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Sample records for venous injection oxytocinin

  1. Venous access and care: harnessing pragmatics in harm reduction for people who inject drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Magdalena; Rhodes, Tim

    2012-06-01

    To explore the facilitators of long-term hepatitis C avoidance among people who inject drugs. We employed a qualitative life history design. Recruitment took place through low-threshold drug services and drug user networks in South East and North London. Participants were interviewed at the recruitment services or in their homes. The sample comprised 35 people who inject drugs, 20 of whom were hepatitis C antibody-negative. Participants' average injecting trajectory was 19 years (6-33), with 66% primarily injecting heroin, and 34% a crack and heroin mix. Nine (26%) of the sample were female and the average age was 39 years (23-53). Two interviews were conducted with each participant, with the second interview incorporating reference to a computer-constructed life history time-line. Interview accounts were audiorecorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed thematically. Hepatitis C risk awareness was recent and deprioritized by the majority of participants. The facilitation of venous access and care was an initial and enduring rationale for safe injecting practices. Difficult venous access resulted in increased contamination of injecting environments and transitions to femoral injecting. Participants expressed an unmet desire for non-judgemental venous access information and advice. Harm reduction interventions which attend to the immediate priorities of people who inject drugs, such as venous access and care, have the potential to re-engage individuals who are jaded or confused by hepatitis C prevention messages. © 2011 The Authors, Addiction © 2011 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  2. [Endovascular treatment for venous malformations with three-point anhydrous ethanol injection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qizhen; Li, Jiaguang; Lei, Shaorong; Tan, Wuyuan; Long, Jianhong

    2015-08-01

    To explore the safe method with anhydrous ethanol injection in the treatment of venous malformation.
 A total of 96 patients with venous malformation were conducted anhydrous ethanol injection for 245 times through percutaneous puncture by three-point method. The complications were observed. In animal experiment, according to the different concentrations of anhydrous ethanol injection, rats were divided into an anhydrous ethanol group, a 75% ethanol group, a 50% ethanol group and a 25% ethanol group (n=5 in each group), and the damage of vessels after ethanol injection was observed.
 The successful rate for three-point ethanol injection was 88%. The incidence for both skin ulcer and numbness was 0.9% without severe complications in lung and heart. In the animal experiments, the entire vessel wall including outer membrane was damaged in the anhydrous ethanol group. Part of vessel walls, including the inner membrane and muscle layer, were damaged in both the 75% ethanol group and the 50% ethanol group. However, there was no damage in the vessels in the 25% ethanol group.
 With the decrease in ethanol concentration, the vascular damage is decreased and eventually disappeared. Three-point anhydrous ethanol injection is safe and effective.

  3. Chronic venous disorders and injection drug use: impact on balance, gait, and walk speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieper, Barbara; Templin, Thomas N; Birk, Thomas J; Kirsner, Robert S

    2008-01-01

    Injection drug users are at high risk for chronic venous disorders (CVD), a condition resulting in a progressive deterioration of venous function of the legs. However, the effects of CVD on walking mobility in this population have not been studied. We examined a causal model of the relationship between injection drug use, CVD, and Walking Mobility. The validity of the Tinetti Balance and Gait scales and walk speed as a composite measure of Walking Mobility was also explored. The participants were 104 men and women from a methadone maintenance treatment center. Drug use included 18 persons who injected drugs only in the hands, arms, and above the waist; 70 who injected all over the body including the lower extremities; and 16 who never injected drugs but used illegal substances by other routes. Forty-nine percent of participants had moderate to severe CVD. Participants were classified into 2 groups according to their history of injection drug use: (a) those who injected in the lower extremities (n = 70) and (b) those who injected in the arms plus those who did not inject (n = 34). All measurements were obtained at baseline and again approximately 6.5 weeks later. Structural equation modeling was used to examine the causal effect of CVD on Walking Mobility. The validity of the Balance and Gait scales and the walk time variable as measures of a Walking Mobility factor was examined using a second-order confirmatory factor analysis. Questionnaires included the Demographic and Health History and Drug History. The lower extremities were evaluated with the clinical portion of the Clinical-Etiology-Anatomy-Pathophysiology classification. Participants completed the Tinetti Balance and Gait test. A timed 6-m walk at the person's normal pace was used to calculate walk speed. Test-retest reliability of the Tinetti Balance and Gait test and walk speed ranged from 0.79 to 0.86. Balance and gait scores were skewed toward the high end of the scale. Walking speed was slow. The leg-injecting

  4. Placement of central venous access via subclavian vein under fluoroscopic guidance with intravenous contrast injection

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    Choo, Sung Wook; Choo, In Wook; Do, Young Soo; Kim, Seung Hoon; Yoh, Kyu Tong; Ro, Duk Woo; Kim, Bo Kyung [Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of Hickman catheter placement via the subclavian vein under fluoroscopic guidance with intravenous contrast injection. During an eleven-month period, 187 Hickman catheters were percutaneously placed in 167 consecutive patients in an interventional radiology suite. Subclavian venous puncture was made with injection of contrast medium into the peripheral venous line. After subclavian venous access had been obtained, a subcutaneous tunnel was created using a peel-away sheath or a tunneler. The Hickman catheters were inserted through a peel-away sheath, the distal tip of which was as the junction of the right atrium and the superior vena cava. One hundred and eighty-six Hickman catheters were successfully placed ; the one failure was due to anatomical tortuosity of the vein (0.53%). Complications included one case of subclavian vein occlusion (0.53%) ; three of line occlusion by thrombus (1.6%) ; one of oozing at the suture site (0.53%) ; six of infection or inflammation (3.2%) ; eight of natural removal (4.2%) ; one case of air embolism (0.53%) and two of malposition (0.1%). Major complications such as pneumothorax or arterial puncture leading to mediastinal hemorrhage did not, however, occur. The authors concluded that radiologic Hickman catheter placement offers advantages over traditional approaches in terms of safety, convenience, and time and cost savings.

  5. Injection of gadolinium contrast through pediatric central venous catheters: a safety study

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    Moriarty, John M.; Ramos, Yanerys; Finn, J.P. [University of California, Department of Radiological Sciences, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Kung, Geoffrey L. [University of California, Department of Radiological Sciences, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); University of California, Biomedical Engineering Interdepartmental Program, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Moghaddam, Abbas N. [University of California, Department of Radiological Sciences, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Amirkabir University of Technology (Tehran Polytechnic), Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ennis, Daniel B. [University of California, Department of Radiological Sciences, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); University of California, Biomedical Engineering Interdepartmental Program, Los Angeles, CA (United States); University of California, Biomedical Physics Interdepartmental Program, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2012-09-15

    Catheter rupture during CT angiography has prompted policies prohibiting the use of electronic injectors with peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICCs) not only for CT but also for MRI. Consequently, many institutions mandate hand injection for MR angiography, limiting precision of infusion rates and durations of delivery. To determine whether electronic injection of gadolinium-based contrast media through a range of small-caliber, single-lumen PICCs would be safe without risk of catheter rupture over the range of clinical protocols and determine whether programmed flow rates and volumes were realized when using PICCs for contrast delivery. Experiments were performed and recorded using the Medrad Spectris Solaris EP MR Injection System. PICC sizes, contrast media and flow rates were based on common institutional protocols. No catheters were damaged during any experiments. Mean difference between programmed and delivered volume was 0.07 {+-} 0.10 mL for all experiments. Reduced flow rates and prolonged injection durations were observed when the injector's pressure-limiting algorithm was triggered, only in protocols outside the clinical range. PICCs commonly used in children can withstand in vitro power injection of gadolinium-based contrast media at protocols significantly above clinical levels. (orig.)

  6. Effects of injection--drug injury on ankle mobility and chronic venous disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieper, Barbara; Templin, Thomas N; Birk, Thomas J; Kirsner, Robert S

    2007-01-01

    To identify potential confounders and test a causal model of injection-site risk, chronic venous disorders (CVD), and ankle mobility. The reliability and validity of goniometry measurements of ankle mobility were also of interest because they are seldom performed in people with a history of injection-drug use. The study was a test-retest design, consisting of 104 participants from a methadone maintenance treatment center. Each participant provided demographic information, health and drug histories, and underwent bilateral ankle goniometric measures of dorsiflexion, plantar flexion, inversion, and eversion. The clinical portion of the Clinical-Etiology-Anatomy-Pathophysiology (CEAP)was used to classify CVD severity. Reliability of goniometry measurements ranged from .70 to .90. Causal modeling supported hypotheses of increased risk from leg injection and reciprocal effects involving ankle mobility and disease progression. Ankle inversion mobility was the strongest indicator of ankle mobility. Injury to the lower extremities from IDU affected CVD and mobility. Further research should include assessment of comorbidity and other potential confounders. Ankle inversion should remain part of the goniometry assessment.

  7. Single bolus intravenous regadenoson injection versus central venous infusion of adenosine for maximum coronary hyperaemia in fractional flow reserve measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Nunen, Lokien X; Lenders, Guy D; Schampaert, Stéphanie; van 't Veer, Marcel; Wijnbergen, Inge; Brueren, Guus R G; Tonino, Pim A L; Pijls, Nico H J

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the hyperaemic effect of a single bolus regadenoson injection to a central venous adenosine infusion for inducing hyperaemia in the measurement of fractional flow reserve (FFR). One hundred patients scheduled for FFR measurement were enrolled. FFR was first measured by IV adenosine (140 µg/kg/min), thereafter by IV bolus regadenoson injection (400 µg), followed by another measurement by IV adenosine and bolus injection of regadenoson. The regadenoson injections were randomised to central or peripheral intravenous. Hyperaemic response and duration of steady state maximum hyperaemia were studied, central versus peripheral venous regadenoson injections were compared, and safety and reproducibility of repeated injections were investigated. Mean age was 66±8 years, 75% of the patients were male. The target stenosis was located in the LM, LAD, LCX, and RCA in 7%, 54%, 20% and 19%, respectively. There was no difference in FFR measured by adenosine or by regadenoson (ΔFFR=0.00±0.01, r=0.994, pregadenoson was variable (10-600 s). No serious side effects of either drug were observed. Maximum coronary hyperaemia can be achieved easily, rapidly, and safely by one single intravenous bolus of regadenoson administered either centrally or peripherally. Repeated regadenoson injections are safe. The hyperaemic plateau is variable. Clinical Trial Registration: http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/ show/study/NCT01809743?term=NCT01809743&rank=1 (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01809743).

  8. Right arm injection of contrast medium reduces venous artifacts in head and neck multislice spiral computed tomography angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, H; Song, Y-L; Li, X-S; Bi, Y-M; Wang, P; Fan, H-X; Meng, L M; Hu, H-X

    2015-12-01

    We tested whether injection of contrast medium via right or left arm would affect venous artifacts on head and neck multislice spiral computed tomography (CT) angiography. 326 patients were enrolled. Each patient was injected with 10 ml of contrast medium at 5 ml/sec. Time of peak contrast value plus an additional 1 sec was defined as delay time. Another 40 ml of contrast medium were injected with the same injection speed. The scanning area ranged from the aortic arch to the top of the head. Left and right forearms were used for intravenous injections of contrast medium in, respectively, 151 and 175 patients. Comparative analyses of image quality included determining contrast medium residues remaining in the superior vena cava, brachiocephalic vein, or subclavian vein, and comparisons of quality of three-dimensional CT angiography. In 75% of head and neck angiographies, the delay time of the common carotid artery ranged from 16 to 22 sec. In 60% of the images, the quality was graded as excellent, with the left arm injection resulting in delay time of > 23 sec and the right arm delay time of > 18 sec. The CT imaging quality after contrast injections via left or right arms was statistically significant (p arm injection was better than after left arm injection. Intravenous injection of contrast medium via right arm reduces artifacts from contrast medium residues and improves the image quality of head and neck CT angiography.

  9. Transpulmonary thermodilution using femoral indicator injection: a prospective trial in patients with a femoral and a jugular central venous catheter

    OpenAIRE

    Saugel, Bernd; Umgelter, Andreas; Schuster, Tibor; Phillip, Veit; Roland M. Schmid; Huber, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Advanced hemodynamic monitoring using transpulmonary thermodilution (TPTD) is established for measurement of cardiac index (CI), global end-diastolic volume index (GEDVI) and extra-vascular lung water index (EVLWI). TPTD requires indicator injection via a central venous catheter (usually placed via the jugular or subclavian vein). However, superior vena cava access is often not feasible due to the clinical situation. This study investigates the conformity of TPTD using femoral ac...

  10. Sleep Quality: A Pilot Study Comparing Patients With and Without Injection-Related Venous Ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieper, Barbara; Templin, Thomas N

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to (a) compare sleep quality of persons with and without injection-related venous ulcers (VU) and (b) examine associations between global sleep quality with age, sex, comorbidities, pain, nutrition, physical health rating, fatigue, emotional problems, health-related quality of life, attitude toward physical activity, and number of ulcers. This study used a cross-sectional design. The participants included 31 patients with VU and 30 without VU (men [n = 35] and women; mean age = 54 years) who were attending an indigent clinic for wound care or general health. Participants were recruited from an urban clinic when they came for primary care or wound care. Questionnaires were administered at that time and included the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Mini Nutrition Assessment, Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) questions about general physical health, fatigue, emotional problems, and quality of life, Brief Pain Inventory worst pain rating, Positive Attitude and Motivation for Physical Activity Scale, wound assessment, and demographic factors. The 2 groups did not differ on the PSQI in terms of time going to bed, minutes to fall asleep, time awakening, hours slept, and time in bed. Those with VU compared to without VU took more medications to help sleep (P≤ .03). There were no significant differences in PSQI correlations across groups. All study variables except age, gender, and quality of life were significantly related to Global sleep disturbance score. A higher number of comorbid conditions, worse pain, poorer nutrition, poor physical health rating, greater fatigue, more emotional problems, and poor attitude toward physical activity were related to greater sleep disturbances for all participants. Both groups had mean Global PSQI scores greater than 5 (with VU = 7.83 and without VU = 8.2), indicating sleep problems. Study findings suggest that sleep disturbances may be a concern in persons with VU

  11. Regional cerebral blood flow measurements in schizophrenics by /sup 133/Xe inhalation and intra-venous injection method

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    Matsuda, Hiroshi; Seki, Hiroyasu; Sumiya, Hisashi; Ishida, Hiroko; Taki, Junichi; Hisada, Kinichi; Kurachi, Masayoshi; Kobayashi, Katsuji; Yamaguchi, Nariyoshi (Kanazawa Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1984-12-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow measurements were performed in 25 schizophrenic patients and 25 healthy volunteers by /sup 133/Xe inhalation and intra-venous injection method. Schizophrenic patients were classified into the following three groups. Group I: 8 patients without auditory hallucination measured by 2-dimensional /sup 133/Xe inhalation method. Group II: 6 patients with auditory hallucination measured by the same method as in Group I. Group III: 11 patients, including 2 patients with auditory hallucination measured by 3-dimensional /sup 133/Xe intra-venous injection method at the level of OM+5 cm. Bilateral regional percent values, which were obtained by dividing regional values by hemispheric mean or sectional mean values, for frontal lobes in Group I and II were significantly lower than those in the controls. In addition, bilateral regional percent values for bilateral temporal lobes in Group II were significantly higher than those in the controls. In Group III, regional percent values for right frontal lobes and those for posterior part of central gray matter showed significant decrease and increase, respectively. These findings would suggest that the negative symptoms of schizophrenia are related to the hypofrontal and positive ones to the hypertemporoparietal activity.

  12. Systematic review of the safety and efficacy of contrast injection via venous catheters for contrast-enhanced computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.B. Buijs

    Full Text Available Objective: To examine the safety and efficacy of contrast injection through a central venous catheter (CVC for contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT. Methods: A systematic literature search was performed using PubMed. Studies were deemed eligible if they reported on the use of CVCs for contrast administration. Selected articles were assessed for their relevance and risk of bias. Articles with low relevance and high risk of bias or both were excluded. Data from included articles was extracted. Results: Seven studies reported on the use of CVCs for contrast administration. Catheter rupture did not occur in any study. The incidence of dislocation ranged from 2.2-15.4%. Quality of scans was described in three studies, with less contrast enhancement of pulmonary arteries and the thoracic aorta in two studies, and average or above average quality in one study. Four other studies used higher flowrates, but did not report quality of scans. Conclusion: Contrast injection via CVCs can be performed safely for CECT when using a strict protocol. Quality of scans depended on multiple factors like flow rate, indication of the scan, and cardiac output of the patient. In each patient, an individual evaluation whether to use the CVC as access for contrast media should be made, while bolus tracking may be mandatory in most cases. Keywords: Central venous catheter, CVC, Contrast, Contrast-enhanced, CT-scan

  13. Safety and feasibility in highly concentrated contrast material power injections for CT-perfusion studies of the brain using central venous catheters

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    Macht, Stephan, E-mail: stephan.macht@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [University Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Beseoglu, Kerim, E-mail: beseoglu@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [University Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Neurosurgery, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Eicker, Sven, E-mail: sven.eicker@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [University Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Neurosurgery, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Rybacki, Konrad, E-mail: rybacki@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [University Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Braun, Sebastian, E-mail: sebastian.braun@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [University Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Anaesthesiology, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Mathys, Christian, E-mail: mathys@uni-duesseldorf.de [University Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Antoch, Gerald, E-mail: antoch@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [University Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Turowski, Bernd, E-mail: bernd.turowski@uni-duesseldorf.de [University Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany)

    2012-08-15

    Introduction: CT perfusion studies play an important role in the early detection as well as in therapy monitoring of vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage. High-flow injections via central venous catheters are not recommended but may sometimes be the only possibility to obtain high-quality images. Materials and methods: We retrospectively analyzed our data for CT perfusions performed with power injection of contrast material with an iodine concentration of 400 mg/ml via the distal 16G lumen of the Arrow three and five lumen central venous catheter with preset flow rates of 5 ml/s. Results: 104 examinations with central venous catheters were evaluated (67 with five lumen and 37 with three lumen). No complications were observed. Mean flow rates were 4.4 {+-} 0.5 ml/s using the three lumen catheter and 4.6 {+-} 0.6 ml/s using the five lumen catheter respectively. The mean injection pressure measured by the power injector was 200.7 {+-} 17.5 psi for the three lumen central venous catheter and 194.5 {+-} 6.5 psi for the five lumen catheter, respectively. Conclusion: Following a strict safety protocol there were no complications associated with power injections of contrast material containing 400 mg iodine/ml with preset flow rates up to 5 ml/s via the distal 16G lumen of the Arrow multi-lumen central venous catheter. However, since power-injections are off-label use with Arrow central venous catheters, this procedure cannot be recommended until potential safety hazards have been ruled out by the manufacturer.

  14. Safety and feasibility in highly concentrated contrast material power injections for CT-perfusion studies of the brain using central venous catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macht, Stephan; Beseoglu, Kerim; Eicker, Sven; Rybacki, Konrad; Braun, Sebastian; Mathys, Christian; Antoch, Gerald; Turowski, Bernd

    2012-08-01

    CT perfusion studies play an important role in the early detection as well as in therapy monitoring of vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage. High-flow injections via central venous catheters are not recommended but may sometimes be the only possibility to obtain high-quality images. We retrospectively analyzed our data for CT perfusions performed with power injection of contrast material with an iodine concentration of 400mg/ml via the distal 16G lumen of the Arrow three and five lumen central venous catheter with preset flow rates of 5ml/s. 104 examinations with central venous catheters were evaluated (67 with five lumen and 37 with three lumen). No complications were observed. Mean flow rates were 4.4±0.5ml/s using the three lumen catheter and 4.6±0.6ml/s using the five lumen catheter respectively. The mean injection pressure measured by the power injector was 200.7±17.5psi for the three lumen central venous catheter and 194.5±6.5psi for the five lumen catheter, respectively. Following a strict safety protocol there were no complications associated with power injections of contrast material containing 400mg iodine/ml with preset flow rates up to 5ml/s via the distal 16G lumen of the Arrow multi-lumen central venous catheter. However, since power-injections are off-label use with Arrow central venous catheters, this procedure cannot be recommended until potential safety hazards have been ruled out by the manufacturer. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Transvenous DSA: ECG-controlled cardial effects and venous complications after pre-atrial injection of nonionic contrast media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arlart, I.P.; Sigel, H.

    1986-09-01

    Transvenous DSA is a diagnostic technique for ambulatory examination that is well tolerated by patients, although it is commonly known that bolus injection of contrast medium for examination of the cardiovascular system may affect the cardiovascular hemodynamic process. The prospective study described was intended to reveal in 100 patients the effects on ECG data, as well as clinical symptoms of non-tolerance of contrast medium (nonionic, with high iodine content, Iopamidol 370), applied by central pre-atrial injection. In addition, catheterization-induced complications in the venous system of the arm were studied in 130 patients. Change of heart rate was the most frequent effect observed (increase in 49% of patients pretreated with Buscopan, decrease in 36% of non-pretreated patients). The second next effects were supraventricular and ventricular ES (20%), minor prolongations of PQ and QRS intervals (14%), and ST lowering (3%), without clinical symptons. In one case, an attack of Angina pectoris was observed, another patient developed a cutane allergy. After catheterization of brachial vein, thromboses were observed in 3% of patients, as well as local inflammations in 6%, short attacks of fever in 2.3%. The complications were observed for the most part in cases where re-sterilised catheters had been used.

  16. The standing heel-rise test: relation to chronic venous disorders and balance, gait, and walk time in injection drug users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieper, Barbara; Templin, Thomas N; Birk, Thomas J; Kirsner, Robert S

    2008-09-01

    Injection drug use can impair mobility. When mobility is impaired in combination with other potential pathologic changes to the veins, muscles, and joints of the lower legs, chronic venous disorders can develop. The heel-rise test, an assessment of eccentric-concentric muscle action of calf muscle function with regard to plantar flexion, can be used to measure ankle mobility. To examine the test-retest reliability and construct validity of the heel-rise test in relation to chronic venous disorders in persons with a history of injection drug use (N = 104), a test-retest study (M = 45.9+/-12.9 days from first to second test) was conducted. Participants were assessed for chronic venous disorders of the legs and walk time; they also completed the heel-rise and Tinetti Balance and Gait tests. Test-retest reliability was found to be good for full heel rise of right and left legs (ICC = .66 and .67, respectively). Heel-rise performance was positively correlated with balance (r = .38 to .47) and gait (r = .38 to .45) and negatively related to walk time (r = -.30 to -.35) (P test as a measure of calf muscle function is supported by these results, implicating the role of mobility restriction in the etiology of venous disease. Although more research is needed regarding its performance, the heel-rise test may be a low-cost, noninvasive screening or assessment tool in a variety of outpatient settings.

  17. Comparison of two low-dose calcium infusion schedules for localization of insulinomas by selective pancreatic arterial injection with hepatic venous sampling for insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braatvedt, G; Jennison, E; Holdaway, I M

    2014-01-01

    Localization of small insulinomas may be difficult. Selective pancreatic arterial injection of calcium with hepatic venous insulin measurement (SACST) has been used for this purpose, but can rarely cause hypoglycaemia. Two low-dose concentrations of calcium, 0·25 and 0·1 of the usual concentration used for the test, have been compared for sensitivity of localization and safety. Selective pancreatic arterial injection of calcium with hepatic venous insulin measurement was performed at calcium concentrations of 0·0025 (Protocol A) and 0·00625 (Protocol B) mEq calcium per kg. The standard concentration is 0·025 mEq/kg. Twenty one successive patients with biochemical evidence of insulinoma were studied. Using surgical localization as the gold standard, Protocol A had a sensitivity of 91% and Protocol B 75% for correct localization. The false-positive localization rate was 16%. No hypoglycaemia was observed. These results compare favourably with published data using the standard calcium concentration. Selective pancreatic arterial injection of calcium with hepatic venous insulin measurement was superior to localization by noninvasive imaging; in seven cases, SACST was correct when conventional imaging was negative (five) or false positive (two). Low concentrations of calcium are effective and safe when performing SACST for localization of insulinoma. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Risk of extravasation after power injection of contrast media via the proximal port of multilumen central venous catheters. Case report and review of the literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schummer, C.; Sakr, Y.; Reinhart, K. [Jena Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Anaestesiologie und Intensivtherapie; Steenbeck, J. [Jena Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Gugel, M. [Zentralklinik Bad Berka (Germany). Klinik fuer Anaesthesiologie und Intensivtherapie; Schummer, W. [SRH Zentralklinikum Suhl (Germany). Dept. of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine

    2010-01-15

    Multilumen central venous catheters (CVCs) are not commonly used for power injection. However, in critically ill patients, CVCs - most of which do not have FDA approval for power injection - may be the only available venous access. The pitfalls of multilumen CVCs are illustrated by a case report of a patient in whom extravasation of intravenously administered contrast medium occurred after power injection in a triple-lumen CVC using the lumen with the port furthest from the catheter tip. The underlying mechanisms for the displacement of the initially correctly placed right subclavian CVC could include elevation of both arms of the obese patient or the power injection itself. The distances between port openings and catheter tips of various commercially available multilumen CVCs are assessed. We examine the possible caveats of ECG-guided CVC placement for optimal tip position, discuss technical difficulties related to power injection via CVCs, and review commonly used drugs that may cause extravasation injury. Knowledge of the distances between CVC port openings and the catheter tip are essential for safe intravasal administration of fluids. (orig.)

  19. Contrast media power injection using central venous port catheters - results of an in vitro study; Kontrastmitteldruckinjektion in Portkathetersysteme - Ergebnisse einer In-vitro-Studie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gebauer, B. [Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde, Charite, Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Campus Buch, Berlin (Germany); Teichgraeber, U.K.M.; Hothan, T. [Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde, Charite, Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Berlin (Germany); Felix, R. [Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde, Charite, Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Campus Buch, Berlin (Germany); Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde, Charite, Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Berlin (Germany); Wagner, H.J. [Klinik fuer Strahlendiagnostik, Medizinisches Zentrum fuer Radiologie, Klinikum der Philipps-Univ., Marburg (Germany)

    2005-10-01

    Purpose: are implanted central venous port catheters suitable for contrast media pressure (power) injection in computed tomography? Material and methods: in an in vitro study 100 ml of contrast medium (Ultravist 370, Schering, Berlin, Deutschland) was injected through 20 different port catheter systems using a power injector (Stellant, Medrad, Inianola, USA) with a pressure limit of 325 PSI. The injection rate was increased from 2 ml/s to 10 ml/s in increments of 2 ml/s. The maximum injection pressure and maximum injection rate were assessed. Results: an injection rate of 2 ml/s was possible in all catheter systems. Injection rates of 4 ml/s in 18 systems, 6 ml/s in 13 systems and 8 ml/s in 6 systems were achieved. With a given pressure limit of 325 PSI an injection rate of 10 ml/s was not possible in any of the port catheter systems. There were no catheter ruptures, catheter disconnections or contrast extravasations noted. (orig.)

  20. Arterio-venous concentration difference of [51Cr]EDTA after a single injection in man. Significance of renal function and local blood flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehling, M; Hyldstrup, L; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl

    1989-01-01

    The present investigation was undertaken in order to study (1) the difference in arterial (Ca) and venous (Cv) concentration of [51Cr]EDTA (ethylenediaminetetraacetate) after a single intravenous injection, (2) the impact of different physiological variables on this difference, and (3) the error......, and 180-300 min post-injection (p.i.) Cv was 5.9% higher than Ca (range 0.5-13.9%, P less than 0.001). The more reduced renal function, the smaller was the concentration difference. The areas under the arterial and the venous plasma concentration curves did not differ significantly at either 0-infinity...... or 0-300 min p.i. whereas the venous area 0-100 min p.i. underestimated the arterial area in the same period by 4.1% (P less than 0.05). In a computer simulation model, variation in the forearm capillary permeability-surface area product did not have any significant influence on the Cv-Ca difference...

  1. Arterio-venous concentration difference of [51Cr]EDTA after a single injection in man. Significance of renal function and local blood flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehling, M; Hyldstrup, Lars; Henriksen, Jens Henrik

    1989-01-01

    introduced in the measurement of renal plasma clearance and total plasma clearance by using venous blood samples instead of arterial. In 13 patients with GFR ranging from 29 to 150 ml min-1, Ca was higher than Cv immediately after the injection. After mean 38 min (range 12-82 min) the two curves crossed......, and 180-300 min post-injection (p.i.) Cv was 5.9% higher than Ca (range 0.5-13.9%, P less than 0.001). The more reduced renal function, the smaller was the concentration difference. The areas under the arterial and the venous plasma concentration curves did not differ significantly at either 0-infinity......, whereas the difference was very sensitive to even small changes in forearm blood flow within the physiological range. For measurement of renal plasma clearance it is recommended to use one long period: from the time of injection until 300 min p.i. or longer. If the clearance period is too short, the use...

  2. [Venous ulcer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhler, Kornelia

    2016-06-01

    Venous disorders causing a permanent increase in venous pressure are by far the most frequent reason for ulcers of the lower extremity. With a prevalence of 1 % in the general population rising to 4 % in the elderly over 80 and its chronic character, 1 % of healthcare budgets of the western world are spent on treatment of venous ulcers. A thorough investigation of the underlying venous disorder is the prerequisite for a differenciated therapy. This should comprise elimination of venous reflux as well as local wound management. Chronic ulcers can successfully be treated by shave therapy and split skin grafting. Compression therapy is a basic measure not only in venous ulcer treatment but also in prevention of ulcer recurrence. Differential diagnosis which have to be considered are arterial ulcers, vasculitis and neoplasms.

  3. Venous Ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caprini, J.A.; Partsch, H.; Simman, R.

    2013-01-01

    Venous leg ulcers are the most frequent form of wounds seen in patients. This article presents an overview on some practical aspects concerning diagnosis, differential diagnosis and treatment. Duplex ultrasound investigations are essential to ascertain the diagnosis of the underlying venous pathology and to treat venous refluxes. Differential diagnosis includes mainly other vascular lesions (arterial, microcirculatory causes), hematologic and metabolic diseases, trauma, infection, malignancies. Patients with superficial venous incompetence may benefit from endovenous or surgical reflux abolition diagnosed by Duplex ultrasound. The most important basic component of the management is compression therapy, for which we prefer materials with low elasticity applied with high initial pressure (short-stretch bandages and Velcro-strap devices). Local treatment should be simple, absorbing and not sticky dressings keeping adequate moisture balance after debridement of necrotic tissue and biofilms are preferred. After the ulcer is healed compression therapy should be continued in order to prevent recurrence. PMID:26236636

  4. Combined magnetic resonance imaging of deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary arteries after a single injection of a blood pool contrast agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansch, Andreas; Neumann, Steffi; Baltzer, Pascal; Waginger, Matthias; Kaiser, Werner A.; Mentzel, Hans-Joachim [Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Jena (Germany); Betge, Stefan; Poehlmann, Gunther [Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Department of Internal Medicine I, Jena (Germany); Pfeil, Alexander; Wolf, Gunter [Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Department of Internal Medicine III, Jena (Germany); Boettcher, Joachim [SRH Klinikum Gera, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Gera (Germany)

    2011-02-15

    Agreement rate between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and Doppler ultrasound (DUS) for the detection of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in the lower extremities was attempted by using the intravascular MRI contrast agent gadofosveset trisodium. The potential of this method to detect pulmonary embolism (PE) was also evaluated. Forty-three consecutive inpatients with ultrasound-confirmed DVT but no clinical signs of PE were prospectively enrolled in this feasibility study. MRI was performed after a single injection of gadofosveset trisodium. The pulmonary arteries were imaged using a 3D Fast Low Angle Shot (FLASH) gradient recalled echo sequence. Additionally, pulmonary arteries, abdominal veins, pelvic and leg veins were imaged using a fat-suppressed 3D gradient echo Volume Interpolated Breath-hold Examination (VIBE FS). Gadofosveset trisodium-enhanced MRI detected more thrombi in the pelvic region, upper leg and lower leg than the initial DUS. In addition, PE was detected in 16 of the 43 DVT patients (37%). This study shows the feasibility of a combined protocol for the MRI diagnosis of DVT and PE using gadofosveset trisodium. This procedure is not only more sensitive in detecting DVT compared to standard DUS, but is also able to detect PE in asymptomatic patients. (orig.)

  5. Central venous catheter - flushing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000157.htm Central venous catheter - flushing To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. You have a central venous catheter. This is a tube that goes into a ...

  6. Intravitreal injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antibiotic - intravitreal injection; Triamcinolone - intravitreal injection; Dexamethasone - intravitreal injection; Lucentis - intravitreal injection; Avastin - intravitreal injection; Bevacizumab - intravitreal injection; Ranibizumab - intravitreal injection; ...

  7. Venous drainage of the face.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishi, S; Imanishi, N; Yoshimura, Y; Inoue, Y; Sakamoto, Y; Chang, H; Okumoto, T

    2017-04-01

    The venous anatomy of the face was examined in 12 fresh cadavers. Venograms and arteriovenograms were obtained after the injection of contrast medium. In 8 of the 12 cadavers, a large loop was formed by the facial vein, the supratrochlear vein, and the superficial temporal vein, which became the main trunk vein of the face. In 4 of the 12 cadavers, the superior lateral limb of the loop vein was less well developed. The loop vein generally did not accompany the arteries of the face. Cutaneous branches of the loop vein formed a polygonal venous network in the skin, while communicating branches ran toward deep veins. These findings suggest that blood from the dermis of the face is collected by the polygonal venous network and enters the loop vein through the cutaneous branches, after which blood flows away from the face through the superficial temporal vein, the facial vein, and the communicating branches and enters the deep veins. Copyright © 2016 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Cerebral venous angiomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnoli, A.L.; Hildebrandt, G.

    1985-01-01

    Clinical symptoms and radiological signs in 15 patients with cerebral venous malformations are presented and the diagnostic problems discussed. The circulation time in combination with cerebral malformations and angiomas of the scalp are described. CT findings in cases of venous malformations of the brain stem are evaluated. Spot-like enhancement, as well as sharply demarcated round shaped enhancement are characteristic for venous angiomas. Cavernous angiomas usually present as homogenous or inhomogenous round shaped enhanced areas. (Author).

  9. Persistent portal venous gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huurman, Volkert A L; Visser, Leo G; Steens, Stefan C A; Terpstra, Onno T; Schaapherder, Alexander F M

    2006-05-01

    This case report describes a patient diagnosed with ongoing portal venous gas, initiated by a rather common Campylobacter enterocolitis and maintained by septic thrombophlebitis and possibly by chronic cholecystitis. Cholecystectomy attenuated the patient's septic condition. The etiology of portal venous gas determines both the patient's prognosis and the choice for either conservative or surgical treatment. This report describes persistence of portal venous gas for a long period and a possible role for chronic cholecystitis as a cause.

  10. Lifestyle and venous thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pomp, Elisabeth Rebekka

    2008-01-01

    In the Multiple Environmental and Genetic Assessment of risk factors for venous thrombosis (MEGA study), a large population-based case-control study, we investigated lifestyle factors as risk factors for venous thrombosis. Overweight, smoking and alcohol consumption were addressed and pregnancy and

  11. Venous reflux on contrast-enhanced head and neck magnetic resonance angiography: Analysis of causative factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Dong Jae; Lee, Eun Ja [Dept. of Radiology, Dongguk University Ilsan Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Jong Myon [Dept. of Preventive Medicine, Jeju National University School of Medicine, Jeju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the causative factors of venous reflux on contrast-enhanced head and neck magnetic resonance angiography. We retrospectively reviewed 150 patients with right-arm injections and 150 patients with left-arm injections. We included the age, gender, body mass index, history of hypertension, and history of diabetes mellitus in the evaluation of all patients. We measured the shortest width of the left or right brachiocephalic vein (BCV), the diameter of the aortic arch, and the distance between the sternum and vertebral body. The relationship between these factors and the venous reflux was analyzed. In patients with venous reflux, we performed qualitative image scoring for suboptimal images. In patients with venous reflux, the image quality of the left-arm injection group was significantly inferior to the image quality of the right-arm injection group. The mean age and the male-to-female ratio of patients with venous reflux were significantly higher than those of patients without venous reflux. In patients receiving the left-arm injection, the mean shortest width of the left BCV was significantly narrower in patients with venous reflux than in patients without venous reflux. A left-arm injection should be avoided, especially in elderly patients, to acquire an optimal image.

  12. [Developmental venous anomaly (DVA)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, A; Hagen, T; Ahlhelm, F; Viera, J; Reith, W; Schulte-Altedorneburg, G

    2007-10-01

    As congenital anatomic variants of venous drainage, developmental venous anomalies (DVA) represent up to 60% of all cerebral vascular malformations. The prior term "venous angioma" is a misnomer implicating an abnormal vascular structure with an increased bleeding risk. They are often found incidentally and are hardly ever symptomatic. Their morphologic characteristics are dilated vessels in the white matter, which converge on a greater collector vein, forming the typical caput medusae. They drain into the superficial or deep venous system. The frequent association with other, potentially bleeding-prone vascular malformations is clinically relevant, in particular cavernous angioma, which might require therapeutic action. Therefore, coincident vascular lesions need to be actively sought by appropriate additional imaging techniques.

  13. Venous thrombosis: an overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, C.W.

    1986-07-01

    Venous thromboembolic disease contributes to morbidity and mortality in certain groups of hospitalized patients, particularly those who have undergone surgery. Although principles of treatment have changed relatively little during the past 20 years, significant advances have been made in the diagnosis of deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Venography, once the only reliable diagnostic technique, has been largely replaced by noninvasive tests: impedance plethysmography, venous Doppler, /sup 125/I-radiofibrinogen-uptake test, and phleborheography. Virchow's triad of stasis, vessel injury, and hypercoagulability remains a valid explanation of the pathogenesis of thrombus formation, but laboratory and clinical data have refined our knowledge of how these factors interact to result in clinically significant disease. Knowledge of the natural history of venous thrombosis, plus heightened awareness of the long-term morbidity and expense associated with the postphlebitic syndrome, have led to increased interest in preventing DVT. Clinically and economically, venous thrombosis is best managed by prevention. 61 references.

  14. Venous ulcer review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevis, Paul; Earnshaw, Jonothan

    2011-01-01

    Clinical question: What is the best treatment for venous ulcers? Results: Compression aids ulcer healing. Pentoxifylline can aid ulcer healing. Artificial skin grafts are more effective than other skin grafts in helping ulcer healing. Correction of underlying venous incompetence reduces ulcer recurrence. Implementation: Potential pitfalls to avoid are: Failure to exclude underlying arterial disease before application of compression.Unusual-looking ulcers or those slow to heal should be biopsied to exclude malignant transformation. PMID:21673869

  15. Venous ulcer review

    OpenAIRE

    Bevis, Paul; Earnshaw, Jonothan

    2011-01-01

    Paul Bevis, Jonothan Earnshaw Department of Vascular Surgery, Gloucestershire Royal Hospital, Great Western Road, Gloucester, UKDate of preparation: 3 February 2011Conflict of interest: None declared.Clinical question: What is the best treatment for venous ulcers?Results: Compression aids ulcer healing. Pentoxifylline can aid ulcer healing. Artificial skin grafts are more effective than other skin grafts in helping ulcer healing. Correction of underlying venous incompetence reduces ulcer recu...

  16. Hormonal contraception and venous thromboembolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lidegaard, Øjvind; Milsom, Ian; Geirsson, Reynir Tomas

    2012-01-01

    New studies about the influence of hormonal contraception on the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) have been published.......New studies about the influence of hormonal contraception on the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) have been published....

  17. Models of the venous system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehlsen, J

    2000-01-01

    of the venous system require at least three elements: a resistor, a capacitor and an inductor, with the latter being of more importance in the venous than in the arterial system. Non-linearities must be considered in pressure/flow relations in the small venules, during venous collapse, or low flow conditions...

  18. Venous oxygen saturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartog, Christiane; Bloos, Frank

    2014-12-01

    Early detection and rapid treatment of tissue hypoxia are important goals. Venous oxygen saturation is an indirect index of global oxygen supply-to-demand ratio. Central venous oxygen saturation (ScvO2) measurement has become a surrogate for mixed venous oxygen saturation (SvO2). ScvO2 is measured by a catheter placed in the superior vena cava. After results from a single-center study suggested that maintaining ScvO2 values >70% might improve survival rates in septic patients, international practice guidelines included this target in a bundle strategy to treat early sepsis. However, a recent multicenter study with >1500 patients found that the use of central hemodynamic and ScvO2 monitoring did not improve long-term survival when compared to the clinical assessment of the adequacy of circulation. It seems that if sepsis is recognized early, a rapid initiation of antibiotics and adequate fluid resuscitation are more important than measuring venous oxygen saturation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Anatomical evaluation of penile venous system by CT cavernosography in patients with erectile dysfunction and venous leakage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Famili

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Erectile dysfunction is an important problem in men and an organic cause is found in about 50% of cases. When a vasculogenic etiology is suspected, imaging assessments are of great help. Cavernosography is traditionally recognized as an imaging modality for evaluation of venous leakage in men with impotency. We employed CT cavernosography as a novel technique for demonstrating penile venous anatomy and leaking veins.Methods: In the present case series study, we recruited 45 patients with erectile dysfunction by convenient sampling at Hazrat Rasoul Akram Hospital in Tehran, Iran, during one year (1390. The patients had previously been diagnosed with venous incompetency by Doppler study. After intracavernosal injection of prostaglandin E1, we injected sterile normal saline into the corpora cavernosa to achieve penile erection. Later, we injected contrast media into the corpus cavernosum, which was followed by CT scan of the penis and pelvic area to show the venous anatomy and leakage sites.Results: The mean age of the patients was 35.8±8.9 years. 36 (80% patients had venous leakage in crural veins, 27 (60% in cavernosal veins, 27 (60% in circumflex veins, 24 (52.3% in urethral veins, 21 (46.7% in deep dorsal vein, 3 (6.7% in para-arterial veins and 3 (6.7% in corpus spongiosum. Conclusion: The results of this study show the high prevalence of venous leakage in patients referring for erectile dysfunction. Moreover, CT cavernosography was shown to be a useful method for evaluating penile venous system and its related leakage sites which are important for surgical planning.

  20. Venous ulcer: what is new?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffetto, Joseph D; Marston, William A

    2011-01-01

    The pathophysiology of venous dermal abnormality in chronic venous ulcers is reflective of a complex interplay that involves sustained venous hypertension, inflammation, changes in the microcirculation, cytokine and matrix metalloproteinase activation, and altered cellular function. Red blood cells and macromolecules extravasate into the interstitium and activate endothelial cells. Endothelial expression of specific adhesion molecules recruits leukocytes and causes diapedesis of these cells into the dermal microvasculature, promoting an inflammatory response with activation of cytokines and proteinases. Altered cell function enhances a state of vulnerability in the surrounding tissues, initiating specific changes associated with venous disease. Ultimately, the persistent inflammatory-proteinase activity leads to advanced chronic venous insufficiency and ulcer formation. The mainstay of therapy in venous ulcer abnormality is correction of the underlying venous hypertension through compression therapy and/or surgery. Understanding the science involved in the pathophysiology of venous ulcer formation has led to the development of adjunctive treatment directed at the dysregulated molecular pathways. Randomized clinical trials are critical for determining the most effective evidence-based treatments for venous ulcer, and this review discusses important trials that have had a significant impact on venous ulcer healing. In addition, the authors have included subsections referred to as "Translational Implications for Therapy" in the basic science sections of the review to help bridge the basic science knowledge with clinical applications that may help to modulate the molecular abnormalities in the pathophysiologic cascade leading to venous ulcers.

  1. Medroxyprogesterone Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medroxyprogesterone intramuscular (into a muscle) injection and medroxyprogesterone subcutaneous (under the skin) injection are used to prevent pregnancy. Medroxyprogesterone subcutaneous injection is also used to treat endometriosis ( ...

  2. Genetics in chronic venous disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Yasmin; Onida, Sarah; Davies, Alun

    2017-02-01

    Chronic venous disease is highly prevalent in the Western world, with varicose veins being the most common form of clinical manifestation. With recent developments in sequencing technology, clinicians and geneticists alike are embarking on a journey to identify and unravel the genetic candidates of chronic venous disease. There is now currently substantial evidence to suggest the presence of genetic influences in the aetiology and pathology of venous disease. Despite this, the precise nature and profile of the genes involved in chronic venous disease remain a poorly understood entity. Moreover, it is strikingly apparent that the majority of venous genetic studies conducted over the past decade do not adhere to fundamental research principles. The emergence of high-throughput genotyping platforms permits a more systematic search for inherited components of venous disease. Pursuing a genome-wide frontier has the potential to reveal novel critical metabolic pathways and explain the genetic susceptibility of chronic venous disease. An expedited knowledge of the genetic factors in the aetiology of venous disease may translate into better prevention or treatment, which would benefit patients suffering from its clinical sequelae. Researchers should be urged to foster collaborative links and design a genome-wide case-control association study as an international consortium to provide a statistically robust paradigm in the field of chronic venous disease genetics. This will carry promise for clinically relevant progress and represent a first step towards better understanding of the genetics of chronic venous disease aetiology.

  3. Sumatriptan Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsuma® Injection ... Imitrex® Injection ... Sumavel® Injection ... Sumatriptan injection is used to treat the symptoms of migraine headaches (severe, throbbing headaches that sometimes are accompanied by ...

  4. Intracranial Connections of the Vertebral Venous Plexus: Anatomical Study with Application to Neurosurgical and Endovascular Procedures at the Craniocervical Junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubbs, R Shane; Demerdash, Amin; Loukas, Marios; Curé, Joel; Oskouian, Rod J; Ansari, Shaheryar; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A

    2018-01-01

    Descriptions of intracranial extensions of vertebral venous plexuses are lacking. To identify vertebral venous plexuses at the craniocervical junction in cadavers and describe them. The authors dissected 15 ink-injected, formalin-fixed, adult cadaveric heads and measured cranial extensions of the spinal venous plexuses. All specimens had vertebral venous plexuses at the craniocervical junction composed of multiple interwoven vessels concentrated anteriorly (anterior vertebral plexuses), posteriorly (posterior vertebral venous plexuses), and laterally (lateral vertebral venous plexuses). Veins making up the plexus tended to be largest for the anterior internal vertebral venous plexus. On 33%, a previously unnamed lateral internal vertebral venous plexus was identified that connected to the lateral marginal sinus. The anterior external vertebral venous plexus connected to the basilar venous plexus via transclival emissary veins in 13%; remaining veins connected either intracranially via small perforating branches through the anterior atlanto-occipital membrane (33%) or had no direct gross connections inside the cranium (53%). The anterior internal vertebral plexus, which traveled between layers of the posterior longitudinal ligament, connected to the anterior half of the marginal sinus in 33% and anterolateral parts of the marginal sinus in 20%. The posterior internal venous plexus connected to the posterior aspect of the marginal sinus on 80% and into the occipital sinus in 13.3%. The posterior external venous plexus connected to veins of the hypoglossal canal in 20% and into the posterior aspect of the marginal sinus in 13.3%. Knowledge of these connections is useful to neurosurgeons and interventional radiologists.

  5. Endoscopic injection sclerotherapy for bleeding varices in children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Endoscopic injection sclerotherapy for bleeding varices in children with intrahepatic and extrahepatic portal venous obstruction: Benefit of injection tract embolisation. ... In a previous study at our institution, sclerotherapy was associated with a high re-bleeding rate and oesophageal ulceration. Embolisation of the injection ...

  6. Lornoxicam use to reduce the pain associated with propofol injection

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nihal Başak

    2017-04-28

    ]. Just as propofol is used ... ulcer or non-acceptance of the procedure. Using a computer-generated randomisation pro- .... injection of 0.5 mg/kg lidocaine, which causes venous occlusion, before the administration of propofol ...

  7. Understanding Guyton's venous return curves

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Beard, Daniel A; Feigl, Eric O

    2011-01-01

    ...) was experimentally increased the right atrial pressure decreased, Arthur Guyton and coworkers proposed an interpretation that right atrial pressure represents a back pressure restricting venous return...

  8. Orbital venous pattern in relation to extraorbital venous drainage and superficial lymphatic vessels in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloveska, Marcela; Kresakova, Lenka; Vdoviakova, Katarina; Petrovova, Eva; Elias, Mario; Panagiotis, Artemiou; Andrejcakova, Zuzana; Supuka, Peter; Purzyc, Halina; Kissova, Viktoria

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the normal and variant anatomy of extraorbital and intraorbital venous drainage together with retroorbital communication, and determine the lymphatic drainage from the superficial orbital region with a potential outlet of lymphatic vessel into the venous bloodstream. The study of the venous system was carried out on 32 Wistar rats by using corrosion casts methods and radiography, while the lymphatic system was studied in 12 Wistar rats following ink injection. Superficially, orbital veins are connected with extraorbital veins running through angular vein of the eye and the superficial temporal vein, and via the pterygoid plexus with the maxillary vein, which provide readily accessible communication routes in the spread of infection. The extent of intraorbital and periorbital venous drainage was ensured by the dorsal and ventral external ophthalmic vein through the infraorbital vein, which together formed the principal part of the ophthalmic plexus. Venous drainage of the eyeball was carried out mainly by the vortex veins, ciliary veins and internal ophthalmic vein. The highest variability, first presented by differences in structural arrangement and formation of anastomoses, was observed within the ventral external ophthalmic vein (22 cases) and the medial vortex vein (10 cases). Four vortex veins, one vein in each quadrant of the eye, were observed in rats. The vortex vein located on the ventral side of the eyeball was occasionally found as two veins (in four cases) in the present study. The lymphatic vessel from the lower eyelid entered into the mandibular lymph centre, and from the upper eyelid entered into the superficial cervical lymph centre, but both drained into the deep cranial cervical lymph node. The direct entry of lymph entering the veins without passing through lymph nodes was not observed.

  9. Venous function after pharmacomechanical thrombolysis for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Chronic venous insufficiency is an important complication following iliofemoral deep venous thrombosis. Early thrombus removal may preserve venous function and prevent this complication. This study represents the largest reported South African series of pharmacomechanical thrombolysis for iliofemoral ...

  10. The treatment of venous ulcers of the lower extremities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Venous hypertension from failure of proper venous valve function in the veins of thelower extremities causes changes over time in the microcirculation of the skin of the distal extremity. These changes set the stage for the development of a chronic nonhealing ulceration, which typically occurs at the ankle. The mainstay of treatment has been conservative, with compression dressings and elevation of the extremity. However, results have been less than satisfactory because of delay in healing and high recurrence rates after successful healing. Elimination of the venous hypertension should be the goal of therapy using more recent minimally invasive surgical techniques, including ablation of incompetent truncal veins with laser or radiofrequency energy and use of ultrasound-guided foam sclerosant injections to close incompetent perforator veins that are frequently found in or near the ulcer bed. This approach will shorten ulcer healing time and reduce recurrence rates as well as patient suffering and expense. PMID:17948110

  11. Central venous catheter - dressing change

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000156.htm Central venous catheter - dressing change To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. You have a central venous catheter. This is a tube that goes into a ...

  12. Chronic Venous Disease under pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.W.I. Reeder (Suzan)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractIn chapter 1 we provide a general introduction of this thesis. Chronic venous disease (CVD) is a common medical condition that affects 2-64% of the worldwide population and leads to leg ulcers in 1% of the Western population. Venous leg ulceration (VLU) has an unfavorable prognosis with

  13. Venous Thromboembolism in Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneta Samková

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE during childhood is low with two peaks – neonatal and adolescent age. This retrospective study is focused on clinical characteristics of VTE during adolescence. The main goals are to assess the most frequent inherited and acquired risk factors and to evaluate the benefit of D-dimers in diagnostics of venous thromboemblism. The data of 18 adolescents were analysed – 16 girls (88.9%, 2 boys (11.1%. In 9 patients (50% thrombosis of the lower limb deep veins was diagnosed, six patients (33.3% suffered from symptomatic pulmonary embolism (PE and 3 patients (16.7% from thrombosis at unusual sites. One patient had an idiopathic VTE, the mean number of the inherited and acquired risk factors was 2.6. The most frequent inherited risk factor was Leiden mutation of factor V (27.8%. The most frequent acquired risk factor was oral contraception (OC in 12 out of 16 girls (75%. All of our patients on oral contraception had one or more additional risk factors. 10 out of 18 (55.6% patients with VTE had elevated activity of factor VIII. The sensitivity of D-dimers was low (50% in patients with distal lower limb thrombosis, but very high (100% in patients with PE.

  14. Adalimumab Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humira® Injection ... Adalimumab injection is used alone or with other medications to relieve the symptoms of certain autoimmune disorders (conditions in ... some areas of the body) in adults. Adalimumab injection is in a class of medications called tumor ...

  15. Oxacillin Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxacillin injection is used to treat infections caused by certain bacteria. Oxacillin injection is in a class of medications called penicillins. ... works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as oxacillin injection will not work for colds, flu, or other ...

  16. Rituximab Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rituximab injection (Rituxan) and rituximab and hyaluronidase human injection (Rituxin Hycela) are used alone or with other medications to ... that begins in the white blood cells). Rituximab injection is also used with another medication to treat ...

  17. Fluorouracil Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrucil® Injection ... Fluorouracil injection comes as a solution (liquid) to be given intravenously (into a vein) by a doctor or nurse ... you are feeling during your treatment with fluorouracil injection.

  18. Ondansetron Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zofran® Injection ... Ondansetron injection is used to prevent nausea and vomiting caused by cancer chemotherapy and surgery. Ondansetron is in a ... medications: or any of the ingredients in ondansetron injection. Ask your pharmacist for a list of the ...

  19. Romiplostim Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or may tell you to stop taking these medications if romiplostim injection works well for you.Romiplostim injection does not ... will give you the manufacturer's patient information sheet (Medication ... romiplostim injection. Read the information carefully and ask your doctor ...

  20. Placement of an implantable central venous access device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Hoon; Lee, Young Suk [Dan Kook Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Hospital

    1998-03-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of placement of a central venous catheter with infusion port into the superior vena cava. Central venous catheters with a infusion port were implanted in 21 patients (M:F=4:17, age range:15-63, mean age: 41) diagnosed as suffering from breast cancer (n=9), lymphoma (n=7), thymoma (n=2) rhabdomyosarcoma(n=2) and rectal cancer (n=1). The per(n=9), lymphoma(n=7), thymoma (n=2) rhabdomyosarcoma (n=2) and rectal cancer (n=1). The peripheral portion of the subclavian vein was punctured under fluoroscopic guidance during injection of contrast media at the site of the ipsilateral peripheral vein (20 cases) and under ultrasonographic guidance (1 case). 9.6F central venous catheters placed in the superior vena cava via the subclavian vein and the connected infusion ports were implanted in the subcutaneous pocket near the puncture site of the right anterosuperior chest wall. Radiologic placement under fluoroscopic guidance of a central venous catheter with a infusion port is easy, safe and useful for patients requiring long-term venous access. (author). 21 refs., 2 figs.

  1. Scintigraphic imaging of lower-extremity acute venous thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carretta, R F

    1998-01-01

    The need for a radiopharmaceutical that will yield a definitive diagnosis of acute venous thrombosis in the lower extremities is evident from (1) the current difficulty in making a diagnosis on the basis of clinical signs and symptoms alone; (2) the sometimes inadequate or less sensitive diagnosis made on the basis of contrast venography or ultrasound; and (3) the need to prevent pulmonary embolism, death, and other long-term sequelae that may result from undetected acute venous thrombosis. A new radiopharmaceutical was recently approved for use in the scintigraphic imaging of acute venous thrombosis in the lower extremities of patients who have signs and symptoms of acute venous thrombosis. This radiopharmaceutical (ACUTECT) is a complex of the small synthetic peptide apcitide and the radionuclide technetium (Tc) 99m (99mTc-apcitide). Apcitide binds to glycoprotein IIb/IIIa receptors, which are expressed on the surface of activated platelets, making the radiopharmaceutical specific for acute, not chronic, thrombi. 99mTc-Apcitide allows accurate imaging of the entire lower extremities, including the calf. It has an excellent safety profile, is easy to administer by injection into an antecubital vein, and allows early imaging of acute deep-vein thrombosis (10 to 60 minutes postinjection). 99mTc-Apcitide may be used as an alternative to contrast venography and a complement to ultrasonography in the detection of acute venous thrombosis in the lower extremities.

  2. Cerebral venous thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, José Manuel; Canhão, Patrícia; Aguiar de Sousa, Diana

    2016-12-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) has an incidence of 1.32/100,000/years in high-income countries, and higher in middle- and low-income countries. CVT is more frequent in infants and children young adults and females, especially during pregnancy/puerperium. CVT are now being diagnosed with increasing frequency because of the increased awareness and higher use of magnetic resonance imaging (MR) for investigating patients with acute and subacute headaches and new onset seizures. CVT rarely present as a stroke syndrome. Their most frequent presentations are isolated headache, intracranial hypertension syndrome, seizures, a lobar syndrome and encephalopathy. The confirmation of the diagnosis of CVT relies on the demonstration of thrombi in the cerebral veins and/or sinuses by MR/MR venography or veno CT. The more frequent risk factors/associated conditions for CVT are genetic prothrombotic conditions, antiphospholipid syndrome and other acquired prothrombotic diseases, including cancer, oral contraceptives, puerperium and pregnancy, infections and trauma. The prognosis of CVT is in general favorable, as acute death rate is below 5% and only 15% of the patients remain dependent or die. Treatment in the acute phase includes management of the associated condition, anticoagulation with either low molecular weight or unfractionated heparin, treatment of intracranial hypertension, prevention of recurrent seizures and headache relief. In patients in severe condition on admission or who deteriorate despite anticoagulation, local thrombolysis or thrombectomy is an option. Decompressive surgery is lifesaving in patients with large venous infarcts or hemorrhage with impending herniation. After the acute phase, patients should anticoagulated for a variable period of time, depending on their inherent thrombotic risk. CVT patients may experience recurrent seizures. Prophylaxis with anti-epileptic drugs is recommended after the first seizure, in those with hemispheric lesions. There

  3. Venous chest anatomy: clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasen, M H; Charnsangavej, C

    1998-03-01

    This article provides a practical approach to the clinical implications and importance of understanding the collateral venous anatomy of the thorax. Routine radiography, conventional venography, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging studies provide correlative anatomic models for the demonstration of how interconnecting collateral vascular networks within the thorax maintain venous stability at all times. Five major systems comprise the collateral venous network of the thorax (Fig. 1). These include the paravertebral, azygos-hemiazygos, internal mammary, lateral thoracic, and anterior jugular venous systems (AJVS). The five systems are presented in the following sequence: (a) a brief introduction to the importance of catheter position and malposition in understanding access to the thoracic venous system, (b) the anatomy of the azygos-hemiazygos systems and their relationship with the paravertebral plexus, (c) the importance of the AJVS, (d) 'loop' concepts interconnecting the internal mammary and azygos-hemiazygos systems by means of the lateral thoracic and intercostal veins, and (e) the interconnecting venous networks on the thoracic side of the thoracoabdominal junction. Certain aspects of the venous anatomy of the thorax will not be discussed in this chapter and include (a) the intra-abdominal anastomoses between the superior and inferior vena cavae (IVC) via the internal mammary, lateral thoracic, and azygos-hemiazygos systems (beyond the scope of this article), (b) potential collateral vessels involving vertebral, parascapular, thyroidal, thymic, and other smaller veins that might anastomose with the major systems, and (c) anatomic variants and pitfalls that may mimic pathologic conditions (space limitations).

  4. Ibandronate Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boniva® Injection ... Ibandronate injection is used to treat osteoporosis (a condition in which the bones become thin and weak and break ... Ibandronate injection comes as a solution (liquid) to be injected into a vein by a doctor or nurse in ...

  5. Tocilizumab Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or the syringe and do not inject the medication.You may inject tocilizumab injection on the front of the thighs or anywhere ... your doctor about the risks of receiving this medication.Tocilizumab injection may cause other side effects. Call your doctor ...

  6. Certolizumab Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... package or the syringe. Do not inject the medication.You may inject certolizumab injection anywhere on your stomach or thighs except your ... your doctor about the risks of receiving this medication.Certolizumab injection may cause other side effects. Call your doctor ...

  7. Sarilumab Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for RA or who could not take these medications. Sarilumab injection is in a class of medications called interleukin- ... are any problems and do not inject the medication.You may inject sarilumab injection on the front of the thighs or anywhere ...

  8. Doppler ultrasound study and venous mapping in chronic venous insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Carriazo, M; Gómez de las Heras, C; Mármol Vázquez, P; Ramos Solís, M F

    2016-01-01

    Chronic venous insufficiency of the lower limbs is very prevalent. In recent decades, Doppler ultrasound has become the method of choice to study this condition, and it is considered essential when surgery is indicated. This article aims to establish a method for the examination, including venous mapping and preoperative marking. To this end, we review the venous anatomy of the lower limbs and the pathophysiology of chronic venous insufficiency and explain the basic hemodynamic concepts and the terminology required to elaborate a radiological report that will enable appropriate treatment planning and communication with other specialists. We briefly explain the CHIVA (the acronym for the French term "cure conservatrice et hémodynamique de l'insuffisance veineuse en ambulatoire"=conservative hemodynamic treatment for chronic venous insufficiency) strategy, a minimally invasive surgical strategy that aims to restore correct venous hemodynamics without resecting the saphenous vein. Copyright © 2015 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Central Venous Catheter (Central Line)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... venous catheter (KATHeter), also known as a central line or CVC, is long, soft, thin, hollow tube ... into a large vein (blood vessel). A central line is much like an intravenous (IV) catheter that ...

  10. Clinical overview of venous thromboembolism

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    circulation, causing either partial or complete obstruction of pulmonary blood flow (in 4–13% of ... Keywords:anticoagulants, deep vein thrombosis, DVT, embolus, NOAC, PE, pulmonary embolism, thromboprophylaxis, thrombus, venous thromboembolism ... Cigarette smoking, including passive smoking. Hypercoagulability ...

  11. Heritability of chronic venous disease

    OpenAIRE

    Fiebig, Andreas; Krusche, Petra; De Wolf, Andreas; Krawczak, Michael; Timm, Birgitt; Nikolaus, Susanna; Frings, Norbert; Schreiber, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Varicose veins without skin changes have a prevalence of approximately 20% in Northern and Western Europe whereas advanced chronic venous insufficiency affects about 3% of the population. Genetic risk factors are thought to play an important role in the aetiology of both these chronic venous diseases (CVD). We evaluated the relative genetic and environmental impact upon CVD risk by estimating the heritability of the disease in 4,033 nuclear families, comprising 16,434 individuals from all ove...

  12. Neonatal Venous Thromboembolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina M. Haley

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Neonates are the pediatric population at highest risk for development of venous thromboembolism (VTE, and the incidence of VTE in the neonatal population is increasing. This is especially true in the critically ill population. Several large studies indicate that the incidence of neonatal VTE is up almost threefold in the last two decades. Central lines, fluid fluctuations, sepsis, liver dysfunction, and inflammation contribute to the risk profile for VTE development in ill neonates. In addition, the neonatal hemostatic system is different from that of older children and adults. Platelet function, pro- and anticoagulant proteins concentrations, and fibrinolytic pathway protein concentrations are developmentally regulated and generate a hemostatic homeostasis that is unique to the neonatal time period. The clinical picture of a critically ill neonate combined with the physiologically distinct neonatal hemostatic system easily fulfills the criteria for Virchow’s triad with venous stasis, hypercoagulability, and endothelial injury and puts the neonatal patient at risk for VTE development. The presentation of a VTE in a neonate is similar to that of older children or adults and is dependent upon location of the VTE. Ultrasound is the most common diagnostic tool employed in identifying neonatal VTE, but relatively small vessels of the neonate as well as frequent low pulse pressure can make ultrasound less reliable. The diagnosis of a thrombophilic disorder in the neonatal population is unlikely to change management or outcome, and the role of thrombophilia testing in this population requires further study. Treatment of neonatal VTE is aimed at reducing VTE-associated morbidity and mortality. Recommendations for treating, though, cannot be extrapolated from guidelines for older children or adults. Neonates are at risk for bleeding complications, particularly younger neonates with more fragile intracranial vessels. Developmental alterations in the

  13. Palmar contracture release with arterialized venous instep flap: An anatomical and clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zor, Fatih; Yalçın, Bülent; Tekin, Levent; Eski, Muhitdin; Işık, Selcuk; Şengezer, Mustafa

    2015-07-01

    Plantar skin has similar histologic features to the palmar area and appears to be the ideal tissue for reconstruction of the palmar region. In this study, an anatomic examination was performed to determine the superficial venous architecture of the instep area, and the use of arterialized venous instep flaps for palmar contracture release was assessed. The anatomical study was performed on 12 fresh cadaver feet. The arterialized venous instep flap, including the skin, subcutaneous tissue and superficial venous plexus, was harvested. To determine the venous structure, dissection (n = 6) and injection-corrosion (n = 6) techniques were used. In the clinical study, nine arterialized venous instep flaps were used for palmar contracture release. All flaps were harvested above the deep fascia and included skin, subcutaneous fat, and the superficial venous plexus. At the plantar site of the flap, two or three veins, one of which was used, were dissected for a sufficient length for the arterial anastomosis. The saphenous vein was used for the venous anastomosis. Dissection and injection-corrosion techniques revealed that the flap had 7-12 and 4-6 veins at its plantar and superior edges, respectively, with numerous anastomoses and interconnections between the veins. The flap dimensions were between 3 × 5 cm and 4 × 6 cm. All flaps survived, with two partial flap necrosis that healed with spontaneous epithelization. No debulking procedures were undertaken and all flaps adapted well to the recipient site. The arterialized venous instep flap is a good alternative to reconstruct palmar contractures by adding similar tissue that is thin and pliable with minimal donor site morbidity. Copyright © 2015 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Tacrolimus Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tacrolimus injection is used along with other medications to prevent rejection (attack of the transplanted organ by ... who have received kidney, liver, or heart transplants. Tacrolimus injection should only be used by people who ...

  15. Naltrexone Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivitrol® ... Naltrexone injection is used along with counseling and social support to help people who have stopped drinking large amounts of alcohol to avoid drinking again. Naltrexone injection is also used along with counseling and social ...

  16. Cefazolin Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cefazolin injection is used to treat certain infections caused by bacteria including skin, bone, joint, genital, blood, heart valve, ... pneumonia), biliary tract, and urinary tract infections. Cefazolin injection also may be used before, during, and sometimes ...

  17. Mipomersen Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mipomersen injection is used to decrease levels of cholesterol and other fatty substances in the blood in people who ... that removes LDL from the blood), but mipomersen injection should not be used along with this treatment. ...

  18. Denosumab Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denosumab injection (Prolia) is used to treat osteoporosis (a condition in which the bones become thin and weak and ... not respond to other medications for osteoporosis. Denosumab injection (Prolia) is also used to treat bone loss ...

  19. Ampicillin Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ampicillin injection is used to treat certain infections that are caused by bacteria such as meningitis (infection of the ... heart, urinary tract, and gastrointestinal tract infections. Ampicillin injection is in a class of medications called penicillins. ...

  20. Cefotetan Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cefotetan injection is used to treat infections of the lungs, skin, bones, joints, stomach area, blood, female reproductive organs, and urinary tract. Cefotetan injection is also used before surgery to prevent infections. ...

  1. Eculizumab Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eculizumab injection is used to treat paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH: a type of anemia in which too many red ... oxygen to all parts of the body). Eculizumab injection is also used to treat atypical hemolytic uremic ...

  2. Tigecycline Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tigecycline injection used to treat certain serious infections including community acquired pneumonia (a lung infection that developed in a ... area between the chest and the waist). Tigecycline injection should not be used to treat pneumonia that ...

  3. Estrogen Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... estradiol cypionate and estradiol valerate forms of estrogen injection are used to treat hot flushes (hot flashes; ... consider a different treatment. These forms of estrogen injection are also sometimes used to treat the symptoms ...

  4. Ceftazidime Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceftazidime injection is used to treat certain infections caused by bacteria including pneumonia and other lower respiratory tract (lung) ... female genital tract, and urinary tract infections. Ceftazidime injection is in a class of medications called cephalosporin ...

  5. Tobramycin Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobramycin injection is used to treat certain serious infections that are caused by bacteria such as meningitis (infection of ... lungs, skin, bones, joints, and urinary tract. Tobramycin injection is in a class of medications called aminoglycoside ...

  6. Cefoxitin Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cefoxitin injection is used to treat infections caused by bacteria including pneumonia and other lower respiratory tract (lung) infections; ... organs, blood, bone, joint, and skin infections. Cefoxitin injection may also be used before and during surgery, ...

  7. Naloxone Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naloxone injection and naloxone prefilled auto-injection device (Evzio) are used along with emergency medical treatment to reverse the life-threatening effects of a known or suspected opiate (narcotic) ...

  8. Cyanocobalamin Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyanocobalamin injection is used to treat and prevent a lack of vitamin B12 that may be caused by any ... organs) and permanent damage to the nerves. Cyanocobalamin injection also may be given as a test to ...

  9. Dulaglutide Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulaglutide injection is used with a diet and exercise program to control blood sugar levels in adults with type ... medications did not control levels well enough. Dulaglutide injection is not used to treat type 1 diabetes ( ...

  10. Mitoxantrone Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitoxantrone injection is used to decrease the number of symptom episodes and slow the development of disability in patients with certain forms of multiple sclerosis (MS). Mitoxantrone injection is also used together with steroid medications to ...

  11. Testosterone Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and testosterone pellet (Testopel) are forms of testosterone injection used to treat symptoms of low testosterone in ... are low before you begin to use testosterone injection. Testosterone enanthate (Delatestryl) and testosterone pellet (Testopel) are ...

  12. Cefepime Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cefepime injection is used to treat certain infections caused by bacteria including pneumonia, and skin, urinary tract, and kidney infections. Cefepime injection is used in combination with metronidazole (Flagyl) to ...

  13. Ranitidine Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranitidine injection is used in people who are hospitalized to treat certain conditions in which the stomach produces too ... were not successfully treated with other medications. Ranitidine injection is also used on a short-term basis ...

  14. Gentamicin Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentamicin injection is used to treat certain serious infections that are caused by bacteria such as meningitis (infection of ... lungs, skin, bones, joints, and urinary tract. Gentamicin injection is in a class of medications called aminoglycoside ...

  15. Meropenem Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meropenem injection is used to treat skin and abdominal (stomach area) infections caused by bacteria and meningitis (infection of ... children 3 months of age and older. Meropenem injection is in a class of medications called antibiotics. ...

  16. Pralatrexate Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pralatrexate injection is used to treat peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL; a form of cancer that begins in a ... come back after treatment with other medications. Pralatrexate injection has not been shown to help people who ...

  17. Tesamorelin Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesamorelin injection is used to decrease the amount of extra fat in the stomach area in adults with human ... fat in certain areas of the body). Tesamorelin injection is not used to help with weight loss. ...

  18. Daptomycin Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daptomycin injection is used alone or in combination with other medications to treat certain blood infections in adults or ... children 1 year of age and older . Daptomycin injection is in a class of medications called cyclic ...

  19. Albiglutide Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albiglutide injection is used with a diet and exercise program to control blood sugar levels in adults with type ... medications did not control levels well enough. Albiglutide injection is not used to treat type 1 diabetes ( ...

  20. Cefuroxime Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cefuroxime injection is used to treat certain infections caused by bacteria including pneumonia and other lower respiratory tract (lung) ... blood, bone, joint, and urinary tract infections. Cefuroxime injection may also be used before, during, and sometimes ...

  1. Hydrocortisone Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydrocortisone injection is used to treat symptoms of low corticosteroid levels (lack of certain substances that are usually produced ... also used to treat severe allergic reactions. Hydrocortisone injection is used in the management of multiple sclerosis ( ...

  2. Aztreonam Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aztreonam injection is used to treat certain infections that are caused by bacteria, including respiratory tract (including pneumonia and ... area) infections, that are caused by bacteria. Aztreonam injection also may be used before, during, and sometimes ...

  3. Peramivir Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peramivir injection is used to treat some types of influenza infection ('flu') in people who have had symptoms of ... flu for no longer than 2 days. Peramivir injection is in a class of medications called neuraminidase ...

  4. Vancomycin Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vancomycin injection is used alone or in combination with other medications to treat certain serious infections such as endocarditis ( ... of the lungs, skin, blood, and bones. Vancomycin injection is in a class of medications called glycopeptide ...

  5. Amikacin Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amikacin injection is used to treat certain serious infections that are caused by bacteria such as meningitis (infection of ... lungs, skin, bones, joints, and urinary tract. Amikacin injection is in a class of medications called aminoglycoside ...

  6. Diphenhydramine Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diphenhydramine injection is used to treat allergic reactions, especially for people who are unable to take diphenhydramine by mouth. ... is used also to treat motion sickness. Diphenhydramine injection is also used alone or along with other ...

  7. Abaloparatide Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... injection may cause osteosarcoma (bone cancer) in laboratory rats. It is not known whether abaloparatide injection increases ... too have too much calcium in the blood, hyperparathyroidism (condition in which the body produces too much ...

  8. Doxycycline Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may have been exposed to anthrax in the air. Doxycycline injection is in a class of medications ... decrease the effectiveness of hormonal contraceptives (birth control pills, patches, rings, or injections). Talk to your doctor ...

  9. Trastuzumab Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trastuzumab injection is used along with other medications or after other medications have been used to treat ... has spread to other parts of the body. Trastuzumab injection is also used during and after treatment ...

  10. Ganciclovir Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganciclovir injection is used to treat cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis (eye infection that can cause blindness) in people ... in transplant recipients at risk for CMV infection. Ganciclovir injection is in a class of medications called ...

  11. Metronidazole Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metronidazole injection is used to treat certain skin, blood, bone, joint, gynecologic, and abdominal (stomach area) infections ... spinal cord), and certain respiratory infections, including pneumonia. Metronidazole injection is also to prevent infection when used ...

  12. Dexrazoxane Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... side effects that may be caused by chemotherapy medications. Dexrazoxane injection (Zinecard) is used to prevent or decrease heart ... your doctor about the risks of receiving this medication.Dexrazoxane injection may cause other side effects. Call your doctor ...

  13. Methylnaltrexone Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the bowel from the effects of opioid (narcotic) medications. ... questions about how to prepare or inject this medication.Methylnaltrexone injection comes in prefilled syringes and in vials to ...

  14. Lacosamide Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of seizures in people who cannot take oral medications. Lacosamide injection is in a class of medications called anticonvulsants. ... doctor.Do not let anyone else use your medication. Lacosamide injection is a controlled substance. Prescriptions may be refilled ...

  15. Alirocumab Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your dose depending on your response to this medication.Alirocumab injection helps to control cholesterol levels, but does not ... prefilled syringe or prefilled dosing pen containing alirocumab injection.

  16. Mepolizumab Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... asthma is not controlled with their current asthma medication. Mepolizumab injection is in a class of medications called monoclonal ... want to decrease the doses of your other medications gradually.Mepolizumab injection is not used to treat a sudden attack ...

  17. Romidepsin Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... already been treated with at least one other medication given by mouth or by injection. Romidepsin injection is in a class of medications called histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors. It works by ...

  18. Avelumab Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or after it was treated with other chemotherapy medications. Avelumab injection is in a class of medications called monoclonal ... avelumab based on your body's response to this medication.Avelumab injection may cause serious reactions during the infusion of ...

  19. Etanercept Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... dose. You also should not mix any other medications with etanercept injection.If your medication comes in a prefilled syringe or automatic injection device, use each syringe or device only once ...

  20. [Duplexsonography investigation in patients with venous ulcer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanneret-Gris, Christina

    2011-03-01

    Venous hypertension due to venous insufficiency causes venous ulcers. Duplexsonography is a widely accepted non invasive method to assess venous insufficiency with venous reflux measurements. Retrograde venous flow is defined as venous reflux. The testing of venous reflux is reliable if transvalvular pressure is sufficiently high and transvalvular flow velocity exceeds 30 cm/s. Reflux testing in the proximal leg veins (V. femoralis communis, V. femoralis, V. saphena magna) is done using a standardised Valsalva Manoeuvre (exspiration into a tube up to a pressure of 30 mmHg, pressure established within 0.5 seconds, pressure hold for 3 seconds). Distal leg vein testing (V. poplitea, V. tibialis posterior, V. saphena parva) is recommended with a two handed - compression distally to the tested veins. The most important parameter is venous reflux time, a cut off of > 2 seconds is recommended.

  1. Developmental venous anomaly (DVA); Developmental Venous Anomaly (DVA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmer, A.; Ahlhelm, F.; Viera, J.; Reith, W.; Schulte-Altedorneburg, G. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Hagen, T. [Radiologische Praxis, Augsburg (Germany)

    2007-10-15

    As congenital anatomic variants of venous drainage, developmental venous anomalies (DVA) represent up to 60% of all cerebral vascular malformations. The prior term ''venous angioma'' is a misnomer implicating an abnormal vascular structure with an increased bleeding risk. They are often found incidentally and are hardly ever symptomatic. Their morphologic characteristics are dilated vessels in the white matter, which converge on a greater collector vein, forming the typical caput medusae. They drain into the superficial or deep venous system. The frequent association with other, potentially bleeding-prone vascular malformations is clinically relevant, in particular cavernous angioma, which might require therapeutic action. Therefore, coincident vascular lesions need to be actively sought by appropriate additional imaging techniques. (orig.) [German] Als eine embryologische Variante der venoesen Drainage macht die so genannte ''developmental venous anomaly'' (DVA) etwa 60% aller zerebralen vaskulaeren Malformationen aus. Der vormalige Terminus ''venoeses Angiom'' sollte nicht mehr benutzt werden, da er abnormale Gefaessstrukturen mit einem erhoehten Blutungsrisiko impliziert. Die DVA werden oft inzidentell entdeckt und sind nur selten symptomatisch. Das typische Erscheinungsbild ist durch dilatierte, medusenhauptartig angeordnete venoese Marklagergefaesse gekennzeichnet, die in eine groessere Sammelvene drainieren. Der Abfluss erfolgt ueber das oberflaechliche oder tiefe Venensystem. Klinisch wichtig ist die haeufige Assoziation mit anderen zerebralen Gefaessmalformationen, insbesondere kavernoesen Angiomen, nach denen im Rahmen der Diagnostik explizit gesucht werden muss, da diese eine potenzielle Blutungsquelle darstellen und ein therapeutisches Vorgehen erfordern koennen. (orig.)

  2. Thrombosis of venous outflows of the cavernous sinus: possible aetiology of the cortical venous reflux in case of indirect carotid-cavernous fistulas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Thomas; Sylvestre, Philippe; Blanc, Raphaël; Botta, Daniele; Ciccio, Gabriele; Smajda, Stanislas; Redjem, Hocine; Piotin, Michel

    2017-05-01

    The presence of a cortical venous reflux (CVR) in a carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF) is well described and is considered to be a criterion for urgent treatment. This reflux is often associated with direct/traumatic CCF and the high-flow of the fistula alone explains the reflux. For indirect CCF, the pathophysiology of a CVR is unclear. All patients treated endovascularly for an indirect CCF with a cortical venous reflux between 2003 and 2015 were included. We retrospectively analysed data focusing on whether venous outflows of the cavernous sinus would opacify or not with the local injection of contrast, in order to locate those that could explain the venous reflux. Twenty consecutive patients (male/female ratio, 2/3) were included in this series with a mean age of 63 years. All patients presented ocular signs and no patients showed any neurological sign secondary to the CVR. We distinguished four patterns of CVR: in the superficial middle cerebral vein (75%), in the uncal vein (15%), in the superior petrosal vein (5%) and in the inferior petrosal vein (5%). Seventy percent of the cases presented a lack of opacification in more than three venous outflows of the CS involved. Each patient received an endovascular therapy by venous approach with a success rate of 76.9% per embolisation session. Two patients (10%) presented a permanent ocular paresis and two others a transient deficit. CVR is directly correlated with the thrombosis of multiple venous outflows of the CS. The "non-opacification" of at least three of the CS venous outflows is necessary for the development of CVR. Such thrombosis may be explained by the combination of haemodynamic and inflammatory changes of the venous wall.

  3. Busulfan Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busulfex® Injection ... Busulfan injection is used to treat a certain type of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML; a type of cancer of ... of 16 doses) before bone marrow transplant.Busulfan injection may cause seizures during therapy with the medication. ...

  4. Granisetron Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... antagonists. It works by blocking serotonin, a natural substance in the body that causes nausea and vomiting. ... throat chest pain injection site redness, swelling, or warmth with or without fever (for the extended-release injection) injection site bleeding, bruising, or pain (for ...

  5. Venous chest anatomy: clinical implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chasen, M.H.; Charnsangavej, C. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, The University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    1998-03-01

    This article provides a practical approach to the clinical implications and importance of understanding the collateral venous anatomy of the thorax. Routine radiography, conventional venography, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging studies provide correlative anatomic models for the demonstration of how interconnecting collateral vascular networks within the thorax maintain venous stability at all times. Five major systems comprise the collateral venous network of the thorax ( Fig. 1 ). These include the paravertebral, azygos-hemiazygos, internal mammary, lateral thoracic, and anterior jugular venous systems (AJVS). The five systems are presented in the following sequence: (a) a brief introduction to the importance of catheter position and malposition in understanding access to the thoracic venous system, (b) the anatomy of the azygos-hemiazygos systems and their relationship with the paravertebral plexus, (c) the importance of the AJVS, (d) 'loop' concepts interconnecting the internal mammary and azygos-hemiazygos systems by means of the lateral thoracic and intercostal veins, and (e) the interconnecting venous networks on the thoracic side of the thoracoabdominal junction. Certain aspects of the venous anatomy of the thorax will not be discussed in this chapter and include (a) the intra-abdominal anastomoses between the superior and inferior vena cavae (IVC) via the internal mammary, lateral thoracic, and azygos-hemiazygos systems (beyond the scope of this article), (b) potential collateral vessels involving vertebral, parascapular, thyroidal, thymic, and other smaller veins that might anastomose with the major systems, and (c) anatomic variants and pitfalls that may mimic pathologic conditions (space limitations). (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  6. Contemporary diagnosis of venous malformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee BB

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available BB Lee,1 I Baumgartner21Department of Surgery, George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA; 2Swiss Cardiovascular Center, University Hospital Bern, Bern, SwitzerlandAbstract: Venous malformation is a congenital vascular malformation resulting from defective development during various stages of embryogenesis and selectively affecting the venous system. Depending on the embryologic stage when the developmental arrest occurred, the clinical presentation of venous malformation is extremely variable in location, extent, severity, natural progression, and hemodynamic impact. Extratruncular lesions occur in the earlier stages of embryonic life, and retain characteristics unique to mesenchymal cells (angioblasts, growing and proliferating when stimulated internally (eg, by menarche, pregnancy, and hormones or externally (eg, by trauma or surgery. These lesions also have a significant hemodynamic impact on the venous system involved, in addition to the risk of localized intravascular coagulopathy. However, truncal lesions, as defective developments along the late stage, no longer carry the risk of proliferation and recurrence due to lack of mesenchymal characteristics. Although, they often have serious hemodynamic consequences due to direct involvement of the main vein trunk. Therefore, a thorough clinical history and careful physical examination should be followed by an appropriate combination of noninvasive and less invasive tests (eg, Doppler ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography to confirm the clinical impression as well as to define the extent and severity of the venous malformation. Invasive tests, eg, phlebography or angiography, are seldom needed for the diagnosis per se. Additional evaluation for coagulation abnormalities, eg, D-dimer and fibrinogen levels, is generally recommended, especially for the treatment of surgery and endovascular candidates with extensive lesions to assess the localized intravascular

  7. Direct orbital puncture of the cavernous sinus for the treatment of a carotid-cavernous dural AV fistula with a concomitant venous/lymphatic malformation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coumou, Adriaan D.; van den Berg, René; Bot, Joost C.; Beetsma, Daan B.; Saeed, Peerooz

    2014-01-01

    A 37- year old male with a long history of a left orbital venous/lympathic malformation presented with ocular injection, increased proptosis and reduced left vision. Angiography demonstrated a carotid cavernous dural AV fistula combined with a concomitant venous/lymphatic malformation. After

  8. Systemic venous drainage: can we help Newton?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corno, Antonio F

    2007-06-01

    In recent years substantial progress occurred in the techniques of cardiopulmonary bypass, but the factor potentially limiting the flexibility of cardiopulmonary bypass remains the drainage of the systemic venous return. In the daily clinical practice of cardiac surgery, the amount of systemic venous return on cardiopulmonary bypass is directly correlated with the amount of the pump flow. As a consequence, the pump flow is limited by the amount of venous return that the pump is receiving. On cardiopulmonary bypass the amount of venous drainage depends upon the central venous pressure, the height differential between patient and inlet of the venous line into the venous reservoir, and the resistance in the venous cannula(s) and circuit. The factors determining the venous return to be taken into consideration in cardiac surgery are the following: (a) characteristics of the individual patient; (b) type of planned surgical procedure; (c) type of venous cannula(s); (d) type of circuit for cardiopulmonary bypass; (e) strategy of cardiopulmonary bypass; (f) use of accessory mechanical systems to increased the systemic venous return. The careful pre-operative evaluation of all the elements affecting the systemic venous drainage, including the characteristics of the individual patient and the type of required surgical procedure, the choice of the best strategy of cardiopulmonary bypass, and the use of the most advanced materials and tools, can provide a systemic venous drainage substantially better than what it would be allowed by the simple "Law of universal gravitation" by Isaac Newton.

  9. Cerebral venous thrombosis in childhood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huisman, T.A.G.M.; Martin, E.; Willi, U.V. [Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiology, University Children' s Hospital Zurich (Switzerland); Holzmann, D. [Dept. of Otorhinolaryngology, University Children' s Hospital Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2001-09-01

    This was a retrospective study to determine different etiologies of cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) in childhood and to correlate extent and location of thrombosis with the etiology and the age of the child as well as the final outcome. In addition, the radiologic approach is discussed. This was a retrospective analysis of 19 children with CVT. The children were examined by contrast-enhanced dynamic CT. Radiologic findings were correlated with the etiology of CVT. Cerebral venous thrombosis is not as infrequent in children as has been thought. Cerebral venous thrombosis in children can occur due to trauma (n=9), infections (n=7), or coagulation disorders (n=3). Extent and location of thrombosis, as well as complications, final outcome, and therapy, depend on the etiology. Computed tomography remains a valuable primary imaging modality in the diagnosis of CVT in the acutely injured or diseased child. (orig.)

  10. Dutch Venous Ulcer guideline update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maessen-Visch, M Birgitte; de Roos, Kees-Peter

    2014-05-01

    The revised guideline of 2013 is an update of the 2005 guideline "venous leg ulcer". In this special project four separate guidelines (venous leg ulcer, varicose veins, compression therapy and deep venous disorders) were revised and developed simultaneously. A meeting was held including representatives of any organisation involved in venous disease management including patient organizations and health insurance companies. Eighteen clinical questions where defined, and a new strategy was used to accelerate the process. This resulted in two new and two revised guidelines within one year. The guideline committee advises use of the C of the CEAP classification as well as the Venous Clinical Severity Score (VCSS) and a Quality of life (QoL) score in the assessment of clinical signs. These can provide insight into the burden of disease and the effects of treatment as experienced by the patient. A duplex ultrasound should be performed in every patient to establish the underlying aetiology and to evaluate the need for treatment (which is discussed in a separate guideline). The use of the TIME model for describing venous ulcers is recommended. There is no evidence for antiseptic or antibiotic wound care products except for a Cochrane review in which some evidence is presented for cadexomer iodine. Signs of infection are the main reason for the use of oral antibiotics. When the ulcer fails to heal the use of oral aspirin and pentoxifylline can be considered as an adjunct. For the individual patient, the following aspects should be considered: the appearance of the ulcer (amount of exudate) according to the TIME model, the influence of wound care products on moisturising the wound, frequency of changing compression bandages, pain and allergies. The cost of the dressings should also be considered. Education and training of patients t improves compliance with compression therapy but does not influence wound healing rates. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  11. Abnormal systemic venous connection possibly associated with a persistent right umbilical vein; a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smevik Bjarne

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abnormal venous connections involving a persistent right umbilical vein are rare. In a minority of cases the liver is entirely bypassed and the condition is associated with multiple congenital malformations. Case presentation The described case illustrates a systemic venous drainage that was severely abnormal in a newborn girl with a truncus arteriosus type II congenital heart defect. Injection of contrast medium through the umbilical vein catheter revealed a very peculiar venous connection that passed anterio-laterally through the right hemithorax before crossing in an oblique fashion towards the superior vena cava. Conclusions This venous drainage may be the result of a persistent right umbilical vein connecting with the superior vena cava.

  12. A young man with nonhealing venous ulcers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vloedbeld, M. G.; Venema, A. W.; Smit, A. J.

    A 35-year-old man presented with nonhealing ulcers at an atypical location on his left foot, caused by a combination of venous insufficiency (after deep venous thrombosis) and arterial insufficiency. The underlying cause was Buerger's disease.

  13. Traditional Long-Term Central Venous Catheters Versus Transhepatic Venous Catheters in Infants and Young Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Amanda Marie; Danford, David A; Curzon, Christopher L; Anderson, Venus; Delaney, Jeffrey W

    2017-10-01

    Children with congenital heart disease may require long-term central venous access for intensive care management; however, central venous access must also be preserved for future surgical and catheterization procedures. Transhepatic venous catheters may be an useful alternative. The objective of this study was to compare transhepatic venous catheters with traditional central venous catheters regarding complication rate and duration of catheter service. Retrospective review of 12 congenital heart disease patients from September 2013 to July 2015 who underwent placement of one or more transhepatic venous catheters. Single freestanding pediatric hospital located in the central United States. Pediatric patients with congenital heart disease who underwent placement of transhepatic venous catheter. Cohort's central venous catheter complication rates and duration of catheter service were compared with transhepatic venous catheter data. Twelve patients had a total of 19 transhepatic venous lines. Transhepatic venous lines had a significantly longer duration of service than central venous lines (p = 0.001). No difference between the two groups was found in the number of documented thrombi, thrombolytic burden, or catheter sites requiring wound care consultation. A higher frequency of infection in transhepatic venous lines versus central venous lines was found, isolated to four transhepatic venous lines that had a total of nine infections. All but one was successfully managed without catheter removal. The difference in the proportion of infections to catheters in transhepatic venous lines versus central venous lines was significant (p = 0.0001), but no difference in the rate of infection-related catheter removal was found. Without compromising future central venous access sites, transhepatic venous lines had superior duration of service without increased thrombosis, thrombolytic use, or insertion site complications relative to central venous lines. Transhepatic venous

  14. Venous leg ulcer in the context of chronic venous disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano Sánchez, F S; Marinel lo Roura, J; Carrasco Carrasco, E; González-Porras, J R; Escudero Rodríguez, J R; Sánchez Nevarez, I; Díaz Sánchez, S

    2014-05-01

    Chronic venous disease (CVD) is a frequent disorder with a high socioeconomic impact. Little is known about the possible differences between healed ulcer (C5 group) and active ulcer (C6 group) in terms of disease severity and quality of life (QoL). Our aim was to determine the possible differences in severity disease and QoL between the C5-C6 and C1 (control) group. Data from a national, multicentre, observational and cross-sectional study (n = 1598) were used to compare three groups of CVD: C1 (n = 243), C5 (n = 136) and C6 (n = 70). CVD severity was assessed with the Venous Clinical Severity Score (VCSS) and QoL with the Short Form 12 Health Survey (SF-12) and Chronic Lower Limb Venous Insufficiency Questionnaire (CIVIQ-20). Patients with active ulcers had a higher mean total VCSS than patients with healed ulcers (P ulcers than in those with C1 (P ulcers (C6) had lower QoL scores, but the differences were not statistically significant. Patients with venous leg ulcers (C5-C6) are associated with high severity and poor QoL. However, the healing of a leg ulcer did not contribute to improvement of QoL.

  15. Injection compositions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crnogorac Luka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a brief overview of the methods and materials for injection in underground construction, with a focus on the use of new injection compounds for this purpose. The aim is to draw attention to the possibility of applying new materials for injection that are present in the world, which would facilitate the work, significantly shorten time of work and downtime.

  16. Central venous catheters: incidence and predictive factors of venous thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammes, Mary; Desai, Amishi; Pasupneti, Shravani; Kress, John; Funaki, Brian; Watson, Sydeaka; Herlitz, Jean; Hines, Jane

    2015-07-01

    Central venous catheter access in an acute setting can be a challenge given underlying disease and risk for venous thrombosis. Peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICCs) are commonly placed but limit sites for fistula creation in patients with chronic renal failure (CKD). The aim of this study is to determine the incidence of venous thrombosis from small bore internal jugular (SBIJ) and PICC line placement. This investigation identifies populations of patients who may not be ideal candidates for a PICC and highlights the importance of peripheral vein preservation in patients with renal failure. A venous Doppler ultrasound was performed at the time of SBIJ insertion and removal to evaluate for thrombosis in the internal jugular vein. Data was collected pre- and post-intervention to ascertain if increased vein preservation knowledge amongst the healthcare team led to less use of PICCs. Demographic factors were collected in the SBIJ and PICC groups and risk factor analysis was completed. 1,122 subjects had PICC placement and 23 had SBIJ placement. The incidence of thrombosis in the PICC group was 10%. One patient with an SBIJ had evidence of central vein thrombosis when the catheter was removed. Univariate and multivariate analysis demonstrated a history of transplant, and the indication of total parenteral nutrition was associated with thrombosis (p<0.001). The decrease in PICCs placed in patients with CKD 6 months before and after intervention was significant (p<0.05). There are subsets of patients ith high risk for thrombosis who may not be ideal candidates for a PICC.

  17. Hormonal contraceptives and venous thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stegeman, Berendina Hendrika (Bernardine)

    2013-01-01

    Oral contraceptive use is associated with venous thrombosis. However, the mechanism behind this remains unclear. The aim of this thesis was to evaluate genetic variation in the first-pass metabolism of contraceptives, to identify the clinical implications of hormonal contraceptive use after a

  18. Lower-limb venous thrombosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    307. Lower-limb venous thrombosis. July 2009 Vol.27 No.7 CME. Most DVTs arise in calf muscle veins, particularly within the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles (calf vein DVT). Many of these remain localised to the muscle and will not cause any clinical problem. If, however, the circumstances that initially caused the.

  19. Omalizumab Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... want to decrease the doses of your other medications gradually.Omalizumab injection is not used to treat a sudden attack ... your doctor about the risks of using this medication.Omalizumab injection may cause other side effects. Call your doctor ...

  20. Elotuzumab Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or that had improved after treatment with other medications but later returned. Elotuzumab injection is in a class of medications called monoclonal ... your doctor about the risks of receiving this medication.Elotuzumab injection may cause other side effects. Call your doctor ...

  1. Colistimethate Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have, and how well you respond to the medication.You may receive colistimethate injection in a hospital or you may administer the medication at home. If you will be receiving colistimethate injection at home, your healthcare provider will show you ...

  2. Carfilzomib Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on how well your body responds to the medication.Carfilzomib injection may cause a severe or life-threatening reactions ... if you are allergic to carfilzomib, any other medications, or any of the ingredients in carfilzomib injection. Ask your pharmacist for a list of the ...

  3. Vedolizumab Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that has not improved when treated with other medications. Vedolizumab injection is in a class of medications called integrin ... to the medication. You may be given other medications to treat reactions to vedolizumab injection. Tell your doctor or nurse immediately if you ...

  4. Leucovorin Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... accidentally received an overdose of methotrexate or similar medications. Leucovorin injection is also used to treat anemia (low level ... is also used with 5-fluorouracil (a chemotherapy medication) to treat ... intestine). Leucovorin injection is in a class of medications called folic ...

  5. A Case of Asymptomatic Venous Air Embolism Demonstrated on 18F FDG PET/CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dejanovic, Danijela; Alslev, Louise; Abrahamsson, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    We present the findings on F FDG PET/CT in connection with iatrogenic venous air embolism. The patient was referred for a posttreatment evaluation PET/CT for peripheral T-cell lymphoma. On the PET images, an intense FDG-uptake was seen in the injected vein. Simultaneous non-contrast-enhanced CT s...

  6. Subcutaneous Injections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Maria

    This thesis is about visualization and characterization of the tissue-device interaction during subcutaneous injection. The tissue pressure build-up during subcutaneous injections was measured in humans. The insulin pen FlexTouchr (Novo Nordisk A/S) was used for the measurements and the pressure...... build-up was evaluated indirectly from the changes in the flow rate between subcutaneous injections and air injections. This method enabled the tissue counter pressure to be evaluated without a formal clinical study approval. The measurements were coupled to a model for the pressure evolution...... in subcutaneous tissue, based on mass conservation and flow in a porous medium. From the measurements the flow permeability and bulk modulus of the tissue were determined. In the adipose tissue the drug forms a bolus from where it is absorbed by the blood capillaries. The spatial distribution of the injected...

  7. Increased rheumatoid factor and deep venous thrombosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer-Olesen, Christine L; Nielsen, Sune F; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The risk of deep venous thrombosis is increased in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. We tested the hypothesis that increased concentrations of rheumatoid factor are associated with increased risk of deep venous thrombosis in individuals without autoimmune rheumatic disease in the ge......BACKGROUND: The risk of deep venous thrombosis is increased in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. We tested the hypothesis that increased concentrations of rheumatoid factor are associated with increased risk of deep venous thrombosis in individuals without autoimmune rheumatic disease...... in the general population. METHODS: We included 54628 participants from the Copenhagen City Heart Study (1981-83) and the Copenhagen General Population Study (2004-12), all with a measured concentration of IgM rheumatoid factor and without autoimmune rheumatic disease or venous thromboembolism. The main outcome...... was incident deep venous thrombosis. There were no losses to follow-up. RESULTS: During 368381 person-years, 670 individuals developed deep venous thrombosis. A rheumatoid factor concentration ≥ vs

  8. Pain and efficacy of local anesthetics for central venous access

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William C Culp Jr

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available William C Culp Jr1, Mohammed Yousaf2, Benjamin Lowry1, Timothy C McCowan3, William C Culp21Division of Cardiothoracic Anesthesiology, Scott and White Hospital, The Texas A&M University College of Medicine, Temple, TX, USA; 2Division of Interventional Radiology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR, USA; 3Department of Radiology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS, USAPurpose: To compare pain during injection and efficacy of analgesia of local anesthetics during central venous line placement.Methods: Sixty-two patients were studied in a randomized, double-blinded prospective fashion. Patients received 1% lidocaine (L, buffered 1% lidocaine (LB, or 2% chloroprocaine (CP injected around the internal jugular vein for procedural analgesia for central venous access. Patients reported pain via a standard linear visual analog scale, with 0 representing no pain and 10 being the worst pain imaginable.Results: Overall patient perception of pain was better with CP and L than LB with mean scores of CP 2.4, L 2.6, LB 4.2. Pain with injection mean scores were CP 2.1, L 2.5, LB 3.2. Pain with catheter placement scores were CP 2.5, L 1.7, LB 3.4. Operator assessment of overall pain values were CP 1.9, L 2.2, LB 3.4. LB consistently scored the worst, though compared with CP, this only reached statistical significance in overall patient pain and pain at catheter insertion compared with L.Conclusion: Though chloroprocaine scored better than lidocaine in 3 of 4 parameters, this trend did not achieve statistical significance. Adding sodium bicarbonate to lidocaine isn’t justified in routine practice, nor is routine replacement of lidocaine with chloroprocaine.Keywords: local anesthesia, analgesia, central venous access, lidocaine, chloroprocaine

  9. Radiologically-placed venous ports in children under venous anesthesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Joo Yeon; Jeon, Ung Bae; Choo, Ki Seok; Hwang, Jae Yeon; Kim, Yong Woo; Lee, Yun Jin; Nam, Sang Ool; Lim, Young Tak [Pusan National University School of Medicine, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of radiologic venous port placement in children under venous anesthesia. Between April 2009 and July 2011, 44 ports were implanted in 41 children (24 boys, 17 girls). The age of patients ranged from 9 months to 19 years (mean, 6.5 years) and their body weights ranged from 6.8 kg to 56.3 kg (mean, 23.2 kg). Right internal jugular vein access was used in 42 ports, right subclavian vein in 1, and left subclavian in 1. Durability and complications of port implantation were reviewed. The technical success rate was 100%. The catheter life was 10-661 days (mean 246 days). Two patients died during the follow-up period, 21 and 6 ports were removed at the end of treatment or as a result of complications, respectively. One port was removed and replaced by a Hickmann catheter. Three ports were explanted due to port-related sepsis, one due to a catheter kink, and two for unexplained fever or insertion site pain. The overall port-related infection was 3 cases (6.8%, 0.28/1000 catheter days). Venous port placement by interventional radiologists in children under intravenous sedation is relatively safe, with a high rate of technical success and low rate of complications.

  10. Iliac venous pressure estimates central venous pressure after laparotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boone, Brian A; Kirk, Katherine A; Tucker, Nikia; Gunn, Scott; Forsythe, Raquel

    2014-09-01

    Central venous pressure (CVP) is traditionally obtained through subclavian or internal jugular central catheters; however, many patients who could benefit from CVP monitoring have only femoral lines. The accuracy of illiac venous pressure (IVP) as a measure of CVP is unknown, particularly following laparotomy. This was a prospective, observational study. Patients who had both internal jugular or subclavian lines and femoral lines already in place were eligible for the study. Pressure measurements were taken from both lines in addition to measurement of bladder pressure, mean arterial pressure, and peak airway pressure. Data were evaluated using paired t-test, Bland-Altman analysis, and linear regression. Measurements were obtained from 40 patients, 26 of which had laparotomy. The mean difference between measurements was 2.2 mm Hg. There were no significant differences between patients who had laparotomy and nonsurgical patients (P = 0.93). Bland-Altman analysis revealed a bias of 1.63 ± 2.44 mm Hg. There was no correlation between IVP accuracy and bladder pressure, mean arterial pressure, or peak airway pressure. IVP is an adequate measure of CVP, even in surgical patients who have had recent laparotomy. Measurement of IVP to guide resuscitation is encouraged in patients who have only femoral venous catheter access. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Midazolam Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... injection is in a class of medications called benzodiazepines. It works by slowing activity in the brain ... you have recently stopped drinking large amounts of alcohol or if you have or have ever had ...

  12. Oxytocin Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxytocin injection is used to begin or improve contractions during labor. Oxytocin also is used to reduce bleeding after childbirth. ... other medications or procedures to end a pregnancy. Oxytocin is in a class of medications called oxytocic ...

  13. Fluconazole Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and fungal infections of the eye, prostate (a male reproductive organ), skin and nails. Fluconazole injection is ... Motrin, others) and naproxen (Aleve, Anaprox, Naprelan); oral contraceptives (birth control pills); oral medication for diabetes such ...

  14. Ifosfamide Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... intravenously (into a vein) by a doctor or nurse in a medical facility. It may be injected ... for allergies or hay fever; medications for nausea; opioid (narcotic) medications for pain; rifampin (Rifadin, Rimactane); sedatives; ...

  15. Furosemide Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furosemide injection is used to treat edema (fluid retention; excess fluid held in body tissues) caused by ... fluid in the lungs), kidney, and liver disease. Furosemide is in a class of medications called diuretics (' ...

  16. Pembrolizumab Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or lightheadedness fainting change in the amount or color of urine changes in vision feeling confused Pembrolizumab injection may cause other side effects. Call your doctor if you have any unusual ...

  17. Botox Injections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... LEARN logo to transfer to the LEARN Portal Botox Injections The American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery recommends persons considering Botox® treatment to: Check the physician’s credentials: The physician ...

  18. Epinephrine Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... refrigerate epinephrine injection or leave it in your car, especially in hot or cold weather. If the ... to your pharmacist or contact your local garbage/recycling department to learn about take-back programs in ...

  19. Nivolumab Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nivolumab injection is used alone or in combination with ipilimumab (Yervoy) to treat certain types of melanoma ( ... has worsened after treatment with other chemotherapy medications. Nivolumab is in a class of medications called monoclonal ...

  20. Cidofovir Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cidofovir injection is used along with another medication (probenecid) to treat cytomegaloviral retinitis (CMV retinitis) in people ... body's response to the medication.You must take probenecid tablets by mouth with each dose of cidofovir. ...

  1. Palivizumab Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the skin swelling of the lips, tongue, or face difficulty swallowing difficult, rapid, or irregular breathing bluish-tinged skin, lips, or fingernails muscle weakness or floppiness loss of consciousness Palivizumab injection may cause other side effects. Call ...

  2. Acyclovir Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... It is also used to treat first-time genital herpes outbreaks (a herpes virus infection that causes sores ... in the body. Acyclovir injection will not cure genital herpes and may not stop the spread of genital ...

  3. Haloperidol Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of interest in life, and strong or inappropriate emotions). Haloperidol injection is also used to control motor ... and the laboratory. Your doctor may order certain lab tests to check your body's response to haloperidol ...

  4. Risperidone Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of interest in life, and strong or inappropriate emotions). Risperidone extended-release injection is used alone or ... and the laboratory. Your doctor may order certain lab tests to check your body's response to risperidone ...

  5. Aripiprazole Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of interest in life, and strong or inappropriate emotions). Aripiprazole extended-release injection (Abilify Maintena) is also ... and the laboratory. Your doctor may order certain lab tests to check your body's response to aripiprazole ...

  6. Olanzapine Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of interest in life, and strong or inappropriate emotions). Olanzapine injection is used to treat episodes of ... and the laboratory. Your doctor may order certain lab tests to check your body's response to olanzapine ...

  7. Bendamustine Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Avelox), norfloxacin (Noroxin), and ofloxacin (Floxin); fluvoxamine (Luvox); omeprazole (Prilosec); and ticlopidine (Ticlid). Your doctor may need ... injection. You should use birth control to prevent pregnancy in yourself or your partner during your treatment ...

  8. Pegloticase Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... doctor if you have glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency (an inherited blood disease). Your doctor may test you for G6PD deficiency before you start to receive pegloticase injection. If ...

  9. Leuprolide Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the body and causes pain, heavy or irregular menstruation [periods], and other symptoms). Leuprolide injection (Lupron Depot) ... itching in women spotting (light vaginal bleeding) or menstruation (periods) decrease in size of testicles decrease in ...

  10. Lixisenatide Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/Drugs/DrugSafety/ucm085729.htm) to obtain the Medication Guide. ... exenatide (Bydureon, Byetta), liraglutide (Saxenda, Victoza), any other medications, or any of the ingredients in lixisenatide injection. Ask your pharmacist or check the Medication Guide ...

  11. Tisagenlecleucel Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... htm) or the manufacturer's website to obtain the Medication Guide. ... your doctor about the risks of receiving this medication.Tisagenlecleucel injection may cause other side effects. Call your doctor ...

  12. Meperidine Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... htm) or the manufacturer's website to obtain the Medication Guide. ... and during surgery or other medical procedures. Meperidine injection is in a class of medications called opiate (narcotic) analgesics. It works by changing ...

  13. [Surgical treatment of chronic venous insufficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales, Antonio; Slagsvold, Carl-Erik; Jørgensen, Jørgen J; Sandbaek, Gunnar

    2009-11-19

    Patients with chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) may develop serious symptoms such as pain, oedema, venous claudication and leg ulcers. Conventional therapy includes compression therapy, elevation of the extremities, and in some cases surgical elimination of superficial varicose veins. This article presents and discusses surgical treatment (reconstructive deep venous surgery and transplantation) and endovascular therapy (percutaneous recanalization of post-thrombotic deep venous occlusions). The article is based on literature identified through non-systematic searches in the PubMed and Cochrane databases. After reconstructive deep venous surgery, ulcer healing is reported in 60-78 % of cases and clinical improvement in 90 %. After such surgery, the median ulcer-free period seems to be longer in primary (congenital, familial), 54 months, than in secondary (after deep vein thrombosis) chronic venous insufficiency (18 months). Recanalization of deep venous occlusions is successful in 90 % of patients who have undergone endovascular treatment of venous claudication and leg ulcer. Reconstructive deep venous surgery constitutes a real treatment choice for patients with chronic venous insufficiency for whom conventional measures have failed. The benefits are ulcer-free periods, clinical improvement, return to work and improved quality of life.

  14. Hyperhomocysteinemia and venous thromboembolic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, A; Mazzola, G; Crippa, L; Fermo, I; Viganò D'Angelo, S

    1997-01-01

    In spite of the large number of reports showing that hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) is an independent risk factor for atherosclerosis and arterial occlusive disease, this metabolite of the methionine pathway is measured in relatively few laboratories and its importance is not fully appreciated. Recent data strongly suggest that mild HHcy is also involved in the pathogenesis of venous thromboembolic disease. The aim of this paper is to analyze the most recent advances in this field. The material examined in the present review includes articles and abstracts published in journals covered by the Science Citation Index and Medline. In addition the authors of the present article have been working in the field of mild HHcy as cause of venous thromboembolic disease. The studies examined provide very strong evidence supporting the role of moderate HHcy in the development of premature and/or recurrent venous thromboembolic disease. High plasma homocysteine levels are also a risk factor for deep vein thrombosis in the general population. Folic acid fortification of food has been proposed as a major tool for reducing coronary artery disease mortality in the United States. Vitamin supplementation may also reduce recurrence of venous thromboembolic disease in patients with HHcy. At the present time, however, the clinical efficacy of this approach has not been tested. In addition, the bulk of evidence indicates that fasting total homocysteine determinations can identify up to 50% of the total population of hyperhomocysteinemic subjects. Patients with isolated methionine intolerance may benefit from vitamin B6 supplementation. Homocysteine-lowering vascular disease prevention trials are urgently needed. Such controlled studies, however, should not focus exclusively on fasting homocysteine determinations and folic acid monotherapy.

  15. Starling curves and central venous pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Berlin, Cheryl; Bakker, Jan

    2014-01-01

    textabstractRecent studies challenge the utility of central venous pressure monitoring as a surrogate for cardiac preload. Starting with Starling’s original studies on the regulation of cardiac output, this review traces the history of the experiments that elucidated the role of central venous pressure in circulatory physiology. Central venous pressure is an important physiologic parameter, but it is not an independent variable that determines cardiac output.

  16. Calf venous compliance measured by venous occlusion plethysmography: methodological aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoog, Johan; Zachrisson, Helene; Lindenberger, Marcus; Ekman, Mikael; Ewerman, Lea; Länne, Toste

    2015-02-01

    Calf venous compliance (C calf) is commonly evaluated with venous occlusion plethysmography (VOP) during a standard cuff deflation protocol. However, the technique relies on two not previously validated assumptions concerning thigh cuff pressure (P cuff) transmission and the impact of net fluid filtration (F filt) on C calf. The aim was to validate VOP in the lower limb and to develop a model to correct for F filt during VOP. Strain-gauge technique was used to study calf volume changes in 15 women and 10 age-matched men. A thigh cuff was inflated to 60 mmHg for 4 and 8 min with a subsequent decrease of 1 mmHg s(-1). Intravenous pressure (P iv) was measured simultaneously. C calf was determined with the commonly used equation [Compliance = β 1 + 2β 2 × P cuff] describing the pressure-compliance relationship. A model was developed to identify and correct for F filt. Transmission of P cuff to P iv was 100 %. The decrease in P cuff correlated well with P iv reduction (r = 0.99, P < 0.001). Overall, our model showed that C calf was underestimated when F filt was not accounted for (all P < 0.01). F filt was higher in women (P < 0.01) and showed a more pronounced effect on C calf compared to men (P < 0.05). The impact of F filt was similar during 4- and 8-min VOP. P cuff is an adequate substitute for P iv in the lower limb. F filt is associated with an underestimation of C calf and differences in the effect of F filt during VOP can be accounted for with the correction model. Thus, our model seems to be a valuable tool in future studies of venous wall function.

  17. Central venous line complications and tip detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ameneh Rezaee Gheshlaghi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Central venous line is one of a creative instrument that saves human’s life in critical medical situation. Central venous line access is frequently involved in the disease management. It is used for rapid fluid therapy, transvenous pacemakers, infusion of some medications, hemodialysis or plasmapheresis and etc. Most of the emergency departments have some staffs that are trained for central venous line insertion but related complications occur during central venous line placement.Central venous line might have some complications and complication follow-up should be considered. Thromboembolism and infection are two important medical complications. Arterial puncture, hematoma, pneumothorax and hemothorax are mechanical Central venous line complications. Chest X-ray and some other techniques should be used for detecting these complications.Central venous line tip misplace is a considerable problem for emergency department staffs, previously chest X-ray has been used for central venous line misplace detection. In some recent studies, contrast-enhanced ultrasonography and intravascular electrocardiography have been used for central venous line misplace.

  18. [Application value of Toshiba 320-row dynamic volumetric CT angiography in the diagnosis of venous erectile dysfunction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guo-Yao; Xu, Cheng-Cheng; Wu, Ke-Rong; Liu, Guan-Lin; Zhang, Jie; Pan, Yu-Ning; Tang, Yi-Fan

    2016-07-01

    To investigate the application value of Toshiba 320-row dynamic volumetric CT angiography in the diagnosis of venous erectile dysfunction (VED). We enrolled in this study 33 patients diagnosed with ED by audiovisual sexual stimulation screening in the outpatient department. Penile erection was induced in the patients by injection of 2 mg phentolamine plus 30 mg papaverine into the corpus cavernosum, followed by that of contrast agent of iobitridol through the vein and corpus cavernosum successively. Then 320-row dynamic volumetric CT angiography was performed and the images of the corpus cavernosum in the arterial and venous phases were collected and processed. Different degrees of abnormal venous drainage were observed in 29 of the patients, including 7 cases (24.1%) of back deep venous leakage, 6 cases (20.7%) of foot venous leakage, 3 cases (10.3%) of dorsal superficial venous leakage, 1 case (3.5%) of intervertebral venous leakage, 2 cases (6.9%) of cavernous venous leakage, and 10 cases (34.5%) of mixed venous leakage. Ten of the patients underwent surgery, dorsal deep penile vein ligation in 2 cases, dorsal deep vein embedding plus foot vein ligation in 4, and foot vein ligation in the other 4. Eight of the patients were followed up for 3-12 months post-operatively, during which 2 achieved obvious erectile improvement, while the other 6 gained normal penile erection. Toshiba 320-row dynamic volumetric CT angiography is a reliable method for the diagnosis of VED, which displays the precise location of venous leakage for clinical treatment, with the advantages of clearer images, lower doses of contrast agent and radiation, and faster examination than X-ray penile angiography.

  19. Liraglutide Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... stroke, or death in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus and heart and blood vessel disease. Liraglutide injection ( ... helps move sugar from the blood into other body tissues where it is used for ... appetite and cause weight loss.Over time, people who have diabetes and ...

  20. Obinutuzumab Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... other chemotherapy medication(s). Obinutuzumab injection is in a class of medications called monoclonal antibodies. It works by killing cancer cells. ... office or hospital. Your doctor will select a schedule to give you obinutuzumab ... certain side effects. Your doctor will give you other medications to ...

  1. Ipilimumab Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    (ip'' i lim' ue mab)Ipilimumab injection may cause severe or life-threatening side effects. This includes ... In case of overdose, call your local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222. If the victim has collapsed or is not breathing, call local emergency services at ...

  2. Isavuconazonium Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fungal infections such as invasive aspergillosis (a fungal infection that begins in the lungs and spreads through the bloodstream to other organs) and invasive mucormycosis (a fungal infection that usually begins in the sinuses, brain, or lungs). Isavuconazonium injection is in a class of medications ...

  3. Percutaneous retrieval of dislodged totally implantable central venous access system in 92 cases: Experience in a single hospital

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, C.-C.; Tsai, T.-N. [Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Yang, C.-C. [Department of Medicine, Armed Forces Tao-Yuan General Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Han, C.-L. [Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: allexll.cheng@msa.hinet.net

    2009-02-15

    Objective: To investigate the clinical presentation of dislodged totally implantable central venous access system (central venous port-catheter) fragments and the efficacy and safety of percutaneous retrieval of them in our hospital. Materials and methods: Ninety-two cancer patients, mean age of 53.8 years old with 51.1% male, were enrolled from January 2005 to March 2007. They were referred to our catheterization laboratory for retrieval of fractured central venous port-catheter in our hospital. All patients were followed in the outpatient department for at least 1 month after surgical insertion. The characteristics of disrupted central venous port-catheter were recorded. The procedure-related clinical condition was evaluated. Results: The most common presentation of central venous port-catheter dislodgement is irrigation resistance to infusion (51/92). The most common location of fractured fragments is between superior vena cava and right atrium (i.e. proximal end remained in superior vena cava and distal end in right atrium) (22/92). The most common fracture site of the catheter is at the anastomosis between injection port and catheter (77/92). The retrieval set used mostly is loop snare. The success rate of the percutaneous retrieval of dislodged fragment was 97.8% and the complication rate was 3.3% only. Conclusion: The faulty connection between catheter and injection port contributes mainly to dislodgement of central venous port-catheter. Percutaneous retrieval of dislodged catheter is a highly successful, safe and efficient method.

  4. Venous Thromboembolism in Patients With Thrombocytopenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bælum, Jens Kristian; Ellingsen Moe, Espen; Nybo, Mads

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a frequent and potentially lethal condition. Venous thrombi are mainly constituted of fibrin and red blood cells, but platelets also play an important role in VTE formation. Information about VTE in patients with thrombocytopenia is, however, missing. O...

  5. Venous and arterial thrombosis in dialysis patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ocak, Gurbey; Vossen, Carla Y.; Rotmans, Joris I.; Lijfering, Willem M.; Rosendaal, Frits R.; Parlevliet, Karien J.; Krediet, Ray T.; Boeschoten, Els W.; Dekker, Friedo W.; Verduijn, Marion

    2011-01-01

    Whether the risk of both venous and arterial thrombosis is increased in dialysis patients as compared to the general population is unknown. In addition, it is unknown which subgroups are at highest risk. Furthermore, it is unknown whether having a history of venous thrombosis or arterial thrombosis

  6. An unusual Complication of Central Venous Cannulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashvini Kumar

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Central venous catheter (CVC hub fracture is a rare complication of central venous cannulation. We report a case where catheter hub fracture was detected immediately after CVC insertion. Causes of catheter hub fracture and its complications are discussed.

  7. Pulmonary venous abnormalities encountered on pre ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) elegantly renders pulmonary venous anatomy. With increasing numbers of radiofrequency ablation procedures being performed, there is now a greater emphasis on pre-procedure imaging to delineate this anatomy. Pulmonary venous mapping studies can be performed with or ...

  8. VENOUS THROMBOEMBOLISM PROPHYLAXIS – THE OTHER ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    VENOUS THROMBOEMBOLISM PROPHYLAXIS – THE OTHER SIDE OF THE COIN: A REVIEW OF LITERATURE ... Background: There are no local guidelines for prophylaxis against Venous Thrombo-Embolism (VTE). In the absence of any .... of leg ulceration in the age matched general population. (9.6% to 12.6%).

  9. Sex-specific aspects of venous thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roach, Rachel Elizabeth Jo

    2014-01-01

    Venous thrombosis is a disease that occurs in 1-2 per 1000 people per year. At the time of their first venous thrombosis, approximately 50% of women are exposed to reproductive risk factors (oral contraception, postmenopausal hormone therapy, pregnancy and the puerperium). In this thesis, we showed

  10. Thromboelastography in patients with cerebral venous thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopman, Karen; Uyttenboogaart, Maarten; Hendriks, Herman G. D.; Luijckx, Gert-Jan; Cramwinckel, Ivo R.; Vroomen, Patrick C.; De Keyser, Jacques; van der Meer, Jan

    Introduction: Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a rare presentation of venous thrombosis and has been associated with many conditions. In about 20% no risk factor is identified. The aim of this study was to assess the clot formation by thromboelastography (TEG) in patients with a history of CVT

  11. Starling curves and central venous pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Berlin (Cheryl); J. Bakker (Jan)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractRecent studies challenge the utility of central venous pressure monitoring as a surrogate for cardiac preload. Starting with Starling’s original studies on the regulation of cardiac output, this review traces the history of the experiments that elucidated the role of central venous

  12. Heritability of chronic venous disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krusche, Petra; Wolf, Andreas; Krawczak, Michael; Timm, Birgitt; Nikolaus, Susanna; Frings, Norbert; Schreiber, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Varicose veins without skin changes have a prevalence of approximately 20% in Northern and Western Europe whereas advanced chronic venous insufficiency affects about 3% of the population. Genetic risk factors are thought to play an important role in the aetiology of both these chronic venous diseases (CVD). We evaluated the relative genetic and environmental impact upon CVD risk by estimating the heritability of the disease in 4,033 nuclear families, comprising 16,434 individuals from all over Germany. Upon clinical examination, patients were classified according to the CEAP guidelines as either C2 (simple varicose veins), C3 (oedema), C4 (skin changes without ulceration), C5 (healed ulceration), or C6 (active ulcers). The narrow-sense heritability (h2) of CVD equals 17.3% (standard error 2.5%, likelihood ratio test P = 1.4 × 10−13). The proportion of disease risk attributable to age (at ascertainment) and sex, the two main risk factors for CVD, was estimated as 10.7% (Kullback–Leibler deviance R2). The heritability of CVD is high, thereby suggesting a notable genetic component in the aetiology of the disease. Systematic population-based searches for CVD susceptibility genes are therefore warranted. PMID:20354728

  13. Compression for venous leg ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Meara, Susan; Cullum, Nicky A; Nelson, E Andrea

    2009-01-21

    Around one percent of people in industrialised countries will suffer from a leg ulcer at some time. The majority of these leg ulcers are due to problems in the veins, resulting in an accumulation of blood in the legs. Leg ulcers arising from venous problems are called venous (varicose or stasis) ulcers. The main treatment has been a firm compression garment (bandage or stocking) in order to aid venous return. There is a large number of compression garments available and it is unclear whether they are effective in treating venous ulcers and which compression garment is the most effective. To undertake a systematic review of all randomised controlled trials of the clinical effectiveness of compression bandage or stocking systems in the treatment of venous leg ulceration.Specific questions addressed by the review are:1. Does the application of compression bandages or stockings aid venous ulcer healing? 2. Which compression bandage or stocking system is the most effective? For this update we searched the Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register (14/10/08); The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library Issue 4 2008); Ovid MEDLINE (1950 to October Week 1 2008); Ovid EMBASE (1980 to 2008 Week 41) and Ovid CINAHL (1982 to October Week 1 2008). No date or language restrictions were applied. Randomised controlled trials recruiting people with venous leg ulceration that evaluated any type of compression bandage system or compression hosiery were eligible for inclusion. Comparators included no compression (e.g. primary dressing alone, non-compressive bandage) or an alternative type of compression. Trials had to report an objective measure of ulcer healing in order to be included (primary outcome for the review). Secondary outcomes of the review included ulcer recurrence, costs, quality of life, pain, adverse events and withdrawals. There was no restriction on date, language or publication status of trials. Details of eligible studies were

  14. [Central venous blood gas analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marano, Marco; D'Amato, Anna; Guiotto, Giovanna; Schiraldi, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    The hemodialysis might interfere with patients hemodynamic, as the technique allows a sophisticated game with extra and intravascular fluids. As the cardiocirculatory response could sometimes be unpredictable, it is interesting to collect valuable information by reaching a deep understanding of the tissue metabolism which is mirrored by the blood gas analysis of variations in arterial and central venous blood samples. Particularly interesting are the time course variations of the central venous hemoglobin saturation (ScvO2), which are directly related to the patient with O2-demand as well as to the O2-Delivery (DO2). The ScvO2 is determined by four parameters (cardiac output, Hb concentration, arterial Hb saturation and O2 consumption): If the fluids subtraction during dialysis was about to determine an occult hypoperfusion, the ScvO2 reduction would be a timely warning sign to be considered. Moreover, while the normal veno-arterial PCO2 difference is 2-4 mmHg, whenever a mismatch between O2-demand and DO2arise, a larger v-aPCO2 difference should be observed.

  15. [Physiopathology of superficial venous circulation in athletes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venerando, A; Pelliccia, A

    1981-01-01

    The venous circulation in athletes doing sports involving medium or heavy cardiac strain means that considerable physiological modifications may occur, notably vascular expansion. This phenomenon may be observed in the superficial venous circulation of both the upper and lower members, as well as in pulmonary circulation. Varices of the lower members are common in about 5% of practising athletes, notably in weight-lifters and wrestlers who are particularly prone to this risk, and precisely because venous return is impeded by the predominantly static effort which characterizes these sports. Karate, judo, canoeing, football, high jump and long jump are similar: mechanical blocks or sudden increases of venous pressure following the rapid changes in body-position or particular posture. Nevertheless, these phenomena can only be explained by the supposition that the valvular mechanism of certain subjects is particularly vulnerable. There are other sports, on the other hand, which have a beneficial effect on venous return, especially swimming and long-distance running.

  16. Clinical quality indicators of venous leg ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Monica L; Mainz, Jan; Soernsen, Lars T

    2005-01-01

    In the clinical setting, diagnosis and treatment of venous leg ulcers can vary considerably from patient to patient. The first step to reducing this variation is to document venous leg ulcer care through use of quantitative scientific documentation principles. This requires the development of valid...... and reliable evidence-based quality indicators of venous leg ulcer care. A Scandinavian multidisciplinary, cross-sectional panel of wound healing experts developed clinical quality indicators on the basis of scientific evidence from the literature and subsequent group nominal consensus of the panel......; an independent medical doctor tested the feasibility and reliability of these clinical indicators, assessing the quality of medical technical care on 100 consecutive venous leg ulcer patients. Main outcome measures were healing, recurrence, pain, venous disease diagnosis, differential diagnosis and treatment...

  17. Side effects of corticosteroid injections: what's new?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthelot, Jean-Marie; Le Goff, Benoît; Maugars, Yves

    2013-07-01

    The risk of sepsis with a hip or knee implant does not seem to be increased by prior joint injections, as long as the injection and surgery are separated by at least two months. Calcifications have been reported after intradiscal injection in the coccygeal region for coccydynia. Complete rest for 24 hours after injection of triamcinolone hexacetonide into the knee had no effect on systemic diffusion of the product. Patients infected by HIV who are treated with ritonavir are at much greater risk for Cushing syndrome after epidural injection. Problems with menstruation after corticosteroid injection seem to be related to a transient decrease in estradiol levels, without alterations in FSH and LH levels. The risk of central serous chorioretinopathy and acute necrosis of the retina after injection is not known, even by ophthalmologists. Transient dysphonia occurs in 12% of patients receiving corticosteroid injections. The impressive Tachon's syndrome seems to be the venous counterpart to Nicolau's syndrome for arteries. Injections into C1-C2 should be abandoned because of the neurological risks. Since serious neurological events after foraminal injections could be the result of an overly fast injection into the arterialized radicular veins rather than in the arteries, only slow injections with products having a low risk of embolism or vascular complications should be allowed. Dexamethasone-based preparations seem to contain no particles or crystals, and have not induced any neurological accidents in various animal models, even after direct administration into vertebral or carotid arteries. Copyright © 2012 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Gas6 Promotes Inflammatory (CCR2hiCX3CR1lo) Monocyte Recruitment in Venous Thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurance, Sandrine; Bertin, François-René; Ebrahimian, Talin; Kassim, Yusra; Rys, Ryan N; Lehoux, Stéphanie; Lemarié, Catherine A; Blostein, Mark D

    2017-07-01

    Coagulation and inflammation are inter-related. Gas6 (growth arrest-specific 6) promotes venous thrombosis and participates to inflammation through endothelial-innate immune cell interactions. Innate immune cells can provide the initiating stimulus for venous thrombus development. We hypothesize that Gas6 promotes monocyte recruitment during venous thrombosis. Deep venous thrombosis was induced in wild-type and Gas6-deficient (-/-) mice using 5% FeCl 3 and flow reduction in the inferior vena cava. Total monocyte depletion was achieved by injection of clodronate before deep venous thrombosis. Inflammatory monocytes were depleted using an anti-C-C chemokine receptor type 2 (CCR2) antibody. Similarly, injection of an anti-chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2) antibody induced CCL2 depletion. Flow cytometry and immunofluorescence were used to characterize the monocytes recruited to the thrombus. In vivo, absence of Gas6 was associated with a reduction of monocyte recruitment in both deep venous thrombosis models. Global monocyte depletion by clodronate leads to smaller thrombi in wild-type mice. Compared with wild type, the thrombi from Gas6 -/- mice contain less inflammatory (CCR2 hi CX 3 CR1 lo ) monocytes, consistent with a Gas6-dependent recruitment of this monocyte subset. Correspondingly, selective depletion of CCR2 hi CX 3 CR1 lo monocytes reduced the formation of venous thrombi in wild-type mice demonstrating a predominant role of the inflammatory monocytes in thrombosis. In vitro, the expression of both CCR2 and CCL2 were Gas6 dependent in monocytes and endothelial cells, respectively, impacting monocyte migration. Moreover, Gas6-dependent CCL2 expression and monocyte migration were mediated via JNK (c-Jun N-terminal kinase). This study demonstrates that Gas6 specifically promotes the recruitment of inflammatory CCR2 hi CX 3 CR1 lo monocytes through the regulation of both CCR2 and CCL2 during deep venous thrombosis. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Postpartum venous thromboembolism: incidence and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepper, Naomi K; Boulet, Sheree L; Whiteman, Maura K; Monsour, Michael; Marchbanks, Polly A; Hooper, W Craig; Curtis, Kathryn M

    2014-05-01

    To calculate incidence of postpartum venous thromboembolism by week after delivery and to examine potential risk factors for venous thromboembolism overall and at different times during the postpartum period. A deidentified health care claims information database from employers, health plans, hospitals, and Medicaid programs across the United States was used to identify delivery hospitalizations among women aged 15-44 years during the years 2005-2011. International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification diagnosis and procedure codes were used to identify instances of venous thromboembolism and associated characteristics and conditions among women with recent delivery. Incidence proportions of venous thromboembolism by week postpartum through week 12 were calculated per 10,000 deliveries. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios for selected risk factors among women with postpartum venous thromboembolism and among women with venous thromboembolism during the early or later postpartum periods. The incidence proportion of postpartum venous thromboembolism was highest during the first 3 weeks after delivery, dropping from nine per 10,000 during the first week to one per 10,000 at 4 weeks after delivery and decreasing steadily through the 12th week. Certain obstetric procedures and complications such as cesarean delivery, preeclampsia, hemorrhage, and postpartum infection conferred an increased risk for venous thromboembolism (odds ratios ranging from 1.3 to 6.4), which persisted over the 12-week period compared with women without these risk factors. Risk for postpartum venous thromboembolism is highest during the first 3 weeks after delivery. Women with obstetric complications are at highest risk for postpartum venous thromboembolism, and this risk remains elevated throughout the first 12 weeks after delivery. II.

  20. Venous hemodynamic changes in lower limb venous disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Byung Boong; Nicolaides, Andrew N; Myers, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    There are excellent guidelines for clinicians to manage venous diseases but few reviews to assess their hemodynamic background. Hemodynamic concepts that evolved in the past have largely remained unchallenged in recent decades, perhaps due to their often complicated nature and in part due...... not provide the physiological basis for understanding the hemodynamics of flow, pressure, compliance and resistance. Hemodynamic investigations appear to provide a better correlation with post-treatment clinical outcome and quality of life than ultrasound findings. There is a far better prospect...... for understanding the complete picture of the patient's disability and response to management by combining ultrasound with hemodynamic studies. Accordingly, at the instigation of Dr Angelo Scuderi, the Union Internationale de Phlebologie (UIP) executive board commissioned a large number of experts to assess all...

  1. Familial Clustering of Venous Thromboembolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sindet-Pedersen, Caroline; Oestergaard, Louise Bruun; Gundlund, Anna

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Identification of risk factors for venous thromboembolism (VTE) is of utmost importance to improve current prophylactic regimes and treatment guidelines. The extent to which a family history contributes to the risk of VTE needs further exploration. OBJECTIVES: To examine the relative...... rate of VTE in first-degree relatives compared with the general population. METHODS: By crosslinking Danish nationwide registries we identified patients with VTE between 1978 and 2012, and their familial relations. The first member in a family to acquire VTE was defined as the proband. All first...... regression models, with the general population as a fixed reference. RESULTS: We identified 70,767 children of maternal probands, 66,065 children of paternal probands, and 29,183 siblings to sibling probands. Having a maternal proband or a paternal proband were associated with a significantly increased VTE...

  2. Platelet recruitment to venous stent thrombi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBane, Robert D; Karnicki, Krzysztof; Wysokinski, Waldemar E

    2013-11-01

    Thrombosis following venous stent placement is a morbid clinical outcome. Whether to target platelets or coagulation factors for venous stent thromboprophylaxis remains unclear. We sought to determine whether integrin α(IIb)β3 antagonism with lamifiban would inhibit platelet recruitment to venous stent thrombosis. Anti-thrombotic efficacy was compared between venous and arterial circulations. Pigs received either lamifiban (0.2 mg/kg bolus plus 0.2 mg/kg/h infusion; n = 6) or saline (n = 12). Carotid arteries were crush injured and then harvested 30 min later to provide an assessment of antithrombotic efficacy in the arterial circulation. Iliac venous stents were then deployed and thrombi allowed to propagate for 2 h before harvesting. Platelet deposition was measured by scintillation detection of autologous (111)In-platelets. Venous thrombi were quantified by weight and compared to platelet, Von Willebrand factor (VWF) and fibrinogen content. Arterial platelet deposition (×10(6)/cm(2)) was reduced >80% by lamifiban (398 ± 437) compared to controls (1,540 ± 883; p thrombi occurs in part through the integrin α(IIb)β3 receptor. Unlike arterial thrombosis, inhibition of this receptor is insufficient to prevent venous stent thrombosis.

  3. Direct orbital puncture of the cavernous sinus for the treatment of a carotid-cavernous dural AV fistula with a concomitant venous/lymphatic malformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coumou, Adriaan D; van den Berg, René; Bot, Joost C; Beetsma, Daan B; Saeed, Peerooz

    2014-02-01

    A 37- year old male with a long history of a left orbital venous/lympathic malformation presented with ocular injection, increased proptosis and reduced left vision. Angiography demonstrated a carotid cavernous dural AV fistula combined with a concomitant venous/lymphatic malformation. After attempts at transvenous embolization, a direct uncomplicated transorbital puncture of the cavernous sinus via a lateral orbitotomy was performed with complete resolution of ocular symptoms.

  4. Central venous catheters: the role of radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, P.L. [Department of Radiology, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: pecklingtan@hotmail.com; Gibson, M. [Department of Radiology, Royal Berkshire Hospital, Reading, Berkshire (United Kingdom)

    2006-01-15

    The insertion and management of long-term venous catheters have long been the province of anaesthetists, intensive care physicians and surgeons. Radiologists are taking an increasing role in the insertion of central venous catheters (CVCs) because of their familiarity with the imaging equipment and their ability to manipulate catheters and guide-wires. The radiological management of the complications of CVCs has also expanded as a result. This article reviews the role of radiology in central venous access, covering the detection and management of their complications.

  5. Quality of life in patients with venous stasis ulcers and others with advanced venous insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracz, Edyta; Zamojska, Ewa; Modrzejewski, Andrzej; Zaborski, Daniel; Grzesiak, Wilhelm

    2015-01-01

    The quality of life (QoL) in patients with advanced venous insufficiency (including venous stasis ulcers, skin discoloration, stasis eczema, and lipodermatosclerosis) assessed using the Clinical Etiological Anatomical Pathophysiological (CEAP) and Venous Clinical Severity Score (VCSS) classifications is presented. Also, disease features such as: intensity of pain, edema and inflammatory response that exerted the most profound effect on different domains of QoL are reported. The global QoL in patients with lower leg venous ulcerations was relatively similar to that observed in other patients with chronic venous insufficiency. The presence of venous ulcerations was associated with lower QoL in a Physical domain. Significant correlations were found between pain intensity and the values of Physical, Physiological, Level of Independence and Environmental domains, between edema intensity and Social domain as well as between the intensity of inflammatory response and Physical and Spiritual domains.

  6. The Impact of Lower Extremity Venous Ulcers due to Chronic Venous Insufficiency on Quality of Life

    OpenAIRE

    Koupidis, Sotirios A; Paraskevas, Kosmas I.; Stathopoulos, Vassilios; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P.

    2008-01-01

    Lower extremity venous ulcers comprise a complex medical and social issue. The conservative and/or surgical management of venous ulcers is often inadequate. In addition, the psychosocial aspect of the disease is often overlooked and most often undertreated. Common symptoms such as pain, low self-esteem and patient isolation are usually not recognized and therefore not adequately managed. This mini-review summarizes the current data on the management of lower extremity venous ulcers and their ...

  7. Central Venous Line Insertion Revealing Partial Anomalous Pulmonary Venous Return: Diagnosis and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bashar Alzghoul

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Central venous line malposition is a well-known complication of line insertion. Rarely, it can be mal-positioned in an anomalous pulmonary vein. We present an unusual case of a 56-year-old woman that was found to have partial anomalous pulmonary venous return on central venous line insertion. In this report, we describe a systematic approach to diagnosis and management of this unusual situation.

  8. Central Venous Line Insertion Revealing Partial Anomalous Pulmonary Venous Return: Diagnosis and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzghoul, Bashar; Innabi, Ayoub; Chada, Aditya; Tarawneh, Ahmad R; Kakkera, Krishna; Khasawneh, Khaled

    2017-01-01

    Central venous line malposition is a well-known complication of line insertion. Rarely, it can be mal-positioned in an anomalous pulmonary vein. We present an unusual case of a 56-year-old woman that was found to have partial anomalous pulmonary venous return on central venous line insertion. In this report, we describe a systematic approach to diagnosis and management of this unusual situation.

  9. The possibility for use of venous flaps in plastic surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baytinger, V. F., E-mail: baitinger@mail.tomsknet.ru; Kurochkina, O. S., E-mail: kurochkinaos@yandex.ru; Selianinov, K. V.; Baytinger, A. V. [Research Institute of Microsurgery, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Dzyuman, A. N. [Siberian State Medical University, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-17

    The use of venous flaps is controversial. The mechanism of perfusion of venous flaps is still not fully understood. The research was conducted on 56 white rats. In our experimental work we studied two different models of venous flaps: pedicled venous flap (PVF) and pedicled arterialized venous flap (PAVF). Our results showed that postoperative congestion was present in all flaps. However 66.7% of all pedicled venous flaps and 100% of all pedicled arterialized venous flaps eventually survived. Histological examination revealed that postoperatively the blood flow in the skin of the pedicled arterialized venous flap became «re-reversed» again; there were no differences between mechanism of survival of venous flaps and other flaps. On the 7-14th day in the skin of all flaps were processes of neoangiogenesis and proliferation. Hence the best scenario for the clinical use of venous flaps unfolds when both revascularization and skin coverage are required.

  10. The possibility for use of venous flaps in plastic surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baytinger, V. F.; Kurochkina, O. S.; Selianinov, K. V.; Baytinger, A. V.; Dzyuman, A. N.

    2015-11-01

    The use of venous flaps is controversial. The mechanism of perfusion of venous flaps is still not fully understood. The research was conducted on 56 white rats. In our experimental work we studied two different models of venous flaps: pedicled venous flap (PVF) and pedicled arterialized venous flap (PAVF). Our results showed that postoperative congestion was present in all flaps. However 66.7% of all pedicled venous flaps and 100% of all pedicled arterialized venous flaps eventually survived. Histological examination revealed that postoperatively the blood flow in the skin of the pedicled arterialized venous flap became «re-reversed» again; there were no differences between mechanism of survival of venous flaps and other flaps. On the 7-14th day in the skin of all flaps were processes of neoangiogenesis and proliferation. Hence the best scenario for the clinical use of venous flaps unfolds when both revascularization and skin coverage are required.

  11. Spontaneous thrombosis of developmental venous anomaly (DVA) with venous infarct and acute cerebellar ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Amit; Kanekar, Sangam; Kalapos, Paul; Vijay, Kanupriya

    2014-08-01

    Developmental venous anomaly (DVA), formally known as venous angioma, is a congenital anatomic variant of the venous drainage of the brain. Although they typically have a benign clinical course and a low symptomatic rate, thrombosis of a drainage vein may occur, leading to potentially debilitating complications. We report a unique case of spontaneous thrombosis of a posterior fossa developmental venous anomaly with cerebellar infarct in a 61-year-old man who presented with acute onset cerebellar ataxia. DVA thrombosis was well-depicted on CT and MR studies. Patient was put on anticoagulant therapy and complete recanalization was seen on follow-up imaging.

  12. [European guidelines for sclerotherapy in chronic venous disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacević, Jadranka

    2014-10-01

    Sclerotherapy is the targeted chemical ablation of varicose veins by intravenous injection of a liquid of foamed sclerosing drug. The treated veins may be intradermal, subcutaneous, and/or transfascial as well as superficial and deep in venous malformations. The aim of this guideline is to give evidence-based recommendations for liquid and foam sclerotherapy. This guideline was drafted on behalf of 23 European Phlebological Societies during Guideline Conference on 7-10 May 2012 in Mainz. The conference was organized by the German Society of Phlebology. These guidelines review the present state of knowledge as reflected in published medical literature. The regulatory situation of sclerosant drugs differs from country to country but this has not been considered in this document. The recommendations of this guiedeline are graded according to the American College of Chest Physicians Task Force recommendations on Grading Strenght of Recommendations and Quality of Evidence in Clinical Guidelines. This guideline focuses on the two sclerosing drugs which are licensed in the majority of the European countries, polidokanol and sodium tetradecyl sulphate. Other sclerosants are dot discussed in detail. The guideline gives recommendations concerning indications, contraindications, side-effects, concentrations, volumes, technique and efficacy of liquid and foam sclerotherapy of varicose veins and venous malformations.

  13. Imaging of cerebral venous complications in patients with infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xudong Shen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Systemic and local infections can cause cerebrovascular complications in the central nervous system. The involvement of cerebral venous system would result in venous or dural venous sinus thrombophlebitis. Images can help evaluate the venous complications in patients with central nervous system infection and provide information in guiding treatment and prognosis. The main focus of this review is to emphasize the proper utilization of imaging modalities in assessment the complications of cerebral venous system in patients with infection.

  14. [Emphysematous gastritis with concomitant portal venous air].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Min Yeong; Kim, Jin Il; Kim, Jae Young; Kim, Hyun Ho; Jo, Ik Hyun; Seo, Jae Hyun; Kim, Il Kyu; Cheung, Dae Young

    2015-02-01

    Emphysematous gastritis is a rare form of gastritis caused by infection of the stomach wall by gas forming bacteria. It is a very rare condition that carries a high mortality rate. Portal venous gas shadow represents elevation of intestinal luminal pressure which manifests as emphysematous gastritis or gastric emphysema. Literature reviews show that the mortality rate is especially high when portal venous gas shadow is present on CT scan. Until recently, the treatment of emphysematous gastritis has been immediate surgical intervention. However, there is a recent trend of avoiding surgery because of the frequent occurrence of post-operative complications such as anastomosis leakage. In addition, aggressive surgical treatment has failed to show significant improvement in prognosis. Recently, the authors experienced a case of emphysematous gastritis accompanied by portal venous gas which was treated successfully by conservative treatment without immediate surgical intervention. Herein, we present a case of emphysematous gastritis with concomitant portal venous air along with literature review.

  15. Tuberculosis and Venous Thromboembolism: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncalves, Ivone M; Alves, Daniela Costa; Carvalho, Aurora; do Ceu Brito, Maria; Calvario, Fernando; Duarte, Raquel

    2009-12-16

    Tuberculosis remains an infectious disease with a high prevalence worldwide and represents a major public health issue. Although venous thromboembolism is a rare complication of this disease, it may be a potentially life-threatening event. We report two cases of severe pulmonary tuberculosis associated with venous thromboembolism. A 38 year-old caucasian male that had a thromboembolic event as an unsual presentation form of tuberculosis and a 51 year-old caucasian male that developed deep venous thrombosis later in the course of the disease. An association between inflamation induced by tuberculosis and a hypercoagulable state has been described. Therefore, the occurence of deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolic episods, should be considered in patients with tuberculosis particulary during the first weeks of treatment. The physician's awarness of these phenomena is important to an early diagnostic suspicion and prompt treatment in order to prevent fatal outcomes.

  16. [Venous thromboembolic disease: presentation of a case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirpuri-Mirpuri, P G; Álvarez-Cordovés, M M; Pérez-Monje, A

    2013-01-01

    Venous thromboembolic disease in its clinical spectrum includes both deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary thromboembolism, which is usually a complication of deep vein thrombosis. It is a relatively common disease with significant morbidity and requires an accurate diagnosis. They are numerous risk factors for venous thromboembolism, and there is evidence that the risk of thromboembolic disease increases proportionally to the number of predisposing risk factors present. The primary care physician should know the risk factors and suspect the presence of venous thromboembolic disease when there is a compatible clnical picture. The treatment for this pathology is anticoagulation. We report a patient with cardiovascular risk factors who was seen with pain in the right leg and shortness of breath and referred to the hospital with suspected venous thromboembolism, atrial fibrillation and pleural effusion. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  17. Pathophysiology of spontaneous venous gas embolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambertsen, C. J.; Albertine, K. H.; Pisarello, J. B.; Flores, N. D.

    1991-01-01

    The use of controllable degrees and durations of continuous isobaric counterdiffusion venous gas embolism to investigate effects of venous gas embolism upon blood, cardiovascular, and respiratory gas exchange function, as well as pathological effects upon the lung and its microcirculation is discussed. Use of N2O/He counterdiffusion permitted performance of the pathophysiologic and pulmonary microstructural effects at one ATA without hyperbaric or hypobaric exposures.

  18. Transorbital Glue Embolization of a Recurrent Venous Varix Using Real-Time Image Guidance in the Neuroangiography Suite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakur, Sophia F; Brunozzi, Denise; Setabutr, Pete; Hussein, Ahmed E; Charbel, Fady T; Alaraj, Ali

    2017-08-01

    Orbital lesions are challenging to access due to their location amid critical anatomic structures. Here, we demonstrate direct transorbital cannulation of an orbital venous varix using image guidance. A 36-year-old male was diagnosed with a left orbital venous varix approximately 5 years ago at an outside institution. He subsequently underwent surgery for direct intraoperative embolization of the venous varix followed by surgical resection. The patient recently presented to us with left eye pain, proptosis, double vision, and conjunctival hemorrhage precipitated by straining or lying flat. Orbital magnetic resonance imaging showed recurrence of the venous varix, which was then confirmed with digital subtraction angiography and intraprocedural computed tomography (DynaCT, Siemens Healthineers, Erlangen, Germany). Due to scarring from the previous surgery, percutaneous transorbital embolization of the venous varix was planned. The needle trajectory was determined and also visualized in real-time using image guidance (Needle Guidance, Siemens Healthineers). Once the needle reached the desired target, n-butyl cyanoacrylate glue (Codman Neuro, San Jose, California) was injected until nearly the entire venous varix was occluded. There were no complications, and at his postoperative visit the patient reported resolution of all symptoms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The postoperative venous thromboembolism (TREVO) study - risk and case mortality by surgical specialty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Cristina; Guimarães Pereira, Luís; Moreto, Ana; Sá, Ana Carolina; Azevedo, Ana

    2017-09-01

    Venous thromboembolism, risk of which is increased in surgical patients, is a preventable cause of morbidity and death. The primary objective of this study was to estimate the incidence of symptomatic postoperative venous thromboembolism in adults at a tertiary university hospital, overall and by surgical specialty. The secondary objective was to analyze severity of and mortality from thromboembolic events. We performed a retrospective study to identify cases of in-hospital postoperative venous thromboembolism, encoded by the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, according to the Joint Commission International criteria. Adult patients admitted for surgery in 2008-2012 were included. Among 67 635 hospitalizations, 90 cases of postoperative symptomatic venous thromboembolism were identified, corresponding to an incidence of 1.33/1000 admissions (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1-1.6/1000). Neurosurgery had the highest risk (4.07/1000), followed by urological surgery and general surgery (p<0.001). There were 50 cases of pulmonary embolism, 11 of which were fatal. Of the 90 cases, 12.2% occurred under neuraxial anesthesia and 55.1% in patients with American Society of Anesthesiology III physical status. At least 37.7% of patients with events received a prophylactic dose of injectable anticoagulant postoperatively. The overall risk decreased from 2008 to 2012. Venous thromboembolism-associated mortality during hospitalization was 21.1% (95% CI 13.6-30.4). The incidence of postoperative symptomatic venous thromboembolism was 1.33/1000. Neurosurgery showed the greatest risk. Mortality was 21.1%. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Venous catheterization with ultrasound navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasatkin, A. A.; Urakov, A. L.; Nigmatullina, A. R.

    2015-11-01

    By ultrasound scanning it was determined that respiratory movements made by chest of healthy and sick person are accompanied by respiratory chest rise of internal jugular veins. During the exhalation of an individual diameter of his veins increases and during the breath it decreases down to the complete disappearing if their lumen. Change of the diameter of internal jugular veins in different phases can influence significantly the results of vein puncture and cauterization in patients. The purpose of this research is development of the method increasing the efficiency and safety of cannulation of internal jugular veins by the ultrasound visualization. We suggested the method of catheterization of internal jugular veins by the ultrasound navigation during the execution of which the puncture of venous wall by puncture needle and the following conduction of J-guide is carried out at the moment of patient's exhalation. This method decreases the risk of complications development during catheterization of internal jugular vein due to exclusion of perforating wound of vein and subjacent tissues and anatomical structures.

  1. Venous catheterization with ultrasound navigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasatkin, A. A., E-mail: ant-kasatkin@yandex.ru; Nigmatullina, A. R. [Izhevsk State Medical Academy, Kommunarov street, 281, Izhevsk, Russia, 426034 (Russian Federation); Urakov, A. L., E-mail: ant-kasatkin@yandex.ru [Institute of Mechanics Ural Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, T.Baramzinoy street 34, Izhevsk, Russia, 426067, Izhevsk (Russian Federation); Izhevsk State Medical Academy, Kommunarov street, 281, Izhevsk, Russia, 426034 (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-17

    By ultrasound scanning it was determined that respiratory movements made by chest of healthy and sick person are accompanied by respiratory chest rise of internal jugular veins. During the exhalation of an individual diameter of his veins increases and during the breath it decreases down to the complete disappearing if their lumen. Change of the diameter of internal jugular veins in different phases can influence significantly the results of vein puncture and cauterization in patients. The purpose of this research is development of the method increasing the efficiency and safety of cannulation of internal jugular veins by the ultrasound visualization. We suggested the method of catheterization of internal jugular veins by the ultrasound navigation during the execution of which the puncture of venous wall by puncture needle and the following conduction of J-guide is carried out at the moment of patient’s exhalation. This method decreases the risk of complications development during catheterization of internal jugular vein due to exclusion of perforating wound of vein and subjacent tissues and anatomical structures.

  2. No agreement of mixed venous and central venous saturation in sepsis, independent of sepsis origin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beest, Paul A.; van Ingen, Jan; Boerma, E. Christiaan; Holman, Nicole D.; Groen, Henk; Koopmans, Matty; Spronk, Peter E.; Kuiper, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Controversy remains regarding the relationship between central venous saturation (ScvO(2)) and mixed venous saturation (SvO(2)) and their use and interchangeability in patients with sepsis or septic shock. We tested the hypothesis that ScvO(2) does not reliably predict SvO(2) in sepsis. Additionally

  3. Femoral venous oxygen saturation is no surrogate for central venous oxygen saturation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beest, Paul A.; van der Schors, Alice; Liefers, Henriette; Coenen, Ludo G. J.; Braam, Richard L.; Habib, Najib; Braber, Annemarije; Scheeren, Thomas W. L.; Kuiper, Michael A.; Spronk, Peter E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective:  The purpose of our study was to determine if central venous oxygen saturation and femoral venous oxygen saturation can be used interchangeably during surgery and in critically ill patients. Design:  Prospective observational controlled study. Setting:  Nonacademic university-affiliated

  4. Duration of venous occlusion with lidocaine for preventing propofol induced pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massad, Islam M; Abu-Ali, Hamdi M; Al-Ghanem, Subhi A; Badran, Izdiad Z; Ammari, Bassam A; Daradkeh, Salam S

    2008-07-01

    To study the effect of the venous occlusion duration using lidocaine on the incidence and severity of propofol induced pain. A prospective double-blind randomized study was designed at Jordan University Hospital, Amman, Jordan between October 2007 and November 2007. One hundred and fifty patients aged 14-70 years, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) clinical status I and II who underwent elective surgeries under general anesthesia, were divided into 3 groups. All 3 groups had propofol 1% infusion at a constant rate after applying venous occlusion with lidocaine. The occlusion was applied for 15 seconds (group I, n=50), 30 seconds (group II, n=50) and 60 seconds (group III, n=50). Pain was assessed during injection according to a verbal pain score. Fourteen patients 28% had pain in group I, compared to 16 patients 32% in group II, and 9 patients 18% in group III. This difference did not reach statistical significance p>0.05 for the incidence and severity of pain. While venous occlusion with lidocaine is an effective method in relieving propofol induced pain, we found no difference when the duration of venous occlusion was 15, 30, or 60 seconds.

  5. Venous injury in abusive head trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhary, Arabinda K. [Nemours A. I. duPont Hospital for Children, Department of Radiology, Wilmington, DE (United States); Bradford, Ray; Thamburaj, K.; Boal, Danielle K.B. [Hershey Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Hershey, PA (United States); Dias, Mark S. [Hershey Medical Center, Department of Neurosurgery, Hershey, PA (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Abusive head trauma (AHT) is an important cause of serious brain injury in infants and young children who have characteristic clinical and imaging findings that are discordant with the clinical history provided. Recent attention has focused on abnormalities of the cranial venous sinuses and cortical veins, both on MRI and at autopsy. Although many have interpreted these to be secondary to the AHT, some have recently argued that these venous abnormalities represent primary cortical sinus and venous thrombosis that leads secondarily to subdural hemorrhage and secondary brain injury. Direct trauma to the veins and sinuses has been reported at autopsy in AHT, but there has been no systematic study of venous abnormalities in cases of AHT. The purpose of this study was to define the incidence and characteristics of venous and sinus abnormalities in AHT. We included all children <36 months of age who were diagnosed with abusive head trauma between 2001 and 2012 and who had MRI and magnetic resonance (MR) venography as part of their diagnostic workup. We analyzed age, gender and clinical findings. MRI and MR venography were analyzed independently by two neuroradiologists with a focus on abnormalities involving the intracranial veins and venous sinuses. A total of 45 children were included. The median age was 3 months (range 15 days to 31 months) and 28 were boys (62%). Clinical findings included retinal hemorrhage in 71% and extracranial fractures in 55%. CT or MRI demonstrated subdural hemorrhage in 41 (91%); none had subdural effusions. In 31 cases (69%) MR venography demonstrated mass effect on the venous sinuses or cortical draining veins, with either displacement or partial or complete effacement of the venous structures from an adjacent subdural hematoma or brain swelling. We also describe the lollipop sign, which represents direct trauma to the cortical bridging veins and was present in 20/45 (44%) children. Evidence of displacement or compression of cortical veins

  6. Radio-opaque ethylcellulose-ethanol is a safe and efficient sclerosing agent for venous malformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dompmartin, Anne; Barrellier, Marie-Therese [Universite de Caen Basse Normandie, CHU Caen, Department of Dermatology, Caen (France); Blaizot, Xavier; Chene, Yannick; Gaillard, Cathy [Universite de Caen Basse Normandie, CHU Caen, Clinical Research and Biostatistical Unit, Caen (France); Theron, Jacques [Universite de Caen Basse Normandie, CHU Caen, Neuroradiology, Caen (France); Hammer, Frank [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Cliniques Universitaires St Luc, Department of Vascular and Interventional Radiology, Center for Vascular Anomalies, Brussels (Belgium); Labbe, Daniel [Universite de Caen Basse Normandie, CHU Caen, Plastic Surgery, Caen (France); Leroyer, Robert; Chedru, Valerie; Ollivier, Catherine [Universite de Caen Basse Normandie, CHU Caen, Pharmacy Department, Caen (France); Vikkula, Miikka [Universite catholique de Louvain, de Duve Institute, Laboratory of Human Molecular Genetics, Brussels (Belgium); Boon, Laurence M. [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Cliniques Universitaires St Luc, Division of Plastic Surgery, Center for Vascular Anomalies, Brussels (Belgium); Universite catholique de Louvain, de Duve Institute, Laboratory of Human Molecular Genetics, Brussels (Belgium)

    2011-12-15

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of gelified ethanol, a newly developed sclerosing agent for slow-flow vascular malformations. Seventy-nine sclerotherapy procedures were performed on 44 patients with 37 venous malformations, 2 glomuvenous malformations, 2 lymphatic malformations, 2 lymphatico-venous malformations, and 1 Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome. The median injected volume was 1.00 mL/site of injection. Effects of sclerotherapy on pain, functional and cosmetic disturbance were statistically evaluated with a final result score. Local and systemic complications were recorded. The mean Visual Analogue Scores were 5.20 {+-} 2.81 before and 1.52 {+-} 1.25 after treatment (p < 0.001). Functional and aesthetic improvement was achieved in 31/35 patients (89%) and in 33/41 (80%), respectively. Minor local side effects included necrosis with or without issue of ethylcellulose, palpable residue, and hematoma. No systemic side-effects occurred. Per mL used, radio-opaque gelified ethanol is at least as effective as absolute ethanol. No systemic complication was observed, as only a low dose of ethanol was injected. Indications for sclerotherapy can be widened to areas with higher risk for local side effects (hands and periocular region), as ethanol is trapped in the lesion. Careful injection procedure is though necessary, because only a limited amount of ethylcellulose can be used per puncture. (orig.)

  7. Factors That Influence Perforator Thrombosis and Predict Healing Perforator Sclerotherapy for Venous Ulceration Without Axial Reflux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiguchi, Misaki M.; Hager, Eric S.; Winger, Daniel G.; Hirsch, Stanley A.; Chaer, Rabih A.; Dillavou, Ellen D.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Refluxing perforators contribute to venous ulceration. We sought to describe patient characteristics and procedural factors that (1) impact rates of incompetent perforator vein (IPV) thrombosis with ultrasound-guided sclerotherapy (UGS) and (2) impact the healing of venous ulcers (CEAP 6) without axial reflux. METHODS Retrospective review of UGS of IPV injections from 1/2010–11/2012 identified 73 treated venous ulcers in 62 patients. Patients had no other superficial/axial reflux and were treated with standard wound care and compression. Ultrasound was used to screen for refluxing perforators near ulcer(s), and these were injected with sodium tetradecyl sulfate or polidocanol foam and assessed for thrombosis at 2 weeks. Demographic data, comorbidities, treatment details and outcomes were analyzed. Univariate and multivariable modeling was performed to determine covariates predicting IPV thrombosis and ulcer healing. RESULTS 62 patients with active ulcers for an average of 28 months with compression therapy prior to perforator treatment had an average age of 57.1 years, were 55% male, 36% had a history of DVT and 30% had deep venous reflux. 32 patients (52%) healed ulcers, while 30 patients (48%) had non-healed ulcer(s) in mean follow-up of 30.2 months. Ulcers were treated with 189 injections, with average thrombosis rate of 54%. Of 73 ulcers, 43 ulcers healed (59%), and 30 ulcers did not heal (41%). Patients that healed ulcers had an IPV thrombosis rate of 69 % vs. 38% in patients who did not heal (Pulcer healing found complete IPV thrombosis was a positive predictor (P=.02), while large initial ulcer area was a negative predictor (P=.08). Increased age was associated with fewer ulcer recurrences (P=.05). Hypertension and increased follow-up time predicted increased ulcer recurrences (P=.04, P=.02). Calf vein thrombosis occurred after 3% (6/189) of injections. CONCLUSIONS Thrombosis of IPVs with UGS increases venous ulcer healing in a difficult patient

  8. The Essentials of Parathyroid Hormone Venous Sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taslakian, Bedros, E-mail: btaslakian@gmail.com [NYU Langone Medical Center, Department of Radiology, NYU School of Medicine (United States); Trerotola, Scott O., E-mail: streroto@uphs.upenn.edu [Perelman School of Medicine of the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology (United States); Sacks, Barry, E-mail: bsacks@bidmc.harvard.edu [Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Department of Interventional Radiology (United States); Oklu, Rahmi, E-mail: oklu.rahmi@mayo.edu [Mayo Clinic, Department of Interventional Radiology (United States); Deipolyi, Amy, E-mail: deipolya@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2017-01-15

    Hyperparathyroidism is an excess of parathyroid hormone in the blood due to over-activity of one or more parathyroid gland. Localization of abnormal glands with noninvasive imaging modalities, such as technetium sestamibi scan and cross-sectional imaging, has a high success rate. Parathyroid venous sampling is performed for patients with persistent or recurrent disease after previous parathyroid surgery, when repeat noninvasive imaging studies are negative or discordant. The success of invasive localization studies and results interpretation is dependent on the interventional radiologist’s understanding of the normal and ectopic anatomic locations of parathyroid glands, as well as their blood supply and venous drainage. Anatomic and technical considerations for selective parathyroid venous sampling are reviewed.

  9. Central Venous Catheter-Related Hydrothorax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Se Hun Kim

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This report describes a case of 88-year-old women who developed central venous catheter-related bilateral hydrothorax, in which left pleural effusion, while right pleural effusion was being drained. The drainage prevented accumulation of fluid in the right pleural space, indicating that there was neither extravasation of infusion fluid nor connection between the two pleural cavities. The only explanation for bilateral hydrothorax in this case is lymphatic connections. Although vascular injuries by central venous catheter can cause catheter-related hydrothorax, it is most likely that the positioning of the tip of central venous catheter within the lymphatic duct opening in the right sub-clavian-jugular confluence or superior vena cava causes the catheter-related hydrothorax. Pericardial effusion can also result from retrograde lymphatic flow through the pulmonary lymphatic chains.

  10. Noninvasive measurement of central venous pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, J. G.; Mastenbrook, S. M., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A technique for the noninvasive measurement of CVP in man was developed. The method involves monitoring venous velocity at a point in the periphery with a transcutaneous Doppler ultrasonic velocity meter while the patient performs a forced expiratory maneuver. The idea is the CVP is related to the value of pressure measured at the mouth which just stops the flow in the vein. Two improvements were made over the original procedure. First, the site of venous velocity measurement was shifted from a vein at the antecubital fossa (elbow) to the right external jugular vein in the neck. This allows for sensing more readily events occurring in the central veins. Secondly, and perhaps most significantly, a procedure for obtaining a curve of relative mean venous velocity vs mouth pressure was developed.

  11. Complications of central venous stenosis due to permanent central venous catheters in children on hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinat, Choni; Ben-Shalom, Efrat; Becker-Cohen, Rachel; Feinstein, Sofia; Frishberg, Yaacov

    2014-11-01

    Central venous catheters are frequently used as access for hemodialysis (HD) in children. One of the known complications is central venous stenosis. Although this complication is not rare, it is often asymptomatic and therefore unacknowledged. Superior vena cava (SVC) stenosis is obviously suspected in the presence of upper body edema, but several other signs and symptoms are often unrecognized as being part of this syndrome. We describe four patients with various manifestations of central venous stenosis and SVC syndrome. These sometimes life- or organ-threatening conditions include obstructive sleep apnea, unresolving stridor, increased intracranial pressure, increased intraocular pressure, right-sided pleural effusion, protein-losing enteropathy and lymphadenopathy. The temporal relationship of these complications associated with the use of central venous catheters and documentation of venous stenosis, together with their resolution after alleviation of high venous pressure, points to a causal role. We suggest pathophysiological mechanisms for the formation of each of these complications. In patients with occlusion of the SVC, various unexpected clinical entities can be caused by high central venous pressure. As often the etiology is not obvious, a high index of suspicion is needed as in some cases prompt alleviation of the high pressure is mandatory.

  12. Clinical features and diagnosis of venous thrombosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirsh, J.; Hull, R.D.; Raskob, G.E.

    1986-12-01

    The clinical diagnosis of venous thrombosis is inaccurate because the clinical findings are both insensitive and nonspecific. The sensitivity of clinical diagnosis is low because many potentially dangerous venous thrombi are clinically silent. The specificity of clinical diagnosis is low because the symptoms or signs of venous thrombosis all can be caused by nonthrombotic disorders. A current approach to the diagnosis of clinically suspected venous thrombosis favors the use of impedance plethysmography over Doppler ultrasonography as the main test for this disorder. This is because impedance plethysmography is precise and objective, whereas the interpretation of Doppler ultrasonography is subjective and requires considerable skill and experience to form reliable diagnoses. The use of serial impedance plethysmography has been evaluated recently in a prospective study. The rationale of repeated impedance plethysmography evaluation is based on the premise that calf vein thrombi are only clinically important when they extend into the proximal veins, at which point detection with impedance plethysmography is possible. Therefore, by performing repeated examinations with impedance plethysmography in patients with clinically suspected venous thrombosis, it is possible to identify patients with extending calf vein thrombosis who can be treated appropriately. Impedance plethysmography is performed immediately on referral; if it is positive in the absence of clinical conditions that are known to produce falsely positive results, the diagnosis of venous thrombosis is established, and the patient is treated accordingly. If the result of the initial impedance plethysmography evaluation is negative, anticoagulant therapy is withheld, and impedance plethysmography is repeated the following day, again on day 5 to 7 and on day 10 to 14. 87 references.

  13. Joint Injection/Aspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A Patient / Caregiver Treatments Joint Injection / Aspiration Joint Injections (Joint Aspirations) Fast Facts Joint aspiration is used ... is derived from a joint aspiration or joint injection? Joint aspiration usually is done for help with ...

  14. Penicillin G Procaine Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penicillin G procaine injection is used to treat certain infections caused by bacteria. Penicillin G procaine injection should not be used to ... early in the treatment of certain serious infections. Penicillin G procaine injection is in a class of ...

  15. Ultrasound-guided polidocanol foam sclerotherapy for treating venous malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Subhash; Bhavana, Kranti; Kumar, Sanjeev; Kumar, Prem

    2017-10-28

    To evaluate clinical and imaging outcomes after ultrasound (US)-guided 3% polidocanol (POL) foam-sclerotherapy of venous malformations (VMs). We retrospectively evaluated consecutive VM cases over 1.5 years, with 6-month follow-up. US findings were used to classify VMs into four types depending upon extent of anechoic channels, connections to adjacent veins, and dysmorphism. Single or multiple needles were inserted depending upon lesion size, and used to inject up to 8 mL POL per session, every 2 to 4 weeks. We evaluated reduction in pain and swelling, lesion resolution on imaging, and patient satisfaction. There were 15, 24, 9, and 5 patients (total 53) with type I, II, III, and IV VMs, respectively. The average number of sessions was 5.3, 4.3, and 4, and the average amount of POL injected was 14.24 mL, 16.1 mL, and 23.2 mL for type I, II, III VMs, respectively. The number of sessions correlated with lesion volume (P anechoic areas had better resolution, without correlation with patient satisfaction. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Admission Hyperglycemia and Clinical Outcome in Cerebral Venous Thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuurbier, Susanna M.; Hiltunen, Sini; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Peters, Guusje M.; Silvis, Suzanne M.; Haapaniemi, Elena; Kruyt, Nyika D.; Putaala, Jukka; Coutinho, Jonathan M.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose-Admission hyperglycemia is associated with poor clinical outcome in ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. Admission hyperglycemia has not been investigated in patients with cerebral venous thrombosis. Methods-Consecutive adult patients with cerebral venous thrombosis were included

  17. Venous thrombosis: the history of knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannucci, P M

    2002-01-01

    Venous thrombosis is a frequent disease. It is surprising, therefore, that no case truly compatible with a diagnosis of venous thrombosis was apparently reported in the antiquity. There is no case that could be reasonably attributed to a venous thrombus in the writings of Hippocrates, Galenus, Celius Aurelianus, Ibn an-Nafiz, Avicenna and others. Venous thrombosis is not among the many diseases mentioned in the Bible. The term "leucophlegmasia", first used by Hippocrates and then by Celius Aurelianus, refers to cases of bilateral leg edema, most likely due to conditions such as heart failure, liver cirrhosis and renal insufficiency. Nothing compatible with a diagnosis of venous thrombosis can be found in pieces of art from ancient Egypt, Greece, Rome, Persia and South America. While in these sources there are sometimes representations of varicose veins and ulcers, unilateral leg edema or other pictures compatible with venous thrombosis are not featured. The first well documented case of venous thrombosis is depicted in a beautifully illustrated manuscript written in the 13th century and currently preserved in Paris at the Bibliothèque Nationale (MS Fr 2829, Folio 87). The manuscript describes the case of a young man from Normandy named Raoul who at the age of twenty developed unilateral edema in the right ankle that subsequently extended up to the thigh, with no obvious symptoms in the contralateral leg. Raoul was advised to visit the tomb of Saint Louis who was buried in the church of Saint Denis, where the patient spent several days confessing his sins and praying the saint. Afterwards he chose to collect the dust accumulating below the stone that covered the tomb and to apply it on the fistulae and ulcers of his foot. The openings stopped running and were filled with flesh. He was first obliged to use crutches but subsequently he could walk with a cane, to be eventually able to dispose of all devices, even though his foot throbbed a little. Raoul was cured as

  18. Management of Peripheral and Truncal Venous Injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Triantafillos G. Giannakopoulos

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Civilian injuries are increasing according to the World Health Organization, and this is attributed mainly to road traffic accidents and urban interpersonal violence. Vascular injuries are common in these scenarios and are associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Associated peripheral venous trauma is less likely to lead to death and controversy remains whether ligation or repair should be the primary approach. Conversely, non-compressible truncal venous insult can be lethal due to exsanguination, thus a high index of suspicion is crucial. Operative management is demanding with fair results but recent endovascular adjuncts demonstrate promising results and seem to be the way forward for these serious conditions.

  19. Jugular Venous Catheterization: A Case of Knotting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Erkılıç

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 79-year-old woman, diagnosed for cancer of the ovary, had a central catheter that was placed with difficulty through the right internal jugular vein intraoperatively. After oophorectomy, it was realized that the catheter was knotted. Thus, the central venous catheter was removed successfully using a traction technique in the operating room. Central venous catheter use may result in various complications, although it has been used as an invasive method for hemodynamic monitoring and fluid and drug infusion. Here, we present catheter knotting in a case with solutions for this complication, under literature review.

  20. Venous capacity, venous refill time and the effectiveness of the calf muscle pump in normal subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barendsen, G J; van den Berg, J W

    1984-03-01

    With strain gauge plethysmography various procedures to assess the competence of the venous system in the lower leg were compared in 10 normal subjects. The reproducibility and ease of use were established, and normal values were obtained. It is concluded, that measurements in the sitting position are preferable to those in the standing position. To measure the venous capacity, the dependency test is the method of choice. Rhythmic exercise to assess the effectiveness of the calf muscle pump can be restricted to five successive contractions. The refill time after exercise is not a suitable parameter to assess the competence of the venous valves.

  1. Human cerebral venous outflow pathway depends on posture and central venous pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gisolf, J; van Lieshout, J J; van Heusden, K

    2004-01-01

    Internal jugular veins are the major cerebral venous outflow pathway in supine humans. In upright humans the positioning of these veins above heart level causes them to collapse. An alternative cerebral outflow pathway is the vertebral venous plexus. We set out to determine the effect of posture...... and during a Valsalva manoeuvre in both body positions, correlate highly with model simulation of the jugular cross-sectional area (R(2) = 0.97). The results suggest that the cerebral venous flow distribution depends on posture and CVP: in supine humans the internal jugular veins are the primary pathway...

  2. Patterns of cranial venous system from the comparative anatomy in vertebrates. Part I, introduction and the dorsal venous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aurboonyawat, T; Suthipongchai, S; Pereira, V; Ozanne, A; Lasjaunias, P

    2007-12-01

    Many classifications of the cerebral venous system are found in the literature but they are seldom based on phylogenic study. Among vertebrates, venous drainage of the brain vesicles differs depending on the species. Due to the variability, poorly descriptive articles, and many different names used for the veins, the comparative study of the cranial venous system can hardly be performed in detail. The cranial venous system in vertebrates can be divided into three systems based on the evolution of the meninges and structures of the brain vesicles: the dorsal, lateral-ventral and ventricular systems. This study proposes a new classification of the venous drainage of brain vesicles using knowledge from a comparative study of vertebrates and focusing on the dorsal venous system. We found that the venous drainage of the neopallium and neocerebellum is involved with this system which may be a recent acquisition of cranial venous evolution.

  3. Misplaced left internal jugular venous catheter with an exceptional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Large numbers of central venous catheters (CVCs) are placed each year in the intensive care units and misplacement occurs frequently. Many critically ill patients require central venous catheterization for multiple and varied reasons. Internal jugular vein (IJV) catheter is one of the most frequent central venous catheters in ...

  4. Mechanochemical endovenous ablation and new frontiers in venous intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boersma, D

    2017-01-01

    Venous insufficiency of the lower extremities is a common condition and related to various symptoms, including venous ulcers. The effect of venous insufficiency on patients’ health-related quality of life is substantial and comparable with other chronic diseases such as arthritis, diabetes, and

  5. [Etiology, nomenclature and pathophysiology of chronic venous insufficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmhofer, W

    2016-06-01

    This article presents current notions and conceptions of the aetiopathogenesis of primary varicosis and chronic venous insufficiency, as well as an updated version of the nomenclature and terminology of venous disorders, which was recently agreed on in an international consensus conference. Furthermore, both CEAP-classification and venous severity score system are discussed.

  6. The recalcitrant venous leg ulcer - A never ending story?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.W.I. Reeder (Suzan); M.B. Maessen-Visch (Birgitte); S.I. Langendoen; K.P. de Roos; H.A.M. Neumann (Martino)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: In general, four particular causes of recalcitrant venous leg ulcers may be distinguished. These are foot pump insufficiency, chronic venous compartment syndrome and non-re-canalized popliteal vein thrombosis. The fourth cause of recalcitrant venous leg ulcers is

  7. Injection of cold saline for diagnosis of intramural ventricular arrhythmias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokokawa, Miki; Morady, Fred; Bogun, Frank

    2016-01-01

    The failure to identify a successful target site for catheter ablation despite extensive endocardial and epicardial mapping is a common feature for an intramural site of origin of a ventricular arrhythmia. The purpose of this study was to assess whether transient suppression of premature ventricular complexes (PVCs) by injection of cold saline into the distal coronary venous system can identify an intramural focus. Cold saline (room temperature) was injected through an irrigated-tip catheter into the distal coronary venous system in a consecutive series of 26 patients with frequent PVCs referred for catheter ablation. PVCs were temporarily suppressed in 11 of 26 patients during injection of cold saline. Extensive mapping suggested the presence of an intramural site of origin in 9 of 11 patients with PVC suppression by cold saline but in only 1 of 15 patients in whom PVCs were not suppressed. The suppression of PVCs by cold saline was associated with the presence of an intramural PVC focus with an accuracy of 88% (sensitivity 90%, specificity 88%, positive predictive value 82%, negative predictive value 93%, P = .0002). Temporary suppression of PVCs by cold saline infused into the distal coronary venous system and the perforator veins strongly suggests the presence of an intramural septal focus of the PVCs. Copyright © 2016 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Combined arterial and venous whole-body MR angiography with cardiac MR imaging in patients with thromboembolic disease - initial experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, Florian M.; Hunold, Peter; Barkhausen, Joerg [University Hospital Essen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); Herborn, Christoph U. [University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Medical Prevention Center Hamburg (MPCH) at University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Ruehm, Stefan G. [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Department of Radiology, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Kroger, Knut [University Hospital Essen, Department of Angiology, Essen (Germany)

    2008-05-15

    The objective was to assess the feasibility of a combined arterial and venous whole-body three-dimensional magnetic resonance (MR) angiography, together with a cardiac MR examination, in patients with arterial thromboembolism. Ten patients with arterial thromboembolism underwent a contrast-enhanced whole-body MR examination of the arterial and venous vessels, followed by a cardiac MR examination on a separate occasion within 24 h. All examinations were performed on a 1.5-T MR scanner. For both arterial and venous MR angiography only one injection of contrast agent was necessary. The cardiac imaging protocol included dark-blood-prepared half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo-spin-echo sequences, fast steady-state free precession cine sequences, T2-weighted turbo-spin-echo sequences and inversion recovery gradient-echo fast low-angle-shot sequences after injection of contrast agent. MR imaging revealed additional clinically unknown arterial thromboembolisms in four patients. The thoracic aorta was depicted as embolic source in four patients, while deep vein thrombosis (DVT) was found in one patient as the underlying disease. Unsuspected infarction of parenchymal organs was detected by MRI in two patients. An unknown additional DVT was found in one patient. Four patients were considered to have arterial emboli of cardiac origin. In conclusion, acquisition of arterial and venous MR angiograms of the entire vascular system combined with cardiac MR imaging is a most comprehensive and valuable strategy in patients with arterial thromboembolism. (orig.)

  9. Total Anomalous Pulmonary Venous Connection: Preoperative Anatomy, Physiology, Imaging, and Interventional Management of Postoperative Pulmonary Venous Obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Files, Matthew D; Morray, Brian

    2017-06-01

    Total anomalous pulmonary venous connection refers to a spectrum of cardiac anomalies where the pulmonary veins fail to return to the left atrium and the pulmonary venous blood returns through a systemic vein or directly to the right atrium. There is a wide anatomical variety of venous connections and degrees of pulmonary venous obstruction that affect the presentation, surgical repair, and outcomes. In this review, we explore the preoperative physiology, echocardiographic diagnosis, and approach to postoperative complications.

  10. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation after intravenous injection of paraffin oil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pasgaard, Thomas; Huynh, Anh-Nhi Thi; Gjedsted, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    We present a rare cause of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) due to an accidental intravascular injection of paraffin oil. While there is no specific therapy, we decided to support the patient with veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (V-V ECMO) to allow the ARDS to resolve....... A previously healthy 30-year-old man was admitted to the Emergency Department with acute onset respiratory distress following an injection with paraffin oil for cosmetic purposes. In 36 hours, the patient developed severe ARDS and respiratory support with V-V ECMO was initiated. The patient was successfully...

  11. Apixaban for Extended Treatment of Venous Thromboembolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agnelli, Giancarlo; Buller, Harry R.; Cohen, Alexander; Curto, Madelyn; Gallus, Alexander S.; Johnson, Margot; Porcari, Anthony; Raskob, Gary E.; Weitz, Jeffrey I.; Gallus, Alexander; Raskob, Gary; Weitz, Jeffrey; Prins, Martin; Brandjes, Dees; Kolbach, Dinanda; Limburg, Martinus; Mac Gillavry, Melvin; Otten, Johannes Martinus; Peters, Ron; Roos, Yvo; Segers, Annelise; Slagboom, Ton; Bounameaux, Henry; Hirsh, Jack; Samama, Meyer Michel; Wedel, Hans; Masiukiewicz, Urszula; Pak, Raphael; Sanders, Paul; Sisson, Melanie; Sullivan, Beth; Thompson, John; Auerbach, Jennifer; Cesario, Lynne; Gamero, Miguel; Gordon, Margot; Griffiths, Angela; Noble, Melanie; Ott, Jana; Pennington, Ann; Peffer, Allison; Reinhold, Peggy; Simmons, Melanie; Urwin, Keri; Ceresetto, Jose; McRae, Simon; Pabinger, Ingrid; Pereira, Adamastor Humberto; Spencer, Fred; Gorican, Karel; Husted, Steen Elkiaer; Mottier, Dominique; Harenberg, Job; Pinjala, Ramakrishna; Zeltser, David; Imberti, Davide; Sandset, Morten; Torbicki, Adam; Fijalkowska, Anna; Albino, Jose Pereira; Kirienko, Alexander; Shvarts, Yury; Monreal, Manuel; Jacobson, Barry; Dolan, Gerry; Gudz, Ivan; Ortel, Tom; Spyropoulos, Alex; Torbicki, A.; Fijalkowska, A.; Skupyy, O.; Beryer-Westendorf, J.; de Pellegrin, A.; Prasol, V.; Schellong, S.; Jacobson, B.; Falvo, N.; Abramov, I.; Cizek, V.; Husted, S.; Desai, S.; Gudz, I.; Barillari, G.; Sergeev, O.; Chetter, I.; Inbal, A.; McCollum, C.; Shvalb, P.; Torp-Pedersen, C.; Vasylyuk, S.; Kraemmer Nielsen, H.; Pernod, G.; Schmidt, J.; Bova, C.; Gerasymov, V.; Pabinger-Fasching, I.; Skalicka, L.; Zaichuk, A.; Achkar, A.; Bremmelgaard, A.; Chochola, J.; Gould, T.; Khalafallah, A.; Jakobsen, T.; Rose, P.; Zhukov, B.; Dedek, V.; Mirete Ferrer, J.; Pesant, Y.; Repin, A.; Salem, H.; Solis Morales, L.; Spacek, R.; Cannon, K.; Grzelakowski, P.; Jindal, R.; Pereira, A.; Zidkova, E.; Ambrosio, G.; Cardozo, M.; Dunaj, M.; Gallus, A.; Gavish, D.; Ghanima, W.; Harenberg, J.; Leduc, J. J.; Mismetti, P.; Panico, M.; Porreca, E.; Riera, A.; Bareford, D.; Chong, B.; Dvoryashina, I.; Gómez Cerezo, J.; Kobza, I.; Nielsen, T.; Pendleton, R.; Pullman, J.; Schiffman, G.; Stanbro, M.; Zwettler, U.; Aquilanti, S.; Bratsch, H.; Cohen, K.; Elias, D.; Gan, E.; Holaj, R.; Klinke, W.; Liu, H. S. Y.; Sandset, P. M.; van Nieuwenhuizen, E.; Álvarez-Sala, L. A.; Basson, M.; Braester, A.; Bura-Riviere, A.; Calvo Vargas, C.; Cohen, A.; Correa, J.; Elias, M.; Frost, L.; Imberti, D.; Landolfi, R.; Marschang, P.; Moreira, R.; Mottier, D.; Natarajan, S.; Pottier, P.; Tosetto, A.; Tuxen, C.; Vöhringer, H. F.; Alexander, A.; Barbarash, O.; Fajardo Campos, P.; Graham, M.; Gubka, O.; Hudcovic, M.; Hussein, O.; Jackson, D.; Katelnitskiy, I.; Lawall, H.; Monreal, M.; Palareti, G.; Poggio, R.; Roos, J.; Simonneau, G.; Smith, S. W.; Szopinski, P.; Ortel, T.; Zimlichman, R.; Bridgers, D.; Colan, D.; Czekalski, P.; de Jong, D.; Fortinez, J. T.; Garcia Bragado, F.; Harrington, D.; Izbicki, G.; Kadr, H.; Koslow, A.; Loftus, I.; Marais, H.; Neumeister, A.; Oliven, A.; Palla, A.; Pop, C.; Prandoni, P.; Puskas, A.; Sanchez Llamas, F.; Shotan, A.; Shvarts, Y.; Singh, P.; Tveit, A.; Baker, R.; Borja, V.; Brenner, B.; Brown, H.; Ceresetto, J.; Cha, T. J.; Cohen, Y.; D'Angelo, A.; Dhar, A.; Friis, E.; Hueur, H.; Jiménez Rodríguez Madridejos, R.; Karl, J.; Karrasch, J.; Lishner, M.; Manenti, E.; McRae, S.; Meneveau, N.; Nguyen, D.; Sanchez-Escalante, L.; Santoscoy Ibarra, J.; Sokurenko, G.; Staroverov, I.; Stein, R.; Abdullah, I.; Agnelli, G.; Alcocer Gamba, M.; Balanda, J.; Bruckner, I.; Calabuig Alborch, J.; Caraco, Y.; Comerota, A.; Cromer, M.; de Araujo Filho, J.; de los Rios Ibarra, M.; Diaz-Castañon, J.; Doshi, A.; Ebrahim, I.; Fessel, W. J.; Fletcher, E.; Fourie, N.; Fu, C.; Gutowski, P.; Haddad, G.; Hoffman, U.; Jardula, M.; Kvasnicka, T.; Lewczuk, J.; Leyden, M.; Livneh, A.; Lodigiani, C.; Lovell, C.; Miekus, P.; Paloma, M. J.; Parakh, R.; Raval, M.; Schmidt-Lucke, J.; Shtutin, O.; Soroka, V.; Stevens, D.; Sulik, P.; Tay, J. C.; Vejby-Christensen, H.; Vinereanu, D.; Baghestanian, M.; Bono, J.; Cerana, S.; Freire, A.; Gibson, K.; Giumelli, C.; Iastrebner, C.; Karpenko, A.; Kelly, A.; Lacroix, P.; LaFata, J.; Lobo, S.; Macik, B. G.; Marchena Yglesias, P.; Nishinari, K.; Pinjala, R.; Podczeck-Schweighofer, A.; Raby, K.; Sirpal, S.; Solymoss, S.; Spencer, F.; van Zyl, L.; Vargas Núñez, J. A.; von Bilderling, P.; Warr, T.; Wronski, J.; Wurster, M.; Albino, J. A.; Albuquerque, L.; Averill, F.; Baek, S. H.; Bello, F.; Bergoeing, M.; Blanc, F. X.; Bloomberg, R.; Bolster, D.; Brockmyre, A.; Calimano, C.; Checketts, D.; Cieplinski, W.; Chervu, A.; Collado, F.; Denaro, C.; Gaciong, Z.; Game, M.; Iskander, A.; Kaatz, S.; Kim, D. I.; Koura, F.; Laguna, F.; Lanas Zanetti, F.; Lindhoff-Last, E.; Melaniuk, M.; Meade, A.; Murphy, T.; Ng, H. J.; Páramo Fernández, J. A.; Patil, C.; Piovella, F.; Prisco, D.; Pruszczyk, P.; Reimers, G.; Rivera, E.; Rodriguez-Cintron, W.; Rosenthal, S.; Salbach, P.; Salvador, D.; Schuller, D.; Siragusa, S.; Staniszewski, R.; Torp, R.; Vora, K.; Yip, G.; Alfieri, A.; Belaji, V.; Bhagavan, N.; Carnovali, M.; Cobos Segarra, J.; Di Todaro, F.; Dowell, A.; Corder, C.; Crispin, P.; Cuadrado, J.; Flippo, G.; Fraiz, J.; Guillaumon, A.; Gvora, T.; Hakki, S.; Harris, L.; Ison, R.; Htun, P. T.; Jasani, R.; Kates, M.; Kaminski, L.; Kamerkar, D.; Kirienko, A.; Kroger, K.; LaPerna, L.; Leiva, J.; Luber, J.; McCann, A.; McKenzie, W.; Menna Barreto, S.; Moran, J.; Nikulnikov, P.; Paliwal, Y.; Patel, M.; Pilger, E.; Renwick, W.; Shevela, A.; Starosiliz, D.; Stringam, S.; Spyropoulos, A.; To, R.; Updegrove, J.; van Bellen, B.; Waintrub, M.; White, J.; Yeo, E.; Zangroniz, P.; Zeltser, D.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Apixaban, an oral factor Xa inhibitor that can be administered in a simple, fixed-dose regimen, may be an option for the extended treatment of venous thromboembolism. METHODS In this randomized, double-blind study, we compared two doses of apixaban (2.5 mg and 5 mg, twice daily) with

  12. Travel and venous thrombosis: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, S.; Schreijer, A. J. M.; Cannegieter, S. C.; Bueller, H. R.; Rosendaal, F. R.; Middeldorp, S.

    2007-01-01

    In the past decade, numerous publications on the association between venous thrombosis (VT) and travel have been published. Relative and absolute risks of VT after travel, and particularly after travel by air, have been studied in case-control and observational follow-up studies, whereas the effect

  13. The aetiology of deep venous thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, P C; Agutter, P S

    2006-09-01

    Most ideas about the pathogenesis of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) are dominated by a 'consensus model' first articulated around 1962. This model invokes 'Virchow's triad' and attributes thrombogenesis in veins to some combination of 'hypercoagulability', 'stasis' and 'intimal injury'. This arose as a by-product of studies on the mechanisms of haemostasis and bleeding diatheses that were at best only indirectly relevant to thrombosis, and there are reasons for doubting the causal significance of 'hypercoagulability' and 'stasis' in the aetiology of DVT. Proponents of the consensus model make little reference to a substantial literature, mostly historical, that: (a) emphasizes the significance of the venous valve pockets (VVP) and blood rheology in DVT pathogenesis; and (b) describes morphological features specific to venous thrombi that a valid aetiological model must explain. This literature provides the basis for an alternative hypothesis of DVT aetiology, published some 30 years ago, which has been experimentally corroborated and is compatible with recent cell and molecular biological studies of the venous endothelium. We review this alternative hypothesis, considering its potential value for future research on DVT and embolism, and its significance for clinical practice.

  14. Thermodilution-determined Internal Jugular Venous Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Peter; Widmer, Mario; Hilty, Matthias P

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: Cerebral blood flow (CBF) increases ~20% during whole body exercise although a Kety-Schmidt-determined CBF is reported to remain stable; a discrepancy that could reflect evaluation of arterial vs. internal jugular venous (IJV) flow and/or that CBF is influenced by posture. Here we test...

  15. Venous thromboembolism: Risk profile and management of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. This study aims to describe the venous thromboembolism (VTE) risk profile of women undergoing elective gynaecological surgery in a tertiary hospital and to audit the VTE prophylaxis prescribed. Methods. One hundred and nine women who underwent elective gynaecological surgery at Kalafong Provincial ...

  16. Clinical overview of venous thromboembolism | Schellack | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) encompasses two vascular conditions that are of significant importance, namely deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE). DVT is also the most common cause of PE. Medical and surgical patients, and individuals who are at increased risk of developing VTE through a ...

  17. Venous thromboembolism: awareness and practice of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, the high level of thromboprophylaxis practice appears doubtful because only a few of these physicians carry out VTE risk assessment for their patients as well as follow clinical guidelines on VTE thromboprophylaxis. Key words: Venous thromboembolism, deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, risk factor, ...

  18. Venous function after pharmacomechanical thrombolysis for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Venous function after pharmacomechanical thrombolysis for extensive iliofemoral deep vein thrombosis. ... The PDF file you selected should load here if your Web browser has a PDF reader plug-in installed (for example, a recent version of Adobe Acrobat Reader). If you would like more information about how to print, save, ...

  19. Urethro-venous intravasation during urethrography

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    J.M. Ratkal

    Abstract. Retrograde urethrography is a procedure used to evaluate urethral strictures. Urethro-venous intravasation, rarely seen during retrograde urethrography, can result in bacteremia, adverse reactions to contrast agents, renal failure and even pulmonary embolism. We report one such case of a male patient who ...

  20. Central venous pressure monitoring in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scales, Katie

    This article provides an overview of central venous pressure (CVP) monitoring in clinical practice. It explores the underpinning anatomy and physiology, as well as the indications and means of access, for the procedure. The mechanics and practicalities of measuring CVP are discussed and information for troubleshooting is provided.

  1. Pediatric central venous access devices: nursing interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duffy EA

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Elizabeth A Duffy, Kathryn N Nelson Department of Health Behavior and Biological Sciences, The University of Michigan School of Nursing, Ann Arbor, MI, USA Abstract: A central venous catheter (CVC is an indwelling catheter that provides permanent or temporary stable venous access for both acute and chronically ill pediatric patients. These catheters provide stable venous access that can be used for a variety of medical purposes including drawing blood, hemodynamic monitoring, infusion of intravenous medications, infusion of intravenous fluids, chemotherapy, blood products, and parenteral nutrition. Each day, nurses access and care for CVCs in infants, children, and adolescents; the precision of this care can prevent life-threatening complications. The purpose of this review and the case study is to highlight the importance and components of evidence-based nursing practice in pediatric CVC care. A historical perspective of CVC care is provided in conjunction with current national initiatives to improve patient outcomes for children with CVCs. Infection prevention, clinical practice guidelines, quality improvement, and evidence-based care bundles are discussed. Keywords: pediatric nursing, central venous catheters, central line-associated bloodstream infection, care bundles, pediatric case study 

  2. Venous infraction of developmental venous anomaly: A case report with perfusion imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Youn; Kim, Hye Jeong; Hyun, Su Jeong; Kim, Hee Yeong; Kim, Han Myun; Hwang, Ji Young; Hong, Hye Suk; Woo, Ji Young; Yang, Ik [Dept. of Radiology, Kangnam Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eun Soo [Dept. of Radiology, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    Developmental venous anomaly (DVA) is a common congenital venous malformation characterized by dilated medullary veins in caput medusa configuration and a draining vein. Despite the high incidence of DVAs, they are benign anatomic variations and rarely cause symptoms. Here, we report computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings with perfusion images of acute infarction from underlying DVA in a 63-year-old female patient who presented with acute onset of neurologic symptoms and recovered without any neurologic deficit.

  3. Pycnogenol® in chronic venous insufficiency and related venous disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulati, Om P

    2014-03-01

    The present review provides an update of the biological profile of Pycnogenol in the light of its use in the treatment of chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) and related venous disorders such as deep vein thrombosis (DVT), post-thrombotic syndrome, long haul air-travel-related leg oedema, venous ulcers and acute haemorrhoids. Pycnogenol is a French maritime pine bark extract produced from the outer bark of Pinus pinaster Ait. subsp. atlantica. Its strong antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and vasodilator activities, antithrombotic effects and collagen stabilizing properties make it uniquely able to target the multi facet pathophysiology of CVI and related venous disorders. Clinical studies have shown that it can reduce oedema of the legs in CVI, reduce the incidence of deep venous thrombosis during long haul flights and enhance the healing of venous ulcers and haemorrhoidal episodes by topical application and/or oral administration. This review highlights clinical research findings on the safety, compliance and efficacy of Pycnogenol, including its use in combination products. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Beam Injection into RHIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, W.; Hahn, H.; Mackay, W. W.; Tsoupas, N.

    1997-05-01

    During the RHIC sextant test in January 1997 beam was injected into a sixth of one of the rings for the first time. We describe the injection zone and its bottlenecks, the application program to steer the beam and the injection kickers. We report on the commissioning of the injection systems and on measurements of the kickers.

  5. Sipuleucel-T Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipuleucel-T injection is used to treat certain types of advanced prostate cancer. Sipuleucel-T injection is in a class of medications called ... Sipuleucel-T injection comes as a suspension (liquid) to be injected over about 60 minutes into a vein by ...

  6. [Thrombophlebitis of venous sinuses in otitis media].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuczkowski, Jerzy

    2007-01-01

    Thrombophlebitis of dura venous sinuses is a rare intracranial complication of otitis media, which may be sometimes accompanied by symptoms or sepsis. Anatomical conditions and early diagnosis of this vascular complication determine the treatment modality. Aim of this study was the assessment of diagnostics and treatment of venous sinuses thrombophlebitis in acute and chronic otitis media considering anatomy and the venous sinuses and status of coagulation system. Otogenic thrombophlebitis may occur in lateral, transverse, upper and lower petrosal sinuses, and rarely in cavernous. In some cases thrombophlebitis proces may expand into brain or emissary mastoid veins. Lateral sinus thrombophlebitis in chronic otitis media usually appears clinically as septic fever, earache, and increasing neurologic signs. In acute otitis media when thrombophlebitis develops the patient complains about headache, high fever and visual acquity. Diagnosis of venous sinus thrombophlebitis is based on clinical signs, radiological imaging (CT scan, MRI), bacteriological examinations and laboratory biochemical tests. Contrast enhanced CT scan shows "delta sign". Septic thrombophlebitis sinus sigmoidei is caused by mixed bacterial flora. Surgical treatment in cases with septic thrombus consists of radical modiffied ear operation and lateral sinus exposure. Thrombectomy and jugular vein ligation is performed when sepsis or thrombus is present. Mastoidectomy and tympanic cavity drainage is performed in cases with lateral sinus thrombosis in acute mastoiditis. Intravenous antibiotics therapy should be continued for 2 weeks. Anticoagulants should be given taking into consideration parameters of coagulation system and the type of thrombus. Treatment results of venous sinuses thrombophlebitis are good if they are not accompanied by other intracranial complications.

  7. [Study on 10 409 cases of post-marketing safety Danhong injection centralized monitoring of hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuelin; Tang, Jinfa; Meng, Fei; Li, Chunxiao; Xie, Yanming

    2011-10-01

    To study Danhong injection adverse reactions (ADR) incidence, nature and clinical performance, provide the basis for the clinical safety of drugs. Multi-center, a large sample of hospitals focused on monitoring method. Danhong injection ADR for the rapid onset and ease the quick recovery, the rate was 0. 682% , the newly discovered ADR constipation, sweating, tinnitus, irritability, joint disease, erythema, venous pain, phlebitis, local numbness, pain, weakness, gastrointestinal ulcer bleeding, vasospasm, cyanosis. Danhong injection adverse reactions are type A adverse reactions occasionally, centralized monitoring of hospital medicine injection method is to carry out post-marketing safety re-evaluation of appropriate methods.

  8. Advances in diagnosis and treatment of cerebral venous system diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-yun LIU

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral venous system diseases include cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT, venous sinus stenosis, carotid cavernous fistula (CCF, intracranial arteriovenous malformation (AVM and so on. In recent years, due to the rapid development of neuroimaging and interventional technology, more and more cerebral venous system diseases have been timely diagnosed and treated, such as magnetic resonance black-blood thrombus imaging (MRBTI in the diagnosis of CVT, stenting in the treatment of venous sinus stenosis, micro coil plus Onyx glue or covered stents in the treatment of CCF, which allow us to make a deeper recognition of cerebral venous system diseases. Therefore, this paper will introduce the latest diagnosis and treatment of cerebral venous system diseases. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2016.11.006

  9. Fibrin Glue Injection for Cavernous Sinus Hemostasis Associated with Cranial Nerve Deficit: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Tavanaiepour, Daryoush; Jernigan, Sarah; Abolfotoh, Mohamad; Al-Mefty, Ossama

    2015-01-01

    Fibrin glue injection has been used to control intraoperative cavernous sinus (CS) venous bleeding. There have been no reported complications related to this maneuver. We present a case where a patient developed a sensory trigeminal nerve deficit after injection of fibrin glue into the posterior CS during resection of a petrosal meningioma. We believe that this deficit was due to the compression of the trigeminal ganglion similar to balloon compression procedures. Although fibrin glue injecti...

  10. Predictors and Outcomes of Recurrent Venous Thromboembolism in Elderly Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauber, Sandro; Limacher, Andreas; Tritschler, Tobias; Stalder, Odile; Méan, Marie; Righini, Marc; Aschwanden, Markus; Beer, Jürg Hans; Frauchiger, Beat; Osterwalder, Josef; Kucher, Nils; Lämmle, Bernhard; Cornuz, Jacques; Angelillo-Scherrer, Anne; Matter, Christian M; Husmann, Marc; Banyai, Martin; Staub, Daniel; Mazzolai, Lucia; Hugli, Olivier; Rodondi, Nicolas; Aujesky, Drahomir

    2018-01-04

    Little is known about predictors and outcomes of recurrent venous thromboembolism in elderly patients. We prospectively followed up 991 patients aged ≥65 years with acute venous thromboembolism in a multicenter Swiss cohort study. The primary outcome was symptomatic recurrent venous thromboembolism. We explored the association between baseline characteristics and treatments and recurrent venous thromboembolism using competing risk regression, adjusting for periods of anticoagulation as a time-varying co-variate. We also assessed the clinical consequences (case-fatality, localization) of recurrent venous thromboembolism. During a median follow-up period of 30 months, 122 patients developed recurrent venous thromboembolism, corresponding to a 3-year cumulative incidence of 14.8%. The case-fatality of recurrence was high (20.5%), particularly in patients with unprovoked (23%) and cancer-related venous thromboembolism (29%). After adjustment, only unprovoked venous thromboembolism (sub-hazard ratio [SHR] 1.67 compared to provoked venous thromboembolism; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.00-2.77) and proximal deep vein thrombosis (SHR 2.41 compared to isolated distal deep vein thrombosis; 95% CI 1.07-5.38) were significantly associated with recurrence. Patients with initial pulmonary embolism were more likely to have another pulmonary embolism as a recurrent event than patients with deep vein thrombosis. Elderly patients with acute venous thromboembolism have a substantial long-term risk of recurrent venous thromboembolism and recurrence carries a high case-fatality rate. Only two factors, unprovoked venous thromboembolism and proximal deep vein thrombosis, were independently associated with recurrent venous thromboembolism, indicating that traditional risk factors for venous thromboembolism recurrence (e.g., cancer) may be less relevant in the elderly. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Cerebral Venous Thrombosis Presenting with Subracnoid Hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esra Eruyar

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH associated with cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT is rarely reported. In our case, the initial CT shows with suspected lesions that SAH. After the initial diagnosis of SVT with history and neurological examination findings MRV taken and consistend with thrombus signal change. Dural sinus thrombosis with secondary venous hypertension may lead to SAH into the subarachnoid space due to the rupture of fragile, thin-walled cortical veins. Patients with non-traumatic, non-aneurysmal and non-perimesencephalic subaracnoid hemorrhage tend to have clots circumscribed along the cortical convexity, a condition referred as acute cortical SAH. CVT is a potential cause of cortical SAH. This case; SAH may be the first sign of SVT and especially SVT must do in etiologic research without the involvement of the basal sisterna in cases of SAH.

  12. Intracranial venous thrombosis complicating oral contraception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dindar, F.; Platts, M. E.

    1974-01-01

    Four days after the onset of a severe headache a 22-year-old woman who had been taking oral contraceptives for less than three weeks had a convulsion, followed by right hemiparesis. Other focal neurologic signs and evidence of raised intracranial pressure appeared, and she became comatose on the seventh day. A left craniotomy revealed extensive cerebral venous thrombosis. She died the next day. On postmortem examination extensive thrombosis of the superior sagittal sinus and draining cerebral veins, and multiple areas of cerebral hemorrhage and hemorrhagic infarction were seen. Some of the superficial cerebral veins showed focal necrosis of their walls, and the lateral lacunae of the superior sagittal sinus contained proliferating endothelial cells. The adrenal veins were also thrombosed. The significance of these findings is discussed. The literature on cerebrovascular complications of oral contraception, particularly cerebral venous thrombosis, is reviewed. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3FIG. 4FIG. 5FIG. 6 PMID:4413961

  13. Navigating venous access: a guide for hospitalists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonov, Michael; Pittiruti, Mauro; Rickard, Claire M; Chopra, Vineet

    2015-07-01

    Venous access is the foundation for safe and effective hospital-based care. Inpatient providers must have a deep knowledge of the different types of venous access devices (VADs), their relative indications, contraindications, and appropriateness. However, such knowledge is difficult to come by and usually only gleaned through years of clinical experience. To bridge this gap, we provide an in-depth summary of the relevant anatomical considerations, physical characteristics, advantages, and disadvantages of VADs commonly used in the hospital setting. In doing so, we seek to improve the safety and share the science of vascular access with frontline clinicians. To aid decision-making, we conclude by operationalizing the available data through algorithms that outline appropriate vascular access for the hospitalized patient. © 2015 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  14. Portal Venous Interventions: State of the Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madoff, David C; Gaba, Ron C; Weber, Charles N; Clark, Timothy W I; Saad, Wael E

    2016-02-01

    In recent decades, there have been numerous advances in the management of liver cancer, cirrhosis, and diabetes mellitus. Although these diseases are wide ranging in their clinical manifestations, each can potentially be treated by exploiting the blood flow dynamics within the portal venous system, and in some cases, adding cellular therapies. To aid in the management of these disease states, minimally invasive transcatheter portal venous interventions have been developed to improve the safety of major hepatic resection, to reduce the untoward effects of sequelae from end-stage liver disease, and to minimize the requirement of exogenously administered insulin for patients with diabetes mellitus. This state of the art review therefore provides an overview of the most recent data and strategies for utilization of preoperative portal vein embolization, transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt placement, balloon retrograde transvenous obliteration, and islet cell transplantation. © RSNA, 2016.

  15. Central venous obstruction in the thorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collin, G; Jones, R G; Willis, A P

    2015-06-01

    Central venous stenosis and occlusion can occur secondary to a spectrum of conditions ranging from aggressive malignancy to benign extrinsic anatomical compression in otherwise healthy individuals. Irrespective of aetiology, significant morbidity in the acute setting and long term can occur unless prompt accurate diagnosis and appropriate management is initiated, the radiologist being central to both. The present review will provide radiologists with a thorough illustration and explanation of the range of central venous conditions in the thorax (including deep vein thrombosis, thoracic outlet syndrome, haemodialysis, and malignancy related causes), the salient imaging findings and interventional management using case examples from the authors' practice. Copyright © 2015 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Ultrasound-guided peripheral venous access for therapeutic apheresis procedures reduces need for central venous catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Eric; Garcia, Salvador; Miguel, Robin; Segura, Francisco J; Ipe, Tina S; Leveque, Christopher

    2017-08-01

    Therapeutic and donor apheresis requires adequate vascular access to achieve inlet flow rates of ∼50-100 mL/min. While central dialysis-type venous catheters can usually provide such access, their use includes several associated risks. Some of these risks can be avoided or diminished if adequate peripheral venous access can be established. Some patients have adequate peripheral veins for apheresis that cannot be readily identified visually or by palpation. We hypothesized that ultrasound-guided peripheral venous access would benefit such patients and would lead to placement of fewer central venous catheters. The technique of ultrasound-guided peripheral access for apheresis has been in use at Houston Methodist Hospital since 2012. We performed a prospective review of patients undergoing inpatient and outpatient apheresis at Houston Methodist Hospital from July 1, 2015 to September 30, 2015, to assess its benefit. During this time, we performed 831 procedures on 186 patients, including 787 therapeutic plasma exchanges, three red blood cell exchanges, 41 peripheral stem cell collections. Ultrasound-guided vascular access was used for 68 procedures (8% of all procedures), including 62 therapeutic plasma exchanges, 4 peripheral stem cell collections, and 2 red blood cell changes. Use of ultrasound-guided peripheral access prevented the placement of central venous catheters in 37 (20%) patients, demonstrating its utility in a busy transfusion service. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Femoral venous oxygen saturation and central venous oxygen saturation in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaohong; Wang, Jiandong; Dong, Yun; Chen, Youdai

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the relationship between central venous oxygen saturation (ScvO(2)) and femoral venous oxygen saturation (SfvO(2)) in a large group of critically ill patients. Observational study. A group of unselected critically ill patients with central line placed into superior vena cava were included. A 26-bed intensive care unit in a tertiary referral hospital. None. Venous blood samples of superior vena cava and femoral vein were collected within an interval of 5 to 15 minutes and analyzed with blood gas/electrolyte analyzer immediately. Although SfvO(2) was significantly correlated with ScvO(2) (r = 0.493, P 731 pairs of blood samples collected from 357 patients. The fit line of scatter diagram ScvO(2) vs SfvO(2) had a large intercept (48.68%) and a low slope (0.2978); ScvO(2) was still around 50% while SfvO(2) was nearing 0%. The distribution of blood flow, measured with Doppler ultrasound, had a similar trend in 237 patients and 412 measurements. The ratio of femoral artery flow over common carotid artery flow varied widely (from 0 to 7.13). Blood flow was not distributed in a fixed ratio to the superior vena cava-drained organs and tissues. Central venous oxygen saturation was not representative of the whole systemic circulation in critically ill patients. Central venous oxygen saturation alone might be misleading in goal-directed therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Program requirements for fellowship education in venous and lymphatic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comerota, Anthony J; Min, Robert J; Rathbun, Suman W; Khilnani, Neil; Rooke, Thom; Wakefield, Thomas W; Carman, Teresa L; Lurie, Fedor; Vedantham, Suresh; Zimmet, Steven E

    2017-08-01

    Background In every field of medicine, comprehensive education should be delivered at the graduate level. Currently, no single specialty routinely provides a standardized comprehensive curriculum in venous and lymphatic disease. Method The American Board of Venous & Lymphatic Medicine formed a task force, made up of experts from the specialties of dermatology, family practice, interventional radiology, interventional cardiology, phlebology, vascular medicine, and vascular surgery, to develop a consensus document describing the program requirements for fellowship medical education in venous and lymphatic medicine. Result The Program Requirements for Fellowship Education in Venous and Lymphatic Medicine identify the knowledge and skills that physicians must master through the course of fellowship training in venous and lymphatic medicine. They also specify the requirements for venous and lymphatic training programs. The document is based on the Core Content for Training in Venous and Lymphatic Medicine and follows the ACGME format that all subspecialties in the United States use to specify the requirements for training program accreditation. The American Board of Venous & Lymphatic Medicine Board of Directors approved this document in May 2016. Conclusion The pathway to a vein practice is diverse, and there is no standardized format available for physician education and training. The Program Requirements for Fellowship Education in Venous and Lymphatic Medicine establishes educational standards for teaching programs in venous and lymphatic medicine and will facilitate graduation of physicians who have had comprehensive training in the field.

  19. [Implantable venous access ports, nursing practices].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ourliac, Maryse; Dijols-Lécuyer, Isabelle

    2016-05-01

    Following the publication of national recommendations regarding the handling of implantable venous access ports, an observation audit was carried out in a hospital in 2013. This enabled an assessment of the existing system to be performed, current practices to be compared with the hospital's protocol and adapted corrective measures to be put in place. A further audit carried out in 2015 was particularly encouraging. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Parenchymal abnormalities associated with developmental venous anomalies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    San Millan Ruiz, Diego; Gailloud, Philippe [Johns Hopkins Hospital, Division of Interventional Neuroradiology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Delavelle, Jacqueline [Geneva University Hospital, Neuroradiology Section, Department of Radiology and Medical Informatics, Geneva (Switzerland); Yilmaz, Hasan; Ruefenacht, Daniel A. [Geneva University Hospital, Section of Interventional Neuroradiology, Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Geneva (Switzerland); Piovan, Enrico; Bertramello, Alberto; Pizzini, Francesca [Verona City Hospital, Service of Neuroradiology, Verona (Italy)

    2007-12-15

    To report a retrospective series of 84 cerebral developmental venous anomalies (DVAs), focusing on associated parenchymal abnormalities within the drainage territory of the DVA. DVAs were identified during routine diagnostic radiological work-up based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (60 cases), computed tomography (CT) (62 cases) or both (36 cases). Regional parenchymal modifications within the drainage territory of the DVA, such as cortical or subcortical atrophy, white matter density or signal alterations, dystrophic calcifications, presence of haemorrhage or a cavernous-like vascular malformation (CVM), were noted. A stenosis of the collecting vein of the DVA was also sought for. Brain abnormalities within the drainage territory of a DVA were encountered in 65.4% of the cases. Locoregional brain atrophy occurred in 29.7% of the cases, followed by white matter lesions in 28.3% of MRI investigations and 19.3% of CT investigations, CVMs in 13.3% of MRI investigations and dystrophic calcification in 9.6% of CT investigations. An intracranial haemorrhage possibly related to a DVA occurred in 2.4% cases, and a stenosis on the collecting vein was documented in 13.1% of cases. Parenchymal abnormalities were identified for all DVA sizes. Brain parenchymal abnormalities were associated with DVAs in close to two thirds of the cases evaluated. These abnormalities are thought to occur secondarily, likely during post-natal life, as a result of chronic venous hypertension. Outflow obstruction, progressive thickening of the walls of the DVA and their morphological organization into a venous convergence zone are thought to contribute to the development of venous hypertension in DVA. (orig.)

  1. The controversy on chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Zamboni

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this review is to analyze the actual scientific controversy on chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI and its association with both neurodegenerative disorders and multiple sclerosis (MS. We revised all published studies on prevalence of CCSVI in MS patients, including ultrasound and catheter venography series. Furthermore, we take into consideration other publications dealing with the pathophysiologic consequences of CCSVI in the brain, as well as ecent data characterizing the pathology of the venous wall in course of CCSVI. Finally, safety and pilot data on effectiveness of endovascular CCSVI treatment were further updated. Studies of prevalence show a big variability in prevalence of CCSVI in MS patients assessed by established ultrasonographic criteria. This could be related to high operator dependency of ultrasound. However, 12 studies, by the means of more objective catheter venography, show a prevalence >90% of CCSVI in MS. Global hypo-hypoperfusion of the brain, and reduced cerebral spinal fluid dynamics in MS was shown to be related to CCSVI. Postmortem studies and histology corroborate the 2009 International Union of Phlebology (UIP Consensus decision to insert CCSVI among venous malformations. Finally, safety of balloon angioplasty of the extracranial veins was certainly demonstrated, while prospective data on the potential effectiveness of endovascular treatment of CCSVI support to increase the level of evidence by proceeding with a randomized control trial (RCT. Taking into account the current epidemiological data, including studies on catheter venography, the autoptic findings, and the relationship between CCSVI and both hypo-perfusion and cerebro-spinal fluid flow, we conclude that CCSVI can be definitively inserted among the medical entities. Research is still inconclusive in elucidating the CCSVI role in the pathogenesis of neurological disorders. The controversy between the vascular and the

  2. Mesenteric venous thrombosis: multidisciplinary therapeutic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Pieri

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Mesenteric venous thrombosis is a particular form of intestinal ischemia related to high mortality. The lack of a characteristic clinical picture often leads to a difficult diagnostic and therapeutic classification. We report the case of a young woman, using estrogenic and progestinic oral therapy, affected by a severe form of mesenteric thrombosis and complicated by segmental post ischemic stenosis of small intestine.

  3. A Genetical approach to deep venous thrombosis

    OpenAIRE

    Yavuz, Celal

    2012-01-01

    Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is a common disorder that frequently occurs after surgical procedures and trauma and in the presence of cancer or immobilization conditions. However, it can also develop without any of these predisposing factors. This condition directs the researcher's enquiry to investigating the basis of organismal thrombotic predisposition. The common prothrombotic genetic mutations include factor V Leiden, factor II G20210 A, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, prot...

  4. A genetical approach to deep venous thrombosis

    OpenAIRE

    Celal Yavuz

    2012-01-01

    Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is a common disorderthat frequently occurs after surgical procedures andtrauma and in the presence of cancer or immobilizationconditions. However, it can also develop without any ofthese predisposing factors. This condition directs theresearcher’s enquiry to investigating the basis of organismalthrombotic predisposition. The common prothromboticgenetic mutations include factor V Leiden, factor IIG20210 A, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, prothrombinA20210, and f...

  5. Congenital pseudoarthrosis associated with venous malformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Hadidy, A.; Haroun, A.; Al-Ryalat, N. [Jordan University Hospital, Radiology Department, P.O. Box 340621, Amman (Jordan); Hamamy, H. [Endocrinology and Genetics, National Center for Diabetes, Amman (Jordan); Al-Hadidi, S. [Jordan University Hospital, Departments of Orthopedics, Amman (Jordan)

    2007-06-15

    Congenital pseudoarthrosis is a pathologic entity that may be isolated, or may be associated with neurofibromatosis. We report the case of a 3-year-old female with congenital pseudoarthrosis involving the right tibia and fibula. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and complementary magnetic resonance angiogram (MRA) revealed a lobulated mass with vivid enhancement, which led to the diagnosis of venous malformation. This is the first report of congenital pseudoarthrosis caused by the presence of a vascular malformation. (orig.)

  6. The Anatomical Correlation between the Internal Venous Vertebral System and the Cranial Venae Cavae in Rabbit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Mazensky

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to describe the possible variations in the connection between the internal venous vertebral system and the cranial vena cava in rabbit using corrosion technique. The study was carried out on 40 adult New Zealand white rabbits. The venous system was injected by using Batson's corrosion casting kit number 17. We found the connection between the internal venous vertebral system and the cranial vena cava by means of the vertebral veins and the right azygos vein. The vertebral vein was present as independent tributary in 36 cases (90%. In the rest of the cases, it was found as being double, being triple, or forming a common trunk with other veins. The azygos vein was present as independent tributary of the cranial vena cava in 39 cases (97.5%. We found also a common trunk formed by the junction of the deep cervical vein, the right vertebral vein, and the azygos vein in one case (2.5%. The azygos vein received 6, 7, 8, or 9 pairs of dorsal intercostal veins. Documenting the anatomical variations in the rabbit will aid in the planning of future experimental studies and determining the clinical relevance on such studies.

  7. Autologous platelet-rich plasma in treatment of chronic venous leg ulcers: A prospective case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Seyhan; Aksoy, Eray; Doganci, Suat; Yalcinkaya, Adnan; Diken, Adem I; Cagli, Kerim

    2015-12-01

    We report our results on a case series of 19 patients receiving platelet-rich plasma application in treatment of patients with chronic unhealing venous leg ulcers. There were 16 males and three females with a mean age of 38.55 ± 16.46 years. Planimetric size measurements were performed and pain was tested throughout the treatment period. Follow-up was made in seven-day periods. Patients received 5 ml of platelet-rich plasma for each 5 cm(2) of the wound surface with half of the amount being injected 1-2 mm deep into the wound and the wound surface was covered with the remaining half. Complete wound healing occurred in 18 of 19 patients (94.7%) within a mean of 4.82 ± 2.16 week. There were significant reductions in wound area among all consecutive measurements except for first week. A significant reduction in wound volume was apparent even in first week and sustained among consecutive measurements. Platelet-rich plasma seems effective in terms of promoting healing of venous leg ulcers. Improvement in wound depth was slightly more prominent than that in wound area, indicating a potential role of platelet-rich plasma especially in deep venous ulcers. © The Author(s) 2014.

  8. Developmental venous anomaly in the newborn brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horsch, S. [Erasmus MC-Sophia Children' s Hospital, Department of Neonatology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Helios Klinikum Berlin-Buch, Department of Neonatology, Berlin (Germany); Govaert, P. [Erasmus MC-Sophia Children' s Hospital, Department of Neonatology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Cowan, F.M. [Hammersmith Hospital, Department of Paediatrics, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Benders, M.J.N.L.; Groenendaal, F.; Vries, L.S. de [University Medical Centre Utrecht, Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, Department of Neonatology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Lequin, M.H. [Erasmus MC/Sophia Children' s Hospital, Department of Paediatric Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Saliou, G. [University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Le Kremlin-Bicetre (France)

    2014-07-15

    Cerebral developmental venous anomaly (DVA) is considered a benign anatomical variant of parenchymal venous drainage; it is the most common vascular malformation seen in the adult brain. Despite its assumed congenital origin, little is known about DVA in the neonatal brain. We report here the first cohort study of 14 neonates with DVA. Fourteen infants (seven preterm) with DVA diagnosed neonatally using cranial ultrasound (cUS) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) from three tertiary neonatal units over 14 years are reviewed. DVA was first detected on cUS in 6 and on MRI in 8 of the 14 infants. The cUS appearances of DVA showed a focal fairly uniform area of increased echogenicity, often (86 %) adjacent to the lateral ventricle and located in the frontal lobe (58 %). Blood flow in the dilated collector vein detected by Doppler ultrasound (US) varied between cases (venous flow pattern in ten and arterialized in four). The appearance on conventional MRI was similar to findings in adults. Serial imaging showed a fairly constant appearance to the DVAs in some cases while others varied considerably regarding anatomical extent and flow velocity. This case series underlines that a neonatal diagnosis of DVA is possible with carefully performed cUS and MRI and that DVA tends to be an incidental finding with a diverse spectrum of imaging appearances. Serial imaging suggests that some DVAs undergo dynamic changes during the neonatal period and early infancy; this may contribute to why diagnosis is rare at this age. (orig.)

  9. Developmental venous anomaly in the newborn brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsch, S; Govaert, P; Cowan, F M; Benders, M J N L; Groenendaal, F; Lequin, M H; Saliou, G; de Vries, L S

    2014-07-01

    Cerebral developmental venous anomaly (DVA) is considered a benign anatomical variant of parenchymal venous drainage; it is the most common vascular malformation seen in the adult brain. Despite its assumed congenital origin, little is known about DVA in the neonatal brain. We report here the first cohort study of 14 neonates with DVA. Fourteen infants (seven preterm) with DVA diagnosed neonatally using cranial ultrasound (cUS) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) from three tertiary neonatal units over 14 years are reviewed. DVA was first detected on cUS in 6 and on MRI in 8 of the 14 infants. The cUS appearances of DVA showed a focal fairly uniform area of increased echogenicity, often (86 %) adjacent to the lateral ventricle and located in the frontal lobe (58 %). Blood flow in the dilated collector vein detected by Doppler ultrasound (US) varied between cases (venous flow pattern in ten and arterialized in four). The appearance on conventional MRI was similar to findings in adults. Serial imaging showed a fairly constant appearance to the DVAs in some cases while others varied considerably regarding anatomical extent and flow velocity. This case series underlines that a neonatal diagnosis of DVA is possible with carefully performed cUS and MRI and that DVA tends to be an incidental finding with a diverse spectrum of imaging appearances. Serial imaging suggests that some DVAs undergo dynamic changes during the neonatal period and early infancy; this may contribute to why diagnosis is rare at this age.

  10. Can developmental venous anomalies cause seizures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dussaule, Claire; Masnou, Pascal; Nasser, Ghaïdaa; Archambaud, Frédérique; Cauquil-Michon, Cécile; Gagnepain, Jean-Paul; Bouilleret, Viviane; Denier, Christian

    2017-12-01

    Developmental venous anomalies (DVAs) are congenital anatomical variants of normal venous drainage of normal brain. Although DVAs are often discovered on the occasion of a seizure, their involvement in epilepsy is poorly studied. Our objective was to determine whether DVA can cause seizures, in the cases where there is no associated lesion, including no cavernoma or dysplasia. Based on clinical history, cerebral MRI, EEG recording, and 18 F-FDG PET, we report 4 patients with DVA revealed by seizures. The first patient had a convulsive seizure caused by a hemorrhagic infarction due to thrombosis of her DVA. The second patient had a left temporo-parietal DVA next to a nonspecific lesion, possibly a sequelae of a venous infarction. The last two patients disclosed an isolated and uncomplicated DVA with a concordant epileptic focus confirmed on ictal video EEG recording. We reviewed literature and identified 21 other published cases of seizures caused by complications of a DVA and 9 patients that may have a direct link between epilepsy and an isolated and uncomplicated DVA. Seizures are linked to a DVA in two main situations: presence of an associated epileptogenic lesion, such as cavernoma or dysplasia, and occurrence of a complication of the DVA. Before concluding that a seizure is caused by a DVA, it is essential to perform full MRI protocols to search them. It remains rare and uncertain that isolated and uncomplicated DVA can cause seizures. In this last situation, physiopathological processes are probably different in each patient.

  11. Venous access: options, approaches and issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asch, M.R. [Univ. of Toronto, Mount Sinai Hospital, Dept. of Medical Imaging, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2001-06-01

    Venous access is an essential part of medical practice. It is needed to obtain blood samples to make the diagnosis and to administer fluids or medicines as part of treatment. Although relatively new in the history of medicine, the placement and maintenance of the various venous access devices now occupies a significant portion of many vascular and interventional radiology practices. Thus, it is important to have a thorough understanding of these devices and their uses. The first long-term venous access devices were used in 1973. These were placed via a surgical cut-down on the subclavian vein. In 1982, the first subcutaneous implantable ports were described. These procedures were initially performed by surgeons, but over the last 5-10 years, both the insertion and management of these devices has shifted to interventional radiologists. Peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) lines have almost completely supplanted the use of standard central lines (Fig. 1). A number of factors have facilitated this - namely, ready and less expensive room access, outpatient procedure and radiologists' accessibility and familiarity with image-guidance procedures and catheters and guide wires. (author)

  12. Incidence of central venous catheter hub contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holroyd, Julie L; Vasilopoulos, Terrie; Rice, Mark J; Rand, Kenneth H; Fahy, Brenda G

    2017-06-01

    To investigate microorganisms causing central venous catheter contamination and how this contamination differs across different catheter metrics. After obtaining IRB approval and informed consent, 830 cultures were prospectively obtained from 45 ICU patients with central venous catheter or peripherally inserted central catheter. Bacterial colonies were identified by mass spectrometry. Bacterial contamination of central catheter hubs occurred 44% of the time in this study in the ICU setting. Coagulase-positive staphylococci cultures had higher median (±interquartile range) CFUs (12±232) versus coagulase-negative (3±10) and other bacteria (1±3; Pcentral venous pressure monitoring connections (25.8% vs. 7.1% without). Internal jugular sites (10.0% vs. 2.7% femoral, 6.2% PICC, P=0.031) and medial lumens of triple lumen catheters (11.9% vs. 5.6% distal, 7.0% proximal, P=0.049) had increased incidence of higher bacteria loads (>15 CFUs). This study found a high incidence of central access catheter hub bacterial contamination, which correlated with positive blood cultures in 2 of 3 total bacteremia cases identified in the 45 patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Histological and electrophysiological changes in the retinal pigment epithelium after injection of sodium iodate in the orbital venus plexus of pigmented rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Aboutaleb Kadkhodaeian

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: NaIO3injection into the retrobulbar venous plexus of pigmented rats can result in significant and progressive damage to the RPE and subsequently to the neuroretina of the injected eye, and may serve as a model of retinal degeneration.

  14. Iron Dextran Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron dextran injection is used to treat iron-deficiency anemia (a lower than normal number of red blood ... be treated with iron supplements taken by mouth. Iron dextran injection is in a class of medications called ...

  15. Sodium Ferric Gluconate Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodium ferric gluconate injection is used to treat iron-deficiency anemia (a lower than normal number of ... are also receiving the medication epoetin (Epogen, Procrit). Sodium ferric gluconate injection is in a class of ...

  16. Co-trimoxazole Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Co-trimoxazole injection is used to treat certain infections that are caused by bacteria such as infection of the intestine, lungs ( ... younger than 2 months of age. Co-trimoxazole injection is in a class of medications called sulfonamides. ...

  17. Epoetin Alfa Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epoetin alfa injection is used to treat anemia (a lower than normal number of red blood cells) in people with chronic ... working over a period of time). Epoetin alfa injection is also used to treat anemia caused by ...

  18. Injection losses and protection

    CERN Document Server

    Bartmann, W; Baudrenghien, P; Bracco, C; Dehning, B; Di Mauro, A; Drosdal, L; Emery, J; Goddard, B; Holzer, E B; Höfle, W; Kain, V; Meddahi, M; Radaelli, S; Shaposhnilova, E; Uythoven, J; Valuch, D; Wenninger, J; Zamantzas, C; Gianfelice-Wendt, E

    2012-01-01

    Injection losses are compared for 2010 and 2011 operation. Mitigation techniques which were put in place in 2010 to reduce losses at injection are described. Issues in 2011 operation, their potential improvements and the performance reach for 2012 are shown.

  19. Deoxycholic Acid Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deoxycholic acid injection is used to improve the appearance and profile of moderate to severe submental fat ('double chin'; fatty tissue located under the chin). Deoxycholic acid injection is in a class of medications called ...

  20. Epidural Steroid Injections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Spondylolisthesis BLOG FIND A SPECIALIST Treatments Epidural Steroid Injections Ray Baker MD Ray Baker MD Updated ... out of the spine. Why Get an Epidural Steroid Injection? Narrowing of the spinal passages can occur ...

  1. Amphotericin B Liposomal Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amphotericin B liposomal injection is used to treat fungal infections such as cryptococcal meningitis (a fungal infection of the ... infections in people who cannot receive conventional amphotericin B therapy. Amphotericin B liposomal injection is in a ...

  2. Aminocaproic Acid Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminocaproic acid injection is used to control bleeding that occurs when blood clots are broken down too quickly. ... before the baby is ready to be born). Aminocaproic acid injection is also used to control bleeding in ...

  3. OnabotulinumtoxinA Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... htm) or the manufacturer's website to obtain the Medication Guide. ... adults 18 years of age and older. OnabotulinumtoxinA injection is in a class of medications called neurotoxins. When onabotulinumtoxinA is injected into a ...

  4. Revision of the venous clinical severity score: venous outcomes consensus statement: special communication of the American Venous Forum Ad Hoc Outcomes Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Michael A; Rabe, Eberhard; McLafferty, Robert B; Shortell, Cynthia K; Marston, William A; Gillespie, David; Meissner, Mark H; Rutherford, Robert B

    2010-11-01

    In response to the need for a disease severity measurement, the American Venous Forum committee on outcomes assessment developed the Venous Severity Scoring system in 2000. There are three components of this scoring system, the Venous Disability Score, the Venous Segmental Disease Score, and the Venous Clinical Severity Score (VCSS). The VCSS was developed from elements of the CEAP classification (clinical grade, etiology, anatomy, pathophysiology), which is the worldwide standard for describing the clinical features of chronic venous disease. However, as a descriptive instrument, the CEAP classification responds poorly to change. The VCSS was subsequently developed as an evaluative instrument that would be responsive to changes in disease severity over time and in response to treatment. Based on initial experiences with the VCSS, an international ad hoc working group of the American Venous Forum was charged with updating the instrument. This revision of the VCSS is focused on clarifying ambiguities, updating terminology, and simplifying application. The specific language of proven quality-of-life instruments was used to better address the issues of patients at the lower end of the venous disease spectrum. Periodic review and revision are necessary for generating more universal applicability and for comparing treatment outcomes in a meaningful way. Copyright © 2010 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Rich catalytic injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veninger, Albert [Coventry, CT

    2008-12-30

    A gas turbine engine includes a compressor, a rich catalytic injector, a combustor, and a turbine. The rich catalytic injector includes a rich catalytic device, a mixing zone, and an injection assembly. The injection assembly provides an interface between the mixing zone and the combustor. The injection assembly can inject diffusion fuel into the combustor, provides flame aerodynamic stabilization in the combustor, and may include an ignition device.

  6. External jugular venous pressure as an alternative to conventional central venous pressure in right lobe donor hepatectomies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Mohamed Hussein; Soliman, Hossam El Deen; Morad, Wessam Saber

    2011-12-01

    Many centers have adopted central vein cannulation both for central venous pressure monitoring and fluid administration for right hepatectomy in living-liver donors. However, use of central venous catheters is associated with adverse events that are hazardous to patients and expensive to treat. This study sought to examine the use of external jugular venous pressure as an alternative to conventional central venous pressure in right lobe donor hepatectomies Forty ASA grade I adult living liver-donors without a known history of significant cardiac or pulmonary diseases were enrolled in this prospective observational study. Paired measurement of venous pressures (external jugular venous pressure and internal jugular venous pressure) were taken at the following times: after induction of anesthesia, 30 minutes after skin incision, during right lobe mobilization (every 15 minutes), during hepatic transaction (every 15 minutes), after right lobe resection (every 15 minutes), and after abdominal closure. Paired measurements were equal in 47.5%, 53.5%, 61.5%, 46.3%, and 52.5% for after induction, after skin incision, right lobe mobilization, right lobe transection, after resection, and before abdominal closure periods. However, all measurements were within acceptable limits of bias measurements (± 2 mm Hg). Central venous pressure catheter placement can be avoided and replaced by a less-invasive method such as external jugular venous pressure (which gave an acceptable estimate of central venous pressure in all phases of right lobe resection) in living-donor liver transplant and allowed equivalent monitor even during fluid restriction phases.

  7. Parathyroid Hormone Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have any questions about how to inject this medication.Parathyroid hormone injection comes in a cartridge to be mixed in ... and vitamin D while you are taking this medication.Parathyroid hormone injection controls hypoparathyroidism but does not cure it. Continue ...

  8. HIV-ASSOCIATED VENOUS THROMBOEMBOLISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Bibas

    2011-01-01

    ="false" Priority="21" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="Intense Emphasis" />

    HIV infection has been recognized as a prothrombotic condition and this association has now been proven by a large number of studies with a reported VTE frequency among HIV-infected patients ranging from 0.19% to 7,63 %/year. HIV infection is associated with a two to tenfold increased risk of venous thrombosis in comparison with a general population of the same age. Some r

  9. Compression for preventing recurrence of venous ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, E Andrea; Bell-Syer, Sally E M

    2014-09-09

    Up to 1% of adults will have a leg ulcer at some time. The majority of leg ulcers are venous in origin and are caused by high pressure in the veins due to blockage or weakness of the valves in the veins of the leg. Prevention and treatment of venous ulcers is aimed at reducing the pressure either by removing/repairing the veins, or by applying compression bandages/stockings to reduce the pressure in the veins.The majority of venous ulcers heal with compression bandages, however ulcers frequently recur. Clinical guidelines therefore recommend that people continue to wear compression, usually in the form of hosiery (tights, stockings, socks) after their ulcer heals, to prevent recurrence. To assess the effects of compression (socks, stockings, tights, bandages) in preventing the recurrence of venous ulcers. If compression does prevent ulceration compared with no compression, then to identify whether there is evidence to recommend particular levels of compression (high, medium or low, for example), types of compression, or brands of compression to prevent ulcer recurrence after healing. For this second update we searched The Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register (searched 4 September 2014) which includes the results of regular searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL; The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2014, Issue 8). Randomised controlled trials (RCTs)evaluating compression bandages or hosiery for preventing the recurrence of venous ulcers. Two review authors undertook data extraction and risk of bias assessment independently. Four trials (979 participants) were eligible for inclusion in this review. One trial in patients with recently healed venous ulcers (n = 153) compared recurrence rates with and without compression and found that compression significantly reduced ulcer recurrence at six months (Risk ratio (RR) 0.46, 95% CI 0.27 to 0.76).Two trials compared high-compression hosiery (equivalent to UK class 3) with

  10. Epidemiology of the contraceptive pill and venous thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannaford, Philip C

    2011-02-01

    Current users of combined oral contraceptives have an increased risk of venous thromboembolism. The risk appears to be higher during the first year of use and disappears rapidly once oral contraception is stopped. There is a strong interaction between hereditary defects of coagulation, combined oral contraceptive use and venous thromboembolism. Nevertheless, the routine screening of women before they use combined oral contraception is not recommended. Venous thromboembolism seems to be higher in overweight users, and after air, and possibly other forms of, travel. Both the oestrogen and progestogen content of combined oral contraceptives have been implicated in differences in venous thrombotic risk between products. Even if real, the absolute difference in risk between products is small, because the background incidence of venous thromboembolism in young women is low. All currently available combined oral contraceptives are safe. Progestogen-only oral contraceptives are not associated with an increased risk of venous thromboembolism. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Lack of variation in venous tone potentiates vasovagal syncope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargreaves, A D; Muir, A L

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To investigate the peripheral venous response to head up tilting in malignant vasovagal syndrome. PATIENTS--31 Patients with unexplained syncope or dizziness referred from the cardiology department. METHODS--Changes in calf venous volume were studied by a radionuclide technique during 45 degrees head up tilt testing. RESULTS--During tilt testing six patients became syncopal but 25 were symptom free. The syncopal group had greater increases in calf venous volume after the change in posture and perhaps more importantly considerably less variability in the venous volume during the tilted period. CONCLUSIONS--The venous response was different in the syncopal patients. The lack of response of the peripheral venous circulation to changes in the central circulation may be responsible for triggering the Bezold-Jarisch reflex and malignant vasovagal syncope. PMID:1622700

  12. Core content for training in venous and lymphatic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmet, Steven E; Min, Robert J; Comerota, Anthony J; Meissner, Mark H; Carman, Teresa L; Rathbun, Suman W; Jaff, Michael R; Wakefield, Thomas W; Feied, Craig F

    2014-10-01

    The major venous societies in the United States share a common mission to improve the standards of medical practitioners, the educational goals for teaching and training programs in venous disease, and the quality of patient care related to the treatment of venous disorders. With these important goals in mind, a task force made up of experts from the specialties of dermatology, interventional radiology, phlebology, vascular medicine, and vascular surgery was formed to develop a consensus document describing the Core Content for venous and lymphatic medicine and to develop a core educational content outline for training. This outline describes the areas of knowledge considered essential for practice in the field, which encompasses the study, diagnosis, and treatment of patients with acute and chronic venous and lymphatic disorders. The American Venous Forum and the American College of Phlebology have endorsed the Core Content. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  13. The dynamics of venous return and response to hypervolemia in the toad, Bufo marinus (L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killorn, Erin E; Toews, Daniel P

    2001-01-01

    Background Venous return from the posterior region of amphibians travels by either two renal portal veins to the kidney or a central abdominal vein that drains into the hepatic portal system. The relative proportions of blood flow in these vessels has never been measured nor has a modification of flow been determined when venous return increases by changes in blood volume during hypervolemia or during increased volume input from the posterior lymph hearts. Results Venous return from the posterior region of Bufo marinus was measured under resting conditions and in response to a systemic hypervolemia. Doppler flow probes were positioned on the renal portal and ventral abdominal veins, and flow was recorded as injections of artificial plasma equaling 100% of the animal's plasma volume were administered through the sciatic artery. Resting flow was found to be 5.54 ± 2.03 ml min-1 kg-1 in the paired renal portal veins, and 7.31 ± 0.89 ml min-1 kg-1 in the ventral abdominal vein. While renal portal flow was found to increase by a factor of 2.4 times during the first 10 min of hypervolemia, ventral abdominal flow only increased by a factor of 1.3. Conclusions Our results quantify the contribution to circulation from posterior venous return in the toad Bufo marinus. A preferential movement of excess fluid through the renal portal pathway was also demonstrated, supporting the possibility of water elimination via the renal portal circulation, especially during periods of high water influx into the animals. PMID:11696249

  14. The Doppler-guided transfalcine venous approach in selected cases of vein of Galen malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benes, L; Wakat, J-P; Jüttner, J; Riegel, T; Krischek, B; Bertalanffy, H; Bien, S

    2003-01-01

    This investigation was performed to evaluate the specific procedural issues and indications of a surgically assisted Doppler-guided endovascular transfalcine venous approach for the treatment of vein of Galen aneurysmal malformations (VGAM) in critically ill neonates. Two neonates out of a clinical series of 15 children (8 males and 7 females) with vein of Galen malformations were treated by our neurovascular team, using a combined surgically assisted endovascular transfalcine approach. In the biplanar angiography room a radiographically guided craniotomy (1.5 cm) was placed over the cranial projection of the falciforme sinus. After craniotomy the orthograd flow of the falciforme sinus was identified by Doppler ultrasonography. The sinus was punctured by an i. v. cannula with injection port and was sutured to the skin. A microcatheter was maneuvered over a guide into the malformation under fluoroscopic control. For embolization Guglielmi electrolytically detachable platinum coils were placed into the malformation as an embolic agent. Neurological examination records, available MR images, computed tomographic scans, pre- and postembolization angiograms and follow-up data were analyzed. In both individuals the malformation was classified as VGAM. The follow-up was 6 and 7 months, respectively. No technique associated morbidity or mortality occurred in the present series. At discharge both selected neonates were in stable condition and the flow in the VGAMs could be significantly reduced by a combination of approaches including the venous transfalcine approach. Meanwhile, 6 months after birth one neonate died due to a deterioration of the pulmonary hypertension. Endovascular treatment is presently the most efficient strategy to allow neonates and infants survive the early manifestation of vein of Galen malformations and probably render a normal neurological development. Consequently, a combination of approaches in selected cases including the Doppler guided venous

  15. Venous Access Ports: Indications, Implantation Technique, Follow-Up, and Complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walser, Eric M., E-mail: walser.eric@mayo.edu [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2012-08-15

    The subcutaneous venous access device (SVAD or 'port') is a critical component in the care of patients with chronic disease. The modern SVAD provides reliable access for blood withdrawal and medication administration with minimal disruption to a patient's lifestyle. Because of improved materials and catheter technology, today's ports are lighter and stronger and capable of high-pressure injections of contrast for cross-sectional imaging. The majority of SVAD placement occurs in interventional radiology departments due to their ability to provide this service at lower costs, lower, complication rates, and greater volumes. Port-insertion techniques vary depending on the operator, but all consist of catheter placement in the central venous circulation followed by subcutaneous pocket creation and port attachment to the catheter with fixation and closure of the pocket. Venous access challenges occasionally occur in patients with central vein occlusions, necessitating catheterization of collateral veins or port placement in alternate locations. Complications of SVADs include those associated with the procedure as well as short- (<30 days) and long-term problems. Procedural and early complications are quite rare due to the near-universal use of real-time ultrasound guidance for vein puncture, but they can include hematoma, catheter malposition, arrhythmias, and pneumothorax. Late problems include both thrombotic complications (native venous or port-catheter thrombosis) and infections (tunnel or pocket infections or catheter-associated bloodstream infections). Most guidelines suggest that 0.3 infections/1000 catheter days is an appropriate upper threshold for the insertion of SVADs.

  16. [Venous thrombosis associated with central venous catheter use in patients with cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias Rey, Leticia; Fernández Pérez, Isaura; Barbagelata López, Cristina; Rivera Gallego, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    The use of central venous catheters for various applications (administration of chemotherapy, blood products and others) in patients with cancer is increasingly frequent. The association between thrombosis and catheter use has been fully established but aspects such as its causes, diagnosis, prophylaxis and treatment have not. We describe a case of thrombosis in a patient with cancer treated with chemotherapy who carried a central venous catheter. We also perform a review of the risk factors, the role of the prophylaxis and the treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Curative effects of RF combined with DSA-guided ethanol sclerotherapy in venous malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xing; Meng, Jian; Zhang, Jie; Wu, Ruihan; Gu, Jianmin; Shao, Cuiling; Han, Kun

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the clinical effect of radiofrequency (RF) ablation combined with digital subtraction angiography (DSA)-guided anhydrous ethanol injection sclerotherapy in the treatment of high-return flow venous malformation (VM). Forty-one patients who were diagnosed as high-return flow VM with clinical and radiographic evidence were divided into the observation group (n=19) and control group (n=22) by random number table. All the patients received DSA-guided anhydrous ethanol injection sclerotherapy while the patients in the observation group were given RF ablation in addition. The clinical effect, treatment times and adverse effects of the two groups were analyzed. The effectiveness of the observation group was significantly higher than that of the control group (94.7 vs. 81.8%). Facial paralysis occurred in three patients (13.6%) after ethanol injection in the control group, while the observation group had no facial nerve injury after treatment. The patients in the observation group had significantly fewer number of ethanol injections. RF can improve the efficacy of high-return flow VM and reduce the number of ethanol injections. The scheme is safe and effective, which is worth expanding in clinical practice.

  18. Systematic review of topic treatment for venous ulcers

    OpenAIRE

    Borges, Eline Lima; Caliri, Maria Helena Larcher; Haas, Vanderlei José

    2007-01-01

    Venous ulcer patients can experience this situation for several years without achieving healing if treatment is inadequate. Evidence-based professional practice generates effective results for patients and services. This research aimed to carry out a systematic review to assess the most effective method to improve venous return and the best topic treatment for these ulcers. Studies were collected in eight databases, using the following descriptors: leg ulcer, venous ulcer and similar terms. T...

  19. Lack of variation in venous tone potentiates vasovagal syncope.

    OpenAIRE

    Hargreaves, A D; Muir, A L

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To investigate the peripheral venous response to head up tilting in malignant vasovagal syndrome. PATIENTS--31 Patients with unexplained syncope or dizziness referred from the cardiology department. METHODS--Changes in calf venous volume were studied by a radionuclide technique during 45 degrees head up tilt testing. RESULTS--During tilt testing six patients became syncopal but 25 were symptom free. The syncopal group had greater increases in calf venous volume after the change in ...

  20. LHC Injection Scenarios

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, R

    2002-01-01

    Injection of nominal beam intensities from the SPS into the LHC must be done under well-controlled conditions since an abnormal state of one or more elements in the LHC could lead to severe damage of LHC machine components. This note proposes some general principles to be applied for injection into the LHC. Firstly, only low intensity beams below damage threshold can be injected into an empty machine. Secondly, high intensity beams can only be injected when some beam is already present in the machine. Procedures for injection and failure scenarios are discussed.

  1. Factors associated with poor healing and recurrence of venous ulceration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labropoulos, Nicos; Wang, Eric D; Lanier, Steven T; Khan, Sami U

    2012-01-01

    Plastic surgeons are often approached for wound management and closure of chronic venous ulcers that fail to heal despite multimodal management. The authors present a retrospective analysis of a large series of venous ulcers to determine factors predicting nonhealing and recurrence. Consecutive patients with chronic venous ulcers (≥ 2-cm diameter) were examined for the presence of superficial, perforating, or deep venous disease, including reflux and/or obstruction. Treatment included compression, venous ligation, stripping, thermal ablation, sclerotherapy, and local wound care. Ulcers refractory to 6 months of treatment were defined as nonhealing ulcers. Data were analyzed for differences in baseline patient and ulcer characteristics and clinical course of nonhealing ulcers. Data were compared using Wilcoxon rank sum, chi-square, and Fisher's exact tests using Sigma Stat and SPSS, with α set at p ulcers in 127 patients. Factors associated with ulcer nonhealing included advanced age, increased body mass index, history of deep venous thrombosis, noncompliance with compression therapy, and large ulcer area. One hundred thirty-one of the ulcers (85.6 percent) healed within 6 months and 147 (96 percent) of the ulcers ultimately healed without the need for operative plastic surgical intervention. A thorough understanding of risks and expected clinical course is required for assessment of the nonhealing venous ulcer. The authors recommend identification and correction of underlying venous abnormality and a minimum of at least 6 months of compression and local wound care followed by reassessment of venous function before operative plastic surgical intervention should be considered. Risk, III.

  2. Venous ulcers of the lower limb: Where do we stand?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Sasanka S.

    2012-01-01

    Venous ulcers are the most common ulcers of the lower limb. It has a high morbidity and results in economic strain both at a personal and at a state level. Chronic venous hypertension either due to primary or secondary venous disease with perforator paucity, destruction or incompetence resulting in reflux is the underlying pathology, but inflammatory reactions mediated through leucocytes, platelet adhesion, formation of pericapillary fibrin cuff, growth factors and macromolecules trapped in tissue result in tissue hypoxia, cell death and ulceration. Duplex scan with colour flow is the most useful investigation for venous disease supplying information about patency, reflux, effects of proximal and distal compression, Valsalva maneuver and effects of muscle contraction. Most venous disease can be managed conservatively by leg elevation and compression bandaging. Drugs of proven benefit in venous disease are pentoxifylline and aspirin, but they work best in conjunction with compression therapy. Once ulceration is chronic or the patient does not respond to or cannot maintain conservative regime, surgical intervention treating the underlying venous hypertension and cover for the ulcer is necessary. The different modalities like sclerotherapy, ligation and stripping of superficial varicose veins, endoscopic subfascial perforator ligation, endovenous laser or radiofrequency ablation have similar long-term results, although short-term recovery is best with radiofrequency and foam sclerotherapy. For deep venous reflux, surgical modalities include repair of incompetent venous valves or transplant or transposition of a competent vein segment with normal valves to replace a post-thrombotic destroyed portion of the deep vein. PMID:23162226

  3. Venous ulcers of the lower limb: Where do we stand?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chatterjee S Sasanka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Venous ulcers are the most common ulcers of the lower limb. It has a high morbidity and results in economic strain both at a personal and at a state level. Chronic venous hypertension either due to primary or secondary venous disease with perforator paucity, destruction or incompetence resulting in reflux is the underlying pathology, but inflammatory reactions mediated through leucocytes, platelet adhesion, formation of pericapillary fibrin cuff, growth factors and macromolecules trapped in tissue result in tissue hypoxia, cell death and ulceration. Duplex scan with colour flow is the most useful investigation for venous disease supplying information about patency, reflux, effects of proximal and distal compression, Valsalva maneuver and effects of muscle contraction. Most venous disease can be managed conservatively by leg elevation and compression bandaging. Drugs of proven benefit in venous disease are pentoxifylline and aspirin, but they work best in conjunction with compression therapy. Once ulceration is chronic or the patient does not respond to or cannot maintain conservative regime, surgical intervention treating the underlying venous hypertension and cover for the ulcer is necessary. The different modalities like sclerotherapy, ligation and stripping of superficial varicose veins, endoscopic subfascial perforator ligation, endovenous laser or radiofrequency ablation have similar long-term results, although short-term recovery is best with radiofrequency and foam sclerotherapy. For deep venous reflux, surgical modalities include repair of incompetent venous valves or transplant or transposition of a competent vein segment with normal valves to replace a post-thrombotic destroyed portion of the deep vein.

  4. Pregnancy-related venous thromboembolism and risk of occult cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veres, Katalin; Horváth-Puhó, Erzsébet; Ehrenstein, Vera

    2017-01-01

    The cancer risk during the first year after a pregnancy-related venous thromboembolism episode is higher than expected.An aggressive search for cancer in women with pregnancy-related venous thromboembolism is probably not warranted, due to low absolute risk.......The cancer risk during the first year after a pregnancy-related venous thromboembolism episode is higher than expected.An aggressive search for cancer in women with pregnancy-related venous thromboembolism is probably not warranted, due to low absolute risk....

  5. Reliability and clinical validity of a technique to assess lifetime illicit injection drug use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieper, Barbara; Templin, Thomas N; Birk, Thomas J; Kirsner, Robert S

    2008-02-01

    A lifetime injection drug history is necessary to examine the impact of injection drug use on a physical health problem but it may cover time periods for which information and/or data reported may not be reliable. A test-retest study design was used to examine a technique of questioning persons about lifetime illicit injection drug use history (the Lifetime Injection History Questionnaire), including its reliability and relation to chronic venous disorders as an assessment of validity. Study participants included 104 persons (60 men, 44 women, M age = 49.3 years) provided services at a methadone maintenance treatment center located in a large industrial city in the Midwest. Kappa values for "ever injected" drugs ranged from 1.00 for heroin to .50 for nonprescription methadone (median = .75). High interclass correlations were found for youngest and oldest ages of injecting, years not injecting, and total injecting years (.90 to .98). Interclass correlation values for years injecting in the upper body and lower body were .79 and .70, respectively. Interrater reliability for the clinical portion of the venous disease assessment tool (the Clinical-Etiology-Anatomy-Pathophysiology - CEAP - classification) was high: .97, right leg; .94, left leg. Controlling for age, gender, comorbidities, and body mass index, a classification of injection drug use based on the Lifetime Injection History scales accounted for 32% of the variance in the clinical CEAP scores. This is the first study to examine years of injection drug use that takes periods not injecting drugs into consideration. Focused substance abuse questioning (eg, drug, route, years of use) may help clinicians evaluate health problems related to drug use.

  6. MRA for diagnosis of venous thromboembolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sostman, H. D. [Cornell University, Weill Medical College, Chair of Radiology, New York (United States)

    2001-12-01

    Direct imaging of pulmonary embolism (PE) and deep vein thrombosis (DVT) with CT, and potentially with MR, will continue to replace V/Q scintigraphy. Venous imaging with MR far detecting DVT is used in a few centers, and their published accuracy figures are impressive. Recent studies of MR pulmonary angiography for PE reported that sensitivity of MRA was 85-100%, specificity 95-96%, but this data must be confirmed in other centers and patient populations. MR has advantages compared with CT, which make it worthwhile to continue MR development. Ionizing radiation and iodinated contrast material are not used. Imaging the pulmonary arteries and then imaging whichever venous region is of clinical interest is practical in a single examination. Repeated examinations can be performed safely. New contrast materials will facilitate the practically and accuracy of the MR technique and perfusion imaging may increase sensitivity. MR also has disadvantages compared with CT. It does not image effectively the non-vascular compartment of the lungs. It is more expensive, patient monitoring is more cumbersome, and a routine technique, which embodies all of MR's potential advantages, has not been packaged and tested. Accordingly, helical CT is a realistic option in clinical management of patients with suspected PE in most centers, while clinical application of MR is limited to centers with appropriate MR expertise and technology. However, MR has a number of fundamental characteristics that make it potentially ideal modality for evaluating patients with suspected acute venous thromboembolic disease and further clinical research with MRA is warranted.

  7. 77 FR 24718 - Scientific Information Request on Chronic Venous Ulcers Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-25

    ... Venous Ulcers Treatments AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), HHS. ACTION: Request...) is seeking scientific information submissions from manufacturers of chronic venous ulcer treatment medical devices. Scientific information is being solicited to inform our Chronic Venous Ulcers: A...

  8. Direct oral anticoagulants and venous thromboembolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Franchini

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Venous thromboembolism (VTE, consisting of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, is a major clinical concern associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The cornerstone of management of VTE is anticoagulation, and traditional anticoagulants include parenteral heparins and oral vitamin K antagonists. Recently, new oral anticoagulant drugs have been developed and licensed, including direct factor Xa inhibitors (e.g. rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban and thrombin inhibitors (e.g. dabigatran etexilate. This narrative review focusses on the characteristics of these direct anticoagulants and the main results of published clinical studies on their use in the prevention and treatment of VTE.

  9. Altered Venous Function during Long-Duration Spaceflights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques-Olivier Fortrat

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Venous adaptation to microgravity, associated with cardiovascular deconditioning, may contribute to orthostatic intolerance following spaceflight. The aim of this study was to analyze the main parameters of venous hemodynamics with long-duration spaceflight.Methods: Venous plethysmography was performed on 24 cosmonauts before, during, and after spaceflights aboard the International Space Station. Venous plethysmography assessed venous filling and emptying functions as well as microvascular filtration, in response to different levels of venous occlusion pressure. Calf volume was assessed using calf circumference measurements.Results: Calf volume decreased during spaceflight from 2.3 ± 0.3 to 1.7 ± 0.2 L (p < 0.001, and recovered after it (2.3 ± 0.3 L. Venous compliance, determined as the relationship between occlusion pressure and the change in venous volume, increased during spaceflight from 0.090 ± 0.005 to 0.120 ± 0.007 (p < 0.01 and recovered 8 days after landing (0.071 ± 0.005, arbitrary units. The index of venous emptying rate decreased during spaceflight from −0.004 ± 0.022 to −0.212 ± 0.033 (p < 0.001, arbitrary units. The index of vascular microfiltration increased during spaceflight from 6.1 ± 1.8 to 10.6 ± 7.9 (p < 0.05, arbitrary units.Conclusion: This study demonstrated that overall venous function is changed during spaceflight. In future, venous function should be considered when developing countermeasures to prevent cardiovascular deconditioning and orthostatic intolerance with long-duration spaceflight.

  10. Dihydroergotamine Injection and Nasal Spray

    Science.gov (United States)

    DHE-45® Injection ... to use the nasal spray or administer the injection correctly. After that, you may spray or inject ... home.If you are using the solution for injection, you should never reuse syringes. Dispose of syringes ...

  11. Radiographic signs of non-venous placement of intended central venous catheters in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Erin C. [Boston Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Taylor, George A. [Boston Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Central venous catheters (CVCs) are commonly used in children, and inadvertent arterial or extravascular cannulation is rare but has potentially serious complications. To identify the radiographic signs of arterial placement of CVCs. We retrospectively reviewed seven cases of arterially malpositioned CVCs on chest radiograph. These cases were identified through departmental quality-assurance mechanisms and external consultation. Comparison of arterial cases was made with 127 age-matched chest radiographs with CVCs in normal, expected venous location. On each anteroposterior (AP) radiograph we measured the distance of the catheter tip from the right lateral border of the thoracic spine, and the angle of the vertical portion of the catheter relative to the midline. On each lateral radiograph we measured the angle of the vertical portion of each catheter relative to the anterior border of the thoracic spine. When bilateral subclavian catheters were present, the catheter tips were described as crossed, overlapping or uncrossed. On AP radiographs, arterially placed CVCs were more curved to the left, with catheter tip positions located farther to the left of midline than normal venous CVCs. When bilateral, properly placed venous catheters were present, all catheters crossed at the level of the superior vena cava (SVC). When one of the bilateral catheters was in arterial position, neither of the catheters crossed or the inter-catheter crossover distance was exaggerated. On lateral radiographs, there was a marked anterior angulation of the vertical portion of the catheter (mean angle 37 ± 15 standard deviation [SD] in arterial catheters versus 5.9 ± 8.3 SD in normally placed venous catheters). Useful radiographic signs suggestive of unintentional arterial misplacement of vascular catheters include leftward curvature of the vertical portion of the catheter, left-side catheter tip position, lack of catheter crossover on the frontal radiograph, as well as exaggerated

  12. Radiographic signs of non-venous placement of intended central venous catheters in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Erin C; Taylor, George A

    2016-02-01

    Central venous catheters (CVCs) are commonly used in children, and inadvertent arterial or extravascular cannulation is rare but has potentially serious complications. To identify the radiographic signs of arterial placement of CVCs. We retrospectively reviewed seven cases of arterially malpositioned CVCs on chest radiograph. These cases were identified through departmental quality-assurance mechanisms and external consultation. Comparison of arterial cases was made with 127 age-matched chest radiographs with CVCs in normal, expected venous location. On each anteroposterior (AP) radiograph we measured the distance of the catheter tip from the right lateral border of the thoracic spine, and the angle of the vertical portion of the catheter relative to the midline. On each lateral radiograph we measured the angle of the vertical portion of each catheter relative to the anterior border of the thoracic spine. When bilateral subclavian catheters were present, the catheter tips were described as crossed, overlapping or uncrossed. On AP radiographs, arterially placed CVCs were more curved to the left, with catheter tip positions located farther to the left of midline than normal venous CVCs. When bilateral, properly placed venous catheters were present, all catheters crossed at the level of the superior vena cava (SVC). When one of the bilateral catheters was in arterial position, neither of the catheters crossed or the inter-catheter crossover distance was exaggerated. On lateral radiographs, there was a marked anterior angulation of the vertical portion of the catheter (mean angle 37 ± 15° standard deviation [SD] in arterial catheters versus 5.9 ± 8.3° SD in normally placed venous catheters). Useful radiographic signs suggestive of unintentional arterial misplacement of vascular catheters include leftward curvature of the vertical portion of the catheter, left-side catheter tip position, lack of catheter crossover on the frontal radiograph, as well as

  13. Injection moulding antireflective nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Alexander Bruun; Clausen, Jeppe Sandvik; Mortensen, N. Asger

    We present a method for injection moulding antireflective nanostructures on large areas, for high volume production. Nanostructured black silicon masters were fabricated by mask-less reactive ion etching, and electroplated with nickel. The nickel shim was antistiction coated and used in an inject......We present a method for injection moulding antireflective nanostructures on large areas, for high volume production. Nanostructured black silicon masters were fabricated by mask-less reactive ion etching, and electroplated with nickel. The nickel shim was antistiction coated and used...... in an injection moulding process, to fabricate the antireflective surfaces. The cycle-time was 35 s. The injection moulded structures had a height of 125 nm, and the visible spectrum reflectance of injection moulded black polypropylene surfaces was reduced from 4.5±0.5% to 2.5±0.5%. The gradient of the refractive...

  14. Dabigatran versus warfarin in the treatment of acute venous thromboembolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schulman, Sam; Kearon, Clive; Kakkar, Ajay K.; Mismetti, Patrick; Schellong, Sebastian; Eriksson, Henry; Baanstra, David; Schnee, Janet; Goldhaber, Samuel Z.; Schulman, S.; Eriksson, H.; Goldhaber, S.; Kakkar, A.; Kearon, C.; Mismetti, P.; Schellong, S.; Minar, E.; Bergqvist, D.; Tijssen, J.; Prins, M. [=Martin H.; Büller, H.; Otten, J.; Peters, R.; Mac Gillavry, M.; Pol, S.; Burroughs, A.; Gilmore, I.; Bluguermann, J.; Carlevaro, O.; Dipaola, L.; Gitelman, P.; Santos, D.; Schygiel, P.; Baker, R.; Blombery, P.; Gallus, A.; Gan, E.; Gibbs, H.; Salem, H.; Baghestanian, M.; Pilger, E.; Sturm, W.; Debing, E.; Gadisseur, A.; Hainaut, P.; Verhamme, P.; Wautrecht, J.-C.; Zicot, M.; Bizzachi, J. M. Annichino; Araujo, G.; de Araujo, J. Dalmo; Panico, F. M. Duarte Brandão; Nagato, Y.; Pereira, A. H.; Leao, P. Puech; Ramaciotti, E.; Moreira, R. C. Rocha; Timi, J.; Anderson, D.; Crowther, M.; Dolan, S.; Eikelboom, J.; Spencer, F.; Game, M.; Kahn, S.; Kassis, J.; Klinke, P.; Kovacs, M.; Milot, A.; Ritchie, B.; Rodger, M.; Solymoss, S.; Villeneuve, J.; Yeo, E.; Cervinka, P.; Homza, M.; Hrdy, P.; Klimsa, Z.; Lang, P.; Maly, R.; Oral, I.; Reichert, P.; Spinar, J.; Varejka, P.; Vladimir, J.; Brønnum-Schou, J.; Jensen, S.; Jensen, S. E.; Kristensen, K. S.; Nielsen, H.; Wiemann, O.; Bost, V.; Buchmuller, A.; Guillot, K.; Laurent, P.; Lecomte, F.; Mottier, D.; Quere, I.; Wahl, D.; Beyer, J.; Dormann, A.; Hoffmann, U.; Maier, M.; Mietaschk, A.; Katsenis, K.; Klonaris, C.; Liappis, C.; Acsady, G.; Berhes, I.; Boda, Z.; Farkas, K.; Jakucs, J.; Kollar, L.; Matyas, L.; Riba, M.; Sereg, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Banker, D.; Bharani, A.; Gadkari, M.; Hiremath, J.; Jain, A.; Kareem, S.; Lyengar, S.; Parakh, R.; Sekar, N.; Srinivas, A.; Suresh, K.; Vujay, T.; Brenner, B.; Efrati, S.; Elias, M.; Gavish, D.; Grossman, E.; Lahav, M.; Lishner, M.; Zeltser, D.; Agnelli, G.; Cimminiello, C.; Palareti, G.; Prandoni, P.; Santonastaso, M.; Silingardi, M.; Lee, E. Aldrett; Andrade, J. M. Fontes; Valles, J. Jaurrieta; Biesma, D.; Dees, A.; Fijnheer, R.; Hamulyak, K.; Kramer, M. H. H.; Leebeek, F. W. G.; Lieverse, L.; Nurmohamed, M. T.; Chunilal, S.; Jackson, S.; Ockelford, P.; Smith, M.; Njaastad, A. M.; Sandseth, P. M.; Tveit, A.; Waage, A.; Barata, J.; Capitao, M.; Fernandes, F. E.; Leitão, A.; Providência, L.; Alohin, D. I.; Belentsov, S.; Chernyatina, M.; Chernyavsky, A.; Fokin, A.; Gubenko, A.; Guz, V. Alexander V.; Katelnitsky, I.; Khamitov, A. A. A.; Khitaryan, A.; Khubulava, G.; Mikhailov, I.; Shkurin, V.; Staroverov, I.; Tchumakov, A.; Zaporozhsky, A.; Duris, T.; Poliacik, P.; Spisak, V.; Szentivanyi, M.; Zubek, V.; Adler, D.; Kelbe, D.; Le Roux, D.; Pieterse, A.; Routier, R.; Siebert, R.; Sloane, B.; Smith, C.; van Rensburg, H.; del Toro, J.; García-Fuster, M. J.; Mateo, J.; Monreal, M.; Nieto, J. A.; Sánchez-Molini, P.; Sedano, C.; Trujillo, J.; Valle, R.; Villalta, J.; Aagesen, J.; Carlsson, A.; Johansson, L.; Lärfars, G.; Lindmarker, P.; Säfvenberg, U.; Själander, A.; Bengisun, U.; Calkavur, T.; Guney, M. R.; Karahan, S.; Kurtoglu, M.; Sakinci, U.; Gubka, A.; Mishalov, V.; Skupyy, O.; Cohen, A.; Keeling, D.; Kesteven, P.; MacCallum, P.; Maclean, R.; Shah, P.; Watson, H.; Bartkowiak, A.; Bolster, E.; Botnick, W. C.; Burnett, B.; Chervu, A.; Comerota, A. J.; Dy, N. M.; Fulco, F. A.; Gossage, J. R.; Kaatz, S.; Lahiri, B.; Lerner, R. G.; Masson, J. A.; Moll, S.; Morganroth, M.; Patel, K.; Paulson, R.; Powell, R.; Samson, R.; Seibert, A.; Spyropoulos, A.; Vrooman, P. S.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The direct oral thrombin inhibitor dabigatran has a predictable anticoagulant effect and may be an alternative therapy to warfarin for patients who have acute venous thromboembolism. METHODS: In a randomized, double-blind, noninferiority trial involving patients with acute venous

  15. Central venous oxygen saturation during hypovolaemic shock in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, P; Iversen, H; Secher, N H

    1993-01-01

    We compared central venous oxygen saturation and central venous pressure (CVP) as indices of the effective blood volume during 50 degrees head-up tilt (anti-Trendelenburg's position) induced hypovolaemic shock in eight healthy subjects. Head-up tilt increased thoracic electrical impedance from 31...

  16. Awareness of Venous thromboembolism among doctors in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Venous thromboembolic (VTE) is a preventable leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide and is a cause of sudden death. Awareness of VTE among doctors will reduce the incidence of unexpected deaths in hospitalised patients. Objective: To assess doctors' awareness of venous thromboembolism ...

  17. Can Peripheral Central Venous Lines be inserted safely and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Primary care settings often lack facilities for radiological evaluation of the position of supra-and infra-clavicularly inserted central venous catheters. If peripherally inserted central venous lines could reliably be successfully inserted this would make the need for immediate confirmatory radiological studies less ...

  18. What went wrong? The flawed concept of cerebrospinal venous insufficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valdueza, J.M.; Doepp, F.; Schreiber, S.J.; van Oosten, B.W.; Schmierer, K.; Paul, F.; Wattjes, M.P.

    2013-01-01

    In 2006, Zamboni reintroduced the concept that chronic impaired venous outflow of the central nervous system is associated with multiple sclerosis (MS), coining the term of chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency ('CCSVI'). The diagnosis of 'CCSVI' is based on sonographic criteria, which he found

  19. Rivaroxaban or Aspirin for Extended Treatment of Venous Thromboembolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weitz, Jeffrey I.; Lensing, Anthonie W. A.; Prins, Martin H.; Bauersachs, Rupert; Beyer-Westendorf, Jan; Bounameaux, Henri; Brighton, Timothy A.; Cohen, Alexander T.; Davidson, Bruce L.; Decousus, Hervé; Freitas, Maria C. S.; Holberg, Gerlind; Kakkar, Ajay K.; Haskell, Lloyd; van Bellen, Bonno; Pap, Akos F.; Berkowitz, Scott D.; Verhamme, Peter; Wells, Philip S.; Prandoni, Paolo; Bianchi, Alessandra; Brighton, Tim; Carroll, Patrick; Chong, Beng; Chunilal, Sanjeev; Coughlin, Paul; Curnow, Jennifer; Jackson, David; Tran, Huyen; Ward, Chris; Brodmann, Marianne; Kyrle, Paul; Marschang, Peter; Petkov, Ventzislav; Hainaut, Philippe; Jordens, Paul; Vandekerkhof, Jos; Wautrecht, Jean-Claude; Annichino-Bizzacchi, Joyce; Correa, Joao; Cukier, Alberto; Freire, Antonio; Pereira, Adamastor; Porto, Carmen; Sacilotto, Roberto; Vasconcelos Costa, Agenor; Della Siega, Anthony; Dolan, Sean; Le Gal, Gré goire; Gross, Peter; Kahn, Susan; Kassis, Jeannine; Kovacs, Michael; Pesant, Yves; Ritchie, Bruce; Schulman, Sam; Shivakumar, Sudeep; Solymoss, Susan; Chang, Shu; Chen, Rongchang; Chen, Zhong; Chen, Hong; Dai, Xiangchen; Fang, Baoming; Fu, Weiguo; Gao, Xinglin; Huang, Jinhua; Lai, Yanping; Li, Li; Li, Xiaoqiang; Li, Yiqing; Liu, Jinming; Liu, Shuang; Ma, Wenjiang; Ni, Songshi; Qin, Zhiqiang; Shi, Guochao; Tian, Hongyan; Wang, Shenming; Wang, Lie; Xiao, Wei; Ying, Kejing; Yu, Guanfeng; Yuan, Yadong; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Jin; Zhang, Xinri; Zhang, Liyan; Zhu, Lei; Chlumský , Jaromir; Chochola, Jiri; Dunaj, Milna; Kovarova, Katerina; Lang, Pavel; Matoš ka, Petr; Podpera, Ivo; Spacek, Rudolf; Stehlikova, Olga; Brø nnum-Schou, Jens; Egstrup, Kenneth; Gislason, Gunnar; Jeppesen, Jorgen; May, Ole; Nielsen, Henrik; Wiggers, Henrik; Achkar, Antoine; Aquilanti, Sandro; Benhamou, Ygal; Brisot, Dominique; Bura-Riviere, Alessandra; Castella, Nadine; Elias, Antoine; Falvo, Nicolas; Ferrari, Emile; Lacroix, Philippe; Mahe, Isabelle; Meneveau, Nicolas; Messas, Emmanuel; Mismetti, Patrick; Montaclair, Karine; Mottier, Dominique; Moumneh, Thomas; Paleiron, Nicolas; Parent, Florence; Pernod, Gilles; Sanchez, Olivier; Schmidt, Jeannot; Simoneau, Guy; Stephan, Dominique; Amann, Berthold; Blessing, Erwin; Czihal, Michael; Espinola-Klein, Christine; Kahrmann, Gerd; Licka, Manuela; Neumeister, Axel; Schellong, Sebastian; Boda, Zoltan; Farkas, Katalin; Gurzo, Mihaly; Katona, Andras; Riba, Maria; Sipos, Gyula; Tó th, Kalman; Braester, Andrei; Elias, Mazen; Gafter-Gvili, Anat; Gavish, Dov; Hussein, Osamah; Lishner, Michael; Schiff, Elad; Spectre, Galia; Tzoran-Rozenthal, Inna; Zimlichman, Reuven; Ageno, Walter; Agnelli, Giancarlo; Bova, Carlo; Garbelotto, Raffaella; Ghirarduzzi, Angelo; Imberti, Davide; Pesavento, Raffaele; Porreca, Ettore; Visonà , Adriana; Flota Cervera, Luis; Llamas Esperó n, Guillermo; Rodriguez-Gonzalez, Daniel; Solis Morales, Lucas; Boersma, Willem; ten Cate, Hugo; Erdkamp, Franciscus; Grifioen-Keijzer, Anita; Marwijk Kooy, Marinus; Meijer, Karina; Middeldorp, Saskia; Swart-Heikens, Janneke; ten Wolde, Marije; Westerweel, Peter; Braithwaite, Irene; Harper, Paul; Merriman, Eileen; Ockelford, Paul; Royle, Gordon; Smith, Mark; Ghanima, Waleed; Sandset, Per Morten; Abola, Maria; Chę ciń ski, Pawel; Grzelakowski, Pawel; Lewczuk, Jerzy; Sobkowicz, Bozena; Tomkowski, Witold; Abramov, Igor; Chechulov, Pavel; Karpenko, Andrey; Katelnitskiy, Ivan; Kazakov, Andrey; Makarova, Olga; Panchenko, Elizaveta; Sergeeva, Elena; Subbotin, Yuriy; Suchkov, Igor; Zeltser, Mikhail; Adler, David; Breedt, Johannes; Fourie, Nyda; Isaacs, Rashid; Jacobson, Barry; Siebert, Heidi; van Zyl, Louis; Choi, Jung-Hyun; Kang, Seok-Min; Kim, Kye-Hun; Kim, Hyo-Soo; Kim, Dong-Ik; Min, Seung-Kee; Park, Ki Hyuk; Garcí a-Bragado Dalmau, Fernando; Gó mez Cerezo, Jorge; Mirete, Jose Carlos Ferrer; Riera, Antonio; del Toro, Jorge; Eriksson, Henry; Torstensson, Ingemar; Banyai, Martin; Baumgartner, Iris; Mazzolai, Lucia; Periard, Daniel; Righini, Marc; Staub, Daniel; Chiang, Chern-En; Chiu, Kuan-Ming; Pai, Pei-Ying; Angchaisuksiri, Pantep; Chansung, Kanchana; Ö ngen, Gul; Tuncay, Esin; Alikhan, Raza; Chetter, Ian; Kesteven, Patrick; Nokes, Tim; Bauer, Kenneth; Comerota, Anthony; Elias, Darlene; Garcia, David; Gibson, Kathleen; Ginsberg, Daniel; Jenkins, Jeffrey; Kingsley, Edwin; Lambert, Richard; Lyons, Roger; Pullman, John; Shah, Vinay; Smith, S. Wayne; Stein, Robert; Tapson, Victor; Walsh, John; Wang, Tzu-Fei; Do Loi, Doan; Do Quang, Huan; Pham, Nguyen

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Although many patients with venous thromboembolism require extended treatment, it is uncertain whether it is better to use full- or lower-intensity anticoagulation therapy or aspirin. METHODS In this randomized, double-blind, phase 3 study, we assigned 3396 patients with venous

  20. Patterns of superficial venous arrangement in the cubital fossa of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The cubital fossa is a common site for the removal of venous blood for analysis, transfusion, and intravenous therapy. The superficial venous return from the upper limb follows two or three major superficial veins, which are extremely variable; these include the cephalic, basilic, median cubital, and antebrachial ...

  1. Central venous catheters and catheter locks in children with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Handrup, Mette Møller; Møller, Jens Kjølseth; Schrøder, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    To determine if the catheter lock taurolidine can reduce the number of catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI) in pediatric cancer patients with tunneled central venous catheters (CVC).......To determine if the catheter lock taurolidine can reduce the number of catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI) in pediatric cancer patients with tunneled central venous catheters (CVC)....

  2. Positive outcome of medical leeches (hirudotherapy) for venous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    been treated for several years for chronic superficial venous insufficiency with compression therapy (stockings) and micronized diosmin orally. She had no past or present trophic ulcers, just slight bilateral edema. A routine blood test was within normal limits. Echo Doppler evaluation confirmed chronic venous disease (CVD) ...

  3. Thrombin Avtivable Fibrinolysis Inhibitor in Venous and Arterial Thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.L.E. de Bruijne

    2011-01-01

    textabstractVenous and arterial thromboses are major causes of morbidity and mortality. Venous thrombosis is the result of pathological occlusive clot formation in the veins. It occurs mainly in the deep veins of the leg (deep vein thrombosis), from which parts of the clot frequently embolize to the

  4. Sonography and risk factors for lower limb deep venous thrombosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Lower limb deep venous thrombosis (DVT), and its sequelae (lower limb chronic venous insufficiency and pulmonary embolism) are now well acknowledged as major haematological problems in the world, for which appropriate and accurate means of diagnosis is necessary. Developments in ultrasound have ...

  5. Edoxaban versus Warfarin for the Treatment of Symptomatic Venous Thromboembolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Büller, Harry R.; Décousus, Hervé; Grosso, Michael A.; Mercuri, Michele; Middeldorp, Saskia; Prins, Martin H.; Raskob, Gary E.; Schellong, Sebastian M.; Schwocho, Lee; Segers, Annelise; Shi, Minggao; Verhamme, Peter; Wells, Phil; Agnelli, Giancarlo; Angchaisuksiri, Pantep; Banyai, Martin; Bauersachs, Rupert; van Bellen, Bonno; Blüguermann, Julio; Boda, Zoltán; Bounameaux, Henri; Brenner, Benjamin; Brighton, Tim; Castañon, Javier Diaz; Chechulov, Pavel; Chlumský, Yaromir; Cohen, Alexander; Davidson, Bruce; Decousus, Hervé; Eriksson, Henry; Gallus, Alexander; Gudz, Ivan; Jacobson, Barry; Heng, Lee Lai; Lyons, Roger; Meijer, Karina; Minar, Erich; Monreal, Manuel; Nakamura, Mashio; Oh, Doyeun; Öngen, Gül; Parakh, Rajiv; Piovella, Franco; Raskob, Gary; Rehm, Jeffery; Sandset, Per Morten; Schellong, Sebastian; Smith, Mark; Sokurenko, German; Tomkowski, Witold; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Wang, Chen; Wang, Yuqi; Weitz, Jeff; Yanushko, Vyacheslav; Yin, Wei-Hsian; Prins, Martin; Beenen, Ludo; Brandjes, Dees; MacGillavry, Melvin; Kaplowitz, Neil; Otten, Hans-Martin; Pessayre, Dominique; Peters, Ron; Roos, Yvo; Slagboom, Ton; Eikelboom, John; Crowther, Mark; Roberts, Robin; Vanassche, Thomas; Vandenbriele, Christophe; Debaveye, Barbara; Dani, Viddhi; van Bergen, Petro; Gerrits, Paul; van Kranen, Robbert; Lanz, Hans; Grosso, Michael; Kappelhoff, John; Franc, John; Zhang, George; Lin, Min; Crerand, William; Giordano, Chris; Skinner, Maureen; Hurley, Steve; Lovelace, Gregg; Barrier, Robert; Betcher, Josh; Alvarez, C.; Amuchastegui, L. M.; Blüguermann, J.; Cassettari, A.; Ceressetto, J.; Hrabar, NN; Macin, S.; Mahuad, C.; Oberti, P.; Santini, F.; Baker, R. I.; Blombery, P.; Brighton, T.; Carroll, P.; Chong, B.; Coughlin, P.; Crispin, P.; Fletcher, J.; Gallus, A.; Serisier, D. J.; Tran, H.; Chan, N.; Stafford, L.; Ward, C.; Baghestanian, M.; Kyrle, P. A.; Eischer, L.; Traby, L.; Marschang, P.; Mathies, R.; Pilger, E.; Brodmann, M.; Roithinger, F.; Weltermann, A.; Adzerikho, I.; Davidovskaya, E.; Gorokhovsky, S.; Maslianski, B.; Kulik, A.; Yanushka, A.; de Vleeschauwer, P.; Debing, E.; Duchateau, J.; Gustin, M.; Hainaut, P.; Vandekerkhof, J.; Verhamme, P.; Peerlinck, K.; Verstraeten, P.; Wautrecht, J. C.; Motte, S.; Annichino-Bizzacchi, J. M.; Mello, T. B. T.; Menezes, F. H.; Burihan, M.; Cavalcanti, M.; Correa, J.; Correa de Carvalho, F.; Cukier, A.; Manenti, E.; Manenti, E. R.; Sacilotto, R.; Timi, J. M.; van Bellen, B.; Kahn, S. R.; Kovacs, M.; Langner, A. Lazo; VanSpronsen, H.; Ritchie, B.; Shafai-Sarshar, R.; Shivakumar, S.; Anderson, D.; Robinson, K.; Gallant, B.; Wells, P.; Karovitch, A.; Scarvelis, D.; Carrier, M.; Bai, C. X.; Chen, R. C.; Cheng, Z. Z.; Du, Y. C.; Hu, X. Y.; Gu, Y. Q.; Hao, Q. L.; Sun, S. B.; Wang, C.; Jiang, L.; Liu, C. J.; Liu, C. W.; Liu, S.; Wang, X. X.; Ye, X. F.; Ma, Z.; Qin, Z. Q.; Qin, X. J.; Tian, H. Y.; Wang, Y. Q.; Shi, Z. Y.; Wen, F. Q.; Wu, Q.; Yang, Y. H.; Kuang, T. G.; Yang, H.; Ying, K. J.; Ma, G. F.; Yuan, Y. D.; Yu, J.; Gong, X. W.; Zhang, F. X.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, S. X.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, J. C.; Huang, B.; Zhao, J.; Chlumsky, J.; Hola, D.; Hirmerova, J.; Hutyra, M.; Klimsa, Z.; Holub, M.; Kovarova, K.; Lang, P.; Ryba, M.; Podoubský, R.; Matoska, P.; Mayer, O.; Patek, F.; Tupa, M.; Spacek, R.; Urbanova, R.; Blazejova, S.; Vitovec, M.; Andersen, B.; Brønnum-Schou, J.; Dominguez, H.; Egstrup, K.; Auscher, S.; Jeppesen, J.; Asferg, C.; Vishram, J.; Nielsen, H.; Galsgaard, I.; Michaelsen, M.; Haugaard-Nielsen, B.; Ostergaard, O.; Poulsen, S. H.; Torp-Pedersen, C.; Masik, S.; Kadarik, M.; Meriste, S.; Paumets, M.; Laheäär, M.; Raidjuk, L.; Accassat, S.; Buchmuller, A.; Mismetti, P.; Achkar, A.; Aquilanti, S.; Rifaï, A.; Breuil, N.; Schmidt, J.; Brisot, D.; Brousse, C.; de la Fuentes, P. Tarodo; Chakra, M.; Crestani, B.; Desormais, I.; Lacroix, P.; Diamand, J. M.; El Kouri, D.; Clairand, R.; Elias, A.; Ferrari, E.; Doyen, D.; Chiche, O.; Grange, C.; Guenneguez, H.; Lacut, K.; Couturaud, F.; Mottier, D.; Leroux, L.; Lorcerie, B.; de Maistre, E.; Berthier, S.; Mahe, I.; Martin, M.; Meneveau, N.; Meyer, G.; Sanchez, O.; Montaclair, K.; Pavic, M.; Pernod, G.; Imbert, B.; Quere, I.; Galanaud, J. P.; Roy, P. M.; Sevestre, M. A.; Simoneau, G.; Stephan, D.; Aleil, B.; Mirea, C.; Trinh-Duc, A.; von Bilderling, P. Baron; Beyer-Westendorf, J.; Werth, S.; Köhler, C.; Halbritter, K.; Diehm, C.; Espinola-Klein, C.; Weisser, G.; Franke, D.; Heuer, H.; Horacek, T.; Kahrmann, G.; Kroening, R.; Lawall, H.; Roecken, M.; Schellong, S. M.; Pomper, L.; Voigts, B.; Bernhard, S.; Frommhold, R.; Stellbrink, C.; Boda, Z.; Ilonczai, P.; Olah, Z.; Razso, K.; Schlammadinger, A.; Farkas, K.; Kolossváry, E.; Szabó, I.; Frankfurter, Z.; Gasztonyi, B.; Gurzó, M.; Klucsik, Z.; Kovacs, A.; Szigeti, S.; Varga, C.; Landi, A.; Nyirati, G.; Pecsvarady, Zs; Riba, M.; Sámson, Z.; Sipos, Gy; Szigyártó, M.; Sebő, N.; Szabó, T. Janossikné; Toth, K.; Agarwal, S.; Arneja, J.; Babhulkar, S.; Balaji, R.; Banker, D.; Bhagavan, N. K.; Bhonagiri, S.; Mehta, A.; Dayasagar Rao, V.; Desai, P.; Desai, S. C.; Chandrashekar, A. R.; Singh, R.; Deshpande, A.; Dharmadhikari, A.; Durairaj, N.; Ghaisas, N.; Gupta, S.; Jain, R.; Jindal, R.; Kamerkar, D.; Kothiwale, V. A.; Kothurkar, A.; Kulkarni, R.; Kumar, S.; Mody, B.; Nagabhushan, K. N.; Pandharpurkar, H. K.; Joshi, S.; Parakh, R.; Grover, T.; Patel, J.; Patel, K.; Dudhagra, N.; Pawar, N.; Penurkar, M.; Pinjala, R.; Rai, K.; Rao, B.; Raval, M.; Raval, A.; Mehta, P.; Ravi Kishore, A. G.; Saravanan, S.; Shetty, P.; Srinivas, A.; Suresh, K. R.; Sumanthraj, K.; Girija, K. R.; Vinod, M. Vijan; Gavish, D.; Ashkenazy, B.; Braester, A.; Caraco, Y.; Elias, M.; Goldstein, L.; Grossman, E.; Lahav, M.; Lishner, M.; Lugassy, G.; Oliven, A.; Rachmilevitz, R.; Tzoran, I.; Brenner, B.; Yeganeh, S.; Zeltser, D.; Zimlichman, R.; Ageno, W.; Barillari, G.; Pasca, S.; Bortoluzzi, C.; Cattaneo, M.; Falanga, A.; Ghirarduzzi, A.; Lodigiani, C.; Picchi, C.; Iosub, D. I.; Porreca, E.; Prandoni, P.; Quintavalla, R.; Siragusa, S.; Akita, T.; Aoyama, T.; Fujimoto, K.; Hanzawa, K.; Ikeda, U.; Iwata, H.; Kobayashi, T.; Kondo, K.; Kurimoto, T.; Maeda, H.; Mo, M.; Munemasa, M.; Murakami, H.; Nishi, Y.; Nishibe, T.; Nishigami, K.; Nunohiro, T.; Obayashi, T.; Satoh, T.; Satokawa, H.; Shimizu, K.; Shiroma, H.; Sonoda, M.; Suzuki, Y.; Taniguchi, S.; Tsujita, K.; Yamada, N.; Yasuda, C.; Yoshida, H.; Chang, H. J.; Choi, W. I.; Kwon, K. Y.; Rho, B. H.; Choi, J. S.; Hong, Y. S.; Joh, J. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kim, K. U.; Kim, J. Y.; Kwon, T. W.; Lee, T. S.; Lim, S. Y.; Mun, Y. C.; Oh, D. Y.; Park, K. H.; Yun, W. S.; Yoon, H. I.; Diaz-Castañon, J.; Flota, L. F.; Galindo, J.; Gomez Lara, J.; Jerjes-Sanchez, C.; Palomar-Lever, A.; Rodriguez, D.; Higareda, I.; Boersma, W. G.; de Graaff, C. S.; Oudeman, L.; Brans, E.; Bredie, S. J. H.; Dees, A.; Erdkamp, F.; Peters, F.; Fijnheer, R.; Gerdes, V. E. A.; Griffioen, A.; Jie, K.-S. G.; Meijer, K.; Kooistra, H.; Wiewel-Verschueren, S.; Kamphuisen, P. W.; van Es, J.; Eerenberg, E. S.; Swart Heikens, J.; ten Cate, H.; ten Wolde, M.; Hes, R.; Atalay, S.; Harper, P.; Merriman, E.; Ockelford, P.; Hulton, M. H.; Phillips, J.; Royle, G.; Ford, A.; Smith, M.; Ghanima, W.; Amundsen, H.; Sandset, P. M.; Abola, M. T.; Ganzon, M. S.; Germar, A.; Checinski, P.; Kwasniewski, A.; Tomkowski, W.; Zechowicz, T.; Apartsin, K.; Arutyunov, G.; Barbarash, O.; Burov, Y.; Chechulov, P.; Varaksina, E.; Chernyatina, M.; Gladchenko, M.; Belikov, L.; Fokin, A.; Gubenko, A.; Igor, K.; Olga, M.; Kazakov, Y.; Kazakov, A.; Krasavin, V.; Linev, K.; Plechev, V.; Shesternya, P.; Shkurin, V.; Shvalb, P.; Sokurenko, G.; Sonkin, I.; Remizov, A.; Chernykh, K.; Staroverov, I.; Subbotin, Y.; Zeltser, M.; Seletsky, A.; Iliynykh, A.; Zilber, A.; Zubareva, N.; Tkachenko, I.; Pakhomova, A.; Raghuram, J.; Ng, H. J.; Sin, K.; Adler, D.; Weber, F.; van der Jagt, R.; Basson, M.; Becker, J.; Ellis, G.; Isaacs, R.; Jacobson, B.; Louw, S.; van Rensburg, Jansen; Siebert, H.; Skosana, F.; van Marle, J.; van Zyl, L.; le Roux, R.; Williams, P.; Cereto, F.; Garcia-Bragado, F.; Miranda, R. Tirado; Carlsson, A.; Eriksson, H.; Villegas-Scivetti, M.; Ottosson, E.; Sjalander, A.; Torstensson, I.; Banyai, M.; Afarideh, R.; Gallino, A.; Mazzolai, L.; Righini, M.; Staub, D.; Chen, C. J.; Chiang, C. E.; Wang, K. L.; Chiu, K. M.; Huang, J. H.; Lai, W. T.; Pai, P. Y.; Lin, K. H.; Wang, J. H.; Wu, C. C.; Yin, W. H.; Huang, C. L.; Angchaisuksiri, P.; Kulpraneet, M.; Rojnuckarin, P.; Öngen, G.; Duman, B.; Ozkan, S.; Savas, I.; Selçuk, T.; Tuncay, E.; Gerasymov, V.; Gubka, O.; Gudz, I.; Voloshyn, M.; Nikulnikov, P.; Danylets, A.; Prasol, V.; Rusyn, V.; Sergeev, O.; Shtutin, O.; Skupyy, O.; Tatarin, A.; Venger, I.; Cohen, A. T.; Patel, R.; Hunt, B. J.; Kesteven, P.; Robson, L.; MacCallum, P.; Nokes, T.; Rose, P.; Acs, P.; Gordan, L.; Bhatia, A.; Ali, M.; Amin, D.; Masson, J.; Gavi, E.; Ayele, E.; Ayeni, O.; Canosa, R.; Chavous, D.; Chen, D.; Comerota, A.; Concha, M.; Cunanan-Bush, M.; Daboul, N.; Daggubati, S.; Dang, N.; DiBella, N.; Driver, A.; Dulgeroff, A.; Fraiz, J.; Friedlander, A.; Galvez, A.; Jani, C.; Johnson, S.; Khandelwal, P.; Kingsley, E.; Kingsley, J.; Hutchinson, L.; Lavender, R.; Lyons, R.; Guzley, G.; Martinez, R.; Metjian, A.; Moran, J.; Nadar, V.; Pish, R.; Pullman, J.; Quaranta, A. J.; Ravi, C.; Refaai, M.; Rehm, J.; Richards, D.; Richwine, R.; Sachdeva, S.; Seibert, A.; Sharma, A.; Stricklin, D.; Tannenbaum, A.; Tin-U, C.; Vora, K.; Watkins, D.; Willms, D.

    2013-01-01

    BackgroundWhether the oral factor Xa inhibitor edoxaban can be an alternative to warfarin in patients with venous thromboembolism is unclear. MethodsIn a randomized, double-blind, noninferiority study, we randomly assigned patients with acute venous thromboembolism, who had initially received

  6. An unusual case of repeated venous air embolism during awake ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    their experience of managing an unusual case of repeated VAE during both sides of burr-hole and electrode insertion in awake bilateral DBS surgery. Keywords: awake craniotomy, burr hole, deep brain stimulation, neurosurgery, venous air embolism. Introduction. Venous air embolism (VAE) is the entrainment of air from a.

  7. Risk Factors of Deep Venous Thrombosis in Duplex and Colour ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Deep venous thrombosis is a major health problem with high morbidity and mortality worldwide. Thus early, correct and definitive diagnosis is crucial in assessing thromboembolic risk and initiating therapy. In this regard Patients at risk must be identified and given appropriate prophylaxis to reduce Venous ...

  8. [Patient's consent to central venous catheterization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorini, F; Palumbo, G; Ciliberti, R

    2004-01-01

    The need to obtain a patient's consent for his health care is a principle set out in the Italian Constitution, which safeguards a person's right to health. Articles 13 and 32.2 confirm a person's freedom and the right to make free decisions about one's medical treatment. Nobody must be obliged to any medical procedure, unless as by law enacted. The obligation to inform patients is important during the contractual phase: consent is an essential element in the professional contract governing the relationship between a physician and a patient. The former is obligated to inform the latter about his medical intervention clearly and precisely, to enable the patient to decide freely whether to undergo a medical procedure. At this point, it is also essential to obtain a patient's consent for those treatments that although they are carried out in a correct and careful way, could damage a person's physical integrity. The failure to obtain consent could give rise to a burden of responsibility on behalf of the clinician. A central venous catheterization in hemodialysis (HD) is a common procedure performed during routine nephrological treatments. Our signed informed consent form prior to introducing a central venous catheter is thought to satisfy requirements provided for in current regulations to give correct information.

  9. Compression Stockings for Treating Venous Leg Ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Benigni

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. In order to treat venous leg ulcers, it is recommended to use high pressure compression (30–40 mmHg at the ankle. Compression stockings which are not operator dependant could be the best option because of their pressure control. However 30–40 mmHg compression stockings are often hard to put on. Putting two lower pressure compression stockings over each other could be a good therapeutic alternative. Objectives. To compare the in vitro pressures given by the manufacturers of 2 antiulcer kits with the in vivo interface pressures measured in healthy subjects and to evaluate the stiffness and friction indices from those kits based on the interface pressure in order to assess their clinical properties. Material and Methods. Using a Kikuhime pressure device, interface pressure was measured in 12 healthy subjects at the reference point B1. One stiffness index (Static Stiffness Index (SSI and a friction index have been calculated. Results. Mediven Ulcer kit gets the recommended pressures whereas Jobst’s Ulcer Care kit does not for treating a venous leg ulcer. Jobst’s Ulcer Care transmits entirely the pressure in relation to a friction index close to 1. Conclusion. This antiulcer kit study underlines that in vivo and in vitro pressures can be different (Jobst’s Ulcer Care kit and Mediven Ulcer kit. In order not to lose pressure, it is important to take into account the friction index when superimposing two stockings.

  10. [Prophylaxis of Recurrent Venous Leg Ulcer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroeger, K; Storck, M; Kujath, P; Rabe, E; Dissemond, J

    2017-06-01

    Venous leg ulcer (VLU) counts among the most common chronic wounds in Europe. Treatment is lengthy, cumbersome and costly, and there is a high rate of recurrence. This review shows the measures that should be offered to every patient with healed VLU to permanently prevent recurrence. To prevent VLU in case of varicose veins, the progression of chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) has to be stopped. There is convincing evidence that the effective treatment of varicose veins reduces the recurrence rate in patients with VLU. In patients with post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS), further thrombosis should be prevented through targeted prophylaxis of new thromboembolic events. The benefit of endovascular revascularization on the VLU recurrence rate in patients with post-thrombotic damage in the pelvic veins has not been proven in clinical studies. On the other hand, it has been clearly demonstrated in several studies that compression therapy is the basic procedure for the prevention of recurrent VLU in patients with varicose veins or PTS, regardless of whether other measures have been implemented or not. Good adherence in patients with compression therapy is more important than choosing the highest possible compression class. Future efforts for patients with VLU must aim to provide therapists with tools and treatment strategies to guide their patients and to increase patients' acceptance and understanding of the importance of self-management, in particular regarding compression therapy for the prevention of recurrent VLU. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. Increased venous thrombosis incidence in pregnancies after in vitro fertilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anette Tarp; Kesmodel, U S; Juul, S

    2014-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Is venous thrombosis risk increased in pregnancies after in vitro fertilization? SUMMARY ANSWER The venous thrombosis incidence was significantly increased in pregnancies after in vitro fertilization; especially in the first trimester and in the first 6 weeks post-partum. WHAT...... IS KNOWN ALREADY In vitro fertilization without pregnancy is not associated with increased venous thrombosis incidence. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION This national register-based cohort study covered the period from 1995 to 2005. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS All Danish pregnancies conceived...... by in vitro fertilization (n = 18 787) were included. Venous thrombosis incidence rates in pregnancies after in vitro fertilization were compared with venous thrombosis incidence rates in reference pregnancies, by calculating incidence rate ratios. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE In total, 48 cases were...

  12. THE AZYGOS VENOUS SYSTEM AND ITS ANATOMICAL VARIATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madiki Sudhakara Rao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available AIMS AND OBJECTIVES Azygos veins are important cavocaval and portacaval junctions, which form a collateral circulation in caval vein occlusion and in portal hypertension, cirrhosis of liver. The unpaired azygos venous system consists of azygos vein, hemiazygos vein and accessory azygos vein. This system of veins, along with its mediastinal, bronchial and oesophageal tributaries drains most of the body wall of trunk, namely posterior abdominal and thoracic wall. Anatomical variations of this unpaired azygos venous system are clinically important. AIMS To study and report the occurrence of anatomical variations of the unpaired azygos venous system in the region of East Godavari District, Andhra Pradesh (India. METHODS The present study was carried out in the Department of Anatomy, KIMS & RF, Amalapuram and G.S.L. Medical College, Rajahmundry over a period of 2 years. The present study was conducted on 60 cadavers (irrespective of age and sex. The entire course of the azygos venous system in these 60 cadavers was carefully observed and documented. RESULTS Anatomical variations were present in 16.66% of cases, out of which three distinct types were identified. 6.6% exhibited two separate azygos venous systems with no communications, 5% with communication between the left brachiocephalic vein and the azygos vein and 5% presence of post-aortic venous channels. CONCLUSION Variations of azygos venous system may be wrongly dubbed as aneurysm, lymphadenopathy or other abnormalities while reporting a CT scan of mediastinum. Venous anomalies are also detected only during surgery. The most troublesome intraoperative hazard is haemorrhage, which is mainly of venous origin. To avoid such situations is to have an awareness and knowledge of the expected venous anomalies.

  13. Association of varicosities and concomitant deep venous thrombosis in patients with superficial venous thrombosis, a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baggen, Vivan J M; Chung, Kaman; Koole, Koos; Sarneel, Michelle H J; Rutten, Frans H|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/189152753; Hajer, Gideon R

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In patients with superficial venous thrombosis (SVT) co-existence of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) can be present. Varicosities are considered as a risk factor for both SVT and DVT separately. However, current evidence is contradictory whether varicosities are associated with an increased

  14. Penile venous surgery for treating erectile dysfunction: Past, present, and future perspectives with regard to new insights in venous anatomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Hsing Hsieh

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the physiologic model of normal erectile function, a healthy veno-occlusive mechanism is essential to initiate and maintain a rigid erection. The surgical treatment of patients with venous leakage, which is synonymous with corporoveno-occlusive dysfunction (CVOD, was based on the decreased venous outflow during the erection process. The initial reports of short-term results were promising, but the long-term benefits of penile venous ligation surgery were limited. Most clinical guideline panels concluded that surgeries performed in an attempt to limit the venous outflow of the penis were not recommended. Consequently, this surgery was nearly abandoned in most medical societies worldwide. These unfavorable postoperative outcomes seemed attributable to the indispensable usage of electrocautery and insufficient venous management, based on conventional penile venous anatomy. Advances in better understanding of human penile venous anatomy has enabled the development of refined penile venous stripping surgery. The thorough stripping surgery is an even more radical procedure, which is an even more radical procedure, and seems to be a viable option for the treatment of CVOD, however, there is still a need for further study with well-defined diagnostic criteria, and standardized patient and partner outcome assessment.

  15. A multicenter feasibility study on ultrafiltration via a single peripheral venous access in acute heart failure with overt fluid overload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morpurgo, Marco; Pasqualini, Mario; Brunazzi, Maria Cristiana; Vianello, Gabriele; Valle, Roberto; Roncon, Loris; Fiorini, Fulvio; Aspromonte, Nadia; Barbiero, Mario; Goldoni, Marco; Marenzi, Giancarlo

    2017-08-01

    The need for a central venous catheter has limited the widespread use of ultrafiltration in daily clinical practice for the treatment of acute heart failure (AHF) with overt fluid overload. We evaluated the feasibility of a new ultrafiltration device, the CHIARA (Congestive Heart Impairment Advanced Removal Approach) system, that utilizes a single-lumen cannula (17G, multi-hole) inserted in a peripheral vein of the arm. In this multicenter, prospective, feasibility study, consecutive ultrafiltration treatments (lasting ≥6 hours and with an ultrafiltration rate ≥100ml/h) with the CHIARA device and a single peripheral venous approach were performed at 6 Italian hospitals. For each session, we evaluated the performance of the venous access, the ultrafiltrate volume removed, and the cause of its interruption. One-hundred-three ultrafiltration sessions were performed in 55 patients with AHF (average 1.9±1.7 treatment/patient). The overall median length of ultrafiltration treatment was 14h (interquartile range 7-21) with removal of 3266±3088ml of fluid (183±30ml/hour). The treatment was successfully completed in 92 (89%) sessions and in 80% of patients. The mean suction flow rate from the vein was 70±20ml/min, while the mean re-injection flow rate was 98±26ml/min. There were no clinically relevant complications related to the venous access and/or to the anticoagulant therapy with heparin. The study demonstrated that the CHIARA system satisfies clinical applicability and efficacy criteria in the treatment of AHF, in terms of adequate fluid removal through a single peripheral venous access. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Improvements of venous tone with pycnogenol in chronic venous insufficiency: an ex vivo study on venous segments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcaro, Gianni; Dugall, Mark; Luzzi, Roberta; Hosoi, M; Corsi, Marcello

    2014-03-01

    This study evaluated the stretching and dilatation of venous segments ex vivo in subjects with primary varicose veins in comparison with comparable segments from subjects that used the supplement Pycnogenol (150 mg/d) for 3 months before surgery. Subjects with varicose veins and chronic venous insufficiency voluntarily used Pycnogenol for a period of at least 3 months. The segments of veins removed with surgery (in 30 subjects that had used Pycnogenol and in 10 comparable control subjects that had not used the supplement) were compared with normal, unused vein segments harvested for bypass grafting. The segments were suspended and a weight was attached to the distal part of the veins for 3 minutes and dilated with pressurized water. Digital images were recorded; the veins were measured before and after stretching to evaluate elongation. The manipulation of the vein segment was minimal. Tests were completed within 20 minutes after harvesting the veins. All segments were 4 cm long. The stretching test indicated a significantly higher level of passive elongation in control, varicose segments (2.29; 0.65 mm) in comparison with 1.39; 0.2 mm in vein segments from Pycnogenol-using patients. The dilation test showed an average higher dilation (2.19; 0.3 mm) in control varicose veins in comparison with varicose veins from Pycnogenol-using patients (1.32; 0.7 mm) (p Pycnogenol-using subjects (p Pycnogenol. Varicose segments had a more significant persistent dilatation and elongation in comparison with normal vein segments. Pycnogenol seems to decrease passive dilatation and stretching and gives vein walls a greater tonic recovery and elasticity that allows the vein to recover its original shape after dynamic stresses.

  17. Oral aspirin for treating venous leg ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira Carvalho, Paulo Eduardo; Magolbo, Natiara G; De Aquino, Rebeca F; Weller, Carolina D

    2016-02-18

    Venous leg ulcers (VLUs) or varicose ulcers are the final stage of chronic venous insufficiency (CVI), and are the most common type of leg ulcer. The development of VLUs on ankles and lower legs can occur spontaneously or after minor trauma. The ulcers are often painful and exudative, healing is often protracted and recurrence is common. This cycle of healing and recurrence has a considerable impact on the health and quality of life of individuals, and healthcare and socioeconomic costs. VLUs are a common and costly problem worldwide; prevalence is estimated to be between 1.65% to 1.74% in the western world and is more common in adults aged 65 years and older. The main treatment for a VLU is a firm compression bandage. Compression assists by reducing venous hypertension, enhancing venous return and reducing peripheral oedema. However, studies show that it only has moderate effects on healing, with up to 50% of VLUs unhealed after two years of compression. Non-adherence may be the principal cause of these poor results, but presence of inflammation in people with CVI may be another factor, so a treatment that suppresses inflammation (healing ulcers more quickly) and reduces the frequency of ulcer recurrence (thereby prolonging time between recurrent episodes) would be an invaluable intervention to complement compression treatments. Oral aspirin may have a significant impact on VLU clinical practice worldwide. Evidence for the effectiveness of aspirin on ulcer healing and recurrence in high quality RCTs is currently lacking. To assess the benefits and harms of oral aspirin on the healing and recurrence of venous leg ulcers. In May 2015 we searched: The Cochrane Wounds Specialised Register; The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library); Ovid MEDLINE; Ovid MEDLINE (In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations); Ovid EMBASE and EBSCO CINAHL. Additional searches were made in trial registers and reference lists of relevant publications for

  18. Multipoint Fuel Injection Arrangements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prociw, Lev Alexander (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A multipoint fuel injection system includes a plurality of fuel manifolds. Each manifold is in fluid communication with a plurality of injectors arranged circumferentially about a longitudinal axis for multipoint fuel injection. The injectors of separate respective manifolds are spaced radially apart from one another for separate radial staging of fuel flow to each respective manifold.

  19. Epidural Steroid Injections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Spine Treatment Spondylolisthesis BLOG FIND A SPECIALIST Treatments Epidural Steroid Injections Ray Baker MD Ray Baker MD Updated 7/2009 Epidural Steroid Injections (ESIs) are a common method of treating inflammation associated with low back related leg pain, or neck related arm pain. In both of ...

  20. Iron Sucrose Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... finish your treatment, your doctor may prescribe this medication again.Iron sucrose injection may cause severe or life-threatening reactions while you receive the medication. Your doctor will watch you carefully while you ... of iron sucrose injection and for at least 30 minutes afterwards. Tell ...

  1. Comparison of the effects of heparin and 0.9% sodium chloride solutions in maintenance of patency of central venous catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari Gorji, Mohammad Ali; Rezaei, Fatemeh; Jafari, Hedayat; Yazdani Cherati, Jamshid

    2015-04-01

    Occlusion of central venous catheters is one of the limiting factors in using them. Heparinized saline solution is the standard solution used for keeping the catheters open. This study aimed to determine the effect of heparin saline solution and normal saline in maintenance of patency of central venous catheters. This double-blind study was performed on 84 patients of intensive care unit who had central venous catheters. The patients were randomly divided into two groups of heparin saline receivers and normal saline receivers. In the heparin group after each drug injection into the lumen, 3 mL of heparin saline solution was injected in the catheter as well. The other group only received 10 mL of normal saline instead. The catheters were examined for blood return and flushing every eight hours for 21 days. Data was analyzed using SPSS software version 20 and descriptive and analytic statistics were studied. There was no significant difference in the rate of flushing (P = 0.872) and possibility of taking blood samples from catheters (P = 0.745) in the two groups of heparin and normal saline receivers. Furthermore, using heparin had no effect on prolonging the survival of catheters. Considering possible side effects of heparin and the increase in treatment charges and the fact that using heparin did not have a significant effect on patency and survival of catheters in the studied patients, it is recommended to use normal saline solution to maintain the patency of central venous catheters.

  2. Obesity and lower limb venous disease - The epidemic of phlebesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Huw Ob; Popplewell, Matthew; Singhal, Rishi; Smith, Neil; Bradbury, Andrew W

    2017-05-01

    Introduction Lower limb venous disease affects up to one half, and obesity up to one quarter, of the adult population. Many people are therefore affected by, and present to health services for the treatment of both conditions. This article reviews the available evidence of pathophysiological and clinical relationship between obesity and varicose veins, chronic venous insufficiency and ulceration and deep vein thrombosis. Methods A literature search of PubMed and Cochrane libraries was performed in accordance with PRISMA statement from 1946 to 2015, with further article identification from following cited references for articles examining the relationship between obesity and venous disease. Search terms included obesity, overweight, thrombosis, varicose veins, CEAP, chronic venous insufficiency, treatment, endovenous, endothermal, sclerotherapy, bariatric surgery and deep vein thrombosis. Results The proportion of the population suffering from lower limb venous disease and obesity is increasing. Obesity is an important risk factor for all types of lower limb venous disease, and obese patients with lower limb venous disease are more likely to be symptomatic as a result of their lower limb venous disease. The clinical diagnosis, investigation, imaging and treatment of lower limb venous disease in obese people present a number of challenges. The evidence base underpinning medical, surgical and endovenous management of lower limb venous disease in obese people is limited and such treatment may be associated with worse outcomes and increased risks when compared to patients with a normal body mass index. Conclusion Lower limb venous disease and obesity are both increasingly common. As such, phlebologists will be treating ever greater numbers of obese patients with lower limb venous disease, and clinicians in many other specialties are going to be treating a wide range of obesity-related health problems in people with or at risk of lower limb venous disease. Unfortunately

  3. VENOUS INSUFFICIENCY AND THROMBOEMBOLIC DISEASE IN BARIATRIC SURGERY PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonno van BELLEN

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Context Morbid obesity is associated with various co-morbidities, including chronic venous insufficiency. Bariatric surgery is the only effective treatment for morbid obesity, but with potential risks and possible complications, including venous thromboembolism. Objective To determine the prevalence of clinical and ultrasonographic signs of chronic venous insufficiency in morbid obese patients in preparation for bariatric surgery and the incidence of post-operative venous thromboembolic disease. Methods Patients on work-up for bariatric surgery of Centro Terapêutico Especializado em Fígado (CETEFI and Pro-Gastro surgical teams of the Hospital Beneficência Portuguesa de São Paulo were included. The analysed data were pre-operative findings for venous insufficiency (CEAP - clinical, etiological, anatomical, physiopathologic - classification and venous ultrassonographic findings, type of surgery (open or laparoscopic, abdominal circumference, body mass index (BMI and post-operative ultrassonography search for venous insufficiency and deep venous thrombosis. Results Between March 2007 and December 2009, 95 patients candidates for bariatric surgery had clinical and duplex scan evaluation of the lower limbs venous system. Of the 95 patients, 53 were submitted to the surgical procedure. There was a predominance of women (77.9%, the average age was 38.5 years, average preoperative weight 124.6 kg and average BMI of 45.5 kg/m2. Regarding obesity, 16.8% were obese, and 83.1% were morbidly obese. In relation to the venous findings, 86.3% of the patients did fit CEAP classification less than 3 and 13.7% greater than or equal to 3. Among the post-operative complications, there were four cases of wound infection. Three patients developed post-operative distal venous thrombosis (7.5%, but no one had clinically manifested pulmonary embolism. Conclusion No relation between BMI, CEAP classification and venous ultrassonographic findings were found. Although

  4. The relationship between mixed venous and hepatic venous O2 saturation in patients with septic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier-Hellmann, A; Hannemann, L; Specht, M; Schaffartzik, W; Spies, C; Reinhart, K

    1994-01-01

    It was the purpose of this study to measure the relationship between hepatic venous O2 saturation (ShvO2) and mixed venous O2 saturation (SvO2) in septic patients (n = 21) following treatment with various catecholamines (epinephrine, norepinephrine, dopamine, dopexamine). At baseline mean SvO2 was 74 +/- 5% while mean ShvO2 was 59 +/- 12%. Alpha-mimetic substances such as epinephrine and norepinephrine reduced ShvO2 and increased the difference between SvO2 and ShvO2.Beta2-mimetic and dopaminergic substances (dopexamine, dopamine) did not change the difference between SvO2 and ShvO2. These results show that SvO2 does not necessarily reflect all changes of ShvO2. Monitoring ShvO2 may be helpful in managing septic shock by adding information on adequacy of O2 supply/consumption ratio in the crucial splanchnic region.

  5. Peripheral venous pressure as a predictor of central venous pressure in continuous monitoring in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoozgar, H; Ajami, Gh H; Borzuoee, M; Amirghofran, A A; Ebrahimi, P

    2011-05-01

    Measurement of central venous pressure (CVP) is a reliable method for evaluating intravascular volume status and cardiac function; however it is an invasive and expensive method that may result in some complications such as arterial puncture, pneumothorax and development of infections. This study was performedto compare CVP measurements between central and peripheral catheters in infant and children with congenital heart disease. The CVP and peripheral venous pressure (PVP) were measured simultaneously in 30 patients within 10 consecutive hours. The mean difference between CVP and PVP was 1.48±0.98 mmHg. The linear regression equation showed that CVP was 0.374+0.774 PVP (r(2) = 0.725). PVP measured from a peripheral intravenous catheter in infants and children with congenital heart disease is an accurate estimation of CVP and its changes has good concordance with CVP over a long period of time.

  6. Cerebral Venous Thrombosis and Venous Infarction: Case Report of a Rare Initial Presentation of Smoker's Polycythemia

    OpenAIRE

    Mihir Raval; Anu Paul

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Cerebral venous thrombosis is a rare initial presentation of polycythemia. If diagnosed early, treatment can reduce mortality and morbidity significantly. Often it may present with headache as the only complaint, and thus the diagnosis is likely to be missed. Case Presentation: A medically stable 31-year-old male, a chronic smoker with a ∼17 pack-year history of smoking, was admitted to the emergency room with a 2-week history of gradually worsening, severe, throbbing headache i...

  7. [Monitoring of jugular venous oxygen saturation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Shunsuke

    2011-04-01

    The continuous monitoring of jugular venous oxygen saturation(SjO2) has become a practical method for monitoring global cerebral oxygenation and metabolism. SjO2 reflects the balance between the cerebral blood flow and the cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen (CMRO2), if arterial oxyhemoglobin saturation, hemoglobin concentration remain constant. Normal SjO2 values range between 55% and 75%. Low SjO2 indicates cerebral hypoperfusion or ischemia. Conversely, an increased SjO2 indicates either cerebral hyperemia or a disorder that decreases CMRO2. In minimizing secondary brain damage following resuscitation from cardiopulmonary arrest, SjO2 monitoring is thus considered to be an integral part of multimodality monitoring and can provide important information for the management of patients in neurointensive care.

  8. VENOUS ULCER--A NEW THERAPEUTIC APPROACH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popa, R F; Cazan, I; Baroi, Genoveva; Cazan, Simona; Lefter, G; Strobescu, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Trophic leg ulcer is a major health problem affecting approximately 1-2% of the population, the incidence being higher in the elderly (70-80 years). It is a multifactorial condition, but the most common cause is chronic venous insufficiency. This can be attributed to reflux in the saphenous system and calf perforator vein incompetence. These were first described by Linton, the first intervention designed to correct perforator vein incompetence bearing his name. Today Linton's operation has been abandoned due to the large unaesthetic incision and great postoperative pain. Also, ulcer healing time is long (2 months) and recurrence rate is high. Currently a series of minimally invasive procedures are used to close these perforator veins, such as ultrasound-guided sclerotherapy. The advantages of these techniques are less discomfort to the patients, low rate of complications, short hospital stay.

  9. A genetical approach to deep venous thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celal Yavuz

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Deep venous thrombosis (DVT is a common disorderthat frequently occurs after surgical procedures andtrauma and in the presence of cancer or immobilizationconditions. However, it can also develop without any ofthese predisposing factors. This condition directs theresearcher’s enquiry to investigating the basis of organismalthrombotic predisposition. The common prothromboticgenetic mutations include factor V Leiden, factor IIG20210 A, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, prothrombinA20210, and factor XIII - VIII. Nevertheless, current studiessuggest that the thrombotic events are not connectedwith single gene deletion or homeostatic regulation is alsoaffected by other genetic risk factors. Complex interactionsof genetic mutations can be affects different levels ofthrombotic system or reinforce each other’s effects on homeostaticmechanisms. The analysis of literature, togetherwith the action mechanisms of the classic geneticalfactors and new suggestions, may contribute significantlyto our understanding of the genetic predisposition to venousthrombosis. J Clin Exp Invest 2012; 3(2: 303-306

  10. Venous thromboembolism: have we made headway?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a primary cause of preventable hospital death. The need for effective VTE prophylaxis has been recognized by the Surgical Care Improvement Program (SCIP) and the Joint Commission, which is offering VTE prevention as a core measure set, starting October 1, 2009. The adoption of SCIP VTE measures and mandate to publicly report these rates offers the opportunity to improve the use of prophylaxis in surgical patients and reduce VTE-related morbidity, mortality, and costs. Essential to this reduction is a team approach to implementing real-time interventions. Crucial to the success of the team is early identification of each patient's VTE risk and a mechanism to provide key information to ensure that the physician prescribes appropriate prophylaxis. In addition, it may be the nurse who is responsible for ensuring that a patient receives the appropriate prophylaxis, as well as being the first clinician to observe the clinical signs of a VTE event.

  11. Provisional Matrix Deposition in Hemostasis and Venous Insufficiency: Tissue Preconditioning for Nonhealing Venous Ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Tony J.; Broadbent, James A.; McGovern, Jacqui A.; Broszczak, Daniel A.; Parker, Christina N.; Upton, Zee

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Chronic wounds represent a major burden on global healthcare systems and reduce the quality of life of those affected. Significant advances have been made in our understanding of the biochemistry of wound healing progression. However, knowledge regarding the specific molecular processes influencing chronic wound formation and persistence remains limited. Recent Advances: Generally, healing of acute wounds begins with hemostasis and the deposition of a plasma-derived provisional matrix into the wound. The deposition of plasma matrix proteins is known to occur around the microvasculature of the lower limb as a result of venous insufficiency. This appears to alter limb cutaneous tissue physiology and consequently drives the tissue into a ‘preconditioned’ state that negatively influences the response to wounding. Critical Issues: Processes, such as oxygen and nutrient suppression, edema, inflammatory cell trapping/extravasation, diffuse inflammation, and tissue necrosis are thought to contribute to the advent of a chronic wound. Healing of the wound then becomes difficult in the context of an internally injured limb. Thus, interventions and therapies for promoting healing of the limb is a growing area of interest. For venous ulcers, treatment using compression bandaging encourages venous return and improves healing processes within the limb, critically however, once treatment concludes ulcers often reoccur. Future Directions: Improved understanding of the composition and role of pericapillary matrix deposits in facilitating internal limb injury and subsequent development of chronic wounds will be critical for informing and enhancing current best practice therapies and preventative action in the wound care field. PMID:25785239

  12. Correlation of central venous pressure with venous blood gas analysis parameters; a diagnostic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sima Rahim-Taleghani

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study was conducted to assess the correlation between central venous pressure (CVP and venous blood gas (VBG analysis parameters, to facilitate management of severe sepsis and septic shock in emergency department. Material and methods: This diagnostic study was conducted from January 2014 until June 2015 in three major educational medical centers, Tehran, Iran. For patients selected with diagnosis of septic shock, peripheral blood sample was taken for testing the VBG parameters and the anion gap (AG was calculated. All the mentioned parameters were measured again after infusion of 500 cc of normal saline 0.9% in about 1 h. Results: Totally, 93 patients with septic shock were enrolled, 63 male and 30 female. The mean age was 72.53 ± 13.03 and the mean Shock Index (SI before fluid therapy was 0.79 ± 0.30. AG and pH showed significant negative correlations with CVP, While HCO3 showed a significant positive correlation with CVP. These relations can be affected by the treatment modalities used in shock management such as fluid therapy, mechanical ventilation and vasopressor treatment. Conclusion: It is likely that there is a significant statistical correlation between VBG parameters and AG with CVP, but further research is needed before implementation of the results of this study. Keywords: Shock, Septic, Central venous pressure, Blood gas analysis, Emergency department, Emergency medicine

  13. Peripheral venous pressure as a reliable predictor for monitoring central venous pressure in patients with burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherif, Lulu; Joshi, Vikas S; Ollapally, Anjali; Jain, Prithi; Shetty, Kishan; Ribeiro, Karl Sa

    2015-04-01

    Optimizing cardiovascular function to ensure adequate tissue oxygen delivery is a key objective in the care of critically ill patients with burns. Hemodynamic monitoring may be necessary to optimize resuscitation in serious burn patients with reasonable safety. Invasive central venous pressure (CVP) monitoring has become the corner stone of hemodynamic monitoring in patients with burns but is associated with inherent risks and technical difficulties. Previous studies on perioperative patients have shown that measurement of peripheral venous pressure (PVP) is a less invasive and cost-effective procedure and can reliably predict CVP. The aim of the present prospective clinical study was to determine whether a reliable association exists between changes in CVP and PVP over a long period in patients admitted to the Burns Intensive Care Unit (BICU). The CVP and PVP were measured simultaneously hourly in 30 burns patients in the BICU up to 10 consecutive hours. The predictability of CVP by monitoring PVP was tested by applying the linear regression formula and also using the Bland-Altman plots of repeated measures to evaluate the agreement between CVP and PVP. The regression formula revealed a reliable and significant association between CVP and PVP. The overall mean difference between CVP and PVP was 1.628 ± 0.84 mmHg (P venous pressure measured from a peripheral intravenous catheter in burns patients is a reliable estimation of CVP, and its changes have good concordance with CVP over a long period of time.

  14. [Maternal death by venous thromboembolic disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossignol, M; Morau, E; Dreyfus, M

    2017-12-01

    Pregnancy and postpartum are very high-risk periods for venous thromboembolism events (TEE), which seems to extend far beyond the classical 6-8 weeks after childbirth. Pulmonary embolism (PE) is one of the 3 main causes of direct maternal death in western countries. Between 2010 an 2012 in France, 24 deaths were related to PE giving a maternal mortality ratio of 1/100,000, which is not different from the former report (2007-2009). PE is responsible of 9% of maternal deaths, in equal position with postpartum hemorrhage and amniotic fluid embolism. Four deaths (16%) occurred after pregnancy interruption (1 abortion, 3 medical interruptions), 7 (30%) during ongoing pregnancy (before 22 weeks of pregnancy) and 13 (54%) in the postpartum period (9 to 60 days after childbirth). Among these deaths, 9 occurred in extra hospital setting (at home or in the street). Fifty percent of these deaths seem to be avoidable, as it was in the former report. Main avoidability criteria were: diagnostic delay; mobilization before effective anticoagulation of proximal deep venous thrombosis; insufficient preventive treatment with low molecular weight heparin [duration and/or dose (obesity)]; unjustified induction of labor. Analyzing those deaths allow to remind that in case of high suspicion of TEE, effective anticoagulation should be started without delay, and that angio-TDM is not contraindicated in pregnant women. Low molecular weight heparin regiment should be adapted to real weight. Monitoring of anti-Xa activity, if not routinely recommended, is probably useful in case of obesity or renal insufficiency. Anticipating birth by induction of labor, in the absence of abnormal fetal heart rhythm, should not delay effective anticoagulation of near-term TEE. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. [Oral anticoagulat treatment in venous thromboembolic disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontcuberta, Jordi

    2008-11-01

    Coumarin or anti-vitamin K oral anticoagulants have been used in anticoagulation therapy for more than 50 years. Well-designed studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of these drugs in the primary and secondary prevention of venous thromboembolic disease (VTD). Because of greater life expectancy and the increase in the indications for oral anticoagulation therapy (OAT), more and more patients are receiving this type of treatment. In Spain, approximately 1% of the population receives OAT. The mechanism of action of coumarin anticoagulants is based on inhibition of the interconversion of vitamin K and its 2,3-epoxide (vitamin K epoxide, which modulates gamma-carboxylation of the glutamic acid residues in the N-terminal regions of vitamin-K-dependent factors, namely, II, VII, IX, X, protein C, protein S and protein Z). Due to the lack of gamma-carboxylation, these factors lose their procoagulant activity. Major hemorrhagic complications of OAT in VTD after 3-6 months of treatment, with an INR of 2-3, occur in nearly 2% of patients. The hemorrhagic complications of OAT are related to the intensity of anticoagulation, patient characteristics, the concomitant use of drugs that interfere with hemostasis, and treatment duration. The risk of VTD recurrence after 3-6 months of OAT is high and can be more than 10% in patients with idiopathic thromboembolism or irreversible risk factors such as thrombophilia, cancer and other situations conferring permanent risk. The risk of recurrence is more frequent in men, in patients with thrombophilia especially in antithrombin deficiency, and in patients with cancer, residual venous obstruction, or elevated D dimer.

  16. [Association between venous thrombosis and dyslipidemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Raso, Aránzazu; Ene, Gabriela; Miranda, Carolina; Vidal, Rosa; Mata, Raquel; Llamas Sillero, M Pilar

    2014-07-07

    Venous and arterial thrombosis, despite being historically considered as distinct conditions, share certain risk factors. Dyslipidemia is a clinical condition with a relatively high prevalence in the population and has been associated with an increased thrombotic risk. Lipids and lipoproteins modulate the expression and/or function of thrombotic, fibrinolytic and rheological factors. We have developed a descriptive, retrospective, comparative, cross-sectional study including a group of 313 patients with venous thromboembolism (VTE). We collected basic demographic data, cardiovascular risk factors and thrombotic complications. All patients were subjected to a lipid profile study with determination of total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol (cHDL), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (cLDL) and triglycerides. The multivariable analysis showed that dyslipidemia was a risk factor for VTE (odds ratio [OR] 3.87, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 2.72-5.56; P<.0001). Of a total of 313 patients included in the study, 31% (n=97) had a recurrent thrombotic event and 23% (n=72) developed post-thrombotic syndrome. cHDL levels below 35 mg/dl and cLDL levels higher than 180 mg/dl represented risk factors for the development of recurrent thrombosis, OR 3.12 (95% CI 1.35-7.74; P=.008) and OR 2.35 (95% CI 1.24-4.45; P=.008), respectively, and post-thrombotic syndrome, OR 3.44 (95% CI 1.43-8.83; P=.005) and OR 2.35 (95% CI 1.24-4.45; P=.008). Our study confirmed the association between dyslipidemia and VTE and showed a risk of thrombosis nearly 4 times higher in individuals with this disease. In addition, alterations in the lipid profile were also related to a higher prevalence of thrombotic complications, recurrence and post-thrombotic syndrome. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  17. Idiopathic versus secondary venous thromboembolism. Findings of the RIETE registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrajas, J M; Garmendia, C; Portillo, J; Gabriel, F; Mainez, C; Yera, C; Monreal, M

    2014-10-01

    The Computerized Registry of Patients with Venous Thromboembolism (RIETE) is a prospective registry that consecutively includes patients diagnosed with venous thromboembolism. We compared the clinical presentation and response to anticoagulant treatment in patients with idiopathic venous thromboembolism (IVT) versus secondary venous thromboembolism (SVT, associated with a risk factor). We analyzed the differences in clinical characteristics, comorbidity, treatment and events during the first 3months after the diagnosis of venous thromboembolism in patients with IVT or SVT and according to their initial clinical presentation. A total of 39,921 patients with IVT (n=18,029; 45.1%) or SVT (n=21,892; 54.9%) were enrolled. The patients with IVT had a greater history of venous thromboembolism than those diagnosed with SVT (pSVT group (pSVT group than in the IVT group. At 90days, bleeding, death and the recurrence of venous thromboembolism were significantly more frequent in the SVT group. The multivariate analysis confirmed that IVT was associated with fewer major (OR, 0.60; 95%CI, 0.50-0.61; pSVT at 90days of the diagnosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Nurses' knowledge about venous leg ulcer care: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ylönen, M; Stolt, M; Leino-Kilpi, H; Suhonen, R

    2014-06-01

    There is an increasing prevalence of venous leg ulcers coinciding with increasing older people populations. They are therefore important health problems, which restrict daily activities and incur high costs. Efficient and comprehensive nursing care for people with venous leg ulcers requires knowledge of causes, presentations and characteristics, the effects that venous leg ulcers have on individuals and nursing care with evidence-based treatment. To identify the gaps between nurses' demonstrated knowledge of venous leg ulcers and the related nursing care treatment with evidence-based nursing care. A computerized search using MEDLINE, CINAHL the COCHRANE LIBRARY was conducted. The initial search yielded 174 citations from which 16 relevant articles were included in this review. Four themes in venous leg ulcer nursing care emerged demonstrating nurses' knowledge gaps: assessment, physiology and the healing process, nursing care and dressings, and compression treatment. This review suggests that there is a lack of knowledge related to venous leg ulcer physiology, the healing process and how this influences care and treatment. Nurses may not be using the evidence base sufficiently well to support ulcer healing and patient well-being. There is a need for a positive work culture development and ongoing educational programmes aimed at improving nurses' knowledge of venous leg ulcer treatment and care, which address the themes within the results of this review. © 2014 International Council of Nurses.

  19. Hepatic venous pressure gradients measured by duplex ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tasu, J.-P.; Rocher, L.; Peletier, G.; Kuoch, V.; Kulh, E.; Miquel, A.; Buffet, C.; Biery, M

    2002-08-01

    AIMS: The hepatic venous pressure gradient is a major prognostic factor in portal hypertension but its measurement is complex and requires invasive angiography. This study investigated the relationship between the hepatic venous pressure gradient and a number of Doppler measurements, including the arterial acceleration index. METHOD: We measured the hepatic venous pressure gradient in 50 fasting patients at hepatic venography. Immediately afterwards, a duplex sonographic examination of the liver was performed at which multiple measurements and indices of the venous and arterial hepatic vasculature were made. RESULTS: Hepatic arterial acceleration was correlated directly with the hepatic venous pressure gradient (r = 0.83, P < 0.0001) and with the Child-Pugh score (r = 0.63, P < 0.0001). An acceleration index cut-off value of 1 m.s{sup -2} provided a positive predictive value of 95%, a sensitivity of 65% and a specificity of 95% for detecting patients with severe portal hypertension (hepatic venous pressure gradient > 12 mmHg). A correlation between the hepatic venous pressure gradient and the congestion index of the portal vein velocity (r = 0.45,P = 0.01) and portal vein velocity (r = 0.40,P = 0.044), was also noted. CONCLUSION: Measuring the hepatic arterial acceleration index may help in the non-invasive evaluation of portal hypertension. Tasu, J.-P. et al. (2002)

  20. Unsuspected lower extremity deep venous thrombosis simulating musculoskeletal pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parellada, Antoni J.; Reiter, Sean B.; Glickman, Peter L.; Kloss, Linda A. [Frankford Hospitals, DII - Diagnostic Imaging, Inc., Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Morrison, William B. [Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Carrino, John A. [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Patel, Pinecca [Frankford Hospitals, Jefferson Health System, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2006-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to highlight the critical role that MRI may play in diagnosing unsuspected lower extremity deep venous thrombosis and to stress the importance of scrutinizing MRI studies of the lower extremity showing apparently non-specific muscle edema for any evidence of intramuscular venous thrombosis. The imaging studies of four patients in whom deep venous thrombosis was unsuspected on clinical grounds, and first diagnosed on the basis of MRI findings, were reviewed by two musculoskeletal radiologists in consensus. In all four patients the initial clinical suspicion was within the scope of musculoskeletal injuries (gastrocnemius strain, n=3; ruptured Baker cyst, n=1), explaining the choice of MRI over ultrasound as the first diagnostic modality. All patients showed marked reactive edema in the surrounding soft tissues or muscles. Three patients showed MR evidence of branching rim-enhancing structures within intramuscular plexuses characteristic of venous thrombosis (gastrocnemius, n=1; sural, n=2); one patient showed a distended popliteal vein. Ultrasound was able to duplicate the MRI findings in three patients: one patient showed above-the-knee extension on ultrasound; neither of the two patients with intramuscular thrombosis demonstrated on ultrasound showed extension to the deep venous trunks. Intramuscular venous thrombosis can present as marked edema-like muscle changes on MRI, simulating primary musculoskeletal conditions. In the absence of clinical suspicion for deep venous thrombosis, only the identification of rim-enhancing branching intramuscular tubular structures will allow the correct diagnosis to be made. (orig.)

  1. Intravascular thrombosis as a result of central venous access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biernacka, Jadwiga; Nestorowicz, Andrzej; Wach, Małgorzata

    2002-01-01

    Central venous access represents one of the most basic therapeutic procedures in modern medicine. Unfortunately, numerous advantages that result from maintaining a central venous line are accompanied by some complications among which the venous thrombosis is the most significant clinically. The study was designed to assess frequency and natural history of this complication in the setting at a multi profile clinical hospital. Central venous cannulation was performed by a fully qualified anaesthesiologist in every case. There were 887 cannulations and only 5 patients with clinically significant venous thrombosis. The analysis of the collected data allowed us to state that the frequency of intravascular thrombosis is low, but this complication is often associated with extensive impairment of patency of the central veins. Full recanalization is not always achieved regardless of the treatment applied. Pulmonary embolism in the course of central venous thrombosis was diagnosed in one patient only and appeared as a multiple and fine X-ray infiltrates. It seems that in the presence of permanent or even life threatening complications of central venous thrombosis their risk should be minimized by frequent examination of the cannulation site and early initiation of antithrombotic treatment.

  2. Venous Stenosis and Occlusion in the Presence of Endocardial Leads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boczar, Krzysztof; Ząbek, Andrzej; Haberka, Kazimierz; Hardzina, Małgorzata; Dębski, Maciej; Rydlewska, Anna; Nowosielska-Ząbek, Ewa; Lelakowski, Jacek; Małecka, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Venous stenosis and occlusion in the presence of endocardial leads constitute one of the complications of permanent cardiac pacing either by pacemaker, implantable cardioverter-defibrillator or cardiac resynchronization therapy. The aim of this study was to assess the incidence of stenosis and occlusions and determine the risk factors in patients with endocardial leads in a prospective single-center study. Two hundred eighty consecutive patients aged 25-95 years (male 68.8%) were included. A contrast venography examination of the ipsilateral access vein was performed. The whole study population was divided into 2 groups, based on the presence (group I) or absence (group II) of endocardial leads. Venous stenosis/occlusion was identified in 51 patients (37.5%) in group I and in 3 patients (3.6%) in group II; p lead presence most highly correlated with venous complications (OR = 4.172; p leads divided into I A and I B according to venous patency diabetes mellitus was proved in multivariate analysis to be the only protective factor against the development of venous stenosis/occlusion (OR = 0.473; p = 0.010). The presence of endocardial leads is a predisposing factor for venous stenosis/occlusion and increases the risk 4-fold. The venous lesions in the presence of endocardial leads are less frequent among patients with diabetes mellitus.

  3. Therapeutic ultrasound for venous leg ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullum, Nicky; Liu, Zhenmi

    2017-05-15

    Venous leg ulcers are a type of chronic, recurring, complex wound that is more common in people aged over 65 years. Venous ulcers pose a significant burden to patients and healthcare systems. While compression therapy (such as bandages or stockings) is an effective first-line treatment, ultrasound may have a role to play in healing venous ulcers. To determine whether venous leg ulcers treated with ultrasound heal more quickly than those not treated with ultrasound. We searched the Cochrane Wounds Specialised Register (searched 19 September 2016); the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; the Cochrane Library 2016, Issue 8); Ovid MEDLINE (including In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, MEDLINE Daily and Epub Ahead of Print) (1946 to 19 September 2016); Ovid Embase (1974 to 19 September 2016); and EBSCO CINAHL Plus (1937 to 19 September 2016). We also searched three clinical trials registries and the references of included studies and relevant systematic reviews. There were no restrictions based on language, date of publication or study setting. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared ultrasound with no ultrasound. Eligible non-ultrasound comparator treatments included usual care, sham ultrasound and alternative leg ulcer treatments. Two authors independently assessed the search results and selected eligible studies. Details from included studies were summarised using a data extraction sheet, and double-checked. We attempted to contact trial authors for missing data. Eleven trials are included in this update; 10 of these we judged to be at an unclear or high risk of bias. The trials were clinically heterogeneous with differences in duration of follow-up, and ultrasound regimens. Nine trials evaluated high frequency ultrasound; seven studies provided data for ulcers healed and two provided data on change in ulcer size only. Two trials evaluated low frequency ultrasound and both reported ulcers healed data.It is uncertain whether high

  4. Injectables in the prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saemi, Arash M; Plante, Mark K

    2008-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia with associated symptoms and morbidity is increasingly common among aging men. Medical treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms is the mainstay of therapy with progressive disease requiring more invasive intervention. Transurethral resection of the prostate remains a widely applied gold standard therapy. Numerous minimally invasive surgical therapy options have arisen and subsequently faded over recent years. Those remaining in use are largely positioned between pharmacological treatment and transurethral resection of the prostate. Intraprostatic injection therapy, the oldest minimally invasive surgical therapy, has been investigated for over 100 years with renewed interest recently. This review will provide some history of intraprostatic injection for benign prostatic hyperplasia including the most recent reports using transperineal, transrectal and transurethral routes with different injectables. For benign prostatic hyperplasia, transperineal and transurethral injection routes have received the most systematic evaluation. Intraprostatic injection of botulinum toxin type A has received much recent attention with regards to mechanism of action and efficacy. Anhydrous ethanol remains the most extensively studied injectable to date. Injection therapy remains a very promising minimally invasive surgical therapy for benign prostatic hyperplasia with increased attention from the urologic community in recent years. Further experience both with systematic laboratory and clinical trials investigation will be necessary before widespread clinical adoption.

  5. ENDOVASCULAR TREATMENT FOR DISORDERS OF THE VENOUS SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Osiev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The annual rate of deep vein thrombosis in general population is from 5 to 9 cases per 10 000, whereas for venous thromboembolism (deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism taken together amounts to 14 cases per 10 000. To improve longterm results of therapy for thrombosis of deep veins of the lower extremities, it is important to restore venous function and outflow. Anticoagulant therapy with low weight or non-fractionated heparin preparations remains the most widely used method of management. However, total or partial thrombosis resolution under anticoagulant treatment is achieved only in 4 and 14% of cases, respectively. Thrombolysis allows for early resorption of the thrombus by means of a minimally invasive procedure with lower risk of complication. After the venous flow is restored, the aim of treatment is to prevent damage to the venous valves, venous hypertension and repeated thrombosis with development of the post-thrombotic syndrome. Compared to anticoagulation, systemic thrombolysis has the benefit of more rapid clot resorption and less damage to the venous valve. One of its serious limitations is a high bleeding risk related to higher doses of the drug administered through a peripheral vein catheter. Therefore, selective intra-clot administration of thombolytics (direct catheter thrombolysis has been suggested as an alternative. For more effective therapy with the use of lower doses of thrombolytics, the so called pharmaco-mechanical thrombectomy has been developed. Venous stenosis hindering the venous outflow is frequently seen after direct catheter or pharmaco-mechanical thrombolysis. Angioplasty with stent placement is recommended in the cases with residual venous abnormality after successful thrombolysis and thrombectomy. 

  6. Nontraumatic vascular emergencies: imaging and intervention in acute venous occlusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haage, Patrick; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Technology Aachen, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52057 Aachen (Germany); Krings, Timo [Department of Neuroradiology, University of Technology Aachen, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52057 Aachen (Germany)

    2002-11-01

    Risk factors for acute venous occlusion range from prolonged immobilization to hypercoagulability syndromes, trauma, and malignancy. The aim of this review article is to illustrate the different imaging options for the diagnosis of acute venous occlusion and to assess the value of interventional strategies for venous thrombosis treatment in an emergency setting. First, diagnosis and treatment of the most common form of venous occlusion, at the level of the lower extremities, is presented, followed by pelvic vein and inferior vena cava occlusion, mesenteric venous thrombosis, upper extremity occlusion, acute cerebral vein thrombosis, and finally acute venous occlusion of hemodialysis access. In acute venous occlusion of the lower extremity phlebography is still the reference gold standard. Presently, duplex ultrasound with manual compression is the most sensitive and specific noninvasive test. Limitations of ultrasonography include isolated distal calf vein occlusion, obesity, and patients with lower extremity edema. If sonography is nondiagnostic, venography should be considered. Magnetic resonance venography can differentiate an acute occlusion from chronic thrombus, but because of its high cost and limited availability, it is not yet used for the routine diagnosis of lower extremity venous occlusion only. Regarding interventional treatment, catheter-directed thrombolysis can be applied to dissolve thrombus in charily selected patients with symptomatic occlusion and no contraindications to therapy. Acute occlusion of the pelvic veins and the inferior vena cava, often due to extension from the femoropopliteal system, represents a major risk for pulmonary embolism. Color flow Doppler imaging is often limited owing to obesity and bowel gas. Venography has long been considered the gold standard for identifying proximal venous occlusion. Both CT scanning and MR imaging, however, can even more accurately diagnose acute pelvis vein or inferior vena cava occlusion. MRI is

  7. THE RHIC INJECTION SYSTEM.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FISCHER,W.; GLENN,J.W.; MACKAY,W.W.; PTITSIN,V.; ROBINSON,T.G.; TSOUPAS,N.

    1999-03-29

    The RHIC injection system has to transport beam from the AGS-to-RHIC transfer line onto the closed orbits of the RHIC Blue and Yellow rings. This task can be divided into three problems. First, the beam has to be injected into either ring. Second, once injected the beam needs to be transported around the ring for one turn. Third, the orbit must be closed and coherent beam oscillations around the closed orbit should be minimized. We describe our solutions for these problems and report on system tests conducted during the RHIC Sextant test performed in 1997. The system will be fully commissioned in 1999.

  8. Injection moulding antireflective nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Alexander Bruun; Clausen, Jeppe Sandvik; Mortensen, N. Asger

    We present a method for injection moulding antireflective nanostructures on large areas, for high volume production. Nanostructured black silicon masters were fabricated by mask-less reactive ion etching, and electroplated with nickel. The nickel shim was antistiction coated and used in an inject......We present a method for injection moulding antireflective nanostructures on large areas, for high volume production. Nanostructured black silicon masters were fabricated by mask-less reactive ion etching, and electroplated with nickel. The nickel shim was antistiction coated and used...

  9. Injection moulding antireflective nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Alexander Bruun; Clausen, Jeppe Sandvik; Mortensen, N. Asger

    2014-01-01

    We present a method for injection moulding antireflective nanostructures on large areas, for high volume production. Nanostructured black silicon masters were fabricated by mask-less reactive ion etching, and electroplated with nickel. The nickel shim was antistiction coated and used in an inject......We present a method for injection moulding antireflective nanostructures on large areas, for high volume production. Nanostructured black silicon masters were fabricated by mask-less reactive ion etching, and electroplated with nickel. The nickel shim was antistiction coated and used...

  10. Acute Mesenteric Venous Thrombosis with a Vaginal Contraceptive Ring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wesley Eilbert

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Mesenteric venous thrombosis is a rare cause of abdominal pain, which if left untreated may result in bowel infarction, peritonitis and death. The majority of patients with this illness have a recognizable, predisposing prothrombotic condition. Oral contraceptives have been identified as a predisposing factor for mesenteric venous thrombosis in reproductive-aged women. In the last fifteen years new methods of hormonal birth control have been introduced, including a transdermal patch and an intravaginal ring. In this report, we describe a case of mesenteric venous thrombosis in a young woman caused by a vaginal contraceptive ring. [West J Emerg Med. 2014;15(4:395-397.

  11. Role of sodium tetradecyl sulfate in venous malformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saraf Sanjay

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Venous malformations are one of the commonest anomalies of the vascular tree and their management has always remained a major challenge. Surgery and other treatment modalities are not always satisfactory and have a higher morbidity, recurrence and complication rate. The author retrospectively analyzed 40 patients of venous malformations who underwent sclerotherapy with sodium tetradecyl sulfate solely or as an adjunct to surgery. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of sodium tetradecyl sulfate sclerotherapy in the treatment of venous malformations.

  12. Imaging of the complications of peripherally inserted central venous catheters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amerasekera, S.S.H. [Department of Radiology, Good Hope Hospital, Sutton Coldfield, Birmingham (United Kingdom)], E-mail: steve.amerasekera@nhs.net; Jones, C.M.; Patel, R.; Cleasby, M.J. [Department of Radiology, Good Hope Hospital, Sutton Coldfield, Birmingham (United Kingdom)

    2009-08-15

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) are widely used to provide central venous access, often in chronically ill patients with long-term intravenous access requirements. There are a number of significant complications related to both insertion and maintenance of PICC lines, including catheter malposition, migration, venous thrombosis, and line fracture. The incidence of these complications is likely to rise as the number of patients undergoing intravenous outpatient therapy increases, with a corresponding rise in radiologist input. This paper provides an overview of the relevant peripheral and central venous anatomy, including anatomical variations, and outlines the complications of PICC lines. Imaging examples demonstrate the range of radiological findings seen in these complications.

  13. Venous anomalies as potentially lethal risk factors during ordinary catheterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savino Occhionorelli

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Venous malformations are rare but possible findings too, constituting a further risk factor for central venous catheter procedures. Herein we describe a case of death because of an innominate vein perforation by a catheter that incidentally was tucked into a sacciform malformation. Even if the technology advancement is constantly offering us new investigation tools, up to now diagnostic options are limited in the detection of those malformations that could potentially lead to dramatic complications as the described one. The present work raises the awareness about rare venous anomalies and their potential clinical implications. A proper literature review and diagnostic implementation proposal are reported.

  14. Extensive portal venous gas: Unlikely etiology and outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiffany P. Schatz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Portal venous gas or hepatic portal venous gas (HPVG found on imaging portends grave outcomes for patients suffering from ischemic bowel disease or mesenteric ischemia. HPVG is more rarely seen with severe but treatable abdominal infection as well as multiple benign conditions, and therefore must be aggressively evaluated. We report a 70-year old female who developed extensive intra- and extra-hepatic portal venous gas, pneumatosis intestinalis and free air associated with a perforation of the jejunojejunostomy after a gastrectomy for gastric carcinoma.

  15. Management of mixed arterial venous lower extremity ulceration: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayati, Nasim; Carson, John G; Chi, Yung-Wei; Link, Daniel

    2015-10-01

    Mixed arterial venous disease is estimated to affect up to 26% of patients with lower extremity ulcerations. However, its clinical significance and pathophysiology are incompletely understood. Furthermore, there is no consensus on the optimal treatment modality, whether conservative or operative. In this review paper, we describe the current understanding of the pathophysiology of mixed arterial venous lower extremity ulcers. Guidelines for diagnostic tests for patients with mixed arterial venous diseases are discussed. We review some of the newer biological skin substitutes for conservative wound care. Finally, we propose a treatment algorithm based on current available data. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Traumatic dural venous sinus thrombosis: A Mini Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moscote-Salazar Luis Rafael

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The dural venous sinus thrombosis is a benign disease, representing about 1% of cerebral vascular events. In some cases the development of the disease increased intracranial pressure or symptomatic epilepsy. The development towards a dural venous sinus thrombosis is rare, but is a condition to be considered before the development of ischemic vascular events and a history of recent head trauma. Intracranial hematomas or skull fractures can lead to the establishment of obstructive pathology of the dural venous sinuses. The knowledge of this entity is necessary for the critical care staff and neurosurgery staff.

  17. BILATERAL INTRAOCULAR HEMORRHAGE SECONDARY TO CEREBRAL VENOUS SINUS THROMBOSIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunle-Hassan, Feyi; Dattani, Minaxi; Snead, Martin; Subash, Mala

    2016-10-05

    To report a case of bilateral intraocular hemorrhage secondary to cerebral venous sinus thrombosis with no associated intracranial hemorrhage. Case report. A 32-year-old Asian gentleman presented with left reduced vision as a result of a left subhyaloid macular hemorrhage associated with severe headache. Right retinal hemorrhages were also present. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography brain imaging demonstrated cerebral transverse venous sinus thrombosis. Intraocular hemorrhage has previously been described in association with intracranial hemorrhage and in particular subarachnoid hemorrhage (Terson syndrome). We describe a similar clinical picture in the context of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis with no associated intracranial hemorrhage.

  18. Acceptable results after venous reconstructive surgery following iatrogenic injuries to the iliofemoral vein segment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Morten Bo; Bækgaard, Niels

    2012-01-01

    Venous reconstructions after iatrogenic injuries are rarely performed and are associated with a relatively high risk of complications. We present our experiences with venous reconstructive surgery to the iliofemoral vein segment.......Venous reconstructions after iatrogenic injuries are rarely performed and are associated with a relatively high risk of complications. We present our experiences with venous reconstructive surgery to the iliofemoral vein segment....

  19. To study the effect of injection dexmedetomidine for prevention of pain due to propofol injection and to compare it with injection lignocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapate, Manisha; Andurkar, Ujjwala; Markandeya, Mugdha; Gore, Rajesh; Thatte, Widya

    2015-01-01

    Pain due to injection propofol is a common problem. Different methods are used to decrease the pain but with limited success. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of injection dexmedetomidine 0.2 mcg/kg for prevention of pain due to propofol injection and compare it with injection lignocaine 0.2mg/kg. After taking permission of the Institutional Ethical Committee, written informed consent was obtained from all patients, in a randomized prospective study. 60 American Society of Anesthesiology I and II patients of age range 20-60 years of either sex posted for elective surgeries under general anaesthesia were randomly allocated into two groups. Group I (dexmedetomidine group): Inj. dexmedetomidine 0.2 mcg/kg diluted in 5 mL normal saline and Group II (lignocaine group): Inj. lignocaine 0.2mg/kg diluted in 5 mL normal saline. IV line was secured with 20 G cannula and venous occlusion was applied to forearm using a pneumatic tourniquet and inflated to 70 mm Hg for 1 min. Study drug was injected, tourniquet released and then 25% of the calculated dose of propofol was given intravenously over 10s. After 10s of injection, severity of pain was evaluated using McCrirrick and Hunter scale and then remaining propofol and neuromuscular blocking agent was given. Endotracheal intubation was done and anaesthesia was maintained on O2, N2O and isoflurane on intermittent positive pressure ventilation with Bain's circuit and inj. vecuronium was used as muscle relaxant. Demographic data showed that there was no statistically significant difference between the 2 groups. There was no statistically significant difference between 2 groups in respect to inj. propofol pain. No adverse effects like oedema, pain, wheal response at the site of injection were observed in the two groups. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  20. [To study the effect of injection dexmedetomidine for prevention of pain due to propofol injection and to compare it with injection lignocaine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapate, Manisha; Andurkar, Ujjwala; Markandeya, Mugdha; Gore, Rajesh; Thatte, Widya

    2015-01-01

    Pain due to injection propofol is a common problem. Different methods are used to decrease the pain but with limited success. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of injection dexmedetomidine 0.2mcg/kg for prevention of pain due to propofol injection and compare it with injection lignocaine 0.2mg/kg. After taking permission of the Institutional Ethical Committee, written informed consent was obtained from all patients, in a randomized prospective study. 60 American Society of Anesthesiology I and II patients of age range 20-60 years of either sex posted for elective surgeries under general anaesthesia were randomly allocated into two groups. Group I (dexmedetomidine group): Inj. dexmedetomidine 0.2mcg/kg diluted in 5mL normal saline and Group II (lignocaine group): Inj. lignocaine 0.2mg/kg diluted in 5mL normal saline. IV line was secured with 20G cannula and venous occlusion was applied to forearm using a pneumatic tourniquet and inflated to 70mm Hg for 1min. Study drug was injected, tourniquet released and then 25% of the calculated dose of propofol was given intravenously over 10s. After 10s of injection, severity of pain was evaluated using McCrirrick and Hunter scale and then remaining propofol and neuromuscular blocking agent was given. Endotracheal intubation was done and anaesthesia was maintained on O2, N2O and isoflurane on intermittent positive pressure ventilation with Bain's circuit and inj. vecuronium was used as muscle relaxant. Demographic data showed that there was no statistically significant difference between the 2 groups. There was no statistically significant difference between 2 groups in respect to inj. propofol pain. No adverse effects like oedema, pain, wheal response at the site of injection were observed in the two groups. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  1. Collagenase Clostridium Histolyticum Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease (a thickening of tissue [plaque] inside the penis that causes the penis to curve). Collagenase Clostridium histolyticum injection is in ... the plaque of thickened tissue and allows the penis to be straightened.

  2. Injection-induced earthquakes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ellsworth, William L

    2013-01-01

    ...s. It has long been understood that earthquakes can be induced by impoundment of reservoirs, surface and underground mining, withdrawal of fluids and gas from the subsurface, and injection of fluids...

  3. Premixed direct injection disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, William David; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Lacy, Benjamin; Zuo, Baifang; Uhm, Jong Ho

    2013-04-23

    A fuel/air mixing disk for use in a fuel/air mixing combustor assembly is provided. The disk includes a first face, a second face, and at least one fuel plenum disposed therebetween. A plurality of fuel/air mixing tubes extend through the pre-mixing disk, each mixing tube including an outer tube wall extending axially along a tube axis and in fluid communication with the at least one fuel plenum. At least a portion of the plurality of fuel/air mixing tubes further includes at least one fuel injection hole have a fuel injection hole diameter extending through said outer tube wall, the fuel injection hole having an injection angle relative to the tube axis. The invention provides good fuel air mixing with low combustion generated NOx and low flow pressure loss translating to a high gas turbine efficiency, that is durable, and resistant to flame holding and flash back.

  4. Corticotropin, Repository Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... organs such as the lungs, eyes, skin, and heart and interfere with the function of these organs); ... of the ingredients in corticotropin repository injection, or porcine (pig) proteins. Ask your pharmacist or check the ...

  5. Talimogene Laherparepvec Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talimogene laherparepvec injection is used to treat certain melanoma (a type of skin cancer) tumors that cannot ... that came back after being treated with surgery. Talimogene laherparepvec is in a class of medications called ...

  6. Urinary incontinence - injectable implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... repair; ISD repair; Injectable bulking agents for stress urinary incontinence ... Guideline on the surgical management of female stress urinary incontinence. J Urol . 2010;183(5):1906-1914. PMID: ...

  7. RimabotulinumtoxinB Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... htm) or the manufacturer's website to obtain the Medication Guide. ... cause neck pain and abnormal head positions). RimabotulinumtoxinB injection is in a class of medications called neurotoxins. It works by blocking the nerve ...

  8. Mesotherapy and injection lipolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matarasso, Alan; Pfeifer, Tracy M

    2009-04-01

    The first part of this article familiarizes the reader with the evolution of mesotherapy, injection lipolysis, and the use of phosphatidylcholine and deoxycholate for subcutaneous fat reduction. There is an emphasis on the underlying basic science of fat metabolism and the biochemistry of phosphatidylcholine, so that practitioners will be able to understand future published research on these topics. The second half details some personal experience with injection lipolysis.

  9. Injection and Dump Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Bracco, C; Barnes, M J; Carlier, E; Drosdal, L N; Goddard, B; Kain, V; Meddahi, M; Mertens, V; Uythoven, J

    2012-01-01

    Performance and failures of the LHC injection and ex- traction systems are presented. In particular, a comparison with the 2010 run, lessons learnt during operation with high intensity beams and foreseen upgrades are described. UFOs, vacuum and impedance problems related to the injection and extraction equipment are analysed together with possible improvements and solutions. New implemented features, diagnostics, critical issues of XPOC and IQC applications are addressed.

  10. PS injection area

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    To the right is the PS ring viewed along the direction of the protons. At the left the injection line coming from the 50 MeV Linac 1 (bottom) and going towards the 800 MeV booster, or deflected to the right to be injected directly into straight section 16. The drumlike element behind the (blue) dipole magnet is a 'debuncher' (a 200 MHz cavity). See photos 7409014X and 7409009.

  11. Stuck long-term indwelling central venous catheters in adolescents: three cases and a short topical review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, A; Afshari, A; Henneberg, S W

    2010-01-01

    in the vessel wall and impossible to remove. In the other two cases, catheters were removed with great difficulty by the interventional radiologists. These cases raise important questions concerning the maximum indwelling time and the choice of catheter material when implanting permanent central venous......We present three cases of fixated vascular injection ports. Two patients had cystic fibrosis and one had an immunological defect. All catheters were made from polyurethane and implanted in adolescent patients. Indwelling time were 6-8 years. One patient's catheter was entirely integrated...... catheters (CVCs) in adolescents. Furthermore, it highlights the importance of not breaking a CVC in the attempt to remove it....

  12. Synergistic effect of lidocaine with pingyangmycin for treatment of venous malformation using a mouse spleen model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Nan; Chen, Yuan-Zheng; Mao, Kai-Ping; Fu, Yanjie; Lin, Qiang; Xue, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Aims: To explore whether lidocaine has the synergistic effect with pingyangmycin (PYM) in the venous malformations (VMs) treatment. Methods: The mouse spleen was chosen as a VM model and injected with different concentration of lidocaine or PYM or jointly treated with lidocaine and PYM. After 2, 5, 8 or 14 days, the mouse spleen tissues were acquired for hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis, TUNEL assay and quantitative RT-PCR analysis to examine the toxicological effects of lidocaine and PYM on splenic vascular endothelial cells. Results: 0.4% of lidocaine mildly promoted the apoptosis of endothelial cells, while 2 mg/ml PYM significantly elevated the apoptotic ratios. However, the combination of 0.2% lidocaine and 0.5 mg/ml PYM notably elevated the apoptotic ratios of splenic cells and severely destroyed the configuration of spleen, compared to those of treatment with 0.5 mg/ml PYM alone. Conclusion: Lidocaine exerts synergistic effects with PYM in promoting the apoptosis of mouse splenic endothelial cells, indicating that lidocaine possibly promotes the therapeutic effects of PYM in VMs treatment via synergistically enhancing the apoptosis of endothelial cells of malformed venous lesions. PMID:24966943

  13. Barriers to the diagnosis and treatment of venous thromboembolism in advanced cancer patients: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheard, Laura; Prout, Hayley; Dowding, Dawn; Noble, Simon; Watt, Ian; Maraveyas, Anthony; Johnson, Miriam

    2013-04-01

    Venous thromboembolism is common in patients with cancer and the risk increases with advanced disease. Evidence-based treatment is administration of low-molecular-weight heparin daily by subcutaneous injection. Clinical uncertainty exists as to whether treating venous thromboembolism in advanced disease is in the patient's best interests. To explore the barriers faced by doctors when diagnosing and treating patients with cancer-associated thrombosis. Qualitative, in-depth interview study using framework analysis. Forty-five UK doctors across urban and rural settings, from three specialties, oncology, palliative medicine and general practice, with a mixture of senior and junior staff. Organisational constraints served to act as barriers to the diagnosis and treatment of this patient group. Issues were identified around access to diagnostic testing. A cancer-associated thrombosis patient having to wait for a scan as an inpatient was sometimes deemed unnecessary. Patient ambulance transport (especially transportation of hospice patients) was often viewed as inflexible and bureaucratic. Low-molecular-weight heparin prescribing had sometimes led to tension between the acute, community and hospice sectors about whose prescribing responsibility this was, with different areas having divergent 'rules' and practices. Finally, the doctors interviewed discussed the role of nurses. Multiple logistical barriers are hindering best patient care for people with cancer-associated thrombosis. There is scope for some of these barriers to be reduced to improve service delivery and ultimately patient care. The research team proposes practical recommendations, which could yield direct benefit for patients and the health services.

  14. The use of central venous lines in the treatment of chronically ill children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barczykowska, Ewa; Szwed-Kolińska, Marzena; Wróbel-Bania, Agnieszka; Ślusarz, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of chronic diseases in children is a special medical problem. Maintaining constant access to the central vascular system is necessary for long-term hemato-oncological and nephrological therapies as well as parenteral nutrition. Providing such access enables chemotherapic treatment, complete parenteral nutrition, long-term antibiotic therapy, hemodialysis, treatment of intensive care unit patients, monitoring blood pressure in the pulmonary artery and stimulation of heart rate in emergency situations as well as treatment of patients suffering from complications, especially when chances of access into peripheral veins are exhausted. Continuous access to the central vascular system is desirable in the treatment of chronically ill children. Insertion of a central venous catheter line eliminates the unnecessary pain and stress to a child patient accompanying injection into peripheral vessels. In order to gain long-term and secure access to the central venous system, respecting the guidelines of the Center for Disease Control and Prevention contained in the updated 'Guidelines for the Prevention of Intravascular Catheter-Related Infections' is necessary.

  15. Cardiac arrhythmias associated with umbilical venous catheterisation in neonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheij, Gerdina; Smits-Wintjens, Vivianne; Rozendaal, Lieke; Blom, Nico; Walther, Frans; Lopriore, Enrico

    2009-01-01

    Umbilical venous catheters (UVCs) are commonly used in the management of severely ill neonates. Several life-threatening complications have been described, including catheter-related infections, myocardial perforation, pericardial effusion and cardiac arrhythmias. This report describe two neonates with cardiac arrhythmias due to umbilical venous catheterisation. One neonate had a supraventricular tachycardia requiring treatment with intravenous adenosine administration. Another neonate had an atrial flutter and was managed successfully with synchronised cardioversion. The primary cause of cardiac arrhythmias after umbilical venous catheterisation is inappropriate position of the UVC within the heart and the first step to treat them should be to pull back or even remove the catheter. Cardiac arrhythmia is a rare but potentially severe complication of umbilical venous catheterisation in neonates. PMID:21691401

  16. The pathogenesis of venous thromboembolism : Evidence for multiple interrelated causes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, Jan-Leendert P.; Veeger, Nic J. G. M.; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C.; van der Meer, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Background: Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is thought to result from interactions between multiple genetic and environmental risk factors. Objective: To assess the contribution of multiple thrombophilic defects and exogenous risk factors to the absolute risk for VTE. Design: Retrospective family

  17. Splanchnic venous thrombosis driven by a constitutively activated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Splanchnic venous thrombosis (SVT) has varied etiology with Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) being the most frequent underlying prothrombotic factor. Hematological indices often remain within normal range because of portal hypertension and its sequelae, causing diagnostic ...

  18. Splanchnic venous thrombosis driven by a constitutively activated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Introduction: Splanchnic venous thrombosis (SVT) has varied etiology with Philadelphia- negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) being the most frequent underlying prothrombotic factor. Hematological indices often remain within normal range because of portal hypertension and its sequelae, causing ...

  19. The where, what and how of paediatric central venous access

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-04-17

    Apr 17, 2012 ... disturbances or congenital heart disease, these may be sustained. Electrolyte ... Specialist Anaesthetist, Red Cross Children's Hospital, University of Cape Town ... Keywords: central venous catheter, children, acute complications, infection, thrombosis, subclavian vein, femoral vein, internal jugular vein.

  20. Delivery of Compression Therapy for Venous Leg Ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zarchi, Kian; Jemec, Gregor B E

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: Despite the documented effect of compression therapy in clinical studies and its widespread prescription, treatment of venous leg ulcers is often prolonged and recurrence rates high. Data on provided compression therapy are limited. OBJECTIVE: To assess whether home care nurses achieve...... adequate subbandage pressure when treating patients with venous leg ulcers and the factors that predict the ability to achieve optimal pressure. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: We performed a cross-sectional study from March 1, 2011, through March 31, 2012, in home care centers in 2 Danish...... with venous leg ulcers do not receive adequate compression therapy. Training programs that focus on practical bandaging skills should be implemented to improve management of venous leg ulcers....

  1. [Venous thrombosis of atypical location in patients with cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos Balea, Begoña; Sáenz de Miera Rodríguez, Andrea; Antolín Novoa, Silvia; Quindós Varela, María; Barón Duarte, Francisco; López López, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a complication that frequently occurs in patients with neoplastic diseases. Several models have therefore been developed to identify patient subgroups diagnosed with cancer who are at increased risk of developing VTE. The most common forms of thromboembolic episodes are deep vein thrombosis in the lower limbs and pulmonary thromboembolism. However, venous thrombosis is also diagnosed in atypical locations. There are few revisions of unusual cases of venous thrombosis. In most cases, VTE occurs in the upper limbs and in the presence of central venous catheters, pacemakers and defibrillators. We present the case of a patient diagnosed with breast cancer and treated with surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy who developed a thrombosis in the upper limbs (brachial and axillary). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Continuous central venous saturation monitoring in pediatrics: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spenceley, Neil; Skippen, Peter; Krahn, Gordon; Kissoon, Niranjan

    2008-03-01

    To report the use of a new pediatric central venous catheter that offers continuous central venous saturation (ScVO2) monitoring in the critically ill child. Case report. Pediatric intensive care unit in a tertiary care children's hospital. A 3-month-old child, following cardiac surgery, with an isolated decrease in central venous saturations. Diagnosis of pericardial effusion by echocardiography followed by surgical drainage. ScVO2 readings quickly returned to normal, and the remaining patient course was uneventful. We report the first case of a newly modified central venous catheter (PediaSat Oximetry Catheter, Edwards Lifesciences LLC, Irvine, CA) for children and demonstrate its utility in a patient with impaired oxygen delivery when traditional markers remain stable. This catheter enabled the rapid diagnosis of cardiac compromise due to pericardial effusion, leading to early treatment. Traditional central catheter functions and insertion technique are maintained, making the catheter potentially useful in any critically ill child.

  3. Grade Management in Establishing Pediatric Peripheral Venous Access

    OpenAIRE

    Ya-Min Yan; Mei Gong; Dan Li; Ye Huang; Ai-Qiu Li; Jia-Yu Qiu; Yan-Shang Xiao; Qun-Feng Lu

    2016-01-01

    Background Establishing venous access is a challenging job for pediatric nurses, especially in the emergency department. Measures to ensure higher success rates on the first attempt are important to provide quality nursing care. Objectives To explore the effect of grade management on the success of establishing peripheral venous access in the child population of China and to analyze the factors influencing failed IV access on the ...

  4. The up-to-date management of venous thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Anob M

    2015-08-01

    There have been a number of developments in the management of venous thromboembolism over the past few years. Old questions, such as thrombolysis, have been revisited in recent trials. New initiatives, such as ambulatory care pathways, are being established across the country. This conference brought together doctors from the UK, USA, Spain and Australia to review the up-to-date management of venous thromboembolism. © Royal College of Physicians 2015. All rights reserved.

  5. Central venous line associated osteomyelitis in children with intestinal failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Yu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Children with intestinal failure often require long-term central venous access for parenteral nutrition. Line-related complications often include liver dysfunction, sepsis, and loss of venous access. Osteomyelitis is a rare complication that has been reported in adults with intestinal failure. There has been little focus, however, on the development of osteomyelitis in the pediatric population. In this study we present 2 case studies of patients with intestinal failure requiring parenteral nutrition who subsequently developed acute osteomyelitis.

  6. Percutaneously inserted long-term central venous catheters in pigs of different sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, N; Claesson Lingehall, H; Al Zaidi, N; Claesson, J; Jensen-Waern, M; Lehtipalo, S

    2015-07-01

    Pigs are used for long-term biomedical experiments requiring repeated injections, infusions and collections of blood samples. Thus, it is necessary for vascular catheters to be indwelling to avoid undue stress to the animals and the use of restraints. We propose a refined model of percutaneous insertion of long-term central venous catheters to minimize the surgical trauma and postoperative complications associated with catheter insertion. Different sizes of needles (18 Ga versus 21 Ga) for initial puncture of the veins were compared. In conventional pigs weighing less than 30 kg, catheter insertion may be facilitated by using a microintroducer set with a 21 Ga needle. In pigs weighing 50 kg, a standard 18 Ga needle may be preferable. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Tricuspid valve endocarditis following central venous cannulation: The increasing problem of catheter related infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Babu Kale

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A central venous catheter (CVC is inserted for measurement of haemodynamic variables, delivery of nutritional supplements and drugs and access for haemodialysis and haemofiltration. Catheterization and maintenance are common practices and there is more to the technique than routine placement as evident when a procedure-related complication occurs. More than 15% of the patients who receive CVC placement have some complications and infectious endocarditis involving the tricuspid valve is a rare and serious complication with high morbidity and mortality. Overenthusiastic and deep insertion of the guide wire and forceful injection through the CVC may lead to injury of the tricuspid valve and predispose to bacterial deposition and endocarditis. We report a case of tricuspid valve endocarditis, probably secondary to injury of the anterior tricuspid leaflet by the guide wire or the CVC that required open heart surgery with vegetectomy and repair of the tricuspid valve.

  8. Diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis by phlebography and /sup 99/Tcsup (m)-Plasmin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edenbrandt, C.M.; Nilsson, J.; Ohlin, P. (County Hospital, Helsingborg (Sweden). Dept. of Medicine, Diagnostic Radiology and Clinical Physology)

    1982-01-01

    One hundred and thirty-four patients admitted to the medical emergency ward due to suspected deep venous thrombosis (DVT) were examined. The uptake of intravenously injected porcine /sup 99/Tcsup (m)-plasmin was estimated in both legs. Thereafter, phlebography was performed using a high osmolar contrast medium. All phlebographies were evaluated independently. All patients with negative phlebography were examined after 3-5 days. The plasmin test and phlebography were repeated when called for. The sensivity of the plasmin test was 100% and the specificity 51% when compared to phlebography. The extension of the DVT as demonstrated by the plasmin test was similar to that determined by phlebography. Post-phlebographic trombosis was very rare. It is concluded that /sup 99/Tcsup (m)-plasmin test is a rapid method, convenient to the patient and well suitable as a screening test. The results indicate that a negative plasmin test excludes DVT while a positive test necessitates additional examination by phlebography.

  9. Chronic venous leg ulcer treatment: future research needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, Gerald; Valle, M Fran; Malas, Mahmoud; Qazi, Umair; Maruthur, Nisa M; Doggett, David; Fawole, Oluwakemi A; Bass, Eric B; Zenilman, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence and costs of chronic venous ulcer care in the US are increasing. The Johns Hopkins University Evidence-Based Practice Center recently completed a systematic review of the comparative effectiveness of advanced wound dressings, antibiotics, and surgical management of chronic venous ulcers. Of 10,066 citations identified in the literature search, only 66 (0.06%) met our liberal inclusion criteria for providing evidence on the effectiveness of interventions for chronic venous ulcers. Based on review of those studies, members of our team and a panel of informed stakeholders identified important research gaps and methodological deficiencies and prioritized specific future research needs. Based on that review, we provide the results of our assessment of future research needs for chronic venous ulcer care. Advanced wound dressings were considered to have the highest priority for future research, followed by venous surgery and antibiotics. An imperative from our assessment is that future research evaluating interventions for chronic venous ulcers meet quality standards. In a time of increasing cost pressure, the wound care community needs to develop high-quality evidence to justify the use of present and future therapeutic modalities. © 2013 by the Wound Healing Society.

  10. Portal-venous gas unrelated to mesenteric ischemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiesner, Walter; Mortele, Koenraad J.; Ji, Hoon; Ros, Pablo R. [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Glickman, Jonathan N. [Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2002-06-01

    The aim of this study was to report on 8 patients with all different non-ischemic etiologies for portal-venous gas and to discuss this rare entity and its potentially misleading CT findings in context with a review of the literature. The CT examinations of eight patients who presented with intrahepatic portal-venous gas, unrelated to bowel ischemia or infarction, were reviewed and compared with their medical records with special emphasis on the pathogenesis and clinical impact of portal-venous gas caused by non-ischemic conditions. The etiologies for portal-venous gas included: abdominal trauma (n=1); large gastric cancer (n=1); prior gastroscopic biopsy (n=1); prior hemicolectomy (n=1); graft-vs-host reaction (n=1); large paracolic abscess (n=1); mesenteric recurrence of ovarian cancer superinfected with clostridium septicum (n=1); and sepsis with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n=1). The clinical outcome of all patients was determined by their underlying disease and not negatively influenced by the presence of portal-venous gas. Although the presence of portal-venous gas usually raises the suspicion of bowel ischemia and/or intestinal necrosis, this CT finding may be related to a variety of non-ischemic etiologies and pathogeneses as well. The knowledge about these conditions may help to avoid misinterpretation of CT findings, inappropriate clinical uncertainty and unnecessary surgery in certain cases. (orig.)

  11. Arterial complications, venous thromboembolism and deep venous thrombosis prophylaxis after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, R.P.A. (Rob Paulus Augustinus); M. Reijman (Max); Janssen, D.M. (Daan Martijn); van Mourik, J.B.A. (Jan Bernardus Antonius); Janssen, D.M. (Daan Martijn); van Mourik, J.B.A. (Jan Bernardus Antonius)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractAIM To summarize the current knowledge on vascular complications and deep venous thrombosis (DVT) prophylaxis after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. METHODS A systematic review was conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and

  12. Venous compression syndrome of internal jugular veins prevalence in patients with multiple sclerosis and chronic cerebro-spinal venous insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandolesi, Sandro; Niglio, Tarcisio; Orsini, Augusto; De Sio, Simone; d'Alessandro, Alessandro; Mandolesi, Dimitri; Fedele, Francesco; d'Alessandro, Aldo

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of the incidence of Venous Compression Syndrome (VCS) with full block of the flow of the internal jugular veins (IJVs) in patients with Multiple Sclerosis and Chronic cerebro-spinal venous insufficiency. We included 769 patients with MS and CCSVI (299 males, 470 females) and 210 controls without ms and ccsvi (92 males, 118 females). each subject was investigated by echo-color-doppler (ecd). morphological and hemodynamic ecd data were recorded by a computerized mem-net maps of epidemiological national observatory on ccsvi and they were analyzed by mem-net clinical analysis programs. VCS of IJVs occurs in 240 subjects affected by CCSVI and MS (31% of total) and in 12 controls (6% of total). The differences between the two groups are statistical significant (X² = 36.64, pCerebro-Spinal Venous Insufficiency, Multiple Sclerosis, Venous Compression Syndrome.

  13. Endovascular venous approach in the treatment of ruptured intra-cerebral arterio-venous malformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman Z. Ahmed

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Trans-venous approach has been described for endovascular treatment of many vascular lesions namely the intracranial dural, cavernous and intra-orbital malformations. A patient with a ruptured left deep parietal arteriovenous malformation (AVM treated with primary transvenous Onyx 18 embolization is reported. Trans-arterial approaches were unsuccessful because of the tiny tortuous feeding arteries and hence a transvenous approach was used for embolization. Follow-up angiography at 3 month revealed persistent angiographic cure of the AVM. Our case illustrates that in patients with ruptured small AVM having a single draining vein, transvenous treatment can be utilized to achieve occlusion resulting in AVM cure.

  14. Venous hypertensive encephalopathy secondary to venous sinus thrombosis and dural arteriovenous fistula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Pria; Orru, Emanuele; Izbudak, Izlem; Zhang, Jiaying; Kheradmand, Amir

    2017-08-01

    A 52-year-old man with a history of factor V Leiden thrombophilia, persistent headaches and papilloedema presented with worsening vision and confusion. MRI and MR angiography of the brain at the time of this presentation showed findings concerning for transverse sinus thrombosis and an associated dural arteriovenous fistula. Dural venous sinus thrombosis can lead to the formation of a dural arteriovenous fistula, which must be considered in the differential diagnosis for intracranial hypertension in patients with thrombophilia. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  15. Prevention of venous thrombosis by preoperative glycyrrhizin infusion in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Nobuaki; Kira, Yukimi; Yabunaka, Yoriko; Takaoka, Kunio

    2008-09-01

    Glycyrrhizin is an agent with the capacity to bind to selectin molecules expressed on vascular endothelial cells and potentially prevent the adherence of neutrophils to the vascular endothelial surface. It has been found to prevent intravenous thrombus formation. Venous thrombosis was induced in male rats by ligation of the inferior vena cava (IVC) for 6 h. Before the ligation, the study rats were given intravenous injections of glycyrrhizin through the IVC. After 6 h of venous ligation, the rats were sacrificed and the IVC segments were harvested. Thrombus within the IVC was collected to measure the wet weight. Gene expression of P-, L-, and E-selectin was detected by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction using extracts of mRNA from the IVC vein wall. As baseline controls, IVC samples without ligation were harvested immediately after laparotomy. Neutrophil adhesion to the luminal surface of IVC was assessed on histological sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Blood samples were collected through the IVC proximal to the ligation after 6 h to estimate activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) and prothrombin time (PT). To investigate the effect of glycyrrhizin on binding capacity of P-selectin to human neutrophils, real-time biospecific interaction analysis was performed with the Biacore 2000 system. The mean weight of thrombus in the glycyrrhizintreated group was 12.9 +/- 11.1 mg, which is significantly lower than that of the saline-treated control group (21.3 +/- 12.5 mg). The expression level of P-and L-selectin mRNA in both saline-and glycyrrhizin-treated groups was significantly higher than that of the baseline control. Histological studies of cross sections of IVC showed significantly fewer neutrophils adhering to the luminal surface with glycyrrhizin treatment than in the saline-treated controls. There was no significant difference in the values of coagulation parameters with or without glycyrrhizin treatment. In vitro analysis showed

  16. Imaging Diagnosis of Splanchnic Venous Thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Splanchnic vein thrombosis (SVT is a broad term that includes Budd-Chiari syndrome and occlusion of veins that constitute the portal venous system. Due to the common risk factors involved in the pathogenesis of these clinically distinct disorders, concurrent involvement of two different regions is quite common. In acute and subacute SVT, the symptoms may overlap with a variety of other abdominal emergencies while in chronic SVT, the extent of portal hypertension and its attendant complications determine the clinical course. As a result, clinical diagnosis is often difficult and is frequently reliant on imaging. Tremendous improvements in vascular imaging in recent years have ensured that this once rare entity is being increasingly detected. Treatment of acute SVT requires immediate anticoagulation. Transcatheter thrombolysis or transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt is used in the event of clinical deterioration. In cases with peritonitis, immediate laparotomy and bowel resection may be required for irreversible bowel ischemia. In chronic SVT, the underlying cause should be identified and treated. The imaging manifestations of the clinical syndromes resulting from SVT are comprehensively discussed here along with a brief review of the relevant clinical features and therapeutic approach.

  17. [Venous thromboembolism in patients with acute tuberculosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Amar, J; Dahri, B; Aouina, H; Bouacha, H

    2015-12-01

    Studies have demonstrated a link between tuberculosis and hypercoagulable state, with reported rates of 0,6%-10% venous thromboembolism (VTE) in all adults with tuberculosis. The present study aimed to evaluate the current incidence and characteristics of VTE in a large sample of patients with acute tuberculosis. We report a retrospective study about 26 patients who have confirmed tuberculosis complicated with VTE disease. Sixteen men and ten women were brought together. The mean age was 42.58 years. The thromboembolic complication revealed tuberculosis among 5 patients, appearing during hospitalization of 21 patients among which 16 of them receiving antituberculosis drug. We have listed 10 cases of immediate pulmonary thromboembolism and 16 cases of deep vein thrombosis complicated with pulmonary embolism in 6 cases. Oral anticoagulation drug were associated with heparin after a mean of 4.57 days. Duration average of achievement of an effective dose was of 21.05 days and we prescribe low molecular weight heparin for 6 months on 2 cases. There was favorable evolution among 14 patients, 4 of them have lost sight and the evolution was fatal by cataclysmic haemoptysis in one case, a patient died hepatocellular insufficiency and 6 died by pulmonary embolism. Immunological and hematological abnormalities are incriminated in the genesis of VTE disease during tuberculosis by creating hypercoagulate state. The accumulation of morbidity of these two affections as well as the difficulty of therapeutic care made by medical interaction ifampicin-anticoagulants aggravate the prognostic. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Unilateral papilledema in cerebral venous sinus thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girish Baburao Kulkarni

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the majority of patients with raised intracranial pressure, the papilledema is bilateral. Unilateral papilledema is rare in conditions causing intracranial hypertension, and it has been described in Foster–Kennedy syndrome and in some cases of idiopathic intracranial hypertension. It has never been reported in cerebral venous thrombosis. We report a young lady presenting with features of subacute onset of headache with seizures, on evaluation she had superior sagittal and bilateral lateral sinus thrombosis. The risk factors found on evaluation were Vitamin B12 deficiency and hyperhomocysteinemia. On optic fundus examination, she had swollen optic disc on the right side with normal fundus on the left side, confirmed with the orbital ultrasound B-scan and optic coherence tomography. Her magnetic resonance imaging showed features of raised intracranial pressure with thrombosis of the superior sagittal and bilateral lateral sinus thrombosis. She was treated with anticoagulation (heparin followed by oral anticoagulants, antiedema measures, and vitamin supplementation for hyperhomocysteinemia. She improved over time and was asymptomatic during follow-up. We discuss the possible mechanisms described in the literature for unilateral papilledema. This report highlights the need for carefully performing bilateral fundus examination so as not to miss the vision or life-threatening causes of a headache.

  19. MECHANISMS UNDERLYING MATERNAL VENOUS ADAPTATION IN PREGNANCY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Cresta Wedel; Mandala, Maurizio; Barron, Carolyn; Bernstein, Ira; Osol, George

    2009-01-01

    To define the effects of pregnancy on mechanical properties and reactivity, mesenteric veins from late pregnant (LP) and virgin control (NP) rats were pressurized to determine gestational changes in size and distensibility. Reactivity studies used an adrenergic constrictor (norepinephrine, NE) and an endothelium-mediated vasodilator (acetylcholine, ACh). The contribution of nitric oxide (NO) to endothelial function was evaluated with pharmacologic inhibition of NO synthase. Roles of NO and cGMP in smooth muscle vasodilation were determined by using an NO donor with and without cGMP inhibition using ODQ, a selective inhibitor of guanylyl cyclase. In pregnancy, endothelium-dependent vasodilation markedly increased (largely due to endogenous NO), smooth muscle response to NO decreased (primarily related to cGMP production), and NE sensitivity decreased considerably, with no changes in vessel size or distensibility. Our results identify a pro-vasodilatory state in the systemic venous system which would serve to facilitate the accommodation to plasma volume expansion requisite for normal pregnancy. PMID:19318688

  20. Venous Thromboembolism in Pediatric Vascular Anomalies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taizo A. Nakano

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The presence of a vascular anomaly suggests that capillaries, veins, arteries, and/or lymphatic vessels have demonstrated abnormal development and growth. Often dilated and misshaped, these vessels augment normal flow of blood and lymphatic fluids that increases the overall risk to develop intralesional thrombosis. Abnormal endothelial and lymphoendothelial cells activate hemostasis and hyperfibrinolytic pathways through poorly understood mechanisms, which contribute to the development of localized intravascular coagulopathy. Vascular malformations, tumors, and complex combined syndromes demonstrate varying degrees of prothrombotic activity and consumptive coagulopathy depending on the vessels involved and the pattern and extent of abnormal growth. The clinical impact of venous thromboembolism in pediatric vascular anomalies varies from painful syndromes that disrupt quality of life to life-threatening embolic disease. There remains little literature on the study, evaluation, and treatment of thrombosis in pediatric vascular anomalies. However, there have been great advances in our ability to image complex lesions, to surgically and interventionally augment disease, and to provide enhanced supportive care including patient education, compression therapy, and strategic use of anticoagulation.

  1. Syringe-injectable electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia; Fu, Tian-Ming; Cheng, Zengguang; Hong, Guosong; Zhou, Tao; Jin, Lihua; Duvvuri, Madhavi; Jiang, Zhe; Kruskal, Peter; Xie, Chong; Suo, Zhigang; Fang, Ying; Lieber, Charles M

    2015-07-01

    Seamless and minimally invasive three-dimensional interpenetration of electronics within artificial or natural structures could allow for continuous monitoring and manipulation of their properties. Flexible electronics provide a means for conforming electronics to non-planar surfaces, yet targeted delivery of flexible electronics to internal regions remains difficult. Here, we overcome this challenge by demonstrating the syringe injection (and subsequent unfolding) of sub-micrometre-thick, centimetre-scale macroporous mesh electronics through needles with a diameter as small as 100 μm. Our results show that electronic components can be injected into man-made and biological cavities, as well as dense gels and tissue, with >90% device yield. We demonstrate several applications of syringe-injectable electronics as a general approach for interpenetrating flexible electronics with three-dimensional structures, including (1) monitoring internal mechanical strains in polymer cavities, (2) tight integration and low chronic immunoreactivity with several distinct regions of the brain, and (3) in vivo multiplexed neural recording. Moreover, syringe injection enables the delivery of flexible electronics through a rigid shell, the delivery of large-volume flexible electronics that can fill internal cavities, and co-injection of electronics with other materials into host structures, opening up unique applications for flexible electronics.

  2. Syringe injectable electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Guosong; Zhou, Tao; Jin, Lihua; Duvvuri, Madhavi; Jiang, Zhe; Kruskal, Peter; Xie, Chong; Suo, Zhigang; Fang, Ying; Lieber, Charles M.

    2015-01-01

    Seamless and minimally-invasive three-dimensional (3D) interpenetration of electronics within artificial or natural structures could allow for continuous monitoring and manipulation of their properties. Flexible electronics provide a means for conforming electronics to non-planar surfaces, yet targeted delivery of flexible electronics to internal regions remains difficult. Here, we overcome this challenge by demonstrating syringe injection and subsequent unfolding of submicrometer-thick, centimeter-scale macroporous mesh electronics through needles with a diameter as small as 100 micrometers. Our results show that electronic components can be injected into man-made and biological cavities, as well as dense gels and tissue, with > 90% device yield. We demonstrate several applications of syringe injectable electronics as a general approach for interpenetrating flexible electronics with 3D structures, including (i) monitoring of internal mechanical strains in polymer cavities, (ii) tight integration and low chronic immunoreactivity with several distinct regions of the brain, and (iii) in vivo multiplexed neural recording. Moreover, syringe injection enables delivery of flexible electronics through a rigid shell, delivery of large volume flexible electronics that can fill internal cavities and co-injection of electronics with other materials into host structures, opening up unique applications for flexible electronics. PMID:26053995

  3. Compression of the posterior fossa venous sinuses by epidural hemorrhage simulating venous sinus thrombosis: CT and MR findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Sumit; Ramakrishnaiah, Raghu H.; Hegde, Shilpa V.; Glasier, Charles M. [University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Pediatric Radiology, Little Rock, AR (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Posterior fossa dural venous sinus thrombus is a well-described complication of head trauma, especially when fracture crosses the dural sinus grooves or in association with epidural hemorrhage. We have found that post-traumatic posterior fossa epidural hematoma compressing a dural venous sinus can mimic dural venous thrombus. To discuss the CT and MRI findings of posterior fossa epidural hemorrhages simulating sinus thrombosis, to make radiologists aware of this important imaging pitfall. We describe radiologic findings in four children in whom a posterior fossa epidural hemorrhage mimicked dural venous sinus thrombus. Routine CT head and CT venography were obtained on Toshiba volume and helical CT scanners. MRI and MR venography were performed on a Philips scanner. In all cases there was medial displacement and compression of the posterior fossa dural venous sinuses without intraluminal thrombosis. The epidural hemorrhage was seen tracking along sinus grooves in the occipital bone, peeling the dura containing the sinuses from the calvarium and compressing the sinus, simulating thrombosis on axial CT views. Both venous sinus thrombosis and posterior fossa epidural hemorrhages in children are well-described complications of head trauma. Posterior fossa epidural hemorrhage can mimic a sinus thrombus by compressing and displacing the sinuses. It is important to recognize this pitfall because treatment of a suspected thrombus with anticoagulation can worsen epidural hemorrhage. (orig.)

  4. De novo formation of cerebral cavernous malformation adjacent to existing developmental venous anomaly - an effect of change in venous pressure associated with management of a complex dural arterio-venous fistula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarthy, Hariprakash; Lin, Tzu-Kang; Chen, Yao-Liang; Wu, Yi-Ming; Yeh, Chin-Hua; Wong, Ho-Fai

    2016-12-01

    This is a case report of de novo development of two cerebral cavernous malformations adjacent to existing developmental venous anomalies. The development of cavernomas was noted over a follow-up period of 10 years. These developments happened during the course of staged endovascular management of a complex dural arterio-venous fistula along the right sphenoid wing. The patient presented with a proptosis secondary to lympho-haemangiomatous lesion of the fronto-orbital region and a high-flow right sphenoid wing dural arterio-venous fistula. During the initial period of conservative management of the dural arterio-venous fistula, he developed de novo cavernous malformations in the left mesial temporal lobe adjacent to a developmental venous anomaly in the temporal lobe, and along with this there was engorgement of deep veins related to another existing developmental venous anomaly in the brainstem. Later during the course of endovascular treatment of the dural arterio-venous fistula, a large brainstem cavernoma developed adjacent to the brainstem developmental venous anomaly. This case report discusses the cause-effect relationship of venous pressure changes related to management of dural arterio-venous fistula and de novo formation of cerebral cavernous malformations adjacent to existing developmental venous anomalies. © The Author(s) 2016.

  5. Botulinum toxin injection: a review of injection principles and protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David E. Rapp

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite the favorable outcomes seen using botulinum toxin (BTX for voiding dysfunction using BTX, a standardized technique and protocol for toxin injection is not defined. We reviewed the current literature on intravesical BTX injection for DO (detrusor overactivity. Specific attention was placed on defining optimal injection protocol, including dose, volume, and injection sites. In addition, we sought to describe a standard technique to BTX injection.

  6. Flow Injection Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Elo Harald

    2004-01-01

    This chapter provides an introduction to automated chemical analysis, which essentially can be divided into two groups: batch assays, where the solution is stationary while the container is moved through a number of stations where various unit operations performed; and continuous-flow procedures......, where the system is stationary while the solution moves through a set of conduits in which all required manipulations are performed. Emphasis is placed on flow injection analysis (FIA) and its further developments, that is, sequential injection analysis (SIA) and the Lab-on-Valve (LOV) approach. Since...... FIA is based on the creation of a concentration gradient of the injected sample solution and on reproducible and precise timing of all events, it allows exploitation of a transient read-out. This in turn implies that not only does FIA allow the augmentation of existing analytical techniques...

  7. Dimethyl Ether Injection Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorenson, Spencer C.; Glensvig, Michael; Abata, Duane L.

    1998-01-01

    A series of preliminary investigations has been performed in order to investigate the behavior of DME in a diesel injection environment. These studies have in-cluded visual observations of the spray penetration and angles for high pressure injection into Nitrogen using conventional jerk pump...... in the same system. As a first attempt to simulate combustion of DME in Diesel engines, the results of the spray studies have been incorporated into a simplified spray combustion model. A turbulent jet structure was adjusted to fit the penetration rates of the observed sprays. The observed spray widths agreed...... well with the experimentally observed combustion rates during the mixing controlled portions of the combustion in a naturally aspirated direct injection diesel engine....

  8. [Evaluation of the Charing Cross Venous Ulcer Questionnaire in patients with chronic venous ulcers in Uruguay].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafernaberry, Gabriela; Otero, Gabriela; Agorio, Caroline; Dapueto, Juan J

    2016-01-01

    Chronic venous ulcers (CVU) represent a frequent condition, with difficult therapeutic approaches, that impact on patients’ quality of life, and generate an economic burden to patients and health systems. To perform the cultural adaptation and initial evaluation of the Charing Cross Venous Ulcer Questionnaire (CCVUQ) for Uruguay, and to study the health-related quality of life (HRQL) of patients with CVU. The translated and culturally adapted version of the CCVUQ was applied to a convenience sample of 50 patients. In addition, the PROMIS Global Health Survey was included in the assessment. Both questionnaires showed good internal consistency (Cronbach alfa > 0.70). A statistically significant association was observed between the CCVUQ total scores, its subscales and both dimensions of the PROMIS: Global Physical (GPH) and Global Mental Health (GMH) (rho ≥ 0.40). The CCVUQ mean score was 54.9 ± 42 points while GPH and GMH mean scores were 37.9 ± 29 points, and 43.1 ± 35.1 points respectively. Simple linear regression showed that patients with higher income reported better emotional well-being, while in younger patients, ulcers had a higher impact on Emotional Status and Cosmetics. The translated and adapted version of the CCVUQ was easy to comprehend and apply, showing good psychometric properties. When used in association with the PROMIS Global Health Measure it provides complementary information. HRQL was severely affected in the study sample.

  9. Cerebral Venous Thrombosis and Venous Infarction: Case Report of a Rare Initial Presentation of Smoker's Polycythemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raval, Mihir; Paul, Anu

    2010-11-22

    INTRODUCTION: Cerebral venous thrombosis is a rare initial presentation of polycythemia. If diagnosed early, treatment can reduce mortality and morbidity significantly. Often it may present with headache as the only complaint, and thus the diagnosis is likely to be missed. CASE PRESENTATION: A medically stable 31-year-old male, a chronic smoker with a ∼17 pack-year history of smoking, was admitted to the emergency room with a 2-week history of gradually worsening, severe, throbbing headache in the occipital region sensitive to light. Initial neurological examination was positive only for some involuntary motor tics of the left leg. Initial laboratory workup showed hemoglobin of 20 g/dl and hematocrit of 56.5%. The carboxyhemoglobin level was normal, but the oxygen dissociation curve was shifted to the left. Further evaluation by MRI and MRA of the brain suggested extensive and complete thrombosis of the superior sagittal sinus, right transverse sinus and right sigmoid sinus with a small venous infarct in the right parafrontal region. Given that the patient first presented with a thrombotic event, workup for primary polycythemia and hypercoagulable disorders was carried out, including JAK2 mutation evaluation, which was negative. This left us with smoking as the only risk factor and possible cause for secondary polycythemia. He improved significantly with phlebotomy and anticoagulation treatment. CONCLUSION: This case illustrates a rare but severe complication of secondary polycythemia stressing the importance of being aware of the risk of developing cerebral thrombosis in patients with chronic smoking exposure.

  10. Correlation of central venous pressure with venous blood gas analysis parameters; a diagnostic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahim-Taleghani, Sima; Fatemi, Alireza; Alavi Moghaddam, Mostafa; Shojaee, Majid; Abushouk, Abdelrahman Ibrahim; Forouzanfar, Mohammad Mehdi; Baratloo, Alireza

    2017-03-01

    This study was conducted to assess the correlation between central venous pressure (CVP) and venous blood gas (VBG) analysis parameters, to facilitate management of severe sepsis and septic shock in emergency department. This diagnostic study was conducted from January 2014 until June 2015 in three major educational medical centers, Tehran, Iran. For patients selected with diagnosis of septic shock, peripheral blood sample was taken for testing the VBG parameters and the anion gap (AG) was calculated. All the mentioned parameters were measured again after infusion of 500 cc of normal saline 0.9% in about 1 h. Totally, 93 patients with septic shock were enrolled, 63 male and 30 female. The mean age was 72.53 ± 13.03 and the mean Shock Index (SI) before fluid therapy was 0.79 ± 0.30. AG and pH showed significant negative correlations with CVP, While HCO3 showed a significant positive correlation with CVP. These relations can be affected by the treatment modalities used in shock management such as fluid therapy, mechanical ventilation and vasopressor treatment. It is likely that there is a significant statistical correlation between VBG parameters and AG with CVP, but further research is needed before implementation of the results of this study.

  11. Central or peripheral catheters for initial venous access of ICU patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricard, Jean-Damien; Salomon, Laurence; Boyer, Alexandre; Thiery, Guillaume; Meybeck, Agnes; Roy, Carine; Pasquet, Blandine; Le Mière, Eric; Dreyfuss, Didier

    2013-09-01

    The vast majority of ICU patients require some form of venous access. There are no evidenced-based guidelines concerning the use of either central or peripheral venous catheters, despite very different complications. It remains unknown which to insert in ICU patients. We investigated the rate of catheter-related insertion or maintenance complications in two strategies: one favoring the central venous catheters and the other peripheral venous catheters. Multicenter, controlled, parallel-group, open-label randomized trial. Three French ICUs. Adult ICU patients with equal central or peripheral venous access requirement. Patients were randomized to receive central venous catheters or peripheral venous catheters as initial venous access. The primary endpoint was the rate of major catheter-related complications within 28 days. Secondary endpoints were the rate of minor catheter-related complications and a composite score-assessing staff utilization and time spent to manage catheter insertions. Analysis was intention to treat. We randomly assigned 135 patients to receive a central venous catheter and 128 patients to receive a peripheral venous catheter. Major catheter-related complications were greater in the peripheral venous catheter than in the central venous catheter group (133 vs 87, respectively, p=0.02) although none of those was life threatening. Minor catheter-related complications were 201 with central venous catheters and 248 with peripheral venous catheters (p=0.06). 46% (60/128) patients were managed throughout their ICU stay with peripheral venous catheters only. There were significantly more peripheral venous catheter-related complications per patient in patients managed solely with peripheral venous catheter than in patients that received peripheral venous catheter and at least one central venous catheter: 1.92 (121/63) versus 1.13 (226/200), pcentral venous catheter-related complications per patient between patients initially randomized to peripheral

  12. Tapping but not massage enhances vasodilation and improves venous palpation of cutaneous veins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichimura, Mika; Sasaki, Shinsuke; Mori, Masaharu; Ogino, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigated whether tapping on the median cubital vein or massaging the forearm was more effective in obtaining better venous palpation for venipuncture. Forty healthy volunteers in their twenties were subjected to tapping (10 times in 5 sec) or massage (10 strokes in 20 sec from the wrist to the cubital fossa) under tourniquet inflation on the upper arm. Venous palpation was assessed using the venous palpation score (0-6, with 0 being impalpable). Three venous factors-venous depth, cross-sectional area, and elevation-were also measured using ultrasonography. The venous palpation score increased significantly by tapping but not by massage. Moreover, all 3 venous measurements changed significantly by tapping, while only the depth decreased significantly by massage. The three venous measurements correlated significantly with the venous palpation score, indicating that they are useful objective indicators for evaluating vasodilation. We suggest that tapping is an effective vasodilation technique.

  13. Venous ulcers of the lower extremity: Definition, epidemiology, and economic and social burdens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Brajesh K

    2015-03-01

    Venous ulcer is a common vascular condition affecting 1% of the population, and a prevalence that increases with age. Venous ulcer is defined by the American Venous Forum as "a full-thickness defect of skin, most frequently in the ankle region, that fails to heal spontaneously and is sustained by chronic venous disease, based on venous duplex ultrasound testing." The economic and social burden of this condition is significant to both the affected individual and the health care system. The recurrent nature of venous ulcers underscore the need for treatment of the underlying pathophysiology, that is, ambulatory venous hypertension produced by venous valve reflux alone or in conjunction with venous obstruction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Correlation of venous thromboembolism prophylaxis and electronic medical record alerts with incidence among surgical patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, Rajesh; Lee, Nathaniel; Duane, Therese M; Gu, Zirui; Nguyen, Natalie; Potter, Teresa; Rensing, Edna; Sampson, Renata; Burrows, Mandy; Banas, Colin; Hartigan, Sarah; Grover, Amelia

    2016-11-01

    Venous thromboembolism events are potentially preventable adverse events. We investigated the effect of interruptions and delays in pharmacologic prophylaxis on venous thromboembolism incidence. Additionally, we evaluated the utility of electronic medical record alerts for venous thromboembolism prophylaxis. Venous thromboembolisms were identified in surgical patients retrospectively through Core Measure Venous ThromboEmbolism-6-6 and Patient Safety Indicator 12 between November 2013 and March 2015. Venous thromboembolism pharmacologic prophylaxis and prescriber response to electronic medical record alerts were recorded prospectively. Prophylaxis was categorized as continuous, delayed, interrupted, other, and none. Among 10,318 surgical admissions, there were 131 venous thromboembolisms; 23.7% of the venous thromboembolisms occurred with optimal continuous prophylaxis. Prophylaxis, length of stay, age, and transfer from another hospital were associated with increased venous thromboembolism incidence. Compared with continuous prophylaxis, interruptions were associated with 3 times greater odds of venous thromboembolism. Delays were associated with 2 times greater odds of venous thromboembolism. Electronic medical record alerts occurred in 45.7% of the encounters and were associated with a 2-fold increased venous thromboembolism incidence. Focus groups revealed procedures as the main contributor to interruptions, and workflow disruption as the main limitation of the electronic medical record alerts. Multidisciplinary strategies to decrease delays and interruptions in venous thromboembolism prophylaxis and optimization of electronic medical record tools for prophylaxis may help decrease rates of preventable venous thromboembolism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Strategies in the treatment for intracranial venous sinus thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JIA Qiang

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST is a special type of cerebrovascular disease with high morbidity and mortality which often has an unpredictable outcome. It is usually misdiagnosed because of different causes and variable clinical manifestations. How to improve the diagnosis and therapy of CVST is always the hotspot in clinic. This article aims to investigate the effective and safe strategies in the treatment for CVST. Methods Clinical data of 52 patients diagnosed with CVST were retrospectively analyzed. These patients were subdivided into mild type and severe type according to the features of symptoms, signs, lumbar puncture pressure and imaging. The patients with mild type were treated with systemic anticoagulant therapy combined with intravenous thrombolysis [continuous intravenous infusion of heparin (12.50-25 × 103 U/d for 7-10 d followed by a continuous infusion of urokinase (0.50-0.75 ×106 U/d for 5-7d]. The patients with severe type were treated with endovascular thrombolysis [injection of urokinase (0.50-1 × 106 U, 0.10 × 106 U/min via carotid or vertebral artery; or intravenous infusion of urokinase 1 ×106 U/d and heparin 25 ×103 U/d for 5-7 d], and superior sagittal sinus cut-open/ intrasinus thrombolysis separately. All the patients took oral warfarin for 6-12 months, and follow-up was performed after operation by the method of magnetic resonance venography (MRV. Results Among the 27 cases of mild type receiving systemic anticoagulant agents and intravenous thrombolysis, 14 were cured; 9 were improved; 4 were ineffective. Among the 22 cases of severe type receiving systemic anticoagulant drugs and endovascular thrombolysis, 18 were cured; 3 were improved; 1 was dead. The left 3 cases with gravis type received superior sagittal sinus cut-open/intrasinus thrombolysis and were cured. The period of follow-up was between 6 months and 60 months (the median time was 36 months, and no recurrence happened. Conclusion

  16. Which dressings reduce inflammation and improve venous leg ulcer healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffetto, Joseph D

    2014-05-01

    Chronic venous leg ulcers (VLU) affect around 1% of the adult population in the Western world. The impact of VLU is both social and economic, with significant expenditures on active venous ulcers to provide medical treatment and eventual healing. At the core of VLU is venous hypertension which affects the venous macrocirculation. The changes incurred in venous hemodynamics leads to microcirculatory changes affecting the postcapillary venule and surrounding tissues. Inflammation by leukocytes affecting the venous endothelium, promotes a complex cascade and activation of adhesion molecules expression, chemokines and cytokines released, altered growth factor responses, and activation of protease (e.g. tPA) and proteinase (e.g. MMPs) activity that causes dysregulation and compromise of tissue integrity with eventual dermal damage and ulcer development. A critical component to treating VLU is correcting the abnormal venous hemodynamics and compression therapy. Unfortunately, VLU recurrence ranges between 30-70%, and other modalities in therapy along with compression are required. The goal for adjuvant products is to restore the balance from an inflammatory chronic wound to that of a reparative wound that will promote provisional matrix and epithelialization. There are many products on the market that can be used as adjuvant to compression therapy, but it must be recognized that there is a paucity of clinical trials that have evaluated the clinical effectiveness of specific products with clearly defined end points, and most importantly a healed VLU with a low recurrence rate. This review will discuss the fundamentals of VLU inflammation, and evaluate the available literature that may have benefit in reducing inflammation and lead to effective VLU healing. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  17. Effect of Pycnogenol on the Healing of Venous Ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo, Renato Riera; Santos, Maria Elisabeth Rennó de Castro; Schnaider, Taylor Brandão

    2017-01-01

    Venous ulcers are common complications of chronic venous insufficiency that result in severe physical and mental suffering to patients. The oral administration of diosmin/hesperidin has been used as adjuvant therapy in the treatment of chronic venous insufficiency. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the effect of pycnogenol and diosmin/hesperidin on the healing of venous ulcers. This longitudinal, prospective, randomized clinical trial was conducted with 30 adult patients with venous ulcers from a vascular surgery outpatient clinic of a university hospital. The patients were randomly allocated to 2 groups: Group 1 (n = 15) was treated with pycnogenol (50 mg orally, 3 times daily) and Group 2 (n = 15) was treated with diosmin/hesperidin (450/50 mg orally, twice daily). They were assessed every 15 days for 90 days. During follow-up visits, photo-documentation was obtained and the ulcer area and circumference of the affected limb were measured. Friedman's test and Mann-Whitney test were used to compare ulcer areas and circumference of affected limbs between and within groups at different time points. The level of significance was set at 5% (P pycnogenol and diosmin/hesperidin treatments had a similar effect on the healing of venous ulcers and led to a significant decrease in the circumference of affected limbs (P pycnogenol has an adjuvant effect on the healing of venous ulcers, similar to diosmin/hesperidin. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Sonography for deep venous thrombosis: current and future applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, E James; Fleischer, Arthur C

    2005-12-01

    Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is a one of the most common problems facing the clinician in medicine today. It is often asymptomatic and goes undiagnosed with potentially fatal consequences. Ultrasound has become the "gold standard" in the diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis and with proper attention to technique sensitivity of this test is approximately 97%. An understanding of anatomy, pathophysiology, and risk factors is important. Thrombus formation usually begins beneath a valve leaflet below the knee. Approximately 40% will resolve spontaneously, 40% will become organized, and 20% will propagate. Whether or not a calf vein thrombus is identified, a repeat examination in 7 to 10 days is recommended in patients with risk factors or when deep venous thrombosis is suspected. The three main risk factors for thrombus formation are age greater than 75 years, previous history of deep venous thrombosis, and underlying malignancy. Other diagnostic studies include the contrast venogram, CT or MRI venogram, Tc99m Apcitide study, and the laboratory test D-Dimer. The D-Dimer study is being used more frequently as a screening test with 99% sensitivity in detecting thrombus, whether deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism. However, specificity is only approximately 50% with many conditions leading to false-positive exams. Therefore, a negative examination is useful in avoiding other diagnostic studies, but a positive one may be misleading. Conditions that can lead to a false-positive examination include, but are not limited to diabetes, pregnancy, liver disease, heart conditions, recent surgery, and some gastrointestinal diseases. Like the sonogram, two negative D-Dimer studies a week apart exclude the diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis. Compression sonography with color Doppler remains the best overall test for deep venous thrombosis. It is easy to perform, less expensive than most "high tech" studies, can be performed as a portable examination, and is highly reliable

  19. Review of the cost of venous thromboembolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Maria M; Hogue, Susan; Preblick, Ronald; Kwong, Winghan Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    Background Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is the second most common medical complication and a cause of excess length of hospital stay. Its incidence and economic burden are expected to increase as the population ages. We reviewed the recent literature to provide updated cost estimates on VTE management. Methods Literature search strategies were performed in PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Collaboration, Health Economic Evaluations Database, EconLit, and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts from 2003–2014. Additional studies were identified through searching bibliographies of related publications. Results Eighteen studies were identified and are summarized in this review; of these, 13 reported data from the USA, four from Europe, and one from Canada. Three main cost estimations were identified: cost per VTE hospitalization or per VTE readmission; cost for VTE management, usually reported annually or during a specific period; and annual all-cause costs in patients with VTE, which included the treatment of complications and comorbidities. Cost estimates per VTE hospitalization were generally similar across the US studies, with a trend toward an increase over time. Cost per pulmonary embolism hospitalization increased from $5,198–$6,928 in 2000 to $8,764 in 2010. Readmission for recurrent VTE was generally more costly than the initial index event admission. Annual health plan payments for services related to VTE also increased from $10,804–$16,644 during the 1998–2004 period to an estimated average of $15,123 for a VTE event from 2008 to 2011. Lower costs for VTE hospitalizations and annualized all-cause costs were estimated in European countries and Canada. Conclusion Costs for VTE treatment are considerable and increasing faster than general inflation for medical care services, with hospitalization costs being the primary cost driver. Readmissions for VTE are generally more costly than the initial VTE admission. Further studies evaluating the economic impact of new

  20. Descriptive Data of Patients with Venous Thromboembolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gul Ilhan

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study was designed for collecting descriptive data about diagnosis and treatment of patients diagnosed with venous thromboembolism (VTE in an university hospital and for reflecting approach to VTE in such a reference hospital in this way. Material and Methods: We evaluated archive records of patients disgnosed with deep vein thrombosis (DVT and pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE between 2000 an 2005. Age average of patients was advanced and most of them were women. They had DVT, PTE, DVT and PTE respectively. Most common diagnostic method used for PTE was computed thomogrphy (CT, for DVT was ultrasonography (USG. VTE was diagnosed most frequently in emergency services and policlinics. Most common chronic risk factors for VTE were cancer, heart failure/romathismal cardiac disease, hyperlipidemia/atherosclerosis and obesity. Risk factors spesific to the attacks (or temporary were immobilization, surgery, pregnancy, taking oral contraseptive drugs and trauma. Results: In patients investigated for hemostatic risk factors, Factor V Leiden, Prothrombin 20210 A , and MTHFR mutations were found respectively. Symptoms and findings of patients admitted with PTE were dyspnea-tachipnea, tachycardia, palpitation, pleural pain, caugh, fever, anginal pain, hemopthysis, diaphoresis and wheezing . Echocardiography gave positive results for the most of PTE cases. D-dimer test was found high sensitive. Treatments during accute attacks were low moleculer weight heparin (LMWH, standart heparin, thrombolytic therapy, surgery, aspirine and vena cava inferior filter placement. Acute term complications were death, bleeding and heparin induced thrombocytopenia. Conclusion: This retrospective study reflects the approach of VTE diagnosis and treatment in a reference hospital and it may guide for prospective studies. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(4.000: 610-616

  1. Management of Orbital and Periorbital Venous Malformation

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    Lara A. Benoiton

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundTo review our management of common venous malformation (VM affecting the orbit and/or periorbital area.MethodsConsecutive patients with orbital and/or periorbital VM were identified from our vascular anomalies database. Demographic details of the patients, anatomic site(s affected, symptoms and signs, presence of a family history of VM, and types of treatment(s were collected, supplemented by chart review.ResultsA total of 24 patients’ age 1–68 (mean, 30 years with orbital and/or periorbital VM presented with cosmetic concerns (n = 17, 71%, distensibility (n = 15, 63%, pain (n = 9, 38%, diplopia (n = 4, 17%, and spontaneous thrombosis (n = 1, 8%. The VM caused globe dystopia (n = 13, 54%, enophthalmos (n = 6, 25%, proptosis (n = 3, 12%, exotropia (n = 3, 12%, and pseudoptosis with visual obstruction (n = 3, 13%. A total of 11 (46% patients were managed conservatively. 13 (54% patients underwent active treatment. Ethanol sclerotherapy (ES was performed in six patients with extensive facial VM associated with orbital/periorbital involvement, resulting in symptomatic improvement in five patients, one of whom developed skin necrosis and another patient developed reduced infraorbital nerve sensation. Surgery was performed for localized lesion (n = 3, 23%, for extensive lesions (n = 4, 31% and as an adjunct to ES (n = 6, 46% resulting in symptomatic improvement in all patients. One patient required correction of lower lid ectropion.ConclusionOrbital and/or periorbital VMs are heterogeneous, and management needs to be individualized. Surgery is used for localized lesions aiming for complete excision, as a debulking procedure for extensive orbital/periorbital VM when ES was not possible, or following ES for extensive facial VM with orbital and/or periorbital involvement.

  2. Gaseous fuel injection system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynch, W.M.

    1997-12-18

    A fuel injection method and apparatus, suitable for use with an internal combustion engine operated on LPG, has a reservoir for LPG with an outlet connected via a pump and a non-return valve to a heating chamber which is preferably heated by hot air or hot water, and then via a gas pressure regulator to an injector. The apparatus operates such that LPG is pumped by the pump through the non-return valve to the heating chamber where the LPG is heated to allow gaseous LPG to be transmitted to the injector once a predetermined pressure set on the regulator has been reached, whereupon the injector injects the LPG into the crankcase, transfer ports, carburettor or cylinders of the internal combustion engine. The internal combustion engine may be a two-stroke engine, and lubricant may be injected into the engine along with the gaseous LPG using lubricant injection means that are arranged to adjust the amount of lubricant in accordance with engine speed, preferably by drawing the lubricant into the fuel flow by use of the venturi effect.(author) figs.

  3. IncobotulinumtoxinA Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... abnormal eyelid movements) in adults who have used onabotulinumtoxinA (Botox). IncobotulinumtoxinA injection is in a class of medications ... if you are allergic to incobotulinumtoxinA, abobotulinumtoxinA (Dysport), onabotulinumtoxinA (Botox), rimabotulinumtoxinB (Myobloc), any other medications, or any ...

  4. Central venous catheter insertion into the false lumen of a complicated aortic dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bas, Ahmet; Goksedef, Deniz; Kandemirli, Sedat G; Gulsen, Fatih; Numan, Furuzan

    2017-08-01

    Thoracic endovascular repair is considered the first-line treatment in complicated acute type B dissection. Central venous catheters provide valuable vascular access during endovascular treatments. However, central venous catheters are not without complications. Herein, we report a case of central venous catheter insertion into the false lumen of a complicated acute type B aortic dissection by direct aortic puncture. The tip of the central venous catheter was in the false lumen. The central venous catheter was left in place initially and was removed after graft stent deployment. This case illustrates the importance of image guidance during central venous catheter insertion, which may further complicate an already complicated aortic dissection case.

  5. Upper body central venous catheters in pediatric cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jeffrey W; Vu, Dien N; Chai, Paul J; Kreutzer, Janet H; John, J Blaine; Vener, David F; Jacobs, Jeffrey P

    2013-11-01

    A central venous catheter located in the jugular or subclavian vein provides rapid, reliable vascular access for pediatric heart surgery. However, intravascular catheters are associated with vessel injury. Stenosis or thrombosis of central veins in the upper body can lead to 'superior vena cava syndrome' with markedly elevated venous pressures in the head and neck, causing facial swelling and headaches. This complication may be especially serious for patients with superior cavopulmonary (Glenn) or total cavopulmonary (Fontan) circulation. The authors hypothesized that upper body central line placement would be associated with a low risk of venous thrombosis or stenosis. A three-year retrospective review of infant and univentricular cardiac procedures at a single institution was performed. Two hundred and thirty-five consecutive cardiac surgical patients central lines are routinely placed by the anesthesiologist after induction of anesthesia for pediatric cardiac surgery at the study institution. The major exception is existing central venous access via an umbilical vein or femoral vein. Patients central line [Cook Medical polyurethane, no antibiotic or heparin coating]. Those over two years of age received a 5.0-French, 8-cm triple lumen central line [Cook Medical polyurethane, no antibiotic or heparin coating]. A retrospective review of charts, hospital reports, echocardiographic studies, and cardiac catheterization studies was performed. The combined population of infants central lines were inserted. A total of 158 right internal jugular vein catheters were placed. Two left internal jugular lines, two left subclavian lines, and nine right subclavian lines were placed in this population after failure to obtain right internal jugular access. Due to the small sample size (N = 13), the central lines not placed in the right internal jugular vein were excluded from further review. Two cases with right internal jugular venous lines were excluded due to death (without

  6. Complications of central venous catheter insertion in a teaching hospital

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    Pedro Henrique Comerlato

    Full Text Available Summary Introduction: Central venous catheters are fundamental to daily clinical practice. This procedure is mainly performed by residents, often without supervision or structured training. Objective: To describe the characteristics of central venous catheterization and the complication rate related to it. Method: Retrospective cohort study. Adult patients undergoing central venous catheter insertion out of the intensive care unit (ICU of a teaching hospital were selected from March 2014 to February 2015. Data were collected from medical charts using an electronic form. Clinical and laboratory characteristics from patients, procedure characteristics, and mechanical and infectious complications rates were assessed. Patients with and without complications were compared. Results: Three hundred and eleven (311 central venous catheterizations were evaluated. The main reasons to perform the procedure were lack of peripheral access, chemotherapy and sepsis. There were 20 mechanical complications (6% of procedures. Arterial puncture was the most common. Procedures performed in the second semester were associated with lower risk of complications (odds ratio 0.35 [95CI 0.12-0.98; p=0.037]. Thirty-five (35 catheter-related infection cases (11.1% were reported. They were related to younger patients and procedures performed by residents with more than one year of training. Procedures performed after the first trimester had a lower chance of infection. Conclusion: These results show that the rate of mechanical complications of central venous puncture in our hospital is similar to the literature, but more attention should be given to infection prevention measures.

  7. Rectosigmoid colon venous malformation successfully treated with propranolol and celecoxib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takanari Abematsu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of venous malformation needs to be clarified and, although various treatment modalities are available, an optimal treatment has not been established. A 19-year-old girl presented with venous malformation of the rectosigmoid colon. She showed severe anemia due to rectal hemorrhage; her hemoglobin (Hb level was 4.9 g/dl. A large venous malformation connected to an internal hemorrhoid was evident by endoscopy. Neither surgical resection nor sclerotherapy was indicated because of high blood flow in the venous malformation. Octreotide was initiated. However, the bleeding continued and she required persistent blood transfusions. We started propranolol in the 5th week of hospitalization. Celecoxib, which was started for her knee pain was found to be predictably effective, and we administered it regularly. Propranolol and celecoxib were gradually increased, the rectal bleeding decreased, and her anemia improved. Five months after the initiation of propranolol and celecoxib, she could maintain Hb at 15 g/dl without transfusion. Propranolol can contract blood vessels and celecoxib can inhibit vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF to result in anti-angiogenesis. This combination therapy might be useful for controlling intractable venous malformation.

  8. Squamous cell carcinoma developed on chronic venous leg ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sîrbi, Adelina Gabriela; Florea, Marius; Pătraşcu, Virgil; Rotaru, Maria; Mogoş, Dan Gabriel; Georgescu, Claudia Valentina; Mărgăritescu, Nicolae Dragoş

    2015-01-01

    Chronic venous leg ulcers (VLU), especially long-lasting non-healing ulcers, are among the risk factors for squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Malignant transformation of a VLU is a rare finding and the relative risk of carcinomatous transformation is quite low (about 5.8). SCC arising in the context of a VLU has a particularly aggressive behavior. A 76-year-old male patient with no relevant medical familial history, with chronic venous insufficiency CEAP C6 for 10 years [recurrent leg ulcers with favorable outcome (healing) after specific local and systemic treatment], showing for about three years one ulcerated lesion located on the anterior upper third of the right calf non-responsive to specific treatment, which subsequently increased their size and merged. Biopsy sample was taken. Histopathology showed epidermal acanthosis, papillomatosis, intense parakeratosis, pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia, dysplasia and moderately differentiated squamous cell carcinoma with areas of acantholysis. Immunohistochemistry (Ki67, EMA, cytokeratin 34βE12 and p63) was performed and all types of immunostaining were moderately to intense positive. Above-knee leg amputation and specific oncologic treatment were proposed as possible curative solutions but the patient refused. Ten months after diagnosis and discharge form the Department of Dermatology, the patient died. Patients with chronic venous leg ulcers and clinically suspicious lesions should be evaluated for malignant transformation of the venous lesion. When diagnosed, malignancy complicating a chronic venous leg ulcer requires a resolute treatment as it may be fatal.

  9. Education project to improve venous stasis self-management knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate patients' knowledge of chronic venous disease, venous ulcer occurrence and recurrence, and self-care at baseline, immediately following, 2, and 9 weeks after an educational intervention. The study sample comprised 30 patients diagnosed with venous ulcers. The research setting was an outpatient facility specializing in wound care located in South Florida; the educational intervention occurred in subjects' homes. Single group before and after intervention research design. Patients diagnosed with a first-time venous ulcer were assessed regarding their disease and self-care knowledge. Assessments were completed at baseline, immediately following an educational intervention, and during 2- and 9-week follow-up home visits. In addition to evaluating patient knowledge, wound healing (evaluated by the treating nurse or reported by the patient) was assessed at 2- and 9-week follow-up and wound recurrence was assessed at 9-week follow-up. The educational intervention resulted in a statistically significant increase in knowledge scores (P = .002). This change persisted when patients were evaluated during 2- and 9-week follow-up visits (P = .003). In addition, half of patients who completed the educational intervention remained free of recurrence when evaluated at 9 weeks. Results suggest that patient education related to venous ulcers improves knowledge regarding the disease process and self-care and reduces recurrence when measured at 9 weeks postintervention.

  10. Urinary hemosiderin: role in evaluation of chronic venous insufficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Lal Shrestha

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Chronic venous insufficiency (CVI leads to skin changes with dermal hemosiderin deposition. We studied the presence of hemosiderin in the urine to assess if this could be used as a biochemical marker for CVI. Hereby we present a case control study conducted in a tertiary care centre in South India. There were 100 cases with evidence of advanced CVI (the Clinical-Etiology-Anatomy-Pathophysiology classification: C5, C6 confirmed by duplex scanning. Controls were 50 patients with leg ulcers due to other etiologies. All patients were subjected to urinary hemosiderin testing. In all 100 patients with CVI (C5 and C6 disease axial venous reflux was confirmed by duplex ultrasound. Superficial venous reflux was noted in 71% of patients and deep venous reflux in 54.%. Primary venous insufficiency was the etiology in 81% of patients. Only 4/100 patients had detectable amounts of hemosiderin in the urine. Urine hemosiderin testing to determine presence or absence of CVI yielded the following values: positive predictive value-80%; negative predictive value-33%; sensitivity-4% and specificity-98%. The test could not be recommended as a marker of CVI. In Indian patients urinary hemosiderin is not a useful screening test in CVI.

  11. Uncontrolled seizures resulting from cerebral venous sinus thrombosis complicating neurobrucellosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fardin Faraji

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is a rare form of stroke caused by thrombosis in venous sinuses of the brain. In this study, we reported on a patient with venous sinus thrombosis and brucellosis who presented with uncontrolled seizure despite being treated with anti-epileptic drugs at high doses. The case was a 33-year-old woman with a history of controlled complex partial seizure who presented with headache, asthenia, and uncontrolled seizure for one month. She was febrile and a brain CT scan indicated hemorrhagic focus in the left posterior parietal and the temporal lobe. Magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance venography also proved venous sinus thrombosis in the left transverse sinus. Besides [In addition], a laboratory assessment confirmed brucellosis. Following the treatment with anti-coagulant, anti-brucellosis, and anti-epileptic agents, the patient was discharged in good condition with medical orders. Clinical suspicion and accurate evaluation of a patient′s history is the most important clue in diagnosis and treatment of brucellosis and cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, especially in uncontrolled seizure in patients who had previously been under control.

  12. Human cerebral venous outflow pathway depends on posture and central venous pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gisolf, J; van Lieshout, J J; van Heusden, K

    2004-01-01

    and a Valsalva manoeuvre in the supine and standing position. The model, consisting of 2 jugular veins, each a chain of 10 units containing nonlinear resistances and capacitors, and a vertebral plexus containing a resistance, showed blood flow mainly through the internal jugular veins in the supine position......, but mainly through the vertebral plexus in the upright position. A Valsalva manoeuvre while standing completely re-opened the jugular veins. Results of ultrasound imaging of the right internal jugular vein cross-sectional area at the level of the laryngeal prominence in six healthy subjects, before...... and during a Valsalva manoeuvre in both body positions, correlate highly with model simulation of the jugular cross-sectional area (R(2) = 0.97). The results suggest that the cerebral venous flow distribution depends on posture and CVP: in supine humans the internal jugular veins are the primary pathway...

  13. Complex Partial Epilepsy Associated with Temporal Lobe Developmental Venous Anomaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohail, Amna; Xiong, Zhengming; Qureshi, Mushtaq H; Qureshi, Adnan I

    2015-05-01

    Developmental venous anomalies (DVA) are found incidentally but sometimes patients with these anomalies present with varying degrees of neurologic manifestations. We report a patient with early onset complex partial epilepsy and associated DVA and discuss the natural history, neuroimaging and clinical characteristics, and management. A 21-year-old man presented with a history of complex partial epilepsy with secondary generalization which started at the age of 4 years. An electroencephalogram (EEG) was performed which demonstrated spike and wave discharges predominantly in the left frontotemporal region. A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed which demonstrated a linear flow void suggestive of a DVA. The angiogram demonstrated DVA that connected with the left transverse venous sinus and an anastomotic vein between the straight sinus and the transverse venous sinus traversing the brain parenchyma. He was started on carbamezipine for the treatment of complex partial seizures. Temporal lobe DVA may be associated with complex partial seizures and can be diagnosed by MRI and angiographic findings.

  14. Can venous cord gas values predict fetal acidemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Kate; Whelan, Anna R; Grobman, William A; Miller, Emily S

    2017-09-01

    Umbilical cord arterial blood gas values are used to diagnose fetal acidemia; however, arterial cord blood specimens are frequently not available. We sought to assess whether umbilical cord venous blood gas values can be used to reliably predict fetal acidemia. This is an observational study of women with a singleton gestation at a single tertiary care hospital who delivered from September 2010 through August 2015 and had both umbilical cord arterial and venous blood gas samples measured. Fetal acidemia was defined in 2 ways: (1) umbilical cord arterial pH gas values and the areas under the curve were calculated. Umbilical cord venous blood gas cutoffs associated with gas values. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. An accessory venous channel of abdomen: an anatomical insight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, S; Rath, G; Dhuria, R; Yadav, Y; Suri, R; Das, S

    2011-01-01

    Variations in the venous architecture of the retro peritoneum is not uncommon, mostly those of Inferior Vena Cava (IVC). In this report we describe an extremely rare anatomical entity, where the IVC is formed by the union of the right common iliac vein and the left internal iliac vein. This is associated with a parallel venous channel which is the upward continuation of the left external iliac vein, which finally drains into the IVC at the level of renal veins. Awareness of such unusual variation of abdominal venous channels is helpful during retroperitoneal and laparoscopic surgeries of the abdomen, in staging of abdominal neoplasm, in radiological interpretation as well as therapeutic intervention in cases of recurrent pulmonary embolism.

  16. Fecal impaction causing pelvic venous compression and edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Naramore

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Chronic constipation is a common condition which may result in fecal impaction. A 13-year-old male with chronic constipation and encopresis presented with fecal impaction for three weeks. The impaction caused abdominal pain, distension, encopresis, and decreased oral intake. He was found in severe distress with non-pitting edema of his feet and ankles along with perineal edema. The pedal edema worsened after receiving a fluid bolus, so concern arose for venous compression or a thrombus. A Duplex Ultrasound demonstrated changes in the venous waveforms of the bilateral external iliac and common femoral veins without thrombosis. Manual disimpaction and polyethylene glycol 3350 with electrolytes resolved the pedal and perineal edema. Four months later, he had soft bowel movements without recurrence of the edema. A repeat Duplex Ultrasound was normal. We present a child in whom severe fecal impaction caused pelvic venous compression resulting in bilateral pedal and perineal edema.

  17. Medical and surgical treatment of chronic venous ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Michol A; Qazi, Umair; Bass, Eric; Zenilman, Jonathan; Lazarus, Gerald; Valle, M Frances; Malas, Mahmoud B

    2015-01-01

    Venous ulcer of the lower extremity is a common vascular condition and is associated with decreased quality of life, reduced mobility, and social isolation. Treatment of chronic venous ulcer (CVU) includes compression therapy, debridement of the ulcer when necessary, and wound care. Collagen and antimicrobial dressings can improve the proportion of ulcers healed compared with compression alone. Acellular skin equivalents are not superior to compression, but cellular human skin equivalents can promote more rapid healing, particularly in patients with longstanding ulcers. Current vascular surgical practice is to eliminate documented reflux or obstruction in patients with CVU that have failed a 3-month period of compression dressing, debridement, and local wound care. We found that surgical treatment of the superficial venous system can decrease the time to healing of CVUs compared with compression therapy alone, but does not increase the proportion of ulcers healed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Central venous access: techniques and indications in oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcy, Pierre-Yves [Antoine Lacassagne Anticancer Research Institute, Department of Radiodiagnostics and Interventional Radiology, Nice, Cedex 1 (France)

    2008-10-15

    Long lines can be inserted centrally or peripherally through patent veins into the central venous system down to the atrial caval junction. Traditionally surgeons, anesthetists, cardiologists and more recently interventional radiologists have been placing them using vein cutdown or percutaneous needle puncture techniques. Typical candidates for implanted venous catheters are cancer patients undergoing long-term chemotherapy. The most important issues, in addition to the patency of central veins and the history of previous indwelling catheters, pacewires or venous thrombosis, are the patient's performance status, body mass index, medical history and respiratory status, and the relevant technique. The present article will give an overview of the radiological and surgical implantation techniques and will highlight the impact of imaging means on the technical feasibility, assessment and treatment of device-related complications. (orig.)

  19. Life-threatening Cerebral Venous Thrombosis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Agustin Godoy

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVT can compromise dural sinus, cerebral veins or both. It is an uncommon condition and it is more prevalent in young women. Several prothrombotic states are the principal predisposing factors. Clinical spectrum of presentation is wide, so this entity requires a high suspect index for correct and prompt diagnosis. CVT may develop serious complications that can be life-threatening such as hemorrhagic venous infarctions, cerebral edema, and intracranial hypertension. This report describes the case of a woman who was in treatment for unspecific vaginal bleeding with oral contraceptives. Suddenly she deteriorated to coma with severe respiratory compromise. Neuroimaging showed thrombosis of multiple venous sinus. Physiological neuroprotection, osmotherapy, mechanical ventilation and anticoagulation therapy were the keystones of treatment. In a few months, the patient has recovered a good functional status, while maintaining a motor deficit on the right hand.

  20. Cerebral venous thrombosis presenting as multiple lower cranial nerve palsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byju, N; Jose, James; Saifudheen, K; Gafoor, V Abdul; Jithendranath, P

    2012-10-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a well-recognized entity, but its clinical presentation is varied and often mimics many neurological disorders, making it a diagnostic challenge. Cerebral venous thrombosis has a wide spectrum of signs and symptoms, which may evolve suddenly or over weeks. It mimics many neurological conditions such as meningitis, encephalopathy, idiopathic intracranial hypertension, and stroke. Cerebral venous thrombosis presenting as multiple lower cranial nerve palsies, are rarely reported. We describe a pregnant lady who presented with sensorineural deafness of the right ear and paralysis of the 9(th), 10(th), and 12(th) cranial nerves on the right side. She was diagnosed to have thrombosis of the right transverse sinus and sigmoid sinus with extension to the jugular vein and confluence of sinuses. She improved with anticoagulant treatment.

  1. Assistance protocol for venous ulcers patients: validation of contents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Vieira Dantas

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Venous ulcers require complex treatment and are responsible for significant morbidity and mortality rates. This study aims at identifying aspects validated by the jury for the preparation of an assistance protocol for venous ulcer sufferers. It is a descriptive and quantitative research, with 39 professionals (30 nurses, 7 doctors and two physiotherapists, held at the Onofre Lopes University Hospital, between April and July/2010. Data collection began through a questionnaire checklist. Analysis was performed through Statistical Package for Social Science 15.0, assessing compliance with guidelines. Results were the compositional aspects of the protocol: assessment of patient and lesion history/documentation, wound care/perilesional skin, dressing suggestion, use of antibiotics and pain treatment, surgical treatment/medication, improving venous return and relapse prevention, patient referral, professional training and referral/counter-referral. It was concluded that to compose the protocol, aspects related to diagnosis, treatment and injury prevention must be considered.

  2. Venous ulcer: late complication of a traumatic arteriovenous fistula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Calvin J; Dardik, Alan; Sumpio, Bauer; Indes, Jeff; Muhs, Bart; Ochoa Chaar, Cassius I

    2015-01-01

    Arteriovenous fistula (AVF) formation after penetrating trauma is a well-described phenomenon. However, diagnosis of traumatic AVF is frequently delayed as patients often do not have hard signs of vascular injury at the initial presentation. Late complications of traumatic AVF include arterial and venous dilatation, distal ischemia, venous congestion, and congestive heart failure. This case report describes a traumatic femoral AVF causing distal venous ulceration 3 years after the injury. The AVF was treated with open repair. In the operating room, the Nicoladoni-Branham sign was elicited. The ulcer healed at 1 month and has not recurred at 1-year follow-up. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Cryptogenic Isolated Cortical Venous Infarct: A Report of Three Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ertuğrul Uzar

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Cortical vein infarction without dural sinus involvement is extremely rare. Herein, we present three patients with headache, partial seizure and right-sided numbness. On neurological examination, focal neurologic deficit was not observed in our patients. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed cerebral ischemia which showed as hypointense on T1-weighted images and hyperintense on T2-weighted images that do not follow the boundary of arterial territories, indicating cortical venous infarct. Cortical venous infarct should be suspected in patients who present with sudden onset headache and/or focal epileptic seizures even if there is no neurologic deficit. The diagnosis and treatment of cortical venous infarct should be considered as an emergency because of the high potential for full recovery with anticoagulant treatment.

  4. Arterio-venous shunts or low oxygen utilization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozin, Alexander P

    2010-02-01

    An idea of arteriovenous shunts (AVS) was proposed for explanation of dynamic regulation of oxygenation and venous hyperoxia. A formula enabling calculation of AVS and real CO2 production has recently been derived by comparing data of arterial and venous blood gases. Regarding venous hyperoxia, there is a need to differentiate capillary to tissue transport defect (low oxygen utilisation-LOU) from AVS, which may exist simultaneously. The AVS may be associated with normal or relatively high oxygen utilization from the capillary vessels and increased CO2 production. AVS is proposed to carry protective and 'stealing' properties including renal, cardiac, and pulmonary hemodynamic. Calculations of the AVS may be important for dynamic assessment of vascular and metabolic status and in emergency medicine.

  5. Concomitant cavernous hemangioma and venous angioma of the orbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Tatsuo; Tane, Nobuhiro; Ohira, Akihiro; Matsuoka, Yotaro; Maruyama, Riruke

    2004-01-01

    An unusual case of cavernous hemangioma coexisting with venous angioma in the ipsilateral orbit is described. A 67-year-old woman had a mass in the lower eyelid of her right eye and proptosis. Imaging examinations showed two masses connected to each other in the extraconal space of the right orbit. Anterior orbitotomy was performed to remove the tumors. Histopathological evaluation of the anteriorly located tumor revealed cavernous hemangioma. The posteriorly located tumor was found to be a venous angioma. Endothelial cells in both tumors showed positive immunostaining for factor VIII-related antigen and smooth muscle actin. Immunoreactivity of smooth muscle actin was more prominent in the interstitium of the posteriorly located tumor. Coexistence of cavernous hemangioma and venous angioma in the same area suggests that they are a continuum and of the same origin. Copyright Japanese Ophthalmological Society 2004

  6. New anticoagulants for the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon J McRae

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Simon J McRae, Jeffrey S GinsbergDepartment of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, CanadaAbstract: Anticoagulant therapy is effective at preventing the development of venous thromboembolism in high-risk patients, and reduces morbidity and mortality in individuals with established thromboembolic disease. Vitamin K antagonists and heparins are currently the most commonly used anticoagulant drugs, but they have practical limitations. Therefore, new antithrombotic agents with predictable dose-responses (thereby decreasing the need for monitoring without compromising efficacy or safety, ideally available in an oral formulation and with a rapidly reversible anticoagulant effect, are needed. New drugs fulfilling some of the above criteria have been developed and have proven to be effective agents for the treatment and prevention of venous thromboembolism.Keywords: venous thromboembolism, anticoagulants, antithrombotic

  7. Cortical venous thrombosis following exogenous androgen use for bodybuilding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sveinsson, Olafur; Herrman, Lars

    2013-02-05

    There are only a few reports of patients developing cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) after androgen therapy. We present a young man who developed cortical venous thrombosis after using androgens to increase muscle mass. He was hospitalised for parasthesia and dyspraxia in the left hand followed by a generalised tonic-clonic seizure. At admission, he was drowsy, not fully orientated, had sensory inattention, pronation drift and a positive extensor response, all on the left side. The patient had been using anabolic steroids (dainabol 20 mg/day) for the last month for bodybuilding. CT angiography showed a right cortical venous thrombosis. Anticoagulation therapy was started with intravenous heparin for 11 days and oral anticoagulation (warfarin) thereafter. A control CT angiography 4 months later showed resolution of the thrombosis. He recovered fully.

  8. [An update on the treatment of venous insufficiency in pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Nora, B; Álvarez-Silvares, E

    2017-12-14

    Chronic venous insufficiency is a long-term pathological condition resulting from anatomical or functional alterations of the venous system. This leads to the appearance of symptoms and physical signs that affect a large part of the population and particularly pregnant women, due to the physiology of pregnancy. The few published studies on the use of pharmacological treatments of venous insufficiency in this group of the population, often makes the management of this condition difficult in routine clinical practice. A review is presented in this article, with all the latest updates in the treatment of this condition during pregnancy. There are numerous general, and some pharmacological, recommendations, that we can safely offer the pregnant patient. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Deep Venous Thrombosis Screening in Patients with Inherited Bleeding Disorders and Central Venous Catheters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cost, Carrye R.; Journeycake, Janna M.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Children with inherited bleeding disorders often require central venous catheters (CVC). Although CVCs are known to be complicated by deep venous thrombosis (DVT), little is known about the timeline of DVT development or risk of post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS). Aim To determine the timeline and confirm the incidence of thrombosis in patients with bleeding disorders who have CVCs. Methods In 2002 we instituted a screening program to monitor for CVC-related complications in children with hemophilia and von Willebrand disease. This is a retrospective review of this cohort. All children with CVC followed between January 1, 2000 and June 1, 2009 were evaluated for DVT every 24 months with contrast venography and Doppler sonography. An institutional PTS severity scale was utilized at each visit. Results Thirty-six patients had 37 CVCs placed. Thirty patients had imaging studies, with DVT observed in 14 (47%). Most DVT were diagnosed at the first venogram (median CVC duration 26 months). There were no abnormal ultrasound results. Sixteen patients (44%) had clinical findings consistent with PTS, including 10 (71%) with an abnormal venogram. Dilated chest wall veins appeared to be more strongly associated with underlying DVT (positive predictive value of 0.8) than arm circumference discrepancy. Successful transition to use of peripheral veins occurred at a median of 11 months after abnormal venograms. Conclusions CVC-related DVT is common in children with inherited bleeding disorders, and likely occurs earlier than previously thought. Clinical signs of PTS are also common, but long-term sequelae and severity of PTS are not known. PMID:21435117

  10. Total anomalous pulmonary venous connection: outcome of postoperative pulmonary venous obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seale, Anna N; Uemura, Hideki; Webber, Steven A; Partridge, John; Roughton, Michael; Ho, Siew Y; McCarthy, Karen P; Jones, Sheila; Shaughnessy, Lynda; Sunnegardh, Jan; Hanseus, Katarina; Berggren, Hakan; Johansson, Sune; Rigby, Michael L; Keeton, Barry R; Daubeney, Piers E F

    2013-05-01

    Pulmonary venous obstruction (PVO) is an important cause of late mortality in total anomalous pulmonary venous connection (TAPVC). We aimed to describe current practices for the management of postoperative PVO and the efficacy of the different interventional procedures. We conducted a retrospective international collaborative population-based study involving 19 pediatric cardiac centers in the United Kingdom, Ireland, and Sweden. Patients with TAPVC born between January 1, 1998, and December 31, 2004, were identified. Patients with functionally univentricular circulation or atrial isomerism were excluded. All available data and images were reviewed. Of 406 patients undergoing repair of TAPVC, 71 (17.5%) had postoperative PVO. The diagnosis was made within 6 months of surgery in 59 (83%) of the 71 patients. In 12, serial imaging documented change in appearance of the pulmonary veins. Good-sized pulmonary veins can progress to diffusely small veins and rarely atresia. Patients presenting after 6 months had less severe disease; all are alive at most recent follow-up. Fifty-six (13.8%) of 406 patients underwent intervention for postoperative PVO: 44 had surgical treatment and 12 had an initial catheter intervention. One half underwent 1 or more reinterventions. Three-year survival for patients with postoperative PVO was 58.7% (95% confidence intervals, 46.2%-69.2%) with a trend that those having a surgical strategy did better (P = .083). Risk factors for death included earlier presentation after TAPVC repair, diffusely small pulmonary veins at presentation of postoperative PVO, and an increased number of lung segments affected by obstruction. Postoperative PVO tends to appear in the first 6 months after TAPVC repair and can be progressive. Early intervention for PVO may be indicated before irreversible secondary changes occur. Copyright © 2013 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Review of the cost of venous thromboembolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandez MM

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Maria M Fernandez,1 Susan Hogue,1 Ronald Preblick,2 Winghan Jacqueline Kwong2 1RTI-Health Solutions, Market Access and Outcomes Strategy, Research Triangle Park, NC, 2Daiichi Sankyo, Inc., Health Economics & Outcomes Research, Parsippany, NJ, USA Background: Venous thromboembolism (VTE is the second most common medical complication and a cause of excess length of hospital stay. Its incidence and economic burden are expected to increase as the population ages. We reviewed the recent literature to provide updated cost estimates on VTE management. Methods: Literature search strategies were performed in PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Collaboration, Health Economic Evaluations Database, EconLit, and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts from 2003–2014. Additional studies were identified through searching bibliographies of related publications. Results: Eighteen studies were identified and are summarized in this review; of these, 13 reported data from the USA, four from Europe, and one from Canada. Three main cost estimations were identified: cost per VTE hospitalization or per VTE readmission; cost for VTE management, usually reported annually or during a specific period; and annual all-cause costs in patients with VTE, which included the treatment of complications and comorbidities. Cost estimates per VTE hospitalization were generally similar across the US studies, with a trend toward an increase over time. Cost per pulmonary embolism hospitalization increased from $5,198–$6,928 in 2000 to $8,764 in 2010. Readmission for recurrent VTE was generally more costly than the initial index event admission. Annual health plan payments for services related to VTE also increased from $10,804–$16,644 during the 1998–2004 period to an estimated average of $15,123 for a VTE event from 2008 to 2011. Lower costs for VTE hospitalizations and annualized all-cause costs were estimated in European countries and Canada. Conclusion: Costs for VTE treatment are

  12. INJECTION-MOLDING APPARATUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobell, G.M.

    1958-02-11

    This patent is drawn to an injection molding apparatus for producing a tube closed at one end wherein the normally unsupported end of the core located in the cavity during the injection of the molten material to fill the space between the core and cavity wall, which supporting means is automatically removed from operation during the forming of the closed end of the tube. This support means is a plug extending through the end of the core into a recess in the bottom of the cavity where the closed end of the tube is to be formed. The plug is spring pressed into said recess and is forced out of the recess by a slidable bushing at the top of the cavity which is moved against the force of the spring by the molten material when it fills the uppormost open end portion of the cavity, thereby permitting the closed end of the tube to be formed.

  13. Evidence for varicose vein surgery in venous leg ulceration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheirelseid, Elrasheid A H; Bashar, Khalid; Aherne, Thomas; Babiker, Thamir; Naughton, Peter; Moneley, Daragh; Walsh, Stewart R; Leahy, Austin L

    2016-08-01

    Venous leg ulcers affect 1-3% of adults with a significant economic impact, utilizing 1% of annual healthcare budgets in some western European countries. To determine the effects of intervention for incompetent superficial veins on ulcer healing and recurrence in patients with active or healed venous ulcers. In October 2014, we searched Medline, CINAHL, EMBASE, Scopus, the Cochrane library and Web of Science without date or language restriction for relevant randomized or observational studies. Bibliographies of included studies were also searched for additional studies. Observational studies or randomized controlled trials comparing intervention for varicose veins with compression therapy alone for venous leg ulcers were eligible. In addition, studies compared open to endovenous therapy for varicose veins in patients with leg ulcers and those compared treating saphenous and perforating veins to treating saphenous veins only were also included. Studies had to report at least one ulcer-related outcome (healing rate, recurrence or time to healing). Details of potentially eligible studies were extracted and summarized using a data extraction table. Data extraction and quality assessment were performed independently by two review authors, and any disagreements resolved by consensus or by arbitration of a third author. Intervention for superficial venous reflux improved ulcer healing (risk ratio = 1.11 [1.00, 1.22], 95% CI, p = 0.04) and reduced recurrence (risk ratio = 0.48 [0.32, 0.67], 95% CI, p venous leg ulcer is at beast weak. A well-structured RCT is required to investigate the role of endovenous ablation of incompetent superficial veins in improving venous leg ulcer outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. How to objectively assess jugular primary venous obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Zamboni

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Last January The Lancet published the article by Traboulsee et al. Prevalence of extracranial venous narrowing on catheter venography in people with multiple sclerosis, their sibilings, and unrelated healthy controls: a blinded, case control study. These Authors confirmed the presence of chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency with a high prevalence of about 70% in the Canadian population, but without significant differences between patients and healthy controls, yet. However, they used a criterion never published to assess stenosis, in alternative to the classic measurement of the diameter in the segment immediately preceding the narrowest point. Traboulsee et al. measure the stenosis along the entire length of the internal jugular vein, by comparing the maximum diameter with the narrowest point. It has been demonstrated, from normal anatomy findings, how the jugular bulb diameter normally exceeds 50% of the minimum diameter of the internal jugular vein, clearly showing the reason why Traboulsee et al. did not find significant differences between people with multiple sclerosis, their sibilings, and unrelated healthy controls. Furthermore, as the outcome measure of Traboulsee et al., wall stenosis is a neglected part of primary venous obstruction, because in the majority of cases obstruction is the consequence of intraluminal obstacles, as a considerable part of truncular venous malformations, and/or compression; rarely of external hypoplasia. Finally, several recently published methods can be adopted for objective assessment of restricted jugular flow in course of chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency, by the means of non invasive magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound and plethysmography. This may help us in improving the assessment of cerebral venous return in the near future.

  15. STUDY OF ADVANTAGES AND DISADVANTAGES OF TOTALLY IMPLANTABLE VENOUS ACCESS DEVICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ahmadi

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Totally implantable venous access devices (TIVAD or implantable catheter ports are devices which can be implanted subcutaneously. They enable prolonged and repeated access to the vascular system, into the peritoneal cavity or intravertebral space. This device is particularly useful for repeated medical injection, for blood sampling or transfusion of blood and blood derivatives and for total parenteral nutrition (TPN. Although many patients benefit from the insertion of TIVAD without any secondary effects, any surgical implantation can nevertheless lead to complications. ‎In this study, we investigated the advantages and disadvantages of TIVAD catheter in pediatric age group. A total of 94 cases, 2 to 14 years old, were included in our study. We implanted TIVAD in these patients for chemotherapy in 83 cases (88.29%, for prolonged TPN in 6 cases (6.38%, for corticosteroid and antibiotic therapy after ‎Kasai operation in 2 cases (2.12%, for intermittent IV therapy in 2 cases (2.12% and for need to partial parenteral nutrition in 1 case (1.06%. Out of 94 cases, 14 cases (15% had some kind of complications and 80 cases (85% had no complication. There was no mortality. Most patients and their parents (82 cases, 87.23% were satisfied from TIVAD. ‎It seems that TIVAD can be a useful device for many chronic patients who need an IV access for multiple injections.

  16. PS injection area

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    Looking against the direction of protons in the main ring (left): the beam coming from the linac 1 either goes to the booster (on the right) or is deflected towards the PS to be directly injected into section 26 (facing the camera). Also shown the start of the TT2 line, ejected from straight section 16 to go towards the ISR passing over the beam line from the linac. (see Photo Archive 7409009)

  17. Snowplow Injection Front Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, T. E.; Chandler, M. O.; Buzulukova, N.; Collinson, G. A.; Kepko, E. L.; Garcia-Sage, K. S.; Henderson, M. G.; Sitnov, M. I.

    2013-01-01

    As the Polar spacecraft apogee precessed through the magnetic equator in 2001, Polar encountered numerous substorm events in the region between geosynchronous orbit and 10 RE geocentric distance; most of them in the plasma sheet boundary layers. Of these, a small number was recorded near the neutral sheet in the evening sector. Polar/Thermal Ion Dynamics Experiment provides a unique perspective on the lowest-energy ion plasma, showing that these events exhibited a damped wavelike character, initiated by a burst of radially outward flow transverse to the local magnetic field at approximately 80 km/s. They then exhibit strongly damped cycles of inward/outward flow with a period of several minutes. After one or two cycles, they culminated in a hot plasma electron and ion injection, quite similar to those observed at geosynchronous orbit. Cold plasmaspheric plasmas comprise the outward flow cycles, while the inward flow cycles contain counterstreaming field-parallel polar wind-like flows. The observed wavelike structure, preceding the arrival of an earthward moving substorm injection front, suggests an outward displacement driven by the inward motion at local times closer to midnight, that is, a "snowplow" effect. The damped in/out flows are consistent with interchange oscillations driven by the arrival at the observed local time by an injection originating at greater radius and local time.

  18. Effects of Handgrip Training With Venous Restriction on Brachial Artery Vasodilation

    OpenAIRE

    Credeur, Daniel P.; Hollis, Brandon C.; Welsch, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that resistance training with restricted venous blood flow (Kaatsu) results in significant strength gains and muscle hypertrophy. However, few studies have examined the concurrent vascular responses following restrictive venous blood flow training protocols.

  19. High risk of pregnancy-related venous thromboembolism in women with multiple thrombophilic defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Folkeringa, Nienke; Leendert, Jan; Brouwer, P.; Korteweg, Fleurisca J.; Veeger, Nic J. G. M.; Erwich, Jan Jaap H. M.; van der Meer, Jan

    Pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of venous thromboembolism, which probably varies according to the presence of single or multiple thrombophilic defects. This retrospective family cohort study assessed the risk of venous thromboembolism during pregnancy and puerperium, and the

  20. Comparison of complication rates between umbilical and peripherally inserted central venous catheters in newborns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arnts, I.J.J.; Bullens, L.M.; Groenewoud, J.M.M.; Liem, K.D.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the complication rates between umbilical central venous catheters and peripherally inserted central venous catheters in newborns and to investigate whether other variables might increase complication rates. DESIGN: A retrospective observational study. SETTING: A Level III