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Sample records for vertebral collapse ct

  1. Spinal aneurysmal bone cyst causing acute cord compression without vertebral collapse: CT and MRI findings

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    Chan, Monica S.M.; Wong, Yiu-Chung; Yuen, Ming-Keung [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Tuen Mun Hospital, Hongkong (China); Lam, Dicky [Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Hongkong (China)

    2002-08-01

    Aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) of the spine can cause acute spinal cord compression in young patients. We report the CT and MRI findings in a histology-proven case of spinal ABC presenting with sudden paraplegia. Typical features of a spinal ABC at the thoracic level with considerable extension into the posterior epidural space and cord compression were demonstrated. Special note was made of the disproportionately large longitudinal extent of the epidural component of the lesion. Associated vertebral collapse was absent. A fracture of the overlying cortex had probably allowed the lesion to decompress and track along the epidural space without significantly jeopardizing integrity of the osseous structures. This case illustrates a less frequently recognised mechanism of acute spinal cord compression by ABC. (orig.)

  2. Underdiagnosis of Vertebral Collapse on Routine Multidetector Computed Tomography Scan of the Abdomen

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    Obaid, H.; Husamaldin, Z.; Bhatt, R. (Doncaster Royal Infirmary, Doncaster (United Kingdom))

    2008-09-15

    Background: Vertebral fractures are commonly associated with osteoporosis and have significant morbidity and mortality rates. Osteoporotic vertebral fractures are presently considered as a treatable and preventable condition, and early detection is vital for further management. The evaluation of vertebral compression on multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) scans of the abdomen has, to our knowledge, not been reported before. Purpose: To assess the prevalence of vertebral collapse on routine abdominal CT scans, and to evaluate the usefulness of the multiplanar reconstruction (MPR) capability of MDCT scans in accurately identifying vertebral abnormalities such as vertebral collapse, spondylolisthesis, and retrolisthesis. Material and Methods: A retrospective review of 307 MDCT scans of the abdomen was carried out at a university teaching hospital. Identifiable patient information was anonymized for data protection. All images were reviewed on a picture archiving and communications system (PACS) using sagittal MPR and bone window for the assessment of the vertebrae. Data were collected from the Computerized Radiology Information System (CRIS). Results: Vertebral collapse was seen in 42 (13.6%) of the 307 patients undergoing routine MDCT of the abdomen. Multilevel and single-level collapses were seen in 24 and 18 patients, respectively. Spondylolisthesis was identified in 5.5% (n=17), and retrolisthesis was seen in 0.6% (n=2). All patients with vertebral fracture were older than 50 years. Women were more commonly affected than men. Conclusion: A significant number of patients with vertebral collapse were diagnosed using MPR on MDCT routine scans of the abdomen

  3. Delayed Post-traumatic Vertebral Collapse: MR Categorization and MR-Pathology Correlation

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    Lee, Chong Suh; Yu, Je-Wook; Chung, Sung Soo; Suh, Yeon-Lim; Ahn, Geunghwan; Ahn, Joong Mo

    2007-01-01

    Study Design A retrospective study. Purpose To categorize the MR appearance of ischemic vertebral collapse and to correlate surgical and histologic findings. Overview of Literature X-ray and MRI findings of delayed posttraumatic vertebral collapse shows several patterns. Histopathologic signs of osteonecrosis were present only in minor portion of cases sampled for biopsy of delayed post-traumatic vertebral collapse in the literature. Methods Twenty-one patients (22 vertebral bodies), with sur...

  4. Delayed Post-traumatic Vertebral Collapse: MR Categorization and MR-Pathology Correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chong Suh; Yu, Je-Wook; Chung, Sung Soo; Suh, Yeon-Lim; Ahn, Geunghwan; Ahn, Joong Mo

    2007-06-01

    A retrospective study. To categorize the MR appearance of ischemic vertebral collapse and to correlate surgical and histologic findings. X-ray and MRI findings of delayed posttraumatic vertebral collapse shows several patterns. Histopathologic signs of osteonecrosis were present only in minor portion of cases sampled for biopsy of delayed post-traumatic vertebral collapse in the literature. Twenty-one patients (22 vertebral bodies), with surgically and histopathologically proven ischemic vertebral collapse were included. The patients were examined with a 1.5 T MR imager. Spin echo T1- and T2-weighted images were obtained in axial and sagittal planes. Two experienced musculoskeletal radiologists, who reached consensus, evaluated the MR images. Then, MR-pathology correlations were made. Four different MR patterns were identified. Fluid patterns, were seen in 14% (3/22) of the affected vertebral bodies, and were characterized by hypo-intense signals on T1-weighted images, and hyper-intense signals, similar to water, on T2-weighted images. Extensive bone necrosis was predominant. Compression pattern, the most common pattern, found in 41% (9/22 vertebral bodies), was characterized by a marked decrease of anterior column height. Bone necrosis, granulation tissue, marrow fibrosis, and reactive new bone formation were found in relatively equal proportion. Granulation pattern, seen in 27% (6/22 vertebral bodies), was characterized by hypo-intense signals on T1-weighted images, and intermediate signals on T2-weighted images. Extensive granulation tissue was predominant. Mixed patterns were present in 18% (4/22), of the vertebral bodies. Awareness of histopathologic correlation of MR patterns in patients with delayed post-traumatic vertebral collapse may facilitate effective interpretation of clinical MR images of the spine.

  5. One-stage posterior instrumentation surgery for the treatment of osteoporotic vertebral collapse with neurological deficits

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    Ito, Manabu; Abumi, Kuniyoshi; Kotani, Yoshihisa; Takahata, Masahiko; Hojo, Yoshihiro; Minami, Akio

    2010-01-01

    The number of reports describing osteoporotic vertebral fracture has increased as the number of elderly people has grown. Anterior decompression and fusion alone for the treatment of vertebral collapse is not easy for patients with comorbid medical problems and severe bone fragility. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of one-stage posterior instrumentation surgery for the treatment of osteoporotic vertebral collapse with neurological deficits. A consecutive series of 21 patients who sustained osteoporotic vertebral collapse with neurological deficits were managed with posterior decompression and short-segmental pedicle screw instrumentation augmented with ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWP) cables with or without vertebroplasty using calcium phosphate cement. The mean follow-up was 42 months. All patients showed neurologic recovery. Segmental kyphotic angle at the instrumented level was significantly improved from an average preoperative kyphosis of 22.8–14.7 at a final follow-up. Spinal canal occupation was significantly reduced from an average before surgery of 40.4–19.1% at the final follow-up. Two patients experienced loosening of pedicle screws and three patients developed subsequent vertebral compression fractures within adjacent segments. However, these patients were effectively treated in a conservative fashion without any additional surgery. Our results indicated that one-stage posterior instrumentation surgery augmented with UHMWP cables could provide significant neurological improvement in the treatment of osteoporotic vertebral collapse. PMID:20157741

  6. Analysis of functional CT scan in cervical vertebral disease

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    Hirofuji, Eiichi; Tanaka, Seisuke; Tomihara, Mitsuo; Kita, Hiroshi; Yamasaki, Hiroyuki

    1982-12-01

    The atlantoaxial joint showed displacement in various directions in rheumatoid arthritis and cervical spondylosis. The displacements were promoted by anterior flexion and rotatory movements, exerting great influences on the spnial cord. The intervertebral space between the 5th and 6th vertebra showed narrowing of the vertebral canal in cervical spondylosis and was promoted by posterior flexion to affect the spinal cord to a great extent. Functional CT scan was useful for observation of pathologic conditions of vertebral diseases.

  7. Tetanus with multiple wedge vertebral collapses: A case report in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Data from the case records dary School Class two girl managed at the Department of Paediatrics of the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital were extracted for presentation to highlight vertebral collapse as an uncommon complication of paediatric tetanus and the associated management challenges. The girl ...

  8. A new classification for cervical vertebral injuries: influence of CT

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    Daffner, R.H.; Brown, R.R.; Goldberg, A.L. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Allegheny University Hospitals, Allegheny General, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2000-03-30

    Objective. Computed tomography (CT) has been demonstrated to be superior to radiography in identifying cervical vertebral injuries. However, many of these injuries may not be clinically significant, and require only minimal symptomatic and supportive treatment. It is therefore imperative that radiologists and spine surgeons have criteria for distinguishing between those injuries requiring surgical stabilization and those that do not. The authors propose a new classification of cervical vertebral injuries into two categories: major and minor.Design and patients. A data base, acquired on 1052 separate cervical injuries in 879 patients seen between 1983 and 1998, was reviewed. Four categories of injury based on mechanism [hyperflexion (four variants), hyperextension (two variants), rotary (two variants), and axial compression (five variants)] were identified. ''Major'' injuries are defined as having either radiographic or CT evidence of instability with or without associated localized or central neurologic findings, or have the potential to produce the latter. ''Minor'' injuries have no radiographic and/or CT evidence of instability, are not associated with neurologic findings, and have no potential to cause the latter.Results and conclusions. Cervical injury should be classified as ''major'' if the following radiographic and/or CT criteria are present: displacement of more than 2 mm in any plane, wide vertebral body in any plane, wide interspinous/interlaminar space, wide facet joints, disrupted posterior vertebral body line, wide disc space, vertebral burst, locked or perched facets (unilateral or bilateral), ''hanged man'' fracture of C2, dens fracture, and type III occipital condyle fracture. All other types of fractures may be considered ''minor''. (orig.)

  9. Prevalence of thoracolumbar vertebral fractures on multidetector CT

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    Bartalena, Tommaso [Department of Radiology, S. Orsola University Hospital, Via Massarenti 9 - 40138 Bologna (Italy)], E-mail: t.bartalena@email.it; Giannelli, Giovanni; Rinaldi, Maria Francesca [Department of Radiology, S. Orsola University Hospital, Via Massarenti 9 - 40138 Bologna (Italy); Rimondi, Eugenio [Department of Radiology, Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute, Via G.C. Pupilli 1 - 40136 Bologna (Italy); Rinaldi, Giovanni [Department of Radiology, S. Orsola University Hospital, Via Massarenti 9 - 40138 Bologna (Italy); Sverzellati, Nicola [Department of Clinical Sciences, Section of Radiology, University of Parma, Via Gramsci, 14 - 43100 Parma (Italy); Gavelli, Giampaolo [Department of Radiology, S. Orsola University Hospital, Via Massarenti 9 - 40138 Bologna (Italy)

    2009-03-15

    Objective: To evaluate the prevalence of osteoporotic vertebral fractures in patients undergoing multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) of the chest and/or abdomen. Materials and methods: 323 consecutive patients (196 males, 127 females) with a mean age of 62.6 years (range 20-88) who had undergone chest and/or abdominal MDCT were evaluated. Sagittal reformats of the spine obtained from thin section datasets were reviewed by two radiologists and assessed for vertebral fractures. Morphometric analysis using electronic calipers was performed on vertebral bodies which appeared abnormal upon visual inspection. A vertebral body height loss of 15% or more was considered a fracture and graded as mild (15-24%), moderate (25-49%) or severe (more than 50%). Official radiology reports were reviewed and whether the vertebral fractures had been reported or not was noted. Results: 31 out of 323 patients (9.5%) had at least 1 vertebral fracture and 7 of those patients had multiple fractures for a total of 41 fractures. Morphometric grading revealed 10 mild, 16 moderate and 15 severe fractures. Prevalence was higher in women (14.1%) than men (6.6%) and increased with patients age with a 17.1% prevalence in post-menopausal women. Only 6 out 41 vertebral fractures (14.6%) had been noted in the radiology final report while the remaining 35 (85.45) had not. Conclusion: although vertebral fractures represent frequent incidental findings on multidetector CT studies and may be easily identified on sagittal reformats, they are often underreported by radiologists, most likely because of unawareness of their clinical importance.

  10. Spontaneous vertebral dissection: Clinical, conventional angiographic, CT, and MR findings

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    Provenzale, J.M.; Morgenlander, J.C. [Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Gress, D. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1996-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if typical clinical and neuroradiologic patterns exist in patients with spontaneous vertebral artery (VA) dissection. The medical records and neuroradiologic examinations of 14 patients with spontaneous VA dissection were reviewed. The medical records were examined to exclude patients with a history of trauma and to record evidence of a nontratimatic precipitating event ({open_quotes}trivial trauma{close_quotes}) and presence of possible risk factors such as hypertension. All patients under-went conventional angiography, 13 either CT or MRI (II both CT and MRI), and 3 MRA. Conventional arteriograrris were evaluated for dissection site, evidence of fibromuscular dysplasia, luminal stenosis or occlusion, and pseudoaneurysm formation, CT examinations for the presence of infarction or subarachnoid hemorrhage, MR examinations for the presence of infarction or arterial signal abnormality, and MR angiograms for abnormality of the arterial signal column. Seven patients had precipitating events within 24 h of onset of symptoms that may have been causative of dissection and five had hypertension. At catheter angiography, two patients had dissections in two arteries (both VAs in one patient, VA and internal carotid artery in one patient), giving a total of 15 VAs with dissection. Dissection sites included V1 in four patients, V2 in one patient, V3 in three patients, V4 in six patients, and both V3 and V4 in one patient. Luminal stenosis was present in 13 VAs, occlusion in 2, pseudoaneurysm in 1, and evidence of fibromuscular dysplasia in 1. Posterior circulation infarcts were found on CT or MR in five patients. Subarachnoid hemorrhage was found on CT in two patients and by lumbar puncture alone in two patients. Abnormal periarterial signal on MRI was seen in three patients. MRA demonstrated absent VA signal in one patient, pseudoaneurysm in one, and a false-negative examination in one.

  11. Bilateral transtibial amputation with concomitant thoracolumbar vertebral collapse in a Sichuan earthquake survivor

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    Lau Herman

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The devastating earthquake in Sichuan, China on 12 May 2008 left thousands of survivors requiring medical care and intensive rehabilitation. In view of this great demand, the Chinese Speaking Orthopaedic Society established the "Stand Tall" project to provide voluntary services to aid amputee victims in achieving total rehabilitation and social integration. This case report highlights the multidisciplinary rehabilitation of a girl who suffered thoracolumbar vertebral collapse and underwent bilateral transtibial amputation. The rehabilitation team was involved in all stages of the care process from the pre-operative phase, through amputation, into prosthetic training, and during her life thereafter. Despite this catastrophic event, early rehabilitation and specially designed bilateral prostheses allowed her a high level of functional ability. The joint efforts of the multidisciplinary team and the advancement of new technology have revolutionized the care process for amputees.

  12. Bilateral transtibial amputation with concomitant thoracolumbar vertebral collapse in a Sichuan earthquake survivor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    The devastating earthquake in Sichuan, China on 12 May 2008 left thousands of survivors requiring medical care and intensive rehabilitation. In view of this great demand, the Chinese Speaking Orthopaedic Society established the "Stand Tall" project to provide voluntary services to aid amputee victims in achieving total rehabilitation and social integration. This case report highlights the multidisciplinary rehabilitation of a girl who suffered thoracolumbar vertebral collapse and underwent bilateral transtibial amputation. The rehabilitation team was involved in all stages of the care process from the pre-operative phase, through amputation, into prosthetic training, and during her life thereafter. Despite this catastrophic event, early rehabilitation and specially designed bilateral prostheses allowed her a high level of functional ability. The joint efforts of the multidisciplinary team and the advancement of new technology have revolutionized the care process for amputees. PMID:20630054

  13. A careful evaluation of scout CT lateral radiograph may prevent unreported vertebral fractures

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    Bazzocchi, Alberto; Spinnato, Paolo [Imaging Division, Clinical Department of Radiological and Histocytopathological Sciences, University of Bologna, Sant’Orsola – Malpighi Hospital, Via Massarenti 9, 40138 Bologna (Italy); Albisinni, Ugo [Department of Radiology, Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute, Via Pupilli 1, 40136 Bologna (Italy); Battista, Giuseppe [Imaging Division, Clinical Department of Radiological and Histocytopathological Sciences, University of Bologna, Sant’Orsola – Malpighi Hospital, Via Massarenti 9, 40138 Bologna (Italy); Rossi, Cristina [Section of Radiological Sciences, Department of Clinic Sciences, University of Parma, Via Gramsci 14, 43100 Parma (Italy); Guglielmi, Giuseppe, E-mail: g.guglielmi@unifg.it [Department of Radiology, University of Foggia, Viale Luigi Pinto 1, 71100 Foggia (Italy); Department of Radiology, Scientific Institute “Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza” Hospital, Viale Cappuccini 1, 71013 San Giovanni Rotondo, Foggia (Italy)

    2012-09-15

    Objectives: Our purpose was to review scout CT lateral radiographs to reveal osteoporotic vertebral fractures unreported by radiologists and to explore scout CT as a potential diagnostic tool in the detection of vertebral fractures. Methods: We considered 500 patients (303 males, 197 females, age 64.6 ± 13.5 year-old). Our investigation was firstly focused on scout CT lateral images to detect vertebral fractures with a combined semiquantitative and quantitative diagnostic approach. Findings addressed to vertebral fracture were subsequently confirmed by multiplanar sagittal CT reconstructions. Whenever a vertebral fracture was discovered the radiologist report was read and a collection of patient anamnesis followed to understand whether fractures were already known. Results: In 44/500 patients (8.8%) the evaluation on scout CT was incomplete or limited for patient/technical-based conditions, and 15 were excluded from the analysis. In 67/485 patients (13.8%) 99 vertebral fractures were detected. Among 67 fractured patients only 18 (26.9%) were previously diagnosed by radiologists. However, in the clinical history of 32 patients vertebral fractures were already known. Conclusions: The perception and sensibility to vertebral fractures among radiologists are still poor when the assessment of the spine is not the aim of the examination. Short time spent for the evaluation of scout CT lateral radiographs could improve our accuracy.

  14. Segmentation of vertebral bodies in CT and MR images based on 3D deterministic models

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    Štern, Darko; Vrtovec, Tomaž; Pernuš, Franjo; Likar, Boštjan

    2011-03-01

    The evaluation of vertebral deformations is of great importance in clinical diagnostics and therapy of pathological conditions affecting the spine. Although modern clinical practice is oriented towards the computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging techniques, as they can provide a detailed 3D representation of vertebrae, the established methods for the evaluation of vertebral deformations still provide only a two-dimensional (2D) geometrical description. Segmentation of vertebrae in 3D may therefore not only improve their visualization, but also provide reliable and accurate 3D measurements of vertebral deformations. In this paper we propose a method for 3D segmentation of individual vertebral bodies that can be performed in CT and MR images. Initialized with a single point inside the vertebral body, the segmentation is performed by optimizing the parameters of a 3D deterministic model of the vertebral body to achieve the best match of the model to the vertebral body in the image. The performance of the proposed method was evaluated on five CT (40 vertebrae) and five T2-weighted MR (40 vertebrae) spine images, among them five are normal and five are pathological. The results show that the proposed method can be used for 3D segmentation of vertebral bodies in CT and MR images and that the proposed model can describe a variety of vertebral body shapes. The method may be therefore used for initializing whole vertebra segmentation or reliably describing vertebral body deformations.

  15. Duplex ultrasonography for the detection of vertebral artery stenosis A comparison with CT angiography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rozeman, Anouk D.; Hund, Hajo; Westein, Michel; Wermer, Marieke J H; Nijeholt, Geert J. Lycklama A.; Boiten, Jelis; Schimsheimer, Robert-Jan; Algra, Ale

    Objectives Vertebrobasilar stenosis is frequent in patients with posterior circulation stroke and it increases risk of recurrence. We investigated feasibility of duplex ultrasonography (DUS) for screening for extracranial vertebral artery stenosis and compared it with CT angiography (CTA). Materials

  16. Parametric modelling and segmentation of vertebral bodies in 3D CT and MR spine images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Darko; Likar, Boštjan; Pernuš, Franjo; Vrtovec, Tomaž

    2011-12-07

    Accurate and objective evaluation of vertebral deformations is of significant importance in clinical diagnostics and therapy of pathological conditions affecting the spine. Although modern clinical practice is focused on three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging techniques, the established methods for evaluation of vertebral deformations are limited to measuring deformations in two-dimensional (2D) x-ray images. In this paper, we propose a method for quantitative description of vertebral body deformations by efficient modelling and segmentation of vertebral bodies in 3D. The deformations are evaluated from the parameters of a 3D superquadric model, which is initialized as an elliptical cylinder and then gradually deformed by introducing transformations that yield a more detailed representation of the vertebral body shape. After modelling the vertebral body shape with 25 clinically meaningful parameters and the vertebral body pose with six rigid body parameters, the 3D model is aligned to the observed vertebral body in the 3D image. The performance of the method was evaluated on 75 vertebrae from CT and 75 vertebrae from T(2)-weighted MR spine images, extracted from the thoracolumbar part of normal and pathological spines. The results show that the proposed method can be used for 3D segmentation of vertebral bodies in CT and MR images, as the proposed 3D model is able to describe both normal and pathological vertebral body deformations. The method may therefore be used for initialization of whole vertebra segmentation or for quantitative measurement of vertebral body deformations.

  17. USE OF CT FOR ANALYSIS OF THE VERTEBRAL FORAMEN IN THE HOSPITAL OF QUERÉTARO

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    JESÚS CISNEROS LÁMBARRI

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To determine the morphology of the vertebral foramen and its distance to the midline. Methods: Twenty cervical CT scans from the radiographic record of 12 men and 8 women, 18 to 74 years old, of C1 to C6 segments were evaluated, measuring the foramen diameter and its distance to the midline. We look for anomalies of vertebral foramen morphology, using Philips Ingenuity CT equipment with Philips IntelliSpace Portal software. Results: The mean age was 47 years; the segment with the most anomalies was C1, with 10% (increase in foramen diameter, followed by C2 and C6, with 5% (vertebral foramen hypotrophy; the mean diameter of the C1 to C6 segment was 6.081 mm, and the median distance from the midline to the vertebral foramen of C2 to C6 was 13.215 mm. The largest diameter of the vertebral foramen was C2, with a mean of 6.67 mm and the smallest was C4, with a mean of 5.75 mm; the greatest distance from the midline to the vertebral foramen was C1, with a mean of 22.59 mm and the shortest was C4, with a mean of 12.13 mm. Conclusions: The mean diameter of the vertebral foramen and its distance to the midline was determined, setting a safety region for procedures. In our city, there is no study that determines the means of the vertebral foramina diameters, the distance from the midline and its anomalies. It is necessary to rely on CT scans and to make a preoperative plan to avoid complications associated with morphological alterations.

  18. Dual-energy CT in vertebral compression fractures: performance of visual and quantitative analysis for bone marrow edema demonstration with comparison to MRI

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    Bierry, Guillaume; Venkatasamy, Aina; Kremer, Stephane; Dosch, Jean-Claude; Dietemann, Jean-Louis [University Hospital of Strasbourg, Department of Radiology, Strasbourg (France)

    2014-04-15

    To prospectively evaluate the performance of virtual non-calcium (VNC) dual-energy CT (DECT) images for the demonstration of trauma-related abnormal marrow attenuation in collapsed and non-collapsed vertebral compression fractures (VCF) with MRI as a reference standard. Twenty patients presenting with non-tumoral VCF were consecutively and prospectively included in this IRB-approved study, and underwent MRI and DECT of the spine. MR examination served as a reference standard. Two independent readers visually evaluated all vertebrae for abnormal marrow attenuation (''CT edema'') on VNC DECT images; specificity, sensitivity, predictive values, intra and inter-observer agreements were calculated. A last reader performed a quantitative evaluation of CT numbers; cut-off values were calculated using ROC analysis. In the visual analysis, VNC DECT images had an overall sensitivity of 84 %, specificity of 97 %, and accuracy of 95 %, intra- and inter-observer agreements ranged from k = 0.74 to k = 0.90. CT numbers were significantly different between vertebrae with edema on MR and those without (p < 0.0001). Cut-off values provided sensitivity of 85 % (77 %) and specificity of 82 % (74 %) for ''CT edema'' on thoracic (lumbar) vertebrae. VNC DECT images allowed an accurate demonstration of trauma-related abnormal attenuation in VCF, revealing the acute nature of the fracture, on both visual and quantitative evaluation. (orig.)

  19. Differentiating malignant vertebral tumours from non-malignancies with CT spectral imaging: a preliminary study

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    Yuan, Yuan; Zhang, Yan; Lang, Ning; Yuan, Huishu [Peking University Third Hospital, No.49 North Garden Street, Haidian District, Beijing (China); Li, Jianying [GE Healthcare, CT imaging Research Center, Beijing (China)

    2015-10-15

    To investigate the value of dual-energy spectral computed tomography (DESCT) for differentiating malignant vertebral tumours from non-malignancies during venous phase. This study was institutional review board-approved, and written informed consent was obtained from all patients. Thirty-seven patients were examined by DESCT during venous phase. Twenty patients had malignant vertebral tumours, 17 had non-malignant vertebral tumours. The iodine/water densities for the lesion, the lesion-to-muscle ratio, and lesion-to-artery ratio for iodine density measurements were calculated and compared between the two groups with the two-tailed Student t test. A p-value < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Sensitivity and specificity were compared between the qualitative and quantitative studies. The iodine density, lesion-to-muscle ratio, and lesion-to-artery ratio of the iodine density measurement for malignant vertebral tumours were significantly different from the respective values for non-malignancies (all p < 0.05). Using 0.52 as the threshold value for the lesion-to-artery iodine density ratio, one could obtain sensitivity of 85 % and specificity of 100 % for differentiating malignant vertebral tumours from non-malignancies, significantly higher than the qualitative diagnosis. DESCT imaging enables analysis of a number of additional quantitative CT parameters to improve the accuracy for differentiating malignant vertebral tumours from non-malignancies during venous phase. (orig.)

  20. Vertebral uptake of Tc-99m macroaggregated albumin (MAA) with SPECT/CT occurring in superior vena cava obstruction

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    Karls, Shawn; Hassoun, Hani; Derbekyan, Vilma [Dept. of Nuclear Madicine, Royal Victoria Hospital, Montreal (Canada)

    2016-09-15

    A 67-year-old male presented with dyspnea for which lung scintigraphy was ordered to rule out pulmonary embolus. Planar images demonstrated abnormal midline uptake of Tc-99m macroaggregated albumin, which SPECT/CT localized to several thoracic vertebrae. Thoracic vertebral uptake on perfusion lung scintigraphy was previously described on planar imaging. Radionuclide venography and contrast-enhanced CT subsequently demonstrated superior vena cava (SVC) obstruction with collateralization through the azygous/hemiazygous system and vertebral venous plexus. SPECT/CT differentiated residual esophageal/tracheal ventilation activity, a clinically insignificant finding, from vertebral uptake indicative of SVC obstruction, a potentially life-threatening condition.

  1. Prevalent vertebral fractures on chest CT: higher risk for future hip fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckens, Constantinus F; de Jong, Pim A; Mali, Willem P; Verhaar, Harald J; van der Graaf, Yolanda; Verkooijen, Helena M

    2014-02-01

    Subclinical or undiagnosed vertebral fractures on routine chest computed tomography (CT) may be useful for detecting patients at increased risk of future hip fractures who might benefit from preventive interventions. We investigated whether prevalent vertebral fractures on routine chest CT are associated with future hip fractures. From a source population of 5679 patients ≥40 years old undergoing chest CT in one of three Dutch hospitals between 2002 and 2005, patients hospitalized for hip fractures (n = 149) during a median follow-up of 4.4 years were identified. Following a case-cohort design, a random sample of 576 patients was drawn from the source population and added to the cases. In this group, the presence and severity of vertebral fractures was determined using semiquantitative vertebral fracture assessment and multivariate case-cohort appropriate Cox modeling. We found that cases were older (69 versus 63 years) and more often female (48% versus 38%) than the source population. Compared with those with no fracture, patients with any vertebral fracture had triple the risk of future hip fracture (age- and gender-adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 3.1, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.1-4.7). This HR rose to 3.8 (CI 2.6-5.6) if mild fractures were discounted. Future fracture risk increased significantly with increasing severity of vertebral fracture status: from mild (HR = 2.4, CI 1.5-3.7) and moderate (HR = 4.8, CI 2.5-9.2) to severe (HR = 6.7, CI 2.9-15.5). The same was true for having higher cumulative fracture grades: 1 to 3 (HR = 2.7, CI 1.8-4.1), 4 to 6 (HR = 4.8, CI 2.2-10.5), or ≥7 (HR = 11.2, CI 3.7-34.6). In conclusion, prevalent vertebral fractures on routine clinical chest CT are associated with future hip fracture risk. © 2014 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  2. Future Osteoporotic Fracture Risk related to Lumbar Vertebral Trabecular Attenuation Measured at Routine Body CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Scott J; Graffy, Peter M; Zea, Ryan D; Ziemlewicz, Timothy J; Pickhardt, Perry J

    2018-01-03

    We sought to determine if vertebral trabecular attenuation values measured on routine body CT scans obtained for a variety of unrelated indications can predict future osteoporotic fractures at multiple skeletal sites. For this HIPAA-compliant and IRB-approved retrospective cohort study, trabecular attenuation of the first lumbar vertebra was measured in 1966 consecutive older adults who underwent chest and/or abdominal CT at a single institution over the course of one year. New pathologic fragility fractures that occurred after a patient's CT study date were identified through an electronic health record database query using ICD-9 codes for vertebral, hip, and extremity fractures. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression were performed to determine the effect of L1 trabecular attenuation on fracture-free survival. Age at CT, gender, and presence of a prior fragility fracture were included as confounders in multivariate survival analysis. Model discriminative capability was assessed through calculation of an optimism-corrected concordance index. A total of 507 patients (mean age 73.4 ± 6.3 years; 277 women, 230 men) were included in the final analysis. The median post-CT follow-up interval was 5.8 years (interquartile range 2.1-11.0 years). Univariate analysis showed that L1 attenuation values ≤90 HU are significantly associated with decreased fracture-free survival (pattenuation on fracture-free survival (HR: 0.63 per 10-unit increase; 95% CI: 0.47-0.85). The model concordance index was 0.700. Ten-year probabilities for major osteoporosis-related fractures straddled the treatment threshold for most sub-cohorts over the observed L1 HU range. In conclusion, for patients undergoing body CT scanning for any indication, L1 vertebral trabecular attenuation is a simple measure that, when ≤90 HU, identifies patients with a significant decrease in fracture free survival. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This

  3. The diagnostic value of 18F-FDG-PET/CT and MRI in suspected vertebral osteomyelitis - a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouijzer, Ilse J E; Scheper, Henk; de Rooy, Jacky W J; Bloem, Johan L; Janssen, Marcel J R; van den Hoven, Leon; Hosman, Allard J F; Visser, Leo G; Oyen, Wim J G; Bleeker-Rovers, Chantal P; de Geus-Oei, Lioe-Fee

    2017-12-19

    The aim of this study was to determine the diagnostic value of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in diagnosing vertebral osteomyelitis. From November 2015 until December 2016, 32 patients with suspected vertebral osteomyelitis were prospectively included. All patients underwent both 18F-FDG-PET/CT and MRI within 48 h. All images were independently reevaluated by two radiologists and two nuclear medicine physicians who were blinded to each others' image interpretation. 18F-FDG-PET/CT and MRI were compared to the clinical diagnosis according to international guidelines. For 18F-FDG-PET/CT, sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV in diagnosing vertebral osteomyelitis were 100%, 83.3%, 90.9%, and 100%, respectively. For MRI, sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV were 100%, 91.7%, 95.2%, and 100%, respectively. MRI detected more epidural/spinal abscesses. An important advantage of 18F-FDG-PET/CT is the detection of metastatic infection (16 patients, 50.0%). 18F-FDG-PET/CT and MRI are both necessary techniques in diagnosing vertebral osteomyelitis. An important advantage of 18F-FDG-PET/CT is the visualization of metastatic infection, especially in patients with bacteremia. MRI is more sensitive in detection of small epidural abscesses.

  4. Thoracic Temporal Subtraction Three Dimensional Computed Tomography (3D-CT: Screening for Vertebral Metastases of Primary Lung Cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shingo Iwano

    Full Text Available We developed an original, computer-aided diagnosis (CAD software that subtracts the initial thoracic vertebral three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT image from the follow-up 3D-CT image. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of this CAD software during screening for vertebral metastases on follow-up CT images of primary lung cancer patients.The interpretation experiment included 30 sets of follow-up CT scans in primary lung cancer patients and was performed by two readers (readers A and B, who each had 2.5 years' experience reading CT images. In 395 vertebrae from C6 to L3, 46 vertebral metastases were identified as follows: osteolytic metastases (n = 17, osteoblastic metastases (n = 14, combined osteolytic and osteoblastic metastases (n = 6, and pathological fractures (n = 9. Thirty-six lesions were in the anterior component (vertebral body, and 10 lesions were in the posterior component (vertebral arch, transverse process, and spinous process. The area under the curve (AUC by receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve analysis and the sensitivity and specificity for detecting vertebral metastases were compared with and without CAD for each observer.Reader A detected 47 abnormalities on CT images without CAD, and 33 of them were true-positive metastatic lesions. Using CAD, reader A detected 57 abnormalities, and 38 were true positives. The sensitivity increased from 0.717 to 0.826, and on ROC curve analysis, AUC with CAD was significantly higher than that without CAD (0.849 vs. 0.902, p = 0.021. Reader B detected 40 abnormalities on CT images without CAD, and 36 of them were true-positive metastatic lesions. Using CAD, reader B detected 44 abnormalities, and 39 were true positives. The sensitivity increased from 0.783 to 0.848, and AUC with CAD was nonsignificantly higher than that without CAD (0.889 vs. 0.910, p = 0.341. Both readers detected more osteolytic and osteoblastic metastases with CAD than without CAD

  5. Prolapse of the lumber vertebral disk - correlation of CT and myelographic findings with surgical findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hackenbroch, M.H.; Waldecker, B.; Proemper, K.H.

    1983-02-01

    Side by side with myelography, computed tomography is growing in importance as far as the diagnosis of the lumbar compression syndrome is concerned. From May 1980 to the end of April 1982, the authors employed at the Cologne University Clinic of Orthopaedics in 176 patients operated either for the first time or several times, myelography alone in 54 cases, and myelography combined with computed tomography in 98 cases, whereas computed tomography alone was used 24 times, in each case for the purpose of preoperative diagnosis. An epicritical analysis of the two last-named groups of examinations, basing on the findings made as a result of the operation, showed that computed tomography was superior in respect of the accuracy in determining the level and affected side of the compression. Two CT examinations only could not be utilised for technical reasons. Nine false-positive or false-negative cases (plus two examinations which were useless for technical reasons) were seen among the 98 myelographies of the patient group in question. Besides the equivalent information given by computed tomography in respect of the level and side of the compression, CT supplies additional information regarding constriction of the vertebral canal, defined osseous stenoses, preference for a particular side and site of prolapsed disk tissue, and on the cause of the compression in case there is a considerable stoppage of contrast medium. Computed tomography is better suited than myelography in the immediate post-operative phase for follow-up examination which are aimed at differentiating renewed prolapses, haemorrhages, or cicatrised changes. Provided there is enough capacity for examination, it seems possible that the noninvasive computed tomography will eventually replace invasive myelography as a routine examination method in case of relevant indications.

  6. Automated measurement of bone-mineral-density (BMD) values of vertebral bones based on X-ray torso CT images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, X; Hayashi, T; Chen, H; Hara, T; Yokoyama, R; Kanematsu, M; Hoshi, H; Fujita, H

    2009-01-01

    Bone is one of the most important anatomical structures in humans and osteoporosis is one of the major public health concerns in the world. Osteoporosis is a main target disease of bone, which can be detected by medical image techniques. The purpose of this study is to develop a fully automated computer scheme to measure bone-mineral-density (BMD) values for vertebral trabecular bones. This scheme will aid osteoporosis diagnosis performed using computer tomography (CT) images. This scheme includes the following processing steps: segmentation of the bone region, recognition of the skeletal structures and measurement of the BMD value in vertebral trabecular bone of each vertebral body. The proposed scheme was applied to 20 X-ray torso CT cases to measure the BMD values for vertebral trabecular bones. The experimental results show that the mean and standard deviation of the difference between the BMD values measured by using the proposed method and those measured using a manual segmentation method were 6.93 mg/cm(3) and 6.82 mg/cm(3) respectively. The accuracy of the proposed scheme satisfied the requirement for a computer-aided system used in osteoporosis diagnosis.

  7. Angiographic frequency of blunt cerebrovascular injury in patients with carotid canal or vertebral foramen fractures on multidetector CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKinney, Alexander [Department of Radiology, Hennepin County and University of Minnesota-Fairview and Medical Centers, Minneapolis, MN (United States)]. E-mail: mckin022@umn.edu; Ott, Frederick [Department of Radiology, Hennepin County and University of Minnesota-Fairview and Medical Centers, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Short, James [Department of Radiology, Hennepin County and University of Minnesota-Fairview and Medical Centers, Minneapolis, MN (United States); McKinney, Zeke [Department of Radiology, Hennepin County and University of Minnesota-Fairview and Medical Centers, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Truwit, Charles [Department of Radiology, Hennepin County and University of Minnesota-Fairview and Medical Centers, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2007-06-15

    Purpose: Blunt carotid injuries (BCI's) and blunt vertebral artery injuries (BVI's), known jointly as BCVI's, are common in 'high risk' patients. The purpose is to evaluate the rate of occurrence of BCI/BVI in patients screened purely by the radiologic criteria of fracture through the carotid canal or vertebral transverse foramina, or significant cervical subluxation, noted by multidetector CT. Methods: Seventy-one patients with 108 catheterized vessels were included over a 13-month interval. The angiographic examinations were prompted by current hospital protocol, solely by the presence of fractures involving/adjacent to the carotid canal, cervical fractures involving/adjacent to the foramen transversarium, or cervical fractures with significant subluxation. The incidence of each grade of blunt injury was calculated after review of the CT scans and catheter angiograms by two neuroradiologists. Results: Two thousand and seventy-three total blunt trauma admissions occurred during the time period, with a BCVI rate of 0.92-1.0% (depending on the reviewer), similar to previous studies. Mean time to catheter angiography was 16.6 h. Of the 71 included patients, there were 11-12 BCI's and 10-12 BVI's, an overall rate of 27-30% of BCVI in the patients with foraminal fractures. Interobserver agreement in reviewing the catheter angiograms was excellent (Kappa 0.795). Of note, three internal carotid pseudoaneurysms resolved spontaneously after anticoagulation or aspirin. Conclusion: This study confirms that there is a high rate of BCVI in the presence of carotid canal or vertebral foramen fractures that are noted by multidetector CT. Utilization of purely radiologic criteria of foraminal involvement may be a significant screening tool in the decision of whether to evaluate these patients acutely by catheter or CT angiography, and for early detection of patients at risk for symptomatology, to initiate prompt, prophylactic treatment.

  8. Evaluation of percutaneous vertebroplasty in osteoporotic vertebral fractures using a combination of CT fluoroscopy and conventional lateral fluoroscopy; Perkutane Vertebroplastie osteoporosebedingter Wirbelkoerperfrakturen: Erfahrungen mit der CT-Fluoroskopie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitton, M.B.; Schneider, J.; Brecher, B.; Herber, S.; Mohr, W.; Thelen, M. [Klinik fuer Radiologie, Universitaetskliniken Mainz (Germany); Drees, P.; Eckardt, A.; Heine, J. [Klinik fuer Orthopaedie, Universitaetskliniken Mainz (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    Purpose: Evaluation of vertebroplasty using a combination of CT-fluoroscopy and conventional lateral fluoroscopy in patients with osteoporotic vertebral fractures. Materials and Methods: Fifty-eight patients (23male, 35 women, age 69.7 {+-} 10.2 years) with painful osteoporotic vertebral fractures were treated with vertebroplasty in conscious sedation and local anesthesia. Spiral-CT with sagittal reconstructions of the respective vertebral bodies was used for classification of the fracture. The cannula was placed under CT-guidance in the ventral third of the respective vertebral bodies and cement instilled under CT fluoroscopy and lateral fluoroscopy. When cement migrated towards the vertebral canal, the injection was immediately stopped for 30-60 seconds. After polymerization in this location, the injection was continued until sufficient filling of the vertebra. Results were documented by spiral CT with sagittal reconstructions. Results: A total of 123 vertebral bodies were treated, comprising 39 thoracic and 84 lumbar vertebral bodies, with a mean of 2.1 {+-} 1.3 (range 1 to 6) vertebral bodies in each patient and a maximum of 3 vertebral bodies per session. All interventions were successfully completed in conscious sedation and local anesthesia. A mean volume of 5.9 {+-} 0.6 ml (range 2 to 14 ml) cement was applied for each vertebra, with 79.7% of procedures performed using a unilateral access. To achieve a sufficient cement deposit, a bilateral access was used in 20.3%. The dorsal wall of the vertebra was included in 23.6% of the fractures. In one case, cement migration into the spinal canal was detected, reducing the diameter of the canal by 30%. In two other cases, cement leakage was seen at the puncture site of the vertebra (one intercostotransversally in the 10{sup th} thoracic vertebra and one dorsolaterally in the 1{sup st} lumbar vertebra) with retrograde cement migration through the neuroforamen into the epidural space. In one of these cases, the

  9. Intrathoracic tracheal volume and collapsibility on inspiratory and end-expiratory ct scans correlations with lung volume and pulmonary function in 85 smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashiro, Tsuneo; San José Estépar, Raúl; Matsuoka, Shin; Bartholmai, Brian J; Ross, James C; Diaz, Alejandro; Murayama, Sadayuki; Silverman, Edwin K; Hatabu, Hiroto; Washko, George R

    2011-03-01

    To evaluate the correlations of tracheal volume and collapsibility on inspiratory and end-expiratory computed tomography (CT) with lung volume and with lung function in smokers. The institutional review board approved this study at each institution. 85 smokers (mean age 68, range 45-87 years; 40 females and 45 males) underwent pulmonary function tests and chest CT at full inspiration and end-expiration. On both scans, intrathoracic tracheal volume and lung volume were measured. Collapsibility of the trachea and the lung was expressed as expiratory/inspiratory (E/I) ratios of these volumes. Correlations of the tracheal measurements with the lung measurements and with lung function were evaluated by the linear regression analysis. Tracheal volume showed moderate or strong, positive correlations with lung volume on both inspiratory (r = 0.661, P volume showed a strong, positive correlation with the E/I ratio of lung volume (r = 0.711, P volume and the ratio of forced expiratory volume in the first second to forced vital capacity (r = -0.436, P volume and the ratio of residual volume to total lung capacity (r = 0.253, P = .02). Tracheal volume and collapsibility, measured by inspiratory and end-expiratory CT scans, is related to lung volume and collapsibility. The highly collapsed trachea on end-expiratory CT does not indicate more severe airflow limitation or air-trapping in smokers. Copyright © 2011 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Predator-prey interactions amongst Permo-Triassic terrestrial vertebrates as a deterministic factor influencing faunal collapse and turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codron, J; Botha-Brink, J; Codron, D; Huttenlocker, A K; Angielczyk, K D

    2017-01-01

    Unlike modern mammalian communities, terrestrial Paleozoic and Mesozoic vertebrate systems were characterized by carnivore faunas that were as diverse as their herbivore faunas. The comparatively narrow food base available to carnivores in these paleosystems raises the possibility that predator-prey interactions contributed to unstable ecosystems by driving populations to extinction. Here, we develop a model of predator-prey interactions based on diversity, abundance and body size patterns observed in the Permo-Triassic vertebrate fossil record of the Karoo Basin, South Africa. Our simulations reflect empirical evidence that despite relatively high carnivore: herbivore species ratios, herbivore abundances were sufficient for carnivores to maintain required intake levels through most of the Karoo sequence. However, high mortality rates amongst herbivore populations, even accounting for birth rates of different-sized species, are predicted for assemblages immediately preceding the end-Guadalupian and end-Permian mass extinctions, as well as in the Middle Triassic when archosaurs replaced therapsids as the dominant terrestrial fauna. These results suggest that high rates of herbivore mortality could have played an important role in biodiversity declines leading up to each of these turnover events. Such declines would have made the systems especially vulnerable to subsequent stochastic events and environmental perturbations, culminating in large-scale extinctions. © 2016 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2016 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  11. Iodine-enhanced micro-CT imaging: methodological refinements for the study of the soft-tissue anatomy of post-embryonic vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gignac, Paul M; Kley, Nathan J

    2014-05-01

    The now widespread use of non-destructive X-ray computed tomography (CT) and micro-CTCT) has greatly augmented our ability to comprehensively detail and quantify the internal hard-tissue anatomy of vertebrates. However, the utility of X-ray imaging for gaining similar insights into vertebrate soft-tissue anatomy has yet to be fully realized due to the naturally low X-ray absorption of non-mineralized tissues. In this study, we show how a wide diversity of soft-tissue structures within the vertebrate head-including muscles, glands, fat deposits, perichondria, dural venous sinuses, white and gray matter of the brain, as well as cranial nerves and associated ganglia-can be rapidly visualized in their natural relationships with extraordinary levels of detail using iodine-enhanced (i-e) µCT imaging. To date, Lugol's iodine solution (I2 KI) has been used as a contrast agent for µCT imaging of small invertebrates, vertebrate embryos, and certain isolated parts of larger, post-embryonic vertebrates. These previous studies have all yielded promising results, but visualization of soft tissues in smaller invertebrate and embryonic vertebrate specimens has generally been more complete than that for larger, post-embryonic vertebrates. Our research builds on these previous studies by using high-energy µCT together with more highly concentrated I2 KI solutions and longer staining times to optimize the imaging and differentiation of soft tissues within the heads of post-embryonic archosaurs (Alligator mississippiensis and Dromaius novaehollandiae). We systematically quantify the intensities of tissue staining, demonstrate the range of anatomical structures that can be visualized, and generate a partial three-dimensional reconstruction of alligator cephalic soft-tissue anatomy. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Scenes from the past: initial investigation of early jurassic vertebrate fossils with multidetector CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolliger, Stephan A; Ross, Steffen; Thali, Michael J; Hostettler, Bernhard; Menkveld-Gfeller, Ursula

    2012-01-01

    The study of fossils permits the reconstruction of past life on our planet and enhances our understanding of evolutionary processes. However, many fossils are difficult to recognize, being encased in a lithified matrix whose tedious removal is required before examination is possible. The authors describe the use of multidetector computed tomography (CT) in locating, identifying, and examining fossil remains of crocodilians (Mesosuchia) embedded in hard shale, all without removing the matrix. In addition, they describe how three-dimensional (3D) reformatted CT images provided details that were helpful for extraction and preparation. Multidetector CT can help experienced paleontologists localize and characterize fossils in the matrix of a promising rock specimen in a nondestructive manner. Moreover, with its capacity to generate highly accurate 3D images, multidetector CT can help determine whether the fossils warrant extraction and can assist in planning the extraction process. Thus, multidetector CT may well become an invaluable tool in the field of paleoradiology.

  13. Multi-detector thoracic CT findings in cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome: rib gaps and failure of costo-vertebral separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, Tom Anthony; Arthurs, Owen John; Calder, Alistair Duncan [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Muthialu, Nagarajan [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Cardiothoracic surgery, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-15

    Cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome (CCMS) describes a triad of mandibular hypoplasia, brain dysfunction and posterior rib defects (''rib gaps''). We present the CT imaging for a 2-year-old girl with CCMS that highlights the rib gap defects and shows absent transverse processes with abnormal fusion of the ribs directly to the vertebral bodies. We argue that this is likely to relate to abnormal lateral sclerotome development in embryology, with the failure of normal costo-vertebral junctions compounding impaired thoracic function. The case also highlights the use of CT for specific indications in skeletal dysplasia. (orig.)

  14. Multi-detector thoracic CT findings in cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome: rib gaps and failure of costo-vertebral separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Tom Anthony; Arthurs, Owen John; Muthialu, Nagarajan; Calder, Alistair Duncan

    2014-02-01

    Cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome (CCMS) describes a triad of mandibular hypoplasia, brain dysfunction and posterior rib defects ("rib gaps"). We present the CT imaging for a 2-year-old girl with CCMS that highlights the rib gap defects and shows absent transverse processes with abnormal fusion of the ribs directly to the vertebral bodies. We argue that this is likely to relate to abnormal lateral sclerotome development in embryology, with the failure of normal costo-vertebral junctions compounding impaired thoracic function. The case also highlights the use of CT for specific indications in skeletal dysplasia.

  15. Wavelet based characterization of ex vivo vertebral trabecular bone structure with 3T MRI compared to microCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krug, R; Carballido-Gamio, J; Burghardt, A; Haase, S; Sedat, J W; Moss, W C; Majumdar, S

    2005-04-11

    Trabecular bone structure and bone density contribute to the strength of bone and are important in the study of osteoporosis. Wavelets are a powerful tool to characterize and quantify texture in an image. In this study the thickness of trabecular bone was analyzed in 8 cylindrical cores of the vertebral spine. Images were obtained from 3 Tesla (T) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and micro-computed tomography ({micro}CT). Results from the wavelet based analysis of trabecular bone were compared with standard two-dimensional structural parameters (analogous to bone histomorphometry) obtained using mean intercept length (MR images) and direct 3D distance transformation methods ({micro}CT images). Additionally, the bone volume fraction was determined from MR images. We conclude that the wavelet based analyses delivers comparable results to the established MR histomorphometric measurements. The average deviation in trabecular thickness was less than one pixel size between the wavelet and the standard approach for both MR and {micro}CT analysis. Since the wavelet based method is less sensitive to image noise, we see an advantage of wavelet analysis of trabecular bone for MR imaging when going to higher resolution.

  16. Incorporation of CT-based measurements of trunk anatomy into subject-specific musculoskeletal models of the spine influences vertebral loading predictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Alexander G; Mokhtarzadeh, Hossein; Allaire, Brett T; Velie, Kelsey R; De Paolis Kaluza, M Clara; Anderson, Dennis E; Bouxsein, Mary L

    2017-10-01

    We created subject-specific musculoskeletal models of the thoracolumbar spine by incorporating spine curvature and muscle morphology measurements from computed tomography (CT) scans to determine the degree to which vertebral compressive and shear loading estimates are sensitive to variations in trunk anatomy. We measured spine curvature and trunk muscle morphology using spine CT scans of 125 men, and then created four different thoracolumbar spine models for each person: (i) height and weight adjusted (Ht/Wt models); (ii) height, weight, and spine curvature adjusted (+C models); (iii) height, weight, and muscle morphology adjusted (+M models); and (iv) height, weight, spine curvature, and muscle morphology adjusted (+CM models). We determined vertebral compressive and shear loading at three regions of the spine (T8, T12, and L3) for four different activities. Vertebral compressive loads predicted by the subject-specific CT-based musculoskeletal models were between 54% lower to 45% higher from those estimated using musculoskeletal models adjusted only for subject height and weight. The impact of subject-specific information on vertebral loading estimates varied with the activity and spinal region. Vertebral loading estimates were more sensitive to incorporation of subject-specific spinal curvature than subject-specific muscle morphology. Our results indicate that individual variations in spine curvature and trunk muscle morphology can have a major impact on estimated vertebral compressive and shear loads, and thus should be accounted for when estimating subject-specific vertebral loading. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:2164-2173, 2017. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Prevalence of Vertebral Compression Fractures on Routine CT Scans According to L1 Trabecular Attenuation: Determining Relevant Thresholds for Opportunistic Osteoporosis Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graffy, Peter M; Lee, Scott J; Ziemlewicz, Timothy J; Pickhardt, Perry J

    2017-09-01

    Radiologists interpreting body CT scans may be the first to identify osteoporosis and associated vertebral fractures. This study correlates L1 trabecular attenuation measurements with prevalent vertebral body fractures in older adults undergoing routine CT. Mean L1 trabecular attenuation was measured at thoracoabdominal CT in 1966 consecutive adults (983 men and 983 women) 65 years and older (mean age, 74.1 ± 6.6 [SD] years). Sagittal reconstructions and lateral scouts were analyzed for moderate or severe thoracolumbar vertebral compression fractures according to the Genant semiquantitative assessment method. The diagnostic performance of L1 attenuation for the evaluation of prevalent vertebral fractures was assessed, including ROC curve analysis. A total of 162 (8.2%) individuals (mean age, 78.3 years; 66 men, 96 women) had at least one moderate or severe vertebral fracture. The mean L1 attenuation was 70.2 HU among patients with a prevalent fracture, whereas it was 132.3 HU among patients without fracture (p attenuation was ≤ 90 HU. Prevalence increased to 49.2% with L1 attenuation of ≤ 50 HU. ROC curve analysis determined an optimal threshold of 90 HU (sensitivity = 86.9%, specificity = 83.9%), with a corresponding AUC of 0.895. The odds ratio of having a moderate or severe vertebral compression fracture was 31.9 for L1 attenuation ≤ 90 HU (95% CI, 20.2-50.5; p attenuation values than patients who do not. L1 attenuation ≤ 90 HU may represent an optimal threshold for determining risk for osteoporotic vertebral fractures.

  18. Delayed diagnosis of lung cancer after missed vertebral metastasis on CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M P H Hawkesford

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A 71-year-old man presented with a 4-month history of severe atraumatic monolateral hip pain. Radiographs were normal, and MRI had to be aborted owing to heating up of a remnant of an old spinal cord stimulator. CT revealed squamous cell lung carcinoma with widespread metastases of the spine and pelvis, causing L1 nerve root compression. In retrospect, a lytic lesion consistent with spinal metastasis was found on CT taken 5 months previously, soon after the onset of hip pain, but this was missed by the reporting radiologist at that time. This case highlights that errors in radiology reporting are inevitable, but can be minimized by using a systematic approach to carefully review all available images to avoid missing unexpected pathology.

  19. Fully Automatic Localization and Segmentation of 3D Vertebral Bodies from CT/MR Images via a Learning-Based Method.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengwen Chu

    Full Text Available In this paper, we address the problems of fully automatic localization and segmentation of 3D vertebral bodies from CT/MR images. We propose a learning-based, unified random forest regression and classification framework to tackle these two problems. More specifically, in the first stage, the localization of 3D vertebral bodies is solved with random forest regression where we aggregate the votes from a set of randomly sampled image patches to get a probability map of the center of a target vertebral body in a given image. The resultant probability map is then further regularized by Hidden Markov Model (HMM to eliminate potential ambiguity caused by the neighboring vertebral bodies. The output from the first stage allows us to define a region of interest (ROI for the segmentation step, where we use random forest classification to estimate the likelihood of a voxel in the ROI being foreground or background. The estimated likelihood is combined with the prior probability, which is learned from a set of training data, to get the posterior probability of the voxel. The segmentation of the target vertebral body is then done by a binary thresholding of the estimated probability. We evaluated the present approach on two openly available datasets: 1 3D T2-weighted spine MR images from 23 patients and 2 3D spine CT images from 10 patients. Taking manual segmentation as the ground truth (each MR image contains at least 7 vertebral bodies from T11 to L5 and each CT image contains 5 vertebral bodies from L1 to L5, we evaluated the present approach with leave-one-out experiments. Specifically, for the T2-weighted MR images, we achieved for localization a mean error of 1.6 mm, and for segmentation a mean Dice metric of 88.7% and a mean surface distance of 1.5 mm, respectively. For the CT images we achieved for localization a mean error of 1.9 mm, and for segmentation a mean Dice metric of 91.0% and a mean surface distance of 0.9 mm, respectively.

  20. Fully Automatic Localization and Segmentation of 3D Vertebral Bodies from CT/MR Images via a Learning-Based Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Chengwen; Belavý, Daniel L; Armbrecht, Gabriele; Bansmann, Martin; Felsenberg, Dieter; Zheng, Guoyan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we address the problems of fully automatic localization and segmentation of 3D vertebral bodies from CT/MR images. We propose a learning-based, unified random forest regression and classification framework to tackle these two problems. More specifically, in the first stage, the localization of 3D vertebral bodies is solved with random forest regression where we aggregate the votes from a set of randomly sampled image patches to get a probability map of the center of a target vertebral body in a given image. The resultant probability map is then further regularized by Hidden Markov Model (HMM) to eliminate potential ambiguity caused by the neighboring vertebral bodies. The output from the first stage allows us to define a region of interest (ROI) for the segmentation step, where we use random forest classification to estimate the likelihood of a voxel in the ROI being foreground or background. The estimated likelihood is combined with the prior probability, which is learned from a set of training data, to get the posterior probability of the voxel. The segmentation of the target vertebral body is then done by a binary thresholding of the estimated probability. We evaluated the present approach on two openly available datasets: 1) 3D T2-weighted spine MR images from 23 patients and 2) 3D spine CT images from 10 patients. Taking manual segmentation as the ground truth (each MR image contains at least 7 vertebral bodies from T11 to L5 and each CT image contains 5 vertebral bodies from L1 to L5), we evaluated the present approach with leave-one-out experiments. Specifically, for the T2-weighted MR images, we achieved for localization a mean error of 1.6 mm, and for segmentation a mean Dice metric of 88.7% and a mean surface distance of 1.5 mm, respectively. For the CT images we achieved for localization a mean error of 1.9 mm, and for segmentation a mean Dice metric of 91.0% and a mean surface distance of 0.9 mm, respectively.

  1. Size variation and collapse of emphysema holes at inspiration and expiration CT scan: evaluation with modified length scale method and image co-registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Sang Young; Lee, Minho; Seo, Joon Beom; Kim, Namkug; Lee, Sang Min; Lee, Jae Seung; Oh, Yeon Mok

    2017-01-01

    A novel approach of size-based emphysema clustering has been developed, and the size variation and collapse of holes in emphysema clusters are evaluated at inspiratory and expiratory computed tomography (CT). Thirty patients were visually evaluated for the size-based emphysema clustering technique and a total of 72 patients were evaluated for analyzing collapse of the emphysema hole in this study. A new approach for the size differentiation of emphysema holes was developed using the length scale, Gaussian low-pass filtering, and iteration approach. Then, the volumetric CT results of the emphysema patients were analyzed using the new method, and deformable registration was carried out between inspiratory and expiratory CT. Blind visual evaluations of EI by two readers had significant correlations with the classification using the size-based emphysema clustering method (r-values of reader 1: 0.186, 0.890, 0.915, and 0.941; reader 2: 0.540, 0.667, 0.919, and 0.942). The results of collapse of emphysema holes using deformable registration were compared with the pulmonary function test (PFT) parameters using the Pearson's correlation test. The mean extents of low-attenuation area (LAA), E1 (correlated with the PFT parameters (r=-0.53, -0.43, -0.48, and -0.25), with forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1; -0.81, -0.62, -0.75, and -0.40), and with diffusing capacity of the lungs for carbon monoxide (cDLco), respectively. The fraction of emphysema that shifted to the smaller subgroup showed a significant correlation with FEV1, cDLco, forced expiratory flow at 25%-75% of forced vital capacity, and residual volume (RV)/total lung capacity (r=0.56, 0.73, 0.40, and -0.58). A detailed assessment of the size variation and collapse of emphysema holes may be useful for understanding the dynamic collapse of emphysema and its functional relation.

  2. Size variation and collapse of emphysema holes at inspiration and expiration CT scan: evaluation with modified length scale method and image co-registration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oh SY

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Sang Young Oh,1,* Minho Lee,1,* Joon Beom Seo,1,* Namkug Kim,1,2,* Sang Min Lee,1 Jae Seung Lee,3 Yeon Mok Oh3 1Department of Radiology, 2Department of Convergence Medicine, 3Department of Pulmonology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Republic of Korea *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: A novel approach of size-based emphysema clustering has been developed, and the size variation and collapse of holes in emphysema clusters are evaluated at inspiratory and expiratory computed tomography (CT. Thirty patients were visually evaluated for the size-based emphysema clustering technique and a total of 72 patients were evaluated for analyzing collapse of the emphysema hole in this study. A new approach for the size differentiation of emphysema holes was developed using the length scale, Gaussian low-pass filtering, and iteration approach. Then, the volumetric CT results of the emphysema patients were analyzed using the new method, and deformable registration was carried out between inspiratory and expiratory CT. Blind visual evaluations of EI by two readers had significant correlations with the classification using the size-based emphysema clustering method (r-values of reader 1: 0.186, 0.890, 0.915, and 0.941; reader 2: 0.540, 0.667, 0.919, and 0.942. The results of collapse of emphysema holes using deformable registration were compared with the pulmonary function test (PFT parameters using the Pearson’s correlation test. The mean extents of low-attenuation area (LAA, E1 (<1.5 mm, E2 (<7 mm, E3 (<15 mm, and E4 (≥15 mm were 25.9%, 3.0%, 11.4%, 7.6%, and 3.9%, respectively, at the inspiratory CT, and 15.3%, 1.4%, 6.9%, 4.3%, and 2.6%, respectively at the expiratory CT. The extents of LAA, E2, E3, and E4 were found to be significantly correlated with the PFT ­parameters (r=−0.53, −0.43, −0.48, and −0.25, with forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1; −0.81, −0.62, −0.75, and

  3. Vertebral osteomyelitis without disc involvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamani, I.; Syed, I.; Saifuddin, A. E-mail: asaifuddin@aol.com; Green, R.; MacSweeney, F

    2004-10-01

    Vertebral osteomyelitis is most commonly due to pyogenic or granulomatous infection and typically results in the combined involvement of the intervertebral disc and adjacent vertebral bodies. Non-infective causes include the related conditions of chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) and SAPHO (synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, and osteitis) syndrome. Occasionally, these conditions may present purely within the vertebral body, resulting in various combinations of vertebral marrow oedema and sclerosis, destructive lesions of the vertebral body and pathological vertebral collapse, thus mimicking neoplastic disease. This review illustrates the imaging features of vertebral osteomyelitis without disc involvement, with emphasis on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings.

  4. Skeletal dosimetry in the MAX06 and the FAX06 phantoms for external exposure to photons based on vertebral 3D-microCT images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, R [Departamento de Energia Nuclear, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Av. Prof. Luiz Freire 1000, Cidade Universitaria, CEP 50740-540, Recife, PE (Brazil); Khoury, H J [Departamento de Energia Nuclear, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Av. Prof. Luiz Freire 1000, Cidade Universitaria, CEP 50740-540, Recife, PE (Brazil); Vieira, J W [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica de Pernambuco, Recife, PE (Brazil); Kawrakow, I [Ionizing Radiation Standards, National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa (Canada)

    2006-12-21

    3D-microCT images of vertebral bodies from three different individuals have been segmented into trabecular bone, bone marrow and bone surface cells (BSC), and then introduced into the spongiosa voxels of the MAX06 and the FAX06 phantoms, in order to calculate the equivalent dose to the red bone marrow (RBM) and the BSC in the marrow cavities of trabecular bone with the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code from whole-body exposure to external photon radiation. The MAX06 and the FAX06 phantoms consist of about 150 million 1.2 mm cubic voxels each, a part of which are spongiosa voxels surrounded by cortical bone. In order to use the segmented 3D-microCT images for skeletal dosimetry, spongiosa voxels in the MAX06 and the FAX06 phantom were replaced at runtime by so-called micro matrices representing segmented trabecular bone, marrow and BSC in 17.65, 30 and 60 {mu}m cubic voxels. The 3D-microCT image-based RBM and BSC equivalent doses for external exposure to photons presented here for the first time for complete human skeletons are in agreement with the results calculated with the three correction factor method and the fluence-to-dose response functions for the same phantoms taking into account the conceptual differences between the different methods. Additionally the microCT image-based results have been compared with corresponding data from earlier studies for other human phantoms.

  5. Short-term CT findings after osteosynthesis of fractures of the vertebral spine; Kurzfristige Veraenderungen in der Computertomographie nach osteosynthetischer Versorgung von Wirbelsaeulenfrakturen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, R.J.; Noor, J.; Herzog, H.; Roettgen, R.; Hidajat, N.; Felix, R. [Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde, Charite, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Humboldt-Univ. zu Berlin (Germany); Klinik fuer Unfall- und Wiederherstellungschirurgie, Charite, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Humboldt-Univ. zu Berlin (Germany); Pflugmacher, R.; Maeurer, J. [Radiologie am Prinzregentenplatz, Muenchen (Germany)

    2004-05-01

    Purpose: evaluation of a correlation between surgical stabilization of fractures of the vertebral spine and postoperative short-term CT findings with special attention to degenerative changes. Materials and methods: The pre- and post-operative CT of 55 patients (43male, 12 female, age: 7 - 73 years, mean = 37.7 years) with traumatic fractures of the vertebral spine who underwent surgical stabilization using an internal fixator were analyzed retrospectively. The interval between surgical intervention and first postoperative CT control did not exceed one week. The interval to the second short-term follow-up CT ranged from 6 up to 24 months (mean: 10.3 {+-} 2.7 months). The consensus reading of the short-term CT by two experienced radiologists was compared to the pre- and immediately postoperative CT examinations and with the neurologic findings. Statistical analysis was done using the chi-square- or the Fisher's exact-test. Results: no statistically significant correlation (p > 0.05) was found between the patient's age and the postoperative incidence of osteoporosis, spondylarthrosis, scoliosis, spondylolisthesis or disc protrusion after posttraumatic surgical stabilization using an internal fixator. Also, there was no significant correlation between the fracture's type or location, presence of polytraumatization, the technique of surgical intervention, and the incidence of postoperative degenerative changes in the neighboring segments. The thesis has not been verified (p > 0.05) that polysegment stabilization or prior surgical interventions at the vertebral spine with scar induction are responsible for a higher rate of degeneration. The only risk factor observed for postoperative scoliosis was the burst rotation fracture type C1.3 (AO-classification). (orig.) [German] Ziel: Ziel dieser Studies war, einen Zusammenhang zwischen der operativen Stabilisierung von Wirbelsaeulenfrakturen und kurzfristigen postoperativen, computertomographisch fassbaren

  6. The use of CT-angiography for monitoring thrombus formation after balloon occlusion of a dissecting vertebral artery pseudoaneurysm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verstegen, Marco J. T.; Hulsmans, Frans-Jan H.; Majoie, Charles B. L. M.; Bouma, Gerrit J.

    2002-01-01

    We present a 49-year-old man with a subarachnoid haemorrhage from a dissecting vertebral artery (VA) pseudoaneurysm treated with a proximal balloon occlusion. The clinical course was complicated by the sudden appearance of a lateral medullary syndrome (Wallenberg), which completely resolved after

  7. Skeletal dosimetry in the MAX06 and the FAX06 phantoms for external exposure to photons based on vertebral 3D-microCT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, R.; Khoury, H. J.; Vieira, J. W.; Kawrakow, I.

    2006-12-01

    3D-microCT images of vertebral bodies from three different individuals have been segmented into trabecular bone, bone marrow and bone surface cells (BSC), and then introduced into the spongiosa voxels of the MAX06 and the FAX06 phantoms, in order to calculate the equivalent dose to the red bone marrow (RBM) and the BSC in the marrow cavities of trabecular bone with the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code from whole-body exposure to external photon radiation. The MAX06 and the FAX06 phantoms consist of about 150 million 1.2 mm cubic voxels each, a part of which are spongiosa voxels surrounded by cortical bone. In order to use the segmented 3D-microCT images for skeletal dosimetry, spongiosa voxels in the MAX06 and the FAX06 phantom were replaced at runtime by so-called micro matrices representing segmented trabecular bone, marrow and BSC in 17.65, 30 and 60 µm cubic voxels. The 3D-microCT image-based RBM and BSC equivalent doses for external exposure to photons presented here for the first time for complete human skeletons are in agreement with the results calculated with the three correction factor method and the fluence-to-dose response functions for the same phantoms taking into account the conceptual differences between the different methods. Additionally the microCT image-based results have been compared with corresponding data from earlier studies for other human phantoms. This article is dedicated to Prof. Dr Guenter Drexler from the Laboratório de Ciências Radiológicas, State University of Rio de Janeiro, on the occasion of his 70th birthday.

  8. Dual-energy CT virtual non-calcium technique for detection of bone marrow edema in patients with vertebral fractures: A prospective feasibility study on a single- source volume CT scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diekhoff, T; Hermann, K G; Pumberger, M; Hamm, B; Putzier, M; Fuchs, M

    2017-02-01

    Dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) is a recent development for detecting bone marrow edema (BME) in patients with vertebral compression fractures. The aim of this pilot study was to determine the reliability of single-source DECT in detecting vertebral BME using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as standard of reference. Nine patients with radiographic thoracic or lumbar vertebral compression fractures underwent both, DECT on a 320-row single-source scanner and 1.5T MRI. Virtual non-calcium (VNC) images were reconstructed from the DECT volume datasets. Three blinded readers independently scored images for the presence of BME. Only vertebrae with loss of height in radiography (target vertebrae) were included in the analysis. A vertebra was counted as positive if two readers agreed on the presence of BME. Cohen's kappa was calculated for interrater comparison. Intervertebral ratios of target and the reference vertebra were compared for CT attenuation and MR signal intensity in a reference vertebra using Spearman correlation. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were calculated. Fourteen target vertebrae with a radiographic height loss were identified; eight of them showed BME on MRI, while DECT identified BME in 7 instances. There were no false positive virtual non-calcium images, resulting in a sensitivity of 0.88 (0.75-1.0 among all readers) and specificity of 1.0 (0.81-1.0). Interrater agreement was inferior for DECT (κ=0.63-0.89) compared to MRI (κ=0.9-1.0). Intervertebral ratio in VNC images strongly correlated with short-tau inversion recovery (r=0.87) and inversely with T1 (-0.89). SNR (0.2+/- 0.2 in VNC and 16.7+/- 7.3 in STIR) and CNR (0.2+/- 0.3 and 7.1+/- 6.3) values were inferior in VNC. Detecting BME with single-source DECT is feasible and allows detection of vertebral compression fractures with reasonably high sensitivity and specificity. However, image quality of VNC reconstructions has to be improved to achieve better

  9. Modified posterior vertebral column resection for Kümmell disease: Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feng-Yu; Huo, Li-Shuang; Liu, Sen; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Li-Jun; Yang, Da-Long; Ding, Wen-Yuan

    2017-02-01

    Kümmell's disease is defined as delayed traumatic vertebral collapse disease in which patients develop a kyphosis after asymptomatic minor spinal trauma. Both anterior approach and posterior approach have been reported, however, there is no standard treatment for Kümmell's disease. We described a successful modified posterior vertebral column resection in a patient with Kümmell's disease. A 65-year-old woman reported persistent back pain for almost three months. Kümmell's disease was diagnosed based on computer tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Modified posterior vertebral column resection combined with short-segment fixation was designed to treat this disease. The procedure was successful without any complications. Patient reported that symptoms were obviously improved in one week after operation. Modified posterior vertebral column resection combined with short-segment fixation is an effective treatment option for Kümmell's disease.

  10. Vertebral artery variations and osseous anomaly at the C1-2 level diagnosed by 3D CT angiography in normal subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakao, Norimitsu; Kamiya, Mitsuhiro [Aichi Medical University, Department of Spine Center, Aichi (Japan); Aichi Medical University, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Nagakute, Aichi (Japan); Takeuchi, Mikinobu; Hirasawa, Atsuhiko; Kawanami, Katsuhisa; Takayasu, Masakazu [Aichi Medical University, Department of Spine Center, Aichi (Japan); Nishimura, Manabu [Aichi Medical University, Department of Radiology, Nagakute, Aichi (Japan); Riew, K.D. [Washington University, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, St. Louis, MO (United States); Imagama, Shiro [Nagoya University, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Nagoya, Aichi (Japan); Sato, Keiji [Aichi Medical University, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Nagakute, Aichi (Japan)

    2014-10-15

    The craniovertebral junction is anatomically complicated. Representative vertebral artery (VA) variations include the persistent first intersegmental artery (FIA), fenestration of the VA above and below C1 (FEN), posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) from C1/2, and high-riding VA (HRVA). The ponticulus posticus (PP) is a well-known osseous anomaly at C1. Although those anomalies are frequent in patients with cervical deformity, the prevalence of these in subjects with normal cervical spines is still unknown. The aim of this study is to investigate the variations and prevalence of vascular and osseous anomalies based on three-dimensional computed tomographic (3D CT) angiography in patients without any cervical diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, Klippel-Feil syndrome, or Down syndrome. Eligible subjects were patients who underwent 3D CT angiography by the Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Internal Medicine from January 2009 to October 2013 in our institution. The authors defined a HRVA as a C2 pedicle with a maximum diameter of 4 mm or less. Among 480 subjects with a mean age of 63.1 years, 387 patients were eligible. One hundred and eighteen subjects were female, and 269 were male. HRVA was observed in 10.1 % of patients (39 out of 387 cases), FIA in 1.8 % (7 cases), FEN in 1.3 % (5 cases), and PICA in 1.3 % (5 cases). PP was observed in 6.2 % of patients (24 cases). According to past reports, many VA anomalies could be attributed to congenital or acquired conditions (e.g., rheumatoid arthritis). However, VA anomalies appear to exist even in patients without any such cervical diseases. (orig.)

  11. Prediction of post-operative pulmonary function after lobectomy for primary lung cancer: A comparison among counting method, effective lobar volume, and lobar collapsibility using inspiratory/expiratory CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yabuuchi, Hidetake, E-mail: h-yabu@med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Health Sciences, Kyushu University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Fukuoka (Japan); Kawanami, Satoshi, E-mail: kawanami_01@mac.com [Department of Clinical Radiology, Kyushu University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Fukuoka (Japan); Kamitani, Takeshi, E-mail: kamitani@radiol.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Clinical Radiology, Kyushu University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Fukuoka (Japan); Yonezawa, Masato, E-mail: ymasato@radiol.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Clinical Radiology, Kyushu University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Fukuoka (Japan); Yamasaki, Yuzo, E-mail: yyama@radiol.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Clinical Radiology, Kyushu University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Fukuoka (Japan); Yamanouchi, Torahiko, E-mail: tora0228jp@yahoo.co.jp [Department of Clinical Radiology, Kyushu University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Fukuoka (Japan); Nagao, Michinobu, E-mail: minagao@radiol.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Clinical Radiology, Kyushu University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Fukuoka (Japan); Okamoto, Tatsuro, E-mail: tatsuro@surg2.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Surgery and Science, Kyushu University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Fukuoka (Japan); Honda, Hiroshi, E-mail: honda@radiol.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Clinical Radiology, Kyushu University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • ΔFEV{sub 1.0} and ppoΔFEV{sub 1.0} using lobar collapsibility were strongly correlated. • ΔVC and ppoΔVC using effective lobar volume were strongly correlated. • Counting method was inferior to lobar collapsibility for prediction of ppoFEV{sub 1.0}. • Inspiratory/expiratory CT is useful to predict post-operative pulmonary function. - Abstract: Purpose: To compare the predictabilities of postoperative pulmonary function after lobectomy for primary lung cancer among counting method, effective lobar volume, and lobar collapsibility. Methods: Forty-nine patients who underwent lobectomy for primary lung cancer were enrolled. All patients underwent inspiratory/expiratory CT and pulmonary function tests 2 weeks before surgery and postoperative pulmonary function tests 6–7 months after surgery. Pulmonary function losses (ΔFEV{sub 1.0} and ΔVC) were calculated from the pulmonary function tests. Predictive postoperative pulmonary function losses (ppoΔFEV{sub 1.0} and ppoΔVC) were calculated using counting method, effective volume, and lobar collapsibility. Correlations and agreements between ΔFEV{sub 1.0} and ppoFEV{sub 1.0} and those between ΔVC and ppoΔVC were tested among three methods using Spearman’s correlation coefficient and Bland-Altman plots. Results: ΔFEV{sub 1.0} and ppoΔFEV{sub 1.0insp-exp} were strongly correlated (r = 0.72), whereas ΔFEV{sub 1.0} and ppoΔFEV{sub 1.0count} and ΔFEV{sub 1.0} and Pred. ΔFEV{sub 1.0eff.vol.} were moderately correlated (r = 0.50, 0.56). ΔVC and ppoΔVC{sub eff.vol.} (r = 0.71) were strongly correlated, whereas ΔVC and ppoΔVC{sub count}, and ΔVC and ppoΔVC {sub insp-exp} were moderately correlated (r = 0.55, 0.42). Conclusions: Volumetry from inspiratory/expiratory CT data could be useful to predict postoperative pulmonary function after lobectomy for primary lung cancer.

  12. Collapsing Containers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Justina L.; Battino, Rubin

    1994-01-01

    Describes variations on atmospheric pressure demonstrations and some systematic studies. Demonstrations use steam, generated either externally or internally to the container, to sweep out residual air. Preferred vessels collapsed slowly. Demonstrations use plastic milk jugs set in layers of aluminum foil, pop bottles immersed in 4-L beakers…

  13. Collapsed City

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allen, Nacho Ruiz

    2015-01-01

    Currently, when the socio-economic circumstances seem to announce another change of cultural paradigm for the 21st century, the interest in the urban fact seems to have been renewed in architecture. However, this is no longer focused on models of growth and efficiency, as happened in the 70s...... with its imminent breakdown, the architectural interests have shifted to urban environments like Tokyo, Detroit, Lagos or Rio de Janeiro; places that demonstrate, somehow, an urban culture of collapse....

  14. Prediction of post-operative pulmonary function after lobectomy for primary lung cancer: A comparison among counting method, effective lobar volume, and lobar collapsibility using inspiratory/expiratory CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabuuchi, Hidetake; Kawanami, Satoshi; Kamitani, Takeshi; Yonezawa, Masato; Yamasaki, Yuzo; Yamanouchi, Torahiko; Nagao, Michinobu; Okamoto, Tatsuro; Honda, Hiroshi

    2016-11-01

    To compare the predictabilities of postoperative pulmonary function after lobectomy for primary lung cancer among counting method, effective lobar volume, and lobar collapsibility. Forty-nine patients who underwent lobectomy for primary lung cancer were enrolled. All patients underwent inspiratory/expiratory CT and pulmonary function tests 2 weeks before surgery and postoperative pulmonary function tests 6-7 months after surgery. Pulmonary function losses (ΔFEV1.0 and ΔVC) were calculated from the pulmonary function tests. Predictive postoperative pulmonary function losses (ppoΔFEV1.0 and ppoΔVC) were calculated using counting method, effective volume, and lobar collapsibility. Correlations and agreements between ΔFEV1.0 and ppoFEV1.0 and those between ΔVC and ppoΔVC were tested among three methods using Spearman's correlation coefficient and Bland-Altman plots. ΔFEV1.0 and ppoΔFEV1.0insp-exp were strongly correlated (r=0.72), whereas ΔFEV1.0 and ppoΔFEV1.0count and ΔFEV1.0 and Pred. ΔFEV1.0eff.vol. were moderately correlated (r=0.50, 0.56). ΔVC and ppoΔVCeff.vol. (r=0.71) were strongly correlated, whereas ΔVC and ppoΔVCcount, and ΔVC and ppoΔVC insp-exp were moderately correlated (r=0.55, 0.42). Volumetry from inspiratory/expiratory CT data could be useful to predict postoperative pulmonary function after lobectomy for primary lung cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Initial investigation of 18F-NaF PET/CT for identification of vertebral sites amenable to surgical revision after spinal fusion surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Quon, Andrew; Dodd, Robert; Iagaru, Andrei; de Abreu, Marcelo Rodrigues; Hennemann, Sergio; Neto, Jose Maria Alves; Sprinz, Clarice

    2012-01-01

    Purpose A pilot study was performed in patients with recurrent back pain after spinal fusion surgery to evaluate the ability of 18F-NaF PET/CT imaging to correctly identify those requiring surgical intervention and to locate a site amenable to surgical intervention. Methods In this prospective study 22 patients with recurrent back pain after spinal surgery and with equivocal findings on physical examination and CT were enrolled for evaluation with 18F-NaF PET/CT. All PET/CT images were prospe...

  16. Cervical vertebral column morphology in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea assessed using lateral cephalograms and cone beam CT. A comparative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnesen, L; Jensen, K E; Petersson, A R

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Few studies have described morphological deviations in obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) patients on two-dimensional (2D) lateral cephalograms, and the reliability of 2D radiographs has been discussed. The objective is to describe the morphology of the cervical vertebral column on cone...

  17. Vertebral chondroblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilaslan, Hakan; Sundaram, Murali [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street, SW, Rochester, MN 55905 (United States); Unni, Krishnan K. [Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street, SW, Rochester, MN 55905 (United States)

    2003-02-01

    To determine the age distribution, gender, incidence, and imaging findings of vertebral chondroblastoma, and to compare our series with findings from case reports in the world literature.Design and patients Case records and imaging findings of nine histologically documented vertebral chondroblastomas were retrospectively reviewed for patient age, gender, vertebral column location and level, morphology, matrix, edema, soft tissue mass, spinal canal invasion, and metastases. Our findings were compared with a total of nine patients identified from previous publications in the world literature. The histologic findings in our cases was re-reviewed for diagnosis and specifically for features of calcification and secondary aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC). Clinical follow-up was requested from referring institutions. Nine of 856 chondroblastomas arose in vertebrae (incidence 1.4%; thoracic 5, lumbar 1, cervical 2, sacral 1). There were six males and three females ranging in age from 5 to 41 years (mean 28 years). Satisfactory imaging from seven patients revealed the tumor to arise from the posterior elements in four and the body in three. All tumors were expansive, six of seven were aggressive, and the spinal canal was significantly narrowed by bone or soft tissue mass in six. In one patient canal invasion was minimal. Calcification was pronounced in two and subtle in four. The sole nonaggressive-appearing tumor was heavily mineralized. Bony edema and secondary ABC were not seen on MR imaging. None of the cases had microscopic features of significant secondary ABC. Calcification, and specifically ''chicken wire'' calcification, was identified in two patients. Pulmonary metastases occurred in none. Vertebral chondroblastoma is a rare neoplasm that presents later in life than its appendicular counterpart. On imaging it is aggressive in appearance with bone destruction, soft tissue mass, and spinal canal invasion. The lesions contain variable amounts of mineral

  18. Quantitative dual-energy CT for phantomless evaluation of cancellous bone mineral density of the vertebral pedicle: correlation with pedicle screw pull-out strength

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wichmann, Julian L.; Booz, Christian; Bauer, Ralf W.; Kerl, J.M.; Fischer, Sebastian; Lehnert, Thomas; Vogl, Thomas J.; Khan, M.F. [University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Wesarg, Stefan [Fraunhofer IGD, Cognitive Computing and Medical Imaging, Darmstadt (Germany); Kafchitsas, Konstantinos [Spine Center, Asklepios Klinik Lindenlohe, Schwandorf (Germany)

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate quantitative dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) for phantomless analysis of cancellous bone mineral density (BMD) of vertebral pedicles and to assess the correlation with pedicle screw pull-out strength. Twenty-nine thoracic and lumbar vertebrae from cadaver specimens were examined with DECT. Using dedicated post-processing software, a pedicle screw vector was mapped (R1, intrapedicular segment of the pedicle vector; R2, intermediate segment; R3, intracorporal segment; global, all segments) and BMD was calculated. To invasively evaluate pedicle stability, pedicle screws were drilled through both pedicles and left pedicle screw pull-out strength was measured. Resulting values were correlated using the paired t test and Pearson's linear correlation. Average pedicle screw vector BMD (R1, 0.232 g/cm{sup 3}; R2, 0.166 g/cm{sup 3}; R3, 0.173 g/cm{sup 3}; global, 0.236 g/cm{sup 3}) showed significant differences between R1-R2 (P < 0.002) and R1-R3 (P < 0.034) segments while comparison of R2-R3 did not reach significance (P > 0.668). Average screw pull-out strength (639.2 N) showed a far stronger correlation with R1 (r = 0.80; P < 0.0001) than global BMD (r = 0.42; P = 0.025), R2 (r = 0.37; P = 0.048) and R3 (r = -0.33; P = 0.078) segments. Quantitative DECT allows for phantomless BMD assessment of the vertebral pedicle. BMD of the intrapedicular segment shows a significantly stronger correlation with pedicle screw pull-out strength than other segments. (orig.)

  19. Proximal junctional vertebral fracture-subluxation after adult spine deformity surgery. Does vertebral augmentation avoid this complication? A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernández-Baíllo Nicomedes

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To report to the orthopedic community a case of vertebral fracture and adjacent vertebral subluxation through the upper instrumented vertebra after thoracolumbar fusion with augmentation of the cranial level. Methods This report reviewed the patient`s medical record, her imaging studies and related literature. The possible factors contributing to this fracture are hypothesized. Results A 70-year-old woman underwent decompressive surgery and posterolateral fusion for adult lumbar scoliosis. We used pedicular screws from T10 to S1 and iliac screw at the right side, augmented with cement at T10, T11, L1, L5 and S1; and prophylactic vertebroplasty at T9 to avoid the "topping-off syndrome". Thirty days after discharge, without recognizable inciting trauma, the patient complained of pain in the lower thoracic area. The exam revealed overall neurological deficit below the level of fracture. CT scan and MRI demonstrated a T10 vertebral collapse and T9 vertebral subluxation with morphologic features of flexion-distraction fracture through the upper edge of the screw. At this point, the authors performed posterior decompression at T9 to T10 and extended posterolateral arthrodesis from T2 to T10. To our knowledge, this is an unreported fracture. Conclusions Augmentation of the cranial level in a long thoracolumbar fusion has been developed to avoid the junctional kyphosis and compression fractures at that level. We alert the orthopedic community that this augmentation may lead to further and more severe fractures, although this opinion requires investigation for confirmation.

  20. Radiotherapy of vertebral hemangiomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakata, Kohichi; Hareyama, Masato; Oouchi, Atushi; Sido, Mitsuo; Nagakura, Hisayasu; Tamakawa, Mituharu; Akiba, Hidenari; Morita, Kazuo [Dept. of Radiology, Sapporo Medical Univ., School of Medicine (Japan)

    1997-12-31

    Between 1975 and 1996, 14 patients (11 females, 3 males) with vertebral hemangioma received treatment with radiotherapy. Thirteen patients had a history of back pain or lumbago and 2 patients had neurological symptoms such as sensory impairment or paraplegia. The standard dose administered was 36 Gy in 18 fractions (five treatments per week). In the 13 patients with pain, this was completely or partially relieved. The condition of a man with hypesthesia of the legs deteriorated and a woman with paraplegia who was treated with decompressive laminectomy followed by radiotherapy recovered completely after irradiation. CT scan before irradiation showed thickened trabeculae as small punctate areas of sclerosis in all patients. At MR imaging before irradiation, T2-weighted MR images showed areas of high intensity in all patients and MR images demonstrated lesion enhancement. However, none of the patients who were treated successfully with radiation demonstrated any changes of the affected vertebra in the conventional radiographic films, CT scan or MR imaging, even 5 years after irradiation. Radiological imaging is indispensable for the diagnosis of vertebral hemangiomas but does not appear to be useful for evaluating the effects of radiotherapy. (orig.).

  1. Normative values for CT-based texture analysis of vertebral bodies in dual X-ray absorptiometry-confirmed, normally mineralized subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mannil, Manoj; Eberhard, Matthias; Becker, Anton S.; Alkadhi, Hatem; Guggenberger, Roman [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Schoenenberg, Denise; Osterhoff, Georg [University Hospital Zurich, Division of Trauma Surgery, Zurich (Switzerland); Frey, Diana P. [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Rheumatology, Zurich (Switzerland); Konukoglu, Ender [Computer Vision Laboratory, Department of Information Technology and Electrical Engineering, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2017-11-15

    To develop age-, gender-, and regional-specific normative values for texture analysis (TA) of spinal computed tomography (CT) in subjects with normal bone mineral density (BMD), as defined by dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), and to determine age-, gender-, and regional-specific differences. In this retrospective, IRB-approved study, TA was performed on sagittal CT bone images of the thoracic and lumbar spine using dedicated software (MaZda) in 141 individuals with normal DXA BMD findings. Numbers of female and male subjects were balanced in each of six age decades. Three hundred and five TA features were analyzed in thoracic and lumbar vertebrae using free-hand regions-of-interest. Intraclass correlation (ICC) coefficients were calculated for determining intra- and inter-observer agreement of each feature. Further dimension reduction was performed with correlation analyses. The TA features with an ICC < 0.81 indicating compromised intra- and inter-observer agreement and with Pearson correlation scores r > 0.8 with other features were excluded from further analysis for dimension reduction. From the remaining 31 texture features, a significant correlation with age was found for the features mean (r = -0.489, p < 0.001), variance (r = -0.681, p < 0.001), kurtosis (r = 0.273, p < 0.001), and WavEnLL{sub s}4 (r = 0.273, p < 0.001). Significant differences were found between genders for various higher-level texture features (p < 0.001). Regional differences among the thoracic spine, thoracic-lumbar junction, and lumbar spine were found for most TA features (p < 0.021). This study established normative values of TA features on CT images of the spine and showed age-, gender-, and regional-specific differences in individuals with normal BMD as defined by DXA. (orig.)

  2. The intravertebral vacuum phenomen as specific sign of osteonecrosis in vertebral compression fractures: results from a radiological and histological study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Libicher, Martin [University of Cologne, Department of Radiology, Koeln (Germany); Appelt, Andreas; Baier, Martin; Meeder, Peter-Juergen; DaFonseca, Katharina [University of Heidelberg, Department of Trauma Surgery, Heidelberg (Germany); Berger, Irina [University of Heidelberg, Department of Pathology, Heidelberg (Germany); Grafe, Ingo; Kasperk, Christian [University of Heidelberg, Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Osteology, Heidelberg (Germany); Noeldge, Gerd [University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2007-09-15

    This study investigated the prevalence of the intravertebral vacuum phenomenon (IVP) and osteonecroses in vertebral compression fractures (VCFs). We therefore performed an histological analysis of biopsies obtained from VCFs prior to balloon kyphoplasty. Computed tomography (CT) scans were reviewed regarding the presence of an IVP (i.e. cleft sign, Kuemmell disease). We reviewed the data of 266 consecutive patients treated by balloon kyphoplasty in 501 procedures from 2002 to 2004. From 180 patients (68%) we obtained adequate bone tissue for histological evaluation. Biopsy specimens were analysed regarding the presence of osteoporosis, infection, malignancy and osteonecrosis. CT scans of all 180 patients were reviewed for presence of an IVP. Histological examination revealed 135 (75%) osteoporoses, 20 (11%) neoplasms, 12 (7%) trauma cases and 13 (7%) osteonecroses. An IVP was present in 12 (7%) patients. There was a significant association of osteonecrosis and IVP (P < 0.0001). Eleven of 12 patients with a vacuum phenomenon showed an osteonecrosis on histology, wheras 11 of 13 patients with osteonecrosis showed an IVP on CT. The IVP is a specific sign of osteonecrosis in vertebral compression fractures (sensitivity 85%, specificity 99%, positive predictive value 91%). Our findings strongly support the thesis that an IVP indicates local bone ischemia associated with a non-healing vertebral collapse and pseudarthrosis. (orig.)

  3. A study on the mineral density of the lumbar vertebral bone in children of metabolic disorders and control using single energy quantitative CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakano, Kazutoshi (Tokyo Women' s Medical Coll. (Japan))

    1991-06-01

    A cross sectional study on the mineral density of the 3rd lumbar vertebral trabecular bone was carried out in 123 children less than 15 years old, comprising 44 controls, and 79 patients affected with conditions which are at risk for developing metabolic derangement of skeletal bone (34 patients taking antiepileptic drugs (AED), 29 undergoing glucocorticoid (GC) therapy and 16 bedridden patients), by using quantitative computed tomography (QCT) with a CaCO{sub 3} phantom. Serum Ca and alkaline-phosphatase (Alp) levels were measured at the time of QCT examinations in all. The results obtained were as follows: The QCT values in the control children showed neither age dependency nor a sexual difference before puberty. The QCT values in each group showed significant difference with one another; the control group>the AED group>the GC group>the bedridden group (p<0.05{approx}0.005). The serum Ca levels in each pathology group were significantly lower than those in the control group (p<0.05{approx}0.005). The serum Alp levels in the AED group were significantly higher (p<0.005) and those in the GC and bedridden groups significantly lower (p<0.01 and p<0.005 respectively) than those in the control group. The only GC group was significant (p<0.01) in the study of the relationships between the QCT value and the serum Alp level of each group. These results suggest that mechanisms underlying the decreased bone mineral density with AED and GC therapy and immobility are different from one another. Especially in the GC group abnormality of the Alp activity may be closely related to the decrease of trabecular bone mineral density. (author).

  4. Pulmonary Embolism with Vertebral Augmentation Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swetha Bopparaju

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available With the prevalence of an aging American population on the rise, osteoporotic vertebral fractures are becoming a common occurrence, resulting in an increase in vertebral augmentation procedures and associated complications such as cement leakage, vertebral compressions, and pulmonary embolism. We describe a patient who presented with respiratory distress three years following kyphoplasty of the lumbar vertebra. Computed tomography (CT angiogram of the chest confirmed the presence of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA cement in the lung fields and pulmonary vessels. We conducted a systematic review of the published literature identifying effective management strategies for the treatment of vertebroplasty-associated pulmonary embolism.

  5. Cosmogenesis and Collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearle, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Some possible benefits of dynamical collapse for a quantum theory of cosmogenesis are discussed. These are a possible long wait before creation begins, creation of energy and space, and choice of a particular universe out of a superposition.

  6. Cosmogenesis and Collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Pearle, Philip

    2010-01-01

    Some possible benefits of dynamical collapse for a quantum theory of cosmogenesis are discussed. These are a possible long wait before creation begins, creation of energy and space, and choice of a particular universe out of a superposition.

  7. Collapse of axion stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eby, Joshua [Department of Physics, University of Cincinnati,2600 Clifton Ave, Cincinnati, OH, 45221 (United States); Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory,P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL, 60510 (United States); Leembruggen, Madelyn; Suranyi, Peter; Wijewardhana, L.C.R. [Department of Physics, University of Cincinnati,2600 Clifton Ave, Cincinnati, OH, 45221 (United States)

    2016-12-15

    Axion stars, gravitationally bound states of low-energy axion particles, have a maximum mass allowed by gravitational stability. Weakly bound states obtaining this maximum mass have sufficiently large radii such that they are dilute, and as a result, they are well described by a leading-order expansion of the axion potential. Heavier states are susceptible to gravitational collapse. Inclusion of higher-order interactions, present in the full potential, can give qualitatively different results in the analysis of collapsing heavy states, as compared to the leading-order expansion. In this work, we find that collapsing axion stars are stabilized by repulsive interactions present in the full potential, providing evidence that such objects do not form black holes. In the last moments of collapse, the binding energy of the axion star grows rapidly, and we provide evidence that a large amount of its energy is lost through rapid emission of relativistic axions.

  8. Chronogenesis, Cosmogenesis and Collapse

    OpenAIRE

    Pearle, Philip

    2012-01-01

    A simple quantum model describing the onset of time is presented. This is combined with a simple quantum model of the onset of space. A major purpose is to explore the interpretational issues which arise. The state vector is a superposition of states representing "instants." The sample space and probability measure are discussed. Critical to the dynamics is state vector collapse: it is argued that a tenable interpretation is not possible without it. Collapse provides a mechanism whereby the u...

  9. Factors for vertebral artery injury accompanied by cervical trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murata, Masaaki; Shingu, Hikosuke; Kimura, Isao; Nasu, Yoshiro; Shiotani, Akihide [San-in Rosai Hospital, Yonago, Tottori (Japan). Spine and Low Back Pain Center

    2001-09-01

    Injury of the vertebral artery with cerebellar and brain stem infarction is a complication of cervical vertebral trauma. However, the pathogenesis and etiological factors remain to be clarified. In this study, we investigated patients with cervical vertebral and cord injury. This study included 51 patients with cervical vertebral and cord injury who were treated in our department. In these patients, plain X-ray, CT, MRI, and MRA findings were examined. The incidence of vertebral arterial injury was 33.3% (17 of 51 patients with cervical vertebral trauma). In 11 of the 17 patients, dislocation fracture was noted, comprising a markedly high percentage (64.7%). Particularly, vertebral arterial injury was commonly observed in patients with a large dislocation distance and severe paralysis. Cerebellar and brain stem infarction related to vertebral arterial injury was observed in 5 of the 17 patients (29.4%). No infarction developed in patients 50 years old or younger. Infarction was detected in relatively elderly patients. Vertebral arterial injury and cerebellar/brain stem infarction related to cervical vertebral trauma were frequently observed in patients with high energy injury. However, these disorders commonly occurred in elderly patients. Therefore, age-related factors such as arteriosclerosis may also be closely involved. In the acute stage, the state of the vertebral artery should be evaluated by MRA and MRI. Among patients with vertebral arterial injury, caution is needed during follow-up those with risk factors such as high energy injury and advanced age. (author)

  10. Assisted techniques for vertebral cementoplasty: Why should we do it?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muto, M., E-mail: mutomar@tiscali.it [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Section of Neuroradiology—“A. Cardarelli” Hospital, Naples (Italy); Marcia, S. [Section of Radiology—Santissima Trinità Hospital, Cagliari (Italy); Guarnieri, G. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Section of Neuroradiology—“A. Cardarelli” Hospital, Naples (Italy); Pereira, V. [Unit of Interventional Neuroradiology–HUG, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2015-05-15

    Assisted techniques (AT) for vertebral cementoplasty include multiple mini-invasive percutaneous systems in which vertebral augmentation is obtained through mechanical devices with the aim to reach the best vertebral height restoration. As an evolution of the vertebroplasty, the rationale of the AT-treatment is to combine the analgesic and stability effect of cement injection with the restoration of a physiological height for the collapsed vertebral body. Reduction of the vertebral body kyphotic deformity, considering the target of normal spine biomechanics, could improve all systemic potential complications evident in patient with vertebral compression fracture (VCF). Main indications for AT are related to fractures in fragile vertebral osseous matrix and non-osteoporotic vertebral lesions due to spine metastasis or trauma. Many companies developed different systems for AT having the same target but different working cannula, different vertebral height restoration system and costs. Aim of this review is to discuss about vertebral cementoplasty procedures and techniques, considering patient inclusion and exclusion criteria as well as all related minor and/or major interventional complications.

  11. The pattern and prevalence of vertebral artery injury in patients with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Other important risk factors for vertebral artery injury include facet joint dislocations and fractures of the first to the third cervical vertebral bodies. The aim of this study was to determine the pattern and prevalence of vertebral artery injury on CT angiography (CTA) in patients with cervical spine fractures. Method.

  12. Radiotherapy for vertebral metastases. Analysis of symptoms and clinical effects by MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugiyama, Akira [Shizuoka Saiseikai General Hospital (Japan)

    1994-12-01

    Fifty patients with 63 symptomatic vertebral metastasis (18 sites: pain only, 28 sites: radiculopathy with pain, 17 sites: myelopathy) were treated by radiotherapy. Primary lesions were located in the lung (9 cases), breast (9), colorectal area (9), prostate (7) and so on. We correlated the radiologic findings, symptoms and clinical effects with metastatic features which were classified into 4 types by MR imaging: non-deformity, expanding, vertebral collapse, and destructive mass. Each type of metastasis was accompanied with or without epidural tumor. Osteolytic metastases were apt to create features of deformity (expanding type: 18 vertebrae, vertebral collapse type: 17, destructive mass type: 9). The features of osteoblastic metastases were no deformity (18 vertebrae) and expanding type (2). The symptom of pain only occurred most frequently in the lumbosacral spine. The vertebral body deformity of symptomatic sites was relatively slight (non-deformity type: 6 sites, expanding type: 6, vertebral collapse type: 6), and epidural tumors were seen at only 2 sites. The effect of radiotherapy was excellent (complete pain relief: 64.7%, partial pain relief: 29.4%). Radiculopathy occurred most frequently in the lumber spine. Vertebral body deformity was noted in most symptomatic sites (expanding type: 9 sites, vertebral collapse type: 10, destructive mass type: 2). Complete relief was obtained in 6 sites (22.2%), partial relief in 18 (63.0%). Myelopathy occurred most often in the thoracic spine, followed by the lumbar spine. The vertebral body deformity was severe (expanding: 3 cases, vertebral collapse type: 3, destructive mass type: 6). Epidural tumors were also present in all but one case. Six of 13 patients treated with radiation alone improved. These 6 patients had non-deformity or expanding types with epidural tumor. No improvement was seen in the vertebral collapse type with epidural tumor or destructive mass type. (author).

  13. Collapsed Dark Matter Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Matthew R.; DiFranzo, Anthony

    2018-02-01

    The distributions of dark matter and baryons in the Universe are known to be very different: The dark matter resides in extended halos, while a significant fraction of the baryons have radiated away much of their initial energy and fallen deep into the potential wells. This difference in morphology leads to the widely held conclusion that dark matter cannot cool and collapse on any scale. We revisit this assumption and show that a simple model where dark matter is charged under a "dark electromagnetism" can allow dark matter to form gravitationally collapsed objects with characteristic mass scales much smaller than that of a Milky-Way-type galaxy. Though the majority of the dark matter in spiral galaxies would remain in the halo, such a model opens the possibility that galaxies and their associated dark matter play host to a significant number of collapsed substructures. The observational signatures of such structures are not well explored but potentially interesting.

  14. Collapsed Dark Matter Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Matthew R; DiFranzo, Anthony

    2018-02-02

    The distributions of dark matter and baryons in the Universe are known to be very different: The dark matter resides in extended halos, while a significant fraction of the baryons have radiated away much of their initial energy and fallen deep into the potential wells. This difference in morphology leads to the widely held conclusion that dark matter cannot cool and collapse on any scale. We revisit this assumption and show that a simple model where dark matter is charged under a "dark electromagnetism" can allow dark matter to form gravitationally collapsed objects with characteristic mass scales much smaller than that of a Milky-Way-type galaxy. Though the majority of the dark matter in spiral galaxies would remain in the halo, such a model opens the possibility that galaxies and their associated dark matter play host to a significant number of collapsed substructures. The observational signatures of such structures are not well explored but potentially interesting.

  15. Chronogenesis, Cosmogenesis and Collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearle, Philip

    2013-06-01

    A simple quantum model describing the onset of time is presented. This is combined with a simple quantum model of the onset of space. A major purpose is to explore the interpretational issues which arise. The state vector is a superposition of states representing different "instants." The sample space and probability measure are discussed. Critical to the dynamics is state vector collapse: it is argued that a tenable interpretation is not possible without it. Collapse provides a mechanism whereby the universe size, like a clock, is narrowly correlated with the quantized time eigenvalues.

  16. COLLAPSED BUILDINGS IN NIGERIA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Global Journal

    2016-05-23

    May 23, 2016 ... STRUCTURAL. FAILURES. Ajayi (1988) has attributed building failures and collapse in Nigeria to poor design of structure and foundation detailing. ... contributors to structural failures in buildings. ... A. E. Archibong, Department of Architecture, Cross River University of Technology, Calabar, Nigeria.

  17. Modeling Core Collapse Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzacappa, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    Core collapse supernovae, or the death throes of massive stars, are general relativistic, neutrino-magneto-hydrodynamic events. The core collapse supernova mechanism is still not in hand, though key components have been illuminated, and the potential for multiple mechanisms for different progenitors exists. Core collapse supernovae are the single most important source of elements in the Universe, and serve other critical roles in galactic chemical and thermal evolution, the birth of neutron stars, pulsars, and stellar mass black holes, the production of a subclass of gamma-ray bursts, and as potential cosmic laboratories for fundamental nuclear and particle physics. Given this, the so called ``supernova problem'' is one of the most important unsolved problems in astrophysics. It has been fifty years since the first numerical simulations of core collapse supernovae were performed. Progress in the past decade, and especially within the past five years, has been exponential, yet much work remains. Spherically symmetric simulations over nearly four decades laid the foundation for this progress. Two-dimensional modeling that assumes axial symmetry is maturing. And three-dimensional modeling, while in its infancy, has begun in earnest. I will present some of the recent work from the ``Oak Ridge'' group, and will discuss this work in the context of the broader work by other researchers in the field. I will then point to future requirements and challenges. Connections with other experimental, observational, and theoretical efforts will be discussed, as well.

  18. Collapsing Enormous Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-09-01

    One of the big puzzles in astrophysics is how supermassive black holes (SMBHs) managed to grow to the large sizes weve observed in the very early universe. In a recent study, a team of researchers examines the possibility that they were formed by the direct collapse of supermassive stars.Formation MysterySMBHs billions of times as massive as the Sun have been observed at a time when the universe was less than a billion years old. But thats not enough time for a stellar-mass black hole to grow to SMBH-size by accreting material so another theory is needed to explain the presence of these monsters so early in the universes history. A new study, led by Tatsuya Matsumoto (Kyoto University, Japan), poses the following question: what if supermassive stars in the early universe collapsed directly into black holes?Previous studies of star formation in the early universe have suggested that, in the hot environment of these primordial times, stars might have been able to build up mass much faster than they can today. This could result in early supermassive stars roughly 100,000 times more massive than the Sun. But if these early stars end their lives by collapsing to become massive black holes in the same way that we believe massive stars can collapse to form stellar-mass black holes today this should result in enormously violent explosions. Matusmoto and collaborators set out to model this process, to determine what we would expect to see when it happens!Energetic BurstsThe authors modeled the supermassive stars prior to collapse and then calculated whether a jet, created as the black hole grows at the center of the collapsing star, would be able to punch out of the stellar envelope. They demonstrated that the process would work much like the widely-accepted collapsar model of massive-star death, in which a jet successfully punches out of a collapsing star, violently releasing energy in the form of a long gamma-ray burst (GRB).Because the length of a long GRB is thought to

  19. Collapse settlement in compacted soils

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Booth, AR

    1977-01-01

    Full Text Available Research into collapse settlement in compacted soils is described, with special reference to recent cases in Southern Africa where collapse settlement occurred in road embankments following wetting of the soil. The laboratory work described...

  20. Collapse of an antibubble.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Jun; Ji, Chen; Yuan, BaoGang; Ruan, XiaoDong; Fu, Xin

    2013-06-01

    In contrast to a soap bubble, an antibubble is a liquid globule surrounded by a thin film of air. The collapse behavior of an antibubble is studied using a high-speed video camera. It is found that the retraction velocity of the thin air film of antibubbles depends on the thickness of the air film, e, the surface tension coefficient σ, etc., and varies linearly with (σ/ρe)(1/2), according to theoretical analysis and experimental observations. During the collapse of the antibubble, many tiny bubbles can be formed at the rim of the air film due to the Rayleigh instability. In most cases, a larger bubble will emerge finally, which holds most of the volume of the air film.

  1. Shock induced cavity collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skidmore, Jonathan; Doyle, Hugo; Tully, Brett; Betney, Matthew; Foster, Peta; Ringrose, Tim; Ramasamy, Rohan; Parkin, James; Edwards, Tom; Hawker, Nicholas

    2016-10-01

    Results from the experimental investigation of cavity collapse driven by a strong planar shock (>6km/s) are presented. Data from high speed framing cameras, laser backlit diagnostics and time-resolved pyromety are used to validate the results of hydrodynamic front-tracking simulations. As a code validation exercise, a 2-stage light gas gun was used to accelerate a 1g Polycarbonate projectile to velocities exceeding 6km/s; impact with a PMMA target containing a gas filled void results in the formation of a strong shockwave with pressures exceeding 1Mbar. The subsequent phenomena associated with the collapse of the void and excitation of the inert gas fill are recorded and compared to simulated data. Variation of the mass density and atomic number of the gas fill is used to alter the plasma parameters furthering the extent of the code validation.

  2. Current and emerging treatment strategies for vertebral compression fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hacein-Bey L

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Lotfi Hacein-BeyRadiological Associates of Sacramento Medical Group Inc, Sacramento, CA, USABackground: Vertebral compression fractures are most commonly related to osteoporosis or cancer, both of which are on the rise throughout the world. Once a vertebra is fractured, gradual deterioration of quality of life due to crippling pain and spinal instability usually follows. Although a number of traditional management options have been available to promote pain relief and to allow for increased activities, such as bed rest, bracing, pain medications, and light exercise programs, these have limited effectiveness in the majority of patients. Over 20 years ago, percutaneous vertebroplasty, which is a minimally invasive procedure consisting of the injection of polymethylmethacrylate directly into the fractured vertebra, emerged as an effective treatment. Various vertebral augmentation procedures were subsequently designed, all of which aim at eliminating pain, limiting or reversing vertebral collapse, and providing stability to the affected segment of the spine.Objective: This article discusses clinical aspects of vertebral compression fractures, current indications and contraindications and summarizes technical aspects of vertebroplasty, kyphoplasty, lordoplasty, and device-implanting vertebral augmentation procedures. Treatment effectiveness, which is significant despite recent criticism of vertebroplasty and other vertebral augmentation procedures, is also discussed. As economic pressures on health care systems are increasing in all countries, it is expected that the appropriateness, clinical effectiveness, and cost-effectiveness of vertebral augmentation procedures will be increasingly established by outcome analyses.Conclusion: It is important that physicians are familiar with vertebroplasty and other procedures designed to treat vertebral fractures in patients with advanced osteoporosis or cancer. These fractures, which are common and often

  3. Gravitational Waves from Gravitational Collapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryer, Chris L; New, Kimberly C B

    2011-01-01

    Gravitational-wave emission from stellar collapse has been studied for nearly four decades. Current state-of-the-art numerical investigations of collapse include those that use progenitors with more realistic angular momentum profiles, properly treat microphysics issues, account for general relativity, and examine non-axisymmetric effects in three dimensions. Such simulations predict that gravitational waves from various phenomena associated with gravitational collapse could be detectable with ground-based and space-based interferometric observatories. This review covers the entire range of stellar collapse sources of gravitational waves: from the accretion-induced collapse of a white dwarf through the collapse down to neutron stars or black holes of massive stars to the collapse of supermassive stars. Supplementary material is available for this article at 10.12942/lrr-2011-1.

  4. Gravitational waves from gravitational collapse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fryer, Christopher L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; New, Kimberly C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Gravitational wave emission from stellar collapse has been studied for nearly four decades. Current state-of-the-art numerical investigations of collapse include those that use progenitors with more realistic angular momentum profiles, properly treat microphysics issues, account for general relativity, and examine non-axisymmetric effects in three dimensions. Such simulations predict that gravitational waves from various phenomena associated with gravitational collapse could be detectable with ground-based and space-based interferometric observatories. This review covers the entire range of stellar collapse sources of gravitational waves: from the accretion induced collapse of a white dwarf through the collapse down to neutron stars or black holes of massive stars to the collapse of supermassive stars.

  5. Gravitational Waves from Gravitational Collapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris L. Fryer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gravitational-wave emission from stellar collapse has been studied for nearly four decades. Current state-of-the-art numerical investigations of collapse include those that use progenitors with more realistic angular momentum profiles, properly treat microphysics issues, account for general relativity, and examine non-axisymmetric effects in three dimensions. Such simulations predict that gravitational waves from various phenomena associated with gravitational collapse could be detectable with ground-based and space-based interferometric observatories. This review covers the entire range of stellar collapse sources of gravitational waves: from the accretion-induced collapse of a white dwarf through the collapse down to neutron stars or black holes of massive stars to the collapse of supermassive stars.

  6. PREFACE: Collapse Calderas Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottsmann, Jo; Aguirre-Diaz, Gerardo

    2008-10-01

    Caldera-formation is one of the most awe-inspiring and powerful displays of nature's force. Resultant deposits may cover vast areas and significantly alter the immediate topography. Post-collapse activity may include resurgence, unrest, intra-caldera volcanism and potentially the start of a new magmatic cycle, perhaps eventually leading to renewed collapse. Since volcanoes and their eruptions are the surface manifestation of magmatic processes, calderas provide key insights into the generation and evolution of large-volume silicic magma bodies in the Earth's crust. Despite their potentially ferocious nature, calderas play a crucial role in modern society's life. Collapse calderas host essential economic deposits and supply power for many via the exploitation of geothermal reservoirs, and thus receive considerable scientific, economic and industrial attention. Calderas also attract millions of visitors world-wide with their spectacular scenic displays. To build on the outcomes of the 2005 calderas workshop in Tenerife (Spain) and to assess the most recent advances on caldera research, a follow-up meeting was proposed to be held in Mexico in 2008. This abstract volume presents contributions to the 2nd Calderas Workshop held at Hotel Misión La Muralla, Querétaro, Mexico, 19-25 October 2008. The title of the workshop `Reconstructing the evolution of collapse calderas: Magma storage, mobilisation and eruption' set the theme for five days of presentations and discussions, both at the venue as well as during visits to the surrounding calderas of Amealco, Amazcala and Huichapan. The multi-disciplinary workshop was attended by more than 40 scientist from North, Central and South America, Europe, Australia and Asia. Contributions covered five thematic topics: geology, geochemistry/petrology, structural analysis/modelling, geophysics, and hazards. The workshop was generously supported by the International Association of Volcanology and the Chemistry of The Earth's Interior

  7. Steroid-associated hip joint collapse in bipedal emus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Zhen Zheng

    Full Text Available In this study we established a bipedal animal model of steroid-associated hip joint collapse in emus for testing potential treatment protocols to be developed for prevention of steroid-associated joint collapse in preclinical settings. Five adult male emus were treated with a steroid-associated osteonecrosis (SAON induction protocol using combination of pulsed lipopolysaccharide (LPS and methylprednisolone (MPS. Additional three emus were used as normal control. Post-induction, emu gait was observed, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI was performed, and blood was collected for routine examination, including testing blood coagulation and lipid metabolism. Emus were sacrificed at week 24 post-induction, bilateral femora were collected for micro-computed tomography (micro-CT and histological analysis. Asymmetric limping gait and abnormal MRI signals were found in steroid-treated emus. SAON was found in all emus with a joint collapse incidence of 70%. The percentage of neutrophils (Neut % and parameters on lipid metabolism significantly increased after induction. Micro-CT revealed structure deterioration of subchondral trabecular bone. Histomorphometry showed larger fat cell fraction and size, thinning of subchondral plate and cartilage layer, smaller osteoblast perimeter percentage and less blood vessels distributed at collapsed region in SAON group as compared with the normal controls. Scanning electron microscope (SEM showed poor mineral matrix and more osteo-lacunae outline in the collapsed region in SAON group. The combination of pulsed LPS and MPS developed in the current study was safe and effective to induce SAON and deterioration of subchondral bone in bipedal emus with subsequent femoral head collapse, a typical clinical feature observed in patients under pulsed steroid treatment. In conclusion, bipedal emus could be used as an effective preclinical experimental model to evaluate potential treatment protocols to be developed for prevention of

  8. The Nimitz Freeway Collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Bernard J.

    2004-10-01

    One of the most tragic sights created by the Loma Prieta earthquake of Oct. 17, 1989, was the collapse of the double-deck Nimitz Freeway (the Cypress Street Viaduct on Interstate 880) just south and east of the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge in Oakland. Along a 1.4-km north-south stretch, the upper deck of the freeway fell on top of the lower deck of the freeway, killing 42 motorists (see Fig. 1). Even though the earthquake occurred during rush hour (5:04 p.m.), traffic was extremely light that day because the third game of the World Series between the Oakland Athletics and the San Francisco Giants was about to begin and many commuters were already at home in front of their television sets.

  9. Fungal osteomyelitis with vertebral re-ossification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O Guinn, Devon J; Serletis, Demitre; Kazemi, Noojan

    2016-01-01

    We present a rare case of thoracic vertebral osteomyelitis secondary to pulmonary Blastomyces dermatitides. A 27-year-old male presented with three months of chest pains and non-productive cough. Examination revealed diminished breath sounds on the right. CT/MR imaging confirmed a right-sided pre-/paravertebral soft tissue mass and destructive lytic lesions from T2 to T6. CT-guided needle biopsy confirmed granulomatous pulmonary Blastomycosis. Conservative management with antifungal therapy was initiated. Neurosurgical review confirmed no clinical or profound radiographic instability, and the patient was stabilized with TLSO bracing. Serial imaging 3 months later revealed near-resolution of the thoracic soft tissue mass, with vertebral re-ossification from T2 to T6. Fungal osteomyelitis presents a rare entity in the spectrum of spinal infections. In such cases, lytic spinal lesions are classically seen in association with a large paraspinous mass. Fungal infections of the spinal column may be treated conservatively, with surgical intervention reserved for progressive cases manifesting with neurological compromise and/or spinal column instability. Here, we found unexpected evidence for vertebral re-ossification across the affected thoracic levels (T2-6) in response to IV antibiotic therapy and conservative bracing, nearly 3 months later. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Spherical Collapse in Chameleon Models

    CERN Document Server

    Brax, Ph; Steer, D A

    2010-01-01

    We study the gravitational collapse of an overdensity of nonrelativistic matter under the action of gravity and a chameleon scalar field. We show that the spherical collapse model is modified by the presence of a chameleon field. In particular, we find that even though the chameleon effects can be potentially large at small scales, for a large enough initial size of the inhomogeneity the collapsing region possesses a thin shell that shields the modification of gravity induced by the chameleon field, recovering the standard gravity results. We analyse the behaviour of a collapsing shell in a cosmological setting in the presence of a thin shell and find that, in contrast to the usual case, the critical density for collapse depends on the initial comoving size of the inhomogeneity.

  11. Astrophysics of Collapsing Axion Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eby, Joshua; Leembruggen, Madelyn; Suranyi, Peter; Wijewardhana, L. C. R.

    2017-01-01

    Axion stars are condensed states of large numbers of axion particles, bound by self-gravitation and quantum self-interactions. The mass of weakly bound axion stars is limited by gravitational stability, with condensates exceeding the maximum mass subject to collapse. During the collapse process, the axion density increases and higher-order self-interactions become increasingly relevant. By taking these terms into account, we provide evidence that in spite of a leading attractive interaction, collapsing axion stars stabilize in a dense state which is larger than its Schwarzschild radius, and so do not form black holes. During the last moments of collapse, number changing processes take place in the axion star with a very large rate, leading to emission of many highly energetic axions which escape from galaxies and galaxy clusters. Finally, if axion stars are a significant fraction of cold dark matter, then frequent collisions with each other or with ordinary stars could catalyze this collapse process as well.

  12. A systematic approach to vertebral hemangioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaudino, Simona; Martucci, Matia; Colantonio, Raffaella; Lozupone, Emilio; Visconti, Emiliano; Leone, Antonio; Colosimo, Cesare [Catholic University, School of Medicine, Department of Radiological Sciences, Rome (Italy)

    2015-01-15

    Vertebral hemangiomas (VHs) are a frequent and often incidental finding on computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the spine. When their imaging appearance is ''typical'' (coarsened vertical trabeculae on radiographic and CT images, hyperintensity on T1- and T2-weighted MR images), the radiological diagnosis is straightforward. Nonetheless, VHs might also display an ''atypical'' appearance on MR imaging because of their histological features (amount of fat, vessels, and interstitial edema). Although the majority of VHs are asymptomatic and quiescent lesions, they can exhibit active behaviors, including growing quickly, extending beyond the vertebral body, and invading the paravertebral and/or epidural space with possible compression of the spinal cord and/or nerve roots (''aggressive'' VHs). These ''atypical'' and ''aggressive'' VHs are a radiological challenge since they can mimic primary bony malignancies or metastases. CT plays a central role in the workup of atypical VHs, being the most appropriate imaging modality to highlight the polka-dot appearance that is representative of them. When aggressive VHs are suspected, both CT and MR are needed. MR is the best imaging modality to characterize the epidural and/or soft-tissue component, helping in the differential diagnosis. Angiography is a useful imaging adjunct for evaluating and even treating aggressive VHs. The primary objectives of this review article are to summarize the clinical, pathological, and imaging features of VHs, as well as the treatment options, and to provide a practical guide for the differential diagnosis, focusing on the rationale assessment of the findings from radiography, CT, and MR imaging. (orig.)

  13. Balloon kyphoplasty treatment for a spontaneous vertebral fracture in renal osteodystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demetriades, Andreas; Wong, Fabian; Ellamushi, Habib; Afshar, Fari; Yeh, John

    2011-01-01

    Renal osteodystrophy is a spectrum of musculoskeletal abnormalities. Bony fractures can occur spontaneously or with minor trauma in this condition. The authors report the first case of balloon kyphoplasty treatment for painful renal osteodystrophy vertebral body collapse secondary to end-stage renal failure on dialysis. The authors have demonstrated that kyphoplasty is a safe procedure for pain management in severe dystrophic patients. In addition, pain treatment with kyphoplasty can be achieved without anatomical restoration of vertebral body height. PMID:22696726

  14. MR manifestations of vertebral artery injuries in cervical spine trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Jeong Sik; Chung, Tae Sub; Kim, Young Soo; Cho, Yong Eun; Kang, Byung Chul; Kim, Dong Ik [Yonsei Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-11-01

    To assess the diagnostic efficacy of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the detection of a vertebral artery injury occurring from major cervical spine trauma. Conventional MR findings of 63 patients and 63 control subjects were compared to detect a possible change in the vertebral arteries resulted from trauma. Plain films, CT and clinical records were also reviewed to correlate the degree of cervical spine injury with vascular change. Nine cases of absent flow signals in vessel lumen were observed in eight patients and one was observed in the control group. Patients more frequently demonstrated other abnormalities such as intraluminal linear signals (n=3) or focal luminal narrowing (n=9) but there was no statistical significance. There was a close relationship between degree of cord damage and occlusion of the vertebral artery. Conventional MR imaging is useful in the detection of vertebral artery occlusion resulting from cervical spine trauma.

  15. Vertebral Fracture Prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    Vertebral Fracture Prediction A method of processing data derived from an image of at least part of a spine is provided for estimating the risk of a future fracture in vertebraeof the spine. Position data relating to at least four neighbouring vertebrae of the spine is processed. The curvature...

  16. Vibrational Collapse of Hexapod Packings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuchen; Ding, Jingqiu; Barés, Jonathan; Zheng, Hu; Dierichs, Karola; Menges, Achim; Behringer, Robert

    2017-06-01

    Columns made of convex noncohesive grains like sand collapse after being released from a confining container. However, structures built from non-convex grains can be stable without external support. In the current experiments, we investigate the effect of vibration on destroying such columns. The change of column height during vertical vibration, can be well characterized by stretched exponential relaxation when the column is short, which is in agreement with previous work, while a faster collapse happens when the column is tall. We investigate the collapse after the fast process including its dependence on column geometry, and on interparticle and basal friction.

  17. Use of computed tomographic densitometry to quantify contrast enhancement of compressive soft tissues in the canine lumbosacral vertebral canal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jeryl C; Shires, Peter K; Inzana, Karen D; Mosby, Adina D; Sponenberg, D Philip; Lanz, Otto I

    2002-05-01

    To evaluate computed tomography (CT) densitometry as a technique for quantifying contrast enhancement of compressive soft tissues in the canine lumbosacral vertebral canal and to determine whether the degree of contrast enhancement can be used to help predict tissue type or histopathologic characteristics. 29 large breed dogs with lumbosacral stenosis. Contrast-enhanced CT of L5-S3 was performed by use of a previously described protocol. At each disk level, CT densities of a water-filled syringe, epaxial muscles, and 4 vertebral canal locations were measured. Mean tissue enhancement was calculated by vertebral canal location, using water-filled syringe enhancement as a correction factor. Corrected CT enhancement was compared with tissue type, degree of tissue inflammation, and degree of tissue activity. Intravenous contrast administration of contrast medium significantly increased CT densities of water-filled syringes and epaxial muscles. Corrected CT enhancement of vertebral canal soft tissues at stenotic sites was greater than at nonstenotic sites. There was no association between enhancement and tissue type for any vertebral canal location. There was no correlation between enhancement and degree of tissue inflammation. There was a correlation between enhancement and tissue activity in the dorsal vertebral canal only. A water-filled syringe is a useful calibration tool for CT density measurements. The degree of tissue contrast enhancement, measured by CT densitometry, can be helpful for predicting the location of compressive soft tissues in dogs with lumbosacral stenosis. However, it is of limited value for predicting compressive soft-tissue types or histopathologic characteristics.

  18. Angle of insertion and confirmation of angles measured after in vitro implantation during laminar vertebral stabilization in vertebral columns obtained from canine cadavers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knell, Sebastian C; Kircher, Patrick; Dennler, Matthias; Montavon, Pierre M; Voss, Katja; Hurter, Karin

    2011-12-01

    To determine angles of insertion for laminar vertebral fixation of L1 and L2 by use of a locking plate in dogs and to confirm screw placement by use of computed tomography (CT). Vertebral specimens harvested from 8 canine cadavers. The point of insertion and minimum and maximum insertion angles for laminar and facet screws for laminar vertebral stabilization were determined by use of CT. A precontoured locking plate was then placed by use of 1 locking screw in the lamina of each lumbar vertebra and 1 nonlocking screw in the facet joint. The position and angle of the screws were examined by use of CT, and penetration into the vertebral canal was recorded. Mean ± SD insertion angles for L1 and L2 were 18 ± 4° and 21 ± 5° toward the vertebral canal and 11 ± 4.4° and 10 ± 3° in a dorsal direction, respectively. Insertion angles for the facet joint were between 24 ± 4° ventrally and 12 ± 2° dorsally. Insertion of the screw did not penetrate the vertebral canal for 23 of 24 (96%) screws. For 23 of 24 inserted screws, the previously determined angle was maintained and purchase of bone and cortices was satisfactory. Placement of laminar and facet screws in canine vertebrae was possible and can be performed safely if angles of insertion determined pre-operatively via CT are maintained.

  19. Predicting vertebral bone strength by vertebral static histomorphometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jesper Skovhus; Ebbesen, Ebbe Nils; Mosekilde, Lis

    2002-01-01

    The study investigates the relationship between static histomorphometry and bone strength of human lumbar vertebral bone. The ability of vertebral histomorphometry to predict vertebral bone strength was compared with that of vertebral densitometry, and also with histomorphometry and bone strength...... of the entire vertebral bodies (L-2) were used for histomorphometry. The other iliac crest biopsies and the L-3 were destructively tested by compression. High correlation was found between BV/TV or Tb.Sp and vertebral bone strength (absolute value of r = 0.86 in both cases). Addition of Tb.Th significantly...... of improving the prediction of bone strength of the vertebral body. The correlations between BV/TV of L-2 and bone strength of L-3 were comparable with the correlation obtained by quantitative computed tomography (QCT), peripheral QCT (pQCT), and dual-energy X-ray absorptrometry (DEXA) of L-3 and bone strength...

  20. Sex reversal in vertebrates

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    This special topic issue of Sexual Development gives an overview of sex reversal in vertebrates, from fishes naturally changing their sex, to rodents escaping the mammalian SRY-determining system. It offers eight up-to-date reviews on specific subjects in sex reversal, considering fishes, amphibians, reptiles, birds, marsupials, and placental mammals, including humans. The broad scope of represented animals makes this ideal for students and researchers, especially those interested in the...

  1. Vertebral split fractures: Technical feasibility of percutaneous vertebroplasty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huwart, Laurent, E-mail: huwart.laurent@wanadoo.fr [Department of Radiology, Hôpital Archet 2, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de Nice, Nice (France); Foti, Pauline, E-mail: pfoti@hotmail.fr [Department of Biostatistics, Hôpital Archet 2, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de Nice, Nice (France); Andreani, Olivier, E-mail: andreani.olivier@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Hôpital Archet 2, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de Nice, Nice (France); Hauger, Olivier, E-mail: olivier.hauger@chubordeaux.fr [Department of Radiology, Hôpital Pellegrin, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de Bordeaux, Bordeaux (France); Cervantes, Elodie, E-mail: elodie.cervantes@live.fr [Department of Radiology, Hôpital Archet 2, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de Nice, Nice (France); Brunner, Philippe, E-mail: pbrunner@chpg.mc [Department of Radiology, Hôpital Princesse Grasse de Monaco (Monaco); Boileau, Pascal, E-mail: boileau.p@chu-nice.fr [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Hôpital Archet 2, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de Nice, Nice (France); Amoretti, Nicolas, E-mail: amorettinicolas@yahoo.fr [Department of Radiology, Hôpital Archet 2, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de Nice, Nice (France)

    2014-01-15

    Objective: The treatment of vertebral split fractures remains controversial, consisting of either corset or internal fixation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the technical feasibility of CT- and fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous vertebroplasty in the treatment of vertebral split fractures. Materials and methods: Institutional review board approval and informed consent were obtained for this study. Sixty-two consecutive adult patients who had post-traumatic vertebral split fractures (A2 according to the AO classification) without neurological symptoms were prospectively treated by percutaneous vertebroplasty. All these procedures were performed by an interventional radiologist under computed tomography (CT) and fluoroscopy guidance by using only local anaesthesia. Postoperative outcome was assessed using the visual analogue scale (VAS) and Oswestry disability index (ODI) scores. Results: Vertebroplasty was performed on thoracic and lumbar vertebrae, creating a cement bridge between the displaced fragment and the rest of the vertebral body. Seven discal cement leakages (11%) were observed, without occurrence of adjacent vertebral compression fractures. The mean VAS measurements ± standard deviation (SD) significantly decreased from 7.9 ± 1.5 preoperatively to 3.3 ± 2.1 at 1 day, 2.2 ± 2.0 at 1 month, and 1.8 ± 1.4 at 6 months (P < 0.001). The mean ODI scores ± SD had also a significant improvement: 62.3 ± 17.2 preoperatively and 15.1 ± 6.0 at the 6-month follow-up (P < 0.001). Conclusion: This study suggests that type A2 vertebral fractures could be successfully treated by CT- and fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous vertebroplasty.

  2. Building the Vertebrate Spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourquié, Olivier

    2008-03-01

    The vertebrate body can be subdivided along the antero-posterior (AP) axis into repeated structures called segments. This periodic pattern is established during embryogenesis by the somitogenesis process. Somites are generated in a rhythmic fashion from the paraxial mesoderm and subsequently differentiate to give rise to the vertebrae and skeletal muscles of the body. Somite formation involves an oscillator-the segmentation clock-whose periodic signal is converted into the periodic array of somite boundaries. This clock drives the dynamic expression of cyclic genes in the presomitic mesoderm and requires Notch and Wnt signaling. Microarray studies of the mouse presomitic mesoderm transcriptome reveal that the segmentation clock drives the periodic expression of a large network of cyclic genes involved in cell signaling. Mutually exclusive activation of the Notch/FGF and Wnt pathways during each cycle suggests that coordinated regulation of these three pathways underlies the clock oscillator. In humans, mutations in the genes associated to the function of this oscillator such as Dll3 or Lunatic Fringe result in abnormal segmentation of the vertebral column such as those seen in congenital scoliosis. Whereas the segmentation clock is thought to set the pace of vertebrate segmentation, the translation of this pulsation into the reiterated arrangement of segment boundaries along the AP axis involves dynamic gradients of FGF and Wnt signaling. The FGF signaling gradient is established based on an unusual mechanism involving mRNA decay which provides an efficient means to couple the spatio-temporal activation of segmentation to the posterior elongation of the embryo. Another striking aspect of somite production is the strict bilateral symmetry of the process. Retinoic acid was shown to control aspects of this coordination by buffering destabilizing effects from the embryonic left-right machinery. Defects in this embryonic program controlling vertebral symmetry might lead

  3. Seismic Progressive Collapse: Qualitative Point of View

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Wibowo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Progressive collapse is a catastrophic structural phenomenon that can occur because of human-made and natural hazards. In progressive collapse mechanism, a single local failure may cause a significant deformation which then may lead to collapse of a structure. The current practices in progressive collapse analysis and design method generally focus on preventing progressive collapse due to abnormal gravity and blast loads. Progressive collapse behaviour of structures due to earthquake loads has not received as much attention. This paper presents a brief overview of the current state-of-knowledge, insights, and issues related to progressive collapse behaviour of structures caused by earthquake loading.

  4. The pattern and prevalence of vertebral artery injury in patients with cervical spine fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzanah Ismail

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: It is not uncommon for vertebral artery injury to occur when there are fractures through the transverse foraminae of the first to the sixth vertebral bodies. Other important risk factors for vertebral artery injury include facet joint dislocations and fractures of the first to the third cervical vertebral bodies. The aim of this study was to determine the pattern and prevalence of vertebral artery injury on CT angiography (CTA in patients with cervical spine fractures.Method: A retrospective review of patients who had undergone CTA of the vertebral arteries was undertaken. Reports were reviewed to determine which patients met the inclusion criteria of having had both cervical spine fractures and CTA of the vertebral arteries. Images of patients who met the inclusion criteria were analysed by a radiologist.Results: The prevalence of vertebral artery injury was 33%. Four out of the 11 patients who had vertebral artery injury, had post-traumatic spasm of the artery, with associated thrombosis or occlusion of the vessel. In terms of blunt carotid vertebral injury (BCVI grading, most of the patients sustained grade IV injuries. Four patients who had vertebral artery injury had fractures of the upper cervical vertebrae, i.e. C1 to C3. Fifteen transverse process fractures were associated with vertebral artery injury. No vertebral artery injury was detected in patients who had facet joint subluxations.Conclusion: Patients with transverse process fractures of the cervical spine and upper cervical vertebral body fractures should undergo CTA to exclude vertebral artery injury.

  5. Moduli destabilization via gravitational collapse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Dong-il [Sogang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Center for Quantum Spacetime; Pedro, Francisco G. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg (Germany). Theory Group; Yeom, Dong-han [Sogang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Center for Quantum Spacetime; Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Yukawa Inst. for Theoretical Physics

    2013-06-15

    We examine the interplay between gravitational collapse and moduli stability in the context of black hole formation. We perform numerical simulations of the collapse using the double null formalism and show that the very dense regions one expects to find in the process of black hole formation are able to destabilize the volume modulus. We establish that the effects of the destabilization will be visible to an observer at infinity, opening up a window to a region in spacetime where standard model's couplings and masses can differ significantly from their background values.

  6. Protostellar Collapse Induced by Compression

    OpenAIRE

    Hennebelle, P.; Whitworth, A. P.; Gladwin, P. P.; Andre, Ph.

    2002-01-01

    We present numerical simulations of the evolution of low-mass, isothermal, molecular cores which are subjected to an increase in external pressure $P\\xt$. If $P\\xt$ increases very slowly, the core approaches instability quite quasistatically. However, for larger (but still quite modest) $dP\\xt/dt$ a compression wave is driven into the core, thereby triggering collapse from the outside in. If collapse of a core is induced by increasing $P\\xt$, this has a number of interesting consequences. (i)...

  7. Is intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility correlated to clinical phenotypes and sex in patients with COPD?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camiciottoli G

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Gianna Camiciottoli,1 Stefano Diciotti,2 Francesca Bigazzi,1 Simone Lombardo,3 Maurizio Bartolucci,4 Matteo Paoletti,1 Mario Mascalchi,3 Massimo Pistolesi1 1Section of Respiratory Medicine, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Florence, Florence, Italy; 2Department of Electrical, Electronic, and Information Engineering “Guglielmo Marconi,” University of Bologna, Cesena, Italy; 3Radiodiagnostic Section, Department of Clinical and Experimental Biomedical Sciences, University of Florence, Florence, Italy; 4Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Careggi University Hospital, Florence, Italy Abstract: A substantial proportion of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD develops various degree of intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility. We studied whether the magnitude of intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility could be different across clinical phenotypes and sex in COPD. Intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility measured at paired inspiratory–expiratory low dose computed tomography (CT and its correlation with clinical, functional, and CT-densitometric data were investigated in 69 patients with COPD according to their predominant conductive airway or emphysema phenotypes and according to sex. Intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility was higher in patients with predominant conductive airway disease (n=28 and in females (n=27. Women with a predominant conductive airway phenotype (n=10 showed a significantly greater degree of collapsibility than women with predominant emphysema (28.9%±4% versus 11.6%±2%; P<0.001. Intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility was directly correlated with inspiratory–expiratory volume variation at CT and with forced expiratory volume (1 second, and inversely correlated with reduced CT lung density and functional residual capacity. Intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility was not correlated with cough and wheezing; however, intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility and clinical phenotypes of COPD

  8. Characterizing analogue caldera collapse with computerized X-ray micro-tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppe, Sam; Holohan, Eoghan; Boone, Matthieu; Pauwels, Elin; Cnudde, Veerle; Kervyn, Matthieu

    2013-04-01

    Analogue models in the past mainly explored caldera collapse structures by documenting 2D model cross-sections. Kinematic aspects and 3D structures of caldera collapse are less well understood, although they are essential to interpret recent field and monitoring data. We applied high resolution radiography and computerized X-ray micro-tomography (µCT) to image the deformation during analogue fluid withdrawal in small-scale caldera collapse models. The models test and highlight the possibilities and limitations of µCT-scanning to qualitatively image and quantitatively analyse deformation of analogue volcano-tectonic experiments. High resolution interval radiography sequences document '2.5D' surface and internal model geometry, and subsidence kinematics of a collapsing caldera block into an emptying fluid body in an unprecedented way. During the whole drainage process, all subsidence was bound by caldera ring faults. Subsidence was associated with dilatation of the analogue granular material within the collapsing column. The temporal subsidence rate pattern within the subsiding volume comprised three phases: 1) Upward ring fault propagation, 2) Rapid subsidence with the highest subsidence rates within the uppermost subsiding volume, 3) Relatively slower subsidence rates over the whole column with intermittent subsidence rate acceleration. Such acceleration did almost never affect the whole column. By using radiography sequences it is possible in a non-destructive manner to obtain a continuous observation of fault propagation, down sag mechanisms and the subsequent development of collapse structures. Multi-angle µCT scans of the collapse result allow for a full virtual 3D reconstruction of the model. This leads to an unprecedented 3D view on fault geometries. The developed method is a step towards the quantitative documentation of volcano-tectonic models that would render data interpretations immediately comparable to monitoring data available from recent

  9. Aberrant right vertebral artery originating from the aortic arch distal to the left subclavian artery: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Soo Heui; Baek, Hye Jin [Dept. of Radiology, Haeundae Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    We present a rare case of an aberrant right vertebral artery originated from the distal aortic arch. This issue has been incidentally detected on a preoperative CT angiography after a stabbing injury of the cervical spinal cord. Normally, the right vertebral artery originates from the right subclavian artery. Therefore, in this case report we will review the incidence and the embryological mechanism of this aberrant course of the right vertebral artery and we will discuss as well the clinical importance of this variation.

  10. Collapse of simple harmonic universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mithani, Audrey T.; Vilenkin, Alexander, E-mail: audrey.todhunter@tufts.edu, E-mail: vilenkin@cosmos.phy.tufts.edu [Institute of Cosmology, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Tufts University, Medford, MA 02155 (United States)

    2012-01-01

    In a recent paper Graham et al constructed oscillating and static universe models which are stable with respect to all classical perturbations. Here we show that such universes are quantum-mechanically unstable and can collapse by quantum tunneling to zero radius. We also present instantons describing nucleation of oscillating and static universes from nothing.

  11. Critical behavior of collapsing surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Kasper; Sourdis, C.

    2009-01-01

    We consider the mean curvature evolution of rotationally symmetric surfaces. Using numerical methods, we detect critical behavior at the threshold of singularity formation resembling that of gravitational collapse. In particular, the mean curvature simulation of a one-parameter family of initial...

  12. Gravitational collapse and naked singularities

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gravitational collapse is one of the most striking phenomena in gravitational physics. The cosmic censorship conjecture has provided strong motivation for research in this field. In the absence of a general proof for censorship, many examples have been proposed, in which naked singularity is the outcome of gravitational ...

  13. The collapsed football pla yer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sello Motaung, BSc, MB ChB, DOH. FIFA Medical Officer and Honorary Part-time Lecturer, Wits Centre for Exercise Science and Sports Medicine, Johannesburg ... parts of the body that may be affected by blows that result in the collapse of a ... temperatures and humidity), especially if players are not acclimatised to such.

  14. Gravitational collapse and naked singularities

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    physical relevance of gravitational collapse is now robust. We have observational evidence for massive and/or supermassive black holes. It is well-understood that there exists an upper limit to the maximum possible mass of a spherical body of cold nuclear matter. We can also naturally consider that black holes may have.

  15. Temperature evolution during dissipative collapse

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    numerous models that noncausal transport equations predict thermodynamical behaviours that can be far .... A radiating model. Following Govender et al [10] we consider a model in which the star undergoes dissipative collapse and evolves to a stable equilibrium state. .... Govender et al [8,9] have shown that the choice.

  16. Spherically symmetric scalar field collapse

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-03-01

    Mar 1, 2013 ... Vaidya metric at the hypersurface and the appropriate junction conditions are obtained. Keywords. Gravitational ... a perfect fluid. As the final stages of collapse might involve dissipative processes as well, ... by Christodoulou [5], Goswami and Joshi [6], Giambo [7] and also by numerical work of. Choptuik [3] ...

  17. Temperature evolution during dissipative collapse

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We investigate the gravitational collapse of a radiating sphere evolving into a final static configuration described by the interior Schwarzschild solution. The temperature profiles of this particular model are obtained within the framework of causal thermodynamics. The overall temperature evolution is enhanced by ...

  18. Pulmonary cement embolism after pedicle screw vertebral stabilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Tonolini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary arterial embolization of polymethylmethacrylate cement, most usually occurring after vertebroplasty or kyphoplasty, is very uncommon following vertebral stabilization procedures. Unenhanced CT scans viewed at lung window settings allow confident identification of cement emboli in the pulmonary circulation along with possible associate parenchymal changes, whereas hyperdense emboli may be less conspicuous on CT-angiographic studies with high-flow contrast medium injection. Although clinical manifestations are largely variable from asymptomatic cases to severe respiratory distress, most cases are treated with anticoagulation.

  19. Vertebral contour in spondylolisthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. S.; Rho, J. C.; Park, J. H.; Choi, H. Y.; Kim, B. K. [Wallace memorial Baptist Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    1981-09-15

    The defect in the pars interarticularis of spondylolisthesis may be dependent on contributing factors related to trauma and stress to which the neural arch is subjected, superimposed on a hereditary diasthesis. Posterior wedging of 5th lumber vertebral body in lumbosacral spondylolisthesis together with the degree of slip have been measured. The average wedging in spondylolisthesis is significantly greater than patient without this condition, and forms a characteristic radiological sign. The degree of wedging and slip show a statistically valid correlation. The diagnosis of spondylolisthesis is becoming more prevalent as the complexity of our society result in the increasing use of roentgenography of the lumbar spine. Isolated lateral deviation and rotation of spinous process seen in anteroposterior radiographs of the lumbar spine seems to be associated with pathology in the pars interarticularis.

  20. Spherically symmetric inhomogeneous dust collapse in higher ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We consider a collapsing spherically symmetric inhomogeneous dust cloud in higher dimensional space-time. We show that the central singularity of collapse can be a strong curvature or a weak curvature naked singularity depending on the initial density distribution.

  1. Meeting Environmental Requirements after a Bridge Collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-01

    This report is intended to assist transportation and environmental professionals in the event of a bridge collapse or similar emergency. It analyzes the environmental review process in five cases of bridge reconstruction following collapse in Florida...

  2. Congenital Vertebral Malformations In French Bulldogs: X-Ray Vs Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Madalina CORLAT

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Congenital vertebral malformations of the thoracolumbar area can have an important impact in the clinical evolution of French Bulldogs due to the instability it creates at the spinal level. The aim of this study is to show the differences between x-ray and CT scans in vertebral malformations of the French Bulldog. CT scans can offer a higher degree of certainty in the diagnosis of congenital vertebral malformations of the dogs. The VR model can offer a more thorough evaluation of the existing modifications of the vertebral body, allowing the examiner to circumvent the superposition effect than can be observed in the x-ray views and offering the chance to evaluate whether there is scoliosis or kyphosis present.

  3. Perelman's collapsing theorem for 3-manifolds

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Jianguo; Ge, Jian

    2009-01-01

    We will simplify the earlier proofs of Perelman's collapsing theorem of 3-manifolds given by Shioya-Yamaguchi and Morgan-Tian. Among other things, we use Perelman's semi-convex analysis of distance functions to construct the desired local Seifert fibration structure on collapsed 3-manifolds. The verification of Perelman's collapsing theorem is the last step of Perelman's proof of Thurston's Geometrization Conjecture on the classification of 3-manifolds. Our proof of Perelman's collapsing theo...

  4. Paired inspiratory/expiratory spiral CT and continuous respiration cine CT in the diagnosis of tracheal instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heussel, C.P.; Schreiber, W.; Thelen, M.; Kauczor, H.U. [Dept. of Radiology, Johannes Gutenberg Univ., Mainz (Germany); Hafner, B. [Dept. of Ear-Nose-Throat Surgery, Johannes Gutenberg Univ., Mainz (Germany); Lill, J. [Dept. of Pneumology, Johannes Gutenberg Univ., Mainz (Germany)

    2001-06-01

    In tracheo- and bronchomalacia, localisation and determination of collapse is necessary for planning of surgical procedure. We compared inspiratory and expiratory spiral CT, cine CT, bronchoscopy, exemplary cine MR, and evaluated the clinical relevance. Twenty-nine patients (2 follow-ups; mean age 61 years, age range 27-85 years) with suspected or verified tracheal stenosis or collapse (post-tracheotomy: n=17; neoplasm: n=5; other: n=7) underwent paired breath-hold inspiratory and expiratory spiral CT. Forty-five additional cine CT were performed at 1-4 levels (mean 1.5) during continuous respiration (increment 100 ms) to clarify respiratory collapse. The tracheal cross-sectional diameters of both techniques were calculated. Comparison with bronchoscopy, follow-up, and influence upon therapy were evaluated retrospectively. Exemplary comparison with cine MR (8 frames/s) was done in 3 cases. In addition to bronchoscopy, further information concerning localisation, extent, collapse, stability of the tracheal wall, distal portions of the stenosis and extraluminal compressions were obtained. A significantly higher degree and more pathological collapses (>50%) were seen using cine CT (38%) compared with paired spiral CT (13%; degree: p<0.0001; number: p<0.001). The findings changed the further therapeutic procedure in 16 of 29 patients. Further stenoses were excluded and bronchoscopy was verified in another 13 of 29. Temporal resolution of cine CT and cine MR is sufficient; however, spatial resolution of cine MR is inferior. Paired inspiratory and expiratory spiral CT localises tracheal stenoses and demonstrates relevant extraluminal compression. Significantly improved evaluation of respiratory collapse and further information of localised tracheal instability is obtained by cine CT. Cine MR promises more functional information especially due to free choice of imaging plane. (orig.)

  5. Reusable collapsible impact energy absorber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alghamdi, A.A.A. [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, King Abdulaziz Univ., Jeddah (Saudi Arabia)

    2003-07-01

    In this paper experimental study of plastic deformation of aluminum frusta when reinverted is presented. Effects of changing the angle of frustum as well as frustum wall thickness on the absorbed energy are investigated. The details of the experimental plastic inversion and reinversion are given. Obtained results show that it is possible to use the inverted aluminum frusta several times, thus they are reusable collapsible absorbers. (orig.)

  6. Bubble-induced cave collapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girihagama, Lakshika; Nof, Doron; Hancock, Cathrine

    2015-01-01

    Conventional wisdom among cave divers is that submerged caves in aquifers, such as in Florida or the Yucatan, are unstable due to their ever-growing size from limestone dissolution in water. Cave divers occasionally noted partial cave collapses occurring while they were in the cave, attributing this to their unintentional (and frowned upon) physical contact with the cave walls or the aforementioned "natural" instability of the cave. Here, we suggest that these cave collapses do not necessarily result from cave instability or contacts with walls, but rather from divers bubbles rising to the ceiling and reducing the buoyancy acting on isolated ceiling rocks. Using familiar theories for the strength of flat and arched (un-cracked) beams, we first show that the flat ceiling of a submerged limestone cave can have a horizontal expanse of 63 meters. This is much broader than that of most submerged Florida caves (~ 10 m). Similarly, we show that an arched cave roof can have a still larger expanse of 240 meters, again implying that Florida caves are structurally stable. Using familiar bubble dynamics, fluid dynamics of bubble-induced flows, and accustomed diving practices, we show that a group of 1-3 divers submerged below a loosely connected ceiling rock will quickly trigger it to fall causing a "collapse". We then present a set of qualitative laboratory experiments illustrating such a collapse in a circular laboratory cave (i.e., a cave with a circular cross section), with concave and convex ceilings. In these experiments, a metal ball represented the rock (attached to the cave ceiling with a magnet), and the bubbles were produced using a syringe located at the cave floor.

  7. Collapse models and perceptual processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlo Ghirardi, Gian; Romano, Raffaele

    2014-04-01

    Theories including a collapse mechanism have been presented various years ago. They are based on a modification of standard quantum mechanics in which nonlinear and stochastic terms are added to the evolution equation. Their principal merits derive from the fact that they are mathematically precise schemes accounting, on the basis of a unique universal dynamical principle, both for the quantum behavior of microscopic systems as well as for the reduction associated to measurement processes and for the classical behavior of macroscopic objects. Since such theories qualify themselves not as new interpretations but as modifications of the standard theory they can be, in principle, tested against quantum mechanics. Recently, various investigations identifying possible crucial test have been discussed. In spite of the extreme difficulty to perform such tests it seems that recent technological developments allow at least to put precise limits on the parameters characterizing the modifications of the evolution equation. Here we will simply mention some of the recent investigations in this direction, while we will mainly concentrate our attention to the way in which collapse theories account for definite perceptual process. The differences between the case of reductions induced by perceptions and those related to measurement procedures by means of standard macroscopic devices will be discussed. On this basis, we suggest a precise experimental test of collapse theories involving conscious observers. We make plausible, by discussing in detail a toy model, that the modified dynamics can give rise to quite small but systematic errors in the visual perceptual process.

  8. Comparison of radiological and clinical results of balloon kyphoplasty according to anterior height loss in the osteoporotic vertebral fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Hyup; Lee, Dong-Oh; Lee, Ji-Ho; Lee, Hyeong-Seok

    2014-10-01

    Percutaneous kyphoplasty is effective for pain reduction and vertebral height restoration in patients with osteoporotic vertebral fractures. However, in cases of severely collapsed fractures involving the loss of more than 70% of the vertebral height, kyphoplasty is technically difficult to perform and the outcomes remain unknown. To compare the vertebral height restoration rate, kyphotic angle, and clinical results of patients who underwent kyphoplasty according to the degree of anterior vertebral height loss. In addition, to determine the feasibility and effects of kyphoplasty on severely collapsed osteoporotic vertebral fractures. A retrospective study. A total of 129 patients (145 vertebrae) who underwent kyphoplasty for osteoporotic painful vertebral fracture and followed up for more than 1 year between September 2005 and August 2012 were recruited for the analysis. The patients' kyphotic angle, anterior vertebral height, and anterior vertebral height restoration ratio 1 year after surgery were compared. Pre- and postoperative pain around the fractured vertebra and the radiological and clinical results according to bone mineral density (BMD) were also compared. Patients were divided into three groups for comparison, according to radiographic findings. Patients with an anterior height compression ratio more than 70% at the time of fracture comprised Group I, patients with a compression ratio of 50-70% comprised Group II, and those with a compression ratio of 30-50% comprised Group III. Group I showed a greater extent of anterior height restoration immediately after surgery compared with the other groups, which noticeably decreased over time. All three groups showed significant restoration of the anterior vertebral height between pre- and postoperative values. The anterior vertebral height 1 year after surgery did not differ between Group I and Group II but was significantly higher in Group III. There was no correlation between the BMD and restoration or

  9. HIERARCHICAL GRAVITATIONAL FRAGMENTATION. I. COLLAPSING CORES WITHIN COLLAPSING CLOUDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naranjo-Romero, Raúl; Vázquez-Semadeni, Enrique; Loughnane, Robert M. [Instituto de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apdo. Postal 3-72, Morelia, Michoacán, 58089, México (Mexico)

    2015-11-20

    We investigate the Hierarchical Gravitational Fragmentation scenario through numerical simulations of the prestellar stages of the collapse of a marginally gravitationally unstable isothermal sphere immersed in a strongly gravitationally unstable, uniform background medium. The core developes a Bonnor–Ebert (BE)-like density profile, while at the time of singularity (the protostar) formation the envelope approaches a singular-isothermal-sphere (SIS)-like r{sup −2} density profile. However, these structures are never hydrostatic. In this case, the central flat region is characterized by an infall speed, while the envelope is characterized by a uniform speed. This implies that the hydrostatic SIS initial condition leading to Shu's classical inside-out solution is not expected to occur, and therefore neither should the inside-out solution. Instead, the solution collapses from the outside-in, naturally explaining the observation of extended infall velocities. The core, defined by the radius at which it merges with the background, has a time-variable mass, and evolves along the locus of the ensemble of observed prestellar cores in a plot of M/M{sub BE} versus M, where M is the core's mass and M{sub BE} is the critical BE mass, spanning the range from the “stable” to the “unstable” regimes, even though it is collapsing at all times. We conclude that the presence of an unstable background allows a core to evolve dynamically from the time when it first appears, even when it resembles a pressure-confined, stable BE-sphere. The core can be thought of as a ram-pressure confined BE-sphere, with an increasing mass due to the accretion from the unstable background.

  10. Axisymmetric collapses of granular columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lube, Gert; Huppert, Herbert E.; Sparks, R. Stephen J.; Hallworth, Mark A.

    2004-06-01

    Experimental observations of the collapse of initially vertical columns of small grains are presented. The experiments were performed mainly with dry grains of salt or sand, with some additional experiments using couscous, sugar or rice. Some of the experimental flows were analysed using high-speed video. There are three different flow regimes, dependent on the value of the aspect ratio a {=} h_i/r_i, where h_i and r_i are the initial height and radius of the granular column respectively. The differing forms of flow behaviour are described for each regime. In all cases a central, conically sided region of angle approximately 59(°) , corresponding to an aspect ratio of 1.7, remains undisturbed throughout the motion. The main experimental results for the final extent of the deposit and the time for emplacement are systematically collapsed in a quantitative way independent of any friction coefficients. Along with the kinematic data for the rate of spread of the front of the collapsing column, this is interpreted as indicating that frictional effects between individual grains in the bulk of the moving flow only play a role in the last instant of the flow, as it comes to an abrupt halt. For a {reach r_infty is given by t_infty {=} 3(h_i/g)(1/2} {=} 3(r_i/g)({1/2}a^{1/2)) , where g is the gravitational acceleration. The insights and conclusions gained from these experiments can be applied to a wide range of industrial and natural flows of concentrated particles. For example, the observation of the rapid deposition of the grains can help explain details of the emplacement of pyroclastic flows resulting from the explosive eruption of volcanoes.

  11. Vertebral Malformations in French Bulldogs

    OpenAIRE

    KURICOVÁ, Mária; LEDECKÝ, Valent; KVETKOVÁ, Jaroslava; LIPTÁK, Tomáš

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to detect vertebral malformations among French Bulldogs admitted between the years 2011 – 2016 due to the high popularity of the breed and the intentions to increase the breed welfare by reducing the occurrence of congenital anomalies. Besides, we aimed to look for gender predisposition, possible vertebral predisposition, occurrence of clinical symptoms and radiographic findings. A total of 73 French Bulldogs met the inclusion criteria (radiographs of the whole spine...

  12. DMRT genes in vertebrate gametogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarkower, David

    2013-01-01

    Genes containing the DM domain DNA-binding motif regulate sex determination and sexual differentiation in a broad variety of metazoans, including nematodes, insects, and vertebrates. They can function in primary sex determination or downstream in sexual differentiation, and they can act either throughout the body or in highly restricted cell types. In vertebrates, several DM domain genes--DMRT genes--play critical roles in gonadal differentiation or gametogenesis. DMRT1 has the most prominent role and likely regulates testicular differentiation in all vertebrates. In the mammalian gonad, DMRT1 exerts both intrinsic and extrinsic control of gametogenesis; it is required for germ cell differentiation in males and regulates meiosis in both sexes, and it is required in supporting cells for the establishment and maintenance of male fate in the testis. These varied functions of DMRT1 serve to coordinate gonadal development and function. In other vertebrates, DMRT1 regulates gonadal differentiation, and it also appears to have played a central role in the evolution of new sex-determining mechanisms in at least three vertebrate clades. This chapter focuses on the regulation of vertebrate gametogenesis by DMRT1. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Geotechnical properties of Egyptian collapsible soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled E. Gaaver

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The risk of constructing structures on collapsible soils presents significant challenges to geotechnical engineers due to sudden reduction in volume upon wetting. Identifying collapsible soils when encountered in the field and taking the needed precautions should substantially reduce the risk of such problems usually reported in buildings and highways. Collapsible soils are those unsaturated soils that can withstand relatively high pressure without showing significant change in volume, however upon wetting; they are susceptible to a large and sudden reduction in volume. Collapsible soils cover significant areas around the world. In Egypt, collapsible soils were observed within the northern portion of the western desert including Borg El-Arab region, and around the city of Cairo in Six-of-October plateau, and Tenth-of-Ramadan city. Settlements associated with development on untreated collapsible soils usually lead to expensive repairs. One method for treating collapsible soils is to densify their structure by compaction. The ongoing study presents the effect of compaction on the geotechnical properties of the collapsible soils. Undisturbed block samples were recovered from test pits at four sites in Borg El-Arab district, located at about 20 km west of the city of Alexandria, Egypt. The samples were tested in both unsoaked and soaked conditions. Influence of water inundation on the geotechnical properties of collapsible soils was demonstrated. A comparative study between natural undisturbed and compacted samples of collapsible soils was performed. An attempt was made to relate the collapse potential to the initial moisture content. An empirical correlation between California Bearing Ratio of the compacted collapsible soils and liquid limit was adopted. The presented simple relationships should enable the geotechnical engineers to estimate the complex parameters of collapsible soils using simple laboratory tests with a reasonable accuracy.

  14. Collapse Analysis of Timber Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    2008-01-01

    A probabilistic based collapse analysis has been performed for a glulam frame structure supporting the roof over the main court in a Norwegian sports centre. The robustness analysis is based on the framework for robustness analysis introduced in the Danish Code of Practice for the Safety of Struc......A probabilistic based collapse analysis has been performed for a glulam frame structure supporting the roof over the main court in a Norwegian sports centre. The robustness analysis is based on the framework for robustness analysis introduced in the Danish Code of Practice for the Safety...... of Structures and a probabilistic modelling of the timber material proposed in the Probabilistic Model Code (PMC) of the Joint Committee on Structural Safety (JCSS). Due to the framework in the Danish Code the timber structure has to be evaluated with respect to the following criteria where at least one shall...... be fulfilled: a) demonstrating that those parts of the structure essential for the safety only have little sensitivity with respect to unintentional loads and defects, or b) demonstrating a load case with „removal of a limited part of the structure‟ in order to document that an extensive failure...

  15. Collapsible Cryogenic Storage Vessel Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, David C.

    2002-01-01

    Collapsible cryogenic storage vessels may be useful for future space exploration missions by providing long-term storage capability using a lightweight system that can be compactly packaged for launch. Previous development efforts have identified an 'inflatable' concept as most promising. In the inflatable tank concept, the cryogen is contained within a flexible pressure wall comprised of a flexible bladder to contain the cryogen and a fabric reinforcement layer for structural strength. A flexible, high-performance insulation jacket surrounds the vessel. The weight of the tank and the cryogen is supported by rigid support structures. This design concept is developed through physical testing of a scaled pressure wall, and through development of tests for a flexible Layered Composite Insulation (LCI) insulation jacket. A demonstration pressure wall is fabricated using Spectra fabric for reinforcement, and burst tested under noncryogenic conditions. An insulation test specimens is prepared to demonstrate the effectiveness of the insulation when subject to folding effects, and to examine the effect of compression of the insulation under compressive loading to simulate the pressure effect in a nonrigid insulation blanket under the action atmospheric pressure, such as would be seen in application on the surface of Mars. Although pressure testing did not meet the design goals, the concept shows promise for the design. The testing program provides direction for future development of the collapsible cryogenic vessel concept.

  16. Reconstructing the ancestral vertebrate brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugahara, Fumiaki; Murakami, Yasunori; Pascual-Anaya, Juan; Kuratani, Shigeru

    2017-05-01

    Highly complicated morphologies and sophisticated functions of vertebrate brains have been established through evolution. However, the origin and early evolutionary history of the brain remain elusive, owing to lack of information regarding the brain architecture of extant and fossil species of jawless vertebrates (agnathans). Comparative analyses of the brain of less studied cyclostomes (only extant agnathan group, consisting of lampreys and hagfish) with the well-known sister group of jawed vertebrates (gnathostomes) are the only tools we have available to illustrate the ancestral architecture of the vertebrate brain. Previous developmental studies had shown that the lamprey lacked well-established brain compartments that are present in gnathostomes, such as the medial ganglionic eminence and the rhombic lip. The most accepted scenario suggested that cyclostomes had fewer compartments than that of the gnathostome brain and that gnathostomes thus evolved by a stepwise addition of innovations on its developmental sequence. However, recent studies have revealed that these compartments are present in hagfish embryos, indicating that these brain regions have been acquired before the split of cyclostomes and gnathostomes. By comparing two cyclostome lineages and gnathostomes, it has become possible to speculate about a more complex ancestral state of the brain, excluding derived traits in either of the lineages. In this review, we summarize recent studies on the brain development of the lamprey and hagfish. Then, we attempt to reconstruct the possible brain architecture of the last common ancestor of vertebrates. Finally, we discuss how the developmental plan of the vertebrate brain has been modified independently in different vertebrate lineages. © 2017 Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  17. Third-generation percutaneous vertebral augmentation systems

    OpenAIRE

    Vanni, Daniele; Galzio, Renato; Kazakova, Anna; Pantalone, Andrea; Grillea, Giovanni; Bartolo, Marcello; Salini, Vincenzo; Magliani, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Currently, there is no general consensus about the management of osteoporotic vertebral fractures (OVF). In the past, conservative treatment for at least one month was deemed appropriate for the majority of vertebral fractures. When pain persisted after conservative treatment, it was necessary to consider surgical interventions including: vertebroplasty for vertebral fractures with less than 30% loss of height of the affected vertebral body and kyphoplasty for vertebral fractures with greater...

  18. Sharper criteria for the wave collapse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuznetsov, E.A.; Juul Rasmussen, J.; Rypdal, K.

    1995-01-01

    Sharper criteria for three-dimensional wave collapse described by the Nonlinear Schrodinger Equation (NLSE) are derived. The collapse threshold corresponds to the ground state soliton which is known to be unstable. Thus, for nonprefocusing distributions this represents the separatrix between...... collapsing and noncollapsing sectors. Numerical results support the theoretical results. Generalizations of the criteria for the NLSE with arbitrary power nonlinearity are also presented....

  19. Marginalization and Collapsibility in Graphical Interaction Models

    OpenAIRE

    Frydenberg, Morten

    1990-01-01

    The behaviour of a graphical interaction model under marginalization is discussed. A graphical interaction model is called collapsible onto a set of variables if the class of marginal distributions is the same as that implied by the related subgraph. The necessary and sufficient condition for collapsibility is found and it is shown that collapsibility is equivalent to a range of other important statistical properties of the model.

  20. Three-Dimensional C-Arm Computed Tomography Combined with Fluoroscopic Guided Pediculoplasty for Treatment of Vertebral Body Metastasis with Lytic Pedicle

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sun, Gang; Jin, Peng; Li, Min; Liu, Xunwei; Li, Fandong; Xie, Zhiyong; Ding, Juan; Peng, Zhaohui

    2012-01-01

    ...) technique, using 3-dimensional C-arm CT reformation combined with fluoroscopic guidance for patients presented vertebral body metastasis with lytic pedicle. Thirteen patients (average age 57.8 years...

  1. Detection of vessel wall calcifications in vertebral arteries using susceptibility weighted imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Lisa C.; Boeker, Sarah M.; Bender, Yvonne Y.; Fallenberg, Eva M.; Wagner, Moritz; Hamm, Bernd; Makowski, Marcus R. [Department of Radiology, Charite, Berlin (Germany); Liebig, Thomas [Department of Neuroradiology, Charite, Berlin (Germany)

    2017-09-15

    Calcification of the brain supplying arteries has been linked to an increased risk for cerebrovascular disease. The purpose of this study was to test the potential of susceptibility weighted MR imaging (SWMR) for the detection of vertebral artery calcifications, based on CT as a reference standard. Four hundred seventy-four patients, who had received head CT and 1.5 T MR scans with SWMR, including the distal vertebral artery, between January 2014 and December 2016, were retrospectively evaluated and 389 patients were included. Sensitivity and specificity for the detection of focal calcifications and intra- and interobserver agreement were calculated for SWMR and standard MRI, using CT as a standard of reference. The diameter of vertebral artery calcifications was used to assess correlations between imaging modalities. Furthermore, the degree of vessel stenosis was determined in 30 patients, who had received an additional angiography. On CT scans, 40 patients showed a total of 52 vertebral artery calcifications. While SWMR reached a sensitivity of 94% (95% CI 84-99%) and a specificity of 97% (95% CI 94-98%), standard MRI yielded a sensitivity of 33% (95% CI 20-46%), and a specificity of 93% (95% CI 90-96%). Linear regression analysis of size measurements confirmed a close correlation between SWMR and CT measurements (R {sup 2} = 0.74, p < 0.001). Compared to standard MRI (ICC = 0.52; CI 0.45-0.59), SWMR showed a higher interobserver agreement for calcification measurements (ICC = 0.84; CI 0.81-0.87). For detection of distal vertebral artery calcifications, SWMR demonstrates a performance comparable to CT and considerably higher than conventional MRI. (orig.)

  2. Vertebral Body Stenting System for the Treatment of Osteoporotic Vertebral Compression Fracture: Follow-up at 12 Months in 20 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muto, M; Greco, B; Setola, F; Vassallo, P; Ambrosanio, G; Guarnieri, G

    2011-08-31

    We describe our preliminary experience with the vertebral body stenting system (VBS) for the treatment of osteoporotic vertebral fracture or traumatic vertebral fracture showing our clinical results at 12 months follow-up. Twenty patients (16 women, four men, mean age 71 years): four with traumatic vertebral fracture (Magerl A1 fractures) and 16 with osteoporotic vertebral compression fracture (VCFs) resistant to conservative therapy, were treated by vertebral body stenting system (VBS) as follows: two at level T11, four at T12, one at L1, two at L2, five at L3 and six at L4. All patients were studied by MR (protocol: sagittal T1W, T2W and T2 STIR) and MDCT with MPR reconstructions. All procedures were performed under local anesthesia with fluoroscopy guidance and a bipeduncular approach. VBS, a new system of implantation of endovertebral stent used as an alternative to conventional vertebroplasty (VP), was implanted in all patients to restore the loss of height in the fractured vertebral body. A clinical and x-ray follow-up was performed at six and 12 months evaluating the result by VAS and ODS scale. New vertebral fractures at a distant level were observed in two cases and treated by VP. VBS was successful and led to an excellent outcome in all patients with clinical improvement stable at six months and one year follow-up. The height in the fractured vertebral body was increased in 12 of the 20 VCFs by an average of 1.5 mm. No vascular, extraforaminal or epidural leakage or other adverse events were observed. In the clinical 12 months follow-up we recorded a reduction of four scores in the VAS evaluation and a 40% reduction in the ODS score compared with the pre-treatment values. Endovertebral stents were stable at 12 months at x-ray control in 19/20 patients. No new vertebral fracture located in adjacent vertebrae were observed at 12 month follow-up. By using a stent, the VBS system reduces the collapsed vertebral body and offers good height restoration. The

  3. Geophysical Processes - MO 2013 Collapse Potential (SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — Collapse potential correlates with locations of underground mines and sinkholes. Computer-generated hazard calculations include areas in close proximity to mines and...

  4. Constructing black hole entropy from gravitational collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Acquaviva, Giovanni; Goswami, Rituparno; Hamid, Aymen I M

    2016-01-01

    Based on a recent proposal for the gravitational entropy of free gravitational fields, we investigate the thermodynamic properties of black hole formation through gravitational collapse in the framework of the semitetrad 1+1+2 covariant formalism. In the simplest case of an Oppenheimer-Snyder-Datt collapse we prove that the change in gravitational entropy outside a collapsing body is related to the variation of the surface area of the body itself, even before the formation of horizons. As a result, we are able to relate the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy of the black hole endstate to the variation of the vacuum gravitational entropy outside the collapsing body.

  5. Constructing black hole entropy from gravitational collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Acquaviva, Giovanni; Goswami, Rituparno; Hamid, Aymen I M

    2014-01-01

    Based on a recent proposal for the gravitational entropy of free gravitational fields, we investigate the thermodynamic properties of black hole formation through gravitational collapse in the framework of the semitetrad 1+1+2 covariant formalism. In the simplest case of an Oppenheimer-Snyder-Datt collapse we prove that the change in gravitational entropy outside a collapsing body is related to the variation of the surface area of the body itself, even before the formation of horizons. As a result, we are able to relate the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy of the black hole endstate to the variation of the vacuum gravitational entropy outside the collapsing body.

  6. Quantum radiation from quantum gravitational collapse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vachaspati, Tanmay [Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); CERCA, Department of Physics, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106-7079 (United States); Stojkovic, Dejan [HEPCOS, Department of Physics, SUNY at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14260-1500 (United States); CERCA, Department of Physics, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106-7079 (United States)], E-mail: ds77@buffalo.edu

    2008-05-15

    We study quantum radiation emitted during the collapse of a quantized, gravitating, spherical domain wall. The amount of radiation emitted during collapse now depends on the wavefunction of the collapsing wall and the background spacetime. If the wavefunction is initially in the form of a sharp wavepacket, the expectation value of the particle occupation number is determined as a function of time and frequency. The results are in good agreement with our earlier semiclassical analysis and show that the quantum radiation is non-thermal and evaporation accompanies gravitational collapse.

  7. Quantum radiation from quantum gravitational collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vachaspati, Tanmay; Stojkovic, Dejan

    2008-05-01

    We study quantum radiation emitted during the collapse of a quantized, gravitating, spherical domain wall. The amount of radiation emitted during collapse now depends on the wavefunction of the collapsing wall and the background spacetime. If the wavefunction is initially in the form of a sharp wavepacket, the expectation value of the particle occupation number is determined as a function of time and frequency. The results are in good agreement with our earlier semiclassical analysis and show that the quantum radiation is non-thermal and evaporation accompanies gravitational collapse.

  8. Collapse of granular media subjected to wetting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Korchi Fatima Zahra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the collapse of granular materials subjected to wetting action. For soils, the collapse potential depends on several parameters such as liquid limit, matric suction, compactness, initial water content and the amount of fine particles. The effect of grain size, which plays a key role in the rearrangement of grains, remains little studied and poorly understood. To investigate the capillary origin of the collapse phenomenon, we present an experimental study on macroscopic and local scales. Our results show the effect of grain size and water content on collapse.

  9. Pregnancy related symptomatic vertebral hemangioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meena Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vertebral hemangiomas are benign vascular tumors of the spine that remain asymptomatic in most cases and incidentally encountered on imaging. Rarely, altered hemodynamic and hormonal changes during pregnancy may expand these benign lesions resulting in severe cord compression. The management of symptomatic vertebral hemangioma during pregnancy is controversial as modalities like radiotherapy and embolization are not suitable and surgery during pregnancy has a risk of preterm labor. Few cases of pregnancy related symptomatic vertebral hemangioma with marked epidural component have been reported in the literature. We report a case of 23-year-old primigravida who developed rapidly progressive paraparesis at 28 weeks of gestation and spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI revealed upper thoracic vertebral hemangioma with extensive extra-osseous extension and spinal cord compression. Laminectomy and surgical decompression of the cord was performed at 32 weeks of the pregnancy. There was significant improvement in muscle power after a week of surgery. Six weeks postoperatively she delivered a full term normal baby with subsequent improvement of neurologic deficit. Repeat MRI of dorsal spine performed at 3 months postoperatively showed reduced posterior and anterior epidural components of vertebral hemangioma.

  10. Balloon kyphoplasty treatment for a spontaneous vertebral fracture in renal osteodystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Demetriades, Andreas; Wong, Fabian; Ellamushi, Habib; Afshar, Fari; Yeh, John

    2011-01-01

    Renal osteodystrophy is a spectrum of musculoskeletal abnormalities. Bony fractures can occur spontaneously or with minor trauma in this condition. The authors report the first case of balloon kyphoplasty treatment for painful renal osteodystrophy vertebral body collapse secondary to end-stage renal failure on dialysis. The authors have demonstrated that kyphoplasty is a safe procedure for pain management in severe dystrophic patients. In addition, pain treatment with kyphoplasty can be achie...

  11. Vertebrate pressure-gradient receivers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    The eardrums of all terrestrial vertebrates (tetrapods) are connected through Eustachian tubes or interaural canals. In some of the animals, these connections create pressure-gradient directionality, an enhanced directionality by interaction of sound arriving at both sides of the eardrum and stro......The eardrums of all terrestrial vertebrates (tetrapods) are connected through Eustachian tubes or interaural canals. In some of the animals, these connections create pressure-gradient directionality, an enhanced directionality by interaction of sound arriving at both sides of the eardrum....... Recent vertebrates form a continuum from perfect interaural transmission (0 dB in a certain frequency band) and pronounced eardrum directionality (30-40 dB) in the lizards, over somewhat attenuated transmission and limited directionality in birds and frogs, to the strongly attenuated interaural...

  12. Computer aided diagnosis for osteoporosis based on vertebral column structure analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Eiji; Kawata, Yoshiki; Niki, Noboru; Nakano, Yasutaka; Harada, Masafumi; Moriyama, Noriyuki

    2012-03-01

    Patients of osteoporosis are comprised of about 11 million people in Japan and it is one of the problems that have gained society. For preventing the osteoporosis, obtaining early detection and treatment are necessary. Multi-slice CT technology has been improving for three dimensional (3D) image analysis, higher body axis resolution and shorter scan time. 3D image analysis using multi-slice CT images of thoracic vertebra can be used for supporting diagnosis of osteoporosis. Simultaneously, this analysis can be used for lung cancer diagnosis which may lead to early detection. We develop automatic extraction and partitioning algorithm for spinal column by analyzing vertebral body structure, and the analysis algorithm of the vertebral body using shape analysis and a bone density measurement for the diagnosis of osteoporosis. An effective result was provided for the case including an insufficient complicated vertebral body bone fracture by the conventional method.

  13. Collapse of a Bose gas: Kinetic approach

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The stability and collapse of the Bose–Einstein condensates with negative scattering lengths have already been observed in the clouds of ultracold 7Li [2] and 85Rb [3] for temperatures (T) close to zero or well below the condensation point (Tc). Soon after the observation, many theories for the collapse have been proposed ...

  14. Gravitational collapse: The story so far

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Then we have the formation of a black hole in the universe as a result of the gravitational collapse. On the other hand, if the formation of event horizon gets delayed sufficiently during the collapse, the result is the development of a naked singularity, or a visible fire ball, which can possibly send out massive radiations to ...

  15. Collapse of Electrostatic Waves in Magnetoplasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shukla, P. K.; Yu, M. Y.; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    1984-01-01

    The two-fluid model is employed to investigate the collapse of electrostatic waves in magnetized plasmas. It is found that nonlinear interaction of ion cyclotron, upper-, and lower-hybrid waves with adiabatic particle motion along the external magnetic field can cause wave-field collapse....

  16. Plastic collapse load of corroded steel plates

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Corroded steel plate; plastic collapse; FEM; rough surface. ... The main aim of present work is to study plastic collapse load of corroded steel plates with irregular surfaces under tension. Non-linear finite element method ... Department of Ocean Engineering, AmirKabir University of Technology, 15914 Tehran, Iran ...

  17. Collapse of UOE manufactured steel pipes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gresnigt, A.M.; Foeken, R.J. van; Chen, S.

    2000-01-01

    The manufacturing method (seamless, UO, UOE) has a con-siderable influence on the collapse pressure of steel pipes. For UOE manufactured pipe, a significant reduction in collapse strength has been observed compared to not expanded pipe. A research program has been carried out to investigate the

  18. The Core-Collapse Supernova Explosion Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Bernhard

    2017-11-01

    The explosion mechanism of core-collapse supernovae is a long-standing problem in stellar astrophysics. We briefly outline the main contenders for a solution and review recent efforts to model core-collapse supernova explosions by means of multi-dimensional simulations. Focusing on the neutrino-driven mechanism, we summarize currents efforts to predict supernova explosion and remnant properties.

  19. The Collapse of the 'Celtic Tiger' Narrative

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Böss, Michael

    2011-01-01

    An account of the factors that led to the collapse of the 'Celtic Tiger' economy in 2008 and an explanation of the political effects and implications for Irish identity.......An account of the factors that led to the collapse of the 'Celtic Tiger' economy in 2008 and an explanation of the political effects and implications for Irish identity....

  20. Predictors of outcomes of percutaneous vertebroplasty for osteoporotic vertebral fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Luis; Pérez-Higueras, Antonio; Granizo, Juan J; de Miguel, Ignacio; Quiñones, Diana; Rossi, Roberto E

    2005-01-01

    Retrospective review of all percutaneous vertebroplasties performed in the authors' institution from November 1994 to June 2002. OBJECTIVE.: To determine the factors affecting the outcome of percutaneous vertebroplasty for the treatment of persistent painful osteoporotic fractures. Percutaneous vertebroplasty is an efficient procedure to treat pain due to osteoporotic vertebral fracture. However, the patient population that is most likely to benefit from this procedure is uncertain, and the inclusion and exclusion criteria for an ideal candidate have varied widely in the literature. A retrospective review of 278 percutaneous vertebroplasty procedures for osteoporotic fractures at 423 levels was performed. Sociodemographic, clinical, radiologic, and procedural data were analyzed as parameters for prognosis significance by univariate and multivariate analysis with logistic regression to estimate the strength of influence of each variable. The presence of two or less symptomatic vertebrae (P < 0.03), the American Society of Anesthesiologists status I (P < 0.001), the presence of signal changes on magnetic resonance imaging (P < 0001), and the collapse of the vertebral body less than 70% (P < 0.001) were assessed as parameters for prognostic significance. Multivariate analysis also showed a significant correlation between the American Society of Anesthesiologists score and height loss of the vertebral body and the final outcome. The presence of signal changes on magnetic resonance imaging showed the highest odds ratio adjusted. Appropriate patient selection is essential for achieving clinical success. Better results can be expected in patients with an American Society of Anesthesiologists score of I and when the level managed is confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging and the vertebral body height loss is less than 70%.

  1. Relative Hypodense Vertebral Artery Sign on Computerized Tomography in Atherosclerotic Near Occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Faraz Raghib

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 52-year-old white male presented with an acute onset of slurred speech along with hypoesthesia in the entire left arm. The acute computed tomography (CT showed relative hypodensity in the intracranial segment of left vertebral artery (VA that was not present in historical images, pointing to the possible lack of flow. The site of occlusion was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI that showed susceptibility effect in the affected artery. By means of historical native CT comparison the site of VA thrombosis was correctly predicted. Local atherosclerotic thrombosis of the VA could be relatively hypodense on native CT and still have positive susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI sign.

  2. Dupla meningocele na coluna vertebral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehrenfried O. Wittig

    1968-03-01

    Full Text Available É relatado caso de dupla meningocele de coluna vertebral, respectivamente nas regiões cervico-torácica e tóraco-lombar, no qual ocorreu hidrocéfalo após pneumoventriculografia. Para a compensação do hidrocéfalo foi feita drenagem ventrículo-peritonial.

  3. MRI and MR angiography of vertebral artery dissection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mascalchi, M. [Cattedra di Radiologia, Universita di Pisa (Italy); Bianchi, M.C. [Servizio di Neuroradiologia, Ospedale S. Chiara, Pisa (Italy); Mangiafico, S. [Servizio di Neuroradiologia, Ospedale di Careggi, Firenze (Italy); Ferrito, G. [Servizio di Neuroradiologia, Ospedali Riuniti, Livorno (Italy); Puglioli, M. [Servizio di Neuroradiologia, Ospedale S. Chiara, Pisa (Italy); Marin, E. [Servizio di Radiologia, Ospedale S. M. Nuova, Firenze (Italy); Mugnai, S. [Clinica Neurologica, Universita di Firenze (Italy); Canapicchi, R. [Servizio di Neuroradiologia, Ospedale S. Chiara, Pisa (Italy); Quilici, N. [Servizio di Neuroradiologia, Ospedali Riuniti, Livorno (Italy); Inzitari, D. [Clinica Neurologica, Universita di Firenze (Italy)

    1997-05-01

    A review of 4,500 angiograms yielded 11 patients with dissection of the vertebral arteries who had MRI and (in 4 patients) MR angiography (MRA) in the acute phase of stroke. One patient with incidental discovery at arteriography of asymptomatic vertebral artery dissection and two patients with acute strokes with MRI and MRA findings consistent with vertebral artery dissection were included. Dissection occurred after neck trauma or chiropractic manipulation in 4 patients and was spontaneous in 10. Dissection involved the extracranial vertebral artery in 9 patients, the extra-intracranial junction in 1, and the intracranial artery in 4. MRI demonstrated infarcts in the brain stem, cerebellum, thalamus or temporo-occipital regions in 7 patients with extra- or extra-intracranial dissections and a solitary lateral medullary infarct in 4 patients (3 with intracranial and 1 with extra-intracranial dissection). In 2 patients no brain abnormality related to vertebral artery dissection was found and in one MRI did not show subarachnoid haemorrhage revealed by CT. Intramural dissecting haematoma appeared as crescentic or rounded high signal on T1-weighted images in 10 patients examined 3-20 days after the onset of symptoms. The abnormal vessel stood out in the low signal cerebrospinal fluid in intracranial dissections, whereas it was more difficult to detect in extracranial dissections because of the intermediate-to-high signal of the normal perivascular structures and slow flow proximal and distal to the dissection. In two patients examined within 36 h of the onset, mural thickening was of intermediate signal intensity on T1-weighted images and high signal on spin-density and T2-weighted images. MRA showed abrupt stenosis in 2 patients and disappearance of flow signal at and distal to the dissection in 5. Follow-up arteriography, MRI or MRA showed findings consistent with occlusion of the dissected vessel in 6 of 8 patients. (orig.). With 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. CT of adult lumbar disc herniations mimicking posterior apophyseal ring fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomori, J.M. (Hadassah Univ. Hospital, Jerusalem (Israel). Dept. of Radiology); Floman, Y.; Liebergall, M. (Hadassah Univ. Hospital, Jerusalem (Israel). Dept. of Orthopedics)

    1991-10-01

    This report concerns 35 adult patients with lumbar or sciatic pain and axial CT findings reportedly associated with posterior apophyseal ring fractures. Review of the CT images suggested two pathophysiologic categories. (1) Posterior Schmorl - A posterior intravertebral disc herniation with posterior displacement of a fractured or remodelled vertebral margin. (2) Calcified subligamentous - Reactive annular and or posterior longitudinal ligament calcification at the periphery of a herniated disc with or without remodelling and anterior displacement of the posterior vertebral margin. (orig.).

  5. Small, Lightweight, Collapsible Glove Box

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Jerry

    2009-01-01

    A small, lightweight, collapsible glove box enables its user to perform small experiments and other tasks. Originally intended for use aboard a space shuttle or the International Space Station (ISS), this glove box could also be attractive for use on Earth in settings in which work space or storage space is severely limited and, possibly, in which it is desirable to minimize weight. The development of this glove box was prompted by the findings that in the original space-shuttle or ISS setting, (1) it was necessary to perform small experiments in a large general-purpose work station, so that, in effect, they occupied excessive space; and it took excessive amounts of time to set up small experiments. The design of the glove box reflects the need to minimize the space occupied by experiments and the time needed to set up experiments, plus the requirement to limit the launch weight of the box and the space needed to store the box during transport into orbit. To prepare the glove box for use, the astronaut or other user has merely to insert hands through the two fabric glove ports in the side walls of the box and move two hinges to a locking vertical position (see figure). The user could do this while seated with the glove box on the user fs lap. When stowed, the glove box is flat and has approximately the thickness of two pieces of 8-in. (.20 cm) polycarbonate.

  6. Symptomatic vertebral hemangiomas during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moles, Alexis; Hamel, Olivier; Perret, Christophe; Bord, Eric; Robert, Roger; Buffenoir, Kevin

    2014-05-01

    Symptomatic vertebral hemangiomas during pregnancy are rare, as only 27 cases have been reported in the literature since 1948. However, symptomatic vertebral hemangiomas can be responsible for spinal cord compression, in which case they constitute a medical emergency, which raises management difficulties in the context of pregnancy. Pregnancy is a known factor responsible for deterioration of these vascular tumors. In this paper, the authors report 2 clinical cases of symptomatic vertebral hemangiomas during pregnancy, including 1 case of spontaneous fracture that has never been previously reported in the literature. The authors then present a brief review of the literature to discuss emergency management of this condition. The first case was a 28-year-old woman at 35 weeks of gestation, who presented with paraparesis. Spinal cord MRI demonstrated a vertebral hemangioma invading the body and posterior arch of T-3 with posterior epidural extension. Laminectomy and vertebroplasty were performed after cesarean section, allowing neurological recovery. The second case involved a 35-year-old woman who presented with spontaneous fracture of T-7 at 36 weeks of gestation, revealing a vertebral hemangioma with no neurological deficit, but it was responsible for pain and local instability. Treatment consisted of postpartum posterior interbody fusion. With a clinical and radiological follow-up of 2 years, no complications and no modification of the hemangiomas were observed. A review of the literature reveals discordant management of these rare cases, which is why the treatment course must be decided by a multidisciplinary team as a function of fetal gestational age and maternal neurological features.

  7. The measurement of the normal thorax using the Haller index methodology at multiple vertebral levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, James E; Gardner, Adrian; Berryman, Fiona; Pynsent, Paul

    2016-10-01

    The Haller index is a ratio of thoracic width and height, measured from an axial CT image and used to describe the internal dimensions of the thoracic cage. Although the Haller index for a normal thorax has been established (Haller et al. 1987; Daunt et al. 2004), this is only at one undefined vertebral level in the thorax. What is not clear is how the Haller index describes the thorax at every vertebral level in the absence of sternal deformity, or how this is affected by age. This paper documents the shape of the thorax using the Haller index calculated from the thoracic width and height at all vertebral levels of the thorax between 8 and 18 years of age. The Haller Index changes with vertebral level, with the largest ratio seen in the most cranial levels of the thorax. Increasing age alters the shape of the thorax, with the most cranial vertebral levels having a greater Haller index over the mid thorax, which does not change. A slight increase is seen in the more caudal vertebral levels. These data highlight that a 'one size fits all' rule for chest width and depth ratio at all ages and all thoracic levels is not appropriate. The normal range for width to height ratio should be based on a patient's age and vertebral level. © 2016 Anatomical Society.

  8. [Computer tomographic densitometry of the normal vertebral body spongiosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robotti, G C; Fritschy, P; Triller, J

    1983-09-01

    The absorption values of cancellous bone of the third lumbar vertebral body were measured in 80 patients by CT. It was possible to demonstrate a statistically significant linear correlation between absorption values and patient age. The older the patient, the lower the average absorption values of cancellous bone. The average absorption values in patients between 20 and 30 Jrs. were found to be about 200 HU, between 30 and 50 Jrs. 180, between 60 and 70 Jrs. 120 and between 70 and 80 Jrs. 100 HU. Although correlation between calcium salt content and absorption of bone under CT are well known, there are other factors (mainly fatty involution of bone marrow) who influences the absorption behaviour of cancellous bone.

  9. Percutanous vertebroplasty for vertebral compression fracture in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ; a report of two cases. ... Background: Osteoporotic vertebral fractures are common in the geriatric age group. ... Conclusion: Percutanous vertebroplasty offers effective, immediate and sustained pain relief in osteoporotic vertebral fractures.

  10. Primary Ewing's sarcoma of the vertebral column

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilaslan, Hakan; Sundaram, Murali [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Ch2-290 200 First Street, SW, Rochester, 55905, MN (United States); Unni, K.Krishnan [Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street, SW, 55905, Rochester, MN (United States); Dekutoski, Mark B. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street, SW, 55905, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2004-09-01

    To determine the demographics, imaging findings, clinical symptoms, and prognosis of primary vertebral Ewing's sarcoma (PVES). A retrospective review of medical records and radiological studies of patients diagnosed with PVES from 1936 through 2001 in our institution and Department of Pathology consultation files was undertaken. Metastatic and soft tissue Ewing's sarcoma cases were excluded. From a total of 1,277 cases of Ewing's sarcoma, 125 (9.8%) had a primary vertebral origin. There were 48 females and 76 males. Patient ages ranged from 4 to 54 (mean 19.3, standard deviation 10.7, median 16) years. Vertebral column distribution was four cervical (3.2%), 13 thoracic (10.5%), 31 lumbar (25%), and 67 sacrum (53.2%). More than one vertebral segment was involved in ten cases (8%). Satisfactory imaging studies were available in 51 patients: 49 radiographs, 27 computerized tomography (CT), and 23 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies. The majority of tumors were lytic (93%). Three cases were mixed lytic and sclerotic (6%) and one sclerotic. In the nonsacral spine, the majority of lesions (12/20) involved the posterior elements with extension into the vertebral body. Five cases were centered in the vertebral body with extension into the posterior elements. Two cases were limited to the posterior elements, and one case solely involved the vertebral body. Ala was the most frequently affected site in the sacrum (18/26). Spinal canal invasion was frequent (91%). Detailed clinical information was available in 53 patients. Duration of symptoms ranged from 1 to 30 (mean 7) months. Local pain was the first symptom and seen in all cases. Neurological deficits were present in 21 (40%) cases. All patients received radiation in various dosages; 70% additionally received chemotherapy. Twenty-five patients had surgery, and two patients received bone marrow transplantation. Forty-five patients had follow-up; the five-year disease-free survival probability is 0

  11. X-ray computed tomography datasets for forensic analysis of vertebrate fossils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Timothy B; Luo, Zhe-Xi; Ketcham, Richard A; Maisano, Jessica A; Colbert, Matthew W

    2016-06-07

    We describe X-ray computed tomography (CT) datasets from three specimens recovered from Early Cretaceous lakebeds of China that illustrate the forensic interpretation of CT imagery for paleontology. Fossil vertebrates from thinly bedded sediments often shatter upon discovery and are commonly repaired as amalgamated mosaics grouted to a solid backing slab of rock or plaster. Such methods are prone to inadvertent error and willful forgery, and once required potentially destructive methods to identify mistakes in reconstruction. CT is an efficient, nondestructive alternative that can disclose many clues about how a specimen was handled and repaired. These annotated datasets illustrate the power of CT in documenting specimen integrity and are intended as a reference in applying CT more broadly to evaluating the authenticity of comparable fossils.

  12. An invertebrate stomach's view on vertebrate ecology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calvignac-Spencer, Sébastien; Leendertz, Fabian H.; Gilbert, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that vertebrate genetic material ingested by invertebrates (iDNA) can be used to investigate vertebrate ecology. Given the ubiquity of invertebrates that feed on vertebrates across the globe, iDNA might qualify as a very powerful tool for 21st century population...

  13. Height restoration of osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures using different intravertebral reduction devices: a cadaveric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Antonio; Oberkircher, Ludwig; Figiel, Jens; Floßdorf, Felix; Bolzinger, Florent; Noriega, David C; Ruchholtz, Steffen

    2015-05-01

    The treatment of osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures using transpedicular cement augmentation has grown significantly during the past two decades. Balloon kyphoplasty was developed to restore vertebral height and improve sagittal alignment. Several studies have shown these theoretical improvements cannot be transferred universally to the clinical setting. The aim of the current study is to evaluate two different procedures used for percutaneous augmentation of vertebral compression fractures with respect to height restoration: balloon kyphoplasty and SpineJack. Twenty-four vertebral bodies of two intact, fresh human cadaveric spines (T6-L5; donor age, 70 years and 60 years; T-score -6.8 points and -6.3 points) were scanned using computed tomography (CT) and dissected into single vertebral bodies. Vertebral wedge compression fractures were created by a material testing machine (Universal testing machine, Instron 5566, Darmstadt, Germany). The axial load was increased continuously until the height of the anterior edge of the vertebral body was reduced by 40% of the initial measured values. After 15 minutes, the load was decreased manually to 100 N. After postfracture CT, the clamped vertebral bodies were placed in a custom-made loading frame with a preload of 100 N. Twelve vertebral bodies were treated using SpineJack (SJ; Vexim, Balma, France), the 12 remaining vertebral bodies were treated with balloon kyphoplasty (BKP; Kyphon, Medtronic, Sunnyvale, CA, USA). The load was maintained during the procedure until the cement set completely. Posttreatment CT was performed. Anterior, central, and posterior height as well as the Beck index were measured prefracture and postfracture as well as after treatment. For anterior height restoration (BKP, 0.14±1.48 mm; SJ, 3.34±1.19 mm), central height restoration (BKP, 0.91±1.04 mm; SJ, 3.24±1.22 mm), and posterior restoration (BKP, 0.37±0.57 mm; SJ, 1.26±1.05), as well as the Beck index (BKP, 0.00±0.06 mm; SJ, 0

  14. Zygotic Genome Activation in Vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jukam, David; Shariati, S Ali M; Skotheim, Jan M

    2017-08-21

    The first major developmental transition in vertebrate embryos is the maternal-to-zygotic transition (MZT) when maternal mRNAs are degraded and zygotic transcription begins. During the MZT, the embryo takes charge of gene expression to control cell differentiation and further development. This spectacular organismal transition requires nuclear reprogramming and the initiation of RNAPII at thousands of promoters. Zygotic genome activation (ZGA) is mechanistically coordinated with other embryonic events, including changes in the cell cycle, chromatin state, and nuclear-to-cytoplasmic component ratios. Here, we review progress in understanding vertebrate ZGA dynamics in frogs, fish, mice, and humans to explore differences and emphasize common features. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Collapsed Lung: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spanish Pneumothorax - infants (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Collapsed Lung updates ... Lung surgery Pneumothorax - slideshow Pneumothorax - infants Related Health Topics Chest Injuries and Disorders Lung Diseases Pleural Disorders ...

  16. Cooperation, cheating, and collapse in biological populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gore, Jeff

    2014-03-01

    Natural populations can collapse suddenly in response to small changes in environmental conditions, and recovery from such a collapse can be difficult. We have used laboratory microbial ecosystems to directly measure theoretically proposed early warning signals of impending population collapse. Yeast cooperatively break down the sugar sucrose, meaning that below a critical size the population cannot sustain itself. We have demonstrated experimentally that changes in the fluctuations of the population size can serve as an early warning signal that the population is close to collapse. The cooperative nature of yeast growth on sucrose suggests that the population may be susceptible to ``cheater'' cells, which do not contribute to the public good and instead merely take advantage of the cooperative cells. We confirm this possibility experimentally and find that such social parasitism decreases the resilience of the population.

  17. Simple Analytic Models of Gravitational Collapse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adler, R.

    2005-02-09

    Most general relativity textbooks devote considerable space to the simplest example of a black hole containing a singularity, the Schwarzschild geometry. However only a few discuss the dynamical process of gravitational collapse, by which black holes and singularities form. We present here two types of analytic models for this process, which we believe are the simplest available; the first involves collapsing spherical shells of light, analyzed mainly in Eddington-Finkelstein coordinates; the second involves collapsing spheres filled with a perfect fluid, analyzed mainly in Painleve-Gullstrand coordinates. Our main goal is pedagogical simplicity and algebraic completeness, but we also present some results that we believe are new, such as the collapse of a light shell in Kruskal-Szekeres coordinates.

  18. Vertebral development and amphibian evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, R L; Kuntz, A; Albright, K

    1999-01-01

    Amphibians provide an unparalleled opportunity to integrate studies of development and evolution through the investigation of the fossil record of larval stages. The pattern of vertebral development in modern frogs strongly resembles that of Paleozoic labyrinthodonts in the great delay in the ossification of the vertebrae, with the centra forming much later than the neural arches. Slow ossification of the trunk vertebrae in frogs and the absence of ossification in the tail facilitate the rapid loss of the tail during metamorphosis, and may reflect retention of the pattern in their specific Paleozoic ancestors. Salamanders and caecilians ossify their centra at a much earlier stage than frogs, which resembles the condition in Paleozoic lepospondyls. The clearly distinct patterns and rates of vertebral development may indicate phylogenetic separation between the ultimate ancestors of frogs and those of salamanders and caecilians within the early radiation of ancestral tetrapods. This divergence may date from the Lower Carboniferous. Comparison with the molecular regulation of vertebral development described in modern mammals and birds suggests that the rapid chondrification of the centra in salamanders relative to that of frogs may result from the earlier migration of sclerotomal cells expressing Pax1 to the area surrounding the notochord.

  19. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Sinuses Computed tomography (CT) of the sinuses ... of CT of the Sinuses? What is CT (Computed Tomography) of the Sinuses? Computed tomography, more commonly known ...

  20. Body CT (CAT Scan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Body Computed tomography (CT) of the body uses special ... the Body? What is CT Scanning of the Body? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT ...

  1. Computed Tomography (CT) - Spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Spine Computed tomography (CT) of the spine is a ... the Spine? What is CT Scanning of the Spine? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT ...

  2. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Abdomen and Pelvis Computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen and pelvis ... Pelvis? What is CT Scanning of the Abdomen/Pelvis? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT ...

  3. Detailed Jet Dynamics in a Collapsing Bubble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supponen, Outi; Obreschkow, Danail; Kobel, Philippe; Farhat, Mohamed

    2015-12-01

    We present detailed visualizations of the micro-jet forming inside an aspherically collapsing cavitation bubble near a free surface. The high-quality visualizations of large and strongly deformed bubbles disclose so far unseen features of the dynamics inside the bubble, such as a mushroom-like flattened jet-tip, crown formation and micro-droplets. We also find that jetting near a free surface reduces the collapse time relative to the Rayleigh time.

  4. Anti-de Sitter gravitational collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Husain, V; Preston, B; Birukou, M

    2003-01-01

    We describe a formalism for studying spherically symmetric collapse of the massless scalar field in any spacetime dimension, and for any value of the cosmological constant LAMBDA. The formalism is used for numerical simulations of gravitational collapse in four spacetime dimensions with negative LAMBDA. We observe critical behaviour at the onset of black-hole formation, and find that the critical exponent is independent of LAMBDA. (letter to the editor)

  5. Lobar collapse with respiratory syncytial virus pneumonitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinn, S.F.; Erickson, S.; Oshman, D.; Hayden, F.

    1985-05-01

    In a study of 30 children with uncomplicated respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) pneumonias, a high incidence of lobar collapse (8/30-26%) was noted. This involved the right upper lobe in seven patients and the left upper lobe in one patient. It is probably attributable to anatomical predispositions, sloughing of necrotic epithelium, and stimulation of mucus production. Lobar collapse should be considered part of the spectrum of RSV pneumonitis.

  6. Radiological classification of retroperitoneal hematoma resulting from lumbar vertebral fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Shota; Ishikawa, Kazuo; Ono, Hidefumi; Kusakabe, Kenji; Fujimura, Ichiro; Ueno, Masato; Idoguchi, Koji; Mizushima, Yasuaki; Matsuoka, Tetsuya

    2018-01-24

    Lumbar vertebral fracture (LVF) infrequently produces massive retroperitoneal hematoma (RPH). This study aimed to systematically review the clinical and radiographic characteristics of RPH resulting from LVF. For 193 consecutive patients having LVF who underwent computed tomography (CT), demographic data, physiological conditions, and outcomes were reviewed from their medical records. Presence or absence of RPH, other bone fractures, or organ/vessel injury was evaluated in their CT images, and LVF or RPH, if present, was classified according to either the Orthopaedic Trauma Association classification or the concept of interfascial planes. RPH resulting only or dominantly from LVF was found in 66 (34.2%) patients, whereas among the others, 64 (33.2%) had no RPH, 38 (19.7%) had RPH from other injuries, and 25 (13.0%) had RPH partly attributable to LVF. The 66 RPHs resulting only or dominantly from LVF were radiologically classified into mild subtype of minor median (n = 35), moderate subtype of lateral (n = 11), and severe subtypes of central pushing-up (n = 13) and combined (n = 7). Of the 20 patients with severe subtypes, 18 (90.0%) were in hemorrhagic shock on admission, and 6 (30.0%) were clinically diagnosed as dying due to uncontrollable RPH resulting from vertebral body fractures despite no anticoagulant medication. LVF can directly produce massive RPH leading to hemorrhagic death. A major survey of such pathology should be conducted to establish appropriate diagnosis and treatment.

  7. Progressive non-infectious anterior vertebral fusion, split cord malformation and situs inversus visceralis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grill Franz

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Progressive non-infectious anterior vertebral fusion is a unique spinal disorder with distinctive radiological features. Early radiographic findings consist of narrowing of the anterior aspect of the intervertebral disk with adjacent end plate erosions. There is a specific pattern of progression. The management needs a multi-disciplinary approach with major input from the orthopaedic surgeon. Case report We report a 12-year-old-female with progressive anterior vertebral fusion. This occurred at three vertebral levels. In the cervical spine there was progressive fusion of the lateral masses of the Axis with C3. Secondly, at the cervico-thoracic level, a severe, progressive, anterior thoracic vertebral fusion (C7-T5 and (T6-T7 resulted in the development of a thick anterior bony ridge and massive sclerosis and thirdly; progressive anterior fusion at L5-S1. Whereas at the level of the upper lumbar spines (L1 a split cord malformation was encountered. Situs inversus visceralis was an additional malformation. The role of the CT scan in detecting the details of the vertebral malformations was important. To our knowledge, neither this malformation complex and nor the role of the CT scan in evaluating these patients, have previously been described. Conclusion The constellations of the skeletal abnormalities in our patient do not resemble any previously reported conditions with progressive anterior vertebral fusion. We also emphasise the important role of computerized tomography in the investigation of these patients in order to improve our understanding of the underlying pathology, and to comprehend the various stages of the progressive fusion process. 3D-CT scan was performed to improve assessment of the spinal changes and to further evaluate the catastrophic complications if fracture of the ankylosed vertebrae does occur. We believe that prompt management cannot be accomplished, unless the nature of these bony malformations is

  8. A systematic review of evidence on malignant spinal metastases: natural history and technologies for identifying patients at high risk of vertebral fracture and spinal cord compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutcliffe, P; Connock, M; Shyangdan, D; Court, R; Kandala, N-B; Clarke, A

    2013-09-01

    articles were identified, of which 31 met the inclusion criteria. No study examined natural history alone. Seventeen studies reported retrospective data, 10 were prospective studies, and three were other study designs. There was one systematic review. There were no randomised controlled trials (RCTs). Approximately 5782 participants were included. Sample sizes ranged from 41 to 859. The age of participants ranged between 7 and 92 years. Types of cancers reported on were lung alone (n= 3), prostate alone (n= 6), breast alone (n= 7), mixed cancers (n= 13) and unclear (n= 1). A total of 93 prognostic factors were identified as potentially significant in predicting risk of SCC or collapse. Overall findings indicated that the more spinal metastases present and the longer a patient was at risk, the greater the reported likelihood of development of SCC and collapse. There was an increased risk of developing SCC if a cancer had already spread to the bones. In the prostate cancer studies, tumour grade, metastatic load and time on hormone therapy were associated with increased risk of SCC. In one study, risk of SCC before death was 24%, and 2.37 times greater with a Gleason score ≥ 7 than with a score of bone lesions were at greater risk of SCC than those with fewer than six lesions [odds ratio (OR) 2.9, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.012 to 8.35, p= 0.047]. For breast cancer patients who received a computerised tomography (CT) scan for suspected SCC, multiple logistic regression in one study identified four independent variables predictive of a positive test: bone metastases ≥ 2 years (OR 3.0 95% CI 1.2 to 7.6; p= 0.02); metastatic disease at initial diagnosis (OR 3.4, 95% CI 1.0 to 11.4; p= 0.05); objective weakness (OR 3.8, 95% CI 1.5 to 9.5; p= 0.005); and vertebral compression fracture on spine radiograph (OR 2.6, 95% CI 1.0 to 6.5; p= 0.05). A further study on mixed cancers, among patients who received surgery for SCC, reported that vertebral body compression fractures

  9. Fracture of posterior margin of lumbar vertebral body

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnan Ajay

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Avulsion or fracture of posterior ring apophysis of lumbar vertebra is not a common clinical entity and is missed often. These fractures are mostly traumatic lesions typically seen in adolescents and young adults, because fusion in this area is not complete until the age of 18 to 25 years. These fractures are occult on plain radiographs and are frequently missed due to unfamiliarity with the entity. But, CT scanning and MR imaging shows characteristic picture. Methods: We had 21 cases of fracture of posterior margin of a lumbar vertebral body from 1991 to 2002. Fracture in all patients were classified according to CT imaging, into the three types described by Takata et al. Out of these, 8 patients were of type I, 4 patients of type II and 9 patients of type III respectively. Focal deficit / muscle weakness was present in only three patients. No fractures of type IV (Epstein et al was found. Twelve patients were treated conservatively and 9 patients were treated by posterior decompression with total laminectomy and removal of retropulsed fragment and discectomy. Results: The mean follow-up period was of 42 months. Conventional radiography could locate the fracture in only 6 cases and CT scan was required in all cases for stamping the diagnosis and classification. Though it is uncommon, high index of suspicion is required to diagnose it, in especially adolescent patients. All the 21 patients had good outcome following the management. Conclusion: Avulsion or fracture of posterior margin of lumbar vertebral body is not so rare entity. In children and young adults diagnosed as having lumbar disc herniation, this lesion may be the proper diagnosis. These fractures need to be accurately diagnosed because as compared to simple disc herniations these fractures require more extensive exposure and resection to relieve the nerve impingent.

  10. Osteomielitis vertebral piógena Pyogenic vertebral osteomyelitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro P. Perrotti

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available La osteomielitis vertebral piógena (OVP es una localización poco frecuente (2-7% Se confirma con el aislamiento de un microorganismo de una vértebra, disco intervertebral, absceso epidural o paravertebral. Se describe una serie de casos por la infrecuente presentación de esta enfermedad, que puede ser consulta inicial en los servicios de clínica médica y por su sintomatología inespecífica que supone una dificultad diagnóstica. Tanto la columna lumbar como la dorsal fueron los sitios más afectados. El dolor dorsolumbar y la paraparesia fueron los síntomas más frecuentes de presentación. En ocho pacientes se aislaron Staphylococcus aureus, en uno Escherichia coli y en el restante Haemophylus sp. Se observó leucocitosis sólo en tres pacientes, y en dos velocidad de sedimentación globular mayor de 100 mm/h. Los diez pacientes presentaron imágenes características de osteomielitis vertebral piógena en la resonancia nuclear magnética. Dentro de las complicaciones, los abscesos paravertebrales y epidurales fueron los más frecuentes (en cinco enfermos. Además, un paciente presentó empiema pleural. De los diez pacientes de esta serie, siete recibieron inicialmente tratamiento médico empírico y luego específico para el germen aislado. En los restantes el tratamiento fue guiado de acuerdo al antibiograma. A dos enfermos fue necesario realizarles laminectomía descompresiva por compromiso de partes blandas y a otros dos estabilización quirúrgica por inestabilidad espinal, observándose buena evolución en todos los casos. Esta serie demuestra que, ante un paciente con dolor dorsolumbar y síntomas neurológicos se deberá tener en cuenta esta entidad para evitar un retraso en el tratamiento.Pyogenic osteomyelitis seldom affects the spine (2-7%. It is diagnosed by the isolation of a bacterial agent in the vertebral body, the intervertebral disks or from paravertebral or epidural abscesses. We report a retrospective study of ten

  11. Fishing amplifies forage fish population collapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essington, Timothy E; Moriarty, Pamela E; Froehlich, Halley E; Hodgson, Emma E; Koehn, Laura E; Oken, Kiva L; Siple, Margaret C; Stawitz, Christine C

    2015-05-26

    Forage fish support the largest fisheries in the world but also play key roles in marine food webs by transferring energy from plankton to upper trophic-level predators, such as large fish, seabirds, and marine mammals. Fishing can, thereby, have far reaching consequences on marine food webs unless safeguards are in place to avoid depleting forage fish to dangerously low levels, where dependent predators are most vulnerable. However, disentangling the contributions of fishing vs. natural processes on population dynamics has been difficult because of the sensitivity of these stocks to environmental conditions. Here, we overcome this difficulty by collating population time series for forage fish populations that account for nearly two-thirds of global catch of forage fish to identify the fingerprint of fisheries on their population dynamics. Forage fish population collapses shared a set of common and unique characteristics: high fishing pressure for several years before collapse, a sharp drop in natural population productivity, and a lagged response to reduce fishing pressure. Lagged response to natural productivity declines can sharply amplify the magnitude of naturally occurring population fluctuations. Finally, we show that the magnitude and frequency of collapses are greater than expected from natural productivity characteristics and therefore, likely attributed to fishing. The durations of collapses, however, were not different from those expected based on natural productivity shifts. A risk-based management scheme that reduces fishing when populations become scarce would protect forage fish and their predators from collapse with little effect on long-term average catches.

  12. Laryngeal collapse in seven brachycephalic puppies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pink, J J; Doyle, R S; Hughes, J M L; Tobin, E; Bellenger, C R

    2006-03-01

    To document the histories, clinical findings, and management of seven puppies with laryngeal collapse occurring secondarily to brachycephalic airway syndrome. Seven brachycephalic puppies aged between 4.5 and six months underwent surgery for management of brachycephalic airway syndrome following presentation for exercise intolerance and increased respiratory noise and effort. Stenotic nares of varying severity and an elongated soft palate were common to all dogs. All dogs had tracheal hypoplasia and this was severe in four dogs. Laryngeal collapse was present in all dogs. Two dogs had stage I, four dogs stage II, and one dog stage III laryngeal collapse. The dog with stage III laryngeal collapse and one dog with stage II laryngeal collapse died. There was no apparent association between the changes evident on thoracic radiographs or the degree of tracheal hypoplasia and postoperative outcome. The development of severe secondary laryngeal changes in dogs aged six months or less supports the suggestion that immature brachycephalic dogs should undergo assessment and, if indicated, surgery as soon as any clinical signs of BAS are apparent.

  13. Simulations of protostellar collapse using multigroup radiation hydrodynamics. II. The second collapse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaytet, N.; Chabrier, G.; Audit, E.

    2013-01-01

    Star formation begins with the gravitational collapse of a dense core inside a molecular cloud. As the collapse progresses, the centre of the core begins to heat up as it becomes optically thick. The temperature and density in the centre eventually reach high enough values where fusion reactions...... and dust opacities present large variations as a function of frequency. In this paper, we follow-up on a previous paper on the collapse and formation of Larson's first core using multigroup radiation hydrodynamics (Paper I) by extending the calculations to the second phase of the collapse and the formation...... of Larson's second core. We have made the use of a non-ideal gas equation of state as well as an extensive set of spectral opacities in a spherically symmetric fully implicit Godunov code to model all the phases of the collapse of a 0.1, 1 and 10 solar mass cloud cores. We find that, for a same central...

  14. Progressive Collapse of High-Rise Buildings from Fire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pershakov Valerii

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Considers ensuring the stability of structures of high-rise buildings against progressive collapse due to fire, proposed measures to ensure the stability of high-rise buildings due to progressive collapse. The analysis of large fires in high-rise buildings with progressive collapse and review of the literature on the issue of progressive collapse. The analysis of the Ukrainian normative documents on progressive collapse resistance.

  15. CIRSE Guidelines on Percutaneous Vertebral Augmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsoumakidou, Georgia, E-mail: gtsoumakidou@yahoo.com; Too, Chow Wei, E-mail: spyder55@gmail.com; Koch, Guillaume, E-mail: guillaume.koch@gmail.com; Caudrelier, Jean, E-mail: jean.caudrelier@chru-strasbourg.fr; Cazzato, Roberto Luigi, E-mail: gigicazzato@hotmail.it; Garnon, Julien, E-mail: juliengarnon@gmail.com; Gangi, Afshin, E-mail: gangi@unistra.fr [Strasbourg University Hospital, Interventional Radiology Department (France)

    2017-03-15

    Vertebral compression fracture (VCF) is an important cause of severe debilitating back pain, adversely affecting quality of life, physical function, psychosocial performance, mental health and survival. Different vertebral augmentation procedures (VAPs) are used in order to consolidate the VCFs, relief pain,and whenever posible achieve vertebral body height restoration. In the present review we give the indications, contraindications, safety profile and outcomes of the existing percutaneous VAPs.

  16. Evolutionary Specialization of Tactile Perception in Vertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Eve R.

    2016-01-01

    Evolution has endowed vertebrates with the remarkable tactile ability to explore the world through the perception of physical force. Yet the sense of touch remains one of the least well understood senses at the cellular and molecular level. Vertebrates specializing in tactile perception can highlight general principles of mechanotransduction. Here, we review cellular and molecular adaptations that underlie the sense of touch in typical and acutely mechanosensitive vertebrates. PMID:27053733

  17. Evolutionary Specialization of Tactile Perception in Vertebrates

    OpenAIRE

    Schneider, Eve R.; Gracheva, Elena O.; Bagriantsev, Slav N.

    2016-01-01

    Evolution has endowed vertebrates with the remarkable tactile ability to explore the world through the perception of physical force. Yet the sense of touch remains one of the least well understood senses at the cellular and molecular level. Vertebrates specializing in tactile perception can highlight general principles of mechanotransduction. Here, we review cellular and molecular adaptations that underlie the sense of touch in typical and acutely mechanosensitive vertebrates.

  18. Vertebral wedging characteristic changes in scoliotic spines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parent, Stefan; Labelle, Hubert; Skalli, Wafa; de Guise, Jacques

    2004-10-15

    A morphometric analysis of vertebral wedging in vertebrae from scoliotic specimens. To quantify the vertebral body changes in 30 anatomic specimens affected by a scoliotic deformity. Only a few studies have evaluated the exact changes occurring at the level of the vertebral body in scoliotic spines. Most are observational studies of rare scoliotic specimens presenting major curvatures. The orientation of vertebral wedging is important for the planning of corrective surgery, performing vertebral osteotomy, and the evaluation of possible growth modulation. Thirty scoliotic specimens with curves presenting various degrees of severity were studied using a three-dimensional digitizing protocol developed to create a precise three-dimensional reconstruction of the vertebrae. Every scoliotic specimen was then matched with a normal specimen, and comparisons were made on the vertebral body parameters both for thoracic and lumbar vertebrae. Analysis of variance and t test calculations were performed to identify significant differences with P = 0.05. A total of 471 vertebrae from scoliotic spines and 510 vertebrae from normal specimens were measured. Vertebral wedging increased progressively towards the apex of the curve and was maximal at the apex. Vertebral wedging was more prominent in the frontal plane, and there was minimal wedging in the sagittal plane. Vertebral heights were significantly different at T3 and T4 for the upper adjacent curve and at T6-T8 for a typical right thoracic curve, with smaller heights located on the concavity of the curve. No changes were observed on the convexity of the curve. Vertebral wedging is an essential component of the scoliotic deformity. The present study provides critical information for corrective surgery and vertebral osteotomy, as vertebral wedging occurs primarily in the frontal plane. Accurate knowledge of this deformity should also provide new insight into corrective surgical strategies aiming at growth modulation and more

  19. Uncertainties in Core Collapse Supernovae Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggan, Jefferson; Cunningham, J.; Kuhlmann, S.; Biswas, R.; Kovacs, E.; Spinka, H.

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of a study of selection criteria to identify Type Ia supernovae photometrically in a simulated mixed sample of Type Ia supernovae and core collapse supernovae. The simulated sample is a mockup of the expected results of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) using the supernovae simulation and fitting package of SNANA [Kessler et al. arXiv:0908.4280]. This is an extension of a previous analysis, [Gjergo et al. arXiv:1205.1480], with updated core collapse templates that are used to simulate the supernovae. We have also studied how systematic variations in the input parameters of the core collapse supernovae, such as absolute brightness and brightness smearing, affect the measured purity of the Type Ia supernova sample.

  20. Inflationary gravitational waves in collapse scheme models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Mariani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The inflationary paradigm is an important cornerstone of the concordance cosmological model. However, standard inflation cannot fully address the transition from an early homogeneous and isotropic stage, to another one lacking such symmetries corresponding to our present universe. In previous works, a self-induced collapse of the wave function has been suggested as the missing ingredient of inflation. Most of the analysis regarding the collapse hypothesis has been solely focused on the characteristics of the spectrum associated to scalar perturbations, and within a semiclassical gravity framework. In this Letter, working in terms of a joint metric-matter quantization for inflation, we calculate, for the first time, the tensor power spectrum and the tensor-to-scalar ratio corresponding to the amplitude of primordial gravitational waves resulting from considering a generic self-induced collapse.

  1. Anterior chamber collapse syndrome in a koala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddle, Vl; Naranjo, C; Bernays, Me

    2014-05-01

    Anterior chamber collapse syndrome has been recognised in various species and is associated with early-life ocular disease or trauma. It is important to differentiate this acquired condition from a congenital malformation. An adult female koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) was referred for assessment of buphthalmos and severe keratitis of the right eye. The degree of keratitis obstructed examination of intraocular structures. Enucleation of the affected eye was performed and the histopathological diagnosis was anterior chamber collapse syndrome and secondary glaucoma. This case contributes to the limited information available in the literature on anterior chamber collapse syndrome, a disease unique in having secondary glaucoma with minimal or no inflammation. The case also expands the literature available on ocular disease in koalas. More specifically, this is the only reported case of glaucoma, of any aetiology, in the koala. © 2014 Australian Veterinary Association.

  2. Inflationary gravitational waves in collapse scheme models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariani, Mauro, E-mail: mariani@carina.fcaglp.unlp.edu.ar [Facultad de Ciencias Astronómicas y Geofísicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Paseo del Bosque S/N, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Bengochea, Gabriel R., E-mail: gabriel@iafe.uba.ar [Instituto de Astronomía y Física del Espacio (IAFE), UBA-CONICET, CC 67, Suc. 28, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); León, Gabriel, E-mail: gleon@df.uba.ar [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria – Pab. I, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2016-01-10

    The inflationary paradigm is an important cornerstone of the concordance cosmological model. However, standard inflation cannot fully address the transition from an early homogeneous and isotropic stage, to another one lacking such symmetries corresponding to our present universe. In previous works, a self-induced collapse of the wave function has been suggested as the missing ingredient of inflation. Most of the analysis regarding the collapse hypothesis has been solely focused on the characteristics of the spectrum associated to scalar perturbations, and within a semiclassical gravity framework. In this Letter, working in terms of a joint metric-matter quantization for inflation, we calculate, for the first time, the tensor power spectrum and the tensor-to-scalar ratio corresponding to the amplitude of primordial gravitational waves resulting from considering a generic self-induced collapse.

  3. A pictorial classification atlas of cement extravasation with vertebral augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lador, Ran; Dreiangel, Niv; Ben-Galim, Peleg J; Hipp, John A

    2010-12-01

    Minimally invasive procedures for the treatment of vertebral compression fractures (VCFs) have been in use since the mid-1980s. A mixture of liquid monomer and powder is introduced through a needle into one or both pedicles, and it polymerizes within the vertebral body in an exothermic chemical reaction. The interaction between cement and the fractured vertebral body determines whether and how the cement stabilizes the fragments, alters morphology, and extravasates. The cement is intended to remain within the vertebral body. However, some studies have reported cement leakage in more than 80% of the procedures. Although cement leakage can have no or minimal clinical consequences, adverse events, such as paraplegia, spinal cord and nerve root compression, cement pulmonary embolisms, or death, can occur. The details of how the cement infiltrates a vertebral body or extravasates out of the body are poorly understood and may help to identify strategies to reduce complications and improve clinical efficacy. Apply novel techniques to demonstrate the cement spread inside vertebrae as well as the points and pattern of cement extravastation. Ex vivo assessment of vertebral augmentation procedures. Vertebrae from six fresh whole human cadaver spines were used to create 24 specimens of three vertebrae each. The specimens were placed in a pneumatic testing system, designed to create controlled anterior wedge compression fractures. Unipedicular augmentation was performed on the central vertebra of 24 specimens using polymethylmethacrylate/barium sulfate Vertebroplastic cements (DePuy Spine, Raynham, MA, USA). The volume of cement injected into each vertebra was recorded. Fine-cut computed tomography (CT) scans of all segments were obtained (Brilliance 64; Philips Medical Imaging, Amsterdam, The Netherlands). Using multiplanar reconstructions and volume compositing three-dimensional imaging (Osirix, www.osirix-viewer.com), each specimen was carefully assessed for cement

  4. Unfolding Dynamics of Single Collapsed DNA Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murayama, Y.; Wada, H.; Ishida, R.; Sano, M.

    We observed elastic responses of single DNA molecules and visualized them during the collapsing transition induced by trivalent cation, spermidine (SPD). The force-extension curves show worm-like behavior, force plateau, and stick-release responses depending on SPD concentration. The periodic stick-release responses may reflect the unraveling of toroidal condensates. At much higher SPD concentration, we observed re-elongation of a single collapsed DNA. For the visualization, a fluorescent dye, YOYO, was used. We observed bright spots in the fluorescence intensity profile of a collapsed DNA during stretching, which may correspond to the collapsed parts within the single DNA. The decrease of the intensity of the spots in stretching implies the mechanical unfolding of collapsed parts. Towards achieving a microscopic understanding of these experimental results, we also investigate the elastic properties of a highly charged polyelectrolyte (PE) chain by Brownian dynamics simulation method. In our dynamic simulation, a PE has a small intrinsic stiffness (i.e., the PE is semiflexible) to model the stiffness of DNA chain, and added multivalent counterions are explicitly taken into account. As the electrostatic coupling parameter (proportional to counterion valency) is increased, counterion condensation is observed, leading finally to the PE collapse through the discontinuous transition for a sufficiently large coupling parameter. Mechanical unfolding of a PE globule reveals its molecular elasticities including force plateau, in agreement with the experimental observations. A numerically deduced electrostatic condensation energy is compared to the experimental value. Charge ordering in the PE-counterion complex and its deformation by the external forcing are elucidated in conjunction with the PE elastic responses. Other dynamic effects such as the effect of a pulling speed are also discussed.

  5. Ghrelin receptors in non-mammalian vertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki eKaiya

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The growth hormone secretagogue-receptor (GHS-R was discovered in humans and pigs in 1996. The endogenous ligand, ghrelin, was discovered three years later, in 1999, and our understanding of the physiological significance of the ghrelin system in vertebrates has grown steadily since then. Although the ghrelin system in non-mammalian vertebrates is a subject of great interest, protein sequence data for the receptor in non-mammalian vertebrates has been limited until recently, and related biological information has not been well organized. In this review, we summarize current information related to the ghrelin receptor in non-mammalian vertebrates.

  6. CT urography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korobkin, M. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2005-11-15

    With the advent of multidetector row CT scanners, evaluation of the urothelium of the entire urinary tract with high-resolution thin sections during a single breath-hold has become a reality. Multidetector CT urography (MDCTU) is a single examination that allows evaluation of potential urinary tract calculi, renal parenchymal masses, and both benign and malignant urothelial lesions. Initial results with this new technique are encouraging. Current investigations of MDCTU focus on methods to improve opacification and distension of the upper urinary tract - the collecting systems, pelvis, and ureters. The role of abdominal compression, infusion of saline and/or furosemide, and optimal time delay of excretory phase imaging is being explored. Upper tract urothelial malignancies, including small lesions less the 5 mmin diameter, can be detected with high sensitivity. Methods to reduce radiation exposure are being explored, including split-bolus contrast injection techniques that combine nephrographic and excretory phases into a single phase. It is likely that in the near future, radiological evaluation of significant unexplained hematuria or of known or prior urothelial malignancy will consist of a single examination - MDCTU. (orig.)

  7. Structural control on karst collapse sinkhole formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santo, Antonio; Ascione, Alessandra; Mazzoli, Stefano; Santangelo, Nicoletta

    2013-04-01

    Collapse sinkholes owing their formation to erosion and deformation phenomena caused by subsurface karstification are widespread in the carbonate massifs of peninsular Italy. In contrast with solution dolines, which are densely distributed on the subplanar top surfaces of the carbonate massifs, the collapse sinkholes (hereinafter labelled karst collapse sinkholes) generally occur as isolated landforms and mostly affect the slopes and piedmont areas. In the latter instances, the sinkholes also affect alluvial fan conglomerates, or slope debris, overlying the carbonate rocks. We investigated the karst collapse sinkholes of the southern-central Apennines mountain belt (Italy), which is representative of a young orogenic system, characterised by recent tectonic activity and strong seismicity. The aim of the study is the identification of the causative factors which control the occurrence of such hazardous phenomena. The study was based on a regional scale analysis on sinkhole distribution in relation to the local geological-structural, geomorphological and hydrogeological contexts, and was paralleled with field analysis of some selected areas. The regional scale analysis indicates that the karst collapse sinkholes are not the mere response to the concurrence of the climatic and lithological conditions which commonly favour the development of karst processes, the occurrence of such landforms appearing strongly influenced by distinctive structural and hydrogeological conditions. In particular, a close relationship between the karst collapse sinkholes and the main extensional faults showing evidence of late Quaternary activity may be envisaged. This is inferred from the spatial distribution of the karst collapse sinkholes, which is strikingly uneven, the sinkholes generally occurring in alignments following large late Quaternary fault zones, or being clustered at the terminations of those faults. In addition, areas affected by the occurrence of groups of sinkholes, are

  8. Role of evaporation in gravitational collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Baccetti, Valentina; Terno, Daniel R

    2016-01-01

    We study collapse of evaporating thin dust shells using two families of metrics to describe the {exterior geometry: the outgoing Vaidya metric and the retarded Schwarzschild metric. Both allow incorporation of Page's evaporation law (the latter in terms of the time at infinity), resulting in a modified equation} of motion for the shell. In these scenarios we find in each case that the collapse is accelerated due to evaporation, but the Schwarzschild radius is not crossed. Instead the shell is always at a certain sub-Planckian distance from this would-be horizon that depends only on the mass and evaporation rate.

  9. Third-generation percutaneous vertebral augmentation systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanni, Daniele; Galzio, Renato; Kazakova, Anna; Pantalone, Andrea; Grillea, Giovanni; Bartolo, Marcello; Salini, Vincenzo; Magliani, Vincenzo

    2016-03-01

    Currently, there is no general consensus about the management of osteoporotic vertebral fractures (OVF). In the past, conservative treatment for at least one month was deemed appropriate for the majority of vertebral fractures. When pain persisted after conservative treatment, it was necessary to consider surgical interventions including: vertebroplasty for vertebral fractures with less than 30% loss of height of the affected vertebral body and kyphoplasty for vertebral fractures with greater than 30% loss of height. Currently, this type of treatment is not feasible. Herein we review the characteristics and methods of operation of three of the most common percutaneous vertebral augmentation systems (PVAS) for the treatment of OVF: Vertebral Body Stenting(®) (VBS), OsseoFix(®) and Spine Jack(®). VBS is a titanium device accompanied by a hydraulic (as opposed to mechanical) working system which allows a partial and not immediate possibility to control the opening of the device. On the other hand, OsseoFix(®) and Spine Jack(®) are accompanied by a mechanical working system which allows a progressive and controlled reduction of the vertebral fracture. Another important aspect to consider is the vertebral body height recovery. OsseoFix(®) has an indirect mechanism of action: the compaction of the trabecular bone causes an increase in the vertebral body height. Unlike the Vertebral Body Stenting(®) and Spine Jack(®), the OsseoFix(®) has no direct lift mechanism. Therefore, for these characteristics and for the force that this device is able to provide. In our opinion, Spine Jack(®) is the only device also suitable for the treatment OVF, traumatic fracture (recent, old or inveterate) and primary or secondary bone tumors.

  10. 3D microstructural architecture of muscle attachments in extant and fossil vertebrates revealed by synchrotron microtomography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Sanchez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Firm attachments binding muscles to skeleton are crucial mechanical components of the vertebrate body. These attachments (entheses are complex three-dimensional structures, containing distinctive arrangements of cells and fibre systems embedded in the bone, which can be modified during ontogeny. Until recently it has only been possible to obtain 2D surface and thin section images of entheses, leaving their 3D histology largely unstudied except by extrapolation from 2D data. Entheses are frequently preserved in fossil bones, but sectioning is inappropriate for rare or unique fossil material. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we present the first non-destructive 3D investigation, by propagation phase contrast synchrotron microtomography (PPC-SRµCT, of enthesis histology in extant and fossil vertebrates. We are able to identify entheses in the humerus of the salamander Desmognathus from the organization of bone-cell lacunae and extrinsic fibres. Statistical analysis of the lacunae differentiates types of attachments, and the orientation of the fibres, reflect the approximate alignment of the muscle. Similar histological structures, including ontogenetically related pattern changes, are perfectly preserved in two 380 million year old fossil vertebrates, the placoderm Compagopiscis croucheri and the sarcopterygian fish Eusthenopteron foordi. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We are able to determine the position of entheses in fossil vertebrates, the approximate orientation of the attached muscles, and aspects of their ontogenetic histories, from PPC-SRµCT data. Sub-micron microtomography thus provides a powerful tool for studying the structure, development, evolution and palaeobiology of muscle attachments.

  11. State-of-the-Art-Review of Collapsible Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. AL-Rawas

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Collapsible soils are encountered in arid and semi-arid regions. Such soils cause potential construction problems due to their collapse upon wetting. The collapse phenomenon is primarily related to the open structure of the soil. Several soil collapse classifications based on parameters such as moisture content, dry density, Atterberg limits and clay content have been proposed in the literature as indicators of the soil collapse potential. Direct measurement of the magnitude of collapse, using laboratory and/or field tests, is essential once a soil showed indications of collapse potential. Treatment methods such as soil replacement, compaction control and chemical stabilization showed significant reduction in the settlement of collapsible soils. The design of foundations on collapsible soils depends on the depth of the soil, magnitude of collapse and economics of the design. Strip foundations are commonly used when collapsing soil extends to a shallow depth while piles and drilled piers are recommended in cases where the soil extends to several meters. This paper provides a comprehensive review of collapsible soils. These include the different types of collapsible soils, mechanisms of collapse, identification and classification methods, laboratory and field testing, treatment methods and guidelines for foundation design.

  12. Gravitational collapse with decaying vacuum energy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The effect of dark energy on the end state of spherical radiation collapse is considered within the context of the cosmic censorship hypothesis. It is found that it is possible to have both black holes as well as naked singularities.

  13. Gravitational collapse with decaying vacuum energy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    β, showing that both naked singularities as well as black holes can form. The case α = 0.125, β = 0 yields a quadratic equation which corresponds to Vaidya collapse [8]. In general, for each value of α in the cubic, there corresponds a range of values of β which yield both positive and negative roots. For example, for α = 0.1, if.

  14. Identification and behavior of collapsible soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Loess is a soil that can exhibit large deformations upon wetting. Cases of wetting induced collapse in loess have : been documented for natural deposits and man-made fills. These issues are of concern to the Indiana DOT due to the growth : of the sta...

  15. Measurements and von Neumann projection/collapse

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    unwanted superpositions of (system + apparatus)-states can be shown to be suppressed, leading eventually to the projection/collapse rule postulated in von Neumann's treatment of measurements [3]. In the next section, the measurement problem in quantum mechanics (QM) is recalled. In §3, some proposed improvements ...

  16. LISA pathfinder appreciably constrains collapse models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helou, Bassam; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; McClelland, David E.; Chen, Yanbei

    2017-04-01

    Spontaneous collapse models are phenomological theories formulated to address major difficulties in macroscopic quantum mechanics. We place significant bounds on the parameters of the leading collapse models, the continuous spontaneous localization (CSL) model, and the Diosi-Penrose (DP) model, by using LISA Pathfinder's measurement, at a record accuracy, of the relative acceleration noise between two free-falling macroscopic test masses. In particular, we bound the CSL collapse rate to be at most (2.96 ±0.12 ) ×10-8 s-1 . This competitive bound explores a new frequency regime, 0.7 to 20 mHz, and overlaps with the lower bound 10-8 ±2 s-1 proposed by Adler in order for the CSL collapse noise to be substantial enough to explain the phenomenology of quantum measurement. Moreover, we bound the regularization cutoff scale used in the DP model to prevent divergences to be at least 40.1 ±0.5 fm , which is larger than the size of any nucleus. Thus, we rule out the DP model if the cutoff is the size of a fundamental particle.

  17. Granular Eruptions: Void Collapse and Jet Formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mikkelsen, R.; Versluis, Andreas Michel; Koene, Elmer; Bruggert, Gert-Wim; van der Meer, Roger M.; van der Weele, J.P.; Lohse, Detlef

    2002-01-01

    Upon impact, sand is blown away in all directions, forming a splash. The ball digs a cylindrical void in the sand and the jet is formed when this void collapses: The focused sand pressure pushes the jet straight up into the air. When the jet comes down again, it breaks up into fragments, i.e.,

  18. Black hole free energy during charged collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edery, Ariel; Beauchesne, Hugues

    2012-03-01

    Numerical work on gravitational collapse in isotropic coordinates has recently shown that the negative of the gravitational Lagrangian approaches the (Helmholtz) free energy of a Schwarzschild black hole at late times of the collapse. We investigate numerically this association during the collapse of a charged scalar field to a Reissner-Nordström (RN) black hole in isotropic coordinates. Charged collapse yields a large outgoing matter wave in the exterior region but this has a negligible effect on the interior. The thermodynamics via the free energy can therefore be investigated by focusing on the interior. We find that the percentage discrepancy between the numerical value for the Lagrangian and the analytical expression for the free energy reach values as low as 3% depending on the initial state. As a consistency check, we also implement a procedure for prolonging the evolution of the exterior region. The matter Lagrangian approaches zero everywhere (interior and exterior) showing clearly that the entropy of the charged black hole is gravitational in origin.

  19. Fire-induced collapses of steel structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dondera, Alexandru; Giuliani, Luisa

    Single-story steel buildings such as car parks and industrial halls are often characterised by stiff beams and flexible columns and may experience an outward (sway) collapse during a fire, endangering people and properties outside the building. It is therefore a current interest of the research t...

  20. Collapse of wave function and special relativity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Rosevaldo de [Universidade Federal do Mato Grosso (UFMT), MT (Brazil); Yoshida, Alexandre Calzavara [Universidade Federal de Uberlandia, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Full text: In this work we show that for no incompatibility between Quantum Physics and Special Relativity, necessarily more postulates should be includes in Quantum Physics. What we want to show is that there is no inconsistency between collapse instantaneous of one entangled state with special relativity. We discovered the necessity to include one more postulate into Quantum Physics when we are studying entangled states in different reference systems. When we perform a Lorentz transformation into one entangled system, we realized that we need to make one more choice. This choice was not predicted by quantum physics nor by special relativity. Other options are: 1. if we define a privileged reference system where the collapse is instantaneous only in it, we will be back to the old discussion about the ether. I do not think that is a very interesting option, but I confess that it would also be an experimental question. 2. one could also define that the collapse was not simultaneous any reference system. 3. postulate: the collapse of the states is simultaneous to the observer carrying out the measure on the state. Adding one more postulate that we do not know if it is true or not, we can make Quantum Mechanics and Special Relativity consistently. An assumption has validity when has no inconsistency with the theories and is known to be proved experimentally. So the question about the validity of the postulates should be an experimental question. (author)

  1. The heterogeneity of world trade collapses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.A.G. van Bergeijk (Peter)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractThis paper analyses drivers of imports during the major world trade collapses of the Great Depression (1930s; 34 countries) and the Great Recession (1930s; 173 countries). The analysis deals with the first year of these episodes and develops a small empirical model that shows a

  2. Spherically symmetric inhomogeneous dust collapse in higher ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Higher dimensional space-time; naked singularity; cosmic censorship. PACS Nos 04.20.Dw; 04.50. ... The existence of strong curvature naked singularities in gravitational collapse of spherically symmetric space-times ..... distributions (in an appropriate metric space) can be discussed along the lines of [16]. 3. Strength of the ...

  3. Collapsing spherical null shells in general relativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Khakshournia

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the gravitational collapse of a spherically symmetric null shell with the flat interior and a charged Vaidya exterior spacetimes is studied. There is no gravitational impulsive wave present on the null hypersurface which is shear-free and contracting. It follows that there is a critical radius at which the shell bounces and starts expanding.

  4. Serial MRI findings of osteoporotic vertebral fractures in the thoracic and lumbar spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamada, Yoshitaka; Henmi, Tatsuhiko; Sakamoto, Rintaro; Hiasa, Masahiko [Health Insurance Naruto Hospital, Tokushima (Japan)

    1998-12-01

    The prognosis of osteoporotic vertebral fractures in the thoracic and lumbar spine was studied by serial MRI findings. This study covered 80 vertebrae in 69 patients treated conservatively and followed-up for more than six months (23 males and 46 females, average age 70 yrs). Group A, characterized by poor diagnostic imaging, consisted of patients who had both severely collapsed vertebra which was progressive in the lateral roentgenogram and delayed improvement in MRI signal intensities. Group B, consisting of poor clinical prognosis, comprised patients with persistent back pain. The predictive factors for Group A were found to be T{sub 1}-low finding over the entire vertebra within one month after injury and fractures of Th{sub 12} or L{sub 1} vertebra. Areas of T{sub 1}-low and T{sub 2}-low intensity adjacent to the vertebral disc presented no improvement in signal intensity and often caused persistent back pain. (author)

  5. Routine needle biopsy during vertebral augmentation procedures. Is it necessary?

    OpenAIRE

    Pneumaticos, Spiros G; Sofia N. Chatziioannou; Savvidou, Christiana; Pilichou, Anastasia; Rontogianni, Dimitra; Korres, Dimitrios S

    2010-01-01

    Vertebral augmentation procedures are currently widely performed to treat vertebral compression fractures. The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency of underlying previously unrecognized etiology in a consecutive series of patients undergoing kyphoplasty to treat vertebral compression fractures. A prospective histological evaluation of vertebral body biopsy specimens from presumed osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures were performed in order to identify aforementioned ca...

  6. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a relatively short time, especially when compared to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). CT scanning is painless, noninvasive and accurate. A ... CT is less sensitive to patient movement than MRI. CT can be performed if you have an ...

  7. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CT is less sensitive to patient movement than MRI. CT can be performed if you have an implanted medical device of any kind, unlike MRI. A diagnosis determined by CT scanning may eliminate ...

  8. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... hard time staying still, are claustrophobic or have chronic pain, you may find a CT exam to ... of soft tissue (particularly the brain, including the disease processes) are less visible on CT scans . CT ...

  9. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the limitations of CT Scanning of the Head? What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, ... than regular radiographs (x-rays). top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT ...

  10. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of CT of the Sinuses? What is CT (Computed Tomography) of the Sinuses? Computed ... nasal cavity by small openings. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT ...

  11. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... pregnancy and x-rays. top of page What does the CT equipment look like? The CT scanner ... a speaker and microphone. top of page How does the procedure work? In many ways CT scanning ...

  12. High-altitude adaptations in vertebrate hemoglobins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Roy E.

    2007-01-01

    Vertebrates at high altitude are subjected to hypoxic conditions that challenge aerobic metabolism. O2 transport from the respiratory surfaces to tissues requires matching between the O2 loading and unloading tensions and theO2-affinity of blood, which is an integrated function of hemoglobin......, birds and ectothermic vertebrates at high altitude....

  13. The MHC molecules of nonmammalian vertebrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaufman, J; Skjoedt, K; Salomonsen, J

    1990-01-01

    to develop. There is no molecular evidence yet to decide whether vertebrate immune systems (and particularly the MHC molecules) are evolutionarily related to invertebrate allorecognition systems, and the functional evidence can be interpreted either way. Even among the vertebrates, there is great...

  14. [Spondylosis: diseases of the vertebral column].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Amador Schüller

    2008-01-01

    Frequent and transcendent diseases for the difficulties of his diagnosis and treatment. The components of the vertebral column, vertebral bodies, discs and unvertebral joints, spondylosis ligaments must be considered to be a functional Unit. The Patology of each one of their parts concerns or reverberates in others.

  15. BK Channels in the Vertebrate Inner Ear

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pyott, S. J.; Duncan, R. K.; Contet, C

    2016-01-01

    The perception of complex acoustic stimuli begins with the deconstruction of sound into its frequency components. This spectral processing occurs first and foremost in the inner ear. In vertebrates, two very different strategies of frequency analysis have evolved. In nonmammalian vertebrates, the

  16. Vertebral architecture in the earliest stem tetrapods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Stephanie E; Ahlberg, Per E; Hutchinson, John R; Molnar, Julia L; Sanchez, Sophie; Tafforeau, Paul; Clack, Jennifer A

    2013-02-14

    The construction of the vertebral column has been used as a key anatomical character in defining and diagnosing early tetrapod groups. Rhachitomous vertebrae--in which there is a dorsally placed neural arch and spine, an anteroventrally placed intercentrum and paired, posterodorsally placed pleurocentra--have long been considered the ancestral morphology for tetrapods. Nonetheless, very little is known about vertebral anatomy in the earliest stem tetrapods, because most specimens remain trapped in surrounding matrix, obscuring important anatomical features. Here we describe the three-dimensional vertebral architecture of the Late Devonian stem tetrapod Ichthyostega using propagation phase-contrast X-ray synchrotron microtomography. Our scans reveal a diverse array of new morphological, and associated developmental and functional, characteristics, including a possible posterior-to-anterior vertebral ossification sequence and the first evolutionary appearance of ossified sternal elements. One of the most intriguing features relates to the positional relationships between the vertebral elements, with the pleurocentra being unexpectedly sutured or fused to the intercentra that directly succeed them, indicating a 'reverse' rhachitomous design. Comparison of Ichthyostega with two other stem tetrapods, Acanthostega and Pederpes, shows that reverse rhachitomous vertebrae may be the ancestral condition for limbed vertebrates. This study fundamentally revises our current understanding of vertebral column evolution in the earliest tetrapods and raises questions about the presumed vertebral architecture of tetrapodomorph fish and later, more crownward, tetrapods.

  17. Multiple vertebral fluid-fluid levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bladt, O.; Demaerel, P.; Catry, F.; Breuseghem, I. Van [University Hospitals Gasthuisberg, Department of Radiology, Leuven (Belgium); Ballaux, F. [University Hospitals Gasthuisberg, Department of Pathology, Leuven (Belgium); Samson, I. [University Hospitals Gasthuisberg, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Leuven (Belgium)

    2004-11-01

    We present a case of multiple vertebral metastases, with multiple fluid-fluid levels, from a moderately to poorly differentiated carcinoma of unknown origin. We suggest that fluid-fluid levels in multiple vertebral lesions are highly suggestive of bone metastases. (orig.)

  18. Age-related changes in vertebral and iliac crest 3D bone microstructure-differences and similarities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jesper Skovhus; Jensen, Michael Vinkel; Niklassen, Andreas Steenholt

    2015-01-01

    Summary Age-related changes of vertebra and iliac crest 3D microstructure were investigated, and we showed that they were in general similar. The 95th percentile of vertebral trabecular thickness distribution increased with age for women. Surprisingly, vertebral and iliac crest bone microstructure...... was only weakly correlated (r = 0.38 to 0.75), despite the overall similar age-related changes.Introduction The purposes of the study were to determine the age-related changes in iliac and vertebral bone microstructure for women and men over a large age range and to investigate the relationship between...... the bone microstructure at these skeletal sites.Methods Matched sets of transiliac crest bone biopsies and lumbar vertebral body (L2) specimens from 41 women (19–96 years) and 39 men (23–95 years) were micro-computed tomography (μCT) scanned, and the 3D microstructure was quantified.Results For both women...

  19. Lamprey: a model for vertebrate evolutionary research

    Science.gov (United States)

    XU, Yang; ZHU, Si-Wei; LI, Qing-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Lampreys belong to the superclass Cyclostomata and represent the most ancient group of vertebrates. Existing for over 360 million years, they are known as living fossils due to their many evolutionally conserved features. They are not only a keystone species for studying the origin and evolution of vertebrates, but also one of the best models for researching vertebrate embryonic development and organ differentiation. From the perspective of genetic information, the lamprey genome remains primitive compared with that of other higher vertebrates, and possesses abundant functional genes. Through scientific and technological progress, scientists have conducted in-depth studies on the nervous, endocrine, and immune systems of lampreys. Such research has significance for understanding and revealing the origin and evolution of vertebrates, and could contribute to a greater understanding of human diseases and treatments. This review presents the current progress and significance of lamprey research. PMID:27686784

  20. High-Dose Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy for Noncompressive Vertebral Metastases in Combination With Zoledronate: A Phase 1 Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pichon, Baptiste [Department of Radiation Oncology, ICO Cancer Center, Saint-Herblain (France); Campion, Loïc [Department of Biostatistics, ICO Cancer Center, Saint-Herblain (France); Delpon, Grégory [Department of Medical Physics, ICO Cancer Center, Saint-Herblain (France); CRCNA, Inserm U892, CNRS UMR 6299, Nantes (France); Thillays, François [Department of Radiation Oncology, ICO Cancer Center, Saint-Herblain (France); Carrie, Christian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Léon Bérard Center, Lyon (France); Cellier, Patrice [Department of Radiation Oncology, ICO Cancer Center, Angers (France); Pommier, Pascal; Laude, Cécile [Department of Radiation Oncology, Léon Bérard Center, Lyon (France); Mervoyer, Augustin [Department of Radiation Oncology, ICO Cancer Center, Saint-Herblain (France); Hamidou, Hadji [Department of Radiation Oncology, ICO Cancer Center, Angers (France); Mahé, Marc-André [Department of Radiation Oncology, ICO Cancer Center, Saint-Herblain (France); Supiot, Stéphane, E-mail: stephane.supiot@ico.unicancer.fr [Department of Radiation Oncology, ICO Cancer Center, Saint-Herblain (France); CRCNA, Inserm U892, CNRS UMR 6299, Nantes (France)

    2016-11-15

    Introduction: Hypofractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (HSRT) for vertebral metastases gives good results in terms of local control but increases the risk of fracture in the treated volume. Preclinical and clinical studies have shown that zoledronate not only reduces the risk of fracture and stimulates osteoclastic remodeling but also increases the immune response and radiosensitivity. This study aimed to evaluate the tolerability and effectiveness of zoledronate in association with radiation therapy. Patients and Methods: We conducted a multicenter phase 1 study that combined HSRT (3 × 9 Gy) and zoledronate in patients with vertebral metastasis ( (NCT01219790)). The principal objective was the absence of spinal cord adverse reactions at 1 year. The secondary objectives were acute tolerability, the presentation of a bone event, local tumor control, pain control, progression-free survival, and overall survival. Results: Thirty patients (25 male, 5 female), median age 66 years, who were followed up for a median period of 19.2 months, received treatment for 49 vertebral metastases. A grade 3 acute mucosal adverse event occurred in 1 patient during the treatment and in 2 more at 1 month. No late neurologic adverse events were reported at 1 year. The mean pain scores diminished significantly at 1 month (1.35; P=.0125) and 3 months (0.77; P<.0001) compared with pain scores at study entry (2.49). Vertebral collapse in the irradiated zone occurred in 1 (2%) treated vertebra. Control of local disease was achieved in 94% of irradiated patients (3 local recurrences). Conclusion: The combination of zoledronate and HSRT in the treatment of vertebral metastasis is well tolerated and seems to reduce the rate of vertebral collapse, effectively relieve pain, and achieve good local tumor control with no late neurologic adverse effects.

  1. Computed tomography-guided percutaneous biopsy for vertebral neoplasms: a department's experience and hybrid biopsy technique to improve yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Vasant; Kosmas, Christos; Josan, Enambir S; Partovi, Sasan; Bhojwani, Nicholas; Fergus, Nathan; Young, Peter C; Robbin, Mark R

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Recent articles have identified the poor diagnostic yield of percutaneous needle biopsy for vertebral osteomyelitis. The current study aimed to confirm the higher accuracy of CT-guided spinal biopsy for vertebral neoplasms and to identify which biopsy technique provides the highest yield. METHODS Over a 9-year period, the radiology department at University Hospitals Case Medical Center performed 222 CT-guided biopsies of vertebral lesions, of which clinicians indicated a concern for vertebral neoplasms in 122 patients. A retrospective chart review was performed to confirm the higher sensitivity of the percutaneous intervention for vertebral neoplasms. RESULTS A core sample was obtained for all 122 biopsies of concern (100.0%). Only 6 cases (4.9%) were reported as nondiagnostic per histological sampling, and 12 cases (9.8%) were negative for disease. The question of vertebral neoplastic involvement warrants follow-up, and the current study was able to determine the subsequent diagnosis of each lesion. Of the 122 total, 94 (77.0%) core samples provided true-positive results, and the sensitivity of core biopsy measured 87.9%. The technical approach did not demonstrate any significant difference in diagnostic yield. However, when the vertebral cortex was initially pierced with a coaxial bone biopsy system and subsequently a 14-gauge spring-loaded cutting biopsy needle was coaxially advanced into lytic lesions, 14 true positives were obtained with a corresponding sensitivity of 100.0%. CONCLUSIONS This study confirms the higher sensitivity of image-guided percutaneous needle biopsy for vertebral neoplasms. In addition, it demonstrates how the use of a novel cutting needle biopsy approach, performed coaxially through a core biopsy track, provides the highest yield.

  2. High-resolution computed tomography evaluation of the bronchial lumen to vertebral body diameter and pulmonary artery to vertebral body diameter ratios in anesthetized ventilated normal cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee-Fowler, Tekla M; Cole, Robert C; Dillon, A Ray; Tillson, D Michael; Garbarino, Rachel; Barney, Sharron

    2017-10-01

    Objectives Bronchial lumen to pulmonary artery diameter (BA) ratio has been utilized to investigate pulmonary pathology on high-resolution CT images. Diseases affecting both the bronchi and pulmonary arteries render the BA ratio less useful. The purpose of the study was to establish bronchial lumen diameter to vertebral body diameter (BV) and pulmonary artery diameter to vertebral body diameter (AV) ratios in normal cats. Methods Using high-resolution CT images, 16 sets of measurements (sixth thoracic vertebral body [mid-body], each lobar bronchi and companion pulmonary artery diameter) were acquired from young adult female cats and 41 sets from pubertal female cats. Results Young adult and pubertal cat BV ratios were not statistically different from each other in any lung lobe. Significant differences between individual lung lobe BV ratios were noted on combined age group analysis. Caudal lung lobe AV ratios were significantly different between young adult and pubertal cats. All other lung lobe AV ratios were not significantly different. Caudal lung lobe AV ratios were significantly different from all other lung lobes but not from each other in both the young adult and pubertal cats. Conclusions and relevance BV ratio reference intervals determined for individual lung lobes could be applied to both young adult and pubertal cats. Separate AV ratios for individual lung lobes would be required for young adult and pubertal cats. These ratios should allow more accurate evaluation of cats with concurrent bronchial and pulmonary arterial disease.

  3. Percutaneous vertebroplasty for the treatment of osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jin Young; Kim, Seung Cheol; Lee, Jee Young; Cha, Sang Hoon [Donkook University College of Medicine, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-05-01

    To assess the usefulness of percutaneous vertebroplasty for the treatment of painful osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures. Eighty five patients [70 women and 15 men aged 51-88 (mean, 70) years with 148 vertebral compression fractures underwent percutaneous vertebroplasty. The causes of fracture were slip, lifting, fall, traffic accident, walking, and other unknown causes; the duration of pain varied from three days to two years. All patients underwent MRI or CT to assess the recent condition of the fracture, and vertebroplasty was performed under DSA fluoroscopic guidance. Routine clinical follow-up examination involved visual analogue pain-scale testing one and two days after vertebroplasty; the results obtained were compared with those of preoperative assessment. The outcome of vertebroplasty was assessed in terms of its efficacy and resulting complications, if any. The procedures were technically successful in all patients. In 73, back pain was relieved within 24 hours; in nine, within 48 hours and in one, within seven days. In two patients, pain relief was insignificant, and one of these died. Percutaneous vertebroplasty was a useful procedure for treating painful osteoporotic compression fractures.

  4. A machine learning approach to extract spinal column centerline from three-dimensional CT data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Caihua; Li, Yuanzhong; Ito, Wataru; Shimura, Kazuo; Abe, Katsumi

    2009-02-01

    The spinal column is one of the most important anatomical structures in the human body and its centerline, that is, the centerline of vertebral bodies, is a very important feature used by many applications in medical image processing. In the past, some approaches have been proposed to extract the centerline of spinal column by using edge or region information of vertebral bodies. However, those approaches may suffer from difficulties in edge detection or region segmentation of vertebral bodies when there exist vertebral diseases such as osteoporosis, compression fracture. In this paper, we propose a novel approach based on machine learning to robustly extract the centerline of the spinal column from threedimensional CT data. Our approach first applies a machine learning algorithm, called AdaBoost, to detect vertebral cord regions, which have a S-shape similar to and close to, but can be detected more stably than, the spinal column. Then a centerline of detected vertebral cord regions is obtained by fitting a spline curve to their central points, using the associated AdaBoost scores as weights. Finally, the obtained centerline of vertebral cord is linearly deformed and translated in the sagittal direction to fit the top and bottom boundaries of the vertebral bodies and then a centerline of the spinal column is obtained. Experimental results on a large CT data set show the effectiveness of our approach.

  5. Functional outcomes and height restoration for patients with multiple myeloma-related osteolytic vertebral compression fractures treated with kyphoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julka, Abhishek; Tolhurst, Stephen R; Srinivasan, Ramesh C; Graziano, Gregory P

    2014-08-01

    A retrospective review of pathologic vertebral fractures related to multiple myeloma. To report the functional status and height restoration of 32 patients treated with kyphoplasty for multiple myeloma-related vertebral compression fractures. Multiple myeloma can cause significant bony resorption, and vertebral involvement is extremely common. Compression fractures due to myelomatous vertebral metastases result in significant pain and can lead to kyphosis and sagittal imbalance. Nonoperative treatment can result in deformity and continued pain, and large surgical procedures have significant morbidity. Percutaneous cement augmentation (kyphoplasty and vertebroplasty) is a minimally invasive technique that can improve pain in these patients. Kyphoplasty also has the potential to provide mild deformity correction in addition to fracture stabilization. Study participants were patients with biopsy-proven multiple myeloma presenting with compression fracture treated with kyphoplasty. Data were compiled from patient charts and preoperative and postoperative radiographs. Patient self-reported functional status were obtained through the use of the Oswestry Disability Index. The degree of vertebral body collapse and deformity was evaluated using the method of Genant and analyzed using paired Student t test. Thirty-two consecutive patients who underwent kyphoplasty at a total of 76 levels for myelomatous vertebral compression fractures were identified. Sixteen fractures were at the thoracolumbar junction. The mean age was 64.3 years. The average Genant grade for the involved levels improved from 1.9 preoperative to 1.53 postoperative, which was statistically significant (PKyphoplasty for vertebral compression fractures due to multiple myeloma is a safe and effective procedure that can lead to pain relief and vertebral height restoration.

  6. Mitotic chromosome condensation in vertebrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vagnarelli, Paola, E-mail: P.Vagnarelli@ed.ac.uk

    2012-07-15

    Work from several laboratories over the past 10-15 years has revealed that, within the interphase nucleus, chromosomes are organized into spatially distinct territories [T. Cremer, C. Cremer, Chromosome territories, nuclear architecture and gene regulation in mammalian cells, Nat. Rev. Genet. 2 (2001) 292-301 and T. Cremer, M. Cremer, S. Dietzel, S. Muller, I. Solovei, S. Fakan, Chromosome territories-a functional nuclear landscape, Curr. Opin. Cell Biol. 18 (2006) 307-316]. The overall compaction level and intranuclear location varies as a function of gene density for both entire chromosomes [J.A. Croft, J.M. Bridger, S. Boyle, P. Perry, P. Teague,W.A. Bickmore, Differences in the localization and morphology of chromosomes in the human nucleus, J. Cell Biol. 145 (1999) 1119-1131] and specific chromosomal regions [N.L. Mahy, P.E. Perry, S. Gilchrist, R.A. Baldock, W.A. Bickmore, Spatial organization of active and inactive genes and noncoding DNA within chromosome territories, J. Cell Biol. 157 (2002) 579-589] (Fig. 1A, A'). In prophase, when cyclin B activity reaches a high threshold, chromosome condensation occurs followed by Nuclear Envelope Breakdown (NEB) [1]. At this point vertebrate chromosomes appear as compact structures harboring an attachment point for the spindle microtubules physically recognizable as a primary constriction where the two sister chromatids are held together. The transition from an unshaped interphase chromosome to the highly structured mitotic chromosome (compare Figs. 1A and B) has fascinated researchers for several decades now; however a definite picture of how this process is achieved and regulated is not yet in our hands and it will require more investigation to comprehend the complete process. From a biochemical point of view a vertebrate mitotic chromosomes is composed of DNA, histone proteins (60%) and non-histone proteins (40%) [6]. I will discuss below what is known to date on the contribution of these two different classes

  7. Unifying Research on Social-Ecological Resilience and Collapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumming, Graeme S; Peterson, Garry D

    2017-09-01

    Ecosystems influence human societies, leading people to manage ecosystems for human benefit. Poor environmental management can lead to reduced ecological resilience and social-ecological collapse. We review research on resilience and collapse across different systems and propose a unifying social-ecological framework based on (i) a clear definition of system identity; (ii) the use of quantitative thresholds to define collapse; (iii) relating collapse processes to system structure; and (iv) explicit comparison of alternative hypotheses and models of collapse. Analysis of 17 representative cases identified 14 mechanisms, in five classes, that explain social-ecological collapse. System structure influences the kind of collapse a system may experience. Mechanistic theories of collapse that unite structure and process can make fundamental contributions to solving global environmental problems. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Identification and behavior of collapsible soils : [technical summary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Collapsible soils are susceptible to large volumetric strains when they become saturated. Numerous soil types : fall in the general category of collapsible soils, including : loess, a well-known aeolian deposit, present throughout : most of Indiana. ...

  9. Dynamic control of collapse in a vortex Airy beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rui-Pin; Chew, Khian-Hooi; He, Sailing

    2013-01-01

    Here we study systematically the self-focusing dynamics and collapse of vortex Airy optical beams in a Kerr medium. The collapse is suppressed compared to a non-vortex Airy beam in a Kerr medium due to the existence of vortex fields. The locations of collapse depend sensitively on the initial power, vortex order, and modulation parameters. The collapse may occur in a position where the initial field is nearly zero, while no collapse appears in the region where the initial field is mainly distributed. Compared with a non-vortex Airy beam, the collapse of a vortex Airy beam can occur at a position away from the area of the initial field distribution. Our study shows the possibility of controlling and manipulating the collapse, especially the precise position of collapse, by purposely choosing appropriate initial power, vortex order or modulation parameters of a vortex Airy beam.

  10. Gravitational and electric energies in collapse of spherically thin capacitor

    CERN Document Server

    Ruffini, Remo

    2013-01-01

    In our previous article (PHYSICAL REVIEW D 86, 084004 (2012)), we present a study of strong oscillating electric fields and electron-positron pair-production in gravitational collapse of a neutral stellar core at or over nuclear densities. In order to understand the back-reaction of such electric energy building and radiating on collapse, we adopt a simplified model describing the collapse of a spherically thin capacitor to give an analytical description how gravitational energy is converted to both kinetic and electric energies in collapse. It is shown that (i) averaged kinetic and electric energies are the same order, about an half of gravitational energy of spherically thin capacitor in collapse; (ii) caused by radiating and rebuilding electric energy, gravitational collapse undergoes a sequence of "on and off" hopping steps in the microscopic Compton scale. Although such a collapse process is still continuous in terms of macroscopic scales, it is slowed down as kinetic energy is reduced and collapsing tim...

  11. Observations on cyanobacterial population collapse in eutrophic lake water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gons, H.J.; Ebert, J.; Hoogveld, H.L.; Van den Hove, L.; Pel, R.; Takkenberg, W.; Woldringh, C.J.

    2002-01-01

    In two laboratory-scale enclosures of water from the shallow, eutrophic Lake Loosdrecht (the Netherlands), the predominating filamentous cyanobacteria grew vigorously for 2 weeks, but then their populations simultaneously collapsed, whereas coccoid cyanobacteria and algae persisted . The collapse

  12. Grading apical vertebral rotation without a computed tomography scan: a clinically relevant system based on the radiographic appearance of bilateral pedicle screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upasani, Vidyadhar V; Chambers, Reid C; Dalal, Ali H; Shah, Suken A; Lehman, Ronald A; Newton, Peter O

    2009-08-01

    Bench-top and retrospective analysis to assess vertebral rotation based on the appearance of bilateral pedicle screws in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). To develop a clinically relevant radiographic grading system for evaluating postoperative thoracic apical vertebral rotation that would correlate with computed tomography (CT) measures of rotation. The 3-column vertebral body control provided by bilateral pedicle screws has enabled scoliosis surgeons to develop advanced techniques of direct vertebral derotation. Our ability to accurately quantify spinal deformity in the axial plane, however, continues to be limited. Trigonometry was used to define the relationship between the position of bilateral pedicle screws and vertebral rotation. This relationship was validated using digital photographs of a bench-top model. The mathematical relationships were then used to calculate vertebral rotation from standing postoperative, posteroanterior radiographs in AIS patients and correlated with postoperative CT measures of rotation. Fourteen digital photographs of the bench-top model were independently analyzed twice by 3 coauthors. The mathematically calculated degree of rotation was found to correlate significantly with the actual degree of rotation (r = 0.99; P < 0.001) and the intra- and interobserver reliability for these measurements were both excellent (kappa = 0.98 and kappa = 0.97, respectively). In the retrospective analysis of 17 AIS patients, the average absolute difference between the radiographic measurement of rotation and the CT measure was only 1.9 degrees +/- 2.0 degrees (r = 0.92; P < 0.001). Based on these correlations a simple radiographic grading system for postoperative apical vertebral rotation was developed. An accurate assessment of vertebral rotation can be performed radiographically, using screw lengths and screw tip-to-rod distances of bilateral segmental pedicle screws and a trigonometric calculation. These data support the use

  13. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for the CT examination. top of page What does the CT equipment look like? The CT scanner ... in the CT scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? In many ways, CT scanning ...

  14. Organizational heterogeneity of vertebrate genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Frenkel

    Full Text Available Genomes of higher eukaryotes are mosaics of segments with various structural, functional, and evolutionary properties. The availability of whole-genome sequences allows the investigation of their structure as "texts" using different statistical and computational methods. One such method, referred to as Compositional Spectra (CS analysis, is based on scoring the occurrences of fixed-length oligonucleotides (k-mers in the target DNA sequence. CS analysis allows generating species- or region-specific characteristics of the genome, regardless of their length and the presence of coding DNA. In this study, we consider the heterogeneity of vertebrate genomes as a joint effect of regional variation in sequence organization superimposed on the differences in nucleotide composition. We estimated compositional and organizational heterogeneity of genome and chromosome sequences separately and found that both heterogeneity types vary widely among genomes as well as among chromosomes in all investigated taxonomic groups. The high correspondence of heterogeneity scores obtained on three genome fractions, coding, repetitive, and the remaining part of the noncoding DNA (the genome dark matter--GDM allows the assumption that CS-heterogeneity may have functional relevance to genome regulation. Of special interest for such interpretation is the fact that natural GDM sequences display the highest deviation from the corresponding reshuffled sequences.

  15. Melatonin Receptor Genes in Vertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Dong Yin

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin receptors are members of the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR family. Three genes for melatonin receptors have been cloned. The MT1 (or Mel1a or MTNR1A and MT2 (or Mel1b or MTNR1B receptor subtypes are present in humans and other mammals, while an additional melatonin receptor subtype, Mel1c (or MTNR1C, has been identified in fish, amphibians and birds. Another melatonin related orphan receptor, GPR50, which does not bind melatonin, is found exclusively in mammals. The hormone melatonin is secreted primarily by the pineal gland, with highest levels occurring during the dark period of a circadian cycle. This hormone acts systemically in numerous organs. In the brain, it is involved in the regulation of various neural and endocrine processes, and it readjusts the circadian pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nucleus. This article reviews recent studies of gene organization, expression, evolution and mutations of melatonin receptor genes of vertebrates. Gene polymorphisms reveal that numerous mutations are associated with diseases and disorders. The phylogenetic analysis of receptor genes indicates that GPR50 is an outgroup to all other melatonin receptor sequences. GPR50 may have separated from a melatonin receptor ancestor before the split between MTNR1C and the MTNR1A/B ancestor.

  16. Molecular Synapomorphies Resolve Evolutionary Relationships of Extant Jawed Vertebrates

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Byrappa Venkatesh; Mark V. Erdmann; Sydney Brenner

    2001-01-01

    .... We identified 13 derived shared molecular markers (synapomorphies) that define clades in the vertebrate lineage and used them to resolve the phylogenetic relationships of extant jawed vertebrates...

  17. Collapse of the Late Proterozoic ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schopf, J. W.

    1991-01-01

    Evidence accumulated over the past two decades is now sufficient to permit an initial quantitative assessment of the patterns of biotic diversity and extinction that occurred during Proterozoic time. Because of limitations in both the quality and quantity of data currently available, however, generalizations thus derived must be regarded as tentative. Nevertheless, read literally, available palaeontological data appear to indicate that the global ecosystem experienced a gradual but massive collapse between 1 000 Ma and the beginning of the Phanerozoic, a supposition consistent with other lines of geological and geochemical evidence. A possible forcing agent for such a collapse appears to have been a decrease in ambient levels of carbon dioxide and a resultant decrease in average global temperature, photosynthetic efficiency, and primary productivity.

  18. Collapse and revival in holographic quenches

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Emilia; Lopez, Esperanza; Mas, Javier; Serantes, Alexandre

    2015-04-01

    We study holographic models related to global quantum quenches in finite size systems. The holographic set up describes naturally a CFT, which we consider on a circle and a sphere. The enhanced symmetry of the conformal group on the circle motivates us to compare the evolution in both cases. Depending on the initial conditions, the dual geometry exhibits oscillations that we holographically interpret as revivals of the initial field theory state. On the sphere, this only happens when the energy density created by the quench is small compared to the system size. However on the circle considerably larger energy densities are compatible with revivals. Two different timescales emerge in this latter case. A collapse time, when the system appears to have dephased, and the revival time, when after rephasing the initial state is partially recovered. The ratio of these two times depends upon the initial conditions in a similar way to what is observed in some experimental setups exhibiting collapse and revivals.

  19. Progenitors of Core-Collapse Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschi, R.; Arnett, D.; Cristini, A.; Georgy, C.; Meakin, C.; Walkington, I.

    2017-02-01

    Massive stars have a strong impact on their surroundings, in particular when they produce a core-collapse supernova at the end of their evolution. In these proceedings, we review the general evolution of massive stars and their properties at collapse as well as the transition between massive and intermediate-mass stars. We also summarise the effects of metallicity and rotation. We then discuss some of the major uncertainties in the modelling of massive stars, with a particular emphasis on the treatment of convection in 1D stellar evolution codes. Finally, we present new 3D hydrodynamic simulations of convection in carbon burning and list key points to take from 3D hydrodynamic studies for the development of new prescriptions for convective boundary mixing in 1D stellar evolution codes.

  20. Lumbar CT findings of patients with low back pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yong Chul; Kim, Yang Soo; Kim, Kyun Sang [Chung-Ang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1986-04-15

    Low back pain is probably the second most common disease entity to upper respiratory infection in developed country. We were missing at least 50% of the pathologic conditions by using conventional diagnostic modalities in low back pain. They did tell us nothing or little about facet abnormalities, lateral recesses, vertebral canal and soft tissue surrounding lumbar spines. High resolutional CT has been the biggest turning point in the diagnosis and management of low back pain. CT make a contribution to reducing the morbidity and probably the cost of evaluating patients with low back pain, and to increasing diagnostic accuracy. We observed 100 cases of lumbar CT using TCT 80A scanner for the evaluation of low back pain during the period from Apr. 1985 to Sept. 1985 at Chung-Ang University Hospital. Lumbar CT scan reveals high-positive findings (98%) in low back pain patients. Common low back disorders in CT are disc bulging (53%), herniated nucleus pulposus (32%), degenerative arthritis in posterior facet joints (27%), spinal stenosis (20%) and postoperative spines (15%). Uncommon low back disorders in CT are compression fracture of vertebral bodies, spondylolysis or spondylolisthesis, tropism, transitional vertebra, Scheueman's disease, limbic fracture, transverse process or articular process fracture, sacroiliac joint subluxation, conjoined nerve root and meningocele.

  1. Medical image of the week: collapse of the trachea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guruguri P

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. A 61 year old man with a history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD requiring multiple intubations over the past 2 years as well as obstructive sleep apnea (OSA presented with acute dyspnea, cough and difficulty expectorating sputum over the last 24 hours. His physical exam was notable for expiratory and inspiratory wheezing. ABG revealed a pH of 7.24, PaCO2 of 71, PaO2 of 103, and HCO3 of 29 mMol consistent with an acute on chronic respiratory acidosis. In the Emergency Department, the patient was given multiple bronchodilators and eventually placed on BiPAP with gradual improvement. CT of the chest revealed the caliber of the trachea was narrowed greater than 50% during expiration (Figure 1B consistent with dynamic airway collapse of tracheobronchomalacia. This often overlooked condition may be related to past intubations or COPD with chronic bronchitis and is often misdiagnosed as COPD or treatment resistant asthma. Stents are often …

  2. Collapsing dynamics of attractive Bose-Einstein condensates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergé, L.; Juul Rasmussen, J.

    2002-01-01

    The self-similar collapse of 3D and quasi-2D atom condensates with negative scattering length is examined. 3D condensates are shown to blow up following the scenario of weak collapse, for which 3-body recombination weakly dissipates the atoms. In contrast, 2D condensates undergo a strong collapse...

  3. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Head Computed tomography (CT) of the head uses special x-ray ... Head? What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  4. Epidemiology of acute vertebral osteomyelitis in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsgaard, M R; Wagn, P; Bengtsson, J

    1998-01-01

    We studied the epidemiology of acute, non-tuberculous, hematogenous vertebral osteomyelitis in Denmark during 1978-1982. 137 patients fulfilled the criteria for acute vertebral osteomyelitis. The incidence was 5/mill/year. There were no cases in the age group 20-29 years. The highest incidence......-1993, the relative number of reported patients with vertebral osteomyelitis had increased in the age group 20-49 years, compared to 1978-1982, but the incidence was highest in the group aged 60-79 years....

  5. The vertebral biomechanic previous and after kyphoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesce, V; Piazzolla, Andrea; Moretti, L; Carlucci, S; Parato, C; Maxy, P; Moretti, B

    2013-10-01

    The biomechanical understanding of increasing anterior column load with progressing kyphosis leading to subsequent vertebral compression fracture (VCF) established the basic rationale for kyphoplasty. The lumbar spine can support an effort of 500 kg in the axis of the vertebral body, and a bending moment of 20 Nm in flexion. Consequently, if this effort is forward deviated of only 10 cm, the acceptable effort will be reduced to 20 kg so it is important to restore the vertebral anterior wall after a VCF: the authors describe the biomechanical modifications in the spine after kyphoplasty.

  6. Simulated cytoskeletal collapse via tau degradation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Austin Sendek

    Full Text Available We present a coarse-grained two dimensional mechanical model for the microtubule-tau bundles in neuronal axons in which we remove taus, as can happen in various neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimers disease, tauopathies, and chronic traumatic encephalopathy. Our simplified model includes (i taus modeled as entropic springs between microtubules, (ii removal of taus from the bundles due to phosphorylation, and (iii a possible depletion force between microtubules due to these dissociated phosphorylated taus. We equilibrate upon tau removal using steepest descent relaxation. In the absence of the depletion force, the transverse rigidity to radial compression of the bundles falls to zero at about 60% tau occupancy, in agreement with standard percolation theory results. However, with the attractive depletion force, spring removal leads to a first order collapse of the bundles over a wide range of tau occupancies for physiologically realizable conditions. While our simplest calculations assume a constant concentration of microtubule intercalants to mediate the depletion force, including a dependence that is linear in the detached taus yields the same collapse. Applying percolation theory to removal of taus at microtubule tips, which are likely to be the protective sites against dynamic instability, we argue that the microtubule instability can only obtain at low tau occupancy, from 0.06-0.30 depending upon the tau coordination at the microtubule tips. Hence, the collapse we discover is likely to be more robust over a wide range of tau occupancies than the dynamic instability. We suggest in vitro tests of our predicted collapse.

  7. Galactic collapse of scalar field dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcubierre, Miguel [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Am Muehlenberg 1, D-14476 Golm (Germany); Guzman, F Siddhartha [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Am Muehlenberg 1, D-14476 Golm (Germany); Matos, Tonatiuh [Departamento de Fisica, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, AP 14-740, 07000 Mexico, DF (Mexico); Nunez, Dario [Centre for Gravitational Physics and Geometry, Penn State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Urena-Lopez, L Arturo [Departamento de Fisica, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, AP 14-740, 07000 Mexico, DF (Mexico); Wiederhold, Petra [Departamento de Control Automatico, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, AP 14-740, 07000 Mexico, DF (Mexico)

    2002-10-07

    We present a scenario for core galaxy formation based on the hypothesis of scalar field dark matter. We interpret galaxy formation through the collapse of a scalar field fluctuation. We find that a cosh potential for the self-interaction of the scalar field provides a reasonable scenario for the formation of a galactic core plus a remnant halo, which is in agreement with cosmological observations and phenomenological studies in galaxies.

  8. Ground deformations in collapsed caldera structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Natale, Giuseppe; Pingue, Folco

    1993-09-01

    A method is presented to analyze the effect of stress-strain discontinuities on the ground deformations generated by a pressure source. This is meant to simulate the effects due to caldera structures, likely to present fractured zones at the borders of the collapsed area. A method originally developed by Crouch (1976) to solve plane-strain problems has been used to simulate deformation curves for several source and discontinuity geometries. The main result is that the location of the discontinuities controls the extension of the deformed zone, and always reduces it with respect to a continuous medium. With respect to a homogeneous medium the presence of lateral discontinuities also acts towards lowering the overpressure required to produce a given amount of deformation. These results indicate that, when analyzing ground deformations in calderas, the use of classical methods involving continuous media should be avoided, or at least taken with caution. These methods, in fact, assume that the extension of the deformed zone is only linked to the source depth. Some examples of ground deformations in active calderas have been analyzed in the framework of the results obtained from theoretical modeling. Four calderas recently affected by ground deformations have been considered: Rabaul (New Guinea), Campi Flegrei (Italy), Long Valley and Yellowstone (U.S.A.). The effects of collapsed structures on the deformation field are possibly evidenced for all the four calderas. At Rabaul and Campi Flegrei, the fracture systems mainly affecting the ground deformations probably represent younger, innermost collapses and are well evidenced by seismicity studies. Ground deformations are here concentrated in an area much smaller than the one enclosed by geologically visible caldera rims. In particular, at Rabaul, the effect of the innermost collapse can explain the high concentration of the uplift in the period 1971-1985, previously modeled by a very shallow source (1-3 km) in terms of

  9. Adsorption-like Collapse of Diblock Copolymers

    OpenAIRE

    Orlandini, E.; Seno, F.; Stella, A. L.

    1999-01-01

    A linear copolymer made of two reciprocally attracting N-monomer blocks collapses to a compact phase through a novel transition, whose exponents are determined with extensive MC simulations in two and three dimensions. In the former case, an identification with the statistical geometry of suitable percolation paths allows to predict that the number of contacts between the blocks grows like $N^{9/16}$. In the compact phase the blocks are mixed and, in two dimensions, also zipped, in such a way...

  10. Ultrasonographic evaluation of tracheal collapse in dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Kidong; Moon, Kumjung; Seong, Yunsang; Oh, Taeho; Yi, Sungjoon; Lee, Keunwoo

    2008-01-01

    Tracheal ultrasonography was performed to measure the width of the tracheal ring shadow and to assess the clinical relevance of these measurements for identifying tracheal collapse. The first tracheal ring width (FTRW) and thoracic inlet tracheal ring width (TITRW) were measured on both expiration and inspiration. The mean of the FTRW width (129 dogs) was greater in expiration (10.97 ± 1.02 mm, p = 0.001) than that in inspiration (9.86 ± 1.03 mm). For 51 normal dogs, the mean of the TITRW width was greater in expiration (9.05 ± 1.52 mm, p = 0.001) than in inspiration (8.02 ± 1.43 mm). For 78 tracheal collapse dogs, the mean of the TITRW width was greater in expiration (15.89 ± 1.01 mm, p = 0.001) than in inspiration (14.85 ± 1.17 mm). The TITRW/FTRW ratio of the normal dogs was higher (p = 0.001) in expiration (0.81 ± 0.09) than that in inspiration (0.79 ± 0.10). When compared between the normal and tracheal collapse dogs, the TITRW/FTRW ratio was also increased (p = 0.001) both in expiration (1.54 ± 0.09) and inspiration (1.47 ± 0.08), respectively. Based on these results, the cutoff level of the TITRW/FTRW ratio was statistically analyzed according to the receiver operating characteristic curve and it could be set at 1.16 in expiration and at 1.13 in inspiration. We have demonstrated that tracheal ultrasonography is a useful technique for the evaluation of tracheal collapse and it can be a supportive tool together with the radiographic findings for making the correct diagnosis. PMID:19043316

  11. The Collapse of Ecosystem Engineer Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José F. Fontanari

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Humans are the ultimate ecosystem engineers who have profoundly transformed the world’s landscapes in order to enhance their survival. Somewhat paradoxically, however, sometimes the unforeseen effect of this ecosystem engineering is the very collapse of the population it intended to protect. Here we use a spatial version of a standard population dynamics model of ecosystem engineers to study the colonization of unexplored virgin territories by a small settlement of engineers. We find that during the expansion phase the population density reaches values much higher than those the environment can support in the equilibrium situation. When the colonization front reaches the boundary of the available space, the population density plunges sharply and attains its equilibrium value. The collapse takes place without warning and happens just after the population reaches its peak number. We conclude that overpopulation and the consequent collapse of an expanding population of ecosystem engineers is a natural consequence of the nonlinear feedback between the population and environment variables.

  12. Matter and gravitons in the gravitational collapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Casadio

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We consider the effects of gravitons in the collapse of baryonic matter that forms a black hole. We first note that the effective number of (soft off-shell gravitons that account for the (negative Newtonian potential energy generated by the baryons is conserved and always in agreement with Bekenstein's area law of black holes. Moreover, their (positive interaction energy reproduces the expected post-Newtonian correction and becomes of the order of the total ADM mass of the system when the size of the collapsing object approaches its gravitational radius. This result supports a scenario in which the gravitational collapse of regular baryonic matter produces a corpuscular black hole without central singularity, in which both gravitons and baryons are marginally bound and form a Bose–Einstein condensate at the critical point. The Hawking emission of baryons and gravitons is then described by the quantum depletion of the condensate and we show the two energy fluxes are comparable, albeit negligibly small on astrophysical scales.

  13. Matter and gravitons in the gravitational collapse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casadio, Roberto, E-mail: casadio@bo.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Alma Mater Universià di Bologna, via Irnerio 46, 40126 Bologna (Italy); I.N.F.N., Sezione di Bologna, IS FLAG, viale B. Pichat 6/2, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Giugno, Andrea, E-mail: A.Giugno@physik.uni-muenchen.de [Arnold Sommerfeld Center, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Theresienstraße 37, 80333 München (Germany); Giusti, Andrea, E-mail: andrea.giusti@bo.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Alma Mater Universià di Bologna, via Irnerio 46, 40126 Bologna (Italy); I.N.F.N., Sezione di Bologna, IS FLAG, viale B. Pichat 6/2, I-40127 Bologna (Italy)

    2016-12-10

    We consider the effects of gravitons in the collapse of baryonic matter that forms a black hole. We first note that the effective number of (soft off-shell) gravitons that account for the (negative) Newtonian potential energy generated by the baryons is conserved and always in agreement with Bekenstein's area law of black holes. Moreover, their (positive) interaction energy reproduces the expected post-Newtonian correction and becomes of the order of the total ADM mass of the system when the size of the collapsing object approaches its gravitational radius. This result supports a scenario in which the gravitational collapse of regular baryonic matter produces a corpuscular black hole without central singularity, in which both gravitons and baryons are marginally bound and form a Bose–Einstein condensate at the critical point. The Hawking emission of baryons and gravitons is then described by the quantum depletion of the condensate and we show the two energy fluxes are comparable, albeit negligibly small on astrophysical scales.

  14. Cooperation, cheating, and collapse in microbial populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gore, Jeff

    2012-02-01

    Natural populations can suffer catastrophic collapse in response to small changes in environmental conditions, and recovery after such a collapse can be exceedingly difficult. We have used laboratory yeast populations to study proposed early warning signals of impending extinction. Yeast cooperatively breakdown the sugar sucrose, meaning that there is a minimum number of cells required to sustain the population. We have demonstrated experimentally that the fluctuations in the population size increase in magnitude and become slower as the population approaches collapse. The cooperative nature of yeast growth on sucrose suggests that the population may be susceptible to cheater cells, which do not contribute to the public good and instead merely take advantage of the cooperative cells. We have confirmed this possibility experimentally by using a cheater yeast strain that lacks the gene encoding the cooperative behavior [1]. However, recent results in the lab demonstrate that the presence of a bacterial competitor may drive cooperation within the yeast population.[4pt] [1] Gore et al, Nature 459, 253 -- 256 (2009)

  15. Essential ingredients in core-collapse supernovae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Raphael Hix

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Carrying 1044 joules of kinetic energy and a rich mix of newly synthesized atomic nuclei, core-collapse supernovae are the preeminent foundries of the nuclear species which make up our solar system and ourselves. Signaling the inevitable death of a massive star, and the birth of a neutron star or black hole, core-collapse supernovae combine physics over a wide range in spatial scales, from kilometer-sized hydrodynamic motions (eventually growing to gigameter scale down to femtometer-scale nuclear reactions. We will discuss our emerging understanding of the convectively-unstable, neutrino-driven explosion mechanism, based on increasingly realistic neutrino radiation hydrodynamic simulations that include progressively better nuclear and particle physics. Multi-dimensional models with spectral neutrino transport from several research groups, which slowly develop successful explosions for a range of progenitors, have recently motivated changes in our understanding of the neutrino reheating mechanism. In a similar fashion, improvements in nuclear physics, most notably explorations of weak interactions on nuclei and the nuclear equation of state, continue to refine our understanding of the births of neutron stars and the supernovae that result. Recent progress on both the macroscopic and microscopic effects that affect core-collapse supernovae are discussed.

  16. Collapse of tall granular columns in fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Krishna; Soga, Kenichi; Delenne, Jean-Yves

    2017-06-01

    Avalanches, landslides, and debris flows are geophysical hazards, which involve rapid mass movement of granular solids, water, and air as a multi-phase system. In order to describe the mechanism of immersed granular flows, it is important to consider both the dynamics of the solid phase and the role of the ambient fluid. In the present study, the collapse of a granular column in fluid is studied using 2D LBM - DEM. The flow kinematics are compared with the dry and buoyant granular collapse to understand the influence of hydrodynamic forces and lubrication on the run-out. In the case of tall columns, the amount of material destabilised above the failure plane is larger than that of short columns. Therefore, the surface area of the mobilised mass that interacts with the surrounding fluid in tall columns is significantly higher than the short columns. This increase in the area of soil - fluid interaction results in an increase in the formation of turbulent vortices thereby altering the deposit morphology. It is observed that the vortices result in the formation of heaps that significantly affects the distribution of mass in the flow. In order to understand the behaviour of tall columns, the run-out behaviour of a dense granular column with an initial aspect ratio of 6 is studied. The collapse behaviour is analysed for different slope angles: 0°, 2.5°, 5° and 7.5°.

  17. Novel vacuum conditions in inflationary collapse models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengochea, Gabriel R.; León, Gabriel

    2017-11-01

    Within the framework of inflationary models that incorporate a spontaneous reduction of the wave function for the emergence of the seeds of cosmic structure, we study the effects on the primordial scalar power spectrum by choosing a novel initial quantum state that characterizes the perturbations of the inflaton. Specifically, we investigate under which conditions one can recover an essentially scale free spectrum of primordial inhomogeneities when the standard Bunch-Davies vacuum is replaced by another one that minimizes the renormalized stress-energy tensor via a Hadamard procedure. We think that this new prescription for selecting the vacuum state is better suited for the self-induced collapse proposal than the traditional one in the semiclassical gravity picture. We show that the parametrization for the time of collapse, considered in previous works, is maintained. Also, we obtain an angular spectrum for the CMB temperature anisotropies consistent with the one that best fits the observational data. Therefore, we conclude that the collapse mechanism might be of a more fundamental character than previously suspected.

  18. Precombination Cloud Collapse and Baryonic Dark Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Craig J.

    1993-01-01

    A simple spherical model of dense baryon clouds in the hot big bang 'strongly nonlinear primordial isocurvature baryon fluctuations' is reviewed and used to describe the dependence of cloud behavior on the model parameters, baryon mass, and initial over-density. Gravitational collapse of clouds before and during recombination is considered including radiation diffusion and trapping, remnant type and mass, and effects on linear large-scale fluctuation modes. Sufficiently dense clouds collapse early into black holes with a minimum mass of approx. 1 solar mass, which behave dynamically like collisionless cold dark matter. Clouds below a critical over-density, however, delay collapse until recombination, remaining until then dynamically coupled to the radiation like ordinary diffuse baryons, and possibly producing remnants of other kinds and lower mass. The mean density in either type of baryonic remnant is unconstrained by observed element abundances. However, mixed or unmixed spatial variations in abundance may survive in the diffuse baryon and produce observable departures from standard predictions.

  19. Collapse and fragmentation of molecular cloud cores. 2: Collapse induced by stellar shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boss, Alan P.

    1995-01-01

    The standard scenario for low-mass star formation involves 'inside-out' collapse of a dense molecular cloud core following loss of magnetic field support through ambipolar diffusion. However, isotopic anomalies in presolar grains and meteoritical inclusions imply that the collapse of the presolar cloud may have been triggered by a stellar shock wave. This paper explores 'outside-in' collapse, that is, protostellar collapse initiated directly by the compression of quiescent dense cloud cores impacted by relatively slow stellar shock waves. A second-order accurate, gravitational hydrodynamics code has been used to study both the spherically symmetrical and three-dimensional evolution of initially centrally condensed, isothermal, self-gravitating, solar-mass cloud cores that are struck by stellar shock waves with velocities up to 25 km/s and postshock temperatures of 10 to 10,000 K. The models show that such mild shock waves do not completely shred and destroy the cloud, and that the dynamical ram pressure can compress the cloud to the verge of self-gravitational collapse. However, compression caused by a high postshock temperature is a considerably more effective means of inducing collapse. Shock-induced collapse produces high initial mass accretion rates (greater than 10(exp -4) solar mass/yr in a solar-mass cloud) that decline rapidly to much lower values, depending on the presence (approximately 10(exp -6) solar mass/yr) or absence (approximately 10(exp -8) to 10(exp -7) solar mass/yr) of an infinite reservoir of mass. Stellar mass accretion rates approximately 10(exp -7) solar mass/yr have been previously inferred from the luminosities of T Tauri stars; balanced mass accretion (stellar rate = envelope rate) at approximately 10(exp -7) solar mass/yr could then be possible if accretion occurs from a finite mass reservoir. Fluid tracers are used to determine what fraction of the stellar shock material is incorporated into the resulting protostellar object and disk

  20. Delayed vertebral diagnosed L4 pincer vertebral fracture, L2-L3 ruptured vertebral lumbar disc hernia, L5 vertebral wedge fracture - Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balasa D

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available An association between delayed ruptured lumbar disc hernia, L5 vertebral wedge fracture and posttraumaticL4 pincer vertebral fracture (A2.3-AO clasification at different levels is a very rare entity. We present the case of a 55 years old male who falled down from a bicycle. 2 months later because of intense and permanent vertebral lumbar and radicular L2 and L3 pain (Visual Scal Autologus of Pain7-8/10 the patient came to the hospital. He was diagnosed with pincer vertebral L4 fracture (A2.3-AO clasification and L2-L3 right ruptured lumbar disc hernia in lateral reces. The patient was operated (L2-L3 right fenestration, and resection of lumbar disc hernia, bilateral stabilisation, L3-L4-L5 with titan screws and postero-lateral bone graft L4 bilateral harvested from iliac crest.

  1. Vertebral Fractures After Discontinuation of Denosumab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cummings, Steven R; Ferrari, Serge; Eastell, Richard

    2018-01-01

    Denosumab reduces bone resorption and vertebral and nonvertebral fracture risk. Denosumab discontinuation increases bone turnover markers 3 months after a scheduled dose is omitted, reaching above-baseline levels by 6 months, and decreases bone mineral density (BMD) to baseline levels by 12 months....... We analyzed the risk of new or worsening vertebral fractures, especially multiple vertebral fractures, in participants who discontinued denosumab during the FREEDOM study or its Extension. Participants received ≥2 doses of denosumab or placebo Q6M, discontinued treatment, and stayed in the study ≥7...... months after the last dose. Of 1001 participants who discontinued denosumab during FREEDOM or Extension, the vertebral fracture rate increased from 1.2 per 100 participant-years during the on-treatment period to 7.1, similar to participants who received and then discontinued placebo (n = 470; 8.5 per 100...

  2. Interconnections between the Ears in Nonmammalian Vertebrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feng, Albert S.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.

    2010-01-01

    Many of the nonmammalian vertebrates (anurans, lizards, crocodiles, and some bird species) have large, continuous air spaces connecting the middle ears and acoustically coupling the eardrums. Acoustical coupling leads to strongly enhanced directionality of the ear at frequencies where diffraction...

  3. Innate immunity in vertebrates: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riera Romo, Mario; Pérez-Martínez, Dayana; Castillo Ferrer, Camila

    2016-06-01

    Innate immunity is a semi-specific and widely distributed form of immunity, which represents the first line of defence against pathogens. This type of immunity is critical to maintain homeostasis and prevent microbe invasion, eliminating a great variety of pathogens and contributing with the activation of the adaptive immune response. The components of innate immunity include physical and chemical barriers, humoral and cell-mediated components, which are present in all jawed vertebrates. The understanding of innate defence mechanisms in non-mammalian vertebrates is the key to comprehend the general picture of vertebrate innate immunity and its evolutionary history. This is also essential for the identification of new molecules with applications in immunopharmacology and immunotherapy. In this review, we describe and discuss the main elements of vertebrate innate immunity, presenting core findings in this field and identifying areas that need further investigation. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Recombination drives vertebrate genome contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Kiwoong; Ellegren, Hans

    2012-01-01

    Selective and/or neutral processes may govern variation in DNA content and, ultimately, genome size. The observation in several organisms of a negative correlation between recombination rate and intron size could be compatible with a neutral model in which recombination is mutagenic for length changes. We used whole-genome data on small insertions and deletions within transposable elements from chicken and zebra finch to demonstrate clear links between recombination rate and a number of attributes of reduced DNA content. Recombination rate was negatively correlated with the length of introns, transposable elements, and intergenic spacer and with the rate of short insertions. Importantly, it was positively correlated with gene density, the rate of short deletions, the deletion bias, and the net change in sequence length. All these observations point at a pattern of more condensed genome structure in regions of high recombination. Based on the observed rates of small insertions and deletions and assuming that these rates are representative for the whole genome, we estimate that the genome of the most recent common ancestor of birds and lizards has lost nearly 20% of its DNA content up until the present. Expansion of transposable elements can counteract the effect of deletions in an equilibrium mutation model; however, since the activity of transposable elements has been low in the avian lineage, the deletion bias is likely to have had a significant effect on genome size evolution in dinosaurs and birds, contributing to the maintenance of a small genome. We also demonstrate that most of the observed correlations between recombination rate and genome contraction parameters are seen in the human genome, including for segregating indel polymorphisms. Our data are compatible with a neutral model in which recombination drives vertebrate genome size evolution and gives no direct support for a role of natural selection in this process.

  5. Observation of Weak Collapse in a Bose-Einstein Condensate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Eigen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We study the collapse of an attractive atomic Bose-Einstein condensate prepared in the uniform potential of an optical-box trap. We characterize the critical point for collapse and the collapse dynamics, observing universal behavior in agreement with theoretical expectations. Most importantly, we observe a clear experimental signature of the counterintuitive weak collapse, namely, that making the system more unstable can result in a smaller particle loss. We experimentally determine the scaling laws that govern the weak-collapse atom loss, providing a benchmark for the general theories of nonlinear wave phenomena.

  6. Observation of Weak Collapse in a Bose-Einstein Condensate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eigen, Christoph; Gaunt, Alexander L.; Suleymanzade, Aziza; Navon, Nir; Hadzibabic, Zoran; Smith, Robert P.

    2016-10-01

    We study the collapse of an attractive atomic Bose-Einstein condensate prepared in the uniform potential of an optical-box trap. We characterize the critical point for collapse and the collapse dynamics, observing universal behavior in agreement with theoretical expectations. Most importantly, we observe a clear experimental signature of the counterintuitive weak collapse, namely, that making the system more unstable can result in a smaller particle loss. We experimentally determine the scaling laws that govern the weak-collapse atom loss, providing a benchmark for the general theories of nonlinear wave phenomena.

  7. Prevalence of vertebral fractures and quality of life in a sample of postmenopausal Brazilian women with osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira Ferreira, Néville; da Silva, Raimunda Beserra; Arthuso, Michael; Pinto-Neto, Aarão Mendes; Caserta, Nelson; Costa-Paiva, Lúcia

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of vertebral fracture was high in postmenopausal Brazilian osteoporotic women; quality of life was impaired regardless of vertebral fractures, despite a direct correlation between the number of vertebral fractures and a worse quality of life score. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the prevalence of vertebral fractures (VF), quality of life (QOL), association between number of VF and QOL scores, and correlate the factors associated with QOL in a sample of postmenopausal Brazilian women with osteoporosis. A cross-sectional study of 126 postmenopausal osteoporotic women aged 55-80 years was conducted. Women were interviewed about sociodemographic and clinical data, responded to QUALEFFO-41 questionnaire, and underwent vertebral radiography to measure the anterior, mean, and posterior height at each vertebra (T4 to L5). VF were classified as anterior wedge, posterior wedge, central collapse, and crush. Data was expressed as means (±SD) and frequencies, Mann-Whitney or Student's T tests were used to compare means, and odds ratio and 95 % confidence interval were used for multiple regression analysis. Values were significant when P value obesity, unemployment, sedentary lifestyle, low level of school education, and non-use of osteoporosis drugs. There was a high prevalence of VF in Brazilian postmenopausal women with osteoporosis. QOL was impaired regardless of VF, despite a direct correlation between number of VF and a worse QOL score.

  8. Quantum dust collapse in 2+1 dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Sarkar, Souvik; Wijewardhana, L C R

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we will examine the consequence of a canonical theory of quantum dust collapse in 2+1 dimensions. The solution of the WDW equation describing the collapse indicates that collapsing shells outside the apparent horizon are accompanied by outgoing shells within the apparent horizon during their collapse phase and stop collapsing once they reach the apparent horizon. Taking this picture of quantum collapse seriously, we determine a static solution with energy density corresponding to a dust ball whose collapse has terminated at the apparent horizon. We show that the boundary radius of the ball is larger than the BTZ radius confirming that no event horizon is formed. The ball is sustained by radial pressure which we determine and which we attribute to the Unruh radiation within it.

  9. Simulations of protostellar collapse using multigroup radiation hydrodynamics. I. The first collapse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaytet, Neil; Audit, Edouard; Chabrier, Gilles

    2012-01-01

    Radiative transfer plays a major role in the process of star formation. Many simulations of gravitational collapse of a cold gas cloud followed by the formation of a protostellar core use a grey treatment of radiative transfer coupled to the hydrodynamics. However, dust opacities which dominate...... the spherically symmetric collapse of a 1 solar mass cloud core. Monochromatic dust opacities for five different temperature ranges were used to compute Planck and Rosseland means inside each frequency group. The results are very consistent with previous studies and only small differences were observed between...... the grey and multigroup simulations. For a same central density, the multigroup simulations tend to produce first cores with a slightly higher radius and central temperature. We also performed simulations of the collapse of a 10 and 0.1 solar mass cloud, which showed the properties of the first core...

  10. In quest of Great Lakes ice age vertebrates

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Holman, J. Alan

    2001-01-01

    ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 The Pleistocene in the Great Lakes Region . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Where to Find Vertebrate Fossils...

  11. Evaluation of collapse and non-collapse of parallel bridges affected by liquefaction and lateral spreading.

    OpenAIRE

    Turner, Benjamin; Brandenberg, Scott J.; Stewart, Jonathan P.

    2013-01-01

    An overview is presented of the authors’ ongoing investigation of the performance of a railroad bridge and adjacent highway bridge during the 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake in Baja California, Mexico. A span of the pile-supported railroad bridge collapsed due to movement of a pier from lateral spreading. The highway bridge, supported on drilled shafts, suffered moderate structural damage but did not collapse. An overview of the site, structural details of the bridges, and the proposed geote...

  12. Surgical procedure and initial radiographic results of a new augmentation technique for vertebral compression fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaler, Martin; Lechner, Ricarda; Nogler, Michael; Gstöttner, Michaela; Bach, Christian

    2013-07-01

    Recently, a new minimally invasive technique called 'vertebral body stenting' (VBS) was introduced for the treatment of osteoporotic vertebral fractures. The technique was developed to prevent the loss of reduction after deflation of the balloon and to reduce the complication rate associated with cement leakage. The amount of kyphosis correction, improvement of vertebral body height and quantitative cement leakage rate by applying CT-based quantitative volumetry after VBS were measured in 27 patients (55 vertebra) and compared with a control group (29 patients, 61 vertebrae), which was treated with conventional vertebroplasty. After VBS, a significant improvement was seen in vertebral height, compared to conventional vertebroplasty. The mean improvement in segmental kyphosis and vertebral kyphosis were 5.8° (p VBS group, the mean injected volume of cement per vertebral body was 7.33 cm(3) (3.34-10.19 cm(3)). The average amount of cement outside the vertebrae was 0.28 cm(3) (0.01-1.64 cm(3)), which was 1.36% of the applied total cement volume. In the vertebroplasty group, the applied mean volume of the cement per level was 2.7 cm(3) (1-5.8 cm(3)) and the average amount of cement outside the vertebrae was 0.15 cm(3) (0.01-1.8 cm(3)), which was 11.5% (0.2-60%) of the applied total volume of cement. The frequency of cement leakage after VBS was 25.5% compared to 42.1% in the vertebroplasty group. VBS led to a significant decrease in the leakage rate compared with conventional vertebroplasty.

  13. Thermal and Chemical Evolution of Collapsing Filaments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, William J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Scannapieco, Evan [Arizona State Univ., Mesa, AZ (United States). School of Earth and Space Exploration

    2013-01-15

    Intergalactic filaments form the foundation of the cosmic web that connect galaxies together, and provide an important reservoir of gas for galaxy growth and accretion. Here we present very high resolution two-dimensional simulations of the thermal and chemical evolution of such filaments, making use of a 32 species chemistry network that tracks the evolution of key molecules formed from hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon. We study the evolution of filaments over a wide range of parameters including the initial density, initial temperature, strength of the dissociating UV background, and metallicity. In low-redshift, Z ≈ 0.1Z filaments, the evolution is determined completely by the initial cooling time. If this is sufficiently short, the center of the filament always collapses to form dense, cold core containing a substantial fraction of molecules. In high-redshift, Z = 10-3Z filaments, the collapse proceeds much more slowly. This is due mostly to the lower initial temperatures, which leads to a much more modest increase in density before the atomic cooling limit is reached, making subsequent molecular cooling much less efficient. Finally, we study how the gravitational potential from a nearby dwarf galaxy affects the collapse of the filament and compare this to NGC 5253, a nearby starbusting dwarf galaxy thought to be fueled by the accretion of filament gas. In contrast to our fiducial case, a substantial density peak forms at the center of the potential. This peak evolves faster than the rest of the filament due to the increased rate at which chemical species form and cooling occur. We find that we achieve similar accretion rates as NGC 5253, but our two-dimensional simulations do not recover the formation of the giant molecular clouds that are seen in radio observations.

  14. THERMAL AND CHEMICAL EVOLUTION OF COLLAPSING FILAMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, William J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-038, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Scannapieco, Evan [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, P.O. Box 871404, Tempe, AZ 85287-1494 (United States)

    2013-05-10

    Intergalactic filaments form the foundation of the cosmic web that connect galaxies together, and provide an important reservoir of gas for galaxy growth and accretion. Here we present very high resolution two-dimensional simulations of the thermal and chemical evolution of such filaments, making use of a 32 species chemistry network that tracks the evolution of key molecules formed from hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon. We study the evolution of filaments over a wide range of parameters including the initial density, initial temperature, strength of the dissociating UV background, and metallicity. In low-redshift, Z Almost-Equal-To 0.1 Z{sub Sun} filaments, the evolution is determined completely by the initial cooling time. If this is sufficiently short, the center of the filament always collapses to form a dense, cold core containing a substantial fraction of molecules. In high-redshift, Z = 10{sup -3} Z{sub Sun} filaments, the collapse proceeds much more slowly. This is mostly due to the lower initial temperatures, which lead to a much more modest increase in density before the atomic cooling limit is reached, making subsequent molecular cooling much less efficient. Finally, we study how the gravitational potential from a nearby dwarf galaxy affects the collapse of the filament and compare this to NGC 5253, a nearby starbursting dwarf galaxy thought to be fueled by the accretion of filament gas. In contrast to our fiducial case, a substantial density peak forms at the center of the potential. This peak evolves faster than the rest of the filament due to the increased rate at which chemical species form and cooling occurs. We find that we achieve similar accretion rates as NGC 5253 but our two-dimensional simulations do not recover the formation of the giant molecular clouds that are seen in radio observations.

  15. Vertebral Artery Caught in the Fracture Gap after Traumatic C2/3 Spondylolisthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf Henkelmann

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Context. Patient with a C2 fracture and entrapment of the right vertebral artery in the fracture gap. Purpose. Presentation of a case with follow-up until end of treatment. Study Design. Case report. Methods. A 25-year-old woman was brought into our emergency room after falling while riding a horse. She complained of pain in the cervical spine. Clinical examinations showed local tenderness at the upper cervical spine and painful impairment of the mobility of the neck, with no signs of neurological impairment. Radiological diagnostics revealed a traumatic C2/3 spondylolisthesis. A computer tomography (CT angiographic scan showed a dislocation of the right vertebral artery into the fracture gap without injury to the artery. Open reduction and osteosynthesis were considered of too high risk. Therefore, we conducted fracture treatment with closed reduction and halo fixation. After removal of the halo fixator, the patient was given a soft cervical collar and was advised to rest for additional 6 weeks before beginning gradual activity. Results. Conventional follow-up revealed osseous consolidation and a CT angiographic scan showed consistent blood flow to the artery. Conclusion. Halo fixation was a safe and effective therapy strategy in the case of vertebral artery entrapment after traumatic C2 spondylolisthesis.

  16. X-ray morphology of the eburnated vertebral body - diagnostic and differential diagnostic problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krug, B.; Lorenz, R.; Steinbrich, W.

    1988-08-01

    1. Numerous diseases may become manifest as eburnated vertebral bodies, and hence the X-ray morphological sign of eburnation is an unspecific one. Isolated characteristics such as the involvement of one or several vertebrae, an intact vertebral space, a broadening of the paravertebral accompanying shadow, and the remaining radiological skeletal status enable narrowing down the differential diagnosis, although anamnesis and clinical findings will supply the main pointers. 2. In primary tumorous eburnations radiotherapy or chemotherapy will render an X-ray morphological assessment of therapeutic success impossible. 3. In primary diagnosis of an eburnated vertebral body it is possible to apply sonography. CT and MR as diagnostic tools step by step to narrow down the differential diagnosis by detecting or excluding pathological abdominal processes such as liver or lymphatic node metastases, paravertebral or intraspinal soft-part dense space-occupying growths or bone infiltration, but it will only rarely be possible to classify the phenomenon properly as being caused by a well-defined process, even if CT and MR are employed.

  17. Climate and the collapse of Maya civilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haug, Gerald H; Günther, Detlef; Peterson, Larry C; Sigman, Daniel M; Hughen, Konrad A; Aeschlimann, Beat

    2003-03-14

    In the anoxic Cariaco Basin of the southern Caribbean, the bulk titanium content of undisturbed sediment reflects variations in riverine input and the hydrological cycle over northern tropical South America. A seasonally resolved record of titanium shows that the collapse of Maya civilization in the Terminal Classic Period occurred during an extended regional dry period, punctuated by more intense multiyear droughts centered at approximately 810, 860, and 910 A.D. These new data suggest that a century-scale decline in rainfall put a general strain on resources in the region, which was then exacerbated by abrupt drought events, contributing to the social stresses that led to the Maya demise.

  18. Anomalous elastic properties across the γ to α volume collapse in cerium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipp, Magnus J.; Jenei, Zs.; Cynn, H.; Kono, Y.; Park, C.; Kenney-Benson, C.; Evans, W.J. (LLNL); (CIW)

    2017-10-31

    The behavior of the f-electrons in the lanthanides and actinides governs important macroscopic properties but their pressure and temperature dependence is not fully explored. Cerium with nominally just one 4f electron offers a case study with its iso-structural volume collapse from the γ-phase to the α-phase ending in a critical point (pC, VC, TC), unique among the elements, whose mechanism remains controversial. Here, we present longitudinal (cL) and transverse sound speeds (cT) versus pressure from higher than room temperature to TC for the first time. While cL experiences a non-linear dip at the volume collapse, cT shows a step-like change. This produces very peculiar macroscopic properties: the minimum in the bulk modulus becomes more pronounced, the step-like increase of the shear modulus diminishes and the Poisson’s ratio becomes negative—meaning that cerium becomes auxetic. At the critical point itself cerium lacks any compressive strength but offers resistance to shear.

  19. Evolution of circadian organization in vertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Menaker

    1997-03-01

    Full Text Available Circadian organization means the way in which the entire circadian system above the cellular level is put together physically and the principles and rules that determine the interactions among its component parts which produce overt rhythms of physiology and behavior. Understanding this organization and its evolution is of practical importance as well as of basic interest. The first major problem that we face is the difficulty of making sense of the apparently great diversity that we observe in circadian organization of diverse vertebrates. Some of this diversity falls neatly into place along phylogenetic lines leading to firm generalizations: i in all vertebrates there is a "circadian axis" consisting of the retinas, the pineal gland and the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN, ii in many non-mammalian vertebrates of all classes (but not in any mammals the pineal gland is both a photoreceptor and a circadian oscillator, and iii in all non-mammalian vertebrates (but not in any mammals there are extraretinal (and extrapineal circadian photoreceptors. An interesting explanation of some of these facts, especially the differences between mammals and other vertebrates, can be constructed on the assumption that early in their evolution mammals passed through a "nocturnal bottleneck". On the other hand, a good deal of the diversity among the circadian systems of vertebrates does not fall neatly into place along phylogenetic lines. In the present review we will consider how we might better understand such "phylogenetically incoherent" diversity and what sorts of new information may help to further our understanding of the evolution of circadian organization in vertebrates

  20. Potential underdiagnosis of osteoporosis in repeated vertebral augmentation for new vertebral compression fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İlhan B

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Birkan İlhan, Fatih Tufan, Gülistan Bahat, Mehmet Akif KaranDivision of Geriatrics, Department of Internal Medicine, Istanbul Medical School, Istanbul University, Istanbul, TurkeyWe read with great interest the article by Liang et al “Repeated vertebral augmentation for new vertebral compression fractures of postvertebral augmentation patients: a nationwide cohort study”.1\tIn their study, the authors investigated the factors possibly associated with new vertebral compression fractures in patients who previously had vertebral augmentation procedures. They reported that osteoporosis (OP was not observed as a risk factor for repeat vertebral augmentation. Among multiple chronic diseases, hypertension (HT was reported as one factor associated with new vertebral fractures. Among the medications used to treat or prevent OP, they reported calcium/vitamin D, bisphosphonates, and calcitonin were associated with not having repeat vertebral augmentation. However, steroids, paracetamol, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were associated with having repeat vertebral augmentation. We would like to comment on their article.View original paper by Kurimato and colleagues.

  1. Vertebral derotation in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis causes hypokyphosis of the thoracic spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watanabe Kota

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that direct vertebral derotation by pedicle screws (PS causes hypokyphosis of the thoracic spine in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS patients, using computer simulation. Methods Twenty AIS patients with Lenke type 1 or 2 who underwent posterior correction surgeries using PS were included in this study. Simulated corrections of each patient’s scoliosis, as determined by the preoperative CT scan data, were performed on segmented 3D models of the whole spine. Two types of simulated extreme correction were performed: 1 complete coronal correction only (C method and 2 complete coronal correction with complete derotation of vertebral bodies (C + D method. The kyphosis angle (T5-T12 and vertebral rotation angle at the apex were measured before and after the simulated corrections. Results The mean kyphosis angle after the C + D method was significantly smaller than that after the C method (2.7 ± 10.0° vs. 15.0 ± 7.1°, p  Conclusions In the 3D simulation study, kyphosis was reduced after complete correction of the coronal and rotational deformity, but it was maintained after the coronal-only correction. These results proved the hypothesis that the vertebral derotation obtained by PS causes hypokyphosis of the thoracic spine.

  2. A case of vertebral artery dissection associated with morning blood pressure surge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eguchi, Kazuo; Tachikawa, Yuichi; Kashima, Ryuichi; Shinohara, Michi; Fukushima, Fumiya; Sato, Takashi; Takeda, Akira; Numao, Toshio; Numao, Toshiro; Kario, Kazuomi; Shimada, Kazuyuki

    2005-10-01

    We report a case of a middle-aged man who suffered a cerebral infarction resulting from dissection of a vertebral artery associated with morning blood pressure surge. A 56-year-old man was transferred to our hospital with dizziness and vomiting in the early morning on a cold day in winter. He reported that he had been standing in front of the sink after bathing when he suddenly felt dizzy and fell down. He did not lose consciousness, and by the time he reached the hospital by ambulance, his dizziness had subsided, but he complained of severe headache and vomited 3 times. On admission, he was alert, and there were no neurological or radiological abnormalities (CT, MR angiography) in the brain. However, infarction in the left cerebellar hemisphere was detected by brain MRI on the 5th day of hospitalization. String sign of the left vertebral artery was noted by angiography, confirming the diagnosis of dissection of the left vertebral artery. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring was performed after discharge. Although the mean 24-h blood pressure was in the normal range, a marked morning blood pressure rise was observed. We speculated that the acute rise of blood pressure in the early morning might have contributed to the dissection of the vertebral artery.

  3. Null fluid collapse in brane world models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harko, Tiberiu; Lake, Matthew J.

    2014-03-01

    The brane world description of our Universe entails a large extra dimension and a fundamental scale of gravity that may be lower than the Planck scale by several orders of magnitude. An interesting consequence of this scenario occurs in the nature of spherically symmetric vacuum solutions to the brane gravitational field equations, which often have properties quite distinct from the standard black hole solutions of general relativity. In this paper, the spherically symmetric collapse on the brane world of four types of null fluid, governed by the barotropic, polytropic, strange quark "bag" model and Hagedorn equations of state, is investigated. In each case, we solve the approximate gravitational field equations, obtained in the high-density limit, determine the equation which governs the formation of apparent horizons and investigate the conditions for the formation of naked singularities. Though, naively, one would expect the increased effective energy density on the brane to favor the formation of black holes over naked singularities, we find that, for the types of fluid considered, this is not the case. However, the black hole solutions differ substantially from their general-relativistic counterparts and brane world corrections often play a role analogous to charge in general relativity. As an astrophysical application of this work, the possibility that energy emission from a Hagedorn fluid collapsing to form a naked singularity may be a source of GRBs in the brane world is also considered.

  4. Spherical collapse in νΛCDM

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoVerde, Marilena

    2014-10-01

    The abundance of massive dark matter halos hosting galaxy clusters provides an important test of the masses of relic neutrino species. The dominant effect of neutrino mass is to lower the typical amplitude of density perturbations that eventually form halos, but for neutrino masses ≳0.4 eV the threshold for halo formation can be changed significantly as well. We study the spherical collapse model for halo formation in cosmologies with neutrino masses in the range mνi=0.05-1 eV and find that halo formation is differently sensitive to Ων and mν. That is, different neutrino hierarchies with a common Ων are in principle distinguishable. The added sensitivity to mν is small but potentially important for scenarios with heavier sterile neutrinos. Massive neutrinos cause the evolution of density perturbations to be scale dependent at high redshift which complicates the usual mapping between the collapse threshold and halo abundance. We propose one way of handling this and compute the correction to the halo mass function within this framework. For ∑mνi≲0.3 eV, our prescription for the halo abundance is only ≲15% different than the standard calculation. However for larger neutrino masses the differences approach 50-100% which, if verified by simulations, could alter neutrino mass constraints from cluster abundance.

  5. Online fuzzy voltage collapse risk quantification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berizzi, A.; Bovo, C.; Delfanti, M.; Merlo, M. [Politecnico di Milano, 20133 Milano (Italy); Cirio, D. [CESI Ricerca (Italy); Pozzi, M. [CESI (Italy)

    2009-05-15

    Many voltage stability indicators have been proposed in the past for the voltage collapse assessment. Almost all of them are determined through quite complex analytical tools; therefore, it is difficult for system operators to give them a physical meaning. In order to perform a simple and reliable evaluation of the security margins, it is necessary to make a synthesis of the information given by the various indices. The present work proposes an Artificial Intelligence-based tool for the evaluation of the voltage security. In particular, a Fuzzy Inference Engine is developed and optimized by two different approaches (Neural Networks and Genetic Algorithms). Starting from the state estimation, a given set of mathematical indices is computed to represent a snapshot of the current electric system operating point. The numerical values are then translated into a set of symbolic and linguistic quantities that are manipulated through a set of logical connectives and Inference Methods provided by the mathematical logic. As a result, the Fuzzy Logic gives a MW measure of the distance from the collapse limit, a metric usually appreciated by system operators. The Fuzzy System has been built and optimized by using, as a test system, a detailed model of the EHV Italian transmission network connected to an equivalent of the UCTE network (about 1700 buses). (author)

  6. Vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty in osteoporotic fractures of vertebral bodies - a prospective 1-year follow-up analysis; Vertebroplastie und Kyphoplastie bei osteoporotischen Wirbelkoerperfrakturen - Eine prospektive Analyse der Einjahresergebnisse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pflugmacher, R.; Kandziora, F.; Schroeder, R.; Schleicher, P.; Scholz, M.; Schnake, K.; Haas, N.; Khodadadyan-Klostermann, C. [Charite - Centrum fuer Muskuloskeletale Chirurgie, Berlin (Germany)

    2005-12-15

    Purpose: Kyphoplasty and vertebroplasty offer two minimally invasive operative stabilization procedures for vertebral compression fractures. The purpose of this prospective study was to investigate whether both procedures are able to reduce pain and to preserve postoperative vertebral height during a 1-year follow up. Materials and methods: Osteoporotic vertebral fractures were treated in 42 cases, 20 patients (15 female, 5 male) underwent vertebroplasty, 22 patients (14 female, 8 male) underwent kyphoplasty. 32 vertebral fractures were treated with vertebroplasty and 35 vertebral fractures were treated with kyphoplasty. Symptomatic levels were identified by correlating the clinical presentation with conventional radiographs, CT or/and MRI. During the follow up reduction of pain was determined. Radiographic scans were performed pre- and postoperatively and after 3, 6 and 12 months. The vertebral height and endplate angles were measured to assess the restoration of the sagittal alignment. The effects on pain symptoms were measured on a self-reported Visual Analog Scale (VAS) and the Oswestry score was documented. Results: The median pain scores (VAS) decreased significantly for kyphoplasty and vertebroplasty from pre- to post-treatment, as did the Oswestry score (p<0.05). No significant differences could be found between both groups for the median pain score (VAS) and the Oswestry score. Kyphoplasty led to a significant restoration of the vertebral height and reduction of kyphosis (p<0.05). During the 1-year follow up operation techniques were able to stabilize the height of the vertebral body. Conclusion: Kyphoplasty and vertebroplasty are effective minimally invasive procedures for the stabilization of osteoporotic vertebral fractures leading to a statistically significant reduction in pain. Kyphoplasty restores significantly vertebral body height in fresh fractures. The restoration of vertebral height and reduction of kyphosis may have an influence on the long

  7. Vertebral body stenting versus kyphoplasty for the treatment of osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Clément M L; Osterhoff, Georg; Schlickeiser, Jannis; Jenni, Raphael; Wanner, Guido A; Ossendorf, Christian; Simmen, Hans-Peter

    2013-04-03

    In the treatment of vertebral compression fractures, vertebral body stenting with an expandable scaffold inserted before application of the bone cement was developed to impede secondary loss of vertebral height encountered in patients treated with balloon kyphoplasty. The purpose of this study was to clarify whether there are relevant differences between balloon kyphoplasty and vertebral body stenting with regard to perioperative and postoperative findings. In a two-armed randomized controlled trial, patients with a total of 100 fresh osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures were treated with either balloon kyphoplasty or vertebral body stenting. The primary outcome was the post-interventional change in the kyphotic angle on radiographs. The secondary outcomes were the maximum pressure of the balloon tamp during inflation, radiation exposure time, perioperative complications, and cement leakage. The mean reduction (and standard deviation) of kyphosis (the kyphotic correction angle) was 4.5° ± 3.6° after balloon kyphoplasty and 4.7° ± 4.2° after vertebral body stenting (p = 0.972). The mean pressures were 24 ± 5 bar (348 ± 72 pounds per square inch [psi]) during vertebral body stenting and 16 ± 6 bar (233 ± 81 psi) during balloon kyphoplasty (p = 0.014). There were no significant differences in radiation exposure time.None of the patients underwent revision surgery, and postoperative neurologic sequelae were not observed. Cement leakage occurred at twenty-five of the 100 vertebral levels without significant differences between the two intervention arms (p = 0.230). Intraoperative material-related complications were observed at one of the fifty vertebral levels in the balloon kyphoplasty group and at nine of the fifty levels in the vertebral body stenting group. No beneficial effect of vertebral body stenting over balloon kyphoplasty was found among patients with painful osteoporotic vertebral fractures with regard to kyphotic correction, cement leakage

  8. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... CT scanning. top of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org: Radiation Therapy for Bladder Cancer Radiation ... Image Gallery Patient undergoing computed tomography (CT) scan View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging ...

  9. CT appearance of splenosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendelson, D.S.; Cohen, B.A.; Armas, R.R.

    1982-12-01

    Splenosis is an unusual complication of splenic trauma. The computed tomographic (CT) appearance of splenosis is described. One should consider this diagnosis when faced with a history of splenic trauma and multiple round or oval masses at CT.

  10. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... allows the body parts to be distinguished from one another on an x-ray film or CT ... benefits vs. risks? Benefits A CT scan is one of the safest means of studying the sinuses. ...

  11. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a CD or DVD. CT ... distinguished from one another on an x-ray film or CT electronic image. In a conventional x- ...

  12. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a CD or DVD. CT ... distinguished from one another on an x-ray film or CT electronic image. In a conventional x- ...

  13. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a CD or DVD. CT ... distinguished from one another on an x-ray film or CT electronic image. In a conventional x- ...

  14. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... the scanner at one time such as with MRI. If an intravenous contrast material is used, you ... CT is less sensitive to patient movement than MRI. CT can be performed if you have an ...

  15. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... microphone. top of page How does the procedure work? In many ways CT scanning works very much ... CT examinations are fast and simple; in emergency cases, they can reveal internal injuries and bleeding quickly ...

  16. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... time, resulting in more detail and additional view capabilities. Modern CT scanners are so fast that they ... the technologist verifies that the images are of high enough quality for accurate interpretation. The CT examination ...

  17. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... time, resulting in more detail and additional view capabilities. Modern CT scanners are so fast that they ... the technologist verifies that the images are of high enough quality for accurate interpretation. A CT scan ...

  18. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... time, resulting in more detail and additional view capabilities. Modern CT scanners are so fast that they ... the technologist verifies that the images are of high enough quality for accurate interpretation. The actual CT ...

  19. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... CT Angiography page . top of page How should I prepare? You should wear comfortable, loose-fitting clothing ... within 10 minutes. top of page What will I experience during and after the procedure? CT exams ...

  20. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... resulting in more detail and additional view capabilities. Modern CT scanners are so fast that they can ... to ensure that you are properly positioned. With modern CT scanners, you will hear only slight buzzing, ...

  1. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... resulting in more detail and additional view capabilities. Modern CT scanners are so fast that they can ... to ensure that you are properly positioned. With modern CT scanners, you will hear only slight buzzing, ...

  2. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... resulting in more detail and additional view capabilities. Modern CT scanners are so fast that they can ... to ensure that you are properly positioned. With modern CT scanners, you will hear only slight buzzing, ...

  3. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... benefits vs. risks? Benefits A CT scan is one of the safest means of studying the sinuses. ... CT scanning provides very detailed images of many types of tissue as well as the lungs, bones, ...

  4. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... see the CT Angiography page . top of page How should I prepare? You should wear comfortable, loose- ... of a speaker and microphone. top of page How does the procedure work? In many ways CT ...

  5. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... CT) of the abdomen and pelvis is a diagnostic imaging test used to help detect diseases of ... as a CT or CAT scan, is a diagnostic medical test that, like traditional x-rays, produces ...

  6. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... microphone. top of page How does the procedure work? In many ways CT scanning works very much ... head CT scanning. Manufacturers of intravenous contrast indicate mothers should not breastfeed their babies for 24-48 ...

  7. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... liver, shows up in shades of gray, and air appears black. With CT scanning, numerous x-ray ... be performed if you have an implanted medical device of any kind, unlike MRI. CT imaging provides ...

  8. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... which may be causing hearing problems. determine whether inflammation or other changes are present in the paranasal ... CT scans . CT is not sensitive in detecting inflammation of the meninges —the membranes covering the brain. ...

  9. Lumbar spine CT scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    CAT scan - lumbar spine; Computed axial tomography scan - lumbar spine; Computed tomography scan - lumbar spine; CT - lower ... The lumbar CT scan is good for evaluating large herniated disks, ... smaller ones. This test can be combined with a myelogram to get ...

  10. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... to a CD or DVD. CT images of internal organs, bones, soft tissue and blood vessels provide ... clicking and whirring sounds as the CT scanner's internal parts, not usually visible to you, revolve around ...

  11. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... microphone. top of page How does the procedure work? In many ways CT scanning works very much ... CT exam to be stressful. The technologist or nurse, under the direction of a physician, may offer ...

  12. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... microphone. top of page How does the procedure work? In many ways CT scanning works very much ... CT exam to be stressful. The technologist or nurse, under the direction of a physician, may offer ...

  13. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... air-filled spaces within the bones of the face surrounding the nasal cavity. CT scanning is painless, ... and blood vessels. A CT scan of the face produces images that also show a patient's paranasal ...

  14. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits A CT scan is one of the ... CT scans should have no immediate side effects. Risks There is always a slight chance of cancer ...

  15. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits CT scanning is painless, noninvasive and accurate. ... CT scans should have no immediate side effects. Risks There is always a slight chance of cancer ...

  16. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Viewing a CT scan, an experienced radiologist ... CT scans should have no immediate side effects. Risks There is always a slight chance of cancer ...

  17. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... Then, the table will move slowly through the machine as the actual CT scanning is performed. Depending on the type of CT scan, the machine may make several passes. You may be asked ...

  18. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... Then, the table will move slowly through the machine as the actual CT scanning is performed. Depending on the type of CT scan, the machine may make several passes. You may be asked ...

  19. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... Then, the table will move slowly through the machine as the actual CT scanning is performed. Depending on the type of CT scan, the machine may make several passes. You may be asked ...

  20. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view ... actual CT scanning is performed. Depending on the type of CT scan, the machine may make several ...

  1. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... body. The cross-sectional images generated during a CT scan can be reformatted in multiple planes, and can ... scanning is performed. Depending on the type of CT scan, the machine may make several passes. You may ...

  2. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... body. The cross-sectional images generated during a CT scan can be reformatted in multiple planes, and can ... particularly of soft tissues and blood vessels. A CT scan of the face produces images that also show ...

  3. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... body. The cross-sectional images generated during a CT scan can be reformatted in multiple planes, and can ... scanning is performed. Depending on the type of CT scan, the machine may make several passes. You may ...

  4. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... of CT Scanning of the Abdomen and Pelvis? What is CT Scanning of the Abdomen/Pelvis? Computed ... soft tissues and blood vessels. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? This ...

  5. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... a stroke. a stroke, especially with a new technique called Perfusion CT. brain tumors. enlarged brain cavities ( ... brain. assess aneurysms or arteriovenous malformations through a technique called CT angiography. For more information, see the ...

  6. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... CT examination can reduce the risk of serious complications, such as those caused by a burst appendix ... See the Safety page for more information about pregnancy and x-rays. CT scanning is, in general, ...

  7. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ... medical device of any kind, unlike MRI. A diagnosis determined by CT scanning may eliminate the need ...

  8. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ... particularly the lungs, abdomen, pelvis and bones. A diagnosis determined by CT scanning may eliminate the need ...

  9. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... pregnancy and x-rays. top of page What does the equipment look like? The CT scanner is ... a speaker and microphone. top of page How does the procedure work? In many ways CT scanning ...

  10. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... pregnancy and x-rays. top of page What does the equipment look like? The CT scanner is ... a speaker and microphone. top of page How does the procedure work? In many ways CT scanning ...

  11. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... the scanning. Any motion, whether breathing or body movements, can lead to artifacts on the images. This ... clinical problems. CT is less sensitive to patient movement than MRI. CT can be performed if you ...

  12. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... the scanning. Any motion, whether breathing or body movements, can lead to artifacts on the images. This ... clinical problems. CT is less sensitive to patient movement than MRI. CT can be performed if you ...

  13. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... the scanning. Any motion, whether breathing or body movements, can lead to artifacts on the images. This ... clinical problems. CT is less sensitive to patient movement than MRI. CT can be performed if you ...

  14. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... soft tissue (particularly the brain, including the disease processes) are less visible on CT scans . CT is ... possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed regularly by a ...

  15. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ... preferable over CT scanning. top of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org: Radiation Therapy for Bladder ...

  16. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... over time. Follow-up examinations are sometimes the best way to see if treatment is working or ... of clinical problems. CT is less sensitive to patient movement than MRI. CT can be performed if ...

  17. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... CT scanner is typically a large, box-like machine with a hole, or short tunnel, in the ... Then, the table will move slowly through the machine as the actual CT scanning is performed. Depending ...

  18. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... CT scanner is typically a large, box-like machine with a hole, or short tunnel, in the ... Then, the table will move slowly through the machine as the actual CT scanning is performed. Depending ...

  19. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... CT scanner is typically a large, box-like machine with a hole, or short tunnel, in the ... Then, the table will move slowly through the machine as the actual CT scanning is performed. Depending ...

  20. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... of the Head? What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT scanning of the head is typically ...

  1. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... the Sinuses? What is CT (Computed Tomography) of the Sinuses? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT of the sinuses is primarily used ...

  2. Thoracic spine CT scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    CAT scan - thoracic spine; Computed axial tomography scan - thoracic spine; Computed tomography scan - thoracic spine; CT scan - ... Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2013:chap 44. US Food and Drug Administration. Computed tomography (CT). Updated August ...

  3. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ... modality for sinusitis. CT of the sinuses is now widely available and is performed in a relatively ...

  4. Symptomatic vertebral hemangioma: Treatment with radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aich Ranen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vertebrae are the second commonest site among skeletal locations affected by hemangioma, but only about one per cent becomes symptomatic throughout the life. Though surgery, intra vertebral injection of various sclerosing agents have been tried in treating this benign process, no general consensus regarding management has been reached. Radiotherapy is emerging as a low cost, simple, non-invasive but very effective modality of treatment of symptomatic vertebral hemangioma. Aim: This study aims to find out the role of external beam radiotherapy in alleviating the symptoms of symptomatic vertebral hemangiomas without compromising the quality of life. Materials and Methods: Seven consecutive patients with symptomatic vertebral hemangioma were treated with a fixed dose of external beam radiotherapy; and muscle power was assessed before, after treatment and during follow-up. Results: All patients showed improvement of muscle power, which increased with the passage of time. Pain relief with improvement of quality of life was obtained in all the patients. Conclusion: Effect of radiotherapy on vertebral hemangioma is dose-dependent and the dose limiting factor is the spinal cord tolerance. In the present era of IMRT, greater dose can be delivered to the parts of vertebra affected by the hemangioma without compromising the spinal cord tolerance and expected to give better results.

  5. Bone creep can cause progressive vertebral deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollintine, Phillip; Luo, Jin; Offa-Jones, Ben; Dolan, Patricia; Adams, Michael A

    2009-09-01

    Vertebral deformities in elderly people are conventionally termed "fractures", but their onset is often insidious, suggesting that time-dependent (creep) processes may also be involved. Creep has been studied in small samples of bone, but nothing is known about creep deformity of whole vertebrae, or how it might be influenced by bone mineral density (BMD). We hypothesise that sustained compressive loading can cause progressive and measurable creep deformity in elderly human vertebrae. 27 thoracolumbar "motion segments" (two vertebrae and the intervening disc and ligaments) were dissected from 20 human cadavers aged 42-91 yrs. A constant compressive force of approximately 1.0 kN was applied to each specimen for either 0.5 h or 2 h, while the anterior, middle and posterior heights of each of the 54 vertebral bodies were measured at 1 Hz using a MacReflex 2D optical tracking system. This located 6 reflective markers attached to the lateral cortex of each vertebral body, with resolution better than 10 microm. Experiments were at laboratory temperature, and polythene film was used to minimise water loss. Volumetric BMD was calculated for each vertebral body, using DXA to measure mineral content, and water immersion for volume. In the 0.5 h tests, creep deformation in the anterior, middle and posterior vertebral cortex averaged 4331, 1629 and 614 micro-strains respectively, where 10,000 micro-strains represents 1% loss in height. Anterior creep strains exceeded posterior (Pspecimens with average BMDfracture.

  6. Vertebral Column Resection for Rigid Spinal Deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saifi, Comron; Laratta, Joseph L; Petridis, Petros; Shillingford, Jamal N; Lehman, Ronald A; Lenke, Lawrence G

    2017-05-01

    Broad narrative review. To review the evolution, operative technique, outcomes, and complications associated with posterior vertebral column resection. A literature review of posterior vertebral column resection was performed. The authors' surgical technique is outlined in detail. The authors' experience and the literature regarding vertebral column resection are discussed at length. Treatment of severe, rigid coronal and/or sagittal malalignment with posterior vertebral column resection results in approximately 50-70% correction depending on the type of deformity. Surgical site infection rates range from 2.9% to 9.7%. Transient and permanent neurologic injury rates range from 0% to 13.8% and 0% to 6.3%, respectively. Although there are significant variations in EBL throughout the literature, it can be minimized by utilizing tranexamic acid intraoperatively. The ability to correct a rigid deformity in the spine relies on osteotomies. Each osteotomy is associated with a particular magnitude of correction at a single level. Posterior vertebral column resection is the most powerful posterior osteotomy method providing a successful correction of fixed complex deformities. Despite meticulous surgical technique and precision, this robust osteotomy technique can be associated with significant morbidity even in the most experienced hands.

  7. A cause of circulatory collapse that should be considered following trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Hesham R

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Management of poly-trauma patients presenting to the emergency room is usually a challenging and formidable task. Two of the common problems seen in those patients are shock and neurological dysfunction. A huge differential for post-traumatic circulatory collapse exist and timely identification of the etiology is of utmost importance to avoid complications. In this report we are describing 2 cases presenting with circulatory collapse following trauma. The first case was a 29 year old female who presented after a motor vehicle accident fully conscious with severe hypotension and bradycardia. The second case presented with severe hemodynamic instability after falling at home. Physical examination of both patients revealed weakness in all 4 limbs and CT cervical spine revealed complete anterior sublaxation of C5 over C6 cervical vertebrae in the first case and partial sublaxation of C5 over C6 cervical vertebrae in the second case confirming that spinal cord injury is the likely cause for these hemodynamic alterations. A high index of suspicion for spinal cord injuries is therefore mandatory when managing a trauma patient presenting with quadriparesis and hemodynamic instability that is otherwise unexplained especially when the ensuing hypotension is associated with bradycardia instead of reflex tachycardia. Awareness of this cause of circulatory collapse is particularly important in the unconscious patient where eliciting sensory and motor deficits looking for spinal cord injury is not always feasible. Both patients were transferred to the intensive care unit and were maintained on epinephrine till becoming hemodynamically stable. The report aims to sensitize readers to this cause of post-traumatic circulatory collapse.

  8. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ... View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests ... Radiation Dose in X-Ray and CT Exams Blood Clots CT Perfusion of ...

  9. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of CT of the Sinuses? What is CT (Computed Tomography) of the Sinuses? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT scan, is a diagnostic medical test that, like traditional x-rays, produces multiple images or pictures of the inside of ...

  10. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... of CT Scanning of the Abdomen and Pelvis? What is CT Scanning of the Abdomen/Pelvis? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT scan, is a diagnostic medical test that, like traditional x-rays, produces multiple images or pictures of the inside of ...

  11. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... the limitations of CT Scanning of the Head? What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT scan, is a diagnostic medical test that, like traditional x-rays, produces multiple images or pictures of the inside of ...

  12. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... the limitations of CT of the Sinuses? What is CT (Computed Tomography) of the Sinuses? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a ... top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT of the sinuses is primarily ...

  13. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... limitations of CT Scanning of the Head? What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a ... top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT scanning of the head is ...

  14. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... microphone. top of page How does the procedure work? In many ways CT scanning works very much like other x-ray examinations. Different ... CT is less sensitive to patient movement than MRI. CT can be performed if you have an ...

  15. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... Computed tomography (CT) of the head uses special x-ray equipment to help assess head injuries, severe headaches, dizziness, and other symptoms of ... content. Related Articles and Media Radiation Dose in X-Ray and CT ... Perfusion of the Head CT Angiography (CTA) Stroke Brain Tumors Computer Tomography ( ...

  16. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... contrast materials and a metallic taste in your mouth that lasts for at most a minute or ... effective imaging tool for a wide range of clinical problems. CT is less sensitive ... body after a CT examination. X-rays used in CT scans should have ...

  17. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Radiation Dose in X-Ray and CT Exams Blood Clots CT Perfusion of the Head CT Angiography ( ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

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    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) ... are the limitations of Children's CT? What is Children's CT? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a ...

  19. Your Radiologist Explains CT Colonography

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    Full Text Available ... posted: Carotid Intima-Media Thickness Test Medical Imaging Costs Video: Coronary CT Angiography Video: Myelography Video: CT ... posted: Carotid Intima-Media Thickness Test Medical Imaging Costs Video: Coronary CT Angiography Video: Myelography Video: CT ...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

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    Full Text Available ... clinical problems. CT is less sensitive to patient movement than MRI. CT can be performed if you ... Images related to Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Videos related to Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Sponsored ...

  1. Kinematic fingerprint of core-collapsed globular clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchini, P.; Webb, J. J.; Sills, A.; Vesperini, E.

    2018-01-01

    Dynamical evolution drives globular clusters toward core collapse, which strongly shapes their internal properties. Diagnostics of core collapse have so far been based on photometry only, namely on the study of the concentration of the density profiles. Here we present a new method to robustly identify core-collapsed clusters based on the study of their stellar kinematics. We introduce the kinematic concentration parameter, ck, the ratio between the global and local degree of energy equipartition reached by a cluster, and show through extensive direct N-body simulations that clusters approaching core collapse and in the post-core collapse phase are strictly characterized by ck > 1. The kinematic concentration provides a suitable diagnostic to identify core-collapsed clusters, independent from any other previous methods based on photometry. We also explore the effects of incomplete radial and stellar mass coverage on the calculation of ck and find that our method can be applied to state-of-art kinematic datasets.

  2. [Flow diversion by double-overlapping-stent for fusiform vertebral artery aneurysm: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchino, Haruto; Asano, Takeshi; Nakayama, Naoki; Kuroda, Satoshi; Houkin, Kiyohiro

    2011-01-01

    The authors present the case of a 61-year-old male with a de novo fusiform vertebral artery aneurysm, probably due to non-traumatic dissection. He underwent flow diversion therapy, using a double overlapping technique, because the origin of the contralateral vertebral artery was stenotic. Placement of two stents resulted in marked reduction of blood flow in the aneurysm. Postoperative course was uneventful. Follow-up 3D-CT angiography revealed a patent blood flow in the stent and a gradual progression of intra-aneurysmal thrombosis. Flow diversion therapy can potentially obliterate the complicated cerebral aneurysm with the preservation of blood flow in the parent artery, and would be one of the important therapeutic options in patients with complicated aneurysms in which conventional strategies such as neck clipping, endovascular coiling and parent artery occlusion are not feasible or contraindicated.

  3. Vascular Pathology in the Extracranial Vertebral Arteries in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentsen, L; Nygård, A; Ovesen, C

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Vascular pathology in the extracranial vertebral arteries remains among the possible causes in cryptogenic stroke. However, the diagnosis is challenged by the great variety in the anatomy of the vertebral arteries, clinical symptoms and difficulties in the radiological assessments....... METHOD: The analysis was based on 657 consecutive patients with symptoms of acute stroke and a final diagnosis of ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack. On admission, a noncontrast CT cerebrum and CTA were performed. A senior consultant neuroradiologist, blinded to clinical data, reviewed all CTA...... (2.8%) with pathological findings had an unknown cause of stroke, likely posterior symptoms and no clinical stroke symptoms from the anterior circuit. Of these, 3 cases were kinked arteries (0.5%) and 15 cases (2.3%) were possible dissections. CONCLUSION: We found that in approximately 3...

  4. The effect of screw tunnels on the biomechanical stability of vertebral body after pedicle screws removal: a finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia-Ming; Zhang, Yu; Zhou, Yang; Chen, Xuan-Yin; Huang, Shan-Hu; Hua, Zi-Kai; Liu, Zhi-Li

    2017-06-01

    Posterior reduction and pedicle screw fixation is a widely used procedure for thoracic and lumbar vertebrae fractures. Usually, the pedicle screws would be removed after the fracture healing and screw tunnels would be left. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of screw tunnels on the biomechanical stability of the lumbar vertebral body after pedicle screws removal by finite element analysis (FEA). First, the CT values of the screw tunnels wall in the fractured vertebral bodies were measured in patients whose pedicle screws were removed, and they were then compared with the values of vertebral cortical bone. Second, an adult patient was included and the CT images of the lumbar spine were harvested. Three dimensional finite element models of the L1 vertebra with unilateral or bilateral screw tunnels were created based on the CT images. Different compressive loads were vertically acted on the models. The maximum loads which the models sustained and the distribution of the force in the different parts of the models were recorded and compared with each other. The CT values of the tunnels wall and vertebral cortical bone were 387.126±62.342 and 399.204±53.612, which were not statistically different (P=0.149). The models of three dimensional tetrahedral mesh finite element of normal lumbar 1 vertebra were established with good geometric similarity and realistic appearance. After given the compressive loads, the cortical bone was the first one to reach its ultimate stress. The maximum loads which the bilateral screw tunnels model, unilateral screw tunnel model, and normal vertebral model can sustain were 3.97 Mpa, 3.83 Mpa, and 3.78 Mpa, respectively. For the diameter of the screw tunnels, the model with a diameter of 6.5 mm could sustain the largest load. In addition, the stress distributing on the outside of the cortical bone gradually decreased as the thickness of the tunnel wall increased. Based on the FEA, pedicle screw tunnels would not decrease the

  5. The origin of the vertebrate skeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivar, Stuart

    2011-01-01

    The anatomy of the human and other vertebrates has been well described since the days of Leonardo da Vinci and Vesalius. The causative origin of the configuration of the bones and of their shapes and forms has been addressed over the ensuing centuries by such outstanding investigators as Goethe, Von Baer, Gegenbauer, Wilhelm His and D'Arcy Thompson, who sought to apply mechanical principles to morphogenesis. However, no coherent causative model of morphogenesis has ever been presented. This paper presents a causative model for the origin of the vertebrate skeleton, based on the premise that the body is a mosaic enlargement of self-organized patterns engrained in the membrane of the egg cell. Drawings illustrate the proposed hypothetical origin of membrane patterning and the changes in the hydrostatic equilibrium of the cytoplasm that cause topographical deformations resulting in the vertebrate body form.

  6. Mitochondrial genome organization and vertebrate phylogenetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira Sérgio Luiz

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of DNA sequencing techniques the organization of the vertebrate mitochondrial genome shows variation between higher taxonomic levels. The most conserved gene order is found in placental mammals, turtles, fishes, some lizards and Xenopus. Birds, other species of lizards, crocodilians, marsupial mammals, snakes, tuatara, lamprey, and some other amphibians and one species of fish have gene orders that are less conserved. The most probable mechanism for new gene rearrangements seems to be tandem duplication and multiple deletion events, always associated with tRNA sequences. Some new rearrangements seem to be typical of monophyletic groups and the use of data from these groups may be useful for answering phylogenetic questions involving vertebrate higher taxonomic levels. Other features such as the secondary structure of tRNA, and the start and stop codons of protein-coding genes may also be useful in comparisons of vertebrate mitochondrial genomes.

  7. A simple proof of Perelman's collapsing theorem for 3-manifolds

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Jianguo; Ge, Jian

    2010-01-01

    We will simplify earlier proofs of Perelman's collapsing theorem for 3-manifolds given by Shioya-Yamaguchi and Morgan-Tian. Among other things, we use Perelman's critical point theory (e.g., multiple conic singularity theory and his fibration theory) for Alexandrov spaces to construct the desired local Seifert fibration structure on collapsed 3-manifolds. The verification of Perelman's collapsing theorem is the last step of Perelman's proof of Thurston's Geometrization Conjecture on the class...

  8. Shell instability of a collapsing dense core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntormousi, Evangelia; Hennebelle, Patrick

    2015-02-01

    Aims: Understanding the formation of binary and multiple stellar systems largely comes down to studying the circumstances under which a condensing core fragments (or not) during the first stages of the collapse. However, both the probability of fragmentation and the number of fragments seem to be determined to a large degree by the initial conditions. In this work we explore this dependence by studying the fate of the linear perturbations of a homogeneous gas sphere, both analytically and numerically. Methods: In particular, we investigate the stability of the well-known homologous solution that describes the collapse of a uniform spherical cloud. One problem that arises in such treatments is the mathematical singularity in the perturbation equations, which corresponds to the location of the sonic point of the flow. This difficulty is surpassed here by explicitly introducing a weak shock next to the sonic point as a natural way of connecting the subsonic to the supersonic regimes. In parallel, we perform adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) numerical simulations of the linear stages of the collapse and compare the growth rates obtained by each method. Results: With this combination of analytical and numerical tools, we explore the behavior of both axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric perturbations. The numerical experiments provide the linear growth rates as a function of the core's initial virial parameter and as a function of the azimuthal wave number of the perturbation. The overlapping regime of the numerical experiments and the analytical predictions is the situation of a cold and large cloud, and in this regime the analytically calculated growth rates agree very well with the ones obtained from the simulations. Conclusions: The use of a weak shock as part of the perturbation allows us to find physically acceptable solutions to the equations for a continuous range of growth rates. The numerical simulations agree very well with the analytical prediction for the most

  9. Experimental bounds on collapse models from gravitational wave detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlesso, Matteo; Bassi, Angelo; Falferi, Paolo; Vinante, Andrea

    2016-12-01

    Wave function collapse models postulate a fundamental breakdown of the quantum superposition principle at the macroscale. Therefore, experimental tests of collapse models are also fundamental tests of quantum mechanics. Here, we compute the upper bounds on the collapse parameters, which can be inferred by the gravitational wave detectors LIGO, LISA Pathfinder, and AURIGA. We consider the most widely used collapse model, the continuous spontaneous localization (CSL) model. We show that these experiments exclude a huge portion of the CSL parameter space, the strongest bound being set by the recently launched space mission LISA Pathfinder. We also rule out a proposal for quantum-gravity-induced decoherence.

  10. Elevated dissolved organic carbon biodegradability from thawing and collapsing permafrost

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Abbott, Benjamin W; Larouche, Julia R; Jones, Jeremy B; Bowden, William B; Balser, Andrew W

    2014-01-01

    ...) in water flowing from collapsing permafrost (thermokarst) on the North Slope of Alaska and tested the role of DOC chemical composition and nutrient concentration in determining biodegradability...

  11. Slipped vertebral epiphysis (report of 2 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Reza Farrokhi

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available

    • Avulsion or fracture of posterior ring apophysis of lumbar vertebra is an uncommon cause of radicular low back pain in pediatric age group, adolescents and athletes. This lesion is one of differential diagnosis of disc herniation. We reported two teenage boys with sever low back pain and sciatica during soccer play that ultimately treated with diagnosis of lipped vertebral apophysis.
    • KEY WORDS: Ring Apophysis, vertebral fracture, sciatica, low back pain, disc herniation.

  12. Cervical vertebral fusion with anterior meningocele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Mathew J; Chavredakis, Emmanuel; Carter, David; Bhojak, Manesh; Jenkinson, Michael D; Clark, Simon R

    2015-04-01

    We present the first described case of cervical vertebral fusion associated with anterior meningocele and syringomyelia. A 45-year-old woman presented with minor trauma, and plain cervical spine radiographs highlighted a congenital deformity of the cervical vertebral bodies. She had a normal neurological examination; however, further imaging revealed a meningocele and syringomyelia. This case highlights the importance of thorough imaging investigation when presented with a congenital deformity in order to detect and prevent development of degenerative spinal cord pathologies. © The Author(s) 2015 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  13. Nocardia brasiliensis vertebral osteomyelitis and epidural abscess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Philip; Ammar, Hussam

    2013-04-11

    Nocardia species exist in the environment as a saprophyte; it is found worldwide in soil and decaying plant matter. They often infect patients with underlying immune compromise, pulmonary disease or history of trauma or surgery. The diagnosis of nocardiosis can be easily missed as it mimics many other granulomatous and neoplastic disease. We report a 69-year-old man who presented with chronic back pain and paraparesis. He was found to have Nocardial brasiliensis vertebral osteomyelitis and epidural abscess. Laminectomy and epidural wash out was performed but with no neurological recovery. This is the second reported case of N brasiliensis vertebral osteomyelitis in the literature.

  14. Final fate of charged anisotropic fluid collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Suhail; Shah, Hassan; Ahmad, Zahid; Ramzan, Muhammad

    2017-11-01

    This paper studies the effects of charge on spherically symmetric collapse of anisotropic fluid with a positive cosmological constant. It is observed that electromagnetic field places restriction on the bounds of cosmological constant, which acts as repulsive force against the contraction of matter content and hence the rate of destruction is faster in the presence of electromagnetic field. We have also noted that the presence of charge affects the time interval between the formation of cosmological horizon (CH) and black hole horizon (BHH). When the electric field strength E(t, r) vanishes, our investigations are in full agreement with the results obtained by Ahmad and Malik [Int. J. Theor. Phys. 55, 600 (2016)].

  15. Current collapse in tunneling transport through benzene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettler, M H; Wenzel, W; Wegewijs, M R; Schoeller, H

    2003-02-21

    We investigate the electrical transport through a system of benzene coupled to metal electrodes by electron tunneling. Using electronic structure calculations, a semiquantitative model for the pi electrons of the benzene is derived that includes general two-body interactions. After exact diagonalization of the benzene model the transport is computed using perturbation theory for weak electrode-benzene coupling (golden rule approximation). We include the effect of an applied electric field on the molecular states, as well as radiative relaxation. We predict a current collapse and strong negative differential conductance due to a "blocking" state when the electrode is coupled to the para-position of benzene. In contrast, for coupling to the meta-position, a series of steps in the I-V curve is found.

  16. Collapse and bounce of null fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Creelman, Bradley

    2016-01-01

    Exact solutions describing the spherical collapse of null fluids can contain regions which violate the energy conditions. Physically the violations occur when the infalling matter continues to move inwards even when non-gravitational repulsive forces become stronger than gravity. In 1991 Ori proposed a resolution for these violations: spacetime surgery should be used to replace the energy condition violating region with an outgoing solution. The matter bounces. We revisit and implement this proposal for the more general Husain null fluids. We find that: 1) generically there is a thin shell discontinuity along the junction surface between ingoing and outgoing solutions, 2) there are special cases where the shell vanishes and 3) these conclusions also apply to charged Vaidya (the original paper argued that there were no shells at the junctions). Along the way we note an apparent error in the standard classification of energy condition violations for Type II stress-energy tensors.

  17. Inhomogeneities from quantum collapse scheme without inflation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel R. Bengochea

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we consider the problem of the emergence of seeds of cosmic structure in the framework of the non-inflationary model proposed by Hollands and Wald. In particular, we consider a modification to that proposal designed to account for breaking the symmetries of the initial quantum state, leading to the generation of the primordial inhomogeneities. This new ingredient is described in terms of a spontaneous reduction of the wave function. We investigate under which conditions one can recover an essentially scale free spectrum of primordial inhomogeneities, and which are the dominant deviations that arise in the model as a consequence of the introduction of the collapse of the quantum state into that scenario.

  18. Inhomogeneities from quantum collapse scheme without inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Bengochea, Gabriel R; Sudarsky, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we consider the problem of the emergence of seeds of cosmic structure in the framework of the non-inflationary model proposed by Hollands and Wald. In particular, we consider a modification to that proposal designed to account for breaking the symmetries of the initial quantum state, leading to the generation of the primordial inhomogeneities. This new ingredient is described in terms of a spontaneous reduction of the wave function. We investigate under which conditions one can recover an essentially scale free spectrum of primordial inhomogeneities, and which are the dominant deviations that arise in the model as a consequence of the introduction of the collapse of the quantum state into that scenario.

  19. Magnetorotational Explosions of Core-Collapse Supernovae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gennady S. Bisnovatyi-Kogan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Core-collapse supernovae are accompanied by formation of neutron stars. The gravitation energy is transformed into the energy of the explosion, observed as SN II, SN Ib,c type supernovae. We present results of 2-D MHD simulations, where the source of energy is rotation, and magnetic eld serves as a "transition belt" for the transformation of the rotation energy into the energy of the explosion. The toroidal part of the magnetic energy initially grows linearly with time due to dierential rotation. When the twisted toroidal component strongly exceeds the poloidal eld, magneto-rotational instability develops, leading to a drastic acceleration in the growth of magnetic energy. Finally, a fast MHD shock is formed, producing a supernova explosion. Mildly collimated jet is produced for dipole-like type of the initial field. At very high initial magnetic field no MRI development was found.

  20. Inhomogeneities from quantum collapse scheme without inflation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bengochea, Gabriel R., E-mail: gabriel@iafe.uba.ar [Instituto de Astronomía y Física del Espacio (IAFE), UBA-CONICET, CC 67, Suc. 28, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Cañate, Pedro, E-mail: pedro.canate@nucleares.unam.mx [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, UNAM, México D.F. 04510, México (Mexico); Sudarsky, Daniel, E-mail: sudarsky@nucleares.unam.mx [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, UNAM, México D.F. 04510, México (Mexico)

    2015-04-09

    In this work, we consider the problem of the emergence of seeds of cosmic structure in the framework of the non-inflationary model proposed by Hollands and Wald. In particular, we consider a modification to that proposal designed to account for breaking the symmetries of the initial quantum state, leading to the generation of the primordial inhomogeneities. This new ingredient is described in terms of a spontaneous reduction of the wave function. We investigate under which conditions one can recover an essentially scale free spectrum of primordial inhomogeneities, and which are the dominant deviations that arise in the model as a consequence of the introduction of the collapse of the quantum state into that scenario.

  1. Pathogen Webs in Collapsing Honey Bee Colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornman, R. Scott; Tarpy, David R.; Chen, Yanping; Jeffreys, Lacey; Lopez, Dawn; Pettis, Jeffery S.; vanEngelsdorp, Dennis; Evans, Jay D.

    2012-01-01

    Recent losses in honey bee colonies are unusual in their severity, geographical distribution, and, in some cases, failure to present recognized characteristics of known disease. Domesticated honey bees face numerous pests and pathogens, tempting hypotheses that colony collapses arise from exposure to new or resurgent pathogens. Here we explore the incidence and abundance of currently known honey bee pathogens in colonies suffering from Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD), otherwise weak colonies, and strong colonies from across the United States. Although pathogen identities differed between the eastern and western United States, there was a greater incidence and abundance of pathogens in CCD colonies. Pathogen loads were highly covariant in CCD but not control hives, suggesting that CCD colonies rapidly become susceptible to a diverse set of pathogens, or that co-infections can act synergistically to produce the rapid depletion of workers that characterizes the disorder. We also tested workers from a CCD-free apiary to confirm that significant positive correlations among pathogen loads can develop at the level of individual bees and not merely as a secondary effect of CCD. This observation and other recent data highlight pathogen interactions as important components of bee disease. Finally, we used deep RNA sequencing to further characterize microbial diversity in CCD and non-CCD hives. We identified novel strains of the recently described Lake Sinai viruses (LSV) and found evidence of a shift in gut bacterial composition that may be a biomarker of CCD. The results are discussed with respect to host-parasite interactions and other environmental stressors of honey bees. PMID:22927991

  2. Pathogen webs in collapsing honey bee colonies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Scott Cornman

    Full Text Available Recent losses in honey bee colonies are unusual in their severity, geographical distribution, and, in some cases, failure to present recognized characteristics of known disease. Domesticated honey bees face numerous pests and pathogens, tempting hypotheses that colony collapses arise from exposure to new or resurgent pathogens. Here we explore the incidence and abundance of currently known honey bee pathogens in colonies suffering from Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD, otherwise weak colonies, and strong colonies from across the United States. Although pathogen identities differed between the eastern and western United States, there was a greater incidence and abundance of pathogens in CCD colonies. Pathogen loads were highly covariant in CCD but not control hives, suggesting that CCD colonies rapidly become susceptible to a diverse set of pathogens, or that co-infections can act synergistically to produce the rapid depletion of workers that characterizes the disorder. We also tested workers from a CCD-free apiary to confirm that significant positive correlations among pathogen loads can develop at the level of individual bees and not merely as a secondary effect of CCD. This observation and other recent data highlight pathogen interactions as important components of bee disease. Finally, we used deep RNA sequencing to further characterize microbial diversity in CCD and non-CCD hives. We identified novel strains of the recently described Lake Sinai viruses (LSV and found evidence of a shift in gut bacterial composition that may be a biomarker of CCD. The results are discussed with respect to host-parasite interactions and other environmental stressors of honey bees.

  3. Collapse of Synchronization in a Memristive Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Mi; Wang, Chun-Ni; Tang, Jun; Ma, Jun

    2015-12-01

    For an oscillating circuit or coupled circuits, damage in electric devices such as inductor, resistance, memristor even capacitor can cause breakdown or collapse of the circuits. These damage could be associated with external attack or aging in electric devices, and then the bifurcation parameters could be deformed from normal values. Resonators or signal generators are often synchronized to produce powerful signal series and this problem could be investigated by using synchronization in network. Complete synchronization could be induced by linear coupling in a two-dimensional network of identical oscillators when the coupling intensity is beyond certain threshold. The collective behavior and synchronization state are much dependent on the bifurcation parameters. Any slight fluctuation in parameter and breakdown in bifurcation parameter can cause transition of synchronization even collapse of synchronization in the network. In this paper, a two-dimensional network composed of the resonators coupled with memristors under nearest-neighbor connection is designed, and the network can reach complete synchronization by carefully selecting coupling intensity. The network keeps synchronization after certain transient period, then a bifurcation parameter in a resonator is switched from the previous value and the adjacent resonators (oscillators) are affected in random. It is found that the synchronization area could be invaded greatly in a diffusive way. The damage area size is much dependent on the selection of diffusive period of damage and deformation degree in the parameter. Indeed, the synchronization area could keep intact at largest size under intermediate deformation degree and coupling intensity. Supported by the National Natural Science of China under Grant Nos. 11265008 and 11365014

  4. Cervical congenital spondylolytic spondylolisthesis associated with duplication of the vertebral artery: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domenicucci, Maurizio; Pescatori, Lorenzo; Marruzzo, Daniele; Colistra, Davide; Missori, Paolo

    2014-09-01

    Cervical bilateral congenital spondylolysis with spondylolisthesis is an abnormality both of congenital and mechanical origin, characterized by its primary feature, cervical bilateral spondylolysis. We are unaware of any reports describing cervical congenital spondylolytic spondylolisthesis associated with duplication of the vertebral artery. To report the case of a patient affected with cervical bilateral congenital spondylolysis with spondylolisthesis associated with duplication of the vertebral artery. A unique case report from a university hospital and a literature review. An 18-year-old man who arrived at the emergency department complaining of neck pain starting from a car accident 5 days ago. Neurologic examination and images taken by ordinary radiographs, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, ordinary computed tomography (CT) scans, and CT angiograms with three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction. Neurologic examination did not find evidence of strength deficit in upper extremities. Ordinary radiographs of the cervical spine showed spondylolisthesis of C6 and C7 and a cortical cleft between the superior and inferior articular facets of the C6 vertebra and spina bifida of the C6 and C2 vertebrae and an abnormal appearance of the remnant spinous processes of the cervical vertebrae. Magnetic resonance imaging confirmed the abnormalities that had been noted on the radiographs. Computed tomography scans of the cervical spine showed congenital spondylolytic spondylolisthesis and spina bifida of the C6 vertebra and duplication of the vertebral artery. They also showed double origins of the vertebral artery depicted by 3D angiographic reconstruction. Conservative treatment of wearing a cervical collar and receiving muscle relaxants and anti-inflammatory drugs was effective. With the pain completely subsided, the patient was discharged 5 days after arriving at the emergency department. Vascular abnormalities should be suspected and investigated in cases of congenital

  5. Automatic localization of vertebral levels in x-ray fluoroscopy using 3D-2D registration: a tool to reduce wrong-site surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otake, Y.; Schafer, S.; Stayman, J. W.; Zbijewski, W.; Kleinszig, G.; Graumann, R.; Khanna, A. J.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2012-09-01

    Surgical targeting of the incorrect vertebral level (wrong-level surgery) is among the more common wrong-site surgical errors, attributed primarily to the lack of uniquely identifiable radiographic landmarks in the mid-thoracic spine. The conventional localization method involves manual counting of vertebral bodies under fluoroscopy, is prone to human error and carries additional time and dose. We propose an image registration and visualization system (referred to as LevelCheck), for decision support in spine surgery by automatically labeling vertebral levels in fluoroscopy using a GPU-accelerated, intensity-based 3D-2D (namely CT-to-fluoroscopy) registration. A gradient information (GI) similarity metric and a CMA-ES optimizer were chosen due to their robustness and inherent suitability for parallelization. Simulation studies involved ten patient CT datasets from which 50 000 simulated fluoroscopic images were generated from C-arm poses selected to approximate the C-arm operator and positioning variability. Physical experiments used an anthropomorphic chest phantom imaged under real fluoroscopy. The registration accuracy was evaluated as the mean projection distance (mPD) between the estimated and true center of vertebral levels. Trials were defined as successful if the estimated position was within the projection of the vertebral body (namely mPD anatomy in fluoroscopy in near-real-time could be valuable in reducing the occurrence of wrong-site surgery while helping to reduce radiation exposure. The method is applicable beyond the specific case of vertebral labeling, since any structure defined in pre-operative (or intra-operative) CT or cone-beam CT can be automatically registered to the fluoroscopic scene.

  6. The shape of the human lumbar vertebral canal A forma do canal vertebral lombar humano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmundo Zarzur

    1996-09-01

    Full Text Available Literature on the anatomy of the human vertebral column characterizes the shape of the lumbar vertebral canal as triangular. The purpose of the present study was to determine the precise shape of the lumbar vertebral canal. Ten lumbar vertebral columns of adult male cadavers were dissected. Two transverse sections were performed in the third lumbar vertebra. One section was performed at the level of the lower border of the ligamenta flava, and the other section was performed at the level of the pedicles. The shape of the lumbar vertebral canal at the level of the pedicles tends to be oval or circular, whereas the shape of the lumbar vertebral canal at the level of the lower border of the ligamenta flava is triangular. Thus, the shape of the human lumbar vertebral canal is not exclusively triangular, as reported in the literature. It is related to the level of the transversal section performed on the lumbar vertebra. This finding should be taken into consideration among factors involved in the spread of solutions introduced into the epidural space.A literatura sobre a anatomia da coluna vertebral descreve como sendo triangular o formato do canal vertebral na região lombar. O objetivo deste estudo é determinar a real forma do canal da coluna vertebral lombar.Dez colunas vertebrais de cadáveres de homens adultos foram dissecadas. Dois cortes transversais foram executados na terceira vértebra lombar. Um corte foi feito no nível das bordas inferiores de dois ligamentos amarelos vizinhos e o outro corte foi transversal, no nível dos pedículos. A forma do canal vertebral variou: no nível dos pedículos ela tende a ser oval ou circular e junto às bordas inferiores dos ligamentos amarelos passa a ser triangular. Portanto, a forma do canal vertebral lombar não é somente triangular; ela depende do nível em que se faz o corte transversal da vértebra. Estes achados devem ser levados em consideração entre os fatores envolvidos na difusão das

  7. Numerical simulations of non-spherical bubble collapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsen, Eric; Colonius, Tim

    2009-06-01

    A high-order accurate shock- and interface-capturing scheme is used to simulate the collapse of a gas bubble in water. In order to better understand the damage caused by collapsing bubbles, the dynamics of the shock-induced and Rayleigh collapse of a bubble near a planar rigid surface and in a free field are analysed. Collapse times, bubble displacements, interfacial velocities and surface pressures are quantified as a function of the pressure ratio driving the collapse and of the initial bubble stand-off distance from the wall; these quantities are compared to the available theory and experiments and show good agreement with the data for both the bubble dynamics and the propagation of the shock emitted upon the collapse. Non-spherical collapse involves the formation of a re-entrant jet directed towards the wall or in the direction of propagation of the incoming shock. In shock-induced collapse, very high jet velocities can be achieved, and the finite time for shock propagation through the bubble may be non-negligible compared to the collapse time for the pressure ratios of interest. Several types of shock waves are generated during the collapse, including precursor and water-hammer shocks that arise from the re-entrant jet formation and its impact upon the distal side of the bubble, respectively. The water-hammer shock can generate very high pressures on the wall, far exceeding those from the incident shock. The potential damage to the neighbouring surface is quantified by measuring the wall pressure. The range of stand-off distances and the surface area for which amplification of the incident shock due to bubble collapse occurs is determined.

  8. Analysis of radiological characteristics distribution in the vertebral bodies of the lumbosacral spine of competitive rowers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.B. Ogurkowska

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Unfavorable biomechanical situations, usually related to the performance of a profession and competitive sports practice, promote formation of overloads. This problem may be particularly perceptible among sportsmen that practice strength and stamina sports. The present study deals with rowing. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the degree of degenerative changes of the lumbosacral spine in competitive rowers, on the basis of an analysis of changes in the cancellous structure of vertebral bodies. This has been achieved on the basis of radiological density acquired from a CT test.

  9. les hemangiomes vertebraux agressifs vertebral hemangiomas

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background 1. Vertebral hemangiomas are benign tumeurs and are raré< ly symptomatic Aggressive forms represent less than. 1% of all cases Medical imaging allows both diagnosis ... '+ tro'ubles sphinctêriens. Irritation pyramidale '. Laminectomie - échec [saignement important) embolieationcomplêtée par une résection.

  10. Impacts of underwater noise on marine vertebrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liebschner, Alexander; Seibel, Henrike; Teilmann, Jonas; Wittekind, Dietrich; Parmentier, Eric; Dähne, Michael; Dietz, Rune; Driver, Jörg; Elk, van Cornelis; Everaarts, Eligius; Findeisen, Henning; Kristensen, Jacob; Lehnert, Kristina; Lucke, Klaus; Merck, Thomas; Müller, Sabine; Pawliczka, Iwona; Ronnenberg, Katrin; Rosenberger, Tanja; Ruser, Andreas; Tougaard, Jakob; Schuster, Max; Sundermeyer, Janne; Sveegaard, Signe; Siebert, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    The project conducts application-oriented research on impacts of underwater noise on marine vertebrates in the North and Baltic Seas. In distinct subprojects, the hearing sensitivity of harbor porpoises and gray seals as well as the acoustic tolerance limit of harbor porpoises to impulsive noise

  11. Separation of vertebral epiphyses in bovine carcases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, M

    1987-01-01

    Separation of vertebral epiphyses in the thoracolumbar region is a cause of rejection of beef carcases for Intervention storage. Incidence is highest in younger cattle and the problem is associated with certain types of hide puller and dressing technique. Three dressing methods are evaluated and tensile strenght of bone specimens is measured. Copyright © 1987. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Extensive thoracolumbosacral vertebral osteomyelitis after Lemierre syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kempen, D. H R; van Dijk, M.; Hoepelman, A. I M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074382160; Oner, F. C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/188615326; Verlaan, J. J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/269057285

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To present a unique case of multilevel vertebral osteomyelitis after Lemierre syndrome. Methods: A previously healthy 27-year-old man presented in the Emergency Department in septic shock because of Lemierre syndrome for which he was subsequently treated with intravenous benzylpenicillin

  13. Diagnosis and Management of Vertebral Compression Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Jason; Davis, Amy

    2016-07-01

    Vertebral compression fractures (VCFs) are the most common complication of osteoporosis, affecting more than 700,000 Americans annually. Fracture risk increases with age, with four in 10 white women older than 50 years experiencing a hip, spine, or vertebral fracture in their lifetime. VCFs can lead to chronic pain, disfigurement, height loss, impaired activities of daily living, increased risk of pressure sores, pneumonia, and psychological distress. Patients with an acute VCF may report abrupt onset of back pain with position changes, coughing, sneezing, or lifting. Physical examination findings are often normal, but can demonstrate kyphosis and midline spine tenderness. More than two-thirds of patients are asymptomatic and diagnosed incidentally on plain radiography. Acute VCFs may be treated with analgesics such as acetaminophen, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, narcotics, and calcitonin. Physicians must be mindful of medication adverse effects in older patients. Other conservative therapeutic options include limited bed rest, bracing, physical therapy, nerve root blocks, and epidural injections. Percutaneous vertebral augmentation, including vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty, is controversial, but can be considered in patients with inadequate pain relief with nonsurgical care or when persistent pain substantially affects quality of life. Family physicians can help prevent vertebral fractures through management of risk factors and the treatment of osteoporosis.

  14. VerSeDa: vertebrate secretome database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortazar, Ana R.; Oguiza, José A.

    2017-01-01

    Based on the current tools, de novo secretome (full set of proteins secreted by an organism) prediction is a time consuming bioinformatic task that requires a multifactorial analysis in order to obtain reliable in silico predictions. Hence, to accelerate this process and offer researchers a reliable repository where secretome information can be obtained for vertebrates and model organisms, we have developed VerSeDa (Vertebrate Secretome Database). This freely available database stores information about proteins that are predicted to be secreted through the classical and non-classical mechanisms, for the wide range of vertebrate species deposited at the NCBI, UCSC and ENSEMBL sites. To our knowledge, VerSeDa is the only state-of-the-art database designed to store secretome data from multiple vertebrate genomes, thus, saving an important amount of time spent in the prediction of protein features that can be retrieved from this repository directly. Database URL: VerSeDa is freely available at http://genomics.cicbiogune.es/VerSeDa/index.php PMID:28365718

  15. Progressive non-infectious anterior vertebral fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, J.R.G.; Martin, I.R.; Shaw, D.G.; Robinson, R.O.

    1986-11-01

    Four cases of progressive non-infectious anterior vertebral fusion are described. Three cases remain relatively asymptomatic, but one has developed spinal cord compression secondary to an acute angled kyphosis. The clinical, radiological, and pathological features are reviewed and some comparisons with the spinal changes in thalidomide embryopathy are made.

  16. Neogene vertebrates from the Gargano Peninsula, Italy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freudenthal, M.

    1971-01-01

    Fissure-fillings in Mesozoic limestones in the Gargano Peninsula yield rich collections of fossil vertebrates, which are characterized by gigantism and aberrant morphology. Their age is considered to be Vallesian or Turolian. The special features of the fauna are probably due to isolation on an

  17. Biomechanical aspects of bone microstructure in vertebrates ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2009-10-29

    Oct 29, 2009 ... Bone is an important tissue in paleontological studies as it is a commonly preserved element in most fossil vertebrates, and can often allow its ... of the size of the bone's building blocks (such as osteon or trabecular thickness) to meet the metabolic demand concomitant to minimal expenditure of energy.

  18. Biomechanical aspects of bone microstructure in vertebrates ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    2009-10-29

    Oct 29, 2009 ... Biomechanical aspects of bone microstructure in vertebrates: potential approach to palaeontological investigations. S MISHRA. School of Engineering Systems and Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology,. Brisbane 4000, Australia. (Email, sk.mishra@qut.edu.au).

  19. Pleistocene vertebrates of the Yukon Territory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harington, C. R.

    2011-08-01

    Unglaciated parts of the Yukon constitute one of the most important areas in North America for yielding Pleistocene vertebrate fossils. Nearly 30 vertebrate faunal localities are reviewed spanning a period of about 1.6 Ma (million years ago) to the close of the Pleistocene some 10 000 BP (radiocarbon years before present, taken as 1950). The vertebrate fossils represent at least 8 species of fishes, 1 amphibian, 41 species of birds and 83 species of mammals. Dominant among the large mammals are: steppe bison ( Bison priscus), horse ( Equus sp.), woolly mammoth ( Mammuthus primigenius), and caribou ( Rangifer tarandus) - signature species of the Mammoth Steppe fauna ( Fig. 1), which was widespread from the British Isles, through northern Europe, and Siberia to Alaska, Yukon and adjacent Northwest Territories. The Yukon faunas extend from Herschel Island in the north to Revenue Creek in the south and from the Alaskan border in the west to Ketza River in the east. The Yukon holds evidence of the earliest-known people in North America. Artifacts made from bison, mammoth and caribou bones from Bluefish Caves, Old Crow Basin and Dawson City areas show that people had a substantial knowledge of making and using bone tools at least by 25 000 BP, and possibly as early as 40 000 BP. A suggested chronological sequence of Yukon Pleistocene vertebrates ( Table 1) facilitates comparison of selected faunas and indicates the known duration of various taxa.

  20. Vertebral Augmentation with Nitinol Endoprosthesis: Clinical Experience in 40 Patients with 1-Year Follow-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anselmetti, Giovanni Carlo, E-mail: gc.anselmetti@fastwebnet.it [Villa Maria Hospital, Interventional Radiology Unit (Italy); Manca, Antonio, E-mail: anto.manca@gmail.com [Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment (IRCC), Interventional Radiology Unit (Italy); Marcia, Stefano, E-mail: stemarcia@gmail.com [Institute of Radiology, University of Cagliari (Italy); Chiara, Gabriele, E-mail: gabriele.chiara@ircc.it [Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment (IRCC), Interventional Radiology Unit (Italy); Marini, Stefano, E-mail: stemarini@gmail.com [Institute of Radiology, University of Cagliari (Italy); Baroud, Gamal, E-mail: gamalbaroud@gmail.com [University of Sherbrooke, Departement de Genie Mecanique (Canada); Regge, Daniele, E-mail: daniele.regge@ircc.it [Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment (IRCC), Radiology Unit (Italy); Montemurro, Filippo, E-mail: filippo.montemurro@ircc.it [Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment (IRCC), Internal Medicine Unit (Italy)

    2013-05-08

    PurposeThis study was designed to assess the clinical outcomes of patients treated by vertebral augmentation with nitinol endoprosthesis (VNE) to treat painful vertebral compression fractures.MethodsForty patients with one or more painful osteoporotic VCF, confirmed by MRI and accompanied by back-pain unresponsive to a minimum 2 months of conservative medical treatment, underwent VNE at 42 levels. Preoperative and postoperative pain measured with Visual Analog Scale (VAS), disability measured by Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and vertebral height restoration (measured with 2-dimensional reconstruction CT) were compared at last follow-up (average follow-up 15 months). Cement extravasation, subsequent fractures, and implant migration were recorded.ResultsLong-term follow-up was obtained in 38 of 40 patients. Both VAS and ODI significantly improved from a median of 8.0 (range 5–10) and 66 % (range 44–88 %) to 0.5 (range 0–8) and 6 % (range 6–66 %), respectively, at 1 year (p < 0.0001). Vertebral height measurements comparing time points increased in a statistically significant manner (ANOVA, p < 0.001). Overall cement extravasation rate was 9.5 %. Discal and venous leakage rates were 7.1 and 0 % respectively. No symptomatic extravasations occurred. Five of 38 (13.1 %) patients experienced new spontaneous, osteoporotic fractures. No device change or migration was observed.ConclusionsVNE is a safe and effective procedure that is able to provide long-lasting pain relief and durable vertebral height gain with a low rate of new fractures and cement leakages.

  1. Analysis on Biomechanical Characteristics of Post-operational Vertebral C5-C6 Segments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heqiang Tian

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Both anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF and artificial cervical disc replacement (ACDR have obvious advantages in the treatment of cervical spondylosis. To analyze the operation results, it is absolutely necessary to study the biomechanics of the movement range of post-operational vertebral C5-C6 segments, especially the biomechanical characteristics in cervical tissues in actual movements. In this study, using the human vertebral 3D graph gained by imaging diagnosis (CT, a vertebral solid model is established by the 3D reconstruction algorithm and reverse engineering technology. After that, with cervical soft tissue structure added to the solid model and set with a joint contact mechanism, a finite element model with a complete, accurate cervical C5-C6 kinematic unit is constructed, based on relevant physiological anatomical knowledge. This model includes vertebral segments, an intervertebral disc, ligament and zygopophysis in the cervical C5-C6 kinematic unit. In the created vertebral finite element model, the model is amended, referring to ACDF and ACDR, and the load and constraint are applied to a normal group, a fusion group and a displacement group, so as to analyze the biomechanical characteristics of the cervical vertebra after ACDF and ACDR. By comparing the finite element simulation results of different surgeries, this paper is intended to evaluate the functions and biomechanical behaviors of the post-operational vertebra, and explore the influence of the operation on the biomechanical stability of the cervical vertebra. This will provide theoretical guidance for implementation and optimization of ACDF and ACDR.

  2. Prediction of Human Vertebral Compressive Strength Using Quantitative Computed Tomography Based Nonlinear Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahad Zeinali

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Because of the importance of vertebral compressive fracture (VCF role in increasing the patients’ death rate and reducing their quality of life, many studies have been conducted for a noninvasive prediction of vertebral compressive strength based on bone mineral density (BMD determination and recently finite element analysis. In this study, QCT-voxel based nonlinear finite element method is used for predicting vertebral compressive strength. Material and Methods: Four thoracolumbar vertebrae were excised from 3 cadavers with an average age of 42 years. They were then put in a water phantom and were scanned using the QCT. Using a computer program prepared in MATLAB, detailed voxel based geometry and mechanical characteristics of the vertebra were extracted from the CT images. The three dimensional finite element models of the samples were created using ANSYS computer program. The compressive strength of each vertebra body was calculated based on a linearly elastic-linearly plastic model and large deformation analysis in ANSYS and was compared to the value measured experimentally for that sample. Results: Based on the obtained results the QCT-voxel based nonlinear finite element method (FEM can predict vertebral compressive strength more effectively and accurately than the common QCT-voxel based linear FEM. The difference between the predicted strength values using this method and the measured ones was less than 1 kN for all the samples. Discussion and Conclusion: It seems that the QCT-voxel based nonlinear FEM used in this study can predict more effectively and accurately the vertebral strengths based on every vertebrae specification by considering their detailed geometric and densitometric characteristics.

  3. Predicting Future Hip Fractures on Routine Abdominal CT Using Opportunistic Osteoporosis Screening Measures: A Matched Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Scott J; Anderson, Paul A; Pickhardt, Perry J

    2017-08-01

    Hip fracture is a major consequence of low bone mineral density, which is treatable but underdiagnosed. The purpose of this case-control study is to determine whether lumbar vertebral trabecular attenuation, vertebral compression fractures, and femoral neck T scores readily derived from abdominopelvic CT scans obtained for various indications are associated with future hip fragility fracture. A cohort of 204 patients with hip fracture (130 women and 74 men; mean age, 74.3 years) who had undergone abdominopelvic CT before fracture occurred (mean interval, 24.8 months) was compared with an age- and sex-matched control cohort without hip fracture. L1 trabecular attenuation, vertebral compression fractures of grades 2 and 3, and femoral neck T scores derived from asynchronous quantitative CT were recorded. The presence of one or more clinical risk factor for fracture was also recorded. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to determine the association of each measurement with the occurrence of hip fracture. The mean L1 trabecular attenuation value, the presence of one or more vertebral compression fracture, and CT-derived femoral neck T scores were all significantly different in patients with hip fracture versus control subjects (p hip fracture outcome after adjustments were made for age, sex, and the presence of one or more clinical risk factor. L1 trabecular attenuation and CT-derived femoral neck T scores showed moderate accuracy in differentiating case and control patients (AUC, 0.70 and 0.78, respectively). L1 trabecular attenuation, CT-derived femoral neck T scores, and the presence of at least one vertebral compression fracture on CT are all associated with future hip fragility fracture in adults undergoing routine abdominopelvic CT for a variety of conditions.

  4. Can a collapse of global civilization be avoided?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, Paul R; Ehrlich, Anne H

    2013-03-07

    Environmental problems have contributed to numerous collapses of civilizations in the past. Now, for the first time, a global collapse appears likely. Overpopulation, overconsumption by the rich and poor choices of technologies are major drivers; dramatic cultural change provides the main hope of averting calamity.

  5. Collapse in a forced three-dimensional nonlinear Schrodinger equation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lushnikov, P.M.; Saffman, M.

    2000-01-01

    We derive sufficient conditions for the occurrence of collapse in a forced three-dimensional nonlinear Schrodinger equation without dissipation. Numerical studies continue the results to the case of finite dissipation.......We derive sufficient conditions for the occurrence of collapse in a forced three-dimensional nonlinear Schrodinger equation without dissipation. Numerical studies continue the results to the case of finite dissipation....

  6. Stability of naked singularity arising in gravitational collapse of Type ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    to choose the velocity function and rest of the initial data so that the end state of collapse is either a black hole (BH) or a naked singularity (NS). This result is significant for two reasons: (1) It produces a substantially 'big' initial data set which under gravitational collapse results into a naked singularity. (2) Type I matter fields.

  7. Predicting epiglottic collapse in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azarbarzin, Ali; Marques, Melania; Sands, Scott A; Op de Beeck, Sara; Genta, Pedro R; Taranto-Montemurro, Luigi; de Melo, Camila M; Messineo, Ludovico; Vanderveken, Olivier M; White, David P; Wellman, Andrew

    2017-09-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is characterised by pharyngeal obstruction occurring at different sites. Endoscopic studies reveal that epiglottic collapse renders patients at higher risk of failed oral appliance therapy or accentuated collapse on continuous positive airway pressure. Diagnosing epiglottic collapse currently requires invasive studies (imaging and endoscopy). As an alternative, we propose that epiglottic collapse can be detected from the distinct airflow patterns it produces during sleep.23 OSA patients underwent natural sleep endoscopy. 1232 breaths were scored as epiglottic/nonepiglottic collapse. Several flow characteristics were determined from the flow signal (recorded simultaneously with endoscopy) and used to build a predictive model to distinguish epiglottic from nonepiglottic collapse. Additionally, 10 OSA patients were studied to validate the pneumotachograph flow features using nasal pressure signals.Epiglottic collapse was characterised by a rapid fall(s) in the inspiratory flow, more variable inspiratory and expiratory flow and reduced tidal volume. The cross-validated accuracy was 84%. Predictive features obtained from pneumotachograph flow and nasal pressure were strongly correlated.This study demonstrates that epiglottic collapse can be identified from the airflow signal measured during a sleep study. This method may enable clinicians to use clinically collected data to characterise underlying physiology and improve treatment decisions. Copyright ©ERS 2017.

  8. Collapse arresting in an inhomogeneous quintic nonlinear Schrodinger model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaididei, Yuri Borisovich; Schjødt-Eriksen, Jens; Christiansen, Peter Leth

    1999-01-01

    Collapse of (1 + 1)-dimensional beams in the inhomogeneous one-dimensional quintic nonlinear Schrodinger equation is analyzed both numerically and analytically. It is shown that in the vicinity of a narrow attractive inhomogeneity, the collapse of beams in which the homogeneous medium would blow up...

  9. The Role of Confinement in Bubble Collapse in a Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Mauro; Alahyari Beig, Shahaboddin; Johnsen, Eric; Barbier, Charlotte

    2017-11-01

    In a variety of applications, cavitation bubbles collapse near solid objects give rise to damage in certain extreme cases. Numerous detailed computational studies have been conducted of a single bubble collapsing near a rigid wall. However, there are known situations where the bubbles collapse in a confined configuration, such as in biomedical applications and in the spallation neutron source. However, the effect of confinement (e.g., in the case of bubble collapse in a narrow channel) is poorly understood. In the present work, we quantify the effect of confinement on the bubble dynamics, pressures and temperatures produced from a single bubble collapsing in a channel. An in-house, solution-adaptive, high-order accurate shock- and interface-capturing method is used to solve the 3D compressible Navier-Stokes equations for gas/liquid flows. We demonstrate the conditions under which the channel walls strengthen/weaken the violence of the collapse and result in amplifying/reducing the wall pressures and temperatures. We further determine the smallest channel width, relative to the initial bubble radius, for which the presence of a second wall affects the collapse. Additional simulations of multiple bubbles collapsing in a channel are underway and will be discussed. This research was supported in part by ONR Grant N00014-12-1-0751 and NSF Grant CBET 1253157.

  10. Collapse of a Public-Private Partnership in

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines the collapse of a public-private partnership (PPP) in the district of U itenhage in 1999. Talks to revive the partnership are high on the agenda. It is therefore essential to examine the reasons for the collapse to avoid the pitfalls of the past and to ensure that a more sustainable and competent partnership ...

  11. Collapse arresters for deep water pipelines: identification of crossover mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toscano, Rita G.; Mantovano, Luciano; Assanelli, Andrea; Amenta, Pablo; Johnson, Daniel; Charreau, Roberto; Dvorkin, Eduardo [Tenaris Center for industrial Research (CINI), Siderca, Campana (Argentina)

    2005-07-01

    Deep water pipelines, normally subjected to external pressure and bending, fail due to structural collapse when the external loading exceeds the pipes collapse limit surface. For steel pipes, the influence on this limit surface of manufacturing imperfections has been thoroughly studied by CINI using finite element models that have been validated via laboratory full-scale tests. After a steel pipeline collapses, the collapse is restrained to the collapse initiation section or it propagates along the pipeline, being this second alternative the most detrimental one for the pipeline integrity. Therefore, it is necessary to build in the pipeline periodic reinforcements, to act as arresters for the collapse propagation. Using finite element models, we study the crossover of collapse arresters by the propagating collapse. The occurrence of different crossover mechanisms is determined by the geometry of the pipes and of the arresters. Laboratory tests were carried out at CINI in order to obtain experimental results that could be used to validate the numerical models. In this paper, we compare the numerical and experimental results for external pressure lo (author)

  12. Fire-induced collapse mechanisms of steel buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giuliani, Luisa; Aiuti, Riccardo; Bontempi, Franco

    2013-01-01

    significant in case the fire has spread through several floors, occurrence which is not contemplated by current fire design requirements, but that has been observed in most high-rise building fires. The results of the studies show that unfavourable collapse of single-story buildings and progressive collapse...

  13. Maternal Postpartum Role Collapse as a Theory of Postpartum Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amankwaa, Linda Clark

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the development of a theory of maternal postpartum role collapse. The influences of traditional role theory and symbolic interactionism are presented. The development of the maternal postpartum role collapse theory emerged from the study of postpartum depression among African-American women (Amankwaa, 2000).…

  14. Feasibility Study of a Standardized Novel Animal Model for Cervical Vertebral Augmentation in Sheep Using a PTH Derivate Bioactive Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Klein

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Prophylactic local treatment involving percutaneous vertebral augmentation using bioactive materials is a new treatment strategy in spine surgery in humans for vertebral bodies at risk. Standardized animal models for this procedure are almost non-existent. The purpose of this study was to: (i prove the efficacy of PTH derivate bioactive materials for new bone formation; and (ii create a new, highly standardized cervical vertebral augmentation model in sheep. Three different concentrations of a modified form of parathyroid hormone (PTH covalently bound to a fibrin matrix containing strontium carbonate were used. The same matrix without PTH and shams were used as controls. The bioactive materials were locally injected. Using a ventral surgical approach, a pre-set amount of material was injected under fluoroscopic guidance into the intertrabecular space of three vertebral bodies. Intravital fluorescent dyes were used to demonstrate new bone formation. After an observation period of four months, the animals were sacrificed, and vertebral bodies were processed for µCT, histomorphometry, histology and sequential fluorescence evaluation. Enhanced localized bone activity and new bone formation in the injected area could be determined for all experimental groups in comparison to the matrix alone and sham with the highest values detected for the group with a medium concentration of PTH.

  15. Prevalence of thoracic vertebral malformations in French bulldogs, Pugs and English bulldogs with and without associated neurological deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, R; Gutierrez-Quintana, R; Ter Haar, G; De Decker, Steven

    2017-03-01

    Congenital vertebral malformations are common incidental findings in small breed dogs. This retrospective observational study evaluated the type and prevalence of thoracic vertebral malformations in 171 neurologically normal and 10 neurologically abnormal screw-tailed brachycephalic dogs. Neurologically normal dogs underwent CT for reasons unrelated to spinal disease, while affected dogs underwent MRI. Imaging studies were reviewed and vertebral malformations including hemivertebrae, block vertebrae, transitional vertebrae, and spina bifida were documented. The group of clinically normal dogs consisted of 62 French bulldogs, 68 Pugs and 41 English bulldogs. The group of affected dogs consisted of one French bulldog and nine Pugs. Overall, 80.7% of neurologically normal animals were affected by at least one vertebral malformation. There was a significant influence of breed, with thoracic vertebral malformations occurring more often in neurologically normal French bulldogs (P neurologically normal French bulldogs (93.5%; P neurologically normal Pugs (17.6%; P = 0.004 vs. English bulldogs). Neurologically normal Pugs were more often diagnosed with transitional vertebrae and spina bifida compared to other breeds (P neurologically normal screw-tailed brachycephalic dogs. While hemivertebrae are often interpreted as incidental diagnostic findings, they appear to be of greater clinical importance in Pugs compared to other screw-tailed brachycephalic breeds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Radiological Imaging Findings of a Case with Vertebral Osteoid Osteoma Leading to Brachial Neuralgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkan Gokce

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoid osteoma is a small, benign osteoblastic tumor consisting of a highly vascularized nidus of connective tissue surrounded by sclerotic bone. Three-quarters of osteoid osteomas are located in the long bones, and only 7-12% in the vertebral column. The classical clinical presentation of spinal osteoid osteoma is that of painful scoliosis. Other clinical features include nerve root irritation and night pain. Osteoid osteoma has characteristic computed tomography (CT findings. Because magnetic resonance imaging (MRI findings of the osteoid osteomas causing intense perinidal edema can be confusing, these patients should be evaluated with clinical findings and other imaging techniques. In this study, we present X-ray, CT, and MRI findings of a case with osteoid osteoma located in thoracic 1 vertebra left lamina and transverse process junction leading to brachial neuralgia symptoms.

  17. The CW domain, a structural module shared amongst vertebrates, vertebrate-infecting parasites and higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Jason; Zhao, Yunde

    2003-11-01

    A previously undetected domain, named CW for its conserved cysteine and tryptophan residues, appears to be a four-cysteine zinc-finger motif found exclusively in vertebrates, vertebrate-infecting parasites and higher plants. Of the twelve distinct nuclear protein families that comprise the CW domain-containing superfamily, only the microrchida (MORC) family has begun to be characterized. However, several families contain other domains suggesting a relationship between the CW domain and either chromatin methylation status or early embryonic development.

  18. Vertebral body stenting: a new method for vertebral augmentation versus kyphoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotter, Robert; Martin, Heiner; Fuerderer, Sebastian; Gabl, Michael; Roeder, Christoph; Heini, Paul; Mittlmeier, Thomas

    2010-06-01

    Vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty are well-established minimally invasive treatment options for compression fractures of osteoporotic vertebral bodies. Possible procedural disadvantages, however, include incomplete fracture reduction or a significant loss of reduction after balloon tamp deflation, prior to cement injection. A new procedure called "vertebral body stenting" (VBS) was tested in vitro and compared to kyphoplasty. VBS uses a specially designed catheter-mounted stent which can be implanted and expanded inside the vertebral body. As much as 24 fresh frozen human cadaveric vertebral bodies (T11-L5) were utilized. After creating typical compression fractures, the vertebral bodies were reduced by kyphoplasty (n = 12) or by VBS (n = 12) and then stabilized with PMMA bone cement. Each step of the procedure was performed under fluoroscopic control and analysed quantitatively. Finally, static and dynamic biomechanical tests were performed. A complete initial reduction of the fractured vertebral body height was achieved by both systems. There was a significant loss of reduction after balloon deflation in kyphoplasty compared to VBS, and a significant total height gain by VBS (mean +/- SD in %, p VBS: 3.7 +/- 3.8], and total anterior height gain [kyphoplasty: 8.0 +/- 9.4; VBS: 13.3 +/- 7.6]). Biomechanical tests showed no significant stiffness and failure load differences between systems. VBS is an innovative technique which allows for the possibly complete reduction of vertebral compression fractures and helps maintain the restored height by means of a stent. The height loss after balloon deflation is significantly decreased by using VBS compared to kyphoplasty, thus offering a new promising option for vertebral augmentation.

  19. Vertebral body stenting: a new method for vertebral augmentation versus kyphoplasty

    OpenAIRE

    Rotter, Robert; Martin, Heiner; Fuerderer, Sebastian; Gabl, Michael; Roeder, Christoph; Heini, Paul; Mittlmeier, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty are well-established minimally invasive treatment options for compression fractures of osteoporotic vertebral bodies. Possible procedural disadvantages, however, include incomplete fracture reduction or a significant loss of reduction after balloon tamp deflation, prior to cement injection. A new procedure called ?vertebral body stenting? (VBS) was tested in?vitro and compared to kyphoplasty. VBS uses a specially designed catheter-mounted stent which can be impl...

  20. Computer-aided diagnosis for osteoporosis using chest 3D CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, K.; Matsuhiro, M.; Suzuki, H.; Kawata, Y.; Niki, N.; Nakano, Y.; Ohmatsu, H.; Kusumoto, M.; Tsuchida, T.; Eguchi, K.; Kaneko, M.

    2016-03-01

    The patients of osteoporosis comprised of about 13 million people in Japan and it is one of the problems the aging society has. In order to prevent the osteoporosis, it is necessary to do early detection and treatment. Multi-slice CT technology has been improving the three dimensional (3-D) image analysis with higher body axis resolution and shorter scan time. The 3-D image analysis using multi-slice CT images of thoracic vertebra can be used as a support to diagnose osteoporosis and at the same time can be used for lung cancer diagnosis which may lead to early detection. We develop automatic extraction and partitioning algorithm for spinal column by analyzing vertebral body structure, and the analysis algorithm of the vertebral body using shape analysis and a bone density measurement for the diagnosis of osteoporosis. Osteoporosis diagnosis support system obtained high extraction rate of the thoracic vertebral in both normal and low doses.

  1. Film collapse behavior on high temperature particle surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tochio, Daisuke; Abe, Yutaka [Department of Mechanical Systems Engineering, Yamagata University, Yonezawa, Yamagata (Japan)

    1999-07-01

    It is pointed out that large-scale vapor explosion may occurred during a severe accident of a nuclear power plant. It is important to predict the possibility of the vapor explosion for the accident management of the nuclear power plant during a severe accident. The thermal detonation model is proposed to predict the vapor explosion. In the thermal detonation model, vapor explosion is started by a trigger. The trigger is vapor film collapse around high temperature material droplets coarsely pre-mixed in low temperature liquid. In the premixing stage, high temperature material droplets are insulated from low temperature liquid by the vapor film. Once the vapor film is collapsed, very quick and large heat transfer starts followed by the atomization. In order to clarify the trigger condition of the vapor explosion, it is necessary to identify the mechanism of the film collapse on the high temperature droplet surface in low temperature particle surface. Since the steam film on a high temperature droplet is unstable in high subcooling condition of low temperature liquid, the possibility of the self-collapse of the steam film is high. On the other hand, the possibility of the film collapse is not high in low subcooling or saturated condition since the steam film is tough. There are many experimental studies on the vapor film collapse behavior on the high temperature material surface. Most of those studies, vapor film collapse follows by the atomization , since melted droplets are used in those experiments. And the experiments used solid material is limited for the cylindrical or flat plate geometry. At present, there is no experimental database on the microscopic mechanism of steam film collapse behavior in spherical geometry for wide range of subcooling conditions. In the present study, steam film collapse behavior on a stainless steel particle surface is experimentally investigated. The stainless steel particle heated up by a burner is immersed into water in a stainless

  2. Hypernatremia and intravenous fluid resuscitation in collapsed ultramarathon runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hew-Butler, Tamara; Boulter, Jeremy; Mbchb, John Godlonton; Phd, Ross Tucker; Mbchb, Timothy Noakes

    2008-05-01

    To determine if a return to normonatremia is required for symptomatology to resolve in collapsed hypernatremic runners and if intravenous (IV) administration of an isotonic solution would adversely affect serum sodium concentration ([Na+]) in collapsed normonatremic runners. Observational study. 2006 Comrades Marathon. 103 collapsed runners. Final serum [Na] upon discharge. 58% of all collapsed runners were hypernatremic. Hypernatremic runners reported significantly more vomiting than normonatremic runners (79 versus 34%; P 145 mmol/L). A return to normonatremia was not required for hypernatremic runners to "recover" and be discharged from the medical tent. Vomiting either aggravated and/or facilitated the development of hypernatremia. IV administration of 1 L of either (1) a hypotonic solution to hypernatremic runners or (2) an isotonic solution to both normonatremic and hypernatremic runners did not produce any adverse biochemical or cardiovascular changes and can therefore be considered a safe and effective treatment for collapsed runners if used in this context.

  3. Varied overstrain injuries of the vertebral column conditioned by evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohlbach, W.

    1983-08-01

    During physiological growth of the juvenile vertebral column, various stages of stability occur which are characterized by the condition of the marginal rim of the vertebral bodies. If the vertebral juvenile column is overstrained, these variations in stability results in a variety of damage to vertebral bodies and vertebral disks. One of these lesions corresponds to Scheuermann's disease (osteochondrosis of vertebral epiphyses in juveniles). Damage of the vertebral column due to overstrain can occur only if the overstrain is applied in upright position. Since Man alone can damage his vertebral column in upright position (as a result of his evolutionary development), Scheuermann's thesis is confirmed that Scheuermann's disease is confined to Man. Spondylolysis/spondylolisthesis is also a damage caused by overstrain. Here, too, the damage can occur only if the load is exercised in upright position, with the exception of a slanted positioning of the intervertebral components.

  4. Evolution of the vertebrate claudin gene family: insights from a basal vertebrate, the sea lamprey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukendi, Christian; Dean, Nicholas; Lala, Rushil; Smith, Jeramiah; Bronner, Marianne E; Nikitina, Natalya V

    2016-01-01

    Claudins are major constituents of tight junctions, contributing both to their intercellular sealing and selective permeability properties. While claudins and claudin-like molecules are present in some invertebrates, the association of claudins with tight junctions has been conclusively documented only in vertebrates. Here we report the sequencing, phylogenetic analysis and comprehensive spatiotemporal expression analysis of the entire claudin gene family in the basal extant vertebrate, the sea lamprey. Our results demonstrate that clear orthologues to about half of all mammalian claudins are present in the lamprey, suggesting that at least one round of whole genome duplication contributed to the diversification of this gene family. Expression analysis revealed that claudins are expressed in discrete and specific domains, many of which represent vertebrate-specific innovations, such as in cranial ectodermal placodes and the neural crest; whereas others represent structures characteristic of chordates, e.g. pronephros, notochord, somites, endostyle and pharyngeal arches. By comparing the embryonic expression of claudins in the lamprey to that of other vertebrates, we found that ancestral expression patterns were often preserved in higher vertebrates. Morpholino mediated loss of Cldn3b demonstrated a functional role for this protein in placode and pharyngeal arch morphogenesis. Taken together, our data provide novel insights into the origins and evolution of the claudin gene family and the significance of claudin proteins in the evolution of vertebrates.

  5. Seepage Model for PA Including Dift Collapse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Li; C. Tsang

    2000-12-20

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the predictions and analysis performed using the Seepage Model for Performance Assessment (PA) and the Disturbed Drift Seepage Submodel for both the Topopah Spring middle nonlithophysal and lower lithophysal lithostratigraphic units at Yucca Mountain. These results will be used by PA to develop the probability distribution of water seepage into waste-emplacement drifts at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as part of the evaluation of the long term performance of the potential repository. This AMR is in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report'' (CRWMS M&O 2000 [153447]). This purpose is accomplished by performing numerical simulations with stochastic representations of hydrological properties, using the Seepage Model for PA, and evaluating the effects of an alternative drift geometry representing a partially collapsed drift using the Disturbed Drift Seepage Submodel. Seepage of water into waste-emplacement drifts is considered one of the principal factors having the greatest impact of long-term safety of the repository system (CRWMS M&O 2000 [153225], Table 4-1). This AMR supports the analysis and simulation that are used by PA to develop the probability distribution of water seepage into drift, and is therefore a model of primary (Level 1) importance (AP-3.15Q, ''Managing Technical Product Inputs''). The intended purpose of the Seepage Model for PA is to support: (1) PA; (2) Abstraction of Drift-Scale Seepage; and (3) Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report (PMR). Seepage into drifts is evaluated by applying numerical models with stochastic representations of hydrological properties and performing flow simulations with multiple realizations of the permeability field around the drift. The Seepage Model for PA uses the distribution of permeabilities derived from air injection testing in

  6. Numerical modelling of collapsing volcanic edifices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Ana; Marques, Fernando; Kaus, Boris

    2017-04-01

    The flanks of Oceanic Volcanic Edifice's (OVEs) can occasionally become unstable. If that occurs, they can deform in two different modes: either slowly along localization failure zones (slumps) or catastrophically as debris avalanches. Yet the physics of this process is incompletely understood, and the role of factors such as the OVE's strength (viscosity, cohesion, friction angle), dimensions, geometry, and existence of weak layers remain to be addressed. Here we perform numerical simulations to study the interplay between viscous and plastic deformation on the gravitational collapse of an OVE (diffuse deformation vs. localization of failure along discrete structures). We focus on the contribution of the edifice's strength parameters for the mode of deformation, as well as on the type of basement. Tests were performed for a large OVE (7.5 km high, 200 km long) and either purely viscous (overall volcano edifice viscosities between 1019-1023 Pa.s), or viscoplastic rheology (within a range of cohesion and friction angle values). Results show that (a) for a strong basement (no slip basal boundary condition), the deformation pattern suggests wide/diffuse "listric" deformation within the volcanic edifice, without the development of discrete plastic failure zones; (b) for a weak basement (free slip basal boundary condition), rapid collapse of the edifice through the propagation of plastic failure structures within the edifice occurs. Tests for a smaller OVE (4.5 km by 30 km) show that failure localization along large-scale listric structures occurs more readily for different combinations of cohesion and friction angles. In these tests, high cohesion values combined with small friction angles lead to focusing of deformation along a narrower band. Tests with a weak layer underlying part of the volcanic edifice base show deformation focused along discrete structures mainly dipping towards the distal sector of the volcano. These tests for a small OVE constitute a promising

  7. Volcanic rock properties control sector collapse events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Amy; Kendrick, Jackie; Lavallée, Yan; Hornby, Adrian; Di Toro, Giulio

    2017-04-01

    Volcanoes constructed by superimposed layers of varying volcanic materials are inherently unstable structures. The heterogeneity of weak and strong layers consisting of ash, tephra and lavas, each with varying coherencies, porosities, crystallinities, glass content and ultimately, strength, can promote volcanic flank and sector collapses. These volcanoes often exist in areas with complex regional tectonics adding to instability caused by heterogeneity, flank overburden, magma movement and emplacement in addition to hydrothermal alteration and anomalous geothermal gradients. Recent studies conducted on the faulting properties of volcanic rocks at variable slip rates show the rate-weakening dependence of the friction coefficients (up to 90% reduction)[1], caused by a wide range of factors such as the generation of gouge and frictional melt lubrication [2]. Experimental data from experiments conducted on volcanic products suggests that frictional melt occurs at slip rates similar to those of plug flow in volcanic conduits [1] and the bases of mass material movements such as debris avalanches from volcanic flanks [3]. In volcanic rock, the generation of frictional heat may prompt the remobilisation of interstitial glass below melting temperatures due to passing of the glass transition temperature at ˜650-750 ˚C [4]. In addition, the crushing of pores in high porosity samples can lead to increased comminution and strain localisation along slip surfaces. Here we present the results of friction tests on both high density, glass rich samples from Santaguito (Guatemala) and synthetic glass samples with varying porosities (0-25%) to better understand frictional properties underlying volcanic collapse events. 1. Kendrick, J.E., et al., Extreme frictional processes in the volcanic conduit of Mount St. Helens (USA) during the 2004-2008 eruption. J. Structural Geology, 2012. 2. Di Toro, G., et al., Fault lubrication during earthquakes. Nature, 2011. 471(7339): p. 494-498. 3

  8. Nucleosynthesis in Core-Collapse Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Taylor Shannon; Viktoria Ohstrom, Eva; Harris, James Austin; Hix, William R.

    2018-01-01

    The nucleosynthesis which occurs in core-collapse supernovae (CCSN) is one of the most important sources of elements in the universe. Elements from Oxygen through Iron come predominantly from supernovae, and contributions of heavier elements are also possible through processes like the weak r-process, the gamma process and the light element primary process. The composition of the ejecta depends on the mechanism of the explosion, thus simulations of high physical fidelity are needed to explore what elements and isotopes CCSN can contribute to Galactic Chemical Evolution. We will analyze the nucleosynthesis results from self-consistent CCSN simulations performed with CHIMERA, a multi-dimensional neutrino radiation-hydrodynamics code. Much of our understanding of CCSN nucleosynthesis comes from parameterized models, but unlike CHIMERA these fail to address essential physics, including turbulent flow/instability and neutrino-matter interaction. We will present nucleosynthesis predictions for the explosion of a 9.6 solar mass first generation star, relying both on results of the 160 species nuclear reaction network used in CHIMERA within this model and on post-processing with a more extensive network. The lowest mass iron core-collapse supernovae, like this model, are distinct from their more massive brethren, with their explosion mechanism and nucleosynthesis being more like electron capture supernovae resulting from Oxygen-Neon white dwarves. We will highlight the differences between the nucleosynthesis in this model and more massive supernovae. The inline 160 species network is a feature unique to CHIMERA, making this the most sophisticated model to date for a star of this type. We will discuss the need and mechanism to extrapolate the post-processing to times post-simulation and analyze the uncertainties this introduces for supernova nucleosynthesis. We will also compare the results from the inline 160 species network to the post-processing results to study further

  9. Simultaneous monitoring of a collapsing landslide with video cameras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Fujisawa

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Effective countermeasures and risk management to reduce landslide hazards require a full understanding of the processes of collapsing landslides. While the processes are generally estimated from the features of debris deposits after collapse, simultaneous monitoring during collapse provides more insights into the processes. Such monitoring, however, is usually very difficult, because it is rarely possible to predict when a collapse will occur. This study introduces a rare case in which a collapsing landslide (150 m in width and 135 m in height was filmed with three video cameras in Higashi-Yokoyama, Gifu Prefecture, Japan. The cameras were set up in the front and on the right and left sides of the slide in May 2006, one month after a series of small slope failures in the toe and the formation of cracks on the head indicated that a collapse was imminent.

    The filmed images showed that the landslide collapse started from rock falls and slope failures occurring mainly around the margin, that is, the head, sides and toe. These rock falls and slope failures, which were individually counted on the screen, increased with time. Analyzing the images, five of the failures were estimated to have each produced more than 1000 m3 of debris, and the landslide collapsed with several surface failures accompanied by a toppling movement. The manner of the collapse suggested that the slip surface initially remained on the upper slope, and then extended down the slope as the excessive internal stress shifted downwards. Image analysis, together with field measurements using a ground-based laser scanner after the collapse, indicated that the landslide produced a total of 50 000 m3 of debris.

    As described above, simultaneous monitoring provides valuable information about landslide processes. Further development of monitoring techniques will help clarify landslide processes qualitatively as well as quantitatively.

  10. Vertebrate richness and biogeography in the Big Thicket of Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael H MacRoberts; Barbara R. MacRoberts; D. Craig Rudolph

    2010-01-01

    The Big Thicket of Texas has been described as rich in species and a “crossroads:” a place where organisms from many different regions meet. We examine the species richness and regional affiliations of Big Thicket vertebrates. We found that the Big Thicket is neither exceptionally rich in vertebrates nor is it a crossroads for vertebrates. Its vertebrate fauna is...

  11. The incidence of secondary vertebral fracture of vertebral augmentation techniques versus conservative treatment for painful osteoporotic vertebral fractures: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Dawei; Meng, Bin; Gan, Minfeng; Niu, Junjie; Li, Shiyan; Chen, Hao; Yuan, Chenxi; Yang, Huilin

    2015-08-01

    Percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) and balloon kyphoplasty (BKP) are minimally invasive and effective vertebral augmentation techniques for managing osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures (OVCFs). Recent meta-analyses have compared the incidence of secondary vertebral fractures between patients treated with vertebral augmentation techniques or conservative treatment; however, the inclusions were not thorough and rigorous enough, and the effects of each technique on the incidence of secondary vertebral fractures remain unclear. To perform an updated systematic review and meta-analysis of the studies with more rigorous inclusion criteria on the effects of vertebral augmentation techniques and conservative treatment for OVCF on the incidence of secondary vertebral fractures. PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, SpringerLink, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library database were searched for relevant original articles comparing the incidence of secondary vertebral fractures between vertebral augmentation techniques and conservative treatment for patients with OVCFs. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and prospective non-randomized controlled trials (NRCTs) were identified. The methodological qualities of the studies were evaluated, relevant data were extracted and recorded, and an appropriate meta-analysis was conducted. A total of 13 articles were included. The pooled results from included studies showed no statistically significant differences in the incidence of secondary vertebral fractures between patients treated with vertebral augmentation techniques and conservative treatment. Subgroup analysis comparing different study designs, durations of symptoms, follow-up times, races of patients, and techniques were conducted, and no significant differences in the incidence of secondary fractures were identified (P > 0.05). No obvious publication bias was detected by either Begg's test (P = 0.360 > 0.05) or Egger's test (P = 0.373 > 0.05). Despite current thinking in the

  12. CT urography for hematuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Nigel C

    2012-03-13

    Hematuria can signify serious disease such as bladder cancer, upper urinary tract urothelial cell carcinoma (UUT-UCC), renal cell cancer or urinary tract stones. CT urography is a rapidly evolving technique made possible by recent advances in CT technology. CT urography is defined as CT examination of the kidneys, ureters and bladder with at least one series of images acquired during the excretory phase after intravenous contrast administration. The reasoning for using CT urography to investigate hematuria is based on its high diagnostic accuracy for urothelial cell carcinoma (UCC) and favorable comparison with other imaging techniques. The optimum diagnostic imaging strategy for patients with hematuria at high-risk for UCC involves the use of CT urography as a replacement for other imaging tests (ultrasonography, intravenous urography, or retrograde ureteropyelography) and as a triage test for cystoscopy, resulting in earlier diagnosis and improved prognosis of bladder cancer, UUT-UCC, renal cell cancer and stones. Current problems with CT urography for investigating hematuria might be solved with a formative educational program simulating clinical reporting to reduce reader error, and a new technique for image-guided biopsy of UUT-UCC detected by CT urography for histopathological confirmation of diagnosis and elimination of false-positive results. CT urography is recommended as the initial imaging test for hematuria in patients at high-risk for UCC.

  13. Closure of the vertebral canal in human embryos and fetuses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mekonen, Hayelom K.; Hikspoors, Jill P. J. M.; Mommen, Greet; Kruepunga, Nutmethee; Köhler, S. Eleonore; Lamers, Wouter H.

    2017-01-01

    The vertebral column is the paradigm of the metameric architecture of the vertebrate body. Because the number of somites is a convenient parameter to stage early human embryos, we explored whether the closure of the vertebral canal could be used similarly for staging embryos between 7 and 10weeks of

  14. Lumbar Vertebral Canal Diameters in Adult Ugandan Skeletons ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Normal values of lumbar vertebral canal diameters are useful in facilitating diagnosis of lumbar vertebral canal stenosis. Various studies have established variation on values between different populations, gender, age, and ethnic groups. Objectives: To determine the lumbar vertebral canal diameters in adult ...

  15. Colony Collapse Disorder: A Descriptive Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    vanEngelsdorp, Dennis; Evans, Jay D.; Saegerman, Claude; Mullin, Chris; Haubruge, Eric; Nguyen, Bach Kim; Frazier, Maryann; Frazier, Jim; Cox-Foster, Diana; Chen, Yanping; Underwood, Robyn; Tarpy, David R.; Pettis, Jeffery S.

    2009-01-01

    Background Over the last two winters, there have been large-scale, unexplained losses of managed honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) colonies in the United States. In the absence of a known cause, this syndrome was named Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) because the main trait was a rapid loss of adult worker bees. We initiated a descriptive epizootiological study in order to better characterize CCD and compare risk factor exposure between populations afflicted by and not afflicted by CCD. Methods and Principal Findings Of 61 quantified variables (including adult bee physiology, pathogen loads, and pesticide levels), no single measure emerged as a most-likely cause of CCD. Bees in CCD colonies had higher pathogen loads and were co-infected with a greater number of pathogens than control populations, suggesting either an increased exposure to pathogens or a reduced resistance of bees toward pathogens. Levels of the synthetic acaricide coumaphos (used by beekeepers to control the parasitic mite Varroa destructor) were higher in control colonies than CCD-affected colonies. Conclusions/Significance This is the first comprehensive survey of CCD-affected bee populations that suggests CCD involves an interaction between pathogens and other stress factors. We present evidence that this condition is contagious or the result of exposure to a common risk factor. Potentially important areas for future hypothesis-driven research, including the possible legacy effect of mite parasitism and the role of honey bee resistance to pesticides, are highlighted. PMID:19649264

  16. Tulsa Oklahoma Oktoberfest Tent Collapse Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly E. Deal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. On October 17, 2007, a severe weather event collapsed two large tents and several smaller tents causing 23 injuries requiring evacuation to emergency departments in Tulsa, OK. Methods. This paper is a retrospective analysis of the regional health system’s response to this event. Data from the Tulsa Fire Department, The Emergency Medical Services Authority (EMSA, receiving hospitals and coordinating services were reviewed and analyzed. EMS patient care reports were reviewed and analyzed using triage designators assigned in the field, injury severity scores, and critical mortality. Results. EMT's and paramedics from Tulsa Fire Department and EMSA provided care at the scene under unified incident command. Of the 23 patients transported by EMS, four were hospitalized, one with critical spinal injury and one with critical head injury. One patient is still in ongoing rehabilitation. Discussion. Analysis of the 2007 Tulsa Oktoberfest mass casualty incident revealed rapid police/fire/EMS response despite challenges of operations at dark under severe weather conditions and the need to treat a significant number of injured victims. There were no fatalities. Of the patients transported by EMS, a minority sustained critical injuries, with most sustaining injuries amenable to discharge after emergency department care.

  17. Colony collapse disorder: a descriptive study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Vanengelsdorp

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Over the last two winters, there have been large-scale, unexplained losses of managed honey bee (Apis mellifera L. colonies in the United States. In the absence of a known cause, this syndrome was named Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD because the main trait was a rapid loss of adult worker bees. We initiated a descriptive epizootiological study in order to better characterize CCD and compare risk factor exposure between populations afflicted by and not afflicted by CCD. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Of 61 quantified variables (including adult bee physiology, pathogen loads, and pesticide levels, no single measure emerged as a most-likely cause of CCD. Bees in CCD colonies had higher pathogen loads and were co-infected with a greater number of pathogens than control populations, suggesting either an increased exposure to pathogens or a reduced resistance of bees toward pathogens. Levels of the synthetic acaricide coumaphos (used by beekeepers to control the parasitic mite Varroa destructor were higher in control colonies than CCD-affected colonies. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first comprehensive survey of CCD-affected bee populations that suggests CCD involves an interaction between pathogens and other stress factors. We present evidence that this condition is contagious or the result of exposure to a common risk factor. Potentially important areas for future hypothesis-driven research, including the possible legacy effect of mite parasitism and the role of honey bee resistance to pesticides, are highlighted.

  18. Flux-driven simulations of turbulence collapse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, G. Y.; Kim, S. S.; Jhang, Hogun; Rhee, T. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Diamond, P. H. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); CASS and Department of Physics, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0429 (United States); Xu, X. Q. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Using three-dimensional nonlinear simulations of tokamak turbulence, we show that an edge transport barrier (ETB) forms naturally once input power exceeds a threshold value. Profiles, turbulence-driven flows, and neoclassical coefficients are evolved self-consistently. A slow power ramp-up simulation shows that ETB transition is triggered by the turbulence-driven flows via an intermediate phase which involves coherent oscillation of turbulence intensity and E×B flow shear. A novel observation of the evolution is that the turbulence collapses and the ETB transition begins when R{sub T} > 1 at t = t{sub R} (R{sub T}: normalized Reynolds power), while the conventional transition criterion (ω{sub E×B}>γ{sub lin} where ω{sub E×B} denotes mean flow shear) is satisfied only after t = t{sub C} ( >t{sub R}), when the mean flow shear grows due to positive feedback.

  19. Suppression of electron correlations in the collapsed tetragonal phase of CaFe2As2 under ambient pressure demonstrated by As75 NMR/NQR measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Y.; Roy, B.; Ran, S.; Bud'ko, S. L.; Canfield, P. C.

    2014-03-01

    The static and the dynamic spin correlations in the low-temperature collapsed tetragonal and the high-temperature tetragonal phase in CaFe2As2 have been investigated by As75 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) measurements. Through the temperature (T) dependence of the nuclear spin lattice relaxation rates (1/T1) and the Knight shifts, although stripe-type antiferromagnetic (AFM) spin correlations are realized in the high-temperature tetragonal phase, no trace of the AFM spin correlations can be found in the nonsuperconducting, low-temperature, collapsed tetragonal (cT) phase. Given that there is no magnetic broadening in As75 NMR spectra, together with the T-independent behavior of magnetic susceptibility χ and the T dependence of 1/T1Tχ, we conclude that Fe spin correlations are completely quenched statically and dynamically in the nonsuperconducting cT phase in CaFe2As2.

  20. Vertebral Augmentation Involving Vertebroplasty or Kyphoplasty for Cancer-Related Vertebral Compression Fractures: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Cancers that metastasize to the spine and primary cancers such as multiple myeloma can result in vertebral compression fractures or instability. Conservative strategies, including bed rest, bracing, and analgesic use, can be ineffective, resulting in continued pain and progressive functional disability limiting mobility and self-care. Surgery is not usually an option for cancer patients in advanced disease states because of their poor medical health or functional status and limited life expectancy. The objectives of this review were to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of percutaneous image-guided vertebral augmentation techniques, vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty, for palliation of cancer-related vertebral compression fractures. We performed a systematic literature search for studies on vertebral augmentation of cancer-related vertebral compression fractures published from January 1, 2000, to October 2014; abstracts were screened by a single reviewer. For those studies meeting the eligibility criteria, full-text articles were obtained. Owing to the heterogeneity of the clinical reports, we performed a narrative synthesis based on an analytical framework constructed for the type of cancer-related vertebral fractures and the diversity of the vertebral augmentation interventions. The evidence review identified 3,391 citations, of which 111 clinical reports (4,235 patients) evaluated the effectiveness of vertebroplasty (78 reports, 2,545 patients) or kyphoplasty (33 reports, 1,690 patients) for patients with mixed primary spinal metastatic cancers, multiple myeloma, or hemangiomas. Overall the mean pain intensity scores often reported within 48 hours of vertebral augmentation (kyphoplasty or vertebroplasty), were significantly reduced. Analgesic use, although variably reported, usually involved parallel decreases, particularly in opioids, and mean pain-related disability scores were also significantly improved. In a randomized controlled trial comparing kyphoplasty

  1. Vertebral Augmentation Involving Vertebroplasty or Kyphoplasty for Cancer-Related Vertebral Compression Fractures: An Economic Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Untreated vertebral compression fractures can have serious clinical consequences and impose a considerable impact on patients' quality of life and on caregivers. Since non-surgical management of these fractures has limited effectiveness, vertebral augmentation procedures are gaining acceptance in clinical practice for pain control and fracture stabilization. The objective of this analysis was to determine the cost-effectiveness and budgetary impact of kyphoplasty or vertebroplasty compared with non-surgical management for the treatment of vertebral compression fractures in patients with cancer. We performed a systematic review of health economic studies to identify relevant studies that compare the cost-effectiveness of kyphoplasty or vertebroplasty with non-surgical management for the treatment of vertebral compression fractures in adults with cancer. We also performed a primary cost-effectiveness analysis to assess the clinical benefits and costs of kyphoplasty or vertebroplasty compared with non-surgical management in the same population. We developed a Markov model to forecast benefits and harms of treatments, and corresponding quality-adjusted life years and costs. Clinical data and utility data were derived from published sources, while costing data were derived using Ontario administrative sources. We performed sensitivity analyses to examine the robustness of the results. In addition, a 1-year budget impact analysis was performed using data from Ontario administrative sources. Two scenarios were explored: (a) an increase in the total number of vertebral augmentation procedures performed among patients with cancer in Ontario, maintaining the current proportion of kyphoplasty versus vertebroplasty; and (b) no increase in the total number of vertebral augmentation procedures performed among patients with cancer in Ontario but an increase in the proportion of kyphoplasties versus vertebroplasties. The base case considered each of kyphoplasty and vertebroplasty

  2. Anatomia do sulco da artéria vertebral Vertebral artery groove anatomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max Franco de Carvalho

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: Diversas técnicas cirúrgicas têm sido realizadas na região craniocervical devido a diversas patologias. Durante o acesso cirúrgico a essa região existe um risco potencial de lesão iatrogênica da artéria vertebral, relacionado ao acesso lateral amplo e à avaliação inadequada da anatomia local. Variações no trajeto da artéria vertebral ocasionam maior risco de lesão vascular. O estudo pré-operatório por imagem da anatomia da artéria vertebral e do seu sulco tem sido realizado para aumentar a segurança cirúrgica. OBJETIVO: Estudar a morfometria da artéria vertebral no atlas através da tomografia computadorizada do sulco da artéria vertebral (SAV em 30 atlas isolados de cadáveres. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: O SAV e suas relações com a linha média foram avaliados através de oito medidas lineares e duas angulares, bilateralmente. A média, valor máximo e mínimo, e desvio padrão foram calculados para cada parâmetro. RESULTADOS: O SAV apresentou uma maior largura e maior espessura do lado esquerdo (pINTRODUCTION: Several surgical techniques have been carried through in the skull-cervical region due to various pathologies. During the surgical access to this region, a potential risk of iatrogenic injury of the vertebral artery exists, related to extended lateral access and the inadequate evaluation of the local anatomy. Variations in the groove of the vertebral artery lead to a greater risk of vascular injury during surgery. Preoperative image study of the vertebral artery anatomy and its groove has been realized to enhance surgical safety. OBJECTIVE: to study the morphometry of atlas vertebral artery on computed tomography scan images of the vertebral artery groove (VAG in 30 dry atlas. METHODS: VAG and its relationship with the midline were evaluated through eight linear and two angular measures, bilaterally. The average, maximum and minimum values, and standard deviation were calculated for each parameter

  3. Vertebral Augmentation Involving Vertebroplasty or Kyphoplasty for Cancer-Related Vertebral Compression Fractures: An Economic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Background Untreated vertebral compression fractures can have serious clinical consequences and impose a considerable impact on patients' quality of life and on caregivers. Since non-surgical management of these fractures has limited effectiveness, vertebral augmentation procedures are gaining acceptance in clinical practice for pain control and fracture stabilization. The objective of this analysis was to determine the cost-effectiveness and budgetary impact of kyphoplasty or vertebroplasty compared with non-surgical management for the treatment of vertebral compression fractures in patients with cancer. Methods We performed a systematic review of health economic studies to identify relevant studies that compare the cost-effectiveness of kyphoplasty or vertebroplasty with non-surgical management for the treatment of vertebral compression fractures in adults with cancer. We also performed a primary cost-effectiveness analysis to assess the clinical benefits and costs of kyphoplasty or vertebroplasty compared with non-surgical management in the same population. We developed a Markov model to forecast benefits and harms of treatments, and corresponding quality-adjusted life years and costs. Clinical data and utility data were derived from published sources, while costing data were derived using Ontario administrative sources. We performed sensitivity analyses to examine the robustness of the results. In addition, a 1-year budget impact analysis was performed using data from Ontario administrative sources. Two scenarios were explored: (a) an increase in the total number of vertebral augmentation procedures performed among patients with cancer in Ontario, maintaining the current proportion of kyphoplasty versus vertebroplasty; and (b) no increase in the total number of vertebral augmentation procedures performed among patients with cancer in Ontario but an increase in the proportion of kyphoplasties versus vertebroplasties. Results The base case considered each of

  4. Predicting mining collapse: Superjerks and the appearance of record-breaking events in coal as collapse precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiang; Liu, Hanlong; Main, Ian G.; Salje, Ekhard K. H.

    2017-08-01

    The quest for predictive indicators for the collapse of coal mines has led to a robust criterion from scale-model tests in the laboratory. Mechanical collapse under uniaxial stress forms avalanches with a power-law probability distribution function of radiated energy P ˜E-ɛ , with exponent ɛ =1.5 . Impending major collapse is preceded by a reduction of the energy exponent to the mean-field value ɛ =1.32 . Concurrently, the crackling noise increases in intensity and the waiting time between avalanches is reduced when the major collapse is approaching. These latter criteria were so-far deemed too unreliable for safety assessments in coal mines. We report a reassessment of previously collected extensive collapse data sets using "record-breaking analysis," based on the statistical appearance of "superjerks" within a smaller spectrum of collapse events. Superjerks are defined as avalanche signals with energies that surpass those of all previous events. The final major collapse is one such superjerk but other "near collapse" events equally qualify. In this way a very large data set of events is reduced to a sparse sequence of superjerks (21 in our coal sample). The main collapse can be anticipated from the sequence of energies and waiting times of superjerks, ignoring all weaker events. Superjerks are excellent indicators for the temporal evolution, and reveal clear nonstationarity of the crackling noise at constant loading rate, as well as self-similarity in the energy distribution of superjerks as a function of the number of events so far in the sequence Es j˜nδ with δ =1.79 . They are less robust in identifying the precise time of the final collapse, however, than the shift of the energy exponents in the whole data set which occurs only over a short time interval just before the major event. Nevertheless, they provide additional diagnostics that may increase the reliability of such forecasts.

  5. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) is a fast, painless exam that uses ... limitations of Children's CT? What is Children's CT? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  6. The Sarmatian vertebrates from Draxeni (Moldavian Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlad Codrea

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Middle Miocene (Sarmatian vertebrates had been unearthed at Draxeni (Vaslui district. The site is located in the northern area of the Moldavian Platform. There, the sand belonging to Şcheia Formation (Bessarabian is mined in a restricted open pit. This sand is related to a littoral environment (shoreface and foreshore. Some of its levels are rich in mollusc debris. Vertebrate remains, carried into the Bessarabian brackish basin are present too, but in smaller amounts. Mastodon, rhinoceros, hipparionine, tortoise remains had been collected there over several years. All teeth and bones are isolated and bear the marks of intensive rolling by waves and currents. This assemblage is typical for the top of Bessarabian in Moldavia, i.e. soon after the first hipparionine invasion in this part of the Europe. This assemblage can be related to the base of MN 9 unit.

  7. Photoreceptor cell fate specification in vertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzezinski, Joseph A.; Reh, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    Photoreceptors – the light-sensitive cells in the vertebrate retina – have been extremely well-characterized with regards to their biochemistry, cell biology and physiology. They therefore provide an excellent model for exploring the factors and mechanisms that drive neural progenitors into a differentiated cell fate in the nervous system. As a result, great progress in understanding the transcriptional network that controls photoreceptor specification and differentiation has been made over the last 20 years. This progress has also enabled the production of photoreceptors from pluripotent stem cells, thereby aiding the development of regenerative medical approaches to eye disease. In this Review, we outline the signaling and transcription factors that drive vertebrate photoreceptor development and discuss how these function together in gene regulatory networks to control photoreceptor cell fate specification. PMID:26443631

  8. Functions of Antimicrobial Peptides in Vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, Eva Edilia

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this review is to examine the multiple activities of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) in vertebrates. The largest AMP families are the cathelicidins and defensins, but several peptides derived from bigger proteins have also been reported. Cathelicidins are characterized by a conserved Nterminal pro-region and a variable region that encodes the C-terminal mature peptide. The β-defensins comprise a large family of AMPs that have diversified their functions, apparently without losing their antimicrobial activity. Cathelicidins and β-defensins are present in all vertebrates studied so far; α- defensins are present in mammals, while θ-defensins are only present in some non-human primates. The AMPs are regulated by posttranslational modifications that mainly include proteolysis, amidation, ADP-ribosylation, glycosylation and phosphorylation. In addition to their antimicrobial effects, AMPs show activity against viral particles and interfere in different steps of virus replication. Moreover, AMPs may both promote and inhibit cancer growth: several vertebrate AMPs kill cancer cells, and some tumors grow in an environment wherein the expression of β-defensins is reduced; however, human cathelicidin and some β-defensins are overexpressed in several types of cancer and are correlated with tumor growth. AMPs are part of the complex network of cells and molecules that forms the vertebrate innate defense system and they induce adaptive responses. In addition, they participate in sperm maturation and male reproduction. AMPs are multifunctional peptides that participate in immune responses, wound healing, angiogenesis, toxin neutralization, iron metabolism, male reproduction, among other functions. However, AMPs may also contribute to excessive inflammation and tumorigenesis. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  9. Delayed coupling theory of vertebrate segmentation

    OpenAIRE

    Morelli, Luis G.; Ares, Saúl; Herrgen, Leah; Schröter, Christian; Jülicher, Frank; Andrew C. Oates

    2008-01-01

    Rhythmic and sequential subdivision of the elongating vertebrate embryonic body axis into morphological somites is controlled by an oscillating multicellular genetic network termed the segmentation clock. This clock operates in the presomitic mesoderm (PSM), generating dynamic stripe patterns of oscillatory gene-expression across the field of PSM cells. How these spatial patterns, the clock’s collective period, and the underlying cellular-level interactions are related is not understood. A th...

  10. Vertebral artery dissection associated with sildenafil abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dersch, Rick; Anastasopoulos, Constantin; Hader, Claudia; Stich, Oliver

    2013-05-01

    We present a 49-year-old male who suffered a cerebellar infarction due to a vertebral artery dissection. The patient had taken sildenafil daily for at least 2 years for sexual enhancement. There was no sexual intercourse or traumatic event prior to symptom onset. Sildenafil intake has been associated with aortic dissection and, in the light of this report, we suggest that chronic sildenafil intake could be a risk factor for arterial dissection. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Vertebral involvement in SAPHO syndrome: MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nachtigal, A.; Cardinal, E.; Bureau, N.J. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. de Montreal, QC (Canada); Sainte-Marie, L.G. [Dept. of Internal Medicine, Univ. de Montreal, QC (Canada); Milette, F. [Department of Pathology, Univ. de Montreal, QC (Canada)

    1999-03-01

    We report on the MRI findings in the vertebrae and surrounding soft tissues in two patients with the SAPHO syndrome (Synovitis, Acne, Pustulosis, Hyperostosis, Osteitis). The MRI findings include abnormal bone marrow signal, either focal or diffuse, of the vertebral bodies and posterior elements; hyperintense paravertebral soft tissue swelling and abnormal signal of the intervertebral discs. These changes are consistent with discitis and osteitis. (orig.) With 6 figs., 17 refs.

  12. Transmission of ranavirus between ectothermic vertebrate hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenes, Roberto; Gray, Matthew J; Waltzek, Thomas B; Wilkes, Rebecca P; Miller, Debra L

    2014-01-01

    Transmission is an essential process that contributes to the survival of pathogens. Ranaviruses are known to infect different classes of lower vertebrates including amphibians, fishes and reptiles. Differences in the likelihood of infection among ectothermic vertebrate hosts could explain the successful yearlong persistence of ranaviruses in aquatic environments. The goal of this study was to determine if transmission of a Frog Virus 3 (FV3)-like ranavirus was possible among three species from different ectothermic vertebrate classes: Cope's gray treefrog (Hyla chrysoscelis) larvae, mosquito fish (Gambusia affinis), and red-eared slider (Trachemys scripta elegans). We housed individuals previously exposed to the FV3-like ranavirus with naïve (unexposed) individuals in containers divided by plastic mesh screen to permit water flow between subjects. Our results showed that infected gray treefrog larvae were capable of transmitting ranavirus to naïve larval conspecifics and turtles (60% and 30% infection, respectively), but not to fish. Also, infected turtles and fish transmitted ranavirus to 50% and 10% of the naïve gray treefrog larvae, respectively. Nearly all infected amphibians experienced mortality, whereas infected turtles and fish did not die. Our results demonstrate that ranavirus can be transmitted through water among ectothermic vertebrate classes, which has not been reported previously. Moreover, fish and reptiles might serve as reservoirs for ranavirus given their ability to live with subclinical infections. Subclinical infections of ranavirus in fish and aquatic turtles could contribute to the pathogen's persistence, especially when highly susceptible hosts like amphibians are absent as a result of seasonal fluctuations in relative abundance.

  13. The timing of Timezyme diversification in vertebrates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien Cazaméa-Catalan

    Full Text Available All biological functions in vertebrates are synchronized with daily and seasonal changes in the environment by the time keeping hormone melatonin. Its nocturnal surge is primarily due to the rhythmic activity of the arylalkylamine N-acetyl transferase AANAT, which thus became the focus of many investigations regarding its evolution and function. Various vertebrate isoforms have been reported from cartilaginous fish to mammals but their origin has not been clearly established. Using phylogeny and synteny, we took advantage of the increasing number of available genomes in order to test whether the various rounds of vertebrate whole genome duplications were responsible for the diversification of AANAT. We highlight a gene secondary loss of the AANAT2 in the Sarcopterygii, revealing for the first time that the AAANAT1/2 duplication occurred before the divergence between Actinopterygii (bony fish and Sarcopterygii (tetrapods, lobe-finned fish, and lungfish. We hypothesize the teleost-specific whole genome duplication (WDG generated the appearance of the AANAT1a/1b and the AANAT2/2'paralogs, the 2' isoform being rapidly lost in the teleost common ancestor (ray-finned fish. We also demonstrate the secondary loss of the AANAT1a in a Paracantopterygii (Atlantic cod and of the 1b in some Ostariophysi (zebrafish and cave fish. Salmonids present an even more diverse set of AANATs that may be due to their specific WGD followed by secondary losses. We propose that vertebrate AANAT diversity resulted from 3 rounds of WGD followed by previously uncharacterized secondary losses. Extant isoforms show subfunctionalized localizations, enzyme activities and affinities that have increased with time since their emergence.

  14. Study of film boiling collapse behavior during vapor explosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yagi, Masahiro; Yamano, Norihiro; Sugimoto, Jun [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Abe, Yutaka; Adachi, Hiromichi; Kobayashi, Tomoyoshi

    1996-06-01

    Possible large scale vapor explosions are safety concern in nuclear power plants during severe accident. In order to identify the occurrence of the vapor explosion and to estimate the magnitude of the induced pressure pulse, it is necessary to investigate the triggering condition for the vapor explosion. As a first step of this study, scooping analysis was conducted with a simulation code based on thermal detonation model. It was found that the pressure at the collapse of film boiling much affects the trigger condition of vapor explosion. Based on this analytical results, basic experiments were conducted to clarify the collapse conditions of film boiling on a high temperature solid ball surface. Film boiling condition was established by flooding water onto a high temperature stainless steel ball heated by a high frequency induction heater. After the film boiling was established, the pressure pulse generated by a shock tube was applied to collapse the steam film on the ball surface. As the experimental boundary conditions, materials and size of the balls, magnitude of pressure pulse and initial temperature of the carbon and stainless steel balls were varied. The transients of pressure and surface temperature were measured. It was found that the surface temperature on the balls sharply decreased when the pressure wave passed through the film on balls. Based on the surface temperature behavior, the film boiling collapse pattern was found to be categorized into several types. Especially, the pattern for stainless steel ball was categorized into three types; no collapse, collapse and reestablishment after collapse. It was thus clarified that the film boiling collapse behavior was identified by initial conditions and that the pressure required to collapse film boiling strongly depended on the initial surface temperature. The present results will provide a useful information for the analysis of vapor explosions based on the thermal detonation model. (J.P.N.)

  15. Modular evolution of the Cetacean vertebral column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchholtz, Emily A

    2007-01-01

    Modular theory predicts that hierarchical developmental processes generate hierarchical phenotypic units that are capable of independent modification. The vertebral column is an overtly modular structure, and its rapid phenotypic transformation in cetacean evolution provides a case study for modularity. Terrestrial mammals have five morphologically discrete vertebral series that are now known to be coincident with Hox gene expression patterns. Here, I present the hypothesis that in living Carnivora and Artiodactyla, and by inference in the terrestrial ancestors of whales, the series are themselves components of larger precaudal and caudal modular units. Column morphology in a series of fossil and living whales is used to predict the type and sequence of developmental changes responsible for modification of that ancestral pattern. Developmental innovations inferred include independent meristic additions to the precaudal column in basal archaeocetes and basilosaurids, stepwise homeotic reduction of the sacral series in protocetids, and dissociation of the caudal series into anterior tail and fluke subunits in basilosaurids. The most dramatic change was the novel association of lumbar and anterior caudal vertebrae in a module that crosses the precaudal/caudal boundary. This large unit is defined by shared patterns of vertebral morphology, count, and size in all living whales (Neoceti).

  16. Epidemiologia do traumatismo da coluna vertebral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Ferraz de Campos

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliação epidemiológica retrospectiva de 100 casos de traumatismo da coluna vertebral. MÉTODO: Estudo transversal de dados colhidos por levantamento de prontuário, segundo protocolo de decodificação local. RESULTADOS: Predomínio etário de 20 a 40 anos em 64% dos casos; sexo masculino em 86%; segmento toracolombar mais comumente atingido 64% e 36% para o segmento cervical; principais causas foram às quedas em 40%, seguidas de acidentes automobilísticos em 25% e quedas da laje 23%. A prevalência dos ferimentos por arma de fogo foi de 7%, mergulho em águas rasas 3% e agressões 2%. Houve análise complementar com cruzamentos entre idade, sexo, causa e segmento da coluna vertebral acometido, observando que o segmento cervical teve grande predomínio nas mulheres em relação aos homens em 85,7% X 14,3%. CONCLUSÃO: O traumatismo da coluna vertebral ocorreu predominantemente em homens entre 20 e 40 anos e o segmento cervical foi o mais acometido nas mulheres em relação aos homens na proporção de 6:1.

  17. Nestedness of ectoparasite-vertebrate host networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean P Graham

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Determining the structure of ectoparasite-host networks will enable disease ecologists to better understand and predict the spread of vector-borne diseases. If these networks have consistent properties, then studying the structure of well-understood networks could lead to extrapolation of these properties to others, including those that support emerging pathogens. Borrowing a quantitative measure of network structure from studies of mutualistic relationships between plants and their pollinators, we analyzed 29 ectoparasite-vertebrate host networks--including three derived from molecular bloodmeal analysis of mosquito feeding patterns--using measures of nestedness to identify non-random interactions among species. We found significant nestedness in ectoparasite-vertebrate host lists for habitats ranging from tropical rainforests to polar environments. These networks showed non-random patterns of nesting, and did not differ significantly from published estimates of nestedness from mutualistic networks. Mutualistic and antagonistic networks appear to be organized similarly, with generalized ectoparasites interacting with hosts that attract many ectoparasites and more specialized ectoparasites usually interacting with these same "generalized" hosts. This finding has implications for understanding the network dynamics of vector-born pathogens. We suggest that nestedness (rather than random ectoparasite-host associations can allow rapid transfer of pathogens throughout a network, and expand upon such concepts as the dilution effect, bridge vectors, and host switching in the context of nested ectoparasite-vertebrate host networks.

  18. Evolution of sound localisation in land vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köppl, Christine

    2009-08-11

    The story of the evolution of hearing in land vertebrates is fascinating but complex. The water-to-land transition changed the physical environment in which hearing happens so dramatically that both the peripheral receptor structures and the central auditory circuits underwent a revolution, leading to the sensitive hearing of higher-frequency airborne sound. This (r)evolution took a very long time indeed. Most of it happened after the early divergence of the major clades of land vertebrates. Hearing, at least hearing as we commonly understand it today, is the youngest of the major senses and much of its evolutionary history is not shared between amphibians, lepidosauromorphs (lizards and snakes), archosauromorphs (birds and crocodilians) and mammals. There was no linear evolution of complexity from 'lower' to 'higher' vertebrates. We are only just beginning to appreciate the implications of this for central auditory processing. There is no consensus, yet, on the evolution of sound localisation. The multitude of physical cues involved in sound localisation means that different selective pressures interact and need to be considered. The use and neural processing of interaural time differences is just one example. It has taught us that long-standing assumptions, such as the homology of the mammalian medial superior olive and the avian nucleus laminaris, need to be questioned and that important insights may arise from unexpected directions, such as the paleontology of middle-ear ossicles. There is still much to discover.

  19. Vertebral osteomyelitis in adults: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickerson, Emma K; Sinha, Rohitashwa

    2016-03-01

    The incidence of vertebral osteomyelitis is increasing, attributed to an ageing population with inherent co-morbidities and improved case ascertainment. References were retrieved from the PubMed database using the terms 'vertebral osteomyelitis' and 'spondylodiscitis' between January 1, 2009 and April 30, 2014 published in English as checked in May 2014 (>1000 abstracts checked). Blood cultures and whole spine imaging with magnetic resonance imaging are essential investigations. Thorough debridement is the mainstay of surgical management, although placing metalwork in active infection is becoming increasingly common. The extent of pursuing spinal biopsies to determine aetiology, antimicrobial choices and duration, monitoring the response to treatment, and surgical techniques and timing all vary widely in clinical practice with heterogeneous studies limiting comparisons. Surgery, rather than conservative approaches, is being proposed as the default management choice, because it can, in carefully selected patients, offer faster reduction in pain scores and improved quality of life. Further studies are needed to define the most effective technique for spinal biopsies to maximize determining aetiology. High-quality trials are required to provide an evidence base for both the medical and surgical management of vertebral osteomyelitis, including challenging medical management as the default option. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Phylotranscriptomic consolidation of the jawed vertebrate timetree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irisarri, Iker; Baurain, Denis; Brinkmann, Henner; Delsuc, Frédéric; Sire, Jean-Yves; Kupfer, Alexander; Petersen, Jörn; Jarek, Michael; Meyer, Axel; Vences, Miguel; Philippe, Hervé

    2017-09-01

    Phylogenomics is extremely powerful but introduces new challenges as no agreement exists on "standards" for data selection, curation and tree inference. We use jawed vertebrates (Gnathostomata) as model to address these issues. Despite considerable efforts in resolving their evolutionary history and macroevolution, few studies have included a full phylogenetic diversity of gnathostomes and some relationships remain controversial. We tested a novel bioinformatic pipeline to assemble large and accurate phylogenomic datasets from RNA sequencing and find this phylotranscriptomic approach successful and highly cost-effective. Increased sequencing effort up to ca. 10Gbp allows recovering more genes, but shallower sequencing (1.5Gbp) is sufficient to obtain thousands of full-length orthologous transcripts. We reconstruct a robust and strongly supported timetree of jawed vertebrates using 7,189 nuclear genes from 100 taxa, including 23 new transcriptomes from previously unsampled key species. Gene jackknifing of genomic data corroborates the robustness of our tree and allows calculating genome-wide divergence times by overcoming gene sampling bias. Mitochondrial genomes prove insufficient to resolve the deepest relationships because of limited signal and among-lineage rate heterogeneity. Our analyses emphasize the importance of large curated nuclear datasets to increase the accuracy of phylogenomics and provide a reference framework for the evolutionary history of jawed vertebrates.

  1. Flapping wing aerodynamics: from insects to vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Diana D; Lentink, David

    2016-04-01

    More than a million insects and approximately 11,000 vertebrates utilize flapping wings to fly. However, flapping flight has only been studied in a few of these species, so many challenges remain in understanding this form of locomotion. Five key aerodynamic mechanisms have been identified for insect flight. Among these is the leading edge vortex, which is a convergent solution to avoid stall for insects, bats and birds. The roles of the other mechanisms - added mass, clap and fling, rotational circulation and wing-wake interactions - have not yet been thoroughly studied in the context of vertebrate flight. Further challenges to understanding bat and bird flight are posed by the complex, dynamic wing morphologies of these species and the more turbulent airflow generated by their wings compared with that observed during insect flight. Nevertheless, three dimensionless numbers that combine key flow, morphological and kinematic parameters - the Reynolds number, Rossby number and advance ratio - govern flapping wing aerodynamics for both insects and vertebrates. These numbers can thus be used to organize an integrative framework for studying and comparing animal flapping flight. Here, we provide a roadmap for developing such a framework, highlighting the aerodynamic mechanisms that remain to be quantified and compared across species. Ultimately, incorporating complex flight maneuvers, environmental effects and developmental stages into this framework will also be essential to advancing our understanding of the biomechanics, movement ecology and evolution of animal flight. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  2. Vertebral Osteomyelitis Caused by Mycobacterium abscessus Surgically Treated Using Antibacterial Iodine-Supported Instrumentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Kato

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium abscessus infections rarely develop in healthy individuals, and mostly they occur in immunocompromised hosts. Vertebral osteomyelitis due to Mycobacterium abscessus is very rare and only three previous cases of spinal infection caused by Mycobacterium abscessus have been reported. Mycobacterium abscessus isolates are uniformly resistant to antituberculous agents and can display a virulent biofilm-forming phenotype. The patient was a 67-year-old woman with vertebral osteomyelitis of the L1-2. She was healthy without immune-suppressed condition, history of trauma, or intravenous drug use. The smear examination of the specimen harvested by CT-guided puncture of the paravertebral abscess revealed Mycobacterium abscessus. Her disease condition did not abate with conservative treatment using antimicrobial chemotherapy. Radical debridement of the vertebral osteomyelitis and anterior reconstruction from T12 to L2 using antibacterial iodine-supported instrumentation were performed. Chemotherapy using clarithromycin, amikacin, and imipenem was applied for 6 months after surgery as these antibiotics had been proven to be effective to Mycobacterium abscessus after surgery. Two years after surgery, the infected anterior site healed and bony fusion was successfully achieved without a recurrence of infection.

  3. Investigation of biomechanical behavior of lumbar vertebral segments with dynamic stabilization device using finite element approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deoghare, Ashish B.; Kashyap, Siddharth; Padole, Pramod M.

    2013-03-01

    Degenerative disc disease is a major source of lower back pain and significantly alters the biomechanics of the lumbar spine. Dynamic stabilization device is a remedial technique which uses flexible materials to stabilize the affected lumbar region while preserving the natural anatomy of the spine. The main objective of this research work is to investigate the stiffness variation of dynamic stabilization device under various loading conditions under compression, axial rotation and flexion. Three dimensional model of the two segment lumbar spine is developed using computed tomography (CT) scan images. The lumbar structure developed is analyzed in ANSYS workbench. Two types of dynamic stabilization are considered: one with stabilizing device as pedicle instrumentation and second with stabilization device inserted around the inter-vertebral disc. Analysis suggests that proper positioning of the dynamic stabilization device is of paramount significance prior to the surgery. Inserting the device in the posterior region indicates the adverse effects as it shows increase in the deformation of the inter-vertebral disc. Analysis executed by positioning stabilizing device around the inter-vertebral disc yields better result for various stiffness values under compression and other loadings. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  4. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ... specific content. Related Articles and Media Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Radiation Dose in X-Ray and CT Exams Contrast Materials Head and Neck ...

  5. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... and surgical biopsy. No radiation remains in a patient's body after a CT examination. X-rays used in CT scans should have no immediate side effects. Risks There is always a slight chance of cancer from excessive exposure to radiation. However, the benefit ...

  6. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... and surgical biopsy. No radiation remains in a patient's body after a CT examination. X-rays used in CT scans should have no immediate side effects. Risks There is always a slight chance of cancer from excessive exposure to radiation. However, the benefit ...

  7. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... and surgical biopsy. No radiation remains in a patient's body after a CT examination. X-rays used in CT scans should have no immediate side effects. Risks There is always a slight chance of cancer from excessive exposure to radiation. However, the benefit ...

  8. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... CT Scanning of the Abdomen and Pelvis? What is CT Scanning of the Abdomen/Pelvis? Computed tomography, more commonly known as ... top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? This procedure is typically used to ...

  9. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... microphone. top of page How does the procedure work? In many ways CT scanning works very much like other x-ray examinations. Different ... a relatively short time, especially when compared to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). CT scanning is painless, noninvasive and accurate. ...

  10. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... have chronic pain, you may find a CT exam to be stressful. The technologist or nurse, under the direction of a physician, may offer you some medication to help you tolerate the CT scanning procedure. For exams (excluding head and neck) your head will remain ...

  11. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... time staying still, are claustrophobic or have chronic pain, you may find a CT exam to be stressful. The technologist or nurse, under the direction of a physician, may offer you some medication to help you tolerate the CT scanning procedure. ...

  12. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... are very nervous or anxious or have chronic pain, you may find a CT exam to be stressful. The technologist or nurse, under the direction of a physician, may offer you some medication to help you tolerate the CT scanning procedure. ...

  13. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... time staying still, are claustrophobic or have chronic pain, you may find a CT exam to be stressful. The technologist or nurse, under the direction of a physician, may offer you some medication to help you tolerate the CT scanning procedure. ...

  14. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Sinuses Computed tomography (CT) of the sinuses uses special x-ray equipment to evaluate the paranasal sinus cavities – hollow, air-filled spaces within the bones of ...

  15. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... images or pictures of the inside of the body. The cross-sectional images generated during a CT scan can be reformatted ... of data to create two-dimensional cross-sectional images of your body, which are then displayed on a monitor. CT ...

  16. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... images or pictures of the inside of the body. The cross-sectional images generated during a CT scan can be reformatted ... of data to create two-dimensional cross-sectional images of your body, which are then displayed on a monitor. CT ...

  17. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... images or pictures of the inside of the body. The cross-sectional images generated during a CT scan can be reformatted ... of data to create two-dimensional cross-sectional images of your body, which are then displayed on a monitor. CT ...

  18. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... the procedure work? In many ways CT scanning works very much like other x-ray examinations. Different body parts absorb the x-rays in varying degrees. It is this crucial difference in absorption that allows the body parts to be distinguished from one another on an x-ray film or CT ...

  19. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... the procedure work? In many ways CT scanning works very much like other x-ray examinations. Different body parts absorb the x-rays in varying degrees. It is this crucial difference in absorption that allows the body parts to be distinguished from one another on an x-ray film or CT ...

  20. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... the procedure work? In many ways CT scanning works very much like other x-ray examinations. Different body parts absorb the x-rays in varying degrees. It is this crucial difference in absorption that allows the body parts to be distinguished from one another on an x-ray film or CT ...