, simple fabrication processes under mild conditions, and easy removal of the templates with less damage to the final structures. Researchers have used many ordered molecular aggregates such as vesicles, micelles, liquid crystals, emulsion droplets, and lipid nanotubes as templates or structure-directing agents to control the synthesis or assembly hard micro- and nanomaterials composed from inorganic compounds or polymers. In addition to their range of sizes and morphologies, vesicles present unique structures that can simultaneously supply different microenvironments for the growth and assembly of hard materials: the inner chamber of vesicles, the outer surface of the vesicles, and the space between bilayers. Two main approaches for applying vesicles in the field of hard materials have been explored: (i) in situ synthesis of micro- or nanomaterials within a specific microenvironment by vesicle templating and (ii) the assembly or incorporation of guest materials during the formation of vesicles. This Account provides an in-depth look at

  18. Ceramic Laser Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soules, T F; Clapsaddle, B J; Landingham, R L; Schaffers, K I

    2005-02-15

    Transparent ceramic materials have several major advantages over single crystals in laser applications, not the least of which is the ability to make large aperture parts in a robust manufacturing process. After more than a decade of working on making transparent YAG:Nd, Japanese workers have recently succeeded in demonstrating samples that performed as laser gain media as well as their single crystal counterparts. Since then several laser materials have been made and evaluated. For these reasons, developing ceramic laser materials is the most exciting and futuristic materials topic in today's major solid-state laser conferences. We have established a good working relationship with Konoshima Ltd., the Japanese producer of the best ceramic laser materials, and have procured and evaluated slabs designed by us for use in our high-powered SSHCL. Our measurements indicate that these materials will work in the SSHCL, and we have nearly completed retrofitting the SSHCL with four of the largest transparent ceramic YAG:Nd slabs in existence. We have also begun our own effort to make this material and have produced samples with various degrees of transparency/translucency. We are in the process of carrying out an extensive design-of-experiments to establish the significant process variables for making transparent YAG. Finally because transparent ceramics afford much greater flexibility in the design of lasers, we have been exploring the potential for much larger apertures, new materials, for example for the Mercury laser, other designs for SSHL, such as, edge pumping designs, slabs with built in ASE suppression, etc. This work has just beginning.

  19. Ceramic tubesheet design analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallett, R.H.; Swindeman, R.W.

    1996-06-01

    A transport combustor is being commissioned at the Southern Services facility in Wilsonville, Alabama to provide a gaseous product for the assessment of hot-gas filtering systems. One of the barrier filters incorporates a ceramic tubesheet to support candle filters. The ceramic tubesheet, designed and manufactured by Industrial Filter and Pump Manufacturing Company (EF&PM), is unique and offers distinct advantages over metallic systems in terms of density, resistance to corrosion, and resistance to creep at operating temperatures above 815{degrees}C (1500{degrees}F). Nevertheless, the operational requirements of the ceramic tubesheet are severe. The tubesheet is almost 1.5 m in (55 in.) in diameter, has many penetrations, and must support the weight of the ceramic filters, coal ash accumulation, and a pressure drop (one atmosphere). Further, thermal stresses related to steady state and transient conditions will occur. To gain a better understanding of the structural performance limitations, a contract was placed with Mallett Technology, Inc. to perform a thermal and structural analysis of the tubesheet design. The design analysis specification and a preliminary design analysis were completed in the early part of 1995. The analyses indicated that modifications to the design were necessary to reduce thermal stress, and it was necessary to complete the redesign before the final thermal/mechanical analysis could be undertaken. The preliminary analysis identified the need to confirm that the physical and mechanical properties data used in the design were representative of the material in the tubesheet. Subsequently, few exploratory tests were performed at ORNL to evaluate the ceramic structural material.

  20. Signaling by Extracellular Vesicles Advances Cancer Hallmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanada, Masamitsu; Bachmann, Michael H; Contag, Christopher H

    2016-02-01

    Mammalian cells secrete various extracellular vesicles (EVs; exosomes, microvesicles, and apoptotic bodies) that differ in biogenesis, composition, and function. Each vesicle type can originate from normal or cancerous cells, transfer molecular cargo to both neighboring and distant cells, and modulate cellular behaviors involved in eubiology and pathology, such as tumor development. Here, we review evidence for the role of EVs in the establishment and maintenance of cancer hallmarks, including sustaining proliferative signaling, evading growth suppression, resisting cell death, reprogramming energy metabolism, acquiring genomic instability, and remodeling the tumor microenvironment. We also discuss how EVs are implicated in the induction of angiogenesis, control of cellular invasion, initiation of premetastatic niches, maintenance of inflammation, and evasion of immune surveillance. The deeper understanding of the biology of EVs and their contribution to the development and progression of tumors is leading to new opportunities in the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Seminal vesicle cystadenoma: a rare clinical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorber, Gideon; Pizov, Galina; Gofrit, Ofer N; Pode, Dov

    2011-08-01

    A 52-yr-old man presented with severe obstructive urinary symptoms. Ten years earlier, a digital rectal examination disclosed a small mass above the prostate, and a computed tomography (CT) scan showed a 3.5-cm cystic tumor of the right seminal vesicle. He had been followed conservatively elsewhere. Reevaluation of the mass with a CT scan and magnetic resonance imaging showed that the mass had grown to a maximal diameter of 14 cm. A transabdominal needle biopsy revealed benign fibromuscular tissue. The tumor was then resected by an open transvesical approach. Pathology was consistent with a benign seminal vesicle cystadenoma. The natural history, pathology, and surgical approach are described. Copyright © 2009 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Docking of secretory vesicles is syntaxin dependent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi de Wit

    Full Text Available Secretory vesicles dock at the plasma membrane before they undergo fusion. Molecular docking mechanisms are poorly defined but believed to be independent of SNARE proteins. Here, we challenged this hypothesis by acute deletion of the target SNARE, syntaxin, in vertebrate neurons and neuroendocrine cells. Deletion resulted in fusion arrest in both systems. No docking defects were observed in synapses, in line with previous observations. However, a drastic reduction in morphologically docked secretory vesicles was observed in chromaffin cells. Syntaxin-deficient chromaffin cells showed a small reduction in total and plasma membrane staining for the docking factor Munc18-1, which appears insufficient to explain the drastic reduction in docking. The sub-membrane cortical actin network was unaffected by syntaxin deletion. These observations expose a docking role for syntaxin in the neuroendocrine system. Additional layers of regulation may have evolved to make syntaxin redundant for docking in highly specialized systems like synaptic active zones.

  3. Vitrification of Germinal Vesicle Stage Oocytes

    OpenAIRE

    ABE, Yasuyuki; AONO, Nobuya; Hara, Kenshiro; Matsumoto, Hiromichi; BAKHTIYARI, Mehrdad; Sasada, Hiroshi; Sato, Eimei

    2004-01-01

    In order to cryopreserve germinal vesicle (GV) stage oocytes, we first need to develop a novel container for keeping large quantities of GV oocytes, because of collecting them as cumulus oocytes complexes (COCs) that have bigger size and larger volume than oocytes themselves, and second modify a protocol for optimizing vitrification of them. In this mini-review, we describe our recent progress for attaining these objectives. When 65 bovine COCs having GV oocytes could be placed on a sheet of ...

  4. Inflammatory Stroke Extracellular Vesicles Induce Macrophage Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couch, Yvonne; Akbar, Naveed; Davis, Simon; Fischer, Roman; Dickens, Alex M; Neuhaus, Ain A; Burgess, Annette I; Rothwell, Peter M; Buchan, Alastair M

    2017-08-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are protein-lipid complexes released from cells, as well as actively exocytosed, as part of normal physiology, but also during pathological processes such as those occurring during a stroke. Our aim was to determine the inflammatory potential of stroke EVs. EVs were quantified and analyzed in the sera of patients after an acute stroke (inflammation in immune cells. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. A readily retrievable pool of synaptic vesicles

    OpenAIRE

    Hua, Y; Sinha, R.; Thiel, C.; Schmidt, R.; Hueve, J.; Martens, H.; Hell, S.; Egner, A.; Klingauf, J.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Although clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) is thought to be the predominant mechanism of synaptic vesicle (SV) recycling, it seems to be too slow for fast recycling. Therefore, it was suggested that a pre-sorted and pre-assembled pool of SV proteins on the presynaptic membrane might support a first wave of fast CME. In this study we monitored the temporal dynamics of such a 'readily retrievable pool' of SV proteins in rat hippocampal neurons using a novel probe. Applying...

  6. Endothelial microparticles: Sophisticated vesicles modulating vascular function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Anne M; Edelberg, Jay; Jonas, Rebecca; Rogers, Wade T; Moore, Jonni S; Syed, Wajihuddin; Mohler, Emile R

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial microparticles (EMPs) belong to a family of extracellular vesicles that are dynamic, mobile, biological effectors capable of mediating vascular physiology and function. The release of EMPs can impart autocrine and paracrine effects on target cells through surface interaction, cellular fusion, and, possibly, the delivery of intra-vesicular cargo. A greater understanding of the formation, composition, and function of EMPs will broaden our understanding of endothelial communication and may expose new pathways amenable for therapeutic manipulation. PMID:23892447

  7. ATP: The crucial component of secretory vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estévez-Herrera, Judith; Domínguez, Natalia; Pardo, Marta R; González-Santana, Ayoze; Westhead, Edward W; Borges, Ricardo; Machado, José David

    2016-07-12

    The colligative properties of ATP and catecholamines demonstrated in vitro are thought to be responsible for the extraordinary accumulation of solutes inside chromaffin cell secretory vesicles, although this has yet to be demonstrated in living cells. Because functional cells cannot be deprived of ATP, we have knocked down the expression of the vesicular nucleotide carrier, the VNUT, to show that a reduction in vesicular ATP is accompanied by a drastic fall in the quantal release of catecholamines. This phenomenon is particularly evident in newly synthesized vesicles, which we show are the first to be released. Surprisingly, we find that inhibiting VNUT expression also reduces the frequency of exocytosis, whereas the overexpression of VNUT drastically increases the quantal size of exocytotic events. To our knowledge, our data provide the first demonstration that ATP, in addition to serving as an energy source and purinergic transmitter, is an essential element in the concentration of catecholamines in secretory vesicles. In this way, cells can use ATP to accumulate neurotransmitters and other secreted substances at high concentrations, supporting quantal transmission.

  8. Detection of platelet vesicles by flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, John P; Jones, Jennifer C

    2017-05-01

    The composition and function of platelet-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs) in health and in disease are a major topic of investigation in biomedical research. However, efforts to delineate specific molecular repertoires and roles for different types of EVs in the circulation are limited not only by the lack of flow cytometers capable of analyzing submicron- and nano-materials across the full size spectrum of plasma EVs, but also by the lack of standardized methods and reference materials that would permit inter-laboratory reproducibility for these analyses. In this review, we summarize the flow cytometry of EVs, with a focus on platelet vesicles in plasma. In addition to delineating the basic principles that govern what precautions must be considered when using flow cytometry for the analysis of platelet vesicles, we provide an overview for how to standardize, control, annotate, and report EV flow cytometry data reproducibly, while looking forward to a next generation of high sensitivity instruments for the analysis of EVs and other submicron biomaterials in the circulation.

  9. Routes and mechanisms of extracellular vesicle uptake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Ann Mulcahy

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EVs are small vesicles released by donor cells that can be taken up by recipient cells. Despite their discovery decades ago, it has only recently become apparent that EVs play an important role in cell-to-cell communication. EVs can carry a range of nucleic acids and proteins which can have a significant impact on the phenotype of the recipient. For this phenotypic effect to occur, EVs need to fuse with target cell membranes, either directly with the plasma membrane or with the endosomal membrane after endocytic uptake. EVs are of therapeutic interest because they are deregulated in diseases such as cancer and they could be harnessed to deliver drugs to target cells. It is therefore important to understand the molecular mechanisms by which EVs are taken up into cells. This comprehensive review summarizes current knowledge of EV uptake mechanisms. Cells appear to take up EVs by a variety of endocytic pathways, including clathrin-dependent endocytosis, and clathrin-independent pathways such as caveolin-mediated uptake, macropinocytosis, phagocytosis, and lipid raft–mediated internalization. Indeed, it seems likely that a heterogeneous population of EVs may gain entry into a cell via more than one route. The uptake mechanism used by a given EV may depend on proteins and glycoproteins found on the surface of both the vesicle and the target cell. Further research is needed to understand the precise rules that underpin EV entry into cells.

  10. Ceramic-on-ceramic total hip arthroplasty early dislocation rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colwell, Clifford W; Hozack, William J; Mesko, J Wesley; D'Antonio, James A; Bierbaum, Benjamin E; Capello, William N; Jaffe, William L; Mai, Kenny T

    2007-12-01

    Wear debris from metal-on-polyethylene articulation in conventional total hip arthroplasty can limit the implant's longevity. Modern ceramic material with high wear resistance and low fracture risk has the potential to extend the lifetime of total hip arthroplasty, which makes the procedure potentially more suitable for young, active patients. Concerns with brittle ceramic material include fracture risk, the "squeak" phenomenon, and potentially a higher dislocation rate secondary to limited neck lengths and liner options. We therefore determined the early dislocation rate in modern ceramic-on-ceramic total hip arthroplasty. In 1635 total hip arthroplasties performed over the 9-year period (1996-2005), we observed three anterior and 15 posterior dislocations (1.1%). All were treated successfully, one with a revision and 17 with closed reduction under general anesthesia. Ceramic-on-ceramic total hip arthroplasty can be a good alternative bearing surface with a low dislocation rate.

  11. Extracellular Vesicles in Renal Diseases: More than Novel Biomarkers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdbrügger, Uta; Le, Thu H

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles from the urine and circulation have gained significant interest as potential diagnostic biomarkers in renal diseases. Urinary extracellular vesicles contain proteins from all sections of the nephron, whereas most studied circulating extracellular vesicles are derived from platelets, immune cells, and the endothelium. In addition to their diagnostic role as markers of kidney and vascular damage, extracellular vesicles may have functional significance in renal health and disease by facilitating communication between cells and protecting against kidney injury and bacterial infection in the urinary tract. However, the current understanding of extracellular vesicles has derived mostly from studies with very small numbers of patients or in vitro data. Moreover, accurate assessment of these vesicles remains a challenge, in part because of a lack of consensus in the methodologies to measure extracellular vesicles and the inability of most techniques to capture the entire size range of these vesicles. However, newer techniques and standardized protocols to improve the detection of extracellular vesicles are in development. A clearer understanding of the composition and biology of extracellular vesicles will provide insights into their pathophysiologic, diagnostic, and therapeutic roles. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  12. Extracellular vesicles in cardiovascular disease: are they Jedi or Sith?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osteikoetxea, Xabier; Németh, Andrea; Sódar, Barbara W; Vukman, Krisztina V; Buzás, Edit Irén

    2016-06-01

    In the recent past, extracellular vesicles have become recognized as important players in cell biology and biomedicine. Extracellular vesicles, including exosomes, microvesicles and apoptotic bodies, are phospholipid bilayer-enclosed structures found to be secreted by most if not all cells. Extracellular vesicle secretion represents a universal and highly conserved active cellular function. Importantly, increasing evidence supports that extracellular vesicles may serve as biomarkers and therapeutic targets or tools in human diseases. Cardiovascular disease undoubtedly represents one of the most intensely studied and rapidly growing areas of the extracellular vesicle field. However, in different studies related to cardiovascular disease, extracellular vesicles have been shown to exert diverse and sometimes discordant biological effects. Therefore, it might seem a puzzle whether these vesicles are in fact beneficial or detrimental to cardiovascular health. In this review we provide a general introduction to extracellular vesicles and an overview of their biological roles in cardiovascular diseases. Furthermore, we aim to untangle the various reasons for the observed discrepancy in biological effects of extracellular vesicles in cardiovascular diseases. To this end, we provide several examples that demonstrate that the observed functional diversity is in fact due to inherent differences among various types of extracellular vesicles. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2016 The Physiological Society.

  13. Grain boundaries in ceramics and ceramic-metal interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarke, D.R.; Wolf, D.

    1986-01-01

    Three interfaces exist: the crystal-crystal grain boundary in very pure single-phase ceramics, the crystal-glass-crystal grain boundary in most single-phase and polyphase ceramics, and the ceramic-metal interface. It is needed to correlate their structure and adhesion/failure. Methods for studying the bonding, interfacial structure, and fracture and adhesion are discussed, and recommendations are given. 42 refs. (DLC)

  14. Ceramic hot-gas filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Elizabeth Sokolinski; Forsythe, George Daniel; Domanski, Daniel Matthew; Chambers, Jeffrey Allen; Rajendran, Govindasamy Paramasivam

    1999-01-01

    A ceramic hot-gas candle filter having a porous support of filament-wound oxide ceramic yarn at least partially surrounded by a porous refractory oxide ceramic matrix, and a membrane layer on at least one surface thereof. The membrane layer may be on the outer surface, the inner surface, or both the outer and inner surface of the porous support. The membrane layer may be formed of an ordered arrangement of circularly wound, continuous filament oxide ceramic yarn, a ceramic filler material which is less permeable than the filament-wound support structure, or some combination of continuous filament and filler material. A particularly effective membrane layer features circularly wound filament with gaps intentionally placed between adjacent windings, and a filler material of ceramic particulates uniformly distributed throughout the gap region. The filter can withstand thermal cycling during backpulse cleaning and is resistant to chemical degradation at high temperatures.

  15. Seal between metal and ceramic conduits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Underwood, Richard Paul; Tentarelli, Stephen Clyde

    2015-02-03

    A seal between a ceramic conduit and a metal conduit of an ion transport membrane device consisting of a sealing surface of ceramic conduit, a sealing surface of ceramic conduit, a single gasket body, and a single compliant interlayer.

  16. Ceramic Composite Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruoff, Rodney S. (Inventor); Stankovich, Sasha (Inventor); Dikin, Dmitriy A. (Inventor); Nguyen, SonBinh T. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A ceramic composite thin film or layer includes individual graphene oxide and/or electrically conductive graphene sheets dispersed in a ceramic (e.g. silica) matrix. The thin film or layer can be electrically conductive film or layer depending the amount of graphene sheets present. The composite films or layers are transparent, chemically inert and compatible with both glass and hydrophilic SiOx/silicon substrates. The composite film or layer can be produced by making a suspension of graphene oxide sheet fragments, introducing a silica-precursor or silica to the suspension to form a sol, depositing the sol on a substrate as thin film or layer, at least partially reducing the graphene oxide sheets to conductive graphene sheets, and thermally consolidating the thin film or layer to form a silica matrix in which the graphene oxide and/or graphene sheets are dispersed.

  17. Development of Sesquioxide Ceramic for High Energy Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-25

    Ceramic Matrix Composites , Ceramics ...important. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Laser Materials Processing, Ceramic Matrix Composites , Ceramics 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF... ceramic processing, optimizing the processing requires time and resources. Once the fabrication process is established, composition adjustment

  18. Tailored Ceramics for Laser Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollingsworth, Joel [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2007-12-10

    Transparent ceramics match or exceed the performance of single-crystal materials in laser applications, with a more-robust fabrication process. Controlling the distribution of optical dopants in transparent ceramics would allow qualitative improvements in amplifier slab design by allowing gain and loss to be varied within the material. My work aims to achieve a controlled pattern or gradient of dopant prior to sintering, in order to produce tailored ceramics.

  19. Laser Micromachining of Ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    SCITI, Diletta; Bellosi, Alida

    2011-01-01

    Laser surface processing of ceramics is an area of considerable technological importance for several structural, tribological, optical and electronic applications. The laser beam behaves as a heat source that induces a temperature rise on the surface and within the bulk of the material. Depending on laser parameters and material characteristics, lasers can be used for fabricating microholes at designated locations, for cutting, scribing, for surface modifications In this work different types ...

  20. Statistic><Ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Tvede

    2008-01-01

    Co-organizer for and participant at the exhibition: Statistic><Ceramics The Röhsska Museum of Design and Decorative Arts; Gothenborg 5/2-16/3 2008 Museum fur Kunst und Gewerbe, Hamburg 3/4-27/4 2008......Co-organizer for and participant at the exhibition: Statistic>2-16/3 2008 Museum fur Kunst und Gewerbe, Hamburg 3/4-27/4 2008...

  1. Neuronal Depolarization Drives Increased Dopamine Synaptic Vesicle Loading via VGLUT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Jenny I; Dunn, Matthew; Mingote, Susana; Karam, Caline S; Farino, Zachary J; Sonders, Mark S; Choi, Se Joon; Grygoruk, Anna; Zhang, Yuchao; Cela, Carolina; Choi, Ben Jiwon; Flores, Jorge; Freyberg, Robin J; McCabe, Brian D; Mosharov, Eugene V; Krantz, David E; Javitch, Jonathan A; Sulzer, David; Sames, Dalibor; Rayport, Stephen; Freyberg, Zachary

    2017-08-30

    The ability of presynaptic dopamine terminals to tune neurotransmitter release to meet the demands of neuronal activity is critical to neurotransmission. Although vesicle content has been assumed to be static, in vitro data increasingly suggest that cell activity modulates vesicle content. Here, we use a coordinated genetic, pharmacological, and imaging approach in Drosophila to study the presynaptic machinery responsible for these vesicular processes in vivo. We show that cell depolarization increases synaptic vesicle dopamine content prior to release via vesicular hyperacidification. This depolarization-induced hyperacidification is mediated by the vesicular glutamate transporter (VGLUT). Remarkably, both depolarization-induced dopamine vesicle hyperacidification and its dependence on VGLUT2 are seen in ventral midbrain dopamine neurons in the mouse. Together, these data suggest that in response to depolarization, dopamine vesicles utilize a cascade of vesicular transporters to dynamically increase the vesicular pH gradient, thereby increasing dopamine vesicle content. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Human mammospheres secrete hormone-regulated active extracellular vesicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esperanza Gonzalez

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is a leading cause of cancer-associated death worldwide. One of the most important prognostic factors for survival is the early detection of the disease. Recent studies indicate that extracellular vesicles may provide diagnostic information for cancer management. We demonstrate the secretion of extracellular vesicles by primary breast epithelial cells enriched for stem/progenitor cells cultured as mammospheres, in non-adherent conditions. Using a proteomic approach we identified proteins contained in these vesicles whose expression is affected by hormonal changes in the cellular environment. In addition, we showed that these vesicles are capable of promoting changes in expression levels of genes involved in epithelial-mesenchymal transition and stem cell markers. Our findings suggest that secreted extracellular vesicles could represent potential diagnostic and/or prognostic markers for breast cancer and support a role for extracellular vesicles in cancer progression.

  3. Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial extracellular vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jaewook; Park, Jaesung; Gho, Yong Song

    2015-04-01

    Like mammalian cells, Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria release nano-sized membrane vesicles into the extracellular environment either in a constitutive manner or in a regulated manner. These bacterial extracellular vesicles are spherical bilayered proteolipids enriched with bioactive proteins, lipids, nucleic acids, and virulence factors. Recent progress in this field supports the critical pathophysiological functions of these vesicles in both bacteria-bacteria and bacteria-host interactions. This review provides an overview of the current understanding on Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial extracellular vesicles, especially regarding the biogenesis, components, and functions in poly-species communities. We hope that this review will stimulate additional research in this emerging field of bacterial extracellular vesicles and contribute to the development of extracellular vesicle-based diagnostic tools and effective vaccines against pathogenic Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Proteomic analysis of extracellular vesicles derived from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jaewook; Kim, Si-Hyun; Choi, Dong-Sic; Lee, Jong Seok; Kim, Dae-Kyum; Go, Gyeongyun; Park, Seon-Min; Kim, Si Hyun; Shin, Jeong Hwan; Chang, Chulhun L; Gho, Yong Song

    2015-10-01

    The release of extracellular vesicles, also known as outer membrane vesicles, membrane vesicles, exosomes, and microvesicles, is an evolutionarily conserved phenomenon from bacteria to eukaryotes. It has been reported that Mycobacterium tuberculosis releases extracellular vesicles harboring immunologically active molecules, and these extracellular vesicles have been suggested to be applicable in vaccine development and biomarker discovery. However, the comprehensive proteomic analysis has not been performed for M. tuberculosis extracellular vesicles. In this study, we identified a total of 287 vesicular proteins by four LC-MS/MS analyses with high confidence. In addition, we identified several vesicular proteins associated with the virulence of M. tuberculosis. This comprehensive proteome profile will help elucidate the pathogenic mechanism of M. tuberculosis. The data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001160 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001160). © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Ceramic stationary gas turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roode, M. van [Solar Turbines Inc., San Diego, CA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The performance of current industrial gas turbines is limited by the temperature and strength capabilities of the metallic structural materials in the engine hot section. Because of their superior high-temperature strength and durability, ceramics can be used as structural materials for hot section components (blades, nozzles, combustor liners) in innovative designs at increased turbine firing temperatures. The benefits include the ability to increase the turbine inlet temperature (TIT) to about 1200{degrees}C ({approx}2200{degrees}F) or more with uncooled ceramics. It has been projected that fully optimized stationary gas turbines would have a {approx}20 percent gain in thermal efficiency and {approx}40 percent gain in output power in simple cycle compared to all metal-engines with air-cooled components. Annual fuel savings in cogeneration in the U.S. would be on the order of 0.2 Quad by 2010. Emissions reductions to under 10 ppmv NO{sub x} are also forecast. This paper describes the progress on a three-phase, 6-year program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Technologies, to achieve significant performance improvements and emissions reductions in stationary gas turbines by replacing metallic hot section components with ceramic parts. Progress is being reported for the period September 1, 1994, through September 30, 1995.

  6. Dental ceramics: a current review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Nathaniel C; Burgess, John O

    2014-03-01

    Ceramics are used for many dental applications and are characterized in various ways, including by their hardness, brittleness, thermal and electrical insulation, and biocompatibility. The ceramics most commonly used in dentistry are oxides, particularly silicon dioxide (SiO2), or silica; aluminum oxide (Al2O3), or alumina; and zirconium dioxide (ZrO2), or zirconia. This article reviews the microstructure of current dental ceramic materials and how it relates to their mechanical properties, clinical techniques, and optical properties. Typical ceramics currently in use are described, and their clinically relevant properties such as strength, fracture, polishability, and wear are compared. Cementation methods are also discussed.

  7. DNA-mediated self-assembly of artificial vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadorn, Maik; Eggenberger Hotz, Peter

    2010-03-26

    Although multicompartment systems made of single unilamellar vesicles offer the potential to outperform single compartment systems widely used in analytic, synthetic, and medical applications, their use has remained marginal to date. On the one hand, this can be attributed to the binary character of the majority of the current tethering protocols that impedes the implementation of real multicomponent or multifunctional systems. On the other hand, the few tethering protocols theoretically providing multicompartment systems composed of several distinct vesicle populations suffer from the readjustment of the vesicle formation procedure as well as from the loss of specificity of the linking mechanism over time. In previous studies, we presented implementations of multicompartment systems and resolved the readjustment of the vesicle formation procedure as well as the loss of specificity by using linkers consisting of biotinylated DNA single strands that were anchored to phospholipid-grafted biotinylated PEG tethers via streptavidin as a connector. The systematic analysis presented herein provides evidences for the incorporation of phospholipid-grafted biotinylated PEG tethers to the vesicle membrane during vesicle formation, providing specific anchoring sites for the streptavidin loading of the vesicle membrane. Furthermore, DNA-mediated vesicle-vesicle self-assembly was found to be sequence-dependent and to depend on the presence of monovalent salts. This study provides a solid basis for the implementation of multi-vesicle assemblies that may affect at least three distinct domains. (i) Analysis. Starting with a minimal system, the complexity of a bottom-up system is increased gradually facilitating the understanding of the components and their interaction. (ii) Synthesis. Consecutive reactions may be implemented in networks of vesicles that outperform current single compartment bioreactors in versatility and productivity. (iii) Personalized medicine. Transport and

  8. Cellular phenotype and extracellular vesicles: basic and clinical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesenberry, Peter J; Goldberg, Laura R; Aliotta, Jason M; Dooner, Mark S; Pereira, Mandy G; Wen, Sicheng; Camussi, Giovanni

    2014-07-01

    Early work on platelet and erythrocyte vesicles interpreted the phenomena as a discard of material from cells. Subsequently, vesicles were studied as possible vaccines and, most recently, there has been a focus on the effects of vesicles on cell fate. Recent studies have indicated that extracellular vesicles, previously referred to as microvesicles or exosomes, have the capacity to change the phenotype of neighboring cells. Extensive work has shown that vesicles derived from either the lung or liver can enter bone marrow cells (this is a prerequisite) and alter their fate toward that of the originating liver and lung tissue. Lung vesicles interacted with bone marrow cells result in the bone marrow cells expressing surfactants A-D, Clara cell protein, and aquaporin-5 mRNA. In a similar vein, liver-derived vesicles induce albumin mRNA in target marrow cells. The vesicles contain protein, mRNA, microRNA, and noncoding RNA and variably some DNA. This genetic package is delivered to cells and alters the phenotype. Further studies have shown that initially the altered phenotype is due to the transfer of mRNA and a transcriptional modulator, but long-term epigenetic changes are induced through transfer of a transcriptional factor, and the mRNA is rapidly degraded in the cell. Studies on the capacity of vesicles to restore injured tissue have been quite informative. Mesenchymal stem cell-derived vesicles are able to reverse the injury to the damaged liver and kidney. Other studies have shown that mesenchymal stem cell-derived vesicles can reverse radiation toxicity of bone marrow stem cells. Extracellular vesicles offer an intriguing strategy for treating a number of diseases characterized by tissue injury.

  9. Spin State As a Probe of Vesicle Self-Assembly

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Sanghoon; Bellouard, Christine; Eastoe, Julian; Canilho, Nadia; Rogers, Sarah E; Ihiawakrim, Dris; Ersen, Ovidiu; Pasc, Andreea

    2016-01-01

    A novel system of paramagnetic vesicles was designed using ion pairs of iron-containing surfactants. Unilamellar vesicles (diameter ≈ 200 nm) formed spontaneously and were characterized by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy, nanoparticle tracking analysis, and light and small-angle neutron scattering. Moreover, for the first time, it is shown that magnetization measurements can be used to investigate self-assembly of such functionalized systems, giving information on the vesicle compo...

  10. Spin State As a Probe of Vesicle Self-Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sanghoon; Bellouard, Christine; Eastoe, Julian; Canilho, Nadia; Rogers, Sarah E; Ihiawakrim, Dris; Ersen, Ovidiu; Pasc, Andreea

    2016-03-02

    A novel system of paramagnetic vesicles was designed using ion pairs of iron-containing surfactants. Unilamellar vesicles (diameter ≈ 200 nm) formed spontaneously and were characterized by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy, nanoparticle tracking analysis, and light and small-angle neutron scattering. Moreover, for the first time, it is shown that magnetization measurements can be used to investigate self-assembly of such functionalized systems, giving information on the vesicle compositions and distribution of surfactants between the bilayers and the aqueous bulk.

  11. [Seminal vesicle cystadenoma as the cause of a retrovesical tumor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminsky, A; Kania, U; Ortloff, P; Sperling, H

    2014-04-01

    Tumors of the seminal vesicle are rare. Malignant tumors are more common than benign tumors. A seminal vesicle cystadenoma is a rarity. We report on a 41-year-old man with the incidental finding of an asymptomatic retrovesical tumor. The tumor, the seminal vesicle, and the abdominal part of the ductus deferens were surgically removed. The operative access is variable and surgical treatment is the method of choice. The patient's prognosis is good and there are no signs of recurrence.

  12. Dynamic properties of the alkaline vesicle population at hippocampal synapses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mareike Röther

    Full Text Available In compensatory endocytosis, scission of vesicles from the plasma membrane to the cytoplasm is a prerequisite for intravesicular reacidification and accumulation of neurotransmitter molecules. Here, we provide time-resolved measurements of the dynamics of the alkaline vesicle population which appears upon endocytic retrieval. Using fast perfusion pH-cycling in live-cell microscopy, synapto-pHluorin expressing rat hippocampal neurons were electrically stimulated. We found that the relative size of the alkaline vesicle population depended significantly on the electrical stimulus size: With increasing number of action potentials the relative size of the alkaline vesicle population expanded. In contrast to that, increasing the stimulus frequency reduced the relative size of the population of alkaline vesicles. Measurement of the time constant for reacification and calculation of the time constant for endocytosis revealed that both time constants were variable with regard to the stimulus condition. Furthermore, we show that the dynamics of the alkaline vesicle population can be predicted by a simple mathematical model. In conclusion, here a novel methodical approach to analyze dynamic properties of alkaline vesicles is presented and validated as a convenient method for the detection of intracellular events. Using this method we show that the population of alkaline vesicles is highly dynamic and depends both on stimulus strength and frequency. Our results implicate that determination of the alkaline vesicle population size may provide new insights into the kinetics of endocytic retrieval.

  13. Floating Escherichia coli by expressing cyanobacterial gas vesicle genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tianhe; Kang, Li; Li, Jiaheng; Wu, Wenjie; Zhang, Peiran; Gong, Minghao; Lai, Weihong; Zhang, Chunyan; Chang, Lei; Peng, Yong; Yang, Zhongzhou; Li, Lian; Bao, Yingying; Xu, Haowen; Zhang, Xiaohua; Sui, Zhenghong; Yang, Guanpin; Wang, Xianghong

    2015-02-01

    Gas vesicles are hollow, air-filled polyprotein structures that provide the buoyancy to cells. They are found in a variety of prokaryotes. In this study, we isolated a partial gas vesicle protein gene cluster containing gvpA and gvpC20Ψ from Planktothrix rubescens, and inserted it into an expression vector and expressed it in E. coli. The gas vesicle was developed in bacterial cells, which made bacterial cells to float on medium surface. We also amplified gvpA and gvpC20Ψ separately and synthesized an artificial operon by fusing these two genes with the standardized gene expression controlling elements of E. coli. The artificial operon was expressed in E. coli, forming gas vesicles and floating bacteria cells. Our findings verified that the whole set of genes and the overall structure of gas vesicle gene cluster are not necessary for developing gas vesicles in bacteria cells. Two genes, gvpA and gvpC20Ψ, of the gas vesicle gene cluster are sufficient for synthesizing an artificial operon that can develop gas vesicles in bacteria cells. Our findings provided a wide range of applications including easing the harvest of cultured microalgae and bacteria, as well as enriching and remediating aquatic pollutants by constructing gas vesicles in their cells.

  14. Fracture strength of three all-ceramic systems: Top-Ceram compared with IPS-Empress and In-Ceram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quran, Firas Al; Haj-Ali, Reem

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the fracture loads and mode of failure of all-ceramic crowns fabricated using Top-Ceram and compare it with all-ceramic crowns fabricated from well-established systems: IPS-Empress II, In-Ceram. Thirty all-ceramic crowns were fabricated; 10 IPS-Empress II, 10 In-Ceram alumina and 10 Top-Ceram. Instron testing machine was used to measure the loads required to introduce fracture of each crown. Mean fracture load for In-Ceram alumina [941.8 (± 221.66) N] was significantly (p > 0.05) higher than those of Top-Ceram and IPS-Empress II. There was no statistically significant difference between Top-Ceram and IPS-Empress II mean fracture loads; 696.20 (+222.20) and 534 (+110.84) N respectively. Core fracture pattern was highest seen in Top- Ceram specimens.

  15. The International Society for Extracellular Vesicles launches the first massive open online course on extracellular vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lässer, Cecilia; Théry, Clotilde; Buzás, Edit I.; Mathivanan, Suresh; Zhao, Weian; Gho, Yong Song; Lötvall, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The International Society for Extracellular Vesicles (ISEV) has organised its first educational online course for students and beginners in the field of extracellular vesicles (EVs). This course, “Basics of Extracellular Vesicles,” uses recorded lectures from experts in the field and will be open for an unlimited number of participants. The course is divided into 5 modules and can be accessed at www.coursera.org/learn/extracellular-vesicles. The first module is an introduction to the field covering the nomenclature and history of EVs. Module 2 focuses on the biogenesis and uptake mechanisms of EVs, as well as their RNA, protein and lipid cargo. Module 3 covers the collection and processing of cell culture media and body fluids such as blood, breast milk, cerebrospinal fluid and urine prior to isolation of EVs. Modules 4 and 5 present different isolation methods and characterisation techniques utilised in the EV field. Here, differential ultracentrifugation, size-exclusion chromatography, density gradient centrifugation, kit-based precipitation, electron microscopy, cryo-electron microscopy, flow cytometry, atomic-force microscopy and nanoparticle-tracking analysis are covered. This first massive open online course (MOOC) on EVs was launched on 15 August 2016 at the platform “Coursera” and is free of charge. PMID:27989272

  16. The International Society for Extracellular Vesicles launches the first massive open online course on extracellular vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lässer, Cecilia; Théry, Clotilde; Buzás, Edit I; Mathivanan, Suresh; Zhao, Weian; Gho, Yong Song; Lötvall, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The International Society for Extracellular Vesicles (ISEV) has organised its first educational online course for students and beginners in the field of extracellular vesicles (EVs). This course, "Basics of Extracellular Vesicles," uses recorded lectures from experts in the field and will be open for an unlimited number of participants. The course is divided into 5 modules and can be accessed at www.coursera.org/learn/extracellular-vesicles. The first module is an introduction to the field covering the nomenclature and history of EVs. Module 2 focuses on the biogenesis and uptake mechanisms of EVs, as well as their RNA, protein and lipid cargo. Module 3 covers the collection and processing of cell culture media and body fluids such as blood, breast milk, cerebrospinal fluid and urine prior to isolation of EVs. Modules 4 and 5 present different isolation methods and characterisation techniques utilised in the EV field. Here, differential ultracentrifugation, size-exclusion chromatography, density gradient centrifugation, kit-based precipitation, electron microscopy, cryo-electron microscopy, flow cytometry, atomic-force microscopy and nanoparticle-tracking analysis are covered. This first massive open online course (MOOC) on EVs was launched on 15 August 2016 at the platform "Coursera" and is free of charge.

  17. The International Society for Extracellular Vesicles launches the first massive open online course on extracellular vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Lässer

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The International Society for Extracellular Vesicles (ISEV has organised its first educational online course for students and beginners in the field of extracellular vesicles (EVs. This course, “Basics of Extracellular Vesicles,” uses recorded lectures from experts in the field and will be open for an unlimited number of participants. The course is divided into 5 modules and can be accessed at www.coursera.org/learn/extracellular-vesicles. The first module is an introduction to the field covering the nomenclature and history of EVs. Module 2 focuses on the biogenesis and uptake mechanisms of EVs, as well as their RNA, protein and lipid cargo. Module 3 covers the collection and processing of cell culture media and body fluids such as blood, breast milk, cerebrospinal fluid and urine prior to isolation of EVs. Modules 4 and 5 present different isolation methods and characterisation techniques utilised in the EV field. Here, differential ultracentrifugation, size-exclusion chromatography, density gradient centrifugation, kit-based precipitation, electron microscopy, cryo-electron microscopy, flow cytometry, atomic-force microscopy and nanoparticle-tracking analysis are covered. This first massive open online course (MOOC on EVs was launched on 15 August 2016 at the platform “Coursera” and is free of charge.

  18. Role of extracellular vesicles in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turpin, Delphine; Truchetet, Marie-Elise; Faustin, Benjamin; Augusto, Jean-François; Contin-Bordes, Cécile; Brisson, Alain; Blanco, Patrick; Duffau, Pierre

    2016-02-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) consist of exosomes released upon fusion of multivesicular bodies with the cell plasma membrane and microparticles shed directly from the cell membrane of many cell types. EVs can mediate cell-cell communication and are involved in many processes including inflammation, immune signaling, angiogenesis, stress response, senescence, proliferation, and cell differentiation. Accumulating evidence reveals that EVs act in the establishment, maintenance and modulation of autoimmune processes among several others involved in cancer and cardiovascular complications. EVs could also present biomedical applications, as disease biomarkers and therapeutic targets or agents for drug delivery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Prostasome-like vesicles stimulate acrosome reaction of pig spermatozoa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcianò Vito

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The presence of small membranous particles characterizes the male genital fluids of different mammalian species. The influence of semen vesicles, denominated prostasomes, on sperm functional properties has been well documented in humans, but their biological activity is scarcely known in other species. The present work investigated prostasome-like vesicles in pig semen for their ability to interact with spermatozoa and to affect acrosome reaction. Methods Prostasome-like vesicles have been isolated from pig seminal plasma by high-speed centrifugation and Sephadex G-200 gel chromatography. Morphology of purified vesicles has been checked by scanning electron microscopy while their protein pattern has been investigated by SDS-PAGE. Then prostasome- like vesicles have been incubated with pig spermatozoa and their ability to interact with sperm has been tested by the aminopeptidase assay. In addition, the efficiency of vesicles to influence the acrosome reaction has been investigated by assessing the sperm acrosomal status by the PI/FITC-PNA (propidium iodide/fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled peanut agglutinin stainings. Results Purified vesicles revealed a complex protein pattern with the occurrence of bands in the high, medium and low molecular weight range. However, the two major bands were observed at ~90 kDa and ~60 kDa. A vesicle-mediated transfer of aminopeptidase to sperm cells has been also detected. Furthermore, a significant increase of acrosome reaction extent has been revealed in spermatozoa incubated with prostasome-like vesicles in comparison to control sperm. Conclusion This is the first report demonstrating that pig prostasome-like vesicles are able, in vitro, to interact with spermatozoa and to stimulate the acrosome reaction. These findings lead to hypothesize a transfer of molecules from vesicles to sperm membrane, thus sensitizing male gametes to undergo the acrosome reaction

  20. Lightweight high performance ceramic material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunn, Stephen D [Knoxville, TN

    2008-09-02

    A sintered ceramic composition includes at least 50 wt. % boron carbide and at least 0.01 wt. % of at least one element selected from the group consisting of Y, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, and Lu, the sintered ceramic composition being characterized by a density of at least 90% of theoretical density.

  1. Ceramics in nuclear waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chikalla, T D; Mendel, J E [eds.

    1979-05-01

    Seventy-three papers are included, arranged under the following section headings: national programs for the disposal of radioactive wastes, waste from stability and characterization, glass processing, ceramic processing, ceramic and glass processing, leaching of waste materials, properties of nuclear waste forms, and immobilization of special radioactive wastes. Separate abstracts were prepared for all the papers. (DLC)

  2. Micromolding for ceramic microneedle arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Nieuwkasteele-Bystrova, Svetlana Nikolajevna; Lüttge, Regina

    2011-01-01

    The fabrication process of ceramic microneedle arrays (MNAs) is presented. This includes the manufacturing of an SU-8/Si-master, its double replication resulting in a PDMS mold for production by micromolding and ceramic sintering. The robustness of the replicated structures was tested by means of

  3. Science and Technology of Ceramics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 4; Issue 8. Science and Technology of Ceramics - Traditional Ceramics. Sheela K Ramasesha. Series Article Volume 4 Issue 8 August 1999 pp 16-24. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  4. Science and Technology of Ceramics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 4; Issue 12. Science and Technology of Ceramics - Functional Ceramics. Sheela K Ramasesha. Series Article Volume 4 Issue 12 December 1999 pp 21-30. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  5. Bioinformatics Tools for Extracellular Vesicles Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keerthikumar, Shivakumar; Gangoda, Lahiru; Gho, Yong Song; Mathivanan, Suresh

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are a class of membranous vesicles that are released by multiple cell types into the extracellular environment. This unique class of extracellular organelles which play pivotal role in intercellular communication are conserved across prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Depending upon the cell origin and the functional state, the molecular cargo including proteins, lipids, and RNA within the EVs are modulated. Owing to this, EVs are considered as a subrepertoire of the host cell and are rich reservoirs of disease biomarkers. In addition, the availability of EVs in multiple bodily fluids including blood has created significant interest in biomarker and signaling research. With the advancement in high-throughput techniques, multiple EV studies have embarked on profiling the molecular cargo. To benefit the scientific community, existing free Web-based resources including ExoCarta, EVpedia, and Vesiclepedia catalog multiple datasets. These resources aid in elucidating molecular mechanism and pathophysiology underlying different disease conditions from which EVs are isolated. Here, the existing bioinformatics tools to perform integrated analysis to identify key functional components in the EV datasets are discussed.

  6. Low thermal expansion glass ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    1995-01-01

    This book is one of a series reporting on international research and development activities conducted by the Schott group of companies With the series, Schott aims to provide an overview of its activities for scientists, engineers, and managers from all branches of industry worldwide where glasses and glass ceramics are of interest Each volume begins with a chapter providing a general idea of the current problems, results, and trends relating to the subjects treated This volume describes the fundamental principles, the manufacturing process, and applications of low thermal expansion glass ceramics The composition, structure, and stability of polycrystalline materials having a low thermal expansion are described, and it is shown how low thermal expansion glass ceramics can be manufactured from appropriately chosen glass compositions Examples illustrate the formation of this type of glass ceramic by utilizing normal production processes together with controlled crystallization Thus glass ceramics with thermal c...

  7. Ceramic membrane development in NGK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Kiyoshi; Sakai, Hitoshi

    2011-05-01

    NGK Insulators, Ltd. was established in 1919 to manufacture the electric porcelain insulators for power transmission lines. Since then, our business has grown as one of the world-leading ceramics manufacturing companies and currently supply with the various environmentally-benign ceramic products to worldwide. In this paper, ceramic membrane development in NGK is described in detail. We have been selling ceramic microfiltration (MF) membranes and ultra-filtration (UF) membranes for many years to be used for solid/liquid separation in various fields such as pharmaceutical, chemical, food and semiconductor industries. In Corporate R&D, new ceramic membranes with sub-nanometer sized pores, which are fabricated on top of the membrane filters as support, are under development for gas and liquid/liquid separation processes.

  8. Method of forming a ceramic matrix composite and a ceramic matrix component

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Diego, Peter; Zhang, James

    2017-05-30

    A method of forming a ceramic matrix composite component includes providing a formed ceramic member having a cavity, filling at least a portion of the cavity with a ceramic foam. The ceramic foam is deposited on a barrier layer covering at least one internal passage of the cavity. The method includes processing the formed ceramic member and ceramic foam to obtain a ceramic matrix composite component. Also provided is a method of forming a ceramic matrix composite blade and a ceramic matrix composite component.

  9. Removal of Vesicle Structures from Transmission Electron Microscope Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Katrine Hommelhoff; Sigworth, Fred; Brandt, Sami Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    symmetries of the vesicles in the polar coordinate plane. We then propose to lift the HOSVD model to a novel hierarchical model by summarizing the multidimensional HOSVD coefficients by their principal components. Along with the model, a solid vesicle normalization scheme and model selection criterion...

  10. IN-VITRO FUSION OF RETICULOCYTE ENDOCYTIC VESICLES WITH LIPOSOMES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VIDAL, M; HOEKSTRA, D

    1995-01-01

    Since reticulocytes have a high demand for iron, which is required for heme biosynthesis, these cells are highly specialized in the endocytosis of the iron carrier transferrin (Tf). From the resulting endocytic vesicles (EVs), iron is released and the vesicles rapidly return to the cell membrane

  11. Generic sorting of raft lipids into secretory vesicles in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Surma, Michal A; Klose, Christian; Klemm, Robin W

    2011-01-01

    a complete lipid overview of the yeast late secretory pathway. We could show that vesicles captured with different baits carry the same cargo and have almost identical lipid compositions; being highly enriched in ergosterol and sphingolipids. This finding indicates that lipid raft sorting is a generic...... feature of vesicles carrying PM cargo and suggests a common lipid-based mechanism for their formation....

  12. Vesicle transport and photoreceptor death: fishing for molecular links.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel-Wolfrum, Kerstin; Wolfrum, Uwe

    2013-06-10

    Intracellular vesicle transport defects can induce retinal degeneration and photoreceptor cell death, but the molecular connections between these processes remains poorly understood. Reporting in Developmental Cell, Nishiwaki et al. (2013) suggest that a vesicle fusion cis-SNARE complex component translates vesicular transport defects into photoreceptor cell apoptosis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Formation and structural properties of multi-block copolymer vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rong; Ma, Shiying

    2014-03-01

    Due to the unique structure, vesicles have attracted considerable attention for their potential applications, such as gene and drug delivery, microcapsules, nanoreactors, cell membrane mimetic, synthetic organelles, etc. By using dissipative particle dynamics, we studied the self-assembly of amphiphilic multi-block copolymer. The phase diagram was constructed by varying the interaction parameters and the composition of the block copolymers. The results show that the vesicles are stable in a large region which is different from the diblock copolymer or triblock copolymer. The structural properties of vesicles can be controlled by varying the interaction parameters and the length of the hydrophobic block. The relationship between the hydrophilic and hydrophobic block length vs the aqueous cavity size and vesicle size are revealed. The copolymers with shorter hydrophobic blocks length or the higher hydrophilicity are more likely to form vesicles with larger aqueous cavity size and vesicle size as well as thinner wall thickness. However, the increase in hydrophobic-block length results to form vesicles with smaller aqueous cavity size and larger vesicle size. Acknowledgments. This work has been supported by NNSFC (No. 21074053) and NBRPC (No. 2010CB923303).

  14. Slow Sedimentation and Deformability of Charged Lipid Vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey Suárez, Iván; Leidy, Chad; Téllez, Gabriel; Gay, Guillaume; Gonzalez-Mancera, Andres

    2013-01-01

    The study of vesicles in suspension is important to understand the complicated dynamics exhibited by cells in in vivo and in vitro. We developed a computer simulation based on the boundary-integral method to model the three dimensional gravity-driven sedimentation of charged vesicles towards a flat surface. The membrane mechanical behavior was modeled using the Helfrich Hamiltonian and near incompressibility of the membrane was enforced via a model which accounts for the thermal fluctuations of the membrane. The simulations were verified and compared to experimental data obtained using suspended vesicles labelled with a fluorescent probe, which allows visualization using fluorescence microscopy and confers the membrane with a negative surface charge. The electrostatic interaction between the vesicle and the surface was modeled using the linear Derjaguin approximation for a low ionic concentration solution. The sedimentation rate as a function of the distance of the vesicle to the surface was determined both experimentally and from the computer simulations. The gap between the vesicle and the surface, as well as the shape of the vesicle at equilibrium were also studied. It was determined that inclusion of the electrostatic interaction is fundamental to accurately predict the sedimentation rate as the vesicle approaches the surface and the size of the gap at equilibrium, we also observed that the presence of charge in the membrane increases its rigidity. PMID:23874582

  15. Lubrication synergy: Mixture of hyaluronan and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) vesicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raj, Akanksha; Wang, Min; Zander, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    with the outer shell of dipalmitoylphophatidylcholine (DPPC) vesicles in bulk solution. Further, we follow adsorption to silica from mixed hyaluronan/DPPC vesicle solution by Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation measurements. Atomic Force Microscope imaging visualises the adsorbed layer structure...... and partly removed from between the surfaces under high loads. These layers offer very low friction coefficient (

  16. Block-Copolymer Vesicles as Nanoreactors for Enzymatic Reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Qi; Schönherr, Holger; Vancso, Gyula J.

    2009-01-01

    The impact of the spatial confinement of polystyrene-block-poly(acrylic acid) (PS-b-PAA) block copolymer (BCP) vesicles on the reactivity of encapsulated bovine pancreas trypsin is studied. Enzymes, as well as small molecules, are encapsulated with loading efficiencies up to 30% in BCP vesicles with

  17. Vesiclepedia: A Compendium for Extracellular Vesicles with Continuous Community Annotation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalra, Hina; Simpson, Richard J.; Ji, Hong; Aikawa, Elena; Altevogt, Peter; Askenase, Philip; Bond, Vincent C.; Borràs, Francesc E.; Breakefield, Xandra; Budnik, Vivian; Buzas, Edit; Camussi, Giovanni; Clayton, Aled; Cocucci, Emanuele; Falcon-Perez, Juan M.; Gabrielsson, Susanne; Gho, Yong Song; Gupta, Dwijendra; Harsha, H. C.; Hendrix, An; Hill, Andrew F.; Inal, Jameel M.; Jenster, Guido; Krämer-Albers, Eva-Maria; Lim, Sai Kiang; Llorente, Alicia; Lötvall, Jan; Marcilla, Antonio; Mincheva-Nilsson, Lucia; Nazarenko, Irina; Nieuwland, Rienk; Nolte-'t Hoen, Esther N. M.; Pandey, Akhilesh; Patel, Tushar; Piper, Melissa G.; Pluchino, Stefano; Prasad, T. S. Keshava; Rajendran, Lawrence; Raposo, Graca; Record, Michel; Reid, Gavin E.; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; Schiffelers, Raymond M.; Siljander, Pia; Stensballe, Allan; Stoorvogel, Willem; Taylor, Douglas; Thery, Clotilde; Valadi, Hadi; van Balkom, Bas W. M.; Vázquez, Jesús; Vidal, Michel; Wauben, Marca H. M.; Yáñez-Mó, María; Zoeller, Margot; Mathivanan, Suresh

    2012-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are membraneous vesicles released by a variety of cells into their microenvironment. Recent studies have elucidated the role of EVs in intercellular communication, pathogenesis, drug, vaccine and gene-vector delivery, and as possible reservoirs of biomarkers. These

  18. The freezing process of small lipid vesicles at molecular resolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Risselada, H. Jelger; Marrink, Siewert J.

    2009-01-01

    At present very little is known about the kinetic barriers which a small vesicle will face during the transformation from the liquid-crystalline to the gel phase, and what the structure of frozen vesicles looks like at the molecular level. The formation of gel domains in the strongly curved bilayer

  19. Thick ceramic coating technique. Atsuniku ceramic coating gijutsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sata, N. (Government Industrial Reserach Institute, Tohoku, Sendai (Japan))

    1987-10-15

    This paper describes a thick ceramic coating technique that uses a reactive bonding process. This process coats interior of a metallic cylinder or surface of a metal having optional curvature with thick (2 mm to 3 mm) ceramics composed mainly of alumina. The process features easiness in coating and simplicity of the equipment. Reactive heat generated from thermit reaction melts iron and alumina as the reaction products, and produces molten ceramics which is cooled on the metal surface to deposit and solidify as a ceramics layer, thus completing the synthesis and the coating in one process. Its application fields would include reaction tubes, abrasive fluid tubes, and high-temperature fluid tubes that can utilize the ceramics' resistance to abrasion, corrosion and heat as well as heat insulation. The ceramics layer has a hardness of about Hv 1500 and porosity from 2 to 3%. The bonding strength between the substrate metal and the ceramics layer can achieve 10 MPa to 20 MPa as a result of surface oxidation treatment and cooling treatment given initially to prevent the outer wall temperature from rising. 2 figs.

  20. A scenario for a genetically controlled fission of artificial vesicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bönzli, Eva; Hadorn, Maik; Jørgensen, Mikkel Girke

    2011-01-01

    Artificial vesicles have been used for decades as model systems of biological cells to investigate scientific questions in simulacra. In recent years, the significance of artificial vesicles further increased because they represent ideal candidates to become the building block of a de novo...... construction of a cell in a bottom-up manner. Numerous efforts to build an artificial cell that bridge the living and non-living world will most presumably represent one of the main goals of science in the 21st century. It was shown that artificial genetic programs and the required cellular machinery can...... be incorporated into vesicles, and therefore allow the synthesis of a large number of proteins (Noireaux et al. 2005). However, vesicle fission remains one of the upcoming challenges in the artificial cell project (Noireaux et al. 2011). So far, vesicle fission is implemented by applying mechanical stress...

  1. Recognition and tethering of transport vesicles at the Golgi apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witkos, Tomasz M; Lowe, Martin

    2017-08-01

    The Golgi apparatus occupies a central position within the secretory pathway where it is a hub for vesicle trafficking. Distinct classes of transport vesicles traffic diverse cargoes into and out of this organelle, as well as between the different Golgi subcompartments. A key feature of Golgi trafficking is the specific recognition of transport vesicles at the different regions of the Golgi apparatus, required for the correct cargo delivery. Specificity is ensured by coiled-coil golgins and multi-subunit tethering complexes (MTCs), which act together to capture vesicles and promote their subsequent fusion with the Golgi membrane. In this review we discuss our current understanding of how golgins and MTCs function together to mediate the specific recognition of vesicles at the Golgi apparatus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. ISEV position paper: extracellular vesicle RNA analysis and bioinformatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew F. Hill

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EVs are the collective term for the various vesicles that are released by cells into the extracellular space. Such vesicles include exosomes and microvesicles, which vary by their size and/or protein and genetic cargo. With the discovery that EVs contain genetic material in the form of RNA (evRNA has come the increased interest in these vesicles for their potential use as sources of disease biomarkers and potential therapeutic agents. Rapid developments in the availability of deep sequencing technologies have enabled the study of EV-related RNA in detail. In October 2012, the International Society for Extracellular Vesicles (ISEV held a workshop on “evRNA analysis and bioinformatics.” Here, we report the conclusions of one of the roundtable discussions where we discussed evRNA analysis technologies and provide some guidelines to researchers in the field to consider when performing such analysis.

  3. Membrane Protrusion Coarsening and Nanotubulation within Giant Unilamellar Vesicles

    KAUST Repository

    Węgrzyn, Ilona

    2011-11-16

    Hydrophobic side groups on a stimuli-responsive polymer, encapsulated within a single giant unilamellar vesicle, enable membrane attachment during compartment formation at elevated temperatures. We thermally modulated the vesicle through implementation of an IR laser via an optical fiber, enabling localized directed heating. Polymer-membrane interactions were monitored using confocal imaging techniques as subsequent membrane protrusions occurred and lipid nanotubes formed in response to the polymer hydrogel contraction. These nanotubes, bridging the vesicle membrane to the contracting hydrogel, were retained on the surface of the polymer compartment, where they were transformed into smaller vesicles in a process reminiscent of cellular endocytosis. This development of a synthetic vesicle system containing a stimuli-responsive polymer could lead to a new platform for studying inter/intramembrane transport through lipid nanotubes. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  4. Extracellular vesicles as new pharmacological targets to treat atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Min; Loyer, Xavier; Boulanger, Chantal M

    2015-09-15

    Extracellular vesicles released by most cell types, include apoptotic bodies (ABs), microvesicles (MVs) and exosomes. They play a crucial role in physiology and pathology, contributing to "cell-to-cell" communication by modifying the phenotype and the function of target cells. Thus, extracellular vesicles participate in the key processes of atherosclerosis from endothelial dysfunction, vascular wall inflammation to vascular remodeling. The purpose of this review is to summarize recent findings on extracellular vesicle formation, structure, release and clearance. We focus on the deleterious and beneficial effects of extracellular vesicles in the development of atherosclerosis. The potential role of extracellular vesicles as biomarkers and pharmacological targets, their innate therapeutic capacity, or their use for novel drug delivery devices in atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases will also be discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Placental Extracellular Vesicles and Feto-Maternal Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, M.; Chamley, L.W.

    2015-01-01

    The human placenta is an anatomically unique structure that extrudes a variety of extracellular vesicles into the maternal blood (including syncytial nuclear aggregates, microvesicles, and nanovesicles). Large quantities of extracellular vesicles are produced by the placenta in both healthy and diseased pregnancies. Since their first description more than 120 years ago, placental extracellular vesicles are only now being recognized as important carriers for proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids, which may play a crucial role in feto-maternal communication. Here, we summarize the current literature on the cargos of placental extracellular vesicles and the known effects of such vesicles on maternal cells/systems, especially those of the maternal immune and vascular systems. PMID:25635060

  6. High-temperature corrosion resistance of ceramics and ceramic coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tortorelli, P.F.

    1996-06-01

    Ceramics and ceramic composites offer the potential to operate fossil energy systems at the higher temperatures necessary for improved energy efficiency and better environmental control. However, because many fossil fuel-derived processes contain sulfur, chlorine, and carbon, as well as oxygen, degradation from high-temperature corrosion and environmental effects arising from reactions of solids with gases and condensable products is a common life-determining factor in operating systems. Ceramic-based products are not immune to such degradation; adequate corrosion resistance must be assured to exploit the technical and economic potential of such materials. This is normally accomplished by using stable, sound oxides that exist in their bulk form, that naturally grow as surface layers upon exposure to an oxidizing environment, or that are deposited as a coating on a susceptible material. It is therefore important to examine the critical issues with respect to more environmental stability of ceramics that have the potential to be corrosion resistant in particular fossil environments. Key aspects include not only chemical compatibility, but the influence of the environment on the mechanical behavior of the ceramic materials. In addition, for coatings, the mechanical reliability of the ceramic is a key issue in that an otherwise corrosion-resistant surface layer must remain sound and adherent in order to provide protection to the underlying substrate. The purpose of this work is to support the development of advanced ceramics and ceramic composites for applications in fossil environments by examining critical issues related to high-temperature corrosion resistance. More specifically, the overall objective of this task is to examine the chemical compatibility and reliability of potentially corrosion-resistant ceramics being developed as protective overcoats and/or structural materials as parts of other work elements funded by the AR&TD Program.

  7. Aceclofenac encapsulated ethanolic nano-vesicles for effective treatment of osteoarthritis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kaur, Arvinder; Jain, Sunil K; Pandey, Ravi S

    2012-01-01

    .... Ethanolic nano-vesicles were prepared by solvent dispersion method. Vesicles were characterized for vesicular size, surface morphology, size and size distribution, zeta potential, entrapment efficiency...

  8. Ceramic fiber reinforced filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinton, David P.; McLaughlin, Jerry C.; Lowden, Richard A.

    1991-01-01

    A filter for removing particulate matter from high temperature flowing fluids, and in particular gases, that is reinforced with ceramic fibers. The filter has a ceramic base fiber material in the form of a fabric, felt, paper of the like, with the refractory fibers thereof coated with a thin layer of a protective and bonding refractory applied by chemical vapor deposition techniques. This coating causes each fiber to be physically joined to adjoining fibers so as to prevent movement of the fibers during use and to increase the strength and toughness of the composite filter. Further, the coating can be selected to minimize any reactions between the constituents of the fluids and the fibers. A description is given of the formation of a composite filter using a felt preform of commercial silicon carbide fibers together with the coating of these fibers with pure silicon carbide. Filter efficiency approaching 100% has been demonstrated with these filters. The fiber base material is alternately made from aluminosilicate fibers, zirconia fibers and alumina fibers. Coating with Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 is also described. Advanced configurations for the composite filter are suggested.

  9. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2003-01-01

    In the present quarter, the possibility of using a more complex interfacial engineering approach to the development of reliable and stable oxygen transport perovskite ceramic membranes/metal seals is discussed. Experiments are presented and ceramic/metal interactions are characterized. Crack growth and fracture toughness of the membrane in the reducing conditions are also discussed. Future work regarding this approach is proposed are evaluated for strength and fracture in oxygen gradient conditions. Oxygen gradients are created in tubular membranes by insulating the inner surface from the reducing environment by platinum foils. Fracture in these test conditions is observed to have a gradient in trans and inter-granular fracture as opposed to pure trans-granular fracture observed in homogeneous conditions. Fracture gradients are reasoned to be due to oxygen gradient set up in the membrane, variation in stoichiometry across the thickness and due to varying decomposition of the parent perovskite. The studies are useful in predicting fracture criterion in actual reactor conditions and in understanding the initial evolution of fracture processes.

  10. Low-resolution simulations of vesicle suspensions in 2D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabacaoğlu, Gökberk; Quaife, Bryan; Biros, George

    2018-03-01

    Vesicle suspensions appear in many biological and industrial applications. These suspensions are characterized by rich and complex dynamics of vesicles due to their interaction with the bulk fluid, and their large deformations and nonlinear elastic properties. Many existing state-of-the-art numerical schemes can resolve such complex vesicle flows. However, even when using provably optimal algorithms, these simulations can be computationally expensive, especially for suspensions with a large number of vesicles. These high computational costs can limit the use of simulations for parameter exploration, optimization, or uncertainty quantification. One way to reduce the cost is to use low-resolution discretizations in space and time. However, it is well-known that simply reducing the resolution results in vesicle collisions, numerical instabilities, and often in erroneous results. In this paper, we investigate the effect of a number of algorithmic empirical fixes (which are commonly used by many groups) in an attempt to make low-resolution simulations more stable and more predictive. Based on our empirical studies for a number of flow configurations, we propose a scheme that attempts to integrate these fixes in a systematic way. This low-resolution scheme is an extension of our previous work [51,53]. Our low-resolution correction algorithms (LRCA) include anti-aliasing and membrane reparametrization for avoiding spurious oscillations in vesicles' membranes, adaptive time stepping and a repulsion force for handling vesicle collisions and, correction of vesicles' area and arc-length for maintaining physical vesicle shapes. We perform a systematic error analysis by comparing the low-resolution simulations of dilute and dense suspensions with their high-fidelity, fully resolved, counterparts. We observe that the LRCA enables both efficient and statistically accurate low-resolution simulations of vesicle suspensions, while it can be 10× to 100× faster.

  11. Mesenchymal stem cell-derived extracellular vesicles attenuate kidney inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eirin, Alfonso; Zhu, Xiang-Yang; Puranik, Amrutesh S; Tang, Hui; McGurren, Kelly A; van Wijnen, Andre J; Lerman, Amir; Lerman, Lilach O

    2017-07-01

    Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) have distinct capability for renal repair, but may have safety concerns. MSC-derived extracellular vesicles emerged as a novel noncellular alternative. Using a porcine model of metabolic syndrome and renal artery stenosis we tested whether extracellular vesicles attenuate renal inflammation, and if this capacity is mediated by their cargo of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL) 10. Pigs with metabolic syndrome were studied after 16 weeks of renal artery stenosis untreated or treated four weeks earlier with a single intrarenal delivery of extracellular vesicles harvested from adipose tissue-derived autologous MSCs. Lean and sham metabolic syndrome animals served as controls (seven each). Five additional pigs with metabolic syndrome and renal artery stenosis received extracellular vesicles with pre-silenced IL10 (IL10 knock-down). Single-kidney renal blood flow, glomerular filtration rate, and oxygenation were studied in vivo and renal injury pathways ex vivo. Retention of extracellular vesicles in the stenotic kidney peaked two days after delivery and decreased thereafter. Four weeks after injection, extracellular vesicle fragments colocalized with stenotic-kidney tubular cells and macrophages, indicating internalization or fusion. Extracellular vesicle delivery attenuated renal inflammation, and improved medullary oxygenation and fibrosis. Renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate fell in metabolic syndrome and renal artery stenosis compared to metabolic syndrome, but was restored in pigs treated with extracellular vesicles. These renoprotective effects were blunted in pigs treated with IL10-depleted extracellular vesicles. Thus, extracellular vesicle-based regenerative strategies might be useful for patients with metabolic syndrome and renal artery stenosis. Copyright © 2017 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The launch of Journal of Extracellular Vesicles (JEV), the official journal of the International Society for Extracellular Vesicles ? about microvesicles, exosomes, ectosomes and other extracellular vesicles

    OpenAIRE

    L?tvall, Jan; Rajendran, Lawrence; Gho, Yong-Song; Thery, Clotilde; Wauben, Marca; Raposo, Graca; Sj?strand, Margareta; Taylor, Douglas; Telemo, Esbj?rn; Breakefield, Xandra O.

    2012-01-01

    In 2011, researchers around the world interested in extracellular vesicles (EV) joined forces and founded the International Society for Extracellular Vesicles (ISEV). Membership has grown to approximately 750 in eight months, and the Society’s first meeting will take place in Gothenburg, Sweden, on 18-21 April 2012. Already approximately 500 participants have been attracted to this event. These are signs of rapid expansion in global research in the field of EV.(Published: 16 April 2012)Citati...

  13. A Perspective on Extracellular Vesicles Proteomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia Rosa-Fernandes

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Increasing attention has been given to secreted extracellular vesicles (EVs in the past decades, especially in the portrayal of their molecular cargo and role as messengers in both homeostasis and pathophysiological conditions. This review presents the state-of-the-art proteomic technologies to identify and quantify EVs proteins along with their PTMs, interacting partners and structural details. The rapid growth of mass spectrometry-based analytical strategies for protein sequencing, PTMs and structural characterization has improved the level of molecular details that can be achieved from limited amount of EVs isolated from different biological sources. Here we will provide a perspective view on the achievements and challenges on EVs proteome characterization using mass spectrometry. A detailed bioinformatics approach will help us to picture the molecular fingerprint of EVs and understand better their pathophysiological function.

  14. Versatile roles of extracellular vesicles in cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosaka, Nobuyoshi; Yoshioka, Yusuke; Fujita, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown that non–cell-autonomous regulation of cancer cells is an important aspect of tumorigenesis. Cancer cells need to communicate with stromal cells by humoral factors such as VEGF, FGFs, and Wnt in order to survive. Recently, extracellular vesicles (EVs) have also been shown to be involved in cell-cell communication between cancer cells and the surrounding microenvironment and to be important for the development of cancer. In addition, these EVs contain small noncoding RNAs, including microRNAs (miRNAs), which contribute to the malignancy of cancer cells. Here, we provide an overview of current research on EVs, especially miRNAs in EVs. We also propose strategies to treat cancers by targeting EVs around cancer cells. PMID:26974161

  15. Role of extracellular vesicles in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Haitao; Hu, Die; Zhang, Licheng; Tang, Peifu

    2018-01-01

    Cell-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs) are involved in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), playing important roles in antigen presentation, inflammation, angiogenesis, cell-cell signal communication, thrombosis, and articular cartilage extracellular matrix degradation. Understanding the pathogenic mechanism of RA is important for developing therapies. The pathogenic indicators of RA, such as submicron-sized EVs, represent promising biomarkers for evaluating RA activity. This review summarizes the recent advances in understanding the pathogenesis of RA, and sheds light on the pathogenic as well as anti-inflammatory or immunosuppressive roles of EVs. We suggest that EVs could be harnessed as tools for drug delivery or targets for RA therapies. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Isolation of Platelet-Derived Extracellular Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aatonen, Maria; Valkonen, Sami; Böing, Anita; Yuana, Yuana; Nieuwland, Rienk; Siljander, Pia

    2017-01-01

    Platelets participate in several physiological functions, including hemostasis, immunity, and development. Additionally, platelets play key roles in arterial thrombosis and cancer progression. Given this plethora of functions, there is a strong interest of the role of platelet-derived (extracellular) vesicles (PDEVs) as functional mediators and biomarkers. Moreover, the majority of the blood-borne EVs are thought to originate from either platelets or directly from the platelet precursor cells, the megakaryocytes, which reside in the bone marrow. To circumvent confusion, we use the term PDEVs for both platelet-derived and/or megakaryocyte-derived EVs. PDEVs can be isolated from blood or from isolated platelets after activation. In this chapter, we describe all commonly used PDEV isolation methods from blood and prepurified platelets.

  17. Methods to isolate extracellular vesicles for diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyejin; Kim, Jiyoon; Park, Jaesung

    2017-12-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are small membrane-bound bodies that are released into extracellular space by diverse cells, and are found in body fluids like blood, urine and saliva. EVs contain RNA, DNA and proteins, which can be biomarkers for diagnosis. EVs can be obtained by minimally-invasive biopsy, so they are useful in disease diagnosis. High yield and purity contribute to precise diagnosis of disease, but damaged EVs and impurities can cause confu sed results. However, EV isolation methods have different yields and purities. Furthermore, the isolation method that is most suitable to maximize EV recovery efficiency depends on the experimental conditions. This review focuses on merits and demerits of several types of EV isolation methods, and provides examples of how to diagnose disease by exploiting information obtained by analysis of EVs.

  18. A Perspective on Extracellular Vesicles Proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa-Fernandes, Livia; Rocha, Victória Bombarda; Carregari, Victor Corasolla; Urbani, Andrea; Palmisano, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Increasing attention has been given to secreted extracellular vesicles (EVs) in the past decades, especially in the portrayal of their molecular cargo and role as messengers in both homeostasis and pathophysiological conditions. This review presents the state-of-the-art proteomic technologies to identify and quantify EVs proteins along with their PTMs, interacting partners and structural details. The rapid growth of mass spectrometry-based analytical strategies for protein sequencing, PTMs and structural characterization has improved the level of molecular details that can be achieved from limited amount of EVs isolated from different biological sources. Here we will provide a perspective view on the achievements and challenges on EVs proteome characterization using mass spectrometry. A detailed bioinformatics approach will help us to picture the molecular fingerprint of EVs and understand better their pathophysiological function.

  19. Biological reference materials for extracellular vesicle studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valkonen, S; van der Pol, E; Böing, A; Yuana, Y; Yliperttula, M; Nieuwland, R; Laitinen, S; Siljander, P R M

    2017-02-15

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) mediate normal physiological homeostasis and pathological processes by facilitating intercellular communication. Research of EVs in basic science and clinical settings requires both methodological standardization and development of reference materials (RM). Here, we show insights and results of biological RM development for EV studies. We used a three-step approach to find and develop a biological RM. First, a literature search was done to find candidates for biological RMs. Second, a questionnaire was sent to EV researchers querying the preferences for RM and their use. Third, a biological RM was selected, developed, characterized, and evaluated. The responses to the survey demonstrated a clear and recognized need for RM optimized for the calibration of EV measurements. Based on the literature, naturally occurring and produced biological RM, such as virus particles and liposomes, were proposed as RM. However, none of these candidate RMs have properties completely matching those of EVs, such as size and refractive index distribution. Therefore, we evaluated the use of nanoerythrosomes (NanoE), vesicles produced from erythrocytes, as a potential biological RM. The strength of NanoE is their resemblance to EVs. Compared to the erythrocyte-derived EVs (eryEVs), NanoE have similar morphology, a similar refractive index (1.37), larger diameter (70% of the NanoE are over 200nm), and increased positive staining for CD235a and lipids (Di-8-ANEPPS) (58% and 67% in NanoE vs. 21% and 45% in eryEVs, respectively). Altogether, our results highlight the general need to develop and validate new RM with similar physical and biochemical properties as EVs to standardize EV measurements between instruments and laboratories. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Extracellular vesicles in obesity and diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo, Fabián; Villalobos-Labra, Roberto; Sobrevia, Bastián; Toledo, Fernando; Sobrevia, Luis

    2017-11-24

    Cell-to-cell communication happens via diverse mechanisms including the synthesis, release and transfer to target cells of extracellular vesicles (EVs). EVs include nanovesicles (i.e., exosomes) and microvesicles, including apoptotic bodies. The amount and cargo of released EVs, which consist of microRNAs (miRNAs), mRNA, proteins, DNA, among other molecules, are altered in obesity and diabetes mellitus. EVs from these diseases show with altered cargo including several miRNAs and the enrichment with molecules involved in inflammation, immune efficiency, and cell activation. The role of EVs in obesity regards with adipocytes-released vesicles that may end in a systemic insulin resistance. In diabetes mellitus, the exosomes cargo may signal to transform a normal phenotype into a diabetic phenotype in endothelial cells. The evidence of EVs as modulators of cell function is increasing; however, it is still unclear whether exosomes or microvesicles are a trustable and useful marker for the diagnose or early detection of obesity or diabetes mellitus. In this review, we summarise the reported information regarding EVs involvement in obesity, T1 and T2 diabetes mellitus, and gestational diabetes mellitus. We emphasise the fact that studies addressing a potential effect of obesity or diabetes mellitus on cell function and the severity of the diseases are done in patients suffering simultaneously with both of these diseases, i.e., diabesity. Unfortunately, the lack of information regarding the biological effects and the potential involved mechanisms makes difficult to understand the role of the EVs as a marker of these and perhaps other diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. In vitro toxicology studies of extracellular vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maji, Sayantan; Yan, Irene K; Parasramka, Mansi; Mohankumar, Swathi; Matsuda, Akiko; Patel, Tushar

    2017-03-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are membrane-bound vesicles released from cells into the extracellular environment. There is emerging interest in the use of EVs as potential therapeutic interventions. We sought to evaluate the safety of EVs that may be therapeutically used by performing in vitro toxicological assessments. EVs were obtained from mesenchymal stem cells (MSC-EV) or from bovine milk (BM-EV) by differential ultracentrifugation, and quantitated using nanoparticle tracking analysis. Genotoxic effects, hematological effects, immunological effects and endotoxin production were evaluated at two dose levels. Neither MSC-EVs nor BM-EVs elicited detectable genotoxic effects using either the alkaline comet assay or micronucleus assay. Hemolysis was observed with BM-EVs but not with MSC-EVs. MSC-EVs did not have any significant effect on either spontaneous or collagen-induced platelet aggregation. In contrast, BM-EVs were noted to increase collagen-induced platelet aggregation, even though no spontaneous increase in platelet aggregation was noted. Both types of EVs induced leukocyte proliferation, which was greater with BM-EV. Neither MSC-EVs nor BM-EVs induced HL-60 phagocytosis, although BM-EVs decreased zymosan-induced phagocytosis. Furthermore, neither MSC-EVs nor BM-EVs induced nitric oxide production. Unlike MSC-EVs, BM-EVs tested positive for endotoxin and induced complement activation. There are significant differences in toxicological profiles between MSC-EVs and BM-EVs that may reflect variations in techniques for EV isolation, EV content or cross-species differences. The safety of MSC-EV supports their use for disease therapeutics, whereas detailed safety and toxicological assessment will be necessary before the use of BM-EVs. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Ceramics in geothermal power plant. Chinetsu hatsuden to ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanada, N. (Government Industrial Research Institute, Tohoku, Sendai (Japan))

    1991-03-30

    This paper summarizes how ceramics are used in geothermal power plants. Although there are not many cases of using ceramics in geothermal power generation, they are used or discussed of their use where environmental temperature or flow velocity in geothermal fluid is high, or solids are anticipated to get mixed, with an expectation on their superior heat and erosion resistance. Applications may include use of alumina ceramics in nozzles in total flow generation turbines, magnesium oxide insulator cable to suspend a measuring instrument to inspect geothermal beds, titania spraying and covering of carbon steel mirror plates in a power plant separator, and SiC ceramics in bearings for downhole pump motors. The paper also describes several examples of problems in development which have been tackled with to date (including manufacture of metal-alumina pipes using a centrifugal thermit process). 8 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Vesicle fusion with bilayer lipid membrane controlled by electrostatic interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azusa Oshima

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The fusion of proteoliposomes is a promising approach for incorporating membrane proteins in artificial lipid membranes. In this study, we employed an electrostatic interaction between vesicles and supported bilayer lipid membranes (s-BLMs to control the fusion process. We combined large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs containing anionic lipids, which we used instead of proteoliposomes, and s-BLMs containing cationic lipids to control electrostatic interaction. Anionic LUVs were never adsorbed or ruptured on the SiO2 substrate with a slight negative charge, and selectively fused with cationic s-BLMs. The LUVs can be fused effectively to the target position. Furthermore, as the vesicle fusion proceeds and some of the positive charges are neutralized, the attractive interaction weakens and finally the vesicle fusion saturates. In other words, we can control the number of LUVs fused with s-BLMs by controlling the concentration of the cationic lipids in the s-BLMs. The fluidity of the s-BLMs after vesicle fusion was confirmed to be sufficiently high. This indicates that the LUVs attached to the s-BLMs were almost completely fused, and there were few intermediate state vesicles in the fusion process. We could control the position and amount of vesicle fusion with the s-BLMs by employing an electrostatic interaction.

  4. Removal of Vesicle Structures From Transmission Electron Microscope Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Katrine Hommelhoff; Sigworth, Fred J.; Brandt, Sami Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we address the problem of imaging membrane proteins for single-particle cryo-electron microscopy reconstruction of the isolated protein structure. More precisely, we propose a method for learning and removing the interfering vesicle signals from the micrograph, prior to reconstruction. In our approach, we estimate the subspace of the vesicle structures and project the micrographs onto the orthogonal complement of this subspace. We construct a 2d statistical model of the vesicle structure, based on higher order singular value decomposition (HOSVD), by considering the structural symmetries of the vesicles in the polar coordinate plane. We then propose to lift the HOSVD model to a novel hierarchical model by summarizing the multidimensional HOSVD coefficients by their principal components. Along with the model, a solid vesicle normalization scheme and model selection criterion are proposed to make a compact and general model. The results show that the vesicle structures are accurately separated from the background by the HOSVD model that is also able to adapt to the asymmetries of the vesicles. This is a promising result and suggests even wider applicability of the proposed approach in learning and removal of statistical structures. PMID:26642456

  5. [EXTRACELLULAR VESICLES: INTERCELLULAR INFORMATION FLOW AND MEDICAL APPLICATIONS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pupyshev, A B

    2015-01-01

    The major features of extracellular vesicles secreted by mammalian cells are considered. Cell activation caused by formation of pathology stimulates the secretion acutely. The vesicles (exosomes, microvesicles) are enriched with annexin V, tetraspanin, miRNA. Exosomes are enriched especially by integrins, heat shock proteins. Microvesicles contain elevated amounts of tissue factors, phosphatidylserine, mRNA. The vesicles carry information about the pathological process, and microvesicles contain more proteins characteristic of inflammation and death than exosomes. They are important mediators of inflammation and infection in the body, have different effects on the immune system and the processes of carcinogenesis and neurodegeneration. However, antigenic profiles of extracellular vesicles differ not profoundly in various pathologies and so far they help diagnostics limitedly. The vesicles carry signals of genetic reprogramming of the cells and epigenetic stimulation, connected with both protein factors and mRNA and miRNA. Profiles of miRNA vesicles produced by the various pathological sources are studied actively and are useful as indicators of source and stage of cancer. Some ways of therapeutic use of the vesicles are also considered.

  6. Placenta-derived extracellular vesicles: their cargo and possible functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Familari, Mary; Cronqvist, Tina; Masoumi, Zahra; Hansson, Stefan R

    2017-03-01

    The literature on extracellular vesicles consists of rapidly expanding and often contradictory information. In this paper we attempt to review what is currently known regarding extracellular vesicles released specifically from human placental syncytiotrophoblast cells with a focus on the common but complex pregnancy-associated syndrome pre-eclampsia, where the level of syncytiotrophoblast extracellular vesicle release is significantly increased. We review common methods for syncytiotrophoblast extracellular vesicle derivation and isolation and we discuss the cargo of syncytiotrophoblast extracellular vesicles including proteins, RNA and lipids and their possible functions. A meta-analysis of available trophoblast-derived extracellular vesicle proteomic datasets revealed only three proteins in common: albumin, fibronectin-1 and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, suggesting some variability in vesicle cargo, most likely reflecting stage and cell type of origin. We discuss the possible sources of variability that may have led to the low number of common markers, which has led us to speculate that markers and density in common use may not be strict criteria for identifying and isolating placenta-derived exosomes.

  7. Rapid synaptic vesicle endocytosis in cone photoreceptors of salamander retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hook, Matthew J.; Thoreson, Wallace B.

    2013-01-01

    Following synaptic vesicle exocytosis, neurons retrieve the fused membrane by a process of endocytosis in order to provide a supply of vesicles for subsequent release and maintain the presynaptic active zone. Rod and cone photoreceptors use a specialized structure called the synaptic ribbon that enables them to sustain high rates of neurotransmitter release. They must also employ mechanisms of synaptic vesicle endocytosis capable of keeping up with release. While much is known about endocytosis at another retinal ribbon synapse, that of the goldfish Mb1 bipolar cell, less is known about endocytosis in photoreceptors. We used capacitance recording techniques to measure vesicle membrane fusion and retrieval in photoreceptors from salamander retinal slices. We found that application of brief depolarizing steps (endocytosis with a time constant ~250 ms. In some cases, the capacitance trace overshot the baseline, indicating excess endocytosis. Calcium had no effect on the time constant, but enhanced excess endocytosis resulting in a faster rate of membrane retrieval. Surprisingly, endocytosis was unaffected by blockers of dynamin, suggesting that cone endocytosis is dynamin-independent. This contrasts with synaptic vesicle endocytosis in rods, which was inhibited by the dynamin inhibitor dynasore and GTPγS introduced through the patch pipette, suggesting that the two photoreceptor types employ distinct pathways for vesicle retrieval. The fast kinetics of synaptic vesicle endocytosis in photoreceptors likely enables these cells to maintain a high rate of transmitter release, allowing them to faithfully signal changes in illumination to second-order neurons. PMID:23238726

  8. Tomosyn inhibits synaptic vesicle priming in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena O Gracheva

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Caenorhabditis elegans TOM-1 is orthologous to vertebrate tomosyn, a cytosolic syntaxin-binding protein implicated in the modulation of both constitutive and regulated exocytosis. To investigate how TOM-1 regulates exocytosis of synaptic vesicles in vivo, we analyzed C. elegans tom-1 mutants. Our electrophysiological analysis indicates that evoked postsynaptic responses at tom-1 mutant synapses are prolonged leading to a two-fold increase in total charge transfer. The enhanced response in tom-1 mutants is not associated with any detectable changes in postsynaptic response kinetics, neuronal outgrowth, or synaptogenesis. However, at the ultrastructural level, we observe a concomitant increase in the number of plasma membrane-contacting vesicles in tom-1 mutant synapses, a phenotype reversed by neuronal expression of TOM-1. Priming defective unc-13 mutants show a dramatic reduction in plasma membrane-contacting vesicles, suggesting these vesicles largely represent the primed vesicle pool at the C. elegans neuromuscular junction. Consistent with this conclusion, hyperosmotic responses in tom-1 mutants are enhanced, indicating the primed vesicle pool is enhanced. Furthermore, the synaptic defects of unc-13 mutants are partially suppressed in tom-1 unc-13 double mutants. These data indicate that in the intact nervous system, TOM-1 negatively regulates synaptic vesicle priming.

  9. Leukocytospermia and function of the seminal vesicles on seminal quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, G F; Kortebani, G; Mazzolli, A B

    1992-05-01

    To determine possible relationships between number of leukocytes, function of seminal vesicles, and seminal quality. The study was carried out on men who consecutively attended an infertility clinic between June 1989 to June 1991. This study was conducted in a private immunological center for infertility, a tertiary care center, The Centro Immunológico-Sección Esterilidad y Reproducción. Semen samples from 280 infertility patients attending an Immunological Center for Infertility were analyzed. We evaluated the effect of leukocytospermia in the presence of normal or abnormal function of seminal vesicles on seminal quality. Sperm count, percent of motile sperm, and percent of sperm vitality were significantly reduced when both leukocytospermia and hypofunction of seminal vesicles were present (P less than 0.01). Leukocytospermic subjects with normal function of seminal vesicles showed similar seminal parameters to those nonleukocytspermics. The incidence of subjects with antisperm antibodies measured by direct immunobeads was significantly higher in leukocytospermic men with hypofunction of seminal vesicles. No differences in the incidence of antisperm antibodies with nonleukocytospermic samples were observed in those with both leukocytospermia and normal function of seminal vesicles. These data provide evidence that white blood cells were deleterious for seminal quality when seminal vesicles were also affected.

  10. Agglomeration of ceramic powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawley, James D.; Larosa, Judith; Dirkse, Fredrick

    1989-01-01

    A research program directed at a critical comparison of numerical models for power agglomeration with experimental observations is currently underway. Central to this program is the quantitative characterization of the distribution of mass within an agglomerate as a function of time. Current experiments are designed to restrict agglomeration to a surface, which is oriented perpendicular to the force of gravity. These experiments are discussed with reference to: their significance to ceramic processing; artifacts which may be avoided in microgravity experiments; and the comparison of information available in real space (from optical microscopy) to that in reciprocal space (from light scattering). The principle machine requirement appears to be a need to obtain information at small scattering angles.

  11. Creep in electronic ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Routbort, J. L.; Goretta, K. C.; Arellano-Lopez, A. R.

    2000-04-27

    High-temperature creep measurements combined with microstructural investigations can be used to elucidate deformation mechanisms that can be related to the diffusion kinetics and defect chemistry of the minority species. This paper will review the theoretical basis for this correlation and illustrate it with examples from some important electronic ceramics having a perovskite structure. Recent results on BaTiO{sub 3}, (La{sub 1{minus}x}Sr){sub 1{minus}y}MnO{sub 3+{delta}}, YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x}, Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub x}, (Bi,Pb){sub 2}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} and Sr(Fe,Co){sub 1.5}O{sub x} will be presented.

  12. Concurrent imaging of synaptic vesicle recycling and calcium dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyan eLi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Synaptic transmission involves the calcium-dependent release of neurotransmitter from synaptic vesicles. Genetically encoded optical probes emitting different wavelengths of fluorescent light in response to neuronal activity offer a powerful approach to understand the spatial and temporal relationship of calcium dynamics to the release of neurotransmitter in defined neuronal populations. To simultaneously image synaptic vesicle recycling and changes in cytosolic calcium, we developed a red-shifted reporter of vesicle recycling based on a vesicular glutamate transporter, VGLUT1-mOrange2 (VGLUT1-mOr2, and a presynaptically-localized green calcium indicator, synaptophysin-GCaMP3 (SyGCaMP3 with a large dynamic range. The fluorescence of VGLUT1-mOr2 is quenched by the low pH of synaptic vesicles. Exocytosis upon electrical stimulation exposes the luminal mOr2 to the neutral extracellular pH and relieves fluorescence quenching. Re-acidification of the vesicle upon endocytosis again reduces fluorescence intensity. Changes in fluorescence intensity thus monitor synaptic vesicle exo- and endocytosis, as demonstrated previously for the green VGLUT1-pHluorin. To monitor changes in calcium, we fused the synaptic vesicle protein synaptophysin to the recently improved calcium indicator GCaMP3. SyGCaMP3 is targeted to presynaptic varicosities, and exhibits changes in fluorescence in response to electrical stimulation consistent with changes in calcium concentration. Using real-time imaging of both reporters expressed in the same synapses, we determine the time course of changes in VGLUT1 recycling in relation to changes in presynaptic calcium concentration. Inhibition of P/Q- and N-type calcium channels reduces calcium levels, as well as the rate of synaptic vesicle exocytosis and the fraction of vesicles released.

  13. The puzzle of chloroplast vesicle transport – involvement of GTPases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sazzad eKarim

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In the cytosol of plant cells vesicle transport occurs via secretory pathways among the endoplasmic reticulum (ER network, Golgi bodies, secretory granules, endosome and plasma membrane. Three systems transfer lipids, proteins and other important molecules through aqueous spaces to membrane-enclosed compartments, via vesicles that bud from donor membranes, being coated and uncoated before tethered and fused with acceptor membranes. In addition, molecular, biochemical and ultrastructural evidence indicates presence of a vesicle transport system in chloroplasts. Little is known about the protein components of this system. However, as chloroplasts harbour the photosynthetic apparatus that ultimately supports most organisms on the planet, close attention to their pathways is warranted. This may also reveal novel diversification and/or distinct solutions to the problems posed by the targeted intra-cellular trafficking of important molecules. To date two homologues to well-known yeast cytosolic vesicle transport proteins, CPSAR1 and CPRabA5e, have been shown to have roles in chloroplast vesicle transport, both being GTPases. Bioinformatic data indicate that several homologues of cytosolic vesicle transport system components are putatively chloroplast-localized and in addition other proteins have been implicated to participate in chloroplast vesicle transport, including vesicle-inducing protein in plastids 1 (VIPP1, thylakoid formation 1 (THF1, snowy cotyledon 2/cotyledon chloroplast biogenesis factor (SCO2/CYO1, curvature thylakoid 1 (CURT1 proteins, and a dynamin like GTPase FZO-like (FZL protein. Several putative potential cargo proteins have also been identified, including building blocks of the photosynthetic apparatus. Here we discuss details of the largely unknown putative chloroplast vesicle transport system, focusing on GTPase-related components.

  14. Dynamics of multicomponent vesicles in a viscous fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Jin Sun; Tseng, Yu-Hau; Li, Shuwang; Voigt, Axel; Lowengrub, John S.

    2010-01-01

    We develop and investigate numerically a thermodynamically consistent model of two-dimensional multicomponent vesicles in an incompressible viscous fluid. The model is derived using an energy variation approach that accounts for different lipid surface phases, the excess energy (line energy) associated with surface phase domain boundaries, bending energy, spontaneous curvature, local inextensibility and fluid flow via the Stokes equations. The equations are high-order (fourth order) nonlinear and nonlocal due to incompressibil-ity of the fluid and the local inextensibility of the vesicle membrane. To solve the equations numerically, we develop a nonstiff, pseudo-spectral boundary integral method that relies on an analysis of the equations at small scales. The algorithm is closely related to that developed very recently by Veerapaneni et al. [81] for homogeneous vesicles although we use a different and more efficient time stepping algorithm and a reformulation of the inextensibility equation. We present simulations of multicomponent vesicles in an initially quiescent fluid and investigate the effect of varying the average surface concentration of an initially unstable mixture of lipid phases. The phases then redistribute and alter the morphology of the vesicle and its dynamics. When an applied shear is introduced, an initially elliptical vesicle tank-treads and attains a steady shape and surface phase distribution. A sufficiently elongated vesicle tumbles and the presence of different surface phases with different bending stiffnesses and spontaneous curvatures yields a complex evolution of the vesicle morphology as the vesicle bends in regions where the bending stiffness and spontaneous curvature are small. PMID:20808718

  15. Extracellular Vesicles in Luminal Fluid of the Ovine Uterus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Gregory; Brooks, Kelsey; Wildung, Mark; Navakanitworakul, Raphatphorn; Christenson, Lane K.; Spencer, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    Microvesicles and exosomes are nanoparticles released from cells and can contain small RNAs, mRNA and proteins that affect cells at distant sites. In sheep, endogenous beta retroviruses (enJSRVs) are expressed in the endometrial epithelia of the uterus and can be transferred to the conceptus trophectoderm. One potential mechanism of enJSRVs transfer from the uterus to the conceptus is via exosomes/microvesicles. Therefore, studies were conducted to evaluate exosomes in the uterine luminal fluid (ULF) of sheep. Exosomes/microvesicles (hereafter referred to as extracellular vesicles) were isolated from the ULF of day 14 cyclic and pregnant ewes using ExoQuick-TC. Transmission electron microscopy and nanoparticle tracking analysis found the isolates contained vesicles that ranged from 50 to 200 nm in diameter. The isolated extracellular vesicles were positive for two common markers of exosomes (CD63 and HSP70) by Western blot analysis. Proteins in the extracellular vesicles were determined by mass spectrometry and Western blot analysis. Extracellular vesicle RNA was analyzed for small RNAs by sequencing and enJSRVs RNA by RT-PCR. The ULF extracellular vesicles contained a large number of small RNAs and miRNAs including 81 conserved mature miRNAs. Cyclic and pregnant ULF extracellular vesicles contained enJSRVs env and gag RNAs that could be delivered to heterologous cells in vitro. These studies support the hypothesis that ULF extracellular vesicles can deliver enJSRVs RNA to the conceptus, which is important as enJSRVs regulate conceptus trophectoderm development. Importantly, these studies support the idea that extracellular vesicles containing select miRNAs, RNAs and proteins are present in the ULF and likely have a biological role in conceptus-endometrial interactions important for the establishment and maintenance of pregnancy. PMID:24614226

  16. Storing Waste in Ceramic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourcier, W L; Sickafus, K

    2004-07-20

    Not all the nuclear waste destined for Yucca Mountain is in the form of spent fuel. Some of it will be radioactive waste generated from the production of nuclear weapons. This so-called defense waste exists mainly as corrosive liquids and sludge in underground tanks. An essential task of the U.S. high-level radioactive waste program is to process these defense wastes into a solid material--called a waste form. An ideal waste form would be extremely durable and unreactive with other repository materials. It would be simple to fabricate remotely so that it could be safely transported to a repository for permanent storage. What's more, the material should be able to tolerate exposure to intense radiation without degradation. And to minimize waste volume, the material must be able to contain high concentrations of radionuclides. The material most likely to be used for immobilization of radioactive waste is glass. Glasses are produced by rapid cooling of high-temperature liquids such that the liquid-like non-periodic structure is preserved at lower temperatures. This rapid cooling does not allow enough time for thermodynamically stable crystalline phases (mineral species) to form. In spite of their thermodynamic instability, glasses can persist for millions of years. An alternate to glass is a ceramic waste form--an assemblage of mineral-like crystalline solids that incorporate radionuclides into their structures. The crystalline phases are thermodynamically stable at the temperature of their synthesis; ceramics therefore tend to be more durable than glasses. Ceramic waste forms are fabricated at temperatures below their melting points and so avoid the danger of handling molten radioactive liquid--a danger that exists with incorporation of waste in glasses. The waste form provides a repository's first line of defense against release of radionuclides. It, along with the canister, is the barrier in the repository over which we have the most control. When a waste

  17. Inorganic glass ceramic slip rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glossbrenner, E. W.; Cole, S. R.

    1972-01-01

    Prototypes of slip rings have been fabricated from ceramic glass, a material which is highly resistant to deterioration due to high temperature. Slip ring assemblies were not structurally damaged by mechanical tests and performed statisfactorily for 200 hours.

  18. Low Thermal Expansion Glass Ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Bach, Hans

    2005-01-01

    This book appears in the authoritative series reporting the international research and development activities conducted by the Schott group of companies. This series provides an overview of Schott's activities for scientists, engineers, and managers from all branches of industry worldwide in which glasses and glass ceramics are of interest. Each volume begins with a chapter providing a general idea of the current problems, results, and trends relating to the subjects treated. This new extended edition describes the fundamental principles, the manufacturing process, and applications of low thermal expansion glass ceramics. The composition, structure, and stability of polycrystalline materials having a low thermal expansion are described, and it is shown how low thermal expansion glass ceramics can be manufactured from appropriately chosen glass compositions. Examples illustrate the formation of this type of glass ceramic by utilizing normal production processes together with controlled crystallization. Thus g...

  19. Recent progress in ceramic joining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loehman, R.E.

    1998-09-01

    Both fundamental and practical aspects of ceramic joining are understood well enough for many, if not most, applications requiring moderate strengths at room temperature. This paper argues that the two greatest needs in ceramic joining are for techniques to join buried interfaces by selective heating, and methods for joining ceramics for use at temperatures of 800 to 1,200 C. Heating with microwave radiation or with high-energy electron beams has been used to join buried ceramic interfaces, for example SiC to SiC. Joints with varying levels of strength at temperatures of 600 to 1,000 C have been made using four techniques: (1) transient liquid phase bonding; (2) joining with refractory braze alloys; (3) joining with refractory glass compositions; and (4) joining using preceramic polymers. Joint strengths as high as 550 MPa at 1,000 C have been reported for silicon nitride-silicon nitride bonds tested in four-point flexure.

  20. Formation of Giant Protein Vesicles by a Lipid Cosolvent Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jesper S.; Vararattanavech, Ardcharaporn; Vissing, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a method to create giant protein vesicles (GPVs) of ≥10 μm by solvent‐driven fusion of large vesicles (0.1–0.2 μm) with reconstituted membrane proteins. We found that formation of GPVs proceeded from rotational mixing of protein‐reconstituted large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs)...... of spinach SoPIP2;1 and E. coli AqpZ aquaporins. Our findings show that hydrophobic interactions within the bilayer of formed GPVs are influenced not only by the solvent partitioning propensity, but also by lipid composition and membrane protein isoform....

  1. Extracellular vesicles are the Trojan horses of viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altan-Bonnet, Nihal

    2016-08-01

    Extracellular vesicles have recently emerged as a novel mode of viral propagation exploited by both enveloped and non-enveloped viruses. In particular non-enveloped viruses utilize the hosts' production of extracellular vesicles to exit from cells non-lytically and to hide and manipulate the immune system. Moreover, challenging the long held idea that viruses behave as independent genetic units, extracellular vesicles enable multiple viral particles and genomes to collectively traffic in and out of cells, which can promote genetic cooperativity among viral quasispecies and enhance the fitness of the overall viral population. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Mating-reactive membrane vesicles from cilia of Paramecium caudatum

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    Membrane vesicles with a high mating reactivity were obtained from cilia of Paramecium caudatum by treatment with a solution containing 2 M urea and 0.1 mM Na2-EDTA. All processes of conjugation were induced in cells of the complementary mating type by approximately 10 mug/ml proteins of the vesicles. Electron microscope observation showed that the membrane vesicles have a diameter of 100-150 nm. Electrophoretic analysis on SDS polyacrylamide gel revealed no significant difference in polypeptide patterns of the particles from the two complementary mating types. PMID:818093

  3. Colocalization of synapsin and actin during synaptic vesicle recycling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloom, Ona; Evergren, Emma; Tomilin, Nikolay

    2003-01-01

    activity, however, synapsin was detected in the pool of vesicles proximal to the active zone. In addition, actin and synapsin were found colocalized in a dynamic filamentous cytomatrix at the sites of synaptic vesicle recycling, endocytic zones. Synapsin immunolabeling was not associated with clathrin......-coated intermediates but was found on vesicles that appeared to be recycling back to the cluster. Disruption of synapsin function by microinjection of antisynapsin antibodies resulted in a prominent reduction of the cytomatrix at endocytic zones of active synapses. Our data suggest that in addition to its known...

  4. ceramics by differential scanning calorimetry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    YbxGd2–xZr2O7 (x = 0, 1, 2) ceramics were pressureless-sintered using ceramic powders acquired by chemical-coprecipitation and calcination methods. Heat capacities of YbxGd2–xZr2O7 were measured with a heat flux-type differential scanning calorimetry in the temperature range of 298–1200 K. At 298 K, the heat.

  5. Development of Ceramic Laser Element

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-24

    macro level (OM) . . . P.7 6. Observation in micro level (SEM, EPMA ) . . . P.9 7. Observation in nano-level (HR-TEM...Transmitted polarized microscopy of the transparent ceramic samples. 10 6.2 By SEM and EPMA (electron probe micro analysis) In order to...Gd:YAG Y Al Nd1%Nd:YAG Fig.11 Electron probe micro analysis ( EPMA ) images of the fabricated transparent ceramic samples. 11 7

  6. Nonlinear fracture of concrete and ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Albert S.; Du, Jia-Ji; Hawkins, Niel M.; Bradt, Richard C.

    1989-01-01

    The nonlinear fracture process zones in an impacted unnotched concrete bend specimen, a prenotched ceramic bend specimen, and an unnotched ceramic/ceramic composite bend specimen were estimated through hybrid experimental numerical analysis. Aggregate bridging in concrete, particulate bridging in ceramics, and fiber bridging in ceramic/ceramic composite are modeled by Barenblatt-type cohesive zones which are incorporated into the finite-element models of the bend specimens. Both generation and propagation analyses are used to estimate the distribution of crack closure stresses in the nonlinear fracture process zones. The finite-element models are then used to simulate fracture tests consisting of rapid crack propagation in an impacted concrete bend specimen, and stable crack growth and strain softening in a ceramic and ceramic/ceramic composite bend specimens.

  7. The Vesicle Priming Factor CAPS Functions as a Homodimer via C2 Domain Interactions to Promote Regulated Vesicle Exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrie, Matt; Esquibel, Joseph; Kabachinski, Greg; Maciuba, Stephanie; Takahashi, Hirohide; Edwardson, J Michael; Martin, Thomas F J

    2016-09-30

    Neurotransmitters and peptide hormones are secreted by regulated vesicle exocytosis. CAPS (also known as CADPS) is a 145-kDa cytosolic and peripheral membrane protein required for vesicle docking and priming steps that precede Ca 2+ -triggered vesicle exocytosis. CAPS binds phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P 2 ) and SNARE proteins and is proposed to promote SNARE protein complex assembly for vesicle docking and priming. We characterized purified soluble CAPS as mainly monomer in equilibrium with small amounts of dimer. However, the active form of CAPS bound to PC12 cell membranes or to liposomes containing PI(4,5)P 2 and Q-SNARE proteins was mainly dimer. CAPS dimer formation required its C2 domain based on mutation or deletion studies. Moreover, C2 domain mutations or deletions resulted in a loss of CAPS function in regulated vesicle exocytosis, indicating that dimerization is essential for CAPS function. Comparison of the CAPS C2 domain to a structurally defined Munc13-1 C2A domain dimer revealed conserved residues involved in CAPS dimerization. We conclude that CAPS functions as a C2 domain-mediated dimer in regulated vesicle exocytosis. The unique tandem C2-PH domain of CAPS may serve as a PI(4,5)P 2 -triggered switch for dimerization. CAPS dimerization may be coupled to oligomeric SNARE complex assembly for vesicle docking and priming. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Additive effects on the energy barrier for synaptic vesicle fusion cause supralinear effects on the vesicle fusion rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schotten, Sebastiaan; Meijer, Marieke; Walter, Alexander Matthias

    2015-01-01

    supralinear effects on the fusion rate. To test this prediction experimentally, we developed a method to assess the number of releasable vesicles, rate constants for vesicle priming, unpriming, and fusion, and the activation energy for fusion by fitting a vesicle state model to synaptic responses induced...... by hypertonic solutions. We show that complexinI/II deficiency or phorbol ester stimulation indeed affects responses to hypertonic solution in a supralinear manner. An additive vs multiplicative relationship between activation energy and fusion rate provides a novel explanation for previously observed non...

  9. Glioblastoma extracellular vesicles: reservoirs of potential biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redzic JS

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Jasmina S Redzic,1 Timothy H Ung,2 Michael W Graner2 1Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2Department of Neurosurgery, School of Medicine, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO, USA Abstract: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most frequent and most devastating of the primary central nervous system tumors, with few patients living beyond 2 years postdiagnosis. The damage caused by the disease and our treatments for the patients often leave them physically and cognitively debilitated. Generally, GBMs appear after very short clinical histories and are discovered by imaging (using magnetic resonance imaging [MRI], and the diagnosis is validated by pathology, following surgical resection. The treatment response and diagnosis of tumor recurrence are also tracked by MRI, but there are numerous problems encountered with these monitoring modalities, such as ambiguous interpretation and forms of pseudoprogression. Diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive biomarkers would be an immense boon in following treatment schemes and in determining recurrence, which often requires an invasive intracranial biopsy to verify imaging data. Extracellular vesicles (EVs are stable, membrane-enclosed, virus-sized particles released from either the cell surface or from endosomal pathways that lead to the systemic release of EVs into accessible biofluids, such as serum/plasma, urine, cerebrospinal fluid, and saliva. EVs carry a wide variety of proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, and other metabolites, with many common features but with enough individuality to be able to identify the cell of origin of the vesicles. These components, if properly interrogated, could allow for the identification of tumor-derived EVs in biofluids, indicating tumor progression, relapse, or treatment failure. That knowledge would allow clinicians to continue with treatment regimens that were actually effective or to change course if the therapies were failing. Here, we review

  10. Visualization of peptide secretory vesicles in living nerve cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Joshua J; Loh, Y Peng

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of real-time movements of peptidergic vesicles in live neurons provides insight into molecular mechanism(s) supporting the activity-dependent secretion of neurotrophins and neuropeptides. We examined the effect of overexpression of exogenous peptides comprising of the cytoplasmic tail sequence of vesicular carboxypeptidase E (CPE), proposed to be involved in the mechanism of trafficking of peptidergic secretory vesicles, in live hippocampal neurons. E16 rat hippocampal neurons were transfected with the peptidergic vesicle markers, CPE C-terminally tagged with red or green fluorescent protein, or brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) tagged with green fluorescent protein, and grown on dishes specialized for real-time live cell visualization. Movements of peptidergic vesicles were imaged in a temperature-controlled chamber on a confocal inverted microscope and analyzed with respect to their velocity, displacement distance, and processivity.

  11. Tension-induced fusion of bilayer membranes and vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shillcock, Julian C.; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2005-03-01

    Maintaining the integrity of their protective plasma membrane is a primary requirement of cells. Accordingly, cellular events that breach the membrane are tightly regulated. Artificial vesicles used in drug delivery must also stay intact until they have reached the desired target. In both cases, the intrinsic resistance of the membrane to rupture must be overcome to allow the efflux of the vesicle's contents. Here, we use mesoscopic simulations to study the fusion of 28-nm-diameter vesicles to 50 × 50 nm2 planar membrane patches over 2 μs. We monitor the time evolution of 93 different fusion attempts. This allows us to construct a global morphology diagram, using the initial tensions of the vesicle and the planar membrane patch as control parameters, and to determine the corresponding fusion statistics. All successful fusion events are observed to occur within 350 ns, which reflects the presence of alternative pathways for the tension relaxation.

  12. EVpedia: a community web portal for extracellular vesicles research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, Dae-Kyum; Lee, Jaewook; Kim, Sae Rom; Choi, Dong-Sic; Yoon, Yae Jin; Kim, Ji Hyun; Go, Gyeongyun; Nhung, Dinh; Hong, Kahye; Jang, Su Chul; Kim, Si-Hyun; Park, Kyong-Su; Kim, Oh Youn; Park, Hyun Taek; Seo, Ji Hye; Aikawa, Elena; Baj-Krzyworzeka, Monika; van Balkom, Bas W. M.; Belting, Mattias; Blanc, Lionel; Bond, Vincent; Bongiovanni, Antonella; Borràs, Francesc E.; Buée, Luc; Buzás, Edit I.; Cheng, Lesley; Clayton, Aled; Cocucci, Emanuele; Dela Cruz, Charles S.; Desiderio, Dominic M.; Di Vizio, Dolores; Ekström, Karin; Falcon-Perez, Juan M.; Gardiner, Chris; Giebel, Bernd; Greening, David W.; Gross, Julia Christina; Gupta, Dwijendra; Hendrix, An; Hill, Andrew F.; Hill, Michelle M.; Nolte-'t Hoen, Esther; Hwang, Do Won; Inal, Jameel; Jagannadham, Medicharla V.; Jayachandran, Muthuvel; Jee, Young-Koo; Jørgensen, Malene; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Kim, Yoon-Keun; Kislinger, Thomas; Lässer, Cecilia; Lee, Dong Soo; Lee, Hakmo; van Leeuwen, Johannes; Lener, Thomas; Liu, Ming-Lin; Lötvall, Jan; Marcilla, Antonio; Mathivanan, Suresh; Möller, Andreas; Morhayim, Jess; Mullier, François; Nazarenko, Irina; Nieuwland, Rienk; Nunes, Diana N.; Pang, Ken; Park, Jaesung; Patel, Tushar; Pocsfalvi, Gabriella; del Portillo, Hernando; Putz, Ulrich; Ramirez, Marcel I.; Rodrigues, Marcio L.; Roh, Tae-Young; Royo, Felix; Sahoo, Susmita; Schiffelers, Raymond; Sharma, Shivani; Siljander, Pia; Simpson, Richard J.; Soekmadji, Carolina; Stahl, Philip; Stensballe, Allan; Stępień, Ewa; Tahara, Hidetoshi; Trummer, Arne; Valadi, Hadi; Vella, Laura J.; Wai, Sun Nyunt; Witwer, Kenneth; Yáñez-Mó, María; Youn, Hyewon; Zeidler, Reinhard; Gho, Yong Song

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are spherical bilayered proteolipids, harboring various bioactive molecules. Due to the complexity of the vesicular nomenclatures and components, online searches for EV-related publications and vesicular components are currently challenging. We present an improved

  13. EVpedia : a community web portal for extracellular vesicles research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, Dae-Kyum; Lee, Jaewook; Kim, Sae Rom; Choi, Dong-Sic; Yoon, Yae Jin; Kim, Ji Hyun; Go, Gyeongyun; Nhung, Dinh; Hong, Kahye; Jang, Su Chul; Kim, Si-Hyun; Park, Kyong-Su; Kim, Oh Youn; Park, Hyun Taek; Seo, Ji Hye; Aikawa, Elena; Baj-Krzyworzeka, Monika; van Balkom, Bas W M; Belting, Mattias; Blanc, Lionel; Bond, Vincent; Bongiovanni, Antonella; Borràs, Francesc E; Buée, Luc; Buzás, Edit I; Cheng, Lesley; Clayton, Aled; Cocucci, Emanuele; Dela Cruz, Charles S; Desiderio, Dominic M; Di Vizio, Dolores; Ekström, Karin; Falcon-Perez, Juan M; Gardiner, Chris; Giebel, Bernd; Greening, David W; Gross, Julia Christina; Gupta, Dwijendra; Hendrix, An; Hill, Andrew F; Hill, Michelle M; Nolte-'t Hoen, Esther; Hwang, Do Won; Inal, Jameel; Jagannadham, Medicharla V; Jayachandran, Muthuvel; Jee, Young-Koo; Jørgensen, Malene; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Kim, Yoon-Keun; Kislinger, Thomas; Lässer, Cecilia; Lee, Dong Soo; Lee, Hakmo; van Leeuwen, Johannes; Lener, Thomas; Liu, Ming-Lin; Lötvall, Jan; Marcilla, Antonio; Mathivanan, Suresh; Möller, Andreas; Morhayim, Jess; Mullier, François; Nazarenko, Irina; Nieuwland, Rienk; Nunes, Diana N; Pang, Ken; Park, Jaesung; Patel, Tushar; Pocsfalvi, Gabriella; Del Portillo, Hernando; Putz, Ulrich; Ramirez, Marcel I; Rodrigues, Marcio L; Roh, Tae-Young; Royo, Felix; Sahoo, Susmita; Schiffelers, Raymond|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/212909509; Sharma, Shivani; Siljander, Pia; Simpson, Richard J; Soekmadji, Carolina; Stahl, Philip; Stensballe, Allan; Stępień, Ewa; Tahara, Hidetoshi; Trummer, Arne; Valadi, Hadi; Vella, Laura J; Wai, Sun Nyunt; Witwer, Kenneth; Yáñez-Mó, María; Youn, Hyewon; Zeidler, Reinhard; Gho, Yong Song; Nolte - t Hoen, Esther|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/261632175

    2014-01-01

    MOTIVATION: Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are spherical bilayered proteolipids, harboring various bioactive molecules. Due to the complexity of the vesicular nomenclatures and components, online searches for EV-related publications and vesicular components are currently challenging. RESULTS: We

  14. Biological properties of extracellular vesicles and their physiological functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yáñez-Mó, María; Siljander, Pia R-M; Andreu, Zoraida; Zavec, Apolonija Bedina; Borràs, Francesc E; Buzas, Edit I; Buzas, Krisztina; Casal, Enriqueta; Cappello, Francesco; Carvalho, Joana; Colás, Eva; Cordeiro-da Silva, Anabela; Fais, Stefano; Falcon-Perez, Juan M; Ghobrial, Irene M; Giebel, Bernd; Gimona, Mario; Graner, Michael; Gursel, Ihsan; Gursel, Mayda; Heegaard, Niels H H; Hendrix, An; Kierulf, Peter; Kokubun, Katsutoshi; Kosanovic, Maja; Kralj-Iglic, Veronika; Krämer-Albers, Eva-Maria; Laitinen, Saara; Lässer, Cecilia; Lener, Thomas; Ligeti, Erzsébet; Linē, Aija; Lipps, Georg; Llorente, Alicia; Lötvall, Jan; Manček-Keber, Mateja; Marcilla, Antonio; Mittelbrunn, Maria; Nazarenko, Irina; Nolte-'t Hoen, Esther N M; Nyman, Tuula A; O'Driscoll, Lorraine; Olivan, Mireia; Oliveira, Carla; Pállinger, Éva; Del Portillo, Hernando A; Reventós, Jaume; Rigau, Marina; Rohde, Eva; Sammar, Marei; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; Santarém, N; Schallmoser, Katharina; Ostenfeld, Marie Stampe; Stoorvogel, Willem|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074352385; Stukelj, Roman; Van der Grein, Susanne G|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/412755211; Vasconcelos, M Helena; Wauben, Marca H M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/112675735; De Wever, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade, extracellular vesicles (EVs) have been recognized as potent vehicles of intercellular communication, both in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. This is due to their capacity to transfer proteins, lipids and nucleic acids, thereby influencing various physiological and pathological

  15. Theory of dielectric response of charged-bilayer-vesicle solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, C.-Y. D.

    1996-10-01

    The dielectric response is calculated for a solution containing charged bilayer vesicles and simple electrolyte. The solution is assumed to contain a high salt concentration so that the Debye screening length is small compared to the size of the vesicles. The presence of two (electric) double layers, one on each side of the bilayer, gives low-frequency salt relaxations (kHz for 1 μm vesicles) that explain the experimentally observed α relaxations which are known to appear only for charged vesicles. The double layers also modify the high-frequency β relaxations which have been previously modeled by using the Maxwell-Wagner theory. The calculation method can be easily extended to other bilayer geometries.

  16. Biogenesis and function of Porphyromonas gingivalis outer membrane vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, H

    2015-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is one of the keystone pathogens associated with chronic periodontitis. All P. gingivalis strains examined thus far produce outer membrane vesicles. Recent studies have found that vesicles possess some well-known virulence factors of P. gingivalis such as adhesins, toxins and proteolytic enzymes. Carrying most of the characteristic features of their parent P. gingivalis cells, vesicles communicate with host cells and other members of microbial biofilms, resulting in the transmission of virulence factors into these host cells and the formation of pathogenic bacteria-dominated microbial communities. An in-depth understanding of both the nature and role of vesicles in the pathogenicity of P. gingivalis is both important and timely, particularly when speaking of periodontitis and its related systemic effects. PMID:26343879

  17. Yeast Membrane Vesicles: Isolation and General Characteristics1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Michael S.; Cirillo, Vincent P.

    1972-01-01

    Yeast membrane vesicles are formed when packed yeast are ground manually in a porcelain mortar and pestle with glass beads (0.2 mm diameter). These vesicles can be separated from the other components of the grinding mixture by a combination of centrifugation steps and elution from a column of the same glass beads (0.2 mm diameter). Isolated vesicles are osmotically sensitive, contain cytoplasmic components, and have energy-independent transport function. They are unable to metabolize glucose, but have respiratory function which is thought to be associated with intravesicular mitochondria. Invertase and oligomycin-insensitive adenosine triphosphatase are present in lysed vesicle preparations, and the appropriateness of these enzyme activities as membrane markers is discussed. Images PMID:4337848

  18. Extracellular vesicles secreted by Schistosoma mansoni contain protein vaccine candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotillo, Javier; Pearson, Mark; Potriquet, Jeremy; Becker, Luke; Pickering, Darren; Mulvenna, Jason; Loukas, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Herein we show for the first time that Schistosoma mansoni adult worms secrete exosome-like extracellular vesicles ranging from 50 to 130nm in size. Extracellular vesicles were collected from the excretory/secretory products of cultured adult flukes and purified by Optiprep density gradient, resulting in highly pure extracellular vesicle preparations as confirmed by transmission electron microscopy and Nanosight tracking analysis. Extracellular vesicle proteomic analysis showed numerous known vaccine candidates, potential virulence factors and molecules implicated in feeding. These findings provide new avenues for the exploration of host-schistosome interactions and offer a potential mechanism by which some vaccine antigens exert their protective efficacy. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Large Deformation Mechanics of Plasma Membrane Chained Vesicles in Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosawada, Tadashi; Sanada, Kouichi; Takano, Tetsuo

    The clathrin-coated pits, vesicles and chained vesicles on the inner surface of the plasma membrane facilitate the cell to transport specific extracellular macromolecules. This cellular process is strongly involved with large mechanical deformations of the plasma membrane accompanied by changes in membrane curvature. The assembly of the clathrin coat is thought to provide curvature into the membrane. Hence, effects of in-plane shear elasticity due to these coat structure may be significant on the vesicular mechanics. In this study, large deformation mechanics of plasma membrane chained vesicles in cells have been formulated based on minimization of bending and in-plane shear strain energy of the membrane. Effects of outer surrounding cytoplasmic flat membrane upon mechanically stable shapes of the vesicles were revealed, while effects of in-plane shear elasticity were partly discussed.

  20. Assembly of cells and vesicles for organ engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taguchi, Tetsushi, E-mail: taguchi.tetsushi@nims.go.jp [Biofunctional Materials Unit, Nano-Bio Field, Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan)

    2011-12-15

    The development of materials and technologies for the assembly of cells and/or vesicles is a key for the next generation of tissue engineering. Since the introduction of the tissue engineering concept in 1993, various types of scaffolds have been developed for the regeneration of connective tissues in vitro and in vivo. Cartilage, bone and skin have been successfully regenerated in vitro, and these regenerated tissues have been applied clinically. However, organs such as the liver and pancreas constitute numerous cell types, contain small amounts of extracellular matrix, and are highly vascularized. Therefore, organ engineering will require the assembly of cells and/or vesicles. In particular, adhesion between cells/vesicles will be required for regeneration of organs in vitro. This review introduces and discusses the key technologies and materials for the assembly of cells/vesicles for organ regeneration. (topical review)

  1. Sortilin mediates vascular calcification via its recruitment into extracellular vesicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goettsch, Claudia; Hutscheson, JD; Aikawa, M

    2016-01-01

    Vascular calcification is a common feature of major cardiovascular diseases. Extracellular vesicles participate in the formation of microcalcifications that are implicated in atherosclerotic plaque rupture; however, the mechanisms that regulate formation of calcifying extracellular vesicles remain...... obscure. Here, we have demonstrated that sortilin is a key regulator of smooth muscle cell (SMC) calcification via its recruitment to extracellular vesicles. Sortilin localized to calcifying vessels in human and mouse atheromata and participated in formation of microcalcifications in SMC culture. Sortilin...... regulated the loading of the calcification protein tissue nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) into extracellular vesicles, thereby conferring its calcification potential. Furthermore, SMC calcification required Rab11-dependent trafficking and FAM20C/casein kinase 2-dependent C-terminal phosphorylation...

  2. Assembly of cells and vesicles for organ engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Tetsushi

    2011-12-01

    The development of materials and technologies for the assembly of cells and/or vesicles is a key for the next generation of tissue engineering. Since the introduction of the tissue engineering concept in 1993, various types of scaffolds have been developed for the regeneration of connective tissues in vitro and in vivo. Cartilage, bone and skin have been successfully regenerated in vitro, and these regenerated tissues have been applied clinically. However, organs such as the liver and pancreas constitute numerous cell types, contain small amounts of extracellular matrix, and are highly vascularized. Therefore, organ engineering will require the assembly of cells and/or vesicles. In particular, adhesion between cells/vesicles will be required for regeneration of organs in vitro. This review introduces and discusses the key technologies and materials for the assembly of cells/vesicles for organ regeneration.

  3. Improved Methods of Producing and Administering Extracellular Vesicles | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    An efficient method of producing purified extracellular vesicles (EVs), in conjunction with a method that blocks liver macrophages from clearing EVs from the body, has produced promising results for the use of EVs in cancer therapy.

  4. Extracellular vesicles in human follicular fluid do not promote coagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Cordula; Böing, Anita N; Montag, Markus; Strowitzki, Thomas; Markert, Udo R; Mastenbroek, Sebastiaan; Nieuwland, Rienk; Toth, Bettina

    2016-11-01

    Body fluids contain extracellular vesicles expressing tissue factor on their surface and serve as an additional trigger for coagulation. During the menstrual cycle ovarian tissue restoration is mandatory and it is unknown whether follicular fluid might provide procoagulant substances. Within an observational study, follicular fluid from women undergoing IVF/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) was analysed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), electron microscopy, resistive pulse sensing (RPS), nanoparticle-tracking analysis (NTA) and fibrin generation tests (FGT). The presence of extracellular vesicles, especially CD9-positive extracellular vesicles in follicular fluid, was proven. However, clotting tests revealed no procoagulant properties of the detected extracellular vesicles. Copyright © 2016 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Unilamellar Vesicle Formation and Encapsulation by Microfluidic Jetting

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jeanne C. Stachowiak; David L. Richmond; Thomas H. Li; Allen P. Liu; Sapun H. Parekh; Daniel A. Fletcher

    2008-01-01

    ...) using a pulsed microfluidic jet. Akin to blowing a bubble, the microfluidic jet deforms a planar lipid bilayer into a vesicle that is filled with solution from the jet and separates from the planar bilayer...

  6. Interaction and rheology of vesicle suspensions in confined shear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zaiyi; Farutin, Alexander; Thiébaud, Marine; Misbah, Chaouqi

    2017-10-01

    Dynamics and rheology of a confined suspension of vesicles (a model for red blood cells) are studied numerically in two dimensions by using an immersed boundary lattice Boltzmann method. We pay particular attention to the link between the spatiotemporal organization and the rheology of the suspension. Besides confinement, we analyze the effect of concentration of the suspension, ϕ (defined as the area fraction occupied by the vesicles in the simulation domain), as well as the viscosity contrast λ (defined as the ratio between the viscosity of the fluid inside the vesicles, ηint, and that of the suspending fluid, ηext). The hydrodynamic interaction between two vesicles is shown to play a key role in determining the spatial organization. For λ =1 , the pair of vesicles settles into an equilibrium state with constant interdistance, which is regulated by the confinement. The equilibrium interdistance increases with the gap between walls, following a linear relationship. However, no stable equilibrium interdistance between two tumbling vesicles is observed for λ =10 . A quite ordered suspension is observed concomitant with the existence of an equilibrium interdistance between a vesicle pair. However, a disordered suspension prevails when no pair equilibrium interdistance exists, as occurs for tumbling vesicles. We then analyze the rheology, focusing on the effective viscosity, denoted as η , as well as on normalized viscosity, defined as [η ] =(η -ηext) /(ηextϕ ) . Ordering of the suspension is accompanied by a nonmonotonic behavior of [η ] with ϕ , while η exhibits plateaus. The nonmonotonic behavior of [η ] is suppressed when a disordered pattern prevails.

  7. Cryo-electron microscopy of extracellular vesicles in fresh plasma

    OpenAIRE

    Yuana, Yuana; Koning, Roman I.; Maxim E. Kuil; Rensen, Patrick C.N.; Koster, Abraham J.; Bertina, Rogier M.; Osanto, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Extracellular vesicles (EV) are phospholipid bilayer-enclosed vesicles recognized as new mediators in intercellular communication and potential biomarkers of disease. They are found in many body fluids and mainly studied in fractions isolated from blood plasma in view of their potential in medicine. Due to the limitations of available analytical methods, morphological information on EV in fresh plasma is still rather limited.Objectives: To image EV and determine the morphology, ...

  8. Cystadenoma of the seminal vesicle. A case report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundhus, E; Bundgaard, N; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    1984-01-01

    Cystadenomas of the seminal vesicle are extremely rare benign tumours, which only have been reported seven times earlier in the literature. The first Danish case is reported with discussion of symptomatology, pathology and treatment.......Cystadenomas of the seminal vesicle are extremely rare benign tumours, which only have been reported seven times earlier in the literature. The first Danish case is reported with discussion of symptomatology, pathology and treatment....

  9. Luminescent functionalized vesicles: synthesis, characterization and analytical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Balk, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    This work describes the membrane functionalization of small unilamellar phospholipid vesicles by incorporation of artificial amphiphiles. The presented investigations demonstrate a fast and simple approach for sensing molecular recognition events at the membrane-water interface. Chapter 1 describes the dynamic recognition of multivalent ligands by receptor recruiting in fluid vesicle membranes. Two amphiphilic metal-complexes with attached FRET-pair labels were prepared and embedded into D...

  10. Extracellular vesicles provide a means for tissue crosstalk during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whitham, Martin; Parker, Benjamin L; Friedrichsen, Martin

    2018-01-01

    Exercise stimulates the release of molecules into the circulation, supporting the concept that inter-tissue signaling proteins are important mediators of adaptations to exercise. Recognizing that many circulating proteins are packaged in extracellular vesicles (EVs), we employed quantitative...... vesicles. Pulse-chase and intravital imaging experiments suggested EVs liberated by exercise have a propensity to localize in the liver and can transfer their protein cargo. Moreover, by employing arteriovenous balance studies across the contracting human limb, we identified several novel candidate...

  11. TNF-? promotes extracellular vesicle release in mouse astrocytes through glutaminase

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Kaizhe; Ye, Ling; Lu, Hongfang; Chen, Huili; Zhang, Yanyan; Huang, Yunlong; Zheng, Jialin C.

    2017-01-01

    Background Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are membrane-contained vesicles shed from cells. EVs contain proteins, lipids, and nucleotides, all of which play important roles in intercellular communication. The release of EVs is known to increase during neuroinflammation. Glutaminase, a mitochondrial enzyme that converts glutamine to glutamate, has been implicated in the biogenesis of EVs. We have previously demonstrated that TNF-? promotes glutaminase expression in neurons. However, the expressio...

  12. Adsorption and encapsulation of flexible polyelectrolytes in charged spherical vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shojaei, H. R.; Muthukumar, M.

    2017-06-01

    We present a theory of adsorption of flexible polyelectrolytes on the interior and exterior surfaces of a charged vesicle in an electrolyte solution. The criteria for adsorption and the density profiles of the adsorbed polymer chain are derived in terms of various characteristics of the polymer, vesicle, and medium, such as the charge density and length of the polymer, charge density and size of the vesicle, electrolyte concentration and dielectric constant of the medium. For adsorption inside the vesicle, the competition between the loss of conformational entropy and gain in adsorption energy results in two kinds of encapsulated states, depending on the strength of the polymer-vesicle interaction. By considering also the adsorption from outside the vesicle, we derive the entropic and energy contributions to the free energy change to transfer an adsorbed chain in the interior to an adsorbed chain on the exterior. In this paper, we have used the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) method to solve the equation for the probability distribution function of the chain. The present WKB results are compared with the previous results based on variational methods. The WKB and variational results are in good agreement for both the interior and exterior states of adsorption, except in the zero-salt limit for adsorption in the exterior region. The adsorption criteria and density profiles for both the interior and exterior states are presented in terms of various experimentally controllable variables. Calculation of the dependencies of free energy change to transfer an adsorbed chain from the interior to the exterior surface on salt concentration and vesicle radius shows that the free energy penalty to expel a chain from a vesicle is only of the order of thermal energy.

  13. Melanoma affects the composition of blood cell-derived extracellular vesicles

    OpenAIRE

    Nina Koliha; Ute Heider; Tobias Ozimkowski; Martin Wiemann; Andreas Bosio; Stefan Wild

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles are specifically loaded with nucleic acids, lipids, and proteins from their parental cell. Therefore, the constitution of extracellular vesicles reflects the type and status of the originating cell and extracellular vesicles in melanoma patient’s plasma could be indicative for the tumor. Likewise, extracellular vesicles might influence tumor progression by regulating immune responses. We performed a broad protein characterization of extracellular vesicles from plasma of...

  14. Lipid Vesicle Shape Analysis from Populations Using Light Video Microscopy and Computer Vision

    OpenAIRE

    Jernej Zupanc; Barbara Drašler; Sabina Boljte; Veronika Kralj-Iglič; Aleš Iglič; Deniz Erdogmus; Damjana Drobne

    2014-01-01

    We present a method for giant lipid vesicle shape analysis that combines manually guided large-scale video microscopy and computer vision algorithms to enable analyzing vesicle populations. The method retains the benefits of light microscopy and enables non-destructive analysis of vesicles from suspensions containing up to several thousands of lipid vesicles (1-50 µm in diameter). For each sample, image analysis was employed to extract data on vesicle quantity and size distributions of their ...

  15. Extracellular Vesicles and Autophagy in Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianyang Gao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is a type of chronic joint disease that is characterized by the degeneration and loss of articular cartilage and hyperplasia of the synovium and subchondral bone. There is reasonable knowledge about articular cartilage physiology, biochemistry, and chondrocyte metabolism. However, the etiology and pathogenesis of OA remain unclear and need urgent clarification to guide the early diagnosis and treatment of OA. Extracellular vesicles (EVs are small membrane-linking particles that are released from cells. In recent decades, several special biological properties have been found in EV, especially in terms of cartilage. Autophagy plays a critical role in the regulation of cellular homeostasis. Likewise, more and more research has gradually focused on the effect of autophagy on chondrocyte proliferation and function in OA. The synthesis and release of EV are closely associated with autophagy. At the same time, both EV and autophagy play a role in OA development. Based on the mechanism of EV and autophagy in OA development, EV may be beneficial in the early diagnosis of OA; on the other hand, the combination of EV and autophagy-related regulatory drugs may provide insight into possible OA therapeutic strategies.

  16. Dysregulations of Synaptic Vesicle Trafficking in Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egbujo, Chijioke N; Sinclair, Duncan; Hahn, Chang-Gyu

    2016-08-01

    Schizophrenia is a serious psychiatric illness which is experienced by about 1 % of individuals worldwide and has a debilitating impact on perception, cognition, and social function. Over the years, several models/hypotheses have been developed which link schizophrenia to dysregulations of the dopamine, glutamate, and serotonin receptor pathways. An important segment of these pathways that have been extensively studied for the pathophysiology of schizophrenia is the presynaptic neurotransmitter release mechanism. This set of molecular events is an evolutionarily well-conserved process that involves vesicle recruitment, docking, membrane fusion, and recycling, leading to efficient neurotransmitter delivery at the synapse. Accumulated evidence indicate dysregulation of this mechanism impacting postsynaptic signal transduction via different neurotransmitters in key brain regions implicated in schizophrenia. In recent years, after ground-breaking work that elucidated the operations of this mechanism, research efforts have focused on the alterations in the messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression of presynaptic neurotransmitter release molecules in schizophrenia and other neuropsychiatric conditions. In this review article, we present recent evidence from schizophrenia human postmortem studies that key proteins involved in the presynaptic release mechanism are dysregulated in the disorder. We also discuss the potential impact of dysfunctional presynaptic neurotransmitter release on the various neurotransmitter systems implicated in schizophrenia.

  17. Extracellular Vesicles and Autophagy in Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Weimin; Chen, Mingxue; Huang, Jingxiang; Yuan, Zhiguo; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Mingjie; Li, Penghao; Wang, Aiyuan; Wang, Yu; Sui, Xiang; Zhang, Li; Xu, Wenjing; Lu, Shibi

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a type of chronic joint disease that is characterized by the degeneration and loss of articular cartilage and hyperplasia of the synovium and subchondral bone. There is reasonable knowledge about articular cartilage physiology, biochemistry, and chondrocyte metabolism. However, the etiology and pathogenesis of OA remain unclear and need urgent clarification to guide the early diagnosis and treatment of OA. Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are small membrane-linking particles that are released from cells. In recent decades, several special biological properties have been found in EV, especially in terms of cartilage. Autophagy plays a critical role in the regulation of cellular homeostasis. Likewise, more and more research has gradually focused on the effect of autophagy on chondrocyte proliferation and function in OA. The synthesis and release of EV are closely associated with autophagy. At the same time, both EV and autophagy play a role in OA development. Based on the mechanism of EV and autophagy in OA development, EV may be beneficial in the early diagnosis of OA; on the other hand, the combination of EV and autophagy-related regulatory drugs may provide insight into possible OA therapeutic strategies. PMID:28078284

  18. Towards traceable size determination of extracellular vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoltán Varga

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Extracellular vesicles (EVs have clinical importance due to their roles in a wide range of biological processes. The detection and characterization of EVs are challenging because of their small size, low refractive index, and heterogeneity. Methods: In this manuscript, the size distribution of an erythrocyte-derived EV sample is determined using state-of-the-art techniques such as nanoparticle tracking analysis, resistive pulse sensing, and electron microscopy, and novel techniques in the field, such as small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS and size exclusion chromatography coupled with dynamic light scattering detection. Results: The mode values of the size distributions of the studied erythrocyte EVs reported by the different methods show only small deviations around 130 nm, but there are differences in the widths of the size distributions. Conclusion: SAXS is a promising technique with respect to traceability, as this technique was already applied for traceable size determination of solid nanoparticles in suspension. To reach the traceable measurement of EVs, monodisperse and highly concentrated samples are required.

  19. Measuring Synaptic Vesicle Endocytosis in Cultured Hippocampal Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal, Seth; Lee, Sung Hoon; Wu, Ling-Gang

    2017-09-04

    During endocytosis, fused synaptic vesicles are retrieved at nerve terminals, allowing for vesicle recycling and thus the maintenance of synaptic transmission during repetitive nerve firing. Impaired endocytosis in pathological conditions leads to decreases in synaptic strength and brain functions. Here, we describe methods used to measure synaptic vesicle endocytosis at the mammalian hippocampal synapse in neuronal culture. We monitored synaptic vesicle protein endocytosis by fusing a synaptic vesicular membrane protein, including synaptophysin and VAMP2/synaptobrevin, at the vesicular lumenal side, with pHluorin, a pH-sensitive green fluorescent protein that increases its fluorescence intensity as the pH increases. During exocytosis, vesicular lumen pH increases, whereas during endocytosis vesicular lumen pH is re-acidified. Thus, an increase of pHluorin fluorescence intensity indicates fusion, whereas a decrease indicates endocytosis of the labelled synaptic vesicle protein. In addition to using the pHluorin imaging method to record endocytosis, we monitored vesicular membrane endocytosis by electron microscopy (EM) measurements of Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) uptake by vesicles. Finally, we monitored the formation of nerve terminal membrane pits at various times after high potassium-induced depolarization. The time course of HRP uptake and membrane pit formation indicates the time course of endocytosis.

  20. Asymmetric osmotic water permeation through a vesicle membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jiaye; Zhao, Yunzhen; Fang, Chang; Shi, Yue

    2017-05-01

    Understanding the water permeation through a cell membrane is of primary importance for biological activities and a key step to capture its shape transformation in salt solution. In this work, we reveal the dynamical behaviors of osmotically driven transport of water molecules across a vesicle membrane by molecular dynamics simulations. Of particular interest is that the water transport in and out of vesicles is highly distinguishable given the osmotic force are the same, suggesting an asymmetric osmotic transportation. This asymmetric phenomenon exists in a broad range of parameter space such as the salt concentration, temperature, and vesicle size and can be ascribed to the similar asymmetric potential energy of lipid-ion, lipid-water, lipid-solution, lipid-lipid, and the lipid-lipid energy fluctuation. Specifically, the water flux has a linear increase with the salt concentration, similar to the prediction by Nernst-Planck equation or Fick's first law. Furthermore, due to the Arrhenius relation between the membrane permeability and temperature, the water flux also exhibits excellent Arrhenius dependence on the temperature. Meanwhile, the water flux shows a linear increase with the vesicle surface area since the flux amount across a unit membrane area should be a constant. Finally, we also present the anonymous diffusion behaviors for the vesicle itself, where transitions from normal diffusion at short times to subdiffusion at long times are identified. Our results provide significant new physical insights for the osmotic water permeation through a vesicle membrane and are helpful for future experimental studies.

  1. Active elastohydrodynamics of vesicles in narrow blind constrictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fai, T. G.; Kusters, R.; Harting, J.; Rycroft, C. H.; Mahadevan, L.

    2017-11-01

    Fluid-resistance limited transport of vesicles through narrow constrictions is a recurring theme in many biological and engineering applications. Inspired by the motor-driven movement of soft membrane-bound vesicles into closed neuronal dendritic spines, here we study this problem using a combination of passive three-dimensional simulations and a simplified semianalytical theory for the active transport of vesicles forced through constrictions by molecular motors. We show that the motion of these objects is characterized by two dimensionless quantities related to the geometry and to the strength of forcing relative to the vesicle elasticity. We use numerical simulations to characterize the transit time for a vesicle forced by fluid pressure through a constriction in a channel and find that relative to an open channel, transport into a blind end leads to the formation of a smaller forward-flowing lubrication layer that strongly impedes motion. When the fluid pressure forcing is complemented by forces due to molecular motors that are responsible for vesicle trafficking into dendritic spines, we find that the competition between motor forcing and fluid drag results in multistable dynamics reminiscent of the real system. Our study highlights the role of nonlocal hydrodynamic effects in determining the kinetics of vesicular transport in constricted geometries.

  2. Formation of asymmetric vesicles via phospholipase D-mediated transphosphatidylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaoka, Rina; Kurosaki, Haruko; Nakao, Hiroyuki; Ikeda, Keisuke; Nakano, Minoru

    2018-02-01

    Most biomembranes have an asymmetric structure with regard to phospholipid distribution between the inner and outer leaflets of the lipid bilayers. Control of the asymmetric distribution plays a pivotal role in several cellular functions such as intracellular membrane fusion and cell division. The mechanism by which membrane asymmetry and its alteration function in these transformation processes is not yet clear. To understand the significance of membrane asymmetry on trafficking and metabolism of intracellular vesicular components, a system that experimentally reproduces the asymmetric nature of biomembranes is essential. Here, we succeeded in obtaining asymmetric vesicles by means of transphosphatidylation reactions with phospholipase D (PLD), which acts exclusively on phosphatidylcholine (PC) present in the outer leaflet of vesicles. By treating PC vesicles with PLD in the presence of 1.7M serine and 0.3M ethanolamine, we obtained asymmetric vesicles that are topologically similar to intracellular vesicles containing phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylethanolamine in the cytosolic leaflet. PLD and other unwanted compounds could be removed by trypsin digestion followed by dialysis. Our established technique has a great advantage over conventional methods in that asymmetric vesicles can be provided at high yield and high efficiency, which is requisite for most physicochemical assays. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Extracellular Membrane Vesicles and Phytopathogenicity of Acholeplasma laidlawii PG8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladislav M. Chernov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available For the first time, the phytopathogenicity of extracellular vesicles of Acholeplasma laidlawii PG8 (a ubiquitous mycoplasma that is one of the five common species of cell culture contaminants and is a causative agent for phytomycoplasmoses in Oryza sativa L. plants was studied. Data on the ability of extracellular vesicles of Acholeplasma laidlawii PG8 to penetrate from the nutrient medium into overground parts of Oryza sativa L. through the root system and to cause alterations in ultrastructural organization of the plants were presented. As a result of the analysis of ultrathin leaf sections of plants grown in medium with A. laidlawii PG8 vesicles, we detected significant changes in tissue ultrastructure characteristic to oxidative stress in plants as well as their cultivation along with bacterial cells. The presence of nucleotide sequences of some mycoplasma genes within extracellular vesicles of Acholeplasma laidlawii PG8 allowed a possibility to use PCR (with the following sequencing to perform differential detection of cells and bacterial vesicles in samples under study. The obtained data may suggest the ability of extracellular vesicles of the mycoplasma to display in plants the features of infection from the viewpoint of virulence criteria—invasivity, infectivity—and toxigenicity—and to favor to bacterial phytopathogenicity.

  4. Biogenesis and function of ESCRT-dependent extracellular vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juan, Thomas; Fürthauer, Maximilian

    2018-02-01

    From bacteria to humans, cells secrete a large variety of membrane-bound extracellular vesicles. Only relatively recently has it however started to become clear that the exovesicular transport of proteins and RNAs is important for normal physiology and numerous pathological conditions. Extracellular vesicles can be formed through the release of the intralumenal vesicles of multivesicular endosomes as so-called exosomes, or through direct, ectosomal, budding from the cell surface. Through their ability to promote the bending of membranes away from the cytoplasm, the components of the Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport (ESCRT) have been implicated in both exo- and ectosomal biogenesis. Studies of the ESCRT machinery may therefore provide important insights into the formation and function of extracellular vesicles. In the present review, we first describe the cell biological mechanisms through which ESCRT components contribute to the biogenesis of different types of extracellular vesicles. We then discuss how recent functional studies have started to uncover important roles of ESCRT-dependent extracellular vesicles in a wide variety of processes, including the transport of developmental signaling molecules and embryonic morphogenesis, the regulation of social behavior and host-pathogen interactions, as well as the etiology and progression of neurodegenerative pathologies and cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Endothelial plasmalemmal vesicles have a characteristic striped bipolar surface structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, K R; Carley, W W; Palade, G E

    1985-12-01

    Capillary endothelial cells have a large population of small (65-80 nm diameter in transmission electron microscopy) vesicles of which a large fraction is associated with the plasmalemma of the luminal and abluminal side. We studied the fine structure and distribution of these plasmalemmal vesicles by high resolution scanning electron microscopy in cultured endothelial cells obtained from bovine adrenal cortical capillaries. Cell monolayers were covered with polylysine-coated silicon chips, split in high potassium buffer, fixed in aldehyde mixtures, and then treated with OsO4 and thiocarbohydrazide. After critical point drying, the specimens were coated with a thin (less than 2 nm) continuous film of chromium. On the cytoplasmic aspect of the dorsal plasmalemmal fragments seen in such specimens, plasmalemmal vesicles appear as uniform vesicular protrusions approximately 70-90 nm in diameter, preferentially concentrated in distinct large fields in which they occur primarily as single units. Individual plasmalemmal vesicles exhibit a striped surface fine structure which consists of ridges approximately 10 nm in diameter, separated by furrows and oriented as meridians, often ending at two poles on opposite sides of the vesicles in a plane parallel to the plasmalemma. This striped surface structure is clearly distinct from the cage structure of coated pits found, at low surface density, on the same specimens. The cytoplasmic aspect of the plasmalemma proper is covered by a fibrillar infrastructure which does not extend over plasmalemmal vesicles but on which the latter appear to be anchored by fine filaments.

  6. Nano-Ceramic Coated Plastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Junghyun

    2013-01-01

    Plastic products, due to their durability, safety, and low manufacturing cost, are now rapidly replacing cookware items traditionally made of glass and ceramics. Despite this trend, some still prefer relatively expensive and more fragile ceramic/glassware because plastics can deteriorate over time after exposure to foods, which can generate odors, bad appearance, and/or color change. Nano-ceramic coatings can eliminate these drawbacks while still retaining the advantages of the plastic, since the coating only alters the surface of the plastic. The surface coating adds functionality to the plastics such as self-cleaning and disinfectant capabilities that result from a photocatalytic effect of certain ceramic systems. These ceramic coatings can also provide non-stick surfaces and higher temperature capabilities for the base plastics without resorting to ceramic or glass materials. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) and zinc oxide (ZnO) are the candidates for a nano-ceramic coating to deposit on the plastics or plastic films used in cookware and kitchenware. Both are wide-bandgap semiconductors (3.0 to 3.2 eV for TiO2 and 3.2 to 3.3 eV for ZnO), so they exhibit a photocatalytic property under ultraviolet (UV) light. This will lead to decomposition of organic compounds. Decomposed products can be easily washed off by water, so the use of detergents will be minimal. High-crystalline film with large surface area for the reaction is essential to guarantee good photocatalytic performance of these oxides. Low-temperature processing (plastics. One possible way of processing nanoceramic coatings at low temperatures (plastic materials (silicone, Teflon, PET, etc.) that can possess both photocatalytic oxide properties and flexible plastic properties. Processing cost is low and it does not require any expensive equipment investment. Processing can be scalable to current manufacturing infrastructure.

  7. Minimal experimental requirements for definition of extracellular vesicles and their functions : a position statement from the International Society for Extracellular Vesicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lötvall, Jan; Hill, Andrew F; Hochberg, Fred; Buzás, Edit I; Di Vizio, Dolores; Gardiner, Christopher; Gho, Yong Song; Kurochkin, Igor V; Mathivanan, Suresh; Quesenberry, Peter; Sahoo, Susmita; Tahara, Hidetoshi; Wauben, Marca H|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/112675735; Witwer, Kenneth W; Théry, Clotilde

    2014-01-01

    Secreted membrane-enclosed vesicles, collectively called extracellular vesicles (EVs), which include exosomes, ectosomes, microvesicles, microparticles, apoptotic bodies and other EV subsets, encompass a very rapidly growing scientific field in biology and medicine. Importantly, it is currently

  8. Ordered ceramic membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, M.A.; Hill, C.G. Jr.; Zeltner, W.A.

    1991-10-01

    Ceramic membranes have been formed from colloidal sols coated on porous clay supports. These supported membranes have been characterized in terms of their permeabilities and permselectivities to various aqueous test solutions. The thermal stabilities and pore structures of these membranes have been characterized by preparing unsupported membranes of the correpsonding material and performing N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption and X-ray diffraction studies on these membranes. To date, membranes have been prepared from a variety of oxides, including TiO{sub 2}, SiO{sub 2}, ZrO{sub 2}, and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, as well as Zr-, Fe-, and Nb-doped TiO{sub 2}. In many of these membranes pore diameters are less than 2 nm, while in others the pore diameters are between 3 and 5 nm. Procedures for fabricating porous clay supports with reproducible permeabilities for pure water are also discussed. 30 refs., 59 figs., 22 tabs.

  9. Ceramic HEPA Filter Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, M A; Bergman, W; Haslam, J; Brown, E P; Sawyer, S; Beaulieu, R; Althouse, P; Meike, A

    2012-04-30

    Potential benefits of ceramic filters in nuclear facilities: (1) Short term benefit for DOE, NRC, and industry - (a) CalPoly HTTU provides unique testing capability to answer questions for DOE - High temperature testing of materials, components, filter, (b) Several DNFSB correspondences and presentations by DNFSB members have highlighted the need for HEPA filter R and D - DNFSB Recommendation 2009-2 highlighted a nuclear facility response to an evaluation basis earthquake followed by a fire (aka shake-n-bake) and CalPoly has capability for a shake-n-bake test; (2) Intermediate term benefit for DOE and industry - (a) Filtration for specialty applications, e.g., explosive applications at Nevada, (b) Spin-off technologies applicable to other commercial industries; and (3) Long term benefit for DOE, NRC, and industry - (a) Across industry, strong desire for better performance filter, (b) Engineering solution to safety problem will improve facility safety and decrease dependence on associated support systems, (c) Large potential life-cycle cost savings, and (d) Facilitates development and deployment of LLNL process innovations to allow continuous ventilation system operation during a fire.

  10. Direct imaging of RAB27B-enriched secretory vesicle biogenesis in lacrimal acinar cells reveals origins on a nascent vesicle budding site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian Chiang

    Full Text Available This study uses YFP-tagged Rab27b expression in rabbit lacrimal gland acinar cells, which are polarized secretory epithelial cells, to characterize early stages of secretory vesicle trafficking. Here we demonstrate the utility of YFP-Rab27b to delineate new perspectives on the mechanisms of early vesicle biogenesis in lacrimal gland acinar cells, where information is significantly limited. Protocols were developed to deplete the mature YFP-Rab27b-enriched secretory vesicle pool in the subapical region of the cell, and confocal fluorescence microscopy was used to track vesicle replenishment. This analysis revealed a basally-localized organelle, which we termed the "nascent vesicle site," from which nascent vesicles appeared to emerge. Subapical vesicular YFP-Rab27b was co-localized with p150(Glued, a component of the dynactin cofactor of cytoplasmic dynein. Treatment with the microtubule-targeted agent, nocodazole, did not affect release of mature secretory vesicles, although during vesicle repletion it significantly altered nascent YFP-Rab27b-enriched secretory vesicle localization. Instead of moving to the subapical region, these vesicles were trapped at the nascent vesicle site which was adjacent to, if not a sub-compartment of, the trans-Golgi network. Finally, YFP-Rab27b-enriched secretory vesicles which reached the subapical cytoplasm appeared to acquire the actin-based motor protein, Myosin 5C. Our findings show that Rab27b enrichment occurs early in secretory vesicle formation, that secretory vesicles bud from a visually discernable nascent vesicle site, and that transport from the nascent vesicle site to the subapical region requires intact microtubules.

  11. III Advanced Ceramics and Applications Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Gadow, Rainer; Mitic, Vojislav; Obradovic, Nina

    2016-01-01

    This is the Proceedings of III Advanced Ceramics and Applications conference, held in Belgrade, Serbia in 2014. It contains 25 papers on various subjects regarding preparation, characterization and application of advanced ceramic materials.

  12. Reliability of ceramics for heat engine applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    The advantages and disadvantages associated with the use of monolithic ceramics in heat engines are discussed. The principle gaps in the state of understanding of ceramic material, failure origins, nondestructive tests as well as life prediction are included.

  13. Panel report on high temperature ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nolet, T C [ed.

    1979-01-01

    Fundamental research is reported concerning high temperature ceramics for application in turbines, engines, batteries, gasifiers, MHD, fuel cells, heat exchangers, and hot wall combustors. Ceramics microstructure and behavior are included. (FS)

  14. Incorporation of Waste Ceramic Blocks in Structural Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Orley Magalhães; das Graças da Silva-Valenzuela, Maria; Andrade, Christiano Gianesi Bastos; Junior, Antonio Hortêncio Munhoz; Valenzuela-Díaz, Francisco Rolando

    In Brazil, Ceramics Industries produce bricks and ceramic tiles in practically all the country. In the southwestern region of Bahia are located some of these industries. A considerable proportion of the material produced do not pass the quality control for not having a uniform visual appearance or have cracks. These burned pieces are generally discarded, resulting in a big quantity of waste. The objective of this work is the characterization of this industrial waste and thus consign them to other industrial applications. Our results demonstrate that the burned waste have potential to be used for incorporation in common clay for structural ceramics, thereby avoiding its disposal in nature and reducing this environmental liability. Experimental bodies were tested with different quantities of waste. The common clay and the burned waste were characterized by XRD, TG/DTA, and SEM. The burned specimens were tested for mechanical strength, water absorption, bulk density, and apparent porosity. An incorporation of 10% of waste furnished the best results.

  15. High flow ceramic pot filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Halem, D; van der Laan, H; Soppe, A I A; Heijman, S G J

    2017-11-01

    Ceramic pot filters are considered safe, robust and appropriate technologies, but there is a general consensus that water revenues are limited due to clogging of the ceramic element. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential of high flow ceramic pot filters to produce more water without sacrificing their microbial removal efficacy. High flow pot filters, produced by increasing the rice husk content, had a higher initial flow rate (6-19 L h-1), but initial LRVs for E. coli of high flow filters was slightly lower than for regular ceramic pot filters. This disadvantage was, however, only temporarily as the clogging in high flow filters had a positive effect on the LRV for E. coli (from below 1 to 2-3 after clogging). Therefore, it can be carefully concluded that regular ceramic pot filters perform better initially, but after clogging, the high flow filters have a higher flow rate as well as a higher LRV for E. coli. To improve the initial performance of new high flow filters, it is recommended to further utilize residence time of the water in the receptacle, since additional E. coli inactivation was observed during overnight storage. Although a relationship was observed between flow rate and LRV of MS2 bacteriophages, both regular and high flow filters were unable to reach over 2 LRV. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Mutations in the major gas vesicle protein GvpA and impacts on gas vesicle formation in Haloferax volcanii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knitsch, Regine; Schneefeld, Marie; Weitzel, Kerstin; Pfeifer, Felicitas

    2017-09-12

    Gas vesicles are proteinaceous, gas-filled nanostructures produced by some bacteria and archaea. The hydrophobic major structural protein GvpA forms the ribbed gas vesicle wall. An in-silico 3D-model of GvpA of the predicted coil-α1-β1-β2-α2-coil structure is available and implies that the two β-chains constitute the hydrophobic interior surface of the gas vesicle wall. To test the importance of individual amino acids in GvpA we performed 85 single substitutions and analyzed these variants in Haloferax volcanii ΔA + Amut transformants for their ability to form gas vesicles (Vac(+) phenotype). In most cases, an alanine substitution of a non-polar residue did not abolish gas vesicle formation, but the replacement of single non-polar by charged residues in β1 or β2 resulted in Vac(-) transformants. A replacement of residues near the β-turn altered the spindle-shape to a cylindrical morphology of the gas vesicles. Vac(-) transformants were also obtained with alanine substitutions of charged residues of helix α1 suggesting that these amino acids form salt-bridges with another GvpA monomer. In helix α2, only the alanine substitution of His53 or Tyr54, led to Vac(-) transformants, whereas most other substitutions had no effect. We discuss our results in respect to the GvpA structure and data available from solid-state NMR. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Focus on Extracellular Vesicles: Physiological Role and Signalling Properties of Extracellular Membrane Vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nunzio Iraci

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EVs are a heterogeneous population of secreted membrane vesicles, with distinct biogenesis routes, biophysical properties and different functions both in physiological conditions and in disease. The release of EVs is a widespread biological process, which is conserved across species. In recent years, numerous studies have demonstrated that several bioactive molecules are trafficked with(in EVs, such as microRNAs, mRNAs, proteins and lipids. The understanding of their final impact on the biology of specific target cells remains matter of intense debate in the field. Also, EVs have attracted great interest as potential novel cell-free therapeutics. Here we describe the proposed physiological and pathological functions of EVs, with a particular focus on their molecular content. Also, we discuss the advances in the knowledge of the mechanisms regulating the secretion of EV-associated molecules and the specific pathways activated upon interaction with the target cell, highlighting the role of EVs in the context of the immune system and as mediators of the intercellular signalling in the brain.

  18. Focus on Extracellular Vesicles: Physiological Role and Signalling Properties of Extracellular Membrane Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iraci, Nunzio; Leonardi, Tommaso; Gessler, Florian; Vega, Beatriz; Pluchino, Stefano

    2016-02-06

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are a heterogeneous population of secreted membrane vesicles, with distinct biogenesis routes, biophysical properties and different functions both in physiological conditions and in disease. The release of EVs is a widespread biological process, which is conserved across species. In recent years, numerous studies have demonstrated that several bioactive molecules are trafficked with(in) EVs, such as microRNAs, mRNAs, proteins and lipids. The understanding of their final impact on the biology of specific target cells remains matter of intense debate in the field. Also, EVs have attracted great interest as potential novel cell-free therapeutics. Here we describe the proposed physiological and pathological functions of EVs, with a particular focus on their molecular content. Also, we discuss the advances in the knowledge of the mechanisms regulating the secretion of EV-associated molecules and the specific pathways activated upon interaction with the target cell, highlighting the role of EVs in the context of the immune system and as mediators of the intercellular signalling in the brain.

  19. Ceramic cutting tools materials, development and performance

    CERN Document Server

    Whitney, E Dow

    1994-01-01

    Interest in ceramics as a high speed cutting tool material is based primarily on favorable material properties. As a class of materials, ceramics possess high melting points, excellent hardness and good wear resistance. Unlike most metals, hardness levels in ceramics generally remain high at elevated temperatures which means that cutting tip integrity is relatively unaffected at high cutting speeds. Ceramics are also chemically inert against most workmetals.

  20. Emerging Ceramic-based Materials for Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denry, I.; Kelly, J.R.

    2014-01-01

    Our goal is to give an overview of a selection of emerging ceramics and issues for dental or biomedical applications, with emphasis on specific challenges associated with full-contour zirconia ceramics, and a brief synopsis on new machinable glass-ceramics and ceramic-based interpenetrating phase composites. Selected fabrication techniques relevant to dental or biomedical applications such as microwave sintering, spark plasma sintering, and additive manufacturing are also reviewed. Where appropriate, the authors have added their opinions and guidance. PMID:25274751

  1. Sugar-based gemini surfactant with a vesicle-to-micelle transition at acidic pH and a reversible vesicle flocculation near neutral pH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johnsson, M; Wagenaar, A; Engberts, JBFN

    2003-01-01

    A sugar-based (reduced glucose) gemini surfactant forms vesicles in dilute aqueous solution near neutral pH. At lower pH, there is a vesicle-to-micelle transition within a narrow pH region (pH 6.0-5.6). The vesicles are transformed into large cylindrical micelles that in turn are transformed into

  2. Durability of feldspathic veneering ceramic on glass-infiltrated alumina ceramics after long-term thermocycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquita, A M M; Ozcan, M; Souza, R O A; Kojima, A N; Nishioka, R S; Kimpara, E T; Bottino, M A

    2010-01-01

    This study compared the bond strength durability of a feldspathic veneering ceramic to glass-infiltrated reinforced ceramics in dry and aged conditions. Disc shaped (thickness: 4 mm, diameter: 4 mm) of glass-infiltrated alumina (In-Ceram Alumina) and glass-infiltrated alumina reinforced by zirconia (In-Ceram Zirconia) core ceramic specimens (N=48, N=12 per groups) were constructed according to the manufacturers' recommendations. Veneering ceramic (VITA VM7) was fired onto the core ceramics using a mold. The core-veneering ceramic assemblies were randomly divided into two conditions and tested either immediately after specimen preparation (Dry) or following 30000 thermocycling (5-55 ºC±1; dwell time: 30 seconds). Shear bond strength test was performed in a universal testing machine (cross-head speed: 1 mm/min). Failure modes were analyzed using optical microscope (x20). The bond strength data (MPa) were analyzed using ANOVA (α=0.05). Thermocycling did not decrease the bond strength results for both In-Ceram Alumina (30.6±8.2 MPa; P=0.2053) and In-Ceram zirconia (32.6±9 MPa; P=0.3987) core ceramic-feldspathic veneering ceramic combinations when compared to non-aged conditions (28.1±6.4 MPa, 29.7±7.3 MPa, respectively). There were also no significant differences between adhesion of the veneering ceramic to either In-Ceram Alumina or In-Ceram Zirconia ceramics (P=0.3289). Failure types were predominantly a mixture of adhesive failure between the veneering and the core ceramic together with cohesive fracture of the veneering ceramic. Long-term thermocycling aging conditions did not impair the adhesion of the veneering ceramic to the glass-infiltrated alumina core ceramics tested.

  3. Ablation Resistant Zirconium and Hafnium Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Jeffrey (Inventor); White, Michael J. (Inventor); Kaufman, Larry (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    High temperature ablation resistant ceramic composites have been made. These ceramics are composites of zirconium diboride and zirconium carbide with silicon carbide, hafnium diboride and hafnium carbide with silicon carbide and ceramic composites which contain mixed diborides and/or carbides of zirconium and hafnium. along with silicon carbide.

  4. Ceramic microfabrication by rapid prototyping process chains

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    fast and inexpensive supply for polymer master models and a ceramic shaping method that enables the replication of the RP model into multiple ceramic materials within a short time. (Knitter et al 1999). 2. Rapid prototyping process chains. The manufacturing of ceramic microparts presented here set out with the 3D-CAD ...

  5. Instructional Resources. The Significance of Form: Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawatsky, Carole; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Presents four lesson plans designed to teach K-12 students about ceramics and the artists using the medium. Each lesson is centered around one ceramic piece: (1) "Wall Clock," by the Chantilly Porcelain Factory; (2) "Poppy Vase," by Adelaide Robineau; (3) "Laughing Eyes," by Pablo Picasso; and (4) "Ceramic Drum Jar," by Tsayutitsa. (GEA)

  6. An immunoassay for urinary extracellular vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salih, Mahdi; Fenton, Robert A; Knipscheer, Jeroen; Janssen, Joost W; Vredenbregt-van den Berg, Mirella S; Jenster, Guido; Zietse, Robert; Hoorn, Ewout J

    2016-04-15

    Although nanosized urinary extracellular vesicles (uEVs) are increasingly used for biomarker discovery, their isolation currently relies on time-consuming techniques hindering high-throughput application. To navigate this problem, we designed an immunoassay to isolate, quantify, and normalize uEV proteins. The uEV immunoassay consists of a biotinylated CD9 antibody to isolate uEVs, an antibody against the protein of interest, and two conjugated antibodies to quantify the protein of interest and CD9. As a proof of principle, the immunoassay was developed to analyze the water channel aquaporin-2 (AQP2) and the sodium-chloride cotransporter (NCC). CD9 was used as a capture antibody because immunoprecipitation showed that anti-CD9 antibody, but not anti-CD63 antibody, isolated AQP2 and NCC. CD9 correlated strongly with urine creatinine, allowing CD9 to be used for normalization of spot urines. The uEV immunoassay detected AQP2 and NCC with high sensitivity, low coefficients of variance, and stability in dilution series. After water loading in healthy subjects, the uEV immunoassay detected decreases in AQP2 and NCC equally well as the traditional method using ultracentrifugation and immunoblot. The uEV immunoassay also reliably detected lower and higher AQP2 or NCC levels in uEVs from patients with pathological water or salt reabsorption, respectively. In summary, we report a novel approach to analyze uEVs that circumvents existing isolation and normalization issues, requires small volumes of urine, and detects anticipated changes in physiological responses and clinical disorders. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  7. Procoagulant extracellular vesicles in amniotic fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hell, Lena; Wisgrill, Lukas; Ay, Cihan; Spittler, Andreas; Schwameis, Michael; Jilma, Bernd; Pabinger, Ingrid; Altevogt, Peter; Thaler, Johannes

    2017-06-01

    Embolization of amniotic fluid (AF) into the blood circulation leads to disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). Procoagulant phosphatidylserine (PS)- and tissue factor (TF)-exposing extracellular vesicles (EVs) might play an important role in AF embolism-induced DIC. It was the aim of the present study to perform analyses of the procoagulant properties of AF with a panel of functional coagulation assays and flow cytometry. We applied a prothrombinase assay (that quantifies PS exposure on EVs), an EV-associated TF activity assay, a fibrin generation assay, a thrombin generation assay, a whole blood clotting model, and flow cytometry in AF and control plasma. We found that PS exposure on EVs was 21-fold increased in AF compared with plasma. Also, EV-associated TF activity was highly increased in AF compared with plasma. AF-derived EVs activated the blood coagulation cascade via PS and TF in the fibrin and thrombin generation assays. In a whole blood clotting model, AF-derived EVs significantly shortened the clotting time from 734 ± 139 seconds in the presence to 232 ± 139 seconds in the absence of an anti-TF antibody. The contact activation pathway via factor XII (FXII) was not affected. Applying flow cytometry, a subpopulation of PS+ and TF+ EVs was identified in AF but not in control plasma. In conclusion, we investigated the effect of AF on blood coagulation and found that PS+ and TF+ EVs determine their procoagulant potential. Taken together, our data further delineate the pathomechanisms underlying AF-induced coagulopathy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Surface glycosylation profiles of urine extracellular vesicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jared Q Gerlach

    Full Text Available Urinary extracellular vesicles (uEVs are released by cells throughout the nephron and contain biomolecules from their cells of origin. Although uEV-associated proteins and RNA have been studied in detail, little information exists regarding uEV glycosylation characteristics. Surface glycosylation profiling by flow cytometry and lectin microarray was applied to uEVs enriched from urine of healthy adults by ultracentrifugation and centrifugal filtration. The carbohydrate specificity of lectin microarray profiles was confirmed by competitive sugar inhibition and carbohydrate-specific enzyme hydrolysis. Glycosylation profiles of uEVs and purified Tamm Horsfall protein were compared. In both flow cytometry and lectin microarray assays, uEVs demonstrated surface binding, at low to moderate intensities, of a broad range of lectins whether prepared by ultracentrifugation or centrifugal filtration. In general, ultracentrifugation-prepared uEVs demonstrated higher lectin binding intensities than centrifugal filtration-prepared uEVs consistent with lesser amounts of co-purified non-vesicular proteins. The surface glycosylation profiles of uEVs showed little inter-individual variation and were distinct from those of Tamm Horsfall protein, which bound a limited number of lectins. In a pilot study, lectin microarray was used to compare uEVs from individuals with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease to those of age-matched controls. The lectin microarray profiles of polycystic kidney disease and healthy uEVs showed differences in binding intensity of 6/43 lectins. Our results reveal a complex surface glycosylation profile of uEVs that is accessible to lectin-based analysis following multiple uEV enrichment techniques, is distinct from co-purified Tamm Horsfall protein and may demonstrate disease-specific modifications.

  9. Thermal shock resistance ceramic insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Chester S.; Johnson, William R.

    1980-01-01

    Thermal shock resistant cermet insulators containing 0.1-20 volume % metal present as a dispersed phase. The insulators are prepared by a process comprising the steps of (a) providing a first solid phase mixture of a ceramic powder and a metal precursor; (b) heating the first solid phase mixture above the minimum decomposition temperature of the metal precursor for no longer than 30 minutes and to a temperature sufficiently above the decomposition temperature to cause the selective decomposition of the metal precursor to the metal to provide a second solid phase mixture comprising particles of ceramic having discrete metal particles adhering to their surfaces, said metal particles having a mean diameter no more than 1/2 the mean diameter of the ceramic particles, and (c) densifying the second solid phase mixture to provide a cermet insulator having 0.1-20 volume % metal present as a dispersed phase.

  10. Dynamic properties of ceramic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grady, D.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Experimental Impact Physics Dept.

    1995-02-01

    The present study offers new data and analysis on the transient shock strength and equation-of-state properties of ceramics. Various dynamic data on nine high strength ceramics are provided with wave profile measurements, through velocity interferometry techniques, the principal observable. Compressive failure in the shock wave front, with emphasis on brittle versus ductile mechanisms of deformation, is examined in some detail. Extensive spall strength data are provided and related to the theoretical spall strength, and to energy-based theories of the spall process. Failure waves, as a mechanism of deformation in the transient shock process, are examined. Strength and equation-of-state analysis of shock data on silicon carbide, boron carbide, tungsten carbide, silicon dioxide and aluminum nitride is presented with particular emphasis on phase transition properties for the latter two. Wave profile measurements on selected ceramics are investigated for evidence of rate sensitive elastic precursor decay in the shock front failure process.

  11. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana

    2003-08-07

    In the present quarter, experiments are presented on ceramic/metal interactions of Zirconia/ Ni-B-Si system and with a thin Ti coating deposited on zirconia surface. Existing facilities were modified for evaluation of environmental assisted slow crack growth and creep in flexural mode. Processing of perovskites of LSC, LSF and LSCF composition were continued for evaluation of mechanical properties as a function of environment. These studies in parallel to those on the LSFCO composition is expect to yield important information on questions such as the role of cation segregation and the stability of the perovskite structure on crack initiation vs. crack growth. Studies have been continued on the La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}FeO{sub 3-d} composition using neutron diffraction and TGA studies. A transition from p-type to n-type of conductor was observed at relative low pO{sub 2}, at which the majority carriers changed from the holes to electrons because of the valence state decreases in Fe due to the further loss of oxygen. Investigation on the thermodynamic properties of the membrane materials are continued to develop a complete model for the membrane transport. Data obtained at 850 C show that the stoichiometry in La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.8}Cr{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-x} vary from {approx}2.85 to 2.6 over the pressure range studied. From the stoichiometry a lower limit of 2.6 corresponding to the reduction of all Fe{sup 4+} to Fe{sup 3+} and no reduction of Cr{sup 3+} is expected.

  12. Proton conducting cerate ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coffey, G.W.; Pederson, L.R.; Armstrong, T.R.; Bates, J.L.; Weber, W.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Cerate perovskites of the general formula AM{sub x}Ce{sub 1-x}O{sub 3-{delta}}, where A = Sr or Ba and where M = Gd, Nd, Y, Yb or other rare earth dopant, are known to conduct a protonic current. Such materials may be useful as the electrolyte in a solid oxide fuel cell operating at intermediate temperatures, as an electrochemical hydrogen separation membrane, or as a hydrogen sensor. Conduction mechanisms in these materials were evaluated using dc cyclic voltammetry and mass spectrometry, allowing currents and activation energies for proton, electron, and oxygen ion contributions to the total current to be determined. For SrYb{sub 0.05}Ce{sub 0.95}O{sub 3-{delta}}, one of the best and most environmentally stable compositions, proton conduction followed two different mechanisms: a low temperature process, characterized by an activation energy of 0.42{+-}0.04 eV, and a high temperature process, characterized by an activation energy of 1.38{+-}0.13 eV. It is believed that the low temperature process is dominated by grain boundary conduction while bulk conduction is responsible for the high temperature process. The activation energy for oxygen ion conduction (0.97{+-}0.10 eV) agrees well with other oxygen conductors, while that for electronic conduction, 0.90{+-}0.09 eV, is affected by a temperature-dependent electron carrier concentration. Evaluated by direct measurement of mass flux through a dense ceramic with an applied dc field, oxygen ions were determined to be the majority charge carrier except at the lowest temperatures, followed by electrons and then protons.

  13. Ceramic catalyst materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sault, A.G.; Gardner, T.J. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hanprasopwattanna, A.; Reardon, J.; Datye, A.K. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Hydrous titanium oxide (HTO) ion-exchange materials show great potential as ceramic catalyst supports due to an inherently high ion-exchange capacity which allows facile loading of catalytically active transition metal ions, and an ability to be cast as thin films on virtually any substrate. By coating titania and HTO materials onto inexpensive, high surface area substrates such as silica and alumina, the economics of using these materials is greatly improved, particularly for the HTO materials, which are substantially more expensive in the bulk form than other oxide supports. In addition, the development of thin film forms of these materials allows the catalytic and mechanical properties of the final catalyst formulation to be separately engineered. In order to fully realize the potential of thin film forms of titania and HTO, improved methods for the deposition and characterization of titania and HTO films on high surface area substrates are being developed. By varying deposition procedures, titania film thickness and substrate coverage can be varied from the submonolayer range to multilayer thicknesses on both silica and alumina. HTO films can also be formed, but the quality and reproducibility of these films is not nearly as good as for pure titania films. The films are characterized using a combination of isopropanol dehydration rate measurements, point of zero charge (PZC) measurements, BET surface area, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and elemental analysis. In order to assess the effects of changes in film morphology on catalytic activity, the films are being loaded with MoO{sub 3} using either incipient wetness impregnation or ion-exchange of heptamolybdate anions followed by calcining. The MoO{sub 3} is then sulfided to form MOS{sub 2}, and tested for catalytic activity using pyrene hydrogenation and dibenzothiophene (DBT) desulfurization, model reactions that simulate reactions occurring during coal liquefaction.

  14. Ceramic components for MHD electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchant, D.D.

    A ceramic component which exhibits electrical conductivity down to near room temperatures has the formula: Hf/sub x/In/sub y/A/sub z/O/sub 2/ where x = 0.1 to 0.4, y = 0.3 to 0.6, z = 0.1 to 0.4 and A is a lanthanide rare earth or yttrium. The component is suitable for use in the fabrication of MHD electrodes or as the current leadout portion of a composite electrode with other ceramic components.

  15. Ceramic veneers with minimum preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes; Reis, Rachelle; Santana, Lino; Romanini, Jose Carlos; Carvalho, Ricardo Marins; Furuse, Adilson Yoshio

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this article is to describe the possibility of improving dental esthetics with low-thickness glass ceramics without major tooth preparation for patients with small to moderate anterior dental wear and little discoloration. For this purpose, a carefully defined treatment planning and a good communication between the clinician and the dental technician helped to maximize enamel preservation, and offered a good treatment option. Moreover, besides restoring esthetics, the restorative treatment also improved the function of the anterior guidance. It can be concluded that the conservative use of minimum thickness ceramic laminate veneers may provide satisfactory esthetic outcomes while preserving the dental structure. PMID:24932126

  16. Melanoma affects the composition of blood cell-derived extracellular vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Koliha

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles are specifically loaded with nucleic acids, lipids, and proteins from their parental cell. Therefore, the constitution of extracellular vesicles reflects the type and status of the originating cell and extracellular vesicles in melanoma patient’s plasma could be indicative for the tumor. Likewise, extracellular vesicles might influence tumor progression by regulating immune responses. We performed a broad protein characterization of extracellular vesicles from plasma of melanoma patients and healthy donors as well as from T cells, B cells, natural killer cells, monocytes, monocyte-derived dendritic cells and platelets using a multiplex bead-based platform. Using this method, we succeeded in analyzing 58 proteins that were differentially displayed on extracellular vesicles. Hierarchal clustering of protein intensity patterns grouped extracellular vesicles according to their originating cell type. The analysis of extracellular vesicles from stimulated B cells and monocyte-derived dendritic cells revealed the transfer of surface proteins to vesicles depending on the cell status. The protein profiles of plasma vesicles resembled the protein profiles of extracellular vesicles from platelets, antigen presenting cells and natural cells as shown by platelet markers, costimulatory proteins, and a natural killer cell subpopulation marker. In comparison to healthy plasma vesicles, melanoma plasma vesicles showed altered signals for platelet markers indicating a changed vesicle secretion or protein loading of extracellular vesicles by platelets and a lower CD8 signal that might be associated with a diminished activity of natural killer cells or T cells. As we hardly detected melanoma-derived vesicles in patient’s plasma, we concluded that blood cells induced the observed differences. In summary, our results question a direct effect of melanoma cells on the composition of extracellular vesicles in melanoma plasma, but rather argue

  17. α-Synuclein Dimers Impair Vesicle Fission during Clathrin-Mediated Synaptic Vesicle Recycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey T. Medeiros

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available α-Synuclein is a presynaptic protein that regulates synaptic vesicle (SV trafficking. In Parkinson’s disease (PD and several other neurodegenerative disorders, aberrant oligomerization and aggregation of α-synuclein lead to synaptic dysfunction and neurotoxicity. Despite evidence that α-synuclein oligomers are generated within neurons under physiological conditions, and that altering the balance of monomers and oligomers contributes to disease pathogenesis, how each molecular species of α-synuclein impacts SV trafficking is currently unknown. To address this, we have taken advantage of lamprey giant reticulospinal (RS synapses, which are accessible to acute perturbations via axonal microinjection of recombinant proteins. We previously reported that acute introduction of monomeric α-synuclein inhibited SV recycling, including effects on the clathrin pathway. Here, we report the effects of α-synuclein dimers at synapses. Similar to monomeric α-synuclein, both recombinant α-synuclein dimers that were evaluated bound to small liposomes containing anionic lipids in vitro, but with reduced efficacy. When introduced to synapses, the α-synuclein dimers also induced SV recycling defects, which included a build up of clathrin-coated pits (CCPs with constricted necks that were still attached to the plasma membrane, a phenotype indicative of a vesicle fission defect. Interestingly, both α-synuclein dimers induced longer necks on CCPs as well as complex, branching membrane tubules, which were distinct from the CCPs induced by a dynamin inhibitor, Dynasore. In contrast, monomeric α-synuclein induced a buildup of free clathrin-coated vesicles (CCVs, indicating an inhibition of clathrin-mediated endocytosis at a later stage during the clathrin uncoating process. Taken together, these data further support the conclusion that excess α-synuclein impairs SV recycling. The data additionally reveal that monomeric and dimeric α-synuclein produce

  18. End-capping of amphiphilic nanotubes with phospholipid vesicles: impact of the phospholipid on the cap formation and vesicle loading under osmotic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erne, Petra M; Štacko, Peter; van Dijken, Derk Jan; Chen, Jiawen; Stuart, Marc C A; Feringa, Ben L

    2016-09-22

    Soft amphiphilic nanotubes are capped with vesicles comprised of either overall neutral, zwitterionic phospholipids, or those that carry a net charge. The phase transition temperature of the zwitterionic phospholipids plays a crucial role in the phase separation that leads to the end-capped nanotubes. The cationic vesicle caps can be loaded into the nanotubes via osmosis whereas the anionic vesicle caps are stable under hyper-osmotic conditions. Furthermore, no additional salt needs to be added for the cationic vesicle caps to induce the loading of the vesicles into the nanotubes due to the presence of counterions.

  19. Discovering vesicle traffic network constraints by model checking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Ankit; Bhattacharyya, Arnab; Kuppusamy, Lakshmanan; Srivas, Mandayam; Thattai, Mukund

    2017-01-01

    A eukaryotic cell contains multiple membrane-bound compartments. Transport vesicles move cargo between these compartments, just as trucks move cargo between warehouses. These processes are regulated by specific molecular interactions, as summarized in the Rothman-Schekman-Sudhof model of vesicle traffic. The whole structure can be represented as a transport graph: each organelle is a node, and each vesicle route is a directed edge. What constraints must such a graph satisfy, if it is to represent a biologically realizable vesicle traffic network? Graph connectedness is an informative feature: 2-connectedness is necessary and sufficient for mass balance, but stronger conditions are required to ensure correct molecular specificity. Here we use Boolean satisfiability (SAT) and model checking as a framework to discover and verify graph constraints. The poor scalability of SAT model checkers often prevents their broad application. By exploiting the special structure of the problem, we scale our model checker to vesicle traffic systems with reasonably large numbers of molecules and compartments. This allows us to test a range of hypotheses about graph connectivity, which can later be proved in full generality by other methods.

  20. Vesicle shape, molecular tilt, and the suppression of necks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hongyuan; Huber, Greg; Pelcovits, Robert A.; Powers, Thomas R.

    2007-09-01

    Can the presence of molecular-tilt order significantly affect the shapes of lipid bilayer membranes, particularly membrane shapes with narrow necks? Motivated by the propensity for tilt order and the common occurrence of narrow necks in the intermediate stages of biological processes such as endocytosis and vesicle trafficking, we examine how tilt order inhibits the formation of necks in the equilibrium shapes of vesicles. For vesicles with a spherical topology, point defects in the molecular order with a total strength of +2 are required. We study axisymmetric shapes and suppose that there is a unit-strength defect at each pole of the vesicle. The model is further simplified by the assumption of tilt isotropy: invariance of the energy with respect to rotations of the molecules about the local membrane normal. This isotropy condition leads to a minimal coupling of tilt order and curvature, giving a high energetic cost to regions with Gaussian curvature and tilt order. Minimizing the elastic free energy with constraints of fixed area and fixed enclosed volume determines the allowed shapes. Using numerical calculations, we find several branches of solutions and identify them with the branches previously known for fluid membranes. We find that tilt order changes the relative energy of the branches, suppressing thin necks by making them costly, leading to elongated prolate vesicles as a generic family of tilt-ordered membrane shapes.

  1. Souffle/Spastizin Controls Secretory Vesicle Maturation during Zebrafish Oogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, Dietmar; Schomburg, Christoph; Cerdà, Joan; Vollack, Nadine; Dosch, Roland

    2014-01-01

    During oogenesis, the egg prepares for fertilization and early embryogenesis. As a consequence, vesicle transport is very active during vitellogenesis, and oocytes are an outstanding system to study regulators of membrane trafficking. Here, we combine zebrafish genetics and the oocyte model to identify the molecular lesion underlying the zebrafish souffle (suf) mutation. We demonstrate that suf encodes the homolog of the Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia (HSP) gene SPASTIZIN (SPG15). We show that in zebrafish oocytes suf mutants accumulate Rab11b-positive vesicles, but trafficking of recycling endosomes is not affected. Instead, we detect Suf/Spastizin on cortical granules, which undergo regulated secretion. We demonstrate genetically that Suf is essential for granule maturation into secretion competent dense-core vesicles describing a novel role for Suf in vesicle maturation. Interestingly, in suf mutants immature, secretory precursors accumulate, because they fail to pinch-off Clathrin-coated buds. Moreover, pharmacological inhibition of the abscission regulator Dynamin leads to an accumulation of immature secretory granules and mimics the suf phenotype. Our results identify a novel regulator of secretory vesicle formation in the zebrafish oocyte. In addition, we describe an uncharacterized cellular mechanism for Suf/Spastizin activity during secretion, which raises the possibility of novel therapeutic avenues for HSP research. PMID:24967841

  2. Souffle/Spastizin controls secretory vesicle maturation during zebrafish oogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palsamy Kanagaraj

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available During oogenesis, the egg prepares for fertilization and early embryogenesis. As a consequence, vesicle transport is very active during vitellogenesis, and oocytes are an outstanding system to study regulators of membrane trafficking. Here, we combine zebrafish genetics and the oocyte model to identify the molecular lesion underlying the zebrafish souffle (suf mutation. We demonstrate that suf encodes the homolog of the Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia (HSP gene SPASTIZIN (SPG15. We show that in zebrafish oocytes suf mutants accumulate Rab11b-positive vesicles, but trafficking of recycling endosomes is not affected. Instead, we detect Suf/Spastizin on cortical granules, which undergo regulated secretion. We demonstrate genetically that Suf is essential for granule maturation into secretion competent dense-core vesicles describing a novel role for Suf in vesicle maturation. Interestingly, in suf mutants immature, secretory precursors accumulate, because they fail to pinch-off Clathrin-coated buds. Moreover, pharmacological inhibition of the abscission regulator Dynamin leads to an accumulation of immature secretory granules and mimics the suf phenotype. Our results identify a novel regulator of secretory vesicle formation in the zebrafish oocyte. In addition, we describe an uncharacterized cellular mechanism for Suf/Spastizin activity during secretion, which raises the possibility of novel therapeutic avenues for HSP research.

  3. Overall energy conversion efficiency of a photosynthetic vesicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sener, Melih; Strumpfer, Johan; Singharoy, Abhishek; Hunter, C Neil; Schulten, Klaus

    2016-08-26

    The chromatophore of purple bacteria is an intracellular spherical vesicle that exists in numerous copies in the cell and that efficiently converts sunlight into ATP synthesis, operating typically under low light conditions. Building on an atomic-level structural model of a low-light-adapted chromatophore vesicle from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, we investigate the cooperation between more than a hundred protein complexes in the vesicle. The steady-state ATP production rate as a function of incident light intensity is determined after identifying quinol turnover at the cytochrome bc1 complex (cytb⁢c1) as rate limiting and assuming that the quinone/quinol pool of about 900 molecules acts in a quasi-stationary state. For an illumination condition equivalent to 1% of full sunlight, the vesicle exhibits an ATP production rate of 82 ATP molecules/s. The energy conversion efficiency of ATP synthesis at illuminations corresponding to 1%-5% of full sunlight is calculated to be 0.12-0.04, respectively. The vesicle stoichiometry, evolutionarily adapted to the low light intensities in the habitat of purple bacteria, is suboptimal for steady-state ATP turnover for the benefit of protection against over-illumination.

  4. Biodegradable theranostic plasmonic vesicles of amphiphilic gold nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jibin; Pu, Lu; Zhou, Jiajing; Duan, Bo; Duan, Hongwei

    2013-11-26

    We have developed surface-initiated organocatalytic ring-opening polymerization on functional nanocrystals and synthesized amphiphilic gold nanorods carrying well-defined mixed polymer brushes of poly(ethylene glycol) and polylactide. Self-assembly of the amphiphilic gold nanorods affords biodegradable plasmonic vesicles that can be destructed by both enzymatic degradation and near-infrared photothermal heating. When tagged with Raman probes, strongly coupled gold nanorods in the self-assembled vesicles give rise to highly active SERS signals. The biodegradable plasmonic vesicles exhibit a unique combination of optical and structural properties that are of particular interest for theranostic applications. We have demonstrated that bioconjugated SERS-active plasmonic vesicles can specifically target EpCAM-positive cancer cells, leading to ultrasensitive spectroscopic detection of cancer cells. Furthermore, integration of photothermal effect of gold nanorods and large loading capacity of the vesicles provides opportunities for localized synergistic photothermal ablation and photoactivated chemotherapy, which have shown higher efficiency in killing targeted cancer cells than either single therapeutic modality. The versatile chemistry of organocatalytic ring-opening polymerization, in conjugation with recent development in synthesizing functional nanocrystals with tailored optical, electronic, and magnetic properties opens the possibilities for constructing multifunctional biodegradable platforms for clinical translation.

  5. Characteristic spatial scale of vesicle pair interactions in a plane linear flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levant, Michael; Deschamps, Julien; Afik, Eldad; Steinberg, Victor

    2012-05-01

    We report the experimental studies on interaction of two vesicles trapped in a microfluidic four-roll mill, where a plane linear flow is realized. We found that the dynamics of a vesicle in tank-treading motion is significantly altered by the presence of another vesicle at separation distances up to 3.2-3.7 times of the vesicle effective radius. This result is supported by measurement of a single vesicle back-reaction on the velocity field. Thus the experiment provides the upper bound for the volume fraction φ = 0.08-0.13 of noninteracting vesicle suspensions.

  6. Characterization of extracellular vesicles in whole blood: Influence of pre-analytical parameters and visualization of vesicle-cell interactions using imaging flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fendl, Birgit; Weiss, René; Fischer, Michael B; Spittler, Andreas; Weber, Viktoria

    2016-09-09

    Extracellular vesicles are central players in intercellular communication and are released from the plasma membrane under tightly regulated conditions, depending on the physiological and pathophysiological state of the producing cell. Their heterogeneity requires a spectrum of methods for isolation and characterization, where pre-analytical parameters have profound impact on vesicle analysis, particularly in blood, since sampling, addition of anticoagulants, as well as post-sampling vesicle generation may influence the outcome. Here, we characterized microvesicles directly in whole blood using a combination of flow cytometry and imaging flow cytometry. We assessed the influence of sample agitation, anticoagulation, and temperature on post-sampling vesicle generation, and show that vesicle counts remained stable over time in samples stored without agitation. Storage with gentle rolling mimicking agitation, in contrast, resulted in strong release of platelet-derived vesicles in blood anticoagulated with citrate or heparin, whereas vesicle counts remained stable upon anticoagulation with EDTA. Using imaging flow cytometry, we could visualize microvesicles adhering to blood cells and revealed an anticoagulant-dependent increase in vesicle-cell aggregates over time. We demonstrate that vesicles adhere preferentially to monocytes and granulocytes in whole blood, while no microvesicles could be visualized on lymphocytes. Our data underscore the relevance of pre-analytical parameters in vesicle analysis and demonstrate that imaging flow cytometry is a suitable tool to study the interaction of extracellular vesicles with their target cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Industrial ceramics in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regueiro, M.

    2000-02-01

    Full Text Available The Spanish ceramic industry has experienced a amazing growth in the last four years. Such expansion has affected all sector, but has been particularly noteworthy in those directly related to construction: tiles. glazes, bricks and roof tiles. A combination of an extraordinary exporting effort, together with a record figure in new housing projects (415 000 houses in 1999, are responsible for such outburst. Other sectors, such as refractories have undergone significant growths due to the high rate of steel production increase, also in historical record figures (15m t in 1999. All this sectors doubled altogether the growing rate of their main European competitors. Raw material production has had an even more effervescent trend, almost doubling 1995 production. Such dynamic growth has been associated to a remarkable quality increase and to an unparalleled technological innovation process.

    La industria española de la cerámica ha experimentado un notable crecimiento en los últimos cuatro años; expansión que ha alcanzado a todos los sectores, pero que ha sido especialmente notable en los mas directamente asociados a la construcción: revestimientos, esmaltes, tejas y ladrillos. La combinación de un extraordinario esfuerzo exportador unido a las cifras récord en la viviendas iniciadas, 415 000 en 1999, justifican este auge. Otros sectores como refractarios han experimentado crecimientos significativos ante el ritmo elevado en la producción de acero, que alcanzó asimismo un récord histórico, 15 Mt en 1999. Para el conjunto de estos sectores el ritmo de crecimiento ha duplicado el de los principales competidores europeos. La producción de materias primas han experimentado un dinamismo aún mas elevado duplicándose prácticamente las cifras respecto a 1995. Este crecimiento ha estado asociado a un notable incremento en la calidad y en los procesos de innovación tecnológica.

  8. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana; Thomas W. Eagar; Harold R. Larson; Raymundo Arroyave; X.-D Zhou; Y.-W. Shin; H.U. Anderson; Nigel Browning; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2003-11-01

    The present quarterly report describes some of the initial studies on newer compositions and also includes newer approaches to address various materials issues such as in metal-ceramic sealing. The current quarter's research has also focused on developing a comprehensive reliability model for predicting the structural behavior of the membranes in realistic conditions. In parallel to industry provided compositions, models membranes have been evaluated in varying environment. Of importance is the behavior of flaws and generation of new flaws aiding in fracture. Fracture mechanics parameters such as crack tip stresses are generated to characterize the influence of environment. Room temperature slow crack growth studies have also been initiated in industry provided compositions. The electrical conductivity and defect chemistry of an A site deficient compound (La{sub 0.55}Sr{sub 0.35}FeO{sub 3}) was studied. A higher conductivity was observed for La{sub 0.55}Sr{sub 0.35}FeO{sub 3} than that of La{sub 0.60}Sr{sub 0.40}FeO{sub 3} and La{sub 0.80}Sr{sub 0.20}FeO{sub 3}. Defect chemistry analysis showed that it was primarily contributed by a higher carrier concentration in La{sub 0.55}Sr{sub 0.35}FeO{sub 3}. Moreover, the ability for oxygen vacancy generation is much higher in La{sub 0.55}Sr{sub 0.35}FeO{sub 3} as well, which indicates a lower bonding strength between Fe-O and a possible higher catalytic activity for La{sub 0.55}Sr{sub 0.35}FeO{sub 3}. The program continued to investigate the thermodynamic properties (stability and phase separation behavior) and total conductivity of prototype membrane materials. The data are needed together with the kinetic information to develop a complete model for the membrane transport. Previous report listed initial measurements on a sample of La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-x} prepared in-house by Praxair. Subsequently, a second sample of powder from a larger batch of sample were characterized and compared

  9. Doubled-ended ceramic thyratron

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    The double-ended ceramic thyratron CX 1171 B, with its coaxial voltage divider for the SPS. Such a switch, paralleled by three ignitrons in series forms the "thyragnitron" arrangement, and can switch 10 kA, 25 ms pulses, with very fast rise times.

  10. Optical scattering in glass ceramics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mattarelli, M.; Montagna, M.; Verrocchio, P.

    2008-01-01

    The transparency of glass ceramics with nanocrystals is generally higher than that expected from the theory of Rayleigh scattering. We attribute this ultra-transparency to the spatial correlation of the nanoparticles. The structure factor is calculated for a simple model system, the random

  11. Gas Separations using Ceramic Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul KT Liu

    2005-01-13

    This project has been oriented toward the development of a commercially viable ceramic membrane for high temperature gas separations. A technically and commercially viable high temperature gas separation membrane and process has been developed under this project. The lab and field tests have demonstrated the operational stability, both performance and material, of the gas separation thin film, deposited upon the ceramic membrane developed. This performance reliability is built upon the ceramic membrane developed under this project as a substrate for elevated temperature operation. A comprehensive product development approach has been taken to produce an economically viable ceramic substrate, gas selective thin film and the module required to house the innovative membranes for the elevated temperature operation. Field tests have been performed to demonstrate the technical and commercial viability for (i) energy and water recovery from boiler flue gases, and (ii) hydrogen recovery from refinery waste streams using the membrane/module product developed under this project. Active commercializations effort teaming with key industrial OEMs and end users is currently underway for these applications. In addition, the gas separation membrane developed under this project has demonstrated its economical viability for the CO2 removal from subquality natural gas and landfill gas, although performance stability at the elevated temperature remains to be confirmed in the field.

  12. Immobilization of stable thylakoid vesicles in conductive nanofibers by electrospinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedford, Nicholas M; Winget, G Douglas; Punnamaraju, Srikoundinya; Steckl, Andrew J

    2011-03-14

    Electrospun fibers consisting of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)/poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT/PSS) and poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) have been used to successfully encapsulate and stabilize thylakoid membrane vesicles isolated from spinach. Light-driven electronic properties were measured. Fibers with immobilized thylakoids show higher electrical conductivity compared with fibers without thylakoids under white light conditions. This is attributed to the electron-generating photosynthetic reactions from the thylakoids. Electron and optical microscopy show the presence of thylakoid vesicles within the fibers using lipid-specific stains. After electrospinning into fibers, the thylakoid vesicles still exhibit an ability to produce a light-driven electron gradient, indicating that activity is preserved during the electrospinning process. These electrospun fibers provide an excellent example of incorporating photosynthetic function into an artificial system.

  13. Dynamics of Shape Fluctuations of Quasi-spherical Vesicles Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miao, L.; Lomholt, Michael Andersen; Kleis, J.

    2002-01-01

    of the phenomenological constants in a canonical continuum description of fluid lipid-bilayer membranes and shown the consequences of this new interpretation in terms of the characteristics of the dynamics of vesicle shape fluctuations. Moreover, we have used the systematic formulation of our theory as a framework...... against which we have discussed the previously existing theories and their discrepancies. Finally, we have made a systematic prediction about the system-dependent characteristics of the relaxation dynamics of shape fluctuations of quasi-spherical vesicles with a view of experimental studies......In this paper, the dynamics of spontaneous shape fluctuations of a single, giant quasi-spherical vesicle formed from a single lipid species is revisited theoretically. A coherent physical theory for the dynamics is developed based on a number of fundamental principles and considerations...

  14. Exosomes and other extracellular vesicles in host–pathogen interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schorey, Jeffrey S; Cheng, Yong; Singh, Prachi P; Smith, Victoria L

    2015-01-01

    An effective immune response requires the engagement of host receptors by pathogen-derived molecules and the stimulation of an appropriate cellular response. Therefore, a crucial factor in our ability to control an infection is the accessibility of our immune cells to the foreign material. Exosomes—which are extracellular vesicles that function in intercellular communication—may play a key role in the dissemination of pathogen- as well as host-derived molecules during infection. In this review, we highlight the composition and function of exosomes and other extracellular vesicles produced during viral, parasitic, fungal and bacterial infections and describe how these vesicles could function to either promote or inhibit host immunity. PMID:25488940

  15. Extracellular Vesicles in Brain Tumors and Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Ciregia

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EVs can be classified into apoptotic bodies, microvesicles (MVs, and exosomes, based on their origin or size. Exosomes are the smallest and best characterized vesicles which derived from the endosomal system. These vesicles are released from many different cell types including neuronal cells and their functions in the nervous system are investigated. They have been proposed as novel means for intercellular communication, which takes part not only to the normal neuronal physiology but also to the transmission of pathogenic proteins. Indeed, exosomes are fundamental to assemble and transport proteins during development, but they can also transfer neurotoxic misfolded proteins in pathogenesis. The present review will focus on their roles in neurological diseases, specifically brain tumors, such as glioblastoma (GBM, neuroblastoma (NB, medulloblastoma (MB, and metastatic brain tumors and chronic neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer, Parkinson, multiple sclerosis (MS, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, Huntington, and Prion diseseases highlighting their involvement in spreading neurotoxicity, in therapeutics, and in pathogenesis.

  16. Extracellular Vesicles in Brain Tumors and Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciregia, Federica; Urbani, Andrea; Palmisano, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) can be classified into apoptotic bodies, microvesicles (MVs), and exosomes, based on their origin or size. Exosomes are the smallest and best characterized vesicles which derived from the endosomal system. These vesicles are released from many different cell types including neuronal cells and their functions in the nervous system are investigated. They have been proposed as novel means for intercellular communication, which takes part not only to the normal neuronal physiology but also to the transmission of pathogenic proteins. Indeed, exosomes are fundamental to assemble and transport proteins during development, but they can also transfer neurotoxic misfolded proteins in pathogenesis. The present review will focus on their roles in neurological diseases, specifically brain tumors, such as glioblastoma (GBM), neuroblastoma (NB), medulloblastoma (MB), and metastatic brain tumors and chronic neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer, Parkinson, multiple sclerosis (MS), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Huntington, and Prion diseseases highlighting their involvement in spreading neurotoxicity, in therapeutics, and in pathogenesis. PMID:28912682

  17. A Network of Three Types of Filaments Organizes Synaptic Vesicles for Storage, Mobilization, and Docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Andy A; Chen, Xiaobing; Reese, Thomas S

    2016-03-16

    Synaptic transmission between neurons requires precise management of synaptic vesicles. While individual molecular components of the presynaptic terminal are well known, exactly how the molecules are organized into a molecular machine serving the storage and mobilization of synaptic vesicles to the active zone remains unclear. Here we report three filament types associated with synaptic vesicles in glutamatergic synapses revealed by electron microscope tomography in unstimulated, dissociated rat hippocampal neurons. One filament type, likely corresponding to the SNAREpin complex, extends from the active zone membrane and surrounds docked vesicles. A second filament type contacts all vesicles throughout the active zone and pairs vesicles together. On the third filament type, vesicles attach to side branches extending from the long filament core and form vesicle clusters that are distributed throughout the vesicle cloud and along the active zone membrane. Detailed analysis of presynaptic structure reveals how each of the three filament types interacts with synaptic vesicles, providing a means to traffic reserved and recycled vesicles from the cloud of vesicles into the docking position at the active zone. The formation and release of synaptic vesicles has been extensively investigated. Explanations of the release of synaptic vesicles generally begin with the movement of vesicles from the cloud into the synaptic active zone. However, the presynaptic terminal is filled with filamentous material that would appear to limit vesicular diffusion. Here, we provide a systematic description of three filament types connecting synaptic vesicles. A picture emerges illustrating how the cooperative attachment and release of these three filament types facilitate the movement of vesicles to the active zone to become docked in preparation for release. Copyright © 2016 the authors 0270-6474/16/363222-09$15.00/0.

  18. Cryo-electron microscopy of extracellular vesicles in fresh plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuana, Yuana; Koning, Roman I; Kuil, Maxim E; Rensen, Patrick C N; Koster, Abraham J; Bertina, Rogier M; Osanto, Susanne

    2013-12-31

    Extracellular vesicles (EV) are phospholipid bilayer-enclosed vesicles recognized as new mediators in intercellular communication and potential biomarkers of disease. They are found in many body fluids and mainly studied in fractions isolated from blood plasma in view of their potential in medicine. Due to the limitations of available analytical methods, morphological information on EV in fresh plasma is still rather limited. To image EV and determine the morphology, structure and size distribution in fresh plasma by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM). Fresh citrate- and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA)-anticoagulated plasma or EV isolated from these plasmas were rapidly cryo-immobilized by vitrification and visualized by cryo-EM. EV isolated from fresh plasma were highly heterogeneous in morphology and size and mostly contain a discernible lipid bilayer (lipid vesicles). In fresh plasma there were 2 types of particles with a median diameter of 30 nm (25-260 nm). The majority of these particles are electron dense particles which most likely represent lipoproteins. The minority are lipid vesicles, either electron dense or electron lucent, which most likely represent EV. Lipid vesicles were occasionally observed in close proximity of platelets in citrate and EDTA-anticoagulated platelet-rich plasma. Cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) was employed to determine the 3D structure of platelet secretory granules. Cryo-EM is a powerful technique that enables the characterization of EV in fresh plasma revealing structural details and considerable morphological heterogeneity. Only a small proportion of the submicron structures in fresh plasma are lipid vesicles representing EV.

  19. Cryo-electron microscopy of extracellular vesicles in fresh plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuana Yuana

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Extracellular vesicles (EV are phospholipid bilayer-enclosed vesicles recognized as new mediators in intercellular communication and potential biomarkers of disease. They are found in many body fluids and mainly studied in fractions isolated from blood plasma in view of their potential in medicine. Due to the limitations of available analytical methods, morphological information on EV in fresh plasma is still rather limited. Objectives: To image EV and determine the morphology, structure and size distribution in fresh plasma by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM. Methods: Fresh citrate- and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA-anticoagulated plasma or EV isolated from these plasmas were rapidly cryo-immobilized by vitrification and visualized by cryo-EM. Results: EV isolated from fresh plasma were highly heterogeneous in morphology and size and mostly contain a discernible lipid bilayer (lipid vesicles. In fresh plasma there were 2 types of particles with a median diameter of 30 nm (25–260 nm. The majority of these particles are electron dense particles which most likely represent lipoproteins. The minority are lipid vesicles, either electron dense or electron lucent, which most likely represent EV. Lipid vesicles were occasionally observed in close proximity of platelets in citrate and EDTA-anticoagulated platelet-rich plasma. Cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET was employed to determine the 3D structure of platelet secretory granules. Conclusions: Cryo-EM is a powerful technique that enables the characterization of EV in fresh plasma revealing structural details and considerable morphological heterogeneity. Only a small proportion of the submicron structures in fresh plasma are lipid vesicles representing EV.

  20. Vesicle biomechanics in a time-varying magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Hui; Curcuru, Austen

    2015-01-01

    Cells exhibit distortion when exposed to a strong electric field, suggesting that the field imposes control over cellular biomechanics. Closed pure lipid bilayer membranes (vesicles) have been widely used for the experimental and theoretical studies of cellular biomechanics under this electrodeformation. An alternative method used to generate an electric field is by electromagnetic induction with a time-varying magnetic field. References reporting the magnetic control of cellular mechanics have recently emerged. However, theoretical analysis of the cellular mechanics under a time-varying magnetic field is inadequate. We developed an analytical theory to investigate the biomechanics of a modeled vesicle under a time-varying magnetic field. Following previous publications and to simplify the calculation, this model treated the inner and suspending media as lossy dielectrics, the membrane thickness set at zero, and the electric resistance of the membrane assumed to be negligible. This work provided the first analytical solutions for the surface charges, electric field, radial pressure, overall translational forces, and rotational torques introduced on a vesicle by the time-varying magnetic field. Frequency responses of these measures were analyzed, particularly the frequency used clinically by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). The induced surface charges interacted with the electric field to produce a biomechanical impact upon the vesicle. The distribution of the induced surface charges depended on the orientation of the coil and field frequency. The densities of these charges were trivial at low frequency ranges, but significant at high frequency ranges. The direction of the radial force on the vesicle was dependent on the conductivity ratio between the vesicle and the medium. At relatively low frequencies (biomechanics under a time-varying magnetic field. Biological effects of clinical TMS are not likely to occur via alteration of the biomechanics of brain

  1. Ceramic matrix composite article and process of fabricating a ceramic matrix composite article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairo, Ronald Robert; DiMascio, Paul Stephen; Parolini, Jason Robert

    2016-01-12

    A ceramic matrix composite article and a process of fabricating a ceramic matrix composite are disclosed. The ceramic matrix composite article includes a matrix distribution pattern formed by a manifold and ceramic matrix composite plies laid up on the matrix distribution pattern, includes the manifold, or a combination thereof. The manifold includes one or more matrix distribution channels operably connected to a delivery interface, the delivery interface configured for providing matrix material to one or more of the ceramic matrix composite plies. The process includes providing the manifold, forming the matrix distribution pattern by transporting the matrix material through the manifold, and contacting the ceramic matrix composite plies with the matrix material.

  2. Postcoital Hemorrhage of a Recurrent Seminal Vesicle Cyst Requiring Embolization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Royston

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Herein is a case of a 23-year-old man with recurrence of a seminal vesicle cyst after percutaneous drainage and laparoscopic excision complicated by hemorrhage requiring embolization. He presented to the emergency department for pain after ejaculation. Computed tomographic scan of his pelvis revealed extravasation of contrast near his cyst and pelvic fluid collection suspicious for a hematoma. The patient had steadily decreasing hemoglobin and hematocrit levels. An interventional radiologist performed an embolization of the left seminal vesicle cystic arteries. Hemoglobin and hematocrit values improved and he was discharged. Hemorrhage resolved with embolization procedure and pain dissipated over the course of follow up care.

  3. Potentials and capabilities of the Extracellular Vesicle (EV Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malene Møller Jørgensen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EVs and exosomes are difficult to enrich or purify from biofluids, hence quantification and phenotyping of these are tedious and inaccurate. The multiplexed, highly sensitive and high-throughput platform of the EV Array presented by Jørgensen et al., (J Extracell Vesicles, 2013; 2: 10 has been refined regarding the capabilities of the method for characterization and molecular profiling of EV surface markers. Here, we present an extended microarray platform to detect and phenotype plasma-derived EVs (optimized for exosomes for up to 60 antigens without any enrichment or purification prior to analysis.

  4. Proteomic analysis of cerebrospinal fluid extracellular vesicles: a comprehensive dataset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiasserini, Davide; van Weering, Jan R T; Piersma, Sander R; Pham, Thang V; Malekzadeh, Arjan; Teunissen, Charlotte E; de Wit, Heidi; Jiménez, Connie R

    2014-06-25

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are present in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), yet little is known about their protein composition. The aim of this study is to provide a comprehensive analysis of the proteome of CSF EVs by electron microscopy and high resolution tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) in conjunction with bioinformatics. We report an extensive catalog of 1315 proteins identified in EVs isolated from two different CSF pools by ultracentrifugation, including 230 novel EV proteins. Out of 1315 proteins, 760 were identified in both CSF pools and about 30% of those were also quantitatively enriched in the EV fraction versus the soluble CSF fraction. The proteome of CSF EVs was enriched in exosomal markers such as alix and syntenin-1, heat shock proteins and tetraspanins and contained a high proportion of brain-derived proteins (n=373). Interestingly, several known biomarkers for neurodegenerative diseases such as the amyloid precursor protein, the prion protein and DJ-1 were identified in the EV fractions. Our dataset represents the first comprehensive inventory of the EV proteome in CSF, underscoring the biomarker potential of this organelle. Further comparative studies on CSF EVs isolated from patients diagnosed with neurological disorders are warranted. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000608. Biological significance In this study we analyzed the protein composition of extracellular vesicles isolated from pooled samples of human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). CSF is a colorless fluid surrounding the brain and the spinal cord, important for the physiology of the central nervous system, ensuing mechanical protection, regulation of brain blood flow and elimination of byproducts of the brain. Since brain (patho)physiology is reflected in CSF, this biological fluid represents an ideal source of soluble and vesicle-based biomarkers for neurological diseases. Here we confirm the presence of exosome-like extracellular vesicles in CSF, underscoring

  5. Erythrocyte-derived optical nano-vesicles as theranostic agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mac, Jenny T.; Nunez, Vicente; Bahmani, Baharak; Guerrero, Yadir; Tang, Jack; Vullev, Valentine I.; Anvari, Bahman

    2015-07-01

    We have engineered nano-vesicles, derived from erythrocytes, which can be doped with various near infrared (NIR) organic chromophores, including the FDA-approved indocyanine green (ICG). We refer to these vesicles as NIR erythrocyte-mimicking transducers (NETS) since in response to NIR photo-excitation they can generate heat or emit fluorescent light. Using biochemical methods based on reduction amination, we have functionalized the surface of NET with antibodies to target specific biomolecules. We present results that demonstrate the effectiveness of NETs in targeted imaging of cancer cells that over-express the human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2).

  6. MiR-21-5p in urinary extracellular vesicles is a novel biomarker of urothelial carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Matsuzaki, Kyosuke; Fujita, Kazutoshi; Jingushi, Kentaro; Kawashima, Atsunari; Ujike, Takeshi; Nagahara, Akira; Ueda, Yuko; Tanigawa, Go; Yoshioka, Iwao; Ueda, Koji; Hanayama, Rikinari; Uemura, Motohide; Miyagawa, Yasushi; Tsujikawa, Kazutake; Nonomura, Norio

    2017-01-01

    Background Extracellular vesicles are lipid bilayer vesicles containing protein, messengerRNA and microRNA. Cancer cell-derived extracellular vesicles may be diagnostic and therapeutic targets. We extracted extracellular vesicles from urine of urothelial carcinoma patients and the control group to identify cancer-specific microRNAs in urinary extracellular vesicles as new biomarkers. Materials and methods microRNA from urinary extracellular vesicles extracted from 6 urothelial carcinoma patie...

  7. Catalyzed Ceramic Burner Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, Amy S., Dr.

    2012-06-29

    period in accomplishing these objectives. Our work in the area of Pd-based, methane oxidation catalysts has led to the development of highly active catalysts with relatively low loadings of Pd metal using proprietary coating methods. The thermal stability of these Pd-based catalysts were characterized using SEM and BET analyses, further demonstrating that certain catalyst supports offer enhanced stability toward both PdO decomposition and/or thermal sintering/growth of Pd particles. When applied to commercially available fiber mesh substrates (both metallic and ceramic) and tested in an open-air burner, these catalyst-support chemistries showed modest improvements in the NOx emissions and radiant output compared to uncatalyzed substrates. More significant, though, was the performance of the catalyst-support chemistries on novel media substrates. These substrates were developed to overcome the limitations that are present with commercially available substrate designs and increase the gas-catalyst contact time. When catalyzed, these substrates demonstrated a 65-75% reduction in NOx emissions across the firing range when tested in an open air burner. In testing in a residential boiler, this translated into NOx emissions of <15 ppm over the 15-150 kBtu/hr firing range.

  8. Polymer/TiO₂ hybrid vesicles for excellent UV screening and effective encapsulation of antioxidant agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jianzhong; Sun, Hui

    2014-08-27

    Presented in this paper is a hybrid polymer/titanium dioxide (TiO2) vesicle that has excellent UV-screening efficacy and strong capacity to encapsulate antioxidant agents. Poly(ethylene oxide)-block-poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate)-block-polystyrene (PEO-b-PDMAEMA-b-PS) triblock terpolymer was synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) and then self-assembled into vesicles. Those vesicles showed excellent UV-screening property due to the scattering by vesicles and the absorption by PS vesicle membrane. The selective deposition of solvophobic tetrabutyl titanate in the PDMAEMA shell and the PS membrane of the vesicles led to the formation of polymer/TiO2 hybrid vesicles, resulting in an enhanced UV-screening property by further reflecting and scattering UV radiation. The vesicles can effectively encapsulate antioxidant agents such as ferulic acid (up to 57%), showing a rapid antioxidant capability (within 1 min) and a long-lasting antioxidant effect.

  9. Matrix-dependent local retention of secretory vesicle cargo in cortical neurons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wit, J.; Toonen, R.F.G.; Verhage, M.

    2009-01-01

    Neurons secrete many diffusible signals from synaptic and other secretory vesicles. We characterized secretion of guidance cues, neuropeptides, neurotrophins, and proteases from single secretory vesicles using pHluorin-tagged cargo in cortical neurons. Stimulation triggered transient and persistent

  10. Engineering Globular Protein Vesicles through Tunable Self-Assembly of Recombinant Fusion Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Yeongseon; Choi, Won Tae; Heller, William T; Ke, Zunlong; Wright, Elizabeth R; Champion, Julie A

    2017-09-01

    Vesicles assembled from folded, globular proteins have potential for functions different from traditional lipid or polymeric vesicles. However, they also present challenges in understanding the assembly process and controlling vesicle properties. From detailed investigation of the assembly behavior of recombinant fusion proteins, this work reports a simple strategy to engineer protein vesicles containing functional, globular domains. This is achieved through tunable self-assembly of recombinant globular fusion proteins containing leucine zippers and elastin-like polypeptides. The fusion proteins form complexes in solution via high affinity binding of the zippers, and transition through dynamic coacervates to stable hollow vesicles upon warming. The thermal driving force, which can be tuned by protein concentration or temperature, controls both vesicle size and whether vesicles are single or bi-layered. These results provide critical information to engineer globular protein vesicles via self-assembly with desired size and membrane structure. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Introduction to Extracellular Vesicles: Biogenesis, RNA Cargo Selection, Content, Release, and Uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abels, Erik R; Breakefield, Xandra O

    2016-04-01

    Extracellular vesicles are a heterogeneous group of membrane-limited vesicles loaded with various proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids. Release of extracellular vesicles from its cell of origin occurs either through the outward budding of the plasma membrane or through the inward budding of the endosomal membrane, resulting in the formation of multivesicular bodies, which release vesicles upon fusion with the plasma membrane. The release of vesicles can facilitate intercellular communication by contact with or by internalization of contents, either by fusion with the plasma membrane or by endocytosis into "recipient" cells. Although the interest in extracellular vesicle research is increasing, there are still no real standards in place to separate or classify the different types of vesicles. This review provides an introduction into this expanding and complex field of research focusing on the biogenesis, nucleic acid cargo loading, content, release, and uptake of extracellular vesicles.

  12. Commercial cow milk contains physically stable extracellular vesicles expressing immunoregulatory TGF-beta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieters, B.C.; Arntz, O.J.; Bennink, M.B.; Broeren, M.G.; Caam, A.P.M. van; Koenders, M.I.; Lent, P.L. van; Berg, W.B. van den; Vries, M. de; Kraan, P.M. van der; Loo, F.A.J. van de

    2015-01-01

    SCOPE: Extracellular vesicles, including exosomes, have been identified in all biological fluids and rediscovered as an important part of the intercellular communication. Breast milk also contains extracellular vesicles and the proposed biological function is to enhance the antimicrobial defense in

  13. Translucency of dental ceramics with different thicknesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fu; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Iwasaki, Naohiko

    2013-07-01

    The increased use of esthetic restorations requires an improved understanding of the translucent characteristics of ceramic materials. Ceramic translucency has been considered to be dependent on composition and thickness, but less information is available about the translucent characteristics of these materials, especially at different thicknesses. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between translucency and the thickness of different dental ceramics. Six disk-shaped specimens of 8 glass ceramics (IPS e.max Press HO, MO, LT, HT, IPS e.max CAD LT, MO, AvanteZ Dentin, and Trans) and 5 specimens of 5 zirconia ceramics (Cercon Base, Zenotec Zr Bridge, Lava Standard, Lava Standard FS3, and Lava Plus High Translucency) were prepared following the manufacturers' instructions and ground to a predetermined thickness with a grinding machine. A spectrophotometer was used to measure the translucency parameters (TP) of the glass ceramics, which ranged from 2.0 to 0.6 mm, and of the zirconia ceramics, which ranged from 1.0 to 0.4 mm. The relationship between the thickness and TP of each material was evaluated using a regression analysis (α=.05). The TP values of the glass ceramics ranged from 2.2 to 25.3 and the zirconia ceramics from 5.5 to 15.1. There was an increase in the TP with a decrease in thickness, but the amount of change was material dependent. An exponential relationship with statistical significance (Pceramics and zirconia ceramics. The translucency of dental ceramics was significantly influenced by both material and thickness. The translucency of all materials increased exponentially as the thickness decreased. All of the zirconia ceramics evaluated in the present study showed some degree of translucency, which was less sensitive to thickness compared to that of the glass ceramics. Copyright © 2013 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Single-step isolation of extracellular vesicles by size-exclusion chromatography

    OpenAIRE

    Böing, Anita N.; van der Pol, Edwin; Anita E. Grootemaat; Coumans, Frank A. W.; Sturk, Auguste; Nieuwland, Rienk

    2014-01-01

    Background: Isolation of extracellular vesicles from plasma is a challenge due to the presence of proteins and lipoproteins. Isolation of vesicles using differential centrifugation or density-gradient ultracentrifugation results in co-isolation of contaminants such as protein aggregates and incomplete separation of vesicles from lipoproteins, respectively.Aim: To develop a single-step protocol to isolate vesicles from human body fluids.Methods: Platelet-free supernatant, derived from platelet...

  15. Biochemical and morphological characterization of light and heavy sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles. Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, Kevin Peter [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

    1978-01-01

    Light (30 to 32.5% sucrose) and heavy (38.5 to 42% sucrose) sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles (LSR, HSR) were isolated from rabbit leg muscle. They were then diluted and washed with sucrose or KCl and referred to as sucrose or KCl washed vesicles. Thin-section electron microscopy of LSR vesicles reveals empty vesicles of various sizes and shapes where as the HSR vesicles appear as rounded vesicles of uniform size filled with electron dense material. The LSR consists of predominantly Ca2+ + Mg2+ ATPase (80 to 90%), a small amount of the high affinity Ca binding protein (5%), and a 5000 dalton proteolipid. The sucrose HSR vesicles contain the Ca2+ + Mg2+ ATPase (50%), Calsequestrin (25%), high affinity Ca binding protein (5%), one extrinsic 34,000 dalton protein (3%), one intrinsic 30,000 dalton protein (3%), a 9000 dalton proteolipid, and a 5000 dalton proteolipid. The sucrose--washed HSR vesicles contain greater than three times the calcium content of the sucrose washed LSR vesicles where as the KCl--washed vesicles contain less than 15 nmoles Ca2+ mg of protein each. The light and heavy sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles were both able to accumulate calcium in the presence of ATP. Exchange of methanesulfonate for chloride resulted in the release of calcium from both the light and heavy SR vesicles. Sucrose causes a slight inhibition of chloride--induced calcium release from the heavy SR vesicles but it greatly reduces the release of calcium from the light SR vesicles. Sodium dantrolene (20 uM) has no effect on the release of calcium from the light SR vesicles but it inhibits the release of calcium from the heavy SR vesicles. The results indicate that the chloride--induced release of calcium may be acting by two mechanisms, osmotic swelling and depolarization.

  16. Ceramic fiber reinforced glass-ceramic matrix composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A slurry of BSAS glass powders is cast into tapes which are cut to predetermined sizes. Mats of continuous chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-SiC fibers are alternately stacked with these matrix tapes. This tape-mat stack is warm-pressed to produce a 'green' composite which is heated to burn out organic constituents. The remaining interim material is then hot-pressed to form a BSAS glass-ceramic fiber-reinforced composite.

  17. Evaluation of Monolithic Ceramics and Ceramic Thermal Barrier Coatings for Diesel Engine Applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Swab, Jeffrey J

    2001-01-01

    The Metals and Ceramics Research Branch (MCRB) of the Weapons and Materials Research Directorate is providing ceramic material characterization and evaluation to the Tank Automotive Research, Development, and Engineering Center (TARDEC...

  18. Optical properties of base dentin ceramics for all-ceramic restorations.

    OpenAIRE

    Shiraishi, Takanobu; Wood, Duncan J.; Shinozaki, Nobuya; Van Noort, Richard

    2011-01-01

    The study was conducted to compare the optical parameters of VM7(®) M-shade base dentin ceramics (VITA, Germany) for all ceramic restorations to the chemical composition across the 3D-MASTER(®) shade system.

  19. Specific surface modification of the acetylene-linked glycolipid vesicle by click chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Hidehiro; Kamachi, Toshiaki; Yashima, Eiji

    2012-06-07

    A novel glycolipid with a terminal acetylene was synthesized and used to prepare unilamellar vesicles. Using these vesicles, a convenient method was developed for the specific modification of the vesicle surface using the photoresponsive copper complex [Cu(OH(2))(cage)] as the catalyst for a click reaction.

  20. Studies of matrix vesicle-induced mineralization in a gelatin gel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boskey, A. L.; Boyan, B. D.; Doty, S. B.; Feliciano, A.; Greer, K.; Weiland, D.; Swain, L. D.; Schwartz, Z.

    1992-01-01

    Matrix vesicles isolated from fourth-passage cultures of chondrocytes were tested for their ability to induce hydroxyapatite formation in a gelatin gel in order to gain insight into the function of matrix vesicles in in situ mineralization. These matrix vesicles did not appear to be hydroxyapatite nucleators per se since the extent of mineral accumulation in the gel diffusion system was not altered by the presence of matrix vesicles alone, and in the vesicle containing gels, mineral crystals were formed whether associated with vesicles or not. In gels with these matrix vesicles and beta-glycerophosphate, despite the presence of alkaline phosphatase activity, there was no increase in mineral deposition. This suggested that in the gel system these culture-derived vesicles did not increase local phosphate concentrations. However, when known inhibitors of mineral crystal formation and growth (proteoglycan aggregates [4 mg/ml], or ATP [1 mM], or both proteoglycan and ATP) were included in the gel, more mineral was deposited in gels with the vesicles than in comparable gels without vesicles, indicating that enzymes within these vesicles were functioning to remove the inhibition. These data support the suggestion that one function of the extracellular matrix vesicles is to transport enzymes for matrix modification.

  1. Pseudomonas aeruginosa vesicles associate with and are internalized by human lung epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuehn Meta J

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the major pathogen associated with chronic and ultimately fatal lung infections in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF. To investigate how P. aeruginosa-derived vesicles may contribute to lung disease, we explored their ability to associate with human lung cells. Results Purified vesicles associated with lung cells and were internalized in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Vesicles from a CF isolate exhibited a 3- to 4-fold greater association with lung cells than vesicles from the lab strain PAO1. Vesicle internalization was temperature-dependent and was inhibited by hypertonic sucrose and cyclodextrins. Surface-bound vesicles rarely colocalized with clathrin. Internalized vesicles colocalized with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER marker, TRAPα, as well as with ER-localized pools of cholera toxin and transferrin. CF isolates of P. aeruginosa abundantly secrete PaAP (PA2939, an aminopeptidase that associates with the surface of vesicles. Vesicles from a PaAP knockout strain exhibited a 40% decrease in cell association. Likewise, vesicles from PAO1 overexpressing PaAP displayed a significant increase in cell association. Conclusion These data reveal that PaAP promotes the association of vesicles with lung cells. Taken together, these results suggest that P. aeruginosa vesicles can interact with and be internalized by lung epithelial cells and contribute to the inflammatory response during infection.

  2. Commercial cow milk contains physically stable extracellular vesicles expressing immunoregulatory TGF-β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieters, Bartijn C H; Arntz, Onno J; Bennink, Miranda B; Broeren, Mathijs G A; van Caam, Arjan P M; Koenders, Marije I; van Lent, Peter L E M; van den Berg, Wim B; de Vries, Marieke; van der Kraan, Peter M; van de Loo, Fons A J

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles, including exosomes, have been identified in all biological fluids and rediscovered as an important part of the intercellular communication. Breast milk also contains extracellular vesicles and the proposed biological function is to enhance the antimicrobial defense in newborns. It is, however, unknown whether extracellular vesicles are still present in commercial milk and, more importantly, whether they retained their bioactivity. Here, we characterize the extracellular vesicles present in semi-skimmed cow milk available for consumers and study their effect on T cells. Extracellular vesicles from commercial milk were isolated and characterized. Milk-derived extracellular vesicles contained several immunomodulating miRNAs and membrane protein CD63, characteristics of exosomes. In contrast to RAW 267.4 derived extracellular vesicles the milk-derived extracellular vesicles were extremely stable under degrading conditions, including low pH, boiling and freezing. Milk-derived extracellular vesicles were easily taken up by murine macrophages in vitro. Furthermore, we found that they can facilitate T cell differentiation towards the pathogenic Th17 lineage. Using a (CAGA)12-luc reporter assay we showed that these extracellular vesicles carried bioactive TGF-β, and that anti-TGF-β antibodies blocked Th17 differentiation. Our findings show that commercial milk contains stable extracellular vesicles, including exosomes, and carry immunoregulatory cargo. These data suggest that the extracellular vesicles present in commercial cow milk remains intact in the gastrointestinal tract and exert an immunoregulatory effect.

  3. Molecular Recognition of Vesicles : Host-Guest Interactions Combined with Specific Dimerization of Zwitterions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voskuhl, Jens; Fenske, Tassilo; Stuart, Marc C. A.; Wibbeling, Birgit; Schmuck, Carsten; Ravoo, Bart Jan

    2010-01-01

    The aggregation of beta-cyclodextrin vesicles can be induced by an adamantyl-substituted zwitterionic guanidiniocarbonylpyrrole carboxylate guest molecule (1). Upon addition of 1 to the cyclodextrin vesicles at neutral pH, the vesicles aggregate (but do not fuse), as shown by using UV/Vis and

  4. The function of vesicles in the actinomycete Frankia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meesters, T.

    1988-01-01

    The actinomycete Frankia is a symbiotic nitrogen fixer, living in root nodules of many non-leguminous plants. A typical characteristic of this endophytic organism is the formation of specialized swollen cell structures, called vesicles. Frankia

  5. Ultrasound-guided seminal vesicle biopsies in prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wymenga, LFA; Duisterwinkel, FJ; Groenier, K; Mensink, HJA

    2000-01-01

    Invasion of prostatic adenocarcinoma into the seminal vesicles (SV) is generally accepted as an index of poor prognosis. The pre-operative identification of SV invasion is an important element in staging since it may alter subsequent treatment decisions. We studied the possibility of diagnosing SV

  6. Reconciling Ligase Ribozyme Activity with Fatty Acid Vesicle Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Anella

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The “RNA world” and the “Lipid world” theories for the origin of cellular life are often considered incompatible due to the differences in the environmental conditions at which they can emerge. One obstacle resides in the conflicting requirements for divalent metal ions, in particular Mg2+, with respect to optimal ribozyme activity, fatty acid vesicle stability and protection against RNA strand cleavage. Here, we report on the activity of a short L1 ligase ribozyme in the presence of myristoleic acid (MA vesicles at varying concentrations of Mg2+. The ligation rate is significantly lower at low-Mg2+ conditions. However, the loss of activity is overcompensated by the increased stability of RNA leading to a larger amount of intact ligated substrate after long reaction periods. Combining RNA ligation assays with fatty acid vesicles we found that MA vesicles made of 5 mM amphiphile are stable and do not impair ligase ribozyme activity in the presence of approximately 2 mM Mg2+. These results provide a scenario in which catalytic RNA and primordial membrane assembly can coexist in the same environment.

  7. Swinging of two-domains vesicles in shear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viallat, Annie; Tusch, Simon; Khelloufi, Kamel; Leonetti, Marc

    2014-11-01

    Giant lipid vesicles and red blood cells in shear flow at low shear rates tank tread (TT) at small viscosity ratio between the inner particle volume and the external fluid, and flip or tumble (T) at large viscosity ratio. The phase diagram of motion of red blood cells is however much more complex. Swinging superimposes to TT, cells wobble and roll rather than tumble with increasing shear rate and present a shear-rate driven transition between TT to T. These features are attributed to the shear elasticity and the non spherical stress-free shape of the cell membrane, which stores shear elastic energy as a function of the relative position of its elements. We have created vesicles with a phase diagram of motion comparable to that of red blood cells by preparing membranes with two lipids and cholesterol. These membranes present two domains separated by a contact line. The line has a tension energy that depends on its relative position on the vesicle. Similarly to red blood cells, two-domains vesicles swing and wobble. An analytical model where line tension energy is added to the Keller and Skalak's model fits our experimental data without any adjustable parameter. Our experiments and model shed light on the motion of deformable particles in shear flow.

  8. Dimensional characterization of extracellular vesicles using atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sebaihi, N.; de Boeck, B.; Yuana, Y.; Nieuwland, R.; Petry, J.

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EV) are small biological entities released from cells into body fluids. EV are recognized as mediators in intercellular communication and influence important physiological processes. It has been shown that the concentration and composition of EV in body fluids may differ from

  9. Calcium transport in vesicles energized by cytochrome oxidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosier, Randy N. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

    1979-01-01

    Experiments on the reconstitution of cytochrome oxidase into phospholipid vesicles were carried out using techniques of selectivity energizing the suspensions with ascorbate and cytochrome c or ascorbate, PMS, and internally trapped cytochrome c. It was found that the K+ selective ionophore valinomycin stimulated the rate of respiration of cytochrome oxidase vesicles regardless of the direction of the K+ flux across the vesicle membranes. The stimulation occurred in the presence of protonophoric uncouplers and in the complete absence of potassium or in detergent-lysed suspensions. Gramicidin had similar effects and it was determined that the ionophores acted by specific interaction with cytochrome oxidase rather than by the previously assumed collapse of membrane potentials. When hydrophobic proteins and appropriate coupling factors were incorporated into the cytochrome oxidase, vesicles phosphorylation of ADP could be coupled to the oxidation reaction of cytochrome oxidase. Relatively low P:O, representing poor coupling of the system, were problematical and precluded measurements of protonmotive force. However the system was used to study ion translocation.

  10. Effect of sodium deoxycholate and sodium cholate on DPPC vesicles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TECS

    monitor different stages of interaction of bile salts with DPPC vesicles. NaDC induced significant changes in the ... more hydrophilic NaC does not interact with the membrane efficiently. Complete solubilisation of phos- pholipids .... the temperature was controlled by circulating water through a jacketted cuvette holder from a ...

  11. A Pathogenic Potential of Acinetobacter baumannii-Derived Membrane Vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Suk Jin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii secretes outer membrane vesicles (OMVs. A. baumannii OMVs deliver many virulence factors to host cells and then induce cytotoxicity and innate immune response. OMVs secreted from bacteria contribute directly to host pathology during A. baumannii infection.

  12. Patterns of Surface Immobilized Block Copolymer Vesicle Nanoreactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Qi; de Groot, G.W.; Schönherr, Holger; Vancso, Gyula J.

    2011-01-01

    The immobilization and positioning of ultra small reaction vessels on solid supports open new pathways in applications such as lab-on-a-chip, sensors, microanalyses and microreactors. In our work block copolymer vesicles made from polystyrene-block-polyacrylic acid (PS-b-PAA) were immobilized from

  13. Cdk5 is essential for synaptic vesicle endocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Timothy C; Valova, Valentina A; Malladi, Chandra S

    2003-01-01

    Synaptic vesicle endocytosis (SVE) is triggered by calcineurin-mediated dephosphorylation of the dephosphin proteins. SVE is maintained by the subsequent rephosphorylation of the dephosphins by unidentified protein kinases. Here, we show that cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) phosphorylates dynamin...

  14. Response of midpiece vesicles on human sperm to osmotic stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abraham-Peskir, Joanna V; Chantler, Eric; Uggerhøj, Erik

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We investigated the osmotic response of midpiece vesicles (MPV) on human sperm. METHODS: Light microscopy, transmission X-ray microscopy and computer-aided semen analysis was used to investigate sperm in normozoospermic semen from healthy donors, separated from semen and suspended...

  15. Packing states of multilamellar vesicles in a nonionic surfactant system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le, T.D.; Olsson, U.; Mortensen, K.

    2001-01-01

    under shear. Here, we focused only in the MLV region, L-alpha(*), of a temperature sensitive surfactant system (C12E4-water) to investigate the packing of multilamellar vesicles as a function of temperature under constant shear. Two sets of temperature scan experiments were performed in the L...

  16. Intermedin inhibits norepinephrine-induced contraction of rat seminal vesicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.F. Wong

    2014-09-01

    Conclusion: The results demonstrated that the inhibitory action of IMD on NE-induced seminal vesicle contraction was mediated via the ADM receptor(s and the nitric oxide production pathway, partially by the IMD receptor, but not by the CGRP receptor and the cAMP-PKA pathway.

  17. Glucose-oxidase based self-destructing polymeric vesicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Napoli, A.; Boerakker, M.J.; Tirelli, N.; Nolte, R.J.M.; Sommerdijk, N.A.J.M.; Hubbell, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    We have designed oxidation-responsive vesicles from synthetic amphiphilic block copolymers ("polymersomes") of ethylene glycol and propylene sulfide. Thioethers in the hydrophobic poly(propylene sulfide) block are converted into the more hydrophilic sulfoxides and sulfones upon exposure to an

  18. Proteomic analysis of cerebrospinal fluid extracellular vesicles: A comprehensive dataset

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chiasserini, D.; van Weering, J.R.T.; Piersma, S.R.; Pham, T.V.; Malekzadeh, A.; Teunissen, C.E.; de Wit, H.; Jimenez, C.R.

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are present in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), yet little is known about their protein composition. The aim of this study is to provide a comprehensive analysis of the proteome of CSF EVs by electron microscopy and high resolution tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) in

  19. Cell-derived vesicles exposing coagulant tissue factor in saliva

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berckmans, René J.; Sturk, Auguste; van Tienen, Laurens M.; Schaap, Marianne C. L.; Nieuwland, Rienk

    2011-01-01

    On vascular damage, coagulation is initiated by extravascular tissue factor (TF). Intravascular TF, which is present on circulating cell-derived vesicles, is non-coagulant under physiologic conditions but prothrombotic under pathologic conditions. Human saliva triggers coagulation, but the mechanism

  20. Cell-derived vesicles exposing coagulant tissue factor in saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berckmans, René J; Sturk, Auguste; van Tienen, Laurens M; Schaap, Marianne C L; Nieuwland, Rienk

    2011-03-17

    On vascular damage, coagulation is initiated by extravascular tissue factor (TF). Intravascular TF, which is present on circulating cell-derived vesicles, is noncoagulant under physiologic conditions but prothrombotic under pathologic conditions. Human saliva triggers coagulation, but the mechanism and physiologic relevance are unknown. Because saliva is known to contain TF, we hypothesized that this TF may also be associated with cell-derived vesicles to facilitate coagulation when saliva directly contacts blood. The saliva-induced shortening of the clotting time of autologous plasma and whole blood from healthy subjects (n = 10) proved TF-dependent. This TF was associated with various types of cell-derived vesicles, including microparticles and exosomes. The physiologic function was shown by adding saliva to human pericardial wound blood collected from patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Addition of saliva shortened the clotting time from 300 ± 96 to 186 ± 24 seconds (P = .03). Our results show that saliva triggers coagulation, thereby reducing blood loss and the risk of pathogens entering the blood. We postulate that our reflex to lick a wound may be a mechanism to enable TF-exposing vesicles, present in saliva, to aid in the coagulation process and thus protect the organism from entering pathogens. This unique compartmentalization may be highly conserved because also animals lick their wounds.

  1. Extracellular vesicles in human follicular fluid do not promote coagulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franz, Cordula; Böing, Anita N.; Montag, Markus; Strowitzki, Thomas; Markert, Udo R.; Mastenbroek, Sebastiaan; Nieuwland, Rienk; Toth, Bettina

    2016-01-01

    Body fluids contain extracellular vesicles expressing tissue factor on their surface and serve as an additional trigger for coagulation. During the menstrual cycle ovarian tissue restoration is mandatory and it is unknown whether follicular fluid might provide procoagulant substances. Within an

  2. The role of extracellular vesicles in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quek, Camelia; Hill, Andrew F

    2017-02-19

    Extracellular vesicles, including exosomes, are small membranous vesicles released from many biotypes, contributing to the disease progression and spreading. These extracellular vesicles provide an important mode of cell-to-cell communication by delivering proteins, lipids and RNA to target cells. Exosomes are found associated with neurodegenerative diseases, which are characterised by progressive degeneration of neurons and often associated with misfolded protein. The common diseases include Parkinson's disease (PD), Alzheimer's diseases (AD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and the prion diseases. Of all neurodegenerative diseases, prion diseases are classified as the distinctive group owing to its transmissible and infectious nature of misfolded prion protein. The infectious prion particles have been demonstrated to be present in exosomes to spread prion infectivity within cells. Similarly, misfolded proteins involved in other neurodegenerative diseases such as Amyloid-β and tau in AD, α-synuclein in PD, and superoxide dismutase 1 in ALS have been demonstrated to exploit exosomes for induced spreading of misfolded proteins in a prion-like mechanism. Furthermore, RNA molecules can be taken up by the recipient cells as cargo in exosomes. These RNAs can module the expression of the target genes by repressing or inhibiting protein translation. Here we review the role of exosomes in prion diseases and other common neurodegenerative diseases, and discuss the potential of these vesicles for disease pathogenesis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Transmembrane topology of the acetylcholine receptor examined in reconstituted vesicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCrea, P.D.

    1987-01-01

    Each of the five acetylcholine receptor (AChR) subunits, ..cap alpha../sub 2/..beta..-..gamma..delta, is believed to have the same number of transmembrane crossing and to share the same general folding pattern. AChR isolated from the electric organ of electric fish is predominantly dimeric. We have used this bridge as a marker for the C-terminus of the delta subunit, and presumably that of the other subunits in addition. The disulfide's accessibility to hydrophilic reductants, principally glutathione (GSH), was tested in a reconstituted vesicle system. The reduction of the delta-delta desulfide, as evidenced by the transition of AChrR dimers to monomers, was quantitatively monitored on velocity sedimentation sucrose gradients. Alternatively, the reduction of delta/sub 2/ to delta was followed by employing non-reducing SDS-PAGE. Reductants such as GSH were able to access the bridge in intact right-side-out vesicles. No acceleration of this process was evident when the vesicles were disrupted by freeze-thaw or by detergents. Control experiments which determined the rate of reduction of entrapped diphtheria toxin, or that of /sup 3/H-GSH efflux, demonstrated that intact reconstituted vesicles provide an adequate permeability barrier to GSH access of their intravesicular space.

  4. Synthesis of Micro/Nano Crystalline Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Philip; Isac, Sheelakumari; Abraham, Rosalin; Isac, Jayakumari

    2008-04-01

    As a matter of fact almost every industrial production line, office and home is dependant on ceramic materials. Newly designed devices incorporate ceramic materials because of their useful chemical, electrical, mechanical, thermal and structural properties. The effectiveness of a large system depends critically on its ceramic components. That is ceramics are important, first because they comprise a large basic industry and second because their properties are essential for many applications. Ceramics are more stable than metals both in chemical and thermal environments. In this work the authors describes a method for the preparation of PBT ceramics material from lead oxide (PbO), barium carbonate and titanium oxide based on pre-calcinations of oxides. The results were analyzed by X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Infrared Spectroscopy (IR) and TGA. XRD and SEM studies revealed that its particle size is in nanometer range. Dielectric studies were conducted at a frequency range of 100 KHz to 13 MHz. Mechanical properties were calculated.

  5. Ceramics as biomaterials for dental restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höland, Wolfram; Schweiger, Marcel; Watzke, Ronny; Peschke, Arnd; Kappert, Heinrich

    2008-11-01

    Sintered ceramics and glass-ceramics are widely used as biomaterials for dental restoration, especially as dental inlays, onlays, veneers, crowns or bridges. Biomaterials were developed either to veneer metal frameworks or to produce metal-free dental restorations. Different types of glass-ceramics and ceramics are available and necessary today to fulfill customers' needs (patients, dentists and dental technicians) regarding the properties of the biomaterials and the processing of the products. All of these different types of biomaterials already cover the entire range of indications of dental restorations. Today, patients are increasingly interested in metal-free restoration. Glass-ceramics are particularly suitable for fabricating inlays, crowns and small bridges, as these materials achieve very strong, esthetic results. High-strength ceramics are preferred in situations where the material is exposed to high masticatory forces.

  6. Process for making ceramic hot gas filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Elizabeth Sokolinski; Forsythe, George Daniel; Domanski, Daniel Matthew; Chambers, Jeffrey Allen; Rajendran, Govindasamy Paramasivam

    2001-01-01

    A ceramic hot-gas candle filter having a porous support of filament-wound oxide ceramic yarn at least partially surrounded by a porous refractory oxide ceramic matrix, and a membrane layer on at least one surface thereof. The membrane layer may be on the outer surface, the inner surface, or both the outer and inner surface of the porous support. The membrane layer may be formed of an ordered arrangement of circularly wound, continuous filament oxide ceramic yarn, a ceramic filler material which is less permeable than the filament-wound support structure, or some combination of continuous filament and filler material. A particularly effective membrane layer features circularly wound filament with gaps intentionally placed between adjacent windings, and a filler material of ceramic particulates uniformly distributed throughout the gap region. The filter can withstand thermal cycling during backpulse cleaning and is resistant to chemical degradation at high temperatures.

  7. BasePetroCeram: a database for petrographic and geochemical analysis of archaeological ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Barreau, Jean-Baptiste; Gehres, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Based on ceramics petrographic and geochemical studies, "BasePetroCeram" project aims to reference petrographic and geochemical analysis of archaeological ceramics from France. In the form of a secure database associated with a web interface, this tool allows a stronger recognition of ceramic bodies, as well as exchanges over long distances, but also collaboration of research teams and emergence of new issues. From a technical point of view, the web framework used is F...

  8. Polymeric vesicles: from drug carriers to nanoreactors and artificial organelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Pascal; Baumann, Patric; Enea, Ramona; Onaca, Ozana; Palivan, Cornelia; Meier, Wolfgang

    2011-10-18

    One strategy in modern medicine is the development of new platforms that combine multifunctional compounds with stable, safe carriers in patient-oriented therapeutic strategies. The simultaneous detection and treatment of pathological events through interactions manipulated at the molecular level offer treatment strategies that can decrease side effects resulting from conventional therapeutic approaches. Several types of nanocarriers have been proposed for biomedical purposes, including inorganic nanoparticles, lipid aggregates, including liposomes, and synthetic polymeric systems, such as vesicles, micelles, or nanotubes. Polymeric vesicles--structures similar to lipid vesicles but created using synthetic block copolymers--represent an excellent candidate for new nanocarriers for medical applications. These structures are more stable than liposomes but retain their low immunogenicity. Significant efforts have been made to improve the size, membrane flexibility, and permeability of polymeric vesicles and to enhance their target specificity. The optimization of these properties will allow researchers to design smart compartments that can co-encapsulate sensitive molecules, such as RNA, enzymes, and proteins, and their membranes allow insertion of membrane proteins rather than simply serving as passive carriers. In this Account, we illustrate the advances that are shifting these molecular systems from simple polymeric carriers to smart-complex protein-polymer assemblies, such as nanoreactors or synthetic organelles. Polymeric vesicles generated by the self-assembly of amphiphilic copolymers (polymersomes) offer the advantage of simultaneous encapsulation of hydrophilic compounds in their aqueous cavities and the insertion of fragile, hydrophobic compounds in their membranes. This strategy has permitted us and others to design and develop new systems such as nanoreactors and artificial organelles in which active compounds are simultaneously protected and allowed to

  9. Salt splitting with ceramic membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurath, D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this task is to develop ceramic membrane technologies for salt splitting of radioactively contaminated sodium salt solutions. This technology has the potential to reduce the low-level waste (LLW) disposal volume, the pH and sodium hydroxide content for subsequent processing steps, the sodium content of interstitial liquid in high-level waste (HLW) sludges, and provide sodium hydroxide free of aluminum for recycle within processing plants at the DOE complex. Potential deployment sites include Hanford, Savannah River, and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The technical approach consists of electrochemical separation of sodium ions from the salt solution using sodium (Na) Super Ion Conductors (NaSICON). As the name implies, sodium ions are transported rapidly through these ceramic crystals even at room temperatures.

  10. Silsesquioxane-derived ceramic fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, F. I.; Farmer, S. C.; Terepka, F. M.; Leonhardt, T. A.

    1991-01-01

    Fibers formed from blends of silsesquioxane polymers were characterized to study the pyrolytic conversion of these precursors to ceramics. The morphology of fibers pyrolyzed to 1400 C revealed primarily amorphous glasses whose conversion to beta-SiC is a function of both blend composition and pyrolysis conditions. Formation of beta-SiC crystallites within the glassy phase is favored by higher than stoichiometric C/Si ratios, while carbothermal reduction of Si-O bonds to form SiC with loss of SiO and CO occurs at higher methyl/phenylpropyl silsesquioxane (lower C/Si) ratios. As the carbothermal reduction is assumed to be diffusion controlled, the fibers can serve as model systems to gain understanding of the silsesquioxane pyrolysis behavior, and therefore are useful in the development of polysilsesquioxane-derived ceramic matrices and coatings as well.

  11. Ceramics: Durability and radiation effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewing, R.C.; Lutze, W. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Weber, W.J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-05-01

    At present, there are three seriously considered options for the disposition of excess weapons plutonium: (1) incorporation, partial burn-up and direct disposal of MOX-fuel; (2) vitrification with defense waste and disposal as glass {open_quotes}logs{close_quotes}; (3) deep borehole disposal. The first two options provide a safeguard due to the high activity of fission products in the irradiated fuel and the defense waste. The latter option has only been examined in a preliminary manner, and the exact form of the plutonium has not been identified. In this paper, we review the potential for the immobilization of plutonium in highly durable crystalline ceramics apatite, pyrochlore, zirconolite, monazite and zircon. Based on available data, we propose zircon as the preferred crystalline ceramic for the permanent disposition of excess weapons plutonium.

  12. Manufacturing tailored property ceramic composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewsuk, K.G. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Ceramic Processing Science Dept.; Harrison, L.W. [E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Co., Inc., Wilmington, DE (United States). Central Research and Development Dept.

    1994-11-14

    Composite materials are desirable for many advanced engineering applications where the properties of a single phase material cannot meet all of the service requirements; however, existing process technology has limited the development and commercialization of composites. Lack of reproducible sintering to high density is one of the major obstacles to commercializing ceramic composites. Final-stage, non-reactive liquid phase sintering (NLPS) theory provides metrics for sinterability that can be used as guidelines to design and manufacture dense ceramic-filled-glass (CFG) composites. Additionally, within the constraints defined by the NLPS theory, sum-property models can be used to predict CFG composite properties, and to design composites with properties tailored to specific applications. By integrating composite process models with composite property models, processable, application-tailored CFG composites for microelectronics packaging have been designed and fabricated.

  13. Mullite Ceramics at Extreme Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalita, Patricia; Cornelius, Andrew; Lipinska, Kris; Hemmers, Oliver; Sinogeikin, Stanislav; Fisher, Reinhard; Schneider, Hartmut

    2013-03-01

    Mullite is perhaps one of the most important phases in both traditional and advanced ceramics and thus one of the most widely studied ceramic phases. Even though the thermo-elastic behavior of mullites have been studied extensively (spectroscopy, diffraction, dilatometry, theoretical simulations), there are only few studies into the effects of pressure on mullites. This work aims at filling this gap by examining the role of oxygen vacancies on the mechanical stability and on the bulk modulus of mullite-type structures. DAAD, German Research Council, DFG No FI442/14-1. DOE-NNSA DE-FC08-01NV14049. DOE-BES, DOE-NNSA, NSF, DOD -TACOM, the W.M. Keck Found. DOE-BES, W-31-109-ENG-38.

  14. Experiences with voice to design ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Tvede; Jensen, Kristoffer

    2014-01-01

    This article presents SoundShaping, a system to create ceramics from the human voice and thus how digital technology makes new possibilities in ceramic craft. The article is about how experiential knowledge that the craftsmen gains in a direct physical and tactile interaction with a responding....... The shape is output to a 3D printer to make ceramic results. The system demonstrates the close connection between digital technology and craft practice. Several experiments and reflections demonstrate the validity of this work....

  15. Tantalum-Based Ceramics for Refractory Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, David A.; Leiser, Daniel; DiFiore, Robert; Kalvala, Victor

    2006-01-01

    A family of tantalum-based ceramics has been invented as ingredients of high-temperature composite insulating tiles. These materials are suitable for coating and/or permeating the outer layers of rigid porous (foam-like or fibrous) ceramic substrates to (1) render the resulting composite ceramic tiles impervious to hot gases and (2) enable the tiles to survive high heat fluxes at temperatures that can exceed 3,000 F ( 1,600 C).

  16. Low-thermal expansion infrared glass ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Philip

    2009-05-01

    L2 Tech, Inc. is in development of an innovative infrared-transparent glass ceramic material with low-thermal expansion (ZrW2O8) which has Negative Thermal Expansion (NTE). The glass phase is the infrared-transparent germanate glass which has positive thermal expansion (PTE). Then glass ceramic material has a balanced thermal expansion of near zero. The crystal structure is cubic and the thermal expansion of the glass ceramic is isotropic or equal in all directions.

  17. Synthesis of luminescent ceramics from alumina nanopowder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortov, V.; Kiryakov, A.; Ananchenko, D.; Zvonarev, S.

    2015-11-01

    The effect of the conditions of high-temperature synthesis in a reducing medium on the density, area and cathodoluminescence of ceramics made of compacted α-Al2O3 powder is the focus of this work. The dependence of the luminescence intensity on the temperature and duration of the synthesis of ceramics is presented. The optimal parameters for synthesis of luminescent ceramics from alumina nanopowder are defined.

  18. Multiphase-Multifunctional Ceramic Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-30

    Ceramic Coatings Performing Organization names: Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional – Unidad Queretaro...University of California, Santa Barbara Principal Investigator / Organization: Dr . Luis Gerardo Trápaga Martínez CINVESTAV-Querétaro Principal...Investigator US collaboration / Organization: Dr . Carlos G. Levi University of California, Santa Barbara Reporting Period Final Dates covered

  19. Reconstitution of lipid vesicles associated with HVJ (Sendai virus) sikes. Purification and some properties of vesicles containing nontoxic fragment A of diphtheria toxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    A mixture of HVJ (Sendai virus) spike proteins, the nontoxic fragment A of diphtheria toxin, lecithin, and cholesterol was solubilized in sucrose solution containing a nonionic neutral detergent. The liposomal vesicles which formed on removal of the detergent by dialysis were purified by gel filtration and centrifugation on a sucrose gradient. The resulting purified vesicles had hemagglutinating activity, hemolytic activity and, after solubilization, the enzymic activity of fragment A. The vesicles had no cell fusion activity. Electron microscopy showed that both the outside and inside of membranes of the vesicles were associated with the spikes. When the vesicles were freeze- fractured, no large aggregates of particles were seen on either face. Such fragment A-containing lipid vesicles (liposomes) with HVJ spikes bound to mamalian cell membrane and released their fragment A into the cytoplasm causing cell death. Neither fragment A-containing liposomes without spikes nor empty liposomes with spikes were toxic. PMID:217880

  20. Evaluation of bond strength of various margin ceramics to a zirconia ceramic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Comlekoglu, M. Erhan; Dundar, Mine; Ozcan, Mutlu; Gungor, M. Ali; Gokce, Bulent; Artunc, Celal

    2008-01-01

    Objective: This study evaluated the bond strengths of four different margin ceramics based on fluoroapatite and feldspath to a zirconia ceramic. Methods: Zirconia cores (Zirconzahn) (N = 28, n = 7/margin ceramic group) were fabricated according to the manufacturers' instructions (diameter: 4 mm;

  1. Ceramic Technology Project database: March 1990 summary report. DOE/ORNL Ceramic Technology Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keyes, B.L.P.

    1992-07-01

    This report is the fifth in a series of semiannual data summary reports on information being stored in the Ceramic Technology Project (CTP) database. The overall system status as of March 31, 1990, is summarized, and the latest additions of ceramic mechanical properties data are given for zirconia, silicon carbide, and silicon nitride ceramic mechanical properties data, including some properties on brazed specimens.

  2. The Electrospun Ceramic Hollow Nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahin Homaeigohar

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Hollow nanofibers are largely gaining interest from the scientific community for diverse applications in the fields of sensing, energy, health, and environment. The main reasons are: their extensive surface area that increases the possibilities of engineering, their larger accessible active area, their porosity, and their sensitivity. In particular, semiconductor ceramic hollow nanofibers show greater space charge modulation depth, higher electronic transport properties, and shorter ion or electron diffusion length (e.g., for an enhanced charging–discharging rate. In this review, we discuss and introduce the latest developments of ceramic hollow nanofiber materials in terms of synthesis approaches. Particularly, electrospinning derivatives will be highlighted. The electrospun ceramic hollow nanofibers will be reviewed with respect to their most widely studied components, i.e., metal oxides. These nanostructures have been mainly suggested for energy and environmental remediation. Despite the various advantages of such one dimensional (1D nanostructures, their fabrication strategies need to be improved to increase their practical use. The domain of nanofabrication is still advancing, and its predictable shortcomings and bottlenecks must be identified and addressed. Inconsistency of the hollow nanostructure with regard to their composition and dimensions could be one of such challenges. Moreover, their poor scalability hinders their wide applicability for commercialization and industrial use.

  3. Ceramic technology for Advanced Heat Engines Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, D.R.

    1991-07-01

    Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. However, these programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and database and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. An assessment of needs was completed, and a five year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on the structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to US industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities. This project is managed by ORNL for the Office of Transportation Technologies, Office of Transportation Materials, and is closely coordinated with complementary ceramics tasks funded by other DOE offices, NASA, DOD, and industry.

  4. Emerging ceramic-based materials for dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denry, I; Kelly, J R

    2014-12-01

    Our goal is to give an overview of a selection of emerging ceramics and issues for dental or biomedical applications, with emphasis on specific challenges associated with full-contour zirconia ceramics, and a brief synopsis on new machinable glass-ceramics and ceramic-based interpenetrating phase composites. Selected fabrication techniques relevant to dental or biomedical applications such as microwave sintering, spark plasma sintering, and additive manufacturing are also reviewed. Where appropriate, the authors have added their opinions and guidance. © International & American Associations for Dental Research.

  5. Ceramic-Metal Interfaces in Multilayer Actuators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engell, John; Pedersen, Henrik Guldberg; Andersen, Bjørn

    1996-01-01

    on the quality and strength of this interface. In the case of a weak ceramic-metal interface, delaminations will occur under severe working conditions.Work has been carried out on a commercial PZT type ceramic and various types of Pt electrode paste. The present study involves characterization of the interface......Multilayer actuators consist of a number of piezoelectric or electrostrictive ceramic layers, separated by thin metal electrodes. Thus, the ceramic-metal interface plays an even more important role than for bulk piezoceramics. The performance and durability of the actuator depends closely...

  6. Ceramic Technology For Advanced Heat Engines Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-01

    Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the Department of Energy (DOE), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and Department of Defense (DoD) advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. However, these programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. The objective of the project is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on the structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. This advanced materials technology is being developed in parallel and close coordination with the ongoing DOE and industry proof of concept engine development programs. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to U.S. industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities. Abstracts prepared for appropriate papers.

  7. Portland blended cements: demolition ceramic waste management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Trezza

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Demolition ceramic wastes (DCWs were investigated in order to determine their potential use as supplementary cementitious materials in Portland Blended Cements (PBCs. For this purpose, three ceramic wastes were investigated. After characterization of the materials used, the effect of ceramic waste replacement (8, 24 and 40% by mass was analyzed. Pozzolanic activity, hydration progress, workability and compressive strength were determined at 2, 7 and 28 days. The results showed that the ground wastes behave as filler at an early age, but as hydration progresses, the pozzolanic activity of ceramic waste contributes to the strength requirement.

  8. Manufacturing of superconductive silver/ceramic composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seifi, Behrouz; Bech, Jakob Ilsted; Eriksen, Morten

    2000-01-01

    Manufacturing of superconducting metal/ceramic composites is a rather new discipline within materials forming processes. High Temperature SuperConductors, HTSC, are manufactured applying the Oxide-Powder-In-Tube process, OPIT. A ceramic powder containing lead, calcium, bismuth, strontium, and cop......Manufacturing of superconducting metal/ceramic composites is a rather new discipline within materials forming processes. High Temperature SuperConductors, HTSC, are manufactured applying the Oxide-Powder-In-Tube process, OPIT. A ceramic powder containing lead, calcium, bismuth, strontium...

  9. Improved Slip Casting Of Ceramic Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Gregory M.; Vasquez, Peter; Hicks, Lana P.

    1994-01-01

    Improved technique of investment slip casting developed for making precise ceramic wind-tunnel models. Needed in wind-tunnel experiments to verify predictions of aerothermodynamical computer codes. Ceramic materials used because of their low heat conductivities and ability to survive high temperatures. Present improved slip-casting technique enables casting of highly detailed models from aqueous or nonaqueous solutions. Wet shell molds peeled off models to ensure precise and undamaged details. Used at NASA Langley Research Center to form superconducting ceramic components from nonaqueous slip solutions. Technique has many more applications when ceramic materials developed further for such high-strength/ temperature components as engine parts.

  10. Genetically controlled fusion, exocytosis and fission of artificial vesicles-a roadmap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bönzli, Eva; Hadorn, Maik; de Lucrezia, Davide

    2011-01-01

    were shown to fuse if a special class of viral proteins, termed fusogenic peptides, were added to the external medium (Nomura et al. 2004). In the present work, we intend to develop genetically controlled fusion, fission and exocytosis of vesicles by the synthesis of peptides within vesicles. First, we...... enclosed synthesized peptides in vesicles to induce in a next step fusion of adjacent vesicles, fission and exocytosis of nested vesicles. Second, we will replace the peptides by an enclosed cell-free expression system to internally synthesize fusion peptides. To control the gene expression, different...

  11. Role of extracellular vesicles in de novo mineralization: an additional novel mechanism of cardiovascular calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New, Sophie E P; Aikawa, Elena

    2013-08-01

    Extracellular vesicles are membrane micro/nanovesicles secreted by many cell types into the circulation and the extracellular milieu in physiological and pathological conditions. Evidence suggests that extracellular vesicles, known as matrix vesicles, play a role in the mineralization of skeletal tissue, but emerging ultrastructural and in vitro studies have demonstrated their contribution to cardiovascular calcification as well. Cells involved in the progression of cardiovascular calcification release active vesicles capable of nucleating hydroxyapatite on their membranes. This review discusses the role of extracellular vesicles in cardiovascular calcification and elaborates on this additional mechanism of calcification as an alternative pathway to the currently accepted mechanism of biomineralization via osteogenic differentiation.

  12. Proteomic Analysis of Blood Extracellular Vesicles in Cardiovascular Disease by LC-MS/MS Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldan-Martin, Montserrat; de la Cuesta, Fernando; Alvarez-Llamas, Gloria; Ruiz-Hurtado, Gema; Ruilope, Luis M; Barderas, Maria G

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles are membrane vesicles related to cell communication. These vesicles consist of proteins, RNA, and microRNA and are an interesting and important tool to understand the processes taking place in the secreting cell, especially in diseases in which its release is often enhanced. The used of blood extracellular vesicles in cardiovascular disease as a low invasive, easily accessible source of circulating markers could give us important information related to pathological process even more with the use of proteomic analysis. In this chapter, we describe a protocol to isolate and proteomic analyze extracellular vesicles from blood associated with cardiovascular disease.

  13. Minimal experimental requirements for definition of extracellular vesicles and their functions: a position statement from the International Society for Extracellular Vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Andrew F.; Hochberg, Fred; Buzás, Edit I.; Di Vizio, Dolores; Gardiner, Christopher; Gho, Yong Song; Kurochkin, Igor V.; Mathivanan, Suresh; Quesenberry, Peter; Sahoo, Susmita; Tahara, Hidetoshi; Wauben, Marca H.; Witwer, Kenneth W.; Théry, Clotilde

    2014-01-01

    Secreted membrane-enclosed vesicles, collectively called extracellular vesicles (EVs), which include exosomes, ectosomes, microvesicles, microparticles, apoptotic bodies and other EV subsets, encompass a very rapidly growing scientific field in biology and medicine. Importantly, it is currently technically challenging to obtain a totally pure EV fraction free from non-vesicular components for functional studies, and therefore there is a need to establish guidelines for analyses of these vesicles and reporting of scientific studies on EV biology. Here, the International Society for Extracellular Vesicles (ISEV) provides researchers with a minimal set of biochemical, biophysical and functional standards that should be used to attribute any specific biological cargo or functions to EVs. PMID:25536934

  14. Astrocyte VAMP3 vesicles undergo Ca2+-independent cycling and modulate glutamate transporter trafficking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongdong; Hérault, Karine; Zylbersztejn, Kathleen; Lauterbach, Marcel A; Guillon, Marc; Oheim, Martin; Ropert, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Key points Mouse cortical astrocytes express VAMP3 but not VAMP2. VAMP3 vesicles undergo Ca2+-independent exo- and endocytotic cycling at the plasma membrane. VAMP3 vesicle traffic regulates the recycling of plasma membrane glutamate transporters. cAMP modulates VAMP3 vesicle cycling and glutamate uptake. Abstract Previous studies suggest that small synaptic-like vesicles in astrocytes carry vesicle-associated vSNARE proteins, VAMP3 (cellubrevin) and VAMP2 (synaptobrevin 2), both contributing to the Ca2+-regulated exocytosis of gliotransmitters, thereby modulating brain information processing. Here, using cortical astrocytes taken from VAMP2 and VAMP3 knock-out mice, we find that astrocytes express only VAMP3. The morphology and function of VAMP3 vesicles were studied in cultured astrocytes at single vesicle level with stimulated emission depletion (STED) and total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopies. We show that VAMP3 antibodies label small diameter (∼80 nm) vesicles and that VAMP3 vesicles undergo Ca2+-independent exo-endocytosis. We also show that this pathway modulates the surface expression of plasma membrane glutamate transporters and the glutamate uptake by astrocytes. Finally, using pharmacological and optogenetic tools, we provide evidence suggesting that the cytosolic cAMP level influences astrocytic VAMP3 vesicle trafficking and glutamate transport. Our results suggest a new role for VAMP3 vesicles in astrocytes. PMID:25864578

  15. Lipid vesicle shape analysis from populations using light video microscopy and computer vision.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jernej Zupanc

    Full Text Available We present a method for giant lipid vesicle shape analysis that combines manually guided large-scale video microscopy and computer vision algorithms to enable analyzing vesicle populations. The method retains the benefits of light microscopy and enables non-destructive analysis of vesicles from suspensions containing up to several thousands of lipid vesicles (1-50 µm in diameter. For each sample, image analysis was employed to extract data on vesicle quantity and size distributions of their projected diameters and isoperimetric quotients (measure of contour roundness. This process enables a comparison of samples from the same population over time, or the comparison of a treated population to a control. Although vesicles in suspensions are heterogeneous in sizes and shapes and have distinctively non-homogeneous distribution throughout the suspension, this method allows for the capture and analysis of repeatable vesicle samples that are representative of the population inspected.

  16. Vesicle dynamics in a confined Poiseuille flow: From steady state to chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aouane, Othmane; Thiébaud, Marine; Benyoussef, Abdelilah; Wagner, Christian; Misbah, Chaouqi

    2014-09-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) are the major component of blood, and the flow of blood is dictated by that of RBCs. We employ vesicles, which consist of closed bilayer membranes enclosing a fluid, as a model system to study the behavior of RBCs under a confined Poiseuille flow. We extensively explore two main parameters: (i) the degree of confinement of vesicles within the channel and (ii) the flow strength. Rich and complex dynamics for vesicles are revealed, ranging from steady-state shapes (in the form of parachute and slipper shapes) to chaotic dynamics of shape. Chaos occurs through a cascade of multiple periodic oscillations of the vesicle shape. We summarize our results in a phase diagram in the parameter plane (degree of confinement and flow strength). This finding highlights the level of complexity of a flowing vesicle in the small Reynolds number where the flow is laminar in the absence of vesicles and can be rendered turbulent due to elasticity of vesicles.

  17. Focus on Extracellular Vesicles: Therapeutic Potential of Stem Cell-Derived Extracellular Vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Zhang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The intense research focus on stem and progenitor cells could be attributed to their differentiation potential to generate new cells to replace diseased or lost cells in many highly intractable degenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer disease, multiple sclerosis, and heart diseases. However, experimental and clinical studies have increasingly attributed the therapeutic efficacy of these cells to their secretion. While stem and progenitor cells secreted many therapeutic molecules, none of these molecules singly or in combination could recapitulate the functional effects of stem cell transplantations. Recently, it was reported that extracellular vesicles (EVs could recapitulate the therapeutic effects of stem cell transplantation. Based on the observations reported thus far, the prevailing hypothesis is that stem cell EVs exert their therapeutic effects by transferring biologically active molecules such as proteins, lipids, mRNA, and microRNA from the stem cells to injured or diseased cells. In this respect, stem cell EVs are similar to EVs from other cell types. They are both primarily vehicles for intercellular communication. Therefore, the differentiating factor is likely due to the composition of their cargo. The cargo of EVs from different cell types are known to include a common set of proteins and also proteins that reflect the cell source of the EVs and the physiological or pathological state of the cell source. Hence, elucidation of the stem cell EV cargo would provide an insight into the multiple physiological or biochemical changes necessary to affect the many reported stem cell-based therapeutic outcomes in a variety of experimental models and clinical trials.

  18. What every surgeon should know about Ceramic-on-Ceramic bearings in young patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernigou, Philippe; Roubineau, François; Bouthors, Charlie; Flouzat-Lachaniette, Charles-Henri

    2016-01-01

    Based on the exceptional tribological behaviour and on the relatively low biological activity of ceramic particles, Ceramic-on-Ceramic (CoC) total hip arthroplasty (THA) presents significant advantages CoC bearings decrease wear and osteolysis, the cumulative long-term risk of dislocation, muscle atrophy, and head-neck taper corrosion. However, there are still concerns regarding the best technique for implantation of ceramic hips to avoid fracture, squeaking, and revision of ceramic hips with fracture of a component. We recommend that surgeons weigh the potential advantages and disadvantages of current CoC THA in comparison with other bearing surfaces when considering young very active patients who are candidates for THA. Cite this article: Hernigou P, Roubineau F, Bouthors C, Flouzat-Lachaniette C-H. What every surgeon should know about Ceramic-on-Ceramic bearings in young patients. EFORT Open Rev 2016;1:107-111. DOI: 10.1302/2058-5241.1.000027. PMID:28461936

  19. Improving the strength of ceramics by controlling the interparticle forces and rheology of the ceramic suspensions

    CERN Document Server

    Chou, Y P

    2001-01-01

    This thesis describes a study of the modification of the interparticle forces of colloidal ceramic particles in aqueous suspensions in order to improve the microstructural homogeneity, and hence the reliability and mechanical performances, of subsequently formed ceramic compacts. A concentrated stable fine ceramic powder suspension has been shown to be able to generate a higher density of a ceramic product with better mechanical, and also electrical, electrochemical and optical, properties of the ceramic body. This is because in a colloidally stable suspension there are no aggregates and so defect formation, which is responsible for the ceramic body performance below its theoretical maximum, is reduced. In order to achieve this, it is necessary to form a well dispersed ceramic suspension by ensuring the interparticle forces between the particles are repulsive, with as a high a loading with particles as possible. By examining the rheological behaviour and the results of Atomic Force Microscope, the dispersion ...

  20. Comparative Study of Extracellular Vesicles from the Urine of Healthy Individuals and Prostate Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryzgunova, Olga E; Zaripov, Marat M; Skvortsova, Tatyana E; Lekchnov, Evgeny A; Grigor'eva, Alina E; Zaporozhchenko, Ivan A; Morozkin, Evgeny S; Ryabchikova, Elena I; Yurchenko, Yuri B; Voitsitskiy, Vladimir E; Laktionov, Pavel P

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that extracellular vesicles may be the key to timely diagnosis and monitoring of genito-urological malignancies. In this study we investigated the composition and content of extracellular vesicles found in the urine of healthy donors and prostate cancer patients. Urine of 14 PCa patients and 20 healthy volunteers was clarified by low-speed centrifugation and total extracellular vesicles fraction was obtain by high-speed centrifugation. The exosome-enriched fraction was obtained by filtration of total extracellular vesicles through a 0.1 μm pore filter. Transmission electron microscopy showed that cell-free urine in both groups contained vesicles from 20 to 230 nm. Immunogold staining after ultrafiltration demonstrated that 95% and 90% of extracellular vesicles in healthy individuals and cancer patients, respectively, were exosomes. Protein, DNA and RNA concentrations as well as size distribution of extracellular vesicles in both fractions were analyzed. Only 75% of the total protein content of extracellular vesicles was associated with exosomes which amounted to 90-95% of all vesicles. Median DNA concentrations in total extracellular vesicles and exosome-enriched fractions were 18 pg/ml and 2.6 pg/ml urine, correspondingly. Urine extracellular vesicles carried a population of RNA molecules 25 nt to 200 nt in concentration of no more than 290 pg/ml of urine. Additionally, concentrations of miR-19b, miR-25, miR-125b, and miR-205 were quantified by qRT-PCR. MiRNAs were shown to be differently distributed between different fractions of extracellular vesicles. Detection of miR-19b versus miR-16 in total vesicles and exosome-enriched fractions achieved 100%/93% and 95%/79% specificity/sensitivity in distinguishing cancer patients from healthy individuals, respectively, demonstrating the diagnostic value of urine extracellular vesicles.

  1. MAA-1, a novel acyl-CoA-binding protein involved in endosomal vesicle transport in Caenorhabditis elegans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kobæk Larsen, Morten; Tuck, Simon; Færgeman, Nils J.

    2006-01-01

    The budding and fission of vesicles during membrane trafficking requires many proteins, including those that coat the vesicles, adaptor proteins that recruit components of the coat, and small GTPases that initiate vesicle formation. In addition, vesicle formation in vitro is promoted by the hydro...

  2. Three-component vesicle aggregation driven by adhesion interactions between Au nanoparticles and polydopamine-coated nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Haibao; Zhou, Yongfeng; Huang, Wei; Zheng, Yongli; Zhu, Xinyuan; Yan, Deyue

    2014-06-11

    Large-scale and robust vesicle aggregates were obtained through molecular recognition among cell-sized polymer vesicles, carbon nanotubes and AuNPs, driven by adhesion interactions between Au and polydopamine. Vesicle fusion was effectively avoided in this three-component vesicle aggregation process.

  3. Influence of ceramic thickness and ceramic materials on fracture resistance of posterior partial coverage restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakeman, E M; Rego, N; Chaiyabutr, Y; Kois, J C

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of ceramic thickness and ceramic materials on fracture resistance of posterior partial coverage ceramic restorations. Forty extracted molars were allocated into four groups (n=10) to test for two variables: 1) the thickness of ceramic (1 mm or 2 mm) and 2) the ceramic materials (a lithium disilicate glass-ceramic [IPS e.max] or leucite-reinforced glass ceramic [IPS Empress]). All ceramic restorations were luted with resin cement (Variolink II) on the prepared teeth. These luted specimens were loaded to failure in a universal testing machine, in the compression mode, with a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min. The data were analyzed using two-way analysis of variance and the Tukey Honestly Significantly Different multiple comparison test (α =0.05). The fracture resistance revealed a significant effect for materials (pmaterials was not significant (p=0.406). Mean (standard deviation) fracture resistance values were as follows: a 2-mm thickness of a lithium disilicate bonded to tooth structure (2505 [401] N) revealed a significantly higher fracture resistance than did a 1-mm thickness of leucite-reinforced (1569 [452] N) and a 2-mm thickness of leucite-reinforced ceramic bonded to tooth structure (1716 [436] N) (presistance values between a lithium disilicate ceramic at 1-mm thickness (2105 [567] N) and at 2-mm thickness. Using a lithium disilicate glass ceramic for partial coverage restoration significantly improved fracture resistance compared to using a leucite-reinforced glass ceramic. The thickness of ceramic had no significant effect on fracture resistance when the ceramics were bonded to the underlying tooth structure.

  4. Science and Technology of Ceramics -16 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Science and Technology of Ceramics. 1. Traditional Ceramics. Sheela K Ramasesha is at present in the. Materials Science. Division of the National Aerospace. Laboratories, Bangalore as a senior UGC Re- search. Scientist. She got her. PhD from Indian Institutt of Science in 1980 and was a post doctoral. Fellow at ...

  5. Dense ceramic membranes for methane conversion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwmeester, Henricus J.M.

    2003-01-01

    Dense ceramic membranes made from mixed oxygen-ionic and electronic conducting perovskite-related oxides allow separation of oxygen from an air supply at elevated temperatures (>700 °C). By combining air separation and catalytic partial oxidation of methane to syngas into a ceramic membrane reactor,

  6. Experiences with Voice to Design Ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Tvede; Jensen, Kristoffer

    2013-01-01

    This article presents SoundShaping, a system to create ceramics from the human voice and thus how digital technology makes new possibilities in ceramic craft. The article is about how experiential knowledge that the craftsmen gains in a direct physical and tactile interaction with a responding...

  7. Fabrication of hybrid ceramic matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haug, S. B.; Dharani, L. R.; Carroll, D. R.

    1994-03-01

    The desire to improve the transverse properties and microcracking stress of unidirectional continuous fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites has led to development of the hybrid ceramic matrix composite (HCMC). This paper discusses the techniques we used in the fabrication of HCMC specimens used for mechanical characterization.

  8. New ceramic materials; Nuevos materiales ceramicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno, R.; Dominguez-Rodriguez, A.

    2010-07-01

    This article is to provide a new ceramic materials in which, with a control of their processing and thus their microstructural properties, you can get ceramic approaching ever closer to a metal, both in its structural behavior at low as at high temperatures. (Author) 30 refs.

  9. Shock wave fabricated ceramic-metal nozzles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carton, E.P.; Stuivinga, M.E.C.; Keizers, H.L.J.; Verbeek, H.J.; Put, P.J. van der

    1999-01-01

    Shock compaction was used in the fabrication of high temperature ceramic-based materials. The materials' development was geared towards the fabrication of nozzles for rocket engines using solid propellants, for which the following metal-ceramic (cermet) materials were fabricated and tested: B4C-Ti

  10. Prestresses in bilayered all-ceramic restorations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aboushelib, M.N.; Feilzer, A.J.; de Jager, N.; Kleverlaan, C.J.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: A general trend in all ceramic systems is to use veneering ceramics of slightly lower thermal expansion coefficients compared with that of the framework resulting in a positive mismatch in thermal expansion coefficient (+ΔTEC). The concept behind this TEC mismatch is to generate

  11. Kinetic partitioning between aggregation and vesicle permeabilization by modified ADan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nesgaard, Lise W.; Vad, Brian; Christiansen, Gunna

    2009-01-01

    changed to serines to emulate the reduced peptide. SerADan aggregates rapidly at pH 5.0 and 7.5 in a series of conformational transitions to form beta-sheet rich fibril-like structures, which nevertheless do not bind amyloid-specific dyes, probably due to the absence of organized beta-sheet contacts....... Aggregation is prevented at neutral/acidic pH and low ionic strength by anionic lipid vesicles. These vesicles are permeabilized by monomeric SerADan assembling on the membrane to form stable beta-sheet structures which are different from the solution aggregates. In contrast, solution ageing of SerADan first......-fibrillar aggregates can assemble in a series of steps to form a hierarchy of higher-order assemblies, where rapid formation of stable local beta-sheet structure may prevent rearrangement to amyloid proper....

  12. Decoding the Secret of Cancer by Means of Extracellular Vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuyoshi Kosaka

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the recent outstanding developments in cancer biology is the emergence of extracellular vesicles (EVs. EVs, which are small membrane vesicles that contain proteins, mRNAs, long non-coding RNAs, and microRNAs (miRNAs, are secreted by a variety of cells and have been revealed to play an important role in intercellular communications. These molecules function in the recipient cells; this has brought new insight into cell-cell communication. Recent reports have shown that EVs contribute to cancer cell development, including tumor initiation, angiogenesis, immune surveillance, drug resistance, invasion, metastasis, maintenance of cancer stem cells, and EMT phenotype. In this review, I will summarize recent studies on EV-mediated miRNA transfer in cancer biology. Furthermore, I will also highlight the possibility of novel diagnostics and therapy using miRNAs in EVs against cancer.

  13. Decoding the Secret of Cancer by Means of Extracellular Vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosaka, Nobuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    One of the recent outstanding developments in cancer biology is the emergence of extracellular vesicles (EVs). EVs, which are small membrane vesicles that contain proteins, mRNAs, long non-coding RNAs, and microRNAs (miRNAs), are secreted by a variety of cells and have been revealed to play an important role in intercellular communications. These molecules function in the recipient cells; this has brought new insight into cell-cell communication. Recent reports have shown that EVs contribute to cancer cell development, including tumor initiation, angiogenesis, immune surveillance, drug resistance, invasion, metastasis, maintenance of cancer stem cells, and EMT phenotype. In this review, I will summarize recent studies on EV-mediated miRNA transfer in cancer biology. Furthermore, I will also highlight the possibility of novel diagnostics and therapy using miRNAs in EVs against cancer. PMID:26861408

  14. Complex motions of vesicles and capsules in flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlahovska, Petia; Young, Yuan-Nan; Misbah, Chaouqi

    2009-11-01

    Membrane-bound particles exhibit rich dynamics when placed in flow. For example, in simple shear flow, vesicles made of lipid bilayers tank-tread or tumble. Capsules and red blood cells also show oscillations in the tank-treading inclination angle, called swinging. This motion originates from membrane shear--elasticity and non--spherical unstressed shape. We develop an analytical theory that quantitatively describes the swinging dynamics. Our analysis takes into account that the membrane is deformable, incompressible, and resists bending and shearing. Analytical results for the shape evolution are derived by considering a nearly-spherical particle shape. The phase diagram is constructed and compared to previous models which assume fixed ellipsoidal shape. Dynamics in quadratic and time-dependent flows is also discussed. Floquet analysis is conducted to investigate the vesicle dynamics and conditions for chaotic shape and flow dynamics are established.

  15. Significance of Extracellular Vesicles: Pathobiological Roles in Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Seiji; Azuma, Erika; Muramatsu, Masashi; Hamashima, Takeru; Ishii, Yoko; Sasahara, Masakiyo

    2016-11-25

    Over the past decade, many studies have been conducted on extracellular vesicles (EVs) in the fields of basic and clinical research. EVs are small sized membranous vesicles generated from many type of cells upon activation by environmental stresses such as heat, hypoxia, and irradiation. EVs theoretically consist of microparticles/microvesicles, exosomes, and apoptotic bodies by different productive mechanisms. Clinically, EVs are observed in the blood stream of patients suffering from acute and chronic inflammation evoked by various diseases, and number of EVs in blood flow is often dependent on the inflammatory status and severity of the diseases. To date, it has been reported that small molecules such as RNAs and proteins are encapsulated in EVs; however, the functions of EVs are still unclear in the biological, pathological, and clinical aspects. In this review, we summarize and discuss the biogenesis-based classification, expected function, and pathobiological activities of EVs.

  16. Emerging roles of extracellular vesicles in cellular senescence and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takasugi, Masaki

    2018-02-01

    Cellular senescence is a cellular program that prevents the proliferation of cells at risk of neoplastic transformation. On the other hand, age-related accumulation of senescent cells promotes aging at least partially due to the senescence-associated secretory phenotype, whereby cells secrete high levels of inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and matrix metalloproteinases. Emerging evidence, however, indicates that extracellular vesicles (EVs) are important mediators of the effects of senescent cells on their microenvironment. Senescent cells secrete more EphA2 and DNA via EVs, which can promote cancer cell proliferation and inflammation, respectively. Extracellular vesicles secreted from DNA-damaged cells can also affect telomere regulation. Furthermore, it has now become clear that EVs actually play important roles in many aspects of aging. This review is intended to summarize these recent progresses, with emphasis on relationships between cellular senescence and EVs. © 2018 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Extracellular Vesicles as Therapeutic Agents in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Hernandez, Javier; Redon, Josep; Cortes, Raquel

    2017-03-28

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a heterogeneous autoimmune disease that affects multiple organs. Currently, therapeutic molecules present adverse side effects and are only effective in some SLE patient subgroups. Extracellular vesicles (EV), including exosomes, microvesicles and apoptotic bodies, are released by most cell types, carry nucleic acids, proteins and lipids and play a crucial role in cell-to-cell communication. EVs can stimulate or suppress the immune responses depending on the context. In SLE, EVs can work as autoadjuvants, enhance immune complex formation and maintaining inflammation state. Over the last years, EVs derived from mesenchymal stem cells and antigen presenting cells have emerged as cell-free therapeutic agents to treat autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. In this review, we summarize the current therapeutic applications of extracellular vesicles to regulate immune responses and to ameliorate disease activity in SLE and other autoimmune disorders.

  18. Understanding the biosynthesis of platelets-derived extracellular vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antwi-Baffour, Samuel; Adjei, Jonathan; Aryeh, Claudia; Kyeremeh, Ransford; Kyei, Foster; Seidu, Mahmood A

    2015-09-01

    Platelet-derived extracellular vesicles (PEVs) are described as sub-cellular vesicles released into circulation upon platelets shear stress, activation, injury, or apoptosis. They are considered as universal biomarkers in a wide range of physiological and pathological processes. They are of tremendous significance for the prediction, diagnosis, and observation of the therapeutic success of many diseases. Understanding their biosynthesis and therefore functional properties would contribute to a better understanding of the pathological mechanisms leading to various diseases in which their levels are raised and they are implicated. The review takes a critical look at the historical background of PEVs, their structural components, the mechanism of their formation, physiological, and exogenous stimuli inducing their release and their detection. It concludes by highlighting on the importance of undertaking in-depth studies into PEVs biosynthesis and subsequently gaining a better understanding of their biological role in general.

  19. Imaging and Quantification of Extracellular Vesicles by Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Romain; Tan, Sisareuth; Gounou, Céline; Brisson, Alain R

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are cell-derived vesicles that are present in blood and other body fluids. EVs raise major interest for their diverse physiopathological roles and their potential biomedical applications. However, the characterization and quantification of EVs constitute major challenges, mainly due to their small size and the lack of methods adapted for their study. Electron microscopy has made significant contributions to the EV field since their initial discovery. Here, we describe the use of two transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques for imaging and quantifying EVs. Cryo-TEM combined with receptor-specific gold labeling is applied to reveal the morphology, size, and phenotype of EVs, while their enumeration is achieved after high-speed sedimentation on EM grids.

  20. Curvature-Mediated Assembly of Janus Nanoparticles on Membrane Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrami, Amir Houshang; Weikl, Thomas R

    2018-01-08

    Besides direct particle-particle interactions, nanoparticles adsorbed to biomembranes experience indirect interactions that are mediated by the membrane curvature arising from particle adsorption. In this Letter, we show that the curvature-mediated interactions of adsorbed Janus particles depend on the initial curvature of the membrane prior to adsorption, that is, on whether the membrane initially bulges toward or away from the particles in our simulations. The curvature-mediated interaction can be strongly attractive for Janus particles adsorbed to the outside of a membrane vesicle, which initially bulges away from the particles. For Janus particles adsorbed to the vesicle inside, in contrast, the curvature-mediated interactions are repulsive. We find that the area fraction of the adhesive Janus particle surface is an important control parameter for the curvature-mediated interaction and assembly of the particles, besides the initial membrane curvature.

  1. Extracellular vesicles: small bricks for tissue repair/regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taverna, Simona; Pucci, Marzia; Alessandro, Riccardo

    2017-02-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are nano-sized membrane vesicles involved in intercellular communication. EVs have pleiotropic actions in physiological and pathological conditions. The ability of EVs to transports proteins, drugs and nucleic acid, to target specific cells and to increase the stability of therapeutic cargo, make EVs interesting as new devices for the treatment of human disease. In a recently published issue of European journal of pharmaceutical sciences, Silva and colleagues reviewed the ability of EVs to modulate tissue repair and regeneration, focusing on their roles and therapeutic potential as immunomodulatory messengers. In this perspective, we discussed the open questions regarding the dual role of EVs in immune system, as well as the technical limitation of the procedure for EVs isolation and administration in clinical practices. EV-based therapies require further studies to consider EVs as promising candidate for a novel cell-free therapy in the context of regeneration medicine.

  2. Morphological and topological transformations of lipid bilayer vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Fumimasa; Honda, Makoto; Takeda, Shuichi; Umeda, Tamiki; Takiguchi, Kingo; Hotani, Hirokazu

    2000-06-01

    Liposomes are the micro compartments made of lipid bilayer membrane of which characteristics are quite similar to those of biological membrane. To form artificial cell-like structure, we made liposomes that contained subunit of cytoskeletons: tubulin or actin. Spherical liposomes were transformed into bipolar or cell-like shape by mechanical force generated by the polymerization of encapsulated subunits of microtubules. Disk or dumbbell shape was generated by the polymerization of encapsulated action. Dynamic processes of morphological transformations of liposomes were visualized by the high intensity dark-field light microscopy. Topological changes such as fusion and division of membrane vesicles also play an essential role in cellular activities. We investigated the mechanism of these topological transformations by visualizing their real-time processes. A variety of novel topological transformations were found, including the opening-up of liposomes and the direct expulsion of inner vesicles. .

  3. Numerical computations of the dynamics of fluidic membranes and vesicles

    CERN Document Server

    Barrett, John W; Nürnberg, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Vesicles and many biological membranes are made of two monolayers of lipid molecules and form closed lipid bilayers. The dynamical behaviour of vesicles is very complex and a variety of forms and shapes appear. Lipid bilayers can be considered as a surface fluid and hence the governing equations for the evolution include the surface (Navier--)Stokes equations, which in particular take the membrane viscosity into account. The evolution is driven by forces stemming from the curvature elasticity of the membrane. In addition, the surface fluid equations are coupled to bulk (Navier--)Stokes equations. We introduce a parametric finite element method to solve this complex free boundary problem, and present the first three dimensional numerical computations based on the full (Navier--)Stokes system for several different scenarios. For example, the effects of the membrane viscosity, spontaneous curvature and area difference elasticity (ADE) are studied. In particular, it turns out, that even in the case of no viscosit...

  4. CAPS and Munc13: CATCHRs that SNARE vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Declan J James

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. CAPS (Calcium-dependent Activator Protein for Secretion, aka CADPS and Munc13 (Mammalian Unc-13 proteins function to prime vesicles for Ca2+-triggered exocytosis in neurons and neuroendocrine cells. CAPS and Munc13 proteins contain conserved C-terminal domains that promote the assembly of SNARE complexes for vesicle priming. Similarities of the C-terminal domains of CAPS/Munc13 proteins with CATCHR (Complex Associated with Tethering Containing Helical Rods domains in multi-subunit tethering complexes have been reported. Multi-subunit tethering complexes coordinate multiple interactions for SNARE complex assembly at constitutive membrane fusion steps. We review aspects of these diverse tethering and priming factors to identify common operating principles.

  5. Production and Characterization of Extracellular Vesicles in Malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbagwu, Smart; Walch, Michael; Filgueira, Luis; Mantel, Pierre-Yves

    2017-01-01

    Growing attention is drawn toward the role of extracellular vesicles (EVs) in infectious diseases. EVs, which are small vesicles released by cells, are involved in cellular communication, immune regulation, and pathogenesis. EVs act as messenger carrying functional cargoes, including RNA, DNA, lipids and proteins from a donor cell to regulate the function of a recipient cell. In malaria, EVs play a key role in regulating the progression from the blood to the transmission stage by promoting the switch between asexual and sexual stages that are taken up by mosquitoes. In addition to their role in parasite communication, EVs modulate the immune system and regulate endothelial cell function.In this chapter, we describe protocols to isolate, purify and characterize EVs derived from Plasmodium falciparum infected red blood cell culture.

  6. Shear-Induced Deformation of Surfactant Multilamellar Vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pommella, Angelo; Caserta, Sergio; Guida, Vincenzo; Guido, Stefano

    2012-03-01

    Surfactant multilamellar vesicles (SMLVs) play a key role in the formulation of many industrial products, such as detergents, foodstuff, and cosmetics. In this Letter, we present the first quantitative investigation of the flow behavior of single SMLVs in a shearing parallel plate apparatus. We found that SMLVs are deformed and oriented by the action of shear flow while keeping constant volume and exhibit complex dynamic modes (i.e., tumbling, breathing, and tank treading). This behavior can be explained in terms of an excess area (as compared to a sphere of the same volume) and of microstructural defects, which were observed by 3D shape reconstruction through confocal microscopy. Furthermore, the deformation and orientation of SMLVs scale with radius R in analogy with emulsion droplets and elastic capsules (instead of R3, such as in unilamellar vesicles). A possible application of the physical insight provided by this Letter is in the rationale design of processing methods of surfactant-based systems.

  7. Modelling of Tape Casting for Ceramic Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jabbari, Masoud

    of functional ceramics research. Advances in ceramic forming have enabled low cost shaping techniques such as tape casting and extrusion to be used in some of the most challenging technologies. These advances allow the design of complex components adapted to desired specific properties and applications. However...... of ceramic processing are generally focused on the control of the microstructure while the importance of shaping is often underestimated. Improved performance requires the design and shaping of both controlled architectures and microstructures. Novel functionally graded ceramic materials may be formed...... process of functionally graded ceramic materials for fuel cell applications as well as magnetic refrigeration. Models to simulate the shaping of monolayer/multilayer and graded materials by tape casting are developed. The emphasis is on analyzing the entry flow of multiple slurries from the reservoir...

  8. FY2015 ceramic fuels development annual highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcclellan, Kenneth James [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-09-22

    Key challenges for the Advanced Fuels Campaign are the development of fuel technologies to enable major increases in fuel performance (safety, reliability, power and burnup) beyond current technologies, and development of characterization methods and predictive fuel performance models to enable more efficient development and licensing of advanced fuels. Ceramic fuel development activities for fiscal year 2015 fell within the areas of 1) National and International Technical Integration, 2) Advanced Accident Tolerant Ceramic Fuel Development, 3) Advanced Techniques and Reference Materials Development, and 4) Fabrication of Enriched Ceramic Fuels. High uranium density fuels were the focus of the ceramic fuels efforts. Accomplishments for FY15 primarily reflect the prioritization of identification and assessment of new ceramic fuels for light water reactors which have enhanced accident tolerance while also maintaining or improving normal operation performance, and exploration of advanced post irradiation examination techniques which will support more efficient testing and qualification of new fuel systems.

  9. FY2016 Ceramic Fuels Development Annual Highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcclellan, Kenneth James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-01-24

    Key challenges for the Advanced Fuels Campaign are the development of fuel technologies to enable major increases in fuel performance (safety, reliability, power and burnup) beyond current technologies, and development of characterization methods and predictive fuel performance models to enable more efficient development and licensing of advanced fuels. Ceramic fuel development activities for fiscal year 2016 fell within the areas of 1) National and International Technical Integration, 2) Advanced Accident Tolerant Ceramic Fuel Development, 3) Advanced Techniques and Reference Materials Development, and 4) Fabrication of Enriched Ceramic Fuels. High uranium density fuels were the focus of the ceramic fuels efforts. Accomplishments for FY16 primarily reflect the prioritization of identification and assessment of new ceramic fuels for light water reactors which have enhanced accident tolerance while also maintaining or improving normal operation performance, and exploration of advanced post irradiation examination techniques which will support more efficient testing and qualification of new fuel systems.

  10. Polymer and ceramic nanocomposites for aerospace applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathod, Vivek T.; Kumar, Jayanth S.; Jain, Anjana

    2017-09-01

    This paper reviews the potential of polymer and ceramic matrix composites for aerospace/space vehicle applications. Special, unique and multifunctional properties arising due to the dispersion of nanoparticles in ceramic and metal matrix are briefly discussed followed by a classification of resulting aerospace applications. The paper presents polymer matrix composites comprising majority of aerospace applications in structures, coating, tribology, structural health monitoring, electromagnetic shielding and shape memory applications. The capabilities of the ceramic matrix nanocomposites to providing the electromagnetic shielding for aircrafts and better tribological properties to suit space environments are discussed. Structural health monitoring capability of ceramic matrix nanocomposite is also discussed. The properties of resulting nanocomposite material with its disadvantages like cost and processing difficulties are discussed. The paper concludes after the discussion of the possible future perspectives and challenges in implementation and further development of polymer and ceramic nanocomposite materials.

  11. Polymer and ceramic nanocomposites for aerospace applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathod, Vivek T.; Kumar, Jayanth S.; Jain, Anjana

    2017-11-01

    This paper reviews the potential of polymer and ceramic matrix composites for aerospace/space vehicle applications. Special, unique and multifunctional properties arising due to the dispersion of nanoparticles in ceramic and metal matrix are briefly discussed followed by a classification of resulting aerospace applications. The paper presents polymer matrix composites comprising majority of aerospace applications in structures, coating, tribology, structural health monitoring, electromagnetic shielding and shape memory applications. The capabilities of the ceramic matrix nanocomposites to providing the electromagnetic shielding for aircrafts and better tribological properties to suit space environments are discussed. Structural health monitoring capability of ceramic matrix nanocomposite is also discussed. The properties of resulting nanocomposite material with its disadvantages like cost and processing difficulties are discussed. The paper concludes after the discussion of the possible future perspectives and challenges in implementation and further development of polymer and ceramic nanocomposite materials.

  12. Ceramic Technology for Advanced Heat Engines Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-08-01

    The Ceramic Technology for Advanced Heat Engines Project was developed by the Department of Energy's Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS's Advanced Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS's automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the Department of Energy (DOE), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and Department of Defense (DoD) advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. However, these programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially.

  13. Pulmonary Extracellular Vesicles as Mediators of Local and Systemic Inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Wahlund, Casper J. E.; Eklund, Anders; Grunewald, Johan; Gabrielsson, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    Cells of the airways are constantly exposed to environmental hazards including cigarette smoke, irritants, pathogens, and mechanical insults. Maintaining barrier integrity is vital, and mounting responses to threats depends on intercellular communication. Extracellular vesicles (EVs), including exosomes and microvesicles, are major signal mediators between cells, shuttling cargo in health and disease. Depending on the state of the originating cells, EVs are capable of inducing proinflammatory...

  14. Isolation and characterization of platelet-derived extracellular vesicles

    OpenAIRE

    Aatonen, Maria T.; Öhman, Tiina; Nyman, Tuula A.; Laitinen, Saara; Grönholm, Mikaela; Siljander, Pia R.-M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Platelet-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs) participate, for example, in haemostasis, immunity and development. Most studies of platelet EVs have targeted microparticles, whereas exosomes and EV characterization under various conditions have been less analyzed. Studies have been hampered by the difficulty in obtaining EVs free from contaminating cells and platelet remnants. Therefore, we optimized an EV isolation protocol and compared the quantity and protein content of EVs indu...

  15. Association of Randall's Plaques with Collagen Fibers and Membrane Vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Saeed R.; Rodriguez, Douglas E.; Gower, Laurie B.; Monga, Manoj

    2013-01-01

    Background Idiopathic calcium oxalate (CaOx) kidney stones develop by deposition of CaOx crystals on Randall's plaques (RP). Mechanisms involved in RP formation are still unclear. Objective It is our hypotheses that RP formation is similar to vascular calcification involving components of extracellular matrix including membrane bound vesicles (MV) and collagen fibers. In order to verify our hypothesis we critically examined renal papillary tissue from stone patients. Methods 4 mm cold-cup biopies of renal papillae were performed on fifteen idiopathic stone patients undergoing PCNL. Tissue was immediately fixed and processed for analyses by various light and electron microscopic techniques. Results and Limitations Spherulitic CaP crystals, the hallmark of RP's, were seen in all samples examined. They were seen in interstitium as well as laminated basement membrane of tubular epithelia. Large crystalline deposits comprised of dark elongated strands mixed with spherulites. Strands showed banded patterns similar to collagen. Crystal deposits were surrounded by collagen fibers and membrane bound vesicles. Energy dispersive x-ray microanalyses (EDX) and electron diffraction identified the crystals as hydroxyapatite. The number of kidneys examined is small and urinary data was not available for all the patients. Conclusions Results presented here show that crystals in the Randall's plaques are associated with both the collagen as well as MV. Collagen fibers appeared calcified and vesicles contained crystals. We conclude that crystal deposition in renal papillae may have started with membrane vesicle induced nucleation and grew by addition of crystals on the periphery within a collagen framework. PMID:22266007

  16. Isolation and Characterization of Chick Epiphyseal Cartilage Matrix Vesicle Proteolipid

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    initial calcification in dentine and enamel . J. Ultrastr. Res., 41: 1-17. Bernard GW and Pease DC. 1969. An electron microscopic study of initial...characterization of matrix vesicle protease. Bone, 6: 470. ----------- -40 IT 7, T 7 69 Ketenjian AY and Arsenis C. 1975. Morphological and...J. Biol. Chem., 258: 8601-8607. Siska RF and Provenza DV. 1972. Initial dentin formation in human deciduous teeth . An electron microscopic study

  17. Dimensional characterization of extracellular vesicles using atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebaihi, N.; De Boeck, B.; Yuana, Y.; Nieuwland, R.; Pétry, J.

    2017-03-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EV) are small biological entities released from cells into body fluids. EV are recognized as mediators in intercellular communication and influence important physiological processes. It has been shown that the concentration and composition of EV in body fluids may differ from healthy subjects to patients suffering from particular disease. So, EV have gained a strong scientific and clinical interest as potential biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis of disease. Due to their small size, accurate detection and characterization of EV remain challenging. The aim of the presented work is to propose a characterization method of erythrocyte-derived EV using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The vesicles are immobilized on anti-CD235a-modified mica and analyzed by AFM under buffer liquid and dry conditions. EV detected under both conditions show very similar sizes namely ~30 nm high and ~90 nm wide. The size of these vesicles remains stable over drying time as long as 7 d at room temperature. Since the detected vesicles are not spherical, EV are characterized by their height and diameter, and not only by the height as is usually done for spherical nanoparticles. In order to obtain an accurate measurement of EV diameters, the geometry of the AFM tip was evaluated to account for the lateral broadening artifact inherent to AFM measurements. To do so, spherical polystyrene (PS) nanobeads and EV were concomitantly deposited on the same mica substrate and simultaneously measured by AFM under dry conditions. By applying this procedure, direct calibration of the AFM tip could be performed together with EV characterization under identical experimental conditions minimizing external sources of uncertainty on the shape and size of the tip, thus allowing standardization of EV measurement.

  18. Preparation of PVP hydrogel nanoparticles using lecithin vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vânia Blasques Bueno

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogels micro, sub-micro and nanoparticles are of great interest for drug encapsulation and delivery or as embolotherapic agents. In this work it is described the preparation of nano and sub-microparticles of pre-formed, high molecular weight and monomer free poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone encapsulated inside the core of lecithin vesicles. The hydrogel particles are formed with a very narrow diameter distribution, of about 800 nm, and a moderate swelling ratio, of approximately 10.

  19. Fracture of ceramic/ceramic/polymer trilayers for biomechanical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yan; Miranda, Pedro; Pajares, Antonia; Guiberteau, Fernando; Lawn, Brian R

    2003-12-01

    Fracture damage in trilayers consisting of outer and inner brittle layers bonded to a compliant (polycarbonate) substrate and subjected to concentrated surface loading is analyzed. The principal mode of fracture is radial cracking at the undersurface of the inner (core) layer, even in the strongest of core ceramics--other damage modes, including radial cracking in the outer (veneer) layer, are less invasive in these all-brittle coating systems. Tests on simple trilayer structures fabricated from glasses, sapphire, and dental ceramics are used to examine the dependence of the critical load for radial fracture in terms of relative outer/inner layer thickness and modulus, and inner layer strength. An explicit relation for the critical load, based on a flexing plate model in which the outer/inner bilayer is reduced to an "equivalent" monolithic coating with "effective" composite modulus, is used to examine these dependencies. The theoretical relation describes all the major trends in the critical load data over a broad range of variables, thus providing a sound basis for trilayer design. Relevance of the analysis to dental crowns and other biomechanical applications is a central theme of the study. Copyright 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res 67A: 828-833, 2003

  20. Geopolymers for Structural Ceramic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-31

    Barbosa and MacKenzie, who observed the crystallization of leucite, kalsilite, quartz and cristobalite when heating potassium geopolymers to 1 000,C.4...Lobo, "A pair distribution function analyvsis of zeolite beta ," Microporous and Mesoporous Materials, 77[1] 55-66 (2005). "V. Petkov, V. Parvanov, P...of the American Ceramic Society, 85[5] 1235-1242 (2002). 20N. J. Hess, F. J. Espinosa, S. D. Conradson and W. J. Weber, " Beta radiation effects in

  1. NDE for heat engine ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klima, S. J.

    1984-01-01

    Radiographic, ultrasonic, and scanning laser acoustic microscopy (SLAM) techniques were used to characterize silicon nitride and silicon carbide MOR bars in various stages of fabrication. Conventional and microfocus x-ray techniques were found capable of detecting minute high density inclusions in as-received powders, green compacts, and fully densified specimens. Significant density gradients in sintered bars were observed by radiography, ultrasonic velocity, and SLAM. Ultrasonic attenuation was found sensitive to microstructural variations due to grain and void morphology and distribution. SLAM was also capable of detecting voids, inclusions, and cracks in finished test bars. It was determined that thermoacoustic microscopy techniques have promise for application to green and densified ceramics.

  2. Properties of ceramic candle filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pontius, D.H.

    1995-06-01

    The mechanical integrity of ceramic filter elements is a key issue for hot gas cleanup systems. To meet the demands of the advanced power systems, the filter components must sustain the thermal stresses of normal operations (pulse cleaning), of start-up and shut-down conditions, and of unanticipated process upsets such as excessive ash accumulation without catastrophic failure. They must also survive the various mechanical loads associated with handling and assembly, normal operation, and process upsets. For near-term filter systems, these elements must survive at operating temperatures of 1650{degrees}F for three years.

  3. Ceramic Technology for Advanced Heat Engines Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-08-01

    The Ceramic Technology For Advanced Heat Engines Project was developed by the Department of Energy's Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS's Advanced Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS's automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the Department of Energy (DOE), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and Department of Defense (DOD) advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. However, these programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. An assessment of needs was completed, and a five year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. The objective of the project is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic hearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines.

  4. Fibrous-Ceramic/Aerogel Composite Insulating Tiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Susan M.; Rasky, Daniel J.

    2004-01-01

    Fibrous-ceramic/aerogel composite tiles have been invented to afford combinations of thermal-insulation and mechanical properties superior to those attainable by making tiles of fibrous ceramics alone or aerogels alone. These lightweight tiles can be tailored to a variety of applications that range from insulating cryogenic tanks to protecting spacecraft against re-entry heating. The advantages and disadvantages of fibrous ceramics and aerogels can be summarized as follows: Tiles made of ceramic fibers are known for mechanical strength, toughness, and machinability. Fibrous ceramic tiles are highly effective as thermal insulators in a vacuum. However, undesirably, the porosity of these materials makes them permeable by gases, so that in the presence of air or other gases, convection and gas-phase conduction contribute to the effective thermal conductivity of the tiles. Other disadvantages of the porosity and permeability of fibrous ceramic tiles arise because gases (e.g., water vapor or cryogenic gases) can condense in pores. This condensation contributes to weight, and in the case of cryogenic systems, the heat of condensation undesirably adds to the heat flowing to the objects that one seeks to keep cold. Moreover, there is a risk of explosion associated with vaporization of previously condensed gas upon reheating. Aerogels offer low permeability, low density, and low thermal conductivity, but are mechanically fragile. The basic idea of the present invention is to exploit the best features of fibrous ceramic tiles and aerogels. In a composite tile according to the invention, the fibrous ceramic serves as a matrix that mechanically supports the aerogel, while the aerogel serves as a low-conductivity, low-permeability filling that closes what would otherwise be the open pores of the fibrous ceramic. Because the aerogel eliminates or at least suppresses permeation by gas, gas-phase conduction, and convection, the thermal conductivity of such a composite even at

  5. Complexin synchronizes primed vesicle exocytosis and regulates fusion pore dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhara, Madhurima; Yarzagaray, Antonio; Schwarz, Yvonne; Dutta, Soumyajit; Grabner, Chad; Moghadam, Paanteha K.; Bost, Anneka; Schirra, Claudia; Rettig, Jens; Reim, Kerstin; Brose, Nils; Mohrmann, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    ComplexinII (CpxII) and SynaptotagminI (SytI) have been implicated in regulating the function of SNARE proteins in exocytosis, but their precise mode of action and potential interplay have remained unknown. In this paper, we show that CpxII increases Ca2+-triggered vesicle exocytosis and accelerates its secretory rates, providing two independent, but synergistic, functions to enhance synchronous secretion. Specifically, we demonstrate that the C-terminal domain of CpxII increases the pool of primed vesicles by hindering premature exocytosis at submicromolar Ca2+ concentrations, whereas the N-terminal domain shortens the secretory delay and accelerates the kinetics of Ca2+-triggered exocytosis by increasing the Ca2+ affinity of synchronous secretion. With its C terminus, CpxII attenuates fluctuations of the early fusion pore and slows its expansion but is functionally antagonized by SytI, enabling rapid transmitter discharge from single vesicles. Thus, our results illustrate how key features of CpxII, SytI, and their interplay transform the constitutively active SNARE-mediated fusion mechanism into a highly synchronized, Ca2+-triggered release apparatus. PMID:24687280

  6. Extracellular Vesicles and Their Convergence with Viral Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Wurdinger

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (microvesicles, such as exosomes and shed microvesicles, contain a variety of molecules including proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids. Microvesicles appear mostly to originate from multivesicular bodies or to bud from the plasma membrane. Here, we review the convergence of microvesicle biogenesis and aspects of viral assembly and release pathways. Herpesviruses and retroviruses, amongst others, recruit several elements from the microvesicle biogenesis pathways for functional virus release. In addition, noninfectious pleiotropic virus-like vesicles can be released, containing viral and cellular components. We highlight the heterogeneity of microvesicle function during viral infection, addressing microvesicles that can either block or enhance infection, or cause immune dysregulation through bystander action in the immune system. Finally, endogenous retrovirus and retrotransposon elements deposited in our genomes millions of years ago can be released from cells within microvesicles, suggestive of a viral origin of the microvesicle system or perhaps of an evolutionary conserved system of virus-vesicle codependence. More research is needed to further elucidate the complex function of the various microvesicles produced during viral infection, possibly revealing new therapeutic intervention strategies.

  7. Isolation and characterization of platelet-derived extracellular vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aatonen, Maria T; Ohman, Tiina; Nyman, Tuula A; Laitinen, Saara; Grönholm, Mikaela; Siljander, Pia R-M

    2014-01-01

    Platelet-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs) participate, for example, in haemostasis, immunity and development. Most studies of platelet EVs have targeted microparticles, whereas exosomes and EV characterization under various conditions have been less analyzed. Studies have been hampered by the difficulty in obtaining EVs free from contaminating cells and platelet remnants. Therefore, we optimized an EV isolation protocol and compared the quantity and protein content of EVs induced by different agonists. Platelets isolated with iodixanol gradient were activated by thrombin and collagen, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or Ca(2+) ionophore. Microparticles and exosomes were isolated by differential centrifugations. EVs were quantitated by nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA) and total protein. Size distributions were determined by NTA and electron microscopy. Proteomics was used to characterize the differentially induced EVs. The main EV populations were 100-250 nm and over 90% were vesicle subpopulations. Although platelets constitutively release EVs, vesiculation can be increased, and the activation pathway determines the number and the cargo of the formed EVs. These activation-dependent variations render the use of protein content in sample normalization invalid. Since most platelet EVs are 100-250 nm, only a fraction has been analyzed by previously used methods, for example, flow cytometry. As the EV subpopulations could not be distinguished and large vesicle populations may be lost by differential centrifugation, novel methods are required for the isolation and the differentiation of all EVs.

  8. Durable vesicles for reconstitution of membrane proteins in biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beales, Paul A; Khan, Sanobar; Muench, Stephen P; Jeuken, Lars J C

    2017-02-08

    The application of membrane proteins in biotechnology requires robust, durable reconstitution systems that enhance their stability and support their functionality in a range of working environments. Vesicular architectures are highly desirable to provide the compartmentalisation to utilise the functional transmembrane transport and signalling properties of membrane proteins. Proteoliposomes provide a native-like membrane environment to support membrane protein function, but can lack the required chemical and physical stability. Amphiphilic block copolymers can also self-assemble into polymersomes: tough vesicles with improved stability compared with liposomes. This review discusses the reconstitution of membrane proteins into polymersomes and the more recent development of hybrid vesicles, which blend the robust nature of block copolymers with the biofunctionality of lipids. These novel synthetic vesicles hold great promise for enabling membrane proteins within biotechnologies by supporting their enhanced in vitro performance and could also contribute to fundamental biochemical and biophysical research by improving the stability of membrane proteins that are challenging to work with. © 2017 The Author(s).

  9. Origin of life: LUCA and extracellular membrane vesicles (EMVs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, S.; Forterre, P.

    2016-01-01

    Cells from the three domains of life produce extracellular membrane vesicles (EMVs), suggesting that EMV production is an important aspect of cellular physiology. EMVs have been implicated in many aspects of cellular life in all domains, including stress response, toxicity against competing strains, pathogenicity, detoxification and resistance against viral attack. These EMVs represent an important mode of inter-cellular communication by serving as vehicles for transfer of DNA, RNA, proteins and lipids between cells. Here, we review recent progress in the understanding of EMV biology and their various roles. We focus on the role of membrane vesicles in early cellular evolution and how they would have helped shape the nature of the last universal common ancestor. A membrane-protected micro-environment would have been a key to the survival of spontaneous molecular systems and efficient metabolic reactions. Interestingly, the morphology of EMVs is strongly reminiscent of the morphology of some virions. It is thus tempting to make a link between the origin of the first protocell via the formation of vesicles and the origin of viruses.

  10. Myeloid extracellular vesicles: messengers from the demented brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annamaria eNigro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Blood-borne monocyte derived cells play a pivotal, initially unrecognized, role in most central nervous system disorders, including diseases initially classified as purely neurodegenerative (i.e. AD, PD, and ALS. Their trafficking to the brain and spinal cord has been extensively studied in classical neuroinflammatory disorders such as multiple sclerosis. Central nervous system resident myeloid cells, namely microglia and perivascular macrophages, also are in the spotlight of investigations on neurological disorders. Myeloid cells, such as infiltrating macrophages and microglia, have been described as having both protective and destructive features in neurological disorders, thus identification of their functional phenotype during disease evolution would be of paramount importance. Extracellular vesicles, namely exosomes and shed vesicles, are released by virtually any cell type and can be detected and identified in terms of cell origin in biological fluids. They therefore constitute an ideal tool to access information on cells residing in an inaccessible site such as the brain. We will review here available information on extracellular vesicles detection in neurological disorders with special emphasis on neurodegenerative diseases.

  11. A Hierarchical Convolutional Neural Network for vesicle fusion event classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haohan; Mao, Yunxiang; Yin, Zhaozheng; Xu, Yingke

    2017-09-01

    Quantitative analysis of vesicle exocytosis and classification of different modes of vesicle fusion from the fluorescence microscopy are of primary importance for biomedical researches. In this paper, we propose a novel Hierarchical Convolutional Neural Network (HCNN) method to automatically identify vesicle fusion events in time-lapse Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy (TIRFM) image sequences. Firstly, a detection and tracking method is developed to extract image patch sequences containing potential fusion events. Then, a Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM) is applied on each image patch of the patch sequence with outliers rejected for robust Gaussian fitting. By utilizing the high-level time-series intensity change features introduced by GMM and the visual appearance features embedded in some key moments of the fusion process, the proposed HCNN architecture is able to classify each candidate patch sequence into three classes: full fusion event, partial fusion event and non-fusion event. Finally, we validate the performance of our method on 9 challenging datasets that have been annotated by cell biologists, and our method achieves better performances when comparing with three previous methods. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Charged copolypeptide vesicles with controlled size for intracellular drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holowka, Eric Peter

    Much focus has been given to the synthesis of polypeptidic based materials due to their unique structural features. These polypeptides commonly are amphiphilic in character that benefit from secondary structural features associated with one of the polymer blocks. These features, such as alpha-helix and beta-sheet conformations, allow for control over nanoscale ordering through self-assembly for use in biological sensors and therapeutic drug delivery. We report the preparation and characterization of charged amphiphilic block copolypeptide vesicle formers using transition metal mediated living ring-opening polymerization of N-carboxyanhydrides (NCAs). The vesicle membranes show fluidic properties suggested by dynamic physical behavior allowing for fine size adjustments using liposomal extrusion methods. This extrusion also allows for a facile mode of encapsulation of biomolecules for drug delivery. Modification of the charged residues has shown vesicle stability under osmotic and thermal stress, in pH buffers, and serum cell media, as well as the ability for lipid interaction and cellular interactions.

  13. Quantitative and qualitative analysis of nano-sized vesicles released by dendritic cells and T cells. Towards deciphering the role of extracellular vesicles in immune cell communication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Vlist, E.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314640908

    2013-01-01

    Many cell types release nano-sized vesicles, which can be found in body fluids as well as in cell culture-conditioned medium. These extracellular vesicles (EV) have been identified as vehicles for intercellular communication and are thought to be involved in many (patho)physiological processes. They

  14. Spermatozoa as a transport system of large unilamellar lipid vesicles into the oocyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geerts, N; McGrath, J; Stronk, J N; Vanderlick, T K; Huszar, G

    2014-04-01

    In addition to their role as man-made membranes, vesicles continue to be investigated as carriers for drug delivery. While most research focuses on their injectable properties, here a new delivery strategy is proposed. It is shown that spermatozoa can transport vesicles of variable composition. For human spermatozoa, the vesicles started to show binding after 20 mol% of the nonbinding vesicle backbone lipids were substituted with positive, negative, cerebroside or ganglioside lipids. Vesicle binding is a dynamic process with constant 'on' and 'off' binding. The physiological and motility attributes of the spermatozoa are not affected by the attached vesicles. Sperm swimming characteristics changed only marginally. Also, the activation status of the acrosomal membrane, tested with the fluorescent probe Pisum sativum agglutinin, was not affected by vesicle binding. Moreover, the hyaluronic acid-binding test showed that viable, fully developed spermatozoa will attach and remain bound to hyaluronic acid-coated slides regardless of vesicle binding. Therefore a new 'hybrid' delivery system was created with human spermatozoa, and tested with a mouse IVF system. Large unilamellar vesicles physisorbed to mouse spermatozoa can not only penetrate the mouse oocytes in these proof-of-principle experiments, but also deliver the cargo placed within the vesicles. Copyright © 2013 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Emergent properties of extracellular vesicles: a holistic approach to decode the complexity of intercellular communication networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gho, Yong Song; Lee, Changjin

    2017-06-27

    Shedding of nano-sized bilayered extracellular vesicles and extracellular vesicle-mediated intercellular communication are evolutionarily conserved biological processes. Communication between cells and the environment is an essential process in living organisms and dysregulation of intercellular communication leads to various diseases. Thus, systematic studies on extracellular vesicles, also known as exosomes, microvesicles, and outer membrane vesicles, are critical for a deeper understanding of intercellular communication networks that are crucial for decoding the exact causes of various difficult-to-cure diseases. Recent progress in this emerging field reveals that extracellular vesicles are endogenous carriers of specific subsets of proteins, mRNAs, miRNAs, and other bioactive materials, as well as play diverse pathophysiological roles. However, certain issues regarding diverse subtypes and the complex pathophysiological roles of extracellular vesicles are not yet clearly elucidated. In this review, we first briefly introduce the complexity of extracellular vesicles in terms of their vesicular cargos and protein-protein interaction networks, their diverse subtypes, and multifaceted pathophysiological functions. Then, we introduce the limitation of reductionist approaches in understanding the complexity of extracellular vesicles. We finally suggest that molecular systems biology approaches based on the concept of emergent properties are essential for a comprehensive understanding of the complex pathophysiological functions of heterogeneous extracellular vesicles, either at the single vesicle level or at a systems level as a whole.

  16. Hyperbranched polymer vesicles: from self-assembly, characterization, mechanisms, and properties to applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wenfeng; Zhou, Yongfeng; Yan, Deyue

    2015-06-21

    Vesicles, including lipid vesicles, surfactant vesicles, as well as polymer vesicles, have been extensively investigated over the past fifty years. Among them, polymer vesicles have attracted more and more attention because of their low permeability, superior stability and toughness, in addition to the numerous possibilities for tailoring physical, chemical and biological properties. Polymer vesicles are generally fabricated through the self-assembly of amphiphilic polymers with a linear architecture. Recently, as representative polymers with a highly branched three-dimensional architecture, hyperbranched polymers have also exhibited great potential for preparing vesicles. The resultant hyperbranched polymer vesicles, defined as branched-polymersomes (BPs), have shown unique properties, such as giant and easily tuned vesicle sizes, facile functionalization, a special formation mechanism, and appealing solution behaviours. In this tutorial review, ten years of advances in BPs have been summarized since their first discovery in the year 2004, including the syntheses of vesicle-forming hyperbranched polymers, self-assembly methods, self-assembly mechanisms, as well as the special properties. In addition, the cytomimetic, biomedical and other initiatory applications of BPs are also included.

  17. Myo1c binding to submembrane actin mediates insulin-induced tethering of GLUT4 vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boguslavsky, Shlomit; Chiu, Tim; Foley, Kevin P.; Osorio-Fuentealba, Cesar; Antonescu, Costin N.; Bayer, K. Ulrich; Bilan, Philip J.; Klip, Amira

    2012-01-01

    GLUT4-containing vesicles cycle between the plasma membrane and intracellular compartments. Insulin promotes GLUT4 exocytosis by regulating GLUT4 vesicle arrival at the cell periphery and its subsequent tethering, docking, and fusion with the plasma membrane. The molecular machinery involved in GLUT4 vesicle tethering is unknown. We show here that Myo1c, an actin-based motor protein that associates with membranes and actin filaments, is required for insulin-induced vesicle tethering in muscle cells. Myo1c was found to associate with both mobile and tethered GLUT4 vesicles and to be required for vesicle capture in the total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) zone beneath the plasma membrane. Myo1c knockdown or overexpression of an actin binding–deficient Myo1c mutant abolished insulin-induced vesicle immobilization, increased GLUT4 vesicle velocity in the TIRF zone, and prevented their externalization. Conversely, Myo1c overexpression immobilized GLUT4 vesicles in the TIRF zone and promoted insulin-induced GLUT4 exposure to the extracellular milieu. Myo1c also contributed to insulin-dependent actin filament remodeling. Thus we propose that interaction of vesicular Myo1c with cortical actin filaments is required for insulin-mediated tethering of GLUT4 vesicles and for efficient GLUT4 surface delivery in muscle cells. PMID:22918957

  18. Effect of surfactant counterion and organic modifier on the properties of surfactant vesicles in electrokinetic chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Stephanie A; Foley, Joe P

    2005-08-01

    Counterion and organic modifier are two parameters in EKC that can be varied in order to obtain improved solubility, selectivity, and efficiency. The effect of changing surfactant counterion and/or organic modifier on the chromatographic and electrophoretic properties of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB)/sodium octyl sulfate (SOS) vesicles is examined in EKC. The vesicles are prepared in a 1:3.66 cationic/ anionic mole ratio for a total surfactant concentration of 69 mM. The cationic CTAB is replaced by cetyltrimethylammonium chloride (CTAC) and the first use of CTAC/SOS vesicles is reported. The mean diameter of the CTAC/SOS vesicles is 96 nm while that of the CTAB/SOS vesicles is 85 nm. A class I modifier (2-amino-1-butanol) and a class II modifier (acetonitrile) have similar effects on the EOF, elution range, methylene selectivity, and the efficiency of the CTAB/SOS vesicles and the CTAC/SOS vesicles. Upon addition of 10% ACN, there is roughly a 10-fold increase in the efficiency of heptanophenone, a model hydrophobic compound, compared to the efficiency using unmodified vesicles. Linear free energy relationship (LFER) analysis using the Abraham solvation model is employed to characterize solute-vesicle interactions. The results suggest that organic modifier-vesicle interactions depend somewhat on the counterion.

  19. Ceramic Electrolyte Membrane Technology: Enabling Revolutionary Electrochemical Energy Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-05

    Sep-2014 Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: Ceramic Electrolyte Membrane Technology : Enabling Revolutionary...2601 30-Sep-2014 ABSTRACT Number of Papers published in peer-reviewed journals: Final Report: Ceramic Electrolyte Membrane Technology : Enabling... technology to fabricate larger LLZO ceramic membranes . The goal of this work is to develop ceramic processing technology to fabricate LLZO membranes that

  20. A fractographic study of clinically retrieved zirconia-ceramic and metal-ceramic fixed dental prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Zhen; Chughtai, Asima; Sailer, Irena; Zhang, Yu

    2015-10-01

    A recent 3-year randomized controlled trial (RCT) of tooth supported three- to five-unit zirconia-ceramic and metal-ceramic posterior fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) revealed that veneer chipping and fracture in zirconia-ceramic systems occurred more frequently than those in metal-ceramic systems [1]. This study seeks to elucidate the underlying mechanisms responsible for the fracture phenomena observed in this RCT using a descriptive fractographic analysis. Vinyl-polysiloxane impressions of 12 zirconia-ceramic and 6 metal-ceramic FDPs with veneer fractures were taken from the patients at the end of a mean observation of 40.3±2.8 months. Epoxy replicas were produced from these impressions [1]. All replicas were gold coated, and inspected under the optical microscope and scanning electron microscope (SEM) for descriptive fractography. Among the 12 zirconia-ceramic FDPs, 2 had small chippings, 9 had large chippings, and 1 exhibited delamination. Out of 6 metal-ceramic FDPs, 5 had small chippings and 1 had large chipping. Descriptive fractographic analysis based on SEM observations revealed that fracture initiated from the wear facet at the occlusal surface in all cases, irrespective of the type of restoration. Zirconia-ceramic and metal-ceramic FDPs all fractured from microcracks that emanated from occlusal wear facets. The relatively low fracture toughness and high residual tensile stress in porcelain veneer of zirconia restorations may contribute to the higher chipping rate and larger chip size in zirconia-ceramic FDPs relative to their metal-ceramic counterparts. The low veneer/core interfacial fracture energy of porcelain-veneered zirconia may result in the occurrence of delamination in zirconia-ceramic FDPs. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A fractographic study of clinically retrieved zirconia–ceramic and metal–ceramic fixed dental prostheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Zhen; Chughtai, Asima; Sailer, Irena; Zhang, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Objectives A recent 3-year randomized controlled trial (RCT) of tooth supported three- to five-unit zirconia–ceramic and metal–ceramic posterior fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) revealed that veneer chipping and fracture in zirconia–ceramic systems occurred more frequently than those in metal–ceramic systems [1]. This study seeks to elucidate the underlying mechanisms responsible for the fracture phenomena observed in this RCT using a descriptive fractographic analysis. Methods Vinyl-polysiloxane impressions of 12 zirconia–ceramic and 6 metal–ceramic FDPs with veneer fractures were taken from the patients at the end of a mean observation of 40.3 ± 2.8 months. Epoxy replicas were produced from these impressions [1]. All replicas were gold coated, and inspected under the optical microscope and scanning electron microscope (SEM) for descriptive fractography. Results Among the 12 zirconia–ceramic FDPs, 2 had small chippings, 9 had large chippings, and 1 exhibited delamination. Out of 6 metal–ceramic FDPs, 5 had small chippings and 1 had large chipping. Descriptive fractographic analysis based on SEM observations revealed that fracture initiated from the wear facet at the occlusal surface in all cases, irrespective of the type of restoration. Significance Zirconia–ceramic and metal–ceramic FDPs all fractured from microcracks that emanated from occlusal wear facets. The relatively low fracture toughness and high residual tensile stress in porcelain veneer of zirconia restorations may contribute to the higher chipping rate and larger chip size in zirconia–ceramic FDPs relative to their metal–ceramic counterparts. The low veneer/core interfacial fracture energy of porcelain-veneered zirconia may result in the occurrence of delamination in zirconia–ceramic FDPs. PMID:26233469

  2. Label-free tracking of single extracellular vesicles in a nano-fluidic optical fiber (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Pol, Edwin; Weidlich, Stefan; Lahini, Yoav; Coumans, Frank A. W.; Sturk, Auguste; Nieuwland, Rienk; Schmidt, Markus A.; Faez, Sanli; van Leeuwen, Ton G.

    2016-03-01

    Background: Extracellular vesicles, such as exosomes, are abundantly present in human body fluids. Since the size, concentration and composition of these vesicles change during disease, vesicles have promising clinical applications, including cancer diagnosis. However, since ~70% of the vesicles have a diameter vesicles remains challenging. Thus far, vesicles vesicles to be adhered to a surface. Consequently, the majority of vesicles have never been studied in their physiological environment. We present a novel label-free optical technique to track single vesicles vesicles were contained within a single-mode light-guiding silica fiber containing a 600 nm nano-fluidic channel. Light from a diode laser (660 nm wavelength) was coupled to the fiber, resulting in a strongly confined optical mode in the nano-fluidic channel, which continuously illuminated the freely diffusing vesicles inside the channel. The elastic light scattering from the vesicles, in the direction orthogonal to the fiber axis, was collected using a microscope objective (NA=0.95) and imaged with a home-built microscope. Results: We have tracked single urinary vesicles as small as 35 nm by elastic light scattering. Please note that vesicles are low-refractive index (nvesicles vesicle-based clinical applications.

  3. Radiopaque strontium fluoroapatite glass-ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfram eHöland

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The controlled precipitation of strontium fluoroapatite crystals, was studied in four base glass compositions derived from the SiO2 – Al2O3 – Y2O3 – SrO – Na2O – K2O/Rb2O/Cs2O – P2O5 – F system. The crystal phase formation of these glasses and the main properties of the glass-ceramics, such as thermal and optical properties and radiopacity were compared with a fifth, a reference glass-ceramic. The reference glass-ceramic was characterized as Ca-fluoroapatite glass-ceramic. The four strontium fluoroapatite glass-ceramics showed the following crystal phases: a Sr5(PO43F – leucite, KAlSi2O6 , b Sr5(PO43F – leucite, KAlSi2O6, and nano-sized NaSrPO4 c Sr5(PO43F – pollucite, CsAlSiO4 , and nano-sized NaSrPO4, d Sr5(PO43F – Rb-leucite, RbAlSi2O6, and nano-sized NaSrPO4.The proof of crystal phase formation was possible by X-ray diffraction (XRD. The microstructures, which were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM demonstrated a uniform distribution of the crystals in the glass matrix. The Sr-fluoroapatites were precipitated based on an internal crystallization process, and the crystals demonstrated a needlelike morphology. The study of the crystal growth of needlelike Sr-fluoroapatites gave a clear evidence of an Ostwald ripening mechanism.The formation of leucite, pollucite and Rb-leucite was based on a surface crystallization mechanism. Therefore, a twofold crystallization mechanism was successfully applied to develop these types of glass-ceramics. The main focus of this study was the controlled development of glass-ceramics exhibiting high radiopacity in comparison to the reference glass-ceramic. This goal could be achieved with all four glass-ceramics with the preferred development of the Sr-fluoroapatite – pollucite-type glass-ceramic. In addition to this main development, it was possible to control the thermal properties. Especially the Rb-leucite containing glass-ceramic showed the highest coefficient of thermal

  4. Extracellular Vesicles and Their Role in Urologic Malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junker, Kerstin; Heinzelmann, Joana; Beckham, Carla; Ochiya, Takahiro; Jenster, Guido

    2016-08-01

    Research has increased significantly on small vesicles secreted by healthy and diseased cells. Recent discoveries have revealed their functional and biomarker roles in urologic diseases. Whether and how this knowledge of extracellular vesicles (EVs) affects translational research and clinical practices have become pertinent questions. To provide an overview of the currently available literature on the rising field of EVs, focusing on function and pathogenesis in urologic cancers and the usefulness of EVs as biomarkers. A systematic literature search was conducted using PubMed to identify original articles, review articles, and editorials regarding EVs in different types of urologic tumor diseases. Articles published between 2005 and 2015 were reviewed and selected with the consensus of all authors. Besides soluble factors, different types of EVs are involved in the complex cross talk between different cell types. EVs regulate normal physiologic processes like spermatogenesis and renal function, as well as disease-specific processes including bladder, kidney, and prostate cancer. The content of EVs is derived from the cytoplasm of the donor cell. The proteins and RNAs within these EVs can be isolated from body fluids (eg, urine and blood) and represent potential diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers. EVs are also candidate therapeutic targets and potentially useful as therapeutic vehicles. The current data suggest that EVs are important regulators of cell-cell communication. The growing knowledge about their roles in urologic malignancies provides the basis for novel therapeutic strategies. In addition, nucleic acid and the protein content of EVs holds promise for the discovery of urine- or serum-based biomarkers for kidney, bladder, and prostate cancer. Normal and cancer cells secrete small vesicles that contain proteins and RNAs from the cell of origin. Changes in the diseased cells can be detected by examining the altered content of these vesicles when secreted in

  5. Glass ceramic seals to inconel

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCollister, Howard L.; Reed, Scott T.

    1983-11-08

    A glass ceramic composition prepared by subjecting a glass composition comprising, by weight, 65-80% SiO.sub.2, 8-16%, Li.sub.2 O, 2-8% , Al.sub.2 O.sub.3, 1-8% K.sub.2 O, 1-5% P.sub.2 O.sub.5 and 1.5-7% B.sub.2 O.sub.3, to the following processing steps of heating the glass composition to a temperature sufficient to crystallize lithium metasilicate therein, holding the glass composition at a temperature and for a time period sufficient to dissolve the lithium metasilicate therein thereby creating cristobalite nucleii, cooling the glass composition and maintaining the composition at a temperature and for a time period sufficient to recrystallize lithium metasilicate therein, and thermally treating the glass composition at a temperature and for a time period sufficient to cause growth of cristobalite and further crystallization of lithium metasilicate producing a glass ceramic composition having a specific thermal expansion coefficient and products containing said composition.

  6. Surface scattering from ceramic phosphors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenef, Alan; Kelso, John; Peters, Christopher

    2012-02-01

    Scattering from phosphor converters and epitaxial surfaces is critical for solid state lighting device performance. Volume and surface scattering in solid state lighting devices can play a critical role in efficiency/efficacy, color points, and color angular consistency. Surface scattering in particular has not been well characterized in solid state lighting devices and can be complex to model. Because large angle scattering is important in lighting applications, surface scattering models generally require vector electromagnetic theory to avoid ambiguities often associated with scalar theory at these angles. Furthermore, surface features are often on the order of a few wavelengths, bringing ray tracing approaches into question. In this work, experimental angular scattering measurements are made on ceramic phosphor components where surface scattering dominates. The surface ceramic grain structure is responsible for the scattering. The results are compared to approximate statistical vector theory predictions that use the height autocorrelation functions as input. The autocorrelation measurements were derived from atomic-force microscopy topography measurements. Resulting predictions are in fairly good agreement with measurements.

  7. Randomized, controlled clinical trial of bilayer ceramic and metal-ceramic crown performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquivel-Upshaw, Josephine; Rose, William; Oliveira, Erica; Yang, Mark; Clark, Arthur E; Anusavice, Kenneth

    2013-04-01

    Analyzing the clinical performance of restorative materials is important, as there is an expectation that these materials and procedures will restore teeth and do no harm. The objective of this research study was to characterize the clinical performance of metal-ceramic crowns, core ceramic crowns, and core ceramic/veneer ceramic crowns based on 11 clinical criteria. An IRB-approved, randomized, controlled clinical trial was conducted as a single-blind pilot study. The following three types of full crowns were fabricated: (1) metal-ceramic crown (MC) made from a Pd-Au-Ag-Sn-In alloy (Argedent 62) and a glass-ceramic veneer (IPS d.SIGN veneer); (2) non-veneered (glazed) lithium disilicate glass-ceramic crown (LDC) (IPS e.max Press core and e.max Ceram Glaze); and (3) veneered lithia disilicate glass-ceramic crown (LDC/V) with glass-ceramic veneer (IPS Empress 2 core and IPS Eris). Single-unit crowns were randomly assigned. Patients were recalled for each of 3 years and were evaluated by two calibrated clinicians. Thirty-six crowns were placed in 31 patients. A total of 12 crowns of each of the three crown types were studied. Eleven criteria were evaluated: tissue health, marginal integrity, secondary caries, proximal contact, anatomic contour, occlusion, surface texture, cracks/chips (fractures), color match, tooth sensitivity, and wear (of crowns and opposing enamel). Numerical rankings ranged from 1 to 4, with 4 being excellent, and 1 indicating a need for immediate replacement. Statistical analysis of the numerical rankings was performed using a Fisher's exact test. There was no statistically significant difference between performance of the core ceramic crowns and the two veneered crowns at year 1 and year 2 (p > 0.05). All crowns were rated either as excellent or good for each of the clinical criteria; however, between years 2 and 3, gradual roughening of the occlusal surface occurred in some of the ceramic-ceramic crowns, possibly caused by dissolution and

  8. Randomized, Controlled Clinical Trial of Bilayer Ceramic and Metal-Ceramic Crown Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquivel-Upshaw, Josephine; Rose, William; Oliveira, Erica; Yang, Mark; Clark, Arthur E.; Anusavice, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Analyzing the clinical performance of restorative materials is important, as there is an expectation that these materials and procedures will restore teeth and do no harm. The objective of this research study was to characterize the clinical performance of metal-ceramic crowns, core ceramic crowns, and core ceramic/veneer ceramic crowns based on 11 clinical criteria. Materials and Methods An IRB-approved, randomized, controlled clinical trial was conducted as a single-blind pilot study. The following three types of full crowns were fabricated: (1) metal-ceramic crown (MC) made from a Pd-Au-Ag-Sn-In alloy (Argedent 62) and a glass-ceramic veneer (IPS d.SIGN veneer); (2) non-veneered (glazed) lithium disilicate glass-ceramic crown (LDC) (IPS e.max Press core and e.max Ceram Glaze); and (3) veneered lithia disilicate glass-ceramic crown (LDC/V) with glass-ceramic veneer (IPS Empress 2 core and IPS Eris). Single-unit crowns were randomly assigned. Patients were recalled for each of 3 years and were evaluated by two calibrated clinicians. Thirty-six crowns were placed in 31 patients. A total of 12 crowns of each of the three crown types were studied. Eleven criteria were evaluated: tissue health, marginal integrity, secondary caries, proximal contact, anatomic contour, occlusion, surface texture, cracks/chips (fractures), color match, tooth sensitivity, and wear (of crowns and opposing enamel). Numerical rankings ranged from 1 to 4, with 4 being excellent, and 1 indicating a need for immediate replacement. Statistical analysis of the numerical rankings was performed using a Fisher’s exact test. Results There was no statistically significant difference between performance of the core ceramic crowns and the two veneered crowns at year 1 and year 2 (p > 0.05). All crowns were rated either as excellent or good for each of the clinical criteria; however, between years 2 and 3, gradual roughening of the occlusal surface occurred in some of the ceramic-ceramic crowns

  9. [Release of toxic agents from ceramic utensils].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, H J

    1978-01-01

    Under the influence of acidic agents, ceramic glazes and decorations for ceramics may release certain toxicants, especially lead and cadmium. Both elements are essential constituents of ceramic colours and glazes; their release to acidic foods is technologically unavoidable, but it may be minimized by the utilization of appropriate decoration agents and techniques. In most industrial countries, the release of toxicants from utensils is severely limited, the maximum permissible values and the methods of test and analysis being in part very different and not always in agreement with the demands and conditions of practice. The problems related to the release of toxicants from ceramic utensils are treated from the aspects of ceramics, test techniques, analytics, toxicology and food law, with special regard to the necessity for a well-balanced compromise between the justified hygienic demands of health protection and the actual technological possibilities. The endeavours of the ceramic industry of the GDF to produce ceramic utensils releasing as little toxicants as possible are outlined.

  10. Ceramic restoration repair: report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Henrique Araújo Raposo

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The esthetic and functional rehabilitation of patients with multiple missing teeth can be performed with several techniques and materials. Ceramic restorations provide reliable masticatory function and good esthetics. However, fracture can occur in some cases due to their brittle behavior. In some cases, the replacement of an extensive prosthesis is a problem due to the high treatment cost. In this paper, two cases are presented, in which fractures occurred in extensive metal-ceramic fixed partial dentures, and their replacement was not possible. Ceramic repair was chosen and the sequences of treatment with and without presence of the ceramic fragment are also discussed. The cases illustrate that, in some situations, fractured metal-ceramic partial dentures can be successfully repaired when prosthetic replacement is not a choice. Prosthodontists must use alternatives that allow a reliable repair to extensive metal-ceramic fixed partial dentures. Surface preparation of the ceramic with hydrofluoric acid in conjunction with a silane coupling agent is essential for a predictable bonding of composite resin. The repair performed with composite resin is an esthetic and functional alternative when extensive fixed partial dentures cannot be replaced.

  11. Tribology of ceramics: Report of the Committee on Tribology of Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    The current state of knowledge of ceramic surface structures, composition, and reactivity is reviewed. The tribological requirements of advanced mechanical systems now being deployed (in particular, heat engines) exceed the capabilities of traditional metallic-based materials because of the high temperatures encountered. Advanced ceramic materials for such applications are receiving intense scrutiny, but there is a lack of understanding of the properties and behavior of ceramic surfaces and the influence of processing on the properties of ceramics is described. The adequacy of models, ranging form atomic to macro, to describe and to predict ceramic friction and wear are discussed, as well as what is known about lubrication at elevated temperatures. From this analysis, recommendations are made for coordination, research, and development that will lead to better performance of ceramic materials in tribological systems.

  12. Growth and instability of a phospholipid vesicle in a bath of fatty acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dervaux, J.; Noireaux, V.; Libchaber, A. J.

    2017-06-01

    Using a microfluidic trap, we study the behavior of individual phospholipid vesicles in contact with fatty acids. We show that spontaneous fatty acids insertion inside the bilayer is controlled by the vesicle size, osmotic pressure difference across the membrane and fatty acids concentration in the external bath. Depending on these parameters, vesicles can grow spherically or become unstable and fragment into several daughter vesicles. We establish the phase diagram for vesicle growth and we derive a simple thermodynamic model that reproduces the time evolution of the vesicle volume. Finally, we show that stable growth can be achieved on an artificial cell expressing a simple set of bacterial cytoskeletal proteins, paving the way toward artificial cell reproduction.

  13. Vesicles from Amphiphilic Dumbbells and Janus Dendrimers: Bioinspired Self-Assembled Structures for Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soraya Taabache

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The current review focuses on vesicles obtained from the self-assembly of two types of dendritic macromolecules, namely amphiphilic Janus dendrimers (forming dendrimersomes and amphiphilic dumbbells. In the first part, we will present some synthetic strategies and the various building blocks that can be used to obtain dendritic-based macromolecules, thereby showing their structural versatility. We put our focus on amphiphilic Janus dendrimers and amphiphilic dumbbells that form vesicles in water but we also encompass vesicles formed thereof in organic solvents. The second part of this review deals with the production methods of these vesicles at the nanoscale but also at the microscale. Furthermore, the influence of various parameters (intrinsic to the amphiphilic JD and extrinsic—from the environment on the type of vesicle formed will be discussed. In the third part, we will review the numerous biomedical applications of these vesicles of nano- or micron-size.

  14. Salt, shake, fuse--giant hybrid polymer/lipid vesicles through mechanically activated fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Ian M; Paxton, Walter F

    2014-03-24

    Large (200 nm) poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(butadiene) polymer vesicles fuse into giant (>1 μm) vesicles with mild agitation in dilute aqueous NaCl solutions. This unusual effect is attributed to the salt-induced contraction of the poly(ethylene oxide) corona, reducing steric resistance between vesicles and, with agitation, increasing the probability of contact between the hydrophobic cores of adjacent membranes. In addition, NaCl and agitation facilitated the creation of giant hybrid vesicles from much smaller homogeneous polymersomes and liposomes. Whereas lipid vesicles do not readily fuse with each other under the same circumstances, they did fuse with polymersomes to produce hybrid polymer/lipid vesicles. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Wolbachia bacteria reside in host Golgi-related vesicles whose position is regulated by polarity proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung-Ok Cho

    Full Text Available Wolbachia pipientis are intracellular symbiotic bacteria extremely common in various organisms including Drosophila melanogaster, and are known for their ability to induce changes in host reproduction. These bacteria are present in astral microtubule-associated vesicular structures in host cytoplasm, but little is known about the identity of these vesicles. We report here that Wolbachia are restricted only to a group of Golgi-related vesicles concentrated near the site of membrane biogenesis and minus-ends of microtubules. The Wolbachia vesicles were significantly mislocalized in mutant embryos defective in cell/planar polarity genes suggesting that cell/tissue polarity genes are required for apical localization of these Golgi-related vesicles. Furthermore, two of the polarity proteins, Van Gogh/Strabismus and Scribble, appeared to be present in these Golgi-related vesicles. Thus, establishment of polarity may be closely linked to the precise insertion of Golgi vesicles into the new membrane addition site.

  16. The Role of Extracellular Vesicles: An Epigenetic View of the Cancer Microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Zhongrun; Shen, Qi; Yang, Xi; Qiu, Yongming; Zhang, Wenbin

    2015-01-01

    Exosomes, microvesicles, and other extracellular vesicles are released by many cell types, including cancer cells and cancer-related immune cells. Extracellular vesicles can directly or indirectly facilitate the transfer of bioinformation to recipient cells or to the extracellular environment. In cancer, exosomes have been implicated in tumor initiation, proliferation, and metastasis. Extracellular vesicles can transmit proteins and nucleic acids that participate in DNA methylation, histone modification, and posttranscriptional regulation of RNA. Factors transmitted by extracellular vesicles reflect the donor cell status, and extracellular vesicles derived from tumor cells may be also responsible for altering expression of tumor promoting and tumor suppressing genes in recipient cells. Thus, circulating extracellular vesicles may act as biomarkers of cancer, and detection of these biomarkers may be applied to diagnosis or assessment of prognosis in patients with cancer.

  17. The biology and function of extracellular vesicles in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (Review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Bo; Shan, Ying; Bao, Lili; Chen, Jing; Yang, Liu; Zhang, Qicheng; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Zhenxin; Zhang, Jie; Shi, Si; You, Yiwen

    2018-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles are a heterogeneous group of membrane-enclosed vesicles, which play an important role in intercellular communication. Increasing number of studies have shown that tumor-derived extracellular vesicles might be involved in the transfer of oncogenic cargo (proteins, lipids, messenger RNA, microRNA, non-coding RNAs and DNA) through which cancer cells could shape the tumor microenvironment and influence tumor progression. Nasopharyngeal carcinoma-derived extracellular vesicles have also reported to facilitate tumor proliferation, metastasis and immune escape. Moreover, nasopharyngeal carcinoma-derived extracellular vesicles might serve as biomarkers for early diagnosis and therapeutic targets. The present review provides information on the biological and clinical significance of extracellular vesicles in tumors, especially in nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

  18. Agonists that increase [Ca2+]i halt the movement of cytoplasmatic vesicles in MDCK cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjælde, Randi Groslier; Árnadóttir, Sigrid Salling; Leipziger, Jens Georg

    2011-01-01

    of vesicles by 40%. Because all these perturbations increase [Ca²⁺]i, we speculated that this increase in [Ca²⁺]i was responsible for the vesicle arrest. Therefore, we tested the effect of the Ca²⁺ ionophore, ionomycin (1 μM), which in the presence of extracellular Ca²⁺ resulted in a considerable......Translocation of vesicles within the cytoplasm is essential to normal cell function. The vesicles are typically transported along the microtubules to their destination. The aim of this study was to characterize the vesicular movement in resting and stimulated renal epithelial cells. MDCK cells...... loaded with either quinacrine or acridine orange, dyes taken up by acidic vesicles, were observed at 37°C in semiopen perfusion chambers. Time-lapse series were analyzed by Imaris software. Our data revealed vigorous movement of stained vesicles in resting MDCK cells. These movements seem to require...

  19. Mapping organelle motion reveals a vesicular conveyor belt spatially replenishing secretory vesicles in stimulated chromaffin cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maucort, Guillaume; Kasula, Ravikiran; Papadopulos, Andreas; Nieminen, Timo A; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina; Meunier, Frederic A

    2014-01-01

    How neurosecretory cells spatially adjust their secretory vesicle pools to replenish those that have fused and released their hormonal content is currently unknown. Here we designed a novel set of image analyses to map the probability of tracked organelles undergoing a specific type of movement (free, caged or directed). We then applied our analysis to time-lapse z-stack confocal imaging of secretory vesicles from bovine Chromaffin cells to map the global changes in vesicle motion and directionality occurring upon secretagogue stimulation. We report a defined region abutting the cortical actin network that actively transports secretory vesicles and is dissipated by actin and microtubule depolymerizing drugs. The directionality of this "conveyor belt" towards the cell surface is activated by stimulation. Actin and microtubule networks therefore cooperatively probe the microenvironment to transport secretory vesicles to the periphery, providing a mechanism whereby cells globally adjust their vesicle pools in response to secretagogue stimulation.

  20. Flight-vehicle materials, structures, and dynamics - Assessment and future directions. Vol. 3 - Ceramics and ceramic-matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Stanley R. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The present volume discusses ceramics and ceramic-matrix composites in prospective aerospace systems, monolithic ceramics, transformation-toughened and whisker-reinforced ceramic composites, glass-ceramic matrix composites, reaction-bonded Si3N4 and SiC composites, and chemical vapor-infiltrated composites. Also discussed are the sol-gel-processing of ceramic composites, the fabrication and properties of fiber-reinforced ceramic composites with directed metal oxidation, the fracture behavior of ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs), the fatigue of fiber-reinforced CMCs, creep and rupture of CMCs, structural design methodologies for ceramic-based materials systems, the joining of ceramics and CMCs, and carbon-carbon composites.