WorldWideScience

Sample records for vertical velocities range

  1. Vertical profiles of the 3-D wind velocity retrieved from multiple wind lidars performing triple range-height-indicator scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, Mithu; Valerio Iungo, G.; Ashton, Ryan; Brewer, W. Alan; Choukulkar, Aditya; Delgado, Ruben; Lundquist, Julie K.; Shaw, William J.; Wilczak, James M.; Wolfe, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    Vertical profiles of 3-D wind velocity are retrieved from triple range-height-indicator (RHI) scans performed with multiple simultaneous scanning Doppler wind lidars. This test is part of the eXperimental Planetary boundary layer Instrumentation Assessment (XPIA) campaign carried out at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory. The three wind velocity components are retrieved and then compared with the data acquired through various profiling wind lidars and high-frequency wind data obtained from sonic anemometers installed on a 300 m meteorological tower. The results show that the magnitude of the horizontal wind velocity and the wind direction obtained from the triple RHI scans are generally retrieved with good accuracy. However, poor accuracy is obtained for the evaluation of the vertical velocity, which is mainly due to its typically smaller magnitude and to the error propagation connected with the data retrieval procedure and accuracy in the experimental setup.

  2. Predicting vertical jump height from bar velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ramos, Amador; Štirn, Igor; Padial, Paulino; Argüelles-Cienfuegos, Javier; De la Fuente, Blanca; Strojnik, Vojko; Feriche, Belén

    2015-06-01

    The objective of the study was to assess the use of maximum (Vmax) and final propulsive phase (FPV) bar velocity to predict jump height in the weighted jump squat. FPV was defined as the velocity reached just before bar acceleration was lower than gravity (-9.81 m·s(-2)). Vertical jump height was calculated from the take-off velocity (Vtake-off) provided by a force platform. Thirty swimmers belonging to the National Slovenian swimming team performed a jump squat incremental loading test, lifting 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% of body weight in a Smith machine. Jump performance was simultaneously monitored using an AMTI portable force platform and a linear velocity transducer attached to the barbell. Simple linear regression was used to estimate jump height from the Vmax and FPV recorded by the linear velocity transducer. Vmax (y = 16.577x - 16.384) was able to explain 93% of jump height variance with a standard error of the estimate of 1.47 cm. FPV (y = 12.828x - 6.504) was able to explain 91% of jump height variance with a standard error of the estimate of 1.66 cm. Despite that both variables resulted to be good predictors, heteroscedasticity in the differences between FPV and Vtake-off was observed (r(2) = 0.307), while the differences between Vmax and Vtake-off were homogenously distributed (r(2) = 0.071). These results suggest that Vmax is a valid tool for estimating vertical jump height in a loaded jump squat test performed in a Smith machine. Key pointsVertical jump height in the loaded jump squat can be estimated with acceptable precision from the maximum bar velocity recorded by a linear velocity transducer.The relationship between the point at which bar acceleration is less than -9.81 m·s(-2) and the real take-off is affected by the velocity of movement.Mean propulsive velocity recorded by a linear velocity transducer does not appear to be optimal to monitor ballistic exercise performance.

  3. On the measurement of vertical velocity by MST radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gage, K. S.

    1983-01-01

    An overview is presented of the measurement of atmospheric vertical motion utilizing the MST radar technique. Vertical motion in the atmosphere is briefly discussed as a function of scale. Vertical velocity measurement by MST radars is then considered from within the context of the expected magnitudes to be observed. Examples are drawn from published vertical velocity observations.

  4. Parachute landing fall characteristics at three realistic vertical descent velocities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitting, John W; Steele, Julie R; Jaffrey, Mark A; Munro, Bridget J

    2007-12-01

    Although parachute landing injuries are thought to be due in part to a lack of exposure of trainees to realistic descent velocities during parachute landing fall (PLF) training, no research has systematically investigated whether PLF technique is affected by different vertical descent conditions, with standardized and realistic conditions of horizontal drift. This study was designed to determine the effects of variations in vertical descent velocity on PLF technique. Kinematic, ground reaction force, and electromyographic data were collected and analyzed for 20 paratroopers while they performed parachute landings, using a custom-designed monorail apparatus, with a constant horizontal drift velocity (2.3 m x s(-1)) and at three realistic vertical descent velocities: slow (2.1 m x s(-1)), medium (3.3 m x s(-1)), and fast (4.6 m x s(-1)). Most biomechanical variables characterizing PLF technique were significantly affected by descent velocity. For example, at the fast velocity, the subjects impacted the ground with 123 degrees of plantar flexion and generated ground reaction forces averaging 13.7 times body weight, compared to 106 degrees and 6.1 body weight, respectively, at the slow velocity. Furthermore, the subjects activated their antigravity extensor muscles earlier during the fast velocity condition to eccentrically control the impact absorption. As vertical descent rates increased, the paratroopers displayed a significantly different strategy when performing the PLF. It is therefore recommended that PLF training programs include ground training activities with realistic vertical descent velocities to better prepare trainees to withstand the impact forces associated with initial aerial descents onto the Drop Zone and, ultimately, minimize the potential for injury.

  5. Some numerical calculations of the vertical velocity field in hurricanes

    OpenAIRE

    Krishnamurti, T. N.

    2011-01-01

    The commonly observed crescent-shaped geometry of the tangential wind field in hurricanes is imposed on the primitive equations of atmospheric motion, and solutions for the vertical velocity field are obtained. It is shown that the numerically computed vertical motion field exhibits a spiral form, very similar to what is observed in radar pictures in individual hurricanes. Aircraft flight data from the National Hurricane Research Project are utilized to carry out the numerical calculations i...

  6. Muscle activation history at different vertical jumps and its influence on vertical velocity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kopper, Bence; Csende, Zsolt; Safar, Sandor; Hortobagyi, Tibor; Tihanyi, Jozsef

    In the present study we investigated displacement, time, velocity and acceleration history of center of mass (COM) and electrical activity of knee extensors to estimate the dominance of the factors influencing the vertical velocity in squat jumps (SJs), countermovement jumps (CMJs) and drop jumps

  7. Turbulence velocity profiling for high sensitivity and vertical-resolution atmospheric characterization with Stereo-SCIDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, J.; Butterley, T.; Townson, M. J.; Reeves, A. P.; Morris, T. J.; Wilson, R. W.

    2017-02-01

    As telescopes become larger, into the era of ˜40 m Extremely Large Telescopes, the high-resolution vertical profile of the optical turbulence strength is critical for the validation, optimization and operation of optical systems. The velocity of atmospheric optical turbulence is an important parameter for several applications including astronomical adaptive optics systems. Here, we compare the vertical profile of the velocity of the atmospheric wind above La Palma by means of a comparison of Stereo-SCIntillation Detection And Ranging (Stereo-SCIDAR) with the Global Forecast System models and nearby balloon-borne radiosondes. We use these data to validate the automated optical turbulence velocity identification from the Stereo-SCIDAR instrument mounted on the 2.5 m Isaac Newton Telescope, La Palma. By comparing these data we infer that the turbulence velocity and the wind velocity are consistent and that the automated turbulence velocity identification of the Stereo-SCIDAR is precise. The turbulence velocities can be used to increase the sensitivity of the turbulence strength profiles, as weaker turbulence that may be misinterpreted as noise can be detected with a velocity vector. The turbulence velocities can also be used to increase the altitude resolution of a detected layer, as the altitude of the velocity vectors can be identified to a greater precision than the native resolution of the system. We also show examples of complex velocity structure within a turbulent layer caused by wind shear at the interface of atmospheric zones.

  8. Wind Velocity Vertical Extrapolation by Extended Power Law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zekai Şen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Wind energy gains more attention day by day as one of the clean renewable energy resources. We predicted wind speed vertical extrapolation by using extended power law. In this study, an extended vertical wind velocity extrapolation formulation is derived on the basis of perturbation theory by considering power law and Weibull wind speed probability distribution function. In the proposed methodology not only the mean values of the wind speeds at different elevations but also their standard deviations and the cross-correlation coefficient between different elevations are taken into consideration. The application of the presented methodology is performed for wind speed measurements at Karaburun/Istanbul, Turkey. At this location, hourly wind speed measurements are available for three different heights above the earth surface.

  9. Orthogonal Vertical Velocity Dispersion Distributions Produced by Bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Min; Shen, Juntai; Debattista, Victor P.; de Lorenzo-Cáceres, Adriana

    2017-02-01

    In barred galaxies, the contours of stellar velocity dispersions (σ) are generally expected to be oval and aligned with the orientation of bars. However, many double-barred (S2B) galaxies exhibit distinct σ peaks on the minor axis of the inner bar, which we termed “σ-humps,” while two local σ minima are present close to the ends of inner bars, I.e., “σ-hollows.” Analysis of numerical simulations shows that {σ }z-humps or hollows should play an important role in generating the observed σ-humps+hollows in low-inclination galaxies. In order to systematically investigate the properties of {σ }z in barred galaxies, we apply the vertical Jeans equation to a group of well-designed three-dimensional bar+disk(+bulge) models. A vertically thin bar can lower {σ }z along the bar and enhance it perpendicular to the bar, thus generating {σ }z-humps+hollows. Such a result suggests that {σ }z-humps+hollows can be generated by the purely dynamical response of stars in the presence of a sufficiently massive, vertically thin bar, even without an outer bar. Using self-consistent N-body simulations, we verify the existence of vertically thin bars in the nuclear-barred and S2B models that generate prominent σ-humps+hollows. Thus, the ubiquitous presence of σ-humps+hollows in S2Bs implies that inner bars are vertically thin. The addition of a bulge makes the {σ }z-humps more ambiguous and thus tends to somewhat hide the {σ }z-humps+hollows. We show that {σ }z may be used as a kinematic diagnostic of stellar components that have different thicknesses, providing a direct perspective on the morphology and thickness of nearly face-on bars and bulges with integral field unit spectroscopy.

  10. A Unified Global Reference Frame of Vertical Crustal Movements by Satellite Laser Ranging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinhui Zhu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Crustal movement is one of the main factors influencing the change of the Earth system, especially in its vertical direction, which affects people’s daily life through the frequent occurrence of earthquakes, geological disasters, and so on. In order to get a better study and application of the vertical crustal movement,as well as its changes, the foundation and prerequisite areto devise and establish its reference frame; especially, a unified global reference frame is required. Since SLR (satellite laser ranging is one of the most accurate space techniques for monitoring geocentric motion and can directly measure the ground station’s geocentric coordinates and velocities relative to the centre of the Earth’s mass, we proposed to take the vertical velocity of the SLR technique in the ITRF2008 framework as the reference frame of vertical crustal motion, which we defined as the SLR vertical reference frame (SVRF. The systematic bias between other velocity fields and the SVRF was resolved by using the GPS (Global Positioning System and VLBI (very long baseline interferometry velocity observations, and the unity of other velocity fields and SVRF was realized,as well. The results show that it is feasible and suitable to take the SVRF as a reference frame, which has both geophysical meanings and geodetic observations, so we recommend taking the SLR vertical velocity under ITRF2008 as the global reference frame of vertical crustal movement.

  11. Terminal velocity of a shuttlecock in vertical fall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peastrel, Mark; Lynch, Rosemary; Armenti, Angelo

    1980-07-01

    We have performed a straightforward vertical fall experiment for a case where the effects of air resistance are important and directly measurable. Using a commonly available badminton shuttlecock, a tape measure, and a millisecond timer, the times required for the shuttlecock to fall given distances (up to almost ten meters) were accurately measured. The experiment was performed in an open stairwell. The experimental data was compared to the predictions of several models. The best fit was obtained with the model which assumes a resistive force quadratic in the instantaneous speed of the falling object. This model was fitted to the experimental data enabling us to predict the terminal velocity of the shuttlecock (6.80 m/sec). The results indicate that, starting from rest, the vertically falling shuttlecock achieves 99% of its terminal velocity in 1.84 sec, after falling 9.2 m. The relative ease in collecting the data, as well as the excellent agreement with theory, make this an ideal experiment for use in physics courses at a variety of levels.

  12. Orographic precipitation and vertical velocity characteristics from drop size and fall velocity spectra observed by disdrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-In; Kim, Dong-Kyun; Kim, Ji-Hyeon; Kang, Yunhee; Kim, Hyeonjoon

    2017-04-01

    During a summer monsoon season each year, severe weather phenomena caused by front, mesoscale convective systems, or typhoons often occur in the southern Korean Peninsula where is mostly comprised of complex high mountains. These areas play an important role in controlling formation, amount, and distribution of rainfall. As precipitation systems move over the mountains, they can develop rapidly and produce localized heavy rainfall. Thus observational analysis in the mountainous areas is required for studying terrain effects on the rapid rainfall development and its microphysics. We performed intensive field observations using two s-band operational weather radars around Mt. Jiri (1950 m ASL) during summertime on June and July in 2015-2016. Observation data of DSD (Drop Size Distribution) from Parsivel disdrometer and (w component) vertical velocity data from ultrasonic anemometers were analyzed for Typhoon Chanhom on 12 July 2015 and the heavy rain event on 1 July 2016. During the heavy rain event, a dual-Doppler radar analysis using Jindo radar and Gunsan radar was also conducted to examine 3-D wind fields and vertical structure of reflectivity in these areas. For examining up-/downdrafts in the windward or leeward side of Mt. Jiri, we developed a new scheme technique to estimate vertical velocities (w) from drop size and fall velocity spectra of Parsivel disdrometers at different stations. Their comparison with the w values observed by the 3D anemometer showed quite good agreement each other. The Z histogram with regard to the estimated w was similar to that with regard to R, indicating that Parsivel-estimated w is quite reasonable for classifying strong and weak rain, corresponding to updraft and downdraft, respectively. Mostly, positive w values (upward) were estimated in heavy rainfall at the windward side (D1 and D2). Negative w values (downward) were dominant even during large rainfall at the leeward side (D4). For D1 and D2, the upward w percentages were

  13. Range/velocity limitations for time-domain blood velocity estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    1993-01-01

    The traditional range/velocity limitation for blood velocity estimation systems using ultrasound is elucidated. It is stated that the equation is a property of the estimator used, not the actual physical measurement situation, as higher velocities can be estimated by the time domain cross...

  14. Estimation of vertical migration velocity of (137)Cs in the Mount IDA/Kazdagi, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadeniz, Özlem; Çakır, Rukiye; Karakurt, Hidayet

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents the results obtained from a radioecological study carried out in the forest sites of Mount IDA (Kazdagi)/Edremit, Turkey. For 118 soil profiles, the depth distribution of (137)Cs activity was established by fitting the experimental points to an exponential, a gaussian or a log-normal function. The relaxation lengths were in the range of 1.09-16.7 cm with a mean of 5.73 cm, showing a slow transport and a strong retention capacity of (137)Cs even after the 26-y period of Chernobyl accident. From the data for the vertical distribution of (137)Cs in soil profiles, the mean annual migration velocity of (137)Cs was in the range of 0.11-0.62 cm year(-1) with a mean of 0.30 cm year(-1). Statistically significant correlations between the thickness of the humus layer and the mean annual velocity of (137)Cs were found for both coniferous and mixed forest sites. The mean annual velocity of (137)Cs in the forests sites with Pinus nigra var pallasiana was significantly higher than sites with Pinus brutia. External dose-rates from the (137)Cs in forest soils were estimated using a conversion factor used in many studies and comprised with the external dose-rates determined according to the vertical distribution of (137)Cs within the soil depth profiles. It is clearly seen that both levels and spatial distribution patterns of the external dose-rates from (137)Cs were influenced considerably with the vertical migration rate and the vertical distribution of (137)Cs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Using Smartphone Pressure Sensors to Measure Vertical Velocities of Elevators, Stairways, and Drones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Martín; Martí, Arturo C.

    2017-01-01

    We measure the vertical velocities of elevators, pedestrians climbing stairs, and drones (flying unmanned aerial vehicles), by means of smartphone pressure sensors. The barometric pressure obtained with the smartphone is related to the altitude of the device via the hydrostatic approximation. From the altitude values, vertical velocities are…

  16. Influence of running velocity on vertical, leg and joint stiffness : modelling and recommendations for future research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brughelli, Matt; Cronin, John

    2008-01-01

    Human running can be modelled as either a spring-mass model or multiple springs in series. A force is required to stretch or compress the spring, and thus stiffness, the variable of interest in this paper, can be calculated from the ratio of this force to the change in spring length. Given the link between force and length change, muscle stiffness and mechanical stiffness have been areas of interest to researchers, clinicians, and strength and conditioning practitioners for many years. This review focuses on mechanical stiffness, and in particular, vertical, leg and joint stiffness, since these are the only stiffness types that have been directly calculated during human running. It has been established that as running velocity increases from slow-to-moderate values, leg stiffness remains constant while both vertical stiffness and joint stiffness increase. However, no studies have calculated vertical, leg or joint stiffness over a range of slow-to-moderate values to maximum values in an athletic population. Therefore, the effects of faster running velocities on stiffness are relatively unexplored. Furthermore, no experimental research has examined the effects of training on vertical, leg or joint stiffness and the subsequent effects on running performance. Various methods of training (Olympic style weightlifting, heavy resistance training, plyometrics, eccentric strength training) have shown to be effective at improving running performance. However, the effects of these training methods on vertical, leg and joint stiffness are unknown. As a result, the true importance of stiffness to running performance remains unexplored, and the best practice for changing stiffness to optimize running performance is speculative at best. It is our hope that a better understanding of stiffness, and the influence of running speed on stiffness, will lead to greater interest and an increase in experimental research in this area.

  17. Vertical Velocities in Cumulus Convection: Implications for Climate and Prospects for Realistic Simulation at Cloud Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donner, Leo

    2014-05-01

    Cumulus mass fluxes are essential controls on the interactions between cumulus convection and large-scale flows. Cumulus parameterizations have generally been built around them, and these parameterizations are basic components of climate models. Several important questions in climate science depend also on cumulus vertical velocities. Interactions between aerosols and convection comprise a prominent example, and scale-aware cumulus parameterizations that require explicit information about cumulus areas are another. Basic progress on these problems requires realistic characterization of cumulus vertical velocities from observations and models. Recent deployments of dual-Doppler radars are providing unprecedented observations, which can be compared against cloud-resolving models (CRMs). The CRMs can subsequently be analyzed to develop and evaluate parameterizations of vertical velocities in climate models. Vertical velocities from several cloud models will be compared against observations in this presentation. CRM vertical velocities will be found to depend strongly on model resolution and treatment of sub-grid turbulence and microphysics. Although many current state-of-science CRMs do not simulate vertical velocities well, recent experiments with these models suggest that with appropriate treatments of sub-grid turbulence and microphysics robustly realistic modeling of cumulus vertical velocities is possible.

  18. Clutter in the GMTI range-velocity map.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2009-04-01

    Ground Moving Target Indicator (GMTI) radar maps echo data to range and range-rate, which is a function of a moving target's velocity and its position within the antenna beam footprint. Even stationary clutter will exhibit an apparent motion spectrum and can interfere with moving vehicle detections. Consequently it is very important for a radar to understand how stationary clutter maps into radar measurements of range and velocity. This mapping depends on a wide variety of factors, including details of the radar motion, orientation, and the 3-D topography of the clutter.

  19. Diagnosis of hydrometeor profiles from area-mean vertical-velocity data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Scott A.; Houze, Robert A., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    A simple one-dimensional microphysical retrieval model is developed for estimating vertical profiles of liquid and frozen hydrometeor mixing ratios from observed vertical profiles of area-mean vertical velocity in regions of convective and/or stratiform precipitation. The mean vertical-velocity profiles can be obtained from Doppler radar (single and dual) or other means. The one-dimensional results are shown to be in good agreement with two-dimensional microphysical fields from a previous study. Sensitivity tests are performed.

  20. Diagnosing ocean vertical velocities off New Caledonia from a SPRAY glider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuda, Jean-Luc; Marin, Frédéric; Durand, Fabien; Terre, Thierry

    2013-04-01

    A SPRAY glider has been operated in the Coral Sea (South-Western tropical Pacific ocean) since 2011, with the primary goal of monitoring the boundary currents and jets. In this presentation, we will describe how oceanic vertical velocities can be estimated from SPRAY glider measurements, with application to the observation of internal waves off New Caledonia in May-June 2012. Pressure measurements by the glider allow estimating the vertical velocities of the glider (relative to ocean bottom) at each time. These vertical velocities are the sum of the vertical velocities of the glider relative to the water body (governed by the laws of motion of the glider) and of the oceanic vertical velocities (due to ocean internal dynamics). If we solve the laws of motion of the glider (via an adequate flight model), we can thus retrieve oceanic vertical velocities. On account of their small magnitude, the retrieval of ocean vertical velocities would be tricky - if not impossible - through other conventional instruments such as ADCPs. Following a couple of similar previous studies on the SLOCUM and SEAGLIDER gliders, we describe a simplified flight model for the SPRAY glider. This model has three parameters that only depend on the characteristics of the glider: the compressibility and thermal expansion coefficients (that are constant) and the drag coefficient (that is allowed to change dive after dive, because of potential fouling of the hull). We estimate these parameters under the assumption that the absolute vertical water velocity average to zero over a long enough spatio-temporal window (typically: a profile or a group of profiles). Unlike previous studies, our flight model takes into account the vehicle roll to assess its impact on the flight model and oceanic vertical velocity retrieval. We apply this approach to a 40-day/250 dives/800km mission performed in May-June 2012 along 167°E south of New Caledonia. Dramatic water vertical velocities variations (up to 3-4 cm

  1. Magnetic and velocity fields MHD flow of a stretched vertical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Analytical solutions for heat and mass transfer by laminar flow of Newtonian, viscous, electrically conducting and heat generation/absorbing fluid on a continuously moving vertical permeable surface with buoyancy in the presence of a magnetic field and a first order chemical reaction are reported. The solutions for magnetic ...

  2. Intraseasonal vertical velocity variation caused by the equatorial wave in the central equatorial Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Horii, T.; Masumoto, Y.; Ueki, I.; PrasannaKumar, S.; Mizuno, K.

    for African-Asian-Australian Monsoon Analysis and Prediction, in October-November 2006. Using an array of four subsurface moored acoustic Doppler current profilers, we estimated vertical velocity by applying the continuity equation. Results indicated...

  3. Estimates of vertical velocities and eddy coefficients in the Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Varkey, M.J.; Sastry, J.S.

    Vertical velocities and eddy coefficients in the intermediate depths of the Bay of Bengal are calculated from mean hydrographic data for 300 miles-squares. The linear current density (sigma- O) versus log-depth plots show steady balance between...

  4. Determination of vertical velocities in the equatorial part of the western Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bahulayan, N.; Varadachari, V.V.R.

    Using steady state two-dimensional turbulent diffusion equations of salt and heat some important characteristics of vertical circulation in the equatorial part of the Indian Ocean have been evaluated and discussed. Upwelling and sinking velocities...

  5. The Vertical Variation of HI Velocity Dispersion in Disk Galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, Stephan Pieter Cornelis; Freeman, Ken; van der Kruit, Pieter C.

    2010-01-01

    One of the key assumptions in dynamical applications of the HI velocity dispersion in disk galaxies (e.g. to the flattening of the dark halo) has always been the isothermal nature of the HI distribution. There is no physical reason for this assumption: it is made because until now it has not been

  6. Variable Phase Propagation Velocity for Long Range Lightning Location System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z.; Koh, K.; Mezentsev, A.; Enno, S. E.; Sugier, J.; Fullekrug, M.

    2016-12-01

    Lightning Location System (LLS) is of key importance to numerous meteorological, industrial and aviation systems worldwide. A crucial input parameter of a LLS which utilizes time-of-arrival (TOA) method is the wave propagation velocity at low frequencies. For example, the WWLLN network use group velocity approach, which is assumed to be constant near the speed of light [e.g. Dowden et al., 2002]. The detected lightning signals are normally a mixture of ground waves and sky waves (i.e. ionospheric hops), which are associated with different elevation angle of the incident wave [e.g., Fullekrug et al., 2015]. In this study, we introduce the new concept of "phase propagation velocity" as observed by the receiver considering the elevation angle. It is found that the radio waves from two submarine communication transmitters at 20.9 kHz and 23.4 kHz exhibit phase propagation velocities that are 0.51% slower and 0.64% faster than the speed of light as a result of sky wave contributions and ground effects. Here, we apply our new technique, using a variable phase propagation velocity, to the TOA method for the first time. This method was applied to electric field recordings from a long range LLS ( 500km) that consists of four radio receivers in Western Europe. The lightning locations inferred from variable velocities improve the accuracy of locations inferred from a fixed velocity by 0.89-1.06 km when compared to the lightning locations reported by the UK Met Office. The observed phase propagation velocities depend on the ground and ionosphere conditions along the propagation paths. The distribution of the observed phase propagation velocities in small geographic areas fit a normal distribution that is not centered at the speed of light. Consequently, representative velocities can be calculated for many small geographic areas to produce a velocity map over central France where numerous lightning discharges occurred. This map reflects the impact of sky waves and ground

  7. Cloud base vertical velocity statistics: a comparison between an atmospheric mesoscale model and remote sensing observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Tonttila

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The statistics of cloud base vertical velocity simulated by the non-hydrostatic mesoscale model AROME are compared with Cloudnet remote sensing observations at two locations: the ARM SGP site in central Oklahoma, and the DWD observatory at Lindenberg, Germany. The results show that AROME significantly underestimates the variability of vertical velocity at cloud base compared to observations at their nominal resolution; the standard deviation of vertical velocity in the model is typically 4–8 times smaller than observed, and even more during the winter at Lindenberg. Averaging the observations to the horizontal scale corresponding to the physical grid spacing of AROME (2.5 km explains 70–80 % of the underestimation by the model. Further averaging of the observations in the horizontal is required to match the model values for the standard deviation in vertical velocity. This indicates an effective horizontal resolution for the AROME model of at least 10 km in the presented case. Adding a TKE-term on the resolved grid-point vertical velocity can compensate for the underestimation, but only for altitudes below approximately the boundary layer top height. The results illustrate the need for a careful consideration of the scales the model is able to accurately resolve, as well as for a special treatment of sub-grid scale variability of vertical velocities in kilometer-scale atmospheric models, if processes such as aerosol-cloud interactions are to be included in the future.

  8. The large low velocity province and the vertical flow beneath the Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, K.; Geller, R. J.; Tsuchiya, T.

    2010-12-01

    % faster than the transverse (SH) component in the depth range from about 200-400 km above the core-mantle boundary (CMB). The major mineralogical components above the D" discontinuity in this depth range are Mg-perovskite (pv) and ferropericlase (fp). The observed anisotropy could be interpreted as due to lattice preferred orientation (LPO) of either pv, fp, or both in the lowermost mantle induced by vertical flow due to thermal buoyancy, which might be related to the root of the Hawaiian hotspot.

  9. A Sensor Fusion Method for Tracking Vertical Velocity and Height Based on Inertial and Barometric Altimeter Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Maria Sabatini

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A sensor fusion method was developed for vertical channel stabilization by fusing inertial measurements from an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU and pressure altitude measurements from a barometric altimeter integrated in the same device (baro-IMU. An Extended Kalman Filter (EKF estimated the quaternion from the sensor frame to the navigation frame; the sensed specific force was rotated into the navigation frame and compensated for gravity, yielding the vertical linear acceleration; finally, a complementary filter driven by the vertical linear acceleration and the measured pressure altitude produced estimates of height and vertical velocity. A method was also developed to condition the measured pressure altitude using a whitening filter, which helped to remove the short-term correlation due to environment-dependent pressure changes from raw pressure altitude. The sensor fusion method was implemented to work on-line using data from a wireless baro-IMU and tested for the capability of tracking low-frequency small-amplitude vertical human-like motions that can be critical for stand-alone inertial sensor measurements. Validation tests were performed in different experimental conditions, namely no motion, free-fall motion, forced circular motion and squatting. Accurate on-line tracking of height and vertical velocity was achieved, giving confidence to the use of the sensor fusion method for tracking typical vertical human motions: velocity Root Mean Square Error (RMSE was in the range 0.04–0.24 m/s; height RMSE was in the range 5–68 cm, with statistically significant performance gains when the whitening filter was used by the sensor fusion method to track relatively high-frequency vertical motions.

  10. A sensor fusion method for tracking vertical velocity and height based on inertial and barometric altimeter measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatini, Angelo Maria; Genovese, Vincenzo

    2014-07-24

    A sensor fusion method was developed for vertical channel stabilization by fusing inertial measurements from an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) and pressure altitude measurements from a barometric altimeter integrated in the same device (baro-IMU). An Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) estimated the quaternion from the sensor frame to the navigation frame; the sensed specific force was rotated into the navigation frame and compensated for gravity, yielding the vertical linear acceleration; finally, a complementary filter driven by the vertical linear acceleration and the measured pressure altitude produced estimates of height and vertical velocity. A method was also developed to condition the measured pressure altitude using a whitening filter, which helped to remove the short-term correlation due to environment-dependent pressure changes from raw pressure altitude. The sensor fusion method was implemented to work on-line using data from a wireless baro-IMU and tested for the capability of tracking low-frequency small-amplitude vertical human-like motions that can be critical for stand-alone inertial sensor measurements. Validation tests were performed in different experimental conditions, namely no motion, free-fall motion, forced circular motion and squatting. Accurate on-line tracking of height and vertical velocity was achieved, giving confidence to the use of the sensor fusion method for tracking typical vertical human motions: velocity Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) was in the range 0.04-0.24 m/s; height RMSE was in the range 5-68 cm, with statistically significant performance gains when the whitening filter was used by the sensor fusion method to track relatively high-frequency vertical motions.

  11. Launch velocity requirements for interceptors of short range ballistic missiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Geoffrey S.

    The problem of estimating the performance requirements for interceptors of short range (less than 500 nm) ballistic missiles is addressed. Classical orbit determination methods are used to parametrically study the impulsive interceptor launch velocities required to intercept incoming ballistic missiles. Atmospheric and planetary rotational effects are neglected. Dependent variables include the relative positions of the interceptor and ballistic missile launch sites to the target point, interceptor acquisition delay time and depressed ballistic missile trajectories. The resulting data is reduced to a series of curves highlighting the relative impact of each parameter. Factors limiting the interceptor time of flight are shown to have the strongest influence on interceptor launch velocity requirements.

  12. Evaluation of gridded scanning ARM cloud radar reflectivity observations and vertical doppler velocity retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamer, K.; Tatarevic, A.; Jo, I.; Kollias, P.

    2014-04-01

    The scanning Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) cloud radars (SACRs) provide continuous atmospheric observations aspiring to capture the 3-D cloud-scale structure. Sampling clouds in 3-D is challenging due to their temporal-spatial scales, the need to sample the sky at high elevations and cloud radar limitations. Thus, a suggested scan strategy is to repetitively slice the atmosphere from horizon to horizon as clouds advect over the radar (Cross-Wind Range-Height Indicator - CW-RHI). Here, the processing and gridding of the SACR CW-RHI scans are presented. First, the SACR sample observations from the ARM Southern Great Plains and Cape Cod sites are post-processed (detection mask, gaseous attenuation correction, insect filtering and velocity de-aliasing). The resulting radial Doppler moment fields are then mapped to Cartesian coordinates with time as one of the dimensions. Next the Cartesian-gridded Doppler velocity fields are decomposed into the horizontal wind velocity contribution and the vertical Doppler velocity component. For validation purposes, all gridded and retrieved fields are compared to collocated zenith-pointing ARM cloud radar measurements. We consider that the SACR sensitivity loss with range, the cloud type observed and the research purpose should be considered in determining the gridded domain size. Our results also demonstrate that the gridded SACR observations resolve the main features of low and high stratiform clouds. It is established that the CW-RHI observations complemented with processing techniques could lead to robust 3-D cloud dynamical representations up to 25-30 degrees off zenith. The proposed gridded products are expected to advance our understanding of 3-D cloud morphology, dynamics and anisotropy and lead to more realistic 3-D radiative transfer calculations.

  13. Entanglement-enhanced lidars for simultaneous range and velocity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Quntao; Zhang, Zheshen; Shapiro, Jeffrey H.

    2017-10-01

    Lidar is a well-known optical technology for measuring a target's range and radial velocity. We describe two lidar systems that use entanglement between transmitted signals and retained idlers to obtain significant quantum enhancements in simultaneous measurements of these parameters. The first entanglement-enhanced lidar circumvents the Arthurs-Kelly uncertainty relation for simultaneous measurements of range and radial velocity from the detection of a single photon returned from the target. This performance presumes there is no extraneous (background) light, but is robust to the round-trip loss incurred by the signal photons. The second entanglement-enhanced lidar—which requires a lossless, noiseless environment—realizes Heisenberg-limited accuracies for both its range and radial-velocity measurements, i.e., their root-mean-square estimation errors are both proportional to 1 /M when M signal photons are transmitted. These two lidars derive their entanglement-based enhancements from the use of a unitary transformation that takes a signal-idler photon pair with frequencies ωS and ωI and converts it to a signal-idler photon pair whose frequencies are (ωS+ωI)/2 and (ωS-ωI)/2 . Insight into how this transformation provides its benefits is provided through an analogy to continuous-variable superdense coding.

  14. The elastic wave velocity response of methane gas hydrate formation in vertical gas migration systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Q. T.; Hu, G. W.; Ye, Y. G.; Liu, C. L.; Li, C. F.; Best, A. I.; Wang, J. S.

    2017-06-01

    Knowledge of the elastic wave velocities of hydrate-bearing sediments is important for geophysical exploration and resource evaluation. Methane gas migration processes play an important role in geological hydrate accumulation systems, whether on the seafloor or in terrestrial permafrost regions, and their impact on elastic wave velocities in sediments needs further study. Hence, a high-pressure laboratory apparatus was developed to simulate natural continuous vertical migration of methane gas through sediments. Hydrate saturation (S h) and ultrasonic P- and S-wave velocities (V p and V s) were measured synchronously by time domain reflectometry (TDR) and by ultrasonic transmission methods respectively during gas hydrate formation in sediments. The results were compared to previously published laboratory data obtained in a static closed system. This indicated that the velocities of hydrate-bearing sediments in vertical gas migration systems are slightly lower than those in closed systems during hydrate formation. While velocities increase at a constant rate with hydrate saturation in the closed system, P-wave velocities show a fast-slow-fast variation with increasing hydrate saturation in the vertical gas migration system. The observed velocities are well described by an effective-medium velocity model, from which changing hydrate morphology was inferred to cause the fast-slow-fast velocity response in the gas migration system. Hydrate forms firstly at the grain contacts as cement, then grows within the pore space (floating), then finally grows into contact with the pore walls again. We conclude that hydrate morphology is the key factor that influences the elastic wave velocity response of methane gas hydrate formation in vertical gas migration systems.

  15. Role of Vertical Jumps and Anthropometric Variables in Maximal Kicking Ball Velocities in Elite Soccer Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez-Lorenzo Lois

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Kicking is one of the most important skills in soccer and the ability to achieve ma ximal kicking velocity with both legs leads to an advantage for the soccer player. This study examined the relationship be tween kicking ball velocity with both legs using anthropometric measurements and vertical jumps (a squat jump (SJ; a countermovement jump without (CMJ and with the arm swing (CMJA and a reactive jump (RJ. Anthropome tric measurements did not correlate with kicking ball velocity. Vertical jumps correlated significantly with kicking ball velocity using the dominant leg only (r = .47, r = .58, r = .44, r = .51, for SJ, CMJ, CMJA and RJ, respectively . Maximal kicking velocity with the dominant leg was significantly higher than with the non-dominant leg (t = 18.0 4, p < 0.001. Our results suggest that vertical jumps may be an optimal test to assess neuromuscular skills involved in kicking at maximal speed. Lack of the relationship between vertical jumps and kicking velocity with the non-dominant leg may reflect a difficulty to exhibit the neuromuscular skills during dominant leg kicking.

  16. Measurements of the fluctuating liquid velocity of a bidisperse suspension of bubbles rising in a vertical channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Juan Carlos; Mendez, Santos; Zenit, Roberto

    2009-11-01

    Experiments were performed in a vertical channel to study the behaviour of a bidisperse suspension of bubbles. Bubbles were produced using capillaries of two distinct inner diameters. The capillaries are small enough to generate bubbles in the range of 1 to 6 mm in diameter. Using water and water-glycerin mixtures, the vertical component of the fluctuating liquid velocity was obtained using a flying hot wire anemometer technique. The system is characterized by the dimensionless Reynolds and Weber numbers in the range of 22bubble concentration. We also found that the variance, normalized with the mean bubble velocity squared, Tf% =Uf^^'2/Ub^2, increased as the Reynolds number decreased. Bidisperse flows, in general, show larger values of fluctuation.

  17. Using smartphones' pressure sensors to measure vertical velocities in elevators, stairways and drones

    CERN Document Server

    Monteiro, Martin

    2016-01-01

    By means of smartphones' pressure sensors we measure vertical velocities of elevators, pedestrians climbing stairways and flying unmanned aerial vehicles (or \\textit{drones}). The barometric pressure obtained with the smartphone is related, thanks to the hydrostatic approximation, to the altitude of the device. From the altitude values, the vertical velocity is accordingly derived. The approximation considered is valid in the first hundreds meters of the inner layers of the atmosphere. Simultaneously to the pressure, the acceleration values, reported by the buit-in accelerometers, are also recorded. Integrating numerically the acceleration, vertical velocity and altitude are also obtained. We show that data obtained with the pressure sensor is considerable less noisy than that obtained with the accelerometer in the experiments proposed here. Accumulatioin of errors are also evident in the numerical integration of the acceleration values. The comparison with reference values taken from the architectural plans ...

  18. Lagrangian temperature and vertical velocity fluctuations due to gravity waves in the lower stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podglajen, Aurélien; Hertzog, Albert; Plougonven, Riwal; Legras, Bernard

    2016-04-01

    Wave-induced Lagrangian fluctuations of temperature and vertical velocity in the lower stratosphere are quantified using measurements from superpressure balloons (SPBs). Observations recorded every minute along SPB flights allow the whole gravity wave spectrum to be described and provide unprecedented information on both the intrinsic frequency spectrum and the probability distribution function of wave fluctuations. The data set has been collected during two campaigns coordinated by the French Space Agency in 2010, involving 19 balloons over Antarctica and 3 in the deep tropics. In both regions, the vertical velocity distributions depart significantly from a Gaussian behavior. Knowledge on such wave fluctuations is essential for modeling microphysical processes along Lagrangian trajectories. We propose a new simple parameterization that reproduces both the non-Gaussian distribution of vertical velocities (or heating/cooling rates) and their observed intrinsic frequency spectrum.

  19. Velocity measurements in the wake of laboratory-scale vertical axis turbines and rotating circular cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araya, Daniel; Dabiri, John

    2014-11-01

    We present experimental data to compare the wake characteristics of a laboratory-scale vertical-axis turbine with that of a rotating circular cylinder. The cylinder is constructed to have the same diameter and height as the turbine in order to provide a comparison that is independent of the tunnel boundary conditions. Both the turbine and cylinder are motor-driven to tip-speed ratios based on previous experiments. An analysis of the effect of the motor-driven flow is also presented. These measurements are relevant for exploring the complex structure of the vertical axis turbine wake relative to the canonical wake of a circular cylinder. 2D particle image velocimetry is used to measure the velocity field in a two-dimensional plane normal to the axis of rotation. This velocity field is then used to compare time-averaged streamwise velocity, phase-averaged vorticity, and the velocity power spectrum in the wake of the two configurations. The results give insight into the extent to which solid cylinders could be used as a simplified model of the flow around vertical axis turbines in computational simulations, especially for turbine array optimization.

  20. Water Velocity Measurements on a Vertical Barrier Screen at the Bonneville Dam Second Powerhouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, James S.; Deng, Zhiqun; Weiland, Mark A.; Martinez, Jayson J.; Yuan, Yong

    2011-11-22

    Fish screens at hydroelectric dams help to protect rearing and migrating fish by preventing them from passing through the turbines and directing them towards the bypass channels by providing a sweeping flow parallel to the screen. However, fish screens may actually be harmful to fish if they become impinged on the surface of the screen or become disoriented due to poor flow conditions near the screen. Recent modifications to the vertical barrier screens (VBS) at the Bonneville Dam second powerhouse (B2) intended to increase the guidance of juvenile salmonids into the juvenile bypass system (JBS) have resulted in high mortality and descaling rates of hatchery subyearling Chinook salmon during the 2008 juvenile salmonid passage season. To investigate the potential cause of the high mortality and descaling rates, an in situ water velocity measurement study was conducted using acoustic Doppler velocimeters (ADV) in the gatewell slot at Units 12A and 14A of B2. From the measurements collected the average approach velocity, sweep velocity, and the root mean square (RMS) value of the velocity fluctuations were calculated. The approach velocities measured across the face of the VBS varied but were mostly less than 0.3 m/s. The sweep velocities also showed large variances across the face of the VBS with most measurements being less than 1.5 m/s. This study revealed that the approach velocities exceeded criteria recommended by NOAA Fisheries and Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife intended to improve fish passage conditions.

  1. Using smartphone pressure sensors to measure vertical velocities of elevators, stairways, and drones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Martín; Martí, Arturo C.

    2017-01-01

    We measure the vertical velocities of elevators, pedestrians climbing stairs, and drones (flying unmanned aerial vehicles), by means of smartphone pressure sensors. The barometric pressure obtained with the smartphone is related to the altitude of the device via the hydrostatic approximation. From the altitude values, vertical velocities are derived. The approximation considered is valid in the first hundred meters of the inner layers of the atmosphere. In addition to pressure, acceleration values were also recorded using the built-in accelerometer. Numerical integration was performed, obtaining both vertical velocity and altitude. We show that data obtained using the pressure sensor is significantly less noisy than that obtained using the accelerometer. Error accumulation is also evident in the numerical integration of the acceleration values. In the proposed experiments, the pressure sensor also outperforms GPS, because this sensor does not receive satellite signals indoors and, in general, the operating frequency is considerably lower than that of the pressure sensor. In the cases in which it is possible, comparison with reference values taken from the architectural plans of buildings validates the results obtained using the pressure sensor. This proposal is ideally performed as an external or outreach activity with students to gain insight about fundamental questions in mechanics, fluids, and thermodynamics.

  2. Vertical velocity distribution in open-channel flow with rigid vegetation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Changjun; Hao, Wenlong; Chang, Xiangping

    2014-01-01

    In order to experimentally investigate the effects of rigid vegetation on the characteristics of flow, the vegetations were modeled by rigid cylindrical rod. Flow field is measured under the conditions of submerged rigid rod in flume with single layer and double layer vegetations. Experiments were performed for various spacings of the rigid rods. The vegetation models were aligned with the approaching flow in a rectangular channel. Vertical distributions of time-averaged velocity at various streamwise distances were evaluated using an acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV). The results indicate that, in submerged conditions, it is difficult to described velocity distribution along the entire depth using unified function. The characteristic of vertical distribution of longitudinal velocity is the presence of inflection. Under the inflection, the line is convex and groove above inflection. The interaction of high and low momentum fluids causes the flow to fold and creates strong vortices within each mixing layer. Understanding the flow phenomena in the area surrounding the tall vegetation, especially in the downstream region, is very important when modeling or studying the riparian environment. ADV measures of rigid vegetation distribution of the flow velocity field can give people a new understanding.

  3. The Effect of Atmospheric Cooling on Vertical Velocity Dispersion and Density Distribution of Brown Dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Russell E., Jr.; Thorman, Paul A.; Schmidt, Sarah J.; Cohen, Seth H.; Hathi, Nimish P.; Holwerda, Benne W.; Lunine, Jonathan I.; Pirzkal, Nor; Windhorst, Rogier A.; Young, Erick

    2017-09-01

    We present a Monte Carlo simulation designed to predict the vertical velocity dispersion of brown dwarfs in the Milky Way. We show that since these stars are constantly cooling, the velocity dispersion has a noticeable trend with the spectral type. With realistic assumptions for the initial mass function, star formation history, and the cooling models, we show that the velocity dispersion is roughly consistent with what is observed for M dwarfs, decreases to cooler spectral types, and increases again for the coolest types in our study (˜T9). We predict a minimum in the velocity dispersions for L/T transition objects, however, the detailed properties of the minimum predominately depend on the star formation history. Since this trend is due to brown dwarf cooling, we expect that the velocity dispersion as a function of spectral type should deviate from the constancy around the hydrogen-burning limit. We convert from velocity dispersion to vertical scale height using standard disk models and present similar trends in disk thickness as a function of spectral type. We suggest that future, wide-field photometric and/or spectroscopic missions may collect sizable samples of distant (˜ 1 kpc) dwarfs that span the hydrogen-burning limit. As such, we speculate that such observations may provide a unique way of constraining the average spectral type of hydrogen burning. Support for program #13266 was provided by NASA through a grant from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under the NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  4. Eccentric loading and range of knee joint motion effects on performance enhancement in vertical jumping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Kieran A; Wallace, Eric S

    2007-12-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the effects of variations in eccentric loading and knee joint range of motion on performance enhancement associated with the stretch-shortening cycle in vertical jumping. Seventeen male elite volleyball players performed three variations of the vertical jump which served as the research model: the squat jump (SJ), countermovement jump (CMJ) and drop jump from a height of 30 cm (DJ30). Knee joint angle (70 degrees and 90 degrees of flexion) at the commencement of the propulsive phase for each jump type was experimentally controlled, with the trunk kept as erect as possible. Force and motion data were recorded for each performance and used to compute a range of kinematic and kinetic variables, including hip, knee and ankle angles, angular velocities, work done, net joint moments and a number of temporal variables. The average of 12 trials for each participant was used in a series of repeated measures ANOVA's (jump xk nee, alpha=.05). From both knee joint angles, an increase in eccentric loading resulted in a significant increase in jump height (DJ30>CMJ>SJ; pjumping is dependent upon the interaction of the magnitude of eccentric loading and the range of motion used.

  5. Water Velocity Measurements on a Vertical Barrier Screen at the Bonneville Dam Second Powerhouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Yuan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Fish screens at hydroelectric dams help to protect rearing and migrating fish by preventing them from passing through the turbines and directing them towards the bypass channels by means of a sweeping flow parallel to the screen. However, fish screens may actually be harmful to fish if the fish become impinged on the surface of the screen or become disoriented due to poor flow conditions near the screen. Recent modifications to the vertical barrier screens (VBS in the gate wells at the Bonneville Dam second powerhouse (B2 were intended to increase the guidance of juvenile salmonids into the juvenile bypass system but have resulted in higher mortality and descaling rates of hatchery subyearling Chinook salmon during the 2008 juvenile salmonid passage season. To investigate the potential cause of the high mortality and descaling rates, an in situ water velocity measurement study was conducted using acoustic Doppler velocimeters in the gate well slots at turbine units 12A and 14A of B2. From the measurements collected, the average approach velocity, sweep velocity, and the root mean square value of the velocity fluctuations were calculated. The approach velocities measured across the face of the VBS were variable and typically less than 0.3 m/s, but fewer than 50% were less than or equal to 0.12 m/s. There was also large variance in sweep velocities across the face of the VBS with most measurements recorded at less than 1.5 m/s. Results of this study revealed that the approach velocities in the gate wells exceeded criteria intended to improve fish passage conditions that were recommended by National Marine Fisheries Service and the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife. The turbulence measured in the gate well may also result in suboptimal fish passage conditions but no established guidelines to contrast those results have been published.

  6. The boundary condition for vertical velocity and its interdependence with surface gas exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Andrew S.

    2017-07-01

    The law of conservation of linear momentum is applied to surface gas exchanges, employing scale analysis to diagnose the vertical velocity (w) in the boundary layer. Net upward momentum in the surface layer is forced by evaporation (E) and defines non-zero vertical motion, with a magnitude defined by the ratio of E to the air density, as w = E/ρ. This is true even right down at the surface where the boundary condition is w|0 = E/ρ|0 (where w|0 and ρ|0 represent the vertical velocity and density of air at the surface). This Stefan flow velocity implies upward transport of a non-diffusive nature that is a general feature of the troposphere but is of particular importance at the surface, where it assists molecular diffusion with upward gas migration (of H2O, for example) but opposes that of downward-diffusing species like CO2 during daytime. The definition of flux-gradient relationships (eddy diffusivities) requires rectification to exclude non-diffusive transport, which does not depend on scalar gradients. At the microscopic scale, the role of non-diffusive transport in the process of evaporation from inside a narrow tube - with vapour transport into an overlying, horizontal airstream - was described long ago in classical mechanics and is routinely accounted for by chemical engineers, but has been neglected by scientists studying stomatal conductance. Correctly accounting for non-diffusive transport through stomata, which can appreciably reduce net CO2 transport and marginally boost that of water vapour, should improve characterisations of ecosystem and plant functioning.

  7. The boundary condition for vertical velocity and its interdependence with surface gas exchange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Kowalski

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The law of conservation of linear momentum is applied to surface gas exchanges, employing scale analysis to diagnose the vertical velocity (w in the boundary layer. Net upward momentum in the surface layer is forced by evaporation (E and defines non-zero vertical motion, with a magnitude defined by the ratio of E to the air density, as w = E/ρ. This is true even right down at the surface where the boundary condition is w|0 = E/ρ|0 (where w|0 and ρ|0 represent the vertical velocity and density of air at the surface. This Stefan flow velocity implies upward transport of a non-diffusive nature that is a general feature of the troposphere but is of particular importance at the surface, where it assists molecular diffusion with upward gas migration (of H2O, for example but opposes that of downward-diffusing species like CO2 during daytime. The definition of flux–gradient relationships (eddy diffusivities requires rectification to exclude non-diffusive transport, which does not depend on scalar gradients. At the microscopic scale, the role of non-diffusive transport in the process of evaporation from inside a narrow tube – with vapour transport into an overlying, horizontal airstream – was described long ago in classical mechanics and is routinely accounted for by chemical engineers, but has been neglected by scientists studying stomatal conductance. Correctly accounting for non-diffusive transport through stomata, which can appreciably reduce net CO2 transport and marginally boost that of water vapour, should improve characterisations of ecosystem and plant functioning.

  8. Alignment of stress, mean wind, and vertical gradient of the velocity vector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Jacob; Mann, Jakob; Patton, E.G.

    2012-01-01

    In many applications in the atmospheric surface layer the turbulent-viscosity hypothesis is applied, i.e. the stress vector can be described through the vertical gradient of velocity. In the atmospheric surface layer, where the Coriolis force and baroclinic effects are considered negligible...... of atmospheric boundary layer modeling. The measurements are from the Danish wind turbine test sites at Høvsøre. With theWindCube lidar we are able to reach heights of 250 meters and hence capture the entire atmospheric surface layer both in terms of wind speed and the direction of the mean stress vector....

  9. Horizontal and Vertical Velocities Derived from the IDS Contribution to ITRF2014, and Comparisons with Geophysical Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreaux, G.; Lemoine, F. G.; Argus, D. F.; Santamaria-Gomez, A.; Willis, P.; Soudarin, L.; Gravelle, M.; Ferrage, P.

    2016-01-01

    In the context of the 2014 realization of the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF2014), the International DORIS Service (IDS) has delivered to the IERS a set of 1140 weekly SINEX files including station coordinates and Earth orientation parameters, covering the time period from 1993.0 to 2015.0. From this set of weekly SINEX files, the IDS Combination Center estimated a cumulative DORIS position and velocity solution to obtain mean horizontal and vertical motion of 160 stations at 71 DORIS sites. The main objective of this study is to validate the velocities of the DORIS sites by comparison with external models or time series. Horizontal velocities are compared with two recent global plate models (GEODVEL 2010 and NNR-MORVEL56). Prior to the comparisons, DORIS horizontal velocities were corrected for Global Isostatic Adjustment (GIA) from the ICE-6G (VM5a) model. For more than half of the sites, the DORIS horizontal velocities differ from the global plate models by less than 2-3 mm/yr. For five of the sites (Arequipa, Dionysos/Gavdos, Manila, Santiago) with horizontal velocity differences wrt these models larger than 10 mm/yr, comparisons with GNSS estimates show the veracity of the DORIS motions. Vertical motions from the DORIS cumulative solution are compared with the vertical velocities derived from the latest GPS cumulative solution over the time span 1995.0-2014.0 from the University of La Rochelle (ULR6) solution at 31 co-located DORIS-GPS sites. These two sets of vertical velocities show a correlation coefficient of 0.83. Vertical differences are larger than 2 mm/yr at 23 percent of the sites. At Thule the disagreement is explained by fine-tuned DORIS discontinuities in line with the mass variations of outlet glaciers. Furthermore, the time evolution of the vertical time series from the DORIS station in Thule show similar trends to the GRACE equivalent water height.

  10. Clogging of granular material in vertical pipes discharged at constant velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López-Rodríguez Diego

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We report an experimental study on the flow of spherical particles through a vertical pipe discharged at constant velocity by means of a conveyor belt placed at the bottom. For a pipe diameter 3.67 times the diameter of the particles, we observe the development of hanging arches that stop the flow as they are able to support the weight of the particles above them. We find that the distribution of times that it takes until a stable clog develops, decays exponentially. This is compatible with a clogging probability that remains constant during the discharge. We also observe that the probability of clogging along the pipe decreases with the height, i.e. most of the clogs are developed near the bottom. This spatial dependence may be attributed to different pressure values within the pipe which might also be related to a spontaneous development of an helical structure of the grains inside the pipe.

  11. Determination of station positions and velocities from laser ranging observations to Ajisai, Starlette and Stella satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lejba, P.; Schillak, S.

    2011-02-01

    The positions and velocities of the four Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) stations: Yarragadee (7090), Greenbelt (7105), Graz (7839) and Herstmonceux (7840) from 5-year (2001-2005) SLR data of low orbiting satellites (LEO): Ajisai, Starlette and Stella were determined. The orbits of these satellites were computed from the data provided by 20 SLR stations. All orbital computations were performed by means of NASA Goddard’s GEODYN-II program. The geocentric coordinates were transformed to the topocentric North-South, East-West and Vertical components in reference to ITRF2005. The influence of the number of normal points per orbital arc and the empirical acceleration coefficients on the quality of station coordinates was studied. To get standard deviation of the coordinates determination lower than 1 cm, the number of the normal points per site had to be greater than 50. The computed positions and velocities were compared to those derived from LAGEOS-1/LAGEOS-2 data. Three parameters were used for this comparison: station coordinates stability, differences from ITRF2005 positions and velocities. The stability of coordinates of LEO satellites is significantly worse (17.8 mm) than those of LAGEOS (7.6 mm), the better results are for Ajisai (15.4 mm) than for Starlette/Stella (20.4 mm). The difference in positions between the computed values and ITRF2005 were little bit worse for Starlette/Stella (6.6 mm) than for LAGEOS (4.6 mm), the results for Ajisai were five times worse (29.7 mm) probably due to center of mass correction of this satellite. The station velocities with some exceptions were on the same level (≈1 mm/year) for all satellites. The results presented in this work show that results from Starlette/Stella are better than those from Ajisai for station coordinates determination. We can applied the data from LEO satellites, especially Starlette and Stella for determination of the SLR station coordinates but with two times lower accuracy than when using LAGEOS

  12. Effects of volume averaging on the line spectra of vertical velocity from multiple-Doppler radar observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal-Chen, T.; Wyngaard, J. C.

    1982-01-01

    Calculations of the ratio of the true one-dimensional spectrum of vertical velocity and that measured with multiple-Doppler radar beams are presented. It was assumed that the effects of pulse volume averaging and objective analysis routines is replacement of a point measurement with a volume integral. A u and v estimate was assumed to be feasible when orthogonal radars are not available. Also, the target fluid was configured as having an infinite vertical dimension, zero vertical velocity at the top and bottom, and having homogeneous and isotropic turbulence with a Kolmogorov energy spectrum. The ratio obtained indicated that equal resolutions among radars yields a monotonically decreasing, wavenumber-dependent response function. A gain of 0.95 was demonstrated in an experimental situation with 40 levels. Possible errors introduced when using unequal resolution radars were discussed. Finally, it was found that, for some flows, the extent of attenuation depends on the number of vertical levels resolvable by the radars.

  13. Vertical velocity and turbulence aspects during Mistral events as observed by UHF wind profilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-L. Caccia

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The general purpose of this paper is to experimentally study mesoscale dynamical aspects of the Mistral in the coastal area located at the exit of the Rhône-valley. The Mistral is a northerly low-level flow blowing in southern France along the Rhône-valley axis, located between the French Alps and the Massif Central, towards the Mediterranean Sea. The experimental data are obtained by UHF wind profilers deployed during two major field campaigns, MAP (Mesoscale Alpine Program in autumn 1999, and ESCOMPTE (Expérience sur Site pour COntraindre les Modèles de Pollution atmosphériques et de Transports d'Emission in summer 2001. Thanks to the use of the time evolution of the vertical profile of the horizontal wind vector, recent works have shown that the dynamics of the Mistral is highly dependent on the season because of the occurrence of specific synoptic patterns. In addition, during summer, thermal forcing leads to a combination of sea breeze with Mistral and weaker Mistral due to the enhanced friction while, during autumn, absence of convective turbulence leads to substantial acceleration as low-level jets are generated in the stably stratified planetary boundary layer. At the exit of the Rhône valley, the gap flow dynamics dominates, whereas at the lee of the Alps, the dynamics is driven by the relative contribution of "flow around" and "flow over" mechanisms, upstream of the Alps. This paper analyses vertical velocity and turbulence, i.e. turbulent dissipation rate, with data obtained by the same UHF wind profilers during the same Mistral events. In autumn, the motions are found to be globally and significantly subsident, which is coherent for a dry, cold and stable flow approaching the sea, and the turbulence is found to be of pure dynamical origin (wind shears and mountain/lee wave breaking, which is coherent with non-convective situations. In summer, due to the ground heating and to the interactions with thermal circulation, the

  14. The acceptable air velocity range for local air movement in the Tropics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gong, Nan; Tham, K.W.; Melikov, Arsen Krikor

    2006-01-01

    for 15 minutes, during which the subjects responded to computer-administered questionnaires on their thermal and draft sensations using visual-analogue scales. The results showed that the subjects preferred air movement within a certain range, i.e., a higher percentage was dissatisfied at both low...... and high velocity values. Most dissatisfaction with air movement is caused by thermal sensation, with air movement perception accounting for a smaller proportion. The subjects preferred air movement to be between "just right" and "slightly breezy" and preferred their thermal sensation to be between...... "neutral" and "slightly cool. The study also identified an acceptable air velocity range from 0.3 up to 0.9 m/s under the experimental conditions. This velocity range is relevant for the design of personalized ventilation in practice. This preferred velocity range is higher than the maximum velocity...

  15. The influence of the tangential velocity of inner rotating wall on axial velocity profile of flow through vertical annular pipe with rotating inner surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharf Abdusalam M.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In the oil and gas industries, understanding the behaviour of a flow through an annulus gap in a vertical position, whose outer wall is stationary whilst the inner wall rotates, is a significantly important issue in drilling wells. The main emphasis is placed on experimental (using an available rig and computational (employing CFD software investigations into the effects of the rotation speed of the inner pipe on the axial velocity profiles. The measured axial velocity profiles, in the cases of low axial flow, show that the axial velocity is influenced by the rotation speed of the inner pipe in the region of almost 33% of the annulus near the inner pipe, and influenced inversely in the rest of the annulus. The position of the maximum axial velocity is shifted from the centre to be nearer the inner pipe, by increasing the rotation speed. However, in the case of higher flow, as the rotation speed increases, the axial velocity is reduced and the position of the maximum axial velocity is skewed towards the centre of the annulus. There is a reduction of the swirl velocity corresponding to the rise of the volumetric flow rate.

  16. The influence of the tangential velocity of inner rotating wall on axial velocity profile of flow through vertical annular pipe with rotating inner surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharf, Abdusalam M.; Jawan, Hosen A.; Almabsout, Fthi A.

    2014-03-01

    In the oil and gas industries, understanding the behaviour of a flow through an annulus gap in a vertical position, whose outer wall is stationary whilst the inner wall rotates, is a significantly important issue in drilling wells. The main emphasis is placed on experimental (using an available rig) and computational (employing CFD software) investigations into the effects of the rotation speed of the inner pipe on the axial velocity profiles. The measured axial velocity profiles, in the cases of low axial flow, show that the axial velocity is influenced by the rotation speed of the inner pipe in the region of almost 33% of the annulus near the inner pipe, and influenced inversely in the rest of the annulus. The position of the maximum axial velocity is shifted from the centre to be nearer the inner pipe, by increasing the rotation speed. However, in the case of higher flow, as the rotation speed increases, the axial velocity is reduced and the position of the maximum axial velocity is skewed towards the centre of the annulus. There is a reduction of the swirl velocity corresponding to the rise of the volumetric flow rate.

  17. Anomalous fluctuations of vertical velocity of Earth and their possible implications for earthquakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manshour, Pouya; Ghasemi, Fatemeh; Matsumoto, T; Gómez, J; Sahimi, Muhammad; Peinke, J; Pacheco, A F; Tabar, M Reza Rahimi

    2010-09-01

    High-quality measurements of seismic activities around the world provide a wealth of data and information that are relevant to understanding of when earthquakes may occur. If viewed as complex stochastic time series, such data may be analyzed by methods that provide deeper insights into their nature, hence leading to better understanding of the data and their possible implications for earthquakes. In this paper, we provide further evidence for our recent proposal [P. Mansour, Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 014101 (2009)10.1103/PhysRevLett.102.014101] for the existence of a transition in the shape of the probability density function (PDF) of the successive detrended increments of the stochastic fluctuations of Earth's vertical velocity V_{z} , collected by broadband stations before moderate and large earthquakes. To demonstrate the transition, we carried out extensive analysis of the data for V_{z} for 12 earthquakes in several regions around the world, including the recent catasrophic one in Haiti. The analysis supports the hypothesis that before and near the time of an earthquake, the shape of the PDF undergoes significant and discernable changes, which can be characterized quantitatively. The typical time over which the PDF undergoes the transition is about 5-10 h prior to a moderate or large earthquake.

  18. The longitudinal variability of equatorial electrojet and vertical drift velocity in the African and American sectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Yizengaw

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available While the formation of equatorial electrojet (EEJ and its temporal variation is believed to be fairly well understood, the longitudinal variability at all local times is still unknown. This paper presents a case and statistical study of the longitudinal variability of dayside EEJ for all local times using ground-based observations. We found EEJ is stronger in the west American sector and decreases from west to east longitudinal sectors. We also confirm the presence of significant longitudinal difference in the dusk sector pre-reversal drift, using the ion velocity meter (IVM instrument onboard the C/NOFS satellite, with stronger pre-reversal drift in the west American sector compared to the African sector. Previous satellite observations have shown that the African sector is home to stronger and year-round ionospheric bubbles/irregularities compared to the American and Asian sectors. This study's results raises the question if the vertical drift, which is believed to be the main cause for the enhancement of Rayleigh–Taylor (RT instability growth rate, is stronger in the American sector and weaker in the African sector – why are the occurrence and amplitude of equatorial irregularities stronger in the African sector?

  19. Vertical velocity and turbulence aspects during Mistral events as observed by UHF wind profilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-L. Caccia

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The general purpose of this paper is to experimentally study mesoscale dynamical aspects of the Mistral in the coastal area located at the exit of the Rhône-valley. The Mistral is a northerly low-level flow blowing in southern France along the Rhône-valley axis, located between the French Alps and the Massif Central, towards the Mediterranean Sea. The experimental data are obtained by UHF wind profilers deployed during two major field campaigns, MAP (Mesoscale Alpine Program in autumn 1999, and ESCOMPTE (Expérience sur Site pour COntraindre les Modèles de Pollution atmosphériques et de Transports d'Emission in summer 2001.

    Thanks to the use of the time evolution of the vertical profile of the horizontal wind vector, recent works have shown that the dynamics of the Mistral is highly dependent on the season because of the occurrence of specific synoptic patterns. In addition, during summer, thermal forcing leads to a combination of sea breeze with Mistral and weaker Mistral due to the enhanced friction while, during autumn, absence of convective turbulence leads to substantial acceleration as low-level jets are generated in the stably stratified planetary boundary layer. At the exit of the Rhône valley, the gap flow dynamics dominates, whereas at the lee of the Alps, the dynamics is driven by the relative contribution of "flow around" and "flow over" mechanisms, upstream of the Alps. This paper analyses vertical velocity and turbulence, i.e. turbulent dissipation rate, with data obtained by the same UHF wind profilers during the same Mistral events.

    In autumn, the motions are found to be globally and significantly subsident, which is coherent for a dry, cold and stable flow approaching the sea, and the turbulence is found to be of pure dynamical origin (wind shears and mountain/lee wave breaking, which is coherent with non-convective situations.

    A General Range-Velocity Processing Scheme for Discontinuous Spectrum FMCW Signal in HFSWR Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengguan Pan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Discontinuous spectrum signal which has separate subbands distributed over a wide spectrum band is a solution to synthesize a wideband waveform in a highly congested spectrum environment. In this paper, we present a general range-velocity processing scheme for the discontinuous spectrum-frequency modulated continuous wave (DS-FMCW signal specifically. In range domain, we propose a simple time rearrangement operation which converts the range transform problem of the DS-FMCW signal to a general spectral estimation problem of nonuniformly sampled data. Conventional periodogram results in a dirty range spectrum with high sidelobes which cannot be suppressed by traditional spectral weighting. In this paper, we introduce the iterative adaptive approach (IAA in the estimation of the range spectrum. IAA is shown to have the ability to provide a clean range spectrum. On the other hand, the discontinuity of the signal spectrum has little impact on the velocity processing. However, with the range resolution improved, the influence of the target motion becomes nonnegligible. We present a velocity compensation strategy which includes the intersweep compensation and in-sweep compensation. Our processing scheme with the velocity compensation is shown to provide an accurate and clean range-velocity image which benefits the following detection process.

  1. 30 calibabor Vertical Gun Range in horizontal loading position. Dr. William Quaide and Donald Gault

    Science.gov (United States)

    1965-01-01

    30 calibabor Vertical Gun Range in horizontal loading position. Dr. William Quaide and Donald Gault of Ames planetology branch used this gun range to study the formation of impact craters on the Moon. N-204A Verticle Gun is used to simulate the physics and mechanics of planetaryimpact cratering phenomena.

  2. Improvement of vertical velocity statistics measured by a Doppler lidar through comparison with sonic anemometer observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonin, Timothy A.; Newman, Jennifer F.; Klein, Petra M.; Chilson, Phillip B.; Wharton, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Since turbulence measurements from Doppler lidars are being increasingly used within wind energy and boundary-layer meteorology, it is important to assess and improve the accuracy of these observations. While turbulent quantities are measured by Doppler lidars in several different ways, the simplest and most frequently used statistic is vertical velocity variance (w'2) from zenith stares. However, the competing effects of signal noise and resolution volume limitations, which respectively increase and decrease w'2, reduce the accuracy of these measurements. Herein, an established method that utilises the autocovariance of the signal to remove noise is evaluated and its skill in correcting for volume-averaging effects in the calculation of w'2 is also assessed. Additionally, this autocovariance technique is further refined by defining the amount of lag time to use for the most accurate estimates of w'2. Through comparison of observations from two Doppler lidars and sonic anemometers on a 300 m tower, the autocovariance technique is shown to generally improve estimates of w'2. After the autocovariance technique is applied, values of w'2 from the Doppler lidars are generally in close agreement (R2≈0.95-0.98) with those calculated from sonic anemometer measurements.

  3. Vertical rise velocity of equatorial plasma bubbles estimated from Equatorial Atmosphere Radar (EAR) observations and HIRB model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulasi Ram, S.; Ajith, K. K.; Yokoyama, T.; Yamamoto, M.; Niranjan, K.

    2017-06-01

    The vertical rise velocity (Vr) and maximum altitude (Hm) of equatorial plasma bubbles (EPBs) were estimated using the two-dimensional fan sector maps of 47 MHz Equatorial Atmosphere Radar (EAR), Kototabang, during May 2010 to April 2013. A total of 86 EPBs were observed out of which 68 were postsunset EPBs and remaining 18 EPBs were observed around midnight hours. The vertical rise velocities of the EPBs observed around the midnight hours are significantly smaller ( 26-128 m/s) compared to those observed in postsunset hours ( 45-265 m/s). Further, the vertical growth of the EPBs around midnight hours ceases at relatively lower altitudes, whereas the majority of EPBs at postsunset hours found to have grown beyond the maximum detectable altitude of the EAR. The three-dimensional numerical high-resolution bubble (HIRB) model with varying background conditions are employed to investigate the possible factors that control the vertical rise velocity and maximum attainable altitudes of EPBs. The estimated rise velocities from EAR observations at both postsunset and midnight hours are, in general, consistent with the nonlinear evolution of EPBs from the HIRB model. The smaller vertical rise velocities (Vr) and lower maximum altitudes (Hm) of EPBs during midnight hours are discussed in terms of weak polarization electric fields within the bubble due to weaker background electric fields and reduced background ion density levels.type="synopsis">type="main">Plain Language SummaryEquatorial plasma bubbles are plasma density irregularities in the ionosphere. The radio waves passing through these irregular density structures undergo severe degradation/scintillation that could cause severe disruption of satellite-based communication and augmentation systems such as GPS navigation. These bubbles develop at geomagnetic equator, grow vertically, and elongate along the field lines to latitudes away from the equator. The knowledge on bubble rise velocities and their maximum attainable

  4. On vertical velocity fluctuations and internal tides in an upwelling region off the west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Unnikrishnan, A.S.; Antony, M.K.

    of flow and wind and temperature oscillations at a mooring site in the shelf waters off the west coast of India are discussed. The vertical velocities were computed from a time series of vertical temperature profiles assuming that horizontal advection... of tem- perature is negligible. The computed values at a depth of 40 m during the 72-h period of observation were of the order of 10-l to lo-* cm s-i, with a mean value of - 2.77 x lo-* cm s-i indicating a net upward movement of water. The com- puted...

  5. Resolution function of nonsinusoidal radar signals. I - Range-velocity resolution with rectangular pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Nasser J.

    1990-05-01

    A generalization of a previously published ambiguity function that applies to radar known as large-relative-bandwidth radar, carrier-free radar, impulse radar, or nonsinusoidal radar is discussed. This radar has recently attracted attention because of its ability to penetrate absorbing materials used in the stealth technology. Another good application is the detection of moving targets with a small radar cross section by a look-down radar, which calls for a thumbtack ambiguity function. Since a small radar cross section in this application is typically due to the small size of the target that is coated with absorbing material, the antistealth feature of the nonsinusoidal radar is implicitly being used. The principle is presented of a resolution function (tentatively called the range-velocity or the range-Doppler resolution function) based on processing a nonsinusoidal signal consisting of N characters with a time separation TD and each character consisting of a sequence of L binary pulses of duration T. It is shown that range-velocity resolution functions approaching the ideal thumbtack function are easy to obtain. The blind speeds of the pulse-Doppler radar with sinusoidal carrier do not inherently occur, and all velocities are observed as true velocities rather than as velocities modulo the first blind speed (velocity ambiguity).

  6. Management challenges in a short-range low-velocity gunshot injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arunkumar, K V; Kumar, Sanjeev; Aggarwal, Rajat; Dubey, Prajesh

    2012-07-01

    The use of firearms is becoming more prevalent in the society and hence the number of homicidal and suicidal cases. The severity of gunshot wounds varies depending on the weapons caliber and the distance of firing. Close-range, high-velocity gunshot wounds in the head and neck region can result in devastating esthetic and functional impairment. The complexity in facial skeletal anatomy cause multiple medical and surgical challenges to an operating surgeon, demanding elaborate soft and hard tissue reconstructions. Here we present the successful management of a patient shot by a low-velocity short-range pistol with basic life support measures, wound management, reconstruction, and rehabilitation.

  7. Analysis of Vertical Velocities and Elevated Instability in the Comma-Head of Continental Winter Cyclones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenow, Andrew

    The vertical motion and physical structure of elevated convection and generating cells within the comma heads of three continental winter cyclones are investigated using the Wyoming W-band Cloud Radar mounted on the NSF/NCAR C-130, supplemented by analyses from the Rapid Update Cycle model and WSR-88D data. The cyclones followed three distinct archetypical tracks and were typical of those producing winter weather in the Midwestern United States. In two of the cyclones, dry air in the middle and upper troposphere behind the Pacific cold front intruded over moist Gulf of Mexico air at lower altitudes within the comma head, separating the comma head into two zones. Elevated convection in the southern zone extended from the cold frontal surface to the tropopause. The stronger convective updrafts ranged from 2 to 7 m s-1 and downdrafts from -2 to -6 m s-1. The horizontal scale of the convective cells was ˜5 km. The poleward zone of the comma head was characterized by deep stratiform clouds topped by cloud top generating cells that reached the tropopause. Updrafts and downdrafts within the generating cells ranged from 1-2 m s-1, with the horizontal scale of the cells ˜1-2 km. Precipitation on the poleward side of the comma head conformed to a seeder-feeder process, the generating cells seeding the stratiform cloud, which was forced by synoptic scale ascent. In one case, shallow clouds behind the cyclone's cold front were also topped by cloud top generating cells, with vertical motions ranging from 1 2 m s-1. The development and distribution of potential instability in the elevated convective region of one of these cyclones is examined using a Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model simulation. The strong 8-9 December 2009 cyclone is simulated with a large outer domain and convection-allowing nest to simulate the convective region of the cyclone. The distribution of Most Unstable Convective Available Potential Energy (MUCAPE) is presented, with MUCAPE values up to

  8. Mismatch between marine plankton range movements and the velocity of climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chivers, William J.; Walne, Anthony W.; Hays, Graeme C.

    2017-02-01

    The response of marine plankton to climate change is of critical importance to the oceanic food web and fish stocks. We use a 60-year ocean basin-wide data set comprising >148,000 samples to reveal huge differences in range changes associated with climate change across 35 plankton taxa. While the range of dinoflagellates and copepods tended to closely track the velocity of climate change (the rate of isotherm movement), the range of the diatoms moved much more slowly. Differences in range shifts were up to 900 km in a recent warming period, with average velocities of range movement between 7 km per decade northwards for taxa exhibiting niche plasticity and 99 km per decade for taxa exhibiting niche conservatism. The differing responses of taxa to global warming will cause spatial restructuring of the plankton ecosystem with likely consequences for grazing pressures on phytoplankton and hence for biogeochemical cycling, higher trophic levels and biodiversity.

  9. Differences in End Range of Motion Vertical Jump Kinetic and Kinematic Strategies Between Trained Weightlifters and Elite Short Track Speed Skaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haug, William B; Spratford, Wayne; Williams, Kym J; Chapman, Dale W; Drinkwater, Eric J

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to identify differences in end range of motion (ROM) kinetic and kinematic strategies between highly resistance and vertical jump-trained athletes and controls. Weightlifters (WL: n = 4), short track speed skaters (STSS: n = 5), and nonresistance-trained controls (C: n = 6) performed 6 standing vertical squat jumps (SJ) and countermovement jumps (CMJ) without external resistance. Jump testing was performed using 3-dimensional marker trajectories captured with a 15-camera motion analysis system synchronized with 2 in-ground force plates. During SJ, there were large effects for the difference in time before toe off of peak vertical velocity between WL to STSS and C (ES: -1.43; ES: -1.73, respectively) and for the decrease between peak and toe off vertical velocity (ES: -1.28; ES: -1.71, respectively). During CMJ, there were large effects for the difference in time before toe off of peak vertical velocity between WL to STSS and C (ES: -1.28; ES: -1.53, respectively) and for decrease between peak and toe off vertical velocity (ES: -1.03; ES: -1.59, respectively). Accompanying these differences for both jump types were large effects for time of joint deceleration before toe off for all lower body joints between WL compared with C with large effects between WL and STSS at the hip and between STSS and C at the ankle. These findings suggest that the end ROM kinetic and kinematic strategy used during jumping is group-specific in power-trained athletes, with WL exhibiting superior strategies as compared with resistance- and jump-trained STSS.

  10. Operating length and velocity of human M. vastus lateralis fascicles during vertical jumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaidou, Maria Elissavet; Marzilger, Robert; Bohm, Sebastian; Mersmann, Falk

    2017-01-01

    Humans achieve greater jump height during a counter-movement jump (CMJ) than in a squat jump (SJ). However, the crucial difference is the mean mechanical power output during the propulsion phase, which could be determined by intrinsic neuro-muscular mechanisms for power production. We measured M. vastus lateralis (VL) fascicle length changes and activation patterns and assessed the force–length, force–velocity and power–velocity potentials during the jumps. Compared with the SJ, the VL fascicles operated on a more favourable portion of the force–length curve (7% greater force potential, i.e. fraction of VL maximum force according to the force–length relationship) and more disadvantageous portion of the force–velocity curve (11% lower force potential, i.e. fraction of VL maximum force according to the force–velocity relationship) in the CMJ, indicating a reciprocal effect of force–length and force–velocity potentials for force generation. The higher muscle activation (15%) could therefore explain the moderately greater jump height (5%) in the CMJ. The mean fascicle-shortening velocity in the CMJ was closer to the plateau of the power–velocity curve, which resulted in a greater (15%) power–velocity potential (i.e. fraction of VL maximum power according to the power–velocity relationship). Our findings provide evidence for a cumulative effect of three different mechanisms—i.e. greater force–length potential, greater power–velocity potential and greater muscle activity—for an advantaged power production in the CMJ contributing to the marked difference in mean mechanical power (56%) compared with SJ. PMID:28573027

  11. Addition of Vertical Velocity to a One-Dimensional Aerosol and Trace Gas Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hoppel, William A; Caffrey, Peter; Frick, Glendon M

    2005-01-01

    ... (Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Meteorological Prediction System). The aerosol model is run along an air-mass trajectory generated from the output of COAMPS that includes vertical profiles of meteorological data required by the aerosol model...

  12. Second-order velocity slip with axisymmetric stagnation point flow and heat transfer due to a stretching vertical plate in a Copper-water nanofluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kardri, M. A.; Bachok, N.; Arifin, N. M.; Ali, F. M.

    2017-09-01

    The steady axisymmetric stagnation point flow with second-order velocity slip due to a stretching vertical plate with the existence of copper-water nanofluid was investigated. Similarity transformation has been applied to reduce the governing partial differential equations to ordinary differential equations. Then the self-similar equations are solved numerically using solver bvp4c available in Matlab with Prandtl number, Pr = 6.2. It is found that the dual solutions exist for the certain range of mixed convection parameter. The effects of the governing parameters on the velocity and temperature profile, skin friction coefficient and the local Nusselt number are observed. The results show that the inclusion of nanoparticle copper, will increase the shear stress on the stretching sheet and decrease the heat transfer rate for the slip parameters.

  13. Variability of Vertical Velocity Statistics in the Cloud-Free Convective Boundary Layer as Revealed by Doppler Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, L. K.; Newsom, R. K.; Turner, D. D.

    2016-12-01

    The majority of our understanding of the behavior of vertical velocity in the convective boundary layer is based on a small number of short-term observations made using either in situ or with remote sensing techniques over a limited number of sites. Analysis of long-term statistics have been lacking due to the scarcity of appropriate measurements. The US Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility is addressing this shortcoming through the deployment of a suite of scanning Doppler Lidars at a number of locations, associated with reconfiguration of the ARM Southern Great Plains site and the recent Holistic Interaction of Shallow Clouds, Aerosols, and Land-Ecosystems (HI-SCALE) field campaign. In this study, we utilize data collected by a Doppler Lidar system that has operated continuously from 2011 to the present at a location in north-central Oklahoma to examine the long-term behavior of the vertical velocity variance, skewness, and kurtosis. The application of standard normalization techniques, such as the mixed-layer depth and Deardorff convective velocity scale, do a good job in collapsing the data onto a single curve during periods in which the boundary layer is well developed, albeit with considerable amounts of scatter. During non-steady conditions, such as those found in the morning, scaling using the Deardorff convective velocity scale is found to work poorly. This behavior is likely due to the eddy turnover time and the growth rate of the boundary-layer depth. Systematic differences in the turbulence statistics are found by season, for non-stationary conditions, or periods with relatively small and large values of the surface friction velocity measured at the surface, amount of static instability, and wind shear across the boundary-layer top.

  14. Exploiting short-range cooperation for energy efficient vertical handover operations

    OpenAIRE

    Foukas, Xenofon; Kontovasilis, K.; Marina, M. K.

    2015-01-01

    The availability of multiple collocated wireless networks using heterogeneous technologies and the multi-access support of contemporary mobile devices have allowed wireless connectivity optimization, enabled through vertical handover (VHO) operations. However, this comes at a high energy consumption on the mobile device, due to the inherently expensive nature of some of the involved operations. This work proposes exploiting short-range cooperation among collocated mobile devices to improve th...

  15. Step-Wise Velocity of an Air Bubble Rising in a Vertical Tube Filled with a Liquid Dispersion of Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Heon Ki; Nikolov, Alex D; Wasan, Darsh T

    2017-03-21

    The motion of air bubbles in tubes filled with aqueous suspensions of nanoparticles (nanofluids) is of practical interest for bubble jets, lab-on-a-chip, and transporting media. Therefore, the focus of this study is the dynamics of air bubbles rising in a tube in a nanofluid. Many authors experimentally and analytically proposed that the velocity of rising air bubbles is constant for long air bubbles suspended in a vertical tube in common liquids (e.g. an aqueous glycerol solution) when the capillary number is larger than 10-4. For the first time, we report here a systematic study of an air bubble rising in a vertical tube in a nanofluid (e.g. an aqueous silica dioxide nanoparticle suspension, nominal particle size, 19 nm). We varied the bubble length scaled by the diameter of the tubes (L/D), the concentration of the nanofluid (10 and 12.5 v %), and the tube diameter (0.45, 0.47, and 0.50 cm). The presence of the nanoparticles creates a significant change in the bubble velocity compared with the bubble rising in the common liquid with the same bulk viscosity. We observed a novel phenomenon of a step-wise increase in the air bubble rising velocity versus bubble length for small capillary numbers less than 10-7. This step-wise velocity increase versus the bubble length was not observed in a common fluid. The step-wise velocity increase is attributed to the nanoparticle self-layering phenomenon in the film adjacent to the tube wall. To elucidate the role of the nanoparticle film self-layering on the bubble rising velocity, the effect of the capillary number, the tube diameter (e.g. the capillary pressure), and nanofilm viscosity are investigated. We propose a model that takes into consideration the nanoparticle layering in the film confinement to explain the step-wise velocity phenomenon versus the length of the bubble. The oscillatory film interaction energy isotherm is calculated and the Frenkel approach is used to estimate the film viscosity.

  16. Differences in vertical jumping and mae-geri kicking velocity between international and national level karateka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Balsalobre-Fernández

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Lower limb explosive strength and mae-geri kicking velocity are fundamental in karate competition; although it is unclear whether these variables could differentiate the high-level athletes. The objective of this research is to analyze the differences in the mae-geri kicking velocity and the counter-movement jump (CMJ between a group of international top level karateka and another group of national-level karateka.Methods: Thirteen international-level karateka and eleven national-level karateka participated in the study. After a standard warm-up, CMJ height (in cm and mae-geri kicking velocity (in m/s was measured using an IR-platform and a high-speed camera, respectively.Results: Proceeding with MANCOVA to analyze the differences between groups controlling the effect of age, the results show that the international-level karateka demonstrated significantly higher levels of CMJ than national-level competitors (+22.1%, F = 9.47, p = 0.006, η2 = 0.311. There were no significant differences between groups in the mae-geri kicking velocity (+5,7%, F=0.80; p=0.38; η2=0.03.Conclusion: Our data shows, first, the importance of CMJ assessment as a tool to detect talent in karate and, second, that to achieve international-level in karate it may be important to increase CMJ levels to values ​​similar to those offered here.

  17. Climate change velocity since the Last Glacial Maximum and its importance for patterns of species richness and range size

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandel, Brody Steven; Arge, Lars Allan; Svenning, J.-C.

    these predictions using global data on mammal and amphibian distributions. Consistent with our predictions, richness of small-ranged species of both groups was negatively associated with velocity. Velocity generally explained more variation in richness than did the simple climate anomaly. Climate velocity appears...... to capture an important historical signal on current mammal and amphibian distributions....

  18. Year-Long Vertical Velocity Statistics Derived from Doppler Lidar Data for the Continental Convective Boundary Layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, Larry K. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington; Newsom, Rob K. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington; Turner, David D. [Global Systems Division, NOAA/Earth System Research Laboratory, Boulder, Colorado

    2017-09-01

    One year of Coherent Doppler Lidar (CDL) data collected at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site in Oklahoma is analyzed to provide profiles of vertical velocity variance, skewness, and kurtosis for cases of cloud-free convective boundary layers. The variance was scaled by the Deardorff convective velocity scale, which was successful when the boundary layer depth was stationary but failed in situations when the layer was changing rapidly. In this study the data are sorted according to time of day, season, wind direction, surface shear stress, degree of instability, and wind shear across the boundary-layer top. The normalized variance was found to have its peak value near a normalized height of 0.25. The magnitude of the variance changes with season, shear stress, and degree of instability, but was not impacted by wind shear across the boundary-layer top. The skewness was largest in the top half of the boundary layer (with the exception of wintertime conditions). The skewness was found to be a function of the season, shear stress, wind shear across the boundary-layer top, with larger amounts of shear leading to smaller values. Like skewness, the vertical profile of kurtosis followed a consistent pattern, with peak values near the boundary-layer top (also with the exception of wintertime data). The altitude of the peak values of kurtosis was found to be lower when there was a large amount of wind shear at the boundary-layer top.

  19. Evidence for thermospheric gravity waves in the southern polar cap from ground-based vertical velocity and photometric observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Innis

    Full Text Available Zenith-directed Fabry-Perot Spectrometer (FPS and 3-Field Photometer (3FP observations of the λ630 nm emission (~240 km altitude were obtained at Davis station, Antarctica, during the austral winter of 1999. Eleven nights of suitable data were searched for significant periodicities common to vertical winds from the FPS and photo-metric variations from the 3FP. Three wave-like events were found, each of around one or more hours in duration, with periods around 15 minutes, vertical velocity amplitudes near 60 ms–1 , horizontal phase velocities around 300 ms–1 , and horizontal wavelengths from 240 to 400 km. These characteristics appear consistent with polar cap gravity waves seen by other workers, and we conclude this is a likely interpretation of our data. Assuming a source height near 125 km altitude, we determine the approximate source location by calculating back along the wave trajectory using the gravity wave property relating angle of ascent and frequency. The wave sources appear to be in the vicinity of the poleward border of the auroral oval, at magnetic local times up to 5 hours before local magnetic midnight.

    Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (thermospheric dynamics; waves and tides

  20. Monte Carlo-based subgrid parameterization of vertical velocity and stratiform cloud microphysics in ECHAM5.5-HAM2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Tonttila

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available A new method for parameterizing the subgrid variations of vertical velocity and cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC is presented for general circulation models (GCMs. These parameterizations build on top of existing parameterizations that create stochastic subgrid cloud columns inside the GCM grid cells, which can be employed by the Monte Carlo independent column approximation approach for radiative transfer. The new model version adds a description for vertical velocity in individual subgrid columns, which can be used to compute cloud activation and the subgrid distribution of the number of cloud droplets explicitly. Autoconversion is also treated explicitly in the subcolumn space. This provides a consistent way of simulating the cloud radiative effects with two-moment cloud microphysical properties defined at subgrid scale. The primary impact of the new parameterizations is to decrease the CDNC over polluted continents, while over the oceans the impact is smaller. Moreover, the lower CDNC induces a stronger autoconversion of cloud water to rain. The strongest reduction in CDNC and cloud water content over the continental areas promotes weaker shortwave cloud radiative effects (SW CREs even after retuning the model. However, compared to the reference simulation, a slightly stronger SW CRE is seen e.g. over mid-latitude oceans, where CDNC remains similar to the reference simulation, and the in-cloud liquid water content is slightly increased after retuning the model.

  1. Evolution of Area-Averaged Vertical Velocity in the Convective Region of a Midlatitude Squall Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-12-01

    Ms. Svetla Veleva, Mr. Rusty Billingsly, and Capt. Kevin Mattison for their help in unfolding the raw Doppler-velocity fields; Mr. Robert Barritt for...and evolution of this important class of mesoscale convective system (MCS) (e.g., Zipser 1969, 1977; Houze 1977; LeMonc and Zipser 1980; Ogura and Liou...1980; Zipser and LeMone 1980; Gamache and ltouze 1982, 1985; Houze and Rappaport 1984; Heymsfield and Schotz 1985; Smull and Houze 1985, 1987a,b

  2. Dynamic aeroelastic stability of vertical-axis wind turbines under constant wind velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitzsche, Fred

    1994-05-01

    The flutter problem associated with the blades of a class of vertical-axis wind turbines called Darrieus is studied in detail. The spinning blade is supposed to be initially curved in a particular shape characterized by a state of pure tension at the blade cross section. From this equilibrium position a three-dimensional linear perturbation pattern is superimposed to determine the dynamic aeroelastic stability of the blade in the presence of free wind speed by means of the Floquet-Lyapunov theory for periodic systems.

  3. Measurements and correlations of turbulent burning velocities over wide ranges of fuels and elevated pressures

    KAUST Repository

    Bradley, Derek

    2013-01-01

    The implosion technique has been used to extend measurements of turbulent burning velocities over greater ranges of fuels and pressures. Measurements have been made up to 3.5 MPa and at strain rate Markstein numbers as low as 23. The implosion technique, with spark ignition at two opposite wall positions within a fan-stirred spherical bomb is capable of measuring turbulent burning velocities, at higher pressures than is possible with central ignition. Pressure records and schlieren high speed photography define the rate of burning and the smoothed area of the flame front. The first aim of the study was to extend the previous measurements with ethanol and propane-air, with further measurements over wider ranges of fuels and equivalence ratios with mixtures of hydrogen, methane, 10% hydrogen-90% methane, toluene, and i-octane, with air. The second aim was to study further the low turbulence regime in which turbulent burning co-exists with laminar flame instabilities. Correlations are presented of turbulent burning velocity normalised by the effective rms turbulent velocity acting on the flame front, ut=u0k , with the Karlovitz stretch factor, K, for different strain rate Markstein numbers, a decrease in which increases ut=u0k . Experimental correlations are presented for the present measurements, combined with previous ones. Different burning regimes are also identified, extending from that of mixed turbulence/laminar instability at low values of K to that at high values of K, in which ut=u0k is gradually reduced due to increasing localised flame extinctions. © 2012 The Combustion Institute.

  4. Vertical Profiles of Ammonia in the Colorado Front Range: Impacts of Source Region and Meteorology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tevlin, A.; Kaushik, A.; Noone, D. C.; Ortega, J. V.; Smith, J. N.; Brophy, P.; Kirkland, J.; Link, M. F.; Farmer, D. K.; Wolfe, D. E.; Dube, W. P.; McDuffie, E. E.; Brown, S. S.; Zaragoza, J.; Fischer, E. V.; Murphy, J. G.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric ammonia plays an important role in aerosol particle formation and growth, as well as in nitrogen deposition to sensitive ecosystems. However, significant uncertainties are associated with the distribution and strength of emission sources, and many of the processes that control its atmospheric fate are not fully understood. The high density of agricultural and urban sources located in close proximity to more pristine mountainous areas to the west make the Colorado Front Range a unique area for studying atmospheric ammonia. The meteorology of the region, where heavy monsoon rains can be followed by rapid evaporation, can also impact surface-atmosphere partitioning of ammonia. As part of the Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Éxperiment (FRAPPÉ), vertical profiles of ammonia were measured throughout the boundary layer aboard a moveable platform on the 300 m Boulder Atmospheric Observatory (BAO) tower. Changes in ammonia concentration and its vertical structure were driven not only by changes in wind direction and estimated source region, but also by fluctuations in surface and atmosphere water content. For example, large increases in atmospheric ammonia mixing ratios were observed following rain events. This may be explained by surface-atmosphere exchange of wet-deposited ammonia associated with rapid evaporation following the event, and likely impacts particle formation. This may also play a role in transport from ammonia-rich agricultural areas towards the mountainous regions to the west during periods of upslope flow. The vertical ammonia concentration gradients observed throughout the structured early morning boundary layer also provide insight into the possible causes of early morning spikes in ammonia - a phenomenon that has been well-documented in many other locations. A box model was used to assess the relative importance of surface emissions due to the evaporation of morning dew versus entrainment of ammonia-rich air from above the

  5. MeV-range velocity-space tomography from gamma-ray and neutron emission spectrometry measurements at JET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salewski, Mirko; Nocente, M.; Jacobsen, Asger Schou

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate the measurement of a 2D MeV-range ion velocity distribution function by velocity-space tomography at JET. Deuterium ions were accelerated into the MeV-range by third harmonic ion cyclotron resonance heating. We made measurements with three neutron emission spectrometers and a high-...

  6. On the effects of vertical air velocity on winter precipitation types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Thériault

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The various precipitation types formed within winter storms (such as snow, wet snow and freezing rain often lead to very hazardous weather conditions. These types of precipitation often occur during the passage of a warm front as a warm air mass ascends over a cold air mass. To address this issue further, we used a one-dimensional kinematic cloud model to simulate this gentle ascent (≤10 cm/s of warm air. The initial temperature profile has an above 0°C inversion, a lower subfreezing layer, and precipitation falls from above the temperature inversion. The cloud model is coupled to a double-moment microphysics scheme that simulates the production of various types of winter precipitation. The results are compared with those from a previous study carried out in still air. Based on the temporal evolution of surface precipitation, snow reaches the surface significantly faster than in still air whereas other precipitation types including freezing rain and ice pellets have a shorter duration. Overall, even weak background vertical ascent has an important impact on the precipitation reaching the surface, the time of the elimination of the melting layer, and also the evolution of the lower subfreezing layer.

  7. Magnetic Geared Radial Axis Vertical Wind Turbine for Low Velocity Regimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wei Teow

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In the 21st century, every country is seeking an alternative source of energy especially the renewable sources. There are considerable developments in the wind energy technology in recent years and in more particular on the vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT as they are modular, less installation cost and portable in comparison with that of the horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT systems. The cut-in speed of a conventional wind turbine is 3.5 m/s to 5 m/s. Mechanical geared generators are commonly found in wind technology to step up power conversion to accommodate the needs of the generator. Wind turbine gearboxes suffer from overload problem and frequent maintenance in spite of the high torque density produced. However, an emerging alternative to gearing system is Magnetic Gear (MG as it offers significant advantages such as free from maintenance and inherent overload protection. In this project, numerical analysis is done on designed magnetic gear greatly affects the performance of the generator in terms of voltage generation. Magnetic flux density is distributed evenly across the generator as seen from the uniform sinusoidal output waveform. Consequently, the interaction of the magnetic flux of the permanent magnets has shown no disturbance to the output of the generator as the voltage generated shows uniform waveform despite the rotational speed of the gears. The simulation is run at low wind speed and the results show that the generator starts generating a voltage of 240 V at a wind speed of 1.04 m/s. This shows great improvement in the operating capability of the wind turbine.

  8. EnKF assimilation of simulated spaceborne Doppler observations of vertical velocity: impact on the simulation of a supercell thunderstorm and implications for model-based retrievals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. E. Lewis

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, a number of investigations have been made that point to the robust effectiveness of the Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF in convective-scale data assimilation. These studies have focused on the assimilation of ground-based Doppler radar observations (i.e. radial velocity and reflectivity. The present study differs from these investigations in two important ways. First, in anticipation of future satellite technology, the impact of assimilating spaceborne Doppler-retrieved vertical velocity is examined; second, the potential for the EnKF to provide an alternative to instrument-based microphysical retrievals is investigated. It is shown that the RMS errors of the analyzed fields produced by assimilation of vertical velocity alone are in general better than those obtained in previous studies: in most cases assimilation of vertical velocity alone leads to analyses with small errors (e.g. <1 ms-1 for velocity components after only 3 or 4 assimilation cycles. The microphysical fields are notable exceptions, exhibiting lower errors when observations of reflectivity are assimilated together with observations of vertical velocity, likely a result of the closer relationship between reflectivity and the microphysical fields themselves. It is also shown that the spatial distribution of the error estimates improves (i.e. approaches the true errors as more assimilation cycles are carried out, which could be a significant advantage of EnKF model-based retrievals.

  9. Experimental Demonstration of Long-Range Underwater Acoustic Communication Using a Vertical Sensor Array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Anbang; Zeng, Caigao; Hui, Juan; Ma, Lin; Bi, Xuejie

    2017-06-27

    This paper proposes a composite channel virtual time reversal mirror (CCVTRM) for vertical sensor array (VSA) processing and applies it to long-range underwater acoustic (UWA) communication in shallow water. Because of weak signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), it is unable to accurately estimate the channel impulse response of each sensor of the VSA, thus the traditional passive time reversal mirror (PTRM) cannot perform well in long-range UWA communication in shallow water. However, CCVTRM only needs to estimate the composite channel of the VSA to accomplish time reversal mirror (TRM), which can effectively mitigate the inter-symbol interference (ISI) and reduce the bit error rate (BER). In addition, the calculation of CCVTRM is simpler than traditional PTRM. An UWA communication experiment using a VSA of 12 sensors was conducted in the South China Sea. The experiment achieves a very low BER communication at communication rate of 66.7 bit/s over an 80 km range. The results of the sea trial demonstrate that CCVTRM is feasible and can be applied to long-range UWA communication in shallow water.

  10. Analysis on vertical directional couplers with long range surface plasmons for multilayer optical routing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam, B., E-mail: badrul.alam@uniroma1.it; Veroli, A.; Benedetti, A. [Department of Information Engineering, Electronics and Telecommunications (DIET), University of Rome “La Sapienza,” Rome (Italy)

    2016-08-28

    A structure featuring vertical directional coupling of long-range surface plasmon polaritons between strip waveguides at λ = 1.55 μm is investigated with the aim of producing efficient elements that enable optical multilayer routing for 3D photonics. We have introduced a practical computational method to calculate the interaction on the bent part. This method allows us both to assess the importance of the interaction in the bent part and to control it by a suitable choice of the fabrication parameters that helps also to restrain effects due to fabrication issues. The scheme adopted here allows to reduce the insertion losses compared with other planar and multilayer devices.

  11. An investigation of balsa wood over a range of strain-rates and impact velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palamidi, E.; Harrigan, J. J.

    2006-08-01

    An experimental investigation of the mechanical properties of balsa wood under quasi-static and dynamic conditions is presented. Cylindrical balsa wood specimens were compressed quasi-statically and dynamically along their three principal axes. Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) tests were carried out to determine the importance of the material strain-rate. Balsa wood is a relatively low strength material of about 1.5 MPa in the weakest direction, depending on density. Consequently, the SHPB tests were carried out using low mechanical impedance Polymethylmethacrylate pressure bars. Tests at high strain-rates resulted in an increase in both initial crushing and plateau stresses. Direct impact (DI) tests were performed to measure both the proximal and distal end forces over a range of impact velocities. These results both reinforce the SHPB data and provide measurements for stress enhancement.

  12. An experimental study of wave propagation and velocity distributions in a vertically driven time-dependent granular gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, John Anthony

    Averaged over appropriate space and time scales the dynamics of highly fluidized granular systems are often reminiscent of molecular fluid flows. As a result, theoretical efforts to describe these systems have borrowed heavily from continuum mechanics, particularly hydrodynamics. This has led to various proposed granular hydrodynamic theories which have been used to simulate granular materials in various states of confinement and excitation. These studies suggest that a continuum model for granular gasses can accurately reproduce the mean density, velocity and temperature profiles for an experimental granular gas. This thesis contributes to this body of work by presenting an experimental study of the hydrodynamic fields and velocity distributions within a vertically driven quasi-2D granular gas. We have taken pictures as fast as possible of a time-dependent granular gas using a high-speed CCD camera. We have extracted the positions and velocities of 57-564 particles per frame over 400 GB of raw images collected at 3700 fps. We used this data to compute the density, velocity and temperature fields as functions of time and space to a very high resolution. This approach led to the discovery of novel substructures within the hydrodynamic fields which would have been overlooked had we chosen to average over a drive cycle as earlier studies have done. In particular, the high spatial resolution available from our measurements reveals a serrated substructure in the shock waves which has not been reported before. This substructure is the result of collisional momentum transport . One of the current issues in formulating a granular continuum model is how to incorporate local and non-local dependencies between stress and strain correctly. In this thesis we demonstrate that the collisional transfer of momentum produces a non-local effect in the stress tensor which plays a major role in determining the mean flow. Current models have incorporated only the collisional or

  13. High-resolution Vertical Profiling of Ocean Velocity and Water Properties Under Hurricane Frances in September 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, T. B.; D'Asarp, E. A.; Girton, J. B.; Price, J. F.; Webb, D. C.

    2006-12-01

    In ONR's CBLAST Hurricane research program observations were made of the upper ocean's response to Hurricane Frances. Three EM-APEX floats (velocity sensing versions of Webb Research APEX floats) and two Lagrangian floats were deployed north of Hispaniola from a C-130 aircraft ahead of Hurricane Frances in September 2004. The EM-APEX floats measured T, S and V over the upper 500 m starting about a day before the storm's arrival. The Lagrangian floats measured temperature and salinity while following the three- dimensional boundary layer turbulence in the upper 40 m. One EM-APEX float was directly under the track of the storm's eye, another EM-APEX and two Lagrangian floats went in about 50 km to the right of the track (where the surface winds are strongest) and the third float was about 100 km to the right. The EM-APEX floats profiled for 10 hours from the surface to 200 m, then continued profiling between 35 and 200 m with excursions to 500 m every half inertial period. After 5 days, the EM-APEX floats surfaced and transmitted the accumulated processed observations, then the floats profiled to 500 m every half inertial period until recovered early in October aided by GPS and Iridium. The float array sampled in unprecedented detail the upper-ocean turbulence, momentum, and salt and heat changes in response to the hurricane. The buildup of surface gravity waves in advance of the storm was also observed in the velocity profiles, with significant wave heights of up to 11 m. Rapid acceleration of inertial currents in the surface mixing layer (SML) to over 1 m/s stimulated vertical mixing by shear instability at the SML base, as indicated by low Richardson numbers and SML deepening from about 40 m to 120 m under the strongest wind forcing. Surface cooling of about 2.5 C was primarily due to the SML deepening and entrainment of colder water, with a small contribution from surface heat flux. Intense inertial pumping was observed under the eye, with vertical excursions of

  14. A Study of Three Dimensional Bubble Velocities at Co-current Gas-liquid Vertical Upward Bubbly Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Kuntoro, Hadiyan Yusuf; Deendarlianto,

    2015-01-01

    Recently, experimental series of co-current gas-liquid upward bubbly flows in a 6 m-height and 54.8 mm i.d. vertical titanium pipe had been conducted at the TOPFLOW thermal hydraulic test facility, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Germany. The experiments were initially performed to develop a high quality database of two-phase flows as well as to validate new CFD models. An ultrafast dual-layer electron beam X-ray tomography, named ROFEX, was used as measurement system with high spatial and temporal resolutions. The gathered cross sectional grey value image results from the tomography scanning were reconstructed, segmented and evaluated to acquire gas bubble parameters for instance bubble position, size and holdup. To assign the correct paired bubbles from both measurement layers, a bubble pair algorithm was implemented on the basis of the highest probability values of bubbles in position, volume and velocity. Hereinafter, the individual characteristics of bubbles were calculated include instantaneous th...

  15. Vertical Jump Height is more Strongly Associated with Velocity and Work Performed Prior to Take-off

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, J. R.; Loehr, J. A.; DeWitt, J. K.; Lee, S. M. C.; English, K. L.; Nash, R. E.; Leach, M. A.; Hagan, R. D.

    2008-01-01

    Vertical jump (VJ) height is commonly used as a measure of athletic capability in strength and power sports. Although VJ has been shown to be a predictor of athletic performance, it is not clear which kinetic ground reaction force (GRF) variables, such as peak force (PF), peak power (PP), peak velocity (PV), total work (TW) or impulse (Imp) are the best correlates. To determine which kinetic variables (PF, PP, PV, TW, and Imp) best correlate with VJ height. Twenty subjects (14 males, 6 females) performed three maximal countermovement VJs on a force platform (Advanced Mechanical Technology, Inc., Watertown, MA, USA). VJ jump height was calculated as the difference between standing reach and the highest reach point measured using a Vertec. PF, PP, PV, TW, and Imp were calculated using the vertical GRF data sampled at 1000 Hz from the lowest point in the countermovement through the concentric portion until take-off. GRF data were normalized to body mass measured using a standard scale (Detecto, Webb City, MO, USA). Correlation coefficients were computed between each GRF variable and VJ height using a Pearson correlation. VJ height (43.4 plus or minus 9.1 cm) was significantly correlated (p less than 0.001) with PF (998 plus or minus 321 N; r=0.51), PP (1997 plus or minus 772 W; r=0.69), PV (2.66 plus or minus 0.40 m (raised dot) s(sup -1); r=0.85), TW (259 plus or minus 93.0 kJ; r=0.82), and Imp (204 plus or minus 51.1 N(raised dot)s; r=0.67). Although all variables were correlated to VJ height, PV and TW were more strongly correlated to VJ height than PF, PP, and Imp. Therefore, since TW is equal to force times displacement, the relative displacement of the center of mass along with the forces applied during the upward movement of the jump are critical determinants of VJ height. PV and TW are key determinants of VJ height, and therefore successful training programs to increase VJ height should focus on rapid movement (PV) and TW by increasing power over time rather

  16. Determination of positions and velocity of Riyadh SLR station using satellite laser ranging observations to Lageos1 and Lageos2 satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alothman, A.; Schillak, S.

    2012-04-01

    Riyadh Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) station (7832) has been established since 1995 and situated in the Arabian plate which is countering a north east motion. Laser ranging observations of about 20 global SLR stations to the LAGEOS-1/LAGEOS-2 for 13-year (1996-2010) have been used to determine station positions and velocity of Riyadh SLR station. The NASA Godard's GEODYN-II orbital software has been used to perform orbit determination of these two satellites. The computations were performed based on 114 monthly arcs of observations with total number of normal points of 33708 and 40168 for LAGEOS-1 and LAGEOS-2 respectively. The geocentric coordinates were computed and then transformed to the topocentric North-South, East-West, and Vertical components in the ITRF2008 reference frame. Effects of normal points for each arc and the empirical acceleration coefficients on estimated station coordinates have been investigated. In order to achieve a lower standard deviation (less than 1 cm) of estimated coordinates, the number of the normal points per SLR station had to be greater than 50. The range biases were 7.5mm and 7.2 mm with long term biases stability 2.5 mm and 2.0 mm for LAGEOS-1 and LAGEOS-2 satellites, respectively. RMS of fit was calculated for all stations and found to be 17.2 mm for the whole period. Time series of positions and velocities have been computed for Riyadh SLR station with stability of ±10.1 mm, ±9.3 mm, and ±9.0 mm for X, Y, and Z coordinates, respectively. The estimated velocity is 29.1 mm/year, 31.6 mm/year, and 1.9 mm/year in North-South, East-West and vertical directions, respectively, with a 3D velocity 42.9 mm/year. 3D deviation from the ITRF2008 was equal 4.5 mm. To recover tectonic motion affecting the station, further analysis of velocity estimates has shown general agreement of Riyadh SLR station in comparison with recent GPS estimates for the Arabian plate motion.

  17. Estimations of Vertical Velocities Using the Omega Equation in Different Flow Regimes in Preparation for the High Resolution Observations of the SWOT Altimetry Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietri, A.; Capet, X.; d'Ovidio, F.; Le Sommer, J.; Molines, J. M.; Doglioli, A. M.

    2016-02-01

    Vertical velocities (w) associated with meso and submesoscale processes play an essential role in ocean dynamics and physical-biological coupling due to their impact on the upper ocean vertical exchanges. However, their small intensity (O 1 cm/s) compared to horizontal motions and their important variability in space and time makes them very difficult to measure. Estimations of these velocities are thus usually inferred using a generalized approach based on frontogenesis theories. These estimations are often obtained by solving the diagnostic omega equation. This equation can be expressed in different forms from a simple quasi geostrophic formulation to more complex ones that take into account the ageostrophic advection and the turbulent fluxes. The choice of the method used generally depends on the data available and on the dominant processes in the region of study. Here we aim to provide a statistically robust evaluation of the scales at which the vertical velocity can be resolved with confidence depending on the formulation of the equation and the dynamics of the flow. A high resolution simulation (dx=1-1.5 km) of the North Atlantic was used to compare the calculations of w based on the omega equation to the modelled vertical velocity. The simulation encompasses regions with different atmospheric forcings, mesoscale activity, seasonality and energetic flows, allowing us to explore several different dynamical contexts. In a few years the SWOT mission will provide bi-dimensional images of sea level elevation at a significantly higher resolution than available today. This work helps assess the possible contribution of the SWOT data to the understanding of the submesoscale circulation and the associated vertical fluxes in the upper ocean.

  18. Simultaneous Range-Velocity Processing and SNR Analysis of AFIT’s Random Noise Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-22

    First, and above all else, I give thanks and praise to the one from whom all blessings are given. Thank you, God , for continually giving generously to...target’s radial velocity is constant over the measurement window Ttx. Lievsay [18] created a bank of reference signals, analogous to Doppler filter...where ⌈⋅⌉ represents the integer ceiling of the computed value. Velocity resolution is directly tied to the highest frequency of the signal, fℎ and

  19. A Method for Retrieving Vertical Air Velocities in Convective Clouds over the Tibetan Plateau from TIPEX-III Cloud Radar Doppler Spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiafeng Zheng

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In the summertime, convective cells occur frequently over the Tibetan Plateau (TP because of the large dynamic and thermal effects of the landmass. Measurements of vertical air velocity in convective cloud are useful for advancing our understanding of the dynamic and microphysical mechanisms of clouds and can be used to improve the parameterization of current numerical models. This paper presents a technique for retrieving high-resolution vertical air velocities in convective clouds over the TP through the use of Doppler spectra from vertically pointing Ka-band cloud radar. The method was based on the development of a “small-particle-traced” idea and its associated data processing, and it used three modes of radar. Spectral broadening corrections, uncertainty estimations, and results merging were used to ensure accurate results. Qualitative analysis of two typical convective cases showed that the retrievals were reliable and agreed with the expected results inferred from other radar measurements. A quantitative retrieval of vertical air motion from a ground-based optical disdrometer was used to compare with the radar-derived result. This comparison illustrated that, while the data trends from the two methods of retrieval were in agreement while identifying the updrafts and downdrafts, the cloud radar had a much higher resolution and was able to reveal the small-scale variations in vertical air motion.

  20. Difference of horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratios of observed earthquakes and microtremors and its application to S-wave velocity inversion based on the diffuse field concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawase, Hiroshi; Mori, Yuta; Nagashima, Fumiaki

    2018-01-01

    We have been discussing the validity of using the horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratios (HVRs) as a substitute for S-wave amplifications after Nakamura first proposed the idea in 1989. So far a formula for HVRs had not been derived that fully utilized their physical characteristics until a recent proposal based on the diffuse field concept. There is another source of confusion that comes from the mixed use of HVRs from earthquake and microtremors, although their wave fields are hardly the same. In this study, we compared HVRs from observed microtremors (MHVR) and those from observed earthquake motions (EHVR) at one hundred K-NET and KiK-net stations. We found that MHVR and EHVR share similarities, especially until their first peak frequency, but have significant differences in the higher frequency range. This is because microtremors mainly consist of surface waves so that peaks associated with higher modes would not be prominent, while seismic motions mainly consist of upwardly propagating plain body waves so that higher mode resonances can be seen in high frequency. We defined here the spectral amplitude ratio between them as EMR and calculated their average. We categorize all the sites into five bins by their fundamental peak frequencies in MHVR. Once we obtained EMRs for five categories, we back-calculated EHVRs from MHVRs, which we call pseudo-EHVRs (pEHVR). We found that pEHVR is much closer to EHVR than MHVR. Then we use our inversion code to invert the one-dimensional S-wave velocity structures from EHVRs based on the diffuse field concept. We also applied the same code to pEHVRs and MHVRs for comparison. We found that pEHVRs yield velocity structures much closer to those by EHVRs than those by MHVRs. This is natural since what we have done up to here is circular except for the average operation in EMRs. Finally, we showed independent examples of data not used in the EMR calculation, where better ground structures were successfully identified from p

  1. Coherent lidar modulated with frequency stepped pulse trains for unambiguous high duty cycle range and velocity sensing in the atmosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindelöw, Per Jonas Petter; Mohr, Johan Jacob

    2007-01-01

    Range unambiguous high duty cycle coherent lidars can be constructed based on frequency stepped pulse train modulation, even continuously emitting systems could be envisioned. Such systems are suitable for velocity sensing of dispersed targets, like the atmosphere, at fast acquisition rates...

  2. Escape Velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikola Vlacic

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this project, we investigated if it is feasible for a single staged rocket with constant thrust to attain escape velocity. We derived an equation for the velocity and position of a single staged rocket that launches vertically. From this equation, we determined if an ideal model of a rocket is able to reach escape velocity.

  3. Dielectric properties of vertically aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes in the terahertz and mid-infrared range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Mark D.; Zouaghi, Wissem; Meng, Fanqi; Wiecha, Matthias M.; Rabia, Kaneez; Heinlein, Thorsten; Hussein, Laith; Babu, Deepu; Yadav, Sandeep; Engstler, Jörg; Schneider, Jörg J.; Nicoloso, Norbert; Rychetský, Ivan; Kužel, Petr; Roskos, Hartmut G.

    2018-01-01

    We investigate the broadband dielectric properties of vertically aligned, multi-wall carbon nanotubes (VACNT), over both the terahertz (THz) and mid-infrared spectral ranges. The nominally undoped, metallic VACNT samples are probed at normal incidence, i.e. the response is predominantly due to polarisation perpendicular to the CNT axis. A detailed comparison of various conductivity models and previously reported results is presented for the non-Drude behaviour we observe in the conventional THz range (up to 2.5 THz). Extension to the mid-infrared range reveals an absorption peak at \

  4. Group velocity effect on resonant, long-range wake-fields in slow wave structures

    CERN Document Server

    Smirnov, A V

    2002-01-01

    Synchronous wake-fields in a dispersive waveguide are derived in a general explicit form on the basis of a rigorous electro-dynamical approach using Fourier transformations. The fundamental role of group velocity in wake-field propagation, calculation of attenuation, amplitudes, form-factors and loss-factors is analyzed for single bunch radiation. Adiabatic tapering of the waveguide and bunch density variation is taken into account analytically for the time-domain fields. Effects of field 'compression/expansion' and group delays are demonstrated. The role of these effects is discussed for single bunch wake-fields, transient beam loading, BBU and HOMs. A novel waveguide structure with central rf coupling and both positive and negative velocities is proposed. It can be used effectively in both high-energy accelerators and single-section linacs.

  5. A Sensor Fusion Method for Tracking Vertical Velocity and Height Based on Inertial and Barometric Altimeter Measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Angelo Maria Sabatini; Vincenzo Genovese

    2014-01-01

    A sensor fusion method was developed for vertical channel stabilization by fusing inertial measurements from an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) and pressure altitude measurements from a barometric altimeter integrated in the same device (baro-IMU). An Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) estimated the quaternion from the sensor frame to the navigation frame; the sensed specific force was rotated into the navigation frame and compensated for gravity, yielding the vertical linear acceleration; finally,...

  6. Vertical structure of internal wave induced velocity for mode I and II solitary waves in two- and three-layer fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigiyatullin, Ayrat; Kurkin, Andrey; Kurkina, Oxana; Rouvinskaya, Ekaterina; Rybin, Artem

    2017-04-01

    With the use of the Gardner equation, or its variable-coefficient forms, the velocity components of fluid particles in the vertical section induced by a passage of internal waves can be estimated in weakly nonlinear limit. The horizontal velocity gives the greatest contribution into the local current speed. This is a typical property of long waves. This feature of an internal wave field may greatly contribute to the local sediment transport and/or resuspension. The velocity field induced by mode I and II internal solitary waves are studied. The contribution from second-order terms in asymptotic expansion into the horizontal velocity is estimated for the models of two- and three-layer fluid density stratification for solitons of positive and negative polarity, as well as for breathers of different shapes and amplitudes. The influence of the nonlinear correction manifests itself firstly in the shape of the lines of zero horizontal velocity: they are curved and the shape depends on the soliton amplitude and polarity while for the leading-order wave field they are horizontal. Also the wavefield accounting for the nonlinear correction for mode I waves has smaller maximal absolute values of negative velocities (near-surface for the soliton of elevation, and near-bottom for the soliton of depression) and larger maximums of positive velocities. Thus for the solitary internal waves of positive polarity weakly nonlinear theory overestimates the near-bottom velocities and underestimates the near-surface current. For solitary waves of negative polarity, which are the most typical for hydrological conditions of low and middle latitudes, the situation is the opposite. Similar estimations are produced for mode II waves, which possess more complex structure. The presented results of research are obtained with the support of the Russian Foundation for Basic Research grant 16-35-00413.

  7. Doppler ultrasound velocities and resistive indexes immediately after pediatric liver transplantation: normal ranges and predictors of failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamieson, Lucy H; Arys, Bo; Low, Gavin; Bhargava, Ravi; Kumbla, Surekha; Jaremko, Jacob L

    2014-07-01

    We sought to determine the ranges of Doppler ultrasound findings immediately after pediatric liver transplantation that are associated with successful outcomes or postoperative complications. This study included consecutive children who underwent Doppler ultrasound less than 48 hours after liver transplantation from 2001 to 2011. Operative reports and clinical outcome data were recorded. We had 110 patients (54% girls) with mean age at transplantation of 2.9 years (median, 1.3 years; range, 0-14 years) and a median follow-up interval of 3.5 years. Two pediatric radiologists reviewed ultrasound images in consensus. We computed descriptive statistics, interindex correlations, and analysis of variance. Twenty-four of 110 patients had a vascular complication, most commonly hepatic arterial thrombosis (seven patients). Compared with published adult normal values, normal pediatric Doppler parameters at postoperative day 1 trended toward higher normal velocities and resistive indexes (up to 0.95). Absent or low-velocity common hepatic artery flow less than 50 cm/s or a common hepatic artery resistive index less than 0.50 were significantly associated with hepatic artery thrombosis, whereas absent or low-velocity portal venous flow less than 30 cm/s or low-velocity hepatic venous flow less than 25 cm/s were significantly associated with vascular complications and a monotonic hepatic venous waveform was significantly associated with venous complications. Flow in a pediatric liver on the first day after transplantation is normally hyperdynamic, especially in the youngest transplant recipients, and, as a result, low velocities or resistive indexes are particularly concerning for complications. The pediatric-specific ranges of expected posttransplantation Doppler ultrasound findings presented in this article should assist in identifying normal variation and potentially life-threatening complications.

  8. Acute Effect of Biomechanical Muscle Stimulation on the Counter-Movement Vertical Jump Power and Velocity in Division I Football Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Bert H; Monaghan, Taylor P; Sellers, John H; Conchola, Eric C; Pope, Zach K; Glass, Rob G

    2017-05-01

    Jacobson, BH, Monaghan, TP, Sellers, JH, Conchola, EC, Pope, ZK, and Glass, RG. Acute effect of biomechanical muscle stimulation on the counter-movement vertical jump power and velocity in division I football players. J Strength Cond Res 31(5): 1259-1264, 2017-Research regarding whole body vibration (WBV) largely supports such training augmentation in attempts to increase muscle strength and power. However, localized biomechanical vibration has not received the same attention. The purpose of this study was to assess peak and average power before and after acute vibration of selected lower-body sites in division I athletes. Twenty-one subjects were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 conditions using a cross-over design. Pretest consisted of a counter-movement vertical jump (VJ) followed by either localized vibration (30 Hz) to 4 selected lower-body areas or 4 minutes of moderately low-resistance stationary cycling (70 rpm). Vibration consisted of 1 minute bouts at each lower-leg site for a total of 4 minutes followed by an immediate post-test VJ. Repeated measures analysis of variance yielded no significant differences (p > 0.05) in either peak power or peak velocity. Similarly, no significant differences were found for average power and velocity between conditions. It should be noted that, while not significant, the vibration condition demonstrated an increase in peak power and velocity while the bike condition registered slight decreases. Comparing each of the post-VJ repetitions (1, 2, and 3) the vibration condition experienced significantly greater peak power and velocity from VJ 1 to VJ 3 compared with the bike condition which demonstrated no significant differences among the post-test VJs. These results yielded similar, although not statistically significant outcomes to previous studies using WBV. However, the novelty of selected site biomechanical vibration merits further investigation with respect to frequency, magnitude, and duration of vibration.

  9. Maximal power and force-velocity relationships during cycling and cranking exercises in volleyball players. Correlation with the vertical jump test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driss, T; Vandewalle, H; Monod, H

    1998-12-01

    The aim of this study was to propose a test battery adjusted to volleyball players and to study the links between dynamic (vertical jump, force-velocity relationships and maximal anaerobic power in cranking and cycling) and static (maximal voluntary force and rate of force development in isometric conditions) performances. The relationships between braking force (F) and peak velocity (V) have been determined for cycling and cranking exercises in 18 male volleyball players of a district league. According to previous studies, these F-V relationships were assumed to be linear and were expressed as follows: V = V0(1-F/F0), where V0 should be an estimate of the maximal velocity at zero braking force whereas F0 is assumed to be a braking force corresponding to zero velocity. Maximal anaerobic power in cycling (Pmax leg) and cranking (Pmax arm) were calculated as equal to 0.25 V0F0. The same subjects performed a vertical jump test (VJ) and a strength test on an isometric leg press with the measurement of the unilateral isometric maximal voluntary force (MVF) and indices of rate of isometric force development (RFD): maximal rate of force development (MRFD) and the time from 25% to 50% of MVF (T25-50). Pmax leg (15.8 +/- 1.4 W.kg-1) and V0 arm (259.6 +/- 13.1 rpm) were high but similar to the results of elite athletes, previously collected with the same protocols and the same devices. VJ was significantly with F0 leg, Pmax leg and Pmax arm related to body mass. The performances of the dynamic tests were significantly correlated and especially the parameters (V0, F0, Pmax) of the force velocity tests in cycling were significantly correlated with the same parameters in cranking. The results of the isometric tests (MVF, MRFD) were not correlated with VJ, except T25-50 of the left leg. A vertical jump test and a force velocity test with the arms are proposed for a test battery in volleyball players.

  10. Investigation of hopped frequency waveforms for range and velocity measurements of radar targets

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kathree, U

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In the field of radar, High Range Resolution (HRR) profiles are often used to improve target tracking accuracy in range and to allow the radar system to produce an image of an object using techniques such as inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR...

  11. FrFT-CSWSF: Estimating cross-range velocities of ground moving targets using multistatic synthetic aperture radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Chenlei

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Estimating cross-range velocity is a challenging task for space-borne synthetic aperture radar (SAR, which is important for ground moving target indication (GMTI. Because the velocity of a target is very small compared with that of the satellite, it is difficult to correctly estimate it using a conventional monostatic platform algorithm. To overcome this problem, a novel method employing multistatic SAR is presented in this letter. The proposed hybrid method, which is based on an extended space-time model (ESTIM of the azimuth signal, has two steps: first, a set of finite impulse response (FIR filter banks based on a fractional Fourier transform (FrFT is used to separate multiple targets within a range gate; second, a cross-correlation spectrum weighted subspace fitting (CSWSF algorithm is applied to each of the separated signals in order to estimate their respective parameters. As verified through computer simulation with the constellations of Cartwheel, Pendulum and Helix, this proposed time-frequency-subspace method effectively improves the estimation precision of the cross-range velocities of multiple targets.

  12. Base deformation of full metal-jacketed rifle bullets as a measure of impact velocity and range of fire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haag, Lucien C

    2015-03-01

    Full metal-jacketed rifle bullets with lead cores and open bases can experience deformation of their cylindrical shapes as they yaw during the penetration of soft tissues. The amount of deformation depends upon the strength of the bullet and the velocity in soft tissue when they go into yaw. The yaw behavior of a bullet in soft tissue depends upon its design (length, ogive shape, ogive length, center of gravity, and pre-impact stability) as it penetrates soft tissue. The yaw characteristics of common spitzer-type military rifle bullets are relatively well known and quite reproducible when fired into suitable soft tissue simulants. This, in turn, results in a relationship between the amount of deformation of the bullet's shank and impact velocity with soft tissue. The specific relationship between impact velocity and bullet deformation must be worked out through empirical testing, but this relationship can be of critical importance in determining impact velocity, which, in turn, relates to range of fire.

  13. Daytime, low latitude, vertical ExB drift velocities, inferred from ground-based magnetometer observations in the Peruvian, Philippine and Indian longitude sectors under quiet and disturbed conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, D; Chau, J; Yumoto, K; Bhattacharya, A; Alex, S

    2006-01-01

    Daytime, low latitude, vertical ExB drift velocities, inferred from ground-based magnetometer observations in the Peruvian, Philippine and Indian longitude sectors under quiet and disturbed conditions

  14. Geographical limits to species-range shifts are suggested by climate velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Michael T; Schoeman, David S; Richardson, Anthony J; Molinos, Jorge García; Hoffmann, Ary; Buckley, Lauren B; Moore, Pippa J; Brown, Christopher J; Bruno, John F; Duarte, Carlos M; Halpern, Benjamin S; Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove; Kappel, Carrie V; Kiessling, Wolfgang; O'Connor, Mary I; Pandolfi, John M; Parmesan, Camille; Sydeman, William J; Ferrier, Simon; Williams, Kristen J; Poloczanska, Elvira S

    2014-03-27

    The reorganization of patterns of species diversity driven by anthropogenic climate change, and the consequences for humans, are not yet fully understood or appreciated. Nevertheless, changes in climate conditions are useful for predicting shifts in species distributions at global and local scales. Here we use the velocity of climate change to derive spatial trajectories for climatic niches from 1960 to 2009 (ref. 7) and from 2006 to 2100, and use the properties of these trajectories to infer changes in species distributions. Coastlines act as barriers and locally cooler areas act as attractors for trajectories, creating source and sink areas for local climatic conditions. Climate source areas indicate where locally novel conditions are not connected to areas where similar climates previously occurred, and are thereby inaccessible to climate migrants tracking isotherms: 16% of global surface area for 1960 to 2009, and 34% of ocean for the 'business as usual' climate scenario (representative concentration pathway (RCP) 8.5) representing continued use of fossil fuels without mitigation. Climate sink areas are where climate conditions locally disappear, potentially blocking the movement of climate migrants. Sink areas comprise 1.0% of ocean area and 3.6% of land and are prevalent on coasts and high ground. Using this approach to infer shifts in species distributions gives global and regional maps of the expected direction and rate of shifts of climate migrants, and suggests areas of potential loss of species richness.

  15. Predicting the Velocity and Azimuth of Fragments Generated by the Range Destruction or Random Failure of Rocket Casings and Tankage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eck, Marshall B.; Mukunda, Meera

    1988-10-01

    The details of a predictive analytical modeling process as well as the development of normalized relations for momentum partition as a function of SRM burn time and initial geometry are discussed in this paper. Methods for applying similar modeling techniques to liquid-tankage-over-pressure failures are also discussed. These methods have been calibrated against observed SRM ascent failures and on-orbit tankage failures. Casing-quadrant sized fragments with velocities exceeding 100 m/s resulted from Titan 34D-SRM range destruct actions at 10 sec mission elapsed time (MET). Casing-quadrant sized fragments with velocities of approximately 200 m/s resulted from STS-SRM range destruct actions at 110 sec MET. Similar sized fragments for Ariane third stage and Delta second stage tankage were predicted to have maximum velocities of 260 m/s and 480 m/s respectively. Good agreement was found between the predictions and observations for five specific events and it was concluded that the methods developed have good potential for use in predicting the fragmentation process of a number of generically similar casing and tankage systems. There are three copies in the file, one of these is loose.

  16. Sound limb loading in individuals with unilateral transfemoral amputation across a range of walking velocities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell Esposito, Elizabeth; Aldridge Whitehead, Jennifer M; Wilken, Jason M

    2015-12-01

    Individuals with unilateral transfemoral amputation demonstrate significantly increased rates of osteoarthritis in their sound knee. This increased risk is likely the result of altered knee mechanical loading and gait compensations resulting from limited function in the prosthetic limb. Altered knee loading as calculated using loading rates and peak external knee adduction moments and impulses have been associated with both the development and progression of knee osteoarthritis in other populations. The purpose of this study was to determine if young individuals with transfemoral amputation demonstrate biomechanical indicators of increased knee osteoarthritis risk. Fourteen young male Service Members with unilateral transfemoral amputation and 14 able-bodied service members underwent biomechanical gait analysis at three standardized walking velocities. A two-way ANOVA (group × speed) with unpaired comparisons with Bonferroni-Holm post-hoc corrections assessed statistical significance and effect sizes (d) were calculated. Normalized peak external knee adduction moments and impulses were 25.7% (P 0.994) and 27.1% (P 1.019) lower, respectively, in individuals with trans-femoral amputation than controls when averaged across speeds, and effect sizes were large. External knee flexor moments were not, however, different between groups and effect sizes were generally small (P > 0.380, d amputation and effect sizes were large (P 1.644). Individuals with transfemoral amputation did not demonstrate biomechanical risk factors for high medial compartment knee joint loads, but the increased loading rates could place the sound knee at greater risk for cartilage or other tissue damage, even if not localized to the medial compartment. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Possible relationship between the equatorial electrojet (EEJ) and daytime vertical E × B drift velocities in F region from ROCSAT observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Veenadhari, B.; Tulasi Ram, S.; Su, S.-Y.; Kikuchi, T.

    2016-10-01

    The vertical E × B drift is very important parameter as its day to day variability has great influence on the variability in the low latitude F-region ion and electron density distributions. The measurements of vertical ion velocity from the first Republic of China Satellite (ROCSAT-1) provide a unique data base for the development of possible relationship between vertical E × B drifts and ground based magnetometer observation. An attempt has been made to derive quantitative relationship between F-region vertical E × B drifts measured by ROCSAT-1 (600 km) and ground measured equatorial electrojet for the solar maximum period 2001-2003 for Indian and Japanese sectors. The results consistently indicate existence of linear relationship between the measured vertical E × B drifts at topside F-region and EEJ for both the sectors, with a moderate to high correlation coefficients. The linear relationship between ROCSAT-1 measured E × B drifts and EEJ for Indian and Japanese sectors has been compared with a similar relationship with Jicamarca Unattended Long-term Ionosphere Atmosphere Radar (JULIA) measured E × B drifts (150 km echos) and EEJ strength from Peruvian sector during 2003. It has been found that ROCSAT-1 measured E × B drifts shows linear relationship with EEJ, however, exhibits a larger scatter unlike JULIA radar observed E × B drifts. This may be attributed to the large height difference as ROCSAT-1 measures E × B drifts at 600 km altitude and the EEJ is E-region (110 km) phenomenon.

  18. Determining position, velocity and acceleration of free-ranging animals with a low-cost unmanned aerial system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Richard J; Roskilly, Kyle; Buse, Chris; Evans, Hannah K; Hubel, Tatjana Y; Wilson, Alan M

    2016-09-01

    Unmanned aerial systems (UASs), frequently referred to as 'drones', have become more common and affordable and are a promising tool for collecting data on free-ranging wild animals. We used a Phantom-2 UAS equipped with a gimbal-mounted camera to estimate position, velocity and acceleration of a subject on the ground moving through a grid of GPS surveyed ground control points (area ∼1200 m(2)). We validated the accuracy of the system against a dual frequency survey grade GPS system attached to the subject. When compared with GPS survey data, the estimations of position, velocity and acceleration had a root mean square error of 0.13 m, 0.11 m s(-1) and 2.31 m s(-2), respectively. The system can be used to collect locomotion and localisation data on multiple free-ranging animals simultaneously. It does not require specialist skills to operate, is easily transported to field locations, and is rapidly and easily deployed. It is therefore a useful addition to the range of methods available for field data collection on free-ranging animal locomotion. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  19. Determining Effects of Wagon Mass and Vehicle Velocity on Vertical Vibrations of a Rail Vehicle Moving with a Constant Acceleration on a Bridge Using Experimental and Numerical Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Mızrak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Vibrations are vital for derailment safety and passenger comfort which may occur on rail vehicles due to the truck and nearby conditions. In particular, while traversing a bridge, dynamic interaction forces due to moving loads increase the vibrations even further. In this study, the vertical vibrations of a rail vehicle at the midpoint of a bridge, where the amount of deflection is expected to be maximum, were determined by means of a 1 : 5 scaled roller rig and Newmark-β numerical method. Simulations for different wagon masses and vehicle velocities were performed using both techniques. The results obtained from the numerical and experimental methods were compared and it was demonstrated that the former was accurate with an 8.9% error margin. Numerical simulations were performed by identifying different test combinations with Taguchi experiment design. After evaluating the obtained results by means of an ANOVA analysis, it was determined that the wagon mass had a decreasing effect on the vertical vibrations of the rail vehicle by 2.087%, while rail vehicle velocity had an increasing effect on the vibrations by 96.384%.

  20. Case studies of the impact of orbital sampling on stratospheric trend detection and derivation of tropical vertical velocities: solar occultation vs. limb emission sounding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. F. Millán

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the representativeness of two types of orbital sampling applied to stratospheric temperature and trace gas fields. Model fields are sampled using real sampling patterns from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS, the HALogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE and the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS. The MLS sampling acts as a proxy for a dense uniform sampling pattern typical of limb emission sounders, while HALOE and ACE-FTS represent coarse nonuniform sampling patterns characteristic of solar occultation instruments. First, this study revisits the impact of sampling patterns in terms of the sampling bias, as previous studies have done. Then, it quantifies the impact of different sampling patterns on the estimation of trends and their associated detectability. In general, we find that coarse nonuniform sampling patterns may introduce non-negligible errors in the inferred magnitude of temperature and trace gas trends and necessitate considerably longer records for their definitive detection. Lastly, we explore the impact of these sampling patterns on tropical vertical velocities derived from stratospheric water vapor measurements. We find that coarse nonuniform sampling may lead to a biased depiction of the tropical vertical velocities and, hence, to a biased estimation of the impact of the mechanisms that modulate these velocities. These case studies suggest that dense uniform sampling such as that available from limb emission sounders provides much greater fidelity in detecting signals of stratospheric change (for example, fingerprints of greenhouse gas warming and stratospheric ozone recovery than coarse nonuniform sampling such as that of solar occultation instruments.

  1. Ten kilometer vertical Moho offset and shallow velocity contrast along the Denali fault zone from double-difference tomography, receiver functions, and fault zone head waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allam, A. A.; Schulte-Pelkum, V.; Ben-Zion, Y.; Tape, C.; Ruppert, N.; Ross, Z. E.

    2017-11-01

    We examine the structure of the Denali fault system in the crust and upper mantle using double-difference tomography, P-wave receiver functions, and analysis (spatial distribution and moveout) of fault zone head waves. The three methods have complementary sensitivity; tomography is sensitive to 3D seismic velocity structure but smooths sharp boundaries, receiver functions are sensitive to (quasi) horizontal interfaces, and fault zone head waves are sensitive to (quasi) vertical interfaces. The results indicate that the Mohorovičić discontinuity is vertically offset by 10 to 15 km along the central 600 km of the Denali fault in the imaged region, with the northern side having shallower Moho depths around 30 km. An automated phase picker algorithm is used to identify 1400 events that generate fault zone head waves only at near-fault stations. At shorter hypocentral distances head waves are observed at stations on the northern side of the fault, while longer propagation distances and deeper events produce head waves on the southern side. These results suggest a reversal of the velocity contrast polarity with depth, which we confirm by computing average 1D velocity models separately north and south of the fault. Using teleseismic events with M ≥ 5.1, we obtain 31,400 P receiver functions and apply common-conversion-point stacking. The results are migrated to depth using the derived 3D tomography model. The imaged interfaces agree with the tomography model, showing a Moho offset along the central Denali fault and also the sub-parallel Hines Creek fault, a suture zone boundary 30 km to the north. To the east, this offset follows the Totschunda fault, which ruptured during the M7.9 2002 earthquake, rather than the Denali fault itself. The combined results suggest that the Denali fault zone separates two distinct crustal blocks, and that the Totschunda and Hines Creeks segments are important components of the fault and Cretaceous-aged suture zone structure.

  2. ESTIMATION OF VERTICAL DEFLECTIONS IN CONCRETE BEAMS THROUGH DIGITAL CLOSE RANGE PHOTOGRAMMETRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Detchev

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Deformation monitoring, and in general structural health monitoring, of civil infrastructure systems is important in terms of both safety and serviceability. Traditionally, large structures have been monitored using surveying techniques, while fine-scale monitoring of structural components has been done with geotechnical instrumentation. This paper reviews the advantages and disadvantages of using remote sensing methods, such as terrestrial laser scanning and digital close range photogrammetry, for the purposes of precise 3D reconstruction and the estimation of deflections in structural materials. It is also shown how a low-cost setup of multiple digital cameras and projectors can be used for the monitoring of concrete beams subjected to different loading conditions by a hydraulic actuator. The photogrammetric system used does not require any physical targets other than for the purposes of establishing the relative orientation between the involved cameras. The setup was tested in two experiments, and the beam deflections resulted from the photogrammetric system were compared to the ones from a set of one-dimensional laser transducers and a terrestrial laser scanner. The experiments proved that it was possible to detect sub-millimetre level deformations given the used equipment and the geometry of the setup.

  3. Predicting the velocity and azimuth of fragments generated by the range destruction or random failure of rocket casings and tankage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eck, M.; Mukunda, M.

    The proliferation of space vehicle launch sites and the projected utilization of these facilities portends an increase in the number of on-pad, ascent, and on-orbit solid-rocket motor (SRM) casings and liquid-rocket tanks which will randomly fail or will fail from range destruct actions. Beyond the obvious safety implications, these failures may have serious resource implications for mission system and facility planners. SRM-casing failures and liquid-rocket tankage failures result in the generation of large, high velocity fragments which may be serious threats to the safety of launch support personnel if proper bunkers and exclusion areas are not provided. In addition, these fragments may be indirect threats to the general public's safety if they encounter hazardous spacecraft payloads which have not been designed to withstand shrapnel of this caliber. They may also become threats to other spacecraft if, by failing on-orbit, they add to the ever increasing space-junk collision cross-section. Most prior attempts to assess the velocity of fragments from failed SRM casings have simply assigned the available chamber impulse to available casing and fuel mass and solved the resulting momentum balance for velocity. This method may predict a fragment velocity which is high or low by a factor of two depending on the ratio of fuel to casing mass extant at the time of failure. Recognizing the limitations of existing methods, the authors devised an analytical approach which properly partitions the available impulse to each major system-mass component. This approach uses the Physics International developed PISCES code to couple the forces generated by an Eulerian modeled gas flow field to a Lagrangian modeled fuel and casing system. The details of a predictive analytical modeling process as well as the development of normalized relations for momentum partition as a function of SRM burn time and initial geometry are discussed in this paper. Methods for applying similar modeling

  4. Vertical E × B drift velocity variations and associated low-latitude ionospheric irregularities investigated with the TOPEX and GPS satellite data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Horvath

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available With a well-selected data set, the various events of the vertical E × B drift velocity variations at magnetic-equator-latitudes, the resultant ionospheric features at low-and mid-latitudes, and the practical consequences of these E × B events on the equatorial radio signal propagation are demonstrated. On a global scale, the development of a equatorial anomaly is illustrated with a series of 1995 global TOPEX TEC (total electron content maps. Locally, in the Australian longitude region, some field-aligned TOPEX TEC cross sections are combined with the matching Guam (144.86° E; 13.59° N, geographic GPS (Global Positioning System TEC data, covering the northern crest of the equatorial anomaly. Together, the 1998 TOPEX and GPS TEC data are utilized to show the three main events of vertical E × B drift velocity variations: (1 the pre-reversal enhancement, (2 the reversal and (3 the downward maximum. Their effects on the dual-frequency GPS recordings are documented with the raw Guam GPS TEC data and with the filtered Guam GPS dTEC/min or 1-min GPS TEC data after Aarons et al. (1997. During these E × B drift velocity events, the Port Moresby (147.10° E; - 9.40° N, geographic virtual height or h'F ionosonde data (km, which cover the southern crest of the equatorial anomaly in the Australian longitude region, show the effects of plasma drift on the equatorial ionosphere. With the net (D horizontal (H magnetic field intensity parameter, introduced and called DH or Hequator-Hnon-equator (nT by Chandra and Rastogi (1974, the daily E × B drift velocity variations are illustrated at 121° E (geographic in the Australian longitude region. The results obtained with the various data show very clearly that the development of mid-latitude night-time TEC increases is triggered by the westward electric field as the appearance of such night-time TEC increases coincides with the E × B drift velocity reversal. An explanation is offered with the F

  5. Superposed epoch analysis of vertical ion velocity, electron temperature, field-aligned current, and thermospheric wind in the dayside auroral region as observed by DMSP and CHAMP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kervalishvili, G.; Lühr, H.

    2016-12-01

    This study reports on the results obtained by a superposed epoch analysis (SEA) method applied to the electron temperature, vertical ion velocity, field-aligned current (FAC), and thermospheric zonal wind velocity at high-latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere. The SEA study is performed in a magnetic latitude versus magnetic local time (MLat-MLT) frame. The obtained results are based on observations collected during the years 2001-2005 by the CHAMP and DMSP (F13 and F15) satellites. The dependence on interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) orientations is also investigated using data from the NASA/GSFC's OMNI database. Further, the obtained results are subdivided into three Lloyd seasons of 130 days each, which are defined as follows: local winter (1 January ± 65 days), combined equinoxes (1 April and 1 October ± 32days), and local summer (1 July ± 65 days). A period of 130 days is needed by the CHAMP satellite to pass through all local times. The time and location of the electron temperature peaks from CHAMP measurements near the cusp region are used as the reference parameter for the SEA method to investigate the relationship between the electron temperature and other ionospheric quantities. The SEA derived MLat profiles of the electron temperature show a seasonal dependence, increasing from winter to summer, as expected. But, the temperature rise (difference between the reference temperature peak and the background electron temperature) strongly decreases towards local summer. The SEA derived MLat profiles of the ion vertical velocity at DMSP altitude show the same seasonal behaviour as the electron temperature rice. There exists a clear linear relation between these two variables with a quiet large correlation coefficient value, >0.9. The SEA derived MLat profiles of both, thermospheric zonal wind velocity and FAC, show a clear IMF By orientation dependence for all local seasons. The zonal wind velocity is prominently directed towards west in the MLat-MLT frame

  6. Convenient method for estimating underground s-wave velocity structure utilizing horizontal and vertical components microtremor spectral ratio; Bido no suiheido/jogedo supekutoru hi wo riyoshita kan`i chika s ha sokudo kozo suiteiho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, H.; Yoshioka, M.; Saito, T. [Iwate University, Iwate (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1996-05-01

    Studies were conducted about the method of estimating the underground S-wave velocity structure by inversion making use of the horizontal/vertical motion spectral ratio of microtremors. For this purpose, a dynamo-electric velocity type seismograph was used, capable of processing the east-west, north-south, and vertical components integratedly. For the purpose of sampling the Rayleigh wave spectral ratio, one out of all the azimuths was chosen, whose horizontal motion had a high Fourier frequency component coherency with the vertical motions. For the estimation of the underground S-wave velocity structure, parameters (P-wave velocity, S-wave velocity, density, and layer thickness) were determined from the minimum residual sum of squares involving the observed microtremor spectral ratio and the theoretical value calculated by use of a model structure. The known boring data was utilized for the study of the S-wave velocity in the top layer, and it was determined using an S-wave velocity estimation formula for the Morioka area constructed using the N-value, depth, and geological classification. It was found that the optimum S-wave velocity structure even below the top layer well reflects the S-wave velocity obtained by the estimation formula. 5 refs., 6 figs.

  7. Surface rupture and vertical deformation associated with 20 May 2016 M6 Petermann Ranges earthquake, Northern Territory, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Ryan; Clark, Dan; King, Tamarah; Quigley, Mark

    2017-04-01

    Surface-rupturing earthquakes in stable continental regions (SCRs) occur infrequently, though when they occur in heavily populated regions the damage and loss of life can be severe (e.g., 2001 Bhuj earthquake). Quantifying the surface-rupture characteristics of these low-probability events is therefore important, both to improve understanding of the on- and off-fault deformation field near the rupture trace and to provide additional constraints on earthquake magnitude to rupture length and displacement, which are critical inputs for seismic hazard calculations. This investigation focuses on the 24 August 2016 M6.0 Petermann Ranges earthquake, Northern Territory, Australia. We use 0.3-0.5 m high-resolution optical Worldview satellite imagery to map the trace of the surface rupture associated with the earthquake. From our mapping, we are able to trace the rupture over a length of 20 km, trending NW, and exhibiting apparent north-side-up motion. To quantify the magnitude of vertical surface deformation, we use stereo Worldview images processed using NASA Ames Stereo Pipeline software to generate pre- and post-earthquake digital terrain models with a spatial resolution of 1.5 to 2 m. The surface scarp is apparent in much of the post-event digital terrain model. Initial efforts to difference the pre- and post-event digital terrain models yield noisy results, though we detect vertical deformation of 0.2 to 0.6 m over length scales of 100 m to 1 km from the mapped trace of the rupture. Ongoing efforts to remove ramps and perform spatial smoothing will improve our understanding of the extent and pattern of vertical deformation. Additionally, we will compare our results with InSAR and field measurements obtained following the earthquake.

  8. The value of reference ranges for middle cerebral artery peak systolic velocity in the management of rhesus alloimmunized pregnancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrei, Cristian; Vladareanu, Radu

    2012-01-01

    To establish reference ranges for middle cerebral artery peak systolic velocity (MCA PSV) and to certify their value in the management of Rhesus alloimmunized pregnancies. A reference range of MCA PSV with gestation was constructed by studying 342 pregnancies at 25-40 weeks. A comparison was made between the reference ranges produced in our study and those already published. Fetal MCA PSV was also measured in 30 fetuses from Rhesus alloimmunized pregnancies at 25-39 weeks. Last MCA PSV measurement was made within 7 days before measurement of umbilical cord hemoglobin at delivery. MCA PSV and hemoglobin were expressed as multiples of median (MoM). In the normal pregnancies a significant increase in MCA PSV with gestation resulted. The reference ranges for MCA PSV in normal pregnancies were similar to those already in use up to 34 weeks. From 35 to 40 weeks, our values were lower. In the Rhesus alloimmunized pregnancies, MCA PSV was increased. We found a good correlation between MoM MCA PSV and MoM hemoglobin. Using a threshold of 1.29 for MoM PSV, the sensitivity and specificity of MCA PSV in predicting any degree of anemia (Hb ≤0.84 MoM) were 88.46% and 98.27%. Our reference ranges for MCA PSV can perform well from 25 until 35 weeks of gestation. Based on this, measurement of the MCA PSV in fetuses at risk for anemia provides a reliable, non-invasive clinical test for the prediction of fetal anemia.

  9. Horizontal/vertical differences in range and upper/lower visual field differences in the midpoints of sensory fusion limits of oriented lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grove, Philip M; Ono, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    O'Shea and Crassini (1982, Perception & Psychophysics 32 195-196) demonstrated that fusion persists for vertical lines with an orientation disparity of 8 degrees, but diplopia is experienced in simultaneously presented horizontal lines with the same disparity. They concluded that the neural fusion process fuses larger horizontal disparities than vertical disparities. Kertesz criticised their demonstration because it did not quantify the possible motor component associated with fusing their counter-rotated images. Krekling and Blika argued that the demonstrated anisotropy is due to a disparity bias in the visual system, owing to the temporalward tilt of corresponding vertical meridians. We addressed these criticisms with a novel stimulus and presentation protocol, that rendered compensatory cyclovergence eye movements unlikely and explored a wide range of orientation disparities. We confirmed O'Shea and Crassini's vertical/horizontal anisotropy in orientation fusion limits. In addition, our measurements of vertical lines showed that the distributions of fused responses as a function of orientation disparity in the upper and lower visual fields were shifted relative to each other. Therefore, the distributions of fusible orientation disparities are wider for vertical lines than horizontal lines and are relatively shifted as predicted if the fusional range is centred around the vertical horopter.

  10. Along-Track Geopotential Difference and Deflection of the Vertical from GRACE Range Rate: Use of GEOGRACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GRACE

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We present a theory and numerical algorithm to directly determine the time-varying along-track geopotential difference and deflection of the vertical at the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE satellite altitude. The determination was implemented using the GEOGRACE computer program using the K-band range rate (KBRR of GRACE from the Level-1B (L1B product. The method treated KBRR, GPS-derived orbit of GRACE and an initial geopotential difference as measurements used in the least-squares estimation of the geopotential difference and its formal error constrained by the energy conservation principle. The computational procedure consisted of three steps: data reading and interpolation, data calibration and estimations of the geopotential difference and its error. The formal error allowed removal of KBRR outliers that contaminated the gravity solutions. We used the most recent models to account for the gravity changes from multiple sources. A case study was carried out over India to estimate surface mass anomalies from GEOGRACE-derived geopotential differences. The 10-day mass changes were consistent with those from the MASCON solutions of NASA (correlation coefficient up to 0.88. Using the geopotential difference at satellite altitude avoids the errors caused by downward continuation, enabling the detection of small-scale mass changes.

  11. Wide operation range in-phase coherently coupled vertical cavity surface emitting laser array based on proton implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xun, Meng; Xu, Chen; Deng, Jun; Xie, Yiyang; Jiang, Guoqing; Wang, Jun; Xu, Kun; Chen, Hongda

    2015-05-15

    In-phase coherently coupled vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) hexagonal arrays were fabricated using proton implantation. The near-field profiles, far-field profiles, and emission spectra under different injection currents were tested and analyzed. The arrays can maintain in-phase single mode in a considerably wide current range from 10 mA (I(th)) to 35 mA (3.5×I(th)), exhibiting excellent beam quality. The far-field divergence angle of the in-phase coupled array is 2.5 degrees. Approximately 29% of total power is localized in the central lobe. Compared with square structure arrays, hexagonal arrays can maintain a more stable in-phase mode because of stronger coupling among the elements. The maximum output power of 4.9 mW was obtained under pulse wave condition. The simulation of far-field was carried out to match the in-phase operation test results. The performance enhancement of the array is attainable if the condition of heat dissipation is better. The process procedure of proton implantation is relatively simple and of low cost. It can be used as an alternative to coherently coupled array implementations.

  12. The Effect of the Accelerometer Operating Range on Biomechanical Parameters: Stride Length, Velocity, and Peak Tibial Acceleration during Running

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Mitschke

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have used accelerometers with various operating ranges (ORs when measuring biomechanical parameters. However, it is still unclear whether ORs influence the accuracy of running parameters, and whether the different stiffnesses of footwear midsoles influence this accuracy. The purpose of the present study was to systematically investigate the influence of OR on the accuracy of stride length, running velocity, and on peak tibial acceleration. Twenty-one recreational heel strike runners ran on a 15-m indoor track at self-selected running speeds in three footwear conditions (low to high midsole stiffness. Runners were equipped with an inertial measurement unit (IMU affixed to the heel cup of the right shoe and with a uniaxial accelerometer at the right tibia. Accelerometers (at the tibia and included in the IMU with a high OR of ±70 g were used as the reference and the data were cut at ±32, ±16, and at ±8 g in post-processing, before calculating parameters. The results show that the OR influenced the outcomes of all investigated parameters, which were not influenced by tested footwear conditions. The lower ORs were associated with an underestimation error for all biomechanical parameters, which increased noticeably with a decreasing OR. It can be concluded that accelerometers with a minimum OR of ±32 g should be used to avoid inaccurate measurements.

  13. Stress wave velocity and dynamic modulus of elasticity of yellow-poplar ranging from 100 to 10 percent moisture content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jody D. Gray; Shawn T. Grushecky; James P. Armstrong

    2008-01-01

    Moisture content has a significant impact on mechanical properties of wood. In recent years, stress wave velocity has been used as an in situ and non-destructive method for determining the stiffness of wooden elements. The objective of this study was to determine what effect moisture content has on stress wave velocity and dynamic modulus of elasticity. Results...

  14. Effects of cervical high-velocity low-amplitude techniques on range of motion, strength performance, and cardiovascular outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galindez-Ibarbengoetxea, Xabier; Setuain, Igor; Andersen, Lars L.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cervical high-velocity low-amplitude (HVLA) manipulation technique is among the oldest and most frequently used chiropractic manual therapy, but the physiologic and biomechanics effects were not completely clear. OBJECTIVE: This review aims to describe the effects of cervical HVLA man...... to develop a stronger evidence-based foundation for HVLA manipulation techniques as a treatment for cervical conditions....

  15. Relationship Between the Range of Motion and Isometric Strength of Elbow and Shoulder Joints and Ball Velocity in Women Team Handball Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwesig, René; Hermassi, Souhail; Wagner, Herbert; Fischer, David; Fieseler, Georg; Molitor, Thomas; Delank, Karl-Stefan

    2016-12-01

    Schwesig, R, Hermassi, S, Wagner, H, Fischer, D, Fieseler, G, Molitor, T, and Delank, K-S. Relationship between the range of motion and isometric strength of elbow and shoulder joints and ball velocity in women team handball players. J Strength Cond Res 30(12): 3428-3435, 2016-The aims of this study were to investigate relationships between isometric strength and range of motion (ROM) of shoulder and elbow joints and compare 2 different team handball throwing techniques in women team handball. Twenty highly experienced women team handball players (age: 20.7 ± 2.9 years; body mass: 68.4 ± 6.0 kg; and height: 1.74 ± 0.06 m) participated in this study. The isometric strength (hand-held dynamometer) and ROM (goniometer) of shoulder and elbow joints were measured at the beginning of the preseasonal training. After clinical examination, the subjects performed 3 standing throws with run-up (10 m) and 3 jump throws over a hurdle (0.20 m). The mean ball velocity was calculated from 3 attempts and measured using a radar gun. The results showed that the ball velocity of the standing throw with run-up (vST) was significantly higher than that of the jump throw (vJT) (25.5 ± 1.56 vs. 23.2 ± 1.31 m·s; p handball players.

  16. Laser-optical measurements of the velocities of the plasma jets formed from different gases in a kilojoule-range plasma focus facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polukhin, S. N., E-mail: snpol@lebedev.ru; Dzhamankulov, A. M.; Gurei, A. E.; Nikulin, V. Ya., E-mail: vnik@lebedev.ru; Peregudova, E. N.; Silin, P. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    The velocities of the plasma jets formed from Ne, N{sub 2}, Ar, and Xe gases in plasma focus facilities were determined by means of laser-optical shadowgraphy of the shock waves generated at the jet leading edge. In spite of the almost tenfold ratio between the atomic weights of these gases, the outflow velocities of the plasma jets formed in experiments with these gases differ by less than twice, in the range of (0.7–1.1) × 10{sup 7} cm/s under similar discharge conditions. The energies of the jet ions were found to vary from 0.7 keV for nitrogen to 4 keV for xenon.

  17. Vertically integrated (Ga, In)N nanostructures for future single photon emitters operating in the telecommunication wavelength range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winden, A; Mikulics, M; Grützmacher, D; Hardtdegen, H

    2013-10-11

    Important technological steps are discussed and realized for future room-temperature operation of III-nitride single photon emitters. First, the growth technology of positioned single pyramidal InN nanostructures capped by Mg-doped GaN is presented. The optimization of their optical characteristics towards narrowband emission in the telecommunication wavelength range is demonstrated. In addition, a device concept and technology was developed so that the nanostructures became singularly addressable. It was found that the nanopyramids emit in the telecommunication wavelength range if their size is chosen appropriately. A p-GaN contacting layer was successfully produced as a cap to the InN pyramids and the top p-contact was achievable using an intrinsically conductive polymer PEDOT:PSS, allowing a 25% increase in light transmittance compared to standard Ni/Au contact technology. Single nanopyramids were successfully integrated into a high-frequency device layout. These decisive technology steps provide a promising route to electrically driven and room-temperature operating InN based single photon emitters in the telecommunication wavelength range.

  18. Normal ranges and test-retest reproducibility of flow and velocity parameters in intracranial arteries measured with phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correia de Verdier, Maria; Wikstroem, Johan [Uppsala University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2016-05-15

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate normal ranges and test-retest reproducibility of phase-contrast MRI (PC-MRI)-measured flow and velocity parameters in intracranial arteries. Highest flow (HF), lowest flow (LF), peak systolic velocity (PSV), and end diastolic velocity (EDV) were measured at two dates in the anterior (ACA), middle (MCA), and posterior (PCA) cerebral arteries of 30 healthy volunteers using two-dimensional PC-MRI at 3 T. Least detectable difference (LDD) was calculated. In the left ACA, HF was (mean (range, LDD)) 126 ml/min (36-312, 59 %), LF 61 ml/min (0-156, 101 %), PSV 64 cm/s (32-141, 67 %), and EDV 35 cm/s (18-55, 42 %); in the right ACA, HF was 154 ml/min (42-246, 49 %), LF 77 ml/min (0-156, 131 %), PSV 75 cm/s (26-161, 82 %), and EDV 39 cm/s (7-59, 67 %). In the left MCA, HF was 235 ml/min (126-372, 35 %), LF 116 ml/min (42-186, 48 %), PSV 90 cm/s (55-183, 39 %), and EDV 46 cm/s (20-66, 28 %); in the right MCA, HF was 238 ml/min (162-342, 44 %), LF 120 ml/min (72-216, 48 %), PSV 88 cm/s (55-141, 35 %), and EDV 45 cm/s (26-67, 23 %). In the left PCA, HF was 108 ml/min (42-168, 54 %), LF 53 ml/min (18-108, 64 %), PSV 50 cm/s (24-77, 63 %), and EDV 28 cm/s (14-40, 45 %); in the right PCA, HF was 98 ml/min (30-162, 49 %), LF 49 ml/min (12-84, 55 %), PSV 47 cm/s (27-88, 59 %), and EDV 27 cm/s (16-41, 45 %). PC-MRI-measured flow and velocity parameters in the main intracranial arteries have large normal ranges. Reproducibility is highest in MCA. (orig.)

  19. Vertical GPS ground motion rates in the Euro-Mediterranean region: New evidence of velocity gradients at different spatial scales along the Nubia-Eurasia plate boundary

    OpenAIRE

    Serpelloni, Enrico; Faccenna, Claudio; Spada, Giorgio; DONG Danan; Williams, Simon D.P.

    2013-01-01

    We use 2.5 to 14 years long position time series from >800 continuous Global Positioning System (GPS) stations to study vertical deformation rates in the Euro-Mediterranean region. We estimate and remove common mode errors in position time series using a principal component analysis, obtaining a significant gain in the signal-to-noise ratio of the displacements data. Following the results of a maximum likelihood estimation analysis, which gives a mean spectral index ~ −0.7, we adopt a power l...

  20. Radiometric Correction and 3D Integration of Long-Range Ground-Based Hyperspectral Imagery for Mineral Exploration of Vertical Outcrops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Lorenz

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, ground-based hyperspectral imaging has come to the fore, supporting the arduous task of mapping near-vertical, difficult-to-access geological outcrops. The application of outcrop sensing within a range of one to several hundred metres, including geometric corrections and integration with accurate terrestrial laser scanning models, is already developing rapidly. However, there are few studies dealing with ground-based imaging of distant targets (i.e., in the range of several kilometres such as mountain ridges, cliffs, and pit walls. In particular, the extreme influence of atmospheric effects and topography-induced illumination differences have remained an unmet challenge on the spectral data. These effects cannot be corrected by means of common correction tools for nadir satellite or airborne data. Thus, this article presents an adapted workflow to overcome the challenges of long-range outcrop sensing, including straightforward atmospheric and topographic corrections. Using two datasets with different characteristics, we demonstrate the application of the workflow and highlight the importance of the presented corrections for a reliable geological interpretation. The achieved spectral mapping products are integrated with 3D photogrammetric data to create large-scale now-called “hyperclouds”, i.e., geometrically correct representations of the hyperspectral datacube. The presented workflow opens up a new range of application possibilities of hyperspectral imagery by significantly enlarging the scale of ground-based measurements.

  1. Effects of light-load maximal lifting velocity weight training vs. combined weight training and plyometrics on sprint, vertical jump and strength performance in adult soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Rosell, David; Torres-Torrelo, Julio; Franco-Márquez, Felipe; González-Suárez, José Manuel; González-Badillo, Juan José

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of combined light-load maximal lifting velocity weight training (WT) and plyometric training (PT) with WT alone on strength, jump and sprint performance in semiprofessional soccer players. Experimental, pre-post tests measures. Thirty adult soccer players were randomly assigned into three groups: WT alone (FSG, n=10), WT combined to jump and sprint exercises (COM, n=10) and control group (CG, n=10). WT consisted of full squat with low load (∼45-60% 1RM) and low volume (4-6 repetitions). Training program was performed twice a week for 6 weeks of competitive season in addition to 4 soccer sessions a week. Sprint time in 10 and 20m, jump height (CMJ), estimated one-repetition maximum (1RM est ) and velocity developed against different absolute loads in full squat were measured before and after training period. Both experimental groups showed significant improvements in 1RM est (17.4-13.4%; p<0.001), CMJ (7.1-5.2%; p<0.001), sprint time (3.6-0.7%; p<0.05-0.001) and force-velocity relationships (16.9-6.1%; p<0.05-0.001), whereas no significant gains were found in CG. No significant differences were found between FSG and COM. Despite FSG resulted of greater increases in strength variables than COM, this may not translate into superior improvements in the sport-related performance. In fact, COM showed higher efficacy of transfer of strength gains to sprint ability. Therefore, these findings suggest that a combined WT and PT program could represent a more efficient method for improving activities which involve acceleration, deceleration and jumps compared to WT alone. Copyright © 2017 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. 3D position and velocity vector computations of objects jettisoned from the international space station using close-range photogrammetry approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanyan, Valeri; Oshel, Edward; Adamo, Daniel

    2008-04-01

    Measurement of the jettisoned object departure trajectory and velocity vector in the International Space Station (ISS) reference frame is vitally important for prompt evaluation of the object's imminent orbit. We report on the first successful application of photogrammetric analysis of the ISS imagery for the prompt computation of the jettisoned object's position and velocity vectors. As post-EVA analyses examples, we present the Floating Potential Probe (FPP) and the Russian "Orlan" Space Suit jettisons, as well as the near-real-time (provided in several hours after the separation) computations of the Video Stanchion Support Assembly Flight Support Assembly (VSSA-FSA) and Early Ammonia Servicer (EAS) jettisons during the US astronauts space-walk. Standard close-range photogrammetry analysis was used during this EVA to analyze two on-board camera image sequences down-linked from the ISS. In this approach the ISS camera orientations were computed from known coordinates of several reference points on the ISS hardware. Then the position of the jettisoned object for each time-frame was computed from its image in each frame of the video-clips. In another, "quick-look" approach used in near-real time, orientation of the cameras was computed from their position (from the ISS CAD model) and operational data (pan and tilt) then location of the jettisoned object was calculated only for several frames of the two synchronized movies.

  3. 3D Position and Velocity Vector Computations of Objects Jettisoned from the International Space Station Using Close-Range Photogrammetry Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanyan, Valeri; Oshle, Edward; Adamo, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Measurement of the jettisoned object departure trajectory and velocity vector in the International Space Station (ISS) reference frame is vitally important for prompt evaluation of the object s imminent orbit. We report on the first successful application of photogrammetric analysis of the ISS imagery for the prompt computation of the jettisoned object s position and velocity vectors. As post-EVA analyses examples, we present the Floating Potential Probe (FPP) and the Russian "Orlan" Space Suit jettisons, as well as the near-real-time (provided in several hours after the separation) computations of the Video Stanchion Support Assembly Flight Support Assembly (VSSA-FSA) and Early Ammonia Servicer (EAS) jettisons during the US astronauts space-walk. Standard close-range photogrammetry analysis was used during this EVA to analyze two on-board camera image sequences down-linked from the ISS. In this approach the ISS camera orientations were computed from known coordinates of several reference points on the ISS hardware. Then the position of the jettisoned object for each time-frame was computed from its image in each frame of the video-clips. In another, "quick-look" approach used in near-real time, orientation of the cameras was computed from their position (from the ISS CAD model) and operational data (pan and tilt) then location of the jettisoned object was calculated only for several frames of the two synchronized movies. Keywords: Photogrammetry, International Space Station, jettisons, image analysis.

  4. LARGE-EDDY SIMULATIONS OF A SEPARATION/REATTACHMENT BUBBLE IN A TURBULENT-BOUNDARY-LAYER SUBJECTED TO A PRESCRIBED UPPER-BOUNDARY, VERTICAL-VELOCITY PROFILE

    KAUST Repository

    Cheng, Wan

    2015-06-30

    We describe large-eddy simulations of turbulent boundary-layer flow over a flat plate at high Reynolds number in the presence of an unsteady, three-dimensional flow separation/reattachment bubble. The stretched-vortex subgrid-scale model is used in the main flow domain combined with a wall-model that is a two-dimensional extension of that developed by Chung & Pullin (2009). Flow separation and re-attachment of the incoming boundary layer is induced by prescribing wall-normal velocity distribution on the upper boundary of the flow domain that produces an adverse-favorable stream-wise pressure distribution at the wall. The LES predicts the distribution of mean shear stress along the wall including the interior of the separation bubble. Several properties of the separation/reattachment flow are discussed.

  5. Preliminary inter-model comparison of the Agulhas current with direct range doppler velocity estimates from Envisat's Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR)

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Backeberg, Bjorn C

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available is of great importance. In this paper we compare direct surface velocity estimates from Envisat's Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar with surface velocity fields obtained from two different ocean numerical models. In particular, we focus on the models...

  6. Effects of ankle joint mobilization with movement and weight-bearing exercise on knee strength, ankle range of motion, and gait velocity in patients with stroke: a pilot study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    An, Chang-Man; Won, Jong-Im

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of ankle joint mobilization with movement on knee strength, ankle range of motion, and gait velocity, compared with weight-bearing exercise in stroke patients...

  7. Analysis of altimeter data jointly with seafloor electric data (vertically integrated velocity) and VCTD-yoyo data (detailed profiles of VCTD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarits, Pascal D.; Menvielle, M.; Provost, C.; Filloux, J. H.

    1991-01-01

    We propose simultaneous analyses of the TOPEX/POSEIDON altimetry data, in situ data--mainly permanent seafloor electric recordings--and velocity, conductivity, temperature, density (VCTD)-yoyo data at several stations in areas of scientific interest. We are planning experiments in various areas of low and high energy levels. Several complementary and redundant methods will be used to characterize the ocean circulation and its short- and long-term variability. We shall emphasize long-term measurement using permanent stations. Our major initial objectives with the TOPEX/POSEIDON mission are the Confluence area in the Argentine Basin and the Circumpolar Antarctic Current. An early experiment was carried out in the Confluence zone in 1988 and 1990 (Confluence Principal Investigators, 1990) to prepare for an intensive phase later one. This intensive phase will include new types of instrumentation. Preliminary experiments will be carried out in the Mediterranean Sea (in 1991) and in the North Atlantic Ocean (in 1992, north of the Canary Islands) to test the new instrumentation.

  8. A comparison of low-latitude cloud properties and their response to climate change in three AGCMs sorted into regimes using mid-tropospheric vertical velocity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyant, Matthew C.; Bretherton, Christopher S. [University of Washington, Department of Atmospheric Sciences, Box 351640, Seattle, WA (United States); Bacmeister, Julio T. [Goddard Spaceflight Center, NASA Global Modeling and Assimilation Office, Greenbelt, MD (United States); Kiehl, Jeffrey T. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Held, Isaac M.; Zhao, Ming [NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ (United States); Klein, Stephen A. [NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ (United States); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, The Atmospheric Science Division, Livermore, CA (United States); Soden, Brian J. [NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ (United States); University of Miami, Division of Meteorology and Physical Oceanography, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, Miami, FL (United States)

    2006-08-15

    Low-latitude cloud distributions and cloud responses to climate perturbations are compared in near-current versions of three leading U.S. AGCMs, the NCAR CAM 3.0, the GFDL AM2.12b, and the NASA GMAO NSIPP-2 model. The analysis technique of Bony et al. (Clim Dyn 22:71-86, 2004) is used to sort cloud variables by dynamical regime using the monthly mean pressure velocity {omega} at 500 hPa from 30S to 30N. All models simulate the climatological monthly mean top-of-atmosphere longwave and shortwave cloud radiative forcing (CRF) adequately in all {omega}-regimes. However, they disagree with each other and with ISCCP satellite observations in regime-sorted cloud fraction, condensate amount, and cloud-top height. All models have too little cloud with tops in the middle troposphere and too much thin cirrus in ascent regimes. In subsidence regimes one model simulates cloud condensate to be too near the surface, while another generates condensate over an excessively deep layer of the lower troposphere. Standardized climate perturbation experiments of the three models are also compared, including uniform SST increase, patterned SST increase, and doubled CO{sub 2} over a mixed layer ocean. The regime-sorted cloud and CRF perturbations are very different between models, and show lesser, but still significant, differences between the same model simulating different types of imposed climate perturbation. There is a negative correlation across all general circulation models (GCMs) and climate perturbations between changes in tropical low cloud cover and changes in net CRF, suggesting a dominant role for boundary layer cloud in these changes. For some of the cases presented, upper-level clouds in deep convection regimes are also important, and changes in such regimes can either reinforce or partially cancel the net CRF response from the boundary layer cloud in subsidence regimes. This study highlights the continuing uncertainty in both low and high cloud feedbacks simulated by GCMs

  9. Large-scale vertical velocity, diabatic heating and drying profiles associated with seasonal and diurnal variations of convective systems observed in the GoAmazon2014/5 experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Tang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the characteristics of large-scale vertical velocity, apparent heating source (Q1 and apparent moisture sink (Q2 profiles associated with seasonal and diurnal variations of convective systems observed during the two intensive operational periods (IOPs that were conducted from 15 February to 26 March 2014 (wet season and from 1 September to 10 October 2014 (dry season near Manaus, Brazil, during the Green Ocean Amazon (GoAmazon2014/5 experiment. The derived large-scale fields have large diurnal variations according to convective activity in the GoAmazon region and the morning profiles show distinct differences between the dry and wet seasons. In the wet season, propagating convective systems originating far from the GoAmazon region are often seen in the early morning, while in the dry season they are rarely observed. Afternoon convective systems due to solar heating are frequently seen in both seasons. Accordingly, in the morning, there is strong upward motion and associated heating and drying throughout the entire troposphere in the wet season, which is limited to lower levels in the dry season. In the afternoon, both seasons exhibit weak heating and strong moistening in the boundary layer related to the vertical convergence of eddy fluxes. A set of case studies of three typical types of convective systems occurring in Amazonia – i.e., locally occurring systems, coastal-occurring systems and basin-occurring systems – is also conducted to investigate the variability of the large-scale environment with different types of convective systems.

  10. Large-scale vertical velocity, diabatic heating and drying profiles associated with seasonal and diurnal variations of convective systems observed in the GoAmazon2014/5 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Shuaiqi; Xie, Shaocheng; Zhang, Yunyan; Zhang, Minghua; Schumacher, Courtney; Upton, Hannah; Jensen, Michael P.; Johnson, Karen L.; Wang, Meng; Ahlgrimm, Maike; Feng, Zhe; Minnis, Patrick; Thieman, Mandana

    2016-01-01

    This study describes the characteristics of large-scale vertical velocity, apparent heating source (Q1) and apparent moisture sink (Q2) profiles associated with seasonal and diurnal variations of convective systems observed during the two intensive operational periods (IOPs) that were conducted from 15 February to 26 March 2014 (wet season) and from 1 September to 10 October 2014 (dry season) near Manaus, Brazil, during the Green Ocean Amazon (GoAmazon2014/5) experiment. The derived large-scale fields have large diurnal variations according to convective activity in the GoAmazon region and the morning profiles show distinct differences between the dry and wet seasons. In the wet season, propagating convective systems originating far from the GoAmazon region are often seen in the early morning, while in the dry season they are rarely observed. Afternoon convective systems due to solar heating are frequently seen in both seasons. Accordingly, in the morning, there is strong upward motion and associated heating and drying throughout the entire troposphere in the wet season, which is limited to lower levels in the dry season. In the afternoon, both seasons exhibit weak heating and strong moistening in the boundary layer related to the vertical convergence of eddy fluxes. A set of case studies of three typical types of convective systems occurring in Amazonia – i.e., locally occurring systems, coastal-occurring systems and basin-occurring systems – is also conducted to investigate the variability of the large-scale environment with different types of convective systems.

  11. Spatially Explicit Regions Of Peak Velocity Are Highly Differentiated At Different Discharges Ranging from 0.2 to 20 Times Bankfull In A Dynamic Gravel/Cobble Bed River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, M.; Depsky, N. J.; Wyrick, J. R.; Pasternack, G. B.

    2012-12-01

    Previous studies have identified velocity and Shield stress reversals as key mechanisms that maintain riffle-pool morphology. However, those studies have 4 primary limitations: (1) generally small stream size, (2) narrow range of discharge rarely above bankfull, (3) few analyzed cross-sections, and (4) simple binary characterization of channel morphology as riffle or pool. The goal of this study was to develop and assess spatially explicit indicators of velocity reversal and relate them to landform attributes. The four test variables were (1) mean and maximum velocity with increasing discharge for diverse sub-width morphological units (MUs), (2) percent overlap of peak velocity areas (i.e. spatial persistence) between different discharges, (3) distribution of area of peak velocity among MUs with increasing discharge, and (4) percent of total areas of individual MUs that occurs within peak velocity regions with increasing discharge. The testbed for this study was the Lower Yuba River (LYR), a regulated gravel-cobble bed river with an active floodplain that provides anadromous salmonid habitat. Hydraulics were predicted with a validated 2D hydraulic model over 35 km at 1 m resolution for discharges ranging from 0.2-20 times bankfull. Fluvial landforms were classified into 8 reaches, 4 inundation zones, and 31 MUs. This study compared results for a wide meandering reach and a narrow valley-confined reach. At low discharge, high velocities in the wide alluvial reach occurred due to flow constriction imposed by in-channel bars, but with increasing discharge these regions of high velocity shifted to meander bends where vortex flow dominates. The narrower reach exhibited a similar spatial occurrence of the highest velocities at low discharge due to in-channel bars, but upon inundation of these features the valley walls and bedrock outcrops activated as hydraulic controls. In contrast to small streams, these controls activate at flows much greater than bankfull discharge

  12. Vertical shaft windmill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grana, D. C.; Inge, S. V., Jr. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A vertical shaft has several equally spaced blades mounted. Each blade consists of an inboard section and an outboard section skew hinged to the inboard section. The inboard sections automatically adjust their positions with respect to the fixed inboard sections with changes in velocity of the wind. This windmill design automatically governs the maximum rotational speed of shaft.

  13. Subcooled boiling heat transfer in a short vertical SUS304-tube at liquid Reynolds number range 5.19 x 10{sup 4} to 7.43 x 10{sup 5}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hata, Koichi, E-mail: hata@iae.kyoto-u.ac.j [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto Univ., Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Masuzaki, Suguru, E-mail: masuzaki@LHD.nifs.ac.j [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan)

    2009-12-15

    The subcooled boiling heat transfer and the steady-state critical heat fluxes (CHFs) in a short vertical SUS304-tube for the flow velocities (u = 17.28-40.20 m/s), the inlet liquid temperatures (T{sub in} = 293.30-362.49 K), the inlet pressures (P{sub in} = 842.90-1467.93 kPa) and the exponentially increasing heat input (Q = Q{sub 0} exp(t/tau), tau = 8.5 s) are systematically measured by the experimental water loop comprised of a multistage canned-type circulation pump with high pump head. The SUS304 test tubes of inner diameters (d = 3 and 6 mm), heated lengths (L = 33 and 59.5 mm), effective lengths (L{sub eff} = 23.3 and 49.1 mm), L/d (=11 and 9.92), L{sub eff}/d (=7.77 and 8.18), and wall thickness (delta = 0.5 mm) with average surface roughness (Ra = 3.18 mum) are used in this work. The inner surface temperature and the heat flux from non-boiling to CHF are clarified. The subcooled boiling heat transfer for SUS304 test tube is compared with our Platinum test tube data and the values calculated by other workers' correlations for the subcooled boiling heat transfer. The influence of flow velocity on the subcooled boiling heat transfer and the CHF is investigated into details and the widely and precisely predictable correlation of the subcooled boiling heat transfer for turbulent flow of water in a short vertical SUS304-tube is given based on the experimental data. The correlation can describe the subcooled boiling heat transfer obtained in this work within 15% difference. Nucleate boiling surface superheats for the SUS304 test tube become very high. Those at the high flow velocity are close to the lower limit of Heterogeneous Spontaneous Nucleation Temperature. The dominant mechanisms of the flow boiling CHF in a short vertical SUS304-tube are discussed.

  14. Constraining fault interpretation through tomographic velocity gradients: application to northern Cascadia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Ramachandran

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Spatial gradients of tomographic velocities are seldom used in interpretation of subsurface fault structures. This study shows that spatial velocity gradients can be used effectively in identifying subsurface discontinuities in the horizontal and vertical directions. Three-dimensional velocity models constructed through tomographic inversion of active source and/or earthquake traveltime data are generally built from an initial 1-D velocity model that varies only with depth. Regularized tomographic inversion algorithms impose constraints on the roughness of the model that help to stabilize the inversion process. Final velocity models obtained from regularized tomographic inversions have smooth three-dimensional structures that are required by the data. Final velocity models are usually analyzed and interpreted either as a perturbation velocity model or as an absolute velocity model. Compared to perturbation velocity model, absolute velocity models have an advantage of providing constraints on lithology. Both velocity models lack the ability to provide sharp constraints on subsurface faults. An interpretational approach utilizing spatial velocity gradients applied to northern Cascadia shows that subsurface faults that are not clearly interpretable from velocity model plots can be identified by sharp contrasts in velocity gradient plots. This interpretation resulted in inferring the locations of the Tacoma, Seattle, Southern Whidbey Island, and Darrington Devil's Mountain faults much more clearly. The Coast Range Boundary fault, previously hypothesized on the basis of sedimentological and tectonic observations, is inferred clearly from the gradient plots. Many of the fault locations imaged from gradient data correlate with earthquake hypocenters, indicating their seismogenic nature.

  15. Experimental analysis of turbulence effect in settling velocity of suspended sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Salinas–Tapia

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Settling velocities of sediment particles for different size ranges were measured in this work using PIV with the help of discriminatory filters. An experimental channel 10x15 cm cross section was used in order to obtain two set of turbulent characteristics corresponding with two different flow rates. The purpose was to analyze the effect of turbulence on the solids settling velocity. The technique allowed us to measure the individual settling velocity of the particles and the flow velocity field of the fluid. Capture and image analysis was performed with digital cameras (CCD using the software Sharp–provision PIV and the statistical cross correlation technique. Results showed that settling velocity of particles is affected by turbulence which enhances the fluid drag coefficient. Physical explanation of this phenomenon is related with the magnitude of the vertical fluctuating velocity of the fluid. However, more research is needed in order to define settling velocity formulas that takes into account this effect

  16. Numerical calculation of gas and liquid velocities along a vertical flat plate immersed in turbulent tow-phase bubbly flow. Kihoryuchu ni okareta suichoku heiban mawari no ranryu kieki 2 soryu ni kansuru suchi kaiseki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuura, A.; Nakamura, H. (Daido Inst. of Technology, Nagoya (Japan)); Hiraoka, S.; Tada, Y.; Kato, Y. (Nagoya Inst. of Tech. (Japan))

    1993-11-10

    A numerical calculation was made on the bubbly flow using the Prandtl's mixing length theory. The calculation results agreed well with the experimental results in the turbulent flow rather than in the laminar flow. The necessity of discussion on the turbulent flow analysis was clarified. It was elucidated that the experimental results could be explained sufficiently even by the simplest mixing model. The liquid phase velocity vector was aligned on the same direction when the bubbly flow length exceeded 1 cm, and little change took place in the velocity distribution shape. In the analysis of laminar flow, the velocity boundary layer was developed together with tie bubbly flow length, while in the analysis of turbulent flow, such change did not take place. The liquid phase velocity in the vicinity of the inlet had a velocity component which directed to the outside of the wall at the wall side. It was quite different from the analytical result of the laminar flow. The gas phase velocity vector behaved in the similar way to the liquid phase. The velocity direction at the periphery of the velocity distribution in the vicinity of tie inlet was toward the wall surface, and the inlet velocity was rapidly accelerated. 12 refs., 4 figs.

  17. VELOCITY ANISOTROPY IN THE NIGER VDELTTXFSEDIMENTS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: Intrinsic velocity anisotropy, Niger Delta, Thomsen's parameters, vertical i transverse isotropy (VT!) Introduction. In seismology, a layer is anisotropic if seismic waves propagate through it at different velocities in different directions. Sedimentary rocks possess some degree of intrinsic velocity anisotropy (Jones and.

  18. Distribution of muscle fibre conduction velocity for representative samples of motor units in the full recruitment range of the tibialis anterior muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Vecchio, A; Negro, F; Felici, F; Farina, D

    2018-02-01

    Motor units are recruited in an orderly manner according to the size of motor neurones. Moreover, because larger motor neurones innervate fibres with larger diameters than smaller motor neurones, motor units should be recruited orderly according to their conduction velocity (MUCV). Because of technical limitations, these relations have been previously tested either indirectly or in small motor unit samples that revealed weak associations between motor unit recruitment threshold (RT) and MUCV. Here, we analyse the relation between MUCV and RT for large samples of motor units. Ten healthy volunteers completed a series of isometric ankle dorsiflexions at forces up to 70% of the maximum. Multi-channel surface electromyographic signals recorded from the tibialis anterior muscle were decomposed into single motor unit action potentials, from which the corresponding motor unit RT, MUCV and action potential amplitude were estimated. Established relations between muscle fibre diameter and CV were used to estimate the fibre size. Within individual subjects, the distributions of MUCV and fibre diameters were unimodal and did not show distinct populations. MUCV was strongly correlated with RT (mean (SD) R 2  = 0.7 (0.09), P muscle fibre properties for large samples of motor units. The proposed methodology for motor unit analysis has also the potential to open new perspectives in the study of chronic and acute neuromuscular adaptations to ageing, training and pathology. © 2017 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Velocities in Solar Pores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramaniam, K. S.; Keil, S. L.; Smaldone, L. A.

    1996-05-01

    We investigate the three dimensional structure of solar pores and their surroundings using high spatial and spectral resolution data. We present evidence that surface velocities decrease around pores with a corresponding increase in the line-of-sight (LOS) velocities. LOS velocities in pores increase with the strength of the magnetic field. Surface velocities show convergence toward a weak downflow which appear to trace boundaries resembling meso-granular and super granular flows. The observed magnetic fields in the pores appear near these boundaries. We analyze the vertical velocity structure in pores and show that they generally have downflows decreasing exponentially with height, with a scale height of about 90 km. Evidence is also presented for the expanding nature of flux tubes. Finally we describe a phenomenological model for pores. This work was supported by AFOSR Task 2311G3. LAS was partially supported by the Progetto Nazionale Astrofisica e Fisica Cosmica of MURST and Scambi Internazionali of the Universita degli Studi di Napoli Frederico II. National Solar Observatory, NOAO, is operated for the National Science Foundation by AURA, Inc.

  20. Effects of ankle joint mobilization with movement and weight-bearing exercise on knee strength, ankle range of motion, and gait velocity in patients with stroke: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Chang-Man; Won, Jong-Im

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of ankle joint mobilization with movement on knee strength, ankle range of motion, and gait velocity, compared with weight-bearing exercise in stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty subjects with chronic stroke were divided into three groups: MWM (n = 12), WBE (n = 8), and control (n = 10). All groups attended physical therapy sessions 3 times a week for 5 weeks. Subjects in the MWM group performed mobilization with movement exercises, whilst participants in the WBE group performed weight-bearing exercises. Knee peak torque, ankle range of motion, and spatiotemporal gait parameters were evaluated before and after the interventions. [Results] Knee extensor peak torque increased significantly in both MWM and WBE groups. However, only the MWM group showed significant improvement in passive and active ankle range of motion and gait velocity, among the three groups. [Conclusion] Ankle joint mobilization with movement intervention is more effective than simple weight-bearing intervention in improving gait speed in stroke patients with limited ankle motion.

  1. Waves, circulation and vertical dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellor, George

    2013-04-01

    Longuet-Higgins and Stewart (J Fluid Mech 13:481-504, 1962; Deep-Sea Res 11:529-562, 1964) and later Phillips (1977) introduced the problem of waves incident on a beach, from deep to shallow water. From the wave energy equation and the vertically integrated continuity equation, they inferred velocities to be Stokes drift plus a return current so that the vertical integral of the combined velocities was nil. As a consequence, it can be shown that velocities of the order of Stokes drift rendered the advective term in the momentum equation negligible resulting in a simple balance between the horizontal gradients of the vertically integrated elevation and wave radiation stress terms; the latter was first derived by Longuet-Higgins and Stewart. Mellor (J Phys Oceanogr 33:1978-1989, 2003a), noting that vertically integrated continuity and momentum equations were not able to deal with three-dimensional numerical or analytical ocean models, derived a vertically dependent theory of wave-circulation interaction. It has since been partially revised and the revisions are reviewed here. The theory is comprised of the conventional, three-dimensional, continuity and momentum equations plus a vertically distributed, wave radiation stress term. When applied to the problem of waves incident on a beach with essentially zero turbulence momentum mixing, velocities are very large and the simple balance between elevation and radiation stress gradients no longer prevails. However, when turbulence mixing is reinstated, the vertically dependent radiation stresses produce vertical velocity gradients which then produce turbulent mixing; as a consequence, velocities are reduced, but are still larger by an order of magnitude compared to Stokes drift. Nevertheless, the velocity reduction is sufficient so that elevation set-down obtained from a balance between elevation gradient and radiation stress gradients is nearly coincident with that obtained by the aforementioned papers. This paper

  2. Tomographic Inversion for Shear Velocity Beneath the North American Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grand, Stephen P.

    1987-12-01

    A tomographic back projection scheme has been applied to S and SS travel times to invert for shear velocity below the North American plate. The data range in distance from 8° to 80°, and a total of 3923 arrival times were used. First arrivals were measured directly off the seismograms, while the arrival times of later arrivals were found by a waveform correlation technique using synthetic seismograms. The starting model was laterally heterogeneous in the upper 400 km to account for the first-order differences in ray paths already known. The model was divided into blocks with horizontal dimensions of 500 km by 500 km and varying vertical thicknesses. Good resolution was obtained for structure from just below the crust to about 1700 km depth in the mantle. In the upper mantle a high-velocity root was found directly beneath the Canadian shield to about 400 km depth with the Superior province having the highest velocity and deepest root. The east coast of the United States was found to have intermediate velocities from 100 to 350 km depth and the western United States the slowest velocities at these depths. Below 400 km depth the most significant structure found is a slab-shaped high-velocity anomaly from the eastern Carribean to the northern United States. Beneath the Carribean this anomaly is almost vertical and extends from about 700 km to 1700 km depth. Further to the north, the anomaly dips to the east with high velocities at 700 km depth in the central United States and high velocities below 1100 km depth beneath the east coast. The anomaly is about 1% in magnitude. This lower-mantle anomaly may be associated with past subduction of the Farallon plate beneath North America.

  3. Development of an optimal velocity selection method with velocity obstacle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Geuk; Oh, Jun Ho [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    The Velocity obstacle (VO) method is one of the most well-known methods for local path planning, allowing consideration of dynamic obstacles and unexpected obstacles. Typical VO methods separate a velocity map into a collision area and a collision-free area. A robot can avoid collisions by selecting its velocity from within the collision-free area. However, if there are numerous obstacles near a robot, the robot will have very few velocity candidates. In this paper, a method for choosing optimal velocity components using the concept of pass-time and vertical clearance is proposed for the efficient movement of a robot. The pass-time is the time required for a robot to pass by an obstacle. By generating a latticized available velocity map for a robot, each velocity component can be evaluated using a cost function that considers the pass-time and other aspects. From the output of the cost function, even a velocity component that will cause a collision in the future can be chosen as a final velocity if the pass-time is sufficiently long enough.

  4. Orbital velocity

    OpenAIRE

    Modestino, Giuseppina

    2016-01-01

    The trajectory and the orbital velocity are determined for an object moving in a gravitational system, in terms of fundamental and independent variables. In particular, considering a path on equipotential line, the elliptical orbit is naturally traced, verifying evidently the keplerian laws. The case of the planets of the solar system is presented.

  5. Systematic characterization of a 1550 nm microelectromechanical (MEMS)-tunable vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) with 7.92 THz tuning range for terahertz photomixing systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haidar, M. T.; Preu, S.; Cesar, J.; Paul, S.; Hajo, A. S.; Neumeyr, C.; Maune, H.; Küppers, F.

    2018-01-01

    Continuous-wave (CW) terahertz (THz) photomixing requires compact, widely tunable, mode-hop-free driving lasers. We present a single-mode microelectromechanical system (MEMS)-tunable vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) featuring an electrothermal tuning range of 64 nm (7.92 THz) that exceeds the tuning range of commercially available distributed-feedback laser (DFB) diodes (˜4.8 nm) by a factor of about 13. We first review the underlying theory and perform a systematic characterization of the MEMS-VCSEL, with particular focus on the parameters relevant for THz photomixing. These parameters include mode-hop-free CW tuning with a side-mode-suppression-ratio >50 dB, a linewidth as narrow as 46.1 MHz, and wavelength and polarization stability. We conclude with a demonstration of a CW THz photomixing setup by subjecting the MEMS-VCSEL to optical beating with a DFB diode driving commercial photomixers. The achievable THz bandwidth is limited only by the employed photomixers. Once improved photomixers become available, electrothermally actuated MEMS-VCSELs should allow for a tuning range covering almost the whole THz domain with a single system.

  6. GPS Imaging of vertical land motion in California and Nevada: Implications for Sierra Nevada uplift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, William C.; Blewitt, Geoffrey; Kreemer, Corné

    2016-10-01

    We introduce Global Positioning System (GPS) Imaging, a new technique for robust estimation of the vertical velocity field of the Earth's surface, and apply it to the Sierra Nevada Mountain range in the western United States. Starting with vertical position time series from Global Positioning System (GPS) stations, we first estimate vertical velocities using the MIDAS robust trend estimator, which is insensitive to undocumented steps, outliers, seasonality, and heteroscedasticity. Using the Delaunay triangulation of station locations, we then apply a weighted median spatial filter to remove velocity outliers and enhance signals common to multiple stations. Finally, we interpolate the data using weighted median estimation on a grid. The resulting velocity field is temporally and spatially robust and edges in the field remain sharp. Results from data spanning 5-20 years show that the Sierra Nevada is the most rapid and extensive uplift feature in the western United States, rising up to 2 mm/yr along most of the range. The uplift is juxtaposed against domains of subsidence attributable to groundwater withdrawal in California's Central Valley. The uplift boundary is consistently stationary, although uplift is faster over the 2011-2016 period of drought. Uplift patterns are consistent with groundwater extraction and concomitant elastic bedrock uplift, plus slower background tectonic uplift. A discontinuity in the velocity field across the southeastern edge of the Sierra Nevada reveals a contrast in lithospheric strength, suggesting a relationship between late Cenozoic uplift of the southern Sierra Nevada and evolution of the southern Walker Lane.

  7. GPS Imaging of vertical land motion in California and Nevada: Implications for Sierra Nevada uplift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, William C; Blewitt, Geoffrey; Kreemer, Corné

    2016-10-01

    We introduce Global Positioning System (GPS) Imaging, a new technique for robust estimation of the vertical velocity field of the Earth's surface, and apply it to the Sierra Nevada Mountain range in the western United States. Starting with vertical position time series from Global Positioning System (GPS) stations, we first estimate vertical velocities using the MIDAS robust trend estimator, which is insensitive to undocumented steps, outliers, seasonality, and heteroscedasticity. Using the Delaunay triangulation of station locations, we then apply a weighted median spatial filter to remove velocity outliers and enhance signals common to multiple stations. Finally, we interpolate the data using weighted median estimation on a grid. The resulting velocity field is temporally and spatially robust and edges in the field remain sharp. Results from data spanning 5-20 years show that the Sierra Nevada is the most rapid and extensive uplift feature in the western United States, rising up to 2 mm/yr along most of the range. The uplift is juxtaposed against domains of subsidence attributable to groundwater withdrawal in California's Central Valley. The uplift boundary is consistently stationary, although uplift is faster over the 2011-2016 period of drought. Uplift patterns are consistent with groundwater extraction and concomitant elastic bedrock uplift, plus slower background tectonic uplift. A discontinuity in the velocity field across the southeastern edge of the Sierra Nevada reveals a contrast in lithospheric strength, suggesting a relationship between late Cenozoic uplift of the southern Sierra Nevada and evolution of the southern Walker Lane.

  8. Vertical saccades in dyslexic children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiadi, Aimé; Seassau, Magali; Bui-Quoc, Emmanuel; Gerard, Christophe-Loïc; Bucci, Maria Pia

    2014-11-01

    Vertical saccades have never been studied in dyslexic children. We examined vertical visually guided saccades in fifty-six dyslexic children (mean age: 10.5±2.56 years old) and fifty-six age matched non dyslexic children (mean age: 10.3±1.74 years old). Binocular eye movements were recorded using an infrared video-oculography system (mobileEBT®, e(ye)BRAIN). Dyslexic children showed significantly longer latency than the non dyslexic group, also the occurrence of anticipatory and express saccades was more important in dyslexic than in non dyslexic children. The gain and the mean velocity values were significantly smaller in dyslexic than in non dyslexic children. Finally, the up-down asymmetry reported in normal population for the gain and the velocity of vertical saccades was observed in dyslexic children and interestingly, dyslexic children also reported an up-down asymmetry for the mean latency. Taken together all these findings suggested impairment in cortical areas responsible of vertical saccades performance and also at peripheral level of the extra-ocular oblique muscles; moreover, a visuo-attentionnal bias could explain the up-down asymmetry reported for the vertical saccade triggering. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Velocity anisotropy in the Niger Delta sediments derived from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Seismic velocities decrease and increase laterally and vertically, respectively, towards the coast. These variations are attributable to the lateral and vertical changes in the degrees of compaction coastward and reduction in porosity with depth. Three zones of steep, moderate and slow velocity gradients, respectively, have ...

  10. Range and flight time of quadratic resisted projectile motion using the Lambert W function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belgacem, Chokri Hadj

    2014-09-01

    We study projectile motion with air resistance quadratic in speed. An approximation of a low-angle trajectory is considered where the horizontal velocity, v x , is assumed to be much larger than the vertical velocity, v y . The explicit solutions for the range and flight time are expressed in terms of the secondary branch of the Lambert function, {{W}_{-1}}. In addition to their theoretical importance, the results obtained will be of interest to teachers involved in undergraduate physics courses.

  11. Influence of Compression and Stiffness Apparel on Vertical Jump Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wannop, John W; Worobets, Jay T; Madden, Ryan; Stefanyshyn, Darren J

    2016-04-01

    Compression apparel alters both compression of the soft tissues and the hip joint stiffness of athletes. It is not known whether it is the compression elements, the stiffness elements, or some combination that increases performance. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine how systematically increasing upper leg compression and hip joint stiffness independently from one another affects vertical jumping performance. Ten male athletes performed countermovement vertical jumps in 8 concept apparel conditions and 1 control condition (loose fitting shorts). The 8 apparel conditions, 4 that specifically altered the amount of compression exerted on the thigh and 4 that altered the hip joint stiffness by means of elastic thermoplastic polyurethane bands, were tested on 2 separate testing sessions (one testing the compression apparel and the other testing the stiffness apparel). Maximum jump height was measured, while kinematic data of the hip, knee, and ankle joint were recorded with a high-speed camera (480 Hz). Both compression and stiffness apparel can have a positive influence on vertical jumping performance. The increase in jump height for the optimal compression was due to increased hip joint range of motion and a trend of increasing the jump time. Optimal stiffness also increased jump height and had the trend of decreasing the hip joint range of motion and hip joint angular velocity. The exact mechanisms by which apparel interventions alter performance is not clear, but it may be due to alterations to the force-length and force-velocity relationships of muscle.

  12. Vertical air motion retrievals in deep convective clouds using the ARM scanning radar network in Oklahoma during MC3E

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, Kirk W.; Oue, Mariko; Kollias, Pavlos; Giangrande, Scott E.; Collis, Scott M.; Potvin, Corey K.

    2017-08-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Southern Great Plains (SGP) site includes a heterogeneous distributed scanning Doppler radar network suitable for collecting coordinated Doppler velocity measurements in deep convective clouds. The surrounding National Weather Service (NWS) Next Generation Weather Surveillance Radar 1988 Doppler (NEXRAD WSR-88D) further supplements this network. Radar velocity measurements are assimilated in a three-dimensional variational (3DVAR) algorithm that retrieves horizontal and vertical air motions over a large analysis domain (100 km × 100 km) at storm-scale resolutions (250 m). For the first time, direct evaluation of retrieved vertical air velocities with those from collocated 915 MHz radar wind profilers is performed. Mean absolute and root-mean-square differences between the two sources are of the order of 1 and 2 m s-1, respectively, and time-height correlations are of the order of 0.5. An empirical sensitivity analysis is done to determine a range of 3DVAR constraint weights that adequately satisfy the velocity observations and anelastic mass continuity. It is shown that the vertical velocity spread over this range is of the order of 1 m s-1. The 3DVAR retrievals are also compared to those obtained from an iterative upwards integration technique. The results suggest that the 3DVAR technique provides a robust, stable solution for cases in which integration techniques have difficulty satisfying velocity observations and mass continuity simultaneously.

  13. Premixed flame propagation in vertical tubes

    CERN Document Server

    Kazakov, Kirill A

    2015-01-01

    Analytical treatment of premixed flame propagation in vertical tubes with smooth walls is given. Using the on-shell flame description, equations describing quasi-steady flame with a small but finite front thickness are obtained and solved numerically. It is found that near the limits of inflammability, solutions describing upward flame propagation come in pairs having close propagation speeds, and that the effect of gravity is to reverse the burnt gas velocity profile generated by the flame. On the basis of these results, a theory of partial flame propagation driven by the gravitational field is developed. A complete explanation is given of the intricate observed behavior of limit flames, including dependence of the inflammability range on the size of the combustion domain, the large distances of partial flame propagation, and the progression of flame extinction. The role of the finite front-thickness effects is discussed in detail. Also, various mechanisms governing flame acceleration in smooth tubes are ide...

  14. PREDICTING THE INTRA-CYCLIC VARIATION OF THE VELOCITY OF THE CENTRE OF MASS FROM SEGMENTAL VELOCITIES IN BUTTERFLY STROKE: A PILOT STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joao P. Vilas-Boas

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to analyze the relationship between the intra-cycle variation of the horizontal velocity of displacement of the center of mass (dV, the hand's and feet's velocity, as well as, to identify the variables that most predict the dV's, in butterfly stroke. The study was divided in two parts. The aim of Part I was to investigate the behavior of variables in study at slow swimming velocities and the purpose of Part II was the same but at high swimming velocities. 3 male Portuguese swimmers and 1 female swimmer, of international level were studied in Part I. The swimmers were submitted to an incremental set of 200 m butterfly swims. In the Part II, 7 Portuguese male swimmers of national and international level were studied. Each swimmer performed two maximal 25 m butterfly swims. Both protocols were recorded from four different plans, allowing a 3D analysis. It was calculated the dV, the 3D components (Vx, Vy, Vz of the hand's velocity and the 2D components (Vx, Vy of the feet's velocity. Several variables presented significant correlation coefficients with dV at all selected velocities (high velocity ranged from r = 0.58 for Vx-out to r = 0.82 for Vy-1dwn; slow velocity ranged from r = -0.45 for Vx-1dwn to r=0.73 for Vx-ups; overall velocity ranged from r= 0.34 for Vz-ent to r = 0.82 for Vx-ins. It was also computed a regression model to predict dV. For high velocity (up to 1.75 ± 0.09 m.s-1, the variables that best predict dV were Vy during the first downbeat, Vx and Vy during the arm's insweep (r2 = 0.93. At slow velocity (up to 1.48 m.s-1, the variables included in the forward step-by-step regression model were Vx during upsweep, Vy and Vx during insweep (r2 = 0.69. For overall velocity, the variables that most fit the regression model were Vx during upsweep, Vy during second downbeat and Vz during entry (r2= 0.94. In order to reduce dV, butterfliers should increase hand's velocity in all orthogonal components at the

  15. Report on study of accelerating structures for muons in the velocity range of β=v/c=0.08-0.3 for J-PARC (g-2)/EDM experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurennoy, Sergey S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-01-04

    We explored three types of structures for muon acceleration in the beam velocity range β = 0.08-0.3. Somewhat surprisingly, the venerable DTL looks like the best option based on its low maximal field, reasonable efficiency, and simplicity. It also provides the largest flexibility of the beam focusing options. The accelerating gradient for the DTL is the highest of the considered designs, and can be further increased if needed. The IH-APF structure, the baseline choice, is very attractive due its efficiency and potentially lower fabrication cost. However, detailed EM analysis indicated some reasons for concern, mainly related to the high maximal electric fields. We suggested to change the cavity design to CH type, which leads to a novel type of structure, CH-APF. Dr. M. Otani produced the CST model of CH-APF, and preliminary results of its EM analysis are encouraging. Unfortunately, the fabrication of CH-APF structure is likely more complicated than for IH-APF.

  16. Velocities of Subducted Sediments and Continents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, B. R.; van Keken, P. E.; Abers, G. A.; Seward, G.

    2009-12-01

    The growing capability to measure seismic velocities in subduction zones has led to unusual observations. For example, although most minerals have VP/ VS ratios around 1.77, ratios 1.8 have been observed. Here we explore the velocities of subducted sediments and continental crust from trench to sub-arc depths using two methods. (1) Mineralogy was calculated as a function of P & T for a range of subducted sediment compositions using Perple_X, and rock velocities were calculated using the methodology of Hacker & Abers [2004]. Calculated slab-top temperatures have 3 distinct depth intervals with different dP/dT gradients that are determined by how coupling between the slab and mantle wedge is modeled. These three depth intervals show concomitant changes in VP and VS: velocities initially increase with depth, then decrease beyond the modeled decoupling depth where induced flow in the wedge causes rapid heating, and increase again at depth. Subducted limestones, composed chiefly of aragonite, show monotonic increases in VP/ VS from 1.63 to 1.72. Cherts show large jumps in VP/ VS from 1.55-1.65 to 1.75 associated with the quartz-coesite transition. Terrigenous sediments dominated by quartz and mica show similar, but more-subdued, transitions from ~1.67 to 1.78. Pelagic sediments dominated by mica and clinopyroxene show near-monotonic increases in VP/ VS from 1.74 to 1.80. Subducted continental crust that is too dry to transform to high-pressure minerals has a VP/ VS ratio of 1.68-1.70. (2) Velocity anisotropy calculations were made for the same P-T dependent mineralogies using the Christoffel equation and crystal preferred orientations measured via electron-backscatter diffraction for typical constituent phases. The calculated velocity anisotropies range from 5-30%. For quartz-rich rocks, the calculated velocities show a distinct depth dependence because crystal slip systems and CPOs change with temperature. In such rocks, the fast VP direction varies from slab-normal at

  17. Local Lorentz force and ultrasound Doppler velocimetry in a vertical convection liquid metal flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zürner, Till; Vogt, Tobias; Resagk, Christian; Eckert, Sven; Schumacher, Jörg

    2018-01-01

    We report velocity measurements in a vertical turbulent convection flow cell that is filled with the eutectic liquid metal alloy gallium-indium-tin by the use of local Lorentz force velocimetry (LLFV) and ultrasound Doppler velocimetry. We demonstrate the applicability of LLFV for a thermal convection flow and reproduce a linear dependence of the measured force in the range of micronewtons on the local flow velocity magnitude. Furthermore, the presented experiment is used to explore scaling laws of the global turbulent transport of heat and momentum in this low-Prandtl-number convection flow. Our results are found to be consistent with theoretical predictions and recent direct numerical simulations.

  18. Vertical groundwater flow in Permo-Triassic sediments underlying two cities in the Trent River Basin (UK)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, R. G.; Cronin, A. A.; Trowsdale, S. A.; Baines, O. P.; Barrett, M. H.; Lerner, D. N.

    2003-12-01

    The vertical component of groundwater flow that is responsible for advective penetration of contaminants in sandstone aquifers is poorly understood. This lack of knowledge is of particular concern in urban areas where abstraction disrupts natural groundwater flow regimes and there exists an increased density of contaminant sources. Vertical hydraulic gradients that control vertical groundwater flow were investigated using bundled multilevel piezometers and a double-packer assembly in dedicated boreholes constructed to depths of between 50 and 92 m below ground level in Permo-Triassic sediments underlying two cities within the Trent River Basin of central England (Birmingham, Nottingham). The hydrostratigraphy of the Permo-Triassic sediments, indicated by geophysical logging and hydraulic (packer) testing, demonstrates considerable control over observed vertical hydraulic gradients and, hence, vertical groundwater flow. The direction and magnitude of vertical hydraulic gradients recorded in multilevel piezometers and packers are broadly complementary and range, within error, from +0.1 to -0.7. Groundwater is generally found to flow vertically toward transmissive zones within the hydrostratigraphical profile though urban abstraction from the Sherwood Sandstone aquifer also influences observed vertical hydraulic gradients. Bulk, downward Darcy velocities at two locations affected by abstraction are estimated to be in the order of several metres per year. Consistency in the distribution of hydraulic head with depth in Permo-Triassic sediments is observed over a one-year period and adds support the deduction of hydrostratigraphic control over vertical groundwater flow.

  19. Influence of trial repetition on lameness during force platform gait analysis in a heterogeneous population of clinically lame dogs each trotting at its preferred velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickelson, Megan A; Vo, Thao; Piazza, Alexander M; Volstad, Nicola J; Nemke, Brett W; Muir, Peter

    2017-11-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine variance effects influencing ground reaction forces (GRFs) in a heterogeneous population of lame dogs during trotting. ANIMALS 30 client-owned dogs with thoracic limb lameness and 31 dogs with pelvic limb lameness. PROCEDURES GRFs, velocity, height at the dorsal aspect of the scapulae (ie, withers), and shoulder height were obtained. Each dog was trotted across a force platform at its preferred velocity. Variance effects for 12 velocity and associated relative velocity (V*) ranges were examined. RESULTS Individual dog, velocity, V*, and limb significantly influenced GRFs. Withers height V* ranges were associated with small variance in GRFs, but all absolute and V* ranges were associated with significant effects for all 4 limbs and both types of lameness. Significant changes in lame limb GRFs and velocity in ipsilateral trials in dogs with thoracic limb and pelvic limb lameness were evident with trial repetition. Withers height V* range of 0.55 to 0.93 captured a large proportion of trials (> 90%) in dogs with thoracic limb or pelvic limb lameness, with limited effects on peak vertical force and vertical impulse. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Trial repetition caused alterations to GRFs and subject velocity that may have confounded assessment of lameness, which supported the concept that a priori selection of a velocity or V* range for force platform gait analysis should use a range that captures valid trials efficiently while minimizing GRF variance. These ranges typically would span the preferred velocity of subject dogs, such as withers height V* of 0.55 to 0.93.

  20. Segmental and Kinetic Contributions in Vertical Jumps Performed with and without an Arm Swing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feltner, Michael E.; Bishop, Elijah J.; Perez, Cassandra M.

    2004-01-01

    To determine the contributions of the motions of the body segments to the vertical ground reaction force ([F.sub.z]), the joint torques produced by the leg muscles, and the time course of vertical velocity generation during a vertical jump, 15 men were videotaped performing countermovement vertical jumps from a force plate with and without an arm…

  1. Variance associated with walking velocity during force platform gait analysis of a heterogeneous sample of clinically normal dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Alexander M; Binversie, Emily E; Baker, Lauren A; Nemke, Brett; Sample, Susannah J; Muir, Peter

    2017-04-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine whether walking at specific ranges of absolute and relative (V*) velocity would aid efficient capture of gait trial data with low ground reaction force (GRF) variance in a heterogeneous sample of dogs. ANIMALS 17 clinically normal dogs of various breeds, ages, and sexes. PROCEDURES Each dog was walked across a force platform at its preferred velocity, with controlled acceleration within 0.5 m/s(2). Ranges in V* were created for height at the highest point of the shoulders (withers; WHV*). Variance effects from 8 walking absolute velocity ranges and associated WHV* ranges were examined by means of repeated-measures ANCOVA. RESULTS The individual dog effect provided the greatest contribution to variance. Narrow velocity ranges typically resulted in capture of a smaller percentage of valid trials and were not consistently associated with lower variance. The WHV* range of 0.33 to 0.46 allowed capture of valid trials efficiently, with no significant effects on peak vertical force and vertical impulse. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Dogs with severe lameness may be unable to trot or may have a decline in mobility with gait trial repetition. Gait analysis involving evaluation of individual dogs at their preferred absolute velocity, such that dogs are evaluated at a similar V*, may facilitate efficient capture of valid trials without significant effects on GRF. Use of individual velocity ranges derived from a WHV* range of 0.33 to 0.46 can account for heterogeneity and appears suitable for use in clinical trials involving dogs at a walking gait.

  2. Range of wavelengths possible to estimate phase velocities of surface waves in microtremors; Bido tansaho ni okeru suitei kanona bidochu no hyomenha iso sokudo no hacho han`i

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyakoshi, K.; Okada, H.; Ling, S. [Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan)

    1996-05-01

    To specify the maximum wavelength of the phase velocities that can be estimated by the spatial autocorrelation (SPAC) method or F-K method in microtremor exploration, investigations were conducted using numerical simulation. In view of feasibility, an equilateral triangle array was employed, the maximum radius of the array having 7 observation points being 0.10km. The dispersion curve of the Rayleigh wave basic mode was calculated from an underground structure model. White noise was used as the incident wave, and, in case the waves came in from multiple directions, a different phase spectrum was assigned to each direction. In searching for the maximum wave length of phase velocities that could be estimated, a limit was imposed upon estimation, and it was prescribed that the wavelength be the limit if the difference between the theoretical value and estimated phase velocity was 5% or higher. As the result, it was found that it is possible to estimate the phase velocity when the wavelength is up to approximately 10 times longer than the array maximum radius in the SPAC method, and up to approximately 5 times longer in case of the F-K method. 10 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Vertical saccades in children: a developmental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucci, Maria Pia; Seassau, Magali

    2014-03-01

    There are no studies exploring the development of vertical saccades in large populations of children. In this study, we examined the development of vertical saccades in sixty-nine children. Binocular eye movements were recorded using an infrared video oculography system [Mobile EBT(®), e(ye)BRAIN], and movements from both eyes had been analyzed. The gain and the peak velocity of vertical saccades show an up-down asymmetry. Latency value decreases with the age of children, and it does not depend on the direction of the saccades; in contrast, the gain and the peak velocity values of vertical saccades are stable during childhood. We suggest that the up-down asymmetry is developed early, or is innate, in humans. Latencies of vertical saccades develop with the age of children, in relationship with the development of the cortical network responsible for the saccade preparation. In contrast, the precision and the peak velocity are not age-dependent as they are controlled by the cerebellum and brainstem structures.

  4. Salt Interval Velocities vs Latitude in the Deepwater Gulf of Mexico: Keathley Canyon and Walker Ridge Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelius, S.; Castagna, J. P.

    2016-12-01

    ABSTRACT A well log database of approximately 300 well logs from the Keathley Canyon and Walker Ridge areas of the Gulf of Mexico plus Mad Dog Field and Mission Deep Field in Green Canyon has been created for the purpose of building a geologically based 3D velocity model. While in the process of calibrating the finished velocity model, a scatter plot was made of all salt interval velocities versus latitude and an unexpected correlation was observed. Five different interval velocity zones have been identified with each having certain associated mineralogies within a latitude range. The salt interval velocity in the southern limits of the study area is higher than 15,000 ft/sec (4572 m/sec) due to the presence of gypsum. The northern most wells in the project area have anhydrite present inside the salt matrix such that their interval velocity can be as high as 18,535 ft/sec (5650 m/sec). In the mid-latitude zones, sylvite, siltstone, claystone, shale, tar and bitumen, with small traces of both anhydrite and gypsum, are found within the salt, yielding salt interval velocity variation from 14,388 ft/sec to 14,909 ft/sec (4386 m/sec to 4544 m/sec). The mineralogical content of the salt in each well was roughly estimated from mud logs and the corresponding interval velocities were determined from vertical seismic profiles, checkshot surveys, and sonic logs. Both geothermal gradients and overburden geopressure gradients between the mudline and the true vertical depth at well bottom calculated from this well database do not show the same correlation with latitude as the salt interval velocities. Mineralogical modeling of the salt composition using Hashin-Shtrikman bounds shows that these various inclusions within the salt matrix can be the cause of the observed variations in the salt interval velocities.

  5. Analyses of Current And Wave Forces on Velocity Caps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Erik Damgaard; Buhrkall, Jeppe; Eskesen, Mark C. D.

    2015-01-01

    leads the water into another pipe or tunnel system. A pressure gradient generated by the water level difference between the sea and basin drives the flow through the tunnel system. The tunnel system is often in the order of a couple kilometers long. Based on CFD analyses (computational fluid dynamics......Velocity caps are often used in connection with for instance offshore intake sea water for the use of for cooling water for power plants or as a source for desalinization plants. The intakes can also be used for river intakes. The velocity cap is placed on top of a vertical pipe. The vertical pipe......) this paper investigates the current and wave forces on the velocity cap and the vertical cylinder. The Morison’s force model was used in the analyses of the extracted force time series in from the CFD model. Further the distribution of the inlet velocities around the velocity cap was also analyzed in detail...

  6. Acquired vertical accommodative vergence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein-Scharff, Ulrike; Kommerell, Guntram; Lagrèze, Wolf A

    2008-03-08

    Vertical accommodative vergence is an unusual synkinesis in which vertical vergence is modulated together with accommodation. It results from a supranuclear miswiring of the network normally conveying accommodative convergence. So far, it is unknown whether this condition is congenital or acquired. We identified an otherwise healthy girl who gradually developed vertical accommodative vergence between five to 13 years of age. Change of accommodation by 3 diopters induced a vertical vergence of 10 degrees. This observation proves that the miswiring responsible for vertical accommodative vergence must not necessarily be congenital, but can be acquired. The cause and the mechanism leading to vertical accommodative vergence are yet unknown.

  7. Effects of Isometric Scaling on Vertical Jumping Performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bobbert, M.F.

    2013-01-01

    Jump height, defined as vertical displacement in the airborne phase, depends on vertical takeoff velocity. For centuries, researchers have speculated on how jump height is affected by body size and many have adhered to what has come to be known as Borelli's law, which states that jump height does

  8. Numerical study on small scale vertical axis wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra-Santos, Teresa; Gallegos, Armando; Uzarraga, Cristóbal N.; Rodriguez, Miguel A.

    2016-03-01

    The performance of a Vertical Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT) is numerically analyzed. The set-up is Hdarrieus with three straight blades airfoils NACA attached to a rotating vertical shaft. The wind turbine has solidity equals to the unity operating with wind velocity of 7 m/s. Influence of pitch angle is tested to get design tendencies. 2D, transient, Navier Stokes equations are solved using the code Ansys-Fluent. Conservation equations were solved with a Third-Order MUSCL scheme using SIMPLE to couple pressure and velocity. More than six revolutions must be simulated to get the periodic behavior. Two models of turbulence have been contrasted Realizable k-epsilon and Transition SST concluding the last one show more realistic flow features. Pitch angles of 0º, -6º and -10º have been tested with Tip Speed Ratios ranging from 0.7 and 1.6. The no null pitch angles improve the performance of the wind turbine. Instantaneous and averaged power coefficients as well as detailed flow field around the airfoils are showed.

  9. Numerical study on small scale vertical axis wind turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parra-Santos Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The performance of a Vertical Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT is numerically analyzed. The set-up is Hdarrieus with three straight blades airfoils NACA attached to a rotating vertical shaft. The wind turbine has solidity equals to the unity operating with wind velocity of 7 m/s. Influence of pitch angle is tested to get design tendencies. 2D, transient, Navier Stokes equations are solved using the code Ansys-Fluent. Conservation equations were solved with a Third-Order MUSCL scheme using SIMPLE to couple pressure and velocity. More than six revolutions must be simulated to get the periodic behavior. Two models of turbulence have been contrasted Realizable k-epsilon and Transition SST concluding the last one show more realistic flow features. Pitch angles of 0º, -6º and -10º have been tested with Tip Speed Ratios ranging from 0.7 and 1.6. The no null pitch angles improve the performance of the wind turbine. Instantaneous and averaged power coefficients as well as detailed flow field around the airfoils are showed.

  10. Lateral and vertical thermal diffusivities in a dense fluidized bed with tubes bundle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collantes, M.A.; Martin, G.; Le Gal, J.H. [Institut Francais du Petrole (IFP), 92 - Rueil-Malmaison (France)

    1995-07-01

    Dense fluidized beds are acknowledge as homogeneous systems from both temperature and composition aspects. However, some situation such as very large units or fluidized beds with tubes bundle lead to thermal gradients within the bed. These thermal gradients are due to solids motion limitation and may have detrimental effects on the process. This paper relates investigations aiming an determining lateral and vertical thermal diffusivities in a dense fluidized bed with an without a tubes bundle. These investigations have been carried out with an experimental setup of significant size (bed size = 0.6 x 1.1 x 1.3) and with small particles (less 500 microns) so as to fill some gaps of the literature. Thermal diffusivities have been deduced from temperature gradients measured between a hot wall and a cold wall in a perpendicular fluidized bed and by applying a conventional 2-D conduction model. Lateral thermal conductivities as well as vertical thermal conductivities increase with the gas velocity and the height of the bed, and when the particle size decreases. Immersing a vertical tube bundle into the fluidized bed leads to a significant reduction of the lateral thermal diffusivity, while there is no effect on the vertical thermal diffusivity. Correlations have been drawn from the experimental results. They would have to be applied for calculation of any system running at gas velocity ranging from 0.05 to 0.3 m/s and with particle size between 50 and 300 microns. (authors). 14 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Free Convective Flow of a Reacting Fluid between Vertical Porous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigates free convective flow between vertical porous plates. The energy and momentum equations which arise from the definitions of temperature and velocity are written in dimensionless forms. The resulting second order equations are solved to obtain expressions for the velocity, temperature, mass transfer ...

  12. New GNSS velocity field and preliminary velocity model for Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna-Ludeña, Marco P.; Staller, Alejandra; Gaspar-Escribano, Jorge M.; Belén Benito, M.

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we present a new preliminary velocity model of Ecuador based on the GNSS data of the REGME network (continuous monitoring GNSS network). To date, there is no velocity model available for the country. The only existing model in the zone is the regional model VEMOS2009 for South America and Caribbean (Drewes and Heidbach, 2012). This model was developed from the SIRGAS station positions, the velocities of the SIRGAS-CON stations, and several geodynamics projects performed in the region. Just two continuous GNSS (cGNSS) stations of Ecuador were taking into account in the VEMOS2009 model. The first continuous station of the REGME network was established in 2008. At present, it is composed by 32 continuous GNSS stations, covering the country. All the stations provided data during at least two years. We processed the data of the 32 GNSS stations of REGME for the 2008-2014 period, as well as 20 IGS stations in order to link to the global reference frame IGb08 (ITRF2008). GPS data were processed using Bernese 5.0 software (Dach et al., 2007). We obtained and analyzed the GNSS coordinate time series of the 32 REGME stations and we calculated the GPS-derived horizontal velocity field of the country. Velocities in ITRF2008 were transformed into a South American fixed reference frame, using the Euler pole calculated from 8 cGNSS stations throughout this plate. Our velocity field is consistent with the tectonics of the country and contributes to a better understanding of it. From the horizontal velocity field, we determined a preliminary model using the kriging geostatistical technique. To check the results we use the cross-validation method. The differences between the observed and estimated values range from ± 5 mm. This is a new velocity model obtained from GNSS data for Ecuador.

  13. Vertical axis wind turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivcov, Vladimir [Miass, RU; Krivospitski, Vladimir [Miass, RU; Maksimov, Vasili [Miass, RU; Halstead, Richard [Rohnert Park, CA; Grahov, Jurij [Miass, RU

    2011-03-08

    A vertical axis wind turbine is described. The wind turbine can include a top ring, a middle ring and a lower ring, wherein a plurality of vertical airfoils are disposed between the rings. For example, three vertical airfoils can be attached between the upper ring and the middle ring. In addition, three more vertical airfoils can be attached between the lower ring and the middle ring. When wind contacts the vertically arranged airfoils the rings begin to spin. By connecting the rings to a center pole which spins an alternator, electricity can be generated from wind.

  14. Imaging water velocity and volume fraction distributions in water continuous multiphase flows using inductive flow tomography and electrical resistance tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Yiqing; Lucas, Gary P.

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents the design and implementation of an inductive flow tomography (IFT) system, employing a multi-electrode electromagnetic flow meter (EMFM) and novel reconstruction techniques, for measuring the local water velocity distribution in water continuous single and multiphase flows. A series of experiments were carried out in vertical-upward and upward-inclined single phase water flows and ‘water continuous’ gas-water and oil-gas-water flows in which the velocity profiles ranged from axisymmetric (single phase and vertical-upward multiphase flows) to highly asymmetric (upward-inclined multiphase flows). Using potential difference measurements obtained from the electrode array of the EMFM, local axial velocity distributions of the continuous water phase were reconstructed using two different IFT reconstruction algorithms denoted RT#1, which assumes that the overall water velocity profile comprises the sum of a series of polynomial velocity components, and RT#2, which is similar to RT#1 but which assumes that the zero’th order velocity component may be replaced by an axisymmetric ‘power law’ velocity distribution. During each experiment, measurement of the local water volume fraction distribution was also made using the well-established technique of electrical resistance tomography (ERT). By integrating the product of the local axial water velocity and the local water volume fraction in the cross section an estimate of the water volumetric flow rate was made which was compared with a reference measurement of the water volumetric flow rate. In vertical upward flows RT#2 was found to give rise to water velocity profiles which are consistent with the previous literature although the profiles obtained in the multiphase flows had relatively higher central velocity peaks than was observed for the single phase profiles. This observation was almost certainly a result of the transfer of axial momentum from the less dense dispersed phases to the water

  15. Estimation of seabed shear-wave velocity profiles using shear-wave source data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Hefeng; Nguyen, Thanh-Duong; Duffaut, Kenneth

    2013-07-01

    This paper estimates seabed shear-wave velocity profiles and their uncertainties using interface-wave dispersion curves extracted from data generated by a shear-wave source. The shear-wave source generated a seismic signature over a frequency range between 2 and 60 Hz and was polarized in both in-line and cross-line orientations. Low-frequency Scholte- and Love-waves were recorded. Dispersion curves of the Scholte- and Love-waves for the fundamental mode and higher-order modes are extracted by three time-frequency analysis methods. Both the vertically and horizontally polarized shear-wave velocity profiles in the sediment are estimated by the Scholte- and Love-wave dispersion curves, respectively. A Bayesian approach is utilized for the inversion. Differential evolution, a global search algorithm is applied to estimate the most-probable shear-velocity models. Marginal posterior probability profiles are computed by Metropolis-Hastings sampling. The estimated vertically and horizontally polarized shear-wave velocity profiles fit well with the core and in situ measurements.

  16. On the axis ratio of the stellar velocity ellipsoid in disks of spiral galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kruit, PC; de Grijs, R

    1999-01-01

    The spatial distribution of stars in a disk of a galaxy can be described by a radial scale length and a vertical scale height. The ratio of these two scale parameters contains information on the axis ratio of the velocity ellipsoid, i.e. the ratio of the vertical to radial stellar velocity

  17. Influence of Tennis Racquet Kinematics on Ball Topspin Angular Velocity and Accuracy during the Forehand Groundstroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunku Kwon, Robin Pfister, Ronald L. Hager, Iain Hunter, Matthew K. Seeley

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Forehand groundstroke effectiveness is important for tennis success. Ball topspin angular velocity (TAV and accuracy are important for forehand groundstroke effectiveness, and have been extensively studied, previously; despite previous, quality studies, it was unclear whether certain racquet kinematics relate to ball TAV and shot accuracy during the forehand groundstroke. This study evaluated potential relationships between (1 ball TAV and (2 forehand accuracy, and five measures of racquet kinematics: racquet head impact angle (i.e., closed or open face, horizontal and vertical racquet head velocity before impact, racquet head trajectory (resultant velocity direction, relative to horizontal before impact, and hitting zone length (quasi-linear displacement, immediately before and after impact. Thirteen collegiate-level tennis players hit forehand groundstrokes in a biomechanics laboratory, where racquet kinematics and ball TAV were measured, and on a tennis court, to assess accuracy. Correlational statistics were used to evaluate potential relationships between racquet kinematics, and ball TAV (mixed model and forehand accuracy (between-subjects model; α = 0.05. We observed an average (1 racquet head impact angle, (2 racquet head trajectory before impact, relative to horizontal, (3 racquet head horizontal velocity before impact, (4 racquet head vertical velocity before impact, and (5 hitting zone length of 80.4 ± 3.6˚, 18.6 ± 4.3˚, 15.4 ± 1.4 m·s-1, 6.6 ± 2.2 m·s-1, and 79.8 ± 8.6 mm, respectively; and an average ball TAV of 969 ± 375 revolutions per minute. Only racquet head impact angle and racquet head vertical velocity, before impact, significantly correlated with ball TAV (p < 0.01. None of the observed racquet kinematics significantly correlated to the measures of forehand accuracy. These results confirmed mechanical logic and indicate that increased ball TAV is associated with a more closed racquet head impact angle (ranging

  18. Geophysical aspects of vertical streamer seismic data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sognnes, Walter

    1998-12-31

    Vertical cable acquisition is performed by deploying a certain number of vertical hydrophone arrays in the water column, and subsequently shooting a source point on top of it. The advantage of this particular geometry is that gives a data set with all azimuths included. Therefore a more complete 3-D velocity model can be derived. In this paper there are presented some results from the Fuji survey in the Gulf of Mexico. Based on these results, improved geometries and review recommendations for future surveys are discussed. 7 figs.

  19. Probability distribution of vertical longitudinal shear fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtl, G. H.

    1972-01-01

    This paper discusses some recent measurements of third and fourth moments of vertical differences (shears) of longitudinal velocity fluctuations obtained in unstable air at the NASA 150 m meteorological tower site at Cape Kennedy, Fla. Each set of measurements consisted of longitudinal velocity fluctuation time histories obtained at the 18, 30, 60, 90, 120 and 150 m levels, so that 15 wind-shear time histories were obtained from each set of measurements. It appears that the distribution function of the longitudinal wind fluctuations at two levels is not bivariate Gaussian. The implications of the results relative to the design and operation of aerospace vehicles are discussed.-

  20. Natural convection air flow in vertical upright-angled triangular cavities under realistic thermal boundary conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sieres Jaime

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an analytical and numerical computation of laminar natural convection in a collection of vertical upright-angled triangular cavities filled with air. The vertical wall is heated with a uniform heat flux; the inclined wall is cooled with a uniform temperature; while the upper horizontal wall is assumed thermally insulated. The defining aperture angle φ is located at the lower vertex between the vertical and inclined walls. The finite element method is implemented to perform the computational analysis of the conservation equations for three aperture angles φ (= 15º, 30º and 45º and height-based modified Rayleigh numbers ranging from a low Ra = 0 (pure conduction to a high 109. Numerical results are reported for the velocity and temperature fields as well as the Nusselt numbers at the heated vertical wall. The numerical computations are also focused on the determination of the value of the maximum or critical temperature along the hot vertical wall and its dependence with the modified Rayleigh number and the aperture angle.

  1. Estimation of vector velocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    Using a pulsed ultrasound field, the two-dimensional velocity vector can be determined with the invention. The method uses a transversally modulated ultrasound field for probing the moving medium under investigation. A modified autocorrelation approach is used in the velocity estimation. The new...... estimator automatically compensates for the axial velocity, when determining the transverse velocity by using fourth order moments rather than second order moments. The estimation is optimized by using a lag different from one in the estimation process, and noise artifacts are reduced by using averaging...... of RF samples. Further, compensation for the axial velocity can be introduced, and the velocity estimation is done at a fixed depth in tissue to reduce spatial velocity dispersion....

  2. Effect of viewing distance on the generation of vertical eye movements during locomotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, S. T.; Hirasaki, E.; Cohen, B.; Raphan, T.

    1999-01-01

    Vertical head and eye coordination was studied as a function of viewing distance during locomotion. Vertical head translation and pitch movements were measured using a video motion analysis system (Optotrak 3020). Vertical eye movements were recorded using a video-based pupil tracker (Iscan). Subjects (five) walked on a linear treadmill at a speed of 1.67 m/s (6 km/h) while viewing a target screen placed at distances ranging from 0.25 to 2.0 m at 0. 25-m intervals. The predominant frequency of vertical head movement was 2 Hz. In accordance with previous studies, there was a small head pitch rotation, which was compensatory for vertical head translation. The magnitude of the vertical head movements and the phase relationship between head translation and pitch were little affected by viewing distance, and tended to orient the naso-occipital axis of the head at a point approximately 1 m in front of the subject (the head fixation distance or HFD). In contrast, eye velocity was significantly affected by viewing distance. When viewing a far (2-m) target, vertical eye velocity was 180 degrees out of phase with head pitch velocity, with a gain of 0. 8. This indicated that the angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (aVOR) was generating the eye movement response. The major finding was that, at a close viewing distance (0.25 m), eye velocity was in phase with head pitch and compensatory for vertical head translation, suggesting that activation of the linear vestibulo-ocular reflex (lVOR) was contributing to the eye movement response. There was also a threefold increase in the magnitude of eye velocity when viewing near targets, which was consistent with the goal of maintaining gaze on target. The required vertical lVOR sensitivity to cancel an unmodified aVOR response and generate the observed eye velocity magnitude for near targets was almost 3 times that previously measured. Supplementary experiments were performed utilizing body-fixed active head pitch rotations at 1 and 2 Hz

  3. Electrostatic Comb-Drive Actuator with High In-Plane Translational Velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yomna M. Eltagoury

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This work reports the design and opto-mechanical characterization of high velocity comb-drive actuators producing in-plane motion and fabricated using the technology of deep reactive ion etching (DRIE of silicon-on-insulator (SOI substrate. The actuators drive vertical mirrors acting on optical beams propagating in-plane with respect to the substrate. The actuator-mirror device is a fabrication on an SOI wafer with 80 μm etching depth, surface roughness of about 15 nm peak to valley and etching verticality that is better than 0.1 degree. The travel range of the actuators is extracted using an optical method based on optical cavity response and accounting for the diffraction effect. One design achieves a travel range of approximately 9.1 µm at a resonance frequency of approximately 26.1 kHz, while the second design achieves about 2 µm at 93.5 kHz. The two specific designs reported achieve peak velocities of about 1.48 and 1.18 m/s, respectively, which is the highest product of the travel range and frequency for an in-plane microelectromechanical system (MEMS motion under atmospheric pressure, to the best of the authors’ knowledge. The first design possesses high spring linearity over its travel range with about 350 ppm change in the resonance frequency, while the second design achieves higher resonance frequency on the expense of linearity. The theoretical predications and the experimental results show good agreement.

  4. Stagnation-Point Flow towards a Stretching Vertical Sheet with Slip Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khairy Zaimi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The effects of partial slip on stagnation-point flow and heat transfer due to a stretching vertical sheet is investigated. Using a similarity transformation, the governing partial differential equations are reduced into a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The resulting equations are solved numerically using a shooting method. The effect of slip and buoyancy parameters on the velocity, temperature, skin friction coefficient and the local Nusselt number are graphically presented and discussed. It is found that dual solutions exist in a certain range of slip and buoyancy parameters. The skin friction coefficient decreases while the Nusselt number increases as the slip parameter increases.

  5. Boundary layer flow adjacent to a permeable vertical plate with constant surface temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najib, Najwa; Bachok, Norfifah; Md Arifin, Norihan

    2013-04-01

    The effects of suction/injection on the laminar boundary layer flow adjacent to a vertical wall with constant surface temperature are considered. The governing partial differential equations are first transformed into ordinary differential equations before being solved numerically by a finite difference method. Results for the skin friction coefficient, local Nusselt number, velocity profiles as well as temperature profiles are presented for different values of the governing parameters. It is found that the solution was unique for the assisting flow, while dual solutions exist for the opposing flow. The results indicate that the range of known dual solutions increases with suction and decreases with injection.

  6. Experimental Study of a Reference Model Vertical-Axis Cross-Flow Turbine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachant, Peter; Wosnik, Martin; Gunawan, Budi; Neary, Vincent S

    The mechanical power, total rotor drag, and near-wake velocity of a 1:6 scale model (1.075 m diameter) of the US Department of Energy's Reference Model vertical-axis cross-flow turbine were measured experimentally in a towing tank, to provide a comprehensive open dataset for validating numerical models. Performance was measured for a range of tip speed ratios and at multiple Reynolds numbers by varying the rotor's angular velocity and tow carriage speed, respectively. A peak power coefficient CP = 0.37 and rotor drag coefficient CD = 0.84 were observed at a tip speed ratio λ0 = 3.1. A regime of weak linear Re-dependence of the power coefficient was observed above a turbine diameter Reynolds number ReD ≈ 106. The effects of support strut drag on turbine performance were investigated by covering the rotor's NACA 0021 struts with cylinders. As expected, this modification drastically reduced the rotor power coefficient. Strut drag losses were also measured for the NACA 0021 and cylindrical configurations with the rotor blades removed. For λ = λ0, wake velocity was measured at 1 m (x/D = 0.93) downstream. Mean velocity, turbulence kinetic energy, and mean kinetic energy transport were compared with results from a high solidity turbine acquired with the same test apparatus. Like the high solidity case, mean vertical advection was calculated to be the largest contributor to near-wake recovery. However, overall, lower levels of streamwise wake recovery were calculated for the RM2 case-a consequence of both the relatively low solidity and tapered blades reducing blade tip vortex shedding-responsible for mean vertical advection-and lower levels of turbulence caused by higher operating tip speed ratio and therefore reduced dynamic stall. Datasets, code for processing and visualization, and a CAD model of the turbine have been made publicly available.

  7. Topographic form of the Coast Ranges of the Cascadia Margin in relation ot coastal uplift rates and plate subduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsey, Harvey M.; Engebretson, David C.; Mitchell, Clifton E.; Ticknor, Robert L.

    1994-01-01

    The Coast Ranges of the Cascadia margin are overriding the subducted Juan de Fuca/Gorda plate. We investigate the extent to which the latitudinal change in attributes related to the subduction process. These attributes include the varibale age of the subducted slab that underlies the Coast Ranges and average vertical crustal velocities of the western margin of the Coast Rnages for two markedly different time periods, the last 45 years and the last 100 kyr. These vertical crustal velocities are computed from the resurveying of highway bech marks and from the present elevation of shore platforms that have been uplifted in the late Quaternary, respectively. Topogarphy of the Coast Ranges is in part a function of the age and bouyancy of the underlying subducted plate. This is evident in the fact that the two highest topographic elements of the Coast Rnages, the Klamath Mountains and the Olympic Mountains, are underlain by youngest subducted oceanic crust. The subducted Blanco Fracture Zone in southernmost Oregon is responsible for an age discontinuity of subducted crust under the Klamath Mountains. The norhtern terminus of hte topographically higher Klamaths is offset to the north relative to the position of the underlying Blanco Fracture Zone, teh offset being in the direction of migration of the farcture zone, as dictated by relative plate motions. Vertical crustal velocities at the coast, derived from becnh mark surveys, are as much as an order of magnitude greater than vertical crustal velocities derived from uplifted shore platforms. This uplift rate discrepancy indicates that strain is accumulating on the plate margin, to be released during the next interplate earthquake. In a latitudinal sense, average Coast Rnage topography is relatively high where bench mark-derived, short-term vertical crustal velocities are highest. Becuase the shore platform vertical crustal velocities reflect longer-term, premanent uplift, we infer that a small percentage of the

  8. Intuitive Mechanics: Inferences of Vertical Projectile Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milana Damjenić

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Our intuitive knowledge of physics mechanics, i.e. knowledge defined through personal experience about velocity, acceleration, motion causes, etc., is often wrong. This research examined whether similar misconceptions occur systematically in the case of vertical projectiles launched upwards. The first experiment examined inferences of velocity and acceleration of the ball moving vertically upwards, while the second experiment examined whether the mass of the thrown ball and force of the throw have an impact on the inference. The results showed that more than three quarters of the participants wrongly assumed that maximum velocity and peak acceleration did not occur at the initial launch of the projectile. There was no effect of object mass or effect of the force of the throw on the inference relating to the velocity and acceleration of the ball. The results exceed the explanatory reach of the impetus theory, most commonly used to explain the naive understanding of the mechanics of object motion. This research supports that the actions on objects approach and the property transmission heuristics may more aptly explain the dissidence between perceived and actual implications in projectile motion.

  9. An experimental study of naturally driven heated air flow in a vertical pipe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahimi, Mostafa; Bayat, Mohammad Mehdi [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Mohaghegh Ardabili, Ardabil (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-01-15

    Specifications of warm air flow within a vertical pipe which is induced by the buoyancy effect were investigated in this study. Air from surroundings was directed into a heating chamber connected to a vertical pipe to establish a flow within the pipe. The temperature and the velocity were measured at different points within the stable flow and the mean values of these parameters were computed. Mass flow rate of air was evaluated using ideal gas assumption. In order to investigate the effect of the thermal boundary condition of the pipe, two tests were conducted; once for the pipe exposed to the surroundings and then for the pipe with a thermal insulation. A model for predicting the induced flow rate of warm air was developed and the predictions of the model were compared with the experimental data over the tested range of the parameters. (author)

  10. An Experimental Investigation of Passive Variable-Pitch Vertical-Axis Ocean Current Turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ridho Hantoro

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Vertical-axis hydrokinetic turbines with fixed pitch blades typically suffer from poor starting torque, low efficiency and shaking due to large fluctuations in both radial and tangential force with azimuth angle. Maximizing the turbine power output can be achieved only if the mechanism of generation of the hydrodynamic force on the blades is clearly identified and tools to design high-performance rotors are developed. This paper describes an initial experimental investigation to understand more of the performance on vertical-axis turbine related to the effect of fixed-pitch and passive variable-pitch application using airfoil NACA 0018. Comparative analysis according to aspects of rotation and tip speed ratios was discussed. Information regarding the changes of foil position in passive variable-pitch during rotation at a limited range of flow velocity variations test was obtained and analyzed.

  11. High-Velocity Clouds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wakker, Bart P.; Woerden, Hugo van; Oswalt, Terry D.; Gilmore, Gerard

    2013-01-01

    The high-velocity clouds (HVCs) are gaseous objects that do not partake in differential galactic rotation, but instead have anomalous velocities. They trace energetic processes on the interface between the interstellar material in the Galactic disk and intergalactic space. Three different processes

  12. Vertical atlantoaxial dislocation

    OpenAIRE

    Ramaré, S.; Lazennec, J. Y.; Camelot, C.; Saillant, G.; Hansen, S.; Trabelsi, R.

    1999-01-01

    An unusual case of vertical atlantoaxial dislocation without medulla oblongata or spinal cord injury is reported. The pathogenic process suggested occipito-axial dislocation. The case was treated surgically with excellent results on mobility and pain.

  13. Coordination in vertical jumping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bobbert, Maarten F.; van Ingen Schenau, Gerrit Jan

    1988-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate for vertical jumping the relationships between muscle actions, movement pattern and jumping achievement. Ten skilled jumpers performed jumps with preparatory countermovement. Ground reaction forces and cinematographic data were recorded. In addition,

  14. Hybrid vertical cavity laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chung, Il-Sug; Mørk, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    A new hybrid vertical cavity laser structure for silicon photonics is suggested and numerically investigated. It incorporates a silicon subwavelength grating as a mirror and a lateral output coupler to a silicon ridge waveguide.......A new hybrid vertical cavity laser structure for silicon photonics is suggested and numerically investigated. It incorporates a silicon subwavelength grating as a mirror and a lateral output coupler to a silicon ridge waveguide....

  15. Composition of vertical gardens

    OpenAIRE

    Sandeva, Vaska; Despot, Katerina

    2013-01-01

    Vertical gardens are fully functional gardens in areas where there is less oxygen and space, ideal for residential and urban cities where there is no vegetation; occupy a special place in interiors furniture. The gardens occupy an important aesthetic problem. Aesthetic task in vertical gardens can be achieved by forming sectors of identification in the urban landscape through the choice of a particular plant spatial composition and composition, to create comfort and representation in commu...

  16. Eccentricity samples: Implications on the potential and the velocity distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cubarsi R.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Planar and vertical epicycle frequencies and local angular velocity are related to the derivatives up to the second order of the local potential and can be used to test the shape of the potential from stellar disc samples. These samples show a more complex velocity distribution than halo stars and should provide a more realistic test. We assume an axisymmetric potential allowing a mixture of independent ellipsoidal velocity distributions, of separable or Staeckel form in cylindrical or spherical coordinates. We prove that values of local constants are not consistent with a potential separable in addition in cylindrical coordinates and with a spherically symmetric potential. The simplest potential that fits the local constants is used to show that the harmonical and non-harmonical terms of the potential are equally important. The same analysis is used to estimate the local constants. Two families of nested subsamples selected for decreasing planar and vertical eccentricities are used to borne out the relation between the mean squared planar and vertical eccentricities and the velocity dispersions of the subsamples. According to the first-order epicycle model, the radial and vertical velocity components provide accurate information on the planar and vertical epicycle frequencies. However, it is impossible to account for the asymmetric drift which introduces a systematic bias in estimation of the third constant. Under a more general model, when the asymmetric drift is taken into account, the rotation velocity dispersions together with their asymmetric drift provide the correct fit for the local angular velocity. The consistency of the results shows that this new method based on the distribution of eccentricities is worth using for kinematic stellar samples. [Project of the Serbian Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Grant no. No 176011: Dynamics and Kinematics of Celestial Bodies and Systems

  17. Eccentricity Samples: Implications on the Potential and the Velocity Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubarsi, R.; Stojanović, M.; Ninković, S.

    2017-06-01

    Planar and vertical epicycle frequencies and local angular velocity are related to the derivatives up to the second order of the local potential and can be used to test the shape of the potential from stellar disc samples. These samples show a more complex velocity distribution than halo stars and should provide a more realistic test. We assume an axisymmetric potential allowing a mixture of independent ellipsoidal velocity distributions, of separable or Staeckel form in cylindrical or spherical coordinates. We prove that values of local constants are not consistent with a potential separable in addition in cylindrical coordinates and with a spherically symmetric potential. The simplest potential that fits the local constants is used to show that the harmonical and non-harmonical terms of the potential are equally important. The same analysis is used to estimate the local constants. Two families of nested subsamples selected for decreasing planar and vertical eccentricities are used to borne out the relation between the mean squared planar and vertical eccentricities and the velocity dispersions of the subsamples. According to the first-order epicycle model, the radial and vertical velocity components provide accurate information on the planar and vertical epicycle frequencies. However, it is impossible to account for the asymmetric drift which introduces a systematic bias in estimation of the third constant. Under a more general model, when the asymmetric drift is taken into account, the rotation velocity dispersions together with their asymmetric drift provide the correct fit for the local angular velocity. The consistency of the results shows that this new method based on the distribution of eccentricities is worth using for kinematic stellar samples.

  18. Analyses of Current And Wave Forces on Velocity Caps

    OpenAIRE

    Christensen, Erik Damgaard; Buhrkall, Jeppe; Eskesen, Mark C. D.; Jensen, Bjarne

    2015-01-01

    Velocity caps are often used in connection with for instance offshore intake sea water for the use of for cooling water for power plants or as a source for desalinization plants. The intakes can also be used for river intakes. The velocity cap is placed on top of a vertical pipe. The vertical pipe leads the water into another pipe or tunnel system. A pressure gradient generated by the water level difference between the sea and basin drives the flow through the tunnel system. The tunnel system...

  19. Computing discharge using the index velocity method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levesque, Victor A.; Oberg, Kevin A.

    2012-01-01

    Application of the index velocity method for computing continuous records of discharge has become increasingly common, especially since the introduction of low-cost acoustic Doppler velocity meters (ADVMs) in 1997. Presently (2011), the index velocity method is being used to compute discharge records for approximately 470 gaging stations operated and maintained by the U.S. Geological Survey. The purpose of this report is to document and describe techniques for computing discharge records using the index velocity method. Computing discharge using the index velocity method differs from the traditional stage-discharge method by separating velocity and area into two ratings—the index velocity rating and the stage-area rating. The outputs from each of these ratings, mean channel velocity (V) and cross-sectional area (A), are then multiplied together to compute a discharge. For the index velocity method, V is a function of such parameters as streamwise velocity, stage, cross-stream velocity, and velocity head, and A is a function of stage and cross-section shape. The index velocity method can be used at locations where stage-discharge methods are used, but it is especially appropriate when more than one specific discharge can be measured for a specific stage. After the ADVM is selected, installed, and configured, the stage-area rating and the index velocity rating must be developed. A standard cross section is identified and surveyed in order to develop the stage-area rating. The standard cross section should be surveyed every year for the first 3 years of operation and thereafter at a lesser frequency, depending on the susceptibility of the cross section to change. Periodic measurements of discharge are used to calibrate and validate the index rating for the range of conditions experienced at the gaging station. Data from discharge measurements, ADVMs, and stage sensors are compiled for index-rating analysis. Index ratings are developed by means of regression

  20. Coding of Velocity Storage in the Vestibular Nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergei B. Yakushin

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Semicircular canal afferents sense angular acceleration and output angular velocity with a short time constant of ≈4.5 s. This output is prolonged by a central integrative network, velocity storage that lengthens the time constants of eye velocity. This mechanism utilizes canal, otolith, and visual (optokinetic information to align the axis of eye velocity toward the spatial vertical when head orientation is off-vertical axis. Previous studies indicated that vestibular-only (VO and vestibular-pause-saccade (VPS neurons located in the medial and superior vestibular nucleus could code all aspects of velocity storage. A recently developed technique enabled prolonged recording while animals were rotated and received optokinetic stimulation about a spatial vertical axis while upright, side-down, prone, and supine. Firing rates of 33 VO and 8 VPS neurons were studied in alert cynomolgus monkeys. Majority VO neurons were closely correlated with the horizontal component of velocity storage in head coordinates, regardless of head orientation in space. Approximately, half of all tested neurons (46% code horizontal component of velocity in head coordinates, while the other half (54% changed their firing rates as the head was oriented relative to the spatial vertical, coding the horizontal component of eye velocity in spatial coordinates. Some VO neurons only coded the cross-coupled pitch or roll components that move the axis of eye rotation toward the spatial vertical. Sixty-five percent of these VO and VPS neurons were more sensitive to rotation in one direction (predominantly contralateral, providing directional orientation for the subset of VO neurons on either side of the brainstem. This indicates that the three-dimensional velocity storage integrator is composed of directional subsets of neurons that are likely to be the bases for the spatial characteristics of velocity storage. Most VPS neurons ceased firing during drowsiness, but the firing

  1. Coding of Velocity Storage in the Vestibular Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakushin, Sergei B.; Raphan, Theodore; Cohen, Bernard

    2017-01-01

    Semicircular canal afferents sense angular acceleration and output angular velocity with a short time constant of ≈4.5 s. This output is prolonged by a central integrative network, velocity storage that lengthens the time constants of eye velocity. This mechanism utilizes canal, otolith, and visual (optokinetic) information to align the axis of eye velocity toward the spatial vertical when head orientation is off-vertical axis. Previous studies indicated that vestibular-only (VO) and vestibular-pause-saccade (VPS) neurons located in the medial and superior vestibular nucleus could code all aspects of velocity storage. A recently developed technique enabled prolonged recording while animals were rotated and received optokinetic stimulation about a spatial vertical axis while upright, side-down, prone, and supine. Firing rates of 33 VO and 8 VPS neurons were studied in alert cynomolgus monkeys. Majority VO neurons were closely correlated with the horizontal component of velocity storage in head coordinates, regardless of head orientation in space. Approximately, half of all tested neurons (46%) code horizontal component of velocity in head coordinates, while the other half (54%) changed their firing rates as the head was oriented relative to the spatial vertical, coding the horizontal component of eye velocity in spatial coordinates. Some VO neurons only coded the cross-coupled pitch or roll components that move the axis of eye rotation toward the spatial vertical. Sixty-five percent of these VO and VPS neurons were more sensitive to rotation in one direction (predominantly contralateral), providing directional orientation for the subset of VO neurons on either side of the brainstem. This indicates that the three-dimensional velocity storage integrator is composed of directional subsets of neurons that are likely to be the bases for the spatial characteristics of velocity storage. Most VPS neurons ceased firing during drowsiness, but the firing rates of VO

  2. Development of Vertical Cable Seismic System (3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakawa, E.; Murakami, F.; Tsukahara, H.; Mizohata, S.; Ishikawa, K.

    2013-12-01

    The VCS (Vertical Cable Seismic) is one of the reflection seismic methods. It uses hydrophone arrays vertically moored from the seafloor to record acoustic waves generated by surface, deep-towed or ocean bottom sources. Analyzing the reflections from the sub-seabed, we could look into the subsurface structure. Because VCS is an efficient high-resolution 3D seismic survey method for a spatially-bounded area, we proposed the method for the hydrothermal deposit survey tool development program that the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) started in 2009. We are now developing a VCS system, including not only data acquisition hardware but data processing and analysis technique. We carried out several VCS surveys combining with surface towed source, deep towed source and ocean bottom source. The water depths of the survey are from 100m up to 2100m. The target of the survey includes not only hydrothermal deposit but oil and gas exploration. Through these experiments, our VCS data acquisition system has been completed. But the data processing techniques are still on the way. One of the most critical issues is the positioning in the water. The uncertainty in the positions of the source and of the hydrophones in water degraded the quality of subsurface image. GPS navigation system are available on sea surface, but in case of deep-towed source or ocean bottom source, the accuracy of shot position with SSBL/USBL is not sufficient for the very high-resolution imaging. We have developed another approach to determine the positions in water using the travel time data from the source to VCS hydrophones. In the data acquisition stage, we estimate the position of VCS location with slant ranging method from the sea surface. The deep-towed source or ocean bottom source is estimated by SSBL/USBL. The water velocity profile is measured by XCTD. After the data acquisition, we pick the first break times of the VCS recorded data. The estimated positions of

  3. Vertical and horizontal transport of mesospheric Na: Implications for the mass influx of cosmic dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Chester S.; Liu, Alan Z.; Guo, Yafang

    2017-09-01

    The mesospheric metal layers are formed by the vaporization of high-speed cosmic dust particles as they enter the Earth's upper atmosphere. We show that the downward fluxes of these metal atoms, induced locally by waves and turbulence, are related in a straightforward way to the meteoric influxes of the metals, their chemical losses and their advective transport by the large-scale vertical and horizontal motions associated with the meridional circulation system. Above the peak of the metal layers where chemical losses and large-scale vertical motions are small, the wave-induced flux is insensitive to changes in local wave activity. If the downward transport velocity increases, because wave activity increases, then in response, the metal densities will decrease to maintain a constant vertical flux. By fitting the theoretical Na flux profile to the annual mean vertical flux profile measured during the night at the Starfire Optical Range, NM, we derive improved estimates for the global influxes of both Na and cosmic dust. The mean Na influx is 22,500±1050 atoms/cm2/s, which equals 389±18 kg/d for the global input of Na vapor. If the Na composition of the dust particles is identical to CI chondritic meteorites (4990 ppm by mass), then the global influx of cosmic dust is 176±38 t/d. If the composition is identical to ordinary chondrites (7680 ppm), the global dust influx is 107±22 t/d.

  4. Wind tunnel investigation of a 14 foot vertical axis windmill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraca, R. J.; Guillotte, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    A full scale wind tunnel investigation was made to determine the performance characteristics of a 14 ft diameter vertical axis windmill. The parameters measured were wind velocity, shaft torque, shaft rotation rate, along with the drag and yawing moment. A velocity survey of the flow field downstream of the windmill was also made. The results of these tests along with some analytically predicted data are presented in the form of generalized data as a function of tip speed ratio.

  5. Antarctic Ice Velocity Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This compilation of recent ice velocity data of the Antarctic ice sheet is intended for use by the polar scientific community. The data are presented in tabular form...

  6. Anisotropic parameter estimation using velocity variation with offset analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herawati, I.; Saladin, M.; Pranowo, W.; Winardhie, S.; Priyono, A. [Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jalan Ganesa 10, Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia)

    2013-09-09

    Seismic anisotropy is defined as velocity dependent upon angle or offset. Knowledge about anisotropy effect on seismic data is important in amplitude analysis, stacking process and time to depth conversion. Due to this anisotropic effect, reflector can not be flattened using single velocity based on hyperbolic moveout equation. Therefore, after normal moveout correction, there will still be residual moveout that relates to velocity information. This research aims to obtain anisotropic parameters, ε and δ, using two proposed methods. The first method is called velocity variation with offset (VVO) which is based on simplification of weak anisotropy equation. In VVO method, velocity at each offset is calculated and plotted to obtain vertical velocity and parameter δ. The second method is inversion method using linear approach where vertical velocity, δ, and ε is estimated simultaneously. Both methods are tested on synthetic models using ray-tracing forward modelling. Results show that δ value can be estimated appropriately using both methods. Meanwhile, inversion based method give better estimation for obtaining ε value. This study shows that estimation on anisotropic parameters rely on the accuracy of normal moveout velocity, residual moveout and offset to angle transformation.

  7. Experimental data on load test and performance parameters of a LENZ type vertical axis wind turbine in open environment condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seralathan Sivamani

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Performance and load testing data of a three bladed two stage LENZ type vertical axis wind turbine from the experiments conducted in an open environment condition at Hindustan Institute of Technology and Science, Chennai (location 23.2167°N, 72.6833°E are presented here. Low-wind velocity ranging from 2 to 11 m/s is available everywhere irrespective of climatic seasons and this data provides the support to the researchers using numerical tool to validate and develop an enhanced Lenz type design. Raw data obtained during the measurements are processed and presented in the form so as to compare with other typical outputs. The data is measured at different wind speeds prevalent in the open field condition ranging from 3 m/s to 9 m/s. Keywords: Vertical axis wind turbine, Lenz type, Performance, Two-stage, Open environment measurement

  8. Transverse spectral velocity estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Jørgen

    2014-11-01

    A transverse oscillation (TO)-based method for calculating the velocity spectrum for fully transverse flow is described. Current methods yield the mean velocity at one position, whereas the new method reveals the transverse velocity spectrum as a function of time at one spatial location. A convex array probe is used along with two different estimators based on the correlation of the received signal. They can estimate the velocity spectrum as a function of time as for ordinary spectrograms, but they also work at a beam-to-flow angle of 90°. The approach is validated using simulations of pulsatile flow using the Womersly-Evans flow model. The relative bias of the mean estimated frequency is 13.6% and the mean relative standard deviation is 14.3% at 90°, where a traditional estimator yields zero velocity. Measurements have been conducted with an experimental scanner and a convex array transducer. A pump generated artificial femoral and carotid artery flow in the phantom. The estimated spectra degrade when the angle is different from 90°, but are usable down to 60° to 70°. Below this angle the traditional spectrum is best and should be used. The conventional approach can automatically be corrected for angles from 0° to 70° to give fully quantitative velocity spectra without operator intervention.

  9. Vertical jump coordination: fatigue effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodacki, André Luiz Felix; Fowler, Neil E; Bennett, Simon J

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the segmental coordination of vertical jumps under fatigue of the knee extensor and flexor muscles. Eleven healthy and active subjects performed maximal vertical jumps with and without fatigue, which was imposed by requesting the subjects to extend/flex their knees continuously in a weight machine, until they could not lift a load corresponding to approximately 50% of their body weight. Knee extensor and flexor isokinetic peak torques were also measured before and after fatigue. Video, ground reaction forces, and electromyographic data were collected simultaneously and used to provide several variables of the jumps. Fatiguing the knee flexor muscles did not reduce the height of the jumps or induce changes in the kinematic, kinetic, and electromyographic profiles. Knee extensor fatigue caused the subjects to adjust several variables of the movement, in which the peak joint angular velocity, peak joint net moment, and power around the knee were reduced and occurred earlier in comparison with the nonfatigued jumps. The electromyographic data analyses indicated that the countermovement jumps were performed similarly, i.e., a single strategy was used, irrespective of which muscle group (extensor or flexors) or the changes imposed on the muscle force-generating characteristics (fatigue or nonfatigue). The subjects executed the movements as if they scaled a robust template motor program, which guided the movement execution in all jump conditions. It was speculated that training programs designed to improve jump height performance should avoid severe fatigue levels, which may cause the subjects to learn and adopt a nonoptimal and nonspecific coordination solution. It was suggested that the neural input used in the fatigued condition did not constitute an optimal solution and may have played a role in decreasing maximal jump height achievement.

  10. Using remotely sensed data to estimate river characteristics including water-surface velocity and discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Jonathan M.; Kinzel, Paul J.; Legleiter, Carl; McDonald, Richard R.; Overstreet, Brandon; Conaway, Jeff

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes a project combining field studies and analyses directed at providing an assessment of the accuracy of remotely sensed methods for determining river characteristics such as velocity and discharge. In particular, we describe a remote sensing method for surface velocities using mid-wave thermal camera videography combined with image analysis. One of the critical problems in this work is determining a method for relating remotely measured water-surface velocities to vertically averaged velocities through a velocity index. We explore three similarity profiles that allow a relationship between surface and vertically averaged velocity to be found either using empirical results or simple roughness-to-depth ratios. To test the approaches we compare them in a situation where vertical structure is known over most of the flow depth through ADCP measurements. By determining best-fit profiles through the ADCP profiles, average values of the velocity index are found for the cross-sections where measurement were made. By comparing these to the predicted velocity indices from the three similarity profiles, we find that, although the differences between the various similarity profiles are substantial, they are smaller than differences associated with local nonuniformity and nonhydrostatic flow. Nevertheless, the velocity indices are accurate to about +/-5%, meaning that remotely sensed vertically averaged velocities can be computed to well within the current accuracy standard for such values when used for river gaging.

  11. Velocity spectrum for the Iranian plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastami, Morteza; Soghrat, M. R.

    2017-09-01

    Peak ground acceleration (PGA) and spectral acceleration values have been proposed in most building codes/guidelines, unlike spectral velocity (SV) and peak ground velocity (PGV). Recent studies have demonstrated the importance of spectral velocity and peak ground velocity in the design of long period structures (e.g., pipelines, tunnels, tanks, and high-rise buildings) and evaluation of seismic vulnerability in underground structures. The current study was undertaken to develop a velocity spectrum and for estimation of PGV. In order to determine these parameters, 398 three-component accelerograms recorded by the Building and Housing Research Center (BHRC) were used. The moment magnitude (Mw) in the selected database was 4.1 to 7.3, and the events occurred after 1977. In the database, the average shear-wave velocity at 0 to 30 m in depth (Vs30) was available for only 217 records; thus, the site class for the remaining was estimated using empirical methods. Because of the importance of the velocity spectrum at low frequencies, the signal-to-noise ratio of 2 was chosen for determination of the low and high frequency to include a wider range of frequency content. This value can produce conservative results. After estimation of the shape of the velocity design spectrum, the PGV was also estimated for the region under study by finding the correlation between PGV and spectral acceleration at the period of 1 s.

  12. High-velocity penetrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundgren, Ronald G.

    This paper summarizes the results of studies, coupled with a series of tests, that investigated rigid-body projectiles (penetrators) at high (up to 5500 ft/sec) velocities. Before these studies, it had been hypothesized that a velocity limit would be reached at which increasing the velocity would not commensurately increase depth of penetration into a target. It was further inferred that a given velocity/ penetration depth curve would avalanche into the hydrodynamic regime; that is, increasing the velocity past a certain point would decrease penetration performance. The test series utilized 1/2-in., 3-in., and 5 1/2-in. diameter, ogive-nose steel projectiles and grout and concrete targets. The tests confirmed that penetration depth increased as striking velocity increased to 4000 ft/sec. However, beyond striking velocities of 4000 ft/sec, asymmetric erosion and indentation of the projectile nose from the aggregate caused the projectile trajectories to deviate severely from the target centerline. These trajectory deviations caused the projectile to exit the side of the target, severely bend, break, or exhibit decreased penetration performance, confirming the hypothesis. Clearly, these results were dependent on the specific material and geometric parameters. The projectiles had 3.0 and 4.25 CRH (Caliber-Radius-Head) nose shapes and were heat-treated to R(sub c) 38-40. The grout targets had a maximum aggregate diameter of 3/16 in. and a nominal unconfined compressive strength of 2.5 ksi. The concrete targets had a maximum aggregate diameter of 3/4 in. and unconfined compressive strength of 5.5 ksi.

  13. What is the velocity profile of debris flows?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Fabian; McArdell, Brian

    2015-04-01

    The distribution of flow velocity within a debris flow is difficult to determine at full scale in the field due to the large forces and inherently destructive nature of the flow. However, knowledge of the distribution of velocity within a flow would be helpful to constrain rheological models and to better understand the internal dynamics of such flows. Here we describe recent efforts to determine the velocity of debris flows as a function of distance from the channel bed. Measurements were made at the Illgraben, Switzerland, which exhibits a wide variety of flows, ranging from turbulent debris floods to flows which resemble laminar mud flows to more classical debris flows with a clear granular front. The Illgraben observation station is therefore an ideal location to investigate debris flow dynamics. Our measurements were made using sensors embedded on a 14 m long, 2.5 m tall steel-reinforced concrete wall constructed flush with the torrent channel walls. The main instrumentation consists of 18 geophones (10 Hz natural frequency) installed on square steel plates with a side length of 0.3 m. Each steel plate is acoustically isolated from the wall and the other plates through the use of elastomer elements. The geophone plates are arranged in six rows of three sensors with a dimension of 1.8 m in the vertical direction and 1.5 m in the horizontal direction (i.e. parallel to the flow direction). A sensorless plate separates each plate in the horizontal direction. The data are collected at 2 kHz using a high-speed (synchronous) capture card in a pc. The elevation of the flow surface is determined at a cross-stream distance 1 m away from the wall, using a laser sensor installed on a bridge above the wall. We present a processing approach for the geophone data with the goal to track particle sliding across the sensor plates. For signals near or above the sensors' natural frequency (10 Hz), the measured time series are poorly correlated between sensors. Therefore, we use a

  14. Shuttlecock Velocity of a Badminton Drop Shot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ampharin Ongvises

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In a badminton ‘drop shot’, the shuttlecock is struck by a non-rotating racquet at low speed. In this investigation, a shuttlecock was hit by a badminton racquet in a linear collision, simulating a drop shot. The collision was recorded with high-speed video and the velocities of the racquet and shuttlecock determined. The relationship between the impact velocity of the racquet and the velocity of the shuttlecock as it leaves the badminton racquet after collision was found to be proportional over the range tested.

  15. Shuttlecock Velocity of a Badminton Drop Shot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ampharin Ongvises

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In a badminton ‘drop shot’, the shuttlecock is struck by a non-rotating racquet at low speed. In this investigation, a shuttlecock was hit by a badminton racquet in a linear collision, simulating a drop shot. The collision was recorded with high-speed video and the velocities of the racquet and shuttlecock determined. The relationship between the impact velocity of the racquet and the velocity of the shuttlecock as it leaves the badminton racquet after collision was found to be proportional over the range tested.

  16. Microtremor exploration for shallow S-wave velocity profiles at stations in local strong motion network in Bursa, Yalova, and Kocaeli in north-western Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özmen, Özgür Tuna; Yamanaka, Hiroaki; Chimoto, Kosuke; Çeken, Ulubey; Alkan, Mehmet Akif; Tekin, Kudret; Ateş, Erkan

    2017-05-01

    We conducted microtremor array surveys for shallow S-wave velocity profiles at 20 sites in Bursa, Yalova and Kocaeli provinces in the north-western part of Turkey to provide fundamental data to assess the seismic hazard in the area. All of the measurement sites were positioned very close to strong motion stations belonging to the Disaster and Emergency Management Presidency of Turkey (AFAD) in order to further understand site amplification factors in strong motion records. Of the 20 study sites, two were located in Yalova, four in Bursa and 14 in Kocaeli. We temporarily installed two small arrays to obtain simultaneous records of vertical microtremors. Then, the spatial autocorrelation method was applied to retrieve Rayleigh wave phase velocity curves in a frequency range from 1 to 30 Hz from the array records. The phase velocities in the western part of the Kocaeli area are low across a wide frequency range, while relatively high phase velocities are found in the eastern part of the Kocaeli province. The phase velocities in the Yalova and Bursa provinces are widely distributed suggesting large variations in soil conditions. The observed phase velocity curve at each site was inverted to a one-dimensional (1D) S-wave velocity profile to a depth of 100 m, using a hybrid heuristic inversion method. All the S-wave velocity profiles in the eastern Kocaeli area are similar; however, the sites in the western Kocaeli and Yalova-Bursa areas have profiles with different features from the others. Finally, we discuss amplification factors for S-waves using the inverted profiles. The dominant fundamental periods of the amplification factors were distributed in a frequency range from 0.7 to 5 Hz. The profiles obtained are also used to map average S-wave velocities in the study area, with an addition of existing data at strong motion stations of the AFAD.

  17. Experimental study of ``laminar'' bubbly flows in a vertical pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashinsky, O. N.; Timkin, L. S.; Cartellier, A.

    1993-09-01

    Measurement of bubbly two-phase flow parameters in a vertical pipe were performed. To keep the pipe Reynolds number below that for single-phase turbulent transition, a water-glycerin solution was used as the test liquid. Local void fraction and liquid velocity profiles along with the wall shear stress were measured by an electrochemical method. Experiments were made with bubbles of two different sizes. As the gas flow rate was increased, a gradual development of the liquid velocity profile from the parabolic Poiseuille flow to a flattened two-phase profile was observed. The evolution of the wall shear stress and of the velocity fluctuations were also quantified.

  18. Diel vertical migrat..

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2002-01-24

    Jan 24, 2002 ... crustacean zooplankton but also in a Wide array of different marine zooplankton groups. (Russell 1927, McLaren 1963). Thus there is no doubt that ..... cooperation during field work and for their fruitful discussion on the draft manuscript. REFERENCES. Bayly lAE 1986 Aspects of diel vertical migration in ...

  19. Vertical market participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrader, Alexander; Martin, Stephen

    1998-01-01

    Firms that operate at both levels of vertically related Cournot oligopolies will purchase some input supplies from independent rivals, even though they can produce the good at a lower cost, driving up input price for nonintegrated firms at the final good level. Foreclosure, which avoids this stra...... this strategic behavior, yields better market performance than Cournot beliefs...

  20. Hunting Voronoi vertices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferrucci, V.; Overmars, Mark; Rao, A.; Vleugels, J.

    1994-01-01

    Given three objects in the plane, a Voronoi vertex is a point that is equidistant simultaneously from each. In this paper, we consider the problem of computing Voronoi vertices for planar objects of xed but possibly unknown shape; we only require the ability to query the closest point on an object

  1. Vertical deformation at western part of Sumatra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Febriyani, Caroline, E-mail: caroline.fanuel@students.itb.ac.id; Prijatna, Kosasih, E-mail: prijatna@gd.itb.ac.id; Meilano, Irwan, E-mail: irwan.meilano@gd.itb.ac.id

    2015-04-24

    This research tries to make advancement in GPS signal processing to estimate the interseismic vertical deformation field at western part of Sumatra Island. The data derived by Continuous Global Positioning System (CGPS) from Badan Informasi Geospasial (BIG) between 2010 and 2012. GPS Analyze at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (GAMIT) software and Global Kalman Filter (GLOBK) software are used to process the GPS signal to estimate the vertical velocities of the CGPS station. In order to minimize noise due to atmospheric delay, Vienna Mapping Function 1 (VMF1) is used as atmospheric parameter model and include daily IONEX file provided by the Center for Orbit Determination in Europe (CODE) as well. It improves GAMIT daily position accuracy up to 0.8 mm. In a second step of processing, the GLOBK is used in order to estimate site positions and velocities in the ITRF08 reference frame. The result shows that the uncertainties of estimated displacement velocity at all CGPS stations are smaller than 1.5 mm/yr. The subsided deformation patterns are seen at the northern and southern part of west Sumatra. The vertical deformation at northern part of west Sumatra indicates postseismic phase associated with the 2010 and 2012 Northern Sumatra earthquakes and also the long-term postseismic associated with the 2004 and 2005 Northern Sumatra earthquakes. The uplifted deformation patterns are seen from Bukit Tinggi to Seblat which indicate a long-term interseismic phase after the 2007 Bengkulu earthquake and 2010 Mentawai earthquake. GANO station shows a subsidence at rate 12.25 mm/yr, indicating the overriding Indo-Australia Plate which is dragged down by the subducting Southeast Asian Plate.

  2. Conventional Point-Velocity Records and Surface Velocity Observations for Estimating High Flow Discharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Corato

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Flow velocity measurements using point-velocity meters are normally obtained by sampling one, two or three velocity points per vertical profile. During high floods their use is inhibited due to the difficulty of sampling in lower portions of the flow area. Nevertheless, the application of standard methods allows estimation of a parameter, α, which depends on the energy slope and the Manning roughness coefficient. During high floods, monitoring of velocity can be accomplished by sampling the maximum velocity, umax, only, which can be used to estimate the mean flow velocity, um, by applying the linear entropy relationship depending on the parameter, M, estimated on the basis of historical observed pairs (um, umax. In this context, this work attempts to analyze if a correlation between α and M holds, so that the monitoring for high flows can be addressed by exploiting information from standard methods. A methodology is proposed to estimate M from α, by coupling the “historical” information derived by standard methods, and “new” information from the measurement of umax surmised at later times. Results from four gauged river sites of different hydraulic and geometric characteristics have shown the robust estimation of M based on α.

  3. Similarity solution for rarefied flow over a vertical stretched surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Kouz, W.; Kiwan, S.; Sari, M.; Alkhalidi, A.

    2017-07-01

    Similarity technique is used to solve for the laminar natural convection heat transfer for rarefied flows over a linearly vertical stretched surface. Such flows have significant importance in many engineering and manufacturing applications. It is found that the flow is affected by flow parameters, namely, velocity slip (K1), temperature jump (K2), and the Prandtl number (Pr).

  4. Comparison of Vertical Ionospheric Drifts Obtained by Different Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouba, D.

    2016-12-01

    Since 2004 the ionospheric observatory in Pruhonice (Czech Republic, 50N, 14.9E) provides regular ionospheric sounding using Digisonde. In addition to classical ionograms the drift velocities in both E and F region using DDA method are measured routinely. However, vertical component of the drift velocity vector can be estimated by several different methods which can be found in the literature; for example the indirect estimation based on the temporal evolution of measured ionospheric characteristics is often used for calculation of the vertical drift component. The vertical velocity is thus estimated according to the change of characteristics scaled from the classical quarter-hour ionograms. In present paper the direct drift measurement is compared with technique based on measuring of the virtual height at fixed frequency from the F-layer trace on ionogram, technique based on variation of h`F and hmF. The ionospheric observatory in Pruhonice is midlatitudinal station and typicaly provides measurements in 15 minutes cadence. Due to the fact that the most papers use different indirect methods use equatorial data, we also focuse on results of equatorial stations and other stations that carry out measurements with higher cadence (5 minutes). Our comparison shows possibility of using different methods for calculating vertical drift velocity and their relationship to the direct measurement used by Digisondes.

  5. Vertical gastroplasty: evolution of vertical banded gastroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, E E; Doherty, C; Cullen, J J; Scott, D; Rodriguez, E M; Maher, J W

    1998-09-01

    The objective of this paper is to summarize the goals, technical requirements, advantages, and potential risks of gastroplasty for treatment of severe obesity. Gastroplasty is preferred to more complex operations, as it preserves normal digestion and absorption and avoids complications that are peculiar to exclusion operations. The medical literature and a 30-year experience at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics (UIHC) provides an overview of vertical banded gastroplasty (VBG) evolution. Preliminary 10-year results with the VBG technique currently used at UIHC are included. At UIHC the VBG is preferred to other gastroplasties because it provides weight control that extends for at least 10 years and the required objective, intraoperative quality control required for a low rate of reoperation. It is recommended that modifications of the operative technique not be attempted until a surgeon has had experience with the standardized operation--and then only under a carefully designed protocol. Realistic goals for surgery and criteria of success influence the choice of operation and the optimum, lifelong risk/benefit ratio. In conclusion, VBG is a safe, long-term effective operation for severe obesity with advantages over complex operations and more restrictive simple operations.

  6. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, P.A.

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  7. Approximation of wave action flux velocity in strongly sheared mean flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banihashemi, Saeideh; Kirby, James T.; Dong, Zhifei

    2017-08-01

    Spectral wave models based on the wave action equation typically use a theoretical framework based on depth uniform current to account for current effects on waves. In the real world, however, currents often have variations over depth. Several recent studies have made use of a depth-weighted current U˜ due to [Skop, R. A., 1987. Approximate dispersion relation for wave-current interactions. J. Waterway, Port, Coastal, and Ocean Eng. 113, 187-195.] or [Kirby, J. T., Chen, T., 1989. Surface waves on vertically sheared flows: approximate dispersion relations. J. Geophys. Res. 94, 1013-1027.] in order to account for the effect of vertical current shear. Use of the depth-weighted velocity, which is a function of wavenumber (or frequency and direction) has been further simplified in recent applications by only utilizing a weighted current based on the spectral peak wavenumber. These applications do not typically take into account the dependence of U˜ on wave number k, as well as erroneously identifying U˜ as the proper choice for current velocity in the wave action equation. Here, we derive a corrected expression for the current component of the group velocity. We demonstrate its consistency using analytic results for a current with constant vorticity, and numerical results for a measured, strongly-sheared current profile obtained in the Columbia River. The effect of choosing a single value for current velocity based on the peak wave frequency is examined, and we suggest an alternate strategy, involving a Taylor series expansion about the peak frequency, which should significantly extend the range of accuracy of current estimates available to the wave model with minimal additional programming and data transfer.

  8. APPLICATION OF A HEURISTIC METHOD FOR THE ESTIMATION OF S-WAVE VELOCITY STRUCTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfaro Castillo Andrés José

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available The assessment of local site effects is one of the most important subjects in Engineering Seismology. In order to perform an assessment, it is necessary to determine the S-wave velocity structure of the site. Additionally, in some basins, it is very important to know the deep sedimentary structure, due to the amplification phenomena of low frequency waves. There are several techniques to achieve this purpose; probably the most inexpensive technique is using the vertical component of microtremors measured with an array of seismographs. The phase velocity of Rayleigh waves is inverted to an S-wave velocity (Vs profile  using optimization techniques. Most of the time, least square methods have been applied in the inversion.Recently, heuristic methods have also been used for the estimation of the S-wave velocity structure from microtremor.In this study seven arrays of microtremors in the city of Tsukuba city were performed, located to the NE edge of Kanto Basin, in order to estimate the deep S-wave velocity structure. The spatial autocorrelationmethod SPAC was used to determine phase velocity dispersion curves in the frequency range from 0.3-2.5 Hz. The determination of Vs profiles reached a depth of 750 m. Two methods were used to estimate the Swavevelocity structure: Inversion method and a heuristic method via the combination of Downhill Simplex Algorithm with a Very Fast Simulated Annealing Method. Comparisons with Vs from the existent resultsfrom PS-logging tests at the center of the array showed the reliability of the heuristic method.

  9. Density - Velocity Relationships in Explosive Volcanic Plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, M. A.; Kobs-Nawotniak, S. E.

    2015-12-01

    Positively buoyant volcanic plumes rise until the bulk density of the plume is equal to the density of the ambient atmosphere. As ambient air mixes with the plume, it lowers the plume bulk density; thus, the plume is diluted enough to reach neutral density in a naturally stratified atmospheric environment. We produced scaled plumes in analogue laboratory experiments by injecting a saline solution with a tracer dye into distilled water, using a high-pressure injection system. We recorded each eruption with a CASIO HD digital camera and used ImageJ's FeatureJ Edge toolbox to identify individual eddies. We used an optical flow software based off the ImageJ toolbox FlowJ to determine the velocities along the edge of each eddy. Eddy densities were calculated by mapping the dye concentration to the RGB digital color value. We overlaid the eddy velocities over the densities in order to track the behavioral relationship between the two variables with regard to plume motion. As an eddy's bulk density decreases, the vertical velocity decreases; this is a result of decreased mass, and therefore momentum, in the eddy. Furthermore as the density rate of change increases, the eddy deceleration increases. Eddies are most dense at their top and least dense at their bottom. The less dense sections of the eddies have lower vertical velocities than the sections of the eddies with the higher densities, relating to the expanding radial size of an eddy as it rises and the preferential ingestion of ambient air at the base of eddies. Thus the mixing rate in volcanic plumes fluctuates not only as a function of height as described by the classic 1D entrainment hypothesis, but also as a function of position in an eddy itself.

  10. Vertical cross-spectral phases in neutral atmospheric flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chougule, Abhijit S.; Mann, Jakob; Kelly, Mark C.

    2012-01-01

    The cross-spectral phases between velocity components at two heights are analyzed from observations at the Hovsore test site and from the field experiments under the Cooperative Atmosphere-Surface Exchange Study in 1999. These phases represent the degree to which turbulence sensed at one height...... leads (or lags) in time the turbulence sensed at the other height. The phase angle of the cross-wind component is observed to be significantly greater than the phase for the along-wind component, which in turn is greater than the phase for the vertical component. The cross-wind and along-wind phases...... increase with stream-wise wavenumber and vertical separation distance, but there is no significant change in the phase angle of vertical velocity, which remains close to zero. The phases are also calculated using a rapid distortion theory model and large-eddy simulation. The results from the models show...

  11. Seismic Velocity Gradients Across the Transition Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escalante, C.; Cammarano, F.; de Koker, N.; Piazzoni, A.; Wang, Y.; Marone, F.; Dalton, C.; Romanowicz, B.

    2006-12-01

    One-D elastic velocity models derived from mineral physics do a notoriously poor job at predicting the velocity gradients in the upper mantle transition zone, as well as some other features of models derived from seismological data. During the 2006 CIDER summer program, we computed Vs and Vp velocity profiles in the upper mantle based on three different mineral physics approaches: two approaches based on the minimization of Gibbs Free Energy (Stixrude and Lithgow-Bertelloni, 2005; Piazzoni et al., 2006) and one obtained by using experimentally determined phase diagrams (Weidner and Wang, 1998). The profiles were compared by assuming a vertical temperature profile and two end-member compositional models, the pyrolite model of Ringwood (1979) and the piclogite model of Anderson and Bass (1984). The predicted seismic profiles, which are significantly different from each other, primarily due to different choices of properties of single minerals and their extrapolation with temperature, are tested against a global dataset of P and S travel times and spheroidal and toroidal normal mode eigenfrequencies. All the models derived using a potential temperature of 1600K predict seismic velocities that are too slow in the upper mantle, suggesting the need to use a colder geotherm. The velocity gradient in the transition zone is somewhat better for piclogite than for pyrolite, possibly indicating the need to increase Ca content. The presence of stagnant slabs in the transition zone is a possible explanation for the need for 1) colder temperature and 2) increased Ca content. Future improvements in seismic profiles obtained from mineral physics will arise from better knowledge of elastic properties of upper mantle constituents and aggregates at high temperature and pressure, a better understanding of differences between thermodynamic models, and possibly the effect of water through and on Q. High resolution seismic constraints on velocity jumps at 400 and 660 km also need to be

  12. The soil moisture velocity equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogden, Fred L.; Allen, Myron B.; Lai, Wencong; Zhu, Jianting; Seo, Mookwon; Douglas, Craig C.; Talbot, Cary A.

    2017-06-01

    Numerical solution of the one-dimensional Richards' equation is the recommended method for coupling groundwater to the atmosphere through the vadose zone in hyperresolution Earth system models, but requires fine spatial discretization, is computationally expensive, and may not converge due to mathematical degeneracy or when sharp wetting fronts occur. We transformed the one-dimensional Richards' equation into a new equation that describes the velocity of moisture content values in an unsaturated soil under the actions of capillarity and gravity. We call this new equation the Soil Moisture Velocity Equation (SMVE). The SMVE consists of two terms: an advection-like term that accounts for gravity and the integrated capillary drive of the wetting front, and a diffusion-like term that describes the flux due to the shape of the wetting front capillarity profile divided by the vertical gradient of the capillary pressure head. The SMVE advection-like term can be converted to a relatively easy to solve ordinary differential equation (ODE) using the method of lines and solved using a finite moisture-content discretization. Comparing against analytical solutions of Richards' equation shows that the SMVE advection-like term is >99% accurate for calculating infiltration fluxes neglecting the diffusion-like term. The ODE solution of the SMVE advection-like term is accurate, computationally efficient and reliable for calculating one-dimensional vadose zone fluxes in Earth system and large-scale coupled models of land-atmosphere interaction. It is also well suited for use in inverse problems such as when repeat remote sensing observations are used to infer soil hydraulic properties or soil moisture.Plain Language SummarySince its original publication in 1922, the so-called Richards' equation has been the only rigorous way to couple groundwater to the land surface through the unsaturated zone that lies between the water table and land surface. The soil moisture distribution and

  13. The Prescribed Velocity Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm

    The- velocity level in a room ventilated by jet ventilation is strongly influenced by the supply conditions. The momentum flow in the supply jets controls the air movement in the room and, therefore, it is very important that the inlet conditions and the numerical method can generate a satisfactory...

  14. Velocity structure of the mantle transition zone beneath the southeastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guohui; Bai, Ling; Zhou, Yuanze; Wang, Xiaoran; Cui, Qinghui

    2017-11-01

    P-wave triplications related to the 410 km discontinuity (the 410) were clearly observed from the vertical component seismograms of three intermediate-depth earthquakes that occurred in the Indo-Burma Subduction Zone (IBSZ) and were recorded by the Chinese Digital Seismic Network (CDSN). By matching the observed P-wave triplications with synthetics through a grid search, we obtained the best-fit models for four azimuthal profiles (I-IV from north to south) to constrain the P-wave velocity structure near the 410 beneath the southeastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau (TP). A ubiquitous low-velocity layer (LVL) resides atop the mantle transition zone (MTZ). The LVL is 25 to 40 km thick, with a P-wave velocity decrement ranging from approximately - 5.3% to - 3.6% related to the standard Earth model IASP91. An abrupt transition in the velocity decrement of the LVL was observed between profiles II and III. We postulate that the mantle structure beneath the southeastern margin of the TP is primarily controlled by the southeastern extrusion of the TP to the north combined with the eastward subduction of the Indian plate to the south, but not affected by the Emeishan mantle plume. We attribute the LVL to the partial melting induced by water and/or other volatiles released from the subducted Indian plate and the stagnant Pacific plate, but not from the upwelling or the remnants of the Emeishan mantle plume. A high-velocity anomaly ranging from approximately 1.0% to 1.5% was also detected at a depth of 542 to 600 km, providing additional evidence for the remnants of the subducted Pacific plate within the MTZ.

  15. DIURNAL VERTICAL MIGRATIONS OF MEIOFAUNA IN AN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diurnal vertical migrations of meiofauna were observed in an estuarine sand flat and these were related primarily to desiccation and temperature. The migrations. which occurred in the top 10 cm of the sediment. had a mean range of 5 cm and were most strongly exhibited by the interstitial flatworms. polychaetes and ...

  16. Auditory velocity discrimination in the horizontal plane at very high velocities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frissen, Ilja; Féron, François-Xavier; Guastavino, Catherine

    2014-10-01

    We determined velocity discrimination thresholds and Weber fractions for sounds revolving around the listener at very high velocities. Sounds used were a broadband white noise and two harmonic sounds with fundamental frequencies of 330 Hz and 1760 Hz. Experiment 1 used velocities ranging between 288°/s and 720°/s in an acoustically treated room and Experiment 2 used velocities between 288°/s and 576°/s in a highly reverberant hall. A third experiment addressed potential confounds in the first two experiments. The results show that people can reliably discriminate velocity at very high velocities and that both thresholds and Weber fractions decrease as velocity increases. These results violate Weber's law but are consistent with the empirical trend observed in the literature. While thresholds for the noise and 330 Hz harmonic stimulus were similar, those for the 1760 Hz harmonic stimulus were substantially higher. There were no reliable differences in velocity discrimination between the two acoustical environments, suggesting that auditory motion perception at high velocities is robust against the effects of reverberation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Rotating optical tubes for vertical transport of atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Rsheed, Anwar; Lyras, Andreas; Aldossary, Omar M.; Lembessis, Vassilis E.

    2016-12-01

    The classical dynamics of a cold atom trapped inside a vertical rotating helical optical tube (HOT) is investigated by taking also into account the gravitational field. The resulting equations of motion are solved numerically. The rotation of the HOT induces a vertical motion for an atom initially at rest. The motion is a result of the action of two inertial forces, namely, the centrifugal force and the Coriolis force. Both inertial forces force the atom to rotate in a direction opposite to that of the angular velocity of the HOT. The frequency and the turning points of the atom's global oscillation can be controlled by the value and the direction of the angular velocity of the HOT. However, at large values of the angular velocity of the HOT the atom can escape from the global oscillation and be transported along the axis of the HOT. In this case, the rotating HOT operates as an optical Archimedes' screw for atoms.

  18. Vertically stacked nanocellulose tactile sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Minhyun; Kim, Kyungkwan; Kim, Bumjin; Lee, Kwang-Jae; Kang, Jae-Wook; Jeon, Sanghun

    2017-11-16

    Paper-based electronic devices are attracting considerable attention, because the paper platform has unique attributes such as flexibility and eco-friendliness. Here we report on what is claimed to be the firstly fully integrated vertically-stacked nanocellulose-based tactile sensor, which is capable of simultaneously sensing temperature and pressure. The pressure and temperature sensors are operated using different principles and are stacked vertically, thereby minimizing the interference effect. For the pressure sensor, which utilizes the piezoresistance principle under pressure, the conducting electrode was inkjet printed on the TEMPO-oxidized-nanocellulose patterned with micro-sized pyramids, and the counter electrode was placed on the nanocellulose film. The pressure sensor has a high sensitivity over a wide range (500 Pa-3 kPa) and a high durability of 10(4) loading/unloading cycles. The temperature sensor combines various materials such as poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS), silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to form a thermocouple on the upper nanocellulose layer. The thermoelectric-based temperature sensors generate a thermoelectric voltage output of 1.7 mV for a temperature difference of 125 K. Our 5 × 5 tactile sensor arrays show a fast response, negligible interference, and durable sensing performance.

  19. Numerical Study of Natural Convection in Vertical Enclosures Utilizing Nanofluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Alipanah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Enhancement of buoyancy-driven convection heat transfer within vertical cavities containing nanofluids subjected to different side wall temperatures and various aspect ratios is investigated. The computations are based on an iterative, finitevolume numerical procedure (SIMPLE that incorporates the Boussinesq approximation to simulate the buoyancy term. With the base fluid being water, three different nanoparticles (Cu, TiO2, and Al2O3 are considered as the nanofluids. This study has been carried out for the pertinent parameters in the following ranges: the Rayleigh number, Raf = 105–107 and the volumetric fraction of nanoparticle between 0 and 5 percent. The results are presented for different length-to-height ratios varying from 0.1 to 1.0. The comparisons show that the mean Nusselt numbers and velocity magnitudes increase with volume fraction for the whole range of the Rayleigh numbers. The predictions show a noticeable heat transfer enhancement compared to pure fluid. It is also found that the heat transfer enhancement utilizing nanofluid is more pronounced at low aspect ratios than high aspect ratios. Moreover, the results depict that the addition of nanoparticles to the pure fluid has more effects at lower Rayleigh numbers.

  20. Wave propagation and group velocity

    CERN Document Server

    Brillouin, Léon

    1960-01-01

    Wave Propagation and Group Velocity contains papers on group velocity which were published during the First World War and are missing in many libraries. It introduces three different definitions of velocities: the group velocity of Lord Rayleigh, the signal velocity of Sommerfeld, and the velocity of energy transfer, which yields the rate of energy flow through a continuous wave and is strongly related to the characteristic impedance. These three velocities are identical for nonabsorbing media, but they differ considerably in an absorption band. Some examples are discussed in the last chapter

  1. A space vehicle rotating with a uniform angu- lar velocity about a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    A space vehicle rotating with a uniform angu- lar velocity about a vertical axis fixed to it is falling freely vertically downwards, say, with its engine shut off. It carries two astronauts inside it. One astronaut throws a tiny tool towards the other astronaut. The motion of the tiny tool with reference to a rotating frame rigidly fixed.

  2. Radar range measurements in the atmosphere.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2013-02-01

    The earths atmosphere affects the velocity of propagation of microwave signals. This imparts a range error to radar range measurements that assume the typical simplistic model for propagation velocity. This range error is a function of atmospheric constituents, such as water vapor, as well as the geometry of the radar data collection, notably altitude and range. Models are presented for calculating atmospheric effects on radar range measurements, and compared against more elaborate atmospheric models.

  3. Shear-Wave Velocity Structure Around the Korean Peninsula Using the Rayleigh Wave Signature of the North Korea Underground Nuclear Explosion on May 25, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, G.; Shin, J.; Chi, H. C.; Sheen, D.; Park, J.; Cho, C.

    2011-12-01

    The crustal structure around the Korean Peninsula was investigated by analyzing the Rayleigh waves generated from the 2nd North Korea underground nuclear explosion on May 25, 2009. Group velocity dispersion curves were measured from vertical component waveforms of 20 broadband stations in the range of 194 to 1183 km from the test site. The measured dispersion curves were inverted to get shear-wave velocity models for depths from 0 to 50 km. The dispersion curves and the velocity models clearly show lateral variations in the crustal structure, which could be more clearly classified into the North Korea-Northeast China group, the Western Margin of the East Sea group, and the Japan Basin group. For each group, an averaged dispersion curve and an averaged velocity model were measured. The averaged shear-wave velocity model of the North Korea-Northeast China group shows that the mean shear-wave velocity of the Moho discontinuity, which is known to be located at approximately 35 km, is 4.37 km/s with a standard deviation of 0.15 km/s. The averaged shear-wave velocity model of the Japan Basin group shows a mean shear-wave velocity of 4.26 km/s with a standard deviation of 0.14 km/s in the layer between 16 and 22 km. The averaged shear-wave velocity model of the Western Margin of the East Sea group shows characteristics of a transition zone between the North Korea-Northeast China group, which represents continental crust, and the Japan Basin group, which represents oceanic crust. The mean shear-wave velocity in the layer between 16 and 22 km is 4.12 km/s with a standard deviation of 0.05 km/s.

  4. Transverse Spectral Velocity Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2014-01-01

    array probe is used along with two different estimators based on the correlation of the received signal. They can estimate the velocity spectrum as a function of time as for ordinary spectrograms, but they also work at a beam-to-flow angle of 90°. The approach is validated using simulations of pulsatile...... flow using the Womersly–Evans flow model. The relative bias of the mean estimated frequency is 13.6% and the mean relative standard deviation is 14.3% at 90°, where a traditional estimator yields zero velocity. Measurements have been conducted with an experimental scanner and a convex array transducer....... A pump generated artificial femoral and carotid artery flow in the phantom. The estimated spectra degrade when the angle is different from 90°, but are usable down to 60° to 70°. Below this angle the traditional spectrum is best and should be used. The conventional approach can automatically be corrected...

  5. High-Velocity Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Woerden, Hugo; Schwarz, Ulrich J; Boer, Klaas S

    2005-01-01

    This book contains 17 chapters reviewing our knowledge of the high-velocity clouds (HVCs) as of 2004, bringing this together in one place for the first time. Each of the many different aspects of HVC research is addressed by one of the experts in that subfield. These include a historical overview of HVC research and analyses of the structure and kinematics of HVCs. Separate chapters address the intermediate-velocity clouds, the Magellanic Stream, and neutral hydrogen HVCs discovered in external galaxies. Reviews are presented of the Ha emission and of optical and UV absorption-line studies, followed by discussions of the hot Galactic Halo and of the interactions between HVCs and their surroundings. Four chapters summarize the ideas about the origin of the high-velocity gas, with detailed discussions of connections between HVCs and the Galactic Fountain, tidally-stripped material, and remnants of the Milky Way's formation. A chapter outlining what we do not know completes the book. The book comes at a time whe...

  6. Personal Exposure to Contaminant Sources in a Uniform Velocity Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brohus, Henrik; Nielsen, Peter V.

    The objective of this study has been to determine the personal exposure to a contaminant source in a uniform velocity field. This was done by full-scale measurements and computer simulations. The results showed a significant dependence on the velocity field both regarding the direction and the ma...... the usual operation range. Guidelines for personal exposure reduction in a uniform velocity field are discussed.......The objective of this study has been to determine the personal exposure to a contaminant source in a uniform velocity field. This was done by full-scale measurements and computer simulations. The results showed a significant dependence on the velocity field both regarding the direction...

  7. Does Contract Complexity Limit Opportunities? Vertical Organization and Flexibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.P.G. Pennings (Enrico)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe vertical organization of production entails a range of make-or-buy decisions of intermediate goods that are influenced by the difficulty of writing contracts with a potential supplier. When contracting causes high transaction costs, a firm can decide to vertically integrate the

  8. Effects of Unsteady Flow Past An Infinite Vertical Plate With Variable ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of unsteady flow past an infinite vertical plate with variable temperature and constant mass flux are investigated. Laplace transform technique is used to obtain velocity and concentration fields. The computation of the results indicates that the velocity profiles increase with increase in Grashof numbers, mass ...

  9. Mixed convection of micropolar fluid in a vertical double-passage ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of the presence of a thin perfectly conductive baffle on the fully developed laminar mixed convection in a vertical channel containing micropolar fluid is analyzed. The channel has different constant wall temperatures. Analytical expressions for velocity and microrotation velocity are obtained. The solutions are ...

  10. Stationary bottom generated velocity fluctuations in one-dimensional open channel flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, B.

    1994-01-01

    Statistical characteristics are calculated for stationary velocity fluctuations in a one-dimensional open channel flow with a given vertical velocity profile and with one-dimensional irregular bottom waves, characterized by a spectral density function. The calculations are based on an approximate

  11. Modelling Velocity Spectra in the Lower Part of the Planetary Boundary Layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, H.R.; Larsen, Søren Ejling; Højstrup, Jørgen

    1984-01-01

    Principles used when constructing models for velocity spectra are reviewed. Based upon data from the Kansas and Minnesota experiments, simple spectral models are set up for all velocity components in stable air at low heights, and for the vertical spectrum in unstable air through a larger part of...

  12. GPS, su datum vertical.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esteban Dörries

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available La introducción de la metodología GPS en aplicaciones topográficas y geodésicas pone en notoria evidencia la clásica separación de sistemas de referencia en horizontal y vertical. Con GPS el posicionamiento es tridimensional, pero el concepto de altura difiere del clásico. Si se desea utilizar la información altimétrica debe contemplarse la ondulación del geoide.

  13. Movement velocity vs. strength training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário C. Marques

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Intensity during strength training has been commonly identified with relative load (percentage of one-repetition maximum, 1RM or with performing a given maximal number of repetitions in each set (XRM: 5RM, 10RM, 15 RM, etc.. Yet, none of these methods can be appropriate for precisely monitoring the real training effort in each training session. The first approach requires coaches to individually assess the 1RM value for each athlete. We may agree that expressing intensity as a percentage of the maximum repetition has the advantage that it can be used to program strength training for multiple athletes simultaneously, the loads being later transformed in absolute values (kg for each individual. Further, another advantage is that this expression of the intensity can clearly reflect the dynamics of the evolution of the training load if we understand the percentage of 1RM as an effort, and not as a simple arithmetic calculus. Nevertheless, direct assessment of 1RM has some possible disadvantages worth noting. It may be associated with risk of injury when performed incorrectly or by novice athlete’s and it is time-consuming and impractical for large groups. Moreover, the actual RM can change quite rapidly after only a few training sessions and often the obtained value is not the subject’s true maximum. The classic way to prescribe loading intensity is to determine, through trial and error, the maximum number of repetitions that one can be performed with a given submaximal weight. For example, 5RM refers to a weight that can only be lifted five times. Some studies identified the relationship between selected percentages of 1RM and the number of repetitions to failure, establishing a repetition maximum continuum. It is believed that certain performance characteristics are best trained using specific RM load ranges. This method eliminates the need for a direct 1RM test, but it is not without drawbacks either. Using exhaustive efforts is common

  14. Recognition and measurement gas-liquid two-phase flow in a vertical concentric annulus at high pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao; Sun, Baojiang; Guo, Yanli; Gao, Yonghai; Zhao, Xinxin

    2018-02-01

    The air-water flow characteristics under pressure in the range of 1-6 MPa in a vertical annulus were evaluated in this report. Time-resolved bubble rising velocity and void fraction were also measured using an electrical void fraction meter. The results showed that the pressure has remarkable effect on the density, bubble size and rise velocity of the gas. Four flow patterns (bubble, cap-bubble, cap-slug, and churn) were also observed instead of Taylor bubble at high pressure. Additionally, the transition process from bubble to cap-bubble was investigated at atmospheric and high pressures, respectively. The results revealed that the flow regime transition criteria for atmospheric pressure do not work at high pressure, hence a new flow regime transition model for annular flow channel geometry was developed to predict the flow regime transition, which thereafter exhibited high accuracy at high pressure condition.

  15. Remarks on the Definition and Estimation of Friction Velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Rudolf O.

    One of the mainscaling parameters in similarity theory of the atmospheric boundary layer is friction velocity. Unfortunately, several definitions of friction velocity exist in the literature. Some authors use the component of the horizontal Reynolds stress vector in the direction of the mean wind vector to define friction velocity. Others define the friction velocity by means of the absolute value of the horizontal Reynolds stress vector. The two definitions coincide only if the direction of the mean wind vector is parallel to the horizontal Reynolds stress vector. In general, the second definition gives larger values for the friction velocity. Over complex terrain the situation is further complicated by the fact that the terrain following flow is not necessarily horizontal. Thus, several authors have proposed to use terrain following coordinate systems for the definition of friction velocity. By means of a large dataset of fast-response wind measurements with an ultrasonic anemometer the friction velocities resulting from the different definitions are compared. Furthermore, it is shown that friction velocity can be well estimated from horizontal wind speed, and even better from simple horizontal or vertical turbulence parameters.

  16. Cavity Enhanced Velocity Modulation Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siller, Brian; Mills, Andrew; Porambo, Michael; McCall, Benjamin

    2010-11-01

    Over the past several decades, velocity modulation spectroscopy has been used to study dozens of molecular ions of astronomical importance. This technique has been so productive because it provides the advantage of ion-neutral discrimination, which is critically important when interfering neutral molecules are many orders of magnitude more abundant, and when combined with heterodyne techniques, its sensitivity can approach the shot noise limit. Traditionally, velocity modulation experiments have utilized unidirectional multipass White cells to achieve up to about 8 passes through a positive column discharge cell. But by positioning the cell within an optical cavity, it is possible to obtain an effective path length orders of magnitude longer than was previously possible. We have demonstrated this novel technique using a Ti:Sapp laser in the near-IR to observe rovibronic transitions of N2+. By demodulating at twice the modulation frequency, 2nd derivative-like lineshapes are observed for ions that are velocity-modulated, while Gaussian lineshapes are observed for excited neutral that are concentration-modulated. The signals for N2+ and N2+* have been observed to be 78° out of phase with one another, so ion-neutral discrimination is retained. And due to the laser power enhancement and geometry of the optical cavity, Doppler-free saturation spectroscopy is now possible. Observed Lamb dips have widths of 50 MHz, and when combined with calibration by an optical frequency comb, this allows for determination of line centers to within 1 MHz. In our original demonstration of this technique, our sensitivity was limited by noise in the laser-cavity lock. Since then, we have integrated Noise Immune Cavity Enhanced Optical Heterodyne Molecular Spectroscopy (NICE-OHMS) by adding sidebands to the laser at an exact multiple of the cavity free spectral range, and demodulating at the sideband frequency before sending the signal to a lock-in amplifier for demodulating at twice the

  17. Seismic noise: inversion of velocity profile using a non linear algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wathelet, M.; Jongmans, D.

    2003-04-01

    For site effect assessment a good knowledge of the shear wave velocity profile is of prime importance. It can be deduced from the dispersive property of the surface waves present in the noise wave-field or artificially generated. This inversion is not straightforward as different ground models have the same phase velocity curve in the observed frequency range. Moreover the uncertainties on the phase velocity obtained by available processing techniques drastically increase the non unicity of the problem. Widely used iterative linear algorithms initiated by a starting model lead to only one optimal solution that could be a local minimum of the misfit function. In order to investigate the parameter space we implement a direct search algorithm (Neighborhood, M. Sambridge,1999) to inverse the velocity profile. However, in spite of their performance, the direct search algorithms partially reproduce the ensemble of possible good solutions. Different possibilities to help the inversion process are considered. We introduce a priori on the compressional wave velocities in the misfit computations, which could be acquired from refraction tests. Also, adding the inversion of the Rayleigh ellipticity leads to a better constrain of the layer's depth (Scherbaum et al., in press). At low frequency join inversion of both Rayleigh and Love modes could significantly improve the resolution which is usually poor when considering the vertical component alone. This method has been successfully tested on various synthetics in order to estimate its ability to reproduce the original models. Several sites selected in Belgium for the availability of geological and geotechnical data were deeply investigated with ambient vibration measurements (Lennartz 5 seconds and geophones), refraction tomography and surface wave inversion from hammer and explosive shots, and the coherency of the proposed approach has been validated. Study developed within the SESAME European Project.

  18. A non-hydrostatic global spectral dynamical core using a height-based vertical coordinate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Simarro

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Most of the dynamical cores of operational global models can be broadly classified according to the spatial discretisation into two categories: spectral models with mass-based vertical coordinate and grid point models with height-based vertical coordinate. This article describes a new non-hydrostatic dynamical core for a global model that uses the spectral transform method for the horizontal directions and a height-based vertical coordinate. Velocity is expressed in the contravariant basis (instead of the geographical orthonormal basis pointing to the East, North and Zenith directions so that the expressions of the boundary conditions and the divergence of the velocity are simpler. Prognostic variables in our model are the contravariant components of the velocity, the logarithm of pressure and the logarithm of temperature. Covariant tensor analysis is used to derive the differential operators of the prognostic equations, such as the curl, gradient, divergence and covariant derivative of the contravariant velocity. A Lorenz type grid is used in the vertical direction, with the vertical contravariant velocity staggered with respect to the other prognostic variables. High-order vertical operators are constructed following the finite difference technique. Time stepping is semi-implicit because it allows for long time steps that compensates the cost of the spectral transformations. A set of experiments reported in the literature is implemented so as to confirm the accuracy and efficiency of the new dynamical core.

  19. Kinematics and statistics of dense, slow granular flow through vertical channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananda, K. S.; Moka, Sudheshna; Nott, Prabhu R.

    We have investigated the flow of dry granular materials through vertical channels in the regime of dense slow flow using video imaging of the particles adjacent to a transparent wall. Using an image processing technique based on particle tracking velocimetry, the video movies were analysed to obtain the velocities of individual particles. Experiments were conducted in two- and three-dimensional channels. In the latter, glass beads and mustard seeds were used as model granular materials, and their translational velocities were measured. In the former, aluminium disks with a dark diametral stripe were used and their translational velocities and spin were measured. Experiments in the three-dimensional channels were conducted for a range of the channel width W, and for smooth and rough sidewalls. As in earlier studies, we find that shearing takes place predominantly in thin layers adjacent to the walls, while the rest of the material appears to move as a plug. However, there are large velocity fluctuations even in the plug, where the macroscopic deformation rate is negligibly small. The thickness of the shear layer, scaled by the particle diameter dp, increases weakly with W/dp. The experimental data for the velocity field are in good agreement with the Cosserat plasticity model proposed recently. We also measured the mean spin of the particles in the two-dimensional channel, and its deviation from half the vorticity. There is a clear, measurable deviation, which too is in qualitative agreement with the Cosserat plasticity model. The statistics of particle velocity and spin fluctuations in the two-dimensional channel were analysed by determining their probability distribution function, and their spatial and temporal correlation. They were all found to be broadly similar to previous observations for three-dimensional channels, but some differences are evident. The spatial correlation of the velocity fluctuations are much stronger in the two-dimensional channel, implying

  20. Measurements of the average properties of a bidisperse suspension of bubbles rising in a vertical channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Garcia, J. C.; Zenit, R.

    2008-11-01

    This investigation presents an experimental study of a system for which the bubble size is not monodisperse. In this work an experimental equipment was designed to study the behaviour of a bidisperse suspension of bubbles rising in a vertical channel, in which the dual limit of small Weber and large Reynolds number is satisfied. Bubbles were produced using capillaries of two distinct inner diameters. Using water and water-glycerin mixtures, the range of Reynolds numbers was extended from 50 to 500, approximately. To avoid coalescence, a small amount of salt was added to the interstitial fluid, which did not affect the fluid properties significantly. Measurements of the size, bubble velocity, aspect ratio as well the equivalent diameter of the bubbles were obtained as a function of gas volume fraction. We found that the bidisperse nature of the flow changes the dynamics in a significant manner. We observed a modification of the flow agitation, characterized by the liquid velocity variance. Although the decrease of the mean velocity with gas volume fraction is similar to that observed for monodisperse flows (Martínez et. al. 2007), a general increase of the magnitude of fluctuations is observed for certain combinations of bubble size and gas fraction ratios.

  1. Predicting Vertical Motion within Convective Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Heever, S. C.

    2016-12-01

    Convective storms are both beneficial in the fresh water they supply and destructive in the life-threatening extreme weather they produce. They are found throughout the tropics and midlatitudes, vary in structure from isolated to highly organized systems, and are the sole source of precipitation in many regions of Earth. Convective updrafts and downdrafts plays a crucial role in cloud and precipitation formation, latent heating, water vapor transport, storm organization, and large-scale atmospheric circulations such as the Hadley and Walker cells. These processes, in turn, impact the strength and longevity of updrafts and downdrafts through complex, non-linear feedbacks. In spite of the significant influence of convective updrafts and downdrafts on the weather and climate system, accurately predicting vertical motion using numerical models remains challenging. In high-resolution cloud-resolving models where vertical motion is normally resolved, significant biases exist in the predicted profiles of updraft and downdraft velocities, at least for the limited cases where observational data have been available for model evaluation. It has been suggested that feedbacks between the vertical motion and microphysical processes may be one cause of these discrepancies, however, our understanding of these feedbacks remains limited. In this talk, the results of a small field campaign conducted over northeastern Colorado designed to observe storm vertical motion and cold pool characteristics within isolated and organized deep convective storms will be described. High frequency radiosonde, radar and drone measurements of a developing through mature supercell storm updraft and cold pool will be presented and compared with RAMS simulations of the same supercell storm. An analysis of the feedbacks between the storm dynamical and microphysical processes will be presented, and implications for regional and global modeling of severe storms will be discussed.

  2. Shock Pulse Shaping in a Small-Form Factor Velocity Amplifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerard Kelly

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This theme of this paper is the design and characterisation of a velocity amplifier (VAMP machine for high-acceleration shock testing of micro-scale devices. The VAMP applies multiple sequential impacts to amplify velocity through a system of three progressively smaller masses constrained to move in the vertical axis. Repeatable, controlled, mechanical shock pulses are created through the metal-on-metal impact between pulse shaping test rods, which form part of the penultimate and ultimate masses. The objectives are to investigate the controllable parameters that affect the shock pulses induced on collision, namely; striker and incident test rod material; test rod length; pulse shaping mechanisms; and impact velocity. The optimum VAMP configuration was established as a 60 mm long titanium striker test rod and a 120 mm long titanium incident rod. This configuration exhibited an acceleration magnitude and a primary pulse duration range of 5,800–23,400 g and 28.0–44.0 μs respectively. It was illustrated that the acceleration spectral content can be manipulated through control of the test rod material and length. This is critical in the context of practical applications, where it is postulated that the acceleration signal can be controlled to effectively excite specific components in a multi-component assembly affixed to the VAMP incident test rod.

  3. A Variable Stiffness Concept For Efficient Aircraft Vertical Tail Design

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cooper, Jonathan E; Sensburg, O; Amprikidis, M

    2003-01-01

    This report results from a contract tasking University of Manchester as follows: The contractor will investigate using a variable stiffness vertical tail attachment to control aeroelastic performance over a range of dynamic pressures...

  4. Translational Vestibulo-Ocular Reflexes During Off-Vertical Axis Rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Scott J.; Clement, Gilles

    2009-01-01

    The translational vestibulo-ocular reflex (tVOR) is an otolith-mediated response that stabilizes near vision during linear acceleration at higher frequencies where visually mediated reflexes are not adequate. The modulation of horizontal and vergence eye movements during Off-Vertical Axis Rotation (OVAR) are presumed to reflect the tVOR in response to the continuously varying linear acceleration in the interaural and nasooccipital axes, respectively. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of frequency and fixation distance on the modulation of slow phase eye velocity (SPV) as further evidence that the tVOR is elicited during OVAR. Eighteen subjects were rotated about their longitudinal axis tilted by 30 deg off-vertical. Rotational velocities varied between 18 and 288 deg/sec corresponding to a frequency range of 0.05 to 0.8 Hz. Fixation distance was altered by asking subjects to imagine stationary targets that were briefly presented at 0.5, 1 and 2 m during some rotation cycles. The target flash was 40 msec in the nose-up position at eye level. Oculomotor responses were recorded in the dark using infrared binocular videography. Sinusoidal curve fits were used to derive amplitude, phase and bias velocity of the eye movements across multiple rotation cycles. Consistent with previous studies, the modulation of both horizontal and vergence SPV increased with stimulus frequency. The effect of fixation distance was negligible at lower frequencies. The modulation of horizontal and vergence SPV was; however, proportional to fixation distance during OVAR at 0.8 Hz. This increasing sensitivity and dependence on fixation distance of horizontal and vergence SPV during OVAR is consistent with tVOR characteristics measured during other types of linear motion. We conclude that the modulation of horizontal and vergence SPV will be diagnostically more useful at higher stimulus frequencies where the tVOR is more robust.

  5. Sonic velocities for gases from coal-derived liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodner, A.J.; Jett, O.J.

    1982-10-01

    Accurate predictions of choking velocities for three-phase mixtures are needed to properly size coal-slurry letdown valves. The sonic velocity of the gas phase of the coal slurry must be known to evaluate this choking velocity. A FORTRAN computer program, based on the Redlich-Kwong-Soave equation of state, was developed to predict sonic velocities for both pure and pseudocomponent gaseous mixtures. Predictions of the sonic velocity for methane, ethane, propane, and ethylene deviated 0 to 25% from experimental data. The sonic velocity predictions were also more accurate than those with the reduced-property correlation of Pitzer and Curl. The predicted sonic velocity at 700 K for a mixture of gases from coal-derived liquids at conditions typical of coal-slurry letdown valves ranged from 100 to 330 m/s.

  6. Influence of Velocity on Variability in Gait Kinematics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Sylvia X M; Larsen, Peter K; Alkjær, Tine

    2014-01-01

    Closed circuit television (CCTV) footage is often available from crime scenes and may be used to compare perpetrators with suspects. Usually, the footage comprises incomplete gait cycles at different velocities, making gait pattern identification from crimes difficult. This study investigated...... the concurrence of joint angles throughout a gait cycle at three different velocities (3.0, 4.5, 6.0 km/h). Six datasets at each velocity were collected from 16 men. A variability range VR throughout the gait cycle at each velocity for each joint angle for each person was calculated. The joint angles at each...... velocity were compared pairwise, and whenever this showed values within the VR of this velocity, the case was positive. By adding the positives throughout the gait cycle, phases with high and low concurrences were located; peak concurrence was observed at mid-stance phase. Striving for the same velocity...

  7. Characteristics of Vertical Mantle Heat Exchangers for Solar Water Heaters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shah, Louise Jivan; Morrison, G.L.; Behnia, M.

    1999-01-01

    - The flow structure in vertical mantle heat exchangers was investigated using a full-scale tank designed to facilitate flow visualisation. The flow structure and velocities in the mantle were measured using a particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) system. A CFD simulation model of vertical mantle heat...... exchangers was also developed for detailed evaluation of the heat flux distribution over the mantle surface. Both the experimental and simulation results indicate that distribution of the flow around the mantle gap is governed by buoyancy driven recirculation in the mantle. The operation of the mantle...

  8. Vertical Protocol Composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groß, Thomas; Mödersheim, Sebastian Alexander

    2011-01-01

    composition, and it is truly commonplace in today’s communication with the diversity of VPNs and secure browser sessions. In fact, it is normal that we have several layers of secure channels: For instance, on top of a VPN-connection, a browser may establish another secure channel (possibly with a different...... end point). Even using the same protocol several times in such a stack of channels is not unusual: An application may very well establish another TLS channel over an established one. We call this selfcomposition. In fact, there is nothing that tells us that all these compositions are sound, i.......e., that the combination cannot introduce attacks that the individual protocols in isolation do not have. In this work, we prove a composability result in the symbolic model that allows for arbitrary vertical composition (including self-composition). It holds for protocols from any suite of channel and application...

  9. Vertical cavity laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    The present invention provides a vertical cavity laser comprising a grating layer comprising an in-plane grating, the grating layer having a first side and having a second side opposite the first side and comprising a contiguous core grating region having a grating structure, wherein an index......, an index of refraction of the second low-index layer or air being less than 2; and a thickness of the cap layer and a thickness of the grating layer, and a pitch and a duty cycle of the grating structure are selected to obtain a resonance having a free-space resonance wavelength in the interval 300 nm to 3...... microns, the cap layer comprises an active region configured to generate or absorb photons at the free-space resonance wavelength by stimulated emission or absorption when a sufficient forward or reverse bias voltage is applied across the active region, a thickness of the first low-index layer is less...

  10. Direct Observation of Ultralow Vertical Emittance using a Vertical Undulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wootton, Kent

    2015-09-17

    In recent work, the first quantitative measurements of electron beam vertical emittance using a vertical undulator were presented, with particular emphasis given to ultralow vertical emittances [K. P. Wootton, et al., Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams, 17, 112802 (2014)]. Using this apparatus, a geometric vertical emittance of 0.9 ± 0.3 pm rad has been observed. A critical analysis is given of measurement approaches that were attempted, with particular emphasis on systematic and statistical uncertainties. The method used is explained, compared to other techniques and the applicability of these results to other scenarios discussed.

  11. Optimisation of the mean boat velocity in rowing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauter, G; Baumgartner, L; Denoth, J; Riener, R; Wolf, P

    2012-01-01

    In rowing, motor learning may be facilitated by augmented feedback that displays the ratio between actual mean boat velocity and maximal achievable mean boat velocity. To provide this ratio, the aim of this work was to develop and evaluate an algorithm calculating an individual maximal mean boat velocity. The algorithm optimised the horizontal oar movement under constraints such as the individual range of the horizontal oar displacement, individual timing of catch and release and an individual power-angle relation. Immersion and turning of the oar were simplified, and the seat movement of a professional rower was implemented. The feasibility of the algorithm, and of the associated ratio between actual boat velocity and optimised boat velocity, was confirmed by a study on four subjects: as expected, advanced rowing skills resulted in higher ratios, and the maximal mean boat velocity depended on the range of the horizontal oar displacement.

  12. Examples of Vector Velocity Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Peter M.; Pedersen, Mads M.; Hansen, Kristoffer L.

    2011-01-01

    To measure blood flow velocity in vessels with conventional ultrasound, the velocity is estimated along the direction of the emitted ultrasound wave. It is therefore impossible to obtain accurate information on blood flow velocity and direction, when the angle between blood flow and ultrasound wa...

  13. Validation of the iPhone app using the force platform to estimate vertical jump height.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlos-Vivas, Jorge; Martin-Martinez, Juan P; Hernandez-Mocholi, Miguel A; Perez-Gomez, Jorge

    2016-09-22

    Vertical jump performance has been evaluated with several devices: force platforms, contact mats, Vertec, accelerometers, infrared cameras and high-velocity cameras; however, the force platform is considered the gold standard for measuring vertical jump height. The purpose of this study was to validate the iPhone app, My Jump, that measures vertical jump height by comparing it with other methods that use the force platform to estimate vertical jump height, namely, vertical velocity at take-off and time in the air. A total of 40 sport sciences students (age 21.4 ± 1.9 years) completed five countermovement jumps (CMJs) over a force platform. Thus, 200 CMJ heights were evaluated from the vertical velocity at take-off and the time in the air using the force platform, and from the time in the air with the mobile application My Jump. The height obtained was compared using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Correlation between APP and force platform using the time in the air was perfect (ICC = 1.000, P Jump, is an appropriate method to evaluate the vertical jump performance; however, vertical jump height is slightly overestimated compared with that of the force platform.

  14. Characteristics of slug flow in narrow rectangular channels under vertical condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Yan, Changqi; Sun, Licheng; Xing, Dianchuan; Yan, Chaoxing; Tian, Daogui

    2013-07-01

    Gas-liquid slug flow is widely encountered in many practical industrial applications. A detailed understanding of the hydrodynamics of gas slug has important significance for modeling of the slug flow. Non-intrusive flow visualization using a high speed video camera system is applied to study characteristics of slug flow in a vertical narrow rectangular channel (3.25×40 mm2). Ideal Taylor bubbles are hardly observed, and most of the gas slugs are deformed, much more seriously at high liquid superficial velocity. The liquid film thicknesses of left and right narrow sides surrounding gas slug are divergent and wavy, but it has weak effect on liquid film velocity. The gas and liquid velocity as well as the length of gas slug have significant effect on the separating liquid film thickness. The separating liquid film velocity is decreased with the increase of gas superficial velocity at low liquid velocity, and increased with the increase of liquid superficial velocity. The film stops descending and the gas superficial velocity has no significant effect on liquid film separating velocity at high liquid velocity (jL≥1.204 m/s), and it is mainly determined by the liquid flow rate. The shape of slug nose has a significant effect on its velocity, while the effect of its length is very weak. The Ishii&Jones-Zuber drift flux correlation could predict slug velocity well, except at low liquid superficial velocity by reason of that the calculated drift velocity is less than experimental values.

  15. Paintball velocity as a function of distance traveled

    OpenAIRE

    Pat Chiarawongse; Arcan Chirathivat

    2008-01-01

    The relationship between the distance a paintball travels through air and its velocity is investigated by firing a paintball into a ballistic pendulum from a range of distances. The motion of the pendulum was filmed and analyzed by using video analysis software. The velocity of the paintball on impact was calculated from the maximum horizontal displacement of the pendulum. It is shown that the velocity of a paintball decreases exponentially with distance traveled, as expected...

  16. Vertical and Interfacial Transport in Wetlands (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Variano, E. A.

    2010-12-01

    The objective of this work is to understand the fluxes connecting the water column, substrate, and atmosphere in wetland environments. To do this, analytical, numerical, and laboratory models have been used to quantify the hydrodynamic contributions to vertical fluxes. A key question is whether the hydrodynamic transport can be modeled as a diffusivity, and, if so, what the vertical structure of this diffusivity is. This question will be addressed in a number of flow types and for a number of fluxes. The fluxes of interest are heat, sediment, dissolved gases (such as methane and oxygen) and other dissolved solutes (such as nutrients and pollutants). The flows of interest include: unidirectional current, reversing flow (under waves, seiches, and tides), wind-sheared surface flows, and thermal convection. Rain and bioturbation can be important, but are not considered in the modeling work discussed herein. Specifically, we will present results on gas transport at wind-sheared free surface, sediment transport in unidirectional flow, and heat transfer in an oscillating flow cause by a seiche. All three of these will be used to consider the question of appropriate analytical models for vertical transport. The analytic models considered here are all 1D models that assume homogeneity in the horizontal plane. The numerical models use finite element methods and resolve the flow around individual vegetation stems in an idealized geometry. Laboratory models discussed herein also use an idealized geometry. Vegetation is represented by an array of cylinders, whose geometry is modeled after Scirpus spp. wetlands in Northern California. The laboratory model is constructed in a way that allows optical access to the flow, even in dense vegetation and far from boundaries. This is accomplished by using fluoropolymer plastics to construct vegetation models. The optical access allows us to employ particle image velocimetry (PIV) and planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) to measure

  17. Vertical Motion Determined Using Satellite Altimetry and Tide Gauges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Yen Kuo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A robust method to estimate vertical crustal motions by combining geocentric sea level measurements from decadal (1992 - 2003 TOPEX/POSEIDON satellite altimetry and long-term (> 40 years relative sea level records from tide gauges using a novel Gauss-Markov stochastic adjustment model is presented. These results represent an improvement over a prior study (Kuo et al. 2004 in Fennoscandia, where the observed vertical motions are primarily attributed to the incomplete Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA in the region since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM. The stochastic adjustment algorithm and results include a fully-populated a priori covariance matrix. The algorithm was extended to estimate vertical motion at tide gauge locations near open seas and around semi-enclosed seas and lakes. Estimation of nonlinear vertical motions, which could result from co- and postseismic deformations, has also been incorporated. The estimated uncertainties for the vertical motion solutions in coastal regions of the Baltic Sea and around the Great Lakes are in general < 0.5 mm yr-1, which is a significant improvement over existing studies. In the Baltic Sea, the comparisons of the vertical motion solution with 10 collocated GPS radial rates and with the BIFROST GIA model show differences of 0.2 _ 0.9 and 1.6 _ 1.8 mm yr-1, respectively. For the Great Lakes region, the comparisons with the ICE-3G model and with the relative vertical motion estimated using tide gauges only (Mainville and Craymer 2005 show differences of -0.2 _ 0.6 and -0.1 _ 0.5 mm yr-1, respectively. The Alaskan vertical motion solutions (linear and nonlinear models have an estimated uncertainty of ~1.2 - 1.6 mm yr-1, which agree qualitatively with GPS velocity and tide gauge-only solutions (Larsen et al. 2003. This innovative technique could potentially provide improved estimates of the vertical motion globally where long-term tide gauge records exist.

  18. A Tall-Tower Instrument for Mean and Fluctuating Velocity, Fluctuating Temperature and Sensible Heat Flux Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gryning, Sven-Erik; Thomson, D. W.

    1979-01-01

    For an ongoing elevated-source, urban-scale tracer experiment, an instrument system to measure the three-dimensional wind velocity and the turbulent sensible heat flux was developed. The wind velocity was measured with a combination of cup anemometer, propeller (vertical) and vane sensor. The tem......For an ongoing elevated-source, urban-scale tracer experiment, an instrument system to measure the three-dimensional wind velocity and the turbulent sensible heat flux was developed. The wind velocity was measured with a combination of cup anemometer, propeller (vertical) and vane sensor...

  19. Vertical allometry: fact or fiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Iftekhar; Boxenbaum, Harold

    2014-04-01

    In pharmacokinetics, vertical allometry is referred to the clearance of a drug when the predicted human clearance is substantially higher than the observed human clearance. Vertical allometry was initially reported for diazepam based on a 33-fold higher human predicted clearance than the observed human clearance. In recent years, it has been found that many other drugs besides diazepam, can be classified as drugs which exhibit vertical allometry. Over the years, many questions regarding vertical allometry have been raised. For example, (1) How to define and identify the vertical allometry? (2) How much difference should be between predicted and observed human clearance values before a drug could be declared 'a drug which follows vertical allometry'? (3) If somehow one can identify vertical allometry from animal data, how this information can be used for reasonably accurate prediction of clearance in humans? This report attempts to answer the aforementioned questions. The concept of vertical allometry at this time remains complex and obscure but with more extensive works one can have better understanding of 'vertical allometry'. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Velocity and Magnetic Compressions in FEL Drivers

    CERN Document Server

    Serafini, L

    2005-01-01

    We will compare merits and issues of these two techniques suitable for increasing the peak current of high brightness electron beams. The typical range of applicability is low energy for the velocity bunching and middle to high energy for magnetic compression. Velocity bunching is free from CSR effects but requires very high RF stability (time jitters), as well as a dedicated additional focusing and great cure in the beam transport: it is very well understood theoretically and numerical simulations are pretty straightforward. Several experiments of velocity bunching have been performed in the past few years: none of them, nevertheless, used a photoinjector designed and optimized for that purpose. Magnetic compression is a much more consolidated technique: CSR effects and micro-bunch instabilities are its main drawbacks. There is a large operational experience with chicanes used as magnetic compressors and their theoretical understanding is quite deep, though numerical simulations of real devices are still cha...

  1. Tracking moving radar targets with parallel, velocity-tuned filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickel, Douglas L.; Harmony, David W.; Bielek, Timothy P.; Hollowell, Jeff A.; Murray, Margaret S.; Martinez, Ana

    2013-04-30

    Radar data associated with radar illumination of a movable target is processed to monitor motion of the target. A plurality of filter operations are performed in parallel on the radar data so that each filter operation produces target image information. The filter operations are defined to have respectively corresponding velocity ranges that differ from one another. The target image information produced by one of the filter operations represents the target more accurately than the target image information produced by the remainder of the filter operations when a current velocity of the target is within the velocity range associated with the one filter operation. In response to the current velocity of the target being within the velocity range associated with the one filter operation, motion of the target is tracked based on the target image information produced by the one filter operation.

  2. Impact of different vertical transport representations on simulating processes in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ploeger, Felix

    2011-07-06

    trajectories are highly correlated, rendering ozone an interesting tracer for aspects of transport in the TTL where water vapour is not sensitive. Consequently, dispersion and mean upwelling have similar effects on ozone profiles, with slower upwelling and larger dispersion both leading to higher ozone concentrations. Analyses of tropical upwelling based on mean transport characteristics (e.g., mean ascent rates) and model validation have to take into account this ambiguity. Predicted ozone concentrations for kinematic transport are robustly higher than for diabatic transport, due to larger trajectory dispersion caused by the larger inhomogeneity in the kinematic vertical velocity field. During the tropical SCOUT-O3 campaign, kinematic ozone predictions show an extreme high bias compared to in-situ observations. The high sensitivity of many characteristics of transport to the choice of the transport representation, demonstrates the need to better constrain transport in the TTL. Consequently, estimates of exact numbers from models, e.g., for timescales of transport, are not reliable and only a range of values can be given. However, there are robust features of tropical transport, not depending on the transport representation, as for example, a significant impact of monsoon driven horizontal in-mixing from the extratropics on the composition of the TTL. In fact, the annual cycle of ozone above the tropical tropopause is attributed, at least in 'ECMWF-world', to in-mixing of ozone-rich extratropical air during summer. (orig.)

  3. Transverse vertical dispersion in groundwater and the capillary fringe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klenk, I D; Grathwohl, P

    2002-09-01

    Transverse dispersion is the most relevant process in mass transfer of contaminants across the capillary fringe (both directions), dilution of contaminants, and mixing of electron acceptors and electron donors in biodegrading groundwater plumes. This paper gives an overview on literature values of transverse vertical dispersivities alpha(tv) measured at different flow velocities and compares them to results from well-controlled laboratory-tank experiments on mass transfer of trichloroethene (TCE) across the capillary fringe. The measured values of transverse vertical dispersion in the capillary fringe region were larger than in fully saturated media, which is credited to enhanced tortuosity of the flow paths due to entrapped air within the capillary fringe. In all cases, the values observed for alpha(tv) were model, based on the mean square displacement and the pore size accounting for only partial diffusive mixing at increasing flow velocities, shows very good agreement with measured and published data.

  4. Flow reversal of laminar mixed convection in the entry region of symmetrically heated, vertical plate channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desrayaud, G. [Universite de Picardie Jules Verne, INSSET, Lab. Modelisation et Simulation Multi Echelle, MSME FRE 3160 CNRS, 02 - Saint-Quentin (France); Lauriat, G. [Universite Paris-Est, Lab. Modelisation et Simulation Multi Echelle, MSME FRE 3160 CNRS, 77 - Marne-la-Vallee (France)

    2009-11-15

    The present numerical investigation is concerned with flow reversal phenomena for laminar, mixed convection of air in a vertical parallel-plate channel of finite length. Results are obtained for buoyancy-assisted flow in a symmetrically heated channel with uniform wall temperatures for various Grashof numbers and Reynolds numbers in the range 300 {<=} Re {<=} 1300. The effects of buoyancy forces on the flow pattern are investigated and the shapes of velocity and temperature profiles are discussed in detail. Flow reversals centred in the entrance of the channel are predicted. The strength of the cells decreases as the Reynolds number is increased, until they disappear. The regime of reversed flow is identified for high values of the Peclet number in a Pe-Gr/Re map. It is also shown that the channel length has no influence on the occurrence of the reversal flow provided that H/D {>=} 10. (authors)

  5. IMPROVING VERTICAL AND LATERAL RESOLUTION BY STRETCH-FREE, HORIZON-ORIENTED IMAGING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pérez Gabriel

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The pre-stack Kirchhoff migration is implemented for delivering wavelet stretch-free imaged data, if the migration is (ideally limited to the wavelet corresponding to a target horizon. Avoiding wavelet stretch provides long-offset imaged data, far beyond what is reached in conventional migration and results in images from the target with improved vertical and lateral resolution and angular illumination. Increasing the range of imaged offsets also increases the sensitivity to event-crossing, velocity errors and anisotropy. These issues must be addressed to fully achieve the greatest potential of this technique. These ideas are further illustrated with a land survey seismic data application in Texas, U.S.

  6. Vortex-Induced Vibration of an Airfoil Used in Vertical-Axis Wind Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benner, Bridget; Carlson, Daniel; Seyed-Aghazadeh, Banafsheh; Modarres-Sadeghi, Yahya

    2017-11-01

    In Vertical-axis wind turbines (VAWTs), when the blades are placed at high angles of attack with respect to the incoming flow, they could experience flow-induced oscillations. A series of experiments in a re-circulating water tunnel was conducted to study the possible Vortex-Induced Vibration (VIV) of a fully-submerged, flexibly-mounted NACA 0021 airfoil, which is used in some designs of VAWTs. The airfoil was free to oscillate in the crossflow direction, and the tests were conducted in a Reynolds number range of 600velocity range of 0.6< U * <13. The amplitudes of oscillations and flow forces acting on the airfoil were measured at various angles of attack, α, in the range of 0< α<90. The airfoil was observed to oscillate in the range of 60< α<90, where α = 90 exhibited the widest lock-in range (1.67< U * <11.74) and the largest peak amplitude (A * = 1.93 at U * = 5.7). For all cases where oscillations were observed, the oscillation frequency remained close to the structure's natural frequency, defining a lock-in range. Flow visualization tests were also conducted to study the changes in the vortex shedding patterns. This research is supported in part by the National Science Foundation under NSF Award Numbers 1460461 and CBET-1437988.

  7. Modeling vertical coral connectivity and mesophotic refugia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holstein, Daniel M.; Paris, Claire B.; Vaz, Ana C.; Smith, Tyler B.

    2016-03-01

    Whether mesophotic reefs will behave as refugia for corals threatened by global climate change and coastal development depends on vertical exchange of larvae between diverse habitats. Here we use a biophysical model of larval dispersal to estimate vertical connectivity of a broadcasting ( Orbicella faveolata) and a brooding ( Porites astreoides) species of coral in the US Virgin Islands. Modeling predicts subsidy to shallow areas by mesophotic larvae of both species based on local hydrology, adult reproductive characteristics, larval traits, and a wide range of scenarios developed to test depth-sensitive factors, such as fertilization rates and post-settlement survivorship. In extreme model scenarios of reduced fertilization and post-settlement survivorship of mesophotic larvae, 1-10 % local mesophotic subsidy to shallow recruitment is predicted for both species, which are demographically significant. Although direct vertical connectivity is higher for the broadcaster, the brooder demonstrates higher local multigenerational vertical connectivity, which suggests that local P. astreoides populations are more resilient than those of O. faveolata, and corroborates field studies. As shallow habitat degrades, mesophotic-shallow subsidy is predicted to increase for both species. This study is the first of its kind to simulate larval dispersal and settlement between habitats of different depths, and these findings have local, regional, and global implications for predicting and managing coral reef persistence in a changing climate.

  8. Strong velocity effects in collisions of He+ with fullerenes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlatholter, T; Hadjar, O; Hoekstra, R; Morgenstern, R

    1999-01-01

    We have studied fragmentation and ionization of C-60 by He+ impact over a velocity range from 0.1 to 1 a.u. where a transition from vibrational to electronic excitation is predicted. With increasing velocity we observe a strong decrease of evaporative processes (C-60-2m(r+) peaks) and a linearly

  9. Pulsejet engine dynamics in vertical motion using momentum conservation

    OpenAIRE

    Cheche, Tiberius O.

    2017-01-01

    The momentum conservation law is applied to analyse the dynamics of pulsejet engine in vertical motion in a uniform gravitational field in the absence of friction. The model predicts existence of a terminal speed given frequency of the short pulses. The conditions that the engine does not return to the starting position are identified. The number of short periodic pulses after which the engine returns to the starting position is found to be independent of the exhaust velocity and gravitationa...

  10. Optimization of the Vertical Bridgman Method and the Vertical Gradient Method for CdZnTe Single Crystal Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kalbáč

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available In designing optimum parameters of advanced crystal growth techniques, computer modeling has become an important tool owing to the fact that computer simulation is much cheaper than many experimental techniques based on the trial and error method. In this paper, the application of computational modeling in the optimization of experimental setups for the production of CdZnTe single crystals from the melt is demonstrated on two characteristic examples, namely on the vertical Bridgman and vertical gradient method. The influence of adjustable parameters on the temperature, concentration and velocity fields, and on the positions and velocities of the moving interface is studied. Finally, the effect of uncertainty in material parameters on computed results is analyzed.

  11. Protected Vertices in Motzkin trees

    OpenAIRE

    Van Duzer, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we find recurrence relations for the asymptotic probability a vertex is $k$ protected in all Motzkin trees. We use a similar technique to calculate the probabilities for balanced vertices of rank $k$. From this we calculate upper and lower bounds for the probability a vertex is balanced and upper and lower bounds for the expected rank of balanced vertices.

  12. Measurements of Burnout Conditions for Flow of Boiling Water in Vertical Round Ducts (Part 2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Kurt M.; Persson, P.; Nilsson, L.; Eriksson, O.

    1963-06-15

    The present report deals with the results of the second phase of an experimental investigation of burnout conditions for flow of boiling water in vertical round ducts. The following ranges of variables were studied and 809 burnout measurements were obtained. Pressure 5. 3 < p < 37. 3 kg/cm{sup 2}; Inlet subcooling 56 < {delta}t{sub sub} < 212 deg C; Steam quality 0. 20 < x{sub BO} < 0.95; Heat Flux 50 < q/A < 515 W/cm{sup 2}; Mass velocity 100 < m'/F < 1890 kg/m{sup 2}s; Heated length 600 < L < 2500 mm; Duct diameter d = 10 mm. The results are presented in diagrams, where for a certain geometry, the burnout steam qualities, x{sub BO} , were plotted against the pressure with the surface heat flux as parameter. The data have been correlated by curves, and the scatter around the curves is less than {+-} 5 per cent. In the ranges investigated, the observed steam quality at burnout, X{sub BO} generally decreases with increasing heat flux and mass velocity but increases with increasing pressure. The data have been compared with the empirical correlation by Tong, and excellent agreement was found for pressures higher than 10 kg/cm{sup 2}.

  13. Peak power, force, and velocity during jump squats in professional rugby players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Anthony P; Unholz, Cedric N; Potts, Neill; Coleman, Simon G S

    2012-06-01

    Training at the optimal load for peak power output (PPO) has been proposed as a method for enhancing power output, although others argue that the force, velocity, and PPO are of interest across the full range of loads. The aim of this study was to examine the influence of load on PPO, peak barbell velocity (BV), and peak vertical ground reaction force (VGRF) during the jump squat (JS) in a group of professional rugby players. Eleven male professional rugby players (age, 26 ± 3 years; height, 1.83 ± 6.12 m; mass, 97.3 ± 11.6 kg) performed loaded JS at loads of 20-100% of 1 repetition maximum (1RM) JS. A force plate and linear position transducer, with a mechanical braking unit, were used to measure PPO, VGRF, and BV. Load had very large significant effects on PPO (p trained professional rugby players, the optimal load for eliciting PPO during the loaded JS in the range measured occurs at 20% 1RM JS, with decreases in PPO and BV, and increases in VGRF, as the load is increased, although greater PPO likely occurs without any additional load.

  14. Stopping power of Au for silver ions at low velocities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribas, R.V. E-mail: ribas@if.usp.br; Medina, N.H.; Added, N.; Oliveira, J.R.B.; Cybulska, E.W.; Rao, M.N.; Seale, W.A.; Brandolini, F.; Rizzutto, M.A.; Alcantara-Nunez, J.A

    2003-12-01

    Energy loss measurements for the slowing down of Ag ions in Au, in the velocity range 1.6v{sub 0}velocity, are presented. The measurements were performed using the Doppler shift technique and also with a new method, where a secondary beam of low velocity heavy ions is produced by elastic scattering of the accelerated beam. The results are compared to the SRIM2000 calculations (www.srim.org) and to recent measurements in this velocity region.

  15. Preliminary evaluation of vector flow and spectral velocity estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mads Møller; Pihl, Michael Johannes; Haugaard, Per

    Spectral estimation is considered as the golden standard in ultrasound velocity estimation. For spectral velocity estimation the blood flow angle is set by the ultrasound operator. Vector flow provides temporal and spatial estimates of the blood flow angle and velocity. A comparison of vector flow...... estimation and spectral estimates is presented. The variation of the blood flow angle and the effect on the velocity estimate is investigated. The right common carotid arteries of three healthy volunteers were scanned. Real-time spectral and vector flow data were obtained simultaneously from one range gate...

  16. Paintball velocity as a function of distance traveled

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pat Chiarawongse

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between the distance a paintball travels through air and its velocity is investigated by firing a paintball into a ballistic pendulum from a range of distances. The motion of the pendulum was filmed and analyzed by using video analysis software. The velocity of the paintball on impact was calculated from the maximum horizontal displacement of the pendulum. It is shown that the velocity of a paintball decreases exponentially with distance traveled, as expected. The average muzzle velocity of the paint balls is found with an estimate of the drag coefficient

  17. Paintball velocity as a function of distance traveled

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pat Chiarawongse

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between the distance a paintball travels through air and its velocity is investigated by firing a paintball into a ballistic pendulum from a range of distances. The motion of the pendulum was filmed and analyzed by using video analysis software. The velocity of the paintball on impact was calculated from the maximum horizontal displacement of the pendulum. It is shown that the velocity of a paintball decreases exponentially with distance traveled, as expected. The average muzzle velocity of the paint balls is found with an estimate of the drag coefficient.

  18. Microseismic monitoring of soft-rock landslide: contribution of a 3D velocity model for the location of seismic sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floriane, Provost; Jean-Philippe, Malet; Cécile, Doubre; Julien, Gance; Alessia, Maggi; Agnès, Helmstetter

    2015-04-01

    Characterizing the micro-seismic activity of landslides is an important parameter for a better understanding of the physical processes controlling landslide behaviour. However, the location of the seismic sources on landslides is a challenging task mostly because of (a) the recording system geometry, (b) the lack of clear P-wave arrivals and clear wave differentiation, (c) the heterogeneous velocities of the ground. The objective of this work is therefore to test whether the integration of a 3D velocity model in probabilistic seismic source location codes improves the quality of the determination especially in depth. We studied the clay-rich landslide of Super-Sauze (French Alps). Most of the seismic events (rockfalls, slidequakes, tremors...) are generated in the upper part of the landslide near the main scarp. The seismic recording system is composed of two antennas with four vertical seismometers each located on the east and west sides of the seismically active part of the landslide. A refraction seismic campaign was conducted in August 2014 and a 3D P-wave model has been estimated using the Quasi-Newton tomography inversion algorithm. The shots of the seismic campaign are used as calibration shots to test the performance of the different location methods and to further update the 3D velocity model. Natural seismic events are detected with a semi-automatic technique using a frequency threshold. The first arrivals are picked using a kurtosis-based method and compared to the manual picking. Several location methods were finally tested. We compared a non-linear probabilistic method coupled with the 3D P-wave model and a beam-forming method inverted for an apparent velocity. We found that the Quasi-Newton tomography inversion algorithm provides results coherent with the original underlaying topography. The velocity ranges from 500 m.s-1 at the surface to 3000 m.s-1 in the bedrock. For the majority of the calibration shots, the use of a 3D velocity model

  19. Waveform inversion of lateral velocity variation from wavefield source location perturbation

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Yun Seok

    2013-09-22

    It is challenge in waveform inversion to precisely define the deep part of the velocity model compared to the shallow part. The lateral velocity variation, or what referred to as the derivative of velocity with respect to the horizontal distance, with well log data can be used to update the deep part of the velocity model more precisely. We develop a waveform inversion algorithm to obtain the lateral velocity variation by inverting the wavefield variation associated with the lateral shot location perturbation. The gradient of the new waveform inversion algorithm is obtained by the adjoint-state method. Our inversion algorithm focuses on resolving the lateral changes of the velocity model with respect to a fixed reference vertical velocity profile given by a well log. We apply the method on a simple-dome model to highlight the methods potential.

  20. Vertical motion of particles in vibration-induced granular capillarity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Fengxian

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available When a narrow tube inserted into a static container filled with particles is subjected to vertical vibration, the particles rise in the tube, much resembling the ascending motion of a liquid column in a capillary tube. To gain insights on the particle dynamics dictating this phenomenon – which we term granular capillarity – we numerically investigate the system using the Discrete Element Method (DEM. We reproduce the dynamical process of the granular capillarity and analyze the vertical motion of the individual particles in the tube, as well as the average vertical velocities of the particles. Our simulations show that the height of the granular column fluctuates in a periodic or period-doubling manner as the tube vibrates, until a steady-state (capillary height is reached. Moreover, our results for the average vertical velocity of the particles in the tube at different radial positions suggest that granular convection is one major factor underlying the particle-based dynamics that lead to the granular capillarity phenomenon.

  1. Vertical variations of coral reef drag forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, Shai; Niewerth, Stephan; Koll, Katinka; Shavit, Uri; LWI Collaboration; Technion Collaboration

    2017-11-01

    Corals rely on water flow for the supply of nutrients, particles and energy. Therefore, modeling of processes that take place inside the reef, such as respiration and photosynthesis, relies on models that describe the flow and concentration fields. Due to the high spatial heterogeneity of branched coral reefs, depth average models are usually applied. Such an average approach is insufficient when the flow spatial variation inside the reef is of interest. We report on measurements of vertical variations of drag force that are needed for developing 3D flow models. Coral skeletons were densely arranged along a laboratory flume. Two corals were CT-scanned and replaced with horizontally sliced 3D printed replicates. Drag profiles were measured by connecting the slices to costume drag sensors and velocity profiles were measured using a LDV. The measured drag of whole colonies was in excellent agreement with previous studies; however, these studies never showed how drag varies inside the reef. In addition, these distributions of drag force showed an excellent agreement with momentum balance calculations. Based on the results, we propose a new drag model that includes the dispersive stresses, and consequently displays reduced vertical variations of the drag coefficient.

  2. A simple hydrodynamic model of a laminar free-surface jet in horizontal or vertical flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haustein, Herman D.; Harnik, Ron S.; Rohlfs, Wilko

    2017-08-01

    A useable model for laminar free-surface jet evolution during flight, for both horizontal and vertical jets, is developed through joint analytical, experimental, and simulation methods. The jet's impingement centerline velocity, recently shown to dictate stagnation zone heat transfer, encompasses the entire flow history: from pipe-flow velocity profile development to profile relaxation and jet contraction during flight. While pipe-flow is well-known, an alternative analytic solution is presented for the centerline velocity's viscous-driven decay. Jet-contraction is subject to influences of surface tension (We), pipe-flow profile development, in-flight viscous dissipation (Re), and gravity (Nj = Re/Fr). The effects of surface tension and emergence momentum flux (jet thrust) are incorporated analytically through a global momentum balance. Though emergence momentum is related to pipe flow development, and empirically linked to nominal pipe flow-length, it can be modified to incorporate low-Re downstream dissipation as well. Jet contraction's gravity dependence is extended beyond existing uniform-velocity theory to cases of partially and fully developed profiles. The final jet-evolution model relies on three empirical parameters and compares well to present and previous experiments and simulations. Hence, micro-jet flight experiments were conducted to fill-in gaps in the literature: jet contraction under mild gravity-effects, and intermediate Reynolds and Weber numbers (Nj = 5-8, Re = 350-520, We = 2.8-6.2). Furthermore, two-phase direct numerical simulations provided insight beyond the experimental range: Re = 200-1800, short pipes (Z = L/d . Re ≥ 0.01), variable nozzle wettability, and cases of no surface tension and/or gravity.

  3. Sound velocity during solidification in binary eutectic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioka, Hideaki; Kyoden, Tomoaki; Hachiga, Tadashi

    2017-12-01

    We applied an ultrasound technique to an advanced material process by investigating the behavior of sound velocity during solidification of binary alloy melts over a wide range of temperatures and compositions. To gain a basic understanding of the relationship between the sound velocity and phase change in binary eutectic systems, the sound velocity was measured in Pb-Sn and Bi-Sn alloys by the pulse transmission method. Based on the measurement results, we established a link between the sound velocity variation and the complex solidification process, including the initial appearance of undercooling and eutectic reaction. During solidification, alloys usually pass through a transient mushy state between the liquid and solid phases. Since the solid fraction is uniquely related to the sound velocity, we demonstrate that it is possible to identify the solid fraction in the mushy state using the sound velocity. At the eutectic point, a sudden change was observed in relation to the eutectic reaction, in which the sound velocity exhibited an abrupt transition under isothermal conditions. This sudden change in the sound velocity was evident even when the initial composition was below the maximum solid-solution limit, such as when the solute distribution coefficient was relatively large. This result suggests that the presence of a eutectic in the final solidified texture can be predicted using our sound velocity measurement system. Finally, we present a novel sound velocity phase diagram that provides a real-time state determination system using ultrasound during solidification process, such as casting.

  4. The dependence of sheet erosion velocity on slope angle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chernyshev Sergey Nikolaevich

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a method for estimating the erosion velocity on forested natural area. As a research object for testing the methodology the authors selected Neskuchny Garden - a city Park on the Moskva river embankment, named after the cognominal Palace of Catherine's age. Here, an almost horizontal surface III of the Moskva river terrace above the flood-plain is especially remarkable, accentuated by the steep sides of the ravine parallel to St. Andrew's, but short and nameless. The crests of the ravine sides are sharp, which is the evidence of its recent formation, but the old trees on the slopes indicate that it has not been growing for at least 100 years. Earlier Russian researchers defined vertical velocity of sheet erosion for different regions and slopes with different parent (in relation to the soil rocks. The comparison of the velocities shows that climatic conditions, in the first approximation, do not have a decisive influence on the erosion velocity of silt loam soils. The velocities on the shores of Issyk-Kul lake and in Moscow proved to be the same. But the composition of the parent rocks strongly affects the sheet erosion velocity. Even low-strength rock material reduces the velocity by times. Phytoindication method gives a real, physically explainable sheet erosion velocities. The speed is rather small but it should be considered when designing long-term structures on the slopes composed of dispersive soils. On the slopes composed of rocky soils sheet erosion velocity is so insignificant that it shouldn't be taken into account when designing. However, there may be other geological processes, significantly disturbing the stability of slopes connected with cracks.

  5. Training methods to improve vertical jump performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Gomez, J; Calbet, J A L

    2013-08-01

    This study aims to review the main methods used to improve vertical jump performance (VJP). Although many training routines have been proposed, these can be grouped into four main categories: plyometric training (PT), weight training (WT), whole body vibration training (VT) and electromyostimulation training (ET). PT enhances muscular force, the rate of force development (RFD), muscular power, muscle contraction velocity, cross-sectional area (CSA), muscle stiffness allowing greater storage and release of elastic energy. WT improve muscular force, velocity, power output, and RFD during jumping on a force plate, muscle hypertrophy and neural adaptations. One of the most effective methods to improve VJP is the combination of PT with WT, which takes advantage of the enhancement of maximal dynamic force through WT and the positive effects of PT on speed and force of muscle contraction through its specific effect on type II fibers. Some authors have found an increase in VJP with the use of VT while other did not see such an effect. However, it remains unknown by which mechanisms VT could enhance VJP. ET has been shown to elicit muscle hypertrophy. The VJP may be improved when ET is applied concomitantly with PT or practice of sports. In summary, scientific evidence suggests that the best way to improve VJP is through the combination of PT with WT. Further research is needed to establish if better results are possible by more complex strategies.

  6. Characterizing seasonal and diel vertical movement and habitat use of lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) in Clear Lake, Maine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zydlewski, Joseph D.; Gorsky, Dimitry; Balsey, David

    2016-01-01

    Seasonal and daily vertical activity of lake whitefish Coregonus clupeaformis was studied in Clear Lake, Maine (253 ha), using acoustic telemetry from November 2004 to June 2009. Twenty adult lake whitefish were tagged with acoustic tags that had either a depth sensor or both depth and temperature sensors to assess vertical habitat use at a seasonal and daily resolution. Vertical habitat selection varied seasonally and was strongly influenced by temperature. Between December and April, when the lake was covered with ice, surface temperature was below 2°C and tagged individuals occupied deep areas of the lake (∼15 m). After ice-out, fish ascended into shallow waters (∼5 m), responding to increased water temperature and possibly to greater foraging opportunity. When surface water temperatures exceeded 20°C, fish descended below the developing thermocline (∼9 m), where they remained until surface temperatures fell below 20°C; fish then ascended into shallower depths, presumably for feeding and spawning. Through the winter, fish remained in thermal habitats that were warmer than the surface temperatures; in the summer, they selected depths with thermal habitats below 15°C. Though the amplitude varied greatly across seasons, lake whitefish displayed a strong diurnal pattern of activity as measured by vertical velocities. Fish were twofold more active during spring, summer, and fall than during winter. Lake whitefish exhibited diel vertical migrations, rising in the water column during nighttime and occupying deeper waters during the day. This pattern was more pronounced in the spring and fall and far less prominent during winter and summer. The strong linkage between temperature and habitat use may limit the current range of lake whitefish and may be directly impacted by climatic change.

  7. New Urban Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru-Mihai CISMILIANU

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper develops a different approach for enhancing the performance of Vertical Axis Wind Turbines for the use in the urban or rural environment and remote isolated residential areas. Recently the vertical axis wind turbines (VAWT have become more attractive due to the major advantages of this type of turbines in comparison to the horizontal axis wind turbines. We aim to enhance the overall performance of the VAWT by adding a second set of blades (3 x 2=6 blades following the rules of biplane airplanes. The model has been made to operate at a maximum power in the range of the TSR between 2 to 2.5. The performances of the VAWT were investigated numerically and experimentally and justify the new proposed design.

  8. Buoyancy induced Couette-Poiseuille flow in a vertical microchannel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narahari, M.

    2017-10-01

    The fully developed buoyancy-induced (natural convective) Couette-Poiseuille flow in a vertical microchannel is investigated with the velocity slip and temperature jump boundary conditions. Closed form analytical solutions for the velocity and temperature fields are obtained. The effects of the fluid-wall interaction parameter, wall-ambient temperature difference ratio, Knudsen number, mixed convection parameter, and the dimensionless pressure gradient on the velocity, temperature, volume flow rate, heat flux between the plates and the Nusselt number have been discussed in detail through graphs. The outcomes of the investigation indicate that the volume flow rate increases with increasing values of mixed convection parameter, wall-ambient temperature difference ratio, and Knudsen number.

  9. Sodium Velocity Maps on Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, A. E.; Killen, R. M.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the current work was to measure two-dimensional maps of sodium velocities on the Mercury surface and examine the maps for evidence of sources or sinks of sodium on the surface. The McMath-Pierce Solar Telescope and the Stellar Spectrograph were used to measure Mercury spectra that were sampled at 7 milliAngstrom intervals. Observations were made each day during the period October 5-9, 2010. The dawn terminator was in view during that time. The velocity shift of the centroid of the Mercury emission line was measured relative to the solar sodium Fraunhofer line corrected for radial velocity of the Earth. The difference between the observed and calculated velocity shift was taken to be the velocity vector of the sodium relative to Earth. For each position of the spectrograph slit, a line of velocities across the planet was measured. Then, the spectrograph slit was stepped over the surface of Mercury at 1 arc second intervals. The position of Mercury was stabilized by an adaptive optics system. The collection of lines were assembled into an images of surface reflection, sodium emission intensities, and Earthward velocities over the surface of Mercury. The velocity map shows patches of higher velocity in the southern hemisphere, suggesting the existence of sodium sources there. The peak earthward velocity occurs in the equatorial region, and extends to the terminator. Since this was a dawn terminator, this might be an indication of dawn evaporation of sodium. Leblanc et al. (2008) have published a velocity map that is similar.

  10. Is Fish Response related to Velocity and Turbulence Magnitudes? (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, C. A.; Hockley, F. A.; Cable, J.

    2013-12-01

    Riverine fish are subject to heterogeneous velocities and turbulence, and may use this to their advantage by selecting regions which balance energy expenditure for station holding whilst maximising energy gain through feeding opportunities. This study investigated microhabitat selection by guppies (Poecilia reticulata) in terms of the three-dimensional velocity structure generated by idealised boulders in an experimental flume. Velocity and turbulence influenced intra-species variation in swimming behaviour with respect to size, sex and parasite intensity. With increasing body length, fish swam further and more frequently between boulder regions. Larger guppies spent more time in the high velocity and low turbulence region, whereas smaller guppies preferred the low velocity and high shear stress region directly behind the boulders. Male guppies selected the region of low velocity, indicating a possible reduced swimming ability due to hydrodynamic drag imposed by their fins. With increasing parasite (Gyrodactylus turnbulli) burden, fish preferentially selected the region of moderate velocity which had the lowest bulk measure of turbulence of all regions and was also the most spatially homogeneous velocity and turbulence region. Overall the least amount of time was spent in the recirculation zone which had the highest magnitude of shear stresses and mean vertical turbulent length scale to fish length ratio. Shear stresses were a factor of two greater than in the most frequented moderate velocity region, while mean vertical turbulent length scale to fish length ratio were six times greater. Indeed the mean longitudinal turbulent scale was 2-6 times greater than the fish length in all regions. While it is impossible to discriminate between these two turbulence parameters (shear stress and turbulent length to fish length ratio) in influencing the fish preference, our study infers that there is a bias towards fish spending more time in a region where both the bulk

  11. Experimental data on load test and performance parameters of a LENZ type vertical axis wind turbine in open environment condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivamani, Seralathan; T, Micha Premkumar; Sohail, Mohammed; T, Mohan; V, Hariram

    2017-12-01

    Performance and load testing data of a three bladed two stage LENZ type vertical axis wind turbine from the experiments conducted in an open environment condition at Hindustan Institute of Technology and Science, Chennai (location 23.2167°N, 72.6833°E) are presented here. Low-wind velocity ranging from 2 to 11 m/s is available everywhere irrespective of climatic seasons and this data provides the support to the researchers using numerical tool to validate and develop an enhanced Lenz type design. Raw data obtained during the measurements are processed and presented in the form so as to compare with other typical outputs. The data is measured at different wind speeds prevalent in the open field condition ranging from 3 m/s to 9 m/s.

  12. A Compact Vertical Scanner for Atomic Force Microscopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Hong Park

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available A compact vertical scanner for an atomic force microscope (AFM is developed. The vertical scanner is designed to have no interference with the optical microscope for viewing the cantilever. The theoretical stiffness and resonance of the scanner are derived and verified via finite element analysis. An optimal design process that maximizes the resonance frequency is performed. To evaluate the scanner’s performance, experiments are performed to evaluate the travel range, resonance frequency, and feedback noise level. In addition, an AFM image using the proposed vertical scanner is generated.

  13. Kaleidoscopic motion and velocity illusions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helm, P.A. van der

    2007-01-01

    A novel class of vivid motion and velocity illusions for contrast-defined shapes is presented and discussed. The illusions concern a starlike wheel that, physically, rotates with constant velocity between stationary starlike inner and outer shapes but that, perceptually, shows pulsations, jolts

  14. A Compact Vertical Scanner for Atomic Force Microscopes

    OpenAIRE

    Jae Hong Park; Jaesool Shim; Dong-Yeon Lee

    2010-01-01

    A compact vertical scanner for an atomic force microscope (AFM) is developed. The vertical scanner is designed to have no interference with the optical microscope for viewing the cantilever. The theoretical stiffness and resonance of the scanner are derived and verified via finite element analysis. An optimal design process that maximizes the resonance frequency is performed. To evaluate the scanner’s performance, experiments are performed to evaluate the travel range, resonance frequency, an...

  15. Velocity Structure and Spatio-temporal Evolution in the Head Turbidity Currents based on Ultrasound Doppler Velocity Profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Shun; Cesare Giovanni, De; Takeda, Yasushi; Yoshida, Taiki; Tasaka, Yuji; Sakaguchi, Hide

    2017-04-01

    Particle laden flow or turbidity current along the sea floor are important as a sediment conveyer and a formation factor of the submarine topography in the geological field. Especially, in the head of the flow, the kinematic energy is frequently exchanged through the boundary of the ambient water and the seabed floor, and it dominants the substantial dynamics of turbidity currents. An understanding of its turbulence structure helps to predict the sediment transport and layer development processes. To comprehend its dynamics precisely, flume test were conducted with continuously fed fluid quartz flour mixture supply. The flow velocities were measured at two different angles by the ultrasound Doppler velocity profiler UVP and both velocity components, in flow direction and on the vertical axis, were extracted. The fundamental velocity structure corresponds to the theories found in literature. Its spatio-temporal evolution was examined from the velocity distribution profiles along the downstream directions. Additionally, developing processes of head structures were also discussed through hydraulic statistic values such as mean velocity, Reynolds stress, and turbulent kinematic energy.

  16. Trade Liberalisation and Vertical Integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Peter Arendorf; Laugesen, Anders Rosenstand

    producers face decisions on exporting, vertical integration of intermediate-input production, and whether the intermediate-input production should be offshored to a low-wage country. We find that the fractions of final-good producers that pursue either vertical integration, offshoring, or exporting are all......We build a three-country model of international trade in final goods and intermediate inputs and study the relation between four different types of trade liberalisation and vertical integration. Firms are heterogeneous with respect to both productivity and factor (headquarter) intensity. Final-good...... increasing when intermediate-input trade or final-goods trade is liberalised. Finally, we provide guidance for testing the open-economy property rights theory of the firm using firm-level data and surprisingly show that the relationship between factor (headquarter) intensity and the likelihood of vertical...

  17. Horizontal and Vertical Line Designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, Pat

    2003-01-01

    Presents an art lesson in which students learn about the artist Piet Mondrian and create their own abstract artworks. Focuses on geometric shapes using horizontal and vertical lines. Includes background information about the artist. (CMK)

  18. Vertical axis wind turbine airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivcov, Vladimir; Krivospitski, Vladimir; Maksimov, Vasili; Halstead, Richard; Grahov, Jurij Vasiljevich

    2012-12-18

    A vertical axis wind turbine airfoil is described. The wind turbine airfoil can include a leading edge, a trailing edge, an upper curved surface, a lower curved surface, and a centerline running between the upper surface and the lower surface and from the leading edge to the trailing edge. The airfoil can be configured so that the distance between the centerline and the upper surface is the same as the distance between the centerline and the lower surface at all points along the length of the airfoil. A plurality of such airfoils can be included in a vertical axis wind turbine. These airfoils can be vertically disposed and can rotate about a vertical axis.

  19. Effects of Foam Rolling on Vertical Jump Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Jones

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Foam rolling is a popular activity utilized by strength and conditioning coaches as it is believed to increase muscle length and break up fibrous adhesions located in connective tissue. However, there is little research investigating the effects of foam rolling on athletic performance. Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of lower body foam rolling on vertical jump performance. Methods: Twenty males (age 24.05 ± 2.02 years; height 177.43 ± 6.31 cm; mass 81.41 ± 8.76 kg volunteered to participate. Subjects completed three days of testing, separated by at least twenty-four hours. Day one consisted of baseline vertical jumps on a force plate, followed by familiarization with foam rolling and control protocols. Subjects returned on days two and three and performed 30-second bouts of lower body foam rolling or mimicked foam rolling movements on a skateboard followed by vertical jumps on a force plate. The highest jump from each day was used for statistical analyses. Results: Repeated measures ANOVAs revealed no significant differences in Jump height, impulse, relative ground reaction force, or take-off velocity between conditions. Conclusion: 30-second bouts of lower body foam rolling do not improve vertical jump performance. Keywords: Dynamic Warm-Up, Foam Rolling, Vertical Jump

  20. Diffraction imaging and velocity analysis using oriented velocity continuation

    KAUST Repository

    Decker, Luke

    2014-08-05

    We perform seismic diffraction imaging and velocity analysis by separating diffractions from specular reflections and decomposing them into slope components. We image slope components using extrapolation in migration velocity in time-space-slope coordinates. The extrapolation is described by a convection-type partial differential equation and implemented efficiently in the Fourier domain. Synthetic and field data experiments show that the proposed algorithm is able to detect accurate time-migration velocities by automatically measuring the flatness of events in dip-angle gathers.

  1. Loading effects in GPS vertical displacement time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memin, A.; Boy, J. P.; Santamaría-Gómez, A.; Watson, C.; Gravelle, M.; Tregoning, P.

    2015-12-01

    Surface deformations due to loading, with yet no comprehensive representation, account for a significant part of the variability in geodetic time series. We assess effects of loading in GPS vertical displacement time series at several frequency bands. We compare displacement derived from up-to-date loading models to two global sets of positioning time series, and investigate how they are reduced looking at interannual periods (> 2 months), intermediate periods (> 7 days) and the whole spectrum (> 1day). We assess the impact of interannual loading on estimating velocities. We compute atmospheric loading effects using surface pressure fields from the ECMWF. We use the inverted barometer (IB) hypothesis valid for periods exceeding a week to describe the ocean response to the pressure forcing. We used general circulation ocean model (ECCO and GLORYS) to account for wind, heat and fresh water flux. We separately use the Toulouse Unstructured Grid Ocean model (TUGO-m), forced by air pressure and winds, to represent the dynamics of the ocean response at high frequencies. The continental water storage is described using GLDAS/Noah and MERRA-land models. Non-hydrology loading reduces the variability of the observed vertical displacement differently according to the frequency band. The hydrology loading leads to a further reduction mostly at annual periods. ECMWF+TUGO-m better agrees with vertical surface motion than the ECMWF+IB model at all frequencies. The interannual deformation is time-correlated at most of the locations. It is adequately described by a power-law process of spectral index varying from -1.5 to -0.2. Depending on the power-law parameters, the predicted non-linear deformation due to mass loading variations leads to vertical velocity biases up to 0.7 mm/yr when estimated from 5 years of continuous observations. The maximum velocity bias can reach up to 1 mm/yr in regions around the southern Tropical band.

  2. Study of nitrogen two-phase flow pressure drop in horizontal and vertical orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koettig, T.; Kirsch, H.; Santandrea, D.; Bremer, J.

    2017-12-01

    The large-scale liquid argon Short Baseline Neutrino Far-detector located at Fermilab is designed to detect neutrinos allowing research in the field of neutrino oscillations. It will be filled with liquid argon and operate at almost ambient pressure. Consequently, its operation temperature is determined at about 87 K. The detector will be surrounded by a thermal shield, which is actively cooled with boiling nitrogen at a pressure of about 2.8 bar absolute, the respective saturation pressure of nitrogen. Due to strict temperature gradient constraints, it is important to study the two-phase flow pressure drop of nitrogen along the cooling circuit of the thermal shield in different orientations of the flow with respect to gravity. An experimental setup has been built in order to determine the two-phase flow pressure drop in nitrogen in horizontal, vertical upward and vertical downward direction. The measurements have been conducted under quasi-adiabatic conditions and at a saturation pressure of 2.8 bar absolute. The mass velocity has been varied in the range of 20 kg·m‑2·s‑1 to 70 kg·m‑2·s‑1 and the pressure drop data has been recorded scanning the two-phase region from vapor qualities close to zero up to 0.7. The experimental data will be compared with several established predictions of pressure drop e.g. Mueller-Steinhagen and Heck by using the void fraction correlation of Rouhani.

  3. Augmentation of heat transfer in a bubble agitated vertical rectangular channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Asish; Dutta, Tapas Kumar; Ghosh, Dibyendu Narayan

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental study of convective heat transfer between three parallel vertical plates symmetrically spaced with and without bubble agitation to ascertain the degree of augmentation of the heat transfer coefficients due to agitation. The centre plate was electrically heated, while the other side plates were water-cooled forming two successive parallel vertical rectangular channels of dimensions 20 cm × 3.5 cm × 35 cm (length W, gap L, height H) each. At the bottom of the hot and cold plates air spargers were fitted. Water/ethylene glycol (100%) was used to fill the channels. The superficial gas velocity ranged from 0.0016 to 0.01 m/s. Top, bottom and sides of the channels were open to the water/ethylene glycol in the chamber which is the novel aspect of this study. Experimental data have been correlated as under: Natural convective heat transfer: Nu = 0.60 Gr 0.29, r = 0.96, σ = 0.186, 1.17 E6 < Gr < 1.48 E7; Bubble agitated heat transfer: St = 0.11( ReFrPr 2)-0.23, r = 0.82, σ = 0.002, 1.20 E-2 < ( ReFrPr 2) < 1.36 E2.

  4. Modelling vertical uniform contact stress of heavy vehicle tyres

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Steenkamp, Anton J

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available over the selected operating range of 25 kN to 45 kN which is the typical load range for heavy vehicle tyres due to legal axle load limits. The polynomial formulas require only the tyre inflation pressure and vertical tyre load as inputs, in order...

  5. Backward integration, forward integration, and vertical foreclosure

    OpenAIRE

    Spiegel, Yossi

    2013-01-01

    I show that partial vertical integration may either alleviates or exacerbate the concern for vertical foreclosure relative to full vertical integration and I examine its implications for consumer welfare.

  6. Photon Doppler Velocimetry Measurements of Transverse Surface Velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Christopher R.; Lajeunesse, Jeff; Sable, Peter; Hatzenbihler, Ashley; Borg, John P.

    2017-06-01

    Photon Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) is a prominent optical diagnostic used for measuring displacement or velocity in dynamic experiments. A table-top experiment consisting of a 31mm diameter metal wheel mounted in a hand tool was setup to make steady state transverse surface velocity measurements using PDV for a range of velocities and surface preparations. The experiment consisted of PDV collimators positioned with respect to either the side or bottom face of the wheel at various angles to resolve transverse velocity components. Different preparations for the surface of the wheel were explored such as polishing, laser etching, chemical etching, mechanical milling, and retroreflective microspheres. Light return and transverse surface velocity were recorded for each surface preparation as a function of angle. Polished aluminum allowed adequate light return for only one degree from the normal of the wheel, while the retroreflective microspheres exhibited usable light for upwards of 30 degrees. Velocity measurements were performed over a range of 0 to 45 degrees from the surface normal of the rotating wheel for each surface preparation. Velocity measurements from the PDV experiments show good accuracy with theoretical wheel velocities between 0 and 10 m/s.

  7. Soil-Pile Interaction in the Pile Vertical Vibration Based on Fictitious Soil-Pile Model

    OpenAIRE

    Deng, Guodong; Zhang, Jiasheng; Wu, Wenbing; Shi, Xiong; Meng, Fei

    2014-01-01

    By introducing the fictitious soil-pile model, the soil-pile interaction in the pile vertical vibration is investigated. Firstly, assuming the surrounding soil of pile to be viscoelastic material and considering its vertical wave effect, the governing equations of soil-pile system subjected to arbitrary harmonic dynamic force are founded based on the Euler-Bernoulli rod theory. Secondly, the analytical solution of velocity response in frequency domain and its corresponding semianalytical solu...

  8. Experimental study of single taylor bubbles rising in stagnant liquid mixtures inside of vertical tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azevedo, Marcos B. de; Faccini, Jose L.H. [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Su, Jian, E-mail: sujian@lasme.coppe.ufrj.br [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (PEN/COPPE), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2015-07-01

    The present work reports an experimental study of single Taylor bubbles rising in vertical tubes filled with water-glycerin mixtures by using the pulse-echo ultrasonic technique. A 2m long acrylic tube with inner diameter of 24 mm was used in the experiments. Initially, the tube was sealed at the ends and filled partially with the liquid mixtures to leave an air pocket of length L{sub 0} at the top end. A Taylor bubble was formed by the inversion of the tube. The rising bubbles were detected by ultrasonic transducers located at the upper part of the tube. The velocity, the length and the pro le of the bubbles and the thickness of the liquid lm around them were obtained from the ultrasonic signals processing. The liquid lm thickness in the vertical tube was also determined by a graphic method that relates the bubble length L{sub b} with the initial length of the air pocket L{sub 0}. It was observed that the bubble velocity decreased with increasing viscosity, while the lm thickness increased. It was shown that the liquid lm thickness determined by the graphic method fitted well the higher viscosities data, but overestimated the lower viscosities data. Additionally, the results indicated that some correlations developed to estimate the thickness of liquid films falling down inside/outside of tubes and down a plane surface could be applied to estimate the thickness of liquid films falling around Taylor bubbles in an Inverse Viscosity Number (N{sub f} ) range different to those considered in the literature. (author)

  9. Explosive movement in the older men: analysis and comparative study of vertical jump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argaud, Sébastien; Pairot de Fontenay, Benoit; Blache, Yoann; Monteil, Karine

    2017-10-01

    Loss of power has been demonstrated to have severe functional consequences to perform physical daily living tasks in old age. This study aimed to assess how moment and velocity were affected for each joint of the lower limbs during squat jumping for older men in comparison with young adults. Twenty-one healthy older men (74.5 ± 4.6 years) and 22 young men (21.8 ± 2.8 years) performed maximal squat jumps. Inverse dynamics procedure was used to compute the net joint power, moment and velocity produced at the hip, knee and ankle joints. Vertical jump height of the elderly was 64 % lower than the young adults. The maximal power of the body mass center (P maxbmc ) was 57 % lower in the older population. For the instant at P maxbmc , the vertical ground reaction force and the vertical velocity of the body mass center were 26 % and 35 % less in the older adults than in the young adults, respectively (p vertical ground reaction force; p vertical jump. This smaller power resulted from both a lower moment and angular velocity produced at each joint.

  10. A Newly Reanalyzed Dataset of GPS-determined Antarctic Vertical Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, I.; King, M.; Clarke, P. J.; Penna, N. T.; Lavallee, D. A.; Whitehouse, P.

    2010-12-01

    Accurate and precise measurements of vertical crustal motion offer useful constraints on glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) models. Here we present a newly reprocessed data set of GPS-determined vertical rates for Antarctica. We give details of the global reanalysis of 15-years of GPS data, the overarching aim of which is to achieve homogeneous station coordinate time series, and hence surface velocities, for GPS receivers that are in regions of GIA interest in Antarctica. The means by which the reference frame is realized is crucial to obtaining accurate rates. Considerable effort has been spent on achieving a good global distribution of GPS stations, using data from IGS and other permanently recording stations, as well as a number of episodic campaigns in Antarctica. Additionally, we have focused on minimizing the inevitable imbalance in the number of sites in the northern and southern hemispheres. We align our daily non-fiducial solutions to ITRF2005, i.e. a CM frame. We present the results of investigations into the reference frame realization, and also consider a GPS-derived realization of the frame, and its effect on the vertical velocities. Vertical velocities are obtained for approximately 40 Antarctic locations. We compare our GPS derived Antarctic vertical rates with those predicted by the Ivins and James and ICE-5G models, after converting to a CE frame. We also compare to previously published GPS rates. Our GPS velocities are being used to help tune, and bound errors of, a new GIA model also presented in this session.

  11. Method of design for vertical oil shale retorting vessels and retorting therewith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Adam A.

    1978-01-03

    A method of designing the gas flow parameters of a vertical shaft oil shale retorting vessel involves determining the proportion of gas introduced in the bottom of the vessel and into intermediate levels in the vessel to provide for lateral distribution of gas across the vessel cross section, providing mixing with the uprising gas, and determining the limiting velocity of the gas through each nozzle. The total quantity of gas necessary for oil shale treatment in the vessel may be determined and the proportion to be injected into each level is then determined based on the velocity relation of the orifice velocity and its feeder manifold gas velocity. A limitation is placed on the velocity of gas issuing from an orifice by the nature of the solid being treated, usually physical tests of gas velocity impinging the solid.

  12. Analytical Ultracentrifugation: Sedimentation Velocity and Sedimentation Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, James L.; Lary, Jeffrey W.; Moody, Thomas; Laue, Thomas M.

    2009-01-01

    Analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) is a versatile and powerful method for the quantitative analysis of macromolecules in solution. AUC has broad applications for the study of biomacromolecules in a wide range of solvents and over a wide range of solute concentrations. Three optical systems are available for the analytical ultracentrifuge (absorbance, interference and fluorescence) that permit precise and selective observation of sedimentation in real time. In particular, the fluorescence system provides a new way to extend the scope of AUC to probe the behavior of biological molecules in complex mixtures and at high solute concentrations. In sedimentation velocity, the movement of solutes in high centrifugal fields is interpreted using hydrodynamic theory to define the size, shape and interactions of macromolecules. Sedimentation equilibrium is a thermodynamic method where equilibrium concentration gradients at lower centrifugal fields are analyzed to define molecule mass, assembly stoichiometry, association constants and solution nonideality. Using specialized sample cells and modern analysis software, researchers can use sedimentation velocity to determine the homogeneity of a sample and define whether it undergoes concentration-dependent association reactions. Subsequently, more thorough model-dependent analysis of velocity and equilibrium experiments can provide a detailed picture of the nature of the species present in solution and their interactions. PMID:17964931

  13. Numerical study of combined convection heat transfer for thermally developing upward flow in a vertical cylinder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Hussein A.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of the laminar upward mixed convection heat transfer for thermally developing air flow in the entrance region of a vertical circular cylinder under buoyancy effect and wall heat flux boundary condition has been numerically investigated. An implicit finite difference method and the Gauss elimination technique have been used to solve the governing partial differential equations of motion (Navier Stocks equations for two-dimensional model. This investigation covers Reynolds number range from 400 to 1600, heat flux is varied from 70 W/m2 to 400 W/m2. The results present the dimensionless temperature profile, dimensionless velocity profile, dimensionless surface temperature along the cylinder, and the local Nusselt number variation with the dimensionless axial distance Z+. The dimensionless velocity and temperature profile results have revealed that the secondary flow created by natural convection have a significant effect on the heat transfer process. The results have also shown an increase in the Nusselt number values as the heat flux increases. The results have been compared with the available experimental study and with the available analytical solution for pure forced convection in terms of the local Nusselt number. The comparison has shown satisfactory agreement. .

  14. Incorporation of planetary boundary layer dynamics in a numerical model of long-range air-pollutant transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrakov, D.; Djolov, G.; Yordanov, D.

    1983-05-01

    A numerical model of long-range air-pollutant transport is developed, in which a simple planetary boundary layer (PBL) is incorporated. The pollution field results from the superposition of discrete ‘puffs’ of pollutants which are emitted periodically in different regions. The instantaneous sources in the different cells are approximated by rotational ellipsoids with Gaussian concentration distributions. The puff movement due to the external flow is followed by the displacement of the centroid. The expansion of the puff is modelled by nonisotropic Fickian diffusion. A simple barotropic PBL model is used to study the PBL influence. This model gives the flow velocity and the vertical turbulent exchange coefficient, which depend on the external parameters Ro and S — Rossby number and stratification parameter. The model performance is investigated by special test runs. The dependence of the pollution field on source height, stability conditions and vertical motions is shown.

  15. Vertical compact torus injection into the STOR-M tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dazhi

    experiments have been performed in STOR-M by using the USCTI device (University of Saskatchewan Compact Torus Injector). To perform vertical injection, the original USCTI has been modified by attaching a segment of 90° curved tube to deflect CT injection from horizontal to vertical direction. Therefore, a CT formed and accelerated by USCTI in horizontal direction will change its trajectory to vertical and be injected into STOR-M through a vertical port. The main findings of this thesis are: (1) The horizontally injected CT could be deflected to the vertical direction with a velocity ˜ 130 kms-1 and penetrated into the STOR-M plasma by the curved drift tube. A significant increase in the CT velocity after passing the curved tube, from 130 kms-1 to 270 kms-1, has been achieved by further attaching a copper inner electrode. (2) Vertical compact torus injection for fuelling a tokamak has been successfully demonstrated for the first time. Disruption-free discharges of STOR-M have been obtained with vertical CT injection. Prompt increases both in line-averaged density and in the soft X-ray emission level have been observed. The typical density increase is about 20% within 600 mus. Some signatures of confinement improvement of the STOR-M plasma induced by vertical CT injection have also been observed.

  16. Vertical CNT-Si photodiode array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahnood, Arman; Zhou, Hang; Dai, Qing; Vygranenko, Yuri; Suzuki, Yuji; Esmaeili-Rad, Mr; Amaratunga, Gehan; Nathan, Arokia

    2013-09-11

    A photodiode consisting of nanopillars of thin-film silicon p-i-n on an array of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with a noncontinuous cathode electrode is demonstrated. The structure exploits the intrinsic enhancement of the CNTs' electric field, which leads to reduction in the photodiode's operating voltage and response time and enhancement of optical coupling due to better light trapping, as compared with the conventional planar photodiode. These improvements translate to higher resolution and higher frame rate flat-panel imaging systems for a broad range of applications, including computed tomography and particle detection.

  17. Analysis of thin film flow over a vertical oscillating belt with a second grade fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taza Gul

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available An analysis is performed to study the unsteady thin film flow of a second grade fluid over a vertical oscillating belt. The governing equation for velocity field with appropriate boundary conditions is solved analytically using Adomian decomposition method (ADM. Expressions for velocity field have been obtained. Optimal asymptotic method (OHAM has also been used for comparison. The effects of Stocks number, frequency parameter and pressure gradient parameters have been sketched graphically and discussed.

  18. Magnetogenesis through Relativistic Velocity Shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Evan

    Magnetic fields at all scales are prevalent in our universe. However, current cosmological models predict that initially the universe was bereft of large-scale fields. Standard magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) does not permit magnetogenesis; in the MHD Faraday's law, the change in magnetic field B depends on B itself. Thus if B is initially zero, it will remain zero for all time. A more accurate physical model is needed to explain the origins of the galactic-scale magnetic fields observed today. In this thesis, I explore two velocity-driven mechanisms for magnetogenesis in 2-fluid plasma. The first is a novel kinematic 'battery' arising from convection of vorticity. A coupling between thermal and plasma oscillations, this non-relativistic mechanism can operate in flows that are incompressible, quasi-neutral and barotropic. The second mechanism results from inclusion of thermal effects in relativistic shear flow instabilities. In such flows, parallel perturbations are ubiquitously unstable at small scales, with growth rates of order with the plasma frequency over a defined range of parameter-space. Of these two processes, instabilities seem far more likely to account for galactic magnetic fields. Stable kinematic effects will, at best, be comparable to an ideal Biermann battery, which is suspected to be orders of magnitude too weak to produce the observed galactic fields. On the other hand, instabilities grow until saturation is reached, a topic that has yet to be explored in detail on cosmological scales. In addition to investigating these magnetogenesis sources, I derive a general dispersion relation for three dimensional, warm, two species plasma with discontinuous shear flow. The mathematics of relativistic plasma, sheared-flow instability and the Biermann battery are also discussed.

  19. Inertial Effects on the Vertical Transport of Suspended Particles in a Turbulent Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, David; Chamecki, Marcelo

    2017-11-01

    In many atmospheric flows, a dispersed phase is actively suspended by turbulence, whose competition with gravitational settling ultimately dictates its vertical distribution. Examples of dispersed phases include snow, sea-spray droplets, dust, or sand, where individual elements of much larger density than the surrounding air are carried by turbulent motions after emission from the surface. In cases where the particle is assumed to deviate from local fluid motions only by its gravitational settling (i.e., they are inertialess), traditional flux balances predict a power-law dependence of particle concentration with height. It is unclear, however, how particle inertia influences this relationship, and this question is the focus of this work. Direct numerical simulations are conducted of turbulent open-channel flow, laden with Lagrangian particles of specified inertia; in this way the study focuses on the turbulent transport which occurs in the lowest few meters of the planetary boundary layer, in regions critical for connecting emission fluxes to the fluxes felt by the full-scale boundary layer. Simulations over a wide range of particle Stokes number, while holding the dimensionless settling velocity constant, are performed to understand the role of particle inertia on vertical dispersion. It is found that particles deviate from their inertialess behaviour in ways that are not easily captured by traditional theory; concentrations are reduced with increasing Stokes number. Furthermore, a similarity-based eddy diffusivity for particle concentration fails as particles experience inertial acceleration, precluding a closed-form solution for particle concentration as in the case of inertialess particles. The primary consequence of this result is that typical flux parametrizations connecting surface emission models (e.g., saltation models or sea-spray generation functions) to elevated boundary conditions may overestimate particle concentrations due to the reduced vertical

  20. Introduction to vector velocity imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Udesen, Jesper; Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov

    over the full region of interest and a real time image at a frame rate of 20 Hz can be displayed. Real time videos have been obtained from both our research systems and from commercial BK Medical scanners. The vector velocity images reveal the full complexity of the human blood flow. It is easy to see...... direction and the correct velocity magnitude for any orientation of the vessels. At complex geometries like bifurcations, branching and for valves the approach reveals how the velocity changes magnitude and direction over the cardiac cycle. Vector velocity reveals a wealth of new information that now...... is accessible to the ultrasound community. The displaying and studying of this information is challenging as complex flow changes rapidly over the cardiac cycle....

  1. Kriging interpolating cosmic velocity field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yu; Zhang, Jun; Jing, Yipeng; Zhang, Pengjie

    2015-10-01

    Volume-weighted statistics of large-scale peculiar velocity is preferred by peculiar velocity cosmology, since it is free of the uncertainties of galaxy density bias entangled in observed number density-weighted statistics. However, measuring the volume-weighted velocity statistics from galaxy (halo/simulation particle) velocity data is challenging. Therefore, the exploration of velocity assignment methods with well-controlled sampling artifacts is of great importance. For the first time, we apply the Kriging interpolation to obtain the volume-weighted velocity field. Kriging is a minimum variance estimator. It predicts the most likely velocity for each place based on the velocity at other places. We test the performance of Kriging quantified by the E-mode velocity power spectrum from simulations. Dependences on the variogram prior used in Kriging, the number nk of the nearby particles to interpolate, and the density nP of the observed sample are investigated. First, we find that Kriging induces 1% and 3% systematics at k ˜0.1 h Mpc-1 when nP˜6 ×1 0-2(h-1 Mpc )-3 and nP˜6 ×1 0-3(h-1 Mpc )-3 , respectively. The deviation increases for decreasing nP and increasing k . When nP≲6 ×1 0-4(h-1 Mpc )-3 , a smoothing effect dominates small scales, causing significant underestimation of the velocity power spectrum. Second, increasing nk helps to recover small-scale power. However, for nP≲6 ×1 0-4(h-1 Mpc )-3 cases, the recovery is limited. Finally, Kriging is more sensitive to the variogram prior for a lower sample density. The most straightforward application of Kriging on the cosmic velocity field does not show obvious advantages over the nearest-particle method [Y. Zheng, P. Zhang, Y. Jing, W. Lin, and J. Pan, Phys. Rev. D 88, 103510 (2013)] and could not be directly applied to cosmology so far. However, whether potential improvements may be achieved by more delicate versions of Kriging is worth further investigation.

  2. Crustal Velocity Model of the Altai-Sayan Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrend, M. J.; Mackey, K. G.

    2016-12-01

    We have developed a crustal velocity model for the the region encompassed by the Altai-Sayan Seismic Network of South-Central Russia (45o-55o N. X 79o-98o E.). Geographically, the study area includes the Altai and Sayan Mountain Ranges, Western Mongolia, Eastern Kazakhstan, and Northwest China. To develop our model we used phase arrival data from approximately 175 larger earthquakes recorded by the Altai-Sayan Seismic Network between 1977 and 1981 and reported in the bulletin Materialy po Seismichnosti Sibiri. To develop our model, we divided the region into 1o N-S x 2o E-W cells. Events within each cell, plus a small surrounding area, were relocated multiple times using a grid-search routine, in effort to determine the best fitting Pg and Sg velocities. Pg and Sg phase arrivals are generally from the 100-1000 km range and represent secondary arriving phases. These arrivals are dominant in this region and we consider the time picks and phase identifications to be reliable. Velocities tested range from 5.650 to 6.350 km/s for Pg and from 3.310 to 3.710 km/s for Sg. The best fitting velocities for each cell were then assigned to the geographic coordinates of the cell's center point. The standard Jeffreys-Bullen model was used for Pn velocities. The best fitting Pg and Sg velocities are those that minimize the average event residuals in a cell. High residual arrivals were omitted from the location process. In our model, Pg velocities range from 5.975-6.325 km/s, while Sg velocities range from 3.510-3.630 km/s, though the higher velocity extremes are constrained by one event and are not statistically significant. The average Pg velocity of the study area was, 6.147 km/s, and average Sg, 3.576 km/s. Geologically, these velocities are associated with the Central Asiatic Foldbelt and are consistent with regional crustal velocities along the southern edge of the Siberian Craton to the East as determined by previous studies.

  3. Online Wavelet Complementary velocity Estimator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righettini, Paolo; Strada, Roberto; KhademOlama, Ehsan; Valilou, Shirin

    2018-01-02

    In this paper, we have proposed a new online Wavelet Complementary velocity Estimator (WCE) over position and acceleration data gathered from an electro hydraulic servo shaking table. This is a batch estimator type that is based on the wavelet filter banks which extract the high and low resolution of data. The proposed complementary estimator combines these two resolutions of velocities which acquired from numerical differentiation and integration of the position and acceleration sensors by considering a fixed moving horizon window as input to wavelet filter. Because of using wavelet filters, it can be implemented in a parallel procedure. By this method the numerical velocity is estimated without having high noise of differentiators, integration drifting bias and with less delay which is suitable for active vibration control in high precision Mechatronics systems by Direct Velocity Feedback (DVF) methods. This method allows us to make velocity sensors with less mechanically moving parts which makes it suitable for fast miniature structures. We have compared this method with Kalman and Butterworth filters over stability, delay and benchmarked them by their long time velocity integration for getting back the initial position data. Copyright © 2017 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Streamwise decrease of the 'unsteady' virtual velocity of gravel tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klösch, Mario; Gmeiner, Philipp; Habersack, Helmut

    2017-04-01

    Gravel tracers are usually inserted and transported on top of the riverbed, before they disperse vertically and laterally due to periods of intense bedload, the passage of bed forms, lateral channel migration and storage on bars. Buried grains have a lower probability of entrainment, resulting in a reduction of overall mobility, and, on average, in a deceleration of the particles with distance downstream. As a consequence, the results derived from tracer experiments and their significance for gravel transport may depend on the time scale of the investigation period, complicating the comparison of results from different experiments. We developed a regression method, which establishes a direct link between the transport velocity and the unsteady flow variables to yield an 'unsteady' virtual velocity, while considering the tracer slowdown with distance downstream in the regression. For that purpose, the two parameters of a linear excess shear velocity formula (the critical shear velocity u*c and coefficient a) were defined as functions of the travelled distance since the tracer's insertion. Application to published RFID tracer data from the Mameyes River, Puerto Rico, showed that during the investigation period the critical shear velocity u*c of tracers representing the median bed particle diameter (0.11 m) increased from 0.36 m s-1 to 0.44 m s-1, while the coefficient a decreased from the dimensionless value of 4.22 to 3.53, suggesting a reduction of the unsteady virtual velocity at the highest shear velocity in the investigation period from 0.40 m s-1 to 0.08 m s-1. Consideration of the tracer slowdown improved the root mean square error of the calculated mean displacements of the median bed particle diameter from 8.82 m to 0.34 m. As in previous work these results suggest the need of considering the history of transport when deriving travel distances and travel velocities, depending on the aim of the tracer study. The introduced method now allows estimating the

  5. Effect of flow distributors on uniformity of velocity profile in a baghouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chi-Jen Chen; Man-Ting Cheng [Tajen Institute of Technology, Ping-Tung Hsien (Taiwan). Department of Environmental Engineering and Science

    2005-07-01

    In recent years, baghouses have been used as an alternative technology for particulate emission control from pulverized-coal-fired power plants. One of the more significant issues is to improve poor gas distribution that causes bag failures in baghouse operation. Bag failures during operation are almost impossible to prevent, but proper flow design can help in their prevention. This study investigated vertical velocity profiles below the bags in a baghouse (the hopper region) to determine whether flow could be improved with the installation of flow distributors in the hopper region. Three types of flow distributors were used to improve flow distribution and were compared with the original baghouse without flow distributors. Velocity profiles were measured by a hot-wire anemometer at an inlet velocity of 18 m/sec. Uniformity of flow distribution was calculated by the uniformity value U for the velocity profile of each flow distributor. Experimental results showed that the velocity profile of the empty configuration (without flow distributors) was poor because the uniformity value was 2.048. The uniformity values of type 1 (flow distributor with three vertical vanes), type 2 (flow distributor with one vertical and one inclined vane), and type 3 (flow distributor with two inclined vanes) configurations were reduced to 1.051, 0.617, and 0.526, respectively. These results indicate that the flow distributors designed in this study made significant improvements in the velocity profile of a baghouse, with the type 3 configuration having the best performance. 11 refs., 10 figs.

  6. Effect of flow distributors on uniformity of velocity profile in a baghouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chi-Jen; Cheng, Man-Ting

    2005-07-01

    In recent years, the utility industry has turned to baghouses as an alternative technology for particulate emission control from pulverized-coal-fired power plants. One of the more significant issues is to improve poor gas distribution that causes bag failures in baghouse operation. Bag failures during operation are almost impossible to prevent, but proper flow design can help in their prevention. This study investigated vertical velocity profiles below the bags in a baghouse (the hopper region) to determine whether flow could be improved with the installation of flow distributors in the hopper region. Three types of flow distributors were used to improve flow distribution and were compared with the original baghouse without flow distributors. Velocity profiles were measured by a hot-wire anemometer at an inlet velocity of 18 m/sec. Uniformity of flow distribution was calculated by the uniformity value U for the velocity profile of each flow distributor. Experimental results showed that the velocity profile of the empty configuration (without flow distributors) was poor because the uniformity value was 2.048. The uniformity values of type 1 (flow distributor with three vertical vanes), type 2 (flow distributor with one vertical and one inclined vane), and type 3 (flow distributor with two inclined vanes) configurations were reduced to 1.051, 0.617, and 0.526, respectively. These results indicate that the flow distributors designed in this study made significant improvements in the velocity profile of a baghouse, with the type 3 configuration having the best performance.

  7. Friction model for the velocity dependence of nanoscale friction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambe, Nikhil S; Bhushan, Bharat

    2005-10-01

    The velocity dependence of nanoscale friction is studied for the first time over a wide range of velocities between 1 microm s(-1) and 10 mm s(-1) on large scan lengths of 2 and 25 microm. High sliding velocities are achieved by modifying an existing commercial atomic force microscope (AFM) setup with a custom calibrated nanopositioning piezo stage. The friction and adhesive force dependences on velocity are studied on four different sample surfaces, namely dry (unlubricated), hydrophilic Si(100); dry, partially hydrophobic diamond-like carbon (DLC); a partially hydrophobic self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of hexadecanethiol (HDT); and liquid perfluoropolyether lubricant, Z-15. The friction force values are seen to reverse beyond a certain critical velocity for all the sample surfaces studied. A comprehensive friction model is developed to explain the velocity dependence of nanoscale friction, taking into consideration the contributions of adhesion at the tip-sample interface, high impact velocity-related deformation at the contacting asperities and atomic scale stick-slip. A molecular spring model is used for explaining the velocity dependence of friction force for HDT.

  8. Velocity modulation and rhythmic synchronization of gait in Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaut, M H; Miltner, R; Lange, H W; Hurt, C P; Hoemberg, V

    1999-09-01

    This study analyzed the ability of patients with Huntington's disease (HD) to modulate gait velocity without external sensory cues and in response to an auditory rhythmic cue within a frequency entrainment design. Uncued gait patterns of 27 patients were first assessed during normal, slower, and faster self-paced walking. During rhythmic trials, metronome and musical beat patterns were delivered at rates 10% slower and 10-20% faster than baseline cadence to cue gait patterns. After the rhythmic trials, patients were retested at normal gait speed without rhythm. Gait velocities in the patients with HD were below normal reference values in all ranges. Patients were able to significantly (p music. The ability to modulate gait velocity was retained regardless of the severity of the disease. Gait velocity declined with an increase in disability and chorea score. The disability score differentiated better between gait velocity of moderately and severe patients than chorea score. Slowness of gait was significantly correlated only with disability score and not with chorea. Patients had more difficulty producing adequate step rates than stride lengths during normal and fast walking speeds. After the rhythmic trials, unpaced gait velocity remained significantly (p music declined more with severity of disease than metronome tracking. In summary, patients were able to modulate velocity with and without external cues. Velocity adaptations to the external rhythm in music and metronome were achieved without exact synchronization between step cadence and rhythmic stimulus.

  9. A mechanical diagnosis of the ice flow around Dome C: Elmer/Ice 3D simulations constrained by measured surface velocities and radar isochrones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passalacqua, Olivier; Cavitte, Marie; Frezzotti, Massimo; Gagliardini, Olivier; Gillet-Chaulet, Fabien; Parrenin, Frédéric; Ritz, Catherine; Vittuari, Luca; Young, Duncan

    2017-04-01

    The Dome C region has been densely surveyed and studied for the last decades, in particular to describe the shape of the ice surface, the bedrock relief, the surface velocity, the age and fabric structure of the ice, and its vertical temperature profile. No comprehensive ice flow modelling constrained by all of these field data has been done so far in this region. In particular, the Dome C has recently been targetted as an oldest-ice area, so that we intend to take advantage of a 2016 airborne radar survey that revealed the deep radar isochrones south-west of Dome C, and provides unprecendented constraints for the ice flow description. The Stokes equations are solved with the Elmer/Ice finite element solver, on a 80x110 km2 3D domain, for three different values of the Glen exponent n (1, 3 and 4.5), and for different fabric profiles. The goal of this study is threefold. First, as the range of stress types (longitudinal, transverse, and vertical compression-only) are well covered around Dome C, the observed surface velocities should efficiently constrain the possible values of the rheological parameters (Glen exponent and fluidity), and the basal sliding. Then, we apply an anisotropic flow law to correctly model the age structure, observed on the top 4/5th of the ice thickness, so that we induce mechanically-correct ages for the basal layers. Finally, once the ice mechanics is obtained, we compare the modelled vertical velocity profiles with 1D synthetic profiles, to assess the validity conditions of 1D modelling approaches, which are much more flexible tools for ensemble simulations or inversions.

  10. Gait phase varies over velocities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yancheng; Lu, Kun; Yan, Songhua; Sun, Ming; Lester, D Kevin; Zhang, Kuan

    2014-02-01

    We sought to characterize the percent (PT) of the phases of a gait cycle (GC) as velocity changes to establish norms for pathological gait characteristics with higher resolution technology. Ninety five healthy subjects (49 males and 46 females with age 34.9 ± 11.8 yrs, body weight 64.0 ± 11.7 kg and BMI 23.5 ± 3.6) were enrolled and walked comfortably on a 10-m walkway at self-selected slower, normal, and faster velocities. Walking was recorded with a high speed camera (250 frames per second) and the eight phases of a GC were determined by examination of individual frames for each subject. The correlation coefficients between the mean PT of the phases of the three velocities gaits and PT defined by previous publications were all greater than 0.99. The correlation coefficient between velocity and PT of gait phases is -0.83 for loading response (LR), -0.75 for mid stance (MSt), and -0.84 for pre-swing (PSw). While the PT of the phases of three velocities from this study are highly correlated with PT described by Dr. Jacquenlin Perry decades ago, actual PT of each phase varied amongst these individuals with the largest coefficient variation of 24.31% for IC with slower velocity. From slower to faster walk, the mean PT of MSt diminished from 35.30% to 25.33%. High resolution recording revealed ambiguity of some gait phase definitions, and these data may benefit GC characterization of normal and pathological gait in clinical practice. The study results indicate that one should consider individual variations and walking velocity when evaluating gaits of subjects using standard gait phase classification. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Vertical Motion Determined Using Satellite Altimetry and Tide Gauges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Yen Kuo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A robust method to estimate vertical crustal motions by combining geocentric sea level measurements from decadal (1992 - 2003 TOPEX/POSEIDON satellite altimetry and long-term (> 40 years relative sea level records from tide gauges using a novel Gauss-Markov stochastic adjustment model is presented. These results represent an improvement over a prior study (Kuo et al. 2004 in Fennoscandia, where the observed vertical motions are primarily attributed to the incomplete Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA in the region since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM. The stochastic adjustment algorithm and results include a fully-populated a priori covariance matrix. The algorithm was extended to estimate vertical motion at tide gauge locations near open seas and around semi-enclosed seas and lakes. Estimation of nonlinear vertical motions, which could result from co- and postseismic deformations, has also been incorporated. The estimated uncertainties for the vertical motion solutions in coastal regions of the Baltic Sea and around the Great Lakes are in general < 0.5 mm yr-1, which is a significant improvement over existing studies. In the Baltic Sea, the comparisons of the vertical motion solution with 10 collocated GPS radial rates and with the BIFROST GIA model show differences of 0.2 ¡_ 0.9 and 1.6 ¡_ 1.8 mm yr-1, respectively. For the Great Lakes region, the comparisons with the ICE-3G model and with the relative vertical motion estimated using tide gauges only (Mainville and Craymer 2005 show differences of -0.2 ¡_ 0.6 and -0.1 ¡_ 0.5 mm yr-1, respectively. The Alaskan vertical motion solutions (linear and nonlinear models have an estimated uncertainty of ~1.2 - 1.6 mm yr-1, which agree qualitatively with GPS velocity and tide gauge-only solutions (Larsen et al. 2003. This innovative technique could potentially provide improved estimates of the vertical motion globally where long-term tide gauge records exist.

  12. From Surface Flow Velocity Measurements to Discharge Assessment by the Entropy Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommaso Moramarco

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A new methodology for estimating the discharge starting from the monitoring of surface flow velocity, usurf, is proposed. The approach, based on the entropy theory, involves the actual location of maximum flow velocity, umax, which may occur below the water surface (dip phenomena, affecting the shape of velocity profile. The method identifies the two-dimensional velocity distribution in the cross-sectional flow area, just sampling usurf and applying an iterative procedure to estimate both the dip and umax. Five gage sites, for which a large velocity dataset is available, are used as a case study. Results show that the method is accurate in simulating the depth-averaged velocities along the verticals and the mean flow velocity with an error, on average, lower than 12% and 6%, respectively. The comparison with the velocity index method for the estimation of the mean flow velocity using the measured usurf, demonstrates that the method proposed here is more accurate mainly for rivers with a lower aspect ratio where secondary currents are expected. Moreover, the dip assessment is found more representative of the actual location of maximum flow velocity with respect to the one estimated by a different entropy approach. In terms of discharge, the errors do not exceed 3% for high floods, showing the good potentiality of the method to be used for the monitoring of these events.

  13. Solvable Optimal Velocity Models and Asymptotic Trajectory

    CERN Document Server

    Nakanishi, K; Igarashi, Y; Bando, M

    1996-01-01

    In the Optimal Velocity Model proposed as a new version of Car Following Model, it has been found that a congested flow is generated spontaneously from a homogeneous flow for a certain range of the traffic density. A well-established congested flow obtained in a numerical simulation shows a remarkable repetitive property such that the velocity of a vehicle evolves exactly in the same way as that of its preceding one except a time delay $T$. This leads to a global pattern formation in time development of vehicles' motion, and gives rise to a closed trajectory on $\\Delta x$-$v$ (headway-velocity) plane connecting congested and free flow points. To obtain the closed trajectory analytically, we propose a new approach to the pattern formation, which makes it possible to reduce the coupled car following equations to a single difference-differential equation (Rondo equation). To demonstrate our approach, we employ a class of linear models which are exactly solvable. We also introduce the concept of ``asymptotic traj...

  14. Transient natural convection in a vertical channel filled with nanofluids in the presence of thermal radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Das

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The transient natural convection in a vertical channel filled with nanofluids has been studied when thermal radiation is taken into consideration. The equations governing the flow are solved by employing the Laplace transform technique. Exact solutions for the velocity and temperature of nanofluid are obtained in cases of both prescribed surface temperature (PST and prescribed heat flux (PHF. The numerical results for the velocity and temperature of nanofluid are presented graphically for the pertinent parameters and discussed in detail. The fluid velocity is greater in the case of PST than that of PHF.

  15. Hybrid Vertical-Cavity Laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention provides a light source (2) for light circuits on a silicon platform (3). A vertical laser cavity is formed by a gain region (101) arranged between a top mirror (4) and a bottom grating-mirror (12) in a grating region (11) in a silicon layer (10) on a substrate. A waveguide...

  16. Physics and the Vertical Jump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offenbacher, Elmer L.

    1970-01-01

    The physics of vertical jumping is described as an interesting illustration for motivating students in a general physics course to master the kinematics and dynamics of one dimensional motion. The author suggests that mastery of the physical principles of the jump may promote understanding of certain biological phenomena, aspects of physical…

  17. Multiservice Vertical Handoff Decision Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Fang

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Future wireless networks must be able to coordinate services within a diverse-network environment. One of the challenging problems for coordination is vertical handoff, which is the decision for a mobile node to handoff between different types of networks. While traditional handoff is based on received signal strength comparisons, vertical handoff must evaluate additional factors, such as monetary cost, offered services, network conditions, and user preferences. In this paper, several optimizations are proposed for the execution of vertical handoff decision algorithms, with the goal of maximizing the quality of service experienced by each user. First, the concept of policy-based handoffs is discussed. Then, a multiservice vertical handoff decision algorithm (MUSE-VDA and cost function are introduced to judge target networks based on a variety of user- and network-valued metrics. Finally, a performance analysis demonstrates that significant gains in the ability to satisfy user requests for multiple simultaneous services and a more efficient use of resources can be achieved from the MUSE-VDA optimizations.

  18. Advanced high performance vertical hybrid synthetic jet actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tian-Bing (Inventor); Jiang, Xiaoning (Inventor); Su, Ji (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention comprises a high performance, vertical, zero-net mass-flux, synthetic jet actuator for active control of viscous, separated flow on subsonic and supersonic vehicles. The present invention is a vertical piezoelectric hybrid zero-net mass-flux actuator, in which all the walls of the chamber are electrically controlled synergistically to reduce or enlarge the volume of the synthetic jet actuator chamber in three dimensions simultaneously and to reduce or enlarge the diameter of orifice of the synthetic jet actuator simultaneously with the reduction or enlargement of the volume of the chamber. The jet velocity and mass flow rate for the present invention will be several times higher than conventional piezoelectric synthetic jet actuators.

  19. ISAL experiment documentation of vertical tail and OMS pods

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    Investigation of Space Transportation System (STS) Atmospheric Luminosities (ISAL) experiment documentation includes vertical tail and orbital maneuvering system (OMS) pods with surface glow against the blackness of space. This glowing scene was provided by a long duration exposure with a 35mm camera aimed toward the tail of the Earth-orbiting Challenger, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 099. OV-099 was maneuvered to a 120-nautical-mile altitude and flown with open payload bay (PLB) in the velocity vector for the conducting of a test titled, 'Evaluation of Oxygen Interaction with Materials (EOIM)'. Atomic oxygen within the low orbital environment is known to be extremely reactive when in contact with solid surfaces. In the darkened area between the camera and the glowing OMS pods and vertical stabilizer are two trays of test materials.

  20. Galactic Subsystems on the Basis of Cumulative Distribution of Space Velocities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidojević, S.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A sample containing $4,614$ stars with available space velocities and high-quality kinematical data from the Arihip Catalogue is formed. For the purpose of distinguishing galactic subsystems the cumulative distribution of space velocities is studied. The fractions of the three subsystems are found to be: thin disc 92\\%, thick disc 6\\% and halo 2\\%. These results are verified by analysing the elements of velocity ellipsoids and the shape and size of the galactocentric orbits of the sample stars, i.e. the planar and vertical eccentricities of the orbits.

  1. Theory and experiment on electromagnetic-wave-propagation velocities in stacked superconducting tunnel structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sakai, S.; Ustinov, A. V.; Kohlstedt, H.

    1994-01-01

    focused on. Furthermore, under the assumption that all parameters of the layers are equal, analytic solutions for a generic N-fold stack are presented. The velocities of the waves in two- and three-junction stacks by Nb-Al-AlOx-Nb systems are experimentally obtained by measuring the cavity resonance......Characteristic velocities of the electromagnetic waves propagating in vertically stacked Josephson transmission are theoretically discussed. An equation for solving n velocities of the waves in an n Josephson-junction stack is derived. The solutions of two- and threefold stacks are especially...

  2. Galactic subsystems on the basis of cumulative distribution of space velocities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidojević S.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A sample containing 4 614 stars with available space velocities and high-quality kinematical data from the Arihip Catalogue is formed. For the purpose of distinguishing galactic subsystems the cumulative distribution of space velocities is studied. The fractions of the three subsystems are found to be: thin disc 92%, thick disc 6% and halo 2%. These results are verified by analyzing the elements of velocity ellipsoids and the shape and size of the galactocentric orbits of the sample stars, i.e. the planar and vertical eccentricities of the orbits.

  3. Velocity shear generation of solar wind turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, D. A.; Goldstein, Melvyn L.; Matthaeus, William H.; Ghosh, Sanjoy

    1992-01-01

    A two-dimensional incompressible MHD spectral code is used to show that shear-driven turbulence is a possible means for producing many observed properties of the evolution of the magnetic and velocity fluctuations in the solar wind and, in particular, the evolution of the cross helicity ('Alfvenicity') at small scales. It is shown that large-scale shear can nonlinearly produce a cascade to smaller scale fluctuations even when the linear Kelvin-Helmholtz mode is stable, and that a roughly power law inertial range is established by this process. The evolution found is similar to that seen in some other simulations of MHD turbulence.

  4. Multi-Joint Coordination of Vertical Arm Movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Seth

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A model of the human arm was developed to study coordination of multi-joint movement in the vertical plane. The arm was represented as a two-segment, two-degree of freedom dynamic system with net muscle torques acting at the shoulder and elbow. Kinematic data were collected from a subject who performed unrestrained vertical movements with only the initial and final hand elevations prescribed. Movements were performed with and without a hand-held load. The method of computed torques was implemented to obtain net muscle torques, which enables position and velocity feedback to be used to estimate joint angular accelerations that produce a more stable simulation of arm movement. The model simulation was then used to calculate the contributions of the net muscle torques, gravitational torques and velocity-interaction torques to the angular accelerations of the shoulder and elbow and also to the vertical acceleration of the hand. The net muscle torques and gravity were the prime movers of the arm. The velocity-dependent effects contributed little to the dynamics of arm movement and were, in fact, insignificant when the hand was loaded. The muscles of the shoulder and elbow acted synergistically to elevate the arm in the sagittal plane. The hand was accelerated upward by the elbow first, until the point of maximum elbow flexion, after which the shoulder became the prime mover. Gravity acted consistently to accelerate the hand downward. Coordination was notably invariant to changes in external load. Some compensation for load was observed in the control, and these differences were attributed mainly to an increase in system inertia.

  5. Signal velocity in oscillator arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantos, C. E.; Veerman, J. J. P.; Hammond, D. K.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate a system of coupled oscillators on the circle, which arises from a simple model for behavior of large numbers of autonomous vehicles where the acceleration of each vehicle depends on the relative positions and velocities between itself and a set of local neighbors. After describing necessary and sufficient conditions for asymptotic stability, we derive expressions for the phase velocity of propagation of disturbances in velocity through this system. We show that the high frequencies exhibit damping, which implies existence of well-defined signal velocitiesc+ > 0 and c- < 0 such that low frequency disturbances travel through the flock as f+(x - c+t) in the direction of increasing agent numbers and f-(x - c-t) in the other.

  6. Effects of intratidal and tidal range variability on circulation and salinity structure in the Cape Fear River Estuary, North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, May Ling; Luettich, Richard A.; Seim, Harvey

    2009-04-01

    Tidal influences on circulation and the salinity structure are investigated in the largely unstudied Cape Fear River Estuary (CFRE), North Carolina, a partially mixed estuary along the southeast coast of the United States. During two different tidal conditions (high versus low tidal range) and when river flow was low, salinity and velocity data were collected over a semidiurnal tidal cycle in a 2.8 km long transect along the estuary axis. Water level data were recorded nearby. Mechanisms that influence salt transport characteristics are diagnosed from an analysis of the field data. Specifically, we investigated the relationship between tidal range and salinity through comparison of along-channel circulation characteristics, computed salt fluxes, and coefficients of vertical eddy diffusivity (Kz) based on a parameterization and on salt budget analysis. Findings indicate up-estuary tidally driven salt fluxes resulting from oscillatory salt transport are dominant near the pycnocline, while mean advective transport dominates near the bottom during both tidal range periods. Earlier research related to salt transport in estuaries with significant gravitational circulation suggests that up-estuary salt transport increases during low tidal ranges as a result of increased gravitational circulation. In the CFRE, in contrast, net (tidally averaged) near-bottom along-channel velocities are greater during higher tidal range conditions than during lower tidal range conditions. Findings indicate stronger tidal forcing and associated mixing contribute to greater near-bottom salinity gradients and, consequently, increased baroclinic circulation. Lower near-bottom salinities during the higher tidal range period are a result of a combination of increased vertical turbulent salt fluxes near the pycnocline and increased bottom-generated mixing.

  7. Evaluation of force-velocity and power-velocity relationship of arm muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreckovic, Sreten; Cuk, Ivan; Djuric, Sasa; Nedeljkovic, Aleksandar; Mirkov, Dragan; Jaric, Slobodan

    2015-08-01

    A number of recent studies have revealed an approximately linear force-velocity (F-V) and, consequently, a parabolic power-velocity (P-V) relationship of multi-joint tasks. However, the measurement characteristics of their parameters have been neglected, particularly those regarding arm muscles, which could be a problem for using the linear F-V model in both research and routine testing. Therefore, the aims of the present study were to evaluate the strength, shape, reliability, and concurrent validity of the F-V relationship of arm muscles. Twelve healthy participants performed maximum bench press throws against loads ranging from 20 to 70 % of their maximum strength, and linear regression model was applied on the obtained range of F and V data. One-repetition maximum bench press and medicine ball throw tests were also conducted. The observed individual F-V relationships were exceptionally strong (r = 0.96-0.99; all P 0.80), while their concurrent validity regarding directly measured F, P, and V ranged from high (for maximum F) to medium-to-low (for maximum P and V). The findings add to the evidence that the linear F-V and, consequently, parabolic P-V models could be used to study the mechanical properties of muscular systems, as well as to design a relatively simple, reliable, and ecologically valid routine test of the muscle ability of force, power, and velocity production.

  8. Vertical pillar nanoantenna for emission enhancement and redirection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paparone, J.; Laverdant, J.; Brucoli, G.; Symonds, C.; Crut, A.; Del Fatti, N.; Benoit, J. M.; Bellessa, J.

    2018-01-01

    Designing efficient metallic nanostructures can help in realizing bright single photon emission in the visible and near-infrared ranges. We propose a novel nanostructure design that combines the benefits of plasmonic hot spot generation in the near-field and the concept of antennas developed in the radio-frequency range. The antenna is formed by a vertical stack of metallic and dielectric nanocylinders. When used for controlling the far-field emission of a localized source, its key features are moderate losses in the metal, relatively large Purcell factors, as well as a low sensibility to the lateral position of the emitter. A redirection process necessary for these vertical structures is proposed, based on the versatility of the vertical geometry, and allows an efficient redirection of the emitted light even for antennas on dielectric substrates.

  9. Finite Difference Study of MHD Stokes Problem for a Vertical Infinite ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The explicit finite difference method is employed to study the effects of both the Hall and ionslip currents on a free convective flow of a viscous heat generating rotating fluid past an impulsively started infinite vertical plate, to which a strong magnetic field is applied perpendicularly. The velocity (both primary and secondary) ...

  10. Noninvasive monitoring of vocal fold vertical vibration using the acoustic Doppler effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Chao; Jiang, Jack J; Wu, Dan; Liu, Xiaojun; Chodara, Ann

    2012-11-01

    To validate a proposed method of noninvasively monitoring vocal fold vertical vibration through utilization of the acoustic Doppler effect and the waveguide property of the vocal tract. Validation case-control study. In this device, an ultrasound beam is generated and directed into the mouth. The vocal tract, acting as a natural waveguide, guides the ultrasound beam toward the vibrating vocal folds. The vertical velocity of vocal fold vibration is then recovered from the Doppler frequency of the reflected ultrasound. One subject (age 32, male) was studied and measurements were taken under three modes of vocal fold vibration: breathing (no vibration), whispering (irregular vibration), and normal phonation (regular vibration). The peak-to-peak amplitude of the measured velocity of vocal fold vertical vibration was about 0.16 m/s, and the fundamental frequency was 172 Hz; the extracted velocity information showed a reasonable waveform and value in comparison with the previous studies. In all three modes of phonation, the Doppler frequencies derived from the reflected ultrasound corresponded with the vertical velocity of vocal fold vibration as expected. The proposed method can accurately represent the characteristics of different phonation modes such as no phonation, whisper and normal phonation. The proposed device could be used in daily monitoring and assessment of vocal function and vocal fold vibration. Copyright © 2012 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Vertical pressure gradient and particle motions in wave boundary layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Karsten Lindegård

    and its role in the fully turbulent boundary layer. The pressure in the flow is obtained from the flow fields of the oscillatory boundary layer. What differs, the vertical pressure gradient, from other turbulent quantities, like e.g. velocity fluctuations is that it can detect newly generated turbulence....... The experiment is conducted in a oscillating water tunnel, for both smooth bed and rough bed. The particle motion is determined by utilizing particle tracking base on a video recording of the particle motion in the flow. In the oscillatory flow, in contrast to steady current, the particle motion is a function...

  12. High-reliability vertical-axis wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noll, R. B.; Zvara, J.

    A review of the design and development of a 1-kW high-reliability vertical-axis small wind energy conversion system (SWECS) is presented. The SWECS is a straight-bladed version of the Darrieus design. It incorporates high-reliability components in order to obtain a design value of mean time between failures of ten years based on one maintenance day a year. Design features are described, automatic control of the turbine is discussed, and typical results from controlled velocity testing are presented.

  13. Vertical Heat Flux in the Ocean: Estimates from Observations, and Comparisons with a Coupled General Circulation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, P. F.; Masson, D.; Saenko, O.

    2016-02-01

    The net heat uptake by the ocean in a changing climate involves small imbalances between the advective and diffusive processes that transport heat vertically. Generally, it is necessary to rely on global climate models to study these processes in detail. In the present study, it is shown that a key component of the vertical heat flux, namely that associated with the large-scale mean vertical circulation, can be diagnosed over extra-tropical regions from global observational data sets. This component is estimated based on the vertical velocity obtained from the geostrophic vorticity balance, combined with estimates of the absolute geostrophic flow. Results are compared with a non-eddy resolving, coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model. This shows reasonable agreement in the latitudinal distribution of the heat flux, along with net integrated vertical heat flux below about 300 meters depth. The mean vertical heat flux is shown to be dominated by the downward contribution from the southern hemisphere and, in particular, the Southern Ocean. This is driven by the Ekman vertical velocity which induces an upward vertical transport of seawater that is cold relative to the lateral average at a given depth. The correspondence with the coupled model breaks down at depths shallower than 300 m due to the dominant contribution of equatorial regions which have been excluded from the calculation. It appears that the vertical transport of heat by the large-scale mean circulation is consistent with simple linear vorticity dynamics over much of the ocean.

  14. Electrical guidance efficiency of downstream-migrating juvenile Sea Lamprey decreases with increasing water velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miehls, Scott M.; Johnson, Nicholas; Haro, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    We tested the efficacy of a vertically oriented field of pulsed direct current (VEPDC) created by an array of vertical electrodes for guiding downstream-moving juvenile Sea Lampreys Petromyzon marinus to a bypass channel in an artificial flume at water velocities of 10–50 cm/s. Sea Lampreys were more likely to be captured in the bypass channel than in other sections of the flume regardless of electric field status (on or off) or water velocity. Additionally, Sea Lampreys were more likely to be captured in the bypass channel when the VEPDC was active; however, an interaction between the effects of VEPDC and water velocity was observed, as the likelihood of capture decreased with increases in water velocity. The distribution of Sea Lampreys shifted from right to left across the width of the flume toward the bypass channel when the VEPDC was active at water velocities less than 25 cm/s. The VEPDC appeared to have no effect on Sea Lamprey distribution in the flume at water velocities greater than 25 cm/s. We also conducted separate tests to determine the threshold at which Sea Lampreys would become paralyzed. Individuals were paralyzed at a mean power density of 37.0 µW/cm3. Future research should investigate the ability of juvenile Sea Lampreys to detect electric fields and their specific behavioral responses to electric field characteristics so as to optimize the use of this technology as a nonphysical guidance tool across variable water velocities.

  15. Velocity potential formulations of highly accurate Boussinesq-type models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bingham, Harry B.; Madsen, Per A.; Fuhrman, David R.

    2009-01-01

    processes on the weather side of reflective structures. Coast. Eng. 53, 929-945). An exact infinite series solution for the potential is obtained via a Taylor expansion about an arbitrary vertical position z=(z) over cap. For practical implementation however, the solution is expanded based on a slow...... variation of (z) over cap and terms are retained to first-order. With shoaling enhancement, the new models obtain a comparable accuracy in linear shoaling to the original velocity formulation. General consistency relations are also derived which are convenient for verifying that the differential operators...

  16. Maximum height and minimum time vertical jumping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domire, Zachary J; Challis, John H

    2015-08-20

    The performance criterion in maximum vertical jumping has typically been assumed to simply raise the center of mass as high as possible. In many sporting activities minimizing movement time during the jump is likely also critical to successful performance. The purpose of this study was to examine maximum height jumps performed while minimizing jump time. A direct dynamics model was used to examine squat jump performance, with dual performance criteria: maximize jump height and minimize jump time. The muscle model had activation dynamics, force-length, force-velocity properties, and a series of elastic component representing the tendon. The simulations were run in two modes. In Mode 1 the model was placed in a fixed initial position. In Mode 2 the simulation model selected the initial squat configuration as well as the sequence of muscle activations. The inclusion of time as a factor in Mode 1 simulations resulted in a small decrease in jump height and moderate time savings. The improvement in time was mostly accomplished by taking off from a less extended position. In Mode 2 simulations, more substantial time savings could be achieved by beginning the jump in a more upright posture. However, when time was weighted more heavily in these simulations, there was a more substantial reduction in jump height. Future work is needed to examine the implications for countermovement jumping and to examine the possibility of minimizing movement time as part of the control scheme even when the task is to jump maximally. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Relationship between vertical and horizontal jump variables and muscular performance in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbs, Caleb W; Gill, Nicholas D; Smart, Daniel J; McGuigan, Michael R

    2015-03-01

    This study investigated the relationship between vertical and horizontal measures in bilateral and unilateral countermovement jump, drop jump and squat jump (SJ), and sprinting speed and muscle architecture of both the vastus lateralis and gastrocnemius. Subjects (n = 17) completed a 30-m sprint test, muscle stiffness test; ultrasound measures, and a jump testing session. Measures of horizontal peak and mean force, in both bilateral and unilateral jumps, tended to have greater relationships to sprint speeds (R = 0.132-0.576) than peak and mean force in the vertical plane (R = 0.008-0.504). Vertical velocity variables also showed some large and very large correlations to sprint speed (R = 0.062-0.635). Unilateral measures of velocity tended to have larger correlations to sprint performance than their bilateral counterparts across all jump types and peak and mean velocity in SJ showed large and very large correlations to sprint speed (bilateral R = 0.227-0.635; unilateral 0.393-0.574). Few large correlations were shown between muscle stiffness measures of muscle architecture and kinetic and kinematic variables in either vertical or horizontal jumps. The present findings suggest that sport scientists and strength and conditioning practitioners concerned with the prognostic value of kinetic variables to functional movements such as sprint speed should also use horizontal jumps in addition to vertical jumps in testing and training.

  18. Angle independent velocity spectrum determination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    An ultrasound imaging system (100) includes a transducer array (102) that emits an ultrasound beam and produces at least one transverse pulse-echo field that oscillates in a direction transverse to the emitted ultrasound beam and that receive echoes produced in response thereto and a spectral vel...... velocity estimator (110) that determines a velocity spectrum for flowing structure, which flows at an angle of 90 degrees and flows at angles less than 90 degrees with respect to the emitted ultrasound beam, based on the received echoes....

  19. Turbulent mixed convection in asymmetrically heated vertical channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mokni Ameni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper an investigation of mixed convection from vertical heated channel is undertaken. The aim is to explore the heat transfer obtained by adding a forced flow, issued from a flat nozzle located in the entry section of a channel, to the up-going fluid along its walls. Forced and free convection are combined studied in order to increase the cooling requirements. The study deals with both symmetrically and asymmetrically heated channel. The Reynolds number based on the nozzle width and the jet velocity is assumed to be 3 103 and 2.104; whereas, the Rayleigh number based on the channel length and the wall temperature difference varies from 2.57 1010 to 5.15 1012. The heating asymmetry effect on the flow development including the mean velocity and temperature the local Nusselt number, the mass flow rate and heat transfer are examined.

  20. Real-Time Vertical Temperature, and Velocity Profiles from a Wave Glider

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    as well as notes on the spurious stalls incurred due to the mechanical braking system. The second generation UWW was delivered by MacArtney in May...power system was developed for the UWW to limit back electromotive force (back- EMF ) induced by current surges from the UWW’s motor. Majority of the

  1. Real-Time Vertical Temperature, and Velocity Profiles from a Wave Glider

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-30

    Liquid Robotics navigated a Wave Glider from San Diego to Hawaii on a 82 day-long voyage that covered approximately 2500 nautical miles (http...Gawarkiewicz, G., et al. (2011), Circulation and Intrusions Northeast of Taiwan: Chasing and Predicting Uncertainty in the Cold Dome ., Oceanography, 24(4), 110...121. Lee, D.-K., and P. Niiler (2010), Influence of warm SST anomalies formed in the eastern Pacific subduction zone on recent El Nino events, J Mar Res, 68(3-4), 459-477.

  2. Horizontal and Vertical Structure of Velocity, Potential Vorticity and Energy in the Gulf Stream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-02-01

    Number OCE-8208 746; and by the Office of Naval Research under contract Number NOOG 14-82-C -0019, NR 083-004. Reproduction in whole or in part is...The first term on the RHiS can be written 1 (p(0)+ :1)( ufO )+eufl)) 1 (0+P 1 *l 1O)CUI) 0 0 -H 1 HI () (-) pi O / V.1 (pa) +ft w 01 0j~ EoPO o1 1

  3. Inferring regional vertical crustal velocities from averaged relative sea level trends: A proof of concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bâki Iz, H.; Shum, C. K.; Zhang, C.; Kuo, C. Y.

    2017-11-01

    We report the design of a high-throughput gradient hyperbolic lenslet built with real-life materials and capable of focusing a beam into a deep sub-wavelength spot of λ/23. This efficient design is achieved through high-order transformation optics and circular effective-medium theory (CEMT), which are used to engineer the radially varying anisotropic artificial material based on the thin alternating cylindrical metal and dielectric layers. The radial gradient of the effective anisotropic optical constants allows for matching the impedances at the input and output interfaces, drastically improving the throughput of the lenslet. However, it is the use of the zeroth-order CEMT that enables the practical realization of a gradient hyperlens with realistic materials. To illustrate the importance of using the CEMT versus the conventional planar effective-medium theory (PEMT) for cylindrical anisotropic systems, such as our hyperlens, both the CEMT and PEMT are adopted to design gradient hyperlenses with the same materials and order of elemental layers. The CEMT- and PEMT-based designs show similar performance if the number of metal-dielectric binary layers is sufficiently large (9+ pairs) and if the layers are sufficiently thin. However, for the manufacturable lenses with realistic numbers of layers (e.g. five pairs) and thicknesses, the performance of the CEMT design continues to be practical, whereas the PEMT-based design stops working altogether. The accurate design of transformation optics-based layered cylindrical devices enabled by CEMT allow for a new class of robustly manufacturable nanophotonic systems, even with relatively thick layers of real-life materials.

  4. Wind stress, curl and vertical velocity in the Bay of Bengal during southwest monsoon, 1984

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Babu, M.T.; Heblekar, A.K.; Murty, C.S.

    Wind distribution observed during southwest monsoon of 1984 has used to derive the mean wind stress for the season at every 1 degree square grid and curl over the Bay of Bengal. Two regions of maximum wind stress are present over the Bay of Bengal...

  5. The Risk of Airborne Cross-Infection in a Room with Vertical Low-Velocity Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olmedo, Inés; Nielsen, Peter V.; Adana, M. Ruiz de

    2013-01-01

    Downward flow ventilation systems are one of the most recommended ventilation strategies when contaminants in rooms must be removed and people must be protected from the risk of airborne cross-infection. This study is based on experimental tests carried out in a room with downward flow ventilation....... Two breathing thermal manikins are placed in a room face to face. One manikin’s breathing is considered to be the contaminated source to simulate a risky situation with airborne cross-infection. The position of the manikins in relation to the diffuser and the location of diffuser in the room as well...

  6. Subjective visual vertical after treatment of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Maristela Mian; Ganança, Maurício Malavasi; Caovilla, Heloisa Helena

    Otolith function can be studied by testing the subjective visual vertical, because the tilt of the vertical line beyond the normal range is a sign of vestibular dysfunction. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo is a disorder of one or more labyrinthine semicircular canals caused by fractions of otoliths derived from the utricular macula. To compare the subjective visual vertical with the bucket test before and immediately after the particle repositioning maneuver in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. We evaluated 20 patients. The estimated position where a fluorescent line within a bucket reached the vertical position was measured before and immediately after the particle repositioning maneuver. Data were tabulated and statistically analyzed. Before repositioning maneuver, 9 patients (45.0%) had absolute values of the subjective visual vertical above the reference standard and 2 (10.0%) after the maneuver; the mean of the absolute values of the vertical deviation was significantly lower after the intervention (pbenign paroxysmal positional vertigo. Copyright © 2016 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  7. Vertical Transport of Momentum by the Inertial-Gravity Internal Waves in a Baroclinic Current

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Slepyshev

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available When the internal waves break, they are one of the sources of small-scale turbulence. Small-scale turbulence causes the vertical exchange in the ocean. However, internal waves with regard to the Earth rotation in the presence of vertically inhomogeneous two-dimensional current are able to contribute to the vertical transport. Free inertial-gravity internal waves in a baroclinic current in a boundless basin of a constant depth are considered in the Bussinesq approximation. Boundary value problem of linear approximation for the vertical velocity amplitude of internal waves has complex coefficients when current velocity component, which is transversal to the wave propagation direction, depends on the vertical coordinate (taking into account the rotation of the Earth. Eigenfunction and wave frequency are complex, and it is shown that a weak wave damping takes place. Dispersive relation and wave damping decrement are calculated in the linear approximation. At a fixed wave number damping decrement of the second mode is larger (in the absolute value than the one of the first mode. The equation for vertical velocity amplitude for real profiles of the Brunt – Vaisala frequency and current velocity are numerically solved according to implicit Adams scheme of the third order of accuracy. The dispersive curves of the first two modes do not reach inertial frequency in the low-frequency area due to the effect of critical layers in which wave frequency of the Doppler shift is equal to the inertial one. Termination of the second mode dispersive curves takes place at higher frequency than the one of the first mode. In the second order of the wave amplitude the Stokes drift speed is determined. It is shown that the Stokes drift speed, which is transversal to the wave propagation direction, differs from zero if the transversal component of current velocity depends on the vertical coordinate. In this case, the Stokes drift speed in the second mode is lower than

  8. CAN THE CURRICULUM BE USED TO ESTIMATE CRITICAL VELOCITY IN YOUNG COMPETITIVE SWIMMERS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A. Marinho

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The aims of the present study were to assess critical velocity using the swimmer curriculum in front crawl events and to compare critical velocity to the velocity corresponding to a 4 mmol·l-1 of blood lactate concentration and to the velocity of a 30 min test. The sample included 24 high level male swimmers ranged between 14 and 16 years old. For each subject the critical velocity, the velocity corresponding to a 4 mmol·l-1 of blood lactate concentration and the mean velocity of a 30 min test were determined. The critical velocity was also estimated by considering the best performance of a swimmer over several distances based on the swimmer curriculum. Critical velocity including 100, 200 and 400 m events was not different from the velocity of 4 mmol·l-1 of blood lactate concentration. Critical velocity including all the swimmer events was not different from the velocity of a 30 min test. The assessment of critical velocity based upon the swimmer curriculum would therefore seem to be a good approach to determine the aerobic ability of a swimmer. The selection of the events to be included in critical velocity assessment must be a main concern in the evaluation of the swimmer

  9. In-Vivo High Dynamic Range Vector Flow Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villagómez Hoyos, Carlos Armando; Stuart, Matthias Bo; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2015-01-01

    Current vector flow systems are limited in their detectable range of blood flow velocities. Previous work on phantoms has shown that the velocity range can be extended using synthetic aperture directional beamforming combined with an adaptive multi-lag approach. This paper presents a first invivo...

  10. Seismicity and Improved Velocity Structure in Kuwait

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gok, R M; Rodgers, A J; Al-Enezi, A

    2006-01-26

    The Kuwait National Seismic Network (KNSN) began operation in 1997 and consists of nine three-component stations (eight short-period and one broadband) and is operated by the Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research. Although the region is largely believed to be aseismic, considerable local seismicity is recorded by KNSN. Seismic events in Kuwait are clustered in two main groups, one in the south and another in the north. The KNSN station distribution is able to capture the southern cluster within the footprint of the network but the northern cluster is poorly covered. Events tend to occur at depths ranging from the free surface to about 20 km. Events in the northern cluster tend to be deeper than those in south, however this might be an artifact of the station coverage. We analyzed KNSN recordings of nearly 200 local events to improve understanding of seismic events and crustal structure in Kuwait, performing several analyses with increasing complexity. First, we obtained an optimized one-dimensional (1D) velocity model for the entire region using the reported KNSN arrival times and routine locations. The resulting model is consistent with a recently obtained model from the joint inversion of receiver functions and surface wave group velocities. Crustal structure is capped by the thick ({approx} 7 km) sedimentary rocks of the Arabian Platform underlain by normal velocities for stable continental crust. Our new model has a crustal thickness of 44 km, constrained by an independent study of receiver functions and surface wave group velocities by Pasyanos et al (2006). Locations and depths of events after relocation with the new model are broadly consistent with those reported by KISR, although a few events move more than a few kilometers. We then used a double-difference tomography technique (tomoDD) to jointly locate the events and estimate three-dimensional (3D) velocity structure. TomoDD is based on hypoDD relocation algorithm and it makes use of both absolute and

  11. Vertically integrated moisture flux convergence as a predictor of thunderstorms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zomeren, J.; van Delden, A.J.

    2007-01-01

    Vertically Integrated Moisture Flux Convergence (VIMFC) alone and in combination with the lifted stability index of the most unstable layer (SMUL) is evaluated as a thunderstorm predictor. By using six-hourly standard pressure weather analysis data from the European Centre for Medium-range Weather

  12. Ultrahigh Mobility in an Organic Semiconductor by Vertical Chain Alignment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Skrypnychuk, Vasyl; Wetzelaer, Gert-Jan A H; Gordiichuk, Pavlo I; Mannsfeld, Stefan C B; Herrmann, Andreas; Toney, Michael F; Barbero, David R

    2016-01-01

    A method to produce highly efficient and long range vertical charge transport is demonstrated in an undoped polythiophene thin film, with average mobilities above 3.1 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) . These record high mobilities are achieved by controlled orientation of the polymer crystallites enabling the most

  13. Coexistence of Strategic Vertical Separation and Integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansen, Jos

    2003-01-01

    This paper gives conditions under which vertical separation is chosen by some upstream firms, while vertical integration is chosen by others in the equilibrium of a symmetric model. A vertically separating firm trades off fixed contracting costs against the strategic benefit of writing a (two......-part tariff, exclusive dealing) contract with its retailer. Coexistence emerges when more than two vertical Cournot oligopolists supply close substitutes. When vertical integration and separation coexist, welfare could be improved by reducing the number of vertically separating firms. The scope...

  14. A study of methods to estimate debris flow velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochaska, A.B.; Santi, P.M.; Higgins, J.D.; Cannon, S.H.

    2008-01-01

    Debris flow velocities are commonly back-calculated from superelevation events which require subjective estimates of radii of curvature of bends in the debris flow channel or predicted using flow equations that require the selection of appropriate rheological models and material property inputs. This research investigated difficulties associated with the use of these conventional velocity estimation methods. Radii of curvature estimates were found to vary with the extent of the channel investigated and with the scale of the media used, and back-calculated velocities varied among different investigated locations along a channel. Distinct populations of Bingham properties were found to exist between those measured by laboratory tests and those back-calculated from field data; thus, laboratory-obtained values would not be representative of field-scale debris flow behavior. To avoid these difficulties with conventional methods, a new preliminary velocity estimation method is presented that statistically relates flow velocity to the channel slope and the flow depth. This method presents ranges of reasonable velocity predictions based on 30 previously measured velocities. ?? 2008 Springer-Verlag.

  15. Kinematic Fitting of Detached Vertices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattione, Paul [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States)

    2007-05-01

    The eg3 experiment at the Jefferson Lab CLAS detector aims to determine the existence of the $\\Xi_{5}$ pentaquarks and investigate the excited $\\Xi$ states. Specifically, the exotic $\\Xi_{5}^{--}$ pentaquark will be sought by first reconstructing the $\\Xi^{-}$ particle through its weak decays, $\\Xi^{-}\\to\\pi^{-}\\Lambda$ and $\\Lambda\\to\\pi^{-}$. A kinematic fitting routine was developed to reconstruct the detached vertices of these decays, where confidence level cuts on the fits are used to remove background events. Prior to fitting these decays, the exclusive reaction $\\gamma D\\rightarrow pp\\pi^{-}$ was studied in order to correct the track measurements and covariance matrices of the charged particles. The $\\Lambda\\rightarrow p\\pi^{-}$ and $\\Xi^{-}\\to\\pi^{-}\\Lambda$ decays were then investigated to demonstrate that the kinematic fitting routine reconstructs the decaying particles and their detached vertices correctly.

  16. Vertical distribution of Arctic methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tukiainen, Simo; Karppinen, Tomi; Hakkarainen, Janne; Kivi, Rigel; Heikkinen, Pauli; Tamminen, Johanna

    2017-04-01

    In this study we show the vertical distribution of atmospheric methane (CH4) measured in Sodankylä, Northern Finland. The CH4 profiles are retrieved from the direct Sun FTS measurements using the dimension reduction retrieval method. In the retrieval method, we have a few degrees of freedom about the profile shape. The data set covers years 2010-2016 (from February to November) and altitudes 0-40 km. The retrieved FTS profiles are validated against ACE satellite measurements and AirCore balloon measurements. The total columns derived from the FTS profiles are compared to the official TCCON XCH4 data. A vertically resolved methane data set can be used, e.g., to study stratospheric methane during the polar vortex.

  17. INTERNATIONAL SPECIALIZATION AND VERTICAL DIFFERENTIATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Furia Donatella

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available During the last decades, market segmentation and intra-industry trade have become increasingly relevant. The underlying hypothesis of our work is that distinct articles have heterogeneous potential for vertical differentiation, implying that different patterns of international specialization should be identifiable. We carry out an analysis on revealed comparative advantage (through the Lafay Index in specific sectors of interest. Then we highlight the emergence of diverse degrees of product quality differentiation among sectors (through the Relative Quality Index. Results confirm our hypothesis. Indeed it appears that only certain goods, for which the pace of either creative or technological innovation (or both is particularly fast, present a high degree of vertical differentiation and market segmentation. This allows countries to specialize in a particular product variety and gain market power position for that variety. These findings should be taken in due consideration when designing trade policies.

  18. Velocity field calculation for non-orthogonal numerical grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flach, G. P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-03-01

    -orthogonal grid, Darcy velocity components are rigorously derived in this study from normal fluxes to cell faces, which are assumed to be provided by or readily computed from porous-medium simulation code output. The normal fluxes are presumed to satisfy mass balances for every computational cell, and if so, the derived velocity fields are consistent with these mass balances. Derivations are provided for general two-dimensional quadrilateral and three-dimensional hexagonal systems, and for the commonly encountered special cases of perfectly vertical side faces in 2D and 3D and a rectangular footprint in 3D.

  19. Conservative solute approximation to the transport of a remedial reagent in a vertical circulation flow field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jui-Sheng; Jang, Cheng-Shin; Cheng, Chung-Ting; Liu, Chen-Wuing

    2010-09-01

    SummaryThis study presents a novel mathematical model for describing the transport of the remedial reagent in a vertical circulation flow field in an anisotropic aquifer. To develop the mathematical model, the radial and vertical components of the pore water velocity are calculated first by using an analytical solution for steady-state drawdown distribution near a vertical circulation well. Next, the obtained radial and vertical components of the pore water velocity are then incorporated into a three-dimensional axisymmetrical advection-dispersion equation in cylindrical coordinates from which to build the reagent transport equation. The Laplace transform finite difference technique is applied to solve the three-dimensional axisymmetrical advection-dispersion equation with spatial variable-dependent coefficients. The developed mathematical model is used to investigate the effects of various parameters such as hydraulic conductivity anisotropy, longitudinal and transverse dispersivities, the placement of the extraction and injection screened intervals of the vertical circulation well and the injection modes on the transport regime of the remedial reagent. Results show that those parameters have different degrees of impacts on the distribution of the remedial reagent. The mathematical model provides an effective tool for designing and operating an enhanced groundwater remediation in an anisotropic aquifer using the vertical circulation well technology.

  20. A relaxed eddy accumulation system for measuring vertical fluxes of nitrous acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Ren

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available A relaxed eddy accumulation (REA system combined with a nitrous acid (HONO analyzer was developed to measure atmospheric HONO vertical fluxes. The system consists of three major components: (1 a fast-response sonic anemometer measuring both vertical wind velocity and air temperature, (2 a fast-response controlling unit separating air motions into updraft and downdraft samplers by the sign of vertical wind velocity, and (3 a highly sensitive HONO analyzer based on aqueous long path absorption photometry that measures HONO concentrations in the updrafts and downdrafts. A dynamic velocity threshold (±0.5σw, where σw is a standard deviation of the vertical wind velocity was used for valve switching determined by the running means and standard deviations of the vertical wind velocity. Using measured temperature as a tracer and the average values from two field deployments, the flux proportionality coefficient, β, was determined to be 0.42 ± 0.02, in good agreement with the theoretical estimation. The REA system was deployed in two ground-based field studies. In the California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change (CalNex study in Bakersfield, California in summer 2010, measured HONO fluxes appeared to be upward during the day and were close to zero at night. The upward HONO flux was highly correlated to the product of NO2 and solar radiation. During the Biosphere Effects on Aerosols and Photochemistry Experiment (BEARPEX 2009 at Blodgett Forest, California in July 2009, the overall HONO fluxes were small in magnitude and were close to zero. Causes for the different HONO fluxes in the two different environments are briefly discussed.

  1. Poligonación Vertical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esteban Dörries

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available La poligonación vertical es un método de medición de diferencias de altura que aprovecha las posibilidades de las estaciones totales. Se presta fundamentalmente para líneas de nivelación entre nodos formando red. El nombre se debe a que las visuales sucesivas se proyectan sobre aristas verticales en lugar de un plano horizontal, como ocurre en la poligonación convencional.

  2. Vertical Launch System Loadout Planner

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    United States Navy USS United States’ Ship VBA Visual Basic for Applications VLP VLS Loadout Planner VLS Vertical Launch System...mathematically complex and require training to operate the software. A Visual Basic for Applications ( VBA ) Excel (Microsoft Corporation, 2015...lockheed/data/ms2/documents/laun chers/MK41 VLS factsheet.pdf Microsoft Excel version 14.4.3, VBA computer software. (2011). Redmond, WA: Microsoft

  3. Trade Liberalisation and Vertical Integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Peter Arendorf; Laugesen, Anders

    We build a three-country model of international trade in final goods and intermediate inputs and study the relation between different types of trade liberalisation and vertical integration. Firms are heterogeneous with respect to both productivity and factor intensity as observed in data. Final......-economy property rights theory of the firm using firm-level data. Finally, we notice that our model's sorting pattern is in line with recent evidence when the wage difference across countries is not too big....

  4. Vertical Motions of Oceanic Volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clague, D. A.; Moore, J. G.

    2006-12-01

    lasting a few hundred thousand years as the island migrates over a broad flexural arch related to isostatic compensation of a nearby active volcano. The arch is located about 190±30 km away from the center of volcanic activity and is also related to the rejuvenated volcanic stage on the islands. Reefs on Oahu that are uplifted several tens of m above sea level are the primary evidence for uplift as the islands over-ride the flexural arch. At the other end of the movement spectrum, both in terms of magnitude and length of response, are the rapid uplift and subsidence that occurs as magma is accumulated within or erupted from active submarine volcanoes. These changes are measured in days to years and are of cm to m variation; they are measured using leveling surveys, tiltmeters, EDM and GPS above sea level and pressure gauges and tiltmeters below sea level. Other acoustic techniques to measure such vertical movement are under development. Elsewhere, evidence for subsidence of volcanoes is also widespread, ranging from shallow water carbonates on drowned Cretaceous guyots, to mapped shoreline features, to the presence of subaerially-erupted (degassed) lavas on now submerged volcanoes. Evidence for uplift is more limited, but includes makatea islands with uplifted coral reefs surrounding low volcanic islands. These are formed due to flexural uplift associated with isostatic loading of nearby islands or seamounts. In sum, oceanic volcanoes display a long history of subsidence, rapid at first and then slow, sometimes punctuated by brief periods of uplift due to lithospheric loading by subsequently formed nearby volcanoes.

  5. The vertical profile of radar reflectivity of convective cells: A strong indicator of storm intensity and lightning probability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zipser, Edward J.; Lutz, Kurt R.

    1994-01-01

    Reflectivity data from Doppler radars are used to construct vertical profiles of radar reflectivity (VPRR) of convective cells in mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) in three different environmental regimes. The National Center for Atmospheric Research CP-3 and CP-4 radars are used to calculate median VPRR for MCSs in the Oklahoma-Kansas Preliminary Regional Experiment for STORM-Central in 1985. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration-Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere radar in Darwin, Australia, is used to calculate VPRR for MCSs observed both in oceanic, monsoon regimes and in continental, break period regimes during the wet seasons of 1987/88 and 1988/89. The midlatitude and tropical continental VPRRs both exhibit maximum reflectivity somewhat above the surface and have a gradual decrease in reflectivity with height above the freezing level. In sharp contrast, the tropical oceanic profile has a maximum reflectivity at the lowest level and a very rapid decrease in reflectivity with height beginning just above the freezing level. The tropical oceanic profile in the Darwin area is almost the same shape as that for two other tropical oceanic regimes, leading to the conclustion that it is characteristic. The absolute values of reflectivity in the 0 to 20 C range are compared with values in the literature thought to represent a threshold for rapid storm electrification leading to lightning, about 40 dBZ at -10 C. The large negative vertical gradient of reflectivity in this temperature range for oceanic storms is hypothesized to be a direct result of the characteristically weaker vertical velocities observed in MCSs over tropical oceans. It is proposed, as a necessary condition for rapid electrification, that a convective cell must have its updraft speed exceed some threshold value. Based upon field program data, a tentative estimate for the magnitude of this threshold is 6-7 m/s for mean speed and 10-12 m/s for peak speed.

  6. Prophylaxis of vertical HBV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlowska, Malgorzata; Pniewska, Anna; Pilarczyk, Malgorzata; Kozielewicz, Dorota; Domagalski, Krzysztof

    2016-10-01

    An appropriate management of HBV infection is the best strategy to finally reduce the total burden of HBV infection. Mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) is responsible for more than one third of chronic HBV infections worldwide. Because HBV infection in infancy or early childhood often leads to chronic infection, appropriate prophylaxis and management of HBV in pregnancy is crucial to prevent MTCT. The prevention of HBV vertical transmission is a complex task and includes: universal HBV screening of pregnant women, administration of antivirals in the third trimester of pregnancy in women with high viral load and passive-active HBV immunoprophylaxis with hepatitis B vaccine and hepatitis B immune globulin in newborns of all HBV infected women. Universal screening of pregnant women for HBV infection, early identification of HBV DNA level in HBV-infected mothers, maternal treatment with class B according to FDA antivirals and passive/active anti-HBV immunoprophylaxis to newborns of HBV-positive mothers are crucial strategies for reducing vertical HBV transmission rates. Consideration of caesarean section in order to reduce the risk of vertical HBV transmission should be recommend in HBV infected pregnant women with high viral load despite antiviral therapy or when the therapy in the third trimester of pregnancy is not available.

  7. CONNECTION BETWEEN THE SHOCK WAVE SPEED AND II TYPE RADIO BURSTS DRIFT VELOCITY

    OpenAIRE

    E. A. Isaeva; Kravetz, R. O.

    2016-01-01

    The substantial arguments of strong connection between shock wave speed and drift velocity of II type radio bursts in 25-180 MHz range are presented. The studied sample has included 112 proton events that were accompanied with coronal shock waves. To evaluate drift velocity and shock wave speed there was used original records of dynamic spectra from radio spectrograph in 25- 180 MHz range. The velocities of shock waves were evaluated with the power mode model of solar corona density falloff.

  8. Determinants of Arbovirus Vertical Transmission in Mosquitoes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Lequime

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Vertical transmission (VT and horizontal transmission (HT of pathogens refer to parental and non-parental chains of host-to-host transmission. Combining HT with VT enlarges considerably the range of ecological conditions in which a pathogen can persist, but the factors governing the relative frequency of each transmission mode are poorly understood for pathogens with mixed-mode transmission. Elucidating these factors is particularly important for understanding the epidemiology of arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses of public health significance. Arboviruses are primarily maintained by HT between arthropod vectors and vertebrate hosts in nature, but are occasionally transmitted vertically in the vector population from an infected female to her offspring, which is a proposed maintenance mechanism during adverse conditions for HT. Here, we review over a century of published primary literature on natural and experimental VT, which we previously assembled into large databases, to identify biological factors associated with the efficiency of arbovirus VT in mosquito vectors. Using a robust statistical framework, we highlight a suite of environmental, taxonomic, and physiological predictors of arbovirus VT. These novel insights contribute to refine our understanding of strategies employed by arboviruses to persist in the environment and cause substantial public health concern. They also provide hypotheses on the biological processes underlying the relative VT frequency for pathogens with mixed-mode transmission that can be tested empirically.

  9. Radar velocity determination using direction of arrival measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin W.; Bickel, Douglas L.; Naething, Richard M.; Horndt, Volker

    2017-12-19

    The various technologies presented herein relate to utilizing direction of arrival (DOA) data to determine various flight parameters for an aircraft A plurality of radar images (e.g., SAR images) can be analyzed to identify a plurality of pixels in the radar images relating to one or more ground targets. In an embodiment, the plurality of pixels can be selected based upon the pixels exceeding a SNR threshold. The DOA data in conjunction with a measurable Doppler frequency for each pixel can be obtained. Multi-aperture technology enables derivation of an independent measure of DOA to each pixel based on interferometric analysis. This independent measure of DOA enables decoupling of the aircraft velocity from the DOA in a range-Doppler map, thereby enabling determination of a radar velocity. The determined aircraft velocity can be utilized to update an onboard INS, and to keep it aligned, without the need for additional velocity-measuring instrumentation.

  10. [Vertical fractures: apropos of 2 clinical cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Félix Mañes Ferrer, J; Micò Muñoz, P; Sánchez Cortés, J L; Paricio Martín, J J; Miñana Laliga, R

    1991-01-01

    The aim of the study is to present a clinical review of the vertical root fractures. Two clinical cases are presented to demonstrates the criteria for obtaining a correct diagnosis of vertical root fractures.

  11. Propagation of Local Bubble Parameters of Subcooled Boiling Flow in a Pressurized Vertical Annulus Channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, In-Cheol; Lee, Seung Jun; Youn, Young Jung; Park, Jong Kuk; Choi, Hae Seob; Euh, Dong Jin [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    CMFD (Computation Multi-Fluid Dynamics) tools have been being developed to simulate two-phase flow safety problems in nuclear reactor, including the precise prediction of local bubble parameters in subcooled boiling flow. However, a lot of complicated phenomena are encountered in the subcooled boiling flow such as bubble nucleation and departure, interfacial drag of bubbles, lateral migration of bubbles, bubble coalescence and break-up, and condensation of bubbles, and the constitutive models for these phenomena are not yet complete. As a result, it is a difficult task to predict the radial profile of bubble parameters and its propagation along the flow direction. Several experiments were performed to measure the local bubble parameters for the validation of the CMFD code analysis and improvement of the constitutive models of the subcooled boiling flow, and to enhance the fundamental understanding on the subcooled boiling flow. The information on the propagation of the local flow parameters along the flow direction was not provided because the measurements were conducted at the fixed elevation. In SUBO experiments, the radial profiles of local bubble parameters, liquid velocity and temperature were obtained for steam-water subcooled boiling flow in a vertical annulus. The local flow parameters were measured at six elevations along the flow direction. The pressure was in the range of 0.15 to 0.2 MPa. We have launched an experimental program to investigate quantify the local subcooled boiling flow structure under elevated pressure condition in order to provide high precision experimental data for thorough validation of up-to-date CMFD codes. In the present study, the first set of experimental data on the propagation of the radial profile of the bubble parameters was obtained for the subcooled boiling flow of R-134a in a pressurized vertical annulus channel. An experimental program was launched for an in-depth investigation of a subcooled boiling flow in an elevated

  12. Determinations of vertical stroke V{sub cb} vertical stroke and vertical stroke V{sub ub} vertical stroke from baryonic Λ{sub b} decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsiao, Y.K. [Shanxi Normal University, School of Physics and Information Engineering, Linfen (China); National Tsing Hua University, Department of Physics, Hsinchu (China); Geng, C.Q. [Shanxi Normal University, School of Physics and Information Engineering, Linfen (China); National Tsing Hua University, Department of Physics, Hsinchu (China); Hunan Normal University, Synergetic Innovation Center for Quantum Effects and Applications (SICQEA), Changsha (China)

    2017-10-15

    We present the first attempt to extract vertical stroke V{sub cb} vertical stroke from the Λ{sub b} → Λ{sub c}{sup +}l anti ν{sub l} decay without relying on vertical stroke V{sub ub} vertical stroke inputs from the B meson decays. Meanwhile, the hadronic Λ{sub b} → Λ{sub c}M{sub (c)} decays with M = (π{sup -},K{sup -}) and M{sub c} =(D{sup -},D{sup -}{sub s}) measured with high precisions are involved in the extraction. Explicitly, we find that vertical stroke V{sub cb} vertical stroke =(44.6 ± 3.2) x 10{sup -3}, agreeing with the value of (42.11 ± 0.74) x 10{sup -3} from the inclusive B → X{sub c}l anti ν{sub l} decays. Furthermore, based on the most recent ratio of vertical stroke V{sub ub} vertical stroke / vertical stroke V{sub cb} vertical stroke from the exclusive modes, we obtain vertical stroke V{sub ub} vertical stroke = (4.3 ± 0.4) x 10{sup -3}, which is close to the value of (4.49 ± 0.24) x 10{sup -3} from the inclusive B → X{sub u}l anti ν{sub l} decays. We conclude that our determinations of vertical stroke V{sub cb} vertical stroke and vertical stroke V{sub ub} vertical stroke favor the corresponding inclusive extractions in the B decays. (orig.)

  13. Critical velocity experiments in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torbert, R. B.

    1988-01-01

    Published data from active space experiments designed to demonstrate the Alfven critical-velocity effect are compiled in graphs and compared with the predictions of numerical simulations. It is found that the discrepancies in the ionization yields obtained in shaped-charge releases of alkali metals are related to the macroscopic limits of time and energy in such releases. It is argued that the total ionization yield is an inadequate measure of the critical-velocity effect, and a new criterion based on eta, the efficiency of energy transfer from the recently ionized neutrals to a heated electron population, is proposed: the effect would be verified if eta values of 10 percent or greater were observed.

  14. Design of h-Darrieus vertical axis wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Teresa; Vega, Carmen; Gallegos, A.; Uzarraga, N. C.; Castro, F.

    2015-05-01

    Numerical simulation is used to predict the performance of a Vertical Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT) H-Darrieus. The rotor consists of three straight blades with shape of aerofoil of the NACA family attached to a rotating vertical shaft. The influence of the solidity is tested to get design tendencies. The mesh has two fluid volumes: one sliding mesh for the rotor where the rotation velocity is established while the other is the environment of the rotor. Bearing in mind the overall flow is characterized by important secondary flows, the turbulence model selected was realizable k-epsilon with non-equilibrium wall functions. Conservation equations were solved with a Third-Order Muscl scheme using SIMPLE to couple pressure and velocity. During VAWT operation, the performance depends mainly on the relative motion of the rotating blade and has a fundamental period which depends both on the rate of rotation and the number of blades. The transient study is necessary to characterise the hysteresis phenomenon. Hence, more than six revolutions get the periodic behaviour. Instantaneous flows provide insight about wake structure interaction. Time averaged parameters let obtain the characteristic curves of power coefficient.

  15. Design of h-Darrieus vertical axis wind turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parra Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerical simulation is used to predict the performance of a Vertical Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT H-Darrieus. The rotor consists of three straight blades with shape of aerofoil of the NACA family attached to a rotating vertical shaft. The influence of the solidity is tested to get design tendencies. The mesh has two fluid volumes: one sliding mesh for the rotor where the rotation velocity is established while the other is the environment of the rotor. Bearing in mind the overall flow is characterized by important secondary flows, the turbulence model selected was realizable k-epsilon with non-equilibrium wall functions. Conservation equations were solved with a Third-Order Muscl scheme using SIMPLE to couple pressure and velocity. During VAWT operation, the performance depends mainly on the relative motion of the rotating blade and has a fundamental period which depends both on the rate of rotation and the number of blades. The transient study is necessary to characterise the hysteresis phenomenon. Hence, more than six revolutions get the periodic behaviour. Instantaneous flows provide insight about wake structure interaction. Time averaged parameters let obtain the characteristic curves of power coefficient.

  16. A study of the river velocity measurement techniques and analysis methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung Yang, Han; Lun Chiang, Jie

    2013-04-01

    Velocity measurement technology can be traced back to the pitot tube velocity measurement method in the 18th century and today's velocity measurement technology use the acoustic and radar technology, with the Doppler principle developed technology advances, in order to develop the measurement method is more suitable for the measurement of velocity, the purpose is to get a more accurate measurement data and with the surface velocity theory, the maximum velocity theory and the indicator theory to obtain the mean velocity. As the main research direction of this article is to review the literature of the velocity measurement techniques and analysis methods, and to explore the applicability of the measurement method of the velocity measurement instruments, and then to describe the advantages and disadvantages of the different mean velocity profiles analysis method. Adequate review of the references of this study will be able to provide a reference for follow-up study of the velocity measurement. Review velocity measurement literature that different velocity measurement is required to follow the different flow conditions measured be upgraded its accuracy, because each flow rate measurement method has its advantages and disadvantages. Traditional velocity instrument can be used at low flow and RiverRAD microwave radar or imaging technology measurement method may be applied in high flow. In the tidal river can use the ADCP to quickly measure river vertical velocity distribution. In addition, urban rivers may be used the CW radar to set up on the bridge, and wide rivers can be used RiverRAD microwave radar to measure the velocities. Review the relevant literature also found that using Ultrasonic Doppler Current Profiler with the Chiu's theory to the velocity of observing automation work can save manpower and resources to improve measurement accuracy, reduce the risk of measurement, but the great variability of river characteristics in Taiwan and a lot of drifting floating

  17. Vertical perturbation of high energy proton beams in the AGOR cyclotron

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roobol, LP; Brandenburg, S; Post, H; Marti, F

    2001-01-01

    Using a layered target on the radial probe, we have measured the vertical beam current distribution for several high energy proton beams ranging from 150 to 190 MeV. In particular, this allows us to measure the vertical centring of the beam. The 150 MeV beam with high transmission (83 %) through the

  18. Coastal Vertical Land motion in the German Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Matthias; Fenoglio, Luciana; Reckeweg, Florian

    2017-04-01

    In the framework of the ESA Sea Level Climate Change Initiative (CCI) we analyse a set of GNSS equipped tide gauges at the German Bight. Main goals are the determination of tropospheric zenith delay corrections for altimetric observations, precise coordinates in ITRF2008 and vertical land motion (VLM) rates of the tide gauge stations. These are to be used for georeferencing the tide gauges and the correction of tide gauge observations for VLM. The set of stations includes 38 GNSS stations. 19 stations are in the German Bight, where 15 of them belong to the Bundesanstalt für Gewässerkunde, 3 to EUREF and 1 to GREF. These stations are collocated with tide gauges (TGs). The other 19 GNSS stations in the network belong to EUREF, IGS and GREF. We analyse data in the time span from 2008 till the end of 2016 with the Bernese PPP processing approach. Data are partly rather noisy and disturbed by offsets and data gaps at the coastal TG sites. Special effort is therefore put into a proper estimation of the VLM. We use FODITS (Ostini2012), HECTOR (Bos et al, 2013), CATS (Williams, 2003) and the MIDAS approach of Blewitt (2016) to robustly derive rates and realistic error estimates. The results are compared to those published by the European Permanent Network (EPN), ITRF and the Système d'Observation du Niveau des Eaux Littorales (SONEL) for common stations. Vertical motion is small in general, at the -1 to -2 mm/yr level for most coastal stations. A comparison of the standard deviations of the velocity differences to EPN with the mean values of the estimated velocity standard deviations for our solution shows a very good agreement of the estimated velocities and their standard deviations with the reference solution from EPN. In the comparison with results by SONEL the standard deviation of the differences is slightly higher. The discrepancies may arise from differences in the time span analyzed and gaps, offsets and data preprocessing. The combined estimation of functional

  19. Three-dimensional velocity imaging of the Kachchh seismic zone, Gujarat, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Prantik; Chadha, R. K.

    2008-06-01

    To understand the causative mechanism of the continued occurrence of earthquakes in Kachchh, Gujarat for the last six years, we estimated high-resolution three-dimensional Vp, Vs and Vp/Vs structures in the aftershock zones of the 2001 Mw7.7 Bhuj and 2006 Mw5.6 Gedi earthquakes. We used 13,862 P- and 13,736 S-wave high-quality arrival times collected from the seismograms of 2303 aftershocks recorded at 5-18 three-component seismograph stations during 2001-06. Seismic images revealed a marked spatial variation in the velocities (from - 20% to + 14% in Vp, from - 12% to 13% in Vs, and from - 12% to 12% increase in Vp/Vs) in the 0-34 km depth range beneath the Bhuj aftershock zone. Relatively more increase in Vp than Vs, resulting in an increase in Vp/Vs in the crust beneath the seismically active causative fault (North Wagad Fault, NWF) zone of 2001 Bhuj mainshock suggests a rigid, mafic crust beneath the region. They also delineate an increase of 8% in Vp and 14% in Vs, and a decrease of 4% in Vp/Vs in the almost vertical rupture zone of the 2006 Gedi earthquake extending up to 12 km depth. This high velocity body associated with the Gedi mainshock is inferred to be a gabbroic intrusive. The Banni region and the Wagad uplift are found to be associated with high velocity intrusive bodies (inferred to be mafic) extending from 5 to 35 km depth, which might have intruded during the rifting in early Jurassic (~ 160 Ma). Aftershock activity is mainly confined to the zones characterized by high Vp, high Vs and low Vp/Vs ratio, which might be representing the strong, competent and brittle parts of the fault zone/intrusive bodies that could accumulate large strain energy for generating aftershocks for more than six years. It is inferred that the crustal stress concentrations associated with the intrusive bodies are contributing significant perturbation to the crustal stress regime to generate the intraplate earthquakes in the Kachchh rift zone. A few patches of slow (Vp and

  20. Effects of water velocity on activity of juvenile striped bass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowles, R.R.; Griffith, J.S.; Coutant, C.C.

    1976-07-01

    The swimming activity of juvenile striped bass (Morone saxatilis Walbaum) 8 to 80 mm long was investigated in a test chamber simulating, on a small scale, a fixed-screen cooling water intake structure. As water velocity increased from 0 to 30 cm/sec area and distance traveled by juvenile bass 10 to 80 mm long decreased. However, as water velocity increased from 0 to 3 cm/sec the area and distance covered by larval bass increased. The presence of food increased the activity of larval bass, but decreased the activity of juveniles. Area ranged by striped bass at test velocities ranging from 0 to 30 cm/sec increased in proportion to body length. Juvenile striped bass tested at acclimation temperatures between 20 and 5/sup 0/C experienced a 30% reduction of activity. Activity was also reduced as temperature increased from 20 to 30/sup 0/C.

  1. ?Vertical Sextants give Good Sights?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richey, Michael

    Mark Dixon suggests (Forum, Vol. 50, 137) that nobody thus far has attempted to quantify the errors from tilt that arise while observing with the marine sextant. The issue in fact, with the related problem of what exactly is the axis about which the sextant is rotated whilst being (to define the vertical), was the subject of a lively controversy in the first two volumes of this Journal some fifty years ago. Since the consensus of opinion seems to have been that the maximum error does not necessarily occur at 45 degrees, whereas Dixon's table suggests that it does, some reiteration of the arguments may be in order.

  2. BATCH SETTLING IN VERTICAL SETTLERS

    OpenAIRE

    Lama Ramirez, R.; Universidad Nacional Mayor De San Marcos Facultad de Química e Ingeniería Química Departamento de Operaciones Unitarias Av. Venezuela cdra. 34 sin, Lima - Perú; Condorhuamán Ccorimanya, C.; Universidad Nacional Mayor De San Marcos Facultad de Química e Ingeniería Química Departamento de Operaciones Unitarias Av. Venezuela cdra. 34 sin, Lima - Perú

    2014-01-01

    lt has been studied the batch sedimentation of aqueous suspensions of precipitated calcium carbonate, barium sulphate and lead oxide , in vertical thickeners of rectangular and circular cross sectional area. Suspensions vary in concentration between 19.4 and 617.9 g/I and the rate of sedimentation obtained between 0.008 and 7.70 cm/min. The effect of the specific gravity of the solid on the rate of sedimentation is the same for all the suspensions, that is, the greater the value of the specif...

  3. Binocular responses and vertical strabismus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risović Dušica

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Elevation in adduction is the most common pattern of vertical strabismus, and it is mostly treated with surgery. The results of weaking of inferior oblique muscle are very changeable. The aim of this study was to evaluate binocular vision using sensory tests before and one and six months after the surgery. Methods. A total of 79 children were divided in two groups: the first, with inferior oblique muscle of overaction (n = 52, and the second with dissociated vertical deviation (DVD, and primary inferior oblique muscle overaction (n = 27. We tested them by polaroid mirror test (PMT, Worth test at distance and near, fusion amplitudes on sinoptofore, Lang I stereo test and Wirt-Titmus stereo test. We examined our patients before and two times after the surgery for vertical strabismus. Results. Foveal suppression in the group I was found in 60.5% of the patients before, and in 56.4% after the surgery. In group II Foveal suppression was detected in 64.7% of the patients before, but in 55.6% 6 months after the surgery with PMT. Worth test revealed suppression in 23.5% of the patients before, and in 40.7% after the vertical muscle surgery. Parafoveal fussion persisted in about 1/3 of the patients before the surgery, and their amplitudes were a little larger after the surgery in the group I patients. Lang I stereo test was negative in 53.9% before and 51.9% after the surgery in the group I, and in 48.2% of the patients before and after the surgery in the group II patients. Wirt-Titmus stereo test was negative in 74.5% of the patients before and in 72.9% after the surgery in the group I, but in the group II it was negative in 70.8% before and in 68.0% of the patients 6 months after the surgery. Conclusion. Binocular responses were found after surgery in 65.7% of the patients the group I and in 55.6% patients the group II. There was no significant difference between these two groups, but binocular responses were more often in the patients

  4. Vertical heat flux in the ocean: Estimates from observations and from a coupled general circulation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, Patrick F.; Masson, Diane; Saenko, Oleg A.

    2016-06-01

    The net heat uptake by the ocean in a changing climate involves small imbalances between the advective and diffusive processes that transport heat vertically. Generally, it is necessary to rely on global climate models to study these processes in detail. In the present study, it is shown that a key component of the vertical heat flux, namely that associated with the large-scale mean vertical circulation, can be diagnosed over extra-tropical regions from global observational data sets. This component is estimated based on the vertical velocity obtained from the geostrophic vorticity balance, combined with estimates of absolute geostrophic flow. Results are compared with the output of a non-eddy resolving, coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model. Reasonable agreement is found in the latitudinal distribution of the vertical heat flux, as well as in the area-integrated flux below about 250 m depth. The correspondence with the coupled model deteriorates sharply at depths shallower than 250 m due to the omission of equatorial regions from the calculation. The vertical heat flux due to the mean circulation is found to be dominated globally by the downward contribution from the Southern Hemisphere, in particular the Southern Ocean. This is driven by the Ekman vertical velocity which induces an upward transport of seawater that is cold relative to the horizontal average at a given depth. The results indicate that the dominant characteristics of the vertical transport of heat due to the mean circulation can be inferred from simple linear vorticity dynamics over much of the ocean.

  5. Gestation and the evolution of vertical stance bipedal humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.S. Robertson

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available During mammalian gestation a change in maternal stance alters the velocities of maternal blood flows and results in a changed rate of delivery and distribution of nutrients required to form the bone and tissue in various parts of a developing foetus. The latter in turn results in change in the extent and position of tissue and bone formation in the foetus. It is shown that such changes would, over many generations, alter the physical characteristics of the ancestor offspring under conditions where the pregnant maternal ancestor normally exhibiting horizontal stance was constrained to adopt a vertical stance for all or most of the gestation period. This behaviour produced the physical characteristics seen in humans and other Hominidae primates, including the vertical stance and bipedalism of the former accompanied by increase in skull and brain size. The manner in which difficulties of giving birth as the change from horizontal stance to vertical stance proceeded from generation to generation, limited survival is discussed andreasons for the adoption of this behaviour are proposed. The induction of evolutionary change and the operation of natural selection through alterations in the characteristics of embryo/foetus of an animal, induced by physical, chemical, mechanical or behavioural means, is shown to be feasible. The changes are not related to the Lamarckian principle of inheritance of acquired characteristics as the changes described occurred before birth and are not related to any physical or mental characteristics already present in or acquired during the lifetime of the breeding pair.

  6. Design analysis of vertical wind turbine with airfoil variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maulana, Muhammad Ilham; Qaedy, T. Masykur Al; Nawawi, Muhammad

    2016-03-01

    With an ever increasing electrical energy crisis occurring in the Banda Aceh City, it will be important to investigate alternative methods of generating power in ways different than fossil fuels. In fact, one of the biggest sources of energy in Aceh is wind energy. It can be harnessed not only by big corporations but also by individuals using Vertical Axis Wind Turbines (VAWT). This paper presents a three-dimensional CFD analysis of the influence of airfoil design on performance of a Darrieus-type vertical-axis wind turbine (VAWT). The main objective of this paper is to develop an airfoil design for NACA 63-series vertical axis wind turbine, for average wind velocity 2,5 m/s. To utilize both lift and drag force, some of designs of airfoil are analyzed using a commercial computational fluid dynamics solver such us Fluent. Simulation is performed for this airfoil at different angles of attach rearranging from -12°, -8°, -4°, 0°, 4°, 8°, and 12°. The analysis showed that the significant enhancement in value of lift coefficient for airfoil NACA 63-series is occurred for NACA 63-412.

  7. Soret and dufour effects on free convection flow of a couple stress fluid in a vertical channel with chemical reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Srinivasacharya D.; Kaladhar K.

    2013-01-01

    The Soret and Dufour effects in the presence of chemical reaction on natural convection heat and mass transfer of a couple stress fluid in a vertical channel formed by two vertical parallel plates is presented. The governing non-linear partial differential equations are transformed into a system of ordinary differential equations using similarity transformations. The resulting equations are then solved using Homotopy Analysis Method (HAM). Profiles of dimensionless velocity, temperature...

  8. Three-dimensional surface velocities of Storstrømmen glacier, Greenland, derived from radar interferometry and ice-sounding radar measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reeh, Niels; Mohr, Johan Jacob; Madsen, Søren Nørvang

    2003-01-01

    in substantial errors (up to 20%) also on the south-north component of horizontal velocities derived by satellite synthetic aperture radar interferometry (InSAR) measurements. In many glacier environments, the steady-state vertical velocity component required to balance the annual ablation rate is 5-10 m a(-1...... tracks with airborne ice-sounding radar measurement of ice thickness. The results are compared to InSAR velocities previously derived by using the SPF assumption, and to velocities obtained by in situ global positioning system (GPS) measurements. The velocities derived by using the MC principle...

  9. Vertical mobile and reducible atlantoaxial dislocation. Clinical article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Atul; Shah, Abhidha; Rajan, Sanjay

    2009-07-01

    The authors' experience with treatment of 8 patients with "vertical mobile and reducible" atlantoaxial dislocation is reviewed. The probable pathogenesis, radiological and clinical features, and management issues in such cases are discussed. Between January 2006 and March 2008, 8 patients who presented with vertical mobile and reducible atlantoaxial dislocations were treated at the Department of Neurosurgery at King Edward Memorial Hospital in Mumbai, India. The vertical atlantoaxial dislocation/basilar invagination reduced completely on extension of the neck, with no need of any cervical traction. According to the extent of superior migration of the odontoid process, and measurements based on the vertical atlantoaxial instability index, the dislocation was graded as mild, moderate, or severe. All patients were treated using the C-1 lateral mass and C-2 pars plate and screw method of fixation. The study group was composed of 5 male and 3 female patients (mean age 24 years, age range 8-54 years). All patients presented with the physical features of short neck, torticollis, pain in the nape of the neck, and varying degrees of quadriparesis. In 6 patients there was a history of trauma prior to the onset of major neurological symptoms. The dislocation was mild in 3 cases, moderate in 1, and severe in 4. All patients had clinical neurological improvement following surgery. The follow-up duration ranged from 4 to 30 months (mean 18 months). Vertical mobile and reducible atlantoaxial dislocation is a discrete clinical entity. Abnormal inclination and incompetence of the facet joint appears to be the primary causative factor that resulted in vertical dislocation or basilar invagination. Posterior fixation in the reduced dislocation position forms the basis of treatment.

  10. Metrics of hurricane-ocean interaction: vertically-integrated or vertically-averaged ocean temperature?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. Price

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The ocean thermal field is often represented in hurricane-ocean interaction by a metric termed upper Ocean Heat Content (OHC, the vertical integral of ocean temperature in excess of 26°C. High values of OHC have proven useful for identifying ocean regions that are especially favorable for hurricane intensification. Nevertheless, it is argued here that a more direct and robust metric of the ocean thermal field may be afforded by a vertical average of temperature. In the simplest version, dubbed T100, the averaging is from the surface to 100 m, a typical depth of vertical mixing by a category 3 hurricane. OHC and T100 are well correlated over the deep open ocean in the high range of OHC, ≥75 kJ cm−2. They are poorly correlated in the low range of OHC, ≤50 kJ cm−2, in part because OHC is degenerate when evaluated on cool ocean regions, ≤26°C. OHC and T100 can be qualitatively different also over shallow continental shelves: OHC will generally indicate comparatively low values regardless of the ocean temperature, while T100 will take on high values over a shelf that is warm and upwelling neutral or negative. In so far as the ocean thermal field alone is concerned, these warm, shallow continental shelves would appear to be as favorable for hurricane intensification as are warm, deep ocean regions.

  11. A comparison of two landing styles in a two-foot vertical jump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Davila, Marcos; Campos, José; Navarro, Enrique

    2009-01-01

    In team sports, such as basketball and volleyball, the players use different takeoff styles to make the vertical jump. The two-foot vertical jump styles have been classified according to the landing style and identified as hop style, when both feet touch the ground at the same time, and step-close style, when there is a slight delay between the first and second foot making contact with the ground. The aim of this research is to identify the differences between the two styles. Twenty-three subjects participated in the study, of whom 14 were volleyball players and 9 were basketball players. The jumps were video recorded and synchronized with two force platforms at 250 Hz. Two temporal periods of the takeoff were defined according to the reduction or increase in the radial distance between the center of gravity (CG) and the foot support (T - RDCG and T + RDCG, respectively). The findings produced no specific advantages when both styles were compared with respect to takeoff velocity and, consequently, to jump height, but takeoff time was significantly shorter (p vertical velocity of CG at the beginning of the takeoff is significantly lower. Moreover, the mean vertical force developed during T - RDCG was reduced by -627.7 +/- 251.1 N, thus lessening impact on landing. Horizontal velocity at the end of the takeoff is less when the step-close style is used (p jumps where it is necessary to move horizontally during the flight against an opponent.

  12. DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT OF A 1/3 SCALE VERTICAL AXIS WIND TURBINE FOR ELECTRICAL POWER GENERATION

    OpenAIRE

    Altab Hossain; A.K.M.P. Iqbal; Ataur Rahman; M. Arifin; M. Mazian

    2007-01-01

    This research describes the electrical power generation in Malaysia by the measurement of wind velocity acting on the wind turbine technology. The primary purpose of the measurement over the 1/3 scaled prototype vertical axis wind turbine for the wind velocity is to predict the performance of full scaled H-type vertical axis wind turbine. The electrical power produced by the wind turbine is influenced by its two major part, wind power and belt power transmission system. The blade and the drag...

  13. Ultrasonic Measurement of Velocity Profile on Bubbly Flow Using Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongsaroj, W.; Hamdani, A.; Thong-un, N.; Takahashi, H.; Kikura, H.

    2017-10-01

    In two-phase bubbly flow, measurement of liquid and bubble velocity is a necessity to understand fluid characteristic. The conventional ultrasonic velocity profiler (UVP), which has been known as a nonintrusive measurement technique, can measure velocity profile of liquid and bubble simultaneously by applying a separation technique for both phases (liquid and bubble) and transparent test section is unnecessary. The aim of this study was to develop a new technique for separating liquid and bubble velocity data in UVP method to measure liquid and bubble velocity profiles separately. The technique employs only single resonant frequency transducer and a simple UVP system. An extra equipment is not required. Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) based frequency estimator paralleled with other signal processing techniques, which is called as proposed technique, was proposed to measure liquid and bubble velocity separately. The experimental facility of two-phase bubbly flow in the vertical pipe was constructed. Firstly, the Doppler frequency estimation by using the FFT technique was evaluated in single-phase liquid flow. Results showed that FFT technique showed a good agreement with autocorrelation and maximum likelihood estimator. Then, separation of liquid and bubble velocity was demonstrated experimentally in the two-phase bubbly flow. The proposed technique confirmed that liquid and bubble velocity could be measured efficiently.

  14. Throwing velocity and jump height in female water polo players: performance predictors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCluskey, Lisa; Lynskey, Sharon; Leung, Chak Kei; Woodhouse, Danielle; Briffa, Kathy; Hopper, Diana

    2010-03-01

    Throwing velocity and vertical jumping ability are essential components for shooting and passing in water polo. The purpose of this study was to determine whether there is a relationship between throwing velocity and water jump height in highly skilled female water polo players. Throwing velocity and head height at ball release were measured in twenty-two female players (age 20.41 years (6.16); weight 68.28 kg (8.87)) with two 50 frames per second cameras while shooting at goal. Water jump height was also measured with a modified Yardstick device. Multiple regression analyses showed that peak lower limb power was the most significant predictor of maximal velocity. Power alone accounted for 62% of the variance in maximum velocity (pheight and anthropometry) made a significant contribution to throwing velocity. After controlling for the effect of power, head height at ball release accounted for an additional significant proportion of the variance in maximal velocity (R(2) change 7%; p=0.049). Lower body power was a significant predictor of higher throwing velocity in highly skilled female water polo players. Players with relatively higher underlying levels of lower limb power who are able to generate greater elevation out of the water are able to throw the ball faster. Copyright 2009 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Superconducting accelerating structures for very low velocity ion beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Xu

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents designs for four types of very-low-velocity superconducting (SC accelerating cavity capable of providing several MV of accelerating potential per cavity, and suitable for particle velocities in the range 0.006velocity profile to maximize the output energy for each of a number of different ion species. Several laboratories in the U.S. and Europe are planning exotic beam facilities based on SC linacs. The cavity designs presented here are intended for the front end of such linacs, particularly for the postacceleration of rare isotopes of low charge state. Several types of SC cavities have been developed recently to cover particle velocities above 0.06c. Superconducting four-gap quarter-wave resonators for velocities 0.008<β=v/c<0.05 were developed about two decades ago and have been successfully operated at the ATLAS SC linac at Argonne National Laboratory. Since that time, progress in simulation tools, cavity fabrication, and processing have increased SC cavity gradients by a factor of 3–4. This paper applies these tools to optimize the design of a four-gap quarter-wave resonator for exotic beam facilities and other low-velocity applications.

  16. Superconducting accelerating structures for very low velocity ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, J.; Shepard, K.W.; Ostroumov, P.N.; Fuerst, J.D.; Waldschmidt, G.; /Argonne; Gonin, I.V.; /Fermilab

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents designs for four types of very-low-velocity superconducting accelerating cavity capable of providing several MV of accelerating potential per cavity, and suitable for particle velocities in the range 0.006 < v/c < 0.06. Superconducting TEM-class cavities have been widely applied to CW acceleration of ion beams. SC linacs can be formed as an array of independently-phased cavities, enabling a variable velocity profile to maximize the output energy for each of a number of different ion species. Several laboratories in the US and Europe are planning exotic beam facilities based on SC linacs. The cavity designs presented here are intended for the front-end of such linacs, particularly for the post-acceleration of rare isotopes of low charge state. Several types of SC cavities have been developed recently to cover particle velocities above 0.06c. Superconducting four-gap quarter-wave resonators for velocities 0.008 < {beta} = v/c < 0.05 were developed about two decades ago and have been successfully operated at the ATLAS SC linac at Argonne National Laboratory. Since that time, progress in simulation tools, cavity fabrication and processing have increased SC cavity gradients by a factor of 3-4. This paper applies these tools to optimize the design of a four-gap quarter-wave resonator for exotic beam facilities and other low-velocity applications.

  17. Accurate Recovery of H i Velocity Dispersion from Radio Interferometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ianjamasimanana, R. [Max-Planck Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117, Heidelberg (Germany); Blok, W. J. G. de [Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy (ASTRON), Postbus 2, 7990 AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Heald, George H., E-mail: roger@mpia.de, E-mail: blok@astron.nl, E-mail: George.Heald@csiro.au [Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, University of Groningen, P.O. Box 800, 9700 AV, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2017-05-01

    Gas velocity dispersion measures the amount of disordered motion of a rotating disk. Accurate estimates of this parameter are of the utmost importance because the parameter is directly linked to disk stability and star formation. A global measure of the gas velocity dispersion can be inferred from the width of the atomic hydrogen (H i) 21 cm line. We explore how several systematic effects involved in the production of H i cubes affect the estimate of H i velocity dispersion. We do so by comparing the H i velocity dispersion derived from different types of data cubes provided by The H i Nearby Galaxy Survey. We find that residual-scaled cubes best recover the H i velocity dispersion, independent of the weighting scheme used and for a large range of signal-to-noise ratio. For H i observations, where the dirty beam is substantially different from a Gaussian, the velocity dispersion values are overestimated unless the cubes are cleaned close to (e.g., ∼1.5 times) the noise level.

  18. Terminal velocity formula for spheres in a viscous fluid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slot, R.E.

    1983-01-01

    Various attempts have been made to develop a general expression for the terminal velocity of spheres in a viscous fluid (Stokes, Prandtl, Oseen, Rubey, etc.: see Bogardi, 1974 and Vanoni, 1975). All of these formulae show a lack of accuracy and/or are restrict ed to a relatively small range of

  19. Velocity Distributions of Runaway Stars Produced by Supernovae in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Using a method of population synthesis, we investigate the runaway stars produced by disrupted binaries via asymmetric core collapse supernova explosions (CC-RASs) and thermonuclear supernova explosions (TN-RASs). We find the velocities of CC-RASs in the range of about 30--100 km s − 1 . The runaway stars ...

  20. Lithosphere-Asthenosphere Boundary Beneath Regions of Recent Volcanism in the Basin and Range Province and Mojave Desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsyth, D. W.; Rau, C. J.; Plank, T.; Gazel, E.; Bendersky, C.

    2010-12-01

    Melt in the asthenosphere may contribute strongly to the development of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) in some settings. We have compiled a set of vertical shear-velocity profiles beneath centers of recent (Hill and Amboy in the southern Mojave, the lithospheric lid extends to a depth of ~ 90 km. Minimum velocities in the LVZs beneath the higher velocity lids typically are 4.00-4.05 km/s, similar to that beneath the East Pacific Rise and too low to be caused by temperature alone without unreasonably high attenuation. Beneath other centers, like Big Pine, Lathrop Wells and Tahoe, there is no resolvable lid. The lid is either missing or too thin to resolve, but the absence of the lid/LVZ pattern seems to be due to a combination of lower velocities immediately beneath the Moho and higher velocities in the LVZ. Petrological indicators of temperature and depth of melting from basalt composition are in general agreement with the seismological observations, with the depth of last equilibration typically occurring near the top of the LVZ. Beneath Big Pine, for example, the equilibration temperatures are unusually low and the equilibration depth is 40 to 50 km, just below the Moho, in agreement with the lack of a distinct lid. Beneath Cima, equilibration depths are 60-70 km. Beneath Coso, equilibration depths are only slightly deeper than Big Pine, but the temperatures are higher, in agreement with the more pronounced LVZ and the presence of a thin lid. Beneath the Tabernacle Hill/Black Rock volcanic field in west-central Utah, there is a well-developed lid/LVZ structure, but the "high" velocity lid is only ~ 4.10 km/s while the underlying LVZ reaches as low as 3.90 km/s. This observation points to the importance of melt concentration or distribution controlling the velocities. Lid velocities are often relatively low (4.2-4.4 km/s) in the Basin and Range, indicating high temperatures, but here there is probably melt within the lid as well, with higher

  1. 1D layered velocity models and microseismic event locations: synthetic examples for a case with a single linear receiver array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akram, Jubran; Eaton, David W.

    2017-10-01

    We discuss various aspects of 1D velocity-model building for application to microseismic data analysis. We generate simple synthetic example data using a widely used single linear array geometry. The synthetic data contain 30 sources with known locations for a reference model based on previous studies of the Barnett shale. We investigate several key factors that should be considered, including selection of the calibration technique, inclusion of a priori information such as lateral heterogeneity and parameter ranges, and choice of algorithm for travel time computations. For the source-receiver geometry considered here, hypocenter location errors (±6 m in X and ±12 m in Z) can result from differently calibrated models only and without including the errors in picked arrival times and polarization estimates. We find that the errors in hypocenter locations are reduced (±3 m in X and ±6 m in Z) when a model calibrated with multiple shots simultaneously is used. Using four different models (vertical fault, dipping layers, channels, and these effects combined), we demonstrate that systematic errors in hypocenter locations can result when a 1D layered model is used in lieu of a laterally heterogeneous subsurface. Finally, we show that event locations from a velocity model calibrated using direct-arrival times are more stable than from a model calibrated with first-arrival times.

  2. Ultrasonic Doppler Velocity Profiler for Fluid Flow

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    The ultrasonic velocity profile (UVP) method, first developed in medical engineering, is now widely used in clinical settings. The fluid mechanical basis of UVP was established in investigations by the author and his colleagues with work demonstrating that UVP is a powerful new tool in experimental fluid mechanics. There are diverse examples, ranging from problems in fundamental fluid dynamics to applied problems in mechanical, chemical, nuclear, and environmental engineering. In all these problems, the methodological principle in fluid mechanics was converted from point measurements to spatio-temporal measurements along a line. This book is the first monograph on UVP that offers comprehensive information about the method, its principles, its practice, and applied examples, and which serves both current and new users. Current users can confirm that their application configurations are correct, which will help them to improve the configurations so as to make them more efficient and effective. New users will be...

  3. Yielding transition of Carbopol gel in a vertical pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; de Bruyn, John R.; John de Bruyn Team

    2016-11-01

    We have investigated the yielding transition of a simple yield-stress fluid (Carbopol 940) in a vertical pipe. The Carbopol gel was displaced by a Newtonian liquid injected at a constant, controlled rate at the bottom of the pipe. Rough- and smooth-walled pipes were used to study the effects of wall boundary conditions. The pressure in the Carbopol was measured by a pressure gauge fixed on the pipe wall, and the velocity profile in the Carbopol was measured by particle-image velocimetry (PIV). When the Newtonian liquid was injected, the rate of pressure increase was initially high, then decreased to a constant slow rate at later times. A time tc was defined by the intersection of straight lines fit to the pressure-time data at early and late times. In the rough pipe, the wall shear stress at tc is equal to the yield stress, suggesting that this time corresponds to yielding of the fluid. The velocity profiles were parabolic before yielding, and nearly a plug-like afterwards. In the smooth pipe, the pressure and velocity profiles appeared to show similar behavior to that in the rough pipe, but the wall shear stress at tc is substantially smaller than the yield stress and fluid motion was due to wall slip. NSERC.

  4. Exact solutions in a model of vertical gas migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silin, Dmitriy B.; Patzek, Tad W.; Benson, Sally M.

    2006-06-27

    This work is motivated by the growing interest in injectingcarbon dioxide into deep geological formations as a means of avoidingatmospheric emissions of carbon dioxide and consequent global warming.One of the key questions regarding the feasibility of this technology isthe potential rate of leakage out of the primary storage formation. Weseek exact solutions in a model of gas flow driven by a combination ofbuoyancy, viscous and capillary forces. Different combinations of theseforces and characteristic length scales of the processes lead todifferent time scaling and different types of solutions. In the case of athin, tight seal, where the impact of gravity is negligible relative tocapillary and viscous forces, a Ryzhik-type solution implies square-rootof time scaling of plume propagation velocity. In the general case, a gasplume has two stable zones, which can be described by travelling-wavesolutions. The theoretical maximum of the velocity of plume migrationprovides a conservative estimate for the time of vertical migration.Although the top of the plume has low gas saturation, it propagates witha velocity close to the theoretical maximum. The bottom of the plumeflows significantly more slowly at a higher gas saturation. Due to localheterogeneities, the plume can break into parts. Individual plumes alsocan coalesce and from larger plumes. The analytical results are appliedto studying carbon dioxide flow caused by leaks from deep geologicalformations used for CO2 storage. The results are also applicable formodeling flow of natural gas leaking from seasonal gas storage, or formodeling of secondary hydrocarbon migration.

  5. Free convective flow of a stratified fluid through a porous medium bounded by a vertical plane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. K. Mondal

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Steady two-dimensional free convection flow of a thermally stratified viscous fluid through a highly porous medium bounded by a vertical plane surface of varying temperature, is considered. Analytical expressions for the velocity, temperature and the rate of heat transfer are obtained by perturbation method. Velocity distribution and rate of heat transfer for different values of parameters are shown in graphs. Velocity distribution is also obtained for certain values of the parameters by integrating the coupled differential equations by Runge-Kutta method and compared with the analytical solution. The chief concern of the paper is to study the effect of equilibrium temperature gradient on the velocity and the rate of heat transfer.

  6. Effects of parabolic motion on an isothermal vertical plate with constant mass flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Muthucumaraswamy

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available An analytical study of free convection flow near a parabolic started infinite vertical plate with isothermal in the presence of uniform mass flux was considered. The mathematical model is reduced to a system of linear partial differential equations for the velocity, the concentration and the temperature; the closed form exact solutions were obtained by the Laplace transform technique. The velocity, temperature and concentration profiles for the different parameters as thermal Grashof number Gr, mass Grashof number Gc, Prandtl number Pr, Schmidt number Sc and time t were graphed and the numerical values for the skin friction were as tabulated. It is observed that the velocity is enhanced as the time increased and the velocity is decreased as the Prandtl number increased.

  7. High-yield growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes on a continuously moving substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzman de Villoria, R; Hart, A J; Steiner, S A III; Wardle, B L [Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Figueredo, S L; Slocum, A H, E-mail: rguzman@mit.ed [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2009-10-07

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays are grown on a moving substrate, demonstrating continuous growth of nanoscale materials with long-range order. A cold-wall chamber with an oscillating moving platform is used to locally heat a silicon growth substrate coated with an Fe/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst film for CNT growth via chemical vapor deposition. The reactant gases are introduced over the substrate through a directed nozzle to attain high-yield CNT growth. Aligned multi-wall carbon nanotube arrays (or 'forests') with heights of {approx}1 mm are achieved at substrate speeds up to 2.4 mm s{sup -1}. Arrays grown on moving substrates at different velocities are studied in order to identify potential physical limitations of repeatable and fast growth on a continuous basis. No significant differences are noted between static and moving growth as characterized by scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy, although overall growth height is marginally reduced at the highest substrate velocity. CNT arrays produced on moving substrates are also found to be comparable to those produced through well-characterized batch processes consistent with a base-growth mechanism. Growth parameters required for the moving furnace are found to differ only slightly from those used in a comparable batch process; thermal uniformity appears to be the critical parameter for achieving large-area uniform array growth. If the continuous-growth technology is combined with a reaction zone isolation scheme common in other types of processing (e.g., in the manufacture of carbon fibers), large-scale dense and aligned CNT arrays may be efficiently grown and harvested for numerous applications including providing interlayers for advanced composite reinforcement and improved electrical and thermal transport.

  8. Vertical pneumatic conveying in dilute and dense-phase flows: experimental study of the influence of particle density and diameter on fluid dynamic behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narimatsu C.P.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the effects of particle size and density on the fluid dynamic behavior of vertical gas-solid transport of Group D particles in a 53.4 mm diameter transport tube were studied. For the conditions tested, the experimental curves of pressure gradient versus air velocity presented a minimum pressure gradient point, which is associated with a change in the flow regime from dense to dilute phase. The increases in particle size from 1.00 to 3.68 mm and in density from 935 to 2500 kg/m³ caused an increase in pressure gradient for the dense-phase transport region, but were not relevant in dilute transport. The transition velocity between dense and dilute flow (Umin also increased with increasing particle density and diameter. An empirical equation was fitted for predicting transition air velocity for the transport of glass spheres. Additional experiments, covering a wider range of conditions and particles properties, are still needed to allow the fitting of a generalized equation for prediction of Umin.

  9. Sensitivity of the downward to sweeping velocity ratio to the bypass flow percentage along a guide wall for downstream fish passage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Kevin; Towler, Brett; Haro, Alexander J.; Ahlfeld, David P.

    2017-01-01

    Partial-depth impermeable guidance structures (or guide walls) are used as a method to assist in the downstream passage of fish at a hydroelectric facility. However, guide walls can result in a strong downward velocity causing the approaching fish to pass below the wall and into the direction of the turbine intakes. The objective of this study was to describe how the ratio of the vertical velocity to the sweeping velocity magnitude changes along the full length and depth of a guide wall under a wide range of bypass flow percentages within a power canal. This paper focused on two guide wall configurations, each set at an angle of 45 ° to the approaching flow field and at a depth of 10 and 20 ft (3.05 and 6.10 m). The hydraulic conditions upstream of each guide wall configuration were shown to be impacted by a change in the bypass flow percentage, not only near the bypass but also at upstream sections of the guide wall. Furthermore, the effect of changing the bypass flow percentage was similar for both guide wall depths. In both cases, the effect of increasing the bypass flow percentage was magnified closer to the bypass and deeper in the water column along the guide wall.

  10. Pressure Drop in Vertical Core-Annular Flow

    OpenAIRE

    Prada,José Walter Vanegas; Bannwart,Antonio Carlos

    2001-01-01

    An experimental apparatus for the study of core annular flows of heavy oil and water at room temperature has been set up and tested at laboratory scale. The test section consists of a 2.75 cm ID galvanized steel pipe. Tap water and a heavy oil (17.6 Pa.s; 963 kg/m³) were used. Pressure drop in a vertical upward test section was accurately measured for oil flow rates in the range 0.297 - 1.045 l/s and water flow rates ranging from 0.063 to 0.315 l/s. The oil-water input ratio was in the range ...

  11. Capillary holdup between vertical spheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Zeinali Heris

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The maximum volume of liquid bridge left between two vertically mounted spherical particles has been theoretically determined and experimentally measured. As the gravitational effect has not been neglected in the theoretical model, the liquid interface profile is nonsymmetrical around the X-axis. Symmetry in the interface profile only occurs when either the particle size ratio or the gravitational force becomes zero. In this paper, some equations are derived as a function of the spheres' sizes, gap width, liquid density, surface tension and body force (gravity/centrifugal to estimate the maximum amount of liquid that can be held between the two solid spheres. Then a comparison is made between the result based on these equations and several experimental results.

  12. Rayleigh wave phase velocity and error maps up to the fifth overtone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Stéphanie; Debayle, Eric; Ricard, Yanick

    2015-05-01

    We present a global data set of phase velocity maps for Rayleigh waves, with their errors. These maps are obtained from the tomographic inversion of phase velocity curves measured in the period range 40-250 s by Debayle and Ricard (2012), completed with new measurements at longer periods, between 150 and 360 s. The full data set includes ˜22,000,000 phase velocity measurements combined to build 60 phase velocity maps covering the period range 40-360 s for the fundamental mode and up to the fifth overtone. Each phase velocity map is provided with its a posteriori error, resulting in a unique data set which can be combined with other seismic measurements (surface waves, normal modes, and body waves) in regional and global tomographic studies. A preliminary inversion of this data set shows that it provides constraints on the shear velocity structure down to 1000 km depth.

  13. Relação dos saltos vertical, horizontal e sêxtuplo com a agilidade e velocidade em crianças Relationship of vertical, horizontal and sextuple jumps with agility and speed in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogo Henrique Constantino Coledam

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Os objetivos do presente estudo foram: 1 verificar a relação dos saltos vertical, horizontal e sêxtuplo com a agilidade e velocidade de 5, 10 e 25 m; 2 verificar a capacidade desses saltos em predizer o desempenho da agilidade e velocidade de 5, 10 e 25 m em crianças. Vinte e oito meninos (9,47 ± 0,64 anos e 30 meninas (9,69 ± 0,70 anos foram avaliados. Os valores de correlação entre a agilidade, velocidade de 5, 10 e 25 m foram, respectivamente, r = 0,63, 0,51, 0,44 e 0,64 com o salto vertical, r = 0,68, 0,62, 0,28 e 0,62 com o salto sêxtuplo, e r = 0,60, 0,50, 0,26 e 0,57 com o salto horizontal. O salto vertical e o salto sêxtuplo foram capazes de predizer o desempenho da agilidade e da velocidade de 25 m (p The aim of the present study were: 1 To verify the relationship of vertical, horizontal and sextuple jumps with agility and velocity of 5, 10 and 25 m; 2 To verify the capacity of these jumps to predict the agility and 5, 10 and 25 m velocity performance in children. Twenty eight boys (9.47 ± 0.64 years and thirty girls (9.69 ± 0.70 years were evaluated. The correlation values between agility and velocity on 5, 10 and 25 m velocity were, respectively, r = 0.63, 0.51, 0.44 and 0.64 with vertical jump, r = 0.68, 0.62, 0.28 and 0.62 with sextuple jump, and r = 0.60, 0.50, 0.26 and 0.57 with horizontal jump. The vertical and sextuple jumps were able to predict the agility and 25 m velocity performance (p < 0.05. Furthermore, they demonstrated capacity to predict 5 and 10 m velocity, respectively (p < 0.05. The vertical and sextuple jump tests may be used for assessment and control of training with children practicing activities that require agility and velocity, since both jumps predicted the agility and velocity performance, which did not occur with the horizontal jump.

  14. Balance velocities of the Greenland ice sheet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joughin, I.; Fahnestock, M.; Ekholm, Simon

    1997-01-01

    We present a map of balance velocities for the Greenland ice sheet. The resolution of the underlying DEM, which was derived primarily from radar altimetery data, yields far greater detail than earlier balance velocity estimates for Greenland. The velocity contours reveal in striking detail......, the balance map is useful for ice-sheet modelling, mass balance studies, and field planning....

  15. Scattering angle-based filtering via extension in velocity

    KAUST Repository

    Kazei, Vladimir

    2016-09-06

    The scattering angle between the source and receiver wavefields can be utilized in full-waveform inversion (FWI) and in reverse-time migration (RTM) for regularization and quality control or to remove low frequency artifacts. The access to the scattering angle information is costly as the relation between local image features and scattering angles has non-stationary nature. For the purpose of a more efficient scattering angle information extraction, we develop techniques that utilize the simplicity of the scattering angle based filters for constantvelocity background models. We split the background velocity model into several domains with different velocity ranges, generating an

  16. Pressure and velocity dependence of flow-type cavitation erosion

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Auret, JG

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available for rotating disc test rig Parameter Static water pressure Water temperature Sample velocity Air content of water Water flow rate Water quality Range 0.1-2 MPa Ambient to 100 ?C ~40-60 m s-l Deaerated to supersaturated O-30 1... ship?s screw), as opposed to vibratory cavitation erosion. For flow-type cavitation erosion, well-defined rela- tions exist between the flow velocity and liquid pressure, and the amount of cavitation and erosion damage...

  17. Ultrasonic velocity and adiabatic compressibility in dioxane-water mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciupe, A.; Auslaender, D.

    1974-01-01

    Using a method of diffraction of light on an ultrasonic beam, the velocity of ultrasounds and the adiabatic compressibility in dioxane-water mixtures were determined. The dependence of these quantities on the temperature (in the 15-50 C range) and on the concentration (0-100%) were studied. For each temperature there was found a velocity maximum and a compressibility minimum for a given value of the dioxane concentration. The different behavior of these mixtures is due to intense interactions between the molecules of the two liquids composing the mixture.

  18. Maximum Likelihood Blood Velocity Estimator Incorporating Properties of Flow Physics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlaikjer, Malene; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2004-01-01

    of simulated and in vivo data from the carotid artery. The estimator is meant for two-dimensional (2-D) color flow imaging. The resulting mathematical relation for the estimator consists of two terms. The first term performs a cross-correlation analysis on the signal segment in the radio frequency (RF......)-data under investigation. The flow physic properties are exploited in the second term, as the range of velocity values investigated in the cross-correlation analysis are compared to the velocity estimates in the temporal and spatial neighborhood of the signal segment under investigation. The new estimator...

  19. Natural Convection Flow along an Isothermal Vertical Flat Plate with Temperature Dependent Viscosity and Heat Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Mamun Molla

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to investigate the natural convection laminar flow along an isothermal vertical flat plate immersed in a fluid with viscosity which is the exponential function of fluid temperature in presence of internal heat generation. The governing boundary layer equations are transformed into a nondimensional form and the resulting nonlinear system of partial differential equations is reduced to a convenient form which are solved numerically using an efficient marching order implicit finite difference method with double sweep technique. Numerical results are presented in terms of the velocity and temperature distribution of the fluid as well as the heat transfer characteristics, namely, the wall shear stress and the local and average rate of heat transfer in terms of the local skin-friction coefficient, the local and average Nusselt number for a wide range of the viscosity-variation parameter, heat generation parameter, and the Rayleigh number. Increasing viscosity variation parameter and Rayleigh number lead to increasing the local and average Nusselt number and decreasing the wall shear stress. Wall shear stress and the rate of heat transfer decreased due to the increase of heat generation.

  20. Electrical Capacitance Probe Characterization in Vertical Annular Two-Phase Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grazia Monni

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the experimental analysis and the characterization of an electrical capacitance probe (ECP that has been developed at the SIET Italian Company, for the measurement of two-phase flow parameters during the experimental simulation of nuclear accidents, as LOCA. The ECP is used to investigate a vertical air/water flow, characterized by void fraction higher than 95%, with mass flow rates ranging from 0.094 to 0.15 kg/s for air and from 0.002 to 0.021 kg/s for water, corresponding to an annular flow pattern. From the ECP signals, the electrode shape functions (i.e., the signals as a function of electrode distances in single- and two-phase flows are obtained. The dependence of the signal on the void fraction is derived and the liquid film thickness and the phase’s velocity are evaluated by means of rather simple models. The experimental analysis allows one to characterize the ECP, showing the advantages and the drawbacks of this technique for the two-phase flow characterization at high void fraction.

  1. Concentration and vertical distribution of 137Cs in the undisturbed soil of southwestern Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajayi, I R; Fischer, H W; Burak, A; Qwasmeh, A; Tabot, B

    2007-01-01

    The results of measurements of 137Cs in soil profiles that were sampled in undisturbed soil in Ondo, Ekiti, and Oyo states in the southwestern area of Nigeria are presented in this paper. Samples were collected from nine soil profiles. The vertical distributions of 137Cs in the soil profiles have been determined. Cesium concentration ranged from 0.31 +/- 0.10 Bq kg(-1) in the 0-2 cm depth to a maximum of 1.25 +/- 0.21 Bq kg(-1) in the 6-8 cm depth at some sites and from 3.16 +/- 0.16 Bq kg(-1) in 0-5 cm depth to below detection limit (BDL) at 20-25 cm at another site. 137Cs total deposition in 0-10 cm depth was found to be greatest at Ikogosi site with a value of 90.30 Bq m(-2). The results generally showed that more than 40 y after the first nuclear weapon tests, 137Cs still remains within the 25 cm upper layer of soil in the region with a migration velocity of 0.17-0.18 cm y(-1). The mean value of effective dose commitment due to the presence of cesium in soil in the entire region was found to be 10.77 microSv.

  2. Vertically propagating acoustic waves launched by seismic waves visualized in ionograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Takashi; Shinagawa, Hiroyuki

    2013-04-01

    After the magnitude 9.0 earthquake off the Pacific coast of Tohoku (near the east coast of Honshu, Japan), which occurred on 11 March 2011, an unusual multiple-cusp signature (MCS) was observed in ionograms at three ionosonde stations across Japan. Similar MCSs in ionograms were identified in 8 of 43 earthquakes with a seismic magnitude of 8.0 or greater for the period from 1957 to 2011. The appearance of MCSs at different epicentral distances exhibited traveling characteristics at a velocity of ~4.0 km/s, which is in the range of Rayleigh waves. There was a ~7 min offset in delay time at each epicentral distance in the travel-time diagram. This offset is consistent with the propagation time of acoustic waves from the ground to the ionosphere. We analyzed vertical structure of electron density perturbation that caused MCSs. The ionosonde technique is essentially radar-based measurement of a reflection at a height where the plasma frequency is equal to the sounding radio frequency and it is possible to obtain an electron density profile by sweeping the frequency. However, this measured height is not a true height because radio waves do not propagate at the speed of light in the ionosphere. The group velocity of radio waves decreases just below the reflection height where the sounding frequency approaches the plasma frequency. The amount of delay is larger when this region is thicker. The vertically propagating acoustic waves modulate the electron density. The radio wave speed greatly delays and a cusp signature appears in the echo trace at a phase of the periodic perturbation of electron density where the density gradient is most gradual. Simulations were conducted how large amplitude of density perturbation produces cusp signatures as observed. First, the real height density profile was obtained by converting the ionogram trace just before the arrival of coseismic disturbances. The electron density profile was then modified by adding a periodic perturbation and the

  3. PREDICTION OF POWER GENERATION OF SMALL SCALE VERTICAL AXIS WIND TURBINE USING FUZZY LOGIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altab Md. Hossain

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Renewable energy from the wind turbine has been focused for the alternative source of power generation due to the following advances of the of the wind turbine. Firstly, the wind turbine is highly efficient and eco-friendly. Secondly, the turbine has the ability to response for the changeable power generation based on the wind velocity and structural framework. However, the competitive efficiency of the wind turbine is necessary to successfully alternate the conventional power sources. The most relevant factor which affects the overall efficiency of the wind turbine is the wind velocity and the relative turbine dimensions. Artificial intelligence systems are widely used technology that can learn from examples and are able to deal with non-linear problems. Compared with traditional approach, fuzzy logic approach is more efficient for the representation, manipulation and utilization. Therefore, the primary purpose of this work was to investigate the relationship between wind turbine power generation and wind velocity, and to illustrate how fuzzy expert system might play an important role in prediction of wind turbine power generation. The main purpose of the measurement over the small scaled prototype vertical axis wind turbine for the wind velocity is to predict the performance of full scaled H-type vertical axis wind turbine. Prediction of power generation at the different wind velocities has been tested at the Thermal Laboratory of Faculty of Engineering, Universiti Industri Selangor (UNISEL and results concerning the daily prediction have been obtained.

  4. PREDICTION OF POWER GENERATION OF SMALL SCALE VERTICAL AXIS WIND TURBINE USING FUZZY LOGIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altab Hossain

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Renewable energy from the wind turbine has been focused for the alternative source of power generation due to the following advances of the of the wind turbine. Firstly, the wind turbine is highly efficient and eco-friendly. Secondly, the turbine has the ability to response for the changeable power generation based on the wind velocity and structural framework. However, the competitive efficiency of the wind turbine is necessary to successfully alternate the conventional power sources. The most relevant factor which affects the overall efficiency of the wind turbine is the wind velocity and the relative turbine dimensions. Artificial intelligence systems are widely used technology that can learn from examples and are able to deal with non-linear problems. Compared with traditional approach, fuzzy logic approach is more efficient for the representation, manipulation and utilization. Therefore, the primary purpose of this work was to investigate the relationship between wind turbine power generation and wind velocity, and to illustrate how fuzzy expert system might play an important role in prediction of wind turbine power generation. The main purpose of the measurement over the small scaled prototype vertical axis wind turbine for the wind velocity is to predict the performance of full scaled H-type vertical axis wind turbine. Prediction of power generation at the different wind velocities has been tested at the Thermal Laboratory of Faculty of Engineering, Universiti Industri Selangor (UNISEL and results concerning the daily prediction have been obtained.

  5. Velocity and Drag Evolution From the Leading Edge of a Model Mangrove Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maza, Maria; Adler, Katherine; Ramos, Diogo; Garcia, Adrian Mikhail; Nepf, Heidi

    2017-11-01

    An experimental study of unidirectional flow through a model mangrove forest measured both velocity and forces on individual trees. The individual trees were 1/12th scale models of mature Rhizophora, including 24 prop roots distributed in a three-dimensional layout. Thirty-two model trees were distributed in a staggered array producing a 2.5 m long forest. The velocity evolved from a boundary layer profile at the forest leading edge to a vertical profile determined by the vertical distribution of frontal area, with significantly higher velocity above the prop roots. Fully developed conditions were reached at the fifth tree row from the leading edge. Within the root zone the velocity was reduced by up to 50% and the TKE was increased by as much as fivefold, relative to the upstream conditions. TKE in the root zone was mainly produced by root and trunk wakes, and it agreed in magnitude with the estimation obtained using the Tanino and Nepf (2008) formulation. Maximum TKE occurred at the top of the roots, where a strong shear region was associated with the change in frontal area. The drag measured on individual trees decreased from the leading edge and reached a constant value at the fifth row and beyond, i.e., in the fully developed region. The drag exhibited a quadratic dependence on velocity, which justified the definition of a quadratic drag coefficient. Once the correct drag length-scale was defined, the measured drag coefficients collapsed to a single function of Reynolds number.

  6. Measurements of the Effects of Spacers on the Burnout Conditions for Flow of Boiling Water in a Vertical Annulus and a Vertical 7-Rod Cluster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Kurt M.

    1965-03-15

    An analysis for predicting the burnout conditions for flow of boiling water in vertical round ducts is presented. The analysis which is based on the Vanderwater flow model predicts that the burnout conditions are independent of the inlet subcooling and the heated length, and depends only on the local values at the burnout position of pressure, heat flux, steam quality and, mass velocity and the duct diameter. The results of an experimental investigation covering 811 burnout measurements in the pressure range from 41 to 101 kg/cm{sup 2} is presented. These results together with 488 of our earlier burnout measurements at the pressures of 2, 7, 10, 20 and 30 kg/cm{sup 2} were used to determine two constants in the analytical results. The final correlation predicted the burnout heat fluxes of the 1299 measurements within 8 per cent and with an RMS error of 5.3 per cent. The measurements covered the following ranges of variables Diameter d, 3.93-24.95 mm; Heated length L 400-3,500 mm; L/d-ratio L/d 40-890; Pressure p, 2.7-101 kg/cm{sup 2}; Inlet sub-cooling {delta}t{sub sub} 30-240 deg C; Mass velocity G 120-5450 kg/m{sup 3}/s; Heat flux q/A 35-686 W/cm{sup 3}; Burnout steam quality X{sub BO} 0-1.00. The Columbia data and the Winfrith data were also analysed in terms of the measured and predicted burnout heat fluxes and enthalpies, and it was found, that a very good agreement existed between the present results and the Columbia and the Winfrith data. The Columbia data were on the average 3 per cent lower comparing the measured and predicted burnout heat fluxes. The scatter of the data was within + 10 and - 15 per cent and the RMS error was 8.4 per cent. The Winfrith data were on the average 6 per cent higher than the predicted heat fluxes and the deviations of the measured heat fluxes were within + 25 and - 15 per cent of the predictions. The RMS error was 10.8 per cent.

  7. Shuttle vertical fin flowfield by the direct simulation Monte Carlo method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hueser, J. E.; Brock, F. J.; Melfi, L. T.

    1985-01-01

    The flow properties in a model flowfield, simulating the shuttle vertical fin, determined using the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo method. The case analyzed corresponds to an orbit height of 225 km with the freestream velocity vector orthogonal to the fin surface. Contour plots of the flowfield distributions of density, temperature, velocity and flow angle are presented. The results also include mean molecular collision frequency (which reaches 1/60 sec near the surface), collision frequency density (approaches 7 x 10 to the 18/cu m sec at the surface) and the mean free path (19 m at the surface).

  8. Thermal diffusion effects on free convection and mass transfer flow for an infinite vertical plate

    CERN Document Server

    Abdel-Khalek, M M

    2003-01-01

    A theoretical study is performed to examine the effects of thermal diffusion on free convection and mass transfer flow for an infinite vertical plate. The governing equations for the fluid flow and the heat transfer are solved subject to the relevant boundary conditions. A perturbation technique is used to obtain expressions for the velocity field and skin friction. An analysis of the effects of the parameters on the concentration, velocity and temperature profiles as well as skin friction and the rate of mass and heat transfer is done with the aid of graphs.

  9. Structure of central and southern Mexico from velocity and attenuation tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Ting; Robert W. Clayton

    2012-01-01

    The 3D V_p, V_p/_Vs, P- and S-wave attenuation structure of the Cocos subduction zone in Mexico is imaged using earthquakes recorded by two temporary seismic arrays and local stations. Direct P wave arrivals on vertical components and direct S wave arrivals on transverse components from local earthquakes are used for velocity imaging. Relative delay times for P and PKP phases from teleseismic events are also used to obtain a deeper velocity structure beneath the southern seismic array. Using ...

  10. Modeling Travel-Time Correlations Based on Sensitivity Kernels and Correlated Velocity Anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    sensitivity of 1-Hz Pn arrivals are sensitive to the entire velocity profile between the Moho and a maximum depth that reaches 200 km for an arrival at 15...the Earth’s surface, (2) de-correlation of velocity anomalies across interfaces, such as the Moho , and (3) allowing spatial dependence of σ, λ1 and λ2...the Moho down to a depth that increases with distance, with the vertical extent of significant sensitivity (τ ≤ 0.5 s) eventually exceeding our

  11. Shear-wave velocity structure of the Tongariro Volcanic Centre, New Zealand: Fast Rayleigh and slow Love waves indicate strong shallow anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfrey, Holly J.; Fry, Bill; Savage, Martha K.

    2017-04-01

    frequency range of 0.25-1 Hz. First-higher mode Love-waves are similarly slower than first-higher mode Rayleigh waves. This is incompatible with synthetic dispersion curves we calculate using isotropic, layered velocity models appropriate for Ruapehu and Tongariro, in which Love waves travel more quickly than Rayleigh waves of the same period. The Love-Rayleigh discrepancy is likely due to structures such as dykes or cracks in the vertical plane having increased influence on surface-wave propagation. However, several measurements at Ruapehu have Love-wave group velocities that are faster than Rayleigh-wave group velocities. The differences between the Love- and Rayleigh-wave dispersion curves also vary with the azimuth of the interstation path across Ruapehu and Tongariro Volcanoes. Significant azimuthal dependence of both Love and Rayleigh-wave velocities are also observed. This suggests azimuthal anisotropy within the volcanic structures, which coupled with radial anisotropy, makes the Vs structures of Ruapehu and Tongariro Volcanoes anisotropic with orthorhombic or lower order symmetry. We suggest that further work to determine three-dimensional volcanic structures should include provisions for such anisotropy.

  12. Vector blood velocity estimation in medical ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Gran, Fredrik; Udesen, Jesper

    2006-01-01

    Two methods for making vector velocity estimation in medical ultrasound are presented. All of the techniques can find both the axial and transverse velocity in the image and can be used for displaying both the correct velocity magnitude and direction. The first method uses a transverse oscillation...... in the ultrasound field to find the transverse velocity. In-vivo examples from the carotid artery are shown, where complex turbulent flow is found in certain parts of the cardiac cycle. The second approach uses directional beam forming along the flow direction to estimate the velocity magnitude. Using a correlation...

  13. Aggregate Settling Velocities in San Francisco Estuary Margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, R. M.; Stacey, M. T.; Variano, E. A.

    2015-12-01

    One way that humans impact aquatic ecosystems is by adding nutrients and contaminants, which can propagate up the food web and cause blooms and die-offs, respectively. Often, these chemicals are attached to fine sediments, and thus where sediments go, so do these anthropogenic influences. Vertical motion of sediments is important for sinking and burial, and also for indirect effects on horizontal transport. The dynamics of sinking sediment (often in aggregates) are complex, thus we need field data to test and validate existing models. San Francisco Bay is well studied and is often used as a test case for new measurement and model techniques (Barnard et al. 2013). Settling velocities for aggregates vary between 4*10-5 to 1.6*10-2 m/s along the estuary backbone (Manning and Schoellhamer 2013). Model results from South San Francisco Bay shoals suggest two populations of settling particles, one fast (ws of 9 to 5.8*10-4 m/s) and one slow (ws of Brand et al. 2015). While the open waters of San Francisco Bay and other estuaries are well studied and modeled, sediment and contaminants often originate from the margin regions, and the margins remain poorly characterized. We conducted a 24 hour field experiment in a channel slough of South San Francisco Bay, and measured settling velocity, turbulence and flow, and suspended sediment concentration. At this margin location, we found average settling velocities of 4-5*10-5 m/s, and saw settling velocities decrease with decreasing suspended sediment concentration. These results are consistent with, though at the low end of, those seen along the estuary center, and they suggest that the two population model that has been successful along the shoals may also apply in the margins.

  14. Effects of superficial gas velocity on process dynamics in bioreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, T. T.; Kumar, B.

    2014-06-01

    Present work analyzes the flow hydrodynamics and mass transfer mechanisms in double Rushton and CD-6 impeller on wide range (0.0075-0.25 m/s) of superficial gas velocity ( v g) in a gas-liquid phase bioreactor by employing computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technique. The volume averaged velocity magnitude and dissipation rate are found higher with increasing superficial gas velocity. Higher relative power draw ( P g/ P 0) is predicted in CD-6 than the Rushton impeller but no significant difference in volume averaged mass transfer coefficient ( k L a) observed between these two types of impeller. The ratio of power draw with mass transfer coefficient has been found higher in CD-6 impeller (25-50 %) than the Rushton impeller.

  15. Absolute calibration of Doppler coherence imaging velocity images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuell, C. M.; Allen, S. L.; Meyer, W. H.; Howard, J.

    2017-08-01

    A new technique has been developed for absolutely calibrating a Doppler Coherence Imaging Spectroscopy interferometer for measuring plasma ion and neutral velocities. An optical model of the interferometer is used to generate zero-velocity reference images for the plasma spectral line of interest from a calibration source some spectral distance away. Validation of this technique using a tunable diode laser demonstrated an accuracy better than 0.2 km/s over an extrapolation range of 3.5 nm; a two order of magnitude improvement over linear approaches. While a well-characterized and very stable interferometer is required, this technique opens up the possibility of calibrated velocity measurements in difficult viewing geometries and for complex spectral line-shapes.

  16. Velocity measurement by coherent x-ray heterodyning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lhermitte, Julien R. M.; Rogers, Michael C.; Manet, Sabine; Sutton, Mark

    2017-01-01

    We present a small-angle coherent x-ray scattering technique used for measuring flow velocities in slow moving materials. The technique is an extension of X-ray Photon Correlation Spectroscopy (XPCS): It involves mixing the scattering from moving tracer particles with a static reference that heterodynes the signal. This acts to elongate temporal effects caused by flow in homodyne measurements, allowing for a more robust measurement of flow properties. Using coherent x-ray heterodyning, velocities ranging from 0.1 to 10 μm/s were measured for a viscous fluid pushed through a rectangular channel. We describe experimental protocols and theory for making these Poiseuille flow profile measurements and also develop the relevant theory for using heterodyne XPCS to measure velocities in uniform and Couette flows.

  17. A dissipative random velocity field for fully developed fluid turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Pereira, Rodrigo M; Chevillard, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the statistical properties, based on numerical simulations and analytical calculations, of a recently proposed stochastic model for the velocity field of an incompressible, homogeneous, isotropic and fully developed turbulent flow. A key step in the construction of this model is the introduction of some aspects of the vorticity stretching mechanism that governs the dynamics of fluid particles along their trajectory. An additional further phenomenological step aimed at including the long range correlated nature of turbulence makes this model depending on a single free parameter $\\gamma$ that can be estimated from experimental measurements. We confirm the realism of the model regarding the geometry of the velocity gradient tensor, the power-law behaviour of the moments of velocity increments (i.e. the structure functions), including the intermittent corrections, and the existence of energy transfers across scales. We quantify the dependence of these basic properties of turbulent flows on the free...

  18. Structure of diffusion flames from a vertical burner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark A. Finney; Dan Jimenez; Jack D. Cohen; Isaac C. Grenfell; Cyle Wold

    2010-01-01

    Non-steady and turbulent flames are commonly observed to produce flame contacts with adjacent fuels during fire spread in a wide range of fuel bed depths. A stationary gas-fired burner (flame wall) was developed to begin study of flame edge variability along an analagous vertical fuel source. This flame wall is surrogate for a combustion interface at the edge of a deep...

  19. METALLICITY DISTRIBUTION FUNCTIONS, RADIAL VELOCITIES, AND ALPHA ELEMENT ABUNDANCES IN THREE OFF-AXIS BULGE FIELDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Christian I.; Rich, R. Michael [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCLA, 430 Portola Plaza, Box 951547, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States); Kobayashi, Chiaki [Centre for Astrophysics Research, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); Kunder, Andrea; De Propris, Roberto [Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile); Pilachowski, Catherine A. [Department of Astronomy, Indiana University, Swain West 319, 727 East Third Street, Bloomington, IN 47405-7105 (United States); Koch, Andreas, E-mail: cijohnson@astro.ucla.edu, E-mail: rmr@astro.ucla.edu, E-mail: c.kobayashi@herts.ac.uk, E-mail: akunder@ctio.noao.edu, E-mail: catyp@astro.indiana.edu, E-mail: akoch@lsw.uni-heidelberg.de [Zentrum fuer Astronomie der Universitaet Heidelberg, Landessternwarte, Koenigstuhl 12, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-03-10

    We present radial velocities and chemical abundance ratios of [Fe/H], [O/Fe], [Si/Fe], and [Ca/Fe] for 264 red giant branch stars in three Galactic bulge off-axis fields located near (l, b) = (-5.5, -7), (-4, -9), and (+8.5, +9). The results are based on equivalent width and spectrum synthesis analyses of moderate resolution (R Almost-Equal-To 18,000), high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N {approx} 75-300 pixel{sup -1}) spectra obtained with the Hydra spectrographs on the Blanco 4 m and WIYN 3.5 m telescopes. The targets were selected from the blue side of the giant branch to avoid cool stars that would be strongly affected by CN and TiO; however, a comparison of the color-metallicity distribution in literature samples suggests that our selection of bluer targets should not present a significant bias against metal-rich stars. We find a full range in metallicity that spans [Fe/H] Almost-Equal-To -1.5 to +0.5, and that, in accordance with the previously observed minor-axis vertical metallicity gradient, the median [Fe/H] also declines with increasing Galactic latitude in off-axis fields. The off-axis vertical [Fe/H] gradient in the southern bulge is estimated to be {approx}0.4 dex kpc{sup -1}; however, comparison with the minor-axis data suggests that a strong radial gradient does not exist. The (+8.5, +9) field exhibits a higher than expected metallicity, with a median [Fe/H] = -0.23, that might be related to a stronger presence of the X-shaped bulge structure along that line-of-sight. This could also be the cause of an anomalous increase in the median radial velocity for intermediate metallicity stars in the (+8.5, +9) field. However, the overall radial velocity and dispersion for each field are in good agreement with recent surveys and bulge models. All fields exhibit an identical, strong decrease in velocity dispersion with increasing metallicity that is consistent with observations in similar minor-axis outer bulge fields. Additionally, the [O/Fe], [Si/Fe], and [Ca

  20. Rupture Velocities of Intermediate- and Deep-Focus Earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, L. M.

    2014-12-01

    The rupture velocities of intermediate- and deep-focus earthquakes --- how they vary between subduction zones, how they vary with depth, and what their maximum values are --- may help constrain the mechanism(s) of the earthquakes. As part of a global study of intermediate- and deep-focus earthquakes, I have used rupture directivity to estimate the rupture vector (speed and orientation) for 422 earthquakes >70 km depth with MW ≥5.7 since 1990. I estimate the rupture velocity relative to the local P-wave velocity (vr/α). Since the same method is used for all earthquakes, the results can be readily compared across study areas. The study areas --- Middle America, South America, Tonga-Kermadec, Izu-Bonin-Marianas, and Japan-Kurils-Kamchatka --- include some of the warmest and coldest subduction zones: subducting plate ages range from 9-150 Myr and descent rates range from 1-13 cm/yr. Across all subduction zones and depth ranges, for the 193 earthquakes with observable directivity and well-constrained rupture vectors, most earthquakes rupture on the more horizontal of the two possible nodal planes. However, the rupture vectors appear to be randomly-oriented relative to the slip vector, so the earthquakes span the continuum from Mode II (i.e., parallel slip and rupture vectors) to Mode III rupture (i.e., perpendicular slip and rupture vectors). For this earthquake population, the mean rupture velocity is 0.43 vr/α ± 0.14 vr/α. The mean earthquake rupture velocities are similar between all subduction zones. Since the local seismic wavespeed is faster in colder subduction zones, absolute rupture velocities are faster in colder subduction zones. Overall, the fastest rupture velocities exceed the local S-wave speed. The supershear ruptures are associated with earthquakes closer to Mode II than Mode III faulting. This is consistent with theoretical calculations, which limit the rupture velocity to the S-wave speed for Mode III rupture but the P-wave speed for Mode II