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Sample records for ventricular wall stress

  1. Effect of food intake on left ventricular wall stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gårdinger, Ylva; Hlebowicz, Joanna; Björgell, Ola; Dencker, Magnus

    2014-01-28

    Left ventricular wall stress has been investigated in a variety of populations, but the effect of food intake has not been evaluated. We assessed whether left ventricular wall stress is affected by food intake in healthy subjects. Twenty-three healthy subjects aged 25.6 ± 4.5 years were investigated. Meridional end-systolic wall stress (ESS) and circumferential end-systolic wall stress (cESS) were measured before, 30 minutes after, and 110 minutes after a standardised meal. Both ESS and cESS decreased significantly (P stress is affected by food intake in healthy subjects.

  2. Effect of food intake on left ventricular wall stress

    OpenAIRE

    Gårdinger, Ylva; Hlebowicz, Joanna; Björgell, Ola; Dencker, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Left ventricular wall stress has been investigated in a variety of populations, but the effect of food intake has not been evaluated. We assessed whether left ventricular wall stress is affected by food intake in healthy subjects. Methods: Twenty-three healthy subjects aged 25.6 +/- 4.5 years were investigated. Meridional end-systolic wall stress (ESS) and circumferential end-systolic wall stress (cESS) were measured before, 30 minutes after, and 110 minutes after a standardised me...

  3. Fatigue as Presenting Symptom and a High Burden of Premature Ventricular Contractions Are Independently Associated With Increased Ventricular Wall Stress in Patients With Normal Left Ventricular Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Huls van Taxis, Carine F B; Piers, Sebastiaan R D; de Riva Silva, Marta; Dekkers, Olaf M; Pijnappels, Daniël A; Schalij, Martin J; Wijnmaalen, Adrianus P; Zeppenfeld, Katja

    2015-12-01

    High idiopathic premature ventricular contractions (PVC) burden has been associated with PVC-induced cardiomyopathy. Patients may be symptomatic before left ventricular (LV) dysfunction develops. N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and circumferential end-systolic wall stress (cESS) on echocardiography are markers for increased ventricular wall stress. This study aimed to evaluate the relation between presenting symptoms, PVC burden, and increased ventricular wall stress in patients with frequent PVCs and preserved LV function. Eighty-three patients (41 men; 49±15 years) with idiopathic PVCs and normal LV function referred for PVC ablation were included. Type of symptoms (palpitations, fatigue, and [near-]syncope), PVC burden on 24-hour Holter, NT-proBNP levels, and cESS on echocardiography were assessed before and 3 months after ablation. Sustained successful ablation was defined as ≥80% PVC burden reduction during follow-up. Patients were symptomatic for 24 months (Q1-Q3, 16-60); 73% reported palpitations, 47% fatigue, and 30% (near-)syncope. Baseline PVC burden was 23±13%, median NT-proBNP 92 pg/mL (Q1-Q3 50-156), and cESS 143±35 kdyne/cm(2). Fatigue was associated with higher baseline NT-proBNP and cESS (PFatigue was independently associated with a significantly larger reduction in NT-proBNP. In patients with nonsuccessful ablation, NT-proBNP and cESS remained unchanged. In patients with frequent PVCs and preserved LV function, fatigue was associated with higher baseline NT-proBNP and cESS, and with a significantly larger reduction in NT-proBNP after sustained successful ablation. These findings support a link between fatigue and PVC-induced increased ventricular wall stress, despite preserved LV function. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Impact of left ventricular assist device speed adjustment on exercise tolerance and markers of wall stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, Christopher S; Salamonsen, Robert; Keogh, Anne M; Woodard, John; Ayre, Peter; Prichard, Roslyn; Kotlyar, Eugene; Macdonald, Peter S; Jansz, Paul; Spratt, Phillip

    2015-09-01

    Left ventricular assist devices are crucial in rehabilitation of patients with end-stage heart failure. Whether cardiopulmonary function is enhanced with higher pump output is unknown. 10 patients (aged 39±16 years, mean±SD) underwent monitored adjustment of pump speed to determine minimum safe low speed and maximum safe high speed at rest. Patients were then randomized to these speed settings and underwent three 6-minute walk tests (6MWT) and symptom-limited cardiopulmonary stress tests (CPX) on separate days. Pump speed settings (low, normal and high) resulted in significantly different resting pump flows of 4.43±0.6, 5.03±0.94, and 5.72±1.2 l/min (Pexercise (Pexercise time (p=.27). Maximum workload achieved and peak oxygen consumption were significantly different comparing low to high pump speed settings only (Prelease was significantly reduced at higher pump speed with exercise (Prelease consistent with lower myocardial wall stress. This did not, however, improve exercise tolerance.

  5. Quantification of the right ventricular wall using stress myocardial emission computed tomography with thallium-201 in normal subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akanabe, Hiroshi; Oshima, Motoo; Sakuma, Sadayuki; Yamamoto, Shuhei; Kawai, Naoki; Sotobata, Iwao

    1985-01-01

    Although many studies of quantitative analysis of left ventricular myocardial wall (LVMW) have been reported using stress thallium-201 (Tl-201), few reports of right ventricular myocardial wall (RVMW) have been estimated. In this study we determined whether single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with Tl-201 could accurately define normal range of RVMW in normal subjects. Twelve persons who have no valvular disease, nor coronary artery disease were included in this study. Stress SPECT study was reconstructed to make a short axial images of ventricles. RVMW and LVMW were flagged by mamual. Each ventricle was divided into 36 parts at every 10 degree. Relative activity counts in each ventricle were calculated as a percent counts of maximum counts in left ventricle. The normal range of RVMW with stress SPECT was as follows: anterior wall (33.2 +- 11.4 %, mean +- 2 standard deviation, -62.7 +- 18.4 %), free wall (30.1 +- 12.4 % - 38.5 +- 8.8 %), inferior wall (40.4 +- 7.8 % - 60.0 +- 21.4 %), septal wall (65.2 +- 17.2 % - 71.1 +- 14.2 %). Above the results, SPECT with Tl-201 can accurately define the normal range of RVMW, and this method is usefull to quantify the degree of ischemia and hypertrophy in RVMW. (author)

  6. Reduction in Left Ventricular Wall Stress and Improvement in Function in Failing Hearts using Algisyl-LVR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lik Chuan; Zhihong, Zhang; Hinson, Andrew; Guccione, Julius M.

    2013-01-01

    Injection of Algisyl-LVR, a treatment under clinical development, is intended to treat patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. This treatment was recently used for the first time in patients who had symptomatic heart failure. In all patients, cardiac function of the left ventricle (LV) improved significantly, as manifested by consistent reduction of the LV volume and wall stress. Here we describe this novel treatment procedure and the methods used to quantify its effects on LV wall stress and function. Algisyl-LVR is a biopolymer gel consisting of Na+-Alginate and Ca2+-Alginate. The treatment procedure was carried out by mixing these two components and then combining them into one syringe for intramyocardial injections. This mixture was injected at 10 to 19 locations mid-way between the base and apex of the LV free wall in patients. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), together with mathematical modeling, was used to quantify the effects of this treatment in patients before treatment and at various time points during recovery. The epicardial and endocardial surfaces were first digitized from the MR images to reconstruct the LV geometry at end-systole and at end-diastole. Left ventricular cavity volumes were then measured from these reconstructed surfaces. Mathematical models of the LV were created from these MRI-reconstructed surfaces to calculate regional myofiber stress. Each LV model was constructed so that 1) it deforms according to a previously validated stress-strain relationship of the myocardium, and 2) the predicted LV cavity volume from these models matches the corresponding MRI-measured volume at end-diastole and end-systole. Diastolic filling was simulated by loading the LV endocardial surface with a prescribed end-diastolic pressure. Systolic contraction was simulated by concurrently loading the endocardial surface with a prescribed end-systolic pressure and adding active contraction in the myofiber direction. Regional myofiber stress at end-diastole and

  7. Left Ventricular Wall Stress-Mass-Heart Rate Product and Cardiovascular Events in Treated Hypertensive Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Devereux, Richard B; Bang, Casper N; Roman, Mary J

    2015-01-01

    -varying covariate in Cox models assessing predictors of the LIFE primary composite end point (cardiovascular death, MI, or stroke), its individual components, and all-cause mortality. At baseline, the triple product in both treatment groups was, compared with normal adults, elevated in 70% of patients. During...... more, greater heart rate reduction with atenolol resulted in larger reduction of the triple product. Lower triple product during antihypertensive treatment was strongly, independently associated with lower rates of the LIFE primary composite end point, cardiovascular death, and MI, but not stroke.......In the Losartan Intervention for End Point Reduction in Hypertension (LIFE) study, 4.8 years' losartan- versus atenolol-based antihypertensive treatment reduced left ventricular hypertrophy and cardiovascular end points, including cardiovascular death and stroke. However, there was no difference...

  8. Clustering Of Left Ventricular Wall Motion Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjelogrlic, Z.; Jakopin, J.; Gyergyek, L.

    1982-11-01

    A method for detection of wall regions with similar motion was presented. A model based on local direction information was used to measure the left ventricular wall motion from cineangiographic sequence. Three time functions were used to define segmental motion patterns: distance of a ventricular contour segment from the mean contour, the velocity of a segment and its acceleration. Motion patterns were clustered by the UPGMA algorithm and by an algorithm based on K-nearest neighboor classification rule.

  9. Evaluation of Aortic Blood Flow and Wall Shear Stress in Aortic Stenosis and Its Association With Left Ventricular Remodeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Knobelsdorff-Brenkenhoff, Florian; Karunaharamoorthy, Achudhan; Trauzeddel, Ralf Felix; Barker, Alex J; Blaszczyk, Edyta; Markl, Michael; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette

    2016-01-01

    Background Aortic stenosis (AS) leads to variable stress for the left ventricle (LV) and consequently a broad range of LV remodeling. Study aim was to describe blood flow patterns in the ascending aorta of AS patients and determine their association with remodeling. Methods and Results Thirty-seven patients with AS (14 mild, 8 moderate, 15 severe; age 63±13 years) and 37 healthy controls (age 60±10 years) underwent 4D-flow MRI. Helical and vortical flow formations and flow eccentricity were assessed in the ascending aorta. Normalized flow displacement from the vessel center and peak systolic wall shear stress (WSSpeak) in the ascending aorta were quantified. LV remodeling was assessed based on LV mass index (LVMI-I) and the ratio of LV mass to enddiastolic volume (relative wall mass; RWM). Marked helical and vortical flow formation and eccentricity were more prevalent in patients with AS than in healthy subjects, and AS patients exhibited an asymmetric and elevated distribution of WSSpeak. In AS, aortic orifice area was strongly negatively associated with vortical flow formation (p=0.0274), eccentricity (p=0.0070) and flow displacement (p=0.0021). Bicuspid aortic valve was associated with more intense helical (p=0.0098) and vortical flow formation (p=0.0536), higher flow displacement (p=0.11) and higher WSSpeak (p=0.0926). LVM-I and RWM were significantly associated with aortic orifice area (p=0.0611, p=0.0058) and flow displacement (p=0.0058, p=0.0283). Conclusions In this pilot study, AS leads to abnormal blood flow pattern and WSSpeak in the ascending aorta. In addition to aortic orifice area, normalized flow displacement was significantly associated with LV remodeling. PMID:26917824

  10. Noninvasive assessment of right ventricular wall motion by radionuclide cardioangiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Tsunehiko; Uehara, Toshiisa; Naito, Hiroaki; Hayashida, Kohei; Kozuka, Takahiro

    1981-01-01

    Radionuclide cardioangiography is a useful method to evaluate the left ventricular wall motion in various heart diseases. It has been also attempted to assess the right ventricular wall motion simultaneously by radionuclide method. In this study, using the combination of first-pass (RAO 30 0 ) and multi-gate (LAO 40 0 ) method, the site of right vetricle was classified in five. (1 inflow, 2 sinus, 3 outflow, 4 septal, 5 lateral) and the degree of wall motion was classified in four stages (dyskinesis, akinesis, hypokinesis, normal) according to the AHA committee report. These methods were applied clinically to forty-eight patients with various heart diseases. In the cases with right ventricular pressure or volume overload such as COLD, pulmonary infarction, the right ventricle was dilated and the wall motion was reduced in all portions. Especially, in the cases with right ventricular infarction, the right ventricular wall motion was reduced in the infarcted area. The findings of radionuclide method were in good agreement with those of contrast right ventriculography or echocardiography. In conclusion, radionuclide cardioangiography is a useful and noninvasive method to assess not only the left but also the right ventricular wall motion. (author)

  11. Left ventricular wall stress and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase gene expression in renal hypertensive rats: dose-dependent effects of ACE inhibition and AT1-receptor blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zierhut, W; Studer, R; Laurent, D; Kästner, S; Allegrini, P; Whitebread, S; Cumin, F; Baum, H P; de Gasparo, M; Drexler, H

    1996-05-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is associated with altered Ca2+ handling and may predispose to the development of LV dysfunction and cardiac failure. At the cellular level, the re-expression of ANF represents a well-established marker of myocyte hypertrophy while the decreased expression of the sarcoplasmatic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+)-ATPase is thought o play a crucial role in the alterations of Ca2+ handling and LV function. We assessed the dose-dependent effect of chronic ACE inhibition or AT1 receptor blockade on cardiac function in relation to the cardiac expression of the SR Ca(2+)-ATPase and ANF. Renal hypertensive rats (2K-1C) were treated for 12 weeks with three different doses of the ACE inhibitor benazepril, the AT1-receptor antagonist valsartan (each drug 0.3, 3, and 10 mg/kg per day i.p.) or placebo. LV dimensions, hypertrophy and wall stress were determined in vivo by magnetic resonance imaging and the gene expressions of ANF and SR Ca(2+)-ATPase were quantified by Northern blot. Low doses of both drugs did not affect blood pressure, hypertrophy, systolic wall stress and the ANF and SR Ca(2+)-ATPase gene expression. High doses of each drug reduced systolic blood pressure, wall stress, and LV hypertrophy to a similar extent and to values comparable to normotensive, age-matched rats. In addition, high dose treatment reduced LV end-systolic and end-diastolic volume as compared to untreated 2K-1C animals and normalized the mRNA levels of both ANF and SR Ca(2+)-ATPase (as compared to normotensive animals). We conclude that in this model, high doses of ACE inhibition and AT1-receptor blockade are necessary to normalize systolic blood pressure, LV hypertrophy and systolic LV wall stress which, in turn, is associated with restoration of a normal cardiac phenotype with respect to SR Ca(2+)-ATPase and ANF and normalization of cardiac function.

  12. Delayed ventricular septal rupture complicating acute inferior wall myocardial infarction

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Jae Hyung; Sattiraju, Srinivasan; Mehta, Sanjay; Missov, Emil

    2013-01-01

    Background Ventricular septal rupture is a potentially fatal complication of acute myocardial infarction. Its incidence has declined with modern reperfusion therapy. In the era of percutaneous coronary interventions, it occurs a median of 18?24?hours after myocardial infarction and is most commonly associated with anterior myocardial infarction. We present a case of delayed ventricular septal rupture complicating acute inferior wall myocardial infarction. Case presentation A 53-year-old Cauca...

  13. Left ventricular performance during psychological stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, D.Z.; Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston; Dimsdale, J.E.; Moore, R.H.; Barlai-Kovach, M.; Newell, J.B.; McKusick, K.A.; Boucher, C.A.; Fifer, M.A.; Strauss, H.W.

    1989-01-01

    Left ventricular ejection fraction, systolic blood pressure and plasma norepinephrine were measured in six normotensive and six mildly hypertensive subjects during rest and psychological stress. Compared with rest, 8 of the 12 subjects developed significant changes in ejection fraction (increase in 6, decrease in 2); 10 of 12 subjects developed significant elevations of plasma norepinephrine; and all developed significant increases in systolic blood pressure. When the stress effects were examined for the total group, as opposed to within subjects, there were significant increases in plasma norepinephrine and systolic blood pressure but, interestingly, mean ejection fraction and stroke volume remained unchanged, implying stress led to increased left ventricular contractility. (orig.)

  14. Imaging of left ventricular wall motion via venous DSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witte, G.; Roediger, W.; Buecheler, E.; Hamburg Univ.

    1986-01-01

    Until now, angiographical and nuclear medicine examination techniques for imaging left ventricular wall motion have been presenting with difficulties endemic to the methods themselves. For the first time in cardiological diagnostics, digital subtraction angiography (DSA) makes it possible to perform a fairly non-invasive examination with good spatial and temporal resolution. Functional analytic evaluation, however, still demands time-consuming, complicated post-processing. In this article we introduce a method that uses an additive window technique for the immediate generation of wall motion images. (orig.) [de

  15. Mechanical stress is associated with right ventricular response to pulmonary valve replacement in patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Dalin; Yang, Chun; Del Nido, Pedro J; Zuo, Heng; Rathod, Rahul H; Huang, Xueying; Gooty, Vasu; Tang, Alexander; Billiar, Kristen L; Wu, Zheyang; Geva, Tal

    2016-03-01

    Patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot account for a substantial proportion of cases with late-onset right ventricular failure. The current surgical approach, which includes pulmonary valve replacement/insertion, has yielded mixed results. Therefore, it may be clinically useful to identify parameters that can be used to predict right ventricular function response to pulmonary valve replacement. Cardiac magnetic resonance data before and 6 months after pulmonary valve replacement were obtained from 16 patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot (8 male, 8 female; median age, 42.75 years). Right ventricular ejection fraction change from pre- to postpulmonary valve replacement was used as the outcome. The patients were divided into group 1 (n = 8, better outcome) and group 2 (n = 8, worst outcome). Cardiac magnetic resonance-based patient-specific computational right ventricular/left ventricular models were constructed, and right ventricular mechanical stress and strain, wall thickness, curvature, and volumes were obtained for analysis. Our results indicated that right ventricular wall stress was the best single predictor for postpulmonary valve replacement outcome with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.819. Mean values of stress, strain, wall thickness, and longitudinal curvature differed significantly between the 2 groups with right ventricular wall stress showing the largest difference. Mean right ventricular stress in group 2 was 103% higher than in group 1. Computational modeling and right ventricular stress may be used as tools to identify right ventricular function response to pulmonary valve replacement. Large-scale clinical studies are needed to validate these preliminary findings. Copyright © 2016 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Clinical impact of ' in-treatment' wall motion abnormalities in hypertensive patients with left ventricular hypertrophy: the LIFE study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cicala, S.; Simone, G. de; Wachtell, K.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives Left ventricular systolic wall motion abnormalities have prognostic value. Whether wall motion detected by serial echocardiographic examinations predicts prognosis in hypertensive patients with left ventricular hypertrophy ( LVH) without clinically recognized atherosclerotic disease ha...

  17. Stress induced right ventricular dysfunction: An indication of reversible right ventricular ischaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Underwood, S.R.; Walton, S.; Emanuel, R.W.; Swanton, R.H.; Campos Costa, D.; Laming, P.J.; Ell, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    Stress induced changes in left ventricular ejection fraction are widely used in the detection and assessment of coronary artery disease. This study demonstrates that right ventricular dysfunction may also occur, and assesses its significance in terms of coronary artery anatomy. This study involved 14 normal subjects and 26 with coronary artery disease investigated by equilibrium radionuclide ventriculography, at rest and during maximal dynamic exercise. Mean normal resting right ventricular ejection fraction (RVEF) was 0.40 (SD 0.118), and all normal subjects increased RVEF with stress (mean ΔRVEF+0.13 SD 0.099). Mean ΔRVEF in the subjects with coronary artery disease was significantly lower at 0.00 (SD 0.080), but there was overlap between the two groups. The largest falls in RVEF were seen if the right coronary artery was occluded without retrograde filling. In this subgroup with the most severely compromised right ventricular perfusion (nine subjects), RVEF always fell with stress, and mean ΔRVEF was -0.08 (SD 0.050). There was no significant correlation between ΔLVEF and ΔRVEF, implying that the right ventricular dysfunction was due to right ventricular ischaemia, rather than secondary to left ventricular dysfunction. Stress induced right ventricular ischaemia can therefore be detected readily by radionuclide ventriculography. (orig.)

  18. Rapid estimation of left ventricular ejection fraction in acute myocardial infarction by echocardiographic wall motion analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berning, J; Rokkedal Nielsen, J; Launbjerg, J

    1992-01-01

    Echocardiographic estimates of left ventricular ejection fraction (ECHO-LVEF) in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) were obtained by a new approach, using visual analysis of left ventricular wall motion in a nine-segment model. The method was validated in 41 patients using radionuclide...

  19. Functional reserve of the ischemic left ventricle with ventricular aneurysm to afterload stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuiki, Kai; Kobayashi, Tadashi; Hayasaka, Makio

    1985-01-01

    The response of left ventricular function to afterload stress was assessed using DSA for eight patients with old anterior myocardial infarction and ventricular aneurysm including that of the anterior wall. After initial DSA in the basal state, methoxamine was infused intravenously (1 to 2 mg/min). When aortic systolic blood pressure increased by 30 to 50 mmHg, a second DSA was performed for each patient. Left ventricular volumes and ejection fractions were calculated by the area-length method, and regional wall motion was assessed by the visual method according to the AHA classification and the curvature radius of the apical ventricular aneurysm was calculated. Methoxamine induced neither acute heart failure nor angina pectoris in the present series. The heart rates decreased, and there were a significant increase in end-systolic volumes (p ES ). However, ΔESV and ΔR ES did not correlate; ΔR ES was much greater in two patients, who were relatively old. Their aneurysms were circumscribed within the left ventricular anterior wall, their ejection fractions were relatively increased; and their onsets of acute myocardial infarction were relatively recent. (J.P.N.)

  20. Ventricular Septal Dissection Complicating Inferior Wall Myocardial Infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsey Kalvin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Postmyocardial infarction ventricular septal defect is an increasingly rare mechanical complication of acute myocardial infarction. We present a case of acute myocardial infarction from right coronary artery occlusion that developed hypotension and systolic murmur 12 hours after successful percutaneous coronary intervention. Although preoperative imaging suggested a large ventricular septal defect and a pseudoaneurysm, intraoperative findings concluded a serpiginous dissection of the ventricular septum. The imaging technicalities are discussed.

  1. Motional Effect on Wall Shear Stresses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kock, Samuel Alberg; Torben Fründ, Ernst; Yong Kim, Won

    Atherosclerosis is the leading cause of death and severe disability. Wall Shear Stress (WSS), the stress exerted on vessel walls by the flowing blood is a key factor in the development of atherosclerosis. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is widely used for WSS estimations. Most CFD simulations...... are based on static models to ease computational burden leading to inaccurate estimations. The aim of this work was to estimate the effect of vessel wall deformations (expansion and bending) on WSS levels....

  2. Evaluation of right ventricular regional wall motion in inferior myocardial infarction by cine MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishino, Masami; Ohnishi, Shusaku; Hasegawa, Shinji

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate right ventricular regional wall motion in inferior myocardial infarction by cine MRI. Thirteen patients with inferior myocardial infarction were investigated by cine MRI and were divided into proximal group which consisted of seven patients: >90% stenosis in segment 1 or 2 of right coronary artery and distal group which consisted of six patients: >90% stenosis in segment 3 or 4 of right coronary artery. Cine MRI was performed by 1.5 tesla magnet system (Signa, GE). To depict the regional asynergy, right ventricular wall was divided into 6 segments as follows: Segments 1 and 2 were upper and lower segments in transverse planes, respectively. Segments 3 and 4 were free wall and diaphragmatic segments of outflow tract, and segments 5 and 6 were of inflow tract in sagittal planes. Our results were as follows: (1) In proximal group, right ventricular asynergy was detected in six patients but in distal group it was detected in only one patient; (2) Right ventricular asynergy was detected most frequently at diaphragmatic segments in sagittal planes; (3) All the patients who had shown the hemodynamic deterioration of right ventricle on acute phase of inferior myocardial infarction presented the broad asynergy in right ventricle; (4) Cine MRI is clinically useful in evaluating right ventricular regional wall movement and diagnosing right ventricular infarction. (author)

  3. The thick left ventricular wall of the giraffe heart normalises wall tension, but limits stroke volume and cardiac output

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smerup, Morten Holdgaard; Damkjær, Mads; Brøndum, Emil

    2016-01-01

    Giraffes - the tallest extant animals on Earth - are renowned for their high central arterial blood pressure, which is necessary to secure brain perfusion. The pressure which may exceed 300 mmHg has historically been attributed to an exceptionally large heart. Recently, this has been refuted...... by several studies demonstrating that the mass of giraffe heart is similar to that of other mammals when expressed relative to body mass. It remains enigmatic, however, how the normal-sized giraffe heart generates such massive arterial pressures.We hypothesized that giraffe hearts have a small...... intraventricular cavity and a relatively thick ventricular wall, allowing for generation of high arterial pressures at normal left ventricular wall tension. In nine anaesthetized giraffes (495±38 kg), we determined in vivo ventricular dimensions using echocardiography along with intraventricular and aortic...

  4. Paediatric chest wall trauma causing delayed presentation of ventricular arrhythmia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegethoff, Angela M; Raney, Emerald; Mendelson, Jenny; Minckler, Michael R

    2017-07-24

    This report describes a paediatric patient presenting with haemodynamically stable non-sustained ventricular tachycardia 1 day after minor blunt chest trauma. Initial laboratory studies, chest X-ray and echocardiography were normal; however, cardiac MRI revealed precordial haematoma, myocardial contusion and small pericardial effusion. Throughout her hospital course, she remained asymptomatic aside from frequent couplets and triplets of premature ventricular contractions. Ectopy was controlled with oral verapamil. This case highlights how significant cardiac injury may be missed with standard diagnostic algorithms. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  5. Assessment of left ventricular wall motion and function by cross-sectional echocardiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Akifumi; Hirata, Shunkichi; Ishikawa, Kyozo

    1982-01-01

    The clinical efficacy of cross-sectional echocardiography (CSE) was evaluated with M-mode echocardiography and radionuclide cardioangiography (RCG) in 50 cases including 30 patients with myocardial infarction. Segmental wall motion by CSE was highly correlated with segmental wall motion and left ventricular ejection fraction by RCG (r = 0.89 in the former, r = -0.84 in the latter). On the other hand, the left ventricular ejection fraction by M-mode echocardiography revealed a fairly well correlation with that by RCG ( r = 0.68). These results suggest that, as compared with RCG, CSE is quite useful in an evaluation of left ventricular function and in a detection of segmental wall motion abnormalities. (author)

  6. Wall Shear Stress, Wall Pressure and Near Wall Velocity Field Relationships in a Whirling Annular Seal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Gerald L.; Winslow, Robert B.; Thames, H. Davis, III

    1996-01-01

    The mean and phase averaged pressure and wall shear stress distributions were measured on the stator wall of a 50% eccentric annular seal which was whirling in a circular orbit at the same speed as the shaft rotation. The shear stresses were measured using flush mounted hot-film probes. Four different operating conditions were considered consisting of Reynolds numbers of 12,000 and 24,000 and Taylor numbers of 3,300 and 6,600. At each of the operating conditions the axial distribution (from Z/L = -0.2 to 1.2) of the mean pressure, shear stress magnitude, and shear stress direction on the stator wall were measured. Also measured were the phase averaged pressure and shear stress. These data were combined to calculate the force distributions along the seal length. Integration of the force distributions result in the net forces and moments generated by the pressure and shear stresses. The flow field inside the seal operating at a Reynolds number of 24,000 and a Taylor number of 6,600 has been measured using a 3-D laser Doppler anemometer system. Phase averaged wall pressure and wall shear stress are presented along with phase averaged mean velocity and turbulence kinetic energy distributions located 0.16c from the stator wall where c is the seal clearance. The relationships between the velocity, turbulence, wall pressure and wall shear stress are very complex and do not follow simple bulk flow predictions.

  7. Do diabetes mellitus and systemic hypertension predispose to left ventricular free wall rupture in acute myocardial infarction?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melchior, T; Hildebrant, P; Køber, L

    1997-01-01

    Diabetes and systemic hypertension had no influence on left ventricular free wall rupture complicating acute myocardial infarction. Age <65 years and a history of coronary artery disease offers some protection from protection.......Diabetes and systemic hypertension had no influence on left ventricular free wall rupture complicating acute myocardial infarction. Age

  8. Changes in ventricular function during emotional stress and cold exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiess, M.C.; Moore, R.A.; Dimsdale, J.; Alpert, N.M.; Boucher, C.A.; Strauss, H.W.

    1984-01-01

    Patients with cardiac disease frequently develop symptoms with emotional stress or cold exposure. To investigate the effects of these stresses in normal subjects, an ambulatory ventricular function monitor (VEST) (previously reported to measure EFs which correlate well with gamma camera measurements) was employed to record sequential 2 minute time activity curves from the left ventricles of 6 healthy men (ages 19-24) during a control period and during a 30 minute stress interview with a psychiatrist. Four of the subjects were also monitored in a cold room (1 0 C) for 20 min. In addition to the left ventricular time-activity curve, heart rate (HR), and BP (cuff) were recorded. All subjects had increases in HR, BP and EF during the stress interview. Cold, however, produced decreases in HR and EF and an increase in BP. The results (mean +- SD) are tabulated. End-systolic and end-diastolic counts and hence volume decreased during the interview and increased during cold exposure. The results suggest that (1) ambulatory changes in ventricular function can be measured with the VEST, and (2) significant changes in cardiovascular physiology are seen in normal subjects during a stress interview and exposure to cold

  9. Evaluation of segmental left ventricular wall motion by equilibrium gated radionuclide ventriculography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Nostrand, D; Janowitz, W R; Holmes, D R; Cohen, H A

    1979-01-01

    The ability of equilibrium gated radionuclide ventriculography to detect segmental left ventricular (LV) wall motion abnormalities was determined in 26 patients undergoing cardiac catheterization. Multiple gated studies obtained in 30 degrees right anterior oblique and 45 degrees left anterior oblique projections, played back in a movie format, were compared to the corresponding LV ventriculograms. The LV wall in the two projections was divided into eight segments. Each segment was graded as normal, hypokinetic, akinetic, dyskinetic, or indeterminate. Thirteen percent of the segments in the gated images were indeterminate; 24 out of 27 of these were proximal or distal inferior wall segments. There was exact agreement in 86% of the remaining segments. The sensitivity of the radionuclide technique for detecting normal versus any abnormal wall motion was 71%, with a specificity of 99%. Equilibrium gated ventriculography is an excellent noninvasive technique for evaluating segmental LV wall motion. It is least reliable in assessing the proximal inferior wall and interventricular septum.

  10. The effects of stress on left ventricular ejection fraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiess, M.C.; Dimsdale, J.E.; Moore, R.H.; Liu, P.; Newell, J.; Barlai-Kovach, M.; Boucher, C.A.; Strauss, H.W.; Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston; Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston

    1988-01-01

    The left ventricular ejection fraction (EF) was studied in 17 healthy volunteers with a new ambulatory left ventricular function monitor. Heart rate, EF, and blood pressure measurements were made during rest, a psychiatric stress interview, cold exposure, exercise, and eating. An increase in EF was seen during emotional stress (from 0.45±0.09 to 0.51±0.13, P<0.001). This increase was comparable to that observed during exercise (0.52±0.14) and eating (0.52±0.10, P<0.001). In contrast, cold exposure caused a decrease in EF (0.43±0.13, P<0.05). These observations demonstrate the powerful hemodynamic consequences of common behaviors as well as the utility and feasability of studying such behavioral factors in ambulatory subjects. (orig.)

  11. 2D-speckle tracking right ventricular strain to assess right ventricular systolic function in systolic heart failure. Analysis of the right ventricular free and posterolateral walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouton, Stéphanie; Ridon, Héléne; Fertin, Marie; Pentiah, Anju Duva; Goémine, Céline; Petyt, Grégory; Lamblin, Nicolas; Coisne, Augustin; Foucher-Hossein, Claude; Montaigne, David; de Groote, Pascal

    2017-10-15

    Right ventricular (RV) systolic function is a powerful prognostic factor in patients with systolic heart failure. The accurate estimation of RV function remains difficult. The aim of the study was to determine the diagnostic accuracy of 2D-speckle tracking RV strain in patients with systolic heart failure, analyzing both free and posterolateral walls. Seventy-six patients with dilated cardiopathy (left ventricular end-diastolic volume≥75ml/m 2 ) and left ventricular ejection fraction≤45% had an analysis of the RV strain. Feasibility, reproducibility and diagnostic accuracy of RV strain were analyzed and compared to other echocardiographic parameters of RV function. RV dysfunction was defined as a RV ejection fraction≤40% measured by radionuclide angiography. RV strain feasibility was 93.9% for the free-wall and 79.8% for the posterolateral wall. RV strain reproducibility was good (intra-observer and inter-observer bias and limits of agreement of 0.16±1.2% [-2.2-2.5] and 0.84±2.4 [-5.5-3.8], respectively). Patients with left heart failure have a RV systolic dysfunction that can be unmasked by advanced echocardiographic imaging: mean RV strain was -21±5.7% in patients without RV dysfunction and -15.8±5.1% in patients with RV dysfunction (p=0.0001). Mean RV strain showed the highest diagnostic accuracy to predict depressed RVEF (area under the curve (AUC) 0.75) with moderate sensitivity (60.5%) but high specificity (87.5%) using a cutoff value of -16%. RV strain seems to be a promising and more efficient measure than previous RV echocardiographic parameters for the diagnosis of RV systolic dysfunction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Quantitative assessment of left ventricular systolic wall thickening using multidetector computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Thomas S; Kofoed, Klaus F; Møller, Daniel V

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) of the heart provides both anatomical and functional information. The objective of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of quantitative assessment of left ventricular contractile function in relation to two-dimensional transthoracic echocard......BACKGROUND: Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) of the heart provides both anatomical and functional information. The objective of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of quantitative assessment of left ventricular contractile function in relation to two-dimensional transthoracic...... echocardiography (TTE). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Sixty-four patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease underwent ECG-gated 64-slice MDCT and TTE. Regional left ventricular contractile function was measured by percent systolic wall thickening (SWT) in 16 myocardial segments using MDCT, and compared...

  13. Imaging of the ventricular septal wall and the portal vein by digital subtraction angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, Kyoichi; Harashima, Haruhiko; Yamada, Hiromi; Hiraishi, Takahisa; Mikami, Fumio [National Medical Center of Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)

    1983-06-01

    Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) was performed in 2 cases of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and 2 cases of portal vein disorder. In hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, DSA with the infusion of isopaque 370 at the speed of 5 to 7 ml/sec produced the image of the ventricular septal wall, showing a small ejection fraction. Of portal vein disorders, DSA revealed the portal vein and was helpful in diagnosing tumoral thrombosis of the portal vein in a case of liver carcinoma and portal hypertension.

  14. Left ventricular wall motion abnormalities evaluated by factor analysis as compared with Fourier analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirota, Kazuyoshi; Ikuno, Yoshiyasu; Nishikimi, Toshio

    1986-01-01

    Factor analysis was applied to multigated cardiac pool scintigraphy to evaluate its ability to detect left ventricular wall motion abnormalities in 35 patients with old myocardial infarction (MI), and in 12 control cases with normal left ventriculography. All cases were also evaluated by conventional Fourier analysis. In most cases with normal left ventriculography, the ventricular and atrial factors were extracted by factor analysis. In cases with MI, the third factor was obtained in the left ventricle corresponding to wall motion abnormality. Each case was scored according to the coincidence of findings of ventriculography and those of factor analysis or Fourier analysis. Scores were recorded for three items; the existence, location, and degree of asynergy. In cases of MI, the detection rate of asynergy was 94 % by factor analysis, 83 % by Fourier analysis, and the agreement in respect to location was 71 % and 66 %, respectively. Factor analysis had higher scores than Fourier analysis, but this was not significant. The interobserver error of factor analysis was less than that of Fourier analysis. Factor analysis can display locations and dynamic motion curves of asynergy, and it is regarded as a useful method for detecting and evaluating left ventricular wall motion abnormalities. (author)

  15. Reliable 5-min real-time MR technique for left-ventricular-wall motion analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katoh, Marcus; Spuentrup, Elmar; Guenther, Rolf W.; Buecker, Arno; Kuehl, Harald P.; Lipke, Claudia S.A.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the value of a real-time magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) approach for the assessment of left-ventricular-wall motion in patients with insufficient transthoracic echocardiography in terms of accuracy and temporal expenditure. Twenty-five consecutive patients were examined on a 1.5-Tesla whole-body MR system (ACS-NT, Philips Medical Systems, Best, NL) using a real-time and ECG-gated (the current gold standard) steady-state free-precession (SSFP) sequence. Wall motion was analyzed by three observers by consensus interpretation. In addition, the preparation, scanning, and overall examination times were measured. The assessment of the wall motion demonstrated a close agreement between the two modalities resulting in a mean κ coefficient of 0.8. At the same time, each stage of the examination was significantly shortened using the real-time MR approach. Real-time imaging allows for accurate assessment of left-ventricular-wall motion with the added benefit of decreased examination time. Therefore, it may serve as a cost-efficient alternative in patients with insufficient echocardiography. (orig.)

  16. Temporal Fourier transform of digital angiograms for left ventricular regional wall motion analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katayama, Kazuhiro; Guth, B.D.; Widmann, T.F.; Lee, Jong-Dae; Seitelberger, R.; Peterson, K.L.

    1988-01-01

    To determine whether or not the first harmonic of a temporal Fourier transform, applied pixel-by-pixel on time-intensity curves, can detect the subtle wall motion abnormalities due to ischemia, 6 dogs were instrumented with a micromanometer in the left ventricles, a hydraulic cuff occluder around the circumflex coronary artery, and sonomicrometers on the inferior (ischemic) and anterior (non-ischemic) walls. Left ventricular images, obtained after contrast injection via the pulmonary artery, were compared with dimension signals in control and 3 progressive levels of coronary stenosis (Stenosis I, II and III). Normalized, digital functional images (512 x 512 matrix, 256 shades of gray/pixel) were divided into anterior, apical, and inferior areas to acquire regional mean phase (degrees) and amplitude (intensity units) values. After inducing stenosis, phase in ischemic region significantly increased at all 3 levels of stenosis, whereas amplitude significantly decreased at Stenosis II and III. However, amplitude images showed clearly the topographic site of ischemia. There was a progressive increase in phase and decrease in amplitude in ischemic areas as the percent wall thickening (%WTh) fell (phase vs. %WTh: r = -0.55, p < 0.005; amplitude vs. %WTh: r = 0.71, p < 0.001). Heart rate and peak systolic pressure showed no significant changes during stenoses. We conclude that quantitative functional images, generated from a temporal Fourier transform, are sensitive to the detection of left ventricular regional wall motion abnormalities during mild, moderate, and severe degrees of ischemia. (author)

  17. Influence of slice thickness on the determination of left ventricular wall thickness and dimension by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohnishi, Shusaku; Fukui, Sugao; Atsumi, Chisato and others

    1989-02-01

    Wall thickness of the ventricular septum and left ventricle, and left ventricular cavity dimension were determined on magnetic resonance (MR) images with slices 5 mm and 10 mm in thickness. Subjects were 3 healthy volunteers and 7 patients with hypertension (4), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (one) or valvular heart disease (2). In visualizing the cardiac structures such as left ventricular papillary muscle and right and left ventricles, 5 mm-thick images were better than 10 mm-thick images. Edges of ventricular septum and left ventricular wall were more clearly visualized on 5 mm-thick images than 10 mm-thick images. Two mm-thick MR images obtained from 2 patients yielded the most excellent visualization in end-systole, but failed to reveal cardiac structures in detail in end-diastole. Phantom studies revealed no significant differences in image quality of 10 mm and 5 mm in thickness in the axial view 80 degree to the long axis. In the axial view 45 degree to the long axis, 10 mm-thick images were inferior to 5 mm-thick images in detecting the edge of the septum and the left ventricular wall. These results indicate that the selection of slice thickness is one of the most important determinant factors in the measurement of left ventricular wall thickness and cavity dimension. (Namekawa, K).

  18. Influence of slice thickness on the determination of left ventricular wall thickness and dimension by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnishi, Shusaku; Fukui, Sugao; Atsumi, Chisato

    1989-01-01

    Wall thickness of the ventricular septum and left ventricle, and left ventricular cavity dimension were determined on magnetic resonance (MR) images with slices 5 mm and 10 mm in thickness. Subjects were 3 healthy volunteers and 7 patients with hypertension (4), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (one) or valvular heart disease (2). In visualizing the cardiac structures such as left ventricular papillary muscle and right and left ventricles, 5 mm-thick images were better than 10 mm-thick images. Edges of ventricular septum and left ventricular wall were more clearly visualized on 5 mm-thick images than 10 mm-thick images. Two mm-thick MR images obtained from 2 patients yielded the most excellent visualization in end-systole, but failed to reveal cardiac structures in detail in end-diastole. Phantom studies revealed no significant differences in image quality of 10 mm and 5 mm in thickness in the axial view 80 degree to the long axis. In the axial view 45 degree to the long axis, 10 mm-thick images were inferior to 5 mm-thick images in detecting the edge of the septum and the left ventricular wall. These results indicate that the selection of slice thickness is one of the most important determinant factors in the measurement of left ventricular wall thickness and cavity dimension. (Namekawa, K)

  19. Stent implantation influence wall shear stress evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernad, S. I.; Totorean, A. F.; Bosioc, A. I.; Petre, I.; Bernad, E. S.

    2016-06-01

    Local hemodynamic factors are known affect the natural history of the restenosis critically after coronary stenting of atherosclerosis. Stent-induced flows disturbance magnitude dependent directly on the strut design. The impact of flow alterations around struts vary as the strut geometrical parameters change. Our results provide data regarding the hemodynamic parameters for the blood flow in both stenosed and stented coronary artery under physiological conditions, namely wall shear stress and pressure drop.

  20. Scaling of reactor cavity wall loads and stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohachevsky, I.O.

    1977-11-01

    Scalings of reactor cavity wall loads and stresses are determined by deriving an analytic expression in terms of relevant parameters for each loading induced in the reactor cavity walls by fuel pellet microexplosion and by deriving associated expressions relating resulting stresses to shell thicknesses. Also identified are problems that require additional investigations to obtain satisfactory explicit stress estimates for the reactor cavity walls

  1. Frequency of left ventricular thrombus after anterior wall st-segment elevation acute myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, M.W.; Fayyaz, A.

    2014-01-01

    Left ventricular thrombus (LVT) formation is a well known complication seen in patients presenting with acute anterior wall ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). In previous studies the incidence of this complication, after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) has been reported to be 4% to 60% in large anterior wall STEMI, depending significantly upon the method as well as time of reperfusion therapy after STEMI. Objective: The objective of this descriptive case series study was to evaluate the frequency of left ventricular thrombus formation in patients after acute anterior wall ST-Segment elevation myocardial infarction. Methodology: In this study, 100 patients with anterior wall STEMI presenting to cardiac emergency or coronary care unit (CCU) of Cardiac complex, Gulab Devi Hospital, were selected on non-probability, purposive sampling meeting inclusion criteria, after taking written informed consent. All the patients were treated initially for management of acute STEMI, including use of thrombolytics where indicated. 2-D Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) was performed during the same admission to assess presence of LV thrombus (LVT). Results: The mean age of the patients was 54.3 +- 11.4 years. There were 84(84%) male patients and 16 (16%) female patients. LVT was present in 28 (28%) patients on TTE. Among those, there were 23 (82.1%) male and 5 (17.9%) female patients. However, out of 84 male patients 27.4% develop LVT and among 16 female patients this ratio was 31.3%. The LV thrombus was independent of age and gender. LV thrombus was significantly less in thrombolytic group as compared to those who were not given this therapy, i.e. p value <0.05. Conclusion: Patients with anterior wall acute STEMI not infrequently develop the complication of development of LV thrombus. In this study the frequency of LV thrombus formation after anterior wall acute STEMI was 28%. (author)

  2. Usefulness of left ventricular wall thickness-to-diameter ratio in thallium-201 scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manno, B.; Hakki, A.H.; Kane, S.A.; Iskandrian, A.S.

    1983-01-01

    The ratio of left ventricular wall thickness to the cavity dimension, as seen on thallium-201 images, was used in this study to predict left ventricular ejection fraction and volume. We obtained rest thallium-201 images in 50 patients with symptomatic coronary artery disease. The thickness of a normal-appearing segment of the left ventricular wall and the transverse diameter of the cavity were measured in the left anterior oblique projection. The left ventricular ejection fraction and volume in these patients were determined by radionuclide ventriculography. There was a good correlation between thickness-to-diameter ratio and ejection fraction and end-systolic volume. In 18 patients with a thickness-to-diameter ratio less than 0.70, the ejection fraction was lower than in the 16 patients with thickness-to-diameter ratio greater than or equal to 1.0. Similarly, in patients with a thickness-to-diameter ratio less than 0.70, the end-diastolic and end-systolic volume were higher than in the remaining patients with higher thickness-to-diameter ratios. All 18 patients with a thickness-to-diameter ratio less than 0.70 had ejection fractions less than 40%; 14 of 15 patients with a thickness-to-diameter ratio greater than or equal to 1.0 had an ejection fraction greater than 40%. The remaining 16 patients with a thickness-to-diameter ratio of 0.7-0.99 had intermediate ejection fractions and volumes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Assessment of cardiac performance with quantitative radionuclide angiocardiography: sequential left ventricular ejection fraction, normalized left ventricular ejection rate, and regional wall motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, R.C.; Berger, H.J.; Costin, J.C.; Freedman, G.S.; Wolberg, J.; Cohen, L.S.; Gotischalk, A.; Zaret, B.L.

    1977-01-01

    Sequential quantitative first pass radionuclide angiocardiograms (RA) were used to measure left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and left ventricular ejection rate (LVER), and to assess regional wall motion (RWM) in the anterior (ANT) and left anterior oblique (LAO) positions. Studies were obtained with a computerized multicrystal scintillation camera suitable for acquiring high count-rate data. Background was determined in a new fashion by selecting frames temporally from the left ventricular region of interest time-activity curve. A ''representative'' cardiac cycle was formed by summing together counts over three to six cardiac cycles. From this background corrected, high count-rate ''representative''cardiac cycle, LVEF, LVER, and RWM were determined. In 22 patients with normal sinus rhythm in the absence of significant valvular regurgitation, RA LVEF correlated well with that measured by contrast angiography (r = 0.95). LVER correlated well with LVEF measured at contrast angiography (r = 0.90) and allowed complete separation of those with normal (LVER = 3.4 +- 0.17 sec -1 ) and abnormal (LVER = 1.22 +- 0.11 sec -1 ) (P < 0.001) left ventricular performance. This separation was independent of background. Isoproterenol infusion in five normal subjects caused LVER to increase by 81 +- 17% while LVEF increased by 10 +- 2.0%. RWM was correctly defined in 21/22 patients and 89% of left ventricular segments with abnormal wall motion

  4. The influence of wall stress on AAA growth and biomarkers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speelman, L.; Hellenthal, F.A.M.V.I.; Pulinx, B.; Bosboom, E.M.H.; Breeuwer, M.; Sambeek, M.R.; Vosse, van de F.N.; Jacobs, M.J.H.M.; Wodzig, W.K.W.H.; Schurink, G.W.H.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives This study investigated the relation between abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) wall stress, AAA growth rate and biomarker concentrations. With increasing wall stress, more damage may be caused to the AAA wall, possibly leading to progression of the aneurysm and reflection in up- or

  5. Quantification of the relative contribution of the different right ventricular wall motion components to right ventricular ejection fraction: the ReVISION method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakatos, Bálint; Tősér, Zoltán; Tokodi, Márton; Doronina, Alexandra; Kosztin, Annamária; Muraru, Denisa; Badano, Luigi P; Kovács, Attila; Merkely, Béla

    2017-03-27

    Three major mechanisms contribute to right ventricular (RV) pump function: (i) shortening of the longitudinal axis with traction of the tricuspid annulus towards the apex; (ii) inward movement of the RV free wall; (iii) bulging of the interventricular septum into the RV and stretching the free wall over the septum. The relative contribution of the aforementioned mechanisms to RV pump function may change in different pathological conditions.Our aim was to develop a custom method to separately assess the extent of longitudinal, radial and anteroposterior displacement of the RV walls and to quantify their relative contribution to global RV ejection fraction using 3D data sets obtained by echocardiography.Accordingly, we decomposed the movement of the exported RV beutel wall in a vertex based manner. The volumes of the beutels accounting for the RV wall motion in only one direction (either longitudinal, radial, or anteroposterior) were calculated at each time frame using the signed tetrahedron method. Then, the relative contribution of the RV wall motion along the three different directions to global RV ejection fraction was calculated either as the ratio of the given direction's ejection fraction to global ejection fraction and as the frame-by-frame RV volume change (∆V/∆t) along the three motion directions.The ReVISION (Right VentrIcular Separate wall motIon quantificatiON) method may contribute to a better understanding of the pathophysiology of RV mechanical adaptations to different loading conditions and diseases.

  6. Critical wall shear stress for the EHEDG test method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bo Boye Busk; Friis, Alan

    2004-01-01

    In order to simulate the results of practical cleaning tests on closed processing equipment, based on wall shear stress predicted by computational fluid dynamics, a critical wall shear stress is required for that particular cleaning method. This work presents investigations that provide a critical...... wall shear stress of 3 Pa for the standardised EHEDG cleaning test method. The cleaning tests were performed on a test disc placed in a radial flowcell assay. Turbulent flow conditions were generated and the corresponding wall shear stresses were predicted from CFD simulations. Combining wall shear...... stress predictions from a simulation using the low Re k-epsilon and one using the two-layer model of Norris and Reynolds were found to produce reliable predictions compared to empirical solutions for the ideal flow case. The comparison of wall shear stress curves predicted for the real RFC...

  7. ECG-gated blood pool tomography in the determination of left ventricular volume, ejection fraction, and wall motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Underwood, S.R.; Ell, P.J.; Jarritt, P.H.; Emanuel, R.W.; Swanton, R.H.

    1984-01-01

    ECG-gated blood pool tomography promises to provide a ''gold standard'' for noninvasive measurement of left ventricular volume, ejection fraction, and wall motion. This study compares these measurements with those from planar radionuclide imaging and contrast ventriculography. End diastolic and end systolic blood pool images were acquired tomographically using an IGE400A rotating gamma camera and Star computer, and slices were reconstructed orthogonal to the long axis of the heart. Left ventricular volume was determined by summing the areas of the slices, and wall motion was determined by comparison of end diastolic and end systolic contours. In phantom experiments this provided an accurate measurement of volume (r=0.98). In 32 subjects who were either normal or who had coronary artery disease left ventricular volume (r=0.83) and ejection fraction (r=0.89) correlated well with those using a counts based planar technique. In 16 of 18 subjects who underwent right anterior oblique X-ray contrast ventriculography, tomographic wall motion agreed for anterior, apical, and inferior walls, but abnormal septal motion which was not apparent by contrast ventriculography, was seen in 12 subjects tomographically. All 12 had disease of the left anterior descending coronary artery and might have been expected to have abnormal septal motion. ECG-gated blood pool tomography can thus determine left ventricular volume and ejection fraction accurately, and provides a global description of wall motion in a way that is not possible from any single planar image

  8. Cancer stem cells from a rare form of glioblastoma multiforme involving the neurogenic ventricular wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Shengwen

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cancer stem cell (CSC hypothesis posits that deregulated neural stem cells (NSCs form the basis of brain tumors such as glioblastoma multiforme (GBM. GBM, however, usually forms in the cerebral white matter while normal NSCs reside in subventricular and hippocampal regions. We attempted to characterize CSCs from a rare form of glioblastoma multiforme involving the neurogenic ventricular wall. Methods We described isolating CSCs from a GBM involving the lateral ventricles and characterized these cells with in vitro molecular biomarker profiling, cellular behavior, ex vivo and in vivo techniques. Results The patient’s MRI revealed a heterogeneous mass with associated edema, involving the left subventricular zone. Histological examination of the tumor established it as being a high-grade glial neoplasm, characterized by polygonal and fusiform cells with marked nuclear atypia, amphophilic cytoplasm, prominent nucleoli, frequent mitotic figures, irregular zones of necrosis and vascular hyperplasia. Recurrence of the tumor occurred shortly after the surgical resection. CD133-positive cells, isolated from the tumor, expressed stem cell markers including nestin, CD133, Ki67, Sox2, EFNB1, EFNB2, EFNB3, Cav-1, Musashi, Nucleostemin, Notch 2, Notch 4, and Pax6. Biomarkers expressed in differentiated cells included Cathepsin L, Cathepsin B, Mucin18, Mucin24, c-Myc, NSE, and TIMP1. Expression of unique cancer-related transcripts in these CD133-positive cells, such as caveolin-1 and −2, do not appear to have been previously reported in the literature. Ex vivo organotypic brain slice co-culture showed that the CD133+ cells behaved like tumor cells. The CD133-positive cells also induced tumor formation when they were stereotactically transplanted into the brains of the immune-deficient NOD/SCID mice. Conclusions This brain tumor involving the neurogenic lateral ventricular wall was comprised of tumor-forming, CD133-positive cancer

  9. Assessment of ventricular wall motion with focused echocardiography during cardiac arrest to predict survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Can Ozen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Our primary goal is to investigate the hypothesis that in patients with a detectable ventricular wall motion (VWM in cardiac ultrasonography (US during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR, survival rate is significantly more than in patients without VWM in US. Material and methods: In our prospective, single center study, 129 adult cardiac arrest (CA patients were enrolled. Cardiac US according to Focus Assessed Transthoracic Echo (FATE protocol was performed before CPR. Presence of VWM was recorded on forms along with demographic data, initial rhythm, CA location, presence of return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC and time until ROSC was obtained. Results: 129 patients were included. ROSC was obtained in 56/77 (72.7% patients with VWM and 3/52 (5.8% patients without VWM which is statistically significant (p > 0.001. Presence of VWM is 95% (95% CI: 0.95–0.99 sensitive and 70% (95% CI: 0.58–0.80 specific for ROSC. 43/77 (55.8% patients with VWM and 1 (1.9% of 52 patients without VWM survived to hospital admission which was statistically significant (p < 0.001. Presence of VWM was 100% (95% CI: 0.87–1.00 sensitive and 54% (95% CI: 0.43–0.64 specific for survival to hospital admission. Conclusion: No patient without VWM in US survived to hospital discharge. Only 3 had ROSC in emergency department and only 1 survived to hospital admission. This data suggests no patient without VWM before the onset of CPR survived to hospital discharge and this may be an indication to end resuscitative efforts early in these patients. Keywords: Cardiopulmonary resuscitation, Ultrasonography, Echocardiography, Ventricular wall motion

  10. Optimization of multiplane ?PIV for wall shear stress and wall topography characterization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossi, M.; Lindken, R.; Westerweel, J.

    2009-01-01

    Multiplane ?PIV can be utilized to determine the wall shear stress and wall topology from the measured flow over a structured surface. A theoretical model was developed to predict the measurement error for the surface topography and shear stress, based on a theoretical analysis of the precision in

  11. Cell Wall Metabolism in Response to Abiotic Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gall, Hyacinthe Le; Philippe, Florian; Domon, Jean-Marc; Gillet, Françoise; Pelloux, Jérôme; Rayon, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    This review focuses on the responses of the plant cell wall to several abiotic stresses including drought, flooding, heat, cold, salt, heavy metals, light, and air pollutants. The effects of stress on cell wall metabolism are discussed at the physiological (morphogenic), transcriptomic, proteomic and biochemical levels. The analysis of a large set of data shows that the plant response is highly complex. The overall effects of most abiotic stress are often dependent on the plant species, the genotype, the age of the plant, the timing of the stress application, and the intensity of this stress. This shows the difficulty of identifying a common pattern of stress response in cell wall architecture that could enable adaptation and/or resistance to abiotic stress. However, in most cases, two main mechanisms can be highlighted: (i) an increased level in xyloglucan endotransglucosylase/hydrolase (XTH) and expansin proteins, associated with an increase in the degree of rhamnogalacturonan I branching that maintains cell wall plasticity and (ii) an increased cell wall thickening by reinforcement of the secondary wall with hemicellulose and lignin deposition. Taken together, these results show the need to undertake large-scale analyses, using multidisciplinary approaches, to unravel the consequences of stress on the cell wall. This will help identify the key components that could be targeted to improve biomass production under stress conditions. PMID:27135320

  12. Assessment of left ventricular function using dobutamine stress echocardiography and myocardial scintigraphy in valvular heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozaki, Nobuchika; Sugimoto, Takaki; Okada, Masayoshi

    1999-01-01

    To assess the left ventricular (LV) function in valvular heart disease, we employed the preoperative dobutamine stress echocardiography and the myocardial scintigraphy. During the past 13 years, 37 of 324 the patients showed LV dysfunction with the % fractional shortening (%FS) of 25% or less in the preoperative echocardiogram. These patients were retrospectively divided into two groups; Group A (n=21): %FS has improved late after operation; Group B (n=16): %FS has deteriorated or LV failure occurred. The mean follow-up period was 84±54 months after valve surgery. No significant differences were observed in the preoperative characteristics and operative variables between these two groups. The dobutamine stress test had been performed in 8 patients in Group A and 9 patients in Group B preoperatively, and the maximum increase ratio of %FS (Δ%FS) was used for assessment. Seven patients in Group A had showed Δ%FS of more than 9%, while all patients in Group B had showed Δ%FS of less than 9%. Myocardial scintigraphy was performed in 11 patients of them, and another 22 patients with %FS of above 25% acted as the control group. The Defect Score, which was defined as the sum of defect scales in 25 LV segments, showed a significant difference between 11 patients with LV dysfunction and control group. The distribution of the Defect Score in each myocardial segment, showed significantly higher in the posterior and inferior LV segments. In addition, the perfusion defect on myocardial imaging was initiated in the junction between the septal and LV free wall, and extended from the posterior to the lateral wall along with deterioration of LV function. In conclusion, preoperative dobutamine stress echocardiography proved to be very useful for prediction of the postoperative LV function, and myocardial scintigraphy might be indicative of LV function even in valvular heart disease. (author)

  13. Assessment of left ventricular function using dobutamine stress echocardiography and myocardial scintigraphy in valvular heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozaki, Nobuchika; Sugimoto, Takaki; Okada, Masayoshi [Kobe Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1999-02-01

    To assess the left ventricular (LV) function in valvular heart disease, we employed the preoperative dobutamine stress echocardiography and the myocardial scintigraphy. During the past 13 years, 37 of 324 the patients showed LV dysfunction with the % fractional shortening (%FS) of 25% or less in the preoperative echocardiogram. These patients were retrospectively divided into two groups; Group A (n=21): %FS has improved late after operation; Group B (n=16): %FS has deteriorated or LV failure occurred. The mean follow-up period was 84{+-}54 months after valve surgery. No significant differences were observed in the preoperative characteristics and operative variables between these two groups. The dobutamine stress test had been performed in 8 patients in Group A and 9 patients in Group B preoperatively, and the maximum increase ratio of %FS ({delta}%FS) was used for assessment. Seven patients in Group A had showed {delta}%FS of more than 9%, while all patients in Group B had showed {delta}%FS of less than 9%. Myocardial scintigraphy was performed in 11 patients of them, and another 22 patients with %FS of above 25% acted as the control group. The Defect Score, which was defined as the sum of defect scales in 25 LV segments, showed a significant difference between 11 patients with LV dysfunction and control group. The distribution of the Defect Score in each myocardial segment, showed significantly higher in the posterior and inferior LV segments. In addition, the perfusion defect on myocardial imaging was initiated in the junction between the septal and LV free wall, and extended from the posterior to the lateral wall along with deterioration of LV function. In conclusion, preoperative dobutamine stress echocardiography proved to be very useful for prediction of the postoperative LV function, and myocardial scintigraphy might be indicative of LV function even in valvular heart disease. (author)

  14. Congenital left ventricular wall abnormalities in adults detected by gated cardiac multidetector computed tomography: Clefts, aneurysms, diverticula and terminology problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erol, Cengiz; Koplay, Mustafa; Olcay, Ayhan; Kivrak, Ali Sami; Ozbek, Seda; Seker, Mehmet; Paksoy, Yahya

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Our aim was to evaluate congenital left ventricular wall abnormalities (clefts, aneurysms and diverticula), describe and illustrate imaging features, discuss terminology problems and determine their prevalence detected by cardiac CT in a single center. Materials and methods: Coronary CT angiography images of 2093 adult patients were evaluated retrospectively in order to determine congenital left ventricular wall abnormalities. Results: The incidence of left ventricular clefts (LVC) was 6.7% (141 patients) and statistically significant difference was not detected between the sexes regarding LVC (P = 0.5). LVCs were single in 65.2% and multiple in 34.8% of patients. They were located at the basal to mid inferoseptal segment of the left ventricle in 55.4%, the basal to mid anteroseptal segment in 24.1%, basal to mid inferior segment in 17% and septal–apical septal segment in 3.5% of cases. The cleft length ranged from 5 to 22 mm (mean 10.5 mm) and they had a narrow connection with the left ventricle (mean 2.5 mm). They were contractile with the left ventricle and obliterated during systole. Congenital left ventricular septal aneurysm that was located just under the aortic valve was detected in two patients (0.1%). No case of congenital left ventricular diverticulum was detected. Conclusion: Cardiac CT allows us to recognize congenital left ventricular wall abnormalities which have been previously overlooked in adults. LVC is a congenital structural variant of the myocardium, is seen more frequently than previously reported and should be differentiated from aneurysm and diverticulum for possible catastrophic complications of the latter two.

  15. Ventricular septal rupture, right ventricular free wall rupture, hemopericardium, cardiac tamponade, cardiogenic shock, and death in a patient with acute ST elevation myocardial infarction during transthoracic echocardiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osama A El Kady

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of mechanical complications related to myocardial infarction has decreased due to various factors over the last few decades. Patients admitted for acute ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI may respond well to thrombolytic therapy before being taken up for coronary angiography and percutaneous coronary intervention depending on the facilities available at the specific center. Unfortunately, some patients develop complications of myocardial infarction during hospital stay or postdischarge. We present a patient admitted with acute STEMI responding well to thrombolytic therapy. During transthoracic echocardiography of the patient in Intensive Care Unit, the patient developed ventricular septal rupture, right ventricular free wall rupture, hemopericardium, cardiac tamponade, and cardiogenic shock and expired.

  16. Cell Wall Remodeling Enzymes Modulate Fungal Cell Wall Elasticity and Osmotic Stress Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ene, Iuliana V; Walker, Louise A; Schiavone, Marion; Lee, Keunsook K; Martin-Yken, Hélène; Dague, Etienne; Gow, Neil A R; Munro, Carol A; Brown, Alistair J P

    2015-07-28

    The fungal cell wall confers cell morphology and protection against environmental insults. For fungal pathogens, the cell wall is a key immunological modulator and an ideal therapeutic target. Yeast cell walls possess an inner matrix of interlinked β-glucan and chitin that is thought to provide tensile strength and rigidity. Yeast cells remodel their walls over time in response to environmental change, a process controlled by evolutionarily conserved stress (Hog1) and cell integrity (Mkc1, Cek1) signaling pathways. These mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways modulate cell wall gene expression, leading to the construction of a new, modified cell wall. We show that the cell wall is not rigid but elastic, displaying rapid structural realignments that impact survival following osmotic shock. Lactate-grown Candida albicans cells are more resistant to hyperosmotic shock than glucose-grown cells. We show that this elevated resistance is not dependent on Hog1 or Mkc1 signaling and that most cell death occurs within 10 min of osmotic shock. Sudden decreases in cell volume drive rapid increases in cell wall thickness. The elevated stress resistance of lactate-grown cells correlates with reduced cell wall elasticity, reflected in slower changes in cell volume following hyperosmotic shock. The cell wall elasticity of lactate-grown cells is increased by a triple mutation that inactivates the Crh family of cell wall cross-linking enzymes, leading to increased sensitivity to hyperosmotic shock. Overexpressing Crh family members in glucose-grown cells reduces cell wall elasticity, providing partial protection against hyperosmotic shock. These changes correlate with structural realignment of the cell wall and with the ability of cells to withstand osmotic shock. The C. albicans cell wall is the first line of defense against external insults, the site of immune recognition by the host, and an attractive target for antifungal therapy. Its tensile strength is conferred by

  17. Patient-specific AAA wall stress analysis: 99-percentile versus peak stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speelman, L.; Bosboom, E.M.H.; Schurink, G.W.H.; Hellenthal, F.A.M.V.I.; Buth, J.; Breeuwer, M.; Jacobs, M.J.; Vosse, van de F.N.

    2008-01-01

    Objective Biomechanically, rupture of an Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) occurs when the stress acting on the wall due to the blood pressure, exceeds the strength of the wall. Peak wall stress estimations, based on CT reconstruction, may be prone to observer variation. This study focuses on the

  18. Brassinosteroid Mediated Cell Wall Remodeling in Grasses under Abiotic Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolan Rao

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Unlike animals, plants, being sessile, cannot escape from exposure to severe abiotic stresses such as extreme temperature and water deficit. The dynamic structure of plant cell wall enables them to undergo compensatory changes, as well as maintain physical strength, with changing environments. Plant hormones known as brassinosteroids (BRs play a key role in determining cell wall expansion during stress responses. Cell wall deposition differs between grasses (Poaceae and dicots. Grass species include many important food, fiber, and biofuel crops. In this article, we focus on recent advances in BR-regulated cell wall biosynthesis and remodeling in response to stresses, comparing our understanding of the mechanisms in grass species with those in the more studied dicots. A more comprehensive understanding of BR-mediated changes in cell wall integrity in grass species will benefit the development of genetic tools to improve crop productivity, fiber quality and plant biomass recalcitrance.

  19. Cine MR imaging assessment of regional left ventricular systolic wall thickening in patients with remote myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfugfelder, P.; White, R.D.; Sechtem, U.; Gould, R.G.; Higgins, C.B.

    1986-01-01

    Cine MR imaging, a new rapid imaging technique, was used to acquire transverse images of the heart at a rate of 16-30 frames per cardiac cycle. Left ventricular wall thickness was measured at end diastole and end systole in six regions in the midventricular section of 13 healthy subjects and seven patients with previously documented myocardial infarction. Mean percent systolic wall thickening (%SWT) was 51% +- 26% in healthy subjects. In patients, %SWT was -8% +- 22% in the infarct zone and 42% +- 22% in the normal myocardium. In addition to the qualitative information derived from the cinematic display, determination of regional %SWT by cine-MR imaging may be useful for quantifying regional left ventricular dysfunction

  20. Casimir stress in materials: Hard divergency at soft walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griniasty, Itay; Leonhardt, Ulf

    2017-11-01

    The Casimir force between macroscopic bodies is well understood, but not the Casimir stress inside bodies. Suppose empty space or a uniform medium meets a soft wall where the refractive index is continuous but its derivative jumps. For this situation we predict a characteristic power law for the stress inside the soft wall and close to its edges. Our result shows that such edges are not tolerated in the aggregation of liquids at surfaces, regardless whether the liquid is attracted or repelled.

  1. Disfunção ventricular esquerda transitória por cardiomiopatia induzida por estresse Transient left ventricular dysfunction due to stress-induced cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Vinicius Simões

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Apresenta-se o caso de uma paciente de 71 anos que preencheu os critérios diagnósticos para cardiomiopatia induzida por estresse que foi desencadeada por intenso estresse emocional após atropelamento por bicicleta. O quadro clínico mimetizou o infarto agudo do miocárdio, manifestando-se com dor precordial, supradesnivelamento do segmento ST, seguido por ondas T profundas e prolongamento do intervalo QT, elevação discreta de enzimas cardíacas e cursando com disfunção sistólica apical do ventrículo esquerdo e hipercinesia das porções basais (conferindo o aspecto de "abaloamento apical", mas na ausência de obstrução coronariana subepicárdica. A função ventricular normalizou-se após a segunda semana de evolução.The case presented here is of a 71-yr-old female patient who met the diagnostic criteria for stress-induced cardiomyopathy, which was triggered by intense emotional stress after being hit by a bicycle. The clinical picture mimicked that of an acute myocardial infarction, manifesting as precordial pain, ST-segment depression followed by deep negative T waves and prolonging of the QT interval, slight increase in cardiac enzymes and coursing with transient apical ballooning of the left ventricle and hyperkinesis of the basal walls (conferring the aspect of "apical ballooning", although in the absence of subepicardial coronary obstruction. Ventricular function normalized after the second week of clinical evolution.

  2. Identification and Assessment of Paradoxical Ventricular Wall Motion Using ECG Gated Blood Pool Scan - Comparison of cine Loop , Phase Analysis and Paradox Image -

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae Tae; Kim, Gwang Weon; Lee, Kyu Bo; Chung, Byung Chun; Whang, Kee Suk; Chae, Sung Chul; Paek, Wee Hyun; Cheon, Jae Eun; Lee, Hyong Woo; Chung, Jin Hong

    1990-01-01

    Sixty-four patients with paradoxical ventricular wall motion noticed both in angiocardiography or 2-dimensional echocardiography were assessed by ECG gated blood pool scan (GBPS). Endless cine loop image, phase and amplitude images and paradox image obtained by visual inspection of each cardiac beat or Fourier transformation of acquired raw data were investigated to determine the incremental value of GBPS with these processing methods for identification of paradoxical ventricular wall motion. The results were as follows:1) Paradoxical wall motions were observed on interventricular septum in 34 cases, left ventricular free wall in 26 and right ventricular wall in 24. Underlying heart diseases were is chemic (23 cases) valvular(9), congenital heart disease (12), cardiomyopathy (5), pericardial effusion(5), post cardiac surgery(3), corpulmonale (2), endocarditis (l) and right ventricular tumor(l). 2) Left ventricular ejection fractions of patients with paradoxical left ventricular wall motion were significantly lower than those with paradoxical septal motion (p <0.005). 3) The sensitivity of each processing methods for detecting paradoxical wall motion was 76.9% by phase analysis, 74.6% by endless cine loop mapping and 68.4% by paradox image manipulation respectively. Paradoxial motions visualized only in phase, paradox or both images were appeared as hypokinesia or akinesia in cine loop image. 4) All events could be identified by at least one of above three processing methods, however only 34 cases (48.4%) showed the paradoxical motions in all of the three images. By these findings, we concluded that simultaneous inspection of all above three processing methods-endless cine loop, phase analysis and paradox image is necessary for accurate identification and assessment of paradoxical ventricular wall motion when performing GBPS.

  3. Identification and Assessment of Paradoxical Ventricular Wall Motion Using ECG Gated Blood Pool Scan - Comparison of cine Loop , Phase Analysis and Paradox Image -

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Tae; Kim, Gwang Weon; Lee, Kyu Bo; Chung, Byung Chun; Whang, Kee Suk; Chae, Sung Chul; Paek, Wee Hyun; Cheon, Jae Eun [Kyungpook National University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyong Woo; Chung, Jin Hong [Yeongnam National University College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-07-15

    Sixty-four patients with paradoxical ventricular wall motion noticed both in angiocardiography or 2-dimensional echocardiography were assessed by ECG gated blood pool scan (GBPS). Endless cine loop image, phase and amplitude images and paradox image obtained by visual inspection of each cardiac beat or Fourier transformation of acquired raw data were investigated to determine the incremental value of GBPS with these processing methods for identification of paradoxical ventricular wall motion. The results were as follows:1) Paradoxical wall motions were observed on interventricular septum in 34 cases, left ventricular free wall in 26 and right ventricular wall in 24. Underlying heart diseases were is chemic (23 cases) valvular(9), congenital heart disease (12), cardiomyopathy (5), pericardial effusion(5), post cardiac surgery(3), corpulmonale (2), endocarditis (l) and right ventricular tumor(l). 2) Left ventricular ejection fractions of patients with paradoxical left ventricular wall motion were significantly lower than those with paradoxical septal motion (p <0.005). 3) The sensitivity of each processing methods for detecting paradoxical wall motion was 76.9% by phase analysis, 74.6% by endless cine loop mapping and 68.4% by paradox image manipulation respectively. Paradoxial motions visualized only in phase, paradox or both images were appeared as hypokinesia or akinesia in cine loop image. 4) All events could be identified by at least one of above three processing methods, however only 34 cases (48.4%) showed the paradoxical motions in all of the three images. By these findings, we concluded that simultaneous inspection of all above three processing methods-endless cine loop, phase analysis and paradox image is necessary for accurate identification and assessment of paradoxical ventricular wall motion when performing GBPS.

  4. Triglyceride glucose index and common carotid wall shear stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripolino, Cesare; Irace, Concetta; Scavelli, Faustina B; de Franceschi, Maria S; Esposito, Teresa; Carallo, Claudio; Gnasso, Agostino

    2014-02-01

    Alterations in wall shear stress contribute to both clinical and subclinical atherosclerosis. Several conditions such as hypertension, diabetes, and obesity can impair shear stress, but the role of insulin resistance has never been investigated. The present study was designed to investigate whether insulin resistance assessed by TyG Index associates with wall shear stress in the common carotid artery. One hundred six individuals were enrolled. Blood pressure, lipids, glucose, and cigarette smoking were evaluated. TyG Index was calculated as log[fasting triglycerides × fasting glucose / 2]. Subjects underwent blood viscosity measurement and echo-Doppler evaluation of carotid arteries to calculate wall shear stress. The association between TyG Index and carotid wall shear stress was assessed by simple and multiple regression analyses. TyG Index was significantly and inversely associated with carotid wall shear stress both in simple (r = -0.44, P glucose greater than 100 mg/dL, and triglycerides greater than 150 mg/dL. The present findings suggest that increasing insulin resistance, as assessed by TyG Index, associates with atherosclerosis-prone shear stress reduction in the common carotid artery.

  5. Dominance of free wall radial motion in global right ventricular function of heart transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakatos, Bálint Károly; Tokodi, Márton; Assabiny, Alexandra; Tősér, Zoltán; Kosztin, Annamária; Doronina, Alexandra; Rácz, Kristóf; Koritsánszky, Kinga Bianka; Berzsenyi, Viktor; Németh, Endre; Sax, Balázs; Kovács, Attila; Merkely, Béla

    2018-03-01

    Assessment of right ventricular (RV) function using conventional echocardiography might be inadequate as the radial motion of the RV free wall is often neglected. Our aim was to quantify the longitudinal and the radial components of RV function using three-dimensional (3D) echocardiography in heart transplant (HTX) recipients. Fifty-one HTX patients in stable cardiovascular condition without history of relevant rejection episode or chronic allograft vasculopathy and 30 healthy volunteers were enrolled. RV end-diastolic (EDV) volume and total ejection fraction (TEF) were measured by 3D echocardiography. Furthermore, we quantified longitudinal (LEF) and radial ejection fraction (REF) by decomposing the motion of the RV using the ReVISION method. RV EDV did not differ between groups (HTX vs control; 96 ± 27 vs 97 ± 2 mL). In HTX patients, TEF was lower, however, tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE) decreased to a greater extent (TEF: 47 ± 7 vs 54 ± 4% [-13%], TAPSE: 11 ± 5 vs 21 ± 4 mm [-48%], P < .0001). In HTX patients, REF/TEF ratio was significantly higher compared to LEF/TEF (REF/TEF vs LEF/TEF: 0.58 ± 0.10 vs 0.27 ± 0.08, P < .0001), while in controls the REF/TEF and LEF/TEF ratio was similar (0.45 ± 0.07 vs 0.47 ± 0.07). Current results confirm the superiority of radial motion in determining RV function in HTX patients. Parameters incorporating the radial motion are recommended to assess RV function in HTX recipients. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Effects of perfusion detect on the measurement of left ventricular mass, ventricular volume and post-stress left ventricular ejection fraction in gated myocardial perfusion SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Byeong Cheol; Bae, Sun Keun; Lee, Sang Woo; Jeong, Sin Young; Lee, Jae Tae; Lee, Kyu Bo

    2002-01-01

    The presence of perfusion defect may influence the left ventricular mass (LVM) measurement by quantitative gated myocardial perfusion SPECT (QGS), and ischemic myocardium, usually showing perfusion defect may produce post-stress LV dysfunction. This study was aimed to evaluated the effects of extent and reversibility of perfusion defect on the automatic measurement of LVM by QGS and to investigate the effect of reversibility of perfusion defect on post-stress LV dysfunction. Forty-six patients (male/female=34:12, mean age=64 years) with perfusion defect on myocardial perfusion SPECT underwent rest and post-stress QGS. Forty patients (87%) showed reversible defect. End-diastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV), LV ejection fraction (EF), and LV myocardial volume were obtained from QGS by autoquant program, and LVM was calculated by multiplying the LV myocardial volume by the specific gravity of myocardium. LVMs measured at rest and post-stress QGS showed good correlation, and higher correlation was founded in the subjects with fixed perfusion defect and with small defect (smaller than 20%). There were no significant differences in EDVs, ESVs and EFs between obtained by rest and post-stress QGS in patients with fixed myocardial defect. Whereas, EF obtained by post-stress QGS was lower than that by rest QGS in patients with reversible defect and 10 (25%) of them showed decreases in EF more than 5% in post-stress QGS, as compared to that of rest QGS. Excellent correlations of EDVs, ESVs, EFs between rest and post-stress QGS were noted. Patients with fixed defect had higher correlation between defect can affect LVM measurement by QGS and patients with reversible defect shows post-stress LV dysfunction more frequently than patients with fixed perfusion defect

  7. Wall shear stress hot film sensor for use in gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osorio, O D; Silin, N

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to present the construction and characterization of a wall shear stress hot film sensor for use in gases made with MEMS technology. For this purpose, several associated devices were used, including a constant temperature feedback bridge and a shear stress calibration device that allows the sensor performance evaluation. The sensor design adopted here is simple, economical and is manufactured on a flexible substrate allowing its application to curved surfaces. Stationary and transient wall shear stress tests were carried on by means of the calibration device, determining its performance for different conditions.

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Transient Left Ventricular Apical Ballooning Related to Emotional Stress: a Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Mu Sook; Choi, Byoung Wook; Choe, Kyu Ok; Chung, Namsik [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-02-15

    Transient left ventricular apical ballooning is characterized by transient wall motion abnormalities involving the left ventricular apex and mid-ventricle in the absence of coronary arterial occlusion. A 66-year-old woman presented to the emergency department with chest pain that mimicked acute myocardial infarction. An aortogram showed akinesis from the mid to apical left ventricle with sparing of the basal segments. Four days later, she underwent MRI, which demonstrated characteristic apical contractile dysfunction, the same as the aortogram, without evidence of myocardial infarction on the MRI. Two weeks later, her symptoms were resolved and follow-up echocardiography showed normal ventricular function. We suggest that MRI might be an integrated imaging diagnostic tool for the diagnosis of this syndrome, which demonstrated characteristic apical contractile dysfunction with performing cine MRI, the absence of significant coronary artery stenosis with performing coronary MR angiography and the absence of myocardial infarction with performing contrast enhanced delayed MRI.

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Transient Left Ventricular Apical Ballooning Related to Emotional Stress: a Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Mu Sook; Choi, Byoung Wook; Choe, Kyu Ok; Chung, Namsik

    2007-01-01

    Transient left ventricular apical ballooning is characterized by transient wall motion abnormalities involving the left ventricular apex and mid-ventricle in the absence of coronary arterial occlusion. A 66-year-old woman presented to the emergency department with chest pain that mimicked acute myocardial infarction. An aortogram showed akinesis from the mid to apical left ventricle with sparing of the basal segments. Four days later, she underwent MRI, which demonstrated characteristic apical contractile dysfunction, the same as the aortogram, without evidence of myocardial infarction on the MRI. Two weeks later, her symptoms were resolved and follow-up echocardiography showed normal ventricular function. We suggest that MRI might be an integrated imaging diagnostic tool for the diagnosis of this syndrome, which demonstrated characteristic apical contractile dysfunction with performing cine MRI, the absence of significant coronary artery stenosis with performing coronary MR angiography and the absence of myocardial infarction with performing contrast enhanced delayed MRI

  10. Clinical significance of exercise-induced left ventricular wall motion abnormality occurring at a low heart rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimchi, A.; Rozanski, A.; Fletcher, C.; Maddahi, J.; Swan, H.J.; Berman, D.S.

    1987-01-01

    We studied the relationship between the heart rate at the time of onset of exercise-induced wall motion abnormality and the severity of coronary artery disease in 89 patients who underwent exercise equilibrium radionuclide ventriculography as part of their evaluation for coronary artery disease. Segmental wall motion was scored with a five-point system (3 = normal; -1 = dyskinesis); a decrease of one score defined the onset of wall motion abnormality. The onset of wall motion abnormality at less than or equal to 70% of maximal predicted heart rate had 100% predictive accuracy for coronary artery disease and higher sensitivity than the onset of ischemic ST segment depression at similar heart rate during exercise: 36% (25 of 69 patients with coronary disease) vs 19% (13 of 69 patients), p = 0.01. Wall motion abnormality occurring at less than or equal to 70% of maximal predicted heart rate was present in 49% of patients (23 of 47) with critical stenosis (greater than or equal to 90% luminal diameter narrowing), and in only 5% of patients (2 of 42) without such severe stenosis, p less than 0.001. The sensitivity of exercise-induced wall motion abnormality occurring at a low heart rate for the presence of severe coronary artery disease was similar to that of a deterioration in wall motion by more than two scores during exercise (49% vs 53%) or an absolute decrease of greater than or equal to 5% in exercise left ventricular ejection fraction (49% vs 45%)

  11. Thermal stress and creep fatigue limitations in first wall design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majumdar, S.; Misra, B.; Harkness, S.D.

    1977-01-01

    The thermal-hydraulic performance of a lithium cooled cylindrical first wall module has been analyzed as a function of the incident neutron wall loading. Three criteria were established for the purpose of defining the maximum wall loading allowable for modules constructed of Type 316 stainless steel and a vanadium alloy. Of the three, the maximum structural temperature criterion of 750 0 C for vanadium resulted in the limiting wall loading value of 7 MW/m 2 . The second criterion limited thermal stress levels to the yield strength of the alloy. This led to the lowest wall loading value for the Type 316 stainless steel wall (1.7 MW/m 2 ). The third criterion required that the creep-fatigue characteristics of the module allow a lifetime of 10 MW-yr/m 2 . At wall temperatures of 600 0 C, this lifetime could be achieved in a stainless steel module for wall loadings less than 3.2 MW/m 2 , while the same lifetime could be achieved for much higher wall loadings in a vanadium module

  12. Prediction of wall shear stresses in transitional boundary layers using near-wall mean velocity profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Woo Pyung; Shin, Sung Ho; Kang, Shin Hyoung

    2000-01-01

    The local wall shear stress in transitional boundary layer was estimated from the near-wall mean velocity data using the principle of Computational Preston tube Method(CPM). The previous DNS and experimental databases of transitional boundary layers were used to demonstrate the accuracy of the method and to provide the applicable range of wall unit y + . The skin friction coefficients predicted by the CPM agreed well with those from previous studies. To reexamine the applicability of the CPM, near-wall hot-wire measurements were conducted in developing transitional boundary layers on a flat plate with different freestream turbulence intensities. The intermittency profiles across the transitional boundary layers were reasonably obtained from the conditional sampling technique. An empirical correlation between the representative intermittency near the wall and the free parameter K 1 of the extended wall function of CPM has been newly proposed using the present and other experimental data. The CPM has been verified as a useful tool to measure the wall shear stress in transitional boundary layer with reasonable accuracy

  13. A film-based wall shear stress sensor for wall-bounded turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amili, Omid; Soria, Julio

    2011-07-01

    In wall-bounded turbulent flows, determination of wall shear stress is an important task. The main objective of the present work is to develop a sensor which is capable of measuring surface shear stress over an extended region applicable to wall-bounded turbulent flows. This sensor, as a direct method for measuring wall shear stress, consists of mounting a thin flexible film on the solid surface. The sensor is made of a homogeneous, isotropic, and incompressible material. The geometry and mechanical properties of the film are measured, and particles with the nominal size of 11 μm in diameter are embedded on the film's surface to act as markers. An optical technique is used to measure the film deformation caused by the flow. The film has typically deflection of less than 2% of the material thickness under maximum loading. The sensor sensitivity can be adjusted by changing the thickness of the layer or the shear modulus of the film's material. The paper reports the sensor fabrication, static and dynamic calibration procedure, and its application to a fully developed turbulent channel flow at Reynolds numbers in the range of 90,000-130,000 based on the bulk velocity and channel full height. The results are compared to alternative wall shear stress measurement methods.

  14. Determination of left ventricular wall motility injury by factor analysis in patients with advanced ischemic heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasalicky, J.; Kidery, J.; Vavrejn, B.; Surova, H.; Malek, I.

    1989-01-01

    Left ventricular phase and amplitude images (Fourier analysis, PAI) and factor analysis images (FAI) from gated radionuclide ventriculography were obtained in 235 patients after myocardial infarction (MI) and in 44 patients with well documented ischemic heart disease (IHD) in order to assess areas of regional left ventricular motility injury (LVMI). The sensitivity of FAI for LVMI detection was higher than with PAI (36.3% vs 22.7% in patients without MI; 76.6% vs 68% in those after anterior MI; and 53.2% vs 31.9% after posterior MI, respectively). In 2.9% of all patients PAI were unclear due to small time activity amplitudes and heart rate irregularity, whereas FAI could be easily assessed. Significantly decreased left ventricular ejection fraction was observed predominantly after anterior MI in connection with distinct signs of LVMI in a large area of anterior wall or in the anteroseptal and/or apical region. Areas of LVMI could be sharply delineated in FAI; however, in contrast to PAI, FAI is unable to distinguish between dyskinetic and akinetic regions. The use of both PAI and FAI is recommended for more detailed detection of regional LVMI in patients with IHD. (orig.)

  15. A Reynolds stress model for near-wall turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durbin, P. A.

    1993-01-01

    The paper formulates a tensorially consistent near-wall second-order closure model. Redistributive terms in the Reynolds stress equations are modeled by an elliptic relaxation equation in order to represent strongly nonhomogeneous effects produced by the presence of walls; this replaces the quasi-homogeneous algebraic models that are usually employed, and avoids the need for ad hoc damping functions. The model is solved for channel flow and boundary layers with zero and adverse pressure gradients. Good predictions of Reynolds stress components, mean flow, skin friction, and displacement thickness are obtained in various comparisons to experimental and direct numerical simulation data. The model is also applied to a boundary layer flowing along a wall with a 90-deg, constant-radius, convex bend.

  16. Normal left ventricular wall motion measured with two-dimensional myocardial tagging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qi, P; Thomsen, C; Ståhlberg, F

    1993-01-01

    contraction towards the center of the left ventricle, a motion of the base of the heart towards the apex, and a rotation of the left ventricle around its long axis. The direction of left ventricular rotation changed from early systole to late systole. The base and middle levels of the left ventricle rotated...

  17. New method for cardiac resynchronization therapy: Transapical endocardial lead implantation for left ventricular free wall pacing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Kassai (Imre); C. Foldesi (Csaba); A. Szekely (Andrea); T. Szili-Torok (Tamas)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractCoronary sinus lead placement for transvenous left ventricular (LV) pacing in cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) has a significant failure rate at implant and a significant dislocation rate during follow-up. For these patients, epicardial pacing lead implantation is the most

  18. Mental stress-induced left ventricular dysfunction and adverse outcome in ischemic heart disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Julia L; Boyle, Stephen H; Samad, Zainab; Babyak, Michael A; Wilson, Jennifer L; Kuhn, Cynthia; Becker, Richard C; Ortel, Thomas L; Williams, Redford B; Rogers, Joseph G; O'Connor, Christopher M; Velazquez, Eric J; Jiang, Wei

    2017-04-01

    Aims Mental stress-induced myocardial ischemia (MSIMI) occurs in up to 70% of patients with clinically stable ischemic heart disease and is associated with increased risk of adverse prognosis. We aimed to examine the prognostic value of indices of MSIMI and exercise stress-induced myocardial ischemia (ESIMI) in a population of ischemic heart disease patients that was not confined by having a recent positive physical stress test. Methods and results The Responses of Mental Stress Induced Myocardial Ischemia to Escitalopram Treatment (REMIT) study enrolled 310 subjects who underwent mental and exercise stress testing and were followed annually for a median of four years. Study endpoints included time to first and total rate of major adverse cardiovascular events, defined as all-cause mortality and hospitalizations for cardiovascular causes. Cox and negative binomial regression adjusting for age, sex, resting left ventricular ejection fraction, and heart failure status were used to examine associations of indices of MSIMI and ESIMI with study endpoints. The continuous variable of mental stress-induced left ventricular ejection fraction change was significantly associated with both endpoints (all p values mental stress, patients had a 5% increase in the probability of a major adverse cardiovascular event at the median follow-up time and a 20% increase in the number of major adverse cardiovascular events endured over the follow-up period of six years. Indices of ESIMI did not predict endpoints ( ps > 0.05). Conclusion In patients with stable ischemic heart disease, mental, but not exercise, stress-induced left ventricular ejection fraction change significantly predicts risk of future adverse cardiovascular events.

  19. Measurements of wall shear stress in a planar turbulent Couette flow with porous walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuther, Paul

    2013-11-01

    Measurements of drag on a moving web in a multi-span festoon show a stronger than expected dependency on the porosity of the web. The experiments suggest a wall shear stress 3-4 times larger than non-porous webs or historical Couette flow data for solid walls. Previous DNS studies by Jimenez et al. (JFM Vol 442) of boundary layers with passive porous surfaces predict a much smaller increase in wall shear stress for a porous wall of only 40%. Other DNS studies by Quadrio et al. (JFM Vol 576) of porous walls with periodic transpiration do show a large increase in drag under certain periodic conditions of modest amplitude. Although those results are aligned in magnitude with this study, the exact reason for the observed high drag for porous webs in this present study is not understood because there was no external disturbance applied to the web. It can be hypothesized that natural flutter of the web results in a similar mechanism shown in the periodic DNS study, but when the natural flutter was reduced by increasing web tension, there was only a small decrease of the drag. A key difference in this study is that because of the multiple parallel spans in a festoon, any transpiration in one layer must act in the opposite manner on the adjacent span.

  20. Determination of wall shear stress from mean velocity and Reynolds shear stress profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volino, Ralph J.; Schultz, Michael P.

    2018-03-01

    An analytical method is presented for determining the Reynolds shear stress profile in steady, two-dimensional wall-bounded flows using the mean streamwise velocity. The method is then utilized with experimental data to determine the local wall shear stress. The procedure is applicable to flows on smooth and rough surfaces with arbitrary pressure gradients. It is based on the streamwise component of the boundary layer momentum equation, which is transformed into inner coordinates. The method requires velocity profiles from at least two streamwise locations, but the formulation of the momentum equation reduces the dependence on streamwise gradients. The method is verified through application to laminar flow solutions and turbulent DNS results from both zero and nonzero pressure gradient boundary layers. With strong favorable pressure gradients, the method is shown to be accurate for finding the wall shear stress in cases where the Clauser fit technique loses accuracy. The method is then applied to experimental data from the literature from zero pressure gradient studies on smooth and rough walls, and favorable and adverse pressure gradient cases on smooth walls. Data from very near the wall are not required for determination of the wall shear stress. Wall friction velocities obtained using the present method agree with those determined in the original studies, typically to within 2%.

  1. Beneficial effects of elevating cardiac preload on left-ventricular diastolic function and volume during heat stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brothers, R M; Pecini, Redi; Dalsgaard, Morten

    2014-01-01

    via volume loading while heat stressed would 1) increase indices of left ventricular diastolic function, and 2) preserve left ventricular end-diastolic volume (LVEDV) during a subsequent simulated hemorrhagic challenge induced by lower-body negative pressure (LBNP). Indices of left ventricular......Volume loading normalizes tolerance to a simulated hemorrhagic challenge in heat-stressed individuals, relative to when these individuals are thermoneutral. The mechanism(s) by which this occurs is unknown. This project tested two unique hypotheses; that is, the elevation of central blood volume...... diastolic function were evaluated in nine subjects during the following conditions: thermoneutral, heat stress, and heat stress after acute volume loading sufficient to return ventricular filling pressures toward thermoneutral levels. LVEDV was also measured in these subjects during the aforementioned...

  2. Reduced Sodium Current in the Lateral Ventricular Wall Induces Inferolateral J-Waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijborg, Veronique M F; Potse, Mark; Conrath, Chantal E; Belterman, Charly N W; De Bakker, Jacques M T; Coronel, Ruben

    2016-01-01

    J-waves in inferolateral leads are associated with a higher risk for idiopathic ventricular fibrillation. We aimed to test potential mechanisms (depolarization or repolarization dependent) responsible for inferolateral J-waves. We hypothesized that inferolateral J-waves can be caused by regional delayed activation of myocardium that is activated late during normal conditions. Computer simulations were performed to evaluate how J-point elevation is influenced by reducing sodium current conductivity (GNa), increasing transient outward current conductivity (Gto), or cellular uncoupling in three predefined ventricular regions (lateral, anterior, or septal). Two pig hearts were Langendorff-perfused with selective perfusion with a sodium channel blocker of lateral or anterior/septal regions. Volume-conducted pseudo-electrocardiograms (ECG) were recorded to detect the presence of J-waves. Epicardial unipolar electrograms were simultaneously recorded to obtain activation times (AT). Simulation data showed that conduction slowing, caused by reduced sodium current, in lateral, but not in other regions induced inferolateral J-waves. An increase in transient outward potassium current or cellular uncoupling in the lateral zone elicited slight J-point elevations which did not meet J-wave criteria. Additional conduction slowing in the entire heart attenuated J-waves and J-point elevations on the ECG, because of masking by the QRS. Experimental data confirmed that conduction slowing attributed to sodium channel blockade in the left lateral but not in the anterior/septal ventricular region induced inferolateral J-waves. J-waves coincided with the delayed activation. Reduced sodium current in the left lateral ventricular myocardium can cause inferolateral J-waves on the ECG.

  3. Value of transient dilation of the left ventricular cavity on stress thallium scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugihara, Hiroki; Shiga, Kouji; Umamoto, Ikuo

    1991-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the value of transient dilation of the left ventricular cavity on stress thallium scintigraphy in 80 patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD) and 50 with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Twenty persons without either coronary artery stenosis or heart disease were served as controls. Areas surrounded by maximum count points on the line of each 10deg on the short axis slice through the mid-cavity of the left ventricle were obtained at 10 minutes and at 3 hours after exercise. Transient dilation index (TDI) was obtained by dividing the area on early image by that on delayed image. TDI was significantly higher in patients with two or three vessel disease in the IHD group than the control group. High TDI was observed in 8% for one vessel disease, 40% for two vessel disease, and 80% for three vessel disease, contributing to the detection of multivessel IHD. In the HCM group of 80 patients, 24 (48%) had high TDI which was frequently associated with a history of chest pain and positive ECG findings at exercise. When these 24 HCM patients underwent exercise blood pool scintiscanning, left ventricular enddiastolic volume was similar before and at 10 minutes after exercise. These findings suggest that transient dilation of the left ventricular cavity after exercise may reflect subendocardial ischemia in both IHD and HCM. TDI would become a useful indicator for transient dilation of the left ventricular cavity. (N.K.)

  4. Wall shear stress fixed points in blood flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzani, Amirhossein; Shadden, Shawn

    2017-11-01

    Patient-specific computational fluid dynamics produces large datasets, and wall shear stress (WSS) is one of the most important parameters due to its close connection with the biological processes at the wall. While some studies have investigated WSS vectorial features, the WSS fixed points have not received much attention. In this talk, we will discuss the importance of WSS fixed points from three viewpoints. First, we will review how WSS fixed points relate to the flow physics away from the wall. Second, we will discuss how certain types of WSS fixed points lead to high biochemical surface concentration in cardiovascular mass transport problems. Finally, we will introduce a new measure to track the exposure of endothelial cells to WSS fixed points.

  5. [Intervention of systolic pressure and left ventricular hypertrophy in rats under cold stress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, C F; Wang, S G; Peng, Y G; Shi, Y; Du, Y P; Shi, G X; Wen, T; Wang, Y K; Su, H

    2016-06-20

    To investigate the effects of different drugs on systolic blood pressure (SBP) and left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) in spontaneously hypertensive rats under cold stress. A total of 40 male spontaneously hypertensive rats aged 10 weeks (160~200 g) were given adaptive feeding for 7 days at a temperature of 20±1°C and then randomly divided into control group, cold stress group, metoprolol group, amlodipine group, and benazepril group, with 8 rats in each group. SBP, body weight, and heart rate were measured once a week. After the rats were sacrificed by exsanguination, left ventricular weight (LVW) was measured, and left ventricular weight index (LVWI; mg/g) was calculated. Radioimmunoassay was used to measure the concentrations of endothelin-1 (ET-1) and angiotensin-II (Ang-II) in plasma and myocardium, and the chemical method was used to measure the concentrations of nitric oxide (NO) in plasma and myocardium. RT-PCR was used to measure the mRNA expression of endothelin-A receptor. Compared with the cold stress group, all medication groups showed significant reductions in SBP since week 5 (Pcold stress group showed a significant increase in LVWI compared with the control group (3.38±0.27 mg/g vs 2.89±0.19 mg/g, Pcold stress group (2.98±0.28 mg/g vs 3.38±0.27 mg/g, Pcold stress group showed a significant reduction in plasma NO concentration compared with the control group (104.9±19.5 μmol/L vs 129.3±17.8 μmol/L, Pcold stress group, all the medication groups showed significant increases in blood NO concentration (Pcold stress group showed a significant increase in myocardial ET-1 concentration compared with the control group (6.3±1.5 pg/100 mg vs 4.5±1.9 pg/100 mg, Pcold stress group, the amlodipine group showed a significant reduction in myocardial ET-1 concentration (4.4±1.0 pg/100 mg vs 6.3±1.5 pg/100 mg, Pcold stress group had significantly higher mRNA expression of endothelin-A receptor than the control group (0.86±0.23 vs 0.45±0.16, Pcold

  6. Pressure and wall shear stress in blood hammer - Analytical theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Chiang C; Jing, Haixiao

    2016-10-01

    We describe an analytical theory of blood hammer in a long and stiffened artery due to sudden blockage. Based on the model of a viscous fluid in laminar flow, we derive explicit expressions of oscillatory pressure and wall shear stress. To examine the effects on local plaque formation we also allow the blood vessel radius to be slightly nonuniform. Without resorting to discrete computation, the asymptotic method of multiple scales is utilized to deal with the sharp contrast of time scales. The effects of plaque and blocking time on blood pressure and wall shear stress are studied. The theory is validated by comparison with existing water hammer experiments. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Influence of Coherent Structures on the Wall Shear Stress in Axial Flow Between a Cylinder and a Plane Wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khabbouchi, Imed; Guellouz, Mohamed Sadok; Tavoularis, Stavros

    2009-01-01

    Synchronised hot-film and hot-wire measurements were made in the narrower region of a rectangular channel containing a cylindrical rod. The hot-film probe was mounted flush with the channel bottom wall to measure the wall shear stress, while the hot-wire probe was placed at a fixed position, selected in order to easily detect the passage of coherent structures. Mean and rms profiles of the wall shear stress show the influence of the gap to diameter ratio on their respective distributions. The latter presented peculiarities that could only be explained by the presence of coherent structures in the flow between the rod and the wall. Evidence of this presence is seen in the velocity power spectra. The strong influence of the coherent structures on the wall shear stress spatial and temporal distributions is established through velocity-wall shear stress cross-correlations functions and through conditionally sampled measurements

  8. Initial stress and nonlinear material behavior in patient-specific AAA wall stress analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speelman, L.; Bosboom, E.M.H.; Schurink, G.W.H.; Buth, J.; Breeuwer, M.; Jacobs, M.J.; Vosse, van de F.N.

    2009-01-01

    Rupture risk estimation of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) is currently based on the maximum diameter of the AAA. A more critical approach is based on AAA wall stress analysis. For that, in most cases, the AAA geometry is obtained from CT-data and treated as a stress free geometry. However, during

  9. Comparative study of diastolic filling under varying left ventricular wall stiffness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekala, Pritam; Santhanakrishnan, Arvind

    2014-11-01

    Pathological remodeling of the human cardiac left ventricle (LV) is observed in hypertensive heart failure as a result of pressure overload. Myocardial stiffening occurs in these patients prior to chronic maladaptive changes, resulting in increased LV wall stiffness. The goal of this study was to investigate the change in intraventricular filling fluid dynamics inside a physical model of the LV as a function of wall stiffness. Three LV models of varying wall stiffness were incorporated into an in vitro flow circuit driven by a programmable piston pump. Windkessel elements were used to tune the inflow and systemic pressure in the model with least stiffness to match healthy conditions. Models with stiffer walls were comparatively tested maintaining circuit compliance, resistance and pump amplitude constant. 2D phase-locked PIV measurements along the central plane showed that with increase in wall stiffness, the peak velocity and cardiac output inside the LV decreased. Further, inflow vortex ring propagation toward the LV apex was reduced with increasing stiffness. The above findings indicate the importance of considering LV wall relaxation characteristics in pathological studies of filling fluid dynamics.

  10. Analysis of the relationship between myocardial viability and regional left ventricular wall motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furutani, Yuhji; Ozaki, Masaharu; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Sato, Shinichi; Saiki, Atsushi; Kusukawa, Reizo

    1993-01-01

    Myocardial viability was determined by using postsystolic shortening (PSS) as an index, as obtained by cardiac blood pool scintigraphy with Tc-99m HSA. The findings were compared with those of thallium-201 myocardial SPECT. The study population was comparised of 41 patients with single blood vessel disease in the left anterior descending artery (34 with old myocardial infarction and 7 with effort angina pectoris). Left ventricular area was divided into 6 segments, and global and regional left ventricular blood volume curves were obtained. Delayed end-systole was the most common in the apex (41%), followed by the upper septum (37%) and lower septum (10%). PSS resulting from delayed end-systole was seen in 36 areas. PSS/end-diastolic volume (EDV) and PSS/systolic volume (SV) were obtained by adjusting end-diastolic and stroke counts, respectively. Thallium-201 myocardial SPECT images were divided into 5 segments to obtain defect score (DS) for visual Tl uptake. Both PSS/EDV and PSS/SV were greater in association with more delayed end-systole, greater DS, and lower reginal ejection fraction. Areas showing greater PSS were associated with less myocardial viability, as observed on Tl myocardial SPECT images. Thus, PSS seemed to reflect the degree of myocardial necrosis within the region of interest. (N.K.)

  11. Thinner regions of intracranial aneurysm wall correlate with regions of higher wall shear stress: a 7.0 tesla MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankena, Roos; Kleinloog, Rachel; Verweij, Bon H.; van Ooij, Pim; ten Haken, Bennie; Luijten, Peter R.; Rinkel, Gabriel J.E.; Zwanenburg, Jaco J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To develop a method for semi-quantitative wall thickness assessment on in vivo 7.0 tesla (7T) MRI images of intracranial aneurysms for studying the relation between apparent aneurysm wall thickness and wall shear stress. Materials and Methods Wall thickness was analyzed in 11 unruptured aneurysms in 9 patients, who underwent 7T MRI with a TSE based vessel wall sequence (0.8 mm isotropic resolution). A custom analysis program determined the in vivo aneurysm wall intensities, which were normalized to signal of nearby brain tissue and were used as measure for apparent wall thickness (AWT). Spatial wall thickness variation was determined as the interquartile range in AWT (the middle 50% of the AWT range). Wall shear stress was determined using phase contrast MRI (0.5 mm isotropic resolution). We performed visual and statistical comparisons (Pearson’s correlation) to study the relation between wall thickness and wall shear stress. Results 3D colored AWT maps of the aneurysms showed spatial AWT variation, which ranged from 0.07 to 0.53, with a mean variation of 0.22 (a variation of 1.0 roughly means a wall thickness variation of one voxel (0.8mm)). In all aneurysms, AWT was inversely related to WSS (mean correlation coefficient −0.35, P<0.05). Conclusions A method was developed to measure the wall thickness semi-quantitatively, using 7T MRI. An inverse correlation between wall shear stress and AWT was determined. In future studies, this non-invasive method can be used to assess spatial wall thickness variation in relation to pathophysiologic processes such as aneurysm growth and –rupture. PMID:26892986

  12. First wall thermal stress analysis for suddenly applied heat fluxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalessandro, J.A.

    The failure criterion for a solid first wall of an inertial confinement reactor is investigated. Analytical expressions for induced thermal stresses in a plate are given. Two materials have been chosen for this investigation: grade H-451 graphite and chemically vapor deposited (CVD) β-silicon carbide. Structural failure can be related to either the maximum compressive stress produced on the surface or the maximum tensile stress developed in the interior of the plate; however, it is shown that compressive failure would predominate. A basis for the choice of the thermal shock figure of merit, k(1 - ν) sigma/E α kappa/sup 1/2/, is identified. The result is that graphite and silicon carbide rank comparably

  13. Wall morphology, blood flow and wall shear stress: MR findings in patients with peripheral artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galizia, Mauricio S.; Barker, Alex; Collins, Jeremy; Carr, James [Northwestern University, Department of Radiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Liao, Yihua [Northwestern University' s Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Preventive Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); McDermott, Mary M. [Northwestern University' s Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Preventive Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University' s Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Markl, Michael [Northwestern University, Department of Radiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University, Department Biomedical Engineering, McCormick School of Engineering, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2014-04-15

    To investigate the influence of atherosclerotic plaques on femoral haemodynamics assessed by two-dimensional (2D) phase-contrast (PC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with three-directional velocity encoding. During 1 year, patients with peripheral artery disease and an ankle brachial index <1.00 were enrolled. After institutional review board approval and written informed consent, 44 patients (age, 70 ± 12 years) underwent common femoral artery MRI. Patients with contra-indications for MRI were excluded. Sequences included 2D time-of-flight, proton-density, T1-weighted and T2-weighted MRI. Electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated 2D PC-MRI with 3D velocity encoding was acquired. A radiologist classified images in five categories. Blood flow, velocity and wall shear stress (WSS) along the vessel circumference were quantified from the PC-MRI data. The acquired images were of good quality for interpretation. There were no image quality problems related to poor ECG-gating or slice positioning. Velocities, oscillatory shear stress and total flow were similar between patients with normal arteries and wall thickening/plaque. Patients with plaques demonstrated regionally increased peak systolic WSS and enhanced WSS eccentricity. Combined multi-contrast morphological imaging of the peripheral arterial wall with PC-MRI with three-directional velocity encoding is a feasible technique. Further study is needed to determine whether flow is an appropriate marker for altered endothelial cell function, vascular remodelling and plaque progression. (orig.)

  14. Relation between wall shear stress and carotid artery wall thickening MRI versus CFD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cibis, Merih; Potters, Wouter V.; Selwaness, Mariana

    2016-01-01

    Wall shear stress (WSS), a parameter associated with endothelial function, is calculated by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) or phase-contrast (PC) MRI measurements. Although CFD is common in WSS (WSSCFD) calculations, PC-MRI-based WSS (WSSMRI) is more favorable in population studies; since...... it is straightforward and less time consuming. However, it is not clear if WSSMRI and WSSCFD show similar associations with vascular pathology. Our aim was to test the associations between wall thickness (WT) of the carotid arteries and WSSMRI and WSSCFD. The subjects (n=14) with an asymptomatic carotid plaque who...... underwent MRI scans two times within 4 years of time were selected from the Rotterdam Study. We compared WSSCFD and WSSMRI at baseline and follow-up. Baseline WSSMRI and WSSCFD values were divided into 3 categories representing low, medium and high WSS tertiles. WT of each tertile was compared by a one...

  15. Partial LVAD restores ventricular outputs and normalizes LV but not RV stress distributions in the acutely failing heart in silico

    OpenAIRE

    Sack, Kevin L.; Baillargeon, Brian; Acevedo-Bolton, Gabriel; Genet, Martin; Rebelo, Nuno; Kuhl, Ellen; Klein, Liviu; Weiselthaler, Georg M.; Burkhoff, Daniel; Franz, Thomas; Guccione, Julius M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Heart failure is a worldwide epidemic that is unlikely to change as the population ages and life expectancy increases. We sought to detail significant recent improvements to the Dassault Systèmes Living Heart Model (LHM) and use the LHM to compute left ventricular (LV) and right ventricular (RV) myofiber stress distributions under the following 4 conditions: (1) normal cardiac function; (2) acute left heart failure (ALHF); (3) ALHF treated using an LV assist device (LVAD) flow rate o...

  16. Comparison of exercise and pharmacological stress gated SPECT in detecting transient left ventricular dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Hakan; Tan, Yusuf Z; Isgoren, Serkan; Gorur, Gozde D; Kozdag, Guliz; Ural, Ertan; Berk, Fatma

    2008-06-01

    Transient left ventricular contractile dysfunction (TLVD) is observed owing to post-exercise stunning in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Pharmacological stimulation differs from exercise stress because it does not cause demand ischemia. The aim of this study was to determine whether TLVD could also be seen after pharmacological stress (dipyridamole). Of the patients in whom gated single-photon emission computed tomography (GSPECT) was performed in our institution from January 2004 to April 2007, 439 subjects with known or suspected CAD were included in the study. GSPECT was performed for all patients following exercise (group I, n = 220) or pharmacological stress (group II, n = 219) according to a 2-day (stress-rest) protocol after injection of Tc-99m methoxyisobutyl-isonitrile (MIBI). Stress, rest, and difference (stress-rest value) left ventricular ejection fractions (SLVEF, RLVEF, and DLVEF) and transient ischemic dilatation (TID) ratio were derived automatically. Summed stress score, summed rest score, and summed difference score (SDS) for myocardial perfusion were calculated using a 20-segment model and a five-point scoring system. An SDS > 3 was considered as ischemic. On the basis of the perfusion findings, patients were subdivided into a normal (group A, n = 216) and ischemia group (group B, n = 223). DLVEF and perfusion scores of all groups were compared. Relationships between DLVEF and perfusion, and between TID ratio and DLVEF were also evaluated. Stress-induced ischemia was observed in 223 of 439 patients (50.8%). In group A, the difference between stress and rest LVEF values was not significant (P = 0.670 and P = 0.200 for groups IA and IIA, respectively). However, LVEF was significantly decreased after stress compared with rest values for group B (P good correlations between TID ratios and DLVEF values in four subgroups (r = -0.55, r = -0.62, r = -0.59, and r = -0.41; for groups IA, IB, IIA, and IIB, respectively, P stress was observed

  17. Altered Aortic Upper Wall TDI Velocity Is Inversely Related with Left Ventricular Diastolic Function in Operated Tetralogy of Fallot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassareo, Pier Paolo; Saba, Luca; Marras, Andrea R; Mercuro, Giuseppe

    2016-12-01

    Postoperative tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) patients often develop progressive aortic root dilatation due to an impairment in aortic elastic properties. (1) to assess aortic elasticity at the level of the aortic upper wall by tissue Doppler imaging (TDI); (2) to evaluate the influence of aortic elasticity on left ventricular (LV) diastolic function in TOF patients. Twenty-eight postoperative TOF patients (14 males, 14 females. Mean age: 25.7 ± 1.6 years) and 28 age- and sex-matched normal subjects were examined. Aortic distensibility and stiffness index were calculated. Aortic wall systolic and diastolic velocities, LV systolic and diastolic parameters were assessed by TDI. Aortic distensibility was significantly lower (P = .024), and aortic stiffness index significantly higher (P = .036) in TOF patients compared to controls. E/E' was significantly higher in TOF than in control group (P < .001). Aortic upper wall early diastolic velocity (AWEDV) was significantly correlated with aortic stiffness index (r: -0.42; P < .03), aortic distensibility (r = 0.54; P < .004), left atrial volume (r = -0.62; P = .0004), and E/E' ratio (r = -0.87; P < .0001). The latter relationship remained significant even when excluding the influence of age at surgery (r = -0.60; P < .0007) and of previous palliative surgery (r = -0.53; P < .02). Aortic elastic properties can be directly assessed using TDI to measure AWEDV. Aortic elasticity is significantly lower in postoperative TOF patients, exerting a negative effect also on LV diastolic function, with a potential long-term influence on clinical status. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Effect of successful thrombolytic therapy on right ventricular function in acute inferior wall myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuler, G.; Hofmann, M.; Schwarz, F.; Mehmel, H.; Manthey, J.; Tillmanns, H.; Hartmann, S.; Kuebler, W.

    1984-01-01

    In 19 patients undergoing intracoronary fibrinolytic therapy for acute myocardial infarction, the site of coronary obstruction was in the proximal right coronary artery. Time between onset of symptoms and hospitalization was less than 4 hours. These patients were studied prospectively by radionuclide techniques immediately after admission, 48 hours and 4 weeks after AMI. Right and left ventricular (RV and LV) ejection fractions (EF) were calculated from gated blood pool scintigrams and the size of the LV perfusion defect was assessed by thallium-201 scintigraphy. Before the intervention, RV performance was significantly lower (RVEF 29 +/- 8%) than normal (53 +/- 7%). The size of the LV perfusion defect was relatively small (less than 25% of LV circumference), and as a consequence, LV pump function was only marginally impaired (LVEF 54 +/- 11%). Recanalization of the infarct artery was achieved in 12 patients (group A); in 7 patients the infarct artery remained occluded (group B). Early after the intervention (48 hours), RV performance in group A recovered significantly (RVEF: 30 +/- 9% vs 39 +/- 7%, p less than 0.01), and further improvement was noted at 4 weeks (RVEF 43 +/- 5%, p less than 0.01)

  19. Wall shear stress fixed points in cardiovascular fluid mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzani, Amirhossein; Shadden, Shawn C

    2018-05-17

    Complex blood flow in large arteries creates rich wall shear stress (WSS) vectorial features. WSS acts as a link between blood flow dynamics and the biology of various cardiovascular diseases. WSS has been of great interest in a wide range of studies and has been the most popular measure to correlate blood flow to cardiovascular disease. Recent studies have emphasized different vectorial features of WSS. However, fixed points in the WSS vector field have not received much attention. A WSS fixed point is a point on the vessel wall where the WSS vector vanishes. In this article, WSS fixed points are classified and the aspects by which they could influence cardiovascular disease are reviewed. First, the connection between WSS fixed points and the flow topology away from the vessel wall is discussed. Second, the potential role of time-averaged WSS fixed points in biochemical mass transport is demonstrated using the recent concept of Lagrangian WSS structures. Finally, simple measures are proposed to quantify the exposure of the endothelial cells to WSS fixed points. Examples from various arterial flow applications are demonstrated. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Intraventricular filling under increasing left ventricular wall stiffness and heart rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaee, Milad; Lai, Hong Kuan; Schovanec, Joseph; Santhanakrishnan, Arvind; Nagueh, Sherif

    2015-11-01

    Heart failure with normal ejection fraction (HFNEF) is a clinical syndrome that is prevalent in over 50% of heart failure patients. HFNEF patients show increased left ventricle (LV) wall stiffness and clinical diagnosis is difficult using ejection fraction (EF) measurements. We hypothesized that filling vortex circulation strength would decrease with increasing LV stiffness irrespective of heart rate (HR). 2D PIV and hemodynamic measurements were acquired on LV physical models of varying wall stiffness under resting and exercise HRs. The LV models were comparatively tested in an in vitro flow circuit consisting of a two-element Windkessel model driven by a piston pump. The stiffer LV models were tested in comparison with the least stiff baseline model without changing pump amplitude, circuit compliance and resistance. Increasing stiffness at resting HR resulted in diminishing cardiac output without lowering EF below 50% as in HFNEF. Increasing HR to 110 bpm in addition to stiffness resulted in lowering EF to less than 50%. The circulation strength of the intraventricular filling vortex diminished with increasing stiffness and HR. The results suggest that filling vortex circulation strength could be potentially used as a surrogate measure of LV stiffness. This research was supported by the Oklahoma Center for Advancement of Science and Technology (HR14-022).

  1. Clinical Stress Echocardiography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.E. Karagiannis

    2007-01-01

    textabstractTwo-dimensional echocardiography is a commonly used non-invasive method for the assessment of left ventricular function. It provides precise information on both global and segmental myocardial function by displaying endocardial motion and wall thickening. Dobutamine stress

  2. [Isoproterenol stress test for the evaluation of the residual stenosis of the right ventricular outflow tract].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, T; Fukuda, T; Kashima, I; Sato, M; Miura, M; Ueda, H; Yoshiba, S

    2001-07-01

    Hemodynamic changes of the right side of the heart during isoproterenol stress test were assessed and analyzed in 36 patients who underwent definitive repair of tetralogy of Fallot or double outlet right ventricle with pulmonary stenosis. Patients having atresia of the pulmonary artery were excluded from the study. 24 of the patients had previously undergone reconstruction of the right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) with preserving the pulmonary valvar annulus (group N), whilst the remaining 12 patients had undergone transannular enlargement of RVOT with a patch (group T). Preservation of the pulmonary valvar annulus was determined when the intra-operative measurement of diameter of the pulmonary valvar annulus showed values greater than 90% of normal. In both groups, the isoproterenol infusion increased the right to left ventricular peak pressure (RVP/LVP) ratio, pressure gradient between the right ventricle and main pulmonary artery (RV-mPAP), and pressure gradient between the main pulmonary artery and peripheral pulmonary artery (m-pPAP). These values were significantly higher than those measured at rest. When comparisons were made between groups, RV-mPAP of group N was significantly higher than that of group T, both at rest and during stress test. By contrast, m-pPAP of group T was significantly higher than that of group N, both at rest and during stress test. Although no significant difference was found between the groups in RVP/LVP at rest and during stress test, RVP/LVP of both groups increased to the level of more than 0.6 after the isoproterenol infusion. These results led us to conclude that preservation of the pulmonary valvar annulus was better to be applied only to the patients who fulfilled our criterions. Additionally, in the setting of patch reconstruction of the pulmonary artery, every effort should be made so as not to leave the residual stenosis of the peripheral pulmonary artery.

  3. Log-layer mismatch and modeling of the fluctuating wall stress in wall-modeled large-eddy simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiang I. A.; Park, George Ilhwan; Moin, Parviz

    2017-10-01

    Log-layer mismatch refers to a chronic problem found in wall-modeled large-eddy simulation (WMLES) or detached-eddy simulation, where the modeled wall-shear stress deviates from the true one by approximately 15 % . Many efforts have been made to resolve this mismatch. The often-used fixes, which are generally ad hoc, include modifying subgrid-scale stress models, adding a stochastic forcing, and moving the LES-wall-model matching location away from the wall. An analysis motivated by the integral wall-model formalism suggests that log-layer mismatch is resolved by the built-in physics-based temporal filtering. In this work we investigate in detail the effects of local filtering on log-layer mismatch. We show that both local temporal filtering and local wall-parallel filtering resolve log-layer mismatch without moving the LES-wall-model matching location away from the wall. Additionally, we look into the momentum balance in the near-wall region to provide an alternative explanation of how LLM occurs, which does not necessarily rely on the numerical-error argument. While filtering resolves log-layer mismatch, the quality of the wall-shear stress fluctuations predicted by WMLES does not improve with our remedy. The wall-shear stress fluctuations are highly underpredicted due to the implied use of LES filtering. However, good agreement can be found when the WMLES data are compared to the direct numerical simulation data filtered at the corresponding WMLES resolutions.

  4. Characterization of Glutamatergic Neurons in the Rat Atrial Intrinsic Cardiac Ganglia that Project to the Cardiac Ventricular Wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting; Miller, Kenneth E.

    2016-01-01

    The intrinsic cardiac nervous system modulates cardiac function by acting as an integration site for regulating autonomic efferent cardiac output. This intrinsic system is proposed to be composed of a short cardio-cardiac feedback control loop within the cardiac innervation hierarchy. For example, electrophysiological studies have postulated the presence of sensory neurons in intrinsic cardiac ganglia for regional cardiac control. There is still a knowledge gap, however, about the anatomical location and neurochemical phenotype of sensory neurons inside intrinsic cardiac ganglia. In the present study, rat intrinsic cardiac ganglia neurons were characterized neurochemically with immunohistochemistry using glutamatergic markers: vesicular glutamate transporters 1 and 2 (VGLUT1; VGLUT2), and glutaminase (GLS), the enzyme essential for glutamate production. Glutamatergic neurons (VGLUT1/VGLUT2/GLS) in the ICG that have axons to the ventricles were identified by retrograde tracing of wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) injected in the ventricular wall. Co-labeling of VGLUT1, VGLUT2, and GLS with the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) was used to evaluate the relationship between post-ganglionic autonomic neurons and glutamatergic neurons. Sequential labeling of VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 in adjacent tissue sections was used to evaluate the co-localization of VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 in ICG neurons. Our studies yielded the following results: (1) intrinsic cardiac ganglia contain glutamatergic neurons with GLS for glutamate production and VGLUT1 and 2 for transport of glutamate into synaptic vesicles; (2) atrial intrinsic cardiac ganglia contain neurons that project to ventricle walls and these neurons are glutamatergic; (3) many glutamatergic ICG neurons also were cholinergic, expressing VAChT. (4) VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 co-localization occurred in ICG neurons with variation of their protein expression level. Investigation of both glutamatergic and cholinergic ICG

  5. Investigation of the influence of wall stiffness on the stress ratio in mammoth silos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwenstijn, P.L.L.; van Leeuwenstijn, P.L.L.; van Wijk, L.A.; van Wijk, L.A.; Haaker, G.

    1994-01-01

    To calculate the stresses on the walls of silos, it is necessary to have a good estimate of the ratio of horizontal to vertical stress. This ratio however is not known precisely, especially in cases of static stress as found in a mammoth silo. In this paper the influence of the wall stiffness on the

  6. The Relationship Between Surface Curvature and Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Wall Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Galarreta, Sergio Ruiz; Cazón, Aitor; Antón, Raúl; Finol, Ender A

    2017-08-01

    The maximum diameter (MD) criterion is the most important factor when predicting risk of rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). An elevated wall stress has also been linked to a high risk of aneurysm rupture, yet is an uncommon clinical practice to compute AAA wall stress. The purpose of this study is to assess whether other characteristics of the AAA geometry are statistically correlated with wall stress. Using in-house segmentation and meshing algorithms, 30 patient-specific AAA models were generated for finite element analysis (FEA). These models were subsequently used to estimate wall stress and maximum diameter and to evaluate the spatial distributions of wall thickness, cross-sectional diameter, mean curvature, and Gaussian curvature. Data analysis consisted of statistical correlations of the aforementioned geometry metrics with wall stress for the 30 AAA inner and outer wall surfaces. In addition, a linear regression analysis was performed with all the AAA wall surfaces to quantify the relationship of the geometric indices with wall stress. These analyses indicated that while all the geometry metrics have statistically significant correlations with wall stress, the local mean curvature (LMC) exhibits the highest average Pearson's correlation coefficient for both inner and outer wall surfaces. The linear regression analysis revealed coefficients of determination for the outer and inner wall surfaces of 0.712 and 0.516, respectively, with LMC having the largest effect on the linear regression equation with wall stress. This work underscores the importance of evaluating AAA mean wall curvature as a potential surrogate for wall stress.

  7. Shear-stress and wall-stress regulation of vascular remodeling after balloon angioplasty: effect of matrix metalloproteinase inhibition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.J. Slager (Cornelis); J. Kloet (Jeroen); J.A.F. Oomen; J.C.H. Schuurbiers (Johan); B.J. de Smet; M.J. Post (Mark); D.P.V. de Kleijn (Dominique); G. Pasterkamp (Gerard); R. Krams (Rob); C. Borst (Cornelius); J.J. Wentzel (Jolanda); I. Andhyiswara (Ivan)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Constrictive vascular remodeling (VR) is the most significant component of restenosis after balloon angioplasty (PTA). Whereas in physiological conditions VR is associated with normalization of shear stress (SS) and wall stress (WS), after PTA

  8. Comparison of various quantization methods of segmental ventricular wall motion in ischemic heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Probst, P.; Moore, R.; Kim, S.W.; Zollikofer, C.; Amplatz, K.

    1981-01-01

    Numerous methods of measuring regional myocardial wall motion are in use. A critical comparison is needed to assess the strengths, weaknesses, accuracy, and precision of these methods. This paper reports the evaluation of five methods using computer-assisted interactive graphics. Fifty cines were selected: 16 from normal subjects, and 34 from patients with proven cardiovascular diseases. Tracings were made of the opacified left ventricle in end systole and dastole and digitized. All fifty cines were analyzed by five methods using computer-implemented graphic techniques. The reults included a display of the silhouettes, which were translated and rotated according to various methods. In addition, the percent contraction for eleven myocardial regions was tabulated and displayed. The sixteen cines from normal subjects were used to derive 1 range of 'house' normal values for region contraction patterns with which the measurements from the 34 abnormal patients were compared. The five methods were evaluated by comparing results from the computer-aided analysis with the visual assessment of two experienced radiologists. One method was found, the results from which agreed with the radiologists' visual impression for every case. This computer-aided method was quantitative and reproducible. Consequently, it can give information which supplements the visual impression. (orig.) [de

  9. Clinical evaluation of left ventricular wall thickness by combined technique with gated planer 201Tl image and gated cardiac pool image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakai, Kenji; Katsuragawa, Shigehiko; Takahashi, Tsuneo; Matsushita, Kazuo; Kawamura, Akiyoshi

    1983-01-01

    To evaluate the left ventricular (LV) wall thickness, combined technique with gated planer 201-Thallium image and gated cardiac pool image was applied to 6 patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and 4 patients with secondary hypertrophy due to hypertension (HHD) proven by electrocardiography and ultrasonic-echocardiography. Scintigraphic pattern of hypertrophy on reconstructed planer 201 Tl image showed diffuse or asymmetrical apical hypertrophy in HHD, asymmetrical septal hypertrophy in HCM. It was very interesting that abnormal perfusion was shown in 201 Tl image, despite symmetrical hypertrophy in echocardiography. This techniques provided useful information for evaluating the LV wall thickness and cardiac performance. (author)

  10. Clinical evaluation of left ventricular wall thickness by combined technique with gated planer /sup 201/Tl image and gated cardiac pool image

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakai, Kenji; Katsuragawa, Shigehiko; Takahashi, Tsuneo; Matsushita, Kazuo; Kawamura, Akiyoshi

    1983-11-01

    To evaluate the left ventricular (LV) wall thickness, a combined technique with gated planer 201-thallium image and gated cardiac pool image was applied to 6 patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and 4 patients with secondary hypertrophy due to hypertension (HHD) proven by electrocardiography and ultrasonic-echocardiography. Scintigraphic pattern of hypertrophy on reconstructed planer /sup 201/Tl image showed diffuse or asymmetrical apical hypertrophy in HHD, asymmetrical septal hypertrophy in HCM. It was very interesting that abnormal perfusion was shown in /sup 201/Tl image, despite symmetrical hypertrophy in echocardiography. This techniques provided useful information for evaluating the LV wall thickness and cardiac performance.

  11. The impact of transcatheter aortic valve implantation on left ventricular performance and wall thickness – single-centre experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymański, Piotr; Dąbrowski, Maciej; Zakrzewski, Dariusz; Michałek, Piotr; Orłowska-Baranowska, Ewa; El-Hassan, Kamal; Chmielak, Zbigniew; Witkowski, Adam; Hryniewiecki, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is a treatment alternative for the elderly population with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis (AS) at high risk for surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). Aim To assess the impact of TAVI on echocardiographic parameters of left ventricular (LV) performance and wall thickness in patients subjected to the procedure in a single-centre between 2009 and 2013. Material and methods The initial group consisted of 170 consecutive patients with severe AS unsuitable for SAVR. Logistic European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation (EuroSCORE) was 21.73 ±12.42% and mean age was 79.9 ±7.5 years. Results The TAVI was performed in 167 (98.2%) patients. Mean aortic gradient decreased significantly more rapidly after the procedure (from 58.6 ±16.7 mm Hg to 11.9 ±4.9 mm Hg, p < 0.001). The LV ejection fraction (LVEF) significantly increased in both short-term and long-term follow-up (57 ±14% vs. 59 ±13%, p < 0.001 and 56 ±14% vs. 60 ±12%, p < 0.001, respectively). Significant regression of interventricular septum diameter at end-diastole (IVSDD) and end-diastolic posterior wall thickness (EDPWth) was noted in early (15.0 ±2.4 mm vs. 14.5 ±2.3 mm, p < 0.001 and 12.7 ±2.1 mm vs. 12.4 ±1.9 mm, p < 0.028, respectively) and late post-TAVI period (15.1 ±2.5 mm to 14.3 ±2.5 mm, p < 0.001 and 12.8 ±2.0 mm to 12.4 ±1.9 mm, p < 0.007, respectively). Significant paravalvular leak (PL) was noted in 21 (13.1%) patients immediately after TAVI and in 13 (9.6%) patients in follow-up (p < 0.001). Moderate or severe mitral regurgitation (msMR) was seen in 24 (14.9%) patients from the initial group and in 19 (11.8%) patients after TAVI (p < 0.001). Conclusions The TAVI had an immediate beneficial effect on LVEF, LV walls thickness, and the incidence of msMR. The results of the procedure are comparable with those described in other centres. PMID:25848369

  12. Brain ventricular wall movement assessed by a gated cine MR trueFISP sequence in patients treated with endoscopic third ventriculostomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodel, Jerome; Decq, Philippe; Rahmouni, Alain; Bastuji-Garin, Sylvie; Maraval, Anne; Combes, Catherine; Gaston, Andre; Jarraya, Bechir; Le Guerinel, Caroline

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the value of brain ventricular wall movement assessment with a gated cine trueFISP MR sequence for the diagnosis of endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) patency. Sixteen healthy volunteers and ten consecutive patients with noncommunicating hydrocephalus were explored with a MR scanner (Siemens, Avanto 1.5 T) before, 1 week and 3 months after ETV. TrueFISP was evaluated qualitatively (ventricular wall movement and CSF flow through ETV) and quantitatively [distance moved (DMLT) during a cardiac cycle by the lamina terminalis]. The third ventricle volume (TVV) was assessed. Statistical analysis was performed using nonparametric tests. There was no motion of the lamina terminalis (LT) detected on preoperative data. A pulsatile motion of the LT was found for patients with a patent ETV and for controls. DMLT and TVV were correlated (r = 0.79, P = 0.006). A transient dysfunction of ETV was successfully diagnosed on the trueFISP sequence with no motion of the LT or CSF flow observed. The trueFISP sequence appears reliable for the diagnosis of ETV patency and provides non-invasive assessment of the movement of the ventricular wall related to CSF pressure changes. (orig.)

  13. Brain ventricular wall movement assessed by a gated cine MR trueFISP sequence in patients treated with endoscopic third ventriculostomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodel, Jerome [Unite Analyse et Restauration du mouvement, UMR-CNRS, Paris (France); Faculte de Medecine Paris XII, Paris (France); Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Paris (France); Hopital Henri MONDOR, Department of Neuroradiology, Creteil (France); Hopital Henri Mondor, Creteil (France); Decq, Philippe [Unite Analyse et Restauration du mouvement, UMR-CNRS, Paris (France); Faculte de Medecine Paris XII, Paris (France); Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Paris (France); Hopital Henri MONDOR, Department of Neurosurgery, Creteil (France); Rahmouni, Alain [Faculte de Medecine Paris XII, Paris (France); Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Paris (France); Hopital Henri MONDOR, Department of Radiology, Creteil (France); Bastuji-Garin, Sylvie [Faculte de Medecine Paris XII, Paris (France); Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Paris (France); Hopital Henri MONDOR, Department of Public Health, Creteil (France); Maraval, Anne; Combes, Catherine; Gaston, Andre [Faculte de Medecine Paris XII, Paris (France); Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Paris (France); Hopital Henri MONDOR, Department of Neuroradiology, Creteil (France); Jarraya, Bechir [Faculte de Medecine Paris XII, Paris (France); Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Paris (France); Hopital Henri MONDOR, Department of Neurosurgery, Creteil (France); Le Guerinel, Caroline [Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Paris (France); Hopital Henri MONDOR, Department of Neurosurgery, Creteil (France)

    2009-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the value of brain ventricular wall movement assessment with a gated cine trueFISP MR sequence for the diagnosis of endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) patency. Sixteen healthy volunteers and ten consecutive patients with noncommunicating hydrocephalus were explored with a MR scanner (Siemens, Avanto 1.5 T) before, 1 week and 3 months after ETV. TrueFISP was evaluated qualitatively (ventricular wall movement and CSF flow through ETV) and quantitatively [distance moved (DMLT) during a cardiac cycle by the lamina terminalis]. The third ventricle volume (TVV) was assessed. Statistical analysis was performed using nonparametric tests. There was no motion of the lamina terminalis (LT) detected on preoperative data. A pulsatile motion of the LT was found for patients with a patent ETV and for controls. DMLT and TVV were correlated (r = 0.79, P = 0.006). A transient dysfunction of ETV was successfully diagnosed on the trueFISP sequence with no motion of the LT or CSF flow observed. The trueFISP sequence appears reliable for the diagnosis of ETV patency and provides non-invasive assessment of the movement of the ventricular wall related to CSF pressure changes. (orig.)

  14. Understanding the fluid mechanics behind transverse wall shear stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamied, Yumnah; Sherwin, Spencer J; Weinberg, Peter D

    2017-01-04

    The patchy distribution of atherosclerosis within arteries is widely attributed to local variation in haemodynamic wall shear stress (WSS). A recently-introduced metric, the transverse wall shear stress (transWSS), which is the average over the cardiac cycle of WSS components perpendicular to the temporal mean WSS vector, correlates particularly well with the pattern of lesions around aortic branch ostia. Here we use numerical methods to investigate the nature of the arterial flows captured by transWSS and the sensitivity of transWSS to inflow waveform and aortic geometry. TransWSS developed chiefly in the acceleration, peak systolic and deceleration phases of the cardiac cycle; the reverse flow phase was too short, and WSS in diastole was too low, for these periods to have a significant influence. Most of the spatial variation in transWSS arose from variation in the angle by which instantaneous WSS vectors deviated from the mean WSS vector rather than from variation in the magnitude of the vectors. The pattern of transWSS was insensitive to inflow waveform; only unphysiologically high Womersley numbers produced substantial changes. However, transWSS was sensitive to changes in geometry. The curvature of the arch and proximal descending aorta were responsible for the principal features, the non-planar nature of the aorta produced asymmetries in the location and position of streaks of high transWSS, and taper determined the persistence of the streaks down the aorta. These results reflect the importance of the fluctuating strength of Dean vortices in generating transWSS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Left Ventricular Dysfunction Caused by Unrecognized Surgical AV block in a Patient with a Manifest Right Free Wall Accessory Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Gopinathannair, MD, MA

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available A 24-year-old male with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome developed systolic cardiomyopathy and severe heart failure following membranous ventricular septal defect repair and tricuspid valve replacement. Following successful catheter ablation of a right anterolateral accessory pathway (AP, complete AV block with junctional escape rhythm was noted. Patient subsequently underwent implantation of a biventricular ICD. Heart failure symptoms significantly improved soon after and left ventricular systolic function normalized 3 months post-procedure. In this case, surgically acquired AV block likely explains development of postoperative cardiomyopathy by facilitating ventricular activation solely via the AP and thereby increasing the degree of ventricular dyssynchrony.

  16. Comparison of exercise and pharmacological stress gated SPECT in detecting transient left ventricular dysfunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demir, Hakan; Tan, Yusuf Z.; Isgoren, Serkan; Gorur, Gozde D.; Kozdag, Guliz; Ural, Ertan; Berk, Fatma

    2008-01-01

    Transient left ventricular contractile dysfunction (TLVD) is observed owing to post-exercise stunning in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Pharmacological stimulation differs from exercise stress because it does not cause demand ischemia. The aim of this study was to determine whether TLVD could also be seen after pharmacological stress (dipyridamole). Of the patients in whom gated single-photon emission computed tomography (GSPECT) was performed in our institution from January 2004 to April 2007, 439 subjects with known or suspected CAD were included in the study. GSPECT was performed for all patients following exercise (group I, n=220) or pharmacological stress (group II, n=219) according to a 2-day (stress-rest) protocol after injection of Tc-99m methoxyisobutyl-isonitrile (MIBI). Stress, rest, and difference (stress-rest value) left ventricular ejection fractions (SLVEF, RLVEF, and DLVEF) and transient ischemic dilatation (TID) ratio were derived automatically. Summed stress score, summed rest score, and summed difference score (SDS) for myocardial perfusion were calculated using a 20-segment model and a five-point scoring system. An SDS >3 was considered as ischemic. On the basis of the perfusion findings, patients were subdivided into a normal (group A, n=216) and ischemia group (group B, n=223). DLVEF and perfusion scores of all groups were compared. Relationships between DLVEF and perfusion, and between TID ratio and DLVEF were also evaluated. Stress-induced ischemia was observed in 223 of 439 patients (50.8%). In group A, the difference between stress and rest LVEF values was not significant (P=0.670 and P=0.200 for groups IA and IIA, respectively). However, LVEF was significantly decreased after stress compared with rest values for group B (P<0.0001 for groups IB and IIB). TLVD (≤-5% for DLVEF) was observed in 20 of 216 (9%) and 81 of 223 subjects (36%) in patients in groups A and B, respectively (P<0.0001). In group I, we found TLVD in 46 of

  17. End-systolic stress-velocity relation and circumferential fiber velocity shortening for analysing left ventricular function in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fayssoil, A. [Cardiologie, Hopital europeen Georges Pompidou, 20, rue le blanc, Paris (France)], E-mail: fayssoil2000@yahoo.fr; Renault, G. [CNRS UMR 8104, Inserm, U567, Institut Cochin, Universite Paris Descartes, Paris (France); Fougerousse, F. [Genethon, RD, Evry (France)

    2009-08-15

    Traditionally, analysing left ventricular (LV) performance relies on echocardiography by evaluating shortening fraction (SF) in mice. SF is influenced by load conditions. End-systolic stress-velocity (ESSV) relation and circumferential fiber velocity (VcF) shortening are more relevant parameters for evaluating systolic function regardless load conditions particularly in mice's models of heart failure.

  18. High-risk subgroup of inferior myocardial infarction. Importance of anterior wall motion and right ventricular function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Tsunehiko; Yasuda, Tsunehiro; Gold, H K; Leinbach, R C; Boucher, C A; McKusick, K A; Strauss, H W

    1986-12-01

    To identify high-risk subgroups of inferior myocardial infarction, 75 patients presenting with their first inferior infarction were investigated by sequential gated blood pool scans. The patients were divided into four groups based on the right ventricular function (RVF) and anterior wall motion (AWM) of the left ventricle by scan at the time of admission. A second blood pool scan was performed at ten days to evaluate RV and LV function. Thirty-eight patients had cardiac catheterization before discharge and all patients were followed up for one year to determine their clinical outcome. Depressed RVF and reduced AWM were observed in 26 (35%) (Group A); depressed RVF and normal AWM were found in 20 (27%) (Group B); reduced AWM and normal RVE in 10 (13%) (Group C); and normal RVF and AWM in 19 (25%) (Group D). The mean values of biventricular function (LVEF, RVEF) in groups A, B, C, and D were (44.9 +- 8.4%, 32.5 +- 9.9%), (59.9 +- 8.6%, 34.5 +- 8.0%), (44.9 +- 15.7%, 48.2 +- 3.3%), and (60.4 +- 9.1%, 51.6 +- 10.6%), respectively, at admission. In serial measurements, LVEF did not change significantly in any group, however, RVEF improved nearly 10 points in groups A and B at 10 days. Group A also had the highest incidence (82 %) of left anterior descending coronary artery involvement, and the highest mean creatine phosphokinase levels (762 +- 318 U/1): Furthermore, group A had a high incidence of major complications during their hospital course and high mortality during the one-year follow-up. These data clearly identified group A as a high-risk subgroup of patients with inferior infarction.

  19. Wall stress analysis of abdominal aortic aneurysms using 3D ultrasound

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, A. M.; Nguyen, V.L.; Speelman, L.; Schurink, G.W.H.; van de Vosse, F.N.; Lopata, R.G.P.

    2014-01-01

    Wall stress analysis of abdominal aortic aneurysms is a novel tool that has proven high potential to improve risk stratification of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). Wall stress analysis is based on computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging, however, 3D ultrasound (US) has not been

  20. Systolic left ventricular function according to left ventricular concentricity and dilatation in hypertensive patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Casper; Gerdts, Eva; Aurigemma, Gerard P

    2013-01-01

    Left ventricular hypertrophy [LVH, high left ventricular mass (LVM)] is traditionally classified as concentric or eccentric based on left ventricular relative wall thickness. We evaluated left ventricular systolic function in a new four-group LVH classification based on left ventricular dilatation...... [high left ventricular end-diastolic volume (EDV) index and concentricity (LVM/EDV)] in hypertensive patients....

  1. KRE5 Suppression Induces Cell Wall Stress and Alternative ER Stress Response Required for Maintaining Cell Wall Integrity in Candida glabrata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Masato; Ito, Fumie; Aoyama, Toshio; Sato-Okamoto, Michiyo; Takahashi-Nakaguchi, Azusa; Chibana, Hiroji; Shibata, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    The maintenance of cell wall integrity in fungi is required for normal cell growth, division, hyphae formation, and antifungal tolerance. We observed that endoplasmic reticulum stress regulated cell wall integrity in Candida glabrata, which possesses uniquely evolved mechanisms for unfolded protein response mechanisms. Tetracycline-mediated suppression of KRE5, which encodes a predicted UDP-glucose:glycoprotein glucosyltransferase localized in the endoplasmic reticulum, significantly increased cell wall chitin content and decreased cell wall β-1,6-glucan content. KRE5 repression induced endoplasmic reticulum stress-related gene expression and MAP kinase pathway activation, including Slt2p and Hog1p phosphorylation, through the cell wall integrity signaling pathway. Moreover, the calcineurin pathway negatively regulated cell wall integrity, but not the reduction of β-1,6-glucan content. These results indicate that KRE5 is required for maintaining both endoplasmic reticulum homeostasis and cell wall integrity, and that the calcineurin pathway acts as a regulator of chitin-glucan balance in the cell wall and as an alternative mediator of endoplasmic reticulum stress in C. glabrata. PMID:27548283

  2. The cell wall and endoplasmic reticulum stress responses are coordinately regulated in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Krysan, Damian J

    2009-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is an intracellular signaling pathway that regulates the cellular response to the accumulation of misfolded proteins in eukaryotes. Our group has demonstrated that cell wall stress activates UPR in yeast through signals transmitted by the cell wall integrity (CWI) mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascade. The UPR is required to maintain cell wall integrity; mutants lacking a functional UPR have defects in cell wall biosynthesis and are hypersensitive ...

  3. Pressure-volume Relationship in the Stress-echocardiography Laboratory: Does (Left Ventricular End-diastolic) Size Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bombardini, Tonino; Mulieri, Louis A; Salvadori, Stefano; Costantino, Marco Fabio; Scali, Maria Chiara; Marzilli, Mario; Picano, Eugenio

    2017-02-01

    The variation between rest and peak stress end-systolic pressure-volume relation is an afterload-independent index of left ventricular contractility. Whether and to what extent it depends on end-diastolic volume remains unclear. The aim of this study was to assess the dependence of the delta rest-stress end-systolic pressure-volume relation on end-diastolic volume in patients with negative stress echo and all ranges of resting left ventricular function. We analyzed interpretable data obtained in 891 patients (593 men, age 63 ± 12 years) with ejection fraction 47% ± 12%: 338 were normal or near-normal or hypertensive; 229 patients had coronary artery disease; and 324 patients had ischemic or nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy. They were studied with exercise (n = 172), dipyridamole (n = 482) or dobutamine (n = 237) stress echocardiography. The end-systolic pressure-volume relation was evaluated at rest and peak stress from raw measurement of systolic arterial pressure by cuff sphygmomanometer and end-systolic volume by biplane Simpson rule 2-dimensional echocardiography. Absolute values of delta rest-stress end-systolic pressure-volume relation were higher for exercise and dobutamine than for dipyridamole. In the overall population, an inverse relationship between end-systolic pressure-volume relation and end-diastolic volume was present at rest (r 2 = 0.69, P stress (r 2 = 0.56, P stress end-systolic pressure-volume relation was considered (r 2 = 0.13). Left ventricular end-diastolic volume does not affect the rest-stress changes in end-systolic pressure-volume relation in either normal or abnormal left ventricles during physical or pharmacological stress. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Dobutamine stress echocardiography related sustained ventricular tachycardia in a patient with ischaemic cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amrit S Lota

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 66 year-old Asian man; with a complex history of ischaemic heart disease presented with cardiac and troponin negative chest pain. His ECG showed sinus bradycardia with old left bundle branch block. The transthoracic echocardiography showed severely impaired left ventricular systolic function (EF 30-35%. The patient had had coronary artery bypass grafting at age of 42 years and remained asymptomatic until age of 56 years when he presented with incessant ventricular tachycardia requiring amiodarone, lidocaine and electrical cardioversion. Coronary angiography at that time showed occluded vein grafts to the circumflex and diagonal arteries. The right coronary artery (RCA was small and received collaterals from the left system. A myocardial perfusion scan showed extensive inferolateral infarction but no evidence for reversible ischaemia. An implantable cardiac defibrillator (ICD was thus inserted. Over the following years, the patient underwent multiple PCI procedures with rotational atherectomy to the native LAD and associated vein graft, but subsequently developed in-stent restenosis. He also had PCI to the native RCA. He declined a minimally invasive grafting of the left internal mammary artery (LIMA to the LAD and re-implantation of a new ICD after ex-plantation of the original one due to sepsis. His coronary artery disease remained stable following a recent admission with Troponin positive event which was confirmed by a repeat angiogram, therefore, had up-titrated anti-anginal medications. A low dose beta-blockade was discontinued due to documented sinus pauses up to 3 seconds. Following the recent admission, a joint cardiology-cardiothoracic meeting discussion recommended a stress echocardiogram with highdose dobutamine to guide towards considering re-do bypass grafting.

  5. Response of right ventricular ejection fraction to exercise stress in coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narita, Michihiro; Kurihara, Tadashi; Murano, Kenichi; Usami, Masahisa

    1985-01-01

    The right ventricular (RV) response to exercise was assessed in 28 patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and 9 normal subjects. The relationship between RV reserve, exercise left ventricular (LV) reserve and the presence of proximal right coronary artery (RCA) stenosis were evaluated. RV and LV ejection fraction (EF) were determined by multiple-gated equilibrium blood pool imaging with sup(99m)Tc in the modified left anterior oblique position. Graded supine exercise stress blood pool imaging was performed at the same position by using bicycle ergometer. For calculation of RVEF, variable ROIs were used. In normal subjects, both RVEF and LVEF increased significantly during exercise (%ΔRVEF 18.9+-5.9%, %ΔLVEF 16.3%+-4.7%). In CAD groups with and without RCA stenosis, LVEF and RVEF showed decrease or no change during exercise. Although magnitude of change in LVEF from rest to exercise (%ΔLVEF) was not significantly different in both CAD groups (4.1+-9.0% in cases with RCA disease and 6.2+-14.6% in cases without RCA disease), %ΔRVEF was different significantly (16.0+-14.3% in cases with RCA disease and 1.4+-14.1% in cases without RCA disease, p<0.05). In patients with RCA disease, 3 patients (25%) showed depression in RVEF with exercise regardless of the increase in LVEF. However, none of the patients without RCA disease showed depression in RVEF with the increment in LVEF during exercise. These findings suggested that proximal RCA stenosis is one major determinant of exercise RVEF response. But in 9 of 16 patients without RCA disease (56%) both RVEF and LVEF decreased during exercise. Besides, in patients without RCA disease there was a significant linear relationship between the direction and magnitude of change from rest to exercise of LVEF and RVEF (r=0.69). (J.P.N.)

  6. Effects of flow unsteadiness on the wall shear stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amiri, K; Cervantes, M J; Raisee, M

    2012-01-01

    Measurements were performed on pulsating fully turbulent flows in a pipe test rig with a diameter of 100 mm. Sinusoidal oscillatory flow at different frequencies was superimposed on a mean flow of averaged Reynolds number Re=20000 based on the pipe diameter. The measurements have been performed at different forcing frequencies (0.001 + < 0.08) covering all the oscillatory regimes; quasi-steady, relaxation, quasi laminar and high frequency. The amplitude of the flow oscillation was small enough to allow a linear response in the measurements, i.e., all flow parameters showed an oscillatory behavior at the frequency of the flow. The amplitude of the oscillatory flow was about 10% of the mean velocity in all cases. The results include mean and phase averaged values of different parameters. The centerline velocity was measured by a 2D LDA system. Hot film and constant temperature anemometry system was used to determine the wall shear stress. Bulk velocity and pressure gradient along the pipe were also acquired. The results showed a good agreement with the previous analytical, experimental and numerical results available in the literature.

  7. Statistical properties of wall shear stress fluctuations in turbulent channel flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keirsbulck, L.; Labraga, L.; Gad-el-Hak, M.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Accurate measurements of instantaneous wall shear stress are conducted. ► LDA is used to measure near-wall streamwise velocity. ► Electrochemical probe is used to measure wall shear stress. ► Frequency response and non-uniform correction methods were used to provide an accurate, well-resolved wall-statistics database. ► Reynolds number dependency of the statistical wall quantities is investigated. - Abstract: Instantaneous velocity and wall shear stress measurements are conducted in a turbulent channel flow in the Kármán number range of Re τ = 74–400. A one-dimensional LDA system is used to measure the streamwise velocity fluctuations, and an electrochemical technique is utilized to measure the instantaneous wall shear stress. For the latter, frequency response and nonuniform correction methods are used to provide an accurate, well-resolved wall statistics database. The Reynolds number dependency of the statistical wall quantities is carefully investigated. The corrected relative wall shear stress fluctuations fit well with the best DNS data available and meet the need for clarification of the small discrepancy observed in the literature between the experimental and numerical results of such quantities. Higher-order statistics of the wall shear stress, spectra, and the turbulence kinetic energy budget at the wall are also investigated. The present paper shows that the electrochemical technique is a powerful experimental method for hydrodynamic studies involving highly unsteady flows. The study brings with it important consequences, especially in the context of the current debate regarding the appropriate scaling as well as the validation of new predictive models of near-wall turbulence.

  8. Salt stress causes cell wall damage in yeast cells lacking mitochondrial DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Qiuqiang; Liou, Liang-Chun; Ren, Qun; Bao, Xiaoming; Zhang, Zhaojie

    2014-03-03

    The yeast cell wall plays an important role in maintaining cell morphology, cell integrity and response to environmental stresses. Here, we report that salt stress causes cell wall damage in yeast cells lacking mitochondrial DNA (ρ 0 ). Upon salt treatment, the cell wall is thickened, broken and becomes more sensitive to the cell wall-perturbing agent sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Also, SCW11 mRNA levels are elevated in ρ 0 cells. Deletion of SCW11 significantly decreases the sensitivity of ρ 0 cells to SDS after salt treatment, while overexpression of SCW11 results in higher sensitivity. In addition, salt stress in ρ 0 cells induces high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which further damages the cell wall, causing cells to become more sensitive towards the cell wall-perturbing agent.

  9. Estudo da função ventricular na técnica de plicatura da parede livre do ventrículo esquerdo em cães Left ventricular function after plication of the left ventricular free wall in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Newton Bizetto Meira de Andrade

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar os efeitos da técnica na função ventricular esquerda em cães hígidos e com cardiomiopatia dilatada induzida pela doxorrubicina. MÉTODO: De 13 cães, oito receberam doxorrubicina até que a fração de encurtamento (FE fosse menor que 20%. Destes, quatro animais e os cinco não induzidos foram submetidos à plicatura da parede livre do ventrículo esquerdo (PPLVE. Os demais cães não foram operados. Foram avaliados débito cardíaco (DC, pressão arterial, exame físico, eletrocardiografia, sistema "Holter" e ecocardiografia, por 180 dias. RESULTADOS: Houve redução do volume ventricular esquerdo. Os cães induzidos melhoraram após a operação e a fração de ejeção (FEj retornou aos valores normais para a espécie. O DC e a FE aumentaram após a operação. Um cão foi a óbito. Nos cães não operados, a FE diminuiu e foram a óbito em torno de 40 dias após a indução; nos cães não induzidos, esta não se alterou. Houve extra-sístoles ventriculares, que se resolveram espontaneamente. CONCLUSÕES: A PPLVE sem circulação extracorpórea reduz o volume ventricular esquerdo e melhora a função cardíaca dos cães com cardiomiopatia dilatada induzida pela doxorrubicina, demonstrando baixa morbidade e mortalidade tardia.OBJECTIVE: We tested a new surgical technique, the plication of the left ventricular free wall, to reduce left ventricular area and volume and improve left ventricular systolic function, without using a cardiopulmonary bypass. METHODS: Dilated cardiomyopathy was induced in eight dogs by the injection of doxorubicin. Plication of the left ventricular free wall was performed in four dogs with induced cardiomyopathy and in five control dogs. Two dogs not submitted to surgery. The other two dogs died during the induction phase. Cardiac output, 2-dimensional and M-mode echocardiography, arterial blood pressure and electrocardiography were recorded over a 180 days period. Ambulatory electrocardiography

  10. Social Support Moderates the Relationship Between Perceived Stress and Quality of Life in Patients With a Left Ventricular Assist Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abshire, Martha; Russell, Stuart D; Davidson, Patricia M; Budhathoki, Chakra; Han, Hae-Ra; Grady, Kathleen L; Desai, Shashank; Dennison Himmelfarb, Cheryl

    2018-04-20

    Living with a left ventricular assist device has significant psychosocial sequelae that affect health-related quality of life (HRQOL). The purpose of this study was to (1) describe psychosocial indicators of stress including perceived stress, depression, fatigue, and coping; (2) examine relationships among stress indicators by level of perceived stress; (3) examine relationships among indicators of stress and clinical outcomes; and (4) test the moderation of social support on the relationship between stress and clinical outcomes. Participants were recruited from 2 outpatient clinics in a cross-sectional study design. Standardized measures were self-administered via survey. Descriptive statistics, correlation, and multiple linear regression analysis were conducted. The sample (N = 62) was mostly male (78%), black (47%), and married (66%), with a mean age of 56.5 ± 13 years. The overall sample had a moderate stress profile: moderate perceived stress (mean, 11.7 ± 7), few depressive symptoms (mean, 3.2 ± 3.9), and moderate fatigue (mean, 14.3 ± 9.1). Increased perceived stress was associated with fatigue, depressive symptoms, and maladaptive coping (P stress and fatigue were significant correlates of overall HRQOL (adj. R = 0.41, P relationship between perceived stress and HRQOL, controlling for fatigue (R = 0.49, P stress have worse depressive symptoms, fatigue, and coping. The influence of high social support to improve the relationship between stress and HRQOL underscores the importance of a comprehensive plan to address psychosocial factors.

  11. Dependence of intramyocardial pressure and coronary flow on ventricular loading and contractility: a model study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovendeerd, Peter H M; Borsje, Petra; Arts, Theo; van De Vosse, Frans N

    2006-12-01

    The phasic coronary arterial inflow during the normal cardiac cycle has been explained with simple (waterfall, intramyocardial pump) models, emphasizing the role of ventricular pressure. To explain changes in isovolumic and low afterload beats, these models were extended with the effect of three-dimensional wall stress, nonlinear characteristics of the coronary bed, and extravascular fluid exchange. With the associated increase in the number of model parameters, a detailed parameter sensitivity analysis has become difficult. Therefore we investigated the primary relations between ventricular pressure and volume, wall stress, intramyocardial pressure and coronary blood flow, with a mathematical model with a limited number of parameters. The model replicates several experimental observations: the phasic character of coronary inflow is virtually independent of maximum ventricular pressure, the amplitude of the coronary flow signal varies about proportionally with cardiac contractility, and intramyocardial pressure in the ventricular wall may exceed ventricular pressure. A parameter sensitivity analysis shows that the normalized amplitude of coronary inflow is mainly determined by contractility, reflected in ventricular pressure and, at low ventricular volumes, radial wall stress. Normalized flow amplitude is less sensitive to myocardial coronary compliance and resistance, and to the relation between active fiber stress, time, and sarcomere shortening velocity.

  12. Augmentative effect of pulsatility on the wall shear stress in tube flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, M; Tatsumi, E; Tsukiya, T; Taenaka, Y; Nishimura, T; Nishinaka, T; Takano, H; Masuzawa, T; Ohba, K

    1999-08-01

    Wall shear stress (WSS) has been considered to play an important role in the physiological and metabolic functions of the vascular endothelial cells. We investigated the effects of the pulse rate and the maximum flow rate on the WSS to clarify the influence of pulsatility. Water was perfused in a 1/2 inch transparent straight cylinder with a nonpulsatile centrifugal pump and a pulsatile pneumatic ventricular assist device (VAD). In nonpulsatile flow (NF), the flow rate was changed 1 to 6 L/min by 1 L/min increments to obtain standard values of WSS at each flow rate. In pulsatile flow (PF), the pulse rate was controlled at 40, 60, and 80 bpm, and the maximum flow rate was varied from 3.3 to 12.0 L/min while the mean flow rate was kept at 3 L/min. The WSS was estimated from the velocity profile at measuring points using the laser illuminated fluorescence method. In NF, the WSS was 12.0 dyne/cm2 at 3 L/min and 33.0 dyne/cm2 at 6 L/min. In PF, the pulse rate change with the same mean, and the maximum flow rate did not affect WSS. On the other hand, the increase in the maximum flow rate at the constant mean flow rate of 3 L/min augmented the mean WSS from 13.1 to 32.9 dyne/cm2. We concluded that the maximum flow rate exerted a substantial augmentative effect on WSS, and the maximum flow rate was a dominant factor of pulsatility in this effect.

  13. Association of novel biomarkers of cardiovascular stress with left ventricular hypertrophy and dysfunction: implications for screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xanthakis, Vanessa; Larson, Martin G; Wollert, Kai C; Aragam, Jayashri; Cheng, Susan; Ho, Jennifer; Coglianese, Erin; Levy, Daniel; Colucci, Wilson S; Michael Felker, G; Benjamin, Emelia J; Januzzi, James L; Wang, Thomas J; Vasan, Ramachandran S

    2013-11-07

    Currently available screening tools for left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy (LVH) and systolic dysfunction (LVSD) are either expensive (echocardiography) or perform suboptimally (B-type natriuretic peptide [BNP]). It is unknown whether newer biomarkers are associated with LVH and LVSD and can serve as screening tools. We studied 2460 Framingham Study participants (mean age 58 years, 57% women) with measurements of biomarkers mirroring cardiac biomechanical stress (soluble ST-2 [ST2], growth differentiation factor-15 [GDF-15] and high-sensitivity troponin I [hsTnI]) and BNP. We defined LVH as LV mass/height(2) ≥the sex-specific 80th percentile and LVSD as mild/greater impairment of LV ejection fraction (LVEF) or a fractional shortening statistic for the composite outcome increased from 0.765 with risk factors to 0.770 adding BNP, to 0.774 adding novel biomarkers. The continuous Net Reclassification Improvement was 0.212 (95% CI: 0.119 to 0.305, Pstress biomarkers are associated with LVH and LVSD but may have limited clinical utility as screening tools.

  14. Unmasking the mechanism of diffuse left ventricular wall motion abnormality in ischemic cardiomyopathy by resting-redistribution thallium-201 single photon computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namura, Hiroyuki; Yamabe, Hiroshi; Kakimoto, Tetsuya; Hashimoto, Yasunori; Yasaka, Yoshinori; Yoshida, Hiroaki; Itoh, Kazushi; Yokoyama, Mitsuhiro; Maeda, Kazumi.

    1992-01-01

    The study population comprised patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM) who had left ventricular wall motion (LVWM) abnormality in 5 or more segments (n=9), those with extensive myocardial infarction (EMI) having LVWM abnormality in 4 or less segments (n=12), and those with dilated left ventricle (DLV) having LVWM abnormality in all 7 segments (n=9). Defect scores (DS), obtained by initial and delayed Tl-201 myocardial single photon emission computed tomography at rest, were visually assessed to compare perfusion patterns in the three patient groups. The group of ICM patients had greater defect segments (DSeg) and % redistribution (Rd) index than the other two groups, although there was no difference in the number of angiographically proven infarct-related coronary vessels between EMI and ICM. In the group of ICM patients, there was inverse correlation not only between left ventricular ejection fraction and the sum of DS but also between left ventricular enddiastolic volume index and both the sum of DSeg and % Rd index. The group of DLV patients had small sum of DSeg and redistribution, compared with the other two groups. Although diffuse LVWM abnormality, as observed in the group of ICM patients, was considered attributable to potential decrease of coronary perfusion shown as defect on SPECT images, it did not always coincide with findings of coronary angiography. Both DSeg and redistribution phenomenon on SPECT images seemed to have the ability to evaluate the severity of ICM, as well as to differentiate ICM, EMI, and DLV. (N.K.)

  15. Oxidative Stress State Is Associated with Left Ventricular Mechanics Changes, Measured by Speckle Tracking in Essential Hypertensive Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Antonio Moreno-Ruíz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The oxidative stress state is characterized by an increase in oxygen reactive species that overwhelms the antioxidant defense; we do not know if these pathological changes are correlated with alterations in left ventricular mechanics. The aim was correlating the oxidative stress state with the left ventricular global longitudinal strain (GLS and the left ventricular end diastolic pressure (LVEDP. Twenty-five patients with essential hypertension and 25 controls paired by age and gender were studied. All of the participants were subjected to echocardiography and biochemical determination of oxidative stress markers. The hypertensive patients, compared with control subjects, had significantly (p<0.05 higher levels of oxidized proteins (5.03±1.05 versus 4.06±0.63 nmol/mg, lower levels of extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD activity (0.045±0.02 versus 0.082±0.02 U/mg, higher LVEDP (16.2±4.5 versus 11.3±1.6 mm Hg, and lower GLS (−12% versus −16%. Both groups had preserved ejection fraction and the results showed a positive correlation of oxidized proteins with GLS (r=0.386, p=0.006 and LVEDP (r=0.389, p=0.005; we also found a negative correlation of EC-SOD activity with GLS (r=-0.404, p=0.004 and LVEDP (r=-0.347, p=0.014.

  16. Asymmetrically thickened posterior wall is associated with decline of ejection fraction after stress on adenosine stress/rest thallium-201 gated myocardial SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bom Sahn; Lee, Won Woo; Lee, Dong Soo; Chung, June Key; Lee, Myung Chul; Kim, Sang Eun [College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    LV parameters (LVEF. ESVI and EDVI) on adenosine stress/rest thallium-201 gated myocardial SPECT (gSPECT) are various from stress to rest. We investigated the reason why they were various in patients without coronary artery disease. Seventy-one patients(M:F=32:39, age 58.1{+-}9.7yrs), who underwent gSPECT and coronary angiography (CAG) due to chest pain or preoperative evaluation were included. CAG results were normal or insignificant. Exclusion criteria were atrial fibrillation, thyroid disease, primary cardiomyopathy, myocardial bridge, LBBB, MI, and valvular heart disease. Patients were calssified into 3 groups by EF difference ({delta}EF=rest-stress EF) on gSPECT : group1 ({delta}EF{>=}10), group2 (0 {<=}{delta}EF<10), and group3 ({delta}EF<0). LV parameters on gSPECT and thicknesses of IVS (interventricular septum) and LVPW (left ventricular posterior wall) on echocardiography were compared among the 3 groups. Myocardial perfusion status were normal or mild reversible/persistent perfusion defect in 76.1% (54/71). LVEFs at stress were not different among all 3 groups : 59.3{+-}8.54% in group 1 (61.3{+-}10.22% in group 2 and 64.8{+-}7.58% in group 3 (p>0.05). But LVEF at rest was smaller in group 3 (58.7{+-}8.38%) than the other groups (72.5{+-}8.77% in group1 and 66.7{+-}10.6% in group2) (p<0.01). EDVIs and ESVI at stress were larger than those at rest in all groups (p<0.05) except ESVI in group 3 (16.2{+-}6.21ml at stress and 17.5{+-}6.41ml at rest, p<0.01), and that was attributed to EF<0 in group 3. In echocardiographical analysis, group 3 had significantly increased wall thickness of LVPW (10.7{+-}1.2mm versus 9.4{+-}1.6mm, p=0.01) and decreased wall thickness ratio of IVS/LVPW (0.963{+-}0.102 versus 1.048{+-}0.104, p=0.035) than group 1. In patients without coronary artery disease, LVEF, EDVI and ESVI on gSPECT were various and decline of LVEF from stress to rest was caused by unnormalized ESVI . Asymmetrically thickened LVPW may play a crucial role and

  17. Standard practice for estimating the approximate residual circumferential stress in straight thin-walled tubing

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 A qualitative estimate of the residual circumferential stress in thin-walled tubing may be calculated from the change in outside diameter that occurs upon splitting a length of the tubing. This practice assumes a linear stress distribution through the tube wall thickness and will not provide an estimate of local stress distributions such as surface stresses. (Very high local residual stress gradients are common at the surface of metal tubing due to cold drawing, peening, grinding, etc.) The Hatfield and Thirkell formula, as later modified by Sachs and Espey, provides a simple method for calculating the approximate circumferential stress from the change in diameter of straight, thin-walled, metal tubing. 1.2 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  18. Effects of magnetized walls on the particle structure and the yield stress of magnetorheological fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Jianfeng, E-mail: zhoujianfeng@njtech.edu.cn [School of Mechanical and Power Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing 211816, Jiangsu (China); Mo, Jingwen [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Shao, Chunlei [School of Mechanical and Power Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing 211816, Jiangsu (China); Li, Zhigang [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2015-09-01

    In this work, we investigate the quasi-static shear deformation of magnetic particles (MPs) in a Couette flow of magnetorheological (MR) fluids through Stokesian dynamic simulations. The magnetized walls are modeled by a congregation of magnetic dipoles and their effects on the MPs are considered. The simple shear flow of the base fluid with linear velocity distribution is used to generate the shear deformation of the MP structure and the yield stresses under different shear rates are obtained. Comparing with the relatively long chains forming in base fluid without the effect of magnetized walls, the initial structure of MPs is mainly in the form of short chains due to the attractive force of walls. At the beginning of the shear deformation of the MP structure, the concentration of MPs near the walls is found. As the shear deformation develops, however, the chains concentrate at the center of the simulation domain and the MPs near wall boundaries are attracted to the center. The yield stress depends on the initial structure of MPs which is affected by the magnetized walls. It is revealed that the larger shear rate of base fluid results in the larger yield stress, and the effects of the magnetization intensity of the walls and their space distance on the yield stress are also investigated. - Highlights: • We model a Couette flow of magnetorheological fluid considering magnetized walls. • The walls are modeled by a congregation of magnetic dipoles. • Initial structure of MPs is remarkably affected by the walls, so is yield stress. • Larger base fluid shear rate causes the larger shear deformation and larger yield stress.

  19. Effects of magnetized walls on the particle structure and the yield stress of magnetorheological fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Jianfeng; Mo, Jingwen; Shao, Chunlei; Li, Zhigang

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we investigate the quasi-static shear deformation of magnetic particles (MPs) in a Couette flow of magnetorheological (MR) fluids through Stokesian dynamic simulations. The magnetized walls are modeled by a congregation of magnetic dipoles and their effects on the MPs are considered. The simple shear flow of the base fluid with linear velocity distribution is used to generate the shear deformation of the MP structure and the yield stresses under different shear rates are obtained. Comparing with the relatively long chains forming in base fluid without the effect of magnetized walls, the initial structure of MPs is mainly in the form of short chains due to the attractive force of walls. At the beginning of the shear deformation of the MP structure, the concentration of MPs near the walls is found. As the shear deformation develops, however, the chains concentrate at the center of the simulation domain and the MPs near wall boundaries are attracted to the center. The yield stress depends on the initial structure of MPs which is affected by the magnetized walls. It is revealed that the larger shear rate of base fluid results in the larger yield stress, and the effects of the magnetization intensity of the walls and their space distance on the yield stress are also investigated. - Highlights: • We model a Couette flow of magnetorheological fluid considering magnetized walls. • The walls are modeled by a congregation of magnetic dipoles. • Initial structure of MPs is remarkably affected by the walls, so is yield stress. • Larger base fluid shear rate causes the larger shear deformation and larger yield stress

  20. Effect of tip clearance on wall shear stress of an axial LVAD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarath, S.; Vikas, R.

    2017-09-01

    Wall shear stress is a crucial parameter used for blood damage analysis, and typically a value of 400 Pa is set as a limit. Tip clearance is a major factor contributing to hemolysis and pump efficiency. In this study, different tip gap configurations are used to analyse the wall shear stress developed on the blade surface of a constant thickness blade design, and a varying thickness blade design using CFD analysis. It was found that, for a particular geometry, as the clearance gap reduces, flow rate over the high wall shear stress area decreases even though the high wall shear stress span is found to extend. For each design, the optimum clearance gap is iteratively attained, keeping the maximum WSS as a limiting factor. Thus a better pump designs is obtained, whose leakage flow patterns are lower than that of the initial design, hence also leading to higher pump efficiency.

  1. Elliptic blending model : A new near-wall Reynolds-stress turbulence closure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manceau, R.; Hanjali?, K.

    2001-01-01

    A new approach to modeling the effects of a solid wall in one-point second-moment (Reynolds-stress) turbulence closures is presented. The model is based on the relaxation of an inhomogeneous (near-wall) formulation of the pressure–strain tensor towards the chosen conventional homogeneous

  2. Exercise-mediated changes in conduit artery wall thickness in humans: role of shear stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thijssen, D.H.J.; Dawson, E.A.; Munckhof, I.C. van den; Tinken, T.M.; Drijver, E. den; Hopkins, N.; Cable, N.T.; Green, D.J.

    2011-01-01

    Episodic increases in shear stress have been proposed as a mechanism that induces training-induced adaptation in arterial wall remodeling in humans. To address this hypothesis in humans, we examined bilateral brachial artery wall thickness using high-resolution ultrasound in healthy men across an

  3. Mean wall-shear stress measurements using the micro-pillar shear-stress sensor MPS3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Große, S; Schröder, W

    2008-01-01

    A new sensor to measure the mean turbulent wall-shear stress in turbulent flows is described. The wall-shear stress sensor MPS 3 has been tested in a well-defined fully developed turbulent pipe flow at Reynolds numbers Re b based on the bulk velocity U b and the pipe diameter D in the range of Re b = 10 000–20 000. The results demonstrate a convincing agreement of the mean wall-shear stress obtained with the new sensor technique with analytical and experimental results from the literature. The sensor device consists of a flexible micro-pillar that extends from the wall into the viscous sublayer. Bending due to the exerting fluid forces, the pillar-tip deflection serves as a measure for the local wall-shear stress. The sensor concept, calibration techniques, the achievable accuracy and error estimates, the fields of application and the sensor limits will be discussed. Furthermore, a first estimate of the pillar dynamic response will be derived showing the potential of the sensor to also measure the turbulent fluctuating wall-shear stress

  4. Large scale structures in a turbulent boundary layer and their imprint on wall shear stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabon, Rommel; Barnard, Casey; Ukeiley, Lawrence; Sheplak, Mark

    2015-11-01

    Experiments were performed on a turbulent boundary layer developing on a flat plate model under zero pressure gradient flow. A MEMS differential capacitive shear stress sensor with a 1 mm × 1 mm floating element was used to capture the fluctuating wall shear stress simultaneously with streamwise velocity measurements from a hot-wire anemometer traversed in the wall normal direction. Near the wall, the peak in the cross correlation corresponds to an organized motion inclined 45° from the wall. In the outer region, the peak diminishes in value, but is still significant at a distance greater than half the boundary layer thickness, and corresponds to a structure inclined 14° from the wall. High coherence between the two signals was found for the low-frequency content, reinforcing the belief that large scale structures have a vital impact on wall shear stress. Thus, estimation of the wall shear stress from the low-frequency velocity signal will be performed, and is expected to be statistically significant in the outer boundary layer. Additionally, conditionally averaged mean velocity profiles will be presented to assess the effects of high and low shear stress. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. DGE-1315138.

  5. Effect of Wall Shear Stress on Corrosion Inhibitor Film Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canto Maya, Christian M.

    In oil and gas production, internal corrosion of pipelines causes the highest incidence of recurring failures. Ensuring the integrity of ageing pipeline infrastructure is an increasingly important requirement. One of the most widely applied methods to reduce internal corrosion rates is the continuous injection of chemicals in very small quantities, called corrosion inhibitors. These chemical substances form thin films at the pipeline internal surface that reduce the magnitude of the cathodic and/or anodic reactions. However, the efficacy of such corrosion inhibitor films can be reduced by different factors such as multiphase flow, due to enhanced shear stress and mass transfer effects, loss of inhibitor due to adsorption on other interfaces such as solid particles, bubbles and droplets entrained by the bulk phase, and due to chemical interaction with other incompatible substances present in the stream. The first part of the present project investigated the electrochemical behavior of two organic corrosion inhibitors (a TOFA/DETA imidazolinium, and an alkylbenzyl dimethyl ammonium chloride), with and without an inorganic salt (sodium thiosulfate), and the resulting enhancement. The second part of the work explored the performance of corrosion inhibitor under multiphase (gas/liquid, solid/liquid) flow. The effect of gas/liquid multiphase flow was investigated using small and large scale apparatus. The small scale tests were conducted using a glass cell and a submersed jet impingement attachment with three different hydrodynamic patterns (water jet, CO 2 bubbles impact, and water vapor cavitation). The large scale experiments were conducted applying different flow loops (hilly terrain and standing slug systems). Measurements of weight loss, linear polarization resistance (LPR), and adsorption mass (using an electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance, EQCM) were used to quantify the effect of wall shear stress on the performance and integrity of corrosion inhibitor

  6. First wall and blanket stresses induced by cyclic fusion core operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohachevsky, I.O.; Kostoff, R.N.

    1981-01-01

    An analysis is made of cyclic thermal loads and stresses for the complete range of operating conditions. Two critical components were examined; the solid wall adjacent to the fusion plasma (first wall) and the fuel elements in the high power density region of the blanket. Simple closed form expressions were derived for temperature increases and thermal stresses that may be evaluated conveniently and rapidly and the values compared for different systems

  7. Left ventricular mass in borderline hypertension assessed by echo cardiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mezzasalma, L.; Ghione, S.; Palonebo, C.

    1989-01-01

    The relationship between clinical measurement of blood pressure (BP) and left ventricular hypertrophy in arterial hypertension appears to be weak in most studies. On the contrary, stronger correlations with target organ damage in general, and left ventricular hypertrophy in particular, have been reported for blood pressure measurements obtained by ambulatory monitoring; this finding may indicate a possible role for blood pressure response to naturally occurring stresses in determining left ventricular hypertrophy. Aim of this study was to investigate, in 18 patients with borderline arterial hypertension, the relationships between echocardiographically assessed left ventricular mass and, respectively, casual BP and BP responses to some standardized stress tests. Only three patients had a diastolic wall thickness of the interventricular septum and of the posterior wall ≥1.2 cm and none had a pathologically increased left ventricular mass index. The following statistically significant correlations were found: casual diastolic BP vs. left ventricular mass index (r=0.53, p<0.02), systolic BP response to bicycle exercise test vs. left ventricular mass index (r=0.55, p<0.05). Multiple regression analysis showed that almost fifty percent of the variability of left ventricular mass index could be predicted by these two BP measurements. These findings suggest that besides the chronically increased afterload, also the transient hypertensive responses to naturally occuring physical stresses may have a role in determining the extent of cardiac structural changes in borderline hypertensive patients. In addition, they indicate a direct relation between left ventricular mass and blood pressure levels also in borderline hypertension, as previously shown for established hypertension, despite the fact that left ventricular hypertrophy represents only an occasional finding in early stages of hypertension

  8. The distribution of wall shear stress downstream of a change in roughness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loureiro, J.B.R.; Sousa, F.B.C.C.; Zotin, J.L.Z.; Silva Freire, A.P.

    2010-01-01

    In the present work, six different experimental techniques are used to characterize the non-equilibrium flow downstream of a rough-to-smooth step change in surface roughness. Over the rough surface, wall shear stress results obtained through the form drag and the Reynolds stress methods are shown to be mutually consistent. Over the smooth surface, reference wall shear stress data is obtained through two optical methods: linear velocity profiles obtained through laser-Doppler anemometry and a sensor surface, the diverging fringe Doppler sensor. The work shows that the two most commonly used methods to determine the wall shear stress, the log-law gradient method and the Reynolds shear stress method, are completely inappropriate in the developing flow region. Preston tubes, on the other hand, are shown to perform well in the region of a non-equilibrium flow.

  9. Some stress-related issues in tokamak fusion reactor first walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majumdar, S.; Pai, B.; Ryder, R.H.

    1987-01-01

    Recent design studies of a tokamak fusion power reactor and of various blankets have envisioned surface heat fluxes on the first wall ranging from 0.1 to 1.0 MW/m 2 , and end-of-life irradiation fluences ranging from 100 dpa for the austenitic stainless steels to as high as 250 dpa for postulated vanadium alloys. Some tokamak blankets, particularly those using helium or liquid metal as coolant/breeder, may have to operate at relatively high coolant pressures so that the first wall may be subjected to high primary stress in addition to high secondary stresses such as thermal stresses or stresses due to constrained swelling. The present paper focusses on the various problems that may arise in the first wall because of stress and high neutron fluence, and discusses some of the design solutions that have been proposed to overcome these problems

  10. NDE of stresses in thick-walled components by ultrasonic methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goebbels, K.; Pitsch, H.; Schneider, E.; Nowack, H.

    1985-01-01

    The possibilty of measuring stresses - especially residual stresses - by ultrasonic methods has been presented at the 4th and 5th International Conference on NDE in Nuclear Industry. This contribution now presents results of several applications to thick walled components such as turbines and generators for power plants. The measurement technique using linearly polarized shear waves allows one to characterize the homogeneitry of the residual stress situation along and around cylindrically shaped components. Some important results show that the stress distribution integrated over the cross section of the component has not followed in any case the simple relations derived by stress analysts. Conclusions referring to the stress situation inside the components are discussed

  11. Physiological Stress Elicits Impaired Left Ventricular Function in Preterm-Born Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huckstep, Odaro J; Williamson, Wilby; Telles, Fernando; Burchert, Holger; Bertagnolli, Mariane; Herdman, Charlotte; Arnold, Linda; Smillie, Robert; Mohamed, Afifah; Boardman, Henry; McCormick, Kenny; Neubauer, Stefan; Leeson, Paul; Lewandowski, Adam J

    2018-03-27

    Experimental and clinical studies show that prematurity leads to altered left ventricular (LV) structure and function with preserved resting LV ejection fraction (EF). Large-scale epidemiological data now links prematurity to increased early heart failure risk. The authors performed echocardiographic imaging at prescribed exercise intensities to determine whether preterm-born adults have impaired LV functional response to physical exercise. We recruited 101 normotensive young adults born preterm (n = 47; mean gestational age 32.8 ± 3.2 weeks) and term (n = 54) for detailed cardiovascular phenotyping. Full clinical resting and exercise stress echocardiograms were performed, with apical 4-chamber views collected while exercising at 40%, 60%, and 80% of peak exercise capacity, determined by maximal cardiopulmonary exercise testing. Preterm-born individuals had greater LV mass (p = 0.015) with lower peak systolic longitudinal strain (p = 0.038) and similar EF to term-born control subjects at rest (p = 0.62). However, by 60% exercise intensity, EF was 6.7% lower in preterm subjects (71.9 ± 8.7% vs 78.6 ± 5.4%; p = 0.004) and further declined to 7.3% below the term-born group at 80% exercise intensity (69.8 ± 6.4% vs 77.1 ± 6.3%; p = 0.004). Submaximal cardiac output reserve was 56% lower in preterm-born subjects versus term-born control subjects at 40% of peak exercise capacity (729 ± 1,162 ml/min/m 2 vs. 1,669 ± 937 ml/min/m 2 ; p = 0.021). LV length and resting peak systolic longitudinal strain predicted EF increase from rest to 60% exercise intensity in the preterm group (r = 0.68, p = 0.009 and r = 0.56, p = 0.031, respectively). Preterm-born young adults had impaired LV response to physiological stress when subjected to physical exercise, which suggested a reduced myocardial functional reserve that might help explain their increased risk of early heart failure. (Young Adult Cardiovascular Health sTudy [YACHT]; NCT02103231

  12. Feasibility of wall stress analysis of abdominal aortic aneurysms using three-dimensional ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, Annette M; Nguyen, V Lai; Speelman, Lambert; Brands, Peter J; Schurink, Geert-Willem H; van de Vosse, Frans N; Lopata, Richard G P

    2015-05-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are local dilations that can lead to a fatal hemorrhage when ruptured. Wall stress analysis of AAAs is a novel tool that has proven high potential to improve risk stratification. Currently, wall stress analysis of AAAs is based on computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging; however, three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound (US) has great advantages over CT and magnetic resonance imaging in terms of costs, speed, and lack of radiation. In this study, the feasibility of 3D US as input for wall stress analysis is investigated. Second, 3D US-based wall stress analysis was compared with CT-based results. The 3D US and CT data were acquired in 12 patients (diameter, 35-90 mm). US data were segmented manually and compared with automatically acquired CT geometries by calculating the similarity index and Hausdorff distance. Wall stresses were simulated at P = 140 mm Hg and compared between both modalities. The similarity index of US vs CT was 0.75 to 0.91 (n = 12), with a median Hausdorff distance ranging from 4.8 to 13.9 mm, with the higher values found at the proximal and distal sides of the AAA. Wall stresses were in accordance with literature, and a good agreement was found between US- and CT-based median stresses and interquartile stresses, which was confirmed by Bland-Altman and regression analysis (n = 8). Wall stresses based on US were typically higher (+23%), caused by geometric irregularities due to the registration of several 3D volumes and manual segmentation. In future work, an automated US registration and segmentation approach is the essential point of improvement before pursuing large-scale patient studies. This study is a first step toward US-based wall stress analysis, which would be the modality of choice to monitor wall stress development over time because no ionizing radiation and contrast material are involved. Copyright © 2015 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Stress state of thin – walled member of the structure with operation damages under nonuniform loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В.В. Астанін

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available  The publication is dedicated to determining of stress state in particular the stress concentration factors for thin – walled members of the structures subject to nonuniform tension. A structure member has obtained the operation damage generation by corrosion and other causes.

  14. Statistics on Near Wall Structures and Shear Stress Distribution from 3D Holographic Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, J.; Malkiel, E.; Katz, J.

    2007-11-01

    Digital Holographic Microscopy performs 3D velocity measurement in the near-wall region of a turbulent boundary layer in a square channel over a smooth wall at Reτ=1,400. Resolution of ˜1μm over a sample volume of 1.5x2x1.5mm (x^+=50, y^+=60, z^+=50) is sufficient for resolving buffer layer and lower log layer structures, and for measuring instantaneous wall shear stress distributions from velocity gradients in the viscous sublayer. Results, based on 700 instantaneous realizations, provide detailed statistics on the spatial distribution of both wall stress components along with characteristic flow structures. Conditional sampling based on maxima and minima of wall shear stresses, as well as examination of instantaneous flow structures, lead to development of a conceptual model for a characteristic flow phenomenon that seems to generating extreme stress events. This structure develops as an initially spanwise vortex element rises away from the surface, due to local disturbance, causing a local stress minimum. Due to increasing velocity with elevation, this element bends downstream, forming a pair of inclined streamwise vortices, aligned at 45^0 to freestream, with ejection-like flow between them. Entrainment of high streamwise momentum on the outer sides of this vortex pair generates streamwise shear stress maxima, 70 δν downstream, which are displaced laterally by 35 δν from the local minimum.

  15. Prevention of the Rerupture of Collateral Artery Aneurysms on the Ventricular Wall by Early Surgical Revascularization in Moyamoya Disease: Report of Two Cases and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanamori, Fumiaki; Takasu, Syuntaro; Ota, Shinji; Seki, Yukio

    2018-01-01

    Collateral artery aneurysms are a source of intracranial hemorrhage in moyamoya disease. Several reports have shown that surgical revascularization leads to the obliteration of collateral artery aneurysms. However, its effect on the prevention of rebleeding has not been established, and the optimal timing of the operation remains unclear. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the effects of surgical revascularization and to investigate the optimal operation timing in patients with moyamoya disease who have ruptured collateral artery aneurysms on the ventricular wall. Two patients with moyamoya disease who presented with intraventricular hemorrhage caused by rupture of collateral artery aneurysms on the wall of the lateral ventricle are presented here. In both cases, the aneurysms reruptured approximately 1 month after the initial hemorrhage. Both patients successfully underwent superficial temporal artery-middle cerebral artery anastomosis combined with indirect bypass in the subacute stage. The aneurysms decreased with the development of collateral circulation through the direct bypasses, and rebleeding did not occur after the surgery. Because ruptured collateral artery aneurysms on the wall of the lateral ventricle in moyamoya disease are prone to rerupture within 1 month, surgical revascularization may be recommended as soon as the patients are stable and able to withstand the operation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. An Asymptomatic Case of Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome with Right-sided Free-wall Accessory Pathway and Left Ventricular Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takanao Mine, MD

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 16-year-old girl with a known history of asymptomatic Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome exhibited signs of left ventricular (LV septal akinesia and LV dysfunction during routine follow-up. A 12-lead surface ECG showed pre-excitation, a predominantly negative delta wave in V1 and left axis deviation, which was consistent with the presence of a right free-wall accessory pathway. Radiofrequency ablation of the anterolateral right atrium around the local shortest atrium-to-ventricle interval created the accessory pathway block. An echocardiogram taken one month after the procedure revealed that LV septal wall motion had normalized and that LV ejection fraction had improved from 50% before the ablation to 64% after the ablation. Most previous reports of asymptomatic patients of WPW with LV septal dyskinesia and dysfunction have described right septal or posteroseptal accessory pathways. This patient reported here represents a rare case with right free-wall accessory pathway and LV dysfunction without tachycardia.

  17. Reciprocal Interactions between Cadmium-Induced Cell Wall Responses and Oxidative Stress in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Loix

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Cadmium (Cd pollution renders many soils across the world unsuited or unsafe for food- or feed-orientated agriculture. The main mechanism of Cd phytotoxicity is the induction of oxidative stress, amongst others through the depletion of glutathione. Oxidative stress can damage lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids, leading to growth inhibition or even cell death. The plant cell has a variety of tools to defend itself against Cd stress. First and foremost, cell walls might prevent Cd from entering and damaging the protoplast. Both the primary and secondary cell wall have an array of defensive mechanisms that can be adapted to cope with Cd. Pectin, which contains most of the negative charges within the primary cell wall, can sequester Cd very effectively. In the secondary cell wall, lignification can serve to immobilize Cd and create a tougher barrier for entry. Changes in cell wall composition are, however, dependent on nutrients and conversely might affect their uptake. Additionally, the role of ascorbate (AsA as most important apoplastic antioxidant is of considerable interest, due to the fact that oxidative stress is a major mechanism underlying Cd toxicity, and that AsA biosynthesis shares several links with cell wall construction. In this review, modifications of the plant cell wall in response to Cd exposure are discussed. Focus lies on pectin in the primary cell wall, lignification in the secondary cell wall and the importance of AsA in the apoplast. Regarding lignification, we attempt to answer the question whether increased lignification is merely a consequence of Cd toxicity, or rather an elicited defense response. We propose a model for lignification as defense response, with a central role for hydrogen peroxide as substrate and signaling molecule.

  18. Extremely high wall-shear stress events in a turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Chong; Kwon, Yongseok

    2018-04-01

    The present work studies the fluctuating characteristics of the streamwise wall-shear stress in a DNS of a turbulent boundary layer at Re τ =1500 from a structural view. The two-dimensional field of the fluctuating friction velocity u‧ τ (x,z) is decomposed into the large- and small-scale components via a recently proposed scale separation algorithm, Quasi-bivariate Variational Mode Decomposition (QB-VMD). Both components are found to be dominated by streak-like structures, which can be regarded as the wall signature of the inner-layer streaks and the outer-layer LSMs, respectively. Extreme positive/negative wall-shear stress fluctuation events are detected in the large-scale component. The former’s occurrence frequency is nearly one order of magnitude higher than the latter; therefore, they contribute a significant portion of the long tail of the wall-shear stress distribution. Both two-point correlations and conditional averages show that these extreme positive wall-shear stress events are embedded in the large-scale positive u‧ τ streaks. They seem to be formed by near-wall ‘splatting’ process, which are related to strong finger-like sweeping (Q4) events originated from the outer-layer positive LSMs.

  19. First wall thermomechanical stress analysis in a fusion ignition experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodin, G.; Carrera, R.; Howell, J.; Hwang, Y.L.; Montalvo, E.; Ordonez, C.; Dong, J.Q.

    1990-01-01

    The fusion ignition experiment IGNITEX + has been proposed as a low cost means of producing and controlling fusion ignited plasmas for scientific study. A single-turn-coil tokamak plasmas for scientific study. A single-turn-coil tokamak cryogenically precooled at liquid nitrogen temperature is used to produce 20 T fields and 12 MA plasma currents so that high-density ohmic ignition is possible. The high-field, high-density operation should maintain the plasma relatively free of wall impurities. In order to minimize plasma cooling, a low-Z first wall is considered for IGNITEX. The IGNITEX design philosophy emphasizes simplicity and low cost. A limiterless, smooth first will without files and plates is proposed. A low-Z material is applied by plasma jet techniques over a resistive vacuum vessel. This design is thought to be adequate for a magnetic fusion ignition experiment. Maintenance and operation of the first wall system is significantly simplified when compared to conventional designs

  20. Analysis of domain wall dynamics based on skewness of magnetic Barkhausen noise for applied stress determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Song [College of Electrical Engineering and Control Science, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 211816 (China); School of Automation Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210016 (China); Tian, GuiYun, E-mail: tian280@hotmail.com [School of Automation Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210016 (China); School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Merz Court, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, Newcastle NE1 7RU (United Kingdom); Dobmann, Gerd; Wang, Ping [School of Automation Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210016 (China)

    2017-01-01

    Skewness of Magnetic Barkhausen Noise (MBN) signal is used as a new feature for applied stress determination. After experimental studies, skewness presents its ability for measuring applied tensile stress compared with conventional feature, meanwhile, a non-linear behavior of this new feature and an independence of the excitation conditions under compressive stress are found and discussed. Effective damping during domain wall motion influencing the asymmetric shape of the MBN statistical distribution function is discussed under compressive and tensile stress variation. Domain wall (DW) energy and distance between pinning edges of the DW are considered altering the characteristic relaxation time, which is the reason for the non-linear phenomenon of skewness. - Highlights: • The skewness of magnetic Barkhausen noise profile is proposed as a new feature for applied stress determination. • The skewness is sensitive to applied stress and independent to excitation frequency. • Domain wall energy and pinning distance influence the relaxation time of domain wall, which leads to a non-linear behavior of skewness under compressive stress.

  1. Development of Generalized Correlation Equation for the Local Wall Shear Stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Yu Mi; Park, Ju Hwan

    2010-06-01

    The pressure drop characteristics for a fuel channel are essential for the design and reliable operation of a nuclear reactor. Over several decades, analytical methods have been developed to predict the friction factor in the fuel bundle flows. In order to enhance the accuracy of prediction for the pressure drop in a rod bundle, the influences of a channel wall and the local shear stress distribution should be considered. Therefore, the correlation equation for a local wall shear stress distribution should be developed in order to secure an analytical solution for the friction factor of a rod bundle. For a side subchannel, which has the influence of the channel wall, the local wall shear stress distribution is dependent on the ratio of wall to diameter (W/D) as well as the ratio of pitch to diameter (P/D). In the case that W/D has the same value with P/D, the local shear stress distribution can be simply correlated with the function of angular position for each value of P/D. While in the case where W/D has a different value than P/D, the correlation equation should be developed for each case of P/D and W/D. Therefore, in the present study, the generalized correlation equation of the local wall shear stress distribution was developed for a side subchannel in the case where W/D has a different value than P/D. Consequently, the generalized correlation equation of a local wall shear stress distribution can be represented by the equivalent pitch to diameter ratio, P'/D for the case that P/D and W/D had a different value

  2. Evaluation of stresses in large diameter, thin walled piping at support locations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryan, B.J.; Flanders, H.E. Jr.; Rawls, G.B. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The highest stresses in many thin walled piping systems are the local stresses at the pipe supports. These secondary stresses are caused by saddles or other structural discontinuities that restrain pipe ovalization. A static analysis of a thin walled pipe supported on structural steel saddle under dead weight loading is presented. The finite element analysis is performed using a shell model with distributed gravity and hydrostatic pressure loading. Parametric studies on global and local stress are performed to determine the effect of the pipe diameter to thickness ratio. Two aspects of the saddle design are also investigated: the effect of saddle width, and the effect of saddle wrap angle. Additionally, the computed stresses are compared to closed form solutions

  3. Flow rate dependency of critical wall shear stress in a radial-flow cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Detry, J.G.; Jensen, Bo Boye Busk; Sindic, M.

    2009-01-01

    In the present work, a radial-flow cell was used to study the removal of starch particle aggregates from several solid substrates (glass, stainless steel, polystyrene and PTFE) in order to determine the critical wall shear stress value for each case. The particle aggregates were formed by aspersion...... of a water or ethanol suspension of starch granules on the surfaces. Depending on the substrate and on the suspending liquid, the aggregates differed in size and shape. Aggregate removal was studied at two flow rates. At the lower flow rate (Re-inlet = 955), the values of critical wall shear stress...... for the different surfaces suggested that capillary forces were, for all of them, playing an important role in aggregate adhesion since aqueous based aggregates were always more difficult to remove. At the higher flow rate (Re-inlet = 2016) the critical wall shear stress increased as a result of the change...

  4. Measurements of wall-shear-stress distribution on an NACA0018 airfoil by liquid-crystal coating and near-wall particle image velocimetry (PIV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujisawa, N; Oguma, Y; Nakano, T

    2009-01-01

    Measurements of wall-shear-stress distributions along curved surfaces are carried out using non-intrusive experimental methods, such as liquid-crystal coating and near-wall particle image velocimetry (PIV). The former method relies on the color change of the liquid-crystal coating sensitive to the wall shear stress, while the latter is based on the direct evaluation of shear stresses through the near-wall PIV measurement in combination with the image deformation technique. These experimental methods are applied to the measurement of wall-shear-stress distributions of air flow at a free-stream velocity of 15 m s −1 on a flat plate and an NACA0018 airfoil. The experiments are carried out at zero angle of attack for the flat plate and at 0° and ±6° angles of attack for the airfoil, and then the variations of shear-stress distribution along these surfaces are studied. These measurements in wall shear stresses agree with each other within their experimental uncertainties, suggesting the validity of experimental methods for non-intrusive shear-stress measurements. It is found that the wall-shear-stress distribution shows a small negative value upstream of the reattachment point on the NACA0018 airfoil, which is followed by an increase in shear stresses downstream due to laminar–turbulent transition of boundary layers. Such behavior of wall-shear-stress distribution is well correlated with the mean flow and turbulence characteristics along the airfoil surfaces, which are measured by PIV

  5. Differential effects comparing exercise and pharmacologic stress on left ventricular function using gated Tc-99m sestamibi SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtaki, Yuka; Chikamori, Taishiro; Igarashi, Yuko; Hida, Satoshi; Tanaka, Hirokazu; Hatano, Tsuguhisa; Usui, Yasuhiro; Miyagi, Manabu; Yamashina, Akira

    2008-01-01

    Although post-ischemic stunning has emerged as an important marker for severe coronary artery disease (CAD), differences in stress methods may have different effects on left ventricular (LV) volumes and function. To assess differential effects comparing exercise and pharmacologic stress on the LV measurements, 99m Tc-sestamibi gated single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) acquired more than 30 min after stress and at rest was evaluated in 38 patients undergoing adenosine triphosphate (ATP) stress (ATP group) and 38 age- and sex-matched patients subjected to exercise stress (Ex group) among 268 patients with normal SPECT findings. Coronary risk factors and LV volumetric measurements at baseline were similar in the two groups. Compared with volumetric measurements at rest, end-diastolic volume (EDV) increased (72±21 ml to 74±21 ml; P=0.01), end-systolic volume increased (25±12 ml to 28±13 ml; P=0.001), and ejection fraction (EF) decreased after stress (66%±8% to 63%±9%; P<0.002) in the ATP group. In the Ex group, by contrast, no such change was observed. In addition, changes in EDV (3±6 vs. -1±5 ml; P=0.01) and the stress-to-rest ratio of EDV (1.04±0.09 vs. 0.99±0.08; P<0.02) after stress were greater in the ATP than in the Ex group. Differential effects of stress methods on LV volumes persist more than 30 min after the stress. These findings should be kept in mind when interpreting post-ischemic stunning. (author)

  6. Convection of wall shear stress events in a turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabon, Rommel; Mills, David; Ukeiley, Lawrence; Sheplak, Mark

    2017-11-01

    The fluctuating wall shear stress is measured in a zero pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer of Reτ 1700 simultaneously with velocity measurements using either hot-wire anemometry or particle image velocimetry. These experiments elucidate the patterns of large scale structures in a single point measurement of the wall shear stress, as well as their convection velocity at the wall. The wall shear stress sensor is a CS-A05 one-dimensional capacitice floating element from Interdisciplinary Consulting Corp. It has a nominal bandwidth from DC to 5 kHz and a floating element size of 1 mm in the principal sensing direction (streamwise) and 0.2 mm in the cross direction (spanwise), allowing the large scales to be well resolved in the current experimental conditions. In addition, a two sensor array of CS-A05 aligned in the spanwise direction with streamwise separations O (δ) is utilized to capture the convection velocity of specific scales of the shear stress through a bandpass filter and peaks in the correlation. Thus, an average wall normal position for the corresponding convecting event can be inferred at least as high as the equivalent local streamwise velocity. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. DGE-1315138.

  7. Simultaneous wall-shear-stress and wide-field PIV measurements in a turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomit, Guillaume; Fourrie, Gregoire; de Kat, Roeland; Ganapathisubramani, Bharathram

    2015-11-01

    Simultaneous particle image velocimetry (PIV) and hot-film shear stress sensor measurements were performed to study the large-scale structures associated with shear stress events in a flat plate turbulent boundary layer at a high Reynolds number (Reτ ~ 4000). The PIV measurement was performed in a streamwise-wall normal plane using an array of six high resolution cameras (4 ×16MP and 2 ×29MP). The resulting field of view covers 8 δ (where δ is the boundary layer thickness) in the streamwise direction and captures the entire boundary layer in the wall-normal direction. The spatial resolution of the measurement is approximately is approximately 70 wall units (1.8 mm) and sampled each 35 wall units (0.9 mm). In association with the PIV setup, a spanwise array of 10 skin-friction sensors (spanning one δ) was used to capture the footprint of the large-scale structures. This combination of measurements allowed the analysis of the three-dimensional conditional structures in the boundary layer. Particularly, from conditional averages, the 3D organisation of the wall normal and streamwise velocity components (u and v) and the Reynolds shear stress (-u'v') related to a low and high shear stress events can be extracted. European Research Council Grant No-277472-WBT.

  8. Measurement and analysis of flow wall shear stress in an interior subchannel of triangular array rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fakori-Monazah, M.R.; Todreas, N.E.

    1977-08-01

    A simulated model of triangular array rods with pitch to diameter ratio of 1.10 (as a test section) and air as the fluid flow was used to study the LMFBR hydraulic parameters. The wall shear stress distribution around the rod periphery, friction factors, static pressure distributions and turbulence intensity corresponding to various Reynolds numbers ranging from 4140 to 36170 in the central subchannel were measured. Various approaches for measurement of wall shear stress were compared. The measurement was performed using the Preston tube technique with the probe outside diameter equal to 0.014 in

  9. Targeted electroporation of defined lateral ventricular walls: a novel and rapid method to study fate specification during postnatal forebrain neurogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cremer Harold

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Postnatal olfactory bulb (OB neurogenesis involves the generation of granule and periglomerular cells by neural stem cells (NSCs located in the walls of the lateral ventricle (LV. Recent studies show that NSCs located in different regions of the LV give rise to different types of OB neurons. However, the molecular mechanisms governing neuronal specification remain largely unknown and new methods to approach these questions are needed. Results In this study, we refine electroporation of the postnatal forebrain as a technique to perform precise and accurate delivery of transgenes to NSCs located in distinct walls of the LV in the mouse. Using this method, we confirm and expand previous studies showing that NSCs in distinct walls of the LV produce neurons that invade different layers of the OB. Fate mapping of the progeny of radial glial cells located in these distinct LV walls reveals their specification into defined subtypes of granule and periglomerular neurons. Conclusions Our results provide a baseline with which future studies aiming at investigating the role of factors in postnatal forebrain neuronal specification can be compared. Targeted electroporation of defined LV NSC populations will prove valuable to study the genetic factors involved in forebrain neuronal specification.

  10. Correlation between vortices and wall shear stress in a curved artery model under pulsatile flow conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Christopher; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2017-11-01

    One of the most physiologically relevant factors within the cardiovascular system is the wall shear stress. The wall shear stress affects endothelial cells via mechanotransduction and atherosclerotic regions are strongly correlated with curvature and branching in the human vasculature, where the shear stress is both oscillatory and multidirectional. Also, the combined effect of curvature and pulsatility in cardiovascular flows produces unsteady vortices. In this work, our goal is to assess the correlation between multiple vortex pairs and wall shear stress. To accomplish this, we use an in-house high-order flux reconstruction Navier-Stokes solver to simulate pulsatile flow of a Newtonian blood-analog fluid through a rigid 180° curved artery model. We use a physiologically relevant flow rate and generate results using both fully developed and uniform entrance conditions, the latter motivated by the fact that flow upstream to a curved artery may not be fully developed. Under these two inflow conditions, we characterize the evolution of various vortex pairs and their subsequent effect on several wall shear stress metrics. Supported by GW Center for Biomimetics and Bioinspired Engineering.

  11. Prediction of vertical expansion pressure stresses in coke oven heating walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duerselen, H; Janicka, J

    1987-08-01

    The paper describes an accurate method developed by Krupp Koppers for calculating stresses in the central areas of coke oven heating walls. The results of this calculation model have provided the following conclusions for the design of coke ovens: 1) a rising pre-stressing of the heating walls caused by the weight of the top deck of the coke oven leads - compared with the stress limits of W. Ahlers - to lower permissible expansion pressures. 2) A given heating wall width has its corresponding maximum feasible oven height. Heating wall width and top deck weight are not interchangeable parameters. 3) The dependence of the permissible expansion pressure on the stretcher brick thickness should not be overlooked. Stretcher brick thicknesses of under 90 mm are not recomended for tall ovens and heavily swelling coal. 4) The capacity of mortar to absorb tensile stresses is ultimately an undesirable property, because the stresses at the points where the mortar is not holding are higher than in a straightforward stretch of brickwork.

  12. Effect of mental stress on left ventricular ejection fraction and its relationship to the severity of coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroda, Toru; Kuwabara, Yoichi; Watanabe, Satoshi; Nakaya, Jiro; Hasegawa, R.; Shikama, Takeshi; Matsuno, Kouki; Mikami, Yuji; Fujii, Kiyotaka; Saito, Toshihiro; Masuda, Yoshiaki

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the relationship between the mental stress-induced decrease in left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and the severity of exercise-induced ischaemia, 20 patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD) underwent radionuclide ventriculography during mental stress testing and stress myocardial perfusion single-photon emission tomography (SPET). We also examined whether changes in haemodynamic and neurohormonal parameters are related to changes in LVEF during mental stress. The LVEF decreased from 54.8%±17.7% to 49.8%±16.2% with mental stress (P<0.0005). Ten of the 20 patients (50.0%) had a ≥5% decrease in LVEF. The remaining ten patients had no or a <5% decrease in LVEF. There was a significant correlation between the change in LVEF during mental stress and the size of the reversible defect on stress myocardial perfusion SPET (r=-0.80, P<0.0005), with close regional correspondence (75% identical). This correlation was less strong in the 12 patients with a total defect score at rest of <10 (r=-0.69, P=0.014) than in the eight patients with a total defect score at rest of ≥10 (r=-0.94, P=0.001). The changes in blood pressure and heart rate were not significantly correlated with the change in LVEF, but the percent change in adrenaline concentration correlated with the change in LVEF. It is suggested that mental stress impairs systolic function by inducing transient myocardial ischaemia. The effect of neurohormonal responses during mental stress on LV systolic function may also be important in patients with CAD. (orig.)

  13. Effect of mental stress on left ventricular ejection fraction and its relationship to the severity of coronary artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuroda, Toru; Kuwabara, Yoichi; Watanabe, Satoshi; Nakaya, Jiro; Hasegawa, R.; Shikama, Takeshi; Matsuno, Kouki; Mikami, Yuji; Fujii, Kiyotaka; Saito, Toshihiro; Masuda, Yoshiaki [Dept. of Internal Medicine, Chiba Univ. (Japan)

    2000-12-01

    To evaluate the relationship between the mental stress-induced decrease in left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and the severity of exercise-induced ischaemia, 20 patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD) underwent radionuclide ventriculography during mental stress testing and stress myocardial perfusion single-photon emission tomography (SPET). We also examined whether changes in haemodynamic and neurohormonal parameters are related to changes in LVEF during mental stress. The LVEF decreased from 54.8%{+-}17.7% to 49.8%{+-}16.2% with mental stress (P<0.0005). Ten of the 20 patients (50.0%) had a {>=}5% decrease in LVEF. The remaining ten patients had no or a <5% decrease in LVEF. There was a significant correlation between the change in LVEF during mental stress and the size of the reversible defect on stress myocardial perfusion SPET (r=-0.80, P<0.0005), with close regional correspondence (75% identical). This correlation was less strong in the 12 patients with a total defect score at rest of <10 (r=-0.69, P=0.014) than in the eight patients with a total defect score at rest of {>=}10 (r=-0.94, P=0.001). The changes in blood pressure and heart rate were not significantly correlated with the change in LVEF, but the percent change in adrenaline concentration correlated with the change in LVEF. It is suggested that mental stress impairs systolic function by inducing transient myocardial ischaemia. The effect of neurohormonal responses during mental stress on LV systolic function may also be important in patients with CAD. (orig.)

  14. Using digital holographic microscopy for simultaneous measurements of 3D near wall velocity and wall shear stress in a turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, J.; Malkiel, E.; Katz, J.

    2008-12-01

    A digital holographic microscope is used to simultaneously measure the instantaneous 3D flow structure in the inner part of a turbulent boundary layer over a smooth wall, and the spatial distribution of wall shear stresses. The measurements are performed in a fully developed turbulent channel flow within square duct, at a moderately high Reynolds number. The sample volume size is 90 × 145 × 90 wall units, and the spatial resolution of the measurements is 3 8 wall units in streamwise and spanwise directions and one wall unit in the wall-normal direction. The paper describes the data acquisition and analysis procedures, including the particle tracking method and associated method for matching of particle pairs. The uncertainty in velocity is estimated to be better than 1 mm/s, less than 0.05% of the free stream velocity, by comparing the statistics of the normalized velocity divergence to divergence obtained by randomly adding an error of 1 mm/s to the data. Spatial distributions of wall shear stresses are approximated with the least square fit of velocity measurements in the viscous sublayer. Mean flow profiles and statistics of velocity fluctuations agree very well with expectations. Joint probability density distributions of instantaneous spanwise and streamwise wall shear stresses demonstrate the significance of near-wall coherent structures. The near wall 3D flow structures are classified into three groups, the first containing a pair of counter-rotating, quasi streamwise vortices and high streak-like shear stresses; the second group is characterized by multiple streamwise vortices and little variations in wall stress; and the third group has no buffer layer structures.

  15. The FERONIA Receptor Kinase Maintains Cell-Wall Integrity during Salt Stress through Ca2+ Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Wei; Kita, Daniel; Peaucelle, Alexis; Cartwright, Heather N; Doan, Vinh; Duan, Qiaohong; Liu, Ming-Che; Maman, Jacob; Steinhorst, Leonie; Schmitz-Thom, Ina; Yvon, Robert; Kudla, Jörg; Wu, Hen-Ming; Cheung, Alice Y; Dinneny, José R

    2018-03-05

    Cells maintain integrity despite changes in their mechanical properties elicited during growth and environmental stress. How cells sense their physical state and compensate for cell-wall damage is poorly understood, particularly in plants. Here we report that FERONIA (FER), a plasma-membrane-localized receptor kinase from Arabidopsis, is necessary for the recovery of root growth after exposure to high salinity, a widespread soil stress. The extracellular domain of FER displays tandem regions of homology with malectin, an animal protein known to bind di-glucose in vitro and important for protein quality control in the endoplasmic reticulum. The presence of malectin-like domains in FER and related receptor kinases has led to widespread speculation that they interact with cell-wall polysaccharides and can potentially serve a wall-sensing function. Results reported here show that salinity causes softening of the cell wall and that FER is necessary to sense these defects. When this function is disrupted in the fer mutant, root cells explode dramatically during growth recovery. Similar defects are observed in the mur1 mutant, which disrupts pectin cross-linking. Furthermore, fer cell-wall integrity defects can be rescued by treatment with calcium and borate, which also facilitate pectin cross-linking. Sensing of these salinity-induced wall defects might therefore be a direct consequence of physical interaction between the extracellular domain of FER and pectin. FER-dependent signaling elicits cell-specific calcium transients that maintain cell-wall integrity during salt stress. These results reveal a novel extracellular toxicity of salinity, and identify FER as a sensor of damage to the pectin-associated wall. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Right ventricular function in patients with ischemic heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araki, Haruo; Hisano, Ryuichi; Nagata, Yoshiyuki; Caglar, N.; Nakamura, Motoomi

    1985-01-01

    Thirty-five patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD) and 10 normal subjects were studied. Right and left ventricular ejecction fractions (EF) were determined using equilibrium radionuclide ventriculography with technetium-99m. Furthermore, abnormal motion of the right ventricular septal wall was obtained by cardiac cathetelization, and its relation to the right ventricular EF was examined. In IHD patients with anterior myocardial infarction, left ventricular EF decreased, but right ventricular EF was normal. This suggested that left ventricular dysfunction does not always have an effect on right ventricular function. Right ventricular EF was normal even when akinesis or dyskinesis was present in the ventricular septul, suggesting that abnormal motion of the ventricular septal wall has no significantly stimulant effect on right ventricular function. A decreased right ventricular EF was likely to occur only when the right ventricular free wall became ischemic or necrotic simultaneously with occurrence of posterior myocardial infarction. (Namekawa, K.)

  17. Influence of diaphragm wall installation in overconsolidated sandy clays on in situ stress disturbance and resulting wall deformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Truty Andrzej Adam

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Numerical modeling of deep excavations becomes a standard practice in modern geotechnical engineering. A detailed numerical model for a given case is able to reproduce major effects of soil-structure interaction by taking into account any kind of drainage conditions, strong stiffness variation due to effective stress and strain changes, creep and cracking, when reinforced concrete is used as a structural material, but also interface effects between subsoil and structure. Calibrating soil constitutive models is one of the most difficult tasks and due to several sources of uncertainty there is no one unique set of the data that should be used in numerical predictions. Lack or incompleteness of experimental data, significant mismatch between laboratory and field tests is an another source of difficulty. Contrary to several simplified methods, that are usually limited to two dimensions, numerical models allow a full 3D analysis in which many simplifications can be eliminated. This paper is devoted to the problem of in situ stress disturbance caused by diaphragm wall installation in overconsolidated quaternary sandy clays and its influence on final wall deformations.

  18. Hemodynamic stress echocardiography in patients supported with a continuous-flow left ventricular assist device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads Jønsson; Gustafsson, Finn; Madsen, Per Lav

    2010-01-01

    exercise. Exercise induced an increase in cardiac output, systolic pulmonary artery pressure, and diastolic pulmonary artery pressure. Although no changes in left ventricular dimensions or fractional shortening were seen on echocardiography, systolic mitral annular motion (S') increased significantly (in...... parallel with cardiac output) and diastolic E/e' ratio decreased (correlating inversely with diastolic pulmonary artery pressure). These findings emphasize the potential role of exercise echocardiography in studying exercise hemodynamics in LVAD patients....

  19. Validation of a novel modified wall motion score for estimation of left ventricular ejection fraction in ischemic and non-ischemic cardiomyopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scholl, David, E-mail: David.Scholl@utoronto.ca [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario (Canada); Kim, Han W., E-mail: hanwkim@gmail.com [Duke Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Center, Division of Cardiology, Duke University, NC (United States); Shah, Dipan, E-mail: djshah@tmhs.org [The Methodist DeBakey Heart Center, Houston, TX (United States); Fine, Nowell M., E-mail: nowellfine@gmail.com [Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Western Ontario (Canada); Tandon, Shruti, E-mail: standon4@uwo.ca [Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Western Ontario (Canada); Thompson, Terry, E-mail: thompson@lawsonimaging.ca [Lawson Health Research Institute, London, Ontario (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada); Drangova, Maria, E-mail: mdrangov@imaging.robarts.ca [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada); White, James A., E-mail: jwhite@imaging.robarts.ca [Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Western Ontario (Canada); Lawson Health Research Institute, London, Ontario (Canada); Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-08-15

    Background: Visual determination of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) by segmental scoring may be a practical alternative to volumetric analysis of cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The accuracy and reproducibility of this approach for has not been described. The purpose of this study was to validate a novel segmental visual scoring method for LVEF estimation using cine MRI. Methods: 362 patients with known or suspected cardiomyopathy were studied. A modified wall motion score (mWMS) was used to blindly score the wall motion of all cardiac segments from cine MRI imaging. The same datasets were subjected to blinded volumetric analysis using endocardial contour tracing. The population was then separated into a model cohort (N = 181) and validation cohort (N = 181), with the former used to derive a regression equation of mWMS versus true volumetric LVEF. The validation cohort was then used to test the accuracy of this regression model to estimate the true LVEF from a visually determined mWMS. Reproducibility testing of mWMS scoring was performed upon a randomly selected sample of 20 cases. Results: The regression equation relating mWMS to true LVEF in the model cohort was: LVEF = 54.23 - 0.5761 Multiplication-Sign mWMS. In the validation cohort this equation produced a strong correlation between mWMS-derived LVEF and true volumetric LVEF (r = 0.89). Bland and Altman analysis showed no systematic bias in the LVEF estimated using the mWMS (-0.3231%, 95% limits of agreement -12.22% to 11.58%). Inter-observer and intra-observer reproducibility was excellent (r = 0.93 and 0.97, respectively). Conclusion: The mWMS is a practical tool for reporting regional wall motion and provides reproducible estimates of LVEF from cine MRI.

  20. Increased infarct wall thickness by a bio-inert material is insufficient to prevent negative left ventricular remodeling after myocardial infarction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aboli A Rane

    Full Text Available Several injectable materials have been shown to preserve or improve cardiac function as well as prevent or slow left ventricular (LV remodeling post-myocardial infarction (MI. However, it is unclear as to whether it is the structural support or the bioactivity of these polymers that lead to beneficial effects. Herein, we examine how passive structural enhancement of the LV wall by an increase in wall thickness affects cardiac function post-MI using a bio-inert, non-degradable synthetic polymer in an effort to better understand the mechanisms by which injectable materials affect LV remodeling.Poly(ethylene glycol (PEG gels of storage modulus G' = 0.5±0.1 kPa were injected and polymerized in situ one week after total occlusion of the left coronary artery in female Sprague Dawley rats. The animals were imaged using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI at 7±1 day(s post-MI as a baseline and again post-injection 49±4 days after MI. Infarct wall thickness was statistically increased in PEG gel injected vs. control animals (p<0.01. However, animals in the polymer and control groups showed decreases in cardiac function in terms of end diastolic volume, end systolic volume and ejection fraction compared to baseline (p<0.01. The cellular response to injection was also similar in both groups.The results of this study demonstrate that passive structural reinforcement alone was insufficient to prevent post-MI remodeling, suggesting that bioactivity and/or cell infiltration due to degradation of injectable materials are likely playing a key role in the preservation of cardiac function, thus providing a deeper understanding of the influencing properties of biomaterials necessary to prevent post-MI negative remodeling.

  1. Stress analysis of a double-wall vacuum vessel for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conner, D.L.; Williamson, D.E.; Nelson, B.E.

    1991-01-01

    The preliminary structural analyses performed in support of the design of the vacuum vessel for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) are described. A thin, double-wall, all-welded structure is the proposed design concept analyzed. The results of the static stress analysis indicate the adequacy of such a structure. The effects of the proposed high-aspect-ratio design configuration on loading and stresses are also discussed. 4 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  2. The CWI Pathway: Regulation of the Transcriptional Adaptive Response to Cell Wall Stress in Yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Belén Sanz

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Fungi are surrounded by an essential structure, the cell wall, which not only confers cell shape but also protects cells from environmental stress. As a consequence, yeast cells growing under cell wall damage conditions elicit rescue mechanisms to provide maintenance of cellular integrity and fungal survival. Through transcriptional reprogramming, yeast modulate the expression of genes important for cell wall biogenesis and remodeling, metabolism and energy generation, morphogenesis, signal transduction and stress. The yeast cell wall integrity (CWI pathway, which is very well conserved in other fungi, is the key pathway for the regulation of this adaptive response. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of the yeast transcriptional program elicited to counterbalance cell wall stress situations, the role of the CWI pathway in the regulation of this program and the importance of the transcriptional input received by other pathways. Modulation of this adaptive response through the CWI pathway by positive and negative transcriptional feedbacks is also discussed. Since all these regulatory mechanisms are well conserved in pathogenic fungi, improving our knowledge about them will have an impact in the developing of new antifungal therapies.

  3. Near-wall extension of a non-equilibrium, omega-based Reynolds stress model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Tue; Behr, Marek; Reinartz, Birgit

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the development of a new ω-based Reynolds stress model that is consistent with asymptotic analysis in the near wall region and with rapid distortion theory in homogeneous turbulence is reported. The model is based on the SSG/LRR-ω model developed by Eisfeld (2006) with three main modifications. Firstly, the near wall behaviors of the redistribution, dissipation and diffusion terms are modified according to the asymptotic analysis and a new blending function based on low Reynolds number is proposed. Secondly, an anisotropic dissipation tensor based on the Reynolds stress inhomogeneity (Jakirlic et al., 2007) is used instead of the original isotropic model. Lastly, the SSG redistribution term, which is activated far from the wall, is replaced by Speziale's non-equilibrium model (Speziale, 1998).

  4. Importance of initial stress for abdominal aortic aneurysm wall motion: Dynamic MRI validated finite element analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merkx, M.A.G.; Veer, van 't M.; Speelman, L.; Breeuwer, M.; Buth, J.; Vosse, van de F.N.

    2009-01-01

    Currently the transverse diameter is the primary decision criterion to assess rupture risk in patients with an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). To obtain a measure for more patient-specific risk assessment, aneurysm wall stress, calculated using finite element analysis (FEA), has been evaluated in

  5. Volumetric Arterial Wall Shear Stress Calculation Based on Cine Phase Contrast MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Potters, Wouter V.; van Ooij, Pim; Marquering, Henk; VanBavel, Ed; Nederveen, Aart J.

    2015-01-01

    PurposeTo assess the accuracy and precision of a volumetric wall shear stress (WSS) calculation method applied to cine phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) data. Materials and MethodsVolumetric WSS vectors were calculated in software phantoms. WSS algorithm parameters were optimized

  6. Transient temperature and stress distributions in the pressure vessel's wall of a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, G.A. da

    1979-01-01

    In order to calculate the temperature distribution in a reactor vessel wall which is under the effect of gamma radiation originated in the reactor core, a numerical solution is proposed. This problem may arise from a reactor cooling pump failure .The thermal stresses are also calculated. (Author) [pt

  7. Augmentation of wall shear stress inhibits neointimal hyperplasia after stent implantation - Inhibition through reduction of inflammation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carlier, SG; van Damme, LCA; Blommerde, CP; Wentzel, JJ; van Langehove, G; Verheye, S; Kockx, MM; Knaapen, MWM; Cheng, C; Gijsen, F; Duncker, DJ; Stergiopulos, N; Slager, CJ; Serruys, PW; Krams, R

    2003-01-01

    Background - Low wall shear stress (WSS) increases neointimal hyperplasia (NH) in vein grafts and stents. We studied the causal relationship between WSS and NH formation in stents by locally increasing WSS with a flow divider (Anti-Restenotic Diffuser, Endoart SA) placed in the center of the stent.

  8. Stress dependence of the domain wall potential in amorphous CoFeSiB glass-coated microwires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varga, R.; Zhukov, A.; Blanco, J.M.; Gonzalez, J.; Zhukova, V.; Vojtanik, P.

    2006-01-01

    We present a method to study the domain wall potential through the thermal activation of the domain wall across the energy barrier. Two contributions to the domain wall potential in amorphous microwires are recognized: magnetoelastic and relaxation. The role of each contribution is studied by measuring the switching field distribution at different frequencies and under applied stress

  9. Reynolds stress analysis of EMHD-controlled wall turbulence. Part I. Streamwise forcing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, C.H.; Karniadakis, G.E.

    1997-01-01

    In this work we investigate numerically turbulent flow of low electrical conductivity fluid subject to electro-magnetic (EMHD) forcing. The configuration is similar to the one considered in the experimental work of Henoch and Stace [Phys. Fluids 7, 1371 (1995)] but in a channel geometry. The lower wall of the channel is covered with alternating streamwise electrodes and magnets to create a Lorentz force in the positive streamwise direction. Two cases are considered in detail corresponding to interaction parameter values of 0.4 (case 1) and 0.1 (case 2). The effect of switching off and on the electrodes is also studied for the two cases. At the Reynolds number considered (Re τ ∼200), a drag increase was obtained for all cases, in agreement with the experiments of Henoch and Stace. A Reynolds stress analysis was performed based on a new decomposition of the gradients normal to the wall of the Reynolds stress -u'v'. It was found that the vortex stretching term w'w 2 ' and the spanwise variation of the stress component u'w' are responsible for the drag increase. More specifically, the term ∂(u'w')/∂x 3 is associated with secondary vortical motions in the near-wall and becomes large and positive for large shear stress in regions where fluid is moving toward the wall. In contrast, negative values are associated with regions of lower shear where fluid is being lifted away from the wall. Unlike the unperturbed flow, in the controlled flow high speed near-wall streamwise jets are present (case 1) even in the time-averaged fields. Other changes in turbulence structure are quantified using streak spacing, vortex lines, vorticity quadrant analysis, and plots of the rms value of the vorticity angle. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  10. Numerical investigation on residual stress distribution and evolution during multipass narrow gap welding of thick-walled stainless steel pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, C.; Zhang, J.X.; Xue, C.B.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → We performed pass-by-pass simulation of stresses for welding of thick-walled pipes. → The distributions and evolution of the residual stresses are demonstrated. → After the groove is filled to a height, the through-wall stress is almost unchanged. - Abstracts: The detailed pass-by-pass finite element (FE) simulation is presented to investigate the residual stresses in narrow gap multipass welding of pipes with a wall thickness of 70 mm and 73 weld passes. The simulated residual stress on the outer surface is validated with the experimental one. The distribution and evolution of the through-wall residual stresses are demonstrated. The investigated results show that the residual stresses on the outer and inner surfaces are tensile in the weld zone and its vicinity. The through-wall axial residual stresses at the weld center line and the HAZ line demonstrate a distribution of bending type. The through-wall hoop residual stress within the weld is mostly tensile. After the groove is filled to a certain height, the peak tensile stresses and the stress distribution patterns for both axial and hoop stresses remain almost unchanged.

  11. Interaction between a normal shock wave and a turbulent boundary layer at high transonic speeds. Part 2: Wall shear stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, M. S.; Adamson, T. C., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the flow in the two inner layers, the Reynolds stress sublayer and the wall layer. Included is the calculation of the shear stress at the wall in the interaction region. The limit processes considered are those used for an inviscid flow.

  12. Development of generalized correlation equation for the local wall shear stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Yu Mi; Bae, Jun Ho; Park, Joo Hwan

    2010-01-01

    The pressure drop characteristics for a fuel channel are essential for the design and reliable operation of a nuclear reactor. Over several decades, analytical methods have been developed to predict the friction factor in the fuel bundle flows. In order to enhance the accuracy of prediction for the pressure drop in a rod bundle, the influences of a channel wall and the local shear stress distribution should be considered. Hence, the correlation equation for a local shear stress distribution should be developed in order to secure an analytical solution for the friction factor of a rod bundle. For a side subchannel, which has the influence of the channel wall, the local shear stress distribution is dependent on the ratio of wall to diameter (W/D) as well as the ratio of pitch to diameter (P/D). In the case that W/D has the same value with P/D, the local shear stress distribution can be simply correlated with the function of angular position for each value of P/D. While, in the case that W/D has the different value with P/D, the correlation equation should be developed for each case of P/D and W/D. Hence, in the present study, the generalized correlation equation of a local shear stress distribution is developed for a side subchannel in the case that W/D has the different value with P/D

  13. PIV Measurement of Wall Shear Stress and Flow Structures within an Intracranial Aneurysm Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Ricky; Sparrow, Eph; Campbell, Gary; Divani, Afshin; Sheng, Jian

    2012-11-01

    The formation and rupture of an intracranial aneurysm (IA) is a debilitating and often lethal event. Geometric features of the aneurysm bulb and upstream artery, such as bulb size, bulb shape, and curvature of the artery, are two groups of factors that define the flow and stresses within an IA. Abnormal flow stresses are related to rupture. This presentation discusses the development of a quasi-3D PIV technique and its application in various glass models at Re = 275 and 550 to experimentally assess at a preliminary level the impact of geometry and flow rate. Some conclusions are to be drawn linking geometry of the flow domain to rupture risk. The extracted results also serve as the baseline case and as a precursor to a companion presentation by the authors discussing the impact of flow diverters, a new class of medical devices. The PIV experiments were performed in a fully index-matched flow facility, allowing for unobstructed observations over complex geometry. A reconstruction and analysis method was devised to obtain 3D mean wall stress distributions and flow fields. The quasi 3D measurements were reconstructed from orthogonal planes encompassing the entire glass model, spaced 0.4mm apart. Wall shear stresses were evaluated from the near-wall flow viscous stresses.

  14. Annular subvalvular left ventricular aneurysm in Bahia, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, A C; Filho, A S; Esteves, J P; Abreu, W N; Vinhaes, L A; de Almeida Souza, J A; Machado, A

    1976-10-01

    Two cases of left ventricular aneurysm, a 16-year-old black boy and a 23-year-old white girl, from Bahia, Brazil, are presented. In both patients there was enlargement of the cardiac silhouette and a prominent bulge of the left inferior border. On the right oblique view a ring of calcium at the ventricular opening of the aneurysms was visualized. A left ventriculogram showed a huge aneurysm in the first case and a bulge on the lateral wall of the left ventricle in the other. Cardiac catheterization showed a rise in left and right ventricular end-diastolic pressures and in the mean pulmonary artery pressure. In the first case the contour of the right ventricular pressure curve showed a restrictive pattern. The similarities of these aneurysms with the annular submitral type described in young black Africans are stressed.

  15. Innate collateral segments are predominantly present in the subendocardium without preferential connectivity within the left ventricular wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Horssen, Pepijn; Siebes, Maria; Spaan, Jos A E; Hoefer, Imo E; van den Wijngaard, Jeroen P H M

    2014-01-01

    Functional collateral vessels often stem from outward remodelling of pre-existing connections between perfusion territories. Knowledge of the distribution and morphology of innate collateral connections may help in identifying myocardial areas with protection against risk for ischaemia. The coronary network of six healthy canine hearts was investigated with an imaging cryomicrotome. Innate collateral connections ranged from 286 to 1015 μm in diameter. Left ventricular collateral density (number per gram of tissue) was about five in the subendocardium vs. 2.5 in the mid-myocardium (P collateral connections were oriented parallel to the long axis of the heart. For the major coronary arteries, five times more intracoronary than intercoronary connections were found, while their median diameter and interquartile range were not significantly different, at 96.1 (16.9) vs. 94.7 (18.9) μm. Collateral vessels connecting crowns from sister branches from a stem are denoted intercrown connections and those within crowns intracrown connections. The number of intercrown connections was related to the mean tissue weight of the crowns (y = 0.73x − 0.33, r2 = 0.85, P collateral diameter and length were independent of the tissue volumes bridged. We conclude that connectivity and morphology of the innate collateral network are distributed with no preference for intra-or intercrown connections, independent of stem diameter, including epicardial arteries. This renders all sites of the myocardium equally protected in case of coronary artery disease. The orientation of subendocardial collateral vessels indicates the longitudinal direction of subendocardial collateral flow. PMID:24366260

  16. Innate collateral segments are predominantly present in the subendocardium without preferential connectivity within the left ventricular wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Horssen, Pepijn; Siebes, Maria; Spaan, Jos A E; Hoefer, Imo E; van den Wijngaard, Jeroen P H M

    2014-03-01

    Functional collateral vessels often stem from outward remodelling of pre-existing connections between perfusion territories. Knowledge of the distribution and morphology of innate collateral connections may help in identifying myocardial areas with protection against risk for ischaemia. The coronary network of six healthy canine hearts was investigated with an imaging cryomicrotome. Innate collateral connections ranged from 286 to 1015 μm in diameter. Left ventricular collateral density (number per gram of tissue) was about five in the subendocardium vs. 2.5 in the mid-myocardium (P collateral connections were oriented parallel to the long axis of the heart. For the major coronary arteries, five times more intracoronary than intercoronary connections were found, while their median diameter and interquartile range were not significantly different, at 96.1 (16.9) vs. 94.7 (18.9) μm. Collateral vessels connecting crowns from sister branches from a stem are denoted intercrown connections and those within crowns intracrown connections. The number of intercrown connections was related to the mean tissue weight of the crowns (y = 0.73x - 0.33, r2 = 0.85, P collateral diameter and length were independent of the tissue volumes bridged. We conclude that connectivity and morphology of the innate collateral network are distributed with no preference for intra- or intercrown connections, independent of stem diameter, including epicardial arteries. This renders all sites of the myocardium equally protected in case of coronary artery disease. The orientation of subendocardial collateral vessels indicates the longitudinal direction of subendocardial collateral flow.

  17. The Role of Plant Cell Wall Proteins in Response to Salt Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyuben Zagorchev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary agriculture is facing new challenges with the increasing population and demand for food on Earth and the decrease in crop productivity due to abiotic stresses such as water deficit, high salinity, and extreme fluctuations of temperatures. The knowledge of plant stress responses, though widely extended in recent years, is still unable to provide efficient strategies for improvement of agriculture. The focus of study has been shifted to the plant cell wall as a dynamic and crucial component of the plant cell that could immediately respond to changes in the environment. The investigation of plant cell wall proteins, especially in commercially important monocot crops revealed the high involvement of this compartment in plants stress responses, but there is still much more to be comprehended. The aim of this review is to summarize the available data on this issue and to point out the future areas of interest that should be studied in detail.

  18. Right ventricular pressure response to exercise in adults with isolated ventricular septal defect closed in early childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moller, Thomas; Lindberg, Harald; Lund, May Brit; Holmstrom, Henrik; Dohlen, Gaute; Thaulow, Erik

    2018-06-01

    We previously demonstrated an abnormally high right ventricular systolic pressure response to exercise in 50% of adolescents operated on for isolated ventricular septal defect. The present study investigated the prevalence of abnormal right ventricular systolic pressure response in 20 adult (age 30-45 years) patients who underwent surgery for early ventricular septal defect closure and its association with impaired ventricular function, pulmonary function, or exercise capacity. The patients underwent cardiopulmonary tests, including exercise stress echocardiography. Five of 19 patients (26%) presented an abnormal right ventricular systolic pressure response to exercise ⩾ 52 mmHg. Right ventricular systolic function was mixed, with normal tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion and fractional area change, but abnormal tricuspid annular systolic motion velocity (median 6.7 cm/second) and isovolumetric acceleration (median 0.8 m/second2). Left ventricular systolic and diastolic function was normal at rest as measured by the peak systolic velocity of the lateral wall and isovolumic acceleration, early diastolic velocity, and ratio of early diastolic flow to tissue velocity, except for ejection fraction (median 53%). The myocardial performance index was abnormal for both the left and right ventricle. Peak oxygen uptake was normal (mean z score -0.4, 95% CI -2.8-0.3). There was no association between an abnormal right ventricular systolic pressure response during exercise and right or left ventricular function, pulmonary function, or exercise capacity. Abnormal right ventricular pressure response is not more frequent in adult patients compared with adolescents. This does not support the theory of progressive pulmonary vascular disease following closure of left-to-right shunts.

  19. Simulation of Stress Distribution in a Thick- Walled Bushing Produced by Die-Casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pisarek B.P.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Metallographic investigations and a computer simulation of stresses in a gravity die-casting bushing were performed. Simulation of the casting process, solidification of the thick-walled bushing and calculations of the stress was performed using MAGMA5.3 software. The size variability of phases κII affecting the formation of phase stresses σf, depending on the location of the metallographic test area, was identified. The distribution of thermal σt and shrinkage stresses σs, depending on the location of the control point SC in the bushing's volume, was estimated. Probably the nature of these stresses will change slightly even after machining. This can cause variations in operating characteristics (friction coefficient, wear. Due to the strong inhomogeneity of the stress distribution in the bushing's casting, it is necessary to perform further tests of the possibility to conduct thermal treatment guaranteeing homogenization of the internal stresses in the casting, as well as to introduce changes in the bushing' s construction and the casting technology. The paper presents the continuation of the results of research aimed at identifying the causes of defects in the thick-walled bushing, die-casting made of CuAl10Fe5Ni5Cr aluminium bronze.

  20. Cell Wall Amine Oxidases: New Players in Root Xylem Differentiation under Stress Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandip A. Ghuge

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Polyamines (PAs are aliphatic polycations present in all living organisms. A growing body of evidence reveals their involvement as regulators in a variety of physiological and pathological events. They are oxidatively deaminated by amine oxidases (AOs, including copper amine oxidases (CuAOs and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD-dependent polyamine oxidases (PAOs. The biologically-active hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 is a shared compound in all of the AO-catalyzed reactions, and it has been reported to play important roles in PA-mediated developmental and stress-induced processes. In particular, the AO-driven H2O2 biosynthesis in the cell wall is well known to be involved in plant wound healing and pathogen attack responses by both triggering peroxidase-mediated wall-stiffening events and signaling modulation of defense gene expression. Extensive investigation by a variety of methodological approaches revealed high levels of expression of cell wall-localized AOs in root xylem tissues and vascular parenchyma of different plant species. Here, the recent progresses in understanding the role of cell wall-localized AOs as mediators of root xylem differentiation during development and/or under stress conditions are reviewed. A number of experimental pieces of evidence supports the involvement of apoplastic H2O2 derived from PA oxidation in xylem tissue maturation under stress-simulated conditions.

  1. The influence of geometric factors on the wall shear stress distribution in realistic human coronary arteries

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Jorge André Piedade Pinhal dos

    2009-01-01

    Dissertação apresentada na Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia da Universidade Nova de Lisboa para a obtenção do grau de Mestre em Engenharia Biomédica. A presente dissertação foi desenvolvida no Erasmus Medical Center em Roterdão, Holanda Background: Atherosclerosis is the main cause of death in the Western society. It is a geometrically focal disease, affecting preferentially vessel areas of low wall shear stress (SS), which induces the expression of atherogenic genes. To predict wall ...

  2. Endoplasmic reticulum-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) is involved in toxicity of cell wall stress to Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qilin; Zhang, Bing; Li, Jianrong; Zhang, Biao; Wang, Honggang; Li, Mingchun

    2016-10-01

    The cell wall is an important cell structure in both fungi and bacteria, and hence becomes a common antimicrobial target. The cell wall-perturbing agents disrupt synthesis and function of cell wall components, leading to cell wall stress and consequent cell death. However, little is known about the detailed mechanisms by which cell wall stress renders fungal cell death. In this study, we found that ROS scavengers drastically attenuated the antifungal effect of cell wall-perturbing agents to the model fungal pathogen Candida albicans, and these agents caused remarkable ROS accumulation and activation of oxidative stress response (OSR) in this fungus. Interestingly, cell wall stress did not cause mitochondrial dysfunction and elevation of mitochondrial superoxide levels. Furthermore, the iron chelator 2,2'-bipyridyl (BIP) and the hydroxyl radical scavengers could not attenuate cell wall stress-caused growth inhibition and ROS accumulation. However, cell wall stress up-regulated expression of unfold protein response (UPR) genes, enhanced protein secretion and promoted protein folding-related oxidation of Ero1, an important source of ROS production. These results indicated that oxidation of Ero1 in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), rather than mitochondrial electron transport and Fenton reaction, contributed to cell wall stress-related ROS accumulation and consequent growth inhibition. Our findings uncover a novel link between cell wall integrity (CWI), ER function and ROS production in fungal cells, and shed novel light on development of strategies promoting the antifungal efficacy of cell wall-perturbing agents against fungal infections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Western High-Fat Diet Consumption during Adolescence Increases Susceptibility to Traumatic Stress while Selectively Disrupting Hippocampal and Ventricular Volumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyan-Masih, Priya; Vega-Torres, Julio David; Haddad, Elizabeth; Rainsbury, Sabrina; Baghchechi, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Psychological trauma and obesity co-occur frequently and have been identified as major risk factors for psychiatric disorders. Surprisingly, preclinical studies examining how obesity disrupts the ability of the brain to cope with psychological trauma are lacking. The objective of this study was to determine whether an obesogenic Western-like high-fat diet (WD) predisposes rats to post-traumatic stress responsivity. Adolescent Lewis rats (postnatal day 28) were fed ad libitum for 8 weeks with either the experimental WD diet (41.4% kcal from fat) or the control diet (16.5% kcal from fat). We modeled psychological trauma by exposing young adult rats to a cat odor threat. The elevated plus maze and the open field test revealed increased psychological trauma-induced anxiety-like behaviors in the rats that consumed the WD when compared with control animals 1 week after undergoing traumatic stress (p < 0.05). Magnetic resonance imaging showed significant hippocampal atrophy (20% reduction) and lateral ventricular enlargement (50% increase) in the animals fed the WD when compared with controls. These volumetric abnormalities were associated with behavioral indices of anxiety, increased leptin and FK506-binding protein 51 (FKBP51) levels, and reduced hippocampal blood vessel density. We found asymmetric structural vulnerabilities to the WD, particularly the ventral and left hippocampus and lateral ventricle. This study highlights how WD consumption during adolescence impacts key substrates implicated in post-traumatic stress disorder. Understanding how consumption of a WD affects the developmental trajectories of the stress neurocircuitry is critical, as stress susceptibility imposes a marked vulnerability to neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:27844058

  4. Activation of NADPH oxidase mediates increased endoplasmic reticulum stress and left ventricular remodeling after myocardial infarction in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bao; Tian, Jing; Sun, Yi; Xu, Tao-Rui; Chi, Rui-Fang; Zhang, Xiao-Li; Hu, Xin-Ling; Zhang, Yue-An; Qin, Fu-Zhong; Zhang, Wei-Fang

    2015-05-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide 3-phosphate (NADPH) oxidase activity and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress are increased after myocardial infarction (MI). In this study, we proposed to test whether activation of the NADPH oxidase in the remote non-infarcted myocardium mediates ER stress and left ventricular (LV) remodeling after MI. Rabbits with MI or sham operation were randomly assigned to orally receive an NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin or placebo for 30 days. The agents were administered beginning at 1 week after surgery. MI rabbits exhibited decreases in LV fractional shortening, LV ejection fraction and the first derivative of the LV pressure rise, which were abolished by apocynin treatment. NADPH oxidase Nox2 protein and mRNA expressions were increased in the remote non-infarcted myocardium after MI. Immunolabeling further revealed that Nox2 was increased in cardiac myocytes in the remote myocardium. The apocynin treatment prevented increases in the Nox2 expression, NADPH oxidase activity, oxidative stress, myocyte apoptosis and GRP78, CHOP and cleaved caspase 12 protein expression in the remote myocardium. The apocynin treatment also attenuated increases in myocyte diameter and cardiac fibrosis. In cultured H9C2 cardiomyocytes exposed to angiotensin II, an important stimulus for post-MI remodeling, Nox2 knockdown with siRNA significantly inhibited angiotensin II-induced NADPH oxidase activation, reactive oxygen species and GRP78 and CHOP protein expression. We conclude that NADPH oxidase inhibition attenuates increased ER stress in the remote non-infarcted myocardium and LV remodeling late after MI in rabbits. These findings suggest that the activation of NADPH oxidase in the remote non-infarcted myocardium mediates increased ER stress, contributing to myocyte apoptosis and LV remodeling after MI. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Wall stress on ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms with bicuspid compared with tricuspid aortic valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Yue; Wang, Zhongjie; Liu, Raymond; Haraldsson, Henrik; Hope, Michael D; Saloner, David A; Guccione, Julius M; Ge, Liang; Tseng, Elaine

    2018-03-08

    Guidelines for repair of bicuspid aortic valve-associated ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms have been changing, most recently to the same criteria as tricuspid aortic valve-ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms. Rupture/dissection occurs when wall stress exceeds wall strength. Recent studies suggest similar strength of bicuspid aortic valve versus tricuspid aortic valve-ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms; thus, comparative wall stress may better predict dissection in bicuspid aortic valve versus tricuspid aortic valve-ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms. Our aim was to determine whether bicuspid aortic valve-ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms had higher wall stresses than their tricuspid aortic valve counterparts. Patients with bicuspid aortic valve- and tricuspid aortic valve-ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms (bicuspid aortic valve = 17, tricuspid aortic valve = 19) greater than 4.5 cm underwent electrocardiogram-gated computed tomography angiography. Patient-specific 3-dimensional geometry was reconstructed and loaded to systemic pressure after accounting for prestress geometry. Finite element analyses were performed using the LS-DYNA solver (LSTC Inc, Livermore, Calif) with user-defined fiber-embedded material model to determine ascending thoracic aortic aneurysm wall stress. Bicuspid aortic valve-ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms 99th-percentile longitudinal stresses were 280 kPa versus 242 kPa (P = .028) for tricuspid aortic valve-ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms in systole. These stresses did not correlate to diameter for bicuspid aortic valve-ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms (r = -0.004) but had better correlation to tricuspid aortic valve-ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms diameter (r = 0.677). Longitudinal stresses on sinotubular junction were significantly higher in bicuspid aortic valve-ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms than in tricuspid aortic valve-ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms (405 vs 329 kPa, P = .023). Bicuspid

  6. An analytical method for calculating stresses and strains of ATF cladding based on thick walled theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Hyun; Kim, Hak Sung [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyo Chan; Yang, Yong Sik; In, Wang kee [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    In this paper, an analytical method based on thick walled theory has been studied to calculate stress and strain of ATF cladding. In order to prescribe boundary conditions of the analytical method, two algorithms were employed which are called subroutine 'Cladf' and 'Couple' of FRACAS, respectively. To evaluate the developed method, equivalent model using finite element method was established and stress components of the method were compared with those of equivalent FE model. One of promising ATF concepts is the coated cladding, which take advantages such as high melting point, a high neutron economy, and low tritium permeation rate. To evaluate the mechanical behavior and performance of the coated cladding, we need to develop the specified model to simulate the ATF behaviors in the reactor. In particular, the model for simulation of stress and strain for the coated cladding should be developed because the previous model, which is 'FRACAS', is for one body model. The FRACAS module employs the analytical method based on thin walled theory. According to thin-walled theory, radial stress is defined as zero but this assumption is not suitable for ATF cladding because value of the radial stress is not negligible in the case of ATF cladding. Recently, a structural model for multi-layered ceramic cylinders based on thick-walled theory was developed. Also, FE-based numerical simulation such as BISON has been developed to evaluate fuel performance. An analytical method that calculates stress components of ATF cladding was developed in this study. Thick-walled theory was used to derive equations for calculating stress and strain. To solve for these equations, boundary and loading conditions were obtained by subroutine 'Cladf' and 'Couple' and applied to the analytical method. To evaluate the developed method, equivalent FE model was established and its results were compared to those of analytical model. Based on the

  7. Could quantitative longitudinal peak systolic strain help in the detection of left ventricular wall motion abnormalities in our daily echocardiographic practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benyounes, Nadia; Lang, Sylvie; Gout, Olivier; Ancédy, Yann; Etienney, Arnaud; Cohen, Ariel

    2016-10-01

    Transthoracic echocardiography is the most commonly used tool for the detection of left ventricular wall motion (LVWM) abnormalities using "naked eye evaluation". This subjective and operator-dependent technique requires a high level of clinical training and experience. Two-dimensional speckle-tracking echocardiography (2D-STE), which is less operator-dependent, has been proposed for this purpose. However, the role of on-line segmental longitudinal peak systolic strain (LPSS) values in the prediction of LVWM has not been fully evaluated. To test segmental LPSS for predicting LVWM abnormalities in routine echocardiography laboratory practice. LVWM was evaluated by an experienced cardiologist, during routine practice, in 620 patients; segmental LPSS values were then calculated. In this work, reflecting real life, 99.6% of segments were successfully tracked. Mean (95% confidence interval [CI]) segmental LPSS values for normal basal (n=3409), mid (n=3468) and apical (n=3466) segments were -16.7% (-16.9% to -16.5%), -18.2% (-18.3% to -18.0%) and -21.1% (-21.3% to -20.9%), respectively. Mean (95% CI) segmental LPSS values for hypokinetic basal (n=114), mid (n=116) and apical (n=90) segments were -7.7% (-9.0% to -6.3%), -10.1% (-11.1% to -9.0%) and -9.3% (-10.5% to -8.1%), respectively. Mean (95% CI) segmental LPSS values for akinetic basal (n=128), mid (n=95) and apical (n=91) segments were -6.6% (-8.0% to -5.1%), -6.1% (-7.7% to -4.6%) and -4.2% (-5.4% to -3.0%), respectively. LPSS allowed the differentiation between normal and abnormal segments at basal, mid and apical levels. An LPSS value≥-12% detected abnormal segmental motion with a sensitivity of 78% for basal, 70% for mid and 82% for apical segments. Segmental LPSS values may help to differentiate between normal and abnormal left ventricular segments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Wall shear stress from a rotating cylinder in cross flow using the electrochemical technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labraga, L.; Bourabaa, N.; Berkah, T.

    2002-01-01

    The wall shear rate from a rotating cylinder in a uniform flow was measured with flush-mounted electrochemical mass transfer probes. The experiments were performed using two rectangular electrodes in a sandwich arrangement. Initially, the frequency response of that probe was numerically studied using an inverse mass transfer method in order to restore the whole wall shear stress in the time domain starting from the measured transfer coefficients given by the split probe. The experiments were performed in the range of velocity ratios 0 4, points of zero shear stress on the rotating cylinder vanish, which is in fact consistent with the previous arguments that the cylinder is surrounded by a set of closed streamlines. This experimental study shows that, when their dynamic behaviour is known, the electrochemical probes are able to sense complex fine structures not observed up to now by previous analytical, numerical or experimental methods, even when non-linear effects are not negligible. (orig.)

  9. Orbitally shaken shallow fluid layers. II. An improved wall shear stress model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpresa, Paola; Sherwin, Spencer; Weinberg, Peter; van Reeuwijk, Maarten

    2018-03-01

    A new model for the analytical prediction of wall shear stress distributions at the base of orbitally shaken shallow fluid layers is developed. This model is a generalisation of the classical extended Stokes solution and will be referred to as the potential theory-Stokes model. The model is validated using a large set of numerical simulations covering a wide range of flow regimes representative of those used in laboratory experiments. It is demonstrated that the model is in much better agreement with the simulation data than the classical Stokes solution, improving the prediction in 63% of the studied cases. The central assumption of the model—which is to link the wall shear stress with the surface velocity—is shown to hold remarkably well over all regimes covered.

  10. Direct measurement of wall shear stress in a reattaching flow with a photonic sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayaz, U K; Ioppolo, T; Ötügen, M V

    2013-01-01

    Wall shear stress measurements are carried out in a planar backward-facing step flow using a micro-optical sensor. The sensor is essentially a floating element system and measures the shear stress directly. The transduction method to measure the floating element deflection is based on the whispering gallery optical mode (WGM) shifts of a dielectric microsphere. This method is capable of measuring floating element displacements of the order of a nanometer. The floating element surface is circular with a diameter of ∼960 µm, which is part of a beam that is in contact with the dielectric microsphere. The sensor is calibrated for shear stress as well as pressure sensitivity yielding 7.3 pm Pa −1 and 0.0236 pm Pa −1 for shear stress and pressure sensitivity, respectively. Hence, the contribution by the wall pressure is less than two orders of magnitude smaller than that of shear stress. Measurements are made for a Reynolds number range of 2000–5000 extending to 18 step heights from the step face. The results are in good agreement with those of earlier reports. An analysis is also carried out to evaluate the performance of the WGM sensor including measurement sensitivity and bandwidth. (paper)

  11. Estimation of the supplementary axial wall stress generated at peak flow by an arterial stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doriot, Pierre-Andre

    2003-01-01

    Mechanical stresses in arterial walls are known to be implicated in the development of atherosclerosis. While shear stress and circumferential stress have received a lot of attention, axial stress has not. Yet, stenoses can be intuitively expected to produce a supplementary axial stress during flow systole in the region immediately proximal to the constriction cone. In this paper, a model for the estimation of this effect is presented, and ten numerical examples are computed. These examples show that the cyclic increase in axial stress can be quite considerable in severe stenoses (typically 120% or more of the normal stress value). This result is in best agreement with the known mechanical or morphological risk factors of stenosis progression and restenosis (hypertension, elevated pulse pressure, degree of stenosis, stenosis geometry, residual stenosis, etc). The supplementary axial stress generated by a stenosis might create the damages in the endothelium and in the elastic membranes which potentiate the action of the other risk factors (hyperlipidaemia, diabetes, etc). It could thus be an important cause of stenosis progression and of restenosis

  12. Estimation of the supplementary axial wall stress generated at peak flow by an arterial stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doriot, Pierre-André

    2003-01-01

    Mechanical stresses in arterial walls are known to be implicated in the development of atherosclerosis. While shear stress and circumferential stress have received a lot of attention, axial stress has not. Yet, stenoses can be intuitively expected to produce a supplementary axial stress during flow systole in the region immediately proximal to the constriction cone. In this paper, a model for the estimation of this effect is presented, and ten numerical examples are computed. These examples show that the cyclic increase in axial stress can be quite considerable in severe stenoses (typically 120% or more of the normal stress value). This result is in best agreement with the known mechanical or morphological risk factors of stenosis progression and restenosis (hypertension, elevated pulse pressure, degree of stenosis, stenosis geometry, residual stenosis, etc). The supplementary axial stress generated by a stenosis might create the damages in the endothelium and in the elastic membranes which potentiate the action of the other risk factors (hyperlipidaemia, diabetes, etc). It could thus be an important cause of stenosis progression and of restenosis.

  13. Ultrasonic measurements on residual stress in autofrettged thick walled petroleum pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woias, G.; Mizera, J.

    2008-01-01

    The residual stresses in a component or structure are caused by incompatible permanent deformation and related gradient of plastic/elastic strains. They may be generated or modified at every stage in the components life cycle, from original material production to final disposal. Residual stresses can be measured by non-destructive techniques, including X-ray and neutron diffraction, magnetic and ultrasonic methods. The selection of the optimum measurement technique should take account volumetric resolution, material, geometry and access to the component. For large metallic components neutron diffraction is of prime importance as it provides quantitative information on stresses in relatively large volume of methods disregarding its shape complexity. Residual stresses can play a significant role in explaining or preventing failure of components of industrial installations. One example of residual stresses preventing failure are the ones generated by shot peening, inducing surface compressive stresses that improve the fatigue life. Petroleum refinery piping is generally characterized by large-diameters, operated at elevated temperature and under high pressure. Pipelines of a polyethylene plant working in one of the Polish refineries are subjected to pressures exceeding 300 MPa at temperatures above 200 o C. The pipes considered here were pressurized with pressure of 600 MPa. The wall thickness of the pipes is 27 mm and pipe dimensions are 46 x 100 mm. The material is steel with Re=580 MPa. Due to pressurizing, the components retain compressive stresses at the internal surface. These stresses increase resistance to cracking of the pipes. Over the period of exploitation these stresses diminish due to temperature activated relaxation or creep. The purpose of the project is to verify kinetics of such a relaxation process and calibrate alternative methods of their measurements. To avoid stress relaxation, numerical analysis from Finite Element Modelling (FEM)gave an

  14. Wall shear stress characterization of a 3D bluff-body separated flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourrié, Grégoire; Keirsbulck, Laurent; Labraga, Larbi

    2013-10-01

    Efficient flow control strategies aimed at reducing the aerodynamic drag of road vehicles require a detailed knowledge of the reference flow. In this work, the flow around the rear slanted window of a generic car model was experimentally studied through wall shear stress measurements using an electrochemical method. The mean and fluctuating wall shear stress within the wall impact regions of the recirculation bubble and the main longitudinal vortex structures which develop above the rear window are presented. Correlations allow a more detailed characterization of the recirculation phenomenon within the separation bubble. In the model symmetry plane the recirculation structure compares well with simpler 2D configurations; specific lengths, flapping motion and shedding of large-scale vortices are observed, these similarities diminish when leaving the middle plane due to the strong three-dimensionality of the flow. A specific attention is paid to the convection processes occurring within the recirculation: a downstream convection velocity is observed, in accordance with 2D recirculations from the literature, and an upstream convection is highlighted along the entire bubble length which has not been underlined in some previous canonical configurations.

  15. Estimation of gas wall shear stress in horizontal stratified gas-liquid pipe flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newton, C.H.; Behnia, M.

    1996-01-01

    Two-phase pipe flows occur in many industrial applications, such as condensers and evaporators, chemical processing equipment, nuclear reactors, and oil pipelines. A variety of basic mechanistic flow models for predicting the pressure gradient and liquid loading characteristics of these types of flows to assist in design calculations has emerged over the past two decades, especially for the stratified and slug flow regimes. These models generally rely on a number of basic assumptions and empirical closure equations. Possibly the most notable of these relates to the evaluation of interfacial shear stresses. However, one of the most important yet least discussed assumptions used in most of these models is that the phase wall shear stresses can be accurately estimated from correlations developed for single-phase pipe flows. The object of this article is to present measurements of gas wall shear up to locations in close proximity to the gas-liquid interface for a variety of interface conditions in developed flow, and to determine the effects of the interface on average gas wall friction factors. In this context the interface may be smooth, rippled or wavy

  16. Role of Wall Shear Stress in Cryptosporidium parvum Oocyst Attachment to Environmental Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xia; Jedlicka, Sabrina S; Jellison, Kristen L

    2017-12-15

    This study investigated Cryptosporidium parvum oocyst deposition onto biofilms as a function of shear stress under laminar or turbulent flow. Annular rotating bioreactors were used to grow stabilized stream biofilms at shear stresses ranging from 0.038 to 0.46 Pa. These steady-state biofilms were then used to assess the impact of hydrodynamic conditions on C. parvum oocyst attachment. C. parvum deposition onto biofilms followed a pseudo-second-order model under both laminar (after a lag phase) and turbulent flows. The total number of oocysts attached to the biofilm at steady state decreased as the hydrodynamic wall shear stress increased. The oocyst deposition rate constant increased with shear stress but decreased at high shear, suggesting that increasing wall shear stress results in faster attachment of Cryptosporidium due to higher mass transport until the shear forces exceed a critical limit that prevents oocyst attachment. These data show that oocyst attachment in the short and long term are impacted differently by shear: higher shear (to a certain limit) may be associated with faster initial oocyst attachment, but lower shear is associated with greater numbers of oocysts attached at equilibrium. IMPORTANCE This research provides experimental evidence to demonstrate that shear stress plays a critical role in protozoan-pathogen transport and deposition in environmental waters. The data presented in this work expand scientific understanding of Cryptosporidium attachment and fate, which will further influence the development of timely and accurate sampling strategies, as well as advanced water treatment technologies, to target protozoan pathogens in surface waters that serve as municipal drinking water sources. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  17. In vivo 3-dimensional Magnetic Resonance Wall Shear Stress Estimation in Ascending Aortic Dilatation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieging, Erik T.; Frydrychowicz, Alex; Wentland, Andrew; Landgraf, Benjamin R.; Johnson, Kevin M.; Wieben, Oliver; François, Christopher J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To estimate surface-based wall shear stress (WSS) and evaluate flow patterns in ascending aortic dilatation (AscAD) using a high-resolution, time-resolved, three-dimensional (3D), three-directional velocity encoded, radially undersampled phase contrast magnetic resonance sequence (4D PC-MRI). Materials and Methods 4D PC-MRI was performed in 11 patients with AscAD (46.3±22.0 years) and 10 healthy volunteers (32.9±13.4 years) after written informed consent and IRB-approval. Following manual vessel wall segmentation of the ascending aorta (MATLAB, The Mathworks, Natick, MA), a 3D surface was created using spline interpolation. Spatial WSS variation based on surface division in 12 segments and temporal variation were evaluated in AscAD and normal aortas. Visual analysis of flow patterns was performed based on streamlines and particle traces using EnSight (v9.0, CEI, Apex, NC). Results AscAD was associated with significantly increased diastolic WSS, decreased systolic to diastolic WSS ratio, and delayed onset of peak WSS (all P wall of the ascending aorta. Vortical flow with highest velocities along the anterior wall and increased helical flow during diastole were observed in AscAD compared to controls. Conclusion Changes in WSS in the ascending aorta of AscAD correspond to observed alterations in flow patterns compared to controls. PMID:21563242

  18. Four-dimensional echocardiography area strain combined with exercise stress echocardiography to evaluate left ventricular regional systolic function in patients with mild single vessel coronary artery stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yan; Peng, Long; Liu, Yuan-Yuan; Yin, Li-Xue; Li, Chun-Mei; Wang, Yi; Rao, Li

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to assess the diagnosis value of four-dimensional echocardiography area strain (AS) combined with exercise stress echocardiography to evaluate left ventricular regional systolic function in patients with mild single vessel coronary artery stenosis. Based on treadmill exercise load status, two-dimensional conventional echocardiography and four-dimensional echocardiography area strain were performed on patients suspected coronary artery disease before coronary angiogram. Thirty patients (case group) with mild left anterior descending coronary artery stenosis (stenosis Four-dimensional echocardiography area strain combined with exercise stress echocardiography could sensitively find left ventricular regional systolic function abnormality in patients with mild single vessel coronary artery stenosis, and locate stenosis coronary artery accordingly. © 2017, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. The Aspergillus niger MADS-box transcription factor RlmA is required for cell wall reinforcement in response to cell wall stress.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damveld, R.A.; Arentshorst, M.; Franken, A.; Vankuyk, P.A.; Klis, F.M.; van den Hondel, C.A.; Ram, A.F.

    2005-01-01

    In Aspergillus niger, the genes coding for glutamine:fructose-6-phosphate amidotransferase (gfaA) and ¿-1,3-glucan synthase (agsA) are induced in response to cell wall stress. In silico analysis of the promoter region of the two genes revealed the presence of putative DNA binding sites for

  20. Wall shear stress measurement of near-wall flow over inclined and curved boundaries by stereo interfacial particle image velocimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Thien Duy; Wells, John Craig; Nguyen, Chuong Vinh

    2010-01-01

    In investigations of laminar or turbulent flows, wall shear is often important. Nevertheless, conventional particle image velocimetry (PIV) is difficult in near-wall regions. A near-wall measurement technique, named interfacial PIV (IPIV) [Nguyen, C., Nguyen, T., Wells, J., Nakayama, A., 2008. Proposals for PIV of near-wall flow over curved boundaries. In: Proceedings of 14th International Symposium on Applications of Laser Technique to Fluid Mechanics], handles curved boundaries by means of conformal transformation, directly measures the wall gradient, and yields the near-wall tangential velocity profile at one-pixel resolution. In this paper, we show the feasibility of extending IPIV to measure wall gradients by stereo reconstruction. First, we perform a test on synthetic images generated from a direct numerical simulation (DNS) snapshot of turbulent flow over sinusoidal bed. Comparative assessment of wall gradients derived by IPIV, stereo-IPIV and particle image distortion (PID) [Huang, H.T., Fiedler, H.E., Wang, J.J., 1993. Limitation and improvement of PIV. Experiments in Fluids 15(4), 263-273] is evaluated with DNS data. Also, the sensitivity of IPIV and stereo-IPIV results to the uncertainty of identified wall position is examined. As a practical application of IPIV and stereo-IPIV to experimental images, results from turbulent open channel flow over a backward-facing step are discussed in detail.

  1. Dynamic Fungal Cell Wall Architecture in Stress Adaptation and Immune Evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopke, Alex; Brown, Alistair J P; Hall, Rebecca A; Wheeler, Robert T

    2018-04-01

    Deadly infections from opportunistic fungi have risen in frequency, largely because of the at-risk immunocompromised population created by advances in modern medicine and the HIV/AIDS pandemic. This review focuses on dynamics of the fungal polysaccharide cell wall, which plays an outsized role in fungal pathogenesis and therapy because it acts as both an environmental barrier and as the major interface with the host immune system. Human fungal pathogens use architectural strategies to mask epitopes from the host and prevent immune surveillance, and recent work elucidates how biotic and abiotic stresses present during infection can either block or enhance masking. The signaling components implicated in regulating fungal immune recognition can teach us how cell wall dynamics are controlled, and represent potential targets for interventions designed to boost or dampen immunity. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Development of serial measurement system for three-dimensional stress determination by over-coring the strains on borehole wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itamoto, Masaharu; Kuwabara, Kazumichi; Tanno, Takeo; Nakayama, Yoshiki; Mizuta, Yoshiaki

    2007-01-01

    In order to determine the three-dimensional stress state in serial order, the authors developed the serial measurement system for three-dimensional stress determination by over-coring the strains on the borehole wall. The serial stress measurements give the value of the stresses with high accuracy and bring the regional stress variations. In this paper, the authors describe the studies through FEM analysis on the effect of over-coring diameter, the influence of strain gauge length and the behavior of strain on the borehole wall, induced by biaxial external loading. We developed the multi-strain gauge mounted packer and examined it by measuring the strains on the borehole wall through biaxial loading test. The Laboratory tests showed its applicability to practical use. (author)

  3. Comparative transcriptomics indicate changes in cell wall organization and stress response in seedlings during spaceflight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Christina M; Subramanian, Aswati; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Correll, Melanie J; Kiss, John Z

    2017-08-21

    Plants will play an important role in the future of space exploration as part of bioregenerative life support. Thus, it is important to understand the effects of microgravity and spaceflight on gene expression in plant development. We analyzed the transcriptome of Arabidopsis thaliana using the Biological Research in Canisters (BRIC) hardware during Space Shuttle mission STS-131. The bioinformatics methods used included RMA (robust multi-array average), MAS5 (Microarray Suite 5.0), and PLIER (probe logarithmic intensity error estimation). Glycome profiling was used to analyze cell wall composition in the samples. In addition, our results were compared to those of two other groups using the same hardware on the same mission (BRIC-16). In our BRIC-16 experiments, we noted expression changes in genes involved in hypoxia and heat shock responses, DNA repair, and cell wall structure between spaceflight samples compared to the ground controls. In addition, glycome profiling supported our expression analyses in that there was a difference in cell wall components between ground control and spaceflight-grown plants. Comparing our studies to those of the other BRIC-16 experiments demonstrated that, even with the same hardware and similar biological materials, differences in results in gene expression were found among these spaceflight experiments. A common theme from our BRIC-16 space experiments and those of the other two groups was the downregulation of water stress response genes in spaceflight. In addition, all three studies found differential regulation of genes associated with cell wall remodeling and stress responses between spaceflight-grown and ground control plants. © 2017 Botanical Society of America.

  4. Velocity profile and wall shear stress of saccular aneurysms at the anterior communicating artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Ryuhei; Ujiie, Hiroshi; Haida, Sayaka; Nakazawa, Nobuhiko; Hori, Tomokatsu

    2008-01-01

    It has recently been shown that the aspect ratio (dome/neck) of an aneurysm correlates well with intraaneurysmal blood flow. Aneurysms with an aspect ratio larger than 1.6 carry a higher risk of rupture. We examined the effect of aspect ratio (AR) on intra-aneurysmal flow using experimental models. Flow visualization with particle imaging velocimetry and measurement of wall shear stress using laser Doppler anemometry were performed on three different aneurysm models: AR 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0. Intraaneurysmal flow consists of inflow, circulation, and outflow. Rapid inflow impinged on the distal neck creating a stagnant point. Rapid flow and maximum wall shear stress were observed in the vicinity of the stagnant point. By changing the Reynold's number, the stagnant point moved. By increasing the AR of the aneurysm, vortices inside the aneurysm sac closed and very slow flow was observed, resulting in very low shear stress markedly at a Reynold's number of 250, compatible with the diastolic phase. In the aneurysm model AR 2.0, both rapid flow at the neck and vortices inside the aneurysm are sufficient to activate platelets, making a thrombus that may anchor on the dome where very slow flow takes place. Hemodynamics in aneurysms larger than AR 2.0 definitely contribute to thrombus formation.

  5. The Sheer Stress of Shear Stress: Responses of the Vascular Wall to a Haemodynamic Force

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Cheng (Caroline (Ka Lai))

    2006-01-01

    textabstractStudies in the hemodynamic field point to a strong relation between shear stress and the onset to vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis. Data from in vitro studies using sheared endothelial cells have provided insight into the possible mechanisms involved. However, the lack of an

  6. A Study on Effect of Local Wall Thinning in Carbon Steel Elbow Pipe on Elastic Stress Concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Sung; Seo, Jae Seok

    2009-01-01

    Feeder pipes that connect the inlet and outlet headers to the reactor core in CANDU nuclear power plants are considered as safety Class 1 piping items. Therefore, fatigue of feeder pipes should be assessed at design stage in order to verify structural integrity during design lifetime. In accordance with the fatigue assessment result, cumulative usage factors of some feeder pipes have significant values. The feeder pipes made of SA-106 Grade B or C carbon steel have some elbows and bends. An active degradation mechanism for the carbon steel outlet feeder piping is local wall thinning due to flow-accelerated corrosion. Inspection results from plants and metallurgical examinations of removed feeders indicated the presence of localized thinning in the vicinity of the welds in the lower portion of outlet feeders, such as Grayloc hub-to-bend weld, Grayloc hub-to-elbow weld, elbow-to-elbow, and elbow-to-pipe weld. This local wall thinning can cause increase of peak stress due to stress concentration by notch effect. The increase of peak stress results in increase of cumulative usage factor. However, present fatigue assessment doesn't consider the stress concentration due to local wall-thinning. Therefore, it is necessary to assess the effect of local wall thinning on stress concentration. This study investigates the effect of local wall thinning geometry on stress concentration by performing finite element elastic stress analysis

  7. Agreement of left ventricular ejection fraction and volumes between adenosine stress TL-201 gated SPECT and echocardiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pai, M. S. [College of Medicine, Univ. of Ewha, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Moon, D. H.; Kim, H. M.; Yang, Y. J.; Kang, D. H. [Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-07-01

    Electrocardiogram-gated TI-201 SPECT measurements of left ventricular ejection fraction (EF), end-diastolic volume (EDV), and end-systolic volume (ESV) have shown high correlation with conventional methods. However, how much these parameters measured by TI-201 gated SPECT differ from those by echocardiography has not been assessed. Adenosine stress (Ad-G) and redistribution TI-201 gated SPECT (Re-G) and resting echocardiography were conducted in 337 patients (184 male, 153 female). EDV, ESV and LVEF measured by QGS software were compared with the results by echocardiography. Patients with arrhythmia (atrial fibrillation or frequent premature contractions) or evidence of fixed or reversible perfusion defects on TI-201 SPECT were excluded. EF, EDV and ESV measured by Ad-G (63.3{+-}9.8,73.8{+-}30.2,29.1{+-}20.1) and Re-G (65.2{+-}11.6,69.1{+-}30.1,26.5{+-}20.3) correlated well with those by Echo (61.4{+-}7.9,78.3{+-}2.7, 30.7{+-} 17.5 ; r of Ad-G=0.547, 0.850, 0.827, p<0.001 ; r of Re-G=0.585, 0.838, 0.819, p<0.001). However the difference (mean, SD, SEE of Echo - gated SPECT) was statistically significant (EF: Ad-G=1.71, 8.92, 0.48, Re-G=3.59, 10.39, 0.56, p<0.001 ; EDV: Ad-G=4.75, 16.21, 0.88, Re-G=9.53, 16.77, 0.91, p<0.001 ; ESV: Ad-G=1.75, 11.35, 0.61, p<0.05, Re-G=4.29, 11.7, 0.63, p<0.001). Bland-Altman plots showed that the difference of EDV and ESV did not vary in any systematic way over the range of measurement, whereas the difference of EF increased with increasing average EF by Echo and gated-SPECT. The difference of EF, EDV, and ESV between Ad-G and Echo was significantly smaller than those between Re-G and Echo (p<0.001). Gated TI-201 SPECT underestimates EDV and ESV over a wide range of volume. As a result, EF by gated TI-201 SPECT is overestimated especially in patients with small LV volume. Ad-G is preferable to Re-G in assessing left ventricular ejection fraction and volume in place of Echo because of smaller bias.

  8. Reversion of left ventricular systolic dysfunction and abnormal stress test: by catheter ablation, in a patient with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome from Para-Hisian Kent bundle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Chung-Ming; Chu, Kai-Ming; Cheng, Cheng-Chung; Cheng, Shu-Mung; Lin, Wei-Shiang

    2010-01-01

    The diagnosis of Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome is typically reserved for patients who experience ventricular pre-excitation and symptoms that are related to paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia, such as chest pain, dyspnea, dizziness, palpitations, or syncope. Herein, we report the case of a 38-year-old woman who presented at our outpatient department because of exercise intolerance. Cardiac auscultation revealed a grade 2/6 pansystolic murmur over the left lower sternal border. Twelve-lead electrocardiography showed sinus rhythm at a rate of 76 beats/min, with a significant delta wave. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed abnormal left ventricular systolic function. The results of a thallium stress test were also abnormal. Coronary artery disease was suspected; however, coronary angiography yielded normal results. Electrophysiologic study revealed a para-Hisian Kent bundle and a dual atrioventricular nodal pathway. After radiofrequency catheter ablation was performed, the patient's left ventricular function improved and her symptoms disappeared. In Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, left ventricular systolic dyssynchrony can yield abnormal findings on echocardiography and thallium scanning--even in persons who have no cardiovascular risk factors. Physicians who are armed with this knowledge can avoid performing coronary angiography unnecessarily. Catheter ablation can reverse the dyssynchrony of the ventricle and improve the patient's symptoms.

  9. Reversible Stress Cardiomyopathy Presenting as Acute Coronary Syndrome with Elevated Troponin in the Absence of Regional Wall Motion Abnormalities: A Forme Fruste of Stress Cardiomyopathy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahesh Anantha Narayanan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of reversible stress cardiomyopathy in a surgical patient, described here as a forme fruste due to its atypical features. It is important to recognize such unusual presentation of stress cardiomyopathy that mimics acute coronary syndrome. Stress cardiomyopathy commonly presents as acute coronary syndrome and is characterized by typical or atypical variants of regional wall motion abnormalities. We report a 60-year-old Caucasian male with reversible stress cardiomyopathy following a sternal fracture fixation. Although the patient had several typical features of stress cardiomyopathy including physical stress, ST-segment elevation, elevated cardiac biomarkers and normal epicardial coronaries, there were few features that were atypical, including unusual age, gender, absence of regional wall motion abnormalities, high lateral ST elevation, and high troponin-ejection fraction product. In conclusion, this could represent a forme fruste of stress cardiomyopathy.

  10. Phase analysis of gated blood pool SPECT for multiple stress testing assessments of ventricular mechanical dyssynchrony in a tachycardia-induced dilated cardiomyopathy canine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salimian, Samaneh; Thibault, Bernard; Finnerty, Vincent; Grégoire, Jean; Harel, François

    2017-02-01

    Stress-induced dyssynchrony has been shown to be independently correlated with clinical outcomes in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and narrow QRS complexes. However, the extent to which stress levels affect inter- and intraventricular dyssynchrony parameters remains unknown. Ten large dogs were submitted to tachycardia-induced DCM by pacing the right ventricular apex for 3-4 weeks to reach a target ejection fraction (EF) of 35% or less. Stress was then induced in DCM dogs by administering intravenous dobutamine up to a maximum of 20 μg·kg -1 ·min -1 . Hemodynamic and ventricular dyssynchrony data were analyzed by left ventricular (LV) pressure measurements and gated blood pool SPECT (GBPS) imaging. In order to assess mechanical dyssynchrony in DCM subjects and compare it with that of 8 normal counterparts, we extracted the following data: count-based indices of LV contraction homogeneity index (CHI), entropy and phase standard deviation, and interventricular dyssynchrony index. A significant LV intraventricular dyssynchrony (CHI: 96.4 ± 1.3% in control vs 78.6% ± 10.9% in DCM subjects) resulted in an intense LV dysfunction in DCM subjects (EF: 49.5% ± 8.4% in control vs 22.6% ± 6.0% in DCM), compared to control subjects. However, interventricular dyssynchrony did not vary significantly between the two groups. Under stress, DCM subjects showed a significant improvement in ventricular functional parameters at each level (EF: 22.6% ± 6.0% at rest vs 48.1% ± 5.8% at maximum stress). All intraventricular dyssynchrony indices showed a significant increase in magnitude of synchrony from baseline to stress levels of greater than or equal to 5 μg·kg -1 ·min -1 dobutamine. There were individual differences in the magnitude and pattern of change in interventricular dyssynchrony during the various levels of stress. Based on GBPS analyses, different levels of functional stress, even in close intervals, can have a significant impact on

  11. Spatio-temporal characteristics of large scale motions in a turbulent boundary layer from direct wall shear stress measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabon, Rommel; Barnard, Casey; Ukeiley, Lawrence; Sheplak, Mark

    2016-11-01

    Particle image velocimetry (PIV) and fluctuating wall shear stress experiments were performed on a flat plate turbulent boundary layer (TBL) under zero pressure gradient conditions. The fluctuating wall shear stress was measured using a microelectromechanical 1mm × 1mm floating element capacitive shear stress sensor (CSSS) developed at the University of Florida. The experiments elucidated the imprint of the organized motions in a TBL on the wall shear stress through its direct measurement. Spatial autocorrelation of the streamwise velocity from the PIV snapshots revealed large scale motions that scale on the order of boundary layer thickness. However, the captured inclination angle was lower than that determined using the classic method by means of wall shear stress and hot-wire anemometry (HWA) temporal cross-correlations and a frozen field hypothesis using a convection velocity. The current study suggests the large size of these motions begins to degrade the applicability of the frozen field hypothesis for the time resolved HWA experiments. The simultaneous PIV and CSSS measurements are also used for spatial reconstruction of the velocity field during conditionally sampled intense wall shear stress events. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. DGE-1315138.

  12. Cell envelope stress response in cell wall-deficient L-forms of Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Diana; Domínguez-Cuevas, Patricia; Daniel, Richard A; Mascher, Thorsten

    2012-11-01

    L-forms are cell wall-deficient bacteria that can grow and proliferate in osmotically stabilizing media. Recently, a strain of the Gram-positive model bacterium Bacillus subtilis was constructed that allowed controlled switching between rod-shaped wild-type cells and corresponding L-forms. Both states can be stably maintained under suitable culture conditions. Because of the absence of a cell wall, L-forms are known to be insensitive to β-lactam antibiotics, but reports on the susceptibility of L-forms to other antibiotics that interfere with membrane-anchored steps of cell wall biosynthesis are sparse, conflicting, and strongly influenced by strain background and method of L-form generation. Here we investigated the response of B. subtilis to the presence of cell envelope antibiotics, with regard to both antibiotic resistance and the induction of the known LiaRS- and BceRS-dependent cell envelope stress biosensors. Our results show that B. subtilis L-forms are resistant to antibiotics that interfere with the bactoprenol cycle, such as bacitracin, vancomycin, and mersacidin, but are hypersensitive to nisin and daptomycin, which both affect membrane integrity. Moreover, we established a lacZ-based reporter gene assay for L-forms and provide evidence that LiaRS senses its inducers indirectly (damage sensing), while the Bce module detects its inducers directly (drug sensing).

  13. Stress adapted embroidered meshes with a graded pattern design for abdominal wall hernia repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, J.; Bittrich, L.; Breier, A.; Spickenheuer, A.

    2017-10-01

    Abdominal wall hernias are one of the most relevant injuries of the digestive system with 25 million patients in 2013. Surgery is recommended primarily using allogenic non-absorbable wrap-knitted meshes. These meshes have in common that their stress-strain behaviour is not adapted to the anisotropic behaviour of native abdominal wall tissue. The ideal mesh should possess an adequate mechanical behaviour and a suitable porosity at the same time. An alternative fabrication method to wrap-knitting is the embroidery technology with a high flexibility in pattern design and adaption of mechanical properties. In this study, a pattern generator was created for pattern designs consisting of a base and a reinforcement pattern. The embroidered mesh structures demonstrated different structural and mechanical characteristics. Additionally, the investigation of the mechanical properties exhibited an anisotropic mechanical behaviour for the embroidered meshes. As a result, the investigated pattern generator and the embroidery technology allow the production of stress adapted mesh structures that are a promising approach for hernia reconstruction.

  14. Wall Shear Stress Estimation of Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Febina

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available An attempt has been made to evaluate the effects of wall shear stress (WSS on thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD. Aneurysm is an excessive localized swelling of the arterial wall due to many physiological factors and it may rupture causing shock or sudden death. The existing imaging modalities such as MRI and CT assist in the visualization of anomalies in internal organs. However, the expected dynamic behaviour of arterial bulge under stressed condition can only be effectively evaluated through mathematical modelling. In this work, a 3D aneurysm model is reconstructed from the CT scan slices and eventually the model is imported to Star CCM+ (Siemens, USA for intensive CFD analysis. The domain is discretized using polyhedral mesh with prism layers to capture the weakening boundary more accurately. When there is flow reversal in TAA as seen in the velocity vector plot, there is a chance of cell damage causing clots. This is because of the shear created in the system due to the flow pattern. It is observed from the proposed mathematical modelling that the deteriorating WSS is an indicator for possible rupture and its value oscillates over a cardiac cycle as well as over different stress conditions. In this model, the vortex formation pattern and flow reversals are also captured. The non-Newtonian model, including a pulsatile flow instead of a steady average flow, does not overpredict the WSS (15.29 Pa compared to 16 Pa for the Newtonian model. Although in a cycle the flow behaviour is laminar-turbulent-laminar (LTL, utilizing the non-Newtonian model along with LTL model also overpredicted the WSS with a value of 20.1 Pa. The numerical study presented here provides good insight of TAA using a systematic approach to numerical modelling and analysis.

  15. The effect of a self-balancing through wall residual stress distribution on the extension of a through-wall crack in a pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, E.

    1993-01-01

    Leak-before-break arguments for pressurized components involve a comparison of the critical size of crack that will grow unstably under accident loadings and the critical leakage crack size for normal operation loadings. The paper is concerned with the former crack size and particularly with regard to the effect of residual stresses on the critical unstable crack size. Results from an analysis of a simple simulation model are used to provide underpinning for the view, expressed by Green and Knowles at the 1992 American Society of Mechanical Engineers Pressure Vessel and Piping Conference, that self-balancing through-wall residual stresses have little overall effect on the extension of a through-wall crack in a pressure vessel

  16. Effect of cell wall integrity stress and RlmA transcription factor on asexual development and autolysis in Aspergillus nidulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, Zsuzsanna; Szarka, Máté; Kovács, Szilvia; Boczonádi, Imre; Emri, Tamás; Abe, Keietsu; Pócsi, István; Pusztahelyi, Tünde

    2013-05-01

    The cell wall integrity (CWI) signaling pathway is responsible for cell wall remodeling and reinforcement upon cell wall stress, which is proposed to be universal in fungal cultures. In Aspergillus nidulans, both the deletion of rlmA encoding the RlmA transcription factor in CWI signaling and low concentrations of the cell wall polymer intercalating agent Congo Red caused significant physiological changes. The gene deletion mutant ΔrlmA strain showed decreased CWI and oxidative stress resistances, which indicated the connection between the CWI pathway and the oxidative stress response system. The Congo Red stress resulted in alterations in the cell wall polymer composition in submerged cultures due to the induction of the biosynthesis of the alkali soluble fraction as well as the hydrolysis of cell wall biopolymers. Both RlmA and RlmA-independent factors induced by Congo Red stress regulated the expression of glucanase (ANID_00245, engA) and chitinase (chiB, chiA) genes, which promoted the autolysis of the cultures and also modulated the pellet sizes. CWI stress and rlmA deletion affected the expression of brlA encoding the early conidiophore development regulator transcription factor BrlA and, as a consequence, the formation of conidiophores was significantly changed in submerged cultures. Interestingly, the number of conidiospores increased in surface cultures of the ΔrlmA strain. The in silico analysis of genes putatively regulated by RlmA and the CWI transcription factors AnSwi4/AnSwi6 in the SBF complex revealed only a few jointly regulated genes, including ugmA and srrA coding for UgmA UDP-galactopyranose mutase and SrrA stress response regulator, respectively. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The overloaded right heart and ventricular interdependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeije, Robert; Badagliacca, Roberto

    2017-10-01

    The right and the left ventricle are interdependent as both structures are nested within the pericardium, have the septum in common and are encircled with common myocardial fibres. Therefore, right ventricular volume or pressure overloading affects left ventricular function, and this in turn may affect the right ventricle. In normal subjects at rest, right ventricular function has negligible interaction with left ventricular function. However, the right ventricle contributes significantly to the normal cardiac output response to exercise. In patients with right ventricular volume overload without pulmonary hypertension, left ventricular diastolic compliance is decreased and ejection fraction depressed but without intrinsic alteration in contractility. In patients with right ventricular pressure overload, left ventricular compliance is decreased with initial preservation of left ventricular ejection fraction, but with eventual left ventricular atrophic remodelling and altered systolic function. Breathing affects ventricular interdependence, in healthy subjects during exercise and in patients with lung diseases and altered respiratory system mechanics. Inspiration increases right ventricular volumes and decreases left ventricular volumes. Expiration decreases both right and left ventricular volumes. The presence of an intact pericardium enhances ventricular diastolic interdependence but has negligible effect on ventricular systolic interdependence. On the other hand, systolic interdependence is enhanced by a stiff right ventricular free wall, and decreased by a stiff septum. Recent imaging studies have shown that both diastolic and systolic ventricular interactions are negatively affected by right ventricular regional inhomogeneity and prolongation of contraction, which occur along with an increase in pulmonary artery pressure. The clinical relevance of these observations is being explored. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights

  18. Wall shear stress in portal vein of cirrhotic patients with portal hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Pu, Yan-Song; Wang, Xin-Kai; Jiang, An; Zhou, Rui; Li, Yu; Zhang, Qiu-Juan; Wei, Ya-Juan; Chen, Bin; Li, Zong-Fang

    2017-05-14

    To investigate wall shear stress (WSS) magnitude and distribution in cirrhotic patients with portal hypertension using computational fluid dynamics. Idealized portal vein (PV) system models were reconstructed with different angles of the PV-splenic vein (SV) and superior mesenteric vein (SMV)-SV. Patient-specific models were created according to enhanced computed tomography images. WSS was simulated by using a finite-element analyzer, regarding the blood as a Newtonian fluid and the vessel as a rigid wall. Analysis was carried out to compare the WSS in the portal hypertension group with that in healthy controls. For the idealized models, WSS in the portal hypertension group (0-10 dyn/cm 2 ) was significantly lower than that in the healthy controls (10-20 dyn/cm 2 ), and low WSS area (0-1 dyn/cm 2 ) only occurred in the left wall of the PV in the portal hypertension group. Different angles of PV-SV and SMV-SV had different effects on the magnitude and distribution of WSS, and low WSS area often occurred in smaller PV-SV angle and larger SMV-SV angle. In the patient-specific models, WSS in the cirrhotic patients with portal hypertension (10.13 ± 1.34 dyn/cm 2 ) was also significantly lower than that in the healthy controls ( P portal hypertension, the low WSS area extended to wider levels and the magnitude of WSS reached lower levels, thereby being more prone to disturbed flow occurrence. Cirrhotic patients with portal hypertension show dramatic hemodynamic changes with lower WSS and greater potential for disturbed flow, representing a possible causative factor of PV thrombosis.

  19. Analysis of the coherent and turbulent stresses of a numerically simulated rough wall pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, L.; MacDonald, M.; Chung, D.; Hutchins, N.; Ooi, A.

    2017-04-01

    A turbulent rough wall flow in a pipe is simulated using direct numerical simulation (DNS) where the roughness elements consist of explicitly gridded three-dimensional sinusoids. Two groups of simulations were conducted where the roughness semi-amplitude h+ and the roughness wavelength λ+ are systematically varied. The triple decomposition is applied to the velocity to separate the coherent and turbulent components. The coherent or dispersive component arises due to the roughness and depends on the topological features of the surface. The turbulent stress on the other hand, scales with the friction Reynolds number. For the case with the largest roughness wavelength, large secondary flows are observed which are similar to that of duct flows. The occurrence of these large secondary flows is due to the spanwise heterogeneity of the roughness which has a spacing approximately equal to the boundary layer thickness δ.

  20. Continuous monitoring of back-wall stress corrosion cracking propagation by means of potential drop techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Yasumoto; Atsumi, Takeo; Shoji, Tetsuo

    2006-01-01

    In order to investigate the applicability of the potential drop techniques to the continuous monitoring of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) propagation, SCC tests were performed in a sodium thiosulfate solution at room temperature using plate specimens with weldments. The SCC propagation was monitored using the techniques of direct current potential drop (DCPD), alternating current potential drop (ACPD) and modified induced current potential drop (MICPD) on the reverse side that on which the SCC existed and effectiveness of each technique for the continuous monitoring from the reverse side of SCC was compared from the viewpoints of sensitivity to the crack propagation and measurement stability. The MICPD and DCPD techniques permit continuous monitoring of the back-wall SCC propagation, which initiates from a fatigue pre-crack at a depth of about 4 mm, from which it propagates through more than 80% of the specimen thickness. The MICPD technique can decrease the effect of the current flowing in the direction of the crack length by focusing the induced current into the local area of measurement using induction coils, so that the sensitivity of the continuous monitoring of the back wall SCC propagation is higher than that of the DCPD and ACPD techniques. (author)

  1. Direct measurements of wall shear stress by buried wire gages in a shock-wave boundary-layer interaction region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, V. S.; Rose, W. C.

    1977-01-01

    Detailed measurements of wall shear stress (skin friction) were made with specially developed buried wire gages in the interaction regions of a Mach 2.9 turbulent boundary layer with externally generated shocks. Separation and reattachment points inferred by these measurements support the findings of earlier experiments which used a surface oil flow technique and pitot profile measurements. The measurements further indicate that the boundary layer tends to attain significantly higher skin-friction values downstream of the interaction region as compared to upstream. Comparisons between measured wall shear stress and published results of some theoretical calculation schemes show that the general, but not detailed, behavior is predicted well by such schemes.

  2. Interaction between a normal shock wave and a turbulent boundary layer at high transonic speeds. II - Wall shear stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, M. S.; Adamson, T. C., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Asymptotic methods are used to calculate the shear stress at the wall for the interaction between a normal shock wave and a turbulent boundary layer on a flat plate. A mixing length model is used for the eddy viscosity. The shock wave is taken to be strong enough that the sonic line is deep in the boundary layer and the upstream influence is thus very small. It is shown that unlike the result found for laminar flow an asymptotic criterion for separation is not found; however, conditions for incipient separation are computed numerically using the derived solution for the shear stress at the wall. Results are compared with available experimental measurements.

  3. Methods and results for stress analyses on 14-ton, thin-wall depleted UF6 cylinders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkpatrick, J.R.; Chung, C.K.; Frazier, J.L.; Kelley, D.K.

    1996-10-01

    Uranium enrichment operations at the three US gaseous diffusion plants produce depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF 6 ) as a residential product. At the present time, the inventory of DUF 6 in this country is more than half a million tons. The inventory of DUF 6 is contained in metal storage cylinders, most of which are located at the gaseous diffusion plants. The principal objective of the project is to ensure the integrity of the cylinders to prevent causing an environmental hazard by releasing the contents of the cylinders into the atmosphere. Another objective is to maintain the cylinders in such a manner that the DUF 6 may eventually be converted to a less hazardous material for final disposition. An important task in the DUF 6 cylinders management project is determining how much corrosion of the walls can be tolerated before the cylinders are in danger of being damaged during routine handling and shipping operations. Another task is determining how to handle cylinders that have already been damaged in a manner that will minimize the chance that a breach will occur or that the size of an existing breach will be significantly increased. A number of finite element stress analysis (FESA) calculations have been done to analyze the stresses for three conditions: (1) while the cylinder is being lifted, (2) when a cylinder is resting on two cylinders under it in the customary two-tier stacking array, and (3) when a cylinder is resting on tis chocks on the ground. Various documents describe some of the results and discuss some of the methods whereby they have been obtained. The objective of the present report is to document as many of the FESA cases done at Oak Ridge for 14-ton thin-wall cylinders as possible, giving results and a description of the calculations in some detail

  4. The secondary stress analyses in the fuel pin cladding due to the swelling gradient across the wall thickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uwaba, Tomoyuki; Ukai, Shigeharu

    2002-01-01

    Irradiation deformation analyses of FBR fuel cladding were made by using the finite element method. In these analyses the history of the stress occurred in the cladding was evaluated paying attention to the secondary stress induced by the swelling difference across the wall thickness. It was revealed that the difference of the swelling incubation dose in the direction of the thickness and the irradiation creep deformation play an important role in the history of the secondary stress. The effect of the stress-enhanced swelling was also analyzed in this study

  5. Strain-encoded cardiac MRI as an adjunct for dobutamine stress testing: incremental value to conventional wall motion analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korosoglou, Grigorios; Lossnitzer, Dirk; Schellberg, Dieter; Lewien, Antje; Wochele, Angela; Schaeufele, Tim; Neizel, Mirja; Steen, Henning; Giannitsis, Evangelos; Katus, Hugo A; Osman, Nael F

    2009-03-01

    High-dose dobutamine stress MRI is safe and feasible for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease (CAD) in humans. However, the assessment of cine scans relies on the visual interpretation of regional wall motion, which is subjective. Recently, strain-encoded MRI (SENC) has been proposed for the direct color-coded visualization of myocardial strain. The purpose of our study was to compare the diagnostic value of SENC with that provided by conventional wall motion analysis for the detection of inducible ischemia during dobutamine stress MRI. Stress-induced ischemia was assessed by wall motion analysis and by SENC in 101 patients with suspected or known CAD and in 17 healthy volunteers who underwent dobutamine stress MRI in a clinical 1.5-T scanner. Quantitative coronary angiography deemed as the standard reference for the presence or absence of significant CAD (> or =50% diameter stenosis). On a coronary vessel level, SENC detected inducible ischemia in 86 of 101 versus 71 of 101 diseased coronary vessels (P or =50% stenosis (area under the curve, 0.96; SE, 0.01; 95% CI, 0.94 to 0.98; P<0.001). The direct color-coded visualization of strain on MR images is a useful adjunct for dobutamine stress MRI, which provides incremental value for the detection of CAD compared with conventional wall motion readings on cine images.

  6. Clinical studies on myocardial perfusion imaging in patients with right ventricular overload

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abo, Kenji; Yamagata, Takashi; Nakajima, Masao; Fujita, Kimiaki; Morita, Nobuo

    1979-01-01

    Patients with heart disease which had been clinically diagnosed underwent 201 Tl myocardial perfusion imaging. The thickness of right ventricular wall measured from original images was directly proportional to systolic pressure of the right ventricle measured by cardiac catheterization, and 201 Tl activity in the right ventricle was more directly proportional to systolic pressure of the right ventricle. Imaging patterns of various diseases were also described. Images of patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy revealed that right ventricular wall was thin and right ventricular cavity was small, but the thickness of septal wall and left ventricular wall were maximal. Images of patients with mitral insufficiency revealed that the thickness of right ventricular wall, septal wall, and left ventricular wall was medium, and the right ventricular cavity was smaller than the left ventricular cavity. Images of patients with congestive cardiomyopathy and congestive cardiac failure showed that enlargement of both ventricular cavities was disproportionate to the thickness of each wall. Images of patients with arterial septal defect revealed that the thickness of each wall was comparatively normal, the right ventricular cavity was maximal, and the left ventricular cavity was minimal. Images of patients with primary pulmonary hypertention, pulmonary stenosis and tetralogy of Fallot in whom pressure overload was recognized revealed severe thickenings of right ventricular wall, moderate enlargement of the right ventricle, small left ventricle, and thin left ventricular wall. (Tsunoda, M.)

  7. Effect of historical earthquakes on pre-stressed anchor tie back diaphragm wall and on near-by building

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal Mohamed Hafez Ismail Ibrahim

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Pre-stressed tie back anchored diaphragm walls are considered one of the safest lateral supports which help in overall stability when there is a significant difference in land level between back and front of these walls. Permanent lateral supports to these walls are frequently represented by supporting it laterally with foundation and floor slabs of the building. In this paper a special study of one raw anchor diaphragm wall subjected to different earthquake dynamic loads will be presented. The wall retains an excavation of 9.5 m and supports laterally a near-by 5 floor building. Five historical strong motions with different fundamental frequencies are subjected on the wall. The wall displacement, straining actions, anchor extreme force and the influence of variation of anchor stiffness are calculated using a dynamic Plaxis finite element program. The soil is considered as elasto-plastic material and represented using Mohr–Coulomb criteria, the wall and the anchor are considered to behave elastically. Prescribed displacement at the lower bottom boundary represents the earthquake motion. Far left and right absorbent boundaries are assumed to prevent dynamic wave reflection. Four static phases representing construction procedure and one dynamic loading phase are considered. It is found that the straining actions of different historical earthquakes match in shape with each other, the only change is in the amplitude which is affected by earthquake fundamental frequency and its intensity. The maximum dynamic lateral displacement of the wall is at its free top. The near-by building shows a differential settlement towards the wall which causes a change in the sign and amplitude of the straining actions. Increasing the stiffness of anchor was also studied and it was found that it reduces too much the maximum dynamic top wall lateral displacement.

  8. Left ventricular function in right ventricular overload

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwanaga, Shiro; Handa, Shunnosuke; Abe, Sumihisa; Onishi, Shohei; Nakamura, Yoshiro; Kunieda, Etsuo; Ogawa, Koichi; Kubo, Atsushi

    1989-01-01

    This study clarified regional and global functions of the distorted left ventricle due to right ventricular overload by gated radionuclide ventriculography (RNV). Cardiac catheterization and RNV were performed in 13 cases of atrial septal defect (ASD), 13 of pure mitral stenosis (MS), 10 of primary pulmonary hypertension (PPH), and 10 of normal subjects (NL). Right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP) was 32.9±13.9, 45.0±12.2, 88.3±17.1, and 21.2±4.5 mmHg, respectively. The end-systolic LAO view of the left ventricle was halved into septal and free-wall sides. The end-diastolic halves were determined in the same plane. Ejection fractions of the global left ventricle (LVEF), global right ventricle (RVEF), the septal half of the left ventricle (SEPEF), and the free-wall half of the left ventricle (FWEF) were obtained. LVEF was 56.8±9.8% in NL, 52.8±10.5% in ASD, and 49.5±12.9% in PPH. In MS, LVEF (47.0±13.0%) was smaller than those in the other groups. RVEF was 37.0±5.2% in NL, 43.7±15.5% in ASD, and 32.8±11.5% in MS. In PPH, RVEF (25.0±10.6%) was smaller than those in the other groups. SEPEF was smaller in ASD (42.5±13.2%), MS (40.4±13.1%), PPH (40.5±12.5%) than in NL (53.5±8.5%). Systolic function of the septal half of the left ventricle was disturbed by right ventricular overload. RVEF (r=-0.35, p<0.05) and SEPEF (r=-0.51, p<0.01) had negative correlations with RVSP. As RVSP rose, systolic function of the septal half of the left ventricle was more severely disturbed. FWEF was the same among the four groups; NL (57.0±12.6%), ASD (48.6±15.2%), MS (50.5±12.0%), and PPH (51.1±12.3%). There was a good correlation between SEPEF and LVEF in NL (r=0.81), although in PPH this correlation was poor (r=0.64). These data showed that the distorted left ventricular due to right ventricular overload maintains its global function with preserved function of the free-wall side. (J.P.N.)

  9. Effects of suture position on left ventricular fluid mechanics under mitral valve edge-to-edge repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Dongxing; Jiang, Song; Wang, Ze; Hu, Yingying; He, Zhaoming

    2014-01-01

    Mitral valve (MV) edge-to-edge repair (ETER) is a surgical procedure for the correction of mitral valve regurgitation by suturing the free edge of the leaflets. The leaflets are often sutured at three different positions: central, lateral and commissural portions. To study the effects of position of suture on left ventricular (LV) fluid mechanics under mitral valve ETER, a parametric model of MV-LV system during diastole was developed. The distribution and development of vortex and atrio-ventricular pressure under different suture position were investigated. Results show that the MV sutured at central and lateral in ETER creates two vortex rings around two jets, compared with single vortex ring around one jet of the MV sutured at commissure. Smaller total orifices lead to a higher pressure difference across the atrio-ventricular leaflets in diastole. The central suture generates smaller wall shear stresses than the lateral suture, while the commissural suture generated the minimum wall shear stresses in ETER.

  10. Pulsatility Index as a Diagnostic Parameter of Reciprocating Wall Shear Stress Parameters in Physiological Pulsating Waveforms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idit Avrahami

    Full Text Available Arterial wall shear stress (WSS parameters are widely used for prediction of the initiation and development of atherosclerosis and arterial pathologies. Traditional clinical evaluation of arterial condition relies on correlations of WSS parameters with average flow rate (Q and heart rate (HR measurements. We show that for pulsating flow waveforms in a straight tube with flow reversals that lead to significant reciprocating WSS, the measurements of HR and Q are not sufficient for prediction of WSS parameters. Therefore, we suggest adding a third quantity-known as the pulsatility index (PI-which is defined as the peak-to-peak flow rate amplitude normalized by Q. We examine several pulsating flow waveforms with and without flow reversals using a simulation of a Womersley model in a straight rigid tube and validate the simulations through experimental study using particle image velocimetry (PIV. The results indicate that clinically relevant WSS parameters such as the percentage of negative WSS (P[%], oscillating shear index (OSI and the ratio of minimum to maximum shear stress rates (min/max, are better predicted when the PI is used in conjunction with HR and Q. Therefore, we propose to use PI as an additional and essential diagnostic quantity for improved predictability of the reciprocating WSS.

  11. Automatic determination of the dynamic geometry of abdominal aortic aneurysm from MR with application to wall stress simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putter, de S.; Breeuwer, M.; Kose, U.; Vosse, van de F.N.; Gerritsen, F.A.; Lemke, H.U.

    2005-01-01

    The current surgical intervention criterion for abdominal aortic aneurysm is based on the maximum transverse diameter of the aorta. Recent research advances indicate that a better rupture predictor may be derived from the wall stress, which can be computed with the finite element method. An

  12. Contrast-enhanced micro-CT imaging in murine carotid arteries: A new protocol for computing wall shear stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xing, R. (Ruoyu); Wilde, D. (David); McCann, G. (Gayle); Y. Ridwan (Yanto); J.T.C. Schrauwen (Jelle); A.F.W. Steen (Antonius F.W.); F.J.H. Gijsen (Frank); Heiden, K. (Kim)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Wall shear stress (WSS) is involved in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis. The correlation between WSS and atherosclerosis can be investigated over time using a WSS-manipulated atherosclerotic mouse model. To determine WSS in vivo, detailed 3D geometry of the vessel

  13. Two-dimensional echocardiographic features of right ventricular infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Arcy, B.; Nanda, N.C.

    1982-01-01

    Real-time, two-dimensional echocardiographic studies were performed in 10 patients with acute myocardial infarction who had clinical features suggestive of right ventricular involvement. All patients showed right ventricular wall motion abnormalities. In the four-chamber view, seven patients showed akinesis of the entire right ventricular diaphragmatic wall and three showed akinesis of segments of the diaphragmatic wall. Segmental dyskinetic areas involving the right ventricular free wall were identified in four patients. One patient showed a large right ventricular apical aneurysm. Other echocardiographic features included enlargement of the right ventricle in eight cases, paradoxical ventricular septal motion in seven cases, tricuspid incompetence in eight cases, dilation of the stomach in four cases and localized pericardial effusion in two cases. Right ventricular infarction was confirmed by radionuclide methods in seven patients, at surgery in one patient and at autopsy in two patients

  14. Ion Transport and Precipitation Kinetics as Key Aspects of Stress Generation on Pore Walls Induced by Salt Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naillon, A.; Joseph, P.; Prat, M.

    2018-01-01

    The stress generation on pore walls due to the growth of a sodium chloride crystal in a confined aqueous solution is studied from evaporation experiments in microfluidic channels in conjunction with numerical computations of crystal growth. The study indicates that the stress buildup on the pore walls is a highly transient process taking place over a very short period of time (in less than 1 s in our experiments). The analysis makes clear that what matters for the stress generation is not the maximum supersaturation at the onset of the crystal growth but the supersaturation at the interface between the solution and the crystal when the latter is about to be confined between the pore walls. The stress generation is summarized in a simple stress diagram involving the pore aspect ratio and the Damkhöler number characterizing the competition between the precipitation reaction kinetics and the ion transport towards the growing crystal. This opens up the route for a better understanding of the damage of porous materials induced by salt crystallization, an important issue in Earth sciences, reservoir engineering, and civil engineering.

  15. Investigation of residual stresses in thick-walled vessels with combination of autofrettage and wire-winding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedighi, M.; Jabbari, A.H.

    2013-01-01

    Wire-winding and autofrettage processes can be used to introduce beneficial residual stress in the cylinder of thick-walled pressure vessels. In both techniques, internal residual compressive stress will increase internal pressure capacity, improve fatigue life and reduce fatigue crack initiation. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the effects of wire-winding on an autofrettaged thick-walled vessel. Direct method which is a modified Variable Material Properties (VMP) method has been used in order to calculate residual stresses in an autofrettaged vessel. Since wire-winding is done after autofrettage process, the tangent and/or Young's modulus could be changed. For this reason, a new wire-winding method based on Direct Method is introduced. The obtained results for wire-wound autofrettaged vessels are validated by finite element method. The results show that by using this approach, the residual hoop stresses in a wire-wound autofrettaged vessel have a more desirable distribution in the cylinder. -- Highlights: • Combination of autofrettage and wire-winding in pressure vessels has been presented. • A new method based on Direct method is presented for wire-winding process. • Residual hoop stresses are compared in vessels cylinders for different cases. • The residual hoop stress has a more desirable stress distribution. • The benefits of the combined vessel are highlighted in comparison with single cases

  16. Time-Resolved Particle Image Velocimetry Measurements with Wall Shear Stress and Uncertainty Quantification for the FDA Nozzle Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raben, Jaime S; Hariharan, Prasanna; Robinson, Ronald; Malinauskas, Richard; Vlachos, Pavlos P

    2016-03-01

    We present advanced particle image velocimetry (PIV) processing, post-processing, and uncertainty estimation techniques to support the validation of computational fluid dynamics analyses of medical devices. This work is an extension of a previous FDA-sponsored multi-laboratory study, which used a medical device mimicking geometry referred to as the FDA benchmark nozzle model. Experimental measurements were performed using time-resolved PIV at five overlapping regions of the model for Reynolds numbers in the nozzle throat of 500, 2000, 5000, and 8000. Images included a twofold increase in spatial resolution in comparison to the previous study. Data was processed using ensemble correlation, dynamic range enhancement, and phase correlations to increase signal-to-noise ratios and measurement accuracy, and to resolve flow regions with large velocity ranges and gradients, which is typical of many blood-contacting medical devices. Parameters relevant to device safety, including shear stress at the wall and in bulk flow, were computed using radial basis functions. In addition, in-field spatially resolved pressure distributions, Reynolds stresses, and energy dissipation rates were computed from PIV measurements. Velocity measurement uncertainty was estimated directly from the PIV correlation plane, and uncertainty analysis for wall shear stress at each measurement location was performed using a Monte Carlo model. Local velocity uncertainty varied greatly and depended largely on local conditions such as particle seeding, velocity gradients, and particle displacements. Uncertainty in low velocity regions in the sudden expansion section of the nozzle was greatly reduced by over an order of magnitude when dynamic range enhancement was applied. Wall shear stress uncertainty was dominated by uncertainty contributions from velocity estimations, which were shown to account for 90-99% of the total uncertainty. This study provides advancements in the PIV processing methodologies over

  17. Moonlight-like proteins of the cell wall protect sessile cells of Candida from oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Fujarte, Isela; López-Romero, Everardo; Cuéllar-Cruz, Mayra

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms of Candida species are associated with high morbidity and hospital mortality. Candida forms biofilms by adhering to human host epithelium through cell wall proteins (CWP) and simultaneously neutralizing the reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced during the respiratory burst by phagocytic cells. The purpose of this paper is to identify the CWP of Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida krusei and Candida parapsilosis expressed after exposure to different concentrations of H2O2 using a proteomic approach. CWP obtained from sessile cells, both treated and untreated with the oxidizing agent, were resolved by one and two-dimensional (2D-PAGE) gels and identified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis. Some of these proteins were identified and found to correspond to moonlighting CWP such as: (i) glycolytic enzymes, (ii) heat shock, (iii) OSR proteins, (iv) general metabolic enzymes and (v) highly conserved proteins, which are up- or down-regulated in the presence or absence of ROS. We also found that the expression of these CWP is different for each Candida species. Moreover, RT-PCR assays allowed us to demonstrate that transcription of the gene coding for Eno1, one of the moonlight-like CWP identified in response to the oxidant agent, is differentially regulated. To our knowledge this is the first demonstration that, in response to oxidative stress, each species of Candida, differentially regulates the expression of moonlighting CWP, which may protect the organism from the ROS generated during phagocytosis. Presumptively, these proteins allow the pathogen to adhere and form a biofilm, and eventually cause invasive candidiasis in the human host. We propose that, in addition to the antioxidant mechanisms present in Candida, the moonlighting CWP also confer protection to these pathogens from oxidative stress. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Right Ventricular Outflow Tract Tachycardia with Structural Abnormalities of the Right Ventricle and Left Ventricular Diverticulum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bortolo Martini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 43-year-old woman presented to the emergency room with a sustained ventricular tachycardia (VT. ECG showed a QRS in left bundle branch block morphology with inferior axis. Echocardiography, ventricular angiography, and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI revealed a normal right ventricle and a left ventricular diverticulum. Electrophysiology studies with epicardial voltage mapping identified a large fibrotic area in the inferolateral layer of the right ventricular wall and a small area of fibrotic tissue at the anterior right ventricular outflow tract. VT ablation was successfully performed with combined epicardial and endocardial approaches.

  19. Focalized contractile impairment at hypertrophied myocardium proven in consideration of wall stress in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Tadashi; Suzuki, Jun-ichi; Shimamoto, Ryoichi; Tsuji, Taeko; Ohmoto, Yuki; Toyo-oka, Teruhiko; Omata, Masao; Ohtomo, Kuni; Nagai, Ryozo

    2006-01-01

    In hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) a hyperkinetic state is sometimes observed in spite of impaired systolic function in the hypertrophied myocardium. The aim of the present study was to determine the mechanism of this paradox. Seventeen patients with HCM and 10 normal subjects underwent cine magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to measure percent systolic wall thickening and percent fractional shortening. The ratio of systolic radial wall stress of the LV at the hypertrophied myocardium over that at the nonhypertrophied myocardium was evaluated to describe the focal advantageous condition for wall thickening. The ratio was 0.66±0.36 at the start of contraction and 0.78±0.31 at early-systole, indicating consistently smaller radial wall stress at the hypertrophied myocardium. Although the condition for contraction was favorable (a ratio less than 1.00), percent systolic wall thickening at the hypertrophied myocardium (23.0±11.8%) was smaller than that at the nonhypertrophied myocardium (70.5±32.3%). Smaller end-diastolic dimension (HCM group; 45.2±4.2 mm, reference group; 48.9±4.1 mm, P=0.04) with a statistically identical value of systolic decrease in intraventricular dimension (HCM group; 19.7±3.9 mm, reference group; 18.9±3.2 mm, P=0.60) yielded high percent fractional shortening in patients with HCM (43.5±7.6%). Although contractile impairment was proven at the hypertrophied region with low radial wall stress in the HCM group, the smaller end-diastolic dimension in this group resulted in high percent fractional shortening. (author)

  20. The cell wall protein Ecm33 of Candida albicans is involved in chronological life span, morphogenesis, cell wall regeneration, stress tolerance and host-cell interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana eGil-Bona

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Ecm33 is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI-anchored protein in the human pathogen Candida albicans. This protein is known to be involved in fungal cell wall integrity and is also critical for normal virulence in the mouse model of hematogenously disseminated candidiasis, but its function remains unknown. In this work, several phenotypic analyses of the C. albicans ecm33/ecm33 mutant (RML2U were performed. We observed that RML2U displays the inability of protoplast to regenerate the cell wall, activation of the cell wall integrity pathway, hypersensitivity to temperature, osmotic and oxidative stresses and a shortened chronological lifespan. During the exponential and stationary culture phases, nuclear and actin staining revealed the possible arrest of the cell cycle in RML2U cells. Interestingly, a veil growth, never previously described in C. albicans, was serendipitously observed under static stationary cells. The cells that formed this structure were also observed in cornmeal liquid cultures. These cells are giant, round cells, without DNA, and contain large vacuoles, similar to autophagic cells observed in other fungi. Furthermore, RML2U was phagocytozed more than the wild-type strain by macrophages at earlier time points, but the damage caused to the mouse cells was less than with the wild-type strain. Additionally, the percentage of RML2U apoptotic cells after interaction with macrophages was fewer than in the wild-type strain.

  1. High wall shear stress and spatial gradients in vascular pathology: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, Jennifer M; Kolega, John; Meng, Hui

    2013-07-01

    Cardiovascular pathologies such as intracranial aneurysms (IAs) and atherosclerosis preferentially localize to bifurcations and curvatures where hemodynamics are complex. While extensive knowledge about low wall shear stress (WSS) has been generated in the past, due to its strong relevance to atherogenesis, high WSS (typically >3 Pa) has emerged as a key regulator of vascular biology and pathology as well, receiving renewed interests. As reviewed here, chronic high WSS not only stimulates adaptive outward remodeling, but also contributes to saccular IA formation (at bifurcation apices or outer curves) and atherosclerotic plaque destabilization (in stenosed vessels). Recent advances in understanding IA pathogenesis have shed new light on the role of high WSS in pathological vascular remodeling. In complex geometries, high WSS can couple with significant spatial WSS gradient (WSSG). A combination of high WSS and positive WSSG has been shown to trigger aneurysm initiation. Since endothelial cells (ECs) are sensors of WSS, we have begun to elucidate EC responses to high WSS alone and in combination with WSSG. Understanding such responses will provide insight into not only aneurysm formation, but also plaque destabilization and other vascular pathologies and potentially lead to improved strategies for disease management and novel targets for pharmacological intervention.

  2. Electrochemical behavior of single-walled carbon nanotube supercapacitors under compressive stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Rong, Jiepeng; Wei, Bingqing

    2010-10-26

    The effect of compressive stress on the electrochemical behavior of flexible supercapacitors assembled with single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) film electrodes and 1 M aqueous electrolytes with different anions and cations were thoroughly investigated. The under-pressed capacitive and resistive features of the supercapacitors were studied by means of cyclic voltammetry measurements and electrochemical impedance analysis. The results demonstrated that the specific capacitance increased first and saturated in corresponding decreases of the series resistance, the charge-transfer resistance, and the Warburg diffusion resistance under an increased pressure from 0 to 1723.96 kPa. Wettability as well as ion-size effect of different aqueous electrolytes played important roles to determine the pressure dependence behavior of the suerpcapacitors under an applied pressure. An improved high-frequency capacitive response with 1172 Hz knee frequency, which is significantly higher compared to reported values, was observed under the compressive pressure of 1723.96 kPa, indicating an improving and excellent high-power capability of the supercapacitors under the pressure. The experimental results and the thorough analysis described in this work not only provide fundamental insight of pressure effects on supercapacitors but also give an important guideline for future design of next generation flexible/stretchable supercapacitors for industrial and consumer applications.

  3. Effect of membrane and through-wall bending stresses on fatigue crack growth behavior and coolant leakage velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Yeon-Sik

    2003-11-01

    This study clarified the effect of a membrane and a through-wall bending stresses on fatigue crack growth behavior and coolant leakage velocity due to irregularity of crack surface. Each stress component relates to fatigue crack growth behavior directly in general and thus the wild-used K I solutions are anticipated to give good evaluation results on it. Meanwhile, it is necessary to notify that surface irregularity for coolant leakage assessment is made by stress history in nature. Surface irregularity is known to be largely classified into the following two aspects: surface roughness due to continuous crack opening and closure behavior and surface turnover due to cyclic bending stress dominance. Therefore, the deterministic parameters on resistance of coolant leakage by surface irregularity are considered to be not only stress history but crack opening behavior. (author)

  4. Residual stress in the first wall coating materials of TiC and TiN for fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu Shaoyu

    1997-01-01

    Residual stresses measurement in the first wall coating of a fusion reactor of TiC and TiN films by X-ray diffraction 'sin 2 ψ methods' were described. The authors have studied on the effect of conditions of specimen preparation (such as coating method, substrate materials, film thickness and deposition temperature) on the residual stress of TiC and TiN films coated onto Mo, 316LSS and Pocographite by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and physical vapor deposition (PVD) method. All films prepared in this study were found to have a compressive stresses and the CVD method gave lower residual stress than PVD method. TiC film coated on Mo substrate at 1100 degree C by CVD method showed that residual stress as the film thickness was raised from 14 μm to 60 μm, on the other hand, residual stress by PVD method exhibited a high compressive stresses, this kind of stress was principally the intrinsic stress, and a marked decrease in the residual with raising the deposition temperature (200 degree C∼650 degree C) was demonstrated. Origins of the residual stress were discussed by correlation with differences between thermal expansion coefficients, and also with fabrication methods

  5. Concomitant surgical correction of severe stress urinary incontinence and anterior vaginal wall prolapse by anterior vaginal wall wrap: 18 months outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zargham, Mahtab; Alizadeh, Farshid; Tadayyon, Farhad; Khorrami, Mohammad-Hatef; Nouri-Mahdavi, Kia; Gharaati, Mohammad Reza; Izadpanahi, Mohammad Hossein; Yazdani, Mohammad; Mazdak, Hamid

    2013-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study is to evaluate the outcome of an innovative, minimally invasive sling technique with autologous tissue in women with concomitant incontinence and anterior vaginal wall prolapse (AVWP). Materials and Methods: Fifty-six women with stress urinary incontinence (SUI) or mixed urinary incontinence and AVWP were randomly assigned into two groups: In Group A (26 patients), anterior colporrhaphy (Kelly placation) and sling placement using a strip of anterior vaginal wall were performed, and in Group B (30 patients), transvaginal mesh correction of AVWP and tension-free vaginal tape (TVT) insertion (retropubic – craniocaudal route) using polypropylene mesh were carried out. The patients were followed-up for over 18 months and were assessed objectively using a 48 h frequency-volume chart, a 48 h pad test and a standardized stress test. Related surgical complications and outcomes were recorded and compared. Results: Surgical cure rates for Group A and Group B at the first (3 days) and last (18 months) post-operative visits were 62% and 84%; and 54%, and 72%, respectively (P = 0.09 and 0.31). Complications occurred in 9 patients (44%) of Group B, but only 3 patients (12%) in Group A. Conclusion: Vaginal sling surgery using an anterior vaginal wall strip can improve SUI and in comparison with propylene mesh is associated with lower complication rates. Although, the surgical success rate of this technique is lower than T-Sling, larger studies with selected patients will help assess the suitable patients for this pelvic reconstructive surgery. PMID:24516492

  6. Concomitant surgical correction of severe stress urinary incontinence and anterior vaginal wall prolapse by anterior vaginal wall wrap: 18 months outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahtab Zargham

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study is to evaluate the outcome of an innovative, minimally invasive sling technique with autologous tissue in women with concomitant incontinence and anterior vaginal wall prolapse (AVWP. Materials and Methods : Fifty-six women with stress urinary incontinence (SUI or mixed urinary incontinence and AVWP were randomly assigned into two groups: In Group A (26 patients, anterior colporrhaphy (Kelly placation and sling placement using a strip of anterior vaginal wall were performed, and in Group B (30 patients, transvaginal mesh correction of AVWP and tension-free vaginal tape (TVT insertion (retropubic - craniocaudal route using polypropylene mesh were carried out. The patients were followed-up for over 18 months and were assessed objectively using a 48 h frequency-volume chart, a 48 h pad test and a standardized stress test. Related surgical complications and outcomes were recorded and compared. Results: Surgical cure rates for Group A and Group B at the first (3 days and last (18 months post-operative visits were 62% and 84%; and 54%, and 72%, respectively (P = 0.09 and 0.31. Complications occurred in 9 patients (44% of Group B, but only 3 patients (12% in Group A. Conclusion: Vaginal sling surgery using an anterior vaginal wall strip can improve SUI and in comparison with propylene mesh is associated with lower complication rates. Although, the surgical success rate of this technique is lower than T-Sling, larger studies with selected patients will help assess the suitable patients for this pelvic reconstructive surgery.

  7. A control systems approach to quantify wall shear stress normalization by flow-mediated dilation in the brachial artery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank C G van Bussel

    Full Text Available Flow-mediated dilation is aimed at normalization of local wall shear stress under varying blood flow conditions. Blood flow velocity and vessel diameter are continuous and opposing influences that modulate wall shear stress. We derived an index FMDv to quantify wall shear stress normalization performance by flow-mediated dilation in the brachial artery. In 22 fasting presumed healthy men, we first assessed intra- and inter-session reproducibilities of two indices pFMDv and mFMDv, which consider the relative peak and relative mean hyperemic change in flow velocity, respectively. Second, utilizing oral glucose loading, we evaluated the tracking performance of both FMDv indices, in comparison with existing indices [i.e., the relative peak diameter increase (%FMD, the peak to baseline diameter ratio (Dpeak/Dbase, and the relative peak diameter increase normalized to the full area under the curve of blood flow velocity with hyperemia (FMD/shearAUC or with area integrated to peak hyperemia (FMD/shearAUC_peak]. Inter-session and intra-session reproducibilities for pFMDv, mFMDv and %FMD were comparable (intra-class correlation coefficients within 0.521-0.677 range. Both pFMDv and mFMDv showed more clearly a reduction after glucose loading (reduction of ~45%, p≤0.001 than the other indices (% given are relative reductions: %FMD (~11%, p≥0.074; Dpeak/Dbase (~11%, p≥0.074; FMD/shearAUC_peak (~20%, p≥0.016 and FMD/shearAUC (~38%, p≤0.038. Further analysis indicated that wall shear stress normalization under normal (fasting conditions is already far from ideal (FMDv << 1, which (therefore does not materially change with glucose loading. Our approach might be useful in intervention studies to detect intrinsic changes in shear stress normalization performance in conduit arteries.

  8. Stress-intensity factors for a thick-walled cylinder containing an annular imbedded or external or internal surface crack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdol, R.; Erdogan, F.

    1976-01-01

    The elastostatic axisymmetric problem for a long thick-walled cylinder containing a ring-shaped internal or edge crack is considered. Using the standard transform technique the problem is formulated in terms of an integral equation which has a simple Cauchy kernel for the internal crack and a generalized Cauchy kernel for the edge crack as the dominant part. As examples the uniform axial load and the steady-state thermal stress problems have been solved and the related stress intensity factors have been calculated. Among other findings the results show that in the cylinder under uniform axial stress containing an internal crack the stress intensity factor at the inner tip is always greater than that at the outer tip for equal net ligament thicknesses and in the cylinder with an edge crack which is under a state of thermal stress the stress intensity factor is a decreasing function of the crack depth, tending to zero as the crack depth approaches the wall thickness.

  9. A multi-component parallel-plate flow chamber system for studying the effect of exercise-induced wall shear stress on endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan-Xia; Xiang, Cheng; Liu, Bo; Zhu, Yong; Luan, Yong; Liu, Shu-Tian; Qin, Kai-Rong

    2016-12-28

    In vivo studies have demonstrated that reasonable exercise training can improve endothelial function. To confirm the key role of wall shear stress induced by exercise on endothelial cells, and to understand how wall shear stress affects the structure and the function of endothelial cells, it is crucial to design and fabricate an in vitro multi-component parallel-plate flow chamber system which can closely replicate exercise-induced wall shear stress waveforms in artery. The in vivo wall shear stress waveforms from the common carotid artery of a healthy volunteer in resting and immediately after 30 min acute aerobic cycling exercise were first calculated by measuring the inner diameter and the center-line blood flow velocity with a color Doppler ultrasound. According to the above in vivo wall shear stress waveforms, we designed and fabricated a parallel-plate flow chamber system with appropriate components based on a lumped parameter hemodynamics model. To validate the feasibility of this system, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) line were cultured within the parallel-plate flow chamber under abovementioned two types of wall shear stress waveforms and the intracellular actin microfilaments and nitric oxide (NO) production level were evaluated using fluorescence microscope. Our results show that the trends of resting and exercise-induced wall shear stress waveforms, especially the maximal, minimal and mean wall shear stress as well as oscillatory shear index, generated by the parallel-plate flow chamber system are similar to those acquired from the common carotid artery. In addition, the cellular experiments demonstrate that the actin microfilaments and the production of NO within cells exposed to the two different wall shear stress waveforms exhibit different dynamic behaviors; there are larger numbers of actin microfilaments and higher level NO in cells exposed in exercise-induced wall shear stress condition than resting wall shear stress condition

  10. Beat-to-beat ECG restitution: A review and proposal for a new biomarker to assess cardiac stress and ventricular tachyarrhythmia vulnerability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossa, Anthony A

    2017-09-01

    Cardiac restitution is the ability of the heart to recover from one beat to the next. Ventricular arrhythmia vulnerability can occur when the heart does not properly adjust to sudden changes in rate or in hemodynamics leading to excessive temporal and/or spatial heterogeneity in conduction or repolarization. Restitution has historically been used to study, by invasive means, the dynamics of the relationship between action potential duration (APD) and diastolic interval (DI) in sedated subjects using various pacing protocols. Even though the analogous measures of APD and DI can be obtained using the surface ECG to acquire the respective QT and TQ intervals for ECG restitution, this methodology has not been widely adopted for a number of reasons. Recent development of more advanced software algorithms enables ECG intervals to be measured accurately, on a continuous beat-to-beat basis, in an automated manner, and under highly dynamic conditions (i.e., ambulatory or exercise) providing information beyond that available in the typical resting state. Current breakthroughs in ECG technology will allow ECG restitution measures to become a practical approach for providing quantitative measures of the risks for ventricular arrhythmias as well as cardiac stress in general. In addition to a review of the underlying principles and caveats of ECG restitution, a new approach toward an advancement of more integrated restitution biomarkers is proposed. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Evaluation of left ventricular function by digital subtraction angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuribayashi, Sachio; Ootaki, Makoto; Matsuyama, Seiya; Kanemoto, Nariaki; Furuya, Hideo

    1985-01-01

    Effects of contrast medium doses on left ventriculographic images using intravenous digital subtraction angiography (IVDSA-LVG) were assessed. The validity of IVDSA-LVG in evaluating ejection fraction (FF) and left ventricular regional wall motion was determined by comparison with conventional left ventriculography using direct injection (direct LVG). The advantages of left ventriculography using intraarterial subtraction angiography (IADSA-LVG) performed by injecting small doses of contrast media directly into the left ventricle were stressed. 1. To assess the effects of doses of contrast media on IVDSA-LVG, 10, 20, and 30 ml Urografin-76 were injected into the superior vena cava in 16 patients, and the resulting images were compared in each patient. With only 10 ml contrast medium, left ventricular opacification was fairly good, and regional wall motion was evaluated in many cases, but 30 ml were needed to calculate ventricular volume and EF. 2. To determine the validity of IVDSA-LVG in evaluating EF and regional wall motion, we compared IVDSA-LVG using 30 ml of contrast medium with direct LVG in 18 patients. There was a good correlation between the two methods in determining EF (r = 0.877), and 90 % of the interpretations of regional wall motion were in agreement by the two methods. IVDSA-LVG was useful and accurate in evaluating EF and regional wall motion of the left ventricle. 3. IADSA-LVG was performed for five patients, and good quality images were obtained in many cases, even with relatively small doses (10 ml) of contrast media. These results suggested that this method may be used in cases with impaired LV function, to avoid hemodynamic derangement induced by conventional direct LVG using large doses of contrast medium. (author)

  12. Effects of iodinated contrast media on common carotid and brachial artery blood flow and wall shear stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irace, C.; Tamburini, S.; Bertucci, B.; Franceschi, M.S. de; Gnasso, A.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the effect of the intravenous contrast media iomeprol on wall shear stress, blood flow and vascular parameters in the common carotid and brachial artery. Thirty outpatients undergoing thoracic or abdominal spiral CT scans were studied. The internal diameter and flow velocity of the common carotid and brachial artery were evaluated by ultrasound, and blood viscosity was measured before and after low osmolality iomeprol (Iomeron 350) injection. The wall shear stress, blood flow and pulsatility index were calculated. To test the differences between groups, the Wilcoxon rank test and Mann Whitney U test were applied. Blood viscosity decreased slightly, but significantly after contrast media (4.6±0.7 vs. 4.5±0.7 mPa.s, P=0.02). Contrarily, blood flow and wall shear stress did not change in the common carotid artery, but significantly decreased in the brachial artery (0.9±0.4 vs. 0.6±0.3 ml/s, P<0.0001, and 41.5±13.9 vs. 35.3±11.0 dynes/cm2, P<0.002, respectively), whereas the pulsatility index significantly increased in the brachial artery (5.0±3.3 vs. 7.5±5.3, P<0.001). Iomeprol injection causes blood flow and wall shear stress reduction of the brachial artery; the rise in the pulsatility index suggests an increase in peripheral vascular resistance. Further investigation is needed to evaluate whether these modifications can be clinically relevant. (orig.)

  13. Avaliação quantitativa da movimentação parietal regional do ventrículo esquerdo na endomiocardiofibrose Quantitative assessment of left ventricular regional wall motion in endomyocardial fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Mady

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Analisar a movimentação parietal regional do ventrículo esquerdo (VE em pacientes com endomiocardiofibrose (EMF. MÉTODOS: Estudados 88 pacientes, 59 do sexo feminino, com idade média de 39±13 anos (variação de 9 a 65 com evidência ecocardiográfica e angiográfica de EMF do VE. A intensidade da deposição de tecido fibroso na cineventriculografia contrastada foi classificada como discreta, moderada ou importante. A fração de ejeção global do ventrículo esquerdo (FEVE foi determinada pelo método área-comprimento por meio da ventriculografia. O movimento foi medido em 100 cordas eqüidistantes e perpendiculares à linha média desenhada no meio dos contornos diastólico e sistólico finais e normalizadas para o tamanho cardíaco. Analisaram-se cinco segmentos do VE: A - apical; AL - ântero-lateral; AB - ântero-basal; IA - ínfero-apical; IB - ínfero-basal. A anormalidade foi expressa em unidades de desvio padrão do movimento médio em uma população de referência normal, composta por 103 pacientes com VE normal, conforme dados de clínica, eletrocardiograma e padrões angiográficos. RESULTADOS: A FEVE média foi de 0,47±0,12. O envolvimento de tecido fibroso do VE foi discreto em 12 pacientes, moderado em 40 e importante em 36. As regiões com pior movimentação parietal foram A (-1,4±1,6 desvio-padrão/cordas e IA (-1,6±1,8 desvio-padrão/cordas comparadas com AB (-0,3±1,9 desvio-padrão /cordas, AL (-0,5±1,8 desvio-padrão/cordas e IB (-0,9±1,3 desvio-padrão/cordas. Não se observou relação entre a intensidade de envolvimento do tecido fibroso e a manutenção parietal regional. CONCLUSÃO : Existe alteração da movimentação parietal regional na EMF e é independente da intensidade de deposição de tecido fibroso avaliada qualitativamente. O envolvimento não uniforme do VE deve ser levado em conta no planejamento cirúrgico dessa doença.OBJECTIVE: To analyze left ventricular (LV regional wall

  14. Development of a wall-shear-stress sensor and measurements in mini-channels with partial blockages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afara, Samer; Medvescek, James; Mydlarski, Laurent; Baliga, Bantwal R.; MacDonald, Mark

    2014-05-01

    The design, construction, operation and validation of a wall-shear-stress sensor, and measurements obtained using this sensor in air flows downstream of partial blockages in a mini-channel are presented. The sensor consisted of a hot wire mounted over a small rectangular slot and operated using a constant-temperature anemometer. It was used to investigate flows similar to those within the mini-channels inside notebook computers. The overall goal of the present work was to develop a sensor suitable for measurements of the wall-shear stress in such flows, which can be used to validate corresponding numerical simulations, as the latter are known to be often surprisingly inaccurate. To this end, measurements of the wall-shear stress, and the corresponding statistical moments and power spectral densities, were obtained at different distances downstream of the partial blockage, with blockage ratios of 39.7, 59.2, and 76.3 %. The Reynolds number (based on average velocity and hydraulic diameter) ranged from 100 to 900. The results confirmed the presence of unsteadiness, separation, reattachment, and laminar-turbulent transition in the ostensibly laminar flow of air in mini-channels with partial blockages. The present results demonstrate why accurate numerical predictions of cooling air flows in laptop and notebook computers remain a challenging task.

  15. Bicuspid aortic valves are associated with increased wall and turbulence shear stress levels compared to trileaflet aortic valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikrishnan, Neelakantan; Mirabella, Lucia; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2015-06-01

    Congenital bicuspid aortic valves (BAVs) are associated with accelerated disease progression, such as leaflet calcification and ascending aorta dilatation. Although common underlying genetic factors have been implicated in accelerated disease in BAV patients, several studies have suggested that altered hemodynamics also play a role in this disease process. The present study compares turbulence and wall shear stress (WSS) measurements between various BAV and trileaflet aortic valve (TAV) models to provide information for mechanobiological models of BAV disease. BAV and TAV models were constructed from excised porcine aortic valves to simulate parametric variations in BAV stenosis, hemodynamics and geometry. Particle image velocimetry experiments were conducted at physiological pressure conditions to characterize velocity fields in the ascending aorta. The velocity fields were post-processed to calculate turbulence, viscous and wall shear stresses in the ascending aorta. Stenosed BAV models showed the presence of eccentric systolic jets, causing increased WSS. Lower cardiac output resulted in a narrower jet, lower turbulence and lower viscous shear stress (VSS). The specific severe stenosis BAV model studied here showed reduced WSS due to reduction in non-fused leaflet mobility. Dilation of the aorta did not affect any turbulence or VSS, but reduced the WSS. In comparison with BAVs, TAVs have similar VSS values, but much smaller WSS and turbulence levels. These increased turbulence  and WSS levels in BAVs may play a key role in amplifying the biological responses of the ascending aorta wall and valvular leaflets, and support the hemodynamic underpinnings of BAV disease processes.

  16. Analysis of wall shear stress around a competitive swimmer using 3D Navier-Stokes equations in CFD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popa, C V; Zaidi, H; Arfaoui, A; Polidori, G; Taiar, R; Fohanno, S

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with the flow dynamics around a competitive swimmer during underwater glide phases occurring at the start and at every turn. The influence of the head position, namely lifted up, aligned and lowered, on the wall shear stress and the static pressure distributions is analyzed. The problem is considered as 3D and in steady hydrodynamic state. Three velocities (1.4 m/s, 2.2 m/s and 3.1 m/s) that correspond to inter-regional, national and international swimming levels are studied. The flow around the swimmer is assumed turbulent. The Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations are solved with the standard k-ω turbulent model by using the CFD (computational fluid dynamics) numerical method based on a volume control approach. Numerical simulations are carried out with the ANSYS FLUENT® CFD code. The results show that the wall shear stress increases with the velocity and consequently the drag force opposing the movement of the swimmer increases as well. Also, high wall shear stresses are observed in the areas where the body shape, globally rigid in form, presents complex surface geometries such as the head, shoulders, buttocks, heel and chest.

  17. The Cell Wall Protein Ecm33 of Candida albicans is Involved in Chronological Life Span, Morphogenesis, Cell Wall Regeneration, Stress Tolerance, and Host-Cell Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Bona, Ana; Reales-Calderon, Jose A; Parra-Giraldo, Claudia M; Martinez-Lopez, Raquel; Monteoliva, Lucia; Gil, Concha

    2016-01-01

    Ecm33 is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein in the human pathogen Candida albicans. This protein is known to be involved in fungal cell wall integrity (CWI) and is also critical for normal virulence in the mouse model of hematogenously disseminated candidiasis, but its function remains unknown. In this work, several phenotypic analyses of the C. albicans ecm33/ecm33 mutant (RML2U) were performed. We observed that RML2U displays the inability of protoplast to regenerate the cell wall, activation of the CWI pathway, hypersensitivity to temperature, osmotic and oxidative stresses and a shortened chronological lifespan. During the exponential and stationary culture phases, nuclear and actin staining revealed the possible arrest of the cell cycle in RML2U cells. Interestingly, a "veil growth," never previously described in C. albicans, was serendipitously observed under static stationary cells. The cells that formed this structure were also observed in cornmeal liquid cultures. These cells are giant, round cells, without DNA, and contain large vacuoles, similar to autophagic cells observed in other fungi. Furthermore, RML2U was phagocytozed more than the wild-type strain by macrophages at earlier time points, but the damage caused to the mouse cells was less than with the wild-type strain. Additionally, the percentage of RML2U apoptotic cells after interaction with macrophages was fewer than in the wild-type strain.

  18. The Cell Wall Protein Ecm33 of Candida albicans is Involved in Chronological Life Span, Morphogenesis, Cell Wall Regeneration, Stress Tolerance, and Host–Cell Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Bona, Ana; Reales-Calderon, Jose A.; Parra-Giraldo, Claudia M.; Martinez-Lopez, Raquel; Monteoliva, Lucia; Gil, Concha

    2016-01-01

    Ecm33 is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein in the human pathogen Candida albicans. This protein is known to be involved in fungal cell wall integrity (CWI) and is also critical for normal virulence in the mouse model of hematogenously disseminated candidiasis, but its function remains unknown. In this work, several phenotypic analyses of the C. albicans ecm33/ecm33 mutant (RML2U) were performed. We observed that RML2U displays the inability of protoplast to regenerate the cell wall, activation of the CWI pathway, hypersensitivity to temperature, osmotic and oxidative stresses and a shortened chronological lifespan. During the exponential and stationary culture phases, nuclear and actin staining revealed the possible arrest of the cell cycle in RML2U cells. Interestingly, a “veil growth,” never previously described in C. albicans, was serendipitously observed under static stationary cells. The cells that formed this structure were also observed in cornmeal liquid cultures. These cells are giant, round cells, without DNA, and contain large vacuoles, similar to autophagic cells observed in other fungi. Furthermore, RML2U was phagocytozed more than the wild-type strain by macrophages at earlier time points, but the damage caused to the mouse cells was less than with the wild-type strain. Additionally, the percentage of RML2U apoptotic cells after interaction with macrophages was fewer than in the wild-type strain. PMID:26870022

  19. The right ventricular response to ventricular hypofunction in anteroseptal infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanayama, Sugako

    1992-01-01

    Thirty-seven patients with acute anteroseptal infarction but not significant right coronary artery stenosis were examined by using thallium-201 (Tl-201) myocardial perfusion SPECT to determine how the right ventricular (RV) free wall responded to a severely impaired ventricular septum. The patients were divided into the group in which RV free wall was visualized on Tl-201 myocardial SPECT (n=19, RV(+) Group) and the group in which it was not visualized (n=18, RV(-) Group). The relationship between visualization of RV free wall and both RV and left ventricular (LV) function was evaluated. RV(+) Group had larger extent of anteroseptal necrosis and severer impairment of RV free wall, as compared with RV(-) Group. LV ejection fraction (LVEF) was significantly lower in RV(+) Group than RV(-) Group in both acute and chronic phases. Although RV ejection fraction (RVEF) in acute phase was significantly lower in RV(+) Group than RV(-) Group, it did not differ in chronic phase between the two groups. In RV(+) Group, RV stroke work index (RVSWI), pulmonary artery end diastolic pressure (PAEDP), and mean pulmonary artery pressure (MPA) in chronic phase showed a statistically significant increase compared with those in acute phase; these hemodynamic variables in chronic phase were also significantly higher than those in RV(-) Group. RV/LV ratio inversely correlated with LVEF, and both necrotic extent and impairment severity positively correlated with both PAEDP and MPA. RV free wall could be visualized more clearly, corresponding to extremely decreased LV function. These findings suggest that RV free wall may play an important role in maintaining LV and RV function when ventricular septum is severely impaired by anteroseptal infarction. (N.K.)

  20. Role of OsWAK124, a rice wall-associated kinase, in response to environmental heavy metal stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, X.; Hou, X.

    2017-01-01

    Members of the Arabidopsis cell wall-associated kinase (WAK) family play important roles in both development and stress responses. There are about one hundred and twenty five OsWAKs annotated in the rice genome but their functions in rice growth and development are largely unknown. In this paper, we reported a functional role of the OsWAK124 (Os12g0266200) in rice heavy metal responses. Confocal GFP experiments located OsWAK124 in the cell wall and analyses of OsWAK124 promoter GUS transgenic lines suggested that OsWAK124 promoter is primarily active at the meristematic tissues under normal growth condition. Under stress conditions, however, OsWAK124 promoter activity is induced in non-meristematic tissues, such as leaf, stem and root, and the activity in the meristematic tissues is further enhanced. Various transgenic rice lines carrying either RNA interference (RNAi) or overexpression constructs were generated. Transgenic lines were tested for their responses to various stress conditions including salicylic acid, NaCl, AlCl/sub 3/, CuSO/sub 4/ and CdSO/sub 4/. Our analyses showed that rice seedlings overexpressing OsWAK124 are more resistant to the three tested heavy metals (Al, Cu, and Cd), which suggested that OsWAK124, like some Arabidopsis WAK members, plays a role in environmental heavy metal stress responses. (author)

  1. Vacuolar H+-ATPase Protects Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cells against Ethanol-Induced Oxidative and Cell Wall Stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charoenbhakdi, Sirikarn; Dokpikul, Thanittra; Burphan, Thanawat; Techo, Todsapol; Auesukaree, Choowong

    2016-05-15

    During fermentation, increased ethanol concentration is a major stress for yeast cells. Vacuolar H(+)-ATPase (V-ATPase), which plays an important role in the maintenance of intracellular pH homeostasis through vacuolar acidification, has been shown to be required for tolerance to straight-chain alcohols, including ethanol. Since ethanol is known to increase membrane permeability to protons, which then promotes intracellular acidification, it is possible that the V-ATPase is required for recovery from alcohol-induced intracellular acidification. In this study, we show that the effects of straight-chain alcohols on membrane permeabilization and acidification of the cytosol and vacuole are strongly dependent on their lipophilicity. These findings suggest that the membrane-permeabilizing effect of straight-chain alcohols induces cytosolic and vacuolar acidification in a lipophilicity-dependent manner. Surprisingly, after ethanol challenge, the cytosolic pH in Δvma2 and Δvma3 mutants lacking V-ATPase activity was similar to that of the wild-type strain. It is therefore unlikely that the ethanol-sensitive phenotype of vma mutants resulted from severe cytosolic acidification. Interestingly, the vma mutants exposed to ethanol exhibited a delay in cell wall remodeling and a significant increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). These findings suggest a role for V-ATPase in the regulation of the cell wall stress response and the prevention of endogenous oxidative stress in response to ethanol. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been widely used in the alcoholic fermentation industry. Among the environmental stresses that yeast cells encounter during the process of alcoholic fermentation, ethanol is a major stress factor that inhibits yeast growth and viability, eventually leading to fermentation arrest. This study provides evidence for the molecular mechanisms of ethanol tolerance, which is a desirable characteristic for yeast strains used in alcoholic

  2. Comparison of Analytical Methods for Estimation of Early-Age Thermal-Shrinkage Stresses in RC Walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klemczak B.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The volume changes caused by coupled temperature and moisture variations in early-age concrete elements lead to formation of stresses. If a restraint exists along the contact surface of mature concrete against which a new concrete element has been cast, generated stresses are mostly of a restraint origin. In engineering practice a wide range of externally restrained concrete elements can be distinguished such as tank walls or bridge abutments cast against an old set foundation, in which early-age cracking may endanger their durability or functionality. Therefore, for years methods were being developed to predict early-age stresses and cracking risk of externally restrained concrete elements subjected to early-age thermal-moisture effects. The paper presents the comparative study of the most recognised analytical approaches: the method proposed in EC2, the method proposed by ACI Committee 207 and the method developed at the Luleå University of Technology.

  3. Up-regulation of mRNA ventricular PRNP prion protein gene expression in air pollution highly exposed young urbanites: endoplasmic reticulum stress, glucose regulated protein 78, and nanosized particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal-Calderon, Rodolfo; Franco-Lira, Maricela; González-Maciel, Angélica; Reynoso-Robles, Rafael; Harritt, Lou; Pérez-Guillé, Beatriz; Ferreira-Azevedo, Lara; Drecktrah, Dan; Zhu, Hongtu; Sun, Qiang; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; Aragón-Flores, Mariana; Calderón-Garcidueñas, Ana; Diaz, Philippe; Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian

    2013-11-28

    Mexico City Metropolitan Area children and young adults exposed to high concentrations of air pollutants including fine and ultrafine particulate matter (PM) vs. clean air controls, exhibit myocardial inflammation and inflammasome activation with a differential right and left ventricular expression of key inflammatory genes and inflammasomes. We investigated the mRNA expression levels of the prion protein gene PRNP, which plays an important role in the protection against oxidative stress and metal toxicity, and the glucose regulated protein 78, a key protein in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress signaling, in ventricular autopsy samples from 30 children and young adults age 19.97 ± 6.8 years with a lifetime of low (n:4) vs. high (n:26) air pollution exposures. Light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy studies were carried out in human ventricles, and electron microscopy studies were also done in 5 young, highly exposed Mexico City dogs. There was significant left ventricular PRNP and bi-ventricular GRP78 mRNA up-regulation in Mexico City young urbanites vs. controls. PRNP up-regulation in the left ventricle was significantly different from the right, p < 0.0001, and there was a strong left ventricular PRNP and GRP78 correlation (p = 0.0005). Marked abnormalities in capillary endothelial cells, numerous nanosized particles in myocardial ER and in abnormal mitochondria characterized the highly exposed ventricles. Early and sustained cardiac ER stress could result in detrimental irreversible consequences in urban children, and while highly complex systems maintain myocardial homeostasis, failure to compensate for chronic myocardial inflammation, oxidative and ER stress, and particles damaging myocardial organelles may prime the development of pathophysiological cardiovascular states in young urbanites. Nanosized PM could play a key cardiac myocyte toxicity role.

  4. Up-Regulation of mRNA Ventricular PRNP Prion Protein Gene Expression in Air Pollution Highly Exposed Young Urbanites: Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress, Glucose Regulated Protein 78, and Nanosized Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo Villarreal-Calderon

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Mexico City Metropolitan Area children and young adults exposed to high concentrations of air pollutants including fine and ultrafine particulate matter (PM vs. clean air controls, exhibit myocardial inflammation and inflammasome activation with a differential right and left ventricular expression of key inflammatory genes and inflammasomes. We investigated the mRNA expression levels of the prion protein gene PRNP, which plays an important role in the protection against oxidative stress and metal toxicity, and the glucose regulated protein 78, a key protein in endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress signaling, in ventricular autopsy samples from 30 children and young adults age 19.97 ± 6.8 years with a lifetime of low (n:4 vs. high (n:26 air pollution exposures. Light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy studies were carried out in human ventricles, and electron microscopy studies were also done in 5 young, highly exposed Mexico City dogs. There was significant left ventricular PRNP and bi-ventricular GRP78 mRNA up-regulation in Mexico City young urbanites vs. controls. PRNP up-regulation in the left ventricle was significantly different from the right, p < 0.0001, and there was a strong left ventricular PRNP and GRP78 correlation (p = 0.0005. Marked abnormalities in capillary endothelial cells, numerous nanosized particles in myocardial ER and in abnormal mitochondria characterized the highly exposed ventricles. Early and sustained cardiac ER stress could result in detrimental irreversible consequences in urban children, and while highly complex systems maintain myocardial homeostasis, failure to compensate for chronic myocardial inflammation, oxidative and ER stress, and particles damaging myocardial organelles may prime the development of pathophysiological cardiovascular states in young urbanites. Nanosized PM could play a key cardiac myocyte toxicity role.

  5. Idiopathic ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belhassen, B; Viskin, S

    1993-06-01

    Important data have recently been added to our understanding of sustained ventricular tachyarrhythmias occurring in the absence of demonstrable heart disease. Idiopathic ventricular tachycardia (VT) is usually of monomorphic configuration and can be classified according to its site of origin as either right monomorphic (70% of all idiopathic VTs) or left monomorphic VT. Several physiopathological types of monomorphic VT can be presently individualized, according to their mode of presentation, their relationship to adrenergic stress, or their response to various drugs. The long-term prognosis is usually good. Idiopathic polymorphic VT is a much rarer type of arrhythmia with a less favorable prognosis. Idiopathic ventricular fibrillation may represent an underestimated cause of sudden cardiac death in ostensibly healty patients. A high incidence of inducibility of sustained polymorphic VT with programmed ventricular stimulation has been found by our group, but not by others. Long-term prognosis on Class IA antiarrhythmic medications that are highly effective at electrophysiologic study appears excellent.

  6. Determinants of the response of left ventricular ejection fraction to vasodilator stress in electrocardiographically gated {sup 82}rubidium myocardial perfusion PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Tracy L.Y.; Merrill, Jennifer; Bengel, Frank M. [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Volokh, Lana [GE Healthcare, Haifa (Israel)

    2008-02-15

    Myocardial perfusion imaging with {sup 82}Rb PET allows for ECG-gated studies to be obtained early after radiotracer injection, capturing ventricular function close to peak pharmacologic action of dipyridamole. This is different from gated SPECT and may potentially provide additional diagnostic information. We sought to identify potential correlates of the PET-derived ejection fraction response to vasodilator stress. One hundred ten consecutive patients undergoing {sup 82}Rb PET myocardial perfusion imaging during evaluation for coronary artery disease were included. Using a GE Discovery STRx PET-CT scanner, ECG-gated images (eight bins) were obtained at rest and 4 min after dipyridamole infusion, 90 s after infusion of 1,480-2,220 MBq of {sup 82}Rb. Summed rest, stress, and difference scores (SRS, SSS, and SDS) were determined using a five-point scoring system and 20-segment model. Ejection fraction was calculated using automated QGS software. Significant reversibility (SDS {>=} 4) was found in 23 patients (21%). Mean LVEF in all patients was 47 {+-} 13% at rest and 53 {+-} 13% during dipyridamole. LVEF increased in 89 patients, and decreased in 17 patients during vasodilation. The change in LVEF was inversely correlated with SDS (r = -0.26; p = 0.007). Additionally, it was inversely correlated with resting LVEF (r = -0.20; p = 0.03) and SSS (r = -0.25; p = 0.009). No significant correlations were observed with SRS, heart rate, blood pressure, age, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, or pretest likelihood of disease. At multivariate regression analysis, SDS was an independent predictor of the change in LVEF. Gated {sup 82}Rb PET during pharmacologic stress allows for assessment of the functional response to vasodilation. The magnitude of LVEF increase is determined by stress perfusion/reversible perfusion defects. Functional response to hyperemia may thus be incorporated in future evaluations of diagnostic and prognostic algorithms based on {sup 82}Rb PET. (orig.)

  7. Resting electrocardiogram and stress myocardial perfusion imaging in the determination of left ventricular systolic function: an assessment enhancing the performance of gated SPET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moralidis, Efstratios; Spyridonidis, Tryfon; Arsos, Georgios; Skeberis, Vassilios; Anagnostopoulos, Constantinos; Gavrielidis, Stavros

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to determine systolic dysfunction and estimate resting left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) from information collected during routine evaluation of patients with suspected or known coronary heart disease. This approach was then compared to gated single photon emission tomography (SPET). Patients having undergone stress (201)Tl myocardial perfusion imaging followed by equilibrium radionuclide angiography (ERNA) were separated into derivation (n=954) and validation (n=309) groups. Logistic regression analysis was used to develop scoring systems, containing clinical, electrocardiographic (ECG) and scintigraphic data, for the discrimination of an ERNA-LVEFstatistic (mean+/-2SD) provided values of 0.001+/-0.176, 0.071+/-0.196 and 0.040+/-0.152, respectively. The average LVEF was a better discriminator of systolic dysfunction than gated SPET-LVEF in receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and identified more patients (89%) with a stress myocardial perfusion imaging variables. This model provides reliable LVEF estimations, comparable to those from (201)Tl gated SPET, and can enhance the clinical performance of the latter.

  8. Comparison of Quantitative Wall Motion Analysis and Strain For Detection Of Coronary Stenosis With Three-Dimensional Dobutamine Stress Echocardiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Katherine M.; Clark, Alexander P.; Goodman, Norman C.; Glover, David K.; Holmes, Jeffrey W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Quantitative analysis of wall motion from three-dimensional (3D) dobutamine stress echocardiography (DSE) could provide additional diagnostic information not available from qualitative analysis. In this study we compare the effectiveness of 3D fractional shortening (3DFS), a measure of wall motion computed from 3D echocardiography (3DE), to strain and strain rate measured with sonomicrometry for detecting critical stenoses during DSE. Methods Eleven open-chest dogs underwent DSE both with and without a critical stenosis. 3DFS was measured from 3DE images acquired at peak stress. 3DFS was normalized by subtracting average 3DFS during control peak stress (Δ3DFS). Strains in the perfusion defect (PD) were measured from sonomicrometry, and PD size and location were measured with microspheres. Results A Δ3DFS abnormality indicated the presence of a critical stenosis with high sensitivity and specificity (88% and 100%, respectively), and Δ3DFS abnormality size correlated with PD size (R2=0.54). The sensitivity and specificity for Δ3DFS was similar to that for area strain (88%, 100%) and circumferential strain and strain rate (88%, 92% and 88%, 86%, respectively), while longitudinal strain and strain rate were less specific. Δ3DFS correlated significantly with both coronary flow reserve (R2=0.71) and PD size (R2=0.97), while area strain correlated with PD size only (R2=0.67), and other measures were not significantly correlated with flow reserve or PD size. Conclusion Quantitative wall motion analysis using Δ3DFS is effective for detecting critical stenoses during DSE, performing similarly to 3D strain, and provides potentially useful information on the size and location of a perfusion defect. PMID:24815588

  9. Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia: Atypical clinical presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marçalo, José; Menezes Falcão, Luiz

    2017-03-01

    A 67-year-old man was admitted to our hospital after episodes of syncope preceded by malaise and diffuse neck and chest discomfort. No family history of cardiac disease was reported. Laboratory workup was within normal limits, including D-dimers, serum troponin I and arterial blood gases. The electrocardiogram showed sinus rhythm with T-wave inversion in leads V1 to V3. Computed tomography angiography to investigate pulmonary embolism showed no abnormal findings. Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) displayed massive enlargement of the right ventricle with intact interatrial septum and no pulmonary hypertension. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) confirmed right ventricular (RV) dilatation and revealed marked hypokinesia/akinesia of the lateral wall. Exercise stress testing was negative for ischemia. According to the 2010 Task Force criteria for arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia (ARVD), this patient presented two major criteria (global or regional dysfunction and structural alterations: by MRI, regional RV akinesia or dyskinesia or dyssynchronous RV contraction and RV ejection fraction ≤40%, and repolarization abnormalities: inverted T waves in right precordial leads [V1, V2, and V3]); and one minor criterion (>500 ventricular extrasystoles per 24 hours by Holter), and so a diagnosis of ARVD was made. After electrophysiologic study (EPS) the patient received an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD). This late clinical presentation of ARVD highlights the importance of TTE screening, possibly complemented by MRI. The associated risk of sudden death was assessed by EPS leading to the implantation of an ICD. Genetic association studies should be offered to the offspring of all ARVD patients. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Association between left ventricular global longitudinal strain and natriuretic peptides in outpatients with chronic systolic heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaborit, F; Bosselmann, H; Tønder, N

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both impaired left ventricular (LV) global longitudinal strain (GLS) and increased plasma concentrations of natriuretic peptides(NP) are associated with a poor outcome in heart failure (HF). Increased levels of NP reflect increased wall stress of the LV. However, little is known about.......28-8.30, P = 0.013) and linear regression (NT-proBNP: βGLS: 1.19, 95 %-CI: 0.62-1.76, P renal function) and left atrial volume index....... CONCLUSION: Impaired LV GLS is associated with increased plasma concentrations of NP and our data suggest that left ventricular myocardial mechanics estimated by LV GLS reflects myocardial wall stress in chronic systolic HF....

  11. Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia: MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wall, E.E. van der; Bootsma, M.M.; Schalij, M.J.; Kayser, H.W.M.; Roos, A. de

    2000-01-01

    Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia (ARVD) is a heart muscle disorder of unknown cause that is characterized pathologically by fibrofatty replacement of the right ventricular myocardium. Clinical manifestations include structural and functional malformations of the right ventricle, electrocardiographic abnormalities, and presentation with ventricular tachycardias with left bundle branch pattern or sudden death. The disease is often familial with an autosomal inheritance. In addition to right ventricular dilatation, right ventricular aneurysms are typical deformities of ARVD and they are distributed in the so-called ''triangle of dysplasia'', i. e., right ventricular outflow tract, apex, and infundibulum. Ventricular aneurysms at these sites can be considered pathognomonic of ARVD. Another typical hallmark of ARVD is fibrofatty infiltration of the right ventricular free wall. These functional and morphologic characteristics are relevant to clinical imaging investigations such as contrast angiography, echocardiography, radionuclide angiography, ultrafast computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Among these techniques, MRI allows the clearest visualization of the heart, in particular because the right ventricle is involved, which is usually more difficult to explore with the other imaging modalities. Furthermore, MRI offers the specific advantage of visualizing adipose infiltration as a bright signal of the right ventricular myocardium. MRI provides the most important anatomic, functional, and morphologic criteria for diagnosis of ARVD within one single study. As a result, MRI appears to be the optimal imaging technique for detecting and following patients with clinical suspicion of ARVD. (orig.) [de

  12. Thermo-elastic stress analysis of containment wall penetrations using improved finite element formulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramani, D.T.; Dimopoulos, A.; Heglin, B.M.

    1979-01-01

    An increased application of finite element techniques, particularly in evaluating structural integrity of nuclear containment walls around penetration points, has aroused considerable interest. Due to extreme thermal effects in the vicinity of penetrations, the concrete containment wall is subject to unwarranted cracking effects, which must be controlled in accordance with ASME-III Code. This paper essentially deals with a unique finite element method of analysis in which nonlinear heat transfer problem across the penetration assembly in the nuclear containment drywell wall, is formulated. Using this technique, thermal analysis, dealing with an evaluation of temperature distribution around axisymmetric penetration assembly accomodating main steam lines or other vital piping at 600 0 F, is carried out. The method of analysis considers steady-state heat transfer energy balance across the process-pipe, insulation layer, guard-pipe sleeve, two intermediate air layers and an axisymmetric opening in the concrete containment wall, the outer faces of which are maintained at ambient temperature of 120 0 F. (orig.)

  13. Prediction of wall motion improvement after coronary revascularization in patients with postmyocardial infarction. Diagnostic value of dobutamine stress echocardiography and myocardial contrast echocardiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waku, Sachiko; Ohkubo, Tomoyuki; Takada, Kiyoshi; Ishihara, Tadashi; Ohsawa, Nakaaki; Adachi, Itaru; Narabayashi, Isamu

    1997-01-01

    The diagnostic value of dobutamine stress echocardiography, myocardial contrast echocardiography and dipyridamole stress thallium-201 single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) for predicting recovery of wall motion abnormality after revascularization was evaluated in 13 patients with postmyocardial infarction. Seventeen segments showed severe wall motion abnormalities before revascularization. Nine segments which had relatively good Tl uptake on delayed SPECT images despite severely abnormal wall motion were opacified during myocardial contrast echocardiography, and showed improved wall motion after revascularization. In contrast, three segments which had poor Tl uptake and severely abnormal wall motion were not opacified during myocardial contrast echocardiography, and showed no improvement in wall motion during dobutamine stress echocardiography and after revascularization. The following three findings were assumed to be signs of myocardial viability: good Tl uptake on delayed SPECT images, improved wall motion by dobutamine stress echocardiography, and positive opacification of the myocardium by myocardiai contrast echocardiography. Myocardial contrast echocardiography had the highest sensitivity (100%) and negative predictive value (100%). Delayed SPECT images had the highest specificity (100%) and positive predictive value (100%). Dobutamine stress echocardiography had a sensitivity of 83.0%, specificity of 80.0%, positive predictive value of 90.9%, and negative predictive value of 66.7%, respectively. Myocardial contrast echocardiography showed the lowest specificity (60.0%). The techniques of dobutamine stress echocardiography and SPECT, though noninvasive, may underestimate wall motion improvement after revascularization. Further examination by myocardial contrast echocardiography is recommended to assess myocardial viability for determining the indications for coronary revascularization in spite of its invasiveness. (author)

  14. Stress in closed thin-walled tubes of single box subjected by shear forces and application to airfoils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zebbiche Toufik

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The presented work is to develop a numerical computation program to determine the distribution of the shear stress to shear in closed tubes with asymmetric single thin wall section with a constant thickness and applications to airfoils and therefore determining the position and value of the maximum stress. In the literature, there are exact analytical solutions only for some sections of simple geometries such as circular section. Hence our interest is focused on the search of approximate numerical solutions for more complex sections used in aeronautics. In the second stage the position of the shear center is determined so that the section does not undergo torsion. The analytic function of the boundary of the airfoil is obtained by using the cubic spline interpolation since it is given in the form of tabulated points.

  15. Evaluation on double-wall-tube residual stress distribution of sodium-heated steam generator by neutron diffraction and numerical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kisohara, N.; Suzuki, H.; Akita, K.; Kasahara, N.

    2012-01-01

    A double-wall-tube is nominated for the steam generator heat transfer tube of future sodium fast reactors (SFRs) in Japan, to decrease the possibility of sodium/water reaction. The double-wall-tube consists of an inner tube and an outer tube, and they are mechanically contacted to keep the heat transfer of the interface between the inner and outer tubes by their residual stress. During long term SG operation, the contact stress at the interface gradually falls down due to stress relaxation. This phenomenon might increase the thermal resistance of the interface and degrade the tube heat transfer performance. The contact stress relaxation can be predicted by numerical analysis, and the analysis requires the data of the initial residual stress distributions in the tubes. However, unclear initial residual stress distributions prevent precious relaxation evaluation. In order to resolve this issue, a neutron diffraction method was employed to reveal the tri-axial (radius, hoop and longitudinal) initial residual stress distributions in the double-wall-tube. Strain gauges also were used to evaluate the contact stress. The measurement results were analyzed using a JAEA's structural computer code to determine the initial residual stress distributions. Based on the stress distributions, the structural computer code has predicted the transition of the relaxation and the decrease of the contact stress. The radial and longitudinal temperature distributions in the tubes were input to the structural analysis model. Since the radial thermal expansion difference between the inner (colder) and outer (hotter) tube reduces the contact stress and the tube inside steam pressure contributes to increasing it, the analytical model also took these effects into consideration. It has been conduced that the inner and outer tubes are contacted with sufficient stresses during the plant life time, and that effective heat transfer degradation dose not occur in the double-wall-tube SG. (authors)

  16. Receiver operating characteristics of diagnostic efficacy of resting left ventricular performance (evaluating with a non-imaging ECG gated scintillation detector - nuclear stethoscope)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotlyarov, E.V.; Reba, R.C.; Lindsay, J.

    1983-01-01

    Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis of left ventricular performance at rest was applied to evaluate diagnostic utility of non-imaging nuclear detector (''Nuclear Stethoscope''), for screening patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Thirty-one patients without CAD and normal rest and stress radionuclide ventriculography (MUGA) were used as a control group. Another 62 patients with abnormal left ventricular reserve and segmental wall motion abnormalities at rest were also studied. All 93 patients were studied with the Nuclear Stethoscope (30 minutes after conventional MUGA testing) both in beat-to-beat and gated equilibrium modes. ROC analysis showed that along with ejection fraction, stroke and end-diastolic volumes, evaluation of the left ventricular filling phase has a great potential for the identification of patients with a segmental wall motion abnormality and, therefore, significant CAD

  17. Usefulness of {sup 201}Tl myocardial perfusion SPECT in prediction of left ventricular remodeling following an acute myocardial infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Seok Nam; Park, C. H.; Hwang, Kyung Hoon [Ajou Univ. College of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-02-01

    We investigated the role of myocardial perfusion SPECT in prediction of ventricular dilatation and the role of revascularization including thrombolytic therapy and PTCA in prevention of ventricular dilatation after an acute myocardial linfarction (AMI). We performed dipyridamole stress, 4 hour redistribution, and 24 hour reinjection Tl-201 SPECT in 6 patients with AMI two to nine days after attack. Perfusion and wall motion abnormalities were quantified by perfusion index(PI) and wall motion index (WMI). Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), WMI and ventricular volume were measured within 1 week of AMI and after average of 6 months. According to serial changes of left ventricular end-diastolic volume (LVEDV), patients were divided into two groups. We compared WMI, PI and LVEF between the two groups. Relationships among degree of volume, stress-rest PI, WMI, CKMB,Q wave, LVEF and revascularization were analysed using multivariate analysis. Only initial rest perfusion index was significantly different between the two groups (p<0.05). While initial LVEF, stress PI, CKMB, trial of revascularization procedure, presence of Q wave and WMI were not significantly different between the two groups. Eight of 16 patients (50%) showed LV dilatation on follow-up echocardiography. Three of 3 patients (100%) who did not undergo revascualrization procedure documented LV dilatation. And only 5 (38%) of the remaining 13 patients who underwent revascularization revealed LV dilatation. There was no difference in infarct location between the two groups. By multivariate linear regression analysis in patients only undergoing revascularization, rest perfusion index was the only significant factor. Myocardial perfusion SPECT performed prior to revascularization was useful in prediction of LV dilatation after an AMI. Rest perfusion index on myocardial perfusion plays as a significant predictor of left ventricular dilatation after AMI. And revascularization appears to be a valuable

  18. Sympathetic stimulation alters left ventricular relaxation and chamber size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burwash, I G; Morgan, D E; Koilpillai, C J; Blackmore, G L; Johnstone, D E; Armour, J A

    1993-01-01

    Alterations in left ventricular (LV) contractility, relaxation, and chamber dimensions induced by efferent sympathetic nerve stimulation were investigated in nine anesthetized open-chest dogs in sinus rhythm. Supramaximal stimulation of acutely decentralized left stellate ganglia augmented heart rate, LV systolic pressure, and rate of LV pressure rise (maximum +dP/dt, 1,809 +/- 191 to 6,304 +/- 725 mmHg/s) and fall (maximum -dP/dt, -2,392 +/- 230 to -4,458 +/- 482 mmHg/s). It also reduced the time constant of isovolumic relaxation, tau (36.5 +/- 4.8 to 14.9 +/- 1.1 ms). Simultaneous two-dimensional echocardiography recorded reductions in end-diastolic and end-systolic LV cross-sectional chamber areas (23 and 31%, respectively), an increase in area ejection fraction (32%), and increases in end-diastolic and end-systolic wall thicknesses (14 and 13%, respectively). End-systolic and end-diastolic wall stresses were unchanged by stellate ganglion stimulation (98 +/- 12 to 95 +/- 9 dyn x 10(3)/cm2; 6.4 +/- 2.4 to 2.4 +/- 0.3 dyn x 10(3)/cm2, respectively). Atrial pacing to similar heart rates did not alter monitored indexes of contractility. Dobutamine and isoproterenol induced changes similar to those resulting from sympathetic neuronal stimulation. These data indicate that when the efferent sympathetic nervous system increases left ventricular contractility and relaxation, concomitant reductions in systolic and diastolic dimensions of that chamber occur that are associated with increasing wall thickness such that LV wall stress changes are minimized.

  19. Long-term Associations of an Early Corrected Ventricular Septal Defect and Stress Systems of Child and Mother at Primary School Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stonawski, Valeska; Vollmer, Laura; Köhler-Jonas, Nicola; Rohleder, Nicolas; Golub, Yulia; Purbojo, Ariawan; Moll, Gunther H; Heinrich, Hartmut; Cesnjevar, Robert A; Kratz, Oliver; Eichler, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Ventricular septal defect (VSD) is the most common congenital heart defect, with larger VSDs typically being corrected with an open-heart surgery during infancy. Long-term consequences of a VSD-corrective surgery on stress systems of child and mother are still unknown. The aim of the present study is to investigate the associations of an early corrected VSD and diurnal cortisol release of child and mother. 26 children (12 boys) between 6 and 9 years old, who underwent surgery for an isolated VSD within the first 3 years of life, and their mothers participated in the study. Their diurnal cortisol profiles were compared to a sex-, age-, and socioeconomic status-matched healthy control group. Within the VSD group, associations between cortisol and characteristics of surgery and hospitalization were investigated. Child and mother psychopathological symptoms were considered as a possible interfering mechanism of altered cortisol profiles. Diurnal cortisol profiles of children with an early corrected VSD did not differ from those of controls. However, mothers of affected children exhibited higher cortisol levels in the morning ( p  early corrected VSD, in terms of comparable diurnal cortisol profiles with healthy controls, according to a comparable mother-rated psychopathology. Mothers of affected children reveal altered diurnal cortisol levels, without differences in self-rated psychopathology. This divergence should be clarified in future research.

  20. Stress indices for girth welded joints, including radial weld shrinkage, mismatch and tapered-wall transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodabaugh, E.C.; Moore, S.E.

    1978-09-01

    A review is presented of B, C and K stress indices used in the ASME Nuclear Power Plant Code for girth butt welds and girth fillet welds. Theoretical stresses are presented to aid in evaluating C-indices. Fatigue test data are presented to aid in evaluating K-indices and CK-products. A limit load theory is presented to aid in evaluating B-indices. As a result of this review, recommendations are made for changes in the ASME Code. A major part of this consists of presenting definitions for girth welded joints and transitions and appropriate stress indices for those joints

  1. Fibrillar, fibril-associated and basement membrane collagens of the arterial wall: architecture, elasticity and remodeling under stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osidak, M S; Osidak, E O; Akhmanova, M A; Domogatsky, S P; Domogatskaya, A S

    2015-01-01

    The ability of a human artery to pass through 150 million liters of blood sustaining 2 billion pulsations of blood pressure with minor deterioration depends on unique construction of the arterial wall. Viscoelastic properties of this construction enable to re-seal the occuring damages apparently without direct immediate participance of the constituent cells. Collagen structures are considered to be the elements that determine the mechanoelastic properties of the wall in parallel with elastin responsible for elasticity and resilience. Collagen scaffold architecture is the function-dependent dynamic arrangement of a dozen different collagen types composing three distinct interacting forms inside the extracellular matrix of the wall. Tightly packed molecules of collagen types I, III, V provide high tensile strength along collagen fibrils but toughness of the collagen scaffold as a whole depends on molecular bonds between distinct fibrils. Apart of other macromolecules in the extracellular matrix (ECM), collagen-specific interlinks involve microfilaments of collagen type VI, meshwork-organized collagen type VIII, and FACIT collagen type XIV. Basement membrane collagen types IV, XV, XVIII and cell-associated collagen XIII enable transmission of mechanical signals between cells and whole artery matrix. Collagen scaffold undergoes continuous remodeling by decomposition promoted with MMPs and reconstitution from newly produced collagen molecules. Pulsatile stress-strain load modulates both collagen synthesis and MMP-dependent collagen degradation. In this way the ECM structure becomes adoptive to mechanical challenges. The mechanoelastic properties of the arterial wall are changed in atherosclerosis concomitantly with collagen turnover both type-specific and dependent on the structure. Improving the feedback could be another approach to restore sufficient blood circulation.

  2. Left ventricular function abnormalities as a manifestation of silent myocardial ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, C R; Conti, C R; Pepine, C J

    1986-11-01

    A large body of evidence exists indicating that left ventricular dysfunction is a common occurrence in patients with severe coronary artery disease and represents silent or asymptomatic myocardial ischemia. Such dysfunction probably occurs early in the time course of every ischemic episode in patients with coronary artery disease whether symptoms are eventually manifested or not. The pathophysiology of silent versus symptomatic left ventricular dysfunction due to ischemia appears to be identical. Silent ischemia-related left ventricular dysfunction can be documented during spontaneous or stress-induced perturbations in the myocardial oxygen supply/demand ratio. It also may be detected by nitroglycerin-induced improvement in ventricular function or by salutary changes in wall motion following revascularization. Silent left ventricular dysfunction is a very early occurrence during ischemia and precedes electrocardiographic abnormalities. In this light, its existence should always be kept in mind when dealing with patients with ischemic heart disease. It can be hypothesized that because silent ischemia appears to be identical to ischemia with symptoms in a pathophysiologic sense, prognosis and treatment in both cases should be the same.

  3. Discovery of novel cell wall-active compounds using P ywaC, a sensitive reporter of cell wall stress, in the model gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarny, T L; Perri, A L; French, S; Brown, E D

    2014-06-01

    The emergence of antibiotic resistance in recent years has radically reduced the clinical efficacy of many antibacterial treatments and now poses a significant threat to public health. One of the earliest studied well-validated targets for antimicrobial discovery is the bacterial cell wall. The essential nature of this pathway, its conservation among bacterial pathogens, and its absence in human biology have made cell wall synthesis an attractive pathway for new antibiotic drug discovery. Herein, we describe a highly sensitive screening methodology for identifying chemical agents that perturb cell wall synthesis, using the model of the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis. We report on a cell-based pilot screen of 26,000 small molecules to look for cell wall-active chemicals in real time using an autonomous luminescence gene cluster driven by the promoter of ywaC, which encodes a guanosine tetra(penta)phosphate synthetase that is expressed under cell wall stress. The promoter-reporter system was generally much more sensitive than growth inhibition testing and responded almost exclusively to cell wall-active antibiotics. Follow-up testing of the compounds from the pilot screen with secondary assays to verify the mechanism of action led to the discovery of 9 novel cell wall-active compounds. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Expansive stresses of a grout plug on the walls of borehole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Licastro, P.H.; Malek, R.I.A.; Roy, D.M.

    1985-01-01

    The primary function of a concrete plug in a repository seal system is to provide a viable seal at the interface with the host rock by developing and maintaining a positive normal stress across the interface. While standards do exist for unrestrained and restrained expansion of mortar and concrete there are few systems that permit calculation of stress for a stimulated borehole geometry. A system was designed to determine the radial stresses introduced by expansive, cementitious grout on the borehole. It consists of a strain gage instrumented cell and its associated signal conditioner/amplifier. Cell material and thickness can be varied to simulate restraining conditions at given depths. Prior to sample emplacement the cell/system is calibrated by fluid pressurization. Special cell design eliminates the effects of longitudinal stresses during calibration. An analog output as a function of time is recorded, in conjunction with surface temperature of the cylinder. The cell containing grout is maintained under controlled temperature conditions which can be varied from 25 0 C to 90 0 C. Pressure can be applied to the grout column to simulate hydrostatic/geostatic load conditions. Using the equipment described, several expansive grout formulations were studied at 38 0 C. Results obtained for expansive stresses as a function of time are presented together with implications on repository-seal durability

  5. Left ventricular remodeling in preclinical experimental mitral regurgitation of dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, A Ray; Dell'Italia, Louis J; Tillson, Michael; Killingsworth, Cheryl; Denney, Thomas; Hathcock, John; Botzman, Logan

    2012-03-01

    Dogs with experimental mitral regurgitation (MR) provide insights into the left ventricular remodeling in preclinical MR. The early preclinical left ventricular (LV) changes after mitral regurgitation represent progressive dysfunctional remodeling, in that no compensatory response returns the functional stroke volume (SV) to normal even as total SV increases. The gradual disease progression leads to mitral annulus stretch and enlargement of the regurgitant orifice, further increasing the regurgitant volume. Remodeling with loss of collagen weave and extracellular matrix (ECM) is accompanied by stretching and hypertrophy of the cross-sectional area and length of the cardiomyocyte. Isolated ventricular cardiomyocytes demonstrate dysfunction based on decreased cell shortening and reduced intracellular calcium transients before chamber enlargement or decreases in contractility in the whole heart can be clinically appreciated. The genetic response to increased end-diastolic pressure is down-regulation of genes associated with support of the collagen and ECM and up-regulation of genes associated with matrix remodeling. Experiments have not demonstrated any beneficial effects on remodeling from treatments that decrease afterload via blocking the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Beta-1 receptor blockade and chymase inhibition have altered the progression of the LV remodeling and have supported cardiomyocyte function. The geometry of the LV during the remodeling provides insight into the importance of regional differences in responses to wall stress. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Histone acetylation associated up-regulation of the cell wall related genes is involved in salt stress induced maize root swelling

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Hui; Yan, Shihan; Zhao, Lin; Tan, Junjun; Zhang, Qi; Gao, Fei; Wang, Pu; Hou, Haoli; Li, Lijia

    2014-01-01

    Background Salt stress usually causes crop growth inhibition and yield decrease. Epigenetic regulation is involved in plant responses to environmental stimuli. The epigenetic regulation of the cell wall related genes associated with the salt-induced cellular response is still little known. This study aimed to analyze cell morphological alterations in maize roots as a consequence of excess salinity in relation to the transcriptional and epigenetic regulation of the cell wall related protein ge...

  7. [Cellular composition of lymphoid nodules in the trachea wall in rats with different resistance to emotional stress in a model of hemorrhagic stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klyueva, L A

    2017-01-01

    To reveal regularities of changes in cellular composition of lymphoid nodules in the tracheal wall in male Wistar rats resistant and not resistant to emotional stress in a model of hemorrhagic stroke. Lymphoid formations of the tracheal wall (an area near the bifurcation of the organ) were investigated in 98 male Wistar rats using histological methods. Significant changes in the cellular composition of lymphoid nodules were found. The pattern of changes depends on the stress resistance of rats and the period of the experiment. The active cell destruction in lymphoid nodules was noted both in stress resistant and stress susceptible animals. The changes in the structure of lymphoid nodules found in the experimental hemorrhagic stroke suggest a decrease in the local immune resistance, which is most pronounced in rats not resistant to stress, that may contribute to the development of severe inflammatory complications of stroke such as pneumonia.

  8. Transient left ventricular apical ballooning and exercise induced hypertension during treadmill exercise testing: is there a common hypersympathetic mechanism?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oh Jae K

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To describe two cases of Takotsubo like myocardial contractile pattern during exercise stress test secondary to hypertensive response. Background Treadmill exercise testing is known to cause sympathetic stimulation, leading to increased levels of catecholamine, resulting in alteration in vascular tone. Hypertensive response during exercise testing can cause abnormal consequences, resulting in false positive results. Cases We present the cases of two patients experiencing apical and basal akinesis during exercise stress echocardiography, in whom normal wall motion response was observed on subsequent pharmacologic stress testing. The first patient developed transient left ventricular (LV apical akinesis during exercise stress echocardiography. Due to high suspicion that this abnormality might be secondary to hypertensive response, pharmacologic stress testing was performed after three days, which was completely normal and showed no such wall motion abnormality. Qualitative assessment of myocardial perfusion using contrast was also performed, which showed good myocardial blood flow, indicating low probability for significant obstructive coronary artery disease. The second patient developed LV basal akinesis as a result of hypertensive response during exercise testing. Coronary angiogram was not performed in either patient due to low suspicion for coronary artery disease, and subsequently negative stress studies. Results Transient stress induced cardiomyopathy can develop secondary to hypertensive response during exercise stress testing. Conclusion These cases provide supporting evidence to the hyper-sympathetic theory of left ventricular ballooning syndrome.

  9. Influence of wall couple stress in MHD flow of a micropolar fluid in a porous medium with energy and concentration transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asma Khalid

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The intention here is to investigate the effects of wall couple stress with energy and concentration transfer in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD flow of a micropolar fluid embedded in a porous medium. The mathematical model contains the set of linear conservation forms of partial differential equations. Laplace transforms and convolution technique are used for computation of exact solutions of velocity, microrotations, temperature and concentration equations. Numerical values of skin friction, couple wall stress, Nusselt and Sherwood numbers are also computed. Characteristics for the significant variables on the physical quantities are graphically discussed. Comparison with previously published work in limiting sense shows an excellent agreement. Keywords: Micropolor fluid, Microrotation, MHD, Porosity, Wall couple stress, Exact solutions

  10. Rôle of contrast media viscosity in altering vessel wall shear stress and relation to the risk of contrast extravasations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakellariou, Sophia; Li, Wenguang; Paul, Manosh C; Roditi, Giles

    2016-12-01

    Iodinated contrast media (CM) are the most commonly used injectables in radiology today. A range of different media are commercially available, combining various physical and chemical characteristics (ionic state, osmolality, viscosity) and thus exhibiting distinct in vivo behaviour and safety profiles. In this paper, numerical simulations of blood flow with contrast media were conducted to investigate the effects of contrast viscosity on generated vessel wall shear stress and vessel wall pressure to elucidate any possible relation to extravasations. Five different types of contrast for Iodine fluxes ranging at 1.5-2.2gI/s were modelled through 18G and 20G cannulae placed in an ideal vein at two different orientation angles. Results demonstrate that the least viscous contrast media generate the least maximum wall shear stress as well as the lowest total pressure for the same flow rate. This supports the empirical clinical observations and hypothesis that more viscous contrast media are responsible for a higher percentage of contrast extravasations. In addition, results support the clinical hypothesis that a catheter tip directed obliquely to the vein wall always produces the highest maximum wall shear stress and total pressure due to impingement of the contrast jet on the vessel wall. Copyright © 2016 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Exercise-mediated wall shear stress increases mitochondrial biogenesis in vascular endothelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boa Kim

    Full Text Available Enhancing structural and functional integrity of mitochondria is an emerging therapeutic option against endothelial dysfunction. In this study, we sought to investigate the effect of fluid shear stress on mitochondrial biogenesis and mitochondrial respiratory function in endothelial cells (ECs using in vitro and in vivo complementary studies.Human aortic- or umbilical vein-derived ECs were exposed to laminar shear stress (20 dyne/cm2 for various durations using a cone-and-plate shear apparatus. We observed significant increases in the expression of key genes related to mitochondrial biogenesis and mitochondrial quality control as well as mtDNA content and mitochondrial mass under the shear stress conditions. Mitochondrial respiratory function was enhanced when cells were intermittently exposed to laminar shear stress for 72 hrs. Also, shear-exposed cells showed diminished glycolysis and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm. Likewise, in in vivo experiments, mice that were subjected to a voluntary wheel running exercise for 5 weeks showed significantly higher mitochondrial content determined by en face staining in the conduit (greater and lesser curvature of the aortic arch and thoracic aorta and muscle feed (femoral artery arteries compared to the sedentary control mice. Interestingly, however, the mitochondrial biogenesis was not observed in the mesenteric artery. This region-specific adaptation is likely due to the differential blood flow redistribution during exercise in the different vessel beds.Taken together, our findings suggest that exercise enhances mitochondrial biogenesis in vascular endothelium through a shear stress-dependent mechanism. Our findings may suggest a novel mitochondrial pathway by which a chronic exercise may be beneficial for vascular function.

  12. Left ventricular function in response to dipyridamole stress: head-to-head comparison between {sup 82}Rubidium PET and {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi SPECT ECG-gated myocardial perfusion imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giorgi, Maria Clementina; Meneghetti, Jose Claudio; Soares, Jose; Izaki, Marisa; Falcao, Andrea; Imada, Rodrigo; Chalela, William; Oliveira, Marco Antonio de; Nomura, Cesar [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Service - Heart Institute of the University of Sao Paulo Medical School, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Verberne, Hein J. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Academic Medical Center, P.O. Box 22700, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2017-05-15

    Myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) with {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi (sestamibi) SPECT and rubidium-82 ({sup 82}Rb) PET both allow for combined assessment of perfusion and left ventricular (LV) function. We sought to compare parameters of LV function obtained with both methods using a single dipyridamole stress dose. A group of 221 consecutive patients (65.2 ± 10.4 years, 52.9% male) underwent consecutive sestamibi and {sup 82}Rb MPI after a single dipyridamole stress dose. Sestamibi and {sup 82}Rb summed rest (SRS), stress (SSS) and difference (SDS) scores, and LV end-diastolic (EDV) and end-systolic (ESV) volumes and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) were compared. Bland-Altman analysis showed that with increasing ESV and EDV the difference between the two perfusion tracers increased both at rest and post-stress. The mean difference in EDV and ESV between the two perfusion tracers at rest could both be independently explained by the {sup 82}Rb SDS and the sestamibi SRS. The combined models explained approximately 30% of the variation in these volumes between the two perfusion tracers (R{sup 2} = 0.261, p = 0.005; R{sup 2} = 0.296, p < 0.001, for EDV and ESV respectively). However, the mean difference in LVEF between sestamibi and {sup 82}Rb showed no significant trend post-stress (R{sup 2} = 0.001, p = 0.70) and only a modest linear increase with increasing LVEF values at rest (R{sup 2} = 0.032, p = 0.009). Differences in left ventricular volumes between sestamibi and {sup 82}Rb MPI increase with increasing volumes. However, these differences did only marginally affect LVEF between sestamibi and {sup 82}Rb. In clinical practice these results should be taken into account when comparing functional derived parameters between sestamibi and {sup 82}Rb MPI. (orig.)

  13. Free and Cell Wall-Bound Polyamines under Long-Term Water Stress Applied at Different Growth Stages of ×Triticosecale Wittm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Hura

    Full Text Available Long-stemmed and semi-dwarf cultivars of triticale were exposed to water stress at tillering, heading and anthesis stage. Quantitative determination of free and cell wall-bound polyamines, i.e. agmatine, cadaverine, putrescine, spermidine and spermine, was supplemented with an analysis of quantitative relationships between free and cell wall-bound polyamines.The content of free and cell wall-bound polyamines varied depending on the development stage, both under optimal and water stress conditions. Drought-induced increase in free agmatine content was observed at all developmental stages in long-stemmed cultivar. A depletion of spermidine and putrescine was also reported in this cultivar, and spermidine was less abundant in semi-dwarf cultivar exposed to drought stress at the three analyzed developmental stages. Changes in the content of the other free polyamines did not follow a steady pattern reflecting the developmental stages. On the contrary, the content of cell wall-bound polyamines gradually increased from tillering, through heading and until anthesis period.Water stress seemed to induce a progressive decrease in the content of free polyamines and an accumulation of cell wall-bound polyamines.

  14. Accelerated reliability testing of highly aligned single-walled carbon nanotube networks subjected to DC electrical stressing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strus, Mark C; Chiaramonti, Ann N; Kim, Young Lae; Jung, Yung Joon; Keller, Robert R

    2011-07-01

    We investigate the electrical reliability of nanoscale lines of highly aligned, networked, metallic/semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) fabricated through a template-based fluidic assembly process. We find that these SWCNT networks can withstand DC current densities larger than 10 MA cm(-2) for several hours and, in some cases, several days. We develop test methods that show that the degradation rate, failure predictability and total device lifetime can be linked to the initial resistance. Scanning electron and transmission electron microscopy suggest that fabrication variability plays a critical role in the rate of degradation, and we offer an empirical method of quickly determining the long-term performance of a network. We find that well-fabricated lines subject to constant electrical stress show a linear accumulation of damage reminiscent of electromigration in metallic interconnects, and we explore the underlying physical mechanisms that could cause such behavior.

  15. Wall Shear Stress Restoration in Dialysis Patient's Venous Stenosis: Elucidation via 3D CFD and Shape Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudzadeh Akherat, S. M. Javid; Cassel, Kevin; Hammes, Mary; Boghosian, Michael; Illinois Institute of Technology Team; University of Chicago Team

    2016-11-01

    Venous stenosis developed after the growth of excessive neointimal hyperplasia (NH) in chronic dialysis treatment is a major cause of mortality in renal failure patients. It has been hypothesized that the low wall shear stress (WSS) triggers an adaptive response in patients' venous system that through the growth of neointimal hyperplastic lesions restores WSS and transmural pressure, which also regulates the blood flow rate back to physiologically acceptable values which is violated by dialysis treatment. A strong coupling of three-dimensional CFD and shape optimization analyses were exploited to elucidate and forecast this adaptive response which correlates very well topographically with patient-specific clinical data. Based on the framework developed, a medical protocol is suggested to predict and prevent dialysis treatment failure in clinical practice. Supported by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases of the National Institutes of Health (R01 DK90769).

  16. Influence of wall couple stress in MHD flow of a micropolar fluid in a porous medium with energy and concentration transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalid, Asma; Khan, Ilyas; Khan, Arshad; Shafie, Sharidan

    2018-06-01

    The intention here is to investigate the effects of wall couple stress with energy and concentration transfer in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow of a micropolar fluid embedded in a porous medium. The mathematical model contains the set of linear conservation forms of partial differential equations. Laplace transforms and convolution technique are used for computation of exact solutions of velocity, microrotations, temperature and concentration equations. Numerical values of skin friction, couple wall stress, Nusselt and Sherwood numbers are also computed. Characteristics for the significant variables on the physical quantities are graphically discussed. Comparison with previously published work in limiting sense shows an excellent agreement.

  17. Effects of Argentilactone on the Transcriptional Profile, Cell Wall and Oxidative Stress of Paracoccidioides spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Felipe Souto; Coelho, Luciene Melo; Silva, Lívia do Carmo; da Silva Neto, Benedito Rodrigues; Parente-Rocha, Juliana Alves; Bailão, Alexandre Melo; de Oliveira, Cecília Maria Alves; Fernandes, Gabriel da Rocha; Hernández, Orville; Ochoa, Juan Guillermo McEwen; Soares, Célia Maria de Almeida; Pereira, Maristela

    2016-01-01

    Paracoccidioides spp., a dimorphic pathogenic fungus, is the etiologic agent of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM). PCM is an endemic disease that affects at least 10 million people in Latin America, causing severe public health problems. The drugs used against pathogenic fungi have various side effects and limited efficacy; therefore, there is an inevitable and urgent medical need for the development of new antifungal drugs. In the present study, we evaluated the transcriptional profile of Paracoccidioides lutzii exposed to argentilactone, a constituent of the essential oil of Hyptis ovalifolia. A total of 1,058 genes were identified, of which 208 were up-regulated and 850 were down-regulated. Cell rescue, defense and virulence, with a total of 26 genes, was a functional category with a large number of genes induced, including heat shock protein 90 (hsp90), cytochrome c peroxidase (ccp), the hemoglobin ligand RBT5 (rbt5) and superoxide dismutase (sod). Quantitative real-time PCR revealed an increase in the expression level of all of those genes. An enzymatic assay showed a significant increase in SOD activity. The reduced growth of Pbhsp90-aRNA, Pbccp-aRNA, Pbsod-aRNA and Pbrbt5-aRNA isolates in the presence of argentilactone indicates the importance of these genes in the response of Paracoccidioides spp. to argentilactone. The response of the P. lutzii cell wall to argentilactone treatment was also evaluated. The results showed that argentilactone caused a decrease in the levels of polymers in the cell wall. These results suggest that argentilactone is a potential candidate for antifungal therapy.

  18. Effects of Argentilactone on the Transcriptional Profile, Cell Wall and Oxidative Stress of Paracoccidioides spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Souto Araújo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Paracoccidioides spp., a dimorphic pathogenic fungus, is the etiologic agent of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM. PCM is an endemic disease that affects at least 10 million people in Latin America, causing severe public health problems. The drugs used against pathogenic fungi have various side effects and limited efficacy; therefore, there is an inevitable and urgent medical need for the development of new antifungal drugs. In the present study, we evaluated the transcriptional profile of Paracoccidioides lutzii exposed to argentilactone, a constituent of the essential oil of Hyptis ovalifolia. A total of 1,058 genes were identified, of which 208 were up-regulated and 850 were down-regulated. Cell rescue, defense and virulence, with a total of 26 genes, was a functional category with a large number of genes induced, including heat shock protein 90 (hsp90, cytochrome c peroxidase (ccp, the hemoglobin ligand RBT5 (rbt5 and superoxide dismutase (sod. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed an increase in the expression level of all of those genes. An enzymatic assay showed a significant increase in SOD activity. The reduced growth of Pbhsp90-aRNA, Pbccp-aRNA, Pbsod-aRNA and Pbrbt5-aRNA isolates in the presence of argentilactone indicates the importance of these genes in the response of Paracoccidioides spp. to argentilactone. The response of the P. lutzii cell wall to argentilactone treatment was also evaluated. The results showed that argentilactone caused a decrease in the levels of polymers in the cell wall. These results suggest that argentilactone is a potential candidate for antifungal therapy.

  19. The Mitochondrial GTPase Gem1 Contributes to the Cell Wall Stress Response and Invasive Growth of Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Koch

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The interactions of mitochondria with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER are crucial for maintaining proper mitochondrial morphology, function and dynamics. This enables cells to utilize their mitochondria optimally for energy production and anabolism, and it further provides for metabolic control over developmental decisions. In fungi, a key mechanism by which ER and mitochondria interact is via a membrane tether, the protein complex ERMES (ER-Mitochondria Encounter Structure. In the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the mitochondrial GTPase Gem1 interacts with ERMES, and it has been proposed to regulate its activity. Here we report on the first characterization of Gem1 in a human fungal pathogen. We show that in Candida albicans Gem1 has a dominant role in ensuring proper mitochondrial morphology, and our data is consistent with Gem1 working with ERMES in this role. Mitochondrial respiration and steady state cellular phospholipid homeostasis are not impacted by inactivation of GEM1 in C. albicans. There are two major virulence-related consequences of disrupting mitochondrial morphology by GEM1 inactivation: C. albicans becomes hypersusceptible to cell wall stress, and is unable to grow invasively. In the gem1Δ/Δ mutant, it is specifically the invasive capacity of hyphae that is compromised, not the ability to transition from yeast to hyphal morphology, and this phenotype is shared with ERMES mutants. As a consequence of the hyphal invasion defect, the gem1Δ/Δ mutant is drastically hypovirulent in the worm infection model. Activation of the mitogen activated protein (MAP kinase Cek1 is reduced in the gem1Δ/Δ mutant, and this function could explain both the susceptibility to cell wall stress and lack of invasive growth. This result establishes a new, respiration-independent mechanism of mitochondrial control over stress signaling and hyphal functions in C. albicans. We propose that ER-mitochondria interactions and the ER

  20. The Mitochondrial GTPase Gem1 Contributes to the Cell Wall Stress Response and Invasive Growth of Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Barbara; Tucey, Timothy M; Lo, Tricia L; Novakovic, Stevan; Boag, Peter; Traven, Ana

    2017-01-01

    The interactions of mitochondria with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) are crucial for maintaining proper mitochondrial morphology, function and dynamics. This enables cells to utilize their mitochondria optimally for energy production and anabolism, and it further provides for metabolic control over developmental decisions. In fungi, a key mechanism by which ER and mitochondria interact is via a membrane tether, the protein complex ERMES (ER-Mitochondria Encounter Structure). In the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae , the mitochondrial GTPase Gem1 interacts with ERMES, and it has been proposed to regulate its activity. Here we report on the first characterization of Gem1 in a human fungal pathogen. We show that in Candida albicans Gem1 has a dominant role in ensuring proper mitochondrial morphology, and our data is consistent with Gem1 working with ERMES in this role. Mitochondrial respiration and steady state cellular phospholipid homeostasis are not impacted by inactivation of GEM1 in C. albicans . There are two major virulence-related consequences of disrupting mitochondrial morphology by GEM1 inactivation: C. albicans becomes hypersusceptible to cell wall stress, and is unable to grow invasively. In the gem1 Δ / Δ mutant, it is specifically the invasive capacity of hyphae that is compromised, not the ability to transition from yeast to hyphal morphology, and this phenotype is shared with ERMES mutants. As a consequence of the hyphal invasion defect, the gem1 Δ / Δ mutant is drastically hypovirulent in the worm infection model. Activation of the mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase Cek1 is reduced in the gem1 Δ / Δ mutant, and this function could explain both the susceptibility to cell wall stress and lack of invasive growth. This result establishes a new, respiration-independent mechanism of mitochondrial control over stress signaling and hyphal functions in C. albicans . We propose that ER-mitochondria interactions and the ER-Mitochondria Organizing

  1. Reduced left ventricular dimension and function following early life stress: A thrifty phenotype hypothesis engendering risk for mood and anxiety disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy D. Coplan

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Early life stress (ELS in macaques in the form of insecure maternal attachment putatively induces epigenetic adaptations resulting in a “thrifty phenotype” throughout the life cycle. For instance, ELS induces persistent increases in insulin resistance, hippocampal and corpus callosum atrophy and reduced “behavioral plasticity”, which, taken together, engenders an increased risk for mood and anxiety disorders in humans but also a putative sparing of calories. Herein, we test the hypothesis whether a thrifty phenotype induced by ELS is peripherally evident as hypotrophy of cardiac structure and function, raising the possibility that certain mood disorders may represent maladaptive physiological and central thrift adaptations. Methods: 14 adult bonnet macaques (6 males exposed to the maternal variable foraging demand (VFD model of ELS were compared to 20 non-VFD adult subjects (6 males. Left ventricle end-diastolic dimension (LVEDD, Left ventricle end-systolic dimension (LVESD and stroke volume (SV were calculated using echocardiography. Blood pressure and heart rate were measured only in females. Previously obtained neurobehavioral correlates available only in males were analyzed in the context of cardiac parameters. Results: Reduced LVESD (p < 0.05 was observed when controlled for age, sex, body weight and crown-rump length whereas ejection fraction (EF (p = 0.037 was greater in VFD-reared versus non-VFD subjects. Pulse pressure was lower in VFD versus non-VFD females (p < 0.05. Male timidity in response to a human intruder was associated with reduced LVEDD (p < 0.05. Conclusions: ELS is associated with both structural and functional reductions of left ventricular measures, potentially implying a body-wide thrifty phenotype. Parallel “thrift” adaptations may occur in key brain areas following ELS and may play an unexplored role in mood and anxiety disorder susceptibility.

  2. Lack of independent relationships between left ventricular mass and cardiovascular reactivity to physical and psychological stress in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markovitz, J H; Raczynski, J M; Lewis, C E; Flack, J; Chesney, M; Chettur, V; Hardin, J M; Johnson, E

    1996-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether exaggerated blood pressure (BP) reactivity to stress and psychosocial characteristics are related to left ventricular mass (LVM) in a large cohort of young adults. Analyses were conducted with 3,742 participants of the CARDIA study (945 white men, 1,024 white women, 781 black men, and 992 black women), evaluated in 1990 to 1091 with echocardiographic measurement of LVM. Analyses were stratified by gender and race. The relationships of LVM/height2.7 and cardiovascular reactivity to physical and psychological stressors (treadmill exercise, cold pressor, video game, and star-tracing tasks), were examined in both univariate and multivariate analyses adjusting for baseline BP, weight, and other relevant biobehavioral variables. The relationships between LVM and several psychosocial characteristics (hostility, anger suppression, anxiety, depressive symptoms, and education) were also assessed. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) reactivity to exercise was significantly related to LVM in black and white men; LVM was 10% greater among white men with exaggerated (upper quintile) peak exercise SBP than among other white men. SBP reactivity to the cold pressor test was related to LVM in all race/gender groups, although the relationship remained significant only among white men and women in the multivariate analysis. Diastolic blood pressure (DBP) reactivity to the video game was related to LVM only among black men in adjusted analyses. After adjusting for resting BP, weight, and other covariates in linear multiple regression models, SBP reactivity to exercise explained only 3% of the variance in LVM among white men. Otherwise, reactivity to other stressors or psychosocial variables accounted for no more than 1% of the variance in LVM. It was concluded that among a cohort of young adults, blood pressure reactivity to physical and mental stressors did not add substantially to the prediction of LVM when resting BP, weight, and other

  3. A wall shear stress sensor using a pair of sidewall doped cantilevers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thanh-Vinh; Kazama, Ryohei; Takahashi, Hidetoshi; Takahata, Tomoyuki; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Shimoyama, Isao

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we report on a micro-electro mechanical system (MEMS)-based piezoresistive sensor for measuring shear stress induced by an airflow. The advantages of the proposed sensor include a simple sensing method and a high resonance frequency due to the small size of the sensing elements. Our sensor consists of a pair of 3 µm thick cantilevers with piezoresistors formed on the sidewall of their hinges to detect lateral deformation in the cantilevers induced by an airflow. Each cantilever has a 200 µm  ×  400 µm plate supported by two 150 µm long, 4 µm wide beams. The piezoresistors on the two cantilevers are designed to deform in opposite manners when a shear stress is applied and in the same manner when a pressure is applied. Therefore, the applied shear stress can be detected from the difference in the responses of the two cantilevers without becoming conflated with pressure. In this paper, the design, fabrication and evaluation of the proposed sensor are reported and compared to numerical simulation results. From the experimental results, the resolution of the sensor and its first resonance frequency are 1.3 Pa and 3.9 kHz, respectively. Moreover, we show that the effect of temperature on the readout of the sensor can be eliminated using a temperature-compensating piezoresistor fabricated on the same sensor chip. Finally, using the fabricated sensor, the measurement of the shear stress induced by an airflow with velocity between  -10 and 10 m s-1 is demonstrated.

  4. A wall shear stress sensor using a pair of sidewall doped cantilevers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Thanh-Vinh; Shimoyama, Isao; Kazama, Ryohei; Takahashi, Hidetoshi; Takahata, Tomoyuki; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we report on a micro-electro mechanical system (MEMS)-based piezoresistive sensor for measuring shear stress induced by an airflow. The advantages of the proposed sensor include a simple sensing method and a high resonance frequency due to the small size of the sensing elements. Our sensor consists of a pair of 3 µ m thick cantilevers with piezoresistors formed on the sidewall of their hinges to detect lateral deformation in the cantilevers induced by an airflow. Each cantilever has a 200 µ m  ×  400 µ m plate supported by two 150 µ m long, 4 µ m wide beams. The piezoresistors on the two cantilevers are designed to deform in opposite manners when a shear stress is applied and in the same manner when a pressure is applied. Therefore, the applied shear stress can be detected from the difference in the responses of the two cantilevers without becoming conflated with pressure. In this paper, the design, fabrication and evaluation of the proposed sensor are reported and compared to numerical simulation results. From the experimental results, the resolution of the sensor and its first resonance frequency are 1.3 Pa and 3.9 kHz, respectively. Moreover, we show that the effect of temperature on the readout of the sensor can be eliminated using a temperature-compensating piezoresistor fabricated on the same sensor chip. Finally, using the fabricated sensor, the measurement of the shear stress induced by an airflow with velocity between  −10 and 10 m s −1 is demonstrated. (paper)

  5. Influences of lumped passes on welding residual stress of a thick-walled nuclear rotor steel pipe by multipass narrow gap welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Long, E-mail: mse.longtan@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Zhang, Jianxun; Zhuang, Dong [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Liu, Chuan [Provincial Key Lab of Advanced Welding Technology, Jiangsu University of Science and Technology, Zhenjiang 212003 (China)

    2014-07-01

    Highlights: • The internal residual stress of the thick-walled pipe is measured by using the local removal blind hole method. • Two lumped-pass models are developed to reduce computational cost. • The effect of lumped passes on the welding residual stress is discussed. • Reasonable lumped-pass model can guarantee the accuracy and improve the computational efficiency. - Abstract: The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of the lumped passes simulation on the distribution of residual stresses before and after heat treatment in a thick-walled nuclear power rotor pipe with a 89-pass narrow gap welding process. The local removal blind hole method was used to measure internal residual stress of the thick-walled pipe after post weld heat treatment (PWHT). Based on the ANSYS software, a two-dimensional axisymmetric finite element model is employed. Two lumped-pass models of M-5th model (five weld beads as one lumped pass) and M-10th model (ten weld beads as one lumped pass) were developed to reduce computational cost. Based on the results in this study, the distributions of residual stresses of a thick-walled welded pipe before and after PWHT are developed. Meanwhile, the distribution of the through-wall axial residual stress along the weld center line is demonstrated to be a self-equilibrating type. In addition, the investigation results show that reasonable and reliable lumped-pass model can not only guarantee the accuracy of the simulated results, but also improve the computational efficiency in the thermo-elastic–plastic FE analysis procedure. Therefore, from the viewpoint of engineering application the developed lumped-pass computational procedure is a promising and useful method to predict residual stress of large and complex welded structures.

  6. Influences of lumped passes on welding residual stress of a thick-walled nuclear rotor steel pipe by multipass narrow gap welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Long; Zhang, Jianxun; Zhuang, Dong; Liu, Chuan

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The internal residual stress of the thick-walled pipe is measured by using the local removal blind hole method. • Two lumped-pass models are developed to reduce computational cost. • The effect of lumped passes on the welding residual stress is discussed. • Reasonable lumped-pass model can guarantee the accuracy and improve the computational efficiency. - Abstract: The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of the lumped passes simulation on the distribution of residual stresses before and after heat treatment in a thick-walled nuclear power rotor pipe with a 89-pass narrow gap welding process. The local removal blind hole method was used to measure internal residual stress of the thick-walled pipe after post weld heat treatment (PWHT). Based on the ANSYS software, a two-dimensional axisymmetric finite element model is employed. Two lumped-pass models of M-5th model (five weld beads as one lumped pass) and M-10th model (ten weld beads as one lumped pass) were developed to reduce computational cost. Based on the results in this study, the distributions of residual stresses of a thick-walled welded pipe before and after PWHT are developed. Meanwhile, the distribution of the through-wall axial residual stress along the weld center line is demonstrated to be a self-equilibrating type. In addition, the investigation results show that reasonable and reliable lumped-pass model can not only guarantee the accuracy of the simulated results, but also improve the computational efficiency in the thermo-elastic–plastic FE analysis procedure. Therefore, from the viewpoint of engineering application the developed lumped-pass computational procedure is a promising and useful method to predict residual stress of large and complex welded structures

  7. Several loadings and stresses of first wall of SiC with metal liner on conceptual design of moving ring reactor 'KARIN-1'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishikawa, Masahiro; Tachibana, Eizaburo; Watanabe, Kenji; Fujiie, Yoichi.

    1983-01-01

    On conceptual design of moving ring reactor ''KARIN-I'' (Output: 1850 MWe), the first wall of SiC with metal liner is considered by reason that SiC ceramics has specific features of excellent radiation damage resistance in fast neutron spectra and a very low residual radioactivity, and that the thin metal liner has good compatibility with liquid lithium and good vaccum-tight, however, a extent electromagnetic interaction. The electromagnetic force applied on the metal liner and several pressure losses of liquid lithum flow are estimated, and these forces correspond to the fluid mechanical loading on SiC first wall. Thermal loading by neutron flux is calculated on the first wall to obtain temperature distributions along the flow direction and toward the wall thickness. At the outlet of the burning section, the surface temperature of SiC rises to the value of 825 0 C on plasma side and on the metal liner, it rises to the value of 540 0 C. Finally, the stress analysis is performed. The thermal stress is about one order larger than the stress induced by the fluid mechanical loading. At the inlet of the burning section, the average tensile stress of 22.4kg/mm 2 is induced on the outer side of SiC wall, and on the inner side, the average compressive stress of -26.1kg/mm 2 is induced. At the outlet of the burning section, the tensile stress is found to oscillate between 25.5kg/mm 2 and 27.3kg/mm 2 on the outer side of SiC wall by frequency of 1 Hz, and on the inner side, the compressive stress also oscillates between -21.6kg/mm 2 and -29.0kg/mm 2 by the same frequency. These stresses are within the value of fracture stress, (72.5kg/mm 2 ). Difficult residual problems on the first wall are also discussed. (author)

  8. Resolving the True Ventricular Mural Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert S. Stephenson

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The precise nature of packing together of the cardiomyocytes within the ventricular walls has still to be determined. The spiraling nature of the chains of interconnected cardiomyocytes has long been recognized. As long ago as the end of the nineteenth century, Pettigrew had emphasized that the ventricular cone was not arranged on the basis of skeletal muscle. Despite this guidance, subsequent anatomists described entities such as “bulbo-spiral muscles”, with this notion of subunits culminating in the suggestion that the ventricular cone could be unwrapped so as to produce a “ventricular myocardial band”. Others, in contrast, had suggested that the ventricular walls were arranged on the basis of “sheets”, or more recently “sheetlets”, with investigators seeking to establishing the angulation of these entities using techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging. Our own investigations, in contrast, have shown that the cardiomyocytes are aggregated together within the supporting fibrous matrix so as to produce a three-dimensional myocardial mesh. In this review, we summarize the previous accounts, and provide the anatomical evidence we have thus far accumulated to support the model of the myocardial mesh. We show how these anatomic findings underscore the concept of the myocardial mesh functioning in antagonistic fashion. They lend evidence to support the notion that the ventricular myocardium works as a muscular hydrostat.

  9. Convergence of PASTA kinase and two-component signaling in response to cell wall stress in Enterococcus faecalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, Stephanie L; Kristich, Christopher J

    2018-04-09

    Two common signal transduction mechanisms used by bacteria to sense and respond to changing environments are two-component systems (TCSs) and eukaryotic-like Ser/Thr kinases and phosphatases (eSTK/Ps). Enterococcus faecalis is a Gram-positive bacterium and serious opportunistic pathogen that relies on both a TCS and an eSTK/P pathway for intrinsic resistance to cell wall-targeting antibiotics. The TCS consists of a histidine kinase (CroS) and response regulator (CroR) that become activated upon exposure of cells to cell wall-targeting antibiotics, leading to modulation of gene expression. The eSTK/P pathway consists of a transmembrane kinase (IreK) and its cognate phosphatase (IreP), which act antagonistically to mediate antibiotic resistance through an unknown mechanism. Because both CroS/R and IreK/P contribute to enterococcal resistance towards cell wall-targeting antibiotics, we hypothesized these signaling systems are intertwined. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed CroR phosphorylation and CroS/R-dependent gene expression to probe the influence of IreK and IreP on CroS/R signaling. In addition, we analyzed the phosphorylation state of CroS which revealed IreK-dependent phosphorylation of a Thr residue important for CroS function. Our results are consistent with a model in which IreK positively influences CroR-dependent gene expression through phosphorylation of CroS to promote antimicrobial resistance in E. faecalis Importance Two-component signaling systems (TCSs) and eukaryotic-like Ser/Thr kinases (eSTKs) are used by bacteria to sense and adapt to changing environments. Understanding how these pathways are regulated to promote bacterial survival is critical for a more complete understanding of bacterial stress responses and physiology. The opportunistic pathogen Enterococcus faecalis relies on both a TCS (CroS/R) and an eSTK (IreK) for intrinsic resistance to cell wall-targeting antibiotics. We probed the relationship between CroS/R and IreK, revealing

  10. Diabetes as an independent predictor of left ventricular longitudinal strain reduction at rest and during dobutamine stress test in patients with significant coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierzbowska-Drabik, Karina; Trzos, Ewa; Kurpesa, Malgorzata; Rechcinski, Tomasz; Miskowiec, Dawid; Cieslik-Guerra, Urszula; Uznanska-Loch, Barbara; Sobczak, Maria; Kasprzak, Jaroslaw Damian

    2017-12-09

    Diabetes (DM) is a strong cardiovascular risk factor modifying also the left ventricular (LV) function that may be objectively assessed with echocardiographic strain analysis. Although the impact of isolated DM on myocardial deformation has been already studied, few data concern diabetics with coronary artery disease (CAD), especially in all stages of dobutamine stress echocardiography (DSE). We compared LV systolic function during DSE in CAD with and without DM using state-of-the art speckle-tracking quantification and assessed the impact of DM on LV systolic strain. DSE was performed in 250 patients with angina who afterwards had coronarography with ≥50% stenosis in the left main artery and ≥70% in other arteries considered as significant. In this analysis, we included 127 patients with confirmed CAD: 42 with DM [DM(+); mean age 64 ± 9 years] and 85 patients without DM [DM(-); mean age 63 ± 9 years]. The severity of CAD and LV ejection fraction (EF) were similar in both groups. Global and regional LV peak systolic longitudinal strain (PSLS) revealed in all DSE phases lower values in DM(+) group: 14.5 ± 3.6% vs. 17.4 ± 4.0% at rest; P = 0.0001, 13.8 ± 3.9% vs. 16.7 ± 4.0% at peak stress; P = 0.0002, and 14.2 ± 3.1% vs. 15.5 ± 3.5% at recovery; P = 0.0432 for global parameters, although dobutamine challenge did not enhance further resting differences. LV EF, body surface area, and diabetes were independent predictors for strain in 16-variable model (R2 = 0, 51, P coexisting CAD and DM on myocardial strain. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2017. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Determination of stress-strain state of the wooden church log walls with software package

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chulkova Anastasia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The restoration of architectural monuments is going on all over the world today. The main aim of restoration is the renewal of stable functioning of building constructions in normal state. In this article, we have tried to figure out with special software the bearing capacity of log cabins of the Church of Transfiguration on Kizhi island. As shown in research results, determination of stress-strain stage with software package is necessary for the bearing capacity computation as well as field tests.

  12. Parameter-free method for the shape optimization of stiffeners on thin-walled structures to minimize stress concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yang; Shibutan, Yoji [Osaka University, Osaka (Japan); Shimoda, Masatoshi [Toyota Technological Institute, Nagoya (Japan)

    2015-04-15

    This paper presents a parameter-free shape optimization method for the strength design of stiffeners on thin-walled structures. The maximum von Mises stress is minimized and subjected to the volume constraint. The optimum design problem is formulated as a distributed-parameter shape optimization problem under the assumptions that a stiffener is varied in the in-plane direction and that the thickness is constant. The issue of nondifferentiability, which is inherent in this min-max problem, is avoided by transforming the local measure to a smooth differentiable integral functional by using the Kreisselmeier-Steinhauser function. The shape gradient functions are derived by using the material derivative method and adjoint variable method and are applied to the H{sup 1} gradient method for shells to determine the optimal free-boundary shapes. By using this method, the smooth optimal stiffener shape can be obtained without any shape design parameterization while minimizing the maximum stress. The validity of this method is verified through two practical design examples.

  13. Evaluation of thermal stress in the anode chamber wall of a large volume magnetic bucket ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, Russell; Horiike, Hiroshi; Kuriyama, Masaaki; Ohara, Yoshihiro

    1984-02-01

    Thermal stress analysis was performed on the plasma chamber of the Large Volume Magnetic Multipole Bucket Ion Source (LVB) designed for use on the JT-60 NBI system. The energy absorbed by the walls of the plasma chambers of neutral beam injectors is of the order of 1% of the accelerator electrical drain power. A previous study indicates that a moderately high heat flux, of about 600W/cm 2 , is concentrated on the magnetic field cusp lines during normal full power operation. Abnormal arc discharges during conditioning of a stainless steel LVB produced localized melting of the stainless steel at several locations near the cusps lines. The power contained in abnormal arc discharges (arc spots) was estimated from the observed melting. Thermal stress analysis was performed numerically on representative sections of the copper LVB design for both stable and abnormal arc discharge conditions. Results show that this chamber should not fail due to thermal fatigue stesses arising from normal arc discharges. However, fatigue failure may occur after several hundred to a few thousand arc spots of 30mS duration at any one location. Limited arc discharge operation of the copper bucket was performed to partially verify the chamber's durability. (author)

  14. Age-related changes in aortic 3D blood flow velocities and wall shear stress: Implications for the identification of altered hemodynamics in patients with aortic valve disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ooij, Pim; Garcia, Julio; Potters, Wouter V.; Malaisrie, S. Chris; Collins, Jeremy D.; Carr, James C.; Markl, Michael; Barker, Alex J.

    2016-01-01

    To investigate age-related changes in peak systolic aortic 3D velocity and wall shear stress (WSS) in healthy controls and to investigate the importance of age-matching for 3D mapping of abnormal aortic hemodynamics in bicuspid aortic valve disease (BAV). 4D flow MRI (fields strengths = 1.5-3T;

  15. Cytoskeletal role in the transition from compensated to decompensated hypertrophy during adult canine left ventricular pressure overloading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagawa, H.; Koide, M.; Sato, H.; Zile, M. R.; Carabello, B. A.; Cooper, G. 4th

    1998-01-01

    Increased microtubule density causes cardiocyte contractile dysfunction in right ventricular (RV) pressure-overload hypertrophy, and these linked phenotypic and contractile abnormalities persist and progress during the transition to failure. Although more severe in cells from failing than hypertrophied RVs, the mechanical defects are normalized in each case by microtubule depolymerization. To define the role of increased microtubule density in left ventricular (LV) pressure-overload hypertrophy and failure, in a given LV we examined ventricular mechanics, sarcomere mechanics, and free tubulin and microtubule levels in control dogs and in dogs with aortic stenosis both with LV hypertrophy alone and with initially compensated hypertrophy that had progressed to LV muscle failure. In comparing initial values with those at study 8 weeks later, dogs with hypertrophy alone had a very substantial increase in LV mass but preservation of a normal ejection fraction and mean systolic wall stress. Dogs with hypertrophy and associated failure had a substantial but lesser increase in LV mass and a reduction in ejection fraction, as well as a marked increase in mean systolic wall stress. Cardiocyte contractile function was equivalent, and unaffected by microtubule depolymerization, in cells from control LVs and those with compensated hypertrophy. In contrast, cardiocyte contractile function in cells from failing LVs was quite depressed but was normalized by microtubule depolymerization. Microtubules were increased only in failing LVs. These contractile and cytoskeletal changes, when assayed longitudinally in a given dog by biopsy, appeared in failing ventricles only when wall stress began to increase and function began to decrease. Thus, the microtubule-based cardiocyte contractile dysfunction characteristic of pressure-hypertrophied myocardium, originally described in the RV, obtains equally in the LV but is shown here to have a specific association with increased wall stress.

  16. Flow and wall shear stress characterization after endovascular aneurysm repair and endovascular aneurysm sealing in an infrarenal aneurysm model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boersen, Johannes T; Groot Jebbink, Erik; Versluis, Michel; Slump, Cornelis H; Ku, David N; de Vries, Jean-Paul P M; Reijnen, Michel M P J

    2017-12-01

    Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) with a modular endograft has become the preferred treatment for abdominal aortic aneurysms. A novel concept is endovascular aneurysm sealing (EVAS), consisting of dual endoframes surrounded by polymer-filled endobags. This dual-lumen configuration is different from a bifurcation with a tapered trajectory of the flow lumen into the two limbs and may induce unfavorable flow conditions. These include low and oscillatory wall shear stress (WSS), linked to atherosclerosis, and high shear rates that may result in thrombosis. An in vitro study was performed to assess the impact of EVAR and EVAS on flow patterns and WSS. Four abdominal aortic aneurysm phantoms were constructed, including three stented models, to study the influence of the flow divider on flow (Endurant [Medtronic, Minneapolis, Minn], AFX [Endologix, Irvine, Calif], and Nellix [Endologix]). Experimental models were tested under physiologic resting conditions, and flow was visualized with laser particle imaging velocimetry, quantified by shear rate, WSS, and oscillatory shear index (OSI) in the suprarenal aorta, renal artery (RA), and common iliac artery. WSS and OSI were comparable for all models in the suprarenal aorta. The RA flow profile in the EVAR models was comparable to the control, but a region of lower WSS was observed on the caudal wall compared with the control. The EVAS model showed a stronger jet flow with a higher shear rate in some regions compared with the other models. Small regions of low WSS and high OSI were found near the distal end of all stents in the common iliac artery compared with the control. Maximum shear rates in each region of interest were well below the pathologic threshold for acute thrombosis. The different stent designs do not influence suprarenal flow. Lower WSS is observed in the caudal wall of the RA after EVAR and a higher shear rate after EVAS. All stented models have a small region of low WSS and high OSI near the distal outflow

  17. Left ventricular remodelling in chronic primary mitral regurgitation: implications for medical therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCutcheon, Keir; Manga, Pravin

    Surgical repair or replacement of the mitral valve is currently the only recommended therapy for severe primary mitral regurgitation. The chronic elevation of wall stress caused by the resulting volume overload leads to structural remodelling of the muscular, vascular and extracellular matrix components of the myocardium. These changes are initially compensatory but in the long term have detrimental effects, which ultimately result in heart failure. Understanding the changes that occur in the myocardium due to volume overload at the molecular and cellular level may lead to medical interventions, which potentially could delay or prevent the adverse left ventricular remodelling associated with primary mitral regurgitation. The pathophysiological changes involved in left ventricular remodelling in response to chronic primary mitral regurgitation and the evidence for potential medical therapy, in particular beta-adrenergic blockers, are the focus of this review.

  18. Stress echocardiography with smartphone: real-time remote reading for regional wall motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scali, Maria Chiara; de Azevedo Bellagamba, Clarissa Carmona; Ciampi, Quirino; Simova, Iana; de Castro E Silva Pretto, José Luis; Djordjevic-Dikic, Ana; Dodi, Claudio; Cortigiani, Lauro; Zagatina, Angela; Trambaiolo, Paolo; Torres, Marco R; Citro, Rodolfo; Colonna, Paolo; Paterni, Marco; Picano, Eugenio

    2017-11-01

    The diffusion of smart-phones offers access to the best remote expertise in stress echo (SE). To evaluate the reliability of SE based on smart-phone filming and reading. A set of 20 SE video-clips were read in random sequence with a multiple choice six-answer test by ten readers from five different countries (Italy, Brazil, Serbia, Bulgaria, Russia) of the "SE2020" study network. The gold standard to assess accuracy was a core-lab expert reader in agreement with angiographic verification (0 = wrong, 1 = right). The same set of 20 SE studies were read, in random order and >2 months apart, on desktop Workstation and via smartphones by ten remote readers. Image quality was graded from 1 = poor but readable, to 3 = excellent. Kappa (k) statistics was used to assess intra- and inter-observer agreement. The image quality was comparable in desktop workstation vs. smartphone (2.0 ± 0.5 vs. 2.4 ± 0.7, p = NS). The average reading time per case was similar for desktop versus smartphone (90 ± 39 vs. 82 ± 54 s, p = NS). The overall diagnostic accuracy of the ten readers was similar for desktop workstation vs. smartphone (84 vs. 91%, p = NS). Intra-observer agreement (desktop vs. smartphone) was good (k = 0.81 ± 0.14). Inter-observer agreement was good and similar via desktop or smartphone (k = 0.69 vs. k = 0.72, p = NS). The diagnostic accuracy and consistency of SE reading among certified readers was high and similar via desktop workstation or via smartphone.

  19. The MAP kinase-activated protein kinase Rck2p regulates cellular responses to cell wall stresses, filamentation and virulence in the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xichuan; Du, Wei; Zhao, Jingwen; Zhang, Lilin; Zhu, Zhiyan; Jiang, Linghuo

    2010-06-01

    Rck2p is the Hog1p-MAP kinase-activated protein kinase required for the attenuation of protein synthesis in response to an osmotic challenge in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Rck2p also regulates rapamycin sensitivity in both S. cerevisiae and Candida albicans. In this study, we demonstrate that the deletion of CaRCK2 renders C. albicans cells sensitive to, and CaRck2p translocates from the cytosol to the nucleus in response to, cell wall stresses caused by Congo red, Calcoflor White, elevated heat and zymolyase. However, the kinase activity of CaRck2p is not required for the cellular response to these cell wall stresses. Furthermore, transcripts of cell wall protein-encoding genes CaBGL2, CaHWP1 and CaXOG1 are reduced in C. albicans cells lacking CaRCK2. The deletion of CaRCK2 also reduces the in vitro filamentation of C. albicans and its virulence in a mouse model of systemic candidasis. The kinase activity of CaRck2p is required for the virulence, but not for the in vitro filamentation, in C. albicans. Therefore, Rck2p regulates cellular responses to cell wall stresses, filamentation and virulence in the human fungal pathogen C. albicans.

  20. Impact of competitive flow on wall shear stress in coronary surgery: computational fluid dynamics of a LIMA-LAD model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordgaard, Håvard; Swillens, Abigail; Nordhaug, Dag; Kirkeby-Garstad, Idar; Van Loo, Denis; Vitale, Nicola; Segers, Patrick; Haaverstad, Rune; Lovstakken, Lasse

    2010-12-01

    Competitive flow from native coronary vessels is considered a major factor in the failure of coronary bypass grafts. However, the pathophysiological effects are not fully understood. Low and oscillatory wall shear stress (WSS) is known to induce endothelial dysfunction and vascular disease, like atherosclerosis and intimal hyperplasia. The aim was to investigate the impact of competitive flow on WSS in mammary artery bypass grafts. Using computational fluid dynamics, WSS was calculated in a left internal mammary artery (LIMA) graft to the left anterior descending artery in a three-dimensional in vivo porcine coronary artery bypass graft model. The following conditions were investigated: high competitive flow (non-significant coronary lesion), partial competitive flow (significant coronary lesion), and no competitive flow (totally occluded coronary vessel). Time-averaged WSS of LIMA at high, partial, and no competitive flow were 0.3-0.6, 0.6-3.0, and 0.9-3.0 Pa, respectively. Further, oscillatory WSS quantified as the oscillatory shear index (OSI) ranged from (maximum OSI = 0.5 equals zero net WSS) 0.15 to 0.35, OSI similar to the no competitive flow condition. Graft flow is highly dependent on the degree of competitive flow. High competitive flow was found to produce unfavourable WSS consistent with endothelial dysfunction and subsequent graft narrowing and failure. Partial competitive flow, however, may be better tolerated as it was found to be similar to the ideal condition of no competitive flow.

  1. Notch1 and 4 Signaling Responds to an Increasing Vascular Wall Shear Stress in a Rat Model of Arteriovenous Malformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Tu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Notch signaling is suggested to promote the development and maintenance of cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs, and an increasing wall shear stress (WSS contributes to AVM rupture. Little is known about whether WSS impacts Notch signaling, which is important for understanding the angiogenesis of AVMs. WSS was measured in arteriovenous fistulas (AVF surgically created in 96 rats at different time points over a period of 84 days. The expression of Notch receptors 1 and 4 and their ligands, Delta1 and 4, Jagged1, and Notch downstream gene target Hes1 was quantified in “nidus” vessels. The interaction events between Notch receptors and their ligands were quantified using proximity ligation assay. There was a positive correlation between WSS and time (r=0.97; P<0.001. The expression of Notch receptors and their ligands was upregulated following AVF formation. There was a positive correlation between time and the number of interactions between Notch receptors and their ligands aftre AVF formation (r=0.62, P<0.05 and a positive correlation between WSS and the number of interactions between Notch receptors and their ligands (r=0.87, P<0.005. In conclusion, an increasing WSS may contribute to the angiogenesis of AVMs by activation of Notch signaling.

  2. PEG-albumin plasma expansion increases expression of MCP-1 evidencing increased circulatory wall shear stress: an experimental study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Makena Hightower

    Full Text Available Treatment of blood loss with plasma expanders lowers blood viscosity, increasing cardiac output. However, increased flow velocity by conventional plasma expanders does not compensate for decreased viscosity in maintaining vessel wall shear stress (WSS, decreasing endothelial nitric oxide (NO production. A new type of plasma expander using polyethylene glycol conjugate albumin (PEG-Alb causes supra-perfusion when used in extreme hemodilution and is effective in treating hemorrhagic shock, although it is minimally viscogenic. An acute 40% hemodilution/exchange-transfusion protocol was used to compare 4% PEG-Alb to Ringer's lactate, Dextran 70 kDa and 6% Hetastarch (670 kDa in unanesthetized CD-1 mice. Serum cytokine analysis showed that PEG-Alb elevates monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1, a member of a small inducible gene family, as well as expression of MIP-1α, and MIP-2. MCP-1 is specific to increased WSS. Given the direct link between increased WSS and production of NO, the beneficial resuscitation effects due to PEG-Alb plasma expansion appear to be due to increased WSS through increased perfusion and blood flow rather than blood viscosity.

  3. Acetylation of cell wall is required for structural integrity of the leaf surface and exerts a global impact on plant stress responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nafisi, Majse; Stranne, Maria; Fimognari, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    The epidermis on leaves protects plants from pathogen invasion and provides a waterproof barrier. It consists of a layer of cells that is surrounded by thick cell walls, which are partially impregnated by highly hydrophobic cuticular components. We show that the Arabidopsis T-DNA insertion mutants...... to abiotic stress, particularly detoxification of reactive oxygen species and defense against microbial pathogens (e.g., lipid transfer proteins, peroxidases). In accordance, peroxidase activities were found to be elevated in rwa2 as compared to the wild type. These results indicate that cell wall...

  4. Cardiac MRI and Transthoracic Echocardiography of Left Ventricular Myocardial Noncompaction in A Patient with Congestive Heart Failure: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Eui Min; Byun, Joo Nam [Chosun University Hospital College of Medicine, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong Hun [Soonchunhyang University Hospital Bucheon College of Medicine, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-15

    We report a case of a 38-year-old male presenting with new-onset dyspnea, that was diagnosed as left ventricular noncompaction by transthoracic echocardiographic and cardiac MR. The tests revealed left ventricular systolic dysfunction with prominent trabeculations associated with deep intertrabecular recesses and an enddiastolic noncompacted to compacted ratio of 2.5 in the whole apical wall and mid-ventricular anterolateral and inferolateral walls. Delayed gadolinium contrast-enhanced MRI revealed subepicardial mid-wall hyperenhancement of the midventricular anteroseptal and inferoseptal walls, which suggested myocardial fibrosis. We review the pathophysiology, clinical characteristics, and diagnostic approach of the left ventricular noncompaction associated with congestive heart failure

  5. Left ventricular mechanical adaptation to chronic aortic regurgitation in intact dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Florenzano, F.; Glantz, S.A.

    1987-01-01

    Increased and end-diastolic wall stress has been hypothesized to stimulate left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy following volume overload. The authors instrumented intact-chest dogs with radiopaque markers in both ventricles and created volume overload by puncturing one aortic valve cusp. An x-ray system with biplane fluoroscopic and cineradiographic capabilities was used. End-diastolic stress increased immediately, then fell over 3 mo as the heart hypertrophied. End-systolic stress did not change significantly. Chamber contractility, quantified as E/sub max/, the end-systolic pressure-volume line slope, increased. E/sub max/ normalized by multiplying by LV mass increased following the lesion before but not after β-blockade with propranolol and did not change significantly over time, suggesting that chamber contractility changed because of increased mass and sympathetic tone rather than changed intrinsic muscle function. LV mass did not initially correlate with lesion size, but steady-state mass did. Over the range of lesions the authors produced, increased end-diastolic wall stress appears to stimulate hypertrophy at a fixed rate, which stops when end-diastolic wall stress has been reduced to an acceptable level

  6. Expression analysis of cell wall assembly and remodelling-related genes in Arabidopsis roots subjected to boron stress and brassinosteroid at different developmental stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabia İşkil

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Plant cell walls are affected by many biotic and abiotic stress conditions. The aim of this study is to determine the effects of 24-Epibrassinolide (EBL on some cell wall-related genes in root tissue of five- and ten-week-old Arabidopsis thaliana plants exposed to boron (B deficiency (0 µM or toxicity (3000 µM at the transcriptional level. Expressions of the genes that encode cellulose synthase (CESA1, CESA4, CESA6 and CESA8, cellulose synthase-like (CSLB5, expansin (EXPA5, EXPA8 and EXPA14 and cell wall protein (SEB1 decreased under conditions of B deficiency and toxicity. EBL treatments, in general, led the expressions of these genes to reduce significantly. Expressions of xyloglucan endotransglucosylase/hydrolase genes (XTH21 and XTH23 changed only under conditions of B toxicity. Boron stress and/or EBL treatments caused different responses in expression of pectin methylesterase (PME2 and PME41 genes. As a result of B stress, the expression levels of investigated genes changed more in roots of five-week-old plants than in roots of ten-week-old plants. Results of the present study include new findings that support the ability of BRs to increase molecular aspects of tolerance to stress in plants.

  7. Myocardial imaging with 99mTc-Tetrofosmin: Influence of post-stress acquisition time, regional radiotracer uptake, and wall motion abnormalities on the clinical result.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgetti, Assuero; Kusch, Annette; Casagranda, Mirta; Tagliavia, Irene D'Aragona; Marzullo, Paolo

    2010-04-01

    We previously demonstrated that early (15', T1) post-stress myocardial imaging with Tetrofosmin could be more accurate than standard acquisitions (45', T2) in identifying coronary artery disease. To clarify this phenomenon, 120 subjects (age 61 +/- 10 years) with both T1 and T2 scans were divided into Group 1 (53/120 pts) with more ischemia at T1 vs T2 imaging (T1-T2SDS > or = 3); Group 2 (67/120 pts) with similar results (T1-T2SDS statistic and semiquantitative wall motion/thickening values were obtained. Analysis of T1 and T2 post-stress myocardial counts demonstrated a significant Tetrofosmin wash-out rate that was higher in Group 1 control nonischemic regions (15 +/- 8% vs 13.6 +/- 9.6%, P stress wall thickening (T1-T2) was lower in Group 1 ischemic regions (-4.5 +/- 9.15% vs -1.90 +/- 7.0%, P stress acquisition time because of ischemic-induced regional wall thickening abnormalities and the existence of a differential radiotracer myocardial wash-out.

  8. Comparison of dobutamine stress echocardiography and technetium-99m sestamibi single-photon emission tomography for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease in hypertensive patients with and without left ventricular hypertrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elhendy, A.; Geleijnse, M.L.; Van Domburg, R.T.; Bax, J.J.; Nierop, P.R.; Beerens, S.A.M.; Mohsen Ibrahim, M.; Roelandt, J.R.T.C.; Valkema, R.; Krenning, E.P.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of these two imaging modalities in conjunction with dobutamine stress test for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease in hypertensive patients with and without left ventricular hypertrophy. Dobutamine stress echocardiography in conjunction with sestamibi (MIBI) SPET was performed in 84 patients with the diagnosis of systemic hypertension who had been referred for evaluation of myocardial ischaemia. Significant coronary artery disease (≥50% luminal diameter stenosis) was detected in 66 patients (79%). The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the ischaemic pattern at echocardiography for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease were 73% (CI 63%-82%), 83% (CI 75%-91%) and 75% (CI 66%-84%), those for MIBI were 67% (CI 57%-77%), 83% (CI 75%-91%) and 70% (CI 60%-80%) respectively (P = NS vs echocardiography). Significant stenosis was detected in 123 (49%) of the 252 analysed coronary arteries. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of echocardiography for the regional diagnosis of coronary artery disease were 63% (CI 56%-69%), 90% (CI 86%-94%) and 77% (CI 72%-82%). Those for MIBI were 58% (CI 51%-64%), 91% (CI 87%-94%) and 75% (CI 69%-80) respectively (P = NS vs echocardiography). Left ventricular hypertrophy was detected in 59 patients (70%) by echocardiography and did not influence the overall or regional specificity of echocardiography or MIBI SPET.(orig./MG) (orig.)

  9. Reversible wall motion abnormality on adenosine stress/rest thallium-201 gated myocardial SPECT is an independent predictor of coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Eun Kyung; Lee, Won Woo; So, Young; Eo, Jae Seon; Lee, Dong Soo; Chung, June Key; Lee, Myung Chul; Kim, Sang Eun; Kim, Cheol Ho; Lee, Sang Woo

    2004-01-01

    As early as 10 minutes after adenosine stress, immediate post-stress wall motion (ipsWM) can be evaluated on adenosine stress/rest TI-201 gated SPECT (gSPECT). To widen application of TI-201 in gated SPECT, we investigated image quality, LV parameters (EF, EDV, and ESV) reproducibility, and diagnostic competency of gSPECT regarding ipsWM evaluation Myocardial perfusion and wall motion were evaluated by 5-point scoring system in 20-segment model. Image quality was assessed using weighted Kappa (Kw) for inter-and intra-observer agreements of wall motion scores (n=49). Reproducibility was examined through repeated acquisition (n=31). Diagnostic competency was evaluated versus coronary angiography (CAG) and multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to identify significant predictors of coronary artery disease (CAD) among stress abnormal perfusion (SSSp), stress abnormal wall motion (SSSwm), and reversible abnormal wall motion (SDSwm) (n=60). Kw for ipsWM was significantly better than that for rest regarding inter- (0.717 vs 0.489) and intra-observer agreements (0.792 vs 0.688) (p<0.05). 2SD for ipsWM was smaller than that for rest at EF (8.6% vs 10.7%) and ESV (6.0ml vs 8.4ml). Sensitivities of SSSp, SSSwm, and SDSwm were 63.3% (19/30), 63.3% (19/30), and 43.3% (13/30) and specificities 83.3% (25/30), 83.3% (25/30), and 86.7% (26/30), respectively. By multivariate analysis, SSSp (p=0.013) and SDSwm (p=0.039) remained significant predictors. Additionally, SSSwm or SDSwm could find undetected CAD in 54.5% (6/11) of patients with normal perfusion. TI-201 can be successfully applied to gated SPECT for ipsWM evaluation. Moreover, reversible wall motion abnormality on gSPECT is an independent predictor of significant CAD

  10. Diagnostic techniques for measuring temperature transients and stress transients in the first wall of an ICF reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melamed, N.T.; Taylor, L.H.

    1983-01-01

    The primary challenge in the design of an Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) power reactor is to make the first wall survive the frequent explosions of the pellets. Westinghouse has proposed a dry wall design consisting of steel tubes coated with tantalum. This report describes the design of a test chamber and two diagnostic procedures for experimentally determining the reliability of the Westinghouse design. The test chamber simulates the x-ray and ion pulse irradiation of the wall due to a pellet explosion. The diagnostics consist of remote temperature sensing and surface deformation measurements. The chamber and diagnostics can also be used to test other first-wall designs

  11. Evaluating the roles of detailed endocardial structures on right ventricular haemodynamics by means of CFD simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacco, Federica; Paun, Bruno; Lehmkuhl, Oriol; Iles, Tinen L; Iaizzo, Paul A; Houzeaux, Guillaume; Vázquez, Mariano; Butakoff, Constantine; Aguado-Sierra, Jazmin

    2018-06-11

    Computational modelling plays an important role in right ventricular (RV) haemodynamic analysis. However, current approaches employ smoothed ventricular anatomies. The aim of this study is to characterise RV haemodynamics including detailed endocardial structures like trabeculae, moderator band and papillary muscles (PMs). Four paired detailed and smoothed RV endocardium models (two male and two female) were reconstructed from ex-vivo human hearts high-resolution magnetic resonance images (MRI). Detailed models include structures with ≥1 mm 2 cross-sectional area. Haemodynamic characterisation was done by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations with steady and transient inflows, using high performance computing (HPC). The differences between the flows in smoothed and detailed models were assessed using Q-criterion for vorticity quantification, the pressure drop between inlet and outlet, and the wall shear stress (WSS). Results demonstrated that detailed endocardial structures increase the degree of intra-ventricular pressure drop, decrease the WSS and disrupt the dominant vortex creating secondary small vortices. Increasingly turbulent blood flow was observed in the detailed RVs. Female RVs were less trabeculated and presented lower pressure drops than the males. In conclusion, neglecting endocardial structures in RV haemodynamic models may lead to inaccurate conclusions about the pressures, stresses, and blood flow behaviour in the cavity. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. Continuous monitoring of back wall stress corrosion cracking growth in sensitized type 304 stainless steel weldment by means of potential drop techniques

    OpenAIRE

    SATO, Y; ATSUMI, T; SHOJI, T

    2007-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) tests on welded specimens of sensitized type 304SS with a thickness of 20 mm were performed in sodium thiosulphate solution at room temperature, with continuous monitoring of the SCC growth, using the techniques of modified induced current potential drop (MICPD), alternating current potential drop (ACPD) and direct current potential drop (DCPD). The MICPD and DCPD techniques permit continuous monitoring of the back wall SCC, which initiates from a fatigue pre-c...

  13. Development of a system for measuring wall shear stress in blood vessels using magnetic resonance imaging and computational fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Keita; Nagao, Taisuke; Okada, Kouji; Miyazaki, Shohei; Yang, Xiaomei; Yamazaki, Youichi; Murase, Kenya

    2008-01-01

    We developed a system for measuring the wall shear stress (WSS) in blood vessels using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The time-dependent velocity at the center of the blood vessel was measured by phase-contrast MRI and was approximated by finite Fourier series, which was used for generating the velocity profile at the inlet for the boundary condition to the CFD method. To validate the CFD method, we compared the WSS obtained by the CFD method with the theoretical value in a straight cylinder with various radii for both steady and pulsatile flows. We also investigated the dependence of the WSS on the inlet velocity profile incorporated into the CFD method. For steady flow, there was a good agreement between the WSS obtained by the CFD method and the theoretical value. For pulsatile flow, there was a relatively good agreement between them when the radius of the cylinder was 2.5 mm and the inlet velocity profile was given by the Womersley solution for fully developed pulsatile flow in a straight circular cylinder. When the radius of the cylinder was 5 mm and/or the inlet velocity profile was assumed to be parabolic, large differences were observed between them, suggesting that the assumption of fully developed flow does not hold true in these cases. In human studies, the vortex due to the secondary blood flow in the carotid arterial sinus was clearly observed. The WSS in the bifurcation was the highest, while that in the carotid arterial sinus was the smallest. In conclusion, the system presented here appears to be useful for measuring the WSS in blood vessels and for analyzing the cause and/or extent of atherosclerosis, and our results suggest that the inlet velocity profile should be carefully considered. (author)

  14. Ventricular dyssynchrony assessed by gated myocardial perfusion SPECT using a geometrical approach: a feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veen, Berlinda J. van der; Younis, Imad Al; Ajmone-Marsan, Nina; Bax, Jeroen J.; Westenberg, Jos J.M.; Roos, Albert de; Stokkel, Marcel P.M.

    2012-01-01

    Left ventricular dyssynchrony may predict response to cardiac resynchronization therapy and may well predict adverse cardiac events. Recently, a geometrical approach for dyssynchrony analysis of myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS) was introduced. In this study the feasibility of this geometrical method to detect dyssynchrony was assessed in a population with a normal MPS and in patients with documented ventricular dyssynchrony. For the normal population 80 patients (40 men and 40 women) with normal perfusion (summed stress score ≤2 and summed rest score ≤2) and function (left ventricular ejection fraction 55-80%) on MPS were selected; 24 heart failure patients with proven dyssynchrony on MRI were selected for comparison. All patients underwent a 2-day stress/rest MPS protocol. Perfusion, function and dyssynchrony parameters were obtained by the Corridor4DM software package (Version 6.1). For the normal population time to peak motion was 42.8 ± 5.1% RR cycle, SD of time to peak motion was 3.5 ± 1.4% RR cycle and bandwidth was 18.2 ± 6.0% RR cycle. No significant gender-related differences or differences between rest and post-stress acquisition were found for the dyssynchrony parameters. Discrepancies between the normal and abnormal populations were most profound for the mean wall motion (p value <0.001), SD of time to peak motion (p value <0.001) and bandwidth (p value <0.001). It is feasible to quantify ventricular dyssynchrony in MPS using the geometrical approach as implemented by Corridor4DM. (orig.)

  15. Influence of the hole geometry on the flow distribution in ventricular catheters for hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giménez, Ángel; Galarza, Marcelo; Pellicer, Olga; Valero, José; Amigó, José M

    2016-07-15

    Hydrocephalus is a medical condition consisting of an abnormal accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid within the brain. A catheter is inserted in one of the brain ventricles and then connected to an external valve to drain the excess of cerebrospinal fluid. The main drawback of this technique is that, over time, the ventricular catheter ends up getting blocked by the cells and macromolecules present in the cerebrospinal fluid. A crucial factor influencing this obstruction is a non-uniform flow pattern through the catheter, since it facilitates adhesion of suspended particles to the walls. In this paper we focus on the effects that tilted holes as well as conical holes have on the flow distribution and shear stress. We have carried out 3D computational simulations to study the effect of the hole geometry on the cerebrospinal fluid flow through ventricular catheters. All the simulations were done with the OpenFOAM® toolbox. In particular, three different groups of models were investigated by varying (i) the tilt angles of the holes, (ii) the inner and outer diameters of the holes, and (iii) the distances between the so-called hole segments. The replacement of cylindrical holes by conical holes was found to have a strong influence on the flow distribution and to lower slightly the shear stress. Tilted holes did not involve flow distribution changes when the hole segments are sufficiently separated, but the mean shear stress was certainly reduced. The authors present new results about the behavior of the fluid flow through ventricular catheters. These results complete earlier work on this topic by adding the influence of the hole geometry. The overall objective pursued by this research is to provide guidelines to improve existing commercially available ventricular catheters.

  16. γ-Aminobutyric acid transaminase deficiency impairs central carbon metabolism and leads to cell wall defects during salt stress in Arabidopsis roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renault, Hugues; El Amrani, Abdelhak; Berger, Adeline; Mouille, Grégory; Soubigou-Taconnat, Ludivine; Bouchereau, Alain; Deleu, Carole

    2013-05-01

    Environmental constraints challenge cell homeostasis and thus require a tight regulation of metabolic activity. We have previously reported that the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) metabolism is crucial for Arabidopsis salt tolerance as revealed by the NaCl hypersensitivity of the GABA transaminase (GABA-T, At3g22200) gaba-t/pop2-1 mutant. In this study, we demonstrate that GABA-T deficiency during salt stress causes root and hypocotyl developmental defects and alterations of cell wall composition. A comparative genome-wide transcriptional analysis revealed that expression levels of genes involved in carbon metabolism, particularly sucrose and starch catabolism, were found to increase upon the loss of GABA-T function under salt stress conditions. Consistent with the altered mutant cell wall composition, a number of cell wall-related genes were also found differentially expressed. A targeted quantitative analysis of primary metabolites revealed that glutamate (GABA precursor) accumulated while succinate (the final product of GABA metabolism) significantly decreased in mutant roots after 1 d of NaCl treatment. Furthermore, sugar concentration was twofold reduced in gaba-t/pop2-1 mutant roots compared with wild type. Together, our results provide strong evidence that GABA metabolism is a major route for succinate production in roots and identify GABA as a major player of central carbon adjustment during salt stress. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Right ventricular involvement in cardiac sarcoidosis demonstrated with cardiac magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smedema, Jan-Peter; van Geuns, Robert-Jan; Ainslie, Gillian; Ector, Joris; Heidbuchel, Hein; Crijns, Harry J G M

    2017-11-01

    Cardiac involvement in sarcoidosis is reported in up to 30% of patients. Left ventricular involvement demonstrated by contrast-enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance has been well validated. We sought to determine the prevalence and distribution of right ventricular late gadolinium enhancement in patients diagnosed with pulmonary sarcoidosis. We prospectively evaluated 87 patients diagnosed with pulmonary sarcoidosis with contrast-enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance for right ventricular involvement. Pulmonary artery pressures were non-invasively evaluated with Doppler echocardiography. Patient characteristics were compared between the groups with and without right ventricular involvement, and right ventricular enhancement was correlated with pulmonary hypertension, ventricular mass, volume, and systolic function. Left ventricular late gadolinium enhancement was demonstrated in 30 patients (34%). Fourteen patients (16%) had right ventricular late gadolinium enhancement, with sole right ventricular enhancement in only two patients. The pattern of right ventricular enhancement consisted of right ventricular outflow tract enhancement in 1 patient, free wall enhancement in 8 patients, ventricular insertion point enhancement in 10 patients, and enhancement of the right side of the interventricular septum in 11 patients. Pulmonary arterial hypertension correlated with the presence of right ventricular enhancement (P Right ventricular enhancement correlated with systolic ventricular dysfunction (P Right ventricular enhancement was present in 16% of patients diagnosed with pulmonary sarcoidosis and in 48% of patients with left ventricular enhancement. The presence of right ventricular enhancement correlated with pulmonary arterial hypertension, right ventricular systolic dysfunction, hypertrophy, and dilation. © 2017 The Authors. ESC Heart Failure published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology.

  18. Relationship between Fibrosis and Ventricular Arrhythmias in Chagas Heart Disease Without Ventricular Dysfunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tassi, Eduardo Marinho, E-mail: etassi@ibest.com.br [Instituto de Cardiologia Edson Saad - Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Continentino, Marcelo Abramoff [Hospital Frei Galvão, Guaratinguetá, SP (Brazil); Nascimento, Emília Matos do; Pereira, Basílio de Bragança [Instituto de Cardiologia Edson Saad - Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Coppe - Instituto Alberto Luiz Coimbra de Pós-Graduação e Pesquisa de Engenharia - UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Pedrosa, Roberto Coury [Instituto de Cardiologia Edson Saad - Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-05-15

    Patients with Chagas disease and segmental wall motion abnormality (SWMA) have worse prognosis independent of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) is currently the best method to detect SWMA and to assess fibrosis. To quantify fibrosis by using late gadolinium enhancement CMR in patients with Chagas disease and preserved or minimally impaired ventricular function (> 45%), and to detect patterns of dependence between fibrosis, SWMA and LVEF in the presence of ventricular arrhythmia. Electrocardiogram, treadmill exercise test, Holter and CMR were carried out in 61 patients, who were divided into three groups as follows: (1) normal electrocardiogram and CMR without SWMA; (2) abnormal electrocardiogram and CMR without SWMA; (3) CMR with SWMA independently of electrocardiogram. The number of patients with ventricular arrhythmia in relation to the total of patients, the percentage of fibrosis, and the LVEF were, respectively: Group 1, 4/26, 0.74% and 74.34%; Group 2, 4/16, 3.96% and 68.5%; and Group 3, 11/19, 14.07% and 55.59%. Ventricular arrhythmia was found in 31.1% of the patients. Those with and without ventricular arrhythmia had mean LVEF of 59.87% and 70.18%, respectively, and fibrosis percentage of 11.03% and 3.01%, respectively. Of the variables SWMA, groups, age, LVEF and fibrosis, only the latter was significant for the presence of ventricular arrhythmia, with a cutoff point of 11.78% for fibrosis mass (p < 0.001). Even in patients with Chagas disease and preserved or minimally impaired ventricular function, electrical instability can be present. Regarding the presence of ventricular arrhythmia, fibrosis is the most important variable, its amount being proportional to the complexity of the groups.

  19. Relationship between Fibrosis and Ventricular Arrhythmias in Chagas Heart Disease Without Ventricular Dysfunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tassi, Eduardo Marinho; Continentino, Marcelo Abramoff; Nascimento, Emília Matos do; Pereira, Basílio de Bragança; Pedrosa, Roberto Coury

    2014-01-01

    Patients with Chagas disease and segmental wall motion abnormality (SWMA) have worse prognosis independent of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) is currently the best method to detect SWMA and to assess fibrosis. To quantify fibrosis by using late gadolinium enhancement CMR in patients with Chagas disease and preserved or minimally impaired ventricular function (> 45%), and to detect patterns of dependence between fibrosis, SWMA and LVEF in the presence of ventricular arrhythmia. Electrocardiogram, treadmill exercise test, Holter and CMR were carried out in 61 patients, who were divided into three groups as follows: (1) normal electrocardiogram and CMR without SWMA; (2) abnormal electrocardiogram and CMR without SWMA; (3) CMR with SWMA independently of electrocardiogram. The number of patients with ventricular arrhythmia in relation to the total of patients, the percentage of fibrosis, and the LVEF were, respectively: Group 1, 4/26, 0.74% and 74.34%; Group 2, 4/16, 3.96% and 68.5%; and Group 3, 11/19, 14.07% and 55.59%. Ventricular arrhythmia was found in 31.1% of the patients. Those with and without ventricular arrhythmia had mean LVEF of 59.87% and 70.18%, respectively, and fibrosis percentage of 11.03% and 3.01%, respectively. Of the variables SWMA, groups, age, LVEF and fibrosis, only the latter was significant for the presence of ventricular arrhythmia, with a cutoff point of 11.78% for fibrosis mass (p < 0.001). Even in patients with Chagas disease and preserved or minimally impaired ventricular function, electrical instability can be present. Regarding the presence of ventricular arrhythmia, fibrosis is the most important variable, its amount being proportional to the complexity of the groups

  20. Lone ventricular cardiomyopathy,

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... (I) cardiac catheterisation, including coronary arteriography and pulmonary ... described existence of lone ventricular idiopathic ... spectrum of classic idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. ... endomyocardial fibrosis, and from discussions at an.

  1. Experimental Study of Pressure Drop and Wall Shear Stress Characteristics of γ /Al2O3-Water Nanofluid in a Circular pipe under Turbulent flow induced vibration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adil Abbas AL-Moosawy

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Experimental study of γ /Al2O3 with mean diameter of less than 50 nm was dispersed in the distilled water that flows through a pipe consist of five sections as work station ,four sections made of carbon steel metal and one sections made of Pyrex glass pipe, with five nanoparticles volume concentrations of 0%,0.1%,0.2%,0.3%,and 0.4% with seven different volume flow rates 100, 200 , 300, 400, 500, 600 ,and 700ℓ/min were investigated to calculated pressure distribution for the cases without rubber ,with 3mm rubber and with 6mm rubber used to support the pipe. Reynolds number was between 20000 and 130000. Frequency value through pipe was measured for all stations of pipe for all cases. The results show that the pressure drop and wall shear stress of the nanofluid increase by increasing the nanoparticles volume concentrations or Reynolds number, the values of frequency through the pipe increase continuously when wall shear stress increases and the ratio of increment increases as nanofluid concentrations increase. Increasing of vibration frequency lead to increasing the friction factor between the pipe and the wall and thus increasing in pressure drop. Several equations between the wall shear stress and frequency for all volume concentration and for three cases without rubber, with rubber has 3mm thickness ,and with rubber has 6mm thickness. Finally, the results led to that γ /Al2O3 could function as a good and alternative conventional working fluid in heat transfer applications. A good agreement is seen between the experimental and those available in the literature

  2. Usefulness of pulse-wave doppler tissue sampling and dobutamine stress echocardiography for identification of false positive inferior wall defects in SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altinmakas, S.; Dagdeviren, B.; Turkmen, M.; Gursurer, M.; Say, B.; Tezel, T.; Ersek, B.

    2000-01-01

    False positive inferior wall perfusion defects restrict the accuracy of SPECT in diagnosis of coronary artery disease (CAD). Pulse-Wave Tissue Doppler (PWTD) has been recently proposed to assess regional wall motion velocities. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the presence of CAD by using PWTD during dobutamine stress echocardiography (DSE) in patients with an inferior perfusion defect detected by SPECT and compare PWTD parameters of normal cases with patients who had inferior perfusion defect and CAD. Sixty-five patients (mean age 58±8 years, 30 men) with a normal LV systolic function at rest according to echocardiographic evaluation with an inferior ischemia determined by SPECT and a control group (CG) of 34 normal cases (mean age 56±7 years, 16 men) were included in this study. All patients underwent a standard DSE (up to 40 μg/kg/min with additional atropine during sub-maximum heart rate responses). Pulse-wave Doppler tissue sampling of inferior wall was performed in the apical 2-chamber view at rest and stress. The coronary angiography was performed within 24 hours. The results were evaluated for the prediction of significant right coronary artery (RCA) and/or left circumflex coronary artery (CX) with narrowing (≥50% diameter stenosis, assessed by quantitative coronary angiography). It was observed that the peak stress mean E/A ratio was lower in patients with CAD when compared to patients without CAD (0.78±0.2 versus 1.29±0.11 p<0.0001). Also the peak stress E/A ratio of normal cases was significantly higher than patients who had CAD (1.19±0.3 versus 0.78±0.2 p<0.0001). When the cut off point for the E/A ratio was determined as 1, the sensitivity and specificity of dobutamine stress PWTD E/A were 89% and 86%, respectively. The peak stress E/A ratio was higher than 1 in all patients with a false positive perfusion defect. Systolic S velocity increase during DSE was significantly lower in patients with CAD (54%±17 versus 99%±24 p=0

  3. Left Ventricular Myocardial Function in Children With Pulmonary Hypertension: Relation to Right Ventricular Performance and Hemodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkett, Dale A; Slorach, Cameron; Patel, Sonali S; Redington, Andrew N; Ivy, D Dunbar; Mertens, Luc; Younoszai, Adel K; Friedberg, Mark K

    2015-08-01

    Through ventricular interdependence, pulmonary hypertension (PH) induces left ventricular (LV) dysfunction. We hypothesized that LV strain/strain rate, surrogate measures of myocardial contractility, are reduced in pediatric PH and relate to invasive hemodynamics, right ventricular strain, and functional measures of PH. At 2 institutions, echocardiography was prospectively performed in 54 pediatric PH patients during cardiac catheterization, and in 54 matched controls. Patients with PH had reduced LV global longitudinal strain (LS; -18.8 [-17.3 to -20.4]% versus -20.2 [-19.0 to -20.9]%; P=0.0046) predominantly because of reduced basal (-12.9 [-10.8 to -16.3]% versus -17.9 [-14.5 to -20.7]%; Pright ventricular free-wall LS (r=0.64; PBrain natriuretic peptide levels correlated moderately with septal LS (r=0.48; P=0.0038). PH functional class correlated moderately with LV free-wall LS (r=-0.48; P=0.0051). The septum, shared between ventricles and affected by septal shift, was the most affected LV region in PH. Pediatric PH patients demonstrate reduced LV strain/strain rate, predominantly within the septum, with relationships to invasive hemodynamics, right ventricular strain, and functional PH measures. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Ventricular rhythm in atrial fibrillation under anaesthetic infusion with propofol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cervigón, R; Moreno, J; Pérez-Villacastín, J; Reilly, R B; Castells, F

    2009-01-01

    Changes in patients' autonomic tone and specific pharmacologic interventions may modify the ventricular response (actual heart rate) during atrial fibrillation (AF). Hypnotic agents such as propofol may modify autonomic balance as they promote a sedative state. It has been shown that propofol slightly slows atrial fibrillatory activity, but the net global effect on the ventricular response remains unknown. We aimed to evaluate in patients in AF the effect of a propofol bolus on the ventricular rate and regularity at ECG. We analysed the possible relation with local atrial fibrillatory activities, as ratios between atrial and ventricular rates (AVRs), analysing atrial activity from intracardiac electrograms at the free wall of the right and left atria and at the interatrial septum. We compared data at the baseline and after complete hypnosis. Propofol was associated with a more homogeneous ventricular response and lower AVR values at the interatrial septum

  5. Right ventricular hydatid cyst ruptured to pericardium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feridoun Sabzi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac hydatidosis is rare presentation of body hydatidosis. Incidence of cardiac involvements range from 5% to 5% of patients with hydatid disease. Most common site of hydatid cyst in heart is interventricular septum and left ventricular free wall. Right ventricular free wall involvement by cyst that ruptured to pericardial cavity is very rare presentation of hydatid cyst. Cardiac involvement may have serious consequences such as rupture to blood steam or pericardial cavity. Both the disease and its surgical treatment carry a high complication rate, including rupture leading to cardiac tamponade, anaphylaxis and also death. In the present report, a 43-year-old man with constrictive pericarditis secondary to a pericardial hydatid cyst is described.

  6. Association of Right Ventricular Pressure and Volume Overload with Non-Ischemic Septal Fibrosis on Cardiac Magnetic Resonance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiwon Kim

    Full Text Available Non-ischemic fibrosis (NIF on cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR has been linked to poor prognosis, but its association with adverse right ventricular (RV remodeling is unknown. This study examined a broad cohort of patients with RV dysfunction, so as to identify relationships between NIF and RV remodeling indices, including RV pressure load, volume and wall stress.The population comprised patients with RV dysfunction (EF 6-fold more common in the highest, vs. the lowest, common tertile of PASP and RV size (p<0.001.Among wall stress components, NIF was independently associated with RV chamber dilation and afterload, supporting the concept that NIF is linked to adverse RV chamber remodeling.

  7. Vasodilator stress impairs the left ventricular function obtained with gated single-photon emission computed tomography in patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odagiri, Keiichi; Uehara, Akihiko; Kurata, Chinori

    2010-01-01

    Transient ischemic dilatation (TID) and post-stress dysfunction of the left ventricle (LV) are important markers of severe coronary artery disease (CAD). To clarify the effects of stressor type on TID and post-stress LV dysfunction, changes in LV measurements were compared between patients with exercise- or vasodilator-induced stress. The 689 patients referred for technetium-99m tetrofosmin myocardial perfusion imaging were included. Patients were stressed with either a vasodilator (n=236) or exercise (n=453). LV measurements were obtained with electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). LV end-diastolic and end-systolic volume indexes (LVEDVI, LVESVI) increased and LV ejection fraction (LVEF) decreased after stress in the vasodilator-stress group. Vasodilator-stress and the summed difference score (SDS) were independent variables that decreased LVEF after stress. Even in patients without reversible defects, vasodilator-stress impaired LV function. There were no differences in the stress-to-rest ratios of LVEDVI (rEDV) and LVESVI (rESV) among patients with normal myocardial perfusion, fixed defects and reversible defects in the vasodilator-stress group, whereas in the exercise-stress group, rESV was significantly higher in the patients with reversible defects than in those without reversible defects. Within the vasodilator-stress group, neither rEDV nor rESV correlated with the SDS. Vasodilator-stress by itself decreases LVEF after stress. TID should be carefully interpreted when vasodilator-stress is used to detect severe CAD. (author)

  8. Prognostic value of high-dose dobutamine stress magnetic resonance imaging in 1,493 consecutive patients: assessment of myocardial wall motion and perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korosoglou, Grigorios; Elhmidi, Yacine; Steen, Henning; Schellberg, Dieter; Riedle, Nina; Ahrens, Johannes; Lehrke, Stephanie; Merten, Constanze; Lossnitzer, Dirk; Radeleff, Jannis; Zugck, Christian; Giannitsis, Evangelos; Katus, Hugo A

    2010-10-05

    This study sought to determine the prognostic value of wall motion and perfusion assessment during high-dose dobutamine stress (DS) cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a large patient cohort. DS-MRI offers the possibility to integrate myocardial perfusion and wall motion analysis in a single examination for the detection of coronary artery disease (CAD). A total of 1,493 consecutive patients with suspected or known CAD underwent DS-MRI, using a standard protocol in a 1.5-T magnetic resonance scanner. Wall motion and perfusion were assessed at baseline and during stress, and outcome data including cardiac death, nonfatal myocardial infarction ("hard events"), and "late" revascularization performed >90 days after the MR scans were collected during a 2 ± 1 year follow-up period. Fifty-three hard events, including 14 cardiac deaths and 39 nonfatal infarctions, occurred during the follow-up period, whereas 85 patients underwent "late" revascularization. Using multivariable regression analysis, an abnormal result for wall motion or perfusion during stress yielded the strongest independent prognostic value for both hard events and late revascularization, clearly surpassing that of clinical and baseline magnetic resonance parameters (for wall motion: adjusted hazard ratio [HR] of 5.9 [95% confidence interval (CI): 2.5 to 13.6] for hard events and of 3.1 [95% CI: 1.7 to 5.6] for late revascularization, and for perfusion: adjusted HR of 5.4 [95% CI: 2.3 to 12.9] for hard events and of 6.2 [95% CI: 3.3 to 11.3] for late revascularization, p < 0.001 for all). DS-MRI can accurately identify patients who are at increased risk for cardiac death and myocardial infarction, separating them from those with normal findings, who have very low risk for future cardiac events. (Prognostic Value of High Dose Dobutamine Stress Magnetic Resonance Imaging; NCT00837005). Copyright © 2010 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Exercise thallium testing in ventricular preexcitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archer, S.; Gornick, C.; Grund, F.; Shafer, R.; Weir, E.K.

    1987-05-01

    Ventricular preexcitation, as seen in Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, results in a high frequency of positive exercise electrocardiographic responses. Why this occurs is unknown but is not believed to reflect myocardial ischemia. Exercise thallium testing is often used for noninvasive assessment of coronary artery disease in patients with conditions known to result in false-positive electrocardiographic responses. To assess the effects of ventricular preexcitation on exercise thallium testing, 8 men (aged 42 +/- 4 years) with this finding were studied. No subject had signs or symptoms of coronary artery disease. Subjects exercised on a bicycle ergometer to a double product of 26,000 +/- 2,000 (+/- standard error of mean). All but one of the subjects had at least 1 mm of ST-segment depression. Tests were terminated because of fatigue or dyspnea and no patient had chest pain. Thallium test results were abnormal in 5 patients, 2 of whom had stress defects as well as abnormally delayed thallium washout. One of these subjects had normal coronary arteries on angiography with a negative ergonovine challenge, and both had normal exercise radionuclide ventriculographic studies. Delayed thallium washout was noted in 3 of the subjects with ventricular preexcitation and normal stress images. This study suggests that exercise thallium testing is frequently abnormal in subjects with ventricular preexcitation. Ventricular preexcitation may cause dyssynergy of ventricular activation, which could alter myocardial thallium handling, much as occurs with left bundle branch block. Exercise radionuclide ventriculography may be a better test for noninvasive assessment of coronary artery disease in patients with ventricular preexcitation.

  10. Exercise thallium testing in ventricular preexcitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Archer, S.; Gornick, C.; Grund, F.; Shafer, R.; Weir, E.K.

    1987-01-01

    Ventricular preexcitation, as seen in Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, results in a high frequency of positive exercise electrocardiographic responses. Why this occurs is unknown but is not believed to reflect myocardial ischemia. Exercise thallium testing is often used for noninvasive assessment of coronary artery disease in patients with conditions known to result in false-positive electrocardiographic responses. To assess the effects of ventricular preexcitation on exercise thallium testing, 8 men (aged 42 +/- 4 years) with this finding were studied. No subject had signs or symptoms of coronary artery disease. Subjects exercised on a bicycle ergometer to a double product of 26,000 +/- 2,000 (+/- standard error of mean). All but one of the subjects had at least 1 mm of ST-segment depression. Tests were terminated because of fatigue or dyspnea and no patient had chest pain. Thallium test results were abnormal in 5 patients, 2 of whom had stress defects as well as abnormally delayed thallium washout. One of these subjects had normal coronary arteries on angiography with a negative ergonovine challenge, and both had normal exercise radionuclide ventriculographic studies. Delayed thallium washout was noted in 3 of the subjects with ventricular preexcitation and normal stress images. This study suggests that exercise thallium testing is frequently abnormal in subjects with ventricular preexcitation. Ventricular preexcitation may cause dyssynergy of ventricular activation, which could alter myocardial thallium handling, much as occurs with left bundle branch block. Exercise radionuclide ventriculography may be a better test for noninvasive assessment of coronary artery disease in patients with ventricular preexcitation

  11. In tobacco BY-2 cells xyloglucan oligosaccharides alter the expression of genes involved in cell wall metabolism, signalling, stress responses, cell division and transcriptional control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Pérez, Lien; Perrotta, Lara; Acosta, Alexis; Orellana, Esteban; Spadafora, Natasha; Bruno, Leonardo; Bitonti, Beatrice M; Albani, Diego; Cabrera, Juan Carlos; Francis, Dennis; Rogers, Hilary J

    2014-10-01

    Xyloglucan oligosaccharides (XGOs) are breakdown products of XGs, the most abundant hemicelluloses of the primary cell walls of non-Poalean species. Treatment of cell cultures or whole plants with XGOs results in accelerated cell elongation and cell division, changes in primary root growth, and a stimulation of defence responses. They may therefore act as signalling molecules regulating plant growth and development. Previous work suggests an interaction with auxins and effects on cell wall loosening, however their mode of action is not fully understood. The effect of an XGO extract from tamarind (Tamarindus indica) on global gene expression was therefore investigated in tobacco BY-2 cells using microarrays. Over 500 genes were differentially regulated with similar numbers and functional classes of genes up- and down-regulated, indicating a complex interaction with the cellular machinery. Up-regulation of a putative XG endotransglycosylase/hydrolase-related (XTH) gene supports the mechanism of XGO action through cell wall loosening. Differential expression of defence-related genes supports a role for XGOs as elicitors. Changes in the expression of genes related to mitotic control and differentiation also support previous work showing that XGOs are mitotic inducers. XGOs also affected expression of several receptor-like kinase genes and transcription factors. Hence, XGOs have significant effects on expression of genes related to cell wall metabolism, signalling, stress responses, cell division and transcriptional control.

  12. Evaluation of optical data gained by ARAMIS-measurement of abdominal wall movements for an anisotropic pattern design of stress-adapted hernia meshes produced by embroidery technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breier, A.; Bittrich, L.; Hahn, J.; Spickenheuer, A.

    2017-10-01

    For the sustainable repair of abdominal wall hernia the application of hernia meshes is required. One reason for the relapse of hernia after surgery is seen in an inadequate adaption of the mechanical properties of the mesh to the movements of the abdominal wall. Differences in the stiffness of the mesh and the abdominal tissue cause tension, friction and stress resulting in a deficient tissue response and subsequently in a recurrence of a hernia, preferentially in the marginal area of the mesh. Embroidery technology enables a targeted influence on the mechanical properties of the generated textile structure by a directed thread deposition. Textile parameters like stitch density, alignment and angle can be changed easily and locally in the embroidery pattern to generate a space-resolved mesh with mechanical properties adapted to the requirement of the surrounding tissue. To determine those requirements the movements of the abdominal wall and the resulting distortions need to be known. This study was conducted to gain optical data of the abdominal wall movements by non-invasive ARAMIS-measurement on 39 test persons to estimate direction and value of the major strains.

  13. The GPI-anchored protein Ecm33 is vital for conidiation, cell wall integrity, and multi-stress tolerance of two filamentous entomopathogens but not for virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying; Zhu, Jing; Ying, Sheng-Hua; Feng, Ming-Guang

    2014-06-01

    Ecm33 is one of several glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins. This protein is known to be involved in fungal cell wall integrity, but its contribution to multi-stress tolerance is largely unknown. Here we characterized the functions of two Ecm33 orthologues, i.e., Bbecm33 in Beauveria bassiana and Mrecm33 in Metarhizium robertsii. Bbecm33 and Mrecm33 were both confirmed as GPI-anchored cell wall proteins in immunogold localization. Single-gene disruptions of Bbecm33 and Mrecm33 caused slight growth defects, but conidial yield decreased much more in ΔBbecm33 (76 %) than in ΔMrecm33 (42 %), accompanied with significant reductions of intracellular mannitol and trehalose contents in both mutants and weakened cell walls in ΔBbecm33 only. Consequently, ΔBbecm33 was far more sensitive to the cell wall-perturbating agents Congo red and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) than ΔMrecm33, which showed null response to SDS. Both deletion mutants became significantly more sensitive to two oxidants (menadione and H2O2), two fungicides (carbendazim and ethirimol), osmotic salt NaCl, and Ca(2+) during growth despite some degrees of differences in their sensitivities to the chemical stressors. Strikingly, conidial UV-B resistance decreased by 55 % in ΔBbecm33 but was unaffected in ΔMrecm33, unlike a similar decrease (25-28 %) of conidial thermotolerance in both. All the changes were restored to wild-type levels by gene complementation through ectopic gene integration in each fungus. However, neither ΔBbecm33 nor ΔMrecm33 showed a significant change in virulence to a susceptible insect host. Our results indicate that Bbecm33 and Mrecm33 contribute differentially to the conidiation and multi-stress tolerance of B. bassiana and M. robertsii.

  14. Requirement for Pectin Methyl Esterase and Preference for Fragmented over Native Pectins for Wall-associated Kinase-activated, EDS1/PAD4-dependent Stress Response in Arabidopsis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohorn, Bruce D.; Kohorn, Susan L.; Saba, Nicholas J.; Martinez, Victoriano Meco

    2014-01-01

    The wall-associated kinases (WAKs) have a cytoplasmic protein kinase domain that spans the plasma membrane and binds pectin in the extracellular matrix of plants. WAKs are required for cell expansion during Arabidopsis seedling development but are also an integral part of the response to pathogens and stress that present oligogalacturonides (OGs), which subsequently bind to WAKs and activate a MPK6 (mitogen-activated protein kinase)-dependent pathway. It was unclear how WAKs distinguish native pectin polymers and OGs to activate one or the other of these two pathways. A dominant allele of WAK2 constitutively activates the stress response, and we show here that the effect is dependent upon EDS1 and PAD4, transcriptional activators involved in the pathogen response. Moreover, the WAK2 dominant allele is suppressed by a null allele of a pectin methyl esterase (PME3) whose activity normally leads to cross-linking of pectins in the cell wall. Although OGs activate a transcriptional response in wild type, the response is enhanced in a pme3/pme3 null, consistent with a competition by OG and native polymers for activation of WAKs. This provides a plausible mechanism for WAKs to distinguish an expansion from a stress pathway. PMID:24855660

  15. Requirement for pectin methyl esterase and preference for fragmented over native pectins for wall-associated kinase-activated, EDS1/PAD4-dependent stress response in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohorn, Bruce D; Kohorn, Susan L; Saba, Nicholas J; Martinez, Victoriano Meco

    2014-07-04

    The wall-associated kinases (WAKs) have a cytoplasmic protein kinase domain that spans the plasma membrane and binds pectin in the extracellular matrix of plants. WAKs are required for cell expansion during Arabidopsis seedling development but are also an integral part of the response to pathogens and stress that present oligogalacturonides (OGs), which subsequently bind to WAKs and activate a MPK6 (mitogen-activated protein kinase)-dependent pathway. It was unclear how WAKs distinguish native pectin polymers and OGs to activate one or the other of these two pathways. A dominant allele of WAK2 constitutively activates the stress response, and we show here that the effect is dependent upon EDS1 and PAD4, transcriptional activators involved in the pathogen response. Moreover, the WAK2 dominant allele is suppressed by a null allele of a pectin methyl esterase (PME3) whose activity normally leads to cross-linking of pectins in the cell wall. Although OGs activate a transcriptional response in wild type, the response is enhanced in a pme3/pme3 null, consistent with a competition by OG and native polymers for activation of WAKs. This provides a plausible mechanism for WAKs to distinguish an expansion from a stress pathway. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Nuclear medical diagnostic with ventricular aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litter, H.

    1987-01-01

    In the diagnostic of ventricular aneurysms myocardial scintigraphy and above all radionuclide ventriculography (RNV) have special importance. Because of the non-invasive method and the as a result safe and easy use even with stress studies, RNV can provide a very valuable aid with aneurysm patients in early diagnosis, evaluation of the operability and as well as in the prognosis. It must be noted, however, that the differentiation of multivascular diseases and sometimes ventricular aneurysms can be difficult and the inclusion of an angiocardiograph as a radiological invasive examination procedure seems fitting. (orig./MG) [de

  17. Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia in 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian van der Werf

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT is a rare, potentially lethal inherited arrhythmia syndrome characterized by stress or emotion-induced ventricular arrhythmias. CPVT was first described in 1960, while the genetic basis underlying this syndrome was discovered in 2001. The past decade has seen substantial advances in understanding the pathophysiology of CPVT. In addition, significant advances have been made in elucidating clinical characteristics of CPVT patients and new treatment options have become available. Here, we review current literature on CPVT to present state-of-the-art knowledge on the subject of the genetic basis, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis.

  18. Left ventricular diastolic filling in patients with systemic hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narita, Michihiro; Kurihara, Tadashi; Murano, Kenichi; Usami, Masahisa; Honda, Minoru; Kanao, Keisuke

    1985-01-01

    To study the prevalence and significance of left ventricular (LV) diastolic dysfunction in mild to moderate systemic hypertension (HT), cardiac blood pool imagings with Tc-99 m were obtained in 10 normal subjects and 27 patients with HT. The patients with HT did not show any evidence of coronary heart disease, renal insufficiency, cerebrovascular accident or diabetes mellitus. They were divided into 3 groups; (1) HT-1 (n=10): without evidence of echocardiographic (UCG) and electrocardiographic (ECG) left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), (2) HT-2 (n=8): with evidence of ECG-LVH without UCG-LVH, (3) HT-3 (n=9): with evidence of UCG-LVH. UCG-LVH was defined when posterior or interventricular septal tall thickness exceeded 13 mm at end-diastole. From UCG findings LV mass was calculated and from UCG findings and auscultating brachial systolic pressure LV peak-systolic wall stress (WS) was obtained. Cardiac blood pool imagings were performed at modified LAO at rest and during exercise stress. Indices of LV systolic function (rest ejection fraction, mean ejection rate during the first third of ejection and exercise ejection fraction response) were essentially similar in normal subjects and all HT groups. In contrast, LV diastolic filling rate during the first third of diastole (1/3 FR mean) decreased significantly in any group of HT, and it was prominent in HT-3. In patients with HT, 1/3 FR mean did not correlate with blood pressure, LV peak-systolic WS, LV systolic functions and LV end-diastolic volume. But it correlated inversely with LV mass (r=-0.84). These results suggest that impairment of early diastolic LV filling can be detected before systolic cardiac impairment and LVH develop, and it is, at least in part, relate to the LV mass. (author)

  19. Mathematical Model of Stress-Strain State of Curved Tube of Non-Circular Cross-Section with Account of Technological Wall Thickness Variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirogov, S. P.; Ustinov, N. N.; Smolin, N. I.

    2018-05-01

    A mathematical model of the stress-strain state of a curved tube of a non-circular cross-section is presented, taking into account the technological wall thickness variation. On the basis of the semi-membrane shell theory, a system of linear differential equations describing the deformation of a tube under the effect of pressure is obtained. To solve the boundary value problem, the method of shooting is applied. The adequacy of the proposed mathematical model is verified by comparison with the experimental data and the results of the calculation of tubes by the energy method.

  20. Finite Element Optimised Back Analysis of In Situ Stress Field and Stability Analysis of Shaft Wall in the Underground Gas Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yifei Yan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel optimised back analysis method is proposed in this paper. The in situ stress field of an underground gas storage (UGS reservoir in a Turkey salt cavern is analysed by the basic theory of elastic mechanics. A finite element method is implemented to optimise and approximate the objective function by systematically adjusting boundary loads. Optimising calculation is performed based on a novel method to reduce the error between measurement and calculation as much as possible. Compared with common back analysis methods such as regression method, the method proposed can further improve the calculation precision. By constructing a large circular geometric model, the effect of stress concentration is eliminated and a minimum difference between computed and measured stress can be guaranteed in the rectangular objective region. The efficiency of the proposed method is investigated and confirmed by its capability on restoring in situ stress field, which agrees well with experimental results. The characteristics of stress distribution of chosen UGS wells are obtained based on the back analysis results and by applying the corresponding fracture criterion, the shaft walls are proven safe.

  1. Three-dimensional analysis of stresses and the development of failure mechanism in prestressed thick-walled cylinders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertrand, G.; Kotulla, B.

    1984-01-01

    The new design concept for a prestressed concrete reactor vessel which integrates the complete gas cycle into the pressure vessel demands knowledge of crack zone propagation even in zones where predominantly pressure stresses exist. Analytically, the state of stresses and strains, which is dependent on the loading history, can be computed by recording the triaxial stress-strain law for concrete up to the range of critical volumetric and shear deformations. The constitutive law is derived tensorially using invariant description in the stress space. It is demonstrated that near failure loads membrane stress states develop which increase failure resistance. Collapse loads can be defined through the observation of the principal stress vector with the aid of the triaxial failure law of concrete. (author)

  2. Left ventricular function in chronic aortic regurgitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iskandrian, A.S.; Hakki, A.H.; Manno, B.; Amenta, A.; Kane, S.A.

    1983-01-01

    Left ventricular performance was determined in 42 patients with moderate or severe aortic regurgitation during upright exercise by measuring left ventricular ejection fraction and volume with radionuclide ventriculography. Classification of the patients according to exercise tolerance showed that patients with normal exercise tolerance (greater than or equal to 7.0 minutes) had a significantly higher ejection fraction at rest (probability [p] . 0.02) and during exercise (p . 0.0002), higher cardiac index at exercise (p . 0.0008) and lower exercise end-systolic volume (p . 0.01) than did patients with limited exercise tolerance. Similar significant differences were noted in younger patients compared with older patients in ejection fraction at rest and exercise (both p . 0.001) and cardiac index at rest (p . 0.03) and exercise (p . 0.0005). The end-diastolic volume decreased during exercise in 60% of the patients. The patients with a decrease in volume were significantly younger and had better exercise tolerance and a larger end-diastolic volume at rest than did patients who showed an increase in volume. The mean corrected left ventricular end-diastolic radius/wall thickness ratio was significantly greater in patients with abnormal than in those with normal exercise reserve (mean +/- standard deviation 476 +/- 146 versus 377 +/- 92 mm Hg, p less than 0.05). Thus, in patients with chronic aortic regurgitation: 1) left ventricular systolic function during exercise was related to age, exercise tolerance and corrected left ventricular end-diastolic radius/wall thickness ratio, and 2) the end-diastolic volume decreased during exercise, especially in younger patients and patients with normal exercise tolerance or a large volume at rest

  3. Exogenous transglutaminase improves multiple-stress tolerance in Lactococcus lactis and other lactic acid bacteria with glutamine and lysine in the cell wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu; Kan, Zhipeng; You, Yuanli; Gao, Xueling; Wang, Zhigeng; Fu, Ruiyan

    2015-12-01

    To increase the resistance of ingested bacteria to multiple environmental stresses, the role of transglutaminase in Lactococcus lactis and possible mechanisms of action were explored. L. lactis grown with transglutaminase exhibited significantly higher resistance to bile salts, stimulated gastric juice, antibiotics, NaCl, and cold stress compared to the control (cultured without transglutaminase), with no negative influence on cell growth. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the cell walls of L. lactis cultured with 9 U transglutaminase/ml were approx. 1.9-times thicker than the control. Further analysis demonstrated that the multi-resistant phenotype was strain-specific; that is, it occurred in bacteria with the presence of glutamine and lysine in the peptidoglycan. Supplementation of culture media with transglutaminase is an effective, simple, and inexpensive strategy to protect specific ingested bacteria against multiple environmental challenges.

  4. Anatomy of the female pelvic viscera before and after transobturator tape procedures and anterior vaginal wall repair in patients with stress urinary incontinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laketić Darko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Anatomy of the female pelvic viscera was investigated before and after the Tension free Vaginal tape (TVT-O. Forty patients were included in the study. Surgery was performed between 2009 and 2012 in Clinic of Urology (Clinical Center Nis and Department of Urology (Municipal Hospital Prokuplje. Stress Urinary Incontinence (SUI and anterior vaginal wall prolapse was confirmed in all patients. In all patients with anterior vaginal wall prolapse (grade≥2 both tension free vaginal tape (TVT-O and anterior vaginal wall repair were performed. Pelvic Organ Prolapse Quantification (POPQ system was used for the evaluation of prolapse before and after the surgery. Mean age of patients was 61 years. Spinal anesthesia was performed in thirty patients and general anesthesia in 10 patients. Intraoperative blood loss was under 50 ml. There were no bladder, nerve and blood vessels injuries . Thirty eight out of forty patients (95% were satisfied with the outcome of the surgery. There was a significant correction of prolapse after the surgery. Recurrence of prolapse was found in patients with the high grade prolapse before the surgery, as well as, in patients with the history of previous anterior vaginal repair. Pelvic organ prolapse, congenital or acquired, is supported by the congenital weakness of the pelvic floor.

  5. Ventricular Septal Defect (VSD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Call your doctor if your baby or child: Tires easily when eating or playing Is not gaining ... heart procedures. Risk factors Ventricular septal defects may run in families and sometimes may occur with other ...

  6. The cell wall stress response in Aspergillus niger involves increased expression of the glutamine: Fructose-6-phosphate amidotransferase-encoding gene (gfaA) and increased deposition of chitin in the cell wall

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ram, A.F.J.; Arentshorst, M.; Damveld, R.A.; Kuyk, P.A. van; Klis, F.M.; Hondel, C.A.M.J.J. van den

    2004-01-01

    Perturbation of cell wall synthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, either by mutations in cell wall synthesis-related genes or by adding compounds that interfere with normal cell wall assembly, triggers a compensatory response to ensure cell wall integrity. This response includes an increase in chitin

  7. Experimental and CFD Simulation Studies of Wall Shear Stress for Different Impeller Configurations and MBR Activated Sludge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ratkovich, Nicolas Rios; Chan, C.C.V.; Bentzen, Thomas Ruby

    2012-01-01

    in an MBR. Nevertheless, proper experimental validation is required to validate CFD simulation. In this work experimental measurements of shear stress induced by impellers at a membrane surface were made with an electrochemical approach and the results were used to validate CFD simulations. As good results...... appealing for full-scale applications. It has been widely demonstrated that the filtration performances in MBRs can be improved by understanding the shear stress over the membrane surface. Modern tools such as Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) can be used to diagnose and understand the shear stress...

  8. Simulation of bending stress variation in long buried thick-walled pipes under the earth’s movement using combined linear dynamics and beam theories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salau Tajudeen A.O.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study reported a simulation approach to the understanding of the interactions between a buried pipe and the soil system by computing the bending stress variation of harmonically-excited buried pipes. The established principles of linear dynamics theory and simple beam theory were utilised in the analysis of the problem of buried pipe bending stress accumulation and its dynamics. With regards to the parameters that influence the bending stress variations, the most important are the isolation factor, uniform external load, and the corresponding limiting conditions. The simulated mathematical expressions, containing static and dynamic parameters of the buried pipe and earth, were coded in Fortran programming language and applied in the simulation experiment. The results obtained showed that harmonically-excited buried thick-walled pipe became stable and effective when the ratio of the natural frequency of vibration to the forced frequency is greater than 2.0, whenever the damped factor is used as the control parameter for the maximum bending stress. The mirror image of the stress variation produces variation in the location of the maximum bending stress in quantitative terms. The acceptable pipe materials for the simulated cases must have yield strength in bending greater than or equal to 13.95 MPa. The results obtained in this work fill a gap in the literature and will be useful to pipeline engineers and designers, as well as to environmental scientists in initialising and controlling environmental issues and policy formulation concerning the influence of buried pipe on the soil and water in the environment.

  9. Effects of foliar boron application on seed composition, cell wall boron, and seed δ15N and δ13C isotopes in water-stressed soybean plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellaloui, Nacer; Hu, Yanbo; Mengistu, Alemu; Kassem, My A.; Abel, Craig A.

    2013-01-01

    Limited information is available on the effects of foliar boron (B) application on soybean seed composition. The objective of this research was to investigate the effects of foliar B on seed composition (protein, oil, fatty acids, and sugars). Our hypothesis was that since B is involved in nitrogen and carbon metabolism, it may impact seed composition. A repeated greenhouse experiment was conducted where half of the soybean plants was exposed to water stress (WS) and the other half was well-watered. Foliar boron (FB) in the form of boric acid was applied twice at a rate of 1.1 kg ha−1. The first application was during flowering stage, and the second application was during seed-fill stage. Treatments were water stressed plants with no FB (WS–B); water stressed plants with FB (WS+B); watered plants without FB (W–B), and watered plants with FB (W+B). The treatment W–B was used as a control. Comparing with WS–B plants, B concentration was the highest in leaves and seed of W+B plants (84% increase in leaves and 73% in seed). Seeds of W+B plants had higher protein (11% increase), oleic acid (27% increase), sucrose (up to 40% increase), glucose, and fructose comparing with W–B. However, seed stachyose concentrations increased by 43% in WS–B plants seed compared with W–B plants. Cell wall (structural) B concentration in leaves was higher in all plants under water stress, especially in WS–B plants where the percentage of cell wall B reached up to 90%. Water stress changed seed δ15N and δ13C values in both B applied and non-B applied plants, indicating possible effects on nitrogen and carbon metabolism. This research demonstrated that FB increased B accumulation in leaves and seed, and altered seed composition of well-watered and water stressed plants, indicating a possible involvement of B in seed protein, and oleic and linolenic fatty acids. Further research is needed to explain mechanisms of B involvement in seed protein and fatty acids. PMID:23888163

  10. Systolic ventricular filling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrent-Guasp, Francisco; Kocica, Mladen J; Corno, Antonio; Komeda, Masashi; Cox, James; Flotats, A; Ballester-Rodes, Manel; Carreras-Costa, Francesc

    2004-03-01

    The evidence of the ventricular myocardial band (VMB) has revealed unavoidable coherence and mutual coupling of form and function in the ventricular myocardium, making it possible to understand the principles governing electrical, mechanical and energetical events within the human heart. From the earliest Erasistratus' observations, principal mechanisms responsible for the ventricular filling have still remained obscured. Contemporary experimental and clinical investigations unequivocally support the attitude that only powerful suction force, developed by the normal ventricles, would be able to produce an efficient filling of the ventricular cavities. The true origin and the precise time frame for generating such force are still controversial. Elastic recoil and muscular contraction were the most commonly mentioned, but yet, still not clearly explained mechanisms involved in the ventricular suction. Classical concepts about timing of successive mechanical events during the cardiac cycle, also do not offer understandable insight into the mechanism of the ventricular filling. The net result is the current state of insufficient knowledge of systolic and particularly diastolic function of normal and diseased heart. Here we summarize experimental evidence and theoretical backgrounds, which could be useful in understanding the phenomenon of the ventricular filling. Anatomy of the VMB, and recent proofs for its segmental electrical and mechanical activation, undoubtedly indicates that ventricular filling is the consequence of an active muscular contraction. Contraction of the ascendent segment of the VMB, with simultaneous shortening and rectifying of its fibers, produces the paradoxical increase of the ventricular volume and lengthening of its long axis. Specific spatial arrangement of the ascendent segment fibers, their interaction with adjacent descendent segment fibers, elastic elements and intra-cavitary blood volume (hemoskeleton), explain the physical principles

  11. Effect of right ventricular electrode location (outflow tract vs. apex) on mechanical Ventricular synchrony in patients that underwent pacemaker implant therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rincon, Oscar S; Saenz, Luis C; Salazar, Gabriel; Hernandez, Edgar

    2008-01-01

    Objective: to assess in depth the effect of ventricular stimulation from the right ventricular outflow tract and the apex on mechanical ventricular synchrony. Materials And Methods: cohort analytical study. 20 patients with indication of definitive pacemaker indication underwent trans thoracic echocardiogram before and after pacemaker implant with electrode implantation in the right ventricular outflow tract and in the apex (10 patients in each group). There was no structural cardiopathy, ejection fraction was ? 50%, QRS and AV conduction were normal. Mechanical ventricular asynchrony (M mode and tissue doppler) and implant and device parameters were evaluated. Statistical Analysis: results are given as mean values, standard deviation or percentages.Continuous variables were compared using Chi-square test and ANOVA. A p <0.05 value was considered statistically significant. Results: in five patients (25%) a pre-implant ventricular asynchrony was found; in seven (70%) ventricular asynchrony post-implant in the right ventricle outflow tract and in 5 (50%) in the apex. Mean interventricular pot-implant delay was 21,6 ms in the right ventricular outflow tract and 11,5 ms in the apex (p = 0,8); mean septal to lateral wall delay was 73 ms in the right ventricular outflow tract and 26 ms in the apex (p = 0,8). QRS post-implant delay was 134 ms in the right ventricular outflow tract and 140 ms in the apex (p = 0,1). No differences between implant parameters and device programming were found. Conclusions: presence of ventricular asynchrony was evidenced in patients with normal QRS and structurally healthy heart. Ventricular stimulation with pacemaker from the apex or the right ventricular outflow tract suggests acute ventricular asynchrony at least in 60% of the cases, without statistically significant difference between both groups.

  12. Normal nonuniformity of left ventricular contraction. Assessment by cine MR imaging with presaturation myocardial tagging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naito, H.; Arisawa, J.; Harada, K.; Yamagami, H.; Kozuka, T.; Tamura, S.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To identify the normal performance of left ventricular (LV) regional contraction using cine MR imaging with presaturation myocardial tagging. Material and Methods: Sixteen normal volunteers were examined on a 1.5 T MR system with tagging cine sequences. Tags were applied at end-diastole as 2 parallel black lines on short-axis and 4-chamber sections, and the fractional shortenings were calculated at 7 LV locations. Results: The following results were obtained with significance: A transmural gradient of contractility in the short-axis section; prolonged late-systolic endocardial shortening and epicardial early termination in the free wall; initial delay of shortening in the anterior wall; apical predominance of contractility; predominance of circumferential shortening in the free wall and of meridional shortening in the septum. These findings could be associated with myocardial fiber architecture, presumed wall stress and temporal asynergy of excitation. Conclusion: Cine MR imaging with myocardial tagging proved to be useful in assessing the nonuniformity of LV contraction. (orig.)

  13. Evaluation of left ventricular function using digital subtraction ventriculography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yiannikas, J.; Detrano, R.

    1986-01-01

    Digital subtraction ventriculography following injections of contrast via peripheral veins provides excellent images to assess left ventricular function. The images are essentially identical to those following DCV, but allow more uniform mixing of contrast in the left ventricular chamber. Furthermore, few, if any, cardiac arrhythmias occur, hence obviating difficulties that arise from DCV. The spatial resolution of the method is such that regional wall motion assessment of ventricular function is more accurate than that of other noninvasive imaging methods. The use of video-densitometry allows accurate assessment of left ventricular function even when the left ventricular cavity is nonsymmetrically deformed and aneurysmal. In the setting of the cardiac catheterization laboratory, digital ventriculography may provide a safer means of assessing left ventricular function when critical coronary or myocardial disease is present and allows multiple assessments of ventricular function during the same study. Although excellent correlations with standard ventriculography have been noted by all workers, significant discrepancies still exist in individual patients, particularly in the calculations of end diastolic volumes. In the authors experience and in those of most workers, the largest discrepancies existed in patients in whom suboptimal studies are included for analysis. The most frequent reason for the occasional suboptimal study as with all digital subtraction work is the misregistration that results from motion

  14. Evaluation of ventricular function in patients with coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocco, T.P.; Dilsizian, V.; Fischman, A.J.; Strauss, H.W.

    1989-01-01

    The recent expansion of interventional cardiovascular technologies has stimulated a concomitant expansion of noninvasive cardiac studies, both to assist in diagnosis and to evaluate treatment outcomes. Radionuclide ventricular function studies provide a reliable, reproducible means to quantify global left ventricular systolic performance, a critical determinant of prognosis in patients with cardiovascular disease. In addition, the ability to evaluate regional left ventricular wall motion and to assess ventricular performance during exercise have secured a fundamental role for such studies in the screening and treatment of patients with coronary artery disease. Radionuclide techniques have been extended to the evaluation of left ventricular relaxation/filling events, left ventricular systolic/diastolic function in the ambulatory setting, and with appropriate technical modifications, to the assessment of right ventricular performance at rest and with exercise. As a complement to radionuclide perfusion studies, cardiac blood-pool imaging allows for thorough noninvasive description of cardiac physiology and function in both normal subjects and in patients with a broad range of cardiovascular diseases. 122 references

  15. Strain-Encoded Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging as an Adjunct for Dobutamine Stress Testing. Incremental Value to Conventional Wall Motion Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korosoglou, Grigorios; Lossnitzer, Dirk; Schellberg, Dieter; Lewien, Antje; Wochele, Angela; Schaeufele, Tim; Neizel, Mirja; Steen, Henning; Giannitsis, Evangelos; Katus, Hugo A.; Osman, Nael F.

    2009-01-01

    Background High-dose dobutamine stress magnetic resonance imaging (DS-MRI) is safe and feasible for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease (CAD) in humans. However, the assessment of cine scans relies on the visual interpretation of regional wall motion, which is subjective. Recently, Strain-Encoded MRI (SENC) has been proposed for the direct color-coded visualization of myocardial strain. The purpose of our study was to compare the diagnostic value of SENC to that provided by conventional wall motion analysis for the detection of inducible ischemia during DS-MRI. Methods and Results Stress induced ischemia was assessed by wall motion analysis and by SENC in 101 patients with suspected or known CAD and in 17 healthy volunteers who underwent DS-MRI in a clinical 1.5T scanner. Quantitative coronary angiography deemed as the standard reference for the presence or absence of significant CAD (≥50% diameter stenosis). On a coronary vessel level, SENC detected inducible ischemia in 86/101 versus 71/101 diseased coronary vessels (p<0.01 versus cine), and showed normal strain response in 189/202 versus 194/202 vessels with <50% stenosis (p=NS versus cine). On a patient level, SENC detected inducible ischemia in 63/64 versus 55/64 patients with CAD (p<0.05 versus cine), and showed normal strain response in 32/37 versus 34/37 patients without CAD (p=NS versus cine).Quantification analysis demonstrated a significant correlation between strain rate reserve (SRreserve) and coronary artery stenosis severity (r²=0.56, p<0.001), and a cut-off value of SRreserve=1.64 deemed as a highly accurate marker for the detection of stenosis≥50% (AUC=0.96, SE=0.01, 95% CI = 0.94–0.98, p<0.001). Conclusions The direct color-coded visualization of strain on MR-images is a useful adjunct for DS-MRI, which provides incremental value for the detection of CAD compared to conventional wall motion readings on cine images. PMID:19808579

  16. Fatigue life assessment of thin-walled welded joints under non-proportional load-time histories by the shear stress rate integral approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bolchoun

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Fatigue life tests under constant and variable amplitude loadings were performed on the tube-tube thin-walled welded specimens made of magnesium (AZ31 and AZ61 alloys. The tests included pure axial, pure torsional and combined in-phase and out-of-phase loadings with the load ratio  RR " ", " " 1  . For the tests with variable amplitude loads a Gaußdistributed loading spectrum with S L 4 5 10  cycles was used. Since magnesium welds show a fatigue life reduction under out-of-phase loads, a stress-based method, which takes this behavior into account, is proposed. The out-of-phase loading results in rotating shear stress vectors in the section planes, which are not orthogonal to the surface. This fact is used in order to provide an out-of-phase measure of the load. This measure is computed as an area covered by the shear stress vectors in all planes over a certain time interval, its computation involves the shear stress and the shear stress rate vectors in the individual planes. Fatigue life evaluation for the variable amplitudes loadings is performed using the Palmgren-Miner linear damage accumulation, whereas the total damage of every cycle is split up into two components: the amplitude component and the out-of-phase component. In order to compute the two components a modification of the rainflow counting method, which keeps track of the time intervals, where the cycles occur, must be used. The proposed method also takes into account different slopes of the pure axial and the pure torsional Wöhler-line by means of a Wöhler-line interpolation for combined loadings

  17. The PACE-1450 experiment - Crack and leakage behavior of a pre-stressed concrete containment wall considering ageing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermann, N.; Mueller, H.S.; Niklasch, C.; Michel-Ponnelle, S.; Bento, C.; Masson, B.

    2015-01-01

    As an intermediate sized experiment the PACE-1450 experiment aims to investigate the behavior of a curved specimen (length: 3.5 m, width: 1.8 m, height: 1.2 m) which is representative for a 1450 MWe nuclear power plant containment under accidental loading conditions. One focus of this experimental test campaign is the consideration of the ageing of the structure which among other effects leads to a pre-stressing loss. The crack behavior of the realistically reinforced specimen is of as much interest as it is the leakage behavior when an inner pressure occurs within the containment. The reinforcement layout of the specimen is very similar to the original geometry and consists mainly of reinforcement meshes of bars near the inner and outer surface and four pre-stressing cables in the circumferential direction. During the tests the specimen is loaded by pressure which simulates the internal accidental containment pressure of up to 6 bars (absolute pressure). The resulting ring tensile stress in the cylindrical part of the containment is externally applied by hydraulic jacks. An initial pre-stressing of the specimen of 12 MPa is realized in such a way that decreasing the pre-stressing force for the purpose of simulating the ageing of the structure is possible. The facility allows for the cracking of the pre-stressed specimen and for leakage measurements at different controlled crack widths. The specimen is equipped with embedded optical fiber strain and temperature sensors and a sound detection system to record the initiation of cracks. The paper explains the test set-up and presents results of the ongoing test series regarding the cracking and leakage behavior of the specimen

  18. Quantitative assessment of regional left ventricular motion using endocardial landmarks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.J. Slager (Cornelis); T.E.H. Hooghoudt (Ton); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); J.C.H. Schuurbiers (Johan); J.H.C. Reiber (Johan); G.T. Meester (Geert); P.D. Verdouw (Pieter); P.G. Hugenholtz (Paul)

    1986-01-01

    textabstractIn this study the hypothesis is tested that the motion pattern of small anatomic landmarks, recognizable at the left ventricular endocardial border in the contrast angiocardiogram, reflects the motion of the endocardial wall. To verify this, minute metal markers were inserted in the

  19. Shear-stress-induced structural arrangement of water molecules in nanoscale Couette flow with slipping at wall boundary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Jau-Wen

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the structuring of water molecules in a nanoscale Couette flow with the upper plate subjected to lateral forces with various magnitudes and water slipping against a metal wall. It was found that when the upper plate is subjected to a force, the water body deforms into a parallelepiped. Water molecules in the channel are then gradually arranged into lattice positions, creating a layered structure. The structural arrangement of water molecules is caused by the water molecules accommodating themselves to the increase in energy under the application of a lateral force on the moving plate. The ordering arrangement of water molecules increases the rotational degree of freedom, allowing the molecules to increase their Coulomb potential energy through polar rotation that accounts for the energy input through the upper plate. With a force continuously applied to the upper plate, the water molecules in contact with the upper plate move forward until slip between the water and upper plate occurs. The relation between the structural arrangement of water molecules, slip at the wall, and the shear force is studied. The relation between the slip and the locking/unlocking of water molecules to metal atoms is also studied

  20. Predictors of the left ventricular dysfunction induced by ventricular arrhythmia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. І. Vytryhovskiy

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The most powerful predictor of life-threatening arrhythmia risk is a combination of low heart rate variability with low ejection fraction (EF of the left ventricle. Aim. To identify predictors of left ventricle dysfunction which is induced by ventricular arrhythmia. Materials and methods. To diagnose structural changes of left ventricular functional capacity and reserves in patients with previous myocardial infarction and patients with high and very high cardiovascular risk by SCORE scale and for establishment the relationship between morphological heart changes and pathological phenomenon of heart turbulence echocardiography and study of heart rate turbulence variability were performed. 603 patients were selected for the research. All patients were divided into groups: group 1 – patients with coronary heart disease, but without associated risk factors, such as smoking, obesity, metabolic syndrome; group 2 – patients who smoke tobacco more than 2 years (very high cardiovascular risk by scale SCORE; group 3 – patients with metabolic syndrome without coronary heart disease or arterial hypertension (very high cardiovascular risk by scale SCORE. The control group consisted of 149 persons. Results. The feature of structural changes in patients with myocardial infarction and in patients with a high cardiovascular risk by SCORE with heart rate turbulence compared with cases without НRT is considerably thickening of the left interventricular septum in systole. Based on this, it can be argued that the emergence of ventricular arrhythmia and accordingly phenomenon of heart rate turbulence in patients with existing cardiovascular diseases and risk factors has both morphological and functional character. Significant difference of echocardioscopy parameters in patients with postinfarction cardiosclerosis and risk factors by the SCORE system was established by index of intraventricular septum thickness in systole, and in persons with high risk – in

  1. L-Arginine ameliorates cardiac left ventricular oxidative stress by upregulating eNOS and Nrf2 target genes in alloxan-induced hyperglycemic rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramprasath, Tharmarajan; Hamenth Kumar, Palani; Syed Mohamed Puhari, Shanavas; Senthil Murugan, Ponniah; Vasudevan, Varadaraj; Selvam, Govindan Sadasivam

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► L-Arginine treatment reduced the metabolic disturbances in diabetic animals. ► Antioxidant marker proteins were found high in myocardium by L-arginine treatment. ► Elevated antioxidant status, mediates the reduced TBA-reactivity in left ventricle. ► L-Arginine treatment enhanced the Nrf2 and eNOS signaling in left ventricle. ► Improved cell survival signaling by arginine, offers a novel tactic for targeting. -- Abstract: Hyperglycemia is independently related with excessive morbidity and mortality in cardiovascular disorders. L-Arginine-nitric oxide (NO) pathway and the involvement of NO in modulating nuclear factor-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) signaling were well established. In the present study we investigated, whether L-arginine supplementation would improve the myocardial antioxidant defense under hyperglycemia through activation of Nrf2 signaling. Diabetes was induced by alloxan monohydrate (90 mg kg −1 body weight) in rats. Both non-diabetic and diabetic group of rats were divided into three subgroups and they were administered either with L-arginine (2.25%) or L-NAME (0.01%) in drinking water for 12 days. Results showed that L-arginine treatment reduced the metabolic disturbances in diabetic rats. Antioxidant enzymes and glutathione levels were found to be increased in heart left ventricles, thereby reduction of lipid peroxidation by L-arginine treatment. Heart histopathological analysis further validates the reversal of typical diabetic characteristics consisting of alterations in myofibers and myofibrillary degeneration. qRT-PCR studies revealed that L-arginine treatment upregulated the transcription of Akt and downregulated NF-κB. Notably, transcription of eNOS and Nrf2 target genes was also upregulated, which were accompanied by enhanced expression of Nrf2 in left ventricular tissue from diabetic and control rats. Under these findings, we suggest that targeting of eNOS and Nrf2 signaling by L-arginine supplementation could be

  2. L-Arginine ameliorates cardiac left ventricular oxidative stress by upregulating eNOS and Nrf2 target genes in alloxan-induced hyperglycemic rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramprasath, Tharmarajan; Hamenth Kumar, Palani; Syed Mohamed Puhari, Shanavas; Senthil Murugan, Ponniah; Vasudevan, Varadaraj [Molecular Cardiology Unit, Department of Biochemistry, Center for Excellence in Genomic Sciences, School of Biological Sciences, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai 625 021, Tamilnadu (India); Selvam, Govindan Sadasivam, E-mail: drselvamgsbiochem@rediffmail.com [Molecular Cardiology Unit, Department of Biochemistry, Center for Excellence in Genomic Sciences, School of Biological Sciences, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai 625 021, Tamilnadu (India)

    2012-11-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer L-Arginine treatment reduced the metabolic disturbances in diabetic animals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Antioxidant marker proteins were found high in myocardium by L-arginine treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Elevated antioxidant status, mediates the reduced TBA-reactivity in left ventricle. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer L-Arginine treatment enhanced the Nrf2 and eNOS signaling in left ventricle. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Improved cell survival signaling by arginine, offers a novel tactic for targeting. -- Abstract: Hyperglycemia is independently related with excessive morbidity and mortality in cardiovascular disorders. L-Arginine-nitric oxide (NO) pathway and the involvement of NO in modulating nuclear factor-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) signaling were well established. In the present study we investigated, whether L-arginine supplementation would improve the myocardial antioxidant defense under hyperglycemia through activation of Nrf2 signaling. Diabetes was induced by alloxan monohydrate (90 mg kg{sup -1} body weight) in rats. Both non-diabetic and diabetic group of rats were divided into three subgroups and they were administered either with L-arginine (2.25%) or L-NAME (0.01%) in drinking water for 12 days. Results showed that L-arginine treatment reduced the metabolic disturbances in diabetic rats. Antioxidant enzymes and glutathione levels were found to be increased in heart left ventricles, thereby reduction of lipid peroxidation by L-arginine treatment. Heart histopathological analysis further validates the reversal of typical diabetic characteristics consisting of alterations in myofibers and myofibrillary degeneration. qRT-PCR studies revealed that L-arginine treatment upregulated the transcription of Akt and downregulated NF-{kappa}B. Notably, transcription of eNOS and Nrf2 target genes was also upregulated, which were accompanied by enhanced expression of Nrf2 in left ventricular tissue from diabetic

  3. Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vignolo Puglia, W.; Freire Colla, D.; Rivara Urrutia, D.; Lujambio Grene, M.; Arbiza Bruno, T.; Oliveira, G.; Cobas Rodriguez, J.

    1997-01-01

    The arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia is a condition predominantly well defined with arrhythmic events. We analyze three cases diagnosed by the group. These cases were presented as ventricular tachycardia with a morphology of left bundle branch block, presenting one of them aborted sudden death in evolution. The baseline electrocardiogram and signal averaging were abnormal in two of the three cases, like the echocardiogram. The electrophysiological study was able to induce in the three patients with sustained monomorphic ventricular tachycardia morphology of left bundle branch block. The definitive diagnosis was made by right ventriculography in two cases and magnetic resonance imaging in the other. Treatment included antiarrhythmic drugs in the three cases and the placement of an automatic defibrillator which survived a sudden death (Author)

  4. A case of short-coupled premature ventricular beat-induced ventricular fibrillation with early repolarization in the inferolateral leads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidekazu Kondo, MD

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This case report describes a 19-year-old man with early repolarization (ER in the inferolateral leads and a normal QT interval who survived a cardiac arrest that was likely related to polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (VT. Electrocardiograms (ECGs also showed unifocal premature ventricular beats (PVBs with a relatively narrow QRS duration. A Holter ECG documented occasional short-coupled PVBs following non-sustained VTs. Pharmacological stress testing was also performed to assess the effects of anti-arrhythmic drugs on ER (the J wave and PVBs. We performed successful radiofrequency catheter ablation to prevent the recurrence of ventricular fibrillation after cardioverter-defibrillator implantation.

  5. Patterns of ventricular dysfunction in patients receiving cardiotoxic chemotherapy as assessed with gated blood pool imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spies, S.M.; Parikh, S.R.; Spies, W.G.; Zimmer, A.M.; Silverstein, E.A.

    1989-01-01

    Clinical concern over significant cardiotoxicity of commonly employed chemotherapeutic regimens is a common indication for gated blood pool imaging. The authors have undertaken a review of 102 patients referred for such evaluation during a 14-month period. Ventricular ejection fractions, cine displays, and phase analysis were performed on each patient study. Approximately one-third of the cases showed significant abnormalities in wall motion or global ejection fraction. Many abnormal cases had isolated left ventricular findings, while fewer had isolated right ventricular findings. Left ventricular wall motion abnormalities were often focal. The patterns of ventricular dysfunction in patients receiving cardiotoxic chemotherapy are diverse, and awareness of the various possibilities is important for accurate clinical assessment of these patients

  6. Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can be life-saving. But chronic stress can cause both physical and mental harm. There are at least three different types of stress: Routine stress related to the pressures of work, family, and other daily responsibilities Stress brought about ...

  7. Cell wall damage and oxidative stress in Candida albicans ATCC10231 and Aspergillus niger caused by palladium nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athie-García, Martha Samira; Piñón-Castillo, Hilda Amelia; Muñoz-Castellanos, Laila Nayzzel; Ulloa-Ogaz, Ana Laura; Martínez-Varela, Perla Ivonne; Quintero-Ramos, Armando; Duran, Robert; Murillo-Ramirez, José Guadalupe; Orrantia-Borunda, Erasmo

    2018-04-01

    In this work the toxic effect of Palladium nanoparticles (PdNPs) was investigated in two eukaryotic cell models, Candida albicans and Aspergillus niger. PdNPs were synthesized by chemical reduction method, obtaining spherical NPs with a primary size ranging from 3 to 15 nm. PdNPs showed a hydrodynamic size of 1548 nm in Lee's minimum media. Minimal inhibitory concentration was determined at 200 and 250 ppm for Candida albicans and Aspergillus niger respectively, revealing a significant cell growth inhibition (ANOVA and tukey analysis, α = 0.5). Reactive Oxygen Species levels were increased in both microorganisms. Confocal, scanning and transmission electron microscopy studies revealed cell wall damage and cellular morphology changes, induced by the interaction of PdNPs, in both microorganisms. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Contrasting strategies used by lichen microalgae to cope with desiccation-rehydration stress revealed by metabolite profiling and cell wall analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centeno, Danilo C; Hell, Aline F; Braga, Marcia R; Del Campo, Eva M; Casano, Leonardo M

    2016-05-01

    Most lichens in general, and their phycobionts in particular, are desiccation tolerant, but their mechanisms of desiccation tolerance (DT) remain obscure. The physiological responses and cell wall features of two putatively contrasting lichen-forming microalgae, Trebouxia sp. TR9 (TR9), isolated from Ramalina farinacea (adapted to frequent desiccation-rehydration cycles), and Coccomyxa solorina-saccatae (Csol), obtained from Solorina saccata (growing in usually humid limestone crevices, subjected to seasonal dry periods) was characterized. Microalgal cultures were desiccated under 25%-30% RH and then rehydrated. Under these conditions, RWC and ψw decreased faster and simultaneously during dehydration in Csol, whereas TR9 maintained its ψw until 70% RWC. The metabolic profile indicated that polyols played a key role in DT of both microalgae. However, TR9 constitutively accumulated higher amounts of polyols, whereas Csol induced the polyol synthesis under desiccation-rehydration. Csol also accumulated ascorbic acid, while TR9 synthesized protective raffinose-family oligosaccharides (RFOs) and increased its content of phenolics. Additionally, TR9 exhibited thicker and qualitatively different cell wall and extracellular polymeric layer compared with Csol, indicating higher water retention capability. The findings were consistent with the notion that lichen microalgae would have evolved distinct strategies to cope with desiccation-rehydration stress in correspondence with the water regime of their respective habitats. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. FvBck1, a Component of Cell Wall Integrity MAP Kinase Pathway, is Required for Virulence and Oxidative Stress Response in Sugarcane Pokkah Boeng Pathogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengkang eZhang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Fusarium verticillioides (formerly F. moniliforme is suggested as one of the causal agents of Pokkah Boeng, a serious disease of sugarcane worldwide. Currently, detailed molecular and physiological mechanism of pathogenesis is unknown. In this study, we focused on cell wall integrity MAPK pathway as one of the potential signaling mechanisms associated with Pokkah Boeng pathogenesis. We identified FvBCK1 gene that encodes a MAP kinase kinase kinase homolog and determined that it is not only required for growth, micro- and macro-conidia production, and cell wall integrity but also for response to osmotic and oxidative stresses. The deletion of FvBCK1 caused a significant reduction in virulence and FB1 production, a carcinogenic mycotoxin produced by the fungus. Moreover, we found the expression levels of three genes, which are known to be involved in superoxide scavenging, were down regulated in the mutant. We hypothesized that the loss of superoxide scavenging capacity was one of the reasons for reduced virulence, but overexpression of catalase or peroxidase gene failed to restore the virulence defect in the deletion mutant. When we introduced Magnaporthe oryzae MCK1 into the FvBck1 deletion mutant, while certain phenotypes were restored, the complemented strain failed to gain full virulence. In summary, FvBck1 plays a diverse role in F. verticillioides, and detailed investigation of downstream signaling pathways will lead to a better understanding of how this MAPK pathway regulates Pokkah Boeng on sugarcane.

  10. Computational fluid dynamics comparisons of wall shear stress in patient-specific coronary artery bifurcation using coronary angiography and optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Eric; Thondapu, Vikas; Chin, Cheng; Scheerlinck, Cedric; Zahtila, Tony; Mamon, Chris; Nguyen, Wilson; Ooi, Andrew; Barlis, Peter

    2016-11-01

    Blood flow dynamics directly influence biology of the arterial wall, and are closely linked with the development of coronary artery disease. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solvers may be employed to analyze the hemodynamic environment in patient-specific reconstructions of coronary arteries. Although coronary X-ray angiography (CA) is the most common medical imaging modality for 3D arterial reconstruction, models reconstructed from CA assume a circular or elliptical cross-sectional area. This limitation can be overcome with a reconstruction technique fusing CA with intravascular optical coherence tomography (OCT). OCT scans the interior of an artery using near-infrared light, achieving a 10-micron resolution and providing unprecedented detail of vessel geometry. We compared 3D coronary artery bifurcation models generated using CA alone versus OCT-angiography fusion. The model reconstructed from CA alone is unable to identify the detailed geometrical variations of diseased arteries, and also under-estimates the cross-sectional vessel area compared to OCT-angiography fusion. CFD was performed in both models under pulsatile flow in order to identify and compare regions of low wall shear stress, a hemodynamic parameter directly linked with progression of atherosclerosis. Supported by ARC LP150100233 and VLSCI VR0210.

  11. Patterns of left ventricular remodeling among patients with essential and secondary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radulescu, Dan; Stoicescu, Laurentiu; Buzdugan, Elena; Donca, Valer

    2013-12-01

    High blood pressure causes left ventricular hypertrophy, which is a negative prognostic factor among hypertensive patients. To assess left ventricular geometric remodeling patterns in patients with essential hypertension or with hypertension secondary to parenchymal renal disease. We analyzed data from echocardiograms performed in 250 patients with essential hypertension (150 females) and 100 patients with secondary hypertension (60 females). The interventricular septum and the left ventricular posterior wall thickness were measured in the parasternal long-axis. Left ventricular mass was calculated using the Devereaux formula. The most common remodeling type in females and males with essential hypertension were eccentric and concentric left ventricular hypertrophy (cLVH), respectively. Among patients with secondary arterial hypertension, cLVH was most commonly observed in both genders. The prevalence of left ventricular hypertrophy was higher among patients with secondary hypertension. The left ventricular mass index and the relative left ventricular wall thickness were higher in males and also in the secondary hypertension group. Age, blood pressure values and the duration of hypertension, influenced remodeling patterns. We documented a higher prevalence of LVH among patients with secondary hypertension. The type of ventricular remodeling depends on gender, age, type of hypertension, blood pressure values and the duration of hypertension.

  12. Assessment of right ventricular function using gated blood pool single photon emission computed tomography in inferior myocardial infarction with or without hemodynamically significant right ventricular infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Masaharu

    1992-01-01

    Right ventricular function was assessed using gated blood pool single photon emission computed tomography (GSPECT) in 10 normal subjects and 14 patients with inferior myocardial infarction. Three-dimensional backbround subtraction was achieved by applying an optimal cut off level. The patient group consisted of 6 patients with definite hemodynamic abnormalities indicative of right ventricular infarction (RVI) and 8 other patients with significant obstructive lesion at the proximal portion of right coronary artery without obvious hemodynamic signs of RVI. Right ventricular regional wall motion abnormalities were demonstrated on GSPECT functional images and the indices of right ventricular function (i.e the right ventricular ejection fraction (RVEF), the right ventricular peak ejection rate (RVPER) and the right ventricular peak filling rate (RVPFR)) were significantly reduced in the patient group, not only in the patients with definite RVI but also in those without hemodynamic signs of RVI, even in the absence of definite hemodynamic signs, when the proximal portion of right coronary artery is obstructed. It is concluded that GSPECT is reliable for the assessment of right ventricular function and regional wall motion, and is also useful for the diagnosis of RVI. (author)

  13. Quantitative and qualitative characteristics of cell wall components and prenyl lipids in the leaves of Tilia x euchlora trees growing under salt stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milewska-Hendel, Anna; Baczewska, Aneta H; Sala, Katarzyna; Dmuchowski, Wojciech; Brągoszewska, Paulina; Gozdowski, Dariusz; Jozwiak, Adam; Chojnacki, Tadeusz; Swiezewska, Ewa; Kurczynska, Ewa

    2017-01-01

    The study was focused on assessing the presence of arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs) and pectins within the cell walls as well as prenyl lipids, sodium and chlorine content in leaves of Tilia x euchlora trees. The leaves that were analyzed were collected from trees with and without signs of damage that were all growing in the same salt stress conditions. The reason for undertaking these investigations was the observations over many years that indicated that there are trees that present a healthy appearance and trees that have visible symptoms of decay in the same habitat. Leaf samples were collected from trees growing in the median strip between roadways that have been intensively salted during the winter season for many years. The sodium content was determined using atomic spectrophotometry, chloride using potentiometric titration and poly-isoprenoids using HPLC/UV. AGPs and pectins were determined using immunohistochemistry methods. The immunohistochemical analysis showed that rhamnogalacturonans I (RG-I) and homogalacturonans were differentially distributed in leaves from healthy trees in contrast to leaves from injured trees. In the case of AGPs, the most visible difference was the presence of the JIM16 epitope. Chemical analyses of sodium and chloride showed that in the leaves from injured trees, the level of these ions was higher than in the leaves from healthy trees. Based on chromatographic analysis, four poly-isoprenoid alcohols were identified in the leaves of T. x euchlora. The levels of these lipids were higher in the leaves from healthy trees. The results suggest that the differences that were detected in the apoplast and symplasm may be part of the defensive strategy of T. x euchlora trees to salt stress, which rely on changes in the chemical composition of the cell wall with respect to the pectic and AGP epitopes and an increased synthesis of prenyl lipids.

  14. Prognostic value of normal stress myocardial perfusion imaging and ventricular function in Japanese asymptomatic patients with type 2 diabetes. A study of based on the J-ACCESS-2 database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, Shinro; Nakajima, Kenichi; Yamasaki, Yoshimitsu; Kashiwagi, Atsunori; Nishimura, Tsunehiko

    2010-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the clinical risk for hard events after normal single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and to identify the predictors of increased risk in asymptomatic patients with diabetes mellitus, based on a Japanese Assessment of Cardiac Events and Survival Studies by quantitative gated SPECT (J-ACCESS)-2 study. A total of 513 consecutive asymptomatic patients who underwent stress 99m Tc-tetrofosmin SPECT in Japan were included in this study. Based on SPECT image and QGS data, 319 had a summed stress score ≤3, a summed difference score <2 and normal cardiac function (end-systolic volume ≤60 ml, males, ≤40 ml females; left ventricular ejection fraction ≥49%, males, ≥50% females). Myocardial perfusion was normal in 62% of this study population. During a 3-year follow-up, there were a total of 8 cardiac major events (2.5%): 2 cases of sudden death, 5 of acute coronary syndrome, and 1 of hospitalization because of congestive heart failure. The annual major event rate was 0.8%. Subjects undergoing coronary angiography had significantly more major events than those who did not among normal SPECT subjects (P=0.01). Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that the cardiac major events rate was very low, and subjects with normal SPECT can be considered as low risk among asymptomatic patients with diabetes. An excellent prognosis was associated with a normal SPECT in asymptomatic patients with diabetes, so these patients can be exempted from further invasive procedure. (author)

  15. Essential features of residual stress determination in thin-walled plane structures in a base of whole field interferometric measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisarev, Vladimir S.; Odintsev, I.; Balalov, V.; Apalkov, A.

    2003-05-01

    Sophisticated technique for reliable quantitative deriving residual stress values from initial experimental data, which are inherent in combined implementing the hole drilling method with both holographic and speckle interferometry, is described in detail. The approach developed includes both possible ways of obtaining initial experimental information. The first of them consists of recording a set of required interference fringe patterns, which are resulted from residual stress energy release after through hole drilling, in two orthogonal directions that coincide with principal strain directions. The second way is obtaining a series of interrelated fringe patterns when a direction of either observation in reflection hologram interferometry or dual-beam illumination in speckle interferometry lies arbitrary with respect to definite principal strain direction. A set of the most typical both actual and analogous reference fringe patterns, which are related to both reflection hologram and dual-beam speckle interferometry, are presented.

  16. Release of Bacterial Spores from the Inner Walls of a Stainless Steel Cup Subjected to Thermal Stresses and Mechanical Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolochow, H.; Chatigny, M.; Hebert, J.

    1973-01-01

    The release and fallout of particulates from surfaces afforded thermal or impact stress is of concern for control of contamination of Mars from planetary landing vehicles. A metal vessel contaminated by aerosols of spores was used as a model system and the fallout of spores as affected by various mechanisms was examined. Thermal stresses simulating those expected on the Mars lander dislodged approximately .01% of the aerosol deposited surface burden as did a landing shock of 8 to 10G deceleration. Spores imprinted by finger or swab contact yielded similar results. In all cases where repeated cycling of temperature, motion, or shock were employed the majority of fallout occurred in the first cycle. Particles released from the surface were predominantly in the size range 1 to 5 microns.

  17. Toxicity assessment of multi-walled carbon nanotubes on Cucurbita pepo L. under well-watered and water-stressed conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatami, Mehrnaz

    2017-08-01

    The rapid increase in the production and application of various types of nanomaterials increases the possibility of their presence in total environment, which subsequently raises concerns about their potential threats to the first trophic level of organisms, specifically under varying environmental constraints. In this work, seeds of Cucurbita pepo L. were cultured in MS basal medium exposed to multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) at different concentrations (0, 125, 250, 500 and 1000μgmL -1 ) under two levels of water potential, well-watered (0MPa) and water stress (-1.5MPa) induced by polyethylene glycol (PEG 6000) for 14 days. Seeds exposed to MWCNTs showed reduction in germination percentage, root and shoot length, biomass accumulation and vigor index in a dose-dependent manner. However, seedlings germinated in MWCNTs-fortified media had significantly lower germination and growth attributes than those of control under water stress conditions. This happened due to increased oxidative injury indices including hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ), and malondialdehyde (MDA) contents, as well as electrolyte leakage index (ELI) of tissues. The impaired morpho-physiological and biochemical processes of seedlings exposed to different concentrations of MWCNTs under both PEG-induced stress and non-stress growing conditions were consequence of changes in the activation of various cellular antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (POD). Taken together, our findings reveal that MWCNTs played negative role on seed germination and subsequent growth of C. pepo L. seedlings under both levels of water potential. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Investigation of Mechanical and Thermal Properties of Polymer Composites Reinforced by Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube for Reduction of Residual Stresses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Reza Ghasemi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The micromechanical models are used to investigate mechanical and thermal properties of a polymer matrix nanocomposite containing multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT in their effects to reduce residual stresses in nanocomposites. To do this, first nanotubes with different weights and volume fractions were dispersed in ML-506 epoxy resin. By using different micromechanical models, the effect additional nanotubes on elastic modulus and coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE of nanotubes/epoxy were studied as critical parameters. Comparing the model and available experimental results, the modified Halpin-Tsai model and the modified Schapery model were chosen to calculate the mechanical and thermal properties of the nanocomposites. Then, using the matrix reinforced with MWCNT and classical micromechanics models the elastic modulus and coefficients of thermal expansion of the nanocomposites were determined for a single orthotropic ply. The results showed that the rule of mixture (ROM and Hashin-Rosen model to determine the longitudinal and transverse elastic moduli and Van Fo Fy model to calculate the coefficient of thermal expansion were in good agreements with the experimental results of a single-layer nanocomposite. Finally, the classical laminated plate theory (CLPT was used to calculate the residual stresses of the CNT/carbon fiber/epoxy composites with different weights and volume fractions of MWCNT for angle-ply, cross-ply and quasi-isotropic laminated composite materials. The results showed that residual stresses were reduced using a maximum of 1% wt or 0.675% volume fraction of the MWCNT in polymer composites. Also, the highest reduction in residual stresses was observed in [02/902] cross-ply laminated composite materials.

  19. Quantitative evaluation of right ventricular overload with thallium-201 myocardial perfusion scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Toshiya; Miyakoda, Hiroyuki; Koike, Yoshihiro; Itatsu, Hidetaka; Kawai, Naoki; Sotobata, Iwao.

    1983-01-01

    Thallium-201 myocardial perfusion scintigraphy and right-heart catheterization were performed on patients with right ventricular pressure overload (RVPO) or right ventricular volume overload (RVVO). In 18 patients with RVPO, right ventricular systolic pressure correlated significantly both with the RV/LV wall thallium-201 uptake ratios (r=0.54, p<0.02) and the RV wall/background thallium-201 uptake ratios (r=0.70, p<0.01). RV/LV work ratios also significantly correlated with RV/LV wall thallium-201 uptake ratios (r=0.57, p<0.02). In 19 patients with RVVO, Qp/Qs and RV/LV work ratios both significantly correlated with RV/LV wall thallium-201 uptake ratios (r=0.78 and 0.87, respectively; p<0.001 for both) and RV wall/background thallium-201 uptake ratios (r=0.69, p<0.01 for both parameters). Right ventricular systolic pressure also correlated with RV/LV wall thallium-201 uptake ratios (r=0.57, p<0.02). Feasibility of the differentiation between RVPO and RVVO was suggested with use of ''transitional view angle'' and RV/LV diameter ratios obtained from the scintigram. In patients who underwent cardiac surgery, post-operative alleviations of the right ventricular overload were evaluated. There was a significant decrease in RV/LV wall thallium-201 uptake ratios, but no significant decrease in RV wall/background thallium-201 uptake ratios in patients with RVPO. On the other hand, there was a significant decrease both in RV/LV wall thallium-201 uptake ratios and RV wall/background thallium-201 uptake ratios in patients with RVVO. No significant changes were observed between the scintigraphic measurements obtained 1 month and 1 year after the surgery, irrespective of the type of right ventricular overloading. (J.P.N.)

  20. Stress cine MRI for detection of coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sommer, T.; Hofer, U.; Schild, H.

    2002-01-01

    Stress testing is the cornerstone in the diagnosis of patients with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD). Stress echocardiography has become a well-established modality for the detection of ischemia-induced wall motion abnormalities. However, display and reliable interpretation of stress echocardiography studies are user-dependent, the test reproducibility is low, and 10 to 15% of patients yield suboptimal or non-diagnostic images. Due to its high spatial and contrast resolution, MRI is known to permit an accurate determination of left ventricular function and wall thickness at rest. Early stress MRI studies provided promising results with respect to the detection of CAD. However, the clinical impact was limited due to long imaging time and problematic patient monitoring in the MRI environment. Recent technical improvements - namely ultrafast MR image acquisition - led to a significant reduction of imaging time and improved patient safety. Stress can be induced by physical exercise or pharmacologically by administration of a beta 1 -agonist (dobutamine) or vasodilatator (dipyridamole and adenosine). The best developed and most promising stress MRI technique is a high-dose dobutamine/atropine stress protocol (10, 20, 30, 40 μg/kg/min; optionally 0.25-mg fractions of atropine up to maximal dose 1 mg). Severe complications (myocardial infarction, ventricular fibrillation and sustained tachycardia, cardiogenic shock) may be expected in 0.25% of patients. Currently, data of three high-dose dobutamine stress MRI studies are available, revealing a good sensitivity (83 - 87%) and specificity (83 - 86%) in the assessment of CAD. The direct comparison between echocardiography and MRI for the detection of stress-induced wall motion abnormalities yielded better results for dobutamine-MRI in terms of sensitivity (86.2% vs. 74.3%; p [de

  1. Left ventricular diastolic function in patients with coronary artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brugger, P.T.

    1986-08-01

    In 302 patients with confirmed coronary disease we determined the left ventricular diastolic function with the Nuclear Stethoscope by the aid of the Peak Filling Rate (PFR) and the Time to Peak Filling Rate (TPFR). Moreover we investigated the ejection fraction (EF). 201 patients had already suffered a myocardial infarction, of these 99 an anterior wall and 102 an inferior wall infarction. The remaining 101 patients had a CAD without a history of myocardial infarction. The PFR was 2.19 +- 0.65 EDV/sec in the 99 patients after anterior wall infarction and 2.62 +- 0.85 EDV/sec in the 102 patients after inferior wall infarction and 2.79 +- 0.85 EDV/sec in 101 patients with coronary artery disease without a history of myocardial infarction. For the PFR there could be found a statistically significant difference between normal patients and patients after anterior wall infarction (p < 0.0001), normal patients and patients after inferior wall infarction (p < 0.0001) and normal patients and patients with coronary artery disease (p < 0.0001). The TPFR was 180 +- 37.5 msec after anterior - and 158 +- 50.7 msec after inferior wall infarction and 156 +- 45.2 msec in the patients with CAD without previous infarction. The left ventricular diastolic function (PFR and/or TPFR) was abnormal in 88% after anterior- and in 82% after inferior wall infarction and in 69% in coronary patients without previous myocardial infarction. In comparison with this the ejection fraction was reduced in 66% in anterior- and in 61% inferior wall infarction at rest. These results indicate that the diastolic function at rest appears to be more informative for evaluation of a left ventricular dysfunction than the systolic function at rest.

  2. Stress-induced myocardial ischemia is associated with early post-stress left ventricular mechanical dyssynchrony as assessed by phase analysis of {sup 201}Tl gated SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chien-Cheng; Shen, Thau-Yun [Show Chwan Memorial Hospital, Department of Cardiology, Changhua (China); Chang, Ming-Che [Changhua Christian Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Changhua (China); Hung, Guang-Uei [Chang Bing Show Chwan Memorial Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Changhua (China); China Medical University, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Science, Taichung (China); Chen, Wan-Chen [Chang Bing Show Chwan Memorial Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Changhua (China); Kao, Chia-Hung [China Medical University, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Science, Taichung (China); Chen, Ji [Emory University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2012-12-15

    In {sup 201}Tl SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) data are acquired shortly after the stress injection to assess early post-stress left ventricle (LV) function. The purpose of this study was to use {sup 201}Tl SPECT MPI to investigate whether stress-induced myocardial ischemia is associated with LV mechanical dyssynchrony. Enrolled in the study were 75 patients who were referred for dipyridamole stress and rest {sup 201}Tl gated SPECT MPI. The early post-stress scan was started 5 min after injection, and followed by the rest scan 4 h later. The patients were divided into three groups: ischemia group (N = 25, summed stress score, SSS, {>=}5, summed rest score, SRS, <5), infarct group (N = 16, SSS {>=}5, SRS {>=}5) and normal group (N = 34, SSS <5, SRS <5). LV dyssynchrony parameters were calculated by phase analysis, and compared between the stress and rest images. In the ischemia group, LV dyssynchrony was significantly larger during stress than during rest. On the contrary, LV dyssynchrony during stress was significantly smaller than during rest in the normal and infarct groups. LV dyssynchrony during rest was significantly larger in the infarct group than in the normal and ischemia groups. There were no significant differences in LV dyssynchrony during rest between the normal and ischemia groups. Stress-induced myocardial ischemia caused dyssynchronous contraction in the ischemic region, leading to a deterioration in LV synchrony. Normal myocardium had more synchronous contraction during stress. The different dyssynchrony pattern between ischemic and normal myocardium early post-stress may aid the diagnosis of coronary artery disease using {sup 201}Tl gated SPECT MPI. (orig.)

  3. Relation between myocardial response to dobutamine stress and sympathetic nerve activation in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. A comparison of 123I-MIBG scintigraphic and echocardiographic data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naruse, Hitoshi; Arii, Tohru; Kondo, Tomohiro

    2000-01-01

    It is likely that a close association exists between findings obtained by two methods: dobutamine stress echocardiography and 123 I-MIBG scintigraphy. Both of these methods are associated with β-adrenergic receptor mechanisms. This study was conducted to demonstrate the relation between myocardial response to dobutamine stress and sympathetic nerve release of norepinephrine in the failing heart. In 12 patents with heart failure due to idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy, the myocardial effects of dobutamine stress were evaluated by low-dose dobutamine stress echocardiography; and sympathetic nerve function was evaluated by scintigraphic imaging with iodine-123[ 123 I]meta-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), an analogue of norepinephrine. Echocardiography provided quantitative assessment of wall motion and left ventricular dilation; radiotracer studies with 123 I-MIBG provided quantitative assessment of the heart-to-mediastinum (H/M) uptake ratio and washout rate. Results showed that H/M correlated with baseline wall motion (r=0.682, p=0.0146), wall motion after dobutamine stress (r=0.758, p=0.0043), the change in wall motion (r=0.667, p=0.0178), and with left ventricular diastolic diameter (r=0.837, p=0.0007). In addition, the 123 I-MIBG washout rate correlated with baseline wall motion (r=0.608, p=0.0360), wall motion after dobutamine stress (r=0.703, p=0.0107), and with the change in wall motion (r=0.664, p=0.0185). Wall motion, especially in the myocardial response to dobutamine stress, is related to sympathetic nerve activity in heart failure. (author)

  4. Ruptura da parede livre do ventrículo direito após infarto do miocárdio Rupture of the right ventricular free wall after myocardial infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rômulo César Arnal Bonini

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Paciente de 75 anos, com ruptura da parede livre do ventrículo direito, corrigida com pontos de prolene 3.0 ancorados em tira de pericárdio bovino, promovendo o fechamento da ruptura. O paciente recebeu alta hospitalar no 59º dia de pós-operatório, em boas condições clínicas e laboratoriais.Patient 75, years-old, with free wall rupture of the right ventricle, corrected with prolene 3.0 points anchored in bovine pericardium patch, promoting the closure of the rupture. The patient was discharged on the 59th day after surgery in good clinical ans laboratorial conditions.

  5. Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Supplementation Induces Changes in Cardiac miRNA Expression, Reduces Oxidative Stress and Left Ventricular Mass, and Improves Diastolic Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna L. B. Pereira

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of tomato supplementation on the normal rat heart and the role of oxidative stress in this scenario. Male Wistar rats were assigned to two groups: a control group (C; n = 16, in which animals received a control diet + 0.5 mL of corn oil/kg body weight/day, and a tomato group (T; n = 16, in which animals received a control diet supplemented with tomato +0.5 mL of corn oil/kg body weight/day. After three months, morphological, functional, and biochemical analyses were performed. Animals supplemented with tomato had a smaller left atrium diameter and myocyte cross-sectional area (CSA compared to the control group (C group: 474 (415–539; T group: 273 (258–297 µm2; p = 0.004. Diastolic function was improved in rats supplemented with tomato. In addition, lipid hydroperoxide was lower (C group: 267 ± 46.7; T group: 219 ± 23.0 nmol/g; p = 0.039 in the myocardium of rats supplemented with tomato. Tomato intake was also associated with up-regulation of miR-107 and miR-486 and down-regulation of miR-350 and miR-872. In conclusion, tomato supplementation induces changes in miRNA expression and reduces oxidative stress. In addition, these alterations may be responsible for CSA reduction and diastolic function improvement.

  6. Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) Supplementation Induces Changes in Cardiac miRNA Expression, Reduces Oxidative Stress and Left Ventricular Mass, and Improves Diastolic Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Bruna L B; Arruda, Fernanda C O; Reis, Patrícia P; Felix, Tainara F; Santos, Priscila P; Rafacho, Bruna P; Gonçalves, Andrea F; Claro, Renan T; Azevedo, Paula S; Polegato, Bertha F; Okoshi, Katashi; Fernandes, Ana A H; Paiva, Sergio A R; Zornoff, Leonardo A M; Minicucci, Marcos F

    2015-11-19

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of tomato supplementation on the normal rat heart and the role of oxidative stress in this scenario. Male Wistar rats were assigned to two groups: a control group (C; n = 16), in which animals received a control diet + 0.5 mL of corn oil/kg body weight/day, and a tomato group (T; n = 16), in which animals received a control diet supplemented with tomato +0.5 mL of corn oil/kg body weight/day. After three months, morphological, functional, and biochemical analyses were performed. Animals supplemented with tomato had a smaller left atrium diameter and myocyte cross-sectional area (CSA) compared to the control group (C group: 474 (415-539); T group: 273 (258-297) µm²; p = 0.004). Diastolic function was improved in rats supplemented with tomato. In addition, lipid hydroperoxide was lower (C group: 267 ± 46.7; T group: 219 ± 23.0 nmol/g; p = 0.039) in the myocardium of rats supplemented with tomato. Tomato intake was also associated with up-regulation of miR-107 and miR-486 and down-regulation of miR-350 and miR-872. In conclusion, tomato supplementation induces changes in miRNA expression and reduces oxidative stress. In addition, these alterations may be responsible for CSA reduction and diastolic function improvement.

  7. Ventricular dysfunction in children with obstructive sleep apnea: radionuclide assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tal, A.; Leiberman, A.; Margulis, G.; Sofer, S.

    1988-01-01

    Ventricular function was evaluated using radionuclide ventriculography in 27 children with oropharyngeal obstruction and clinical features of obstructive sleep apnea. Their mean age was 3.5 years (9 months to 7.5 years). Conventional clinical assessment did not detect cardiac involvement in 25 of 27 children; however, reduced right ventricular ejection fraction (less than 35%) was found in 10 (37%) patients (mean: 19.5 +/- 2.3% SE, range: 8-28%). In 18 patients wall motion abnormality was detected. In 11 children in whom radionuclide ventriculography was performed before and after adenotonsillectomy, right ventricular ejection fraction rose from 24.4 +/- 3.6% to 46.7 +/- 3.4% (P less than 0.005), and in all cases wall motion showed a definite improvement. In five children, left ventricular ejection fraction rose greater than 10% after removal of oropharyngeal obstruction. It is concluded that right ventricular function may be compromised in children with obstructive sleep apnea secondary to adenotonsillar hypertrophy, even before clinical signs of cardiac involvement are present

  8. Left ventricular pseudoaneurysm versus aneurysm a diagnosis dilemma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samarjit Bisoyi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Free wall rupture of the left ventricle (LV is a rare but life-threatening complication of acute myocardial infaction. Very rarely such rupture may be contained by the adhering pericardium creating a pseudoaneurysm. This condition warrants for an emergency surgery. Left ventricular aneurysm is the discrete thinning of the ventricular wall (<5 mm with akinetic or dyskinetic wall motion causing an out-pouching of the ventricle. Given the propensity for pseudoaneurysms to rupture leading to cardiac tamponade, shock, and death, compared with a more benign natural history for true aneurysms, accurate diagnosis of these conditions is important. True aneurysm, usually, calls for an elective surgery. Clinically differentiating the two conditions remains a challenge. We report the case of a patient with LV pseudoaneurysm, initially diagnosed as true aneurysm at our institution. We have attempted to review the existing literature and discussed the characteristic findings of each entity.

  9. Carboxylated multi-walled carbon nanotubes aggravated biochemical and subcellular damages in leaves of broad bean (Vicia faba L.) seedlings under combined stress of lead and cadmium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Chengrun; Liu, Haitao; Chen, Jinyun; Tian, Yuan; Shi, Jian; Li, Dongdong; Guo, Chen; Ma, Qingping

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • MWCNTs-COOH disturb mineral elements and cause oxidative damages in the leaves. • Cd and Pb combination result in reduction of mineral elements and enrichment of Na, involving in toxicity mechanisms. • MWCNTs-COOH facilitate Cd and Pb uptake, and aggravate biochemical and subcellular damages. - Abstract: Increasing industrialization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) would inevitably lead to their release into the environment and combination with heavy metals. However, studies concerning the combined effects of MWCNTs and heavy metals on agricultural crops are limited. Herein, effects and mechanisms of carboxylated MWCNTs (MWCNTs-COOH) (2.5, 5 and 10 mg/L) and their combination with 20 μM Pb and 5 μM Cd (shortened as Pb + Cd) on Vicia faba L. seedlings were investigated. The results showed that the MWCNTs-COOH disturbed the imbalance of nutrient elements, and caused oxidative stress and damages in the leaves. Additionally, the combination of MWCNTs-COOH with Pb + Cd resulted in enrichment of Pb and Cd, and deterioration of oxidative damages compared with the treatments of MWCNTs-COOH or Pb + Cd alone in the leaves. As the results, the concentrations of MWCNTs-COOH not only caused oxidative stress, but also exacerbated the biochemical and subcellular damages due to the treatment of Pb + Cd in the leaves. It also suggests that persistent release of MWCNTs-COOH into the environment may cause phytotoxicity and aggravate ecological risks due to combination of heavy metals

  10. Pneumatic distension of ventricular mural architecture validated histologically

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burg, M.C.; Heindel, W. [University Hospital Muenster (Germany). Dept. of Clinical Radiology; Lunkenheimer, P. [University Hospital Muenster (Germany). Dept. of Experimental Thoraco-vascular Surgery; Niederer, P. [ETH and University of Zuerich (Switzerland). Inst. for Biomedical Engineering; Brune, C. [Twente Univ. (Netherlands). Dept. of Applied Mathematics; Redmann, K. [University Hospital Muenster (Germany). Center for Reproductive Medicine and Andrology; Smerup, M. [Aarhus University Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery; Spiegel, U.; Becker, F. [University Hospital Muenster (Germany). Dept. Surgical Research; Maintz, D. [University Hospital Muenster (Germany). Dept. of Clinical Radiology; Cologne Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Anderson, R.H. [Newcastle Univ., London (United Kingdom). Inst. of Genetic Medicine

    2016-11-15

    There are ongoing arguments as to how cardiomyocytes are aggregated together within the ventricular walls. We used pneumatic distension through the coronary arteries to exaggerate the gaps between the aggregated cardiomyocytes, analyzing the pattern revealed using computed tomography, and validating our findings by histology. We distended 10 porcine hearts, arresting 4 in diastole by infusion of cardioplegic solutions, and 4 in systole by injection of barium chloride. Mural architecture was revealed by computed tomography, measuring also the angulations of the long chains of cardiomyocytes. We prepared the remaining 2 hearts for histology by perfusion with formaldehyde. Increasing pressures of pneumatic distension elongated the ventricular walls, but produced insignificant changes in mural thickness. The distension exaggerated the spaces between the aggregated cardiomyocytes, compartmenting the walls into epicardial, central, and endocardial regions, with a feathered arrangement of transitions between them. Marked variation was noted in the thicknesses of the parts in the different ventricular segments, with no visible anatomical boundaries between them. Measurements of angulations revealed intruding and extruding populations of cardiomyocytes that deviated from a surface-parallel alignment. Scrolling through the stacks of tomographic images revealed marked spiraling of the aggregated cardiomyocytes when traced from base to apex. Our findings call into question the current assumption that cardiomyocytes are uniformly aggregated together in a tangential fashion. There is marked heterogeneity in the architecture of the different ventricular segments, with the aggregated units never extending in a fully transmural fashion.

  11. Pneumatic distension of ventricular mural architecture validated histologically

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burg, M.C.; Heindel, W.; Lunkenheimer, P.; Niederer, P.; Brune, C.; Redmann, K.; Smerup, M.; Spiegel, U.; Becker, F.; Maintz, D.; Cologne Univ.; Anderson, R.H.

    2016-01-01

    There are ongoing arguments as to how cardiomyocytes are aggregated together within the ventricular walls. We used pneumatic distension through the coronary arteries to exaggerate the gaps between the aggregated cardiomyocytes, analyzing the pattern revealed using computed tomography, and validating our findings by histology. We distended 10 porcine hearts, arresting 4 in diastole by infusion of cardioplegic solutions, and 4 in systole by injection of barium chloride. Mural architecture was revealed by computed tomography, measuring also the angulations of the long chains of cardiomyocytes. We prepared the remaining 2 hearts for histology by perfusion with formaldehyde. Increasing pressures of pneumatic distension elongated the ventricular walls, but produced insignificant changes in mural thickness. The distension exaggerated the spaces between the aggregated cardiomyocytes, compartmenting the walls into epicardial, central, and endocardial regions, with a feathered arrangement of transitions between them. Marked variation was noted in the thicknesses of the parts in the different ventricular segments, with no visible anatomical boundaries between them. Measurements of angulations revealed intruding and extruding populations of cardiomyocytes that deviated from a surface-parallel alignment. Scrolling through the stacks of tomographic images revealed marked spiraling of the aggregated cardiomyocytes when traced from base to apex. Our findings call into question the current assumption that cardiomyocytes are uniformly aggregated together in a tangential fashion. There is marked heterogeneity in the architecture of the different ventricular segments, with the aggregated units never extending in a fully transmural fashion.

  12. The helical ventricular myocardial band of Torrent-Guasp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocica, Mladen J; Corno, Antonio F; Lackovic, Vesna; Kanjuh, Vladimir I

    2007-01-01

    We live in an era of substantial progress in understanding myocardial structure and function at genetic, molecular, and microscopic levels. Yet, ventricular myocardium has proven remarkably resistant to macroscopic analyses of functional anatomy. Pronounced and practically indefinite global and local structural anisotropy of its fibers and other ventricular wall constituents produces electrical and mechanical properties that are nonlinear, anisotropic, time varying, and spatially inhomogeneous. The helical ventricular myocardial band of Torrent-Guasp is a revolutionary new concept in understanding global, 3-dimensional, functional architecture of the ventricular myocardium. This concept defines the principal, cumulative vectors, integrating the tissue architecture (ie, form) and net forces developed (ie, function) within the ventricular mass. The primary purpose of this review is to emphasize the importance of this concept, in the light of collaborative efforts to establish an integrative approach, defining ventricular form and function by linking across multiple scales of biological organization, as explained in the ongoing Physiome project. Because one of the most important scientific missions in this century is integration of basic research with clinical medicine, we believe that this knowledge is not of merely academic importance, but is also the essential prerequisite in clinical evaluation and treatment of different heart diseases.

  13. [Idiopathic ventricular arrhythmia in children. Apropos of 24 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coeurderoy, A; Almange, C; Laurent, M; Biron, Y; Leborgne, P

    1985-12-01

    The severity and prognosis of idiopathic ventricular arrhythmias in childhood were studied in 24 patients (12 boys, 12 girls) with an average age of 8 years at the time of diagnosis of the arrhythmia. Investigations included clinical assessment and analysis of basal ECG (morphology of the arrhythmias) and dynamic recordings (Holter and exercise stress testing). The clinical course was followed for an average of 3.8 years. The patients were classified in two groups: monomorphic arrhythmias (Group I) and polymorphic arrhythmias (Group II). Group I was divided into 4 subgroups: isolated ventricular extrasystoles (IA), 11 patients; ventricular extrasystoles with bursts of ventricular tachycardia (IB), 6 patients; sustained ventricular tachycardia without intercritical extrasystoles (IC), 1 patient; accelerated idioventricular rhythm (ID), 2 patients. Subgroups IA, IB and ID were characterised by the absence of symptoms, the disappearance of the arrhythmia on exercise, the decreased efficacy of antiarrhythmic drugs and an excellent prognosis. Therapeutic abstention was the rule in these patients. Patients in Group IC were characterised by the variability of their symptoms, the absence of exercise induced arrhythmias, the need for treatment in most cases and a good long-term prognosis. Group II was divided into 2 subgroups: adrenergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (IIA), 2 patients, and non-adrenergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (IIB), 2 patients. Patients in Subgroup IIA were characterised by syncope on exercise or emotion, the need for betablocker therapy which considerably improved the patients symptoms but which did not usually prevent sudden death.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Transcriptome analysis of WRKY gene family in Oryza officinalis Wall ex Watt and WRKY genes involved in responses to Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chunmiao; Shen, Qingxi J; Wang, Bo; He, Bin; Xiao, Suqin; Chen, Ling; Yu, Tengqiong; Ke, Xue; Zhong, Qiaofang; Fu, Jian; Chen, Yue; Wang, Lingxian; Yin, Fuyou; Zhang, Dunyu; Ghidan, Walid; Huang, Xingqi; Cheng, Zaiquan

    2017-01-01

    Oryza officinalis Wall ex Watt, a very important and special wild rice species, shows abundant genetic diversity and disease resistance features, especially high resistance to bacterial blight. The molecular mechanisms of bacterial blight resistance in O. officinalis have not yet been elucidated. The WRKY transcription factor family is one of the largest gene families involved in plant growth, development and stress response. However, little is known about the numbers, structure, molecular phylogenetics, and expression of the WRKY genes under Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) stress in O. officinalis due to lacking of O. officinalis genome. Therefore, based on the RNA-sequencing data of O. officinalis, we performed a comprehensive study of WRKY genes in O. officinalis and identified 89 OoWRKY genes. Then 89 OoWRKY genes were classified into three groups based on the WRKY domains and zinc finger motifs. Phylogenetic analysis strongly supported that the evolution of OoWRKY genes were consistent with previous studies of WRKYs, and subgroup IIc OoWRKY genes were the original ancestors of some group II and group III OoWRKYs. Among the 89 OoWRKY genes, eight OoWRKYs displayed significantly different expression (>2-fold, pWRKY family of transcription factors in O.officinalis. Insight was gained into the classification, evolution, and function of the OoWRKY genes, revealing the putative roles of eight significantly different expression OoWRKYs in Xoo strains PXO99 and C5 stress responses in O.officinalis. This study provided a better understanding of the evolution and functions of O. officinalis WRKY genes, and suggested that manipulating eight significantly different expression OoWRKYs would enhance resistance to bacterial blight.

  15. Interaction between a normal shock wave and a turbulent boundary layer at high transonic speeds. Part 1: Pressure distribution. Part 2: Wall shear stress. Part 3: Simplified formulas for the prediction of surface pressures and skin friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, T. C., Jr.; Liou, M. S.; Messiter, A. F.

    1980-01-01

    An asymptotic description is derived for the interaction between a shock wave and a turbulent boundary layer in transonic flow, for a particular limiting case. The dimensionless difference between the external flow velocity and critical sound speed is taken to be much smaller than one, but large in comparison with the dimensionless friction velocity. The basic results are derived for a flat plate, and corrections for longitudinal wall curvature and for flow in a circular pipe are also shown. Solutions are given for the wall pressure distribution and the shape of the shock wave. Solutions for the wall shear stress are obtained, and a criterion for incipient separation is derived. Simplified solutions for both the wall pressure and skin friction distributions in the interaction region are given. These results are presented in a form suitable for use in computer programs.

  16. Noninvasive reconstruction of the three-dimensional ventricular activation sequence during pacing and ventricular tachycardia in the rabbit heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Chengzong; Pogwizd, Steven M; Killingsworth, Cheryl R; He, Bin

    2011-01-01

    Ventricular arrhythmias represent one of leading causes for sudden cardiac death, a significant problem in public health. Noninvasive imaging of cardiac electric activities associated with ventricular arrhythmias plays an important role in better our understanding of the mechanisms and optimizing the treatment options. The present study aims to rigorously validate a novel three-dimensional (3-D) cardiac electrical imaging (3-DCEI) technique with the aid of 3-D intra-cardiac mapping during paced rhythm and ventricular tachycardia (VT) in the rabbit heart. Body surface potentials and intramural bipolar electrical recordings were simultaneously measured in a closed-chest condition in thirteen healthy rabbits. Single-site pacing and dual-site pacing were performed from ventricular walls and septum. VTs and premature ventricular complexes (PVCs) were induced by intravenous norepinephrine (NE). The non-invasively imaged activation sequence correlated well with invasively measured counterparts, with a correlation coefficient of 0.72 and a relative error of 0.30 averaged over all paced beats and NE-induced PVCs and VT beats. The averaged distance from imaged site of initial activation to measured site determined from intra-cardiac mapping was ∼5mm. These promising results suggest that 3-DCEI is feasible to non-invasively localize the origins and image activation sequence of focal ventricular arrhythmias.

  17. Prediction of improvement of myocardial wall motion after coronary artery bypass surgery using rest Tl-201/dipyridamole stress gated Tc-99m-MIBI/24 hour delay Tl-201 SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Dong Soo; Lee, Won Woo; Yeo, Jeong Yeo; Kim, Seok Ki; Kim, Ki Bong; Chung, June Key; Lee, Myung Chul

    1998-01-01

    Using rest Tl-201/ dipyridamole stress gated Tc-99m-MIBI/24 hour delay Tl-201 SPECT, we investigated the predictive values of the markers of the stress-rest reversibility (Rev), Tl-201 rest perfusion (Rest), Tl-201 24 hour redistribution (Del) and Tc-99m-MIBI gated systolic thickening (Thk) for wall motion improvement after coronary artery bypass surgery. In 39 patients (M:F=34:5, age 58±8), preoperative and postoperative (3 months) SPECT were compared. 24 hour delayed SPECT was done in 16 patients having perfusion defects at rest. Perfusion or wall motion was scored from 0 to 3 (0: normal to 3: defect or dyskinesia). Wall motion was abnormal in 142 segments among 585 segments of 99 artery territories which were surgically revascularized. After bypass surgery, ejection fraction increased from 37.8±9.0% to 45.5±12.3% in 22 patients who had decreased ejectin fraction preoperatively. Wall motion improved in 103 (72.5%) segments among 142 dysfunctional segments. Positive predictive values (PPV) of Rev, Rest, Del, and Thk were 83%, 76%, 43%, and 69% respectively. Negative predictive values (NPV) of Rev, Rest, Del, and Thk were 48%, 44%, 58%, and 21%, respectively. Rest/gated stress/delay SPECT had PPV of 74% and NPV of 46%. Through univariate logistic regression analysis revealed Rev( p=0.0008) and Rest (p=0.024) as significant predictors, stepwise multivariate test found Rev as the only good predictor (p=0.0008). Among independent predictors obtained by rest Tl-201/stress gated Tc-99m-MIBI/delayed Tl-201 myocardial SPECT for wall motion improvement after bypass surgery, stress-rest reversibility was the single most useful predictor

  18. Granular packings with moving side walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landry, James W.; Grest, Gary Stephen

    2004-01-01

    The effects of movement of the side walls of a confined granular packing are studied by discrete element, molecular dynamics simulations. The dynamical evolution of the stress is studied as a function of wall movement both in the direction of gravity as well as opposite to it. For all wall velocities explored, the stress in the final state of the system after wall movement is fundamentally different from the original state obtained by pouring particles into the container and letting them settle under the influence of gravity. The original packing possesses a hydrostaticlike region at the top of the container which crosses over to a depth-independent stress. As the walls are moved in the direction opposite to gravity, the saturation stress first reaches a minimum value independent of the wall velocity, then increases to a steady-state value dependent on the wall velocity. After wall movement ceases and the packing reaches equilibrium, the stress profile fits the classic Janssen form for high wall velocities, while some deviations remain for low wall velocities. The wall movement greatly increases the number of particle-wall and particle-particle forces at the Coulomb criterion. Varying the wall velocity has only small effects on the particle structure of the final packing so long as the walls travel a similar distance.

  19. Stress State of Elastic Thick-Walled Ring With Self-Balanced Pressures Distributed on Its Internal and External Borders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kravchuk Aleksandr Stepanovich

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available For the first time with the help of the theory of analytic functions and Kolosov-Muskhelishvili formulas the problem of the two-dimensional theory of elasticity for a thickwalled ring with the uneven pressures, acting on its borders, was solved. The pressure on the inner and outer boundaries is represented by Fourier series. The authors represent the two complex functions which solve boundary problem in the form of Laurent series. The logarithmic terms in these series are absent because the boundary problem has the self-balancing loads on each boundary of ring. The coefficients in the Laurent series are calculated by the boundary conditions. Firstly, the equations were obtained in the general form. But the hypothesis about even distributions of pressures at borders of ring was used for constructing an example. It leads to the fact that all coefficients of analytic functions represented in Laurent series have to be only real. As a solving example, the representation of pressures in equivalent hypotrochoids was used. The application of the computer algebra system Mathematica greatly simplifies the calculation of the distribution of stresses and displacements in ring. It does not require manual formal separation of real and imaginary parts in terms of Kolosov-Muskhelishvili to display the distribution of the physical parameters. It separates them only for calculated numbers with the help of built-in functions.

  20. First wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omori, Junji.

    1991-01-01

    Graphite and C/C composite are used recently for the first wall of a thermonuclear device since materials with small atom number have great impurity allowable capacity for plasmas. Among them, those materials having high thermal conduction are generally anisotropic and have an upper limit for the thickness upon production. Then, anisotropic materials are used for a heat receiving plate, such that the surfaces of the heat receiving plate on the side of lower heat conductivity are brought into contact with each other, and the side of higher thermal conductivity is arranged in parallel with small radius direction and the toroidal direction of the thermonuclear device. As a result, the incident heat on an edge portion can be transferred rapidly to the heat receiving plate, which can suppress the temperature elevation at the surface to thereby reduce the amount of abrasion. Since the heat expansion coefficient of the anisotropic materials is great in the direction of the lower heat conductivity and small in the direction of the higher heat conductivity, the gradient of a thermal load distribution in the direction of the higher heat expansion coefficient is small, and occurrence of thermal stresses due to temperature difference is reduced, to improve the reliability. (N.H.)

  1. Systolic and Diastolic Left Ventricular Mechanics during and after Resistance Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöhr, Eric J; Stembridge, Mike; Shave, Rob; Samuel, T Jake; Stone, Keeron; Esformes, Joseph I

    2017-10-01

    To improve the current understanding of the impact of resistance exercise on the heart, by examining the acute responses of left ventricular (LV) strain, twist, and untwisting rate ("LV mechanics"). LV echocardiographic images were recorded in systole and diastole before, during and immediately after (7-12 s) double-leg press exercise at two intensities (30% and 60% of maximum strength, one-repetition maximum). Speckle tracking analysis generated LV strain, twist, and untwisting rate data. Additionally, beat-by-beat blood pressure was recorded and systemic vascular resistance (SVR) and LV wall stress were calculated. Responses in both exercise trials were statistically similar (P > 0.05). During effort, stroke volume decreased, whereas SVR and LV wall stress increased (P mechanics (P 0.05). Immediately after exercise, systolic LV mechanics returned to baseline levels (P mechanics, but increases diastolic mechanics after exercise, suggesting that resistance exercise has a differential impact on systolic and diastolic heart muscle function. The findings may explain why acute resistance exercise has been associated with reduced stroke volume but chronic exercise training may result in increased LV volumes.

  2. Prevalence of cardiac dyssynchrony and correlation with atrio-ventricular block and QRS width in dilated cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anzouan-Kacou, J B; Ncho-Mottoh, M P; Konin, C

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac dyssynchrony causes disorganised cardiac contraction, delayed wall contraction and reduced pumping efficiency. We aimed to assess the prevalence of different types of dyssynchrony in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), and to establish the correlation between atrio-ventricular block...

  3. Adjusting tidal volume to stress index in an open lung condition optimizes ventilation and prevents overdistension in an experimental model of lung injury and reduced chest wall compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrando, Carlos; Suárez-Sipmann, Fernando; Gutierrez, Andrea; Tusman, Gerardo; Carbonell, Jose; García, Marisa; Piqueras, Laura; Compañ, Desamparados; Flores, Susanie; Soro, Marina; Llombart, Alicia; Belda, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-13

    The stress index (SI), a parameter derived from the shape of the pressure-time curve, can identify injurious mechanical ventilation. We tested the hypothesis that adjusting tidal volume (VT) to a non-injurious SI in an open lung condition avoids hypoventilation while preventing overdistension in an experimental model of combined lung injury and low chest-wall compliance (Ccw). Lung injury was induced by repeated lung lavages using warm saline solution, and Ccw was reduced by controlled intra-abdominal air-insufflation in 22 anesthetized, paralyzed and mechanically ventilated pigs. After injury animals were recruited and submitted to a positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) titration trial to find the PEEP level resulting in maximum compliance. During a subsequent four hours of mechanical ventilation, VT was adjusted to keep a plateau pressure (Pplat) of 30 cmH2O (Pplat-group, n = 11) or to a SI between 0.95 and 1.05 (SI-group, n = 11). Respiratory rate was adjusted to maintain a 'normal' PaCO2 (35 to 65 mmHg). SI, lung mechanics, arterial-blood gases haemodynamics pro-inflammatory cytokines and histopathology were analyzed. In addition Computed Tomography (CT) data were acquired at end expiration and end inspiration in six animals. PaCO2 was significantly higher in the Pplat-group (82 versus 53 mmHg, P = 0.01), with a resulting lower pH (7.19 versus 7.34, P = 0.01). We observed significant differences in VT (7.3 versus 5.4 mlKg(-1), P = 0.002) and Pplat values (30 versus 35 cmH2O, P = 0.001) between the Pplat-group and SI-group respectively. SI (1.03 versus 0.99, P = 0.42) and end-inspiratory transpulmonary pressure (PTP) (17 versus 18 cmH2O, P = 0.42) were similar in the Pplat- and SI-groups respectively, without differences in overinflated lung areas at end- inspiration in both groups. Cytokines and histopathology showed no differences. Setting tidal volume to a non-injurious stress index in an open lung condition improves

  4. Left Ventricular Assist Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khuansiri Narajeenron

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Audience: The audience for this classic team-based learning (cTBL session is emergency medicine residents, faculty, and students; although this topic is applicable to internal medicine and family medicine residents. Introduction: A left ventricular assist device (LVAD is a mechanical circulatory support device that can be placed in critically-ill patients who have poor left ventricular function. After LVAD implantation, patients have improved quality of life.1 The number of LVAD patients worldwide continues to rise. Left-ventricular assist device patients may present to the emergency department (ED with severe, life-threatening conditions. It is essential that emergency physicians have a good understanding of LVADs and their complications. Objectives: Upon completion of this cTBL module, the learner will be able to: 1 Properly assess LVAD patients’ circulatory status; 2 appropriately resuscitate LVAD patients; 3 identify common LVAD complications; 4 evaluate and appropriately manage patients with LVAD malfunctions. Method: The method for this didactic session is cTBL.

  5. Left ventricular diastolic function in patients with coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brugger, P.T.

    1986-01-01

    In 302 patients with confirmed coronary disease we determined the left ventricular diastolic function with the Nuclear Stethoscope by the aid of the Peak Filling Rate (PFR) and the Time to Peak Filling Rate (TPFR). Moreover we investigated the ejection fraction (EF). 201 patients had already suffered a myocardial infarction, of these 99 an anterior wall and 102 an inferior wall infarction. The remaining 101 patients had a CAD without a history of myocardial infarction. The PFR was 2.19 ± 0.65 EDV/sec in the 99 patients after anterior wall infarction and 2.62 ± 0.85 EDV/sec in the 102 patients after inferior wall infarction and 2.79 ± 0.85 EDV/sec in 101 patients with coronary artery disease without a history of myocardial infarction. For the PFR there could be found a statistically significant difference between normal patients and patients after anterior wall infarction (p [de

  6. Second statement of the working group on electrocardiographic diagnosis of left ventricular hypertrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bacharova, Ljuba; Estes, E Harvey; Bang, Lia E

    2011-01-01

    The Working Group on Electrocardiographic Diagnosis of Left Ventricular Hypertrophy, appointed by the Editor of the Journal of Electrocardiology, presents the alternative conceptual model for the ECG diagnosis of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). It is stressed that ECG is a record of electrica...

  7. Scan-rescan reproducibility of segmental aortic wall shear stress as assessed by phase-specific segmentation with 4D flow MRI in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Palen, Roel L F; Roest, Arno A W; van den Boogaard, Pieter J; de Roos, Albert; Blom, Nico A; Westenberg, Jos J M

    2018-05-26

    The aim was to investigate scan-rescan reproducibility and observer variability of segmental aortic 3D systolic wall shear stress (WSS) by phase-specific segmentation with 4D flow MRI in healthy volunteers. Ten healthy volunteers (age 26.5 ± 2.6 years) underwent aortic 4D flow MRI twice. Maximum 3D systolic WSS (WSSmax) and mean 3D systolic WSS (WSSmean) for five thoracic aortic segments over five systolic cardiac phases by phase-specific segmentations were calculated. Scan-rescan analysis and observer reproducibility analysis were performed. Scan-rescan data showed overall good reproducibility for WSSmean (coefficient of variation, COV 10-15%) with moderate-to-strong intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC 0.63-0.89). The variability in WSSmax was high (COV 16-31%) with moderate-to-good ICC (0.55-0.79) for different aortic segments. Intra- and interobserver reproducibility was good-to-excellent for regional aortic WSSmax (ICC ≥ 0.78; COV ≤ 17%) and strong-to-excellent for WSSmean (ICC ≥ 0.86; COV ≤ 11%). In general, ascending aortic segments showed more WSSmax/WSSmean variability compared to aortic arch or descending aortic segments for scan-rescan, intraobserver and interobserver comparison. Scan-rescan reproducibility was good for WSSmean and moderate for WSSmax for all thoracic aortic segments over multiple systolic phases in healthy volunteers. Intra/interobserver reproducibility for segmental WSS assessment was good-to-excellent. Variability of WSSmax is higher and should be taken into account in case of individual follow-up or in comparative rest-stress studies to avoid misinterpretation.

  8. Exercise-induced intra-ventricular gradients as a frequent potential cause of myocardial ischemia in cardiac syndrome X patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almeida Ana G

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of intra-ventricular gradients (IVG during dobutamine or exercise stress is not infrequent, and can be associated to symptoms during stress. The purpose of this study was to assess the occurrence of IVG during exercise stress echocardiography in cardiac syndrome X patients. Methods We prospectively evaluated 91 patients (pts mean aged 51 ± 12 years (age ranged 20 to 75 years old, 44 of whom were women. All pts had angina, positive exercise ECG treadmill testing, normal rest echocardiogram and no coronary artery disease on coronary angiogram (cardiac X syndrome. After complete Doppler echocardiographic evaluation with determination of left ventricular outflow tract index (LVOTi, relative left ventricular wall thickness (RLVWT and left ventricular end-diastolic volume index (LVDVi, all patients underwent stress echocardiography with two-dimensional and Doppler echographic evaluation during and after treadmill exercise. Results For analysis purpose patients were divided in 2 groups, according to the development of IVG. Doppler evidence of IVG was found in 33 (36% of the patients (Group A, with mean age 47 ± 14 years old (age ranged 20 to 72 years and with a mean end-systolic peak gradient of 86 ± 34 mmHg (ranging from 30 to 165 mmHg. The IVG development was accompanied by SAM of the mitral valve in 23 pts. Three of these pts experienced symptomatic hypotension. Ten were women (30% pts. 58 pts in group B, 34 of whom were women (59% (p = 0,01 vs group A, mean aged 53,5 ± 10,9 years old (age ranged 34 to 75 years (p = 0,03 vs group A, did not develop IVG. LVOTi was 10,29 ± 0,9 mm/m2 in group A and 11,4 ± 1 mm/m2 in group B (p 2 in group A and 56 ± 11,6 ml/m2 in group B (p = 0,000. Conclusion 1. A significant number of patients with cardiac X syndrome developed IVG during upright exercise in treadmill. These pts (group A are mainly males and younger than those who did not develop IVG. 2. The development of IVG

  9. The effect of percutaneous transmyocardial laser revascularization on left ventricular function in a porcine model of hibernating myocardium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeda, Francis Q.; Glock, Dana; Sandelski, Joanne; Ibrahim, Osama; Macioch, James E.; Allen, Trisha; Dainauskas, John R.; Parrillo, Joseph E.; Snell, R. Jeffrey; Schaer, Gary L.

    2004-01-01

    Background: Hibernating myocardium is defined as a state of persistently impaired myocardial function at rest due to reduced coronary blood flow that can partially or completely be restored to normal if the myocardial oxygen supply/demand relationship is favorably altered. Percutaneous laser revascularization (PMR) is an emerging catheter-based technique that involves creating channels in the myocardium, directly through a percutaneous approach with a laser delivery system, and has been shown to reduce symptoms in patients with severe refractory angina; however, its effect on improving regional wall motion abnormalities in hibernating myocardium has not been clearly established. We sought to determine the effect of PMR using the Eclipse System (Cardiogenesis) on left ventricular function in a porcine model of hibernating myocardium. Methods: A model of hibernating myocardium was created by placement of an ameroid constrictor in the proximal left anterior descending artery of a 35 kg male Yorkshire pig. The presence of hibernating myocardium was confirmed with dobutamine stress echocardiography (DSE) and defined as severe hypocontractility at rest, with an improvement in systolic wall thickening with low-dose dobutamine in myocardial regions with a subsequent deterioration in function at peak stress (biphasic response). After the demonstration of hibernating myocardium, PMR was performed in the area of hypocontractile function, and the serial echocardiography was performed. The echocardiograms were reviewed by an experienced echocardiologist blinded to the results, and regional wall motion was assessed using the American Society of Echocardiography Wall Motion Score. Six weeks after PMR, the animal was sacrificed and the heart sent for histopathologic studies. Results: A comparison of the regional wall motion function of the area distal to the ameroid constrictor and in the contralateral wall at baseline, post-ameroid placement, and post-PMR was performed

  10. A patient-specific virtual stenotic model of the coronary artery to analyze the relationship between fractional flow reserve and wall shear