WorldWideScience

Sample records for vegetation mapping methods

  1. The Circumpolar Arctic vegetation map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Donald A.; Raynolds, Martha K.; Daniels, F.J.A.; Einarsson, E.; Elvebakk, A.; Gould, W.A.; Katenin, A.E.; Kholod, S.S.; Markon, C.J.; Melnikov, E.S.; Moskalenko, N.G.; Talbot, S. S.; Yurtsev, B.A.; Bliss, L.C.; Edlund, S.A.; Zoltai, S.C.; Wilhelm, M.; Bay, C.; Gudjonsson, G.; Ananjeva, G.V.; Drozdov, D.S.; Konchenko, L.A.; Korostelev, Y.V.; Ponomareva, O.E.; Matveyeva, N.V.; Safranova, I.N.; Shelkunova, R.; Polezhaev, A.N.; Johansen, B.E.; Maier, H.A.; Murray, D.F.; Fleming, Michael D.; Trahan, N.G.; Charron, T.M.; Lauritzen, S.M.; Vairin, B.A.

    2005-01-01

    Question: What are the major vegetation units in the Arctic, what is their composition, and how are they distributed among major bioclimate subzones and countries? Location: The Arctic tundra region, north of the tree line. Methods: A photo-interpretive approach was used to delineate the vegetation onto an Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) base image. Mapping experts within nine Arctic regions prepared draft maps using geographic information technology (ArcInfo) of their portion of the Arctic, and these were later synthesized to make the final map. Area analysis of the map was done according to bioclimate subzones, and country. The integrated mapping procedures resulted in other maps of vegetation, topography, soils, landscapes, lake cover, substrate pH, and above-ground biomass. Results: The final map was published at 1:7 500 000 scale map. Within the Arctic (total area = 7.11 x 106 km 2), about 5.05 ?? 106 km2 is vegetated. The remainder is ice covered. The map legend generally portrays the zonal vegetation within each map polygon. About 26% of the vegetated area is erect shrublands, 18% peaty graminoid tundras, 13% mountain complexes, 12% barrens, 11% mineral graminoid tundras, 11% prostrate-shrub tundras, and 7% wetlands. Canada has by far the most terrain in the High Arctic mostly associated with abundant barren types and prostrate dwarf-shrub tundra, whereas Russia has the largest area in the Low Arctic, predominantly low-shrub tundra. Conclusions: The CAVM is the first vegetation map of an entire global biome at a comparable resolution. The consistent treatment of the vegetation across the circumpolar Arctic, abundant ancillary material, and digital database should promote the application to numerous land-use, and climate-change applications and will make updating the map relatively easy. ?? IAVS; Opulus Press.

  2. 3D Vegetation Mapping Using UAVSAR, LVIS, and LIDAR Data Acquisition Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderon, Denice

    2011-01-01

    The overarching objective of this ongoing project is to assess the role of vegetation within climate change. Forests capture carbon, a green house gas, from the atmosphere. Thus, any change, whether, natural (e.g. growth, fire, death) or due to anthropogenic activity (e.g. logging, burning, urbanization) may have a significant impact on the Earth's carbon cycle. Through the use of Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) and NASA's Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS), which are airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) remote sensing technologies, we gather data to estimate the amount of carbon contained in forests and how the content changes over time. UAVSAR and LVIS sensors were sent all over the world with the objective of mapping out terrain to gather tree canopy height and biomass data; This data is in turn used to correlate vegetation with the global carbon cycle around the world.

  3. Comparison of satellite imagery and infrared aerial photography as vegetation mapping methods in an arctic study area: Jameson Land, East Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Birger Ulf; Mosbech, Anders

    1994-01-01

    Remote Sensing, vegetation mapping, SPOT, Landsat TM, aerial photography, Jameson Land, East Greenland......Remote Sensing, vegetation mapping, SPOT, Landsat TM, aerial photography, Jameson Land, East Greenland...

  4. REMOTE SENSING METHODS FOR PHYTOMASS ESTIMATION AND MAPPING OF TUNDRA VEGETATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Golubeva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mapping of above-ground phytomass provides a baseline for monitoring climate-induced changes, especially in the northern regions. This is important for practical applications, such as assessing quality of pastures and defining reindeer migration routes. Use of very high resolution (1 m and better aerial and satellite images is of particular interest, because changes at the level of individual trees can be monitored over comparatively large areas. The goals of this study were to: i establish relations between phytomass values and structure and spectral reflectance derived from ground research and ii upscale from ground data to QuickBird satellite imagery to compile maps of above-ground phytomass for key sites. As a result, the study has produced a preliminary map of the above-ground phytomass of lichens for a test site in the Tuliok Valley, Khibiny Mountains, central Kola Peninsula, Russia, with phytomass values well in line with fieldwork data.

  5. Spatial Vegetation Data for Acadia National Park Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has produced the Vegetation Spatial Database Coverage (vegetation map) for the...

  6. Spatial Vegetation Data for Effigy Mounds National Monument Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — The vegetation spatial database coverage (vegetation map) is a product of the Effigy Mounds National Monument Vegetation Mapping Project, USGS-NPS Vegetation Mapping...

  7. Spatial Vegetation Data for Colorado National Monument Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — The vegetation units on this map were determined through a series of image processing steps including unsupervised classification, ecological modeling and...

  8. Spatial Vegetation Data for Dinosaur National Monument Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This polygon feature class represents vegetation communities mapped at Dinosaur National Monument. The polygons were delineated following guidelines set by the...

  9. Applicability of a vegetation indices-based method to map bark beetle outbreaks in the High Tatra Mountains

    OpenAIRE

    Mária Havašová; Tomáš Bucha; Ján Ferenčík; Rastislav Jakuš

    2015-01-01

    Automatic identification of forest patches disturbed by the spruce bark beetle Ips typographus L. is crucial to reveal the rules of following bark beetle outbreaks on the landscape scale. Landsat imagery provides free resources to outline past and present gradations of bark beetle outbreaks (BBOs). The objective of this study is to identify the most sensitive vegetation index through different method of vegetation index differencing to identify past and actual bark beetle outbreaks. Six Lands...

  10. Applicability of a vegetation indices-based method to map bark beetle outbreaks in the High Tatra Mountains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mária Havašová

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Automatic identification of forest patches disturbed by the spruce bark beetle Ips typographus L. is crucial to reveal the rules of following bark beetle outbreaks on the landscape scale. Landsat imagery provides free resources to outline past and present gradations of bark beetle outbreaks (BBOs. The objective of this study is to identify the most sensitive vegetation index through different method of vegetation index differencing to identify past and actual bark beetle outbreaks. Six Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM images, from 2005–2009 and 2011, were converted into selected vegetation indices (VIs sensitive to conifer tree health in a Norway spruce–dominated forest in the High Tatra Mountains. The Vegetation Condition Index (VCI, Moisture Stress Index (MSI, Normalised Difference Moisture Index (NDMI, Normalised Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI,   Disturbance Index (DI and Changed Disturbance Index (DI´ were calculated separately for every year, and the methodology of vegetation index differencing was applied to multiple two-year time periods (2005–2006, 2006–2007, 2007–2008, 2008–2009 and 2010–2011, thus producing the Changed Vegetation Index (ΔVI. A set of thresholds was established on ΔVI to classify disturbed and undisturbed forest due to BBOs; the sensitivity of different VIs to identify BBO was equally evaluated. The highest accuracies of classifications were reached in 2007 and 2011 (kappa index of agreement >70% and >40%, respectively, which were characterised by an epidemic phase of a BBO. All selected VIs were highly sensitive to BBOs, except for NDVI. The stable threshold value for change detection is not widely applicable to detect past forest disturbances caused by bark beetles, however. Finally, for further research of the epidemic phases of BBOs, we recommend the utilisation of the vegetation indices VCI, MSI and NDMI to detect BBOs because of their simplicity and easy interpretability.

  11. Crestridge Vegetation Map [ds211

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — This layer represents vegetation communities in the Department of Fish and Game's Crestridge Ecological Reserve. The County of San Diego, the Conservation Biology...

  12. Sand Lake WMD vegetation mapping project update

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Final report on the vegetation mapping project at Sand Lake Wetland Management District. This project is being completed by the use of SPRING software and ground...

  13. National Park Service Vegetation Mapping Inventory Program: Natchez Trace Parkway vegetation mapping project report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hop, Kevin D.; Strassman, Andrew C.; Nordman, Carl; Pyne, Milo; White, Rickie; Jakusz, Joseph; Hoy, Erin E.; Dieck, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    The National Park Service (NPS) Vegetation Mapping Inventory (VMI) Program is an effort to classify, describe, and map existing vegetation of national park units for the NPS Natural Resource Inventory and Monitoring (I&M) Program. The NPS VMI Program is managed by the NPS I&M Division and provides baseline vegetation information to the NPS Natural Resource I&M Program. The U.S. Geological Survey Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center, NatureServe, NPS Gulf Coast Network, and NPS Natchez Trace Parkway (NATR; also referred to as Parkway) have completed vegetation classification and mapping of NATR for the NPS VMI Program.Mappers, ecologists, and botanists collaborated to affirm vegetation types within the U.S. National Vegetation Classification (USNVC) of NATR and to determine how best to map them by using aerial imagery. Analyses of data from 589 vegetation plots had been used to describe an initial 99 USNVC associations in the Parkway; this classification work was completed prior to beginning this NATR vegetation mapping project. Data were collected during this project from another eight quick plots to support new vegetation types not previously identified at the Parkway. Data from 120 verification sites were collected to test the field key to vegetation associations and the application of vegetation associations to a sample set of map polygons. Furthermore, data from 900 accuracy assessment (AA) sites were collected (of which 894 were used to test accuracy of the vegetation map layer). The collective of all these datasets resulted in affirming 122 USNVC associations at NATR.To map the vegetation and open water of NATR, 63 map classes were developed. including the following: 54 map classes represent natural (including ruderal) vegetation types in the USNVC, 5 map classes represent cultural (agricultural and developed) vegetation types in the USNVC, 3 map classes represent nonvegetation open-water bodies (non-USNVC), and 1 map class represents landscapes that

  14. Spatial Vegetation Data for Ozark National Scenic Riverways Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — High resolution vegetation polygons mapped by the National Park Service. This is a map of vegetation associations with 49- and 33-class maps (see table tVegMapInfo...

  15. National Park Service Vegetation Mapping Inventory Program: Appalachian National Scenic Trail vegetation mapping project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hop, Kevin D.; Strassman, Andrew C.; Hall, Mark; Menard, Shannon; Largay, Ery; Sattler, Stephanie; Hoy, Erin E.; Ruhser, Janis; Hlavacek, Enrika; Dieck, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    The National Park Service (NPS) Vegetation Mapping Inventory (VMI) Program classifies, describes, and maps existing vegetation of national park units for the NPS Natural Resource Inventory and Monitoring (I&M) Program. The NPS VMI Program is managed by the NPS I&M Division and provides baseline vegetation information to the NPS Natural Resource I&M Program. The U.S. Geological Survey Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center, NatureServe, NPS Northeast Temperate Network, and NPS Appalachian National Scenic Trail (APPA) have completed vegetation classification and mapping of APPA for the NPS VMI Program.Mappers, ecologists, and botanists collaborated to affirm vegetation types within the U.S. National Vegetation Classification (USNVC) of APPA and to determine how best to map the vegetation types by using aerial imagery. Analyses of data from 1,618 vegetation plots were used to describe USNVC associations of APPA. Data from 289 verification sites were collected to test the field key to vegetation associations and the application of vegetation associations to a sample set of map polygons. Data from 269 validation sites were collected to assess vegetation mapping prior to submitting the vegetation map for accuracy assessment (AA). Data from 3,265 AA sites were collected, of which 3,204 were used to test accuracy of the vegetation map layer. The collective of these datasets affirmed 280 USNVC associations for the APPA vegetation mapping project.To map the vegetation and land cover of APPA, 169 map classes were developed. The 169 map classes consist of 150 that represent natural (including ruderal) vegetation types in the USNVC, 11 that represent cultural (agricultural and developed) vegetation types in the USNVC, 5 that represent natural landscapes with catastrophic disturbance or some other modification to natural vegetation preventing accurate classification in the USNVC, and 3 that represent nonvegetated water (non-USNVC). Features were interpreted from viewing 4

  16. Baseline vegetation mapping : Fort Niobrara National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Final report for the baseline vegetation mapping project on Fort Niobrara National Wildlife Refuge. This project aims to create a vegetation map showing the...

  17. Field Plot Points for Wupatki National Monument Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This spatial dataset in ESRI Coverage format maps field releve plot locations for the vegetation classification and descriptions of the vegetation map at Wupatki...

  18. Spatial Vegetation Data for Johnstown Flood National Memorial Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — Vegetation map of Johnstown Flood National Memorial provides local park-specific names for vegetation types, as well as crosswalks to the National Vegetation...

  19. Spatial Vegetation Data for Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — High resolution vegetation polygons mapped by the National Park Service. The Vegetation Map of Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks was produced over an eight...

  20. Riparian Vegetation Mapping Along the Hanford Reach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FOGWELL, T.W.

    2003-07-11

    During the biological survey and inventory of the Hanford Site conducted in the mid-1990s (1995 and 1996), preliminary surveys of the riparian vegetation were conducted along the Hanford Reach. These preliminary data were reported to The Nature Conservancy (TNC), but were not included in any TNC reports to DOE or stakeholders. During the latter part of FY2001, PNNL contracted with SEE Botanical, the parties that performed the original surveys in the mid 1990s, to complete the data summaries and mapping associated with the earlier survey data. Those data sets were delivered to PNNL and the riparian mapping by vegetation type for the Hanford Reach is being digitized during the first quarter of FY2002. These mapping efforts provide the information necessary to create subsequent spatial data layers to describe the riparian zone according to plant functional types (trees, shrubs, grasses, sedges, forbs). Quantification of the riparian zone by vegetation types is important to a number of DOE'S priority issues including modeling contaminant transport and uptake in the near-riverine environment and the determination of ecological risk. This work included the identification of vegetative zones along the Reach by changes in dominant plant species covering the shoreline from just to the north of the 300 Area to China Bar near Vernita. Dominant and indicator species included Agropyron dasytachyudA. smithii, Apocynum cannabinum, Aristida longiseta, Artemisia campestris ssp. borealis var scouleriana, Artemisa dracunculus, Artemisia lindleyana, Artemisia tridentata, Bromus tectorum, Chrysothamnus nauseosus, Coreopsis atkinsoniana. Eleocharis palustris, Elymus cinereus, Equisetum hyemale, Eriogonum compositum, Juniperus trichocarpa, Phalaris arundinacea, Poa compressa. Salk exigua, Scirpus acutus, Solidago occidentalis, Sporobolus asper,and Sporobolus cryptandrus. This letter report documents the data received, the processing by PNNL staff, and additional data gathered in FY

  1. Integrating Vegetation Classification, Mapping, and Strategic Inventory for Forest Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    C. K. Brewer; R. Bush; D. Berglund; J. A. Barber; S. R. Brown

    2006-01-01

    Many of the analyses needed to address multiple resource issues are focused on vegetation pattern and process relationships and most rely on the data models produced from vegetation classification, mapping, and/or inventory. The Northern Region Vegetation Mapping Project (R1-VMP) data models are based on these three integrally related, yet separate processes. This...

  2. Spatial Vegetation Data for Bent's Old Fort National Historic Site Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — High resolution vegetation polygons mapped by the National Park Service. A total of 800 acres (324 ha) were mapped. Thirteen map classes were used to describe the...

  3. Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge National Vegetation Classification (NVC) map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — National Vegetation Classification (NVC) map for Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge. NVC provides a standardized hierarchical approach to classifying vegetation...

  4. Field Plot Points for Acadia National Park Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has produced a vegetation spatial database coverage (vegetation map) for the Acadia...

  5. Accuracy Assessment Points for Acadia National Park Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has produced a vegetation spatial database coverage (vegetation map) for the Acadia...

  6. Spatial Vegetation Data for Allegheny Portage Railroad National Historic Site Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — Vegetation map of Allegheny Portage Railroad National Historic Site provides local park-specific names for vegetation types, as well as crosswalks to the National...

  7. Spatial Vegetation Data for Whiskeytown National Recreation Area Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — High resolution vegetation polygons mapped by the National Park Service. These data describe vegetation for the Whiskeytown National Recreation Area through the...

  8. Spatial Vegetation Data for Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — High resolution vegetation polygons mapped by the National Park Service. Multivariate ordination and clustering analyses were used to classify the vegetation. As a...

  9. Spatial Vegetation Data for Petrified Forest National Park Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — The Petrified Forest National Park Vegetation Map Database was developed as a primary product in the Petrified Forest National Park Vegetation Classification,...

  10. Spatial Vegetation Data for Canyon De Chelly National Monument Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — The Canyon de Chelly National Monument Vegetation Map Database was developed as a primary product in the Canyon de Chelly National Monument Vegetation...

  11. Spatial Vegetation Data for Mesa Verde National Park Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — The Mesa Verde National Park Vegetation Map Database was developed as a primary product in the Mesa Verde National Park Vegetation Classification, Distribution, and...

  12. Spatial Vegetation Data for Gettysburg National Military Park and Eisenhower National Historic Site Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — Vegetation map of Gettysburg National Military Park and Eisenhower National Historic Site provides local park-specific names for vegetation types, as well as...

  13. Spatial Vegetation Data for Valley Forge National Historical Park Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — The vegetation and landcover of Valley Forge National Historical Park (VAFO) were mapped to the association level of the National Vegetation Classification System...

  14. Spatial Vegetation Data for Upper Delaware Scenic and Recreational River Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — Vegetation map of the Upper Delaware Scenic and Recreational River provides local park-specific names for vegetation types, as well as crosswalks to the National...

  15. The Circumpolar Arctic Vegetation Map: AVHRR-derived base maps, environmental controls, and integrated mapping procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. A. WALKER; W. A. GOULD; MAIERH. A.; M. K. RAYNOLDS

    2002-01-01

    A new false-colour-infrared image derived from biweekly 1993 and 1995 Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) data provides a snow-free and cloud-free base image for the interpretation of vegetation as part of a 1:7.5M-scale Circumpolar Arctic Vegetation Map (CAVM). A maximum-NDVI (Normalized DiVerence Vegetation Index) image prepared from the same data...

  16. Accuracy Assessment Points for Wupatki National Monument Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This spatial dataset in ESRI Coverage format maps accuracy assessment point locations for the vegetation map at Wupatki National Monument and in the surrounding...

  17. Accuracy Assessment Points for Voyageurs National Park Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — Thematic accuracy requirements for the USGS-NPS Vegetation Mapping Program specify 80% accuracy for each map unit that represents USNVC floristic types. A total of...

  18. Application of automated multispectral analysis to Delaware's coastal vegetation mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemas, V. (Principal Investigator); Daiber, D.; Bartlett, D. S.; Crichton, O. W.; Fornes, A. O.

    1973-01-01

    There are no author-identified significant results in this report. Overlay maps of Delaware's wetlands have been prepared, showing the dominant species or group of species of vegetation present. Five such categories of vegetation were used indicating marshes dominated by: (1) salt marsh cord grass; (2) salt marsh hay and spike grass; (3) reed grass; (4) high tide bush and sea myrtle; and (5) a group of fresh water species found in impounded areas built to attract water fowl. Fifteen such maps cover Delaware's wetlands from the Pennsylvania to the Maryland borders. The mapping technique employed utilizes the General Electric multispectral data processing system. This system is a hybrid analog-digital system designed as an analysis tool to be used by an operator whose own judgment and knowledge of ground truth can be incorporated at any time into the analyzing process. The result is a high speed, cost effective method for producing enhanced photomaps showing a number of spectral classes, each enhanced spectral class being representative of a vegetative species or group of species.

  19. A Method for Application of Classification Tree Models to Map Aquatic Vegetation Using Remotely Sensed Images from Different Sensors and Dates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Cai

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In previous attempts to identify aquatic vegetation from remotely-sensed images using classification trees (CT, the images used to apply CT models to different times or locations necessarily originated from the same satellite sensor as that from which the original images used in model development came, greatly limiting the application of CT. We have developed an effective normalization method to improve the robustness of CT models when applied to images originating from different sensors and dates. A total of 965 ground-truth samples of aquatic vegetation types were obtained in 2009 and 2010 in Taihu Lake, China. Using relevant spectral indices (SI as classifiers, we manually developed a stable CT model structure and then applied a standard CT algorithm to obtain quantitative (optimal thresholds from 2009 ground-truth data and images from Landsat7-ETM+, HJ-1B-CCD, Landsat5-TM and ALOS-AVNIR-2 sensors. Optimal CT thresholds produced average classification accuracies of 78.1%, 84.7% and 74.0% for emergent vegetation, floating-leaf vegetation and submerged vegetation, respectively. However, the optimal CT thresholds for different sensor images differed from each other, with an average relative variation (RV of 6.40%. We developed and evaluated three new approaches to normalizing the images. The best-performing method (Method of 0.1% index scaling normalized the SI images using tailored percentages of extreme pixel values. Using the images normalized by Method of 0.1% index scaling, CT models for a particular sensor in which thresholds were replaced by those from the models developed for images originating from other sensors provided average classification accuracies of 76.0%, 82.8% and 68.9% for emergent vegetation, floating-leaf vegetation and submerged vegetation, respectively. Applying the CT models developed for normalized 2009 images to 2010 images resulted in high classification (78.0%–93.3% and overall (92.0%–93.1% accuracies. Our

  20. A Method for Application of Classification Tree Models to Map Aquatic Vegetation Using Remotely Sensed Images from Different Sensors and Dates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hao; Zhao, Dehua; Cai, Ying; An, Shuqing

    2012-01-01

    In previous attempts to identify aquatic vegetation from remotely-sensed images using classification trees (CT), the images used to apply CT models to different times or locations necessarily originated from the same satellite sensor as that from which the original images used in model development came, greatly limiting the application of CT. We have developed an effective normalization method to improve the robustness of CT models when applied to images originating from different sensors and dates. A total of 965 ground-truth samples of aquatic vegetation types were obtained in 2009 and 2010 in Taihu Lake, China. Using relevant spectral indices (SI) as classifiers, we manually developed a stable CT model structure and then applied a standard CT algorithm to obtain quantitative (optimal) thresholds from 2009 ground-truth data and images from Landsat7-ETM+, HJ-1B-CCD, Landsat5-TM and ALOS-AVNIR-2 sensors. Optimal CT thresholds produced average classification accuracies of 78.1%, 84.7% and 74.0% for emergent vegetation, floating-leaf vegetation and submerged vegetation, respectively. However, the optimal CT thresholds for different sensor images differed from each other, with an average relative variation (RV) of 6.40%. We developed and evaluated three new approaches to normalizing the images. The best-performing method (Method of 0.1% index scaling) normalized the SI images using tailored percentages of extreme pixel values. Using the images normalized by Method of 0.1% index scaling, CT models for a particular sensor in which thresholds were replaced by those from the models developed for images originating from other sensors provided average classification accuracies of 76.0%, 82.8% and 68.9% for emergent vegetation, floating-leaf vegetation and submerged vegetation, respectively. Applying the CT models developed for normalized 2009 images to 2010 images resulted in high classification (78.0%–93.3%) and overall (92.0%–93.1%) accuracies. Our results suggest

  1. Spatial Vegetation Data for Voyageurs National Park Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — The vegetation spatial database coverage is of Voyageurs National Park and extended environs, covering 156,886 hectares (387,674 acres). Voyageurs National Park...

  2. Spatial Vegetation Data for Zion National Park Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This metadata is for the vegetation and land-use geo-spatial database for Zion National Park and surrounding areas. The project is authorized as part of the USGS/NPS...

  3. Spatial Vegetation Data for Badlands National Park Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This metadata is for all coverages associated with the vegetation land cover and land use geospatial database for Badlands National Park and surrounding areas. The...

  4. Spatial Vegetation Data for Wupatki National Monument Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This metadata is for the vegetation and land-use geo-spatial database for Wupatki National Monument and surrounding areas. The project is authorized as part of the...

  5. Spatial Vegetation Data for Glacier National Park Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — The geographic information system (GIS) format spatial data set of vegetation for Glacier National Park (GNP) was created by the U.S. Geological Survey...

  6. Maps and navigation methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, A

    1922-01-01

    Different maps and scales are discussed with particular emphasis on their use in aviation. The author makes the observation that current navigation methods are slow and dangerous and should be replaced by scientific methods of navigation based on loxodromy and the use of the compass.

  7. Analysis and Mapping of Vegetation and Habitat for the Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tagestad, Jerry D.

    2010-06-01

    The Lakeview, Oregon, office of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) contracted Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to classify vegetation communities on Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge in northeastern Nevada. The objective of the mapping project was to provide USFWS refuge biologists and planners with detailed vegetation and habitat information that can be referenced to make better decisions regarding wildlife resources, fuels and fire risk, and land management. This letter report describes the datasets and methods used to develop vegetation cover type and shrub canopy cover maps for the Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge. The two map products described in this report are (1) a vegetation cover classification that provides updated information on the vegetation associations occurring on the refuge and (2) a map of shrub canopy cover based on high-resolution images and field data.

  8. Analysis and Mapping of Vegetation and Habitat for the Hart Mountain National Antelope Refuge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tagestad, Jerry D.

    2010-06-01

    The Lakeview, Oregon, office of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) contracted Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to classify vegetation communities on Hart Mountain National Antelope Refuge in northeastern Nevada. The objective of the mapping project was to provide USFWS refuge biologists and planners with detailed vegetation and habitat information that can be referenced to make better decisions regarding wildlife resources, fuels and fire risk, and land management. This letter report describes the datasets and methods used to develop vegetation cover type and shrub canopy cover maps for the Hart Mountain National Antelope Refuge. The two map products described in this report are 1) a vegetation cover classification that provides updated information on the vegetation associations occurring on the refuge and 2) a map of shrub canopy cover based on high-resolution images and field data.

  9. Classification and mapping of rangeland vegetation physiognomic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Plot vegetation species growth form, cover and height data were collected from 450 sampling sites based on eight spectral strata generated using unsupervised image classification. Field data were grouped at four levels of seven, six, three and two vegetation physiognomic classes which were subjected to both ML and ...

  10. Accuracy Assessment Points for Petersburg National Battlefield Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This shapefile depicts the locations of thematic accuracy assessment sampling points used in the vegetation mapping of Petersburg National Battlefield. It was...

  11. Quivira National Wildlife Refuge vegetation mapping project 2010-2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Quivira National Wildlife Refuge was established in 1955, and a detailed vegetation map was not available for management purposes. With the present development of a...

  12. Accuracy Assessment Points for Colorado National Monument Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This point file displays the 500 accuracy assessment (AA) points visited in July and August of 2004 as part of the vegetation mapping project. Five hundred and one...

  13. Accuracy Assessment Points for Dinosaur National Monument Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This point file displays the 1543 accuracy assessment (AA) points visited in the summer of 2005 as part of the vegetation mapping project. The points were randomly...

  14. Bathymetric and vegetation mapping using an airborne multispectral imager

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Borstad, G.A; Zacharias, M.A; MacLeod, W.D

    1995-01-01

    Data from the Compact Airborne Spectrogaphic Imager (CASI) were collected over Horsefly River, British Columbia on September 16, 1993 to map riverine and riparian vegetation as well as river substrates...

  15. Vegetation Mapping - Tecolote Canyon, San Diego Co. [ds656

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Vegetation mapping has been conducted at various City of San Diego Park and Recreation Open Space lands in support of natural resource management objectives and the...

  16. Casa Grande Ruins National Monument Vegetation Mapping Project - Plot Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This layer contains spatial information for 25 plots sampled during vegetation mapping and classification efforts at Casa Grande Ruins NM, AZ. Data was collected by...

  17. Using multi-spectral sensors for vegetation mapping

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Deventer, Heidi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available IT – July 2016 Using multi-spectral sensors for vegetation mapping H van Deventer, MA Cho, M Lück-Vogel and L van Niekerk, CSIR Abstract Wetland and estuarine vegetation is often difficult to detect and separate from adjacent land covers...

  18. Spectroscopic remote sensing for material identification, vegetation characterization, and mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; Lewis, Paul E.; Shen, Sylvia S.

    2012-01-01

    Identifying materials by measuring and analyzing their reflectance spectra has been an important procedure in analytical chemistry for decades. Airborne and space-based imaging spectrometers allow materials to be mapped across the landscape. With many existing airborne sensors and new satellite-borne sensors planned for the future, robust methods are needed to fully exploit the information content of hyperspectral remote sensing data. A method of identifying and mapping materials using spectral feature analyses of reflectance data in an expert-system framework called MICA (Material Identification and Characterization Algorithm) is described. MICA is a module of the PRISM (Processing Routines in IDL for Spectroscopic Measurements) software, available to the public from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) at http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2011/1155/. The core concepts of MICA include continuum removal and linear regression to compare key diagnostic absorption features in reference laboratory/field spectra and the spectra being analyzed. The reference spectra, diagnostic features, and threshold constraints are defined within a user-developed MICA command file (MCF). Building on several decades of experience in mineral mapping, a broadly-applicable MCF was developed to detect a set of minerals frequently occurring on the Earth's surface and applied to map minerals in the country-wide coverage of the 2007 Afghanistan HyMap data set. MICA has also been applied to detect sub-pixel oil contamination in marshes impacted by the Deepwater Horizon incident by discriminating the C-H absorption features in oil residues from background vegetation. These two recent examples demonstrate the utility of a spectroscopic approach to remote sensing for identifying and mapping the distributions of materials in imaging spectrometer data.

  19. Vegetation classification and distribution mapping report Mesa Verde National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Kathryn A.; McTeague, Monica L.; Ogden, Lindsay; Floyd, M. Lisa; Schulz, Keith; Friesen, Beverly A.; Fancher, Tammy; Waltermire, Robert G.; Cully, Anne

    2009-01-01

    The classification and distribution mapping of the vegetation of Mesa Verde National Park (MEVE) and surrounding environment was achieved through a multi-agency effort between 2004 and 2007. The National Park Service’s Southern Colorado Plateau Network facilitated the team that conducted the work, which comprised the U.S. Geological Survey’s Southwest Biological Science Center, Fort Collins Research Center, and Rocky Mountain Geographic Science Center; Northern Arizona University; Prescott College; and NatureServe. The project team described 47 plant communities for MEVE, 34 of which were described from quantitative classification based on f eld-relevé data collected in 1993 and 2004. The team derived 13 additional plant communities from field observations during the photointerpretation phase of the project. The National Vegetation Classification Standard served as a framework for classifying these plant communities to the alliance and association level. Eleven of the 47 plant communities were classified as “park specials;” that is, plant communities with insufficient data to describe them as new alliances or associations. The project team also developed a spatial vegetation map database representing MEVE, with three different map-class schemas: base, group, and management map classes. The base map classes represent the fi nest level of spatial detail. Initial polygons were developed using Definiens Professional (at the time of our use, this software was called eCognition), assisted by interpretation of 1:12,000 true-color digital orthophoto quarter quadrangles (DOQQs). These polygons (base map classes) were labeled using manual photo interpretation of the DOQQs and 1:12,000 true-color aerial photography. Field visits verified interpretation concepts. The vegetation map database includes 46 base map classes, which consist of associations, alliances, and park specials classified with quantitative analysis, additional associations and park specials noted

  20. Spatial Vegetation Data for Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This shapefile is an vegetation map of Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park, Virginia. It was developed by The Virginia Department of Conservation...

  1. Spatial Vegetation Data for Richmond National Battlefield Park Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This shapefile is an vegetation map of Richmond National Battlefield Park, Virginia. It was developed by The Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation,...

  2. Spatial Vegetation Data for Booker T. Washington National Monument Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This shapefile is an vegetation map of Booker T. Washington National Monument, Virginia. It was developed by The Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation,...

  3. Spatial Vegetation Data for Colonial National Historical Park Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This shapefile is an vegetation map of Colonial National Historical Park, Virginia. It was developed by The Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation,...

  4. Spatial Vegetation Data for George Washington Birthplace National Monument Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This shapefile is an vegetation map of George Washington Birthplace National Monument, VA. It was developed by The Virginia Department of Conservation and...

  5. Spatial Vegetation Data for Appomattox Court House National Historical Park Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This shapefile is an vegetation map of Appomattox Court House National Historical Park, Virginia. It was developed by The Virginia Department of Conservation and...

  6. Spatial Vegetation Data for Capitol Reef National Park Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This polygon feature class represents vegetation communities mapped at Capitol Reef National Park to an alliance or association level, depending on the photo...

  7. Spatial Vegetation Data for Florissant Fossil Beds National Monument Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — The vegetation units on this map were determined through the stereoscopic interpretation of aerial photographs supported by field sampling and ecological analysis....

  8. Spatial Vegetation Data Version 2.0a for Shenandoah National Park Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This map depicts 35 USNVC vegetation association classes for Shenandoah National Park developed from AVIRIS hyperspectral imagery, ASTER multispectral imagery and...

  9. Spatial Vegetation Data for Pipe Spring National Monument Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This polygon feature class represents vegetation communities mapped at Pipe Spring National Monument. The polygons were delineated using guidelines set by the...

  10. Landsat-facilitated vegetation map and vegetation reconnaissance of Tetlin National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A Landsat assisted vegetation map was prepared for Tetlin National Wildlife Refuge (925,000 acres). The refuge lies within the northern boreal subzone of eastern...

  11. Spatial Vegetation Data for Fossil Butte National Monument Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This polygon feature class represents vegetation communities mapped at Fossil Butte National Monument. The polygons were generated using guidelines set by the...

  12. Spatial Vegetation Data for Point Reyes National Seashore and Golden Gate National Recreation Area Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — High resolution vegetation polygons mapped by the National Park Service. The vegetation units of this map were determined through stereoscopic interpretation of...

  13. Vegetation classification, mapping, and monitoring at Voyageurs National Park, Minnesota: An application of the U.S. National Vegetation Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber-Langendoen, D.; Aaseng, N.; Hop, K.; Lew-Smith, M.; Drake, J.

    2007-01-01

    Question: How can the U.S. National Vegetation Classification (USNVC) serve as an effective tool for classifying and mapping vegetation, and inform assessments and monitoring? Location: Voyageurs National Park, northern Minnesota, U.S.A and environs. The park contains 54 243 ha of terrestrial habitat in the sub-boreal region of North America. Methods: We classified and mapped the natural vegetation using the USNVC, with 'alliance' and 'association' as base units. We compiled 259 classification plots and 1251 accuracy assessment test plots. Both plot and type ordinations were used to analyse vegetation and environmental patterns. Color infrared aerial photography (1:15840 scale) was used for mapping. Polygons were manually drawn, then transferred into digital form. Classification and mapping products are stored in publicly available databases. Past fire and logging events were used to assess distribution of forest types. Results and Discussion: Ordination and cluster analyses confirmed 49 associations and 42 alliances, with three associations ranked as globally vulnerable to extirpation. Ordination provided a useful summary of vegetation and ecological gradients. Overall map accuracy was 82.4%. Pinus banksiana - Picea mariana forests were less frequent in areas unburned since the 1930s. Conclusion: The USNVC provides a consistent ecological tool for summarizing and mapping vegetation. The products provide a baseline for assessing forests and wetlands, including fire management. The standardized classification and map units provide local to continental perspectives on park resources through linkages to state, provincial, and national classifications in the U.S. and Canada, and to NatureServe's Ecological Systems classification. ?? IAVS; Opulus Press.

  14. Mapping coastal vegetation using an expert system and hyperspectral imagery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmidt, K.S.; Skidmore, A.K.; Kloosterman, E.H.; Oosten, van H.; Kumar, L.; Janssen, J.A.M.

    2004-01-01

    Mapping and monitoring salt marshes in the Netherlands are important activities of the Ministry of Public Works (Rijkswaterstaat). The Survey Department (Meetkundige Dienst) produces vegetation maps using aerial photographs. However, it is a time-consuming and expensive activity. The accuracy of the

  15. Development of a Method to Analyze and Track Emergent Vegetation Using Remote Sensing (A Case Study in ArcMAP and ENVI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Emergent vegetation is an indicator of lake-health for Malheur Lake. Studies indicate that the large carp populations significantly affect emergent vegetation. Thus...

  16. Mapping urban vegetation cover using WorldView-2 imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavayas, François; Ramos, Yuddy; Boyer, André

    2012-06-01

    There are clear indications that densification of built-up areas within cities and new developments in their outskirts, in conjunction with urban population activities, are at the origin of climate changes at the local level and have a direct impact on air and water quality. Densification of the vegetation cover is often mentioned as one of the most important means to mitigate the impacts of climate changes and to improve the quality of the urban environment. Decision making on vegetation cover densification presupposes that urban planners and managers know exactly the actual situation in terms of vegetation location, types and biomass. However, in many cities, inventories of vegetation cover are usually absent. This study examines the feasibility of an automatic system for vegetation cover inventory and mapping in urban areas based on WorldView-2 imagery. The city of Laval, Canada, was chosen as the experimental site. The principal conclusions are as follows: a) conversion of digital counts to ground reflectances is a crucial step in order to fully exploit the potential of WV-2 multispectral images for mapping vegetation cover and recognizing vegetation classes; b) the combined use of NDVIs computed using the three infrared available bands and the red band provides an accurate means of differentiating vegetation cover from other land covers; and c) it is possible to separate trees from other vegetation types and to identify tree species even in dense urban areas using spectral signature characteristics and segmentation algorithms.

  17. Area-Based Approach for Mapping and Monitoring Riverine Vegetation Using Mobile Laser Scanning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harri Kaartinen

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Vegetation plays an important role in stabilizing the soil and decreasing fluvial erosion. In certain cases, vegetation increases the accumulation of fine sediments. Efficient and accurate methods are required for mapping and monitoring changes in the fluvial environment. Here, we develop an area-based approach for mapping and monitoring the vegetation structure along a river channel. First, a 2 × 2 m grid was placed over the study area. Metrics describing vegetation density and height were derived from mobile laser-scanning (MLS data and used to predict the variables in the nearest-neighbor (NN estimations. The training data were obtained from aerial images. The vegetation cover type was classified into the following four classes: bare ground, field layer, shrub layer, and canopy layer. Multi-temporal MLS data sets were applied to the change detection of riverine vegetation. This approach successfully classified vegetation cover with an overall classification accuracy of 72.6%; classification accuracies for bare ground, field layer, shrub layer, and canopy layer were 79.5%, 35.0%, 45.2% and 100.0%, respectively. Vegetation changes were detected primarily in outer river bends. These results proved that our approach was suitable for mapping riverine vegetation.

  18. A vegetation map for eastern Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lillesø, Jens-Peter Barnekow; van Breugel, Paulo; Graudal, Lars

    2015-01-01

    for the right place' and potential distribution maps of the useful woody species that occur in eastern Africa. To navigate this site, please use the menu on the left. For the latest news and updates, check out our Google+ page. And if you want to contact us for questions, comments or any other reason, please...

  19. Map of mixed prairie grassland vegetation, Rocky Flats, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, S J.V.; Webber, P J; Komarkova, V; Weber, W A

    1980-01-01

    A color vegetation map at the scale of 1:12,000 of the area surrounding the Rocky Flats, Rockwell International Plant near Boulder, Colorado, provides a permanent record of baseline data which can be used to monitor changes in both vegetation and environment and thus to contribute to future land management and land-use policies. Sixteen mapping units based on species composition were identified, and characterized by two 10-m/sup 2/ vegetation stands each. These were grouped into prairie, pasture, and valley side on the basis of their species composition. Both the mapping units and these major groups were later confirmed by agglomerative clustering analysis of the 32 vegetation stands on the basis of species composition. A modified Bray and Curtis ordination was used to determine the environmental factor complexes controlling the distribution of vegetation at Rocky flats. Recommendations are made for future policies of environmental management and predictions of the response to environmental change of the present vegetation at the Rocky Flats site.

  20. Field Plot Points for Colonial National Historical Park Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This shapefile shows the location of vegetation sampling plots used for vegetation classification and mapping at Colonial National Historical Park.

  1. Field Plot Points for Richmond National Battlefield Park Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This shapefile shows the location of vegetation sampling plots used for vegetation classification and mapping at Richmond National Battlefield Park.

  2. LBA-ECO LC-15 Aerodynamic Roughness Maps of Vegetation Canopies, Amazon Basin: 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set, LBA-ECO LC-15 Aerodynamic Roughness Maps of Vegetation Canopies, Amazon Basin: 2000, provides physical roughness maps of vegetation canopies in the...

  3. Field Plot Points for Sunset Crater Volcano National Monument Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This spatial dataset in ESRI Coverage format maps field releve plot locations for the vegetation classification and descriptions of the vegetation map at Sunset...

  4. Field Plot Points for Walnut Canyon National Monument Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This spatial dataset in ESRI Coverage format maps field releve plot locations for the vegetation classification and descriptions of the vegetation map at Walnut...

  5. Remote sensing and vegetation mapping in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Jarman

    1983-12-01

    Full Text Available The kinds of imagery, types of data and general relationships between scale of study, scale of mapping and scale of remote sensing products that are appropriate to the South African situation for visual and digital analysis are presented. The type of remote sensing product and processing, the type of field exercise appropriate to each, and the purpose of producing maps at each scale are discussed. Lack of repetitive imagery to date has not allowed for the full investigation of monitoring potential and careful planning at national level is needed to ensure availability of imagery for monitoring purposes. Map production processes which are rapid and accurate should be utilized. An integrated approach to vegetation mapping and surveying, which incorporates the best features of both visual and digital processing, is recommended for use.

  6. Evaluation of bispectral LIDAR data for urban vegetation mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabucet, Jean; Hubert-Moy, Laurence; Corpetti, Thomas; Launeau, Patrick; Lague, Dimitri; Michon, Cyril; Quenol, Herve

    2016-10-01

    Because of the large increase of urban population in the last decades, the question of sustainable development in urban areas is crucial. In this context, vegetation plays a significant role in urban planning, environmental protecting, and sustainable development policy making, heating and cooling requirements of buildings, displacement of animals dispersion, concentration of pollutants, and well-being. In numerous cities, vegetation is limited to public areas using GPS surveys or aerial remote sensing data. Recently, very high-resolution sensors as Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data have permitted significant improvements in vegetation mapping in urban areas. This paper presents an evaluation of a new generation of airborne LIDAR bi-spectral discrete point (Optech titan) for mapping and characterizing urban vegetation. The methodology is based on a four-step approach: 1) the analysis of the quality of data in order to estimate noise between the green and near-infrared LIDAR point clouds; 2) this enables to remove the topographic effects and 3) a first classification, devoted to the elimination of the non-vegetation class, is performed based on the intensity value of the two channels; finally, in 4), the tree coverage is classified into seven categories of strata combination. To this end specific descriptors related to the organization of the point clouds are used. These first results show that compared to monospectral LiDAR data, bi-spectral LiDAR enables to improve significantly both the extraction and the characterization of urban objects. This reveals new perspectives for mapping and characterizing urban patterns and other complex structures.

  7. Vegetation maps and classification in seasonal ecosystems: a quantitative analysis of the Piura dry forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María de los Ángeles La Torre Cuadros

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We studied data from 65 0.1-hectare floristic inventories from the seasonal lowland vegetation in coastal Piura by using multivariate methods and analyses of floristic composition. We identified six vegetation groups, five of which greatly coincide with vegetation types already described 100 years ago by August Weberbauer. In contrast, we were not able to accurately identify any of the eight dry forest categories recently defined by the Proyecto Algarrobo for the study area using numerical methods. We conclude that the maps and data generated by Weberbauer are more accurate and better reveal the floristic relationships of the seasonally dry vegetation in Piura. Therefore, we suggest a more widespread use of the descriptions made by Weberbauer in the region, parallel to those of the Proyecto Algarrobo

  8. Vegetation mapping with satellite data of the Forsmark and Tierp regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boresjoe-Bronge, Laine; Wester, Kjell [SwedPower, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2002-04-01

    SKB (Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co) performs a siting program for deep repository of spent nuclear fuel that includes survey of three potential sites. The SKB siting process has now reached the site investigation phase. There are several fields of investigations performed in this phase. One of them is description of the surface ecosystems. The surface ecosystems are mapped both on a regional (50-100 km{sup 2} ) and a local level (1 km{sup 2} ). Two inventory methods are used, remote sensing (satellite data/aerial photographs) for the regional level, and field inventory for the detailed level. As a part of the surface ecosystem characterisation on the regional level vegetation mapping using satellite data has been performed over the three potential deep depository sites, Forsmark, Tierp and Oskarshamn. The user requirements for the vegetation mapping of the potential sites are the following: Dominated species in the tree layer, shrub layer, field layer and ground layer shall be described both on regional and local level; Dominated species in all layers shall be quantified regarding share and percentage of ground cover, or absence of cover (vegetation free ground); The regional and the local inventory shall have identical or comparable classification systems; The classification system and the method used shall make it possible to scale the results from local to regional level and vice versa; The produced layers shall be presented in digital form and make it possible to model biomass and turnover of organic matter (carbon, nutrients, water); The produced information shall in a first phase be of use for planning and for making nature and environmental considerations. Data sources used in the study include geo-referenced SPOT4 XI data (20 m ground resolution), geo-referenced Landsat TM data (30 m ground resolution), soil type data, topographic map data and colour infrared aerial photographs. The production of vegetation layers has been carried out in two

  9. Estimating fractional vegetation cover and the vegetation index of bare soil and highly dense vegetation with a physically based method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wanjuan; Mu, Xihan; Ruan, Gaiyan; Gao, Zhan; Li, Linyuan; Yan, Guangjian

    2017-06-01

    Normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) of highly dense vegetation (NDVIv) and bare soil (NDVIs), identified as the key parameters for Fractional Vegetation Cover (FVC) estimation, are usually obtained with empirical statistical methods However, it is often difficult to obtain reasonable values of NDVIv and NDVIs at a coarse resolution (e.g., 1 km), or in arid, semiarid, and evergreen areas. The uncertainty of estimated NDVIs and NDVIv can cause substantial errors in FVC estimations when a simple linear mixture model is used. To address this problem, this paper proposes a physically based method. The leaf area index (LAI) and directional NDVI are introduced in a gap fraction model and a linear mixture model for FVC estimation to calculate NDVIv and NDVIs. The model incorporates the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) model parameters product (MCD43B1) and LAI product, which are convenient to acquire. Two types of evaluation experiments are designed 1) with data simulated by a canopy radiative transfer model and 2) with satellite observations. The root-mean-square deviation (RMSD) for simulated data is less than 0.117, depending on the type of noise added on the data. In the real data experiment, the RMSD for cropland is 0.127, for grassland is 0.075, and for forest is 0.107. The experimental areas respectively lack fully vegetated and non-vegetated pixels at 1 km resolution. Consequently, a relatively large uncertainty is found while using the statistical methods and the RMSD ranges from 0.110 to 0.363 based on the real data. The proposed method is convenient to produce NDVIv and NDVIs maps for FVC estimation on regional and global scales.

  10. Vegetation Map of South Africa, Lesotho and Swaziland 2009 and 2012: A description of changes from 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anisha Dayaram

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The variety of applications in which the Vegetation Map of South Africa, Lesotho and Swaziland (VEGMAP is used requires the map to be continually updated and refined to reflect the latest available information. The VEGMAP has been updated twice, in 2009 and 2012, since its first release in 2006.Objectives: The first objective is to report on the motivations for changes in the 2009 and 2012 versions. The second objective is to describe new vegetation types and subtypes included in these versions.Method: Changes to the VEGMAP are implemented after a peer-review process that is managed by the National Vegetation Map Committee. Accepted changes are then incorporated into the VEGMAP using GIS software.Results: Seventy-one of the 449 vegetation types were affected by updates. Changes included the addition of new vegetation types and subtypes, modifications to the boundaries of types present in the 2006 VEGMAP and changes to the names of vegetation types.Conclusion: The updates have affected a small portion of the map but have reflected a progressive refinement in quality. Regions that are still mapped at a coarse scale, especially those earmarked for land-use development, should be prioritised for improved map accuracy and classification through a more proactive approach towards vegetation mapping, using guidelines that are under development.

  11. An alternative simplified version of the VECEA potential natural vegetation map for eastern Africa. figshare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Breugel, Paulo; Klindt, Roeland; Lillesø, Jens-Peter Barnekow

    2015-01-01

    Spatial data layer containing the potential natural vegetation map of eastern Africa and documentation describing the methodology used to create this map......Spatial data layer containing the potential natural vegetation map of eastern Africa and documentation describing the methodology used to create this map...

  12. The vegetative method of propagating Adenia cissampeloides ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vegetative method of propagation was used for the experiments: cuttings from vines in an active growth phase and those from aged vines were made from the mother plant. The former cuttings were classified according to the thickness of the vines as 1 cm and 2 cm thick vines and the latter cuttings were 3 cm thick.

  13. Mapping Arctic Tundra Vegetation Communities Using Field Spectroscopy and Multispectral Satellite Data in North Alaska, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott J. Davidson

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The Arctic is currently undergoing intense changes in climate; vegetation composition and productivity are expected to respond to such changes. To understand the impacts of climate change on the function of Arctic tundra ecosystems within the global carbon cycle, it is crucial to improve the understanding of vegetation distribution and heterogeneity at multiple scales. Information detailing the fine-scale spatial distribution of tundra communities provided by high resolution vegetation mapping, is needed to understand the relative contributions of and relationships between single vegetation community measurements of greenhouse gas fluxes (e.g., ~1 m chamber flux and those encompassing multiple vegetation communities (e.g., ~300 m eddy covariance measurements. The objectives of this study were: (1 to determine whether dominant Arctic tundra vegetation communities found in different locations are spectrally distinct and distinguishable using field spectroscopy methods; and (2 to test which combination of raw reflectance and vegetation indices retrieved from field and satellite data resulted in accurate vegetation maps and whether these were transferable across locations to develop a systematic method to map dominant vegetation communities within larger eddy covariance tower footprints distributed along a 300 km transect in northern Alaska. We showed vegetation community separability primarily in the 450–510 nm, 630–690 nm and 705–745 nm regions of the spectrum with the field spectroscopy data. This is line with the different traits of these arctic tundra communities, with the drier, often non-vascular plant dominated communities having much higher reflectance in the 450–510 nm and 630–690 nm regions due to the lack of photosynthetic material, whereas the low reflectance values of the vascular plant dominated communities highlight the strong light absorption found here. High classification accuracies of 92% to 96% were achieved using

  14. UAV Remote Sensing for Urban Vegetation Mapping Using Random Forest and Texture Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quanlong Feng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV remote sensing has great potential for vegetation mapping in complex urban landscapes due to the ultra-high resolution imagery acquired at low altitudes. Because of payload capacity restrictions, off-the-shelf digital cameras are widely used on medium and small sized UAVs. The limitation of low spectral resolution in digital cameras for vegetation mapping can be reduced by incorporating texture features and robust classifiers. Random Forest has been widely used in satellite remote sensing applications, but its usage in UAV image classification has not been well documented. The objectives of this paper were to propose a hybrid method using Random Forest and texture analysis to accurately differentiate land covers of urban vegetated areas, and analyze how classification accuracy changes with texture window size. Six least correlated second-order texture measures were calculated at nine different window sizes and added to original Red-Green-Blue (RGB images as ancillary data. A Random Forest classifier consisting of 200 decision trees was used for classification in the spectral-textural feature space. Results indicated the following: (1 Random Forest outperformed traditional Maximum Likelihood classifier and showed similar performance to object-based image analysis in urban vegetation classification; (2 the inclusion of texture features improved classification accuracy significantly; (3 classification accuracy followed an inverted U relationship with texture window size. The results demonstrate that UAV provides an efficient and ideal platform for urban vegetation mapping. The hybrid method proposed in this paper shows good performance in differentiating urban vegetation mapping. The drawbacks of off-the-shelf digital cameras can be reduced by adopting Random Forest and texture analysis at the same time.

  15. Mapping Aquatic Vegetation in a Tropical Wetland Using High Spatial Resolution Multispectral Satellite Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy G. Whiteside

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Vegetation plays a key role in the environmental function of wetlands. The Ramsar-listed wetlands of the Magela Creek floodplain in Northern Australia are identified as being at risk from weeds, fire and climate change. In addition, the floodplain is a downstream receiving environment for the Ranger Uranium Mine. Accurate methods for mapping wetland vegetation are required to provide contemporary baselines of annual vegetation dynamics on the floodplain to assist with analysing any potential change during and after minesite rehabilitation. The aim of this study was to develop and test the applicability of geographic object-based image analysis including decision tree classification to classify WorldView-2 imagery and LiDAR-derived ancillary data to map the aquatic vegetation communities of the Magela Creek floodplain. Results of the decision tree classification were compared against a Random Forests classification. The resulting maps showed the 12 major vegetation communities that exist on the Magela Creek floodplain and their distribution for May 2010. The decision tree classification method provided an overall accuracy of 78% which was significantly higher than the overall accuracy of the Random Forests classification (67%. Most of the error in both classifications was associated with confusion between spectrally similar classes dominated by grasses, such as Hymenachne and Pseudoraphis. In addition, the extent of the sedge Eleocharis was under-estimated in both cases. This suggests the method could be useful for mapping wetlands where statistical-based supervised classifications have achieved less than satisfactory results. Based upon the results, the decision tree method will form part of an ongoing operational monitoring program.

  16. USING OF THERMAL STRUCTURE MAPS FOR VEGETATION MAPPING (CASE OF ALTACHEYSKY WILDLIFE AREA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Abramova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal infrared imagery contains considerable amount of qualitative information about ground objects and landscapes. In spite of it, this type of data is often used to derive quantitative information such as land or sea surface temperatures. This paper describes the examination of Altacheysky wildlife area situated in the southern part of Buryatia Republic, Mukhorshibirsky district based on Landsat imagery and ground observations. Ground observations were led to study the vegetation cover of the area. Landsat imagery were used to make multitemporal thermal infrared image combined of 7 ETM+ scenes and to make multispectral image combined of different zones of a OLI scene. Both images were classified. The multitemporal thermal infrared classification result was used to compose thermal structure map of the wildlife area. Comparison of the map, multispectral image classification result and ground observations data reveals that thermal structure map describes better the particularities of Altacheysky wildlife area vegetation cover.

  17. The Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS): An Airborne Laser Altimeter for Mapping Vegetation and Topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, J.; Rabine, David L.

    1998-01-01

    The Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS) is an airborne laser altimeter designed to quickly and extensively map surface topography as well as the relative heights of other reflecting surfaces within the laser footprint. Since 1997, this instrument has primarily been used as the airborne simulator for the Vegetation Canopy Lidar (VCL) mission, a spaceborne mission designed to measure tree height, vertical structure and ground topography (including sub-canopy topography). LVIS is capable of operating from 500 m to 10 km above ground level with footprint sizes from 1 to 60 m. Laser footprints can be randomly spaced within the 7 degree telescope field-of-view, constrained only by the operating frequency of the ND:YAG Q-switched laser (500 Hz). A significant innovation of the LVIS altimeter is that all ranging, waveform recording, and range gating are performed using a single digitizer, clock base, and detector. A portion of the outgoing laser pulse is fiber-optically fed into the detector used to collect the return signal and this entire time history of the outgoing and return pulses is digitized at 500 Msamp/sec. The ground return is then located using software digital signal processing, even in the presence of visibly opaque clouds. The surface height distribution of all reflecting surfaces within the laser footprint can be determined, for example, tree height and ground elevation. To date, the LVIS system has been used to monitor topographic change at Long Valley caldera, CA, as part of NASA's Topography and Surface Change program, and to map tree structure and sub-canopy topography at the La Selva Biological Research Station in Costa Rica, as part of the pre-launch calibration activities for the VCL mission. We present results that show the laser altimeter consistently and accurately maps surface topography, including sub-canopy topography, and vegetation height and structure. These results confirm the measurement concept of VCL and highlight the benefits of

  18. Field Plot Points for George Washington Birthplace National Monument Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This shapefile shows the location of vegetation sampling plots used for vegetation classification and mapping at George Washington Birthplace National Monument.

  19. Field Plot Points for Booker T. Washington National Monument Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This shapefile shows the location of vegetation sampling plots used for vegetation classification and mapping at Booker T. Washington National Monument

  20. Field Plot Points for Appomattox Court House National Historical Park Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This shapefile shows the location of vegetation sampling plots used for vegetation classification and mapping at Appomottox Court House National Historical Park

  1. Field Plot Points for Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This shapefile shows the location of vegetation sampling plots used for vegetation classification and mapping at Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park

  2. Field Plot Points for Waterton-Glacier International Peace Park Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — The classification of vegetation project was conducted to support an international effort to produce the first park-wide vegetation map for the Waterton-Glacier...

  3. Accuracy Assessment Points for Wind Cave National Park Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — The accuracy assessment field work was performed to verify the accuracy of the vegetation communities spatial data developed by the USGS-NPS Vegetation Mapping...

  4. Accuracy Assessment Points for Effigy Mounds National Monument Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has produced a vegetation spatial database coverage (vegetation map) for the Effigy...

  5. Field Plot Points for Effigy Mounds National Monument Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) has produced a vegetation spatial database coverage (vegetation map) for the Effigy...

  6. Field Plot and Observation Points for Dinosaur National Monument Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This point file displays the 727 vegetation plots and 217 observation points visited in 2002, 2003 and 2004 as part of the vegetation mapping project. Plots and...

  7. Field Plot and Accuracy Assessment Points for Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — The vegetation point data for Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore (PIRO) was developed to support two projects associated with the 2004 vegetation map, the collection...

  8. True Color Orthorectified Photomosaic for Mesa Verde National Park Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — As part of a 2006-2007 U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) - National Park Service (NPS) Vegetation Mapping Program to create a digital database of vegetation for Mesa...

  9. Influence of pansharpening techniques in obtaining accurate vegetation thematic maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarrola-Ulzurrun, Edurne; Gonzalo-Martin, Consuelo; Marcello-Ruiz, Javier

    2016-10-01

    In last decades, there have been a decline in natural resources, becoming important to develop reliable methodologies for their management. The appearance of very high resolution sensors has offered a practical and cost-effective means for a good environmental management. In this context, improvements are needed for obtaining higher quality of the information available in order to get reliable classified images. Thus, pansharpening enhances the spatial resolution of the multispectral band by incorporating information from the panchromatic image. The main goal in the study is to implement pixel and object-based classification techniques applied to the fused imagery using different pansharpening algorithms and the evaluation of thematic maps generated that serve to obtain accurate information for the conservation of natural resources. A vulnerable heterogenic ecosystem from Canary Islands (Spain) was chosen, Teide National Park, and Worldview-2 high resolution imagery was employed. The classes considered of interest were set by the National Park conservation managers. 7 pansharpening techniques (GS, FIHS, HCS, MTF based, Wavelet `à trous' and Weighted Wavelet `à trous' through Fractal Dimension Maps) were chosen in order to improve the data quality with the goal to analyze the vegetation classes. Next, different classification algorithms were applied at pixel-based and object-based approach, moreover, an accuracy assessment of the different thematic maps obtained were performed. The highest classification accuracy was obtained applying Support Vector Machine classifier at object-based approach in the Weighted Wavelet `à trous' through Fractal Dimension Maps fused image. Finally, highlight the difficulty of the classification in Teide ecosystem due to the heterogeneity and the small size of the species. Thus, it is important to obtain accurate thematic maps for further studies in the management and conservation of natural resources.

  10. Preserving a Comprehensive Vegetation Knowledge Base--An Evaluation of Four Historical Soviet Vegetation Maps of the Western Pamirs (Tajikistan)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vanselow, Kim André; Samimi, Cyrus; Breckle, Siegmar-W

    2016-01-01

    ... with great potential for studies on vegetation and ecosystem response to global change. The original hand-drawn maps were scanned, georeferenced, and digitized and the corresponding land cover class was assigned to each polygon...

  11. COMPOSING THE HIGH-SCALE VEGETATION MAP OF THE CENTRAL PART OF TIGIREK RIDGE (ALTAY KRAY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Y. Grishchenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of the vegetation cover is important during the study of geosystems because the nature and distribution of vegetation represent many components of geosystems. This paper presents the process of drawing up the vegetation map of the central part of the Tigirek ridge based on field data obtained in July 2015 and satellite imagery. Compiled vegetation map at a scale of 1:50 000 showing the spatial distribution of the vegetation of the territory; basic regularities of the spatial structure of vegetation were revealed.

  12. Accuracy Assessment Points for Friendship Hill National Historic Site Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — Location of thematic accuracy assessment sampling points used in the vegetation classification and mapping of Friendship Hill National Historic Site.

  13. Rescuing and Sharing Historical Vegetation Data for Ecological Analysis: The California Vegetation Type Mapping Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maggi Kelly

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Research efforts that synthesize historical and contemporary ecological data with modeling approaches improve our understanding of the complex response of species, communities, and landscapes to changing biophysical conditions through time and in space. Historical ecological data are particularly important in this respect. There are remaining barriers that limit such data synthesis, and technological improvements that make multiple diverse datasets more readily available for integration and synthesis are needed. This paper presents one case study of the Wieslander Vegetation Type Mapping project in California and highlights the importance of rescuing, digitizing and sharing historical datasets. We review the varied ecological uses of the historical collection: the vegetation maps have been used to understand legacies of land use change and plan for the future; the plot data have been used to examine changes to chaparral and forest communities around the state and to predict community structure and shifts under a changing climate; the photographs have been used to understand changing vegetation structure; and the voucher specimens in combination with other specimen collections have been used for large scale distribution modeling efforts. The digitization and sharing of the data via the web has broadened the scope and scale of the types of analysis performed. Yet, additional research avenues can be pursued using multiple types of VTM data, and by linking VTM data with contemporary data. The digital VTM collection is an example of a data infrastructure that expands the potential of large scale research through the integration and synthesis of data drawn from numerous data sources; its journey from analog to digital is a cautionary tale of the importance of finding historical data, digitizing it with best practices, linking it with other datasets, and sharing it with the research community.

  14. Demonstration of wetland vegetation mapping in Florida from computer-processed satellite and aircraft multispectral scanner data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butera, M. K.

    1979-01-01

    The success of remotely mapping wetland vegetation of the southwestern coast of Florida is examined. A computerized technique to process aircraft and LANDSAT multispectral scanner data into vegetation classification maps was used. The cost effectiveness of this mapping technique was evaluated in terms of user requirements, accuracy, and cost. Results indicate that mangrove communities are classified most cost effectively by the LANDSAT technique, with an accuracy of approximately 87 percent and with a cost of approximately 3 cent per hectare compared to $46.50 per hectare for conventional ground survey methods.

  15. Urban Vegetation Mapping Based on the HJ-1 Ndvi Reconstrction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng; Han, Liu; Liujun, Zhu; Yinyou, Huang; Song, Guo

    2016-06-01

    HJ-1A/B NDVI (HJ NDVI) time-series data possess relatively high spatio-temporal resolution which is significant for the research on urban areas. However, its application is hindered by noise resulting from the restrictions of imaging quality and limits of the satellite platform. The NDVI noise reduction is necessary. Some noise-reduction techniques including the asymmetric Gaussian filter (AG), the double logistic filter (DL), the Savitzky-Golay (S-G) filter and the harmonic analysis (Hants) of NDVI time-series have been used to carry out the NDVI time series reconstruction, and based on the comparison results of different filter, S-G filter is the optimal in the application on urban areas. Finally,urban vegetation mapping is carried out based on the new HJ NDVI.

  16. Accuracy Assessment Points for Walnut Canyon National Monument Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This spatial dataset in ESRI Coverage format maps accuracy assessment point locations for the vegetation map at Walnut Canyon National Monument and in the...

  17. Comparison of Manual Mapping and Automated Object-Based Image Analysis of Non-Submerged Aquatic Vegetation from Very-High-Resolution UAS Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Husson

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aquatic vegetation has important ecological and regulatory functions and should be monitored in order to detect ecosystem changes. Field data collection is often costly and time-consuming; remote sensing with unmanned aircraft systems (UASs provides aerial images with sub-decimetre resolution and offers a potential data source for vegetation mapping. In a manual mapping approach, UAS true-colour images with 5-cm-resolution pixels allowed for the identification of non-submerged aquatic vegetation at the species level. However, manual mapping is labour-intensive, and while automated classification methods are available, they have rarely been evaluated for aquatic vegetation, particularly at the scale of individual vegetation stands. We evaluated classification accuracy and time-efficiency for mapping non-submerged aquatic vegetation at three levels of detail at five test sites (100 m × 100 m differing in vegetation complexity. We used object-based image analysis and tested two classification methods (threshold classification and Random Forest using eCognition®. The automated classification results were compared to results from manual mapping. Using threshold classification, overall accuracy at the five test sites ranged from 93% to 99% for the water-versus-vegetation level and from 62% to 90% for the growth-form level. Using Random Forest classification, overall accuracy ranged from 56% to 94% for the growth-form level and from 52% to 75% for the dominant-taxon level. Overall classification accuracy decreased with increasing vegetation complexity. In test sites with more complex vegetation, automated classification was more time-efficient than manual mapping. This study demonstrated that automated classification of non-submerged aquatic vegetation from true-colour UAS images was feasible, indicating good potential for operative mapping of aquatic vegetation. When choosing the preferred mapping method (manual versus automated the desired level of

  18. Detection and mapping vegetation cover based on the Spectral Angle Mapper algorithm using NOAA AVHRR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagoub, Houria; Belbachir, Ahmed Hafid; Benabadji, Noureddine

    2014-06-01

    Satellite data, taken from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) have been proposed and used for the detection and the cartography of vegetation cover in North Africa. The data used were acquired at the Analysis and Application of Radiation Laboratory (LAAR) from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) sensor of 1 km spatial resolution. The Spectral Angle Mapper Algorithm (SAM) is used for the classification of many studies using high resolution satellite data. In the present paper, we propose to apply the SAM algorithm to the moderate resolution of the NOAA AVHRR sensor data for classifying the vegetation cover. This study allows also exploiting other classification methods for the low resolution. First, the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) is extracted from two channels 1 and 2 of the AVHRR sensor. In order to obtain an initial density representation of vegetal formation distribution, a methodology, based on the combination between the threshold method and the decision tree, is used. This combination is carried out due to the lack of accurate data related to the thresholds that delimit each class. In a second time, and based on spectral behavior, a vegetation cover map is developed using SAM algorithm. Finally, with the use of low resolution satellite images (NOAA AVHRR) and with only two channels, it is possible to identify the most dominant species in North Africa such as: forests of the Liege oaks, other forests, cereal's cultivation, steppes and bar soil.

  19. Mapping Temperate Vegetation Climate Adaptation Variability Using Normalized Land Surface Phenology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Liang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Climate influences geographic differences of vegetation phenology through both contemporary and historical variability. The latter effect is embodied in vegetation heterogeneity underlain by spatially varied genotype and species compositions tied to climatic adaptation. Such long-term climatic effects are difficult to map and therefore often neglected in evaluating spatially explicit phenological responses to climate change. In this study we demonstrate a way to indirectly infer the portion of land surface phenology variation that is potentially contributed by underlying genotypic differences across space. The method undertaken normalized remotely sensed vegetation start-of-season (or greenup onset with a cloned plants-based phenological model. As the geography of phenological model prediction (first leaf represents the instantaneous effect of contemporary climate, the normalized land surface phenology potentially reveals vegetation heterogeneity that is related to climatic adaptation. The study was done at the continental scale for the conterminous U.S., with a focus on the eastern humid temperate domain. Our findings suggest that, in an analogous scenario, if a uniform contemporary climate existed everywhere, spring vegetation greenup would occur earlier in the north than in the south. This is in accordance with known species-level clinal variations—for many temperate plant species, populations adapted to colder climates require less thermal forcing to initiate growth than those in warmer climates. This study, for the first time, shows that such geographic adaption relationships are supported at the ecosystem level. Mapping large-scale vegetation climate adaptation patterns contributes to our ability to better track geographically varied phenological responses to climate change.

  20. SRS 2010 Vegetation Inventory GeoStatistical Mapping Results for Custom Reaction Intensity and Total Dead Fuels.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, Lloyd A. [Leading Solutions, LLC.; Paresol, Bernard [U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station, Portland, OR.

    2014-09-01

    This report of the geostatistical analysis results of the fire fuels response variables, custom reaction intensity and total dead fuels is but a part of an SRS 2010 vegetation inventory project. For detailed description of project, theory and background including sample design, methods, and results please refer to USDA Forest Service Savannah River Site internal report “SRS 2010 Vegetation Inventory GeoStatistical Mapping Report”, (Edwards & Parresol 2013).

  1. Special-Status Plant Species Surveys and Vegetation Mapping at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preston, R E

    2006-10-03

    This report presents the results of Jones & Stokes special-status plant surveys and vegetation mapping for the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Special-status plant surveys were conducted at Site 300 in April to May 1997 and in March to April 2002. Eight special-status plants were identified at Site 300: large-flowered fiddleneck, big tarplant, diamond-petaled poppy, round-leaved filaree, gypsum-loving larkspur, California androsace, stinkbells, and hogwallow starfish. Maps identifying the locations of these species, a discussion of the occurrence of these species at Site 300, and a checklist of the flora of Site 300 are presented. A reconnaissance survey of the LLNL Livermore Site was conducted in June 2002. This survey concluded that no special-status plants occur at the Livermore Site. Vegetation mapping was conducted in 2001 at Site 300 to update a previous vegetation study done in 1986. The purpose of the vegetation mapping was to update and to delineate more precisely the boundaries between vegetation types and to map vegetation types that previously were not mapped. The vegetation map is presented with a discussion of the vegetation classification used.

  2. Accuracy Assessment Points for Tuzigoot National Monument Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — The accuracy assessment field work was performed in May, 1997 to verify the accuracy of the vegetation communities spatial data developed by the USGS-NPS Vegetation...

  3. Field Plot Points for Voyageurs National Park Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — A total of 191 vegetation field plot samples were collected at Voyageurs National Park and environs to support vegetation classification development. Teams of...

  4. The Use of Vegetation Maps and Geographic Information Systems For Assessing Conifer Lands in California (91-23)

    OpenAIRE

    Goodchild, Michael F.; Davis, Frank W.; Painho, Marco; Storns, David M.

    1991-01-01

    This report summarizes research into the nature and sources of errors that occur in medium to small scale vegetation maps such as those used for statewide forestry and conservation planning. The objective of this research was to develop a coherent approach and specific methods for quantifying such errors by jointly analyzing ground observations and multiscale map data using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) operations. Section I of the report provides an overview of statistical approaches ...

  5. Vegetation cover mapping at multiple scales using MODIS, Landsat, RapidEye, and Aircraft imageries in the Texas High Plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, N.; Gowda, P. H.; Maas, S. J.; Basu, S.; Nair, S. S.

    2009-12-01

    Vegetation cover is an important input variable in many earth and environmental studies. In many of these studies, vegetation cover information is needed at different spatial scales. Hence, remote sensing is a popular tool to estimate vegetation cover. Numerous spectral-based models are available in the literature for mapping vegetation cover. However, very limited information is available on their ability to perform well at spatial scales different from the scale at which the model was developed. In this study, we used a procedure based on the Perpendicular Vegetation Index (PVI) to estimate vegetation cover. Using this procedure, vegetation cover is estimated from the ratio of the PVI of an image pixel to the PVI of full vegetation canopy (100% ground cover). The major advantages of this procedure compared to several other methods are that this method does not rely on empirical relationships, and can use raw remote sensing data without converting it into surface reflectance or normalization to account scene-to scene difference in vegetation. Previous studies conducted during the summer growing seasons of 2006, 2007 and 2008 in the Texas High Plains (THP) show that the method could estimate vegetation cover from Landsat imagery with an average error of less than 6%, and from high-resolution aerial images (obtained using TTAMRSS, the Texas Tech Airborne Multispectral Remote Sensing System) with an average error of less than 3%. In this study, we used this procedure to estimate vegetation cover of 10 large agricultural fields in the THP with Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS, 250 m resolution) and with the RapidEye (5 m resolution) imageries. The results were compared with ground-based observations and vegetation cover derived from Landsat and high resolution aircraft imageries.

  6. Cloud-based computation for accelerating vegetation mapping and change detection at regional to national scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew J. Gregory; Zhiqiang Yang; David M. Bell; Warren B. Cohen; Sean Healey; Janet L. Ohmann; Heather M. Roberts

    2015-01-01

    Mapping vegetation and landscape change at fine spatial scales is needed to inform natural resource and conservation planning, but such maps are expensive and time-consuming to produce. For Landsat-based methodologies, mapping efforts are hampered by the daunting task of manipulating multivariate data for millions to billions of pixels. The advent of cloud-based...

  7. An efficient unsupervised index based approach for mapping urban vegetation from IKONOS imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anchang, Julius Y.; Ananga, Erick O.; Pu, Ruiliang

    2016-08-01

    Despite the increased availability of high resolution satellite image data, their operational use for mapping urban land cover in Sub-Saharan Africa continues to be limited by lack of computational resources and technical expertise. As such, there is need for simple and efficient image classification techniques. Using Bamenda in North West Cameroon as a test case, we investigated two completely unsupervised pixel based approaches to extract tree/shrub (TS) and ground vegetation (GV) cover from an IKONOS derived soil adjusted vegetation index. These included: (1) a simple Jenks Natural Breaks classification and (2) a two-step technique that combined the Jenks algorithm with agglomerative hierarchical clustering. Both techniques were compared with each other and with a non-linear support vector machine (SVM) for classification performance. While overall classification accuracy was generally high for all techniques (>90%), One-Way Analysis of Variance tests revealed the two step technique to outperform the simple Jenks classification in terms of predicting the GV class. It also outperformed the SVM in predicting the TS class. We conclude that the unsupervised methods are technically as good and practically superior for efficient urban vegetation mapping in budget and technically constrained regions such as Sub-Saharan Africa.

  8. Vegetation burn severity mapping using Landsat-8 and WorldView-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhuoting; Middleton, Barry R.; Hetzler, Robert; Vogel, John M.; Dye, Dennis G.

    2015-01-01

    We used remotely sensed data from the Landsat-8 and WorldView-2 satellites to estimate vegetation burn severity of the Creek Fire on the San Carlos Apache Reservation, where wildfire occurrences affect the Tribe's crucial livestock and logging industries. Accurate pre- and post-fire canopy maps at high (0.5-meter) resolution were created from World- View-2 data to generate canopy loss maps, and multiple indices from pre- and post-fire Landsat-8 images were used to evaluate vegetation burn severity. Normalized difference vegetation index based vegetation burn severity map had the highest correlation coefficients with canopy loss map from WorldView-2. Two distinct approaches - canopy loss mapping from WorldView-2 and spectral index differencing from Landsat-8 - agreed well with the field-based burn severity estimates and are both effective for vegetation burn severity mapping. Canopy loss maps created with WorldView-2 imagery add to a short list of accurate vegetation burn severity mapping techniques that can help guide effective management of forest resources on the San Carlos Apache Reservation, and the broader fire-prone regions of the Southwest.

  9. Statistical methods in physical mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, David O. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1995-05-01

    One of the great success stories of modern molecular genetics has been the ability of biologists to isolate and characterize the genes responsible for serious inherited diseases like fragile X syndrome, cystic fibrosis and myotonic muscular dystrophy. This dissertation concentrates on constructing high-resolution physical maps. It demonstrates how probabilistic modeling and statistical analysis can aid molecular geneticists in the tasks of planning, execution, and evaluation of physical maps of chromosomes and large chromosomal regions. The dissertation is divided into six chapters. Chapter 1 provides an introduction to the field of physical mapping, describing the role of physical mapping in gene isolation and ill past efforts at mapping chromosomal regions. The next two chapters review and extend known results on predicting progress in large mapping projects. Such predictions help project planners decide between various approaches and tactics for mapping large regions of the human genome. Chapter 2 shows how probability models have been used in the past to predict progress in mapping projects. Chapter 3 presents new results, based on stationary point process theory, for progress measures for mapping projects based on directed mapping strategies. Chapter 4 describes in detail the construction of all initial high-resolution physical map for human chromosome 19. This chapter introduces the probability and statistical models involved in map construction in the context of a large, ongoing physical mapping project. Chapter 5 concentrates on one such model, the trinomial model. This chapter contains new results on the large-sample behavior of this model, including distributional results, asymptotic moments, and detection error rates. In addition, it contains an optimality result concerning experimental procedures based on the trinomial model. The last chapter explores unsolved problems and describes future work.

  10. Generalized vegetation map of north Merrit Island based on a simplified multispectral analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poonai, P.; Floyd, W. J.; Rahmani, M. A.

    1977-01-01

    A simplified system for classification of multispectral data was used for making a generalized map of ground features of North Merritt Island. Subclassification of vegetation within broad categories yielded promising results which led to a completely automatic method and to the production of satisfactory detailed maps. Changes in an area north of Happy Hammocks are evidently related to water relations of the soil and are not associated with the last winter freeze-damage which affected mainly the mangrove species, likely to reestablish themselves by natural processes. A supplementary investigation involving reflectance studies in the laboratory has shown that the reflectance by detached citrus leaves, of wavelengths lying between 400 microns and 700 microns, showed some variation over a period of seven days during which the leaves were kept in a laboratory atmosphere.

  11. Field Plot and Observation Points for Colorado National Monument Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This point file displays the 525 field plot and observation locations visited in 2003 and 2004 as part of the vegetation mapping project for Colorado National...

  12. Accuracy Assessment Points Modified for Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — Location of thematic accuracy assessment sampling points used in the vegetation and fire fuel model mapping in Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area. In this...

  13. Accuracy Assessment Points for Richmond National Battlefield Park Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This shapefile depicts the locations of thematic accuracy assessment sampling points used in the vegetation mapping of Richmond National Battlefield Park. It was...

  14. Accuracy Assessment Points for Colonial National Historical Park Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This shapefile depicts the locations of thematic accuracy assessment sampling points used in the vegetation mapping of Colonial National Historical Park. It was...

  15. Accuracy Assessment Points for Appomattox Court House National Historical Park Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This shapefile depicts the locations of thematic accuracy assessment sampling points used in the vegetation mapping of Appomottox Court House National Historical...

  16. Accuracy Assessment Points for Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This shapefile depicts the locations of thematic accuracy assessment sampling points used in the vegetation mapping of Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National...

  17. Accuracy Assessment Points for Capitol Reef National Park Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This point file displays the 1,313 accuracy assessment (AA) points visited in the summer of 2005 as part of the vegetation mapping project. The points were randomly...

  18. Accuracy Assessment Points for Gateway National Recreation Area Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — Location of thematic accuracy assessment sampling points, that were field sampled, based on the destination accuracy assessment points used in the vegetation mapping...

  19. Accuracy Assessment Points for Natural Bridges National Monument Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This point file displays the 288 accuracy assessment (AA) points visited in the fall of 2004 as part of the vegetation mapping project. The points were randomly...

  20. Accuracy Assessment Points for Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This shapefile includes the accuracy assessment points used to assess the alliance-level vegetation map of Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site (HOFU) developed...

  1. True Color Orthophotography for Fossil Butte National Monument Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This photo mosaic of Fossil Butte National Monument was created from scanned 9x9s flown in 2004 in conjunction with the Vegetation Mapping Program. The photography...

  2. Cedar Breaks National Monument Vegetation Mapping Project - Field Plot, Observation Points and Accuracy Assessment Points

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This point file contains 282 point locations of field plot and observation data used by, and collected for, the vegetation mapping project for Cedar Breaks National...

  3. Accuracy Assessment Points for Black Canyon of the Gunnison National Park Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This point file displays the 757 accuracy assessment (AA) points visited in the late summer of 2004 as part of the vegetation mapping project. The points were...

  4. Accuracy Assessment Points for Fossil Butte National Monument Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This point file displays the 661 accuracy assessment (AA) points visited in the late summer of 2006 as part of the vegetation mapping project. The points were...

  5. Accuracy Assessment Points for Valley Forge National Historical Park Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This shapefile includes the accuracy assessment points used to assess the association-level vegetation map of Valley Forge National Historic Park developed by the...

  6. LBA-ECO LC-15 Aerodynamic Roughness Maps of Vegetation Canopies, Amazon Basin: 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set provides physical roughness maps of vegetation canopies in the Amazon Basin. The images are estimates of aerodynamic roughness length (Z0)...

  7. Pre-LBA CABARE Mapped Land Surface and Vegetation Characteristics, Rondonia, Brazil

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Surface parameter digital maps of vegetation, soil, and topography were obtained for Rondonia, Brazil, covering the 5x5 degree region bounded by 13-8 degrees S and...

  8. Pre-LBA CABARE Mapped Land Surface and Vegetation Characteristics, Rondonia, Brazil

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: Surface parameter digital maps of vegetation, soil, and topography were obtained for Rondonia, Brazil, covering the 5x5 degree region bounded by 13-8...

  9. Accuracy Assessment Point for Fire Island National Seashore Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This dataset was compiled to provide users with the geographic locations of the accuracy assessment plots used to assess the Fire Island Vegetation Map...

  10. Integrating field sampling, spatial statistics and remote sensing to map wetland vegetation in the Pantanal, Brazil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arieira, J.; Karssenberg, D.J.; Jong, S.M. de; Addink, E.A.; Couto, E.G.; Nunes Da Cunha, C.; Skøien, J.

    2011-01-01

    Development of efficient methodologies for mapping wetland vegetation is of key importance to wetland conservation. Here we propose the integration of a number of statistical techniques, in particular cluster analysis, universal kriging and error propagation modelling, to integrate

  11. Field Plot and Observation Points for Fossil Butte National Monument Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This point file contains 255 point locations of field plot and observation data used by, and collected for, the vegetation mapping project for Fossil Butte National...

  12. Integrating field sampling, geostatistics and remote sensing to map wetland vegetation in the Pantanal, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arieira, J.; Karssenberg, D.; de Jong, S. M.; Addink, E. A.; Couto, E. G.; Nunes da Cunha, C.; Skøien, J. O.

    2011-03-01

    Development of efficient methodologies for mapping wetland vegetation is of key importance to wetland conservation. Here we propose the integration of a number of statistical techniques, in particular cluster analysis, universal kriging and error propagation modelling, to integrate observations from remote sensing and field sampling for mapping vegetation communities and estimating uncertainty. The approach results in seven vegetation communities with a known floral composition that can be mapped over large areas using remotely sensed data. The relationship between remotely sensed data and vegetation patterns, captured in four factorial axes, were described using multiple linear regression models. There were then used in a universal kriging procedure to reduce the mapping uncertainty. Cross-validation procedures and Monte Carlo simulations were used to quantify the uncertainty in the resulting map. Cross-validation showed that accuracy in classification varies according with the community type, as a result of sampling density and configuration. A map of uncertainty derived from Monte Carlo simulations revealed significant spatial variation in classification, but this had little impact on the proportion and arrangement of the communities observed. These results suggested that mapping improvement could be achieved by increasing the number of field observations of those communities with a scattered and small patch size distribution; or by including a larger number of digital images as explanatory variables in the model. Comparison of the resulting plant community map with a flood duration map, revealed that flooding duration is an important driver of vegetation zonation. This mapping approach is able to integrate field point data and high-resolution remote-sensing images, providing a new basis to map wetland vegetation and allow its future application in habitat management, conservation assessment and long-term ecological monitoring in wetland landscapes.

  13. Vegetation map and plant checklist of Ol Ari Nyiro ranch and the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ol Ari Nyiro is a 360 km2 ranch of the Laikipia Plateau, in a semi-arid part of Kenya. The vegetation of the ranch and nearby Mukutan Gorge was mapped, and a preliminary check-list of fungi and vascular plants compiled. The vegetation was classified in 16 different types. A total of 708 species and subspecies were ...

  14. Improving the Accuracy of Mapping Urban Vegetation Carbon Density by Combining Shadow Remove, Spectral Unmixing Analysis and Spatial Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qie, G.; Wang, G.; Wang, M.

    2016-12-01

    Mixed pixels and shadows due to buildings in urban areas impede accurate estimation and mapping of city vegetation carbon density. In most of previous studies, these factors are often ignored, which thus result in underestimation of city vegetation carbon density. In this study we presented an integrated methodology to improve the accuracy of mapping city vegetation carbon density. Firstly, we applied a linear shadow remove analysis (LSRA) on remotely sensed Landsat 8 images to reduce the shadow effects on carbon estimation. Secondly, we integrated a linear spectral unmixing analysis (LSUA) with a linear stepwise regression (LSR), a logistic model-based stepwise regression (LMSR) and k-Nearest Neighbors (kNN), and utilized and compared the integrated models on shadow-removed images to map vegetation carbon density. This methodology was examined in Shenzhen City of Southeast China. A data set from a total of 175 sample plots measured in 2013 and 2014 was used to train the models. The independent variables statistically significantly contributing to improving the fit of the models to the data and reducing the sum of squared errors were selected from a total of 608 variables derived from different image band combinations and transformations. The vegetation fraction from LSUA was then added into the models as an important independent variable. The estimates obtained were evaluated using a cross-validation method. Our results showed that higher accuracies were obtained from the integrated models compared with the ones using traditional methods which ignore the effects of mixed pixels and shadows. This study indicates that the integrated method has great potential on improving the accuracy of urban vegetation carbon density estimation. Key words: Urban vegetation carbon, shadow, spectral unmixing, spatial modeling, Landsat 8 images

  15. Accuracy Assessment Points for Badlands National Park Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This metadata is for the accuracy assessment data associated with the vegetation land cover and land use geospatial database for Badlands National Park and...

  16. Field Plot Points for Badlands National Park Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This metadata is for the field data associated with the vegetation land cover and land use geospatial database for Badlands National Park and surrounding areas. The...

  17. Vegetation Inventory, Classification, and Mapping - Report: Camas National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report accompanies the spatial vegetation/habitat database produced for Camas National Wildlife Refuge (NWR). The purpose of this report is to provide enough...

  18. Flood hazard probability mapping method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalantari, Zahra; Lyon, Steve; Folkeson, Lennart

    2015-04-01

    In Sweden, spatially explicit approaches have been applied in various disciplines such as landslide modelling based on soil type data and flood risk modelling for large rivers. Regarding flood mapping, most previous studies have focused on complex hydrological modelling on a small scale whereas just a few studies have used a robust GIS-based approach integrating most physical catchment descriptor (PCD) aspects on a larger scale. The aim of the present study was to develop methodology for predicting the spatial probability of flooding on a general large scale. Factors such as topography, land use, soil data and other PCDs were analysed in terms of their relative importance for flood generation. The specific objective was to test the methodology using statistical methods to identify factors having a significant role on controlling flooding. A second objective was to generate an index quantifying flood probability value for each cell, based on different weighted factors, in order to provide a more accurate analysis of potential high flood hazards than can be obtained using just a single variable. The ability of indicator covariance to capture flooding probability was determined for different watersheds in central Sweden. Using data from this initial investigation, a method to subtract spatial data for multiple catchments and to produce soft data for statistical analysis was developed. It allowed flood probability to be predicted from spatially sparse data without compromising the significant hydrological features on the landscape. By using PCD data, realistic representations of high probability flood regions was made, despite the magnitude of rain events. This in turn allowed objective quantification of the probability of floods at the field scale for future model development and watershed management.

  19. Vegetation inventory, mapping, and classification report, Fort Bowie National Historic Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studd, Sarah; Fallon, Elizabeth; Crumbacher, Laura; Drake, Sam; Villarreal, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    A vegetation mapping and characterization effort was conducted at Fort Bowie National Historic Site in 2008-10 by the Sonoran Desert Network office in collaboration with researchers from the Office of Arid lands studies, Remote Sensing Center at the University of Arizona. This vegetation mapping effort was completed under the National Park Service Vegetation Inventory program which aims to complete baseline mapping inventories at over 270 national park units. The vegetation map data was collected to provide park managers with a digital map product that met national standards of spatial and thematic accuracy, while also placing the vegetation into a regional and even national context. Work comprised of three major field phases 1) concurrent field-based classification data collection and mapping (map unit delineation), 2) development of vegetation community types at the National Vegetation Classification alliance or association level and 3) map accuracy assessment. Phase 1 was completed in late 2008 and early 2009. Community type descriptions were drafted to meet the then-current hierarchy (version 1) of the National Vegetation Classification System (NVCS) and these were applied to each of the mapped areas. This classification was developed from both plot level data and censused polygon data (map units) as this project was conducted as a concurrent mapping and classification effort. The third stage of accuracy assessment completed in the fall of 2010 consisted of a complete census of each map unit and was conducted almost entirely by park staff. Following accuracy assessment the map was amended where needed and final products were developed including this report, a digital map and full vegetation descriptions. Fort Bowie National Historic Site covers only 1000 acres yet has a relatively complex landscape, topography and geology. A total of 16 distinct communities were described and mapped at Fort Bowie NHS. These ranged from lush riparian woodlands lining the

  20. Feasibility of using multiplexed SLAR imagery for water resources management and mapping vegetation communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, B.; Shuchman, R. A.

    1974-01-01

    A two-wavelength (X band and L band) multiplexed synthetic aperture side-looking airborne radar (SLAR), providing parallel- and cross-polarized images, has been tested for application in mapping vegetation and water resources. Indications of the relative heights, densities, surface roughness and other parameters provided by the multiplexed radar imagery can be used to differentiate and map various types of vegetation. The multiplexed SLAR is superior to thermal IR imagery and aerial photography for determining heights of vegetation and water-land boundaries.

  1. The mapping of marsh vegetation using aircraft multispectral scanner data. [in Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butera, M. K.

    1975-01-01

    A test was conducted to determine if salinity regimes in coastal marshland could be mapped and monitored by the identification and classification of marsh vegetative species from aircraft multispectral scanner data. The data was acquired at 6.1 km (20,000 ft.) on October 2, 1974, over a test area in the coastal marshland of southern Louisiana including fresh, intermediate, brackish, and saline zones. The data was classified by vegetational species using a supervised, spectral pattern recognition procedure. Accuracies of training sites ranged from 67% to 96%. Marsh zones based on free soil water salinity were determined from the species classification to demonstrate a practical use for mapping marsh vegetation.

  2. Innovative methods for soil parent material mapping

    OpenAIRE

    Farewell, Timothy S.

    2010-01-01

    Soil parent material exerts a fundamental control on many environmental processes. Nevertheless, resulting from the separate mapping programmes of the geological and soil surveys, parent material is currently poorly mapped in the United Kingdom. This research develops and tests four methods of predicting soil parent material using three study areas in England. The qualities of desirable parent material maps were stated, and then used to create new map value metrics to assess th...

  3. A Continuation Method for Weakly Kannan Maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariza-Ruiz David

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The first continuation method for contractive maps in the setting of a metric space was given by Granas. Later, Frigon extended Granas theorem to the class of weakly contractive maps, and recently Agarwal and O'Regan have given the corresponding result for a certain type of quasicontractions which includes maps of Kannan type. In this note we introduce the concept of weakly Kannan maps and give a fixed point theorem, and then a continuation method, for this class of maps.

  4. Model of Peatland Vegetation Species using HyMap Image and Machine Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayuf Jusuf, Muhammad; Danoedoro, Projo; Muljo Sukojo, Bangun; Hartono

    2017-12-01

    Species Tumih / Parepat (Combretocarpus-rotundatus Mig. Dancer) family Anisophylleaceae and Meranti (Shorea Belangerang, Shorea Teysmanniana Dyer ex Brandis) family Dipterocarpaceae is a group of vegetation species distribution model. Species pioneer is predicted as an indicator of the succession of ecosystem restoration of tropical peatland characteristics and extremely fragile (unique) in the endemic hot spot of Sundaland. Climate change projections and conservation planning are hot topics of current discussion, analysis of alternative approaches and the development of combinations of species projection modelling algorithms through geospatial information systems technology. Approach model to find out the research problem of vegetation level based on the machine learning hybrid method, wavelet and artificial neural networks. Field data are used as a reference collection of natural resource field sample objects and biodiversity assessment. The testing and training ANN data set iterations times 28, achieve a performance value of 0.0867 MSE value is smaller than the ANN training data, above 50%, and spectral accuracy 82.1 %. Identify the location of the sample point position of the Tumih / Parepat vegetation species using HyMap Image is good enough, at least the modelling, design of the species distribution can reach the target in this study. The computation validation rate above 90% proves the calculation can be considered.

  5. [Application of biotope mapping model integrated with vegetation cover continuity attributes in urban biodiversity conservation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Tian; Qiu, Ling; Chen, Cun-gen

    2010-09-01

    Based on the biotope classification system with vegetation structure as the framework, a modified biotope mapping model integrated with vegetation cover continuity attributes was developed, and applied to the study of the greenbelts in Helsingborg in southern Sweden. An evaluation of the vegetation cover continuity in the greenbelts was carried out by the comparisons of the vascular plant species richness in long- and short-continuity forests, based on the identification of woodland continuity by using ancient woodland indicator species (AWIS). In the test greenbelts, long-continuity woodlands had more AWIS. Among the forests where the dominant trees were more than 30-year-old, the long-continuity ones had a higher biodiversity of vascular plants, compared with the short-continuity ones with the similar vegetation structure. The modified biotope mapping model integrated with the continuity features of vegetation cover could be an important tool in investigating urban biodiversity, and provide corresponding strategies for future urban biodiversity conservation.

  6. Evaluation of ALOS PALSAR Data for High-Resolution Mapping of Vegetated Wetlands in Alaska

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Clewley

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available As the largest natural source of methane, wetlands play an important role in the carbon cycle. High-resolution maps of wetland type and extent are required to quantify wetland responses to climate change. Mapping northern wetlands is particularly important because of a disproportionate increase in temperatures at higher latitudes. Synthetic aperture radar data from a spaceborne platform can be used to map wetland types and dynamics over large areas. Following from earlier work by Whitcomb et al. (2009 using Japanese Earth Resources Satellite (JERS-1 data, we applied the “random forests” classification algorithm to variables from L-band ALOS PALSAR data for 2007, topographic data (e.g., slope, elevation and locational information (latitude, longitude to derive a map of vegetated wetlands in Alaska, with a spatial resolution of 50 m. We used the National Wetlands Inventory and National Land Cover Database (for upland areas to select training and validation data and further validated classification results with an independent dataset that we created. A number of improvements were made to the method of Whitcomb et al. (2009: (1 more consistent training data in upland areas; (2 better distribution of training data across all classes by taking a stratified random sample of all available training pixels; and (3 a more efficient implementation, which allowed classification of the entire state as a single entity (rather than in separate tiles, which eliminated discontinuities at tile boundaries. The overall accuracy for discriminating wetland from upland was 95%, and the accuracy at the level of wetland classes was 85%. The total area of wetlands mapped was 0.59 million km2, or 36% of the total land area of the state of Alaska. The map will be made available to download from NASA’s wetland monitoring website.

  7. A vegetation mapping strategy for conifer forests by combining airborne LiDAR data and aerial imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanjun Su; Qinghua Guo; Danny L. Fry; Brandon M. Collins; Maggi Kelly; Jacob P. Flanagan; John J. Battles

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. Accurate vegetation mapping is critical for natural resources management, ecological analysis, and hydrological modeling, among other tasks. Remotely sensed multispectral and hyperspectral imageries have proved to be valuable inputs to the vegetation mapping process, but they can provide only limited vegetation structure...

  8. A vegetation map of the western Transvaal Bush veld

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. van der Meulen

    1979-12-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of a map of land-types (complexes of terrain-form, soil and climate, plant community com­plexes of the western Transvaal Bushveld were inferred and mapped at a 1: 250 000 scale. The syntaxonomy and synecology of the communities are summarized.

  9. Spatial Vegetation Data for Theodore Roosevelt National Park Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This metadata is for all coverages associated with the vegetation land cover and land use geo-spatial database for Theodore Roosevelt National Park and surrounding...

  10. Spatial Vegetation Data for San Antonio Missions National Historical Park Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This metadata is for the vegetation and land-use geo-spatial database for San Antonio Missions National Historical Park (SAAN) and surrounding areas. This project is...

  11. Spatial Vegetation Data for Craters of Moon National Monument and Preserve Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This metadata is for the vegetation and land-use geo-spatial database for Craters of Moon National Monument and Preserve (CRMO), Idaho and surrounding areas. This...

  12. Spatial Vegetation Data for Lyndon B. Johnson National Historical Park Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — his metadata is for the vegetation and land-use geo-spatial database for Lydon B. Johnson National Historical Site and surrounding areas. This project is authorized...

  13. Spatial Vegetation Data for Fort Larned National Historic Site Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This metadata is for the vegetation and land-use geo-spatial database for Fort Larned National Historic Site and surrounding areas. This project is authorized as...

  14. Spatial Vegetation Data for Washita Battlefield National Historic Site Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This metadata is for the vegetation and land-use geo-spatial database for Washita Battlefield National Historic Site and surrounding areas. This project is...

  15. Spatial Vegetation Data for Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — The geographic information system (GIS) format spatial data set of vegetation for Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore (PIRO) was created by the National Park Service...

  16. Spatial Vegetation Data for Apostle Islands National Lakeshore Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — The geographic information system (GIS) format spatial data set of vegetation for Apostle Islands National Lakeshore (APIS) was created for the National Park Service...

  17. Spatial Vegetation Data for Walnut Canyon National Monument Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This metadata is for the vegetation and land-use geo-spatial database for Walnut Canyon National Monument and surrounding areas. The project is authorized as part of...

  18. Spatial Vegetation Data for Sunset Crater Volcano National Monument Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This metadata is for the vegetation and land-use geo-spatial database for Sunset Crater Volcano National Monument and surrounding areas. The project is authorized as...

  19. Pu`ukohola Heiau National Historic Site Vegetation Mapping Project - Spatial Vegetation Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This metadata is for the vegetation and land-use geo-spatial database for Pu'ukohola Heiau National Historic Site (PUHE) , Island of Hawai'i and surrounding areas....

  20. Kaloko-Honokohau National Historical Park Vegetation Mapping Project - Spatial Vegetation Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This metadata is for the vegetation and land-use geo-spatial database for Kaloko-Honokohau National Historical Park (KAHO), Island of Hawai'i and surrounding areas....

  1. Spatial Vegetation Data for Grand Teton National Park Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This metadata is for the vegetation and land-use geo-spatial database for Grand Teton National Park and surrounding areas. This project is authorized as part of the...

  2. Pattern Analysis of Vegetation and Structure Mapping of Yard Plant in Gatak District, Sukoharjo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofyan Anif

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Target of research is to know 1 level of type variety (diversitas and mount the closeness (densitas of lawn crop which conducting in region of District of Gatak of Sub Province Sukoharjo; 2 pattern of mapping of lawn crop which conducting in region District of Gatak of Sub Province Sukoharjo of pursuant to variety level and its closeness. This research is field survey done with the method of multi stage that is stratified purposive of sampling and random sampling. Focus the survey is does the stocktaking of lawn crop which conducting in house lawn. To know the structure of vegetate data processed by using formula Cox (1989 to know the closeness level, while to know the level of species variety, data analyzed to use the index of diversities Simpson. Pursuant to result of inferential solution and research 1 result analyze the structure of vegetate of lawn crop indicate that (a District Gatak have the level of high diversities lawn crop, with the index diversities of equal to 0,84159 and index predominate equal to 0,15841, and also highest PIE 0,20657 and PIE lowerest of equal to 0,00032. Species of lawn crop having high domination that is melinjo (Gnetum gnemon, (b closeness of lawn crop at every countryside in District Gatak of included in category very meeting of because  relied on by a closeness value of every countryside more than 75%. Crop found in research are having high closeness level for example: melinjo, banana, mango, rambutan, papaya, tapioca, and coconut, while crop having low closeness level for example: jambu mete, tapak doro, flower pukul empat; and 2 mapping of lawn crop cover the function value and amount of lawn crop found by a number of 57 type of lawn crop found in researh area, can be grouped to become 5 faction that is drug crop, vegetable faction, fruit crop, decorative crop, and protector crop.

  3. Mapping the spatio-temporal distribution of key vegetation cover properties in lowland river reaches, using digital photography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verschoren, Veerle; Schoelynck, Jonas; Buis, Kerst; Visser, Fleur; Meire, Patrick; Temmerman, Stijn

    2017-06-01

    The presence of vegetation in stream ecosystems is highly dynamic in both space and time. A digital photography technique is developed to map aquatic vegetation cover at species level, which has a very high spatial and a flexible temporal resolution. A digital single-lens reflex (DSLR) camera mounted on a handheld telescopic pole is used. The low-altitude (5 m) orthogonal aerial images have a low spectral resolution (red-green-blue), high spatial resolution (∼1.9 pixels cm-2, ∼1.3 cm length) and flexible temporal resolution (monthly). The method is successfully applied in two lowland rivers to quantify four key properties of vegetated rivers: vegetation cover, patch size distribution, biomass and hydraulic resistance. The main advantages are that the method is (i) suitable for continuous and discontinuous vegetation covers, (ii) of very high spatial and flexible temporal resolution, (iii) relatively fast compared to conventional ground survey methods, (iv) non-destructive and (v) relatively cheap and easy to use, and (vi) the software is widely available and similar open source alternatives exist. The study area should be less than 10 m wide, and the prevailing light conditions and water turbidity levels should be sufficient to look into the water. Further improvements of the image processing are expected in the automatic delineation and classification of the vegetation patches.

  4. Chapter 6 - Developing the LANDFIRE Vegetation and Biophysical Settings Map Unit Classifications for the LANDFIRE Prototype Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennifer L. Long; Melanie Miller; James P. Menakis; Robert E. Keane

    2006-01-01

    The Landscape Fire and Resource Management Planning Tools Prototype Project, or LANDFIRE Prototype Project, required a system for classifying vegetation composition, biophysical settings, and vegetation structure to facilitate the mapping of vegetation and wildland fuel characteristics and the simulation of vegetation dynamics using landscape modeling. We developed...

  5. Orthorectified Photomosaic for Walnut Canyon National Monument Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — Orthophotos combine the image characteristics of a photograph with the geometric qualities of a map. The primary digital orthophotoquad (DOQ) is a 1-meter ground...

  6. Optimum strategies for mapping vegetation using multiple-endmember spectral mixture models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Dar A.; Gardner, Margaret E.; Church, Rick; Ustin, Susan L.; Green, Robert O.

    1997-10-01

    Improved vegetation maps are required for fire management and biodiversity assessment, from critical inputs for hydrological and biogeochemical models and represent a means for scaling-up point measurements. At scales greater than 10 meters, vegetation communities are typically mixed consisting of leaves, branches, exposed soil and shadows. To map mixed vegetation, many researchers employ spectral mixture analysis (SMA). In most SMA applications, a single set of spectra consisting of green vegetation, soil, non- photosynthetic vegetation and shade are used to 'unmix' images. However, because most scenes contain more than four components, this simple approach leads to fraction errors and may fail to differentiate many vegetation types. In this work, we apply a new approach called multiple endmember spectral mixture analysis, in which the number and types of endmembers vary per-pixel. Using this approach, hundreds of unique models are generated that account for community specific differences in plant chemistry, physical attributes and phenology. Additionally, we describe a new strategy for developing and organizing regionally specific spectral libraries. We present result from a study in the Santa Monica Mountains using AVIRIS data, in which we map grassland and chaparral communities, mapping species dominance in some cases to a high degree of accuracy.

  7. Mapping agroecological zones and time lag in vegetation growth by means of Fourier analysis of time series of NDVI images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menenti, M.; Azzali, S.; Verhoef, W.; Van Swol, R.

    1993-01-01

    Examples are presented of applications of a fast Fourier transform algorithm to analyze time series of images of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index values. The results obtained for a case study on Zambia indicated that differences in vegetation development among map units of an existing agroclimatic map were not significant, while reliable differences were observed among the map units obtained using the Fourier analysis.

  8. Remote sensing approach to map riparian vegetation of the Colorado River Ecosystem, Grand Canyon area, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, U.; Glenn, E.; Nagler, P. L.; Sankey, J. B.

    2015-12-01

    Riparian zones in the southwestern U.S. are usually a mosaic of vegetation types at varying states of succession in response to past floods or droughts. Human impacts also affect riparian vegetation patterns. Human- induced changes include introduction of exotic species, diversion of water for human use, channelization of the river to protect property, and other land use changes that can lead to deterioration of the riparian ecosystem. This study explored the use of remote sensing to map an iconic stretch of the Colorado River in the Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona. The pre-dam riparian zone in the Grand Canyon was affected by annual floods from spring run-off from the watersheds of Green River, the Colorado River and the San Juan River. A pixel-based vegetation map of the riparian zone in the Grand Canyon, Arizona, was produced from high-resolution aerial imagery. The map was calibrated and validated with ground survey data. A seven-step image processing and classification procedure was developed based on a suite of vegetation indices and classification subroutines available in ENVI Image Processing and Analysis software. The result was a quantitative species level vegetation map that could be more accurate than the qualitative, polygon-based maps presently used on the Lower Colorado River. The dominant woody species in the Grand Canyon are now saltcedar, arrowweed and mesquite, reflecting stress-tolerant forms adapted to alternated flow regimes associated with the river regulation.

  9. Vegetation Water Content Mapping in a Diverse Agricultural Landscape: National Airborne Field Experiment 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosh, Michael H.; Jing Tao; Jackson, Thomas J.; McKee, Lynn; O'Neill, Peggy

    2011-01-01

    Mapping land cover and vegetation characteristics on a regional scale is critical to soil moisture retrieval using microwave remote sensing. In aircraft-based experiments such as the National Airborne Field Experiment 2006 (NAFE 06), it is challenging to provide accurate high resolution vegetation information, especially on a daily basis. A technique proposed in previous studies was adapted here to the heterogenous conditions encountered in NAFE 06, which included a hydrologically complex landscape consisting of both irrigated and dryland agriculture. Using field vegetation sampling and ground-based reflectance measurements, the knowledge base for relating the Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI) and the vegetation water content was extended to a greater diversity of agricultural crops, which included dryland and irrigated wheat, alfalfa, and canola. Critical to the generation of vegetation water content maps, the land cover for this region was determined from satellite visible/infrared imagery and ground surveys with an accuracy of 95.5% and a kappa coefficient of 0.95. The vegetation water content was estimated with a root mean square error of 0.33 kg/sq m. The results of this investigation contribute to a more robust database of global vegetation water content observations and demonstrate that the approach can be applied with high accuracy. Keywords: Vegetation, field experimentation, thematic mapper, NDWI, agriculture.

  10. Combining vegetation index and model inversion methods for theextraction of key vegetation biophysical parameters using Terra and Aqua MODIS reflectance data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houborg, Rasmus Møller; Søgaard, Henrik; Bøgh, Eva

    2007-01-01

    change. The present study explores the benefits of combining vegetation index and physically based approaches for the spatial and temporal mapping of green leaf area index (LAI), total chlorophyll content (TCab), and total vegetation water content (VWC). A numerical optimization method was employed......Accurate estimates of vegetation biophysical variables are valuable as input to models describing the exchange of carbon dioxide and energy between the land surface and the atmosphere and important for a wide range of applications related to vegetation monitoring, weather prediction, and climate...... for the inversion of a canopy reflectance model using Terra and Aqua MODIS multi-spectral, multi-temporal, and multi-angle reflectance observations to aid the determination of vegetation-specific physiological and structural canopy parameters. Land cover and site-specific inversion modeling was applied...

  11. Remotely sensed phenology for mapping biomes and vegetation functional types

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Wessels, Konrad J

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available This study used remotely-sensed phenology data derived from Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR), in a fully supervised decision-tree classification based on the new biome map of South Africa. The objectives were: (i) to investigate...

  12. Remote mineralogical and vegetation mapping using imaging spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, James, Jr.; Press, Harry

    1987-01-01

    Two airborne flight systems were developed for geological studies: the airborne imaging spectrometer (AIS) and the advanced visible and infrared imaging spectrometer. A satellite imaging spectrometer system, the high resolution imaging spectrometer, is currently being developed and is planned for flight on the proposed NASA Earth Orbiting System. Examples of the application of these instruments in mineral and vegetation studies are described. Experiments conducted with AIS over the Cuprite Mining District (Nevada) and the Owens Valley (California) demonstrate the power of this new approach to remote sensing.

  13. Casa Grande Ruins National Monument Vegetation Mapping Project - Spatial Vegetation Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This feature class contains complete polygonal coverage (map units) for two management units of Casa Grande Ruins NM. Each polygon has been attributed with either...

  14. Analytic methods to generate integrable mappings

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-10-22

    Oct 22, 2015 ... Systematic analytic methods of deriving integrable mappings from integrable nonlinear ordinary differential, differential-difference and lattice equations are presented. More specifically, we explain how to derive integrable mappings through four different techniques namely,. dis-cretization technique,; Lax ...

  15. Evaluating the Use of an Object-Based Approach to Lithological Mapping in Vegetated Terrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Grebby

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Remote sensing-based approaches to lithological mapping are traditionally pixel-oriented, with classification performed on either a per-pixel or sub-pixel basis with complete disregard for contextual information about neighbouring pixels. However, intra-class variability due to heterogeneous surface cover (i.e., vegetation and soil or regional variations in mineralogy and chemical composition can result in the generation of unrealistic, generalised lithological maps that exhibit the “salt-and-pepper” artefact of spurious pixel classifications, as well as poorly defined contacts. In this study, an object-based image analysis (OBIA approach to lithological mapping is evaluated with respect to its ability to overcome these issues by instead classifying groups of contiguous pixels (i.e., objects. Due to significant vegetation cover in the study area, the OBIA approach incorporates airborne multispectral and LiDAR data to indirectly map lithologies by exploiting associations with both topography and vegetation type. The resulting lithological maps were assessed both in terms of their thematic accuracy and ability to accurately delineate lithological contacts. The OBIA approach is found to be capable of generating maps with an overall accuracy of 73.5% through integrating spectral and topographic input variables. When compared to equivalent per-pixel classifications, the OBIA approach achieved thematic accuracy increases of up to 13.1%, whilst also reducing the “salt-and-pepper” artefact to produce more realistic maps. Furthermore, the OBIA approach was also generally capable of mapping lithological contacts more accurately. The importance of optimising the segmentation stage of the OBIA approach is also highlighted. Overall, this study clearly demonstrates the potential of OBIA for lithological mapping applications, particularly in significantly vegetated and heterogeneous terrain.

  16. Vegetation map of the greater Denver area, Front Range urban corridor, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marr, J.W.; Boyd, W.S.

    1979-01-01

    Vegetation is one of our most valuable renewable resources; it is the primary producer of organic matter on which all nongreen organisms are dependent for energy, construction materials, aesthetic enjoyment, and other necessities of life. In order to secure the greatest possible returns from the utilization of the different types of vegetation, people need to know what species are present, the ecological processes in which they are involved, and the ways in which they are arranged in the landscape. This vegetation map is designed to help persons in a wide variety of activities to secure that information.

  17. Airborne Lidar: Advances in Discrete Return Technology for 3D Vegetation Mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie Ussyshkin

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Conventional discrete return airborne lidar systems, used in the commercial sector for efficient generation of high quality spatial data, have been considered for the past decade to be an ideal choice for various mapping applications. Unlike two-dimensional aerial imagery, the elevation component of airborne lidar data provides the ability to represent vertical structure details with very high precision, which is an advantage for many lidar applications focusing on the analysis of elevated features such as 3D vegetation mapping. However, the use of conventional airborne discrete return lidar systems for some of these applications has often been limited, mostly due to relatively coarse vertical resolution and insufficient number of multiple measurements in vertical domain. For this reason, full waveform airborne sensors providing more detailed representation of target vertical structure have often been considered as a preferable choice in some areas of 3D vegetation mapping application, such as forestry research. This paper presents an overview of the specific features of airborne lidar technology concerning 3D mapping applications, particularly vegetation mapping. Certain key performance characteristics of lidar sensors important for the quality of vegetation mapping are discussed and illustrated by the advanced capabilities of the ALTM-Orion, a new discrete return sensor manufactured by Optech Incorporated. It is demonstrated that advanced discrete return sensors with enhanced 3D mapping capabilities can produce data of enhanced quality, which can represent complex structures of vegetation targets at the level of details equivalent in some aspects to the content of full waveform data. It is also shown that recent advances in conventional airborne lidar technology bear the potential to create a new application niche, where high quality dense point clouds, enhanced by fully recorded intensity for multiple returns, may provide sufficient

  18. Alternative method for vegetables cultivation in Benin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Recchia

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In the developing countries populations, which are already vulnerable and food insecure, are likely to be the most seriously affected by the effects of climate change, e.g. yield decreases and price increases for the most important agricultural crops. The IPCC’s Fourth Assessment Report for Africa describes a trend of warming at a rate faster than the global average and increasing aridity: in many parts of Africa, it seems that warmer climates and changes in precipitation will destabilise agricultural production and aggravates food security. The present work concerns the vegetables cultivation in the Parakou region in Benin, where agriculture employs approximately 70% of the active population and contributes to 36% of the Gross Domestic Product and 88% of export earnings. However, the agricultural sector has been regarded as unproductive with low adaptation capacities because of structural factors (e.g. high level of poverty among rural populations, weak mechanization and intensification of production modes, but also because of natural constraints (e.g. poor management of water and soils, leading to soil degradation. Considering the aridity, the low carbon content and the reduced level of nutrients available in the soil, the use of an hydroponic module has been hypothesised. In this way sufficient yields of the crops may be assured and no agricultural machines will be needed for the tillage operations. In addition, the nutrients can be added to the growing solution using residual materials as poultry manure, ashes and green wastes. In order to verify if some construction or maintenance problems can occur and if a growing solution can be easily obtained using agricultural wastes, some tests have been carried out. Moreover laboratory analyses have been done for different solutions that may be adopted with different shares of water, poultry manure, ashes and green wastes. The tests have indicated that the hydroponic module could be used in Benin

  19. Digital soil mapping using remote sensing indices, terrain attributes, and vegetation features in the rangelands of northeastern Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudabadi, Ebrahim; Karimi, Alireza; Haghnia, Gholam Hosain; Sepehr, Adel

    2017-09-11

    Digital soil mapping has been introduced as a viable alternative to the traditional mapping methods due to being fast and cost-effective. The objective of the present study was to investigate the capability of the vegetation features and spectral indices as auxiliary variables in digital soil mapping models to predict soil properties. A region with an area of 1225 ha located in Bajgiran rangelands, Khorasan Razavi province, northeastern Iran, was chosen. A total of 137 sampling sites, each containing 3-5 plots with 10-m interval distance along a transect established based on randomized-systematic method, were investigated. In each plot, plant species names and numbers as well as vegetation cover percentage (VCP) were recorded, and finally one composite soil sample was taken from each transect at each site (137 soil samples in total). Terrain attributes were derived from a digital elevation model, different bands and spectral indices were obtained from the Landsat7 ETM+ images, and vegetation features were calculated in the plots, all of which were used as auxiliary variables to predict soil properties using artificial neural network, gene expression programming, and multivariate linear regression models. According to R 2 RMSE and MBE values, artificial neutral network was obtained as the most accurate soil properties prediction function used in scorpan model. Vegetation features and indices were more effective than remotely sensed data and terrain attributes in predicting soil properties including calcium carbonate equivalent, clay, bulk density, total nitrogen, carbon, sand, silt, and saturated moisture capacity. It was also shown that vegetation indices including NDVI, SAVI, MSAVI, SARVI, RDVI, and DVI were more effective in estimating the majority of soil properties compared to separate bands and even some soil spectral indices.

  20. Classification and mapping of the woody vegetation of Gonarezhou National Park, Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Martini

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Within the framework of the Great Limpopo Transfrontier Conservation Area (GLTFCA, the purpose of this study was to produce a classification of the woody vegetation of the Gonarezhou National Park, Zimbabwe, and a map of its potential distribution. Cover-abundance data of woody species were collected in 330 georeferenced relevés across the Park. These data were used to produce two matrices: the first one using the cover-abundance values as collected in five height layers and the second one based on merging the layers into a single cover value for each species. Automatic classifications were produced for both matrices to determine the optimal number of vegetation types. The two classification approaches both produced 14 types belonging to three macro-groups: mopane, miombo and alluvial woodlands. The results of the two classifications were compared looking at the constant, dominant and diagnostic species of each type. The classification based on separate layers was considered more effective and retained. A high-resolution map of the potential distribution of vegetation types for the whole study area was produced using Random Forest. In the model, the relationship between bioclimatic and topographic variables, known to be correlated to vegetation types, and the classified relevés was used. Identified vegetation types were compared with those of other national parks within the GLTFCA, and an evaluation of the main threats and pressures was conducted.Conservation implications: Vegetation classification and mapping are useful tools for multiple purposes including: surveying and monitoring plant and animal populations, communities and their habitats, and development of management and conservation strategies. Filling the knowledge gap for the Gonarezhou National Park provides a basis for standardised and homogeneous vegetation classification and mapping for the entire Great Limpopo Transfrontier Conservation Area.

  1. Botanical inventory of the Rocky Flats AEC site: mapping methods and preliminary maps. Technical progress report, July 31, 1975--April 28, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webber, P.J.; Clark, S.V.

    1976-01-01

    This Technical Progress Report represents a small but important part of the overall progress and research effort of this contract. It outlines the methods used to produce one 1:12,000 colored vegetation map of the Rocky Flats site and its surrounding area and six black and white 1:500 vegetation maps of intensively studied experimental plots. These maps are already being used by various researchers and it is appropriate that the mapping methods be detailed prior to the final contract report so that their use may be optimised. (auth)

  2. The Circumpolar Arctic Vegetation Map: A tool for analysis of change in permafrost regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, D. A.; Raynolds, M. K.; Maier, H. A.

    2003-12-01

    Arctic vegetation occurs beyond the northern limit of trees, in areas that have an Arctic climate and Arctic flora. Here we present an overview of the recently published Circumpolar Arctic Vegetation Map (CAVM), an area analysis of the vegetation map, and a discussion of its potential for analysis of change in the Arctic. Six countries have Arctic tundra vegetation, Canada, Greenland, Iceland, Russia, Norway (Svalbard), and the US (Total Arctic area = 7.1 million km2). Some treeless areas, such as most of Iceland and the Aluetian Islands are excluded from the map because they lack an Arctic climate. The CAVM divides the Arctic into five bioclimate subzones, A thru E (Subzone A is the coldest and Subzone E is the warmest), based on a combination of summer temperature and vegetation. Fifteen vegetation types are mapped based on the dominant plant growth forms. More detailed, plant-community-level, information is contained in the database used to construct the map. The reverse side of the vegetation map has a false-color infrared image constructed from Advanced Very-High Resolution (AVHRR) satellite-derived raster data, and maps of bioclimate subzones, elevation, landscape types, lake cover, substrate chemistry, floristic provinces, the maximum normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), and aboveground phytomass. The vegetation map was analyzed by vegetation type and biomass for each county, bioclimate subzone, and floristic province. Biomass distribution was analyzed by means of a correlation between aboveground phytomass and the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), a remote-sensing index of surface greenness. Biomass on zonal surfaces roughly doubles within each successively warmer subzone, from about 50 g m-2 in Subzone A to 800 g m-2- in Subzone E. But the pattern of vegetation increase is highly variable, and depends on a number of other factors. The most important appears to be the glacial history of the landscape. Areas that were glaciated during

  3. Mapping Submerged Aquatic Vegetation Using RapidEye Satellite Data: The Example of Lake Kummerow (Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Fritz

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Submersed aquatic vegetation (SAV is sensitive to changes in environmental conditions and plays an important role as a long-term indictor for the trophic state of freshwater lakes. Variations in water level height, nutrient condition, light availability and water temperature affect the growth and species composition of SAV. Detailed information about seasonal variations in littoral bottom coverage are still unknown, although these effects are expected to mask climate change-related long-term changes, as derived by snapshots of standard monitoring methods included in the European Water Framework Directive. Remote sensing offers concepts to map SAV quickly, within large areas, and at short intervals. This study analyses the potential of a semi-empirical method to map littoral bottom coverage by a multi-seasonal approach. Depth-invariant indices were calculated for four Atmospheric & Topographic Correction (ATCOR2 atmospheric corrected RapidEye data sets acquired at Lake Kummerow, Germany, between June and August 2015. RapidEye data evaluation was supported by in situ measurements of the diffuse attenuation coefficient of the water column and bottom reflectance. The processing chain was able to differentiate between SAV and sandy sediment. The successive increase of SAV coverage from June to August was correctly monitored. Comparisons with in situ and Google Earth imagery revealed medium accuracies (kappa coefficient = 0.61, overall accuracy = 72.2%. The analysed time series further revealed how water constituents and temporary surface phenomena such as sun glint or algal blooms influence the identification success of lake bottom substrates. An abundant algal bloom biased the interpretability of shallow water substrate such that a differentiation of sediments and SAV patches failed completely. Despite the documented limitations, mapping of SAV using RapidEye seems possible, even in eutrophic lakes.

  4. Using MERIS fused images for land-cover mapping vegetation status assessment in heterogeneous landscapes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zurita Milla, R.; Clevers, J.G.P.W.; Gijsel, J.A.E.; Schaepman, M.E.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we evaluate the potential of ENVISAT–Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) fused images for land-cover mapping and vegetation status assessment in heterogeneous landscapes. A series of MERIS fused images (15 spectral bands; 25 m pixel size) is created using the linear mixing

  5. ISSUES IN DIGITAL IMAGE PROCESSING OF AERIAL PHOTOGRAPHY FOR MAPPING SUBMERSED AQUATIC VEGETATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper discusses the numerous issues that needed to be addressed when developing a methodology for mapping Submersed Aquatic Vegetation (SAV) from digital aerial photography. Specifically, we discuss 1) choice of film; 2) consideration of tide and weather constraints; 3) in-s...

  6. Mapping coastal & estuarine vegetation using VHR satellite imagery in St Lucia

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Lück-Vogel, Melanie

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The iSimangaliso Wetland Park in which the St Lucia estuary is embedded hosts the largest estuarine system in Africa (155 000 Ha). Remote sensing mapping of the composition of the otherwise largely inaccessible estuarine vegetation provides a...

  7. An evaluation of rapid methods for monitoring vegetation characteristics of wetland bird habitat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavernia, Brian G.; Lyons, James E.; Loges, Brian W.; Wilson, Andrew; Collazo, Jaime A.; Runge, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    Wetland managers benefit from monitoring data of sufficient precision and accuracy to assess wildlife habitat conditions and to evaluate and learn from past management decisions. For large-scale monitoring programs focused on waterbirds (waterfowl, wading birds, secretive marsh birds, and shorebirds), precision and accuracy of habitat measurements must be balanced with fiscal and logistic constraints. We evaluated a set of protocols for rapid, visual estimates of key waterbird habitat characteristics made from the wetland perimeter against estimates from (1) plots sampled within wetlands, and (2) cover maps made from aerial photographs. Estimated percent cover of annuals and perennials using a perimeter-based protocol fell within 10 percent of plot-based estimates, and percent cover estimates for seven vegetation height classes were within 20 % of plot-based estimates. Perimeter-based estimates of total emergent vegetation cover did not differ significantly from cover map estimates. Post-hoc analyses revealed evidence for observer effects in estimates of annual and perennial covers and vegetation height. Median time required to complete perimeter-based methods was less than 7 percent of the time needed for intensive plot-based methods. Our results show that rapid, perimeter-based assessments, which increase sample size and efficiency, provide vegetation estimates comparable to more intensive methods.

  8. Mapping wildland-urban interfaces at large scales integrating housing density and vegetation aggregation for fire prevention in the South of France

    OpenAIRE

    Lampin-Maillet, C.; Jappiot, M.; Long, M; Bouillon, C.; Morge, D.; Ferrier, J.P.

    2009-01-01

    Every year, more than 50,000 wildland fires affect about 500,000 ha of vegetation in southern European countries, particularly in wildland-urban interfaces (WUI). This paper presents a method to characterize and map WUIs at large scales and over large areas for wildland fire prevention in the South of France. Based on the combination of four types of building configuration and three classes of vegetation structure, 12 interface types were classified. Through spatial analysis, fire ignition de...

  9. Mapping gains and losses in woody vegetation across global tropical drylands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, Feng; Brandt, Martin Stefan; Liu, Yi Y

    2017-01-01

    , the actual changes in the woody vegetation are always hidden by interannual fluctuations of the leaf density, because the most widely used remote sensing data are primarily related to the photosynthetically active vegetation components. Here, we quantify the temporal trends of the nonphotosynthetic woody......Woody vegetation in global tropical drylands is of significant importance for both the interannual variability of the carbon cycle and local livelihoods. Satellite observations over the past decades provide a unique way to assess the vegetation long-term dynamics across biomes worldwide. Yet...... components (i.e., stems and branches) in global tropical drylands during 2000-2012 using the vegetation optical depth (VOD), retrieved from passive microwave observations. This is achieved by a novel method focusing on the dry season period to minimize the influence of herbaceous vegetation and using...

  10. Savannah fractional woody vegetation cover mapping with optical and radar data and machine learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symeonakis, Elias; Marqués-Mateu, Ángel; Petroulaki, Kyriaki; Higginbottom, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    The fraction of woody vegetation plays an important role in natural and anthropogenic processes of savannah ecosystems. We investigate the optimal combination of Landsat optical and thermal bands as well as ALOS PALSAR L-band radar data from both wet and dry seasons for the mapping of fractional woody vegetation cover in southern African savannah environments. We employ colour aerial photography for sampling and validation and a random forest classification approach to map the fraction of woody cover in the Northwest Province of South Africa. Our results from random forests classifications show that the most accurate estimates are produced from the model that incorporates all parameters: Landsat optical and thermal bands and vegetation indices for the dry and wet seasons, and HH and HV polarised ALOS PALSAR L-band data. However, the combination of the six Landsat bands from either the wet or the dry season with either the HH or the HV PALSAR band, appears to be sufficient for achieving fractional woody cover balanced accuracies of >85%. Dry season optical bands alone are able to map fractional woody cover with more than 80% balanced accuracy. Our findings can provide much needed assistance to woody vegetation monitoring efforts in southern African savannahs where its expansion over the last decades is partly attributed to bush encroachment and land degradation brought about by recent climatic changes and/or land mismanagement.

  11. The influence of preparation method on children's liking for vegetables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeinstra, G.G.; Koelen, M.; Kok, F.J.; Graaf, de C.

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate how different preparation methods influence children’s liking for vegetables. Participants were children from three age groups (4–6 years N = 46; 7–8 years N = 25; 11–12 years N = 23) and young adults (18–25 years N = 22). The participants tasted and ranked six

  12. Vegetation - Napa County and Blue Ridge Berryessa [ds201

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — In 1995, the Manual of California Vegetation (MCV) introduced a quantitatively based method for classifying and mapping vegetation in California. In 2002 Department...

  13. Will it Blend? Visualization and Accuracy Evaluation of High-Resolution Fuzzy Vegetation Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlinszky, A.; Kania, A.

    2016-06-01

    Instead of assigning every map pixel to a single class, fuzzy classification includes information on the class assigned to each pixel but also the certainty of this class and the alternative possible classes based on fuzzy set theory. The advantages of fuzzy classification for vegetation mapping are well recognized, but the accuracy and uncertainty of fuzzy maps cannot be directly quantified with indices developed for hard-boundary categorizations. The rich information in such a map is impossible to convey with a single map product or accuracy figure. Here we introduce a suite of evaluation indices and visualization products for fuzzy maps generated with ensemble classifiers. We also propose a way of evaluating classwise prediction certainty with "dominance profiles" visualizing the number of pixels in bins according to the probability of the dominant class, also showing the probability of all the other classes. Together, these data products allow a quantitative understanding of the rich information in a fuzzy raster map both for individual classes and in terms of variability in space, and also establish the connection between spatially explicit class certainty and traditional accuracy metrics. These map products are directly comparable to widely used hard boundary evaluation procedures, support active learning-based iterative classification and can be applied for operational use.

  14. Constructing a new integrated genetic linkage map and mapping quantitative trait loci for vegetative mycelium growth rate in Lentinula edodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Wen-Bing; Liu, Wei; Lu, Ying-Ying; Bian, Yin-Bing; Zhou, Yan; Kwan, Hoi Shan; Cheung, Man Kit; Xiao, Yang

    2014-03-01

    The most saturated linkage map for Lentinula edodes to date was constructed based on a monokaryotic population of 146 single spore isolates (SSIs) using sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP), target region amplification polymorphism (TRAP), insertion-deletion (InDel) markers, and the mating-type loci. Five hundred and twenty-four markers were located on 13 linkage groups (LGs). The map spanned a total length of 1006.1 cM, with an average marker spacing of 2.0 cM. Quantitative trait loci (QTLs) mapping was utilized to uncover the loci regulating and controlling the vegetative mycelium growth rate on various synthetic media, and complex medium for commercial cultivation of L. edodes. Two and 13 putative QTLs, identified respectively in the monokaryotic population and two testcross dikaryotic populations, were mapped on seven different LGs. Several vegetative mycelium growth rate-related QTLs uncovered here were clustered on LG4 (Qmgr1, Qdgr1, Qdgr2 and Qdgr9) and LG6 (Qdgr3, Qdgr4 and Qdgr5), implying the presence of main genomic areas responsible for growth rate regulation and control. The QTL hotspot region on LG4 was found to be in close proximity to the region containing the mating-type A (MAT-A) locus. Moreover, Qdgr2 on LG4 was detected on different media, contributing 8.07 %-23.71 % of the phenotypic variation. The present study provides essential information for QTL mapping and marker-assisted selection (MAS) in L. edodes. Copyright © 2014 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Method II : The energy-momentum map

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broer, H.; Hoveijn, I.; Lunter, G.; Vegter, G.

    2003-01-01

    In this chapter we apply the energy–momentum map reduction method to the same class of systems as in Chap. 2, namely two degree-of-freedom systems with optional symmetry, near equilibrium and close to resonance. We calculate the tangent space and nondegeneracy conditions for the 1:2, 1:3 and 1:4

  16. Microscale extraction method for HPLC carotenoid analysis in vegetable matrices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidney Pacheco

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to generate simple, efficient analytical methods that are also fast, clean, and economical, and are capable of producing reliable results for a large number of samples, a micro scale extraction method for analysis of carotenoids in vegetable matrices was developed. The efficiency of this adapted method was checked by comparing the results obtained from vegetable matrices, based on extraction equivalence, time required and reagents. Six matrices were used: tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L., carrot (Daucus carota L., sweet potato with orange pulp (Ipomoea batatas (L. Lam., pumpkin (Cucurbita moschata Duch., watermelon (Citrullus lanatus (Thunb. Matsum. & Nakai and sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas (L. Lam. flour. Quantification of the total carotenoids was made by spectrophotometry. Quantification and determination of carotenoid profiles were formulated by High Performance Liquid Chromatography with photodiode array detection. Microscale extraction was faster, cheaper and cleaner than the commonly used one, and advantageous for analytical laboratories.

  17. A method for determination of {sup 90}Sr in vegetation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nygren, U

    1998-12-01

    This report describes a method for determination of {sup 90}Sr in vegetation. The method consists of wet-ashing the samples and separating Sr from the sample matrix by oxalate precipitation and extraction chromatography. {sup 90}Y ingrowth is awaited after which Y is separated from Sr and {sup 90}Y measured in a proportional counter. The method has been applied on two reference materials and the {sup 90}Sr results agree well with the recommended values. The method has also been used on 20 samples of blueberry twigs and the mean recovery of Sr was 74%

  18. Vegetation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Epstein, H.E.; Walker, D.A.; Bhatt, U.S.

    2012-01-01

    • Over the past 30 years (1982-2011), the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), an index of green vegetation, has increased 15.5% in the North American Arctic and 8.2% in the Eurasian Arctic. In the more southern regions of Arctic tundra, the estimated aboveground plant biomass has...... in vegetation (including shrub tundra expansion) and thunderstorm activity, each a result of Arctic warming, have created conditions that favor a more active Arctic fire regime....

  19. Radiation Source Mapping with Bayesian Inverse Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hykes, Joshua Michael

    We present a method to map the spectral and spatial distributions of radioactive sources using a small number of detectors. Locating and identifying radioactive materials is important for border monitoring, accounting for special nuclear material in processing facilities, and in clean-up operations. Most methods to analyze these problems make restrictive assumptions about the distribution of the source. In contrast, the source-mapping method presented here allows an arbitrary three-dimensional distribution in space and a flexible group and gamma peak distribution in energy. To apply the method, the system's geometry and materials must be known. A probabilistic Bayesian approach is used to solve the resulting inverse problem (IP) since the system of equations is ill-posed. The probabilistic approach also provides estimates of the confidence in the final source map prediction. A set of adjoint flux, discrete ordinates solutions, obtained in this work by the Denovo code, are required to efficiently compute detector responses from a candidate source distribution. These adjoint fluxes are then used to form the linear model to map the state space to the response space. The test for the method is simultaneously locating a set of 137Cs and 60Co gamma sources in an empty room. This test problem is solved using synthetic measurements generated by a Monte Carlo (MCNP) model and using experimental measurements that we collected for this purpose. With the synthetic data, the predicted source distributions identified the locations of the sources to within tens of centimeters, in a room with an approximately four-by-four meter floor plan. Most of the predicted source intensities were within a factor of ten of their true value. The chi-square value of the predicted source was within a factor of five from the expected value based on the number of measurements employed. With a favorable uniform initial guess, the predicted source map was nearly identical to the true distribution

  20. Mapping the recovery of the burnt vegetation by classifying pre- and post-fire spectral indices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A Peña

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzed the state of recovery of the burnt vegetation in the National Park of Torres del Paine between December, 2011 and March, 2012. The calculation and comparison of the NVDI (normalized difference vegetation index of the burnt area throughout a time series of 24 Landsat images acquired before, during and after the fire (2009- 2015, showed the temporal variation in the biomass levels of the burnt vegetation. The subsequent classification and comparison of the spectral indices: NDVI, NBR (normalized burnt ratio and NDWI (normalized difference water index on a full-data available and phenologically matched pre- and post-fire image pair (acquired in October 2009 and 2014, enabled to analyze and mapping the state of recovery of the burnt vegetation. The results show that the area of the lowest classes of all the spectral indices of the pre-fire date became the most dominant on the post-fire date. The pre- and post- fire NDVI class crossing by a confusion matrix showed that the highest and most prevailing pre-fire NDVI classes, mostly corresponding to hydromorphic forests and Andean scrubs, turned into the lowest class in 2014. The remaining area, comprising Patagonian steppe, reestablished its biomass levels in 2014, mostly exhibiting the same pre-fire NDVI classes. These results may provide guidelines to monitor and manage the regeneration of the vegetation impacted by this fire.

  1. Effectiveness of Vegetation Index Transformation for Land Use Identifying and Mapping in the Area of Oil palm Plantation based on SPOT-6 Imagery (Case Study: PT.Tunggal Perkasa Plantations, Air Molek, Indragiri Hulu)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setyowati, H. A.; S, S. H. Murti B.; Sukentyas, E. S.

    2016-11-01

    The reflection of land surface, atmosphere and vegetation conditions affect the reflectance value of the object is recorded on remote sensing image so that it can affect the outcome of information extraction from remote sensing imagery one multispectral classification. This study aims to assess the ability of the transformation of generic vegetation index (Wide Dynamic Range Vegetation Index), the vegetation index transformation that is capable reducing the influence of the atmosphere (Atmospherically Resistant Vegetation Index), and the transformation of vegetation index that is capable of reducing the influence of the background soil (Second Modified Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index) for the identification and mapping of land use in the oil palm plantation area based on SPOT-6 archived on June 13, 2013 from LAPAN. The study area selected oil palm plantations PT. Tunggal Perkasa Plantations, Air Molek, Indragiri Hulu, Riau Province. The method is using the transformation of the vegetation index ARVI, MSAVI2, and WDRVI. Sample selection method used was stratified random sampling. The test method used mapping accuracy of the confusion matrix. The results showed that the best transformation of the vegetation index for the identification and mapping of land use in the plantation area is ARVI transformation with a total of accuracy is 96%. Accuracy of mapping land use settlements 100%, replanting 82.35%, 81.25% young oil palm, old oil palm 99.46%, 100% bush, body of water 100%, and 100% bare-soil.

  2. A land-cover map for South and Southeast Asia derived from SPOT-VEGETATION data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stibig, H.-J.; Belward, A.S.; Roy, P.S.; Rosalina-Wasrin, U.; Agrawal, S.; Joshi, P.K.; ,; Beuchle, R.; Fritz, S.; Mubareka, S.; Giri, C.

    2007-01-01

    Aim  Our aim was to produce a uniform ‘regional’ land-cover map of South and Southeast Asia based on ‘sub-regional’ mapping results generated in the context of the Global Land Cover 2000 project.Location  The ‘region’ of tropical and sub-tropical South and Southeast Asia stretches from the Himalayas and the southern border of China in the north, to Sri Lanka and Indonesia in the south, and from Pakistan in the west to the islands of New Guinea in the far east.Methods  The regional land-cover map is based on sub-regional digital mapping results derived from SPOT-VEGETATION satellite data for the years 1998–2000. Image processing, digital classification and thematic mapping were performed separately for the three sub-regions of South Asia, continental Southeast Asia, and insular Southeast Asia. Landsat TM images, field data and existing national maps served as references. We used the FAO (Food and Agriculture Organization) Land Cover Classification System (LCCS) for coding the sub-regional land-cover classes and for aggregating the latter to a uniform regional legend. A validation was performed based on a systematic grid of sample points, referring to visual interpretation from high-resolution Landsat imagery. Regional land-cover area estimates were obtained and compared with FAO statistics for the categories ‘forest’ and ‘cropland’.Results  The regional map displays 26 land-cover classes. The LCCS coding provided a standardized class description, independent from local class names; it also allowed us to maintain the link to the detailed sub-regional land-cover classes. The validation of the map displayed a mapping accuracy of 72% for the dominant classes of ‘forest’ and ‘cropland’; regional area estimates for these classes correspond reasonably well to existing regional statistics.Main conclusions  The land-cover map of South and Southeast Asia provides a synoptic view of the distribution of land cover of tropical and sub

  3. Vegetation Map of South Africa, Lesotho and Swaziland 2009 and 2012: A description of changes from 2006

    OpenAIRE

    Anisha Dayaram; Leslie Powrie; Tony Rebelo; Andrew Skowno

    2017-01-01

    Background: The variety of applications in which the Vegetation Map of South Africa, Lesotho and Swaziland (VEGMAP) is used requires the map to be continually updated and refined to reflect the latest available information. The VEGMAP has been updated twice, in 2009 and 2012, since its first release in 2006.Objectives: The first objective is to report on the motivations for changes in the 2009 and 2012 versions. The second objective is to describe new vegetation types and subtypes included in...

  4. Object-Based Classification of Ikonos Imagery for Mapping Large-Scale Vegetation Communities in Urban Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert k. Chong

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Effective assessment of biodiversity in cities requires detailed vegetation maps.To date, most remote sensing of urban vegetation has focused on thematically coarse landcover products. Detailed habitat maps are created by manual interpretation of aerialphotographs, but this is time consuming and costly at large scale. To address this issue, wetested the effectiveness of object-based classifications that use automated imagesegmentation to extract meaningful ground features from imagery. We applied thesetechniques to very high resolution multispectral Ikonos images to produce vegetationcommunity maps in Dunedin City, New Zealand. An Ikonos image was orthorectified and amulti-scale segmentation algorithm used to produce a hierarchical network of image objects.The upper level included four coarse strata: industrial/commercial (commercial buildings,residential (houses and backyard private gardens, vegetation (vegetation patches larger than0.8/1ha, and water. We focused on the vegetation stratum that was segmented at moredetailed level to extract and classify fifteen classes of vegetation communities. The firstclassification yielded a moderate overall classification accuracy (64%, κ = 0.52, which ledus to consider a simplified classification with ten vegetation classes. The overallclassification accuracy from the simplified classification was 77% with a κ value close tothe excellent range (κ = 0.74. These results compared favourably with similar studies inother environments. We conclude that this approach does not provide maps as detailed as those produced by manually interpreting aerial photographs, but it can still extract ecologically significant classes. It is an efficient way to generate accurate and detailed maps in significantly shorter time. The final map accuracy could be improved by integrating segmentation, automated and manual classification in the mapping process, especially when considering important vegetation

  5. Location of plant species in Norway gathered as a part of a survey vegetation mapping programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryn, Anders; Kristoffersen, Hans-Petter; Angeloff, Michael; Nystuen, Ingvild; Aune-Lundberg, Linda; Endresen, Dag; Svindseth, Christian; Rekdal, Yngve

    2015-01-01

    Georeferenced species data have a wide range of applications and are increasingly used for e.g. distribution modelling and climate change studies. As an integrated part of an on-going survey programme for vegetation mapping, plant species have been recorded. The data described in this paper contains 18.521 registrations of plants from 1190 different circular plots throughout Norway. All species localities are georeferenced, the spatial uncertainty is provided, and additional ecological information is reported. The published data has been gathered from 1991 until 2015. The entries contain all higher vascular plants and pteridophytes, and some cryptogams. Other ecological information is also provided for the species locations, such as the vegetation type, the cover of the species and slope. The entire material is stored and available for download through the GBIF server. PMID:26958614

  6. Location of plant species in Norway gathered as a part of a survey vegetation mapping programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Bryn

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Georeferenced species data have a wide range of applications and are increasingly used for e.g. distribution modelling and climate change studies. As an integrated part of an on-going survey programme for vegetation mapping, plant species have been recorded. The data described in this paper contains 18.521 registrations of plants from 1190 different circular plots throughout Norway. All species localities are georeferenced, the spatial uncertainty is provided, and additional ecological information is reported. The published data has been gathered from 1991 until 2015. The entries contain all higher vascular plants and pteridophytes, and some cryptogams. Other ecological information is also provided for the species locations, such as the vegetation type, the cover of the species and slope. The entire material is stored and available for download through the GBIF server.

  7. Mapping alien and indigenous vegetation in the KwaZulu-Natal Sandstone Sourveld using remotely sensed data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Odindi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The indigenous KwaZulu-Natal Sandstone Sourveld (KZN SS grassland is highly endemic and species-rich, yet critically endangered and poorly conserved. Ecological threats to this grassland ecosystem are exacerbated by encroachment of woody plants, with severe negative environmental and economic consequences. Hence, there is an increasing need to reliably determine the extent of encroached or invaded areas to design optimal mitigation measures. Because of inherent limitations that characterise traditional approaches like field surveys and aerial photography, adoption of remotely sensed data offer reliable and timely mapping of landscape processes.Objectives: We sought to map the distribution of woody vegetation within the KZN SS using remote sensing approaches.Method: New generation RapidEye imagery, characterised by strategically positioned bands, and the advanced machine learning algorithm Random Forest (RF were used to determine the distribution and composition of alien and indigenous woody vegetation within the KZN SS.Results: Results show that alien and indigenous encroachment and invasion could be mapped with over 86% accuracy whilst the dominant indigenous and alien tree species could be mapped with over 74% accuracy. These results highlight the potential of new generation RapidEye satellite data in combination with advanced machine learning technique in predicting the distribution of alien and indigenous woody cover within a grassland ecosystem. The successful discrimination of the two classes and the species within the classes can be attributed to the additional strategically positioned bands, particularly the red-edge in the new generation RapidEye image.Conclusion: Results underscore the potential of new generation RapidEye satellite data with strategically positioned bands and an advanced machine learning algorithm in predicting the distribution of woody cover in a grassland ecosystem.

  8. Predictive Mapping of Dwarf Shrub Vegetation in an Arid High Mountain Ecosystem Using Remote Sensing and Random Forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim André Vanselow

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In many arid mountains, dwarf shrubs represent the most important fodder and firewood resources; therefore, they are intensely used. For the Eastern Pamirs (Tajikistan, they are assumed to be overused. However, empirical evidence on this issue is lacking. We aim to provide a method capable of mapping vegetation in this mountain desert. We used random forest models based on remote sensing data (RapidEye, ASTER GDEM and 359 plots to predictively map total vegetative cover and the distribution of the most important firewood plants, K. ceratoides and A. leucotricha. These species were mapped as present in 33.8% of the study area (accuracy 90.6%. The total cover of the dwarf shrub communities ranged from 0.5% to 51% (per pixel. Areas with very low cover were limited to the vicinity of roads and settlements. The model could explain 80.2% of the total variance. The most important predictor across the models was MSAVI2 (a spectral vegetation index particularly invented for low-cover areas. We conclude that the combination of statistical models and remote sensing data worked well to map vegetation in an arid mountainous environment. With this approach, we were able to provide tangible data on dwarf shrub resources in the Eastern Pamirs and to relativize previous reports about their extensive depletion.

  9. Exploiting differential vegetation phenology for satellite-based mapping of semiarid grass vegetation in the southwestern United States and northern Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dye, Dennis G.; Middleton, Barry R.; Vogel, John M.; Wu, Zhuoting; Velasco, Miguel G.

    2016-01-01

    We developed and evaluated a methodology for subpixel discrimination and large-area mapping of the perennial warm-season (C4) grass component of vegetation cover in mixed-composition landscapes of the southwestern United States and northern Mexico. We describe the methodology within a general, conceptual framework that we identify as the differential vegetation phenology (DVP) paradigm. We introduce a DVP index, the Normalized Difference Phenometric Index (NDPI) that provides vegetation type-specific information at the subpixel scale by exploiting differential patterns of vegetation phenology detectable in time-series spectral vegetation index (VI) data from multispectral land imagers. We used modified soil-adjusted vegetation index (MSAVI2) data from Landsat to develop the NDPI, and MSAVI2 data from MODIS to compare its performance relative to one alternate DVP metric (difference of spring average MSAVI2 and summer maximum MSAVI2), and two simple, conventional VI metrics (summer average MSAVI2, summer maximum MSAVI2). The NDPI in a scaled form (NDPIs) performed best in predicting variation in perennial C4 grass cover as estimated from landscape photographs at 92 sites (R2 = 0.76, p vegetation types in other regions where the vegetation components of the landscape exhibit contrasting seasonal patterns of phenology.

  10. Revisions to the 1995 map of ecological subregions that affect users of the southern variant of the Forest Vegetation Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. Henry McNab; Chad E. Keyser

    2011-01-01

    The Southern Variant of the Forest Vegetation Simulator utilizes ecological units mapped in 1995 by the Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, to refine tree growth models for the Southern United States. The 2007 revision of the 1995 map resulted in changes of identification and boundary delineation for some ecoregion units. In this report, we summarize the...

  11. Range vegetation type mapping and above-ground green biomass estimations using multispectral imagery. [Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, R. S. (Principal Investigator); Gordon, R. C.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Range vegetation types have been successfully mapped on a portion of the 68,000 acre study site located west of Baggs, Wyoming, using ERTS-1 imagery. These types have been ascertained from field transects over a five year period. Comparable studies will be made with EREP imagery. Above-ground biomass estimation studies are being conducted utilizing double sampling techniques on two similar study sites. Information obtained will be correlated with percent relative reflectance measurements obtained on the ground which will be related to image brightness levels. This will provide an estimate of above-ground green biomass with multispectral imagery.

  12. Method and system for a network mapping service

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bynum, Leo

    2017-10-17

    A method and system of publishing a map includes providing access to a plurality of map data files or mapping services between at least one publisher and at least one subscriber; defining a map in a map context comprising parameters and descriptors to substantially duplicate a map by reference to mutually accessible data or mapping services, publishing a map to a channel in a table file on server; accessing the channel by at least one subscriber, transmitting the mapping context from the server to the at least one subscriber, executing the map context by the at least one subscriber, and generating the map on a display software associated with the at least one subscriber by reconstituting the map from the references and other data in the mapping context.

  13. Case studies: Soil mapping using multiple methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Hauke; Wunderlich, Tina; Hagrey, Said A. Al; Rabbel, Wolfgang; Stümpel, Harald

    2010-05-01

    Soil is a non-renewable resource with fundamental functions like filtering (e.g. water), storing (e.g. carbon), transforming (e.g. nutrients) and buffering (e.g. contamination). Degradation of soils is meanwhile not only to scientists a well known fact, also decision makers in politics have accepted this as a serious problem for several environmental aspects. National and international authorities have already worked out preservation and restoration strategies for soil degradation, though it is still work of active research how to put these strategies into real practice. But common to all strategies the description of soil state and dynamics is required as a base step. This includes collecting information from soils with methods ranging from direct soil sampling to remote applications. In an intermediate scale mobile geophysical methods are applied with the advantage of fast working progress but disadvantage of site specific calibration and interpretation issues. In the framework of the iSOIL project we present here some case studies for soil mapping performed using multiple geophysical methods. We will present examples of combined field measurements with EMI-, GPR-, magnetic and gammaspectrometric techniques carried out with the mobile multi-sensor-system of Kiel University (GER). Depending on soil type and actual environmental conditions, different methods show a different quality of information. With application of diverse methods we want to figure out, which methods or combination of methods will give the most reliable information concerning soil state and properties. To investigate the influence of varying material we performed mapping campaigns on field sites with sandy, loamy and loessy soils. Classification of measured or derived attributes show not only the lateral variability but also gives hints to a variation in the vertical distribution of soil material. For all soils of course soil water content can be a critical factor concerning a succesful

  14. Assessment of methods for mapping snow cover from MODIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittger, Karl; Painter, Thomas H.; Dozier, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    Characterization of snow is critical for understanding Earth’s water and energy cycles. Maps of snow from MODIS have seen growing use in investigations of climate, hydrology, and glaciology, but the lack of rigorous validation of different snow mapping methods compromises these studies. We examine three widely used MODIS snow products: the “binary” (i.e., snow yes/no) global snow maps that were among the initial MODIS standard products; a more recent standard MODIS fractional snow product; and another fractional snow product, MODSCAG, based on spectral mixture analysis. We compare them to maps of snow obtained from Landsat ETM+ data, whose 30 m spatial resolution provides nearly 300 samples within a 500 m MODIS nadir pixel. The assessment uses 172 images spanning a range of snow and vegetation conditions, including the Colorado Rocky Mountains, the Upper Rio Grande, California’s Sierra Nevada, and the Nepal Himalaya. MOD10A1 binary and fractional fail to retrieve snow in the transitional periods during accumulation and melt while MODSCAG consistently maintains its retrieval ability during these periods. Averaged over all regions, the RMSE for MOD10A1 fractional is 0.23, whereas the MODSCAG RMSE is 0.10. MODSCAG performs the most consistently through accumulation, mid-winter and melt, with median differences ranging from -0.16 to 0.04 while differences for MOD10A1 fractional range from -0.34 to 0.35. MODSCAG maintains its performance over all land cover classes and throughout a larger range of land surface properties. Characterizing snow cover by spectral mixing is more accurate than empirical methods based on the normalized difference snow index, both for identifying where snow is and is not and for estimating the fractional snow cover within a sensor’s instantaneous field-of-view. Determining the fractional value is particularly important during spring and summer melt in mountainous terrain, where large variations in snow, vegetation and soil occur over

  15. Introducing a method for mapping recreational experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholst, Andrej Christian; Dempsey, Nicola; Burton, Mel

    2013-01-01

    The provision of recreational opportunities forms an important and long-standing urban planning and management objective. However, considering a range of experiences encountered when in such spaces currently does not form part of existing open space assessment tools in the UK. In this paper, ‘rec......-mapping’, an innovative method of analysing and mapping positive recreational experiences in urban green spaces is explored and piloted within the UK planning context. Originating in the Nordic countries, this on-site method can provide urban planners and designers with data about the extent to which specific green...... spaces provide and support a range of recreational experiences. The exploration reported here is based on a short review of the methods background and an application in two test sites in Sheffield, South Yorkshire in early summer 2010. This paper critically appraises the application of rec...

  16. Evaluation of airborne image data for mapping riparian vegetation within the Grand Canyon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Philip A.; Staid, Matthew I.; Plescia, Jeffrey B.; Johnson, Jeffrey R.

    2002-01-01

    This study examined various types of remote-sensing data that have been acquired during a 12-month period over a portion of the Colorado River corridor to determine the type of data and conditions for data acquisition that provide the optimum classification results for mapping riparian vegetation. Issues related to vegetation mapping included time of year, number and positions of wavelength bands, and spatial resolution for data acquisition to produce accurate vegetation maps versus cost of data. Image data considered in the study consisted of scanned color-infrared (CIR) film, digital CIR, and digital multispectral data, whose resolutions from 11 cm (photographic film) to 100 cm (multispectral), that were acquired during the Spring, Summer, and Fall seasons in 2000 for five long-term monitoring sites containing riparian vegetation. Results show that digitally acquired data produce higher and more consistent classification accuracies for mapping vegetation units than do film products. The highest accuracies were obtained from nine-band multispectral data; however, a four-band subset of these data, that did not include short-wave infrared bands, produced comparable mapping results. The four-band subset consisted of the wavelength bands 0.52-0.59 µm, 0.59-0.62 µm, 0.67-0.72 µm, and 0.73-0.85 µm. Use of only three of these bands that simulate digital CIR sensors produced accuracies for several vegetation units that were 10% lower than those obtained using the full multispectral data set. Classification tests using band ratios produced lower accuracies than those using band reflectance for scanned film data; a result attributed to the relatively poor radiometric fidelity maintained by the film scanning process, whereas calibrated multispectral data produced similar classification accuracies using band reflectance and band ratios. This suggests that the intrinsic band reflectance of the vegetation is more important than inter-band reflectance differences in

  17. Comparison of ASTER- and AVIRIS-Derived Mineraland Vegetation Maps of the White Horse Replacement Alunite Deposit and Surrounding Area, Marysvale Volcanic Field, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockwell, Barnaby W.

    2009-01-01

    This report presents and compares mineral and vegetation maps of parts of the Marysvale volcanic field in west-central Utah that were published in a recent paper describing the White Horse replacement alunite deposit. Detailed, field-verified maps of the deposit were produced from Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data acquired from a low-altitude Twin Otter turboprop airborne platform. Reconnaissance-level maps of surrounding areas including the central and northern Tushar Mountains, Pahvant Range, and portions of the Sevier Plateau to the east were produced from visible, near-infrared, and shortwave-infrared data acquired by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) sensor carried aboard the Terra satellite platform. These maps are also compared to a previously published mineral map of the same area generated from AVIRIS data acquired from the high-altitude NASA ER-2 jet platform. All of the maps were generated by similar analysis methods, enabling the direct comparison of the spatial scale and mineral composition of surface geologic features that can be identified using the three types of remote sensing data. The high spatial (2-17 meter) and spectral (224 bands) resolution AVIRIS data can be used to generate detailed mineral and vegetation maps suitable for geologic and geoenvironmental studies of individual deposits, mines, and smelters. The lower spatial (15-30 meter) and spectral (9 bands) resolution ASTER data are better suited to less detailed mineralogical studies of lithology and alteration across entire hydrothermal systems and mining districts, including regional mineral resource and geoenvironmental assessments. The results presented here demonstrate that minerals and mineral mixtures can be directly identified using AVIRIS and ASTER data to elucidate spatial patterns of mineralogic zonation; AVIRIS data can enable the generation of maps with significantly greater detail and accuracy. The

  18. Mapping paddy biomass with multiple vegetation indexes by using multispectral remotely sensed image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Xiaohe; Wang, Yancang; Song, Xiaoyu; Xu, Xingang

    2016-10-01

    Monitoring dry biomass of crop timely and accurately by remote sensing is crucial to assess crop growth, manage field water-fertilizer and predict yield. The Huaihe River Basin in China was chose as study area to map the spatial distribution of paddy biomass. The study derived 12 vegetation indexes from HJ-CCD image, which were closely related to crop growth. After screening sensitive vegetation index with in-situ samples by correlation analysis, the study developed the inversion model by single variable and multiple variables. The determination coefficient (R2) and root mean square error (RMSE) was used to evaluate the accuracy of models. Results showed that the accuracies of multivariable models were better than these of single-variable models, of which the average R2 reached 0.647 and the average RMSE was 0.059. It indicated that the multi-variable models were input in more information than those of single-variable models, which improved the accuracies of estimating paddy biomass in to a certain degree. The average overall accuracies of multi-variable models were 92.7%, while that of singe-variable models were 87.8%. The model with multiple linear regressions could be used to map the paddy biomass in the study area by using HJ-CCD image.

  19. The integration of GPS, vegetation mapping and GIS in ecological and behavioural studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Mark Rutter

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Global Positioning System (GPS satellite navigation receivers are increasingly being used in ecological and behavioural studies to track the movements of animals in relation to the environments in which they live and forage. Concurrent recording of the animal's foraging behaviour (e.g. from jaw movement recording allows foraging locations to be determined. By combining the animal GPS movement and foraging data with habitat and vegetation maps using a Geographical Information System (GIS it is possible to relate animal movement and foraging location to landscape and habitat features and vegetation types. This powerful approach is opening up new opportunities to study the spatial aspects of animal behaviour, especially foraging behaviour, with far greater precision and objectivity than before. Advances in GPS technology now mean that sub-metre precision systems can be used to track animals, extending the range of application of this technology from landscape and habitat scale to paddock and patch scale studies. As well as allowing ecological hypotheses to be empirically tested at the patch scale, the improvements in precision are also leading to the approach being increasing extended from large scale ecological studies to smaller (paddock scale agricultural studies. The use of sub-metre systems brings both new scientific opportunities and new technological challenges. For example, fitting all of the animals in a group with sub-metre precision GPS receivers allows their relative inter-individual distances to be precisely calculated, and their relative orientations can be derived from data from a digital compass fitted to each receiver. These data, analyzed using GIS, could give new insights into the social behaviour of animals. However, the improvements in precision with which the animals are being tracked also needs equivalent improvements in the precision with which habitat and vegetation are mapped. This needs some degree of automation, as

  20. Vegetation mapping from high-resolution satellite images in the heterogeneous arid environments of Socotra Island (Yemen)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malatesta, Luca; Attorre, Fabio; Altobelli, Alfredo; Adeeb, Ahmed; De Sanctis, Michele; Taleb, Nadim M.; Scholte, Paul T.; Vitale, Marcello

    2013-01-01

    Socotra Island (Yemen), a global biodiversity hotspot, is characterized by high geomorphological and biological diversity. In this study, we present a high-resolution vegetation map of the island based on combining vegetation analysis and classification with remote sensing. Two different image classification approaches were tested to assess the most accurate one in mapping the vegetation mosaic of Socotra. Spectral signatures of the vegetation classes were obtained through a Gaussian mixture distribution model, and a sequential maximum a posteriori (SMAP) classification was applied to account for the heterogeneity and the complex spatial pattern of the arid vegetation. This approach was compared to the traditional maximum likelihood (ML) classification. Satellite data were represented by a RapidEye image with 5 m pixel resolution and five spectral bands. Classified vegetation relevés were used to obtain the training and evaluation sets for the main plant communities. Postclassification sorting was performed to adjust the classification through various rule-based operations. Twenty-eight classes were mapped, and SMAP, with an accuracy of 87%, proved to be more effective than ML (accuracy: 66%). The resulting map will represent an important instrument for the elaboration of conservation strategies and the sustainable use of natural resources in the island.

  1. Estimating wetland vegetation abundance from Landsat-8 operational land imager imagery: a comparison between linear spectral mixture analysis and multinomial logit modeling methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Gong, Zhaoning; Zhao, Wenji; Pu, Ruiliang; Liu, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Mapping vegetation abundance by using remote sensing data is an efficient means for detecting changes of an eco-environment. With Landsat-8 operational land imager (OLI) imagery acquired on July 31, 2013, both linear spectral mixture analysis (LSMA) and multinomial logit model (MNLM) methods were applied to estimate and assess the vegetation abundance in the Wild Duck Lake Wetland in Beijing, China. To improve mapping vegetation abundance and increase the number of endmembers in spectral mixture analysis, normalized difference vegetation index was extracted from OLI imagery along with the seven reflective bands of OLI data for estimating the vegetation abundance. Five endmembers were selected, which include terrestrial plants, aquatic plants, bare soil, high albedo, and low albedo. The vegetation abundance mapping results from Landsat OLI data were finally evaluated by utilizing a WorldView-2 multispectral imagery. Similar spatial patterns of vegetation abundance produced by both fully constrained LSMA algorithm and MNLM methods were observed: higher vegetation abundance levels were distributed in agricultural and riparian areas while lower levels in urban/built-up areas. The experimental results also indicate that the MNLM model outperformed the LSMA algorithm with smaller root mean square error (0.0152 versus 0.0252) and higher coefficient of determination (0.7856 versus 0.7214) as the MNLM model could handle the nonlinear reflection phenomenon better than the LSMA with mixed pixels.

  2. The Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS): A Medium-Altitude, Digitization-Only, Airborne Laser Altimeter for Mapping Vegetation and Topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, J. Bryan; Rabine, David L.; Hofton, Michelle A.

    1999-01-01

    The Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS) is an airborne, scanning laser altimeter designed and developed at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. LVIS operates at altitudes up to 10 km above ground, and is capable of producing a data swath up to 1000 m wide nominally with 25 m wide footprints. The entire time history of the outgoing and return pulses is digitized, allowing unambiguous determination of range and return pulse structure. Combined with aircraft position and attitude knowledge, this instrument produces topographic maps with decimeter accuracy and vertical height and structure measurements of vegetation. The laser transmitter is a diode-pumped Nd:YAG oscillator producing 1064 nm, 10 nsec, 5 mJ pulses at repetition rates up to 500 Hz. LVIS has recently demonstrated its ability to determine topography (including sub-canopy) and vegetation height and structure on flight missions to various forested regions in the U.S. and Central America. The LVIS system is the airborne simulator for the Vegetation Canopy Lidar (VCL) mission (a NASA Earth remote sensing satellite due for launch in 2000), providing simulated data sets and a platform for instrument proof-of-concept studies. The topography maps and return waveforms produced by LVIS provide Earth scientists with a unique data set allowing studies of topography, hydrology, and vegetation with unmatched accuracy and coverage.

  3. Sparse methods for Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgic, Berkin; Chatnuntawech, Itthi; Langkammer, Christian; Setsompop, Kawin

    2015-09-01

    Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping (QSM) aims to estimate the tissue susceptibility distribution that gives rise to subtle changes in the main magnetic field, which are captured by the image phase in a gradient echo (GRE) experiment. The underlying susceptibility distribution is related to the acquired tissue phase through an ill-posed linear system. To facilitate its inversion, spatial regularization that imposes sparsity or smoothness assumptions can be employed. This paper focuses on efficient algorithms for regularized QSM reconstruction. Fast solvers that enforce sparsity under Total Variation (TV) and Total Generalized Variation (TGV) constraints are developed using Alternating Direction Method of Multipliers (ADMM). Through variable splitting that permits closed-form iterations, the computation efficiency of these solvers are dramatically improved. An alternative approach to improve the conditioning of the ill-posed inversion is to acquire multiple GRE volumes at different head orientations relative to the main magnetic field. The phase information from such multi-orientation acquisition can be combined to yield exquisite susceptibility maps and obviate the need for regularized reconstruction, albeit at the cost of increased data acquisition time.

  4. Mapping Aquatic Vegetation in a Large, Shallow Eutrophic Lake: A Frequency-Based Approach Using Multiple Years of MODIS Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohan Liu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Aquatic vegetation serves many important ecological and socioeconomic functions in lake ecosystems. The presence of floating algae poses difficulties for accurately estimating the distribution of aquatic vegetation in eutrophic lakes. We present an approach to map the distribution of aquatic vegetation in Lake Taihu (a large, shallow eutrophic lake in China and reduce the influence of floating algae on aquatic vegetation mapping. Our approach involved a frequency analysis over a 2003–2013 time series of the floating algal index (FAI based on moderate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS data. Three phenological periods were defined based on the vegetation presence frequency (VPF and the growth of algae and aquatic vegetation: December and January composed the period of wintering aquatic vegetation; February and March composed the period of prolonged coexistence of algal blooms and wintering aquatic vegetation; and June to October was the peak period of the coexistence of algal blooms and aquatic vegetation. By comparing and analyzing the satellite-derived aquatic vegetation distribution and 244 in situ measurements made in 2013, we established a FAI threshold of −0.025 and VPF thresholds of 0.55, 0.45 and 0.85 for the three phenological periods. We validated the accuracy of our approach by comparing the results between the satellite-derived maps and the in situ results obtained from 2008–2012. The overall classification accuracy was 87%, 81%, 77%, 88% and 73% in the five years from 2008–2012, respectively. We then applied the approach to the MODIS images from 2003–2013 and obtained the total area of the aquatic vegetation, which varied from 265.94 km2 in 2007 to 503.38 km2 in 2008, with an average area of 359.62 ± 69.20 km2 over the 11 years. Our findings suggest that (1 the proposed approach can be used to map the distribution of aquatic vegetation in eutrophic algae-rich waters and (2 dramatic changes occurred in the

  5. Mapcurves: a quantitative method for comparing categorical maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    William W. Hargrove; M. Hoffman Forrest; Paul F. Hessburg

    2006-01-01

    We present Mapcurves, a quantitative goodness-of-fit (GOF) method that unambiguously shows the degree of spatial concordance between two or more categorical maps. Mapcurves graphically and quantitatively evaluate the degree of fit among any number of maps and quantify a GOF for each polygon, as well as the entire map. The Mapcurve method indicates a perfect fit even if...

  6. Vegetation Indices for Mapping Canopy Foliar Nitrogen in a Mixed Temperate Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihui Wang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Hyperspectral remote sensing serves as an effective tool for estimating foliar nitrogen using a variety of techniques. Vegetation indices (VIs are a simple means of retrieving foliar nitrogen. Despite their popularity, few studies have been conducted to examine the utility of VIs for mapping canopy foliar nitrogen in a mixed forest context. In this study, we assessed the performance of 32 vegetation indices derived from HySpex airborne hyperspectral images for estimating canopy mass-based foliar nitrogen concentration (%N in the Bavarian Forest National Park. The partial least squares regression (PLSR was performed for comparison. These vegetation indices were classified into three categories that are mostly correlated to nitrogen, chlorophyll, and structural properties such as leaf area index (LAI. %N was destructively measured in 26 broadleaf, needle leaf, and mixed stand plots to represent the different species and canopy structure. The canopy foliar %N is defined as the plot-level mean foliar %N of all species weighted by species canopy foliar mass fraction. Our results showed that the variance of canopy foliar %N is mainly explained by functional type and species composition. The normalized difference nitrogen index (NDNI produced the most accurate estimation of %N (R2CV = 0.79, RMSECV = 0.26. A comparable estimation of %N was obtained by the chlorophyll index Boochs2 (R2CV = 0.76, RMSECV = 0.27. In addition, the mean NIR reflectance (800–850 nm, representing canopy structural properties, also achieved a good accuracy in %N estimation (R2CV = 0.73, RMSECV = 0.30. The PLSR model provided a less accurate estimation of %N (R2CV = 0.69, RMSECV = 0.32. We argue that the good performance of all three categories of vegetation indices in %N estimation can be attributed to the synergy among plant traits (i.e., canopy structure, leaf chemical and optical properties while these traits may converge across plant species for evolutionary reasons. Our

  7. Wieslander Vegetation

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Digital version of the 1945 California Vegetation Type Maps by A. E. Wieslander of the U.S. Forest Service. Source scale of maps are 1:100,000. These compiled maps...

  8. Seasonal comparison of two spatially distributed evapotranspiration mapping methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisfaludi, Balázs; Csáki, Péter; Péterfalvi, József; Primusz, Péter

    2017-04-01

    More rainfall is disposed of through evapotranspiration (ET) on a global scale than through runoff and storage combined. In Hungary, about 90% of the precipitation evapotranspirates from the land and only 10% goes to surface runoff and groundwater recharge. Therefore, evapotranspiration is a very important element of the water balance, so it is a suitable parameter for the calibration of hydrological models. Monthly ET values of two MODIS-data based ET products were compared for the area of Hungary and for the vegetation period of the year 2008. The differences were assessed by land cover types and by elevation zones. One ET map was the MOD16, aiming at global coverage and provided by the MODIS Global Evaporation Project. The other method is called CREMAP, it was developed at the Budapest University of Technology and Economics for regional scale ET mapping. CREMAP was validated for the area of Hungary with good results, but ET maps were produced only for the period of 2000-2008. The aim of this research was to evaluate the performance of the MOD16 product compared to the CREMAP method. The average difference between the two products was the highest during summer, CREMAP estimating higher ET values by about 25 mm/month. In the spring and autumn, MOD16 ET values were higher by an average of 6 mm/month. The differences by land cover types showed a similar seasonal pattern to the average differences, and they correlated strongly with each other. Practically the same difference values could be calculated for arable lands and forests that together cover nearly 75% of the area of the country. Therefore, it can be said that the seasonal changes had the same effect on the two method's ET estimations in each land cover type areas. The analysis by elevation zones showed that on elevations lower than 200 m AMSL the trends of the difference values were similar to the average differences. The correlation between the values of these elevation zones was also strong. However weaker

  9. Methods for mapping and monitoring global glaciovolcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Aaron; Kyle, Philip

    2017-03-01

    The most deadly (Nevado del Ruiz, 1985) and the most costly (Eyjafjallajökull, 2010) eruptions of the last 100 years were both glaciovolcanic. Considering its great importance to studies of volcanic hazards, global climate, and even astrobiology, the global distribution of glaciovolcanism is insufficiently understood. We present and assess three algorithms for mapping, monitoring, and predicting likely centers of glaciovolcanic activity worldwide. Each algorithm intersects buffer zones representing known Holocene-active volcanic centers with existing datasets of snow, ice, and permafrost. Two detection algorithms, RGGA and PZGA, are simple spatial join operations computed from the Randolph Glacier Inventory and the Permafrost Zonation Index, respectively. The third, MDGA, is an algorithm run on all 15 available years of the MOD10A2 weekly snow cover product from the Terra MODIS satellite radiometer. Shortcomings and advantages of the three methods are discussed, including previously unreported blunders in the MOD10A2 dataset. Comparison of the results leads to an effective approach for integrating the three methods. We show that 20.4% of known Holocene volcanic centers host glaciers or areas of permanent snow. A further 10.9% potentially interact with permafrost. MDGA and PZGA do not rely on any human input, rendering them useful for investigations of change over time. An intermediate step in MDGA involves estimating the snow-covered area at every Holocene volcanic center. These estimations can be updated weekly with no human intervention. To investigate the feasibility of an automatic ice-loss alert system, we consider three examples of glaciovolcanism in the MDGA weekly dataset. We also discuss the potential use of PZGA to model past and future glaciovolcanism based on global circulation model outputs. Combined, the three algorithms provide an automated system for understanding the geographic and temporal patterns of global glaciovolcanism which should be of use

  10. Mapping vegetation heights in China using slope correction ICESat data, SRTM, MODIS-derived and climate data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huabing; Liu, Caixia; Wang, Xiaoyi; Biging, Gregory S.; Chen, Yanlei; Yang, Jun; Gong, Peng

    2017-07-01

    Vegetation height is an important parameter for biomass assessment and vegetation classification. However, vegetation height data over large areas are difficult to obtain. The existing vegetation height data derived from the Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) data only include laser footprints in relatively flat forest regions (new slope correction method to improve the accuracy of estimates of vegetation heights for regions where slopes fall between 5° and 15°. The new method enabled us to use more than 20% additional laser data compared with the existing vegetation height data which only uses ICESat data in relatively flat areas (slope validate the new vegetation height product. The coefficient of determination (R2) and RMSE of the new vegetation height product were 0.89 and 4.73 m respectively. The accuracy of the product is significantly better than that of the two existing global forest height products produced by Lefsky (2010) and Simard et al. (2011), when compared with the data from 227 field measurements in our study area. The new vegetation height data demonstrated clear distinctions among forest, shrub and grassland, which is promising for improving the classification of vegetation and above-ground forest biomass assessment in China.

  11. Comparison of the Effect of Perchlorine, Sodium Hypochlorite, and Electrochemical Method on Disinfection of Vegetables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Hashemi

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: With increasing concentrations of disinfectants dose, inactivation of bacteria was done in less time. Electrochemical method is the suitable option to disinfect vegetables at home and emergencies.

  12. Using Intervention Mapping for Systematic Development of Two School-Based Interventions Aimed at Increasing Children's Fruit and Vegetable Intake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinaerts, E.; De Nooijer, J.; De Vries, N. K.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to show how the intervention mapping (IM) protocol could be applied to the development of two school-based interventions. It provides an extensive description of the development, implementation and evaluation of two interventions which aimed to increase fruit and vegetable (F&V) consumption among primary…

  13. Landscape-scale ecohydrological mapping demonstrating how flood inundation water quality types relate to floodplain vegetation communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keizer, F.M.; Schot, P.P.; Okruszko, T.; Wassen, M.J.

    2016-01-01

    Landscape scale ecohydrological mapping is commonly restrained to one-dimensional ecohydrological transect studies or two-dimensional vegetation distributions lacking adequate spatial coverage of explanatory hydrological data. The objective of this paper is to construct a two-dimensional (semi 3-D)

  14. A time-delayed method for controlling chaotic maps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Maoyin [Department of Automation, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)]. E-mail: maoyinchen@163.com; Zhou Donghua [Department of Automation, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Shang Yun [College of Mathematics and Information Science, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi' an 710062 (China)

    2005-12-19

    Combining the repetitive learning strategy and the optimality principle, this Letter proposes a time-delayed method to control chaotic maps. This method can effectively stabilize unstable periodic orbits within chaotic attractors in the sense of least mean square. Numerical simulations of some chaotic maps verify the effectiveness of this method.

  15. The importance of temporal and spatial vegetation structure information in biotope mapping schemes: a case study in Helsingborg, Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Tian; Qiu, Ling; Hammer, Mårten; Gunnarsson, Allan

    2012-02-01

    Temporal and spatial vegetation structure has impact on biodiversity qualities. Yet, current schemes of biotope mapping do only to a limited extend incorporate these factors in the mapping. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the application of a modified biotope mapping scheme that includes temporal and spatial vegetation structure. A refined scheme was developed based on a biotope classification, and applied to a green structure system in Helsingborg city in southern Sweden. It includes four parameters of vegetation structure: continuity of forest cover, age of dominant trees, horizontal structure, and vertical structure. The major green structure sites were determined by interpretation of panchromatic aerial photographs assisted with a field survey. A set of biotope maps was constructed on the basis of each level of modified classification. An evaluation of the scheme included two aspects in particular: comparison of species richness between long-continuity and short-continuity forests based on identification of woodland continuity using ancient woodland indicators (AWI) species and related historical documents, and spatial distribution of animals in the green space in relation to vegetation structure. The results indicate that (1) the relationship between forest continuity: according to verification of historical documents, the richness of AWI species was higher in long-continuity forests; Simpson's diversity was significantly different between long- and short-continuity forests; the total species richness and Shannon's diversity were much higher in long-continuity forests shown a very significant difference. (2) The spatial vegetation structure and age of stands influence the richness and abundance of the avian fauna and rabbits, and distance to the nearest tree and shrub was a strong determinant of presence for these animal groups. It is concluded that continuity of forest cover, age of dominant trees, horizontal and vertical structures of vegetation

  16. Effect of blanching and drying methods on the nutritional and sensory quality of leafy vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onayemi, O; Badifu, G I

    1987-01-01

    The nutrient retention and sensory quality factors of vegetables blanched by two methods and solar-dried or dried in the cabinet dryer were evaluated. The type and conditions of the blanching treatment prior to drying affect the retention of ascorbic acid, carotene, and ash in the dried vegetables. The sun-dried vegetables had inferior colour, texture and acceptibility compared to the vegetables dried in the cabinet dryer. There were significant differences in the rehydration and drying ratio of the dried vegetables. The implications of the blanching and drying processes for an effective preservation technique are discussed.

  17. [Three-Iindex-Value Method for Rapid Screening Unqualified Vegetable Oil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wen-xuan; Hong, Gui-shui; Fang, Run; Cai, Xian-chun; Huang, Sheng

    2015-04-01

    In the present study, by measuring the A3 005 (representing unsaturation), A985 (representing conjugated fatty acids), A960 + A985 (representing trans-fatty acid ) of southern common vegetable oils (peanut oil, corn oil, canola oil, soybean oil, sunflower oil, tea seed oil and olive oil), "waste oil" and overdue vegetable oils, the pass-setting-range of these three index values for the vegetable oils was obtained. On this basis, a method for rapid screening unqualified vegetable oil (expired, adding low-cost oil, adding "waste oil") was established. The method effectively improved the monitoring efficiency of vegetable oil. With this method of screening a number of suspected substandard oils were proved unqualified by determination of fatty acid composition and 11, 12, 13, 17 fatty acid content. Through the combination of several detection methods, the causes for disqualification of vegetable oils can be further inferred.

  18. Systematic Mapping and Statistical Analyses of Valley Landform and Vegetation Asymmetries Across Hydroclimatic Gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulos, M. J.; Pierce, J. L.; McNamara, J. P.; Flores, A. N.; Benner, S. G.

    2015-12-01

    Terrain aspect alters the spatial distribution of insolation across topography, driving eco-pedo-hydro-geomorphic feedbacks that can alter landform evolution and result in valley asymmetries for a suite of land surface characteristics (e.g. slope length and steepness, vegetation, soil properties, and drainage development). Asymmetric valleys serve as natural laboratories for studying how landscapes respond to climate perturbation. In the semi-arid montane granodioritic terrain of the Idaho batholith, Northern Rocky Mountains, USA, prior works indicate that reduced insolation on northern (pole-facing) aspects prolongs snow pack persistence, and is associated with thicker, finer-grained soils, that retain more water, prolong the growing season, support coniferous forest rather than sagebrush steppe ecosystems, stabilize slopes at steeper angles, and produce sparser drainage networks. We hypothesize that the primary drivers of valley asymmetry development are changes in the pedon-scale water-balance that coalesce to alter catchment-scale runoff and drainage development, and ultimately cause the divide between north and south-facing land surfaces to migrate northward. We explore this conceptual framework by coupling land surface analyses with statistical modeling to assess relationships and the relative importance of land surface characteristics. Throughout the Idaho batholith, we systematically mapped and tabulated various statistical measures of landforms, land cover, and hydroclimate within discrete valley segments (n=~10,000). We developed a random forest based statistical model to predict valley slope asymmetry based upon numerous measures (n>300) of landscape asymmetries. Preliminary results suggest that drainages are tightly coupled with hillslopes throughout the region, with drainage-network slope being one of the strongest predictors of land-surface-averaged slope asymmetry. When slope-related statistics are excluded, due to possible autocorrelation, valley

  19. Mapping and exploring variation in post-fire vegetation recovery following mixed severity wildfire using airborne LiDAR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Christopher E; Price, Owen F; Tasker, Elizabeth M

    2017-07-01

    There is a public perception that large high-severity wildfires decrease biodiversity and increase fire hazard by homogenizing vegetation composition and increasing the cover of mid-story vegetation. But a growing literature suggests that vegetation responses are nuanced. LiDAR technology provides a promising remote sensing tool to test hypotheses about post-fire vegetation regrowth because vegetation cover can be quantified within different height strata at fine scales over large areas. We assess the usefulness of airborne LiDAR data for measuring post-fire mid-story vegetation regrowth over a range of spatial resolutions (10 × 10 m, 30 × 30 m, 50 × 50 m, 100 × 100 m cell size) and investigate the effect of fire severity on regrowth amount and spatial pattern following a mixed severity wildfire in Warrumbungle National Park, Australia. We predicted that recovery would be more vigorous in areas of high fire severity, because park managers observed dense post-fire regrowth in these areas. Moderate to strong positive associations were observed between LiDAR and field surveys of mid-story vegetation cover between 0.5-3.0 m. Thus our LiDAR survey was an apt representation of on-ground vegetation cover. LiDAR-derived mid-story vegetation cover was 22-40% lower in areas of low and moderate than high fire severity. Linear mixed-effects models showed that fire severity was among the strongest biophysical predictors of mid-story vegetation cover irrespective of spatial resolution. However much of the variance associated with these models was unexplained, presumably because soil seed banks varied at finer scales than our LiDAR maps. Dense patches of mid-story vegetation regrowth were small (median size 0.01 ha) and evenly distributed between areas of low, moderate and high fire severity, demonstrating that high-severity fires do not homogenize vegetation cover. Our results are relevant for ecosystem conservation and fire management because they: indicate

  20. Applying Lidar and High-Resolution Multispectral Imagery for Improved Quantification and Mapping of Tundra Vegetation Structure and Distribution in the Alaskan Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greaves, Heather E.

    Climate change is disproportionately affecting high northern latitudes, and the extreme temperatures, remoteness, and sheer size of the Arctic tundra biome have always posed challenges that make application of remote sensing technology especially appropriate. Advances in high-resolution remote sensing continually improve our ability to measure characteristics of tundra vegetation communities, which have been difficult to characterize previously due to their low stature and their distribution in complex, heterogeneous patches across large landscapes. In this work, I apply terrestrial lidar, airborne lidar, and high-resolution airborne multispectral imagery to estimate tundra vegetation characteristics for a research area near Toolik Lake, Alaska. Initially, I explored methods for estimating shrub biomass from terrestrial lidar point clouds, finding that a canopy-volume based algorithm performed best. Although shrub biomass estimates derived from airborne lidar data were less accurate than those from terrestrial lidar data, algorithm parameters used to derive biomass estimates were similar for both datasets. Additionally, I found that airborne lidar-based shrub biomass estimates were just as accurate whether calibrated against terrestrial lidar data or harvested shrub biomass--suggesting that terrestrial lidar potentially could replace destructive biomass harvest. Along with smoothed Normalized Differenced Vegetation Index (NDVI) derived from airborne imagery, airborne lidar-derived canopy volume was an important predictor in a Random Forest model trained to estimate shrub biomass across the 12.5 km2 covered by our lidar and imagery data. The resulting 0.80 m resolution shrub biomass maps should provide important benchmarks for change detection in the Toolik area, especially as deciduous shrubs continue to expand in tundra regions. Finally, I applied 33 lidar- and imagery-derived predictor layers in a validated Random Forest modeling approach to map vegetation

  1. Mapping vegetation of a wetland ecosystem by fuzzy classification of optical and microwave satellite images supported by various ancillary data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankiewicz, Krystyna; Dabrowska-Zielinska, Katarzyna; Gruszczynska, Maryla; Hoscilo, Agata

    2003-03-01

    An approach to classification of satellite images aimed at vegetation mapping in a wetland ecosystem has been presented. The wetlands of the Biebrza Valley located in the NE part of Poland has been chosen as a site of interest. The difficulty of using satellite images for the classification of a wetland land cover lies in the strong variability of the hydration state of such ecosystem in time. Satellite images acquired by optical or microwave sensors depend heavily on the current water level which often masks the most interesting long-time scale features of vegetation. Therefore the images have to be interpreted in the context of various ancillary data related to the investigated site. In the case of Biebrza Valley the most useful information was obtained from the soil and hydration maps as well as from the old vegetation maps. The object oriented classification approach applied in eCognition software enabled simultaneous use of satellite images together with the additional thematic data. Some supplementary knowledge concerning possible plant cover changes was also introduced into the process of classification. The accuracy of the classification was assessed versus ground-truth data and results of visual interpretation of aerial photos. The achieved accuracy depends on the type of vegetation community in question and is better for forest or shrubs than for meadows.

  2. Usefulness of Skylab color photography and ERTS-1 multispectral imagery for mapping range vegetation types in southwestern Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, R. C. (Principal Investigator)

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Aerial photography at scales of 1:43,400 and 1:104,500 was used to evaluate the usefulness of Skylab color photography (scales of 1:477,979 and 1:712,917) and ERTS-1 multispectral imagery (scale 1:1,000,000) for mapping range vegetation types. The project was successful in producing a range vegetation map of the 68,000 acres of salt desert shrub type in southwestern Wyoming. Techniques for estimation of above-ground green biomass have not yet been confirmed due to the mechanical failure of the photometer used in obtaining relative reflectance measurement. However, graphs of log transmittance versus above-ground green biomass indicate that production estimates may be made for some vegetation types from ERTS imagery. Other vegetation types not suitable for direct ERTS estimation of green biomass may possibly be related to those vegetation types whose production has been estimated from the multispectral imagery.

  3. A multi-scale method of mapping urban influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timothy G. Wade; James D. Wickham; Nicola Zacarelli; Kurt H. Riitters

    2009-01-01

    Urban development can impact environmental quality and ecosystem services well beyond urban extent. Many methods to map urban areas have been developed and used in the past, but most have simply tried to map existing extent of urban development, and all have been single-scale techniques. The method presented here uses a clustering approach to look beyond the extant...

  4. Methods for association mapping using multiple population data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kadri, Naveen Kumar

    This thesis forcused on comparing methods for associationg genetic marker with variation in phenotypes in structured populations. It also focuses on the application of these methods in mapping/fine-mapping QTL affecting production, fertility and mastitis in five breeds of dairy cattle. The most...

  5. Field Plot Points for Washita Battlefield National Historic Site Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This metadata is for the 2005 vegetation data points (spatial database) created from the sample vegetation plots collected at Washita Battlefield National Historic...

  6. Field Plot Points for Fort Larned National Historic Site Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This metadata is for the 2005 vegetation data points (spatial database) created from the sample vegetation plots collected at Fort Larned National Historic Site.

  7. Field Plot Points for Lyndon B. Johnson National Historical Park Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This metadata is for the 2005 vegetation data points (spatial database) created from the sample vegetation plots collected at Lyndon B. Johnson National Historical...

  8. Field Plot Points Modified for Valley Forge National Historical Park Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This shapefile includes the locations of vegetation classification sampling plots used to develop an association-level vegetation classification of Valley Forge...

  9. Barrier island habitat map and vegetation survey—Dauphin Island, Alabama, 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enwright, Nicholas M.; Borchert, Sinéad M.; Day, Richard H.; Feher, Laura C.; Osland, Michael J.; Wang, Lei; Wang, Hongqing

    2017-08-04

    Barrier islands are dynamic environments due to their position at the land-sea interface. Storms, waves, tides, currents, and relative sea-level rise are powerful forces that shape barrier island geomorphology and habitats (for example, beach, dune, marsh, and forest). Hurricane Katrina in 2005 and the Deep Water Horizon oil spill in 2010 are two major events that have affected habitats and natural resources on Dauphin Island, Alabama. The latter event prompted a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and the State of Alabama funded by the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation to investigate viable, sustainable restoration options that protect and restore the natural resources of Dauphin Island, Alabama.In order to understand the feasibility and sustainability of various restoration scenarios, it is important to understand current conditions on Dauphin Island. To further this understanding, a detailed 19-class habitat map for Dauphin Island was produced from 1-foot aerial infrared photography collected on December 4, 2015, and lidar data collected in January 2015. We also conducted a ground survey of habitat types, vegetation community structure, and elevations in November and December 2015. These products provide baseline data regarding the ecological and general geomorphological attributes of the area, which can be compared with observations from other dates for tracking changes over time.

  10. Vegetation Sampling for Wetland Delineation: A Review and Synthesis of Methods and Sampling Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    element in several forest inventory programs. These alternative metrics to cover or frequency are not regularly used in the majority of vegetation...as seedlings, saplings, and overstory vegetation are routinely collected in many forest inventory methods (Schreuder et al. 1993; McRoberts and...Service collects vegetation data using strata from long-term monitoring plots as part of its Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) and National Forest

  11. a Mapping Method of Integrating Multi-Scale River Thematic Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W.; Yue, C.; Cui, C.; Meng, L.

    2017-09-01

    Small-scale maps are generally used in spatial analysis for fast calculation, but part of important features are missing due to its generalization level, which makes the analysis results less accurate. Therefore, it is necessary to improve feature completeness of smallscale maps. The goal of this paper is to put forward a mapping method of integrating the existing multi-scale river thematic maps. In order to achieve this goal, this paper proposed an algorithm for multi-scale line features matching by calculating the distance from node to polyline and an integrating algorithm by simplifying, shortening and merging the features from the original multi-scale thematic maps. The experimental results proved that the new map produced by the method proposed in this paper keeps the same scale as the original small-scale map and it is consistent with the original large-scale map in terms of feature completeness. The strategy proposed in this paper can be used to produce a new river thematic map concluding all the features that users need; moreover, the new map not only expresses features completely but also takes up less storage.

  12. Kuchler Vegetation

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Digital version of potential natural plant communites as compiled and published on 'Map of the Natural Vegetation of California' by A. W. Kuchler, 1976. Source map...

  13. Mapping wildland-urban interfaces at large scales integrating housing density and vegetation aggregation for fire prevention in the South of France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampin-Maillet, Corinne; Jappiot, Marielle; Long, Marlène; Bouillon, Christophe; Morge, Denis; Ferrier, Jean-Paul

    2010-01-01

    Every year, more than 50,000 wildland fires affect about 500,000ha of vegetation in southern European countries, particularly in wildland-urban interfaces (WUI). This paper presents a method to characterize and map WUIs at large scales and over large areas for wildland fire prevention in the South of France. Based on the combination of four types of building configuration and three classes of vegetation structure, 12 interface types were classified. Through spatial analysis, fire ignition density and burned area ratio were linked with the different types of WUI. Among WUI types, isolated WUIs with the lowest housing density represent the highest level of fire risk. 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Spatial Mapping as a Method for Observing Classroom Art Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susi, Frank D.

    1985-01-01

    Spatial mapping is a category system for directly observing instruction in art classrooms. A rationale for studying the spatial dimensions of teaching is presented, how to train observers is explained, procedures involved in a mapping episode are described, methods for analyzing data are suggested, and examples of instruments are presented.…

  15. Non- chemical methods of seed treatment for control of seed- borne pathogens on vegetables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amein, T.; Wright, S.A.I.; Wickstrom, M.; Schmitt, A.; Koch, E.; Wolf, van der J.M.; Groot, S.P.C.; Werner, S.; Jahn, M.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of EU-project "Seed Treatments for Organic Vegetable Production" (STOVE) was to evaluate non-chemical methods for control of seed-borne pathogens in organic vegetable production. Physical (hot air, hot water and electron) and biologi-cal (microorganisms and different agents of natural

  16. Datasprints as a method for Controversy Mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Torben Elgaard; Bach, Daniel; Israelsson, Pelle

    2017-01-01

    A datasprint is an intensive 3-5 day workshop that brings together humanistic researchers, data experts, and stakeholders from a selected field. Together, the participants visualize and analyse a collection of data sets, which have been prepared before the datasprint. In the beginning of a datasp......A datasprint is an intensive 3-5 day workshop that brings together humanistic researchers, data experts, and stakeholders from a selected field. Together, the participants visualize and analyse a collection of data sets, which have been prepared before the datasprint. In the beginning...... collaboration between the partners. Since 2015, DIGHUMLAB has sponsored a special interest group in controversy mapping. Datasprints have proved to be a very productive format for controversy making and for creating dialogue and joint projects between humanistic researchers....

  17. On the validity of lesion-behaviour mapping methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperber, Christoph; Karnath, Hans-Otto

    2017-08-03

    Brain lesion studies have been criticised for producing partly heterogeneous results; especially the validity of statistical voxel-based lesion-behaviour mapping has been discussed. In fact, planning a lesion-behaviour mapping study is associated with many methodological degrees of freedom. In the present review, we argue that not the lesion-behaviour mapping method itself produces heterogeneous results, but rather its heterogeneous or even erroneous application. We outline which methodological pitfalls and trade-offs can affect the results of lesion analyses, addressing behavioural assessment, recruitment of patients, statistical analysis, neuroimaging, and interpretation with brain atlases. Further, we discuss several methods to actually test the validity of lesion-behaviour mapping. Each of these approaches has specific advantages and disadvantages. In combination, they provide valuable tools to answer most empirical questions related to the validity of lesion-behaviour mapping. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Mapping swamp timothy (Cripsis schenoides) seed productivity using spectral values and vegetation indices in managed wetlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahilly, P.J.A.; Li, D.; Guo, Q.; Zhu, J.; Ortega, R.; Quinn, N.W.T.; Harmon, T.C.

    2010-01-15

    This work examines the potential to predict the seed productivity of a key wetland plant species using spectral reflectance values and spectral vegetation indices. Specifically, the seed productivity of swamp timothy (Cripsis schenoides) was investigated in two wetland ponds, managed for waterfowl habitat, in California's San Joaquin Valley. Spectral reflectance values were obtained and associated spectral vegetation indices (SVI) calculated from two sets of high resolution aerial images (May 11, 2006 and June 9, 2006) and were compared to the collected vegetation data. Vegetation data were collected and analyzed from 156 plots for total aboveground biomass, total aboveground swamp timothy biomass, and total swamp timothy seed biomass. The SVI investigated included the Simple Ratio (SR), Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index (SAVI), Transformed Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index (TSAVI), Modified Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index (MSAVI), and Global Environment Monitoring Index (GEMI). We evaluated the correlation of the various SVI with in situ vegetation measurements for linear, quadratic, exponential and power functions. In all cases, the June image provided better predictive capacity relative to May, a result that underscores the importance of timing imagery to coincide with more favorable vegetation maturity. The north pond with the June image using SR and the exponential function (R{sup 2}=0.603) proved to be the best predictor of swamp timothy seed productivity. The June image for the south pond was less predictive, with TSAVI and the exponential function providing the best correlation (R{sup 2}=0.448). This result was attributed to insufficient vegetal cover in the south pond (or a higher percentage of bare soil) due to poor drainage conditions which resulted in a delay in swamp timothy germination. The results of this work suggest that spectral reflectance can be used to estimate seed productivity in managed seasonal

  19. Determination of Lutein from Fruit and Vegetables Through an Alkaline Hydrolysis Extraction Method and HPLC Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fratianni, Alessandra; Mignogna, Rossella; Niro, Serena; Panfili, Gianfranco

    2015-12-01

    A simple and rapid analytical method for the determination of lutein content, successfully used for cereal matrices, was evaluated in fruit and vegetables. The method involved the determination of lutein after an alkaline hydrolysis of the sample matrix, followed by extraction with solvents and analysis by normal phase HPLC. The optimized method was simple, precise, and accurate and it was characterized by few steps that could prevent loss of lutein and its degradation. The optimized method was used to evaluate the lutein amounts in several fruit and vegetables. Rich sources of lutein were confirmed to be green vegetables such as parsley, spinach, chicory, chard, broccoli, courgette, and peas, even if in a range of variability. Taking into account the suggested reference values these vegetables can be stated as good sources of lutein. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  20. Non- chemical methods of seed treatment for control of seed- borne pathogens on vegetables

    OpenAIRE

    Amein, T.; Wright, S. A. I.; Wikström, M; Schmitt, A.; Koch, E.; Wolf, J.; de Groot, S.; Forsberg, G.; Werner, S; Jahn, M

    2009-01-01

    Abstract – The aim of EU-project "Seed Treatments for Organic Vegetable Production" (STOVE) was to evaluate non-chemical methods for control of seed-borne pathogens in organic vegetable production. Physical (hot air, hot water and electron) and biologi-cal (microorganisms and different agents of natural origin) methods have been investigated. Trials have been carried out with different patho-systems such as cabbage / Alternaria spp and parsley / Septoria pet-roselini. Good control was genera...

  1. Mapping paddy rice planting areas through time series analysis of MODIS land surface temperature and vegetation index data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Geli; Xiao, Xiangming; Dong, Jinwei; Kou, Weili; Jin, Cui; Qin, Yuanwei; Zhou, Yuting; Wang, Jie; Menarguez, Michael Angelo; Biradar, Chandrashekhar

    2015-08-01

    Knowledge of the area and spatial distribution of paddy rice is important for assessment of food security, management of water resources, and estimation of greenhouse gas (methane) emissions. Paddy rice agriculture has expanded rapidly in northeastern China in the last decade, but there are no updated maps of paddy rice fields in the region. Existing algorithms for identifying paddy rice fields are based on the unique physical features of paddy rice during the flooding and transplanting phases and use vegetation indices that are sensitive to the dynamics of the canopy and surface water content. However, the flooding phenomena in high latitude area could also be from spring snowmelt flooding. We used land surface temperature (LST) data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor to determine the temporal window of flooding and rice transplantation over a year to improve the existing phenology-based approach. Other land cover types (e.g., evergreen vegetation, permanent water bodies, and sparse vegetation) with potential influences on paddy rice identification were removed (masked out) due to their different temporal profiles. The accuracy assessment using high-resolution images showed that the resultant MODIS-derived paddy rice map of northeastern China in 2010 had a high accuracy (producer and user accuracies of 92% and 96%, respectively). The MODIS-based map also had a comparable accuracy to the 2010 Landsat-based National Land Cover Dataset (NLCD) of China in terms of both area and spatial pattern. This study demonstrated that our improved algorithm by using both thermal and optical MODIS data, provides a robust, simple and automated approach to identify and map paddy rice fields in temperate and cold temperate zones, the northern frontier of rice planting.

  2. Mapping paddy rice planting areas through time series analysis of MODIS land surface temperature and vegetation index data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Geli; Xiao, Xiangming; Dong, Jinwei; Kou, Weili; Jin, Cui; Qin, Yuanwei; Zhou, Yuting; Wang, Jie; Menarguez, Michael Angelo; Biradar, Chandrashekhar

    2015-08-01

    Knowledge of the area and spatial distribution of paddy rice is important for assessment of food security, management of water resources, and estimation of greenhouse gas (methane) emissions. Paddy rice agriculture has expanded rapidly in northeastern China in the last decade, but there are no updated maps of paddy rice fields in the region. Existing algorithms for identifying paddy rice fields are based on the unique physical features of paddy rice during the flooding and transplanting phases and use vegetation indices that are sensitive to the dynamics of the canopy and surface water content. However, the flooding phenomena in high latitude area could also be from spring snowmelt flooding. We used land surface temperature (LST) data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor to determine the temporal window of flooding and rice transplantation over a year to improve the existing phenology-based approach. Other land cover types (e.g., evergreen vegetation, permanent water bodies, and sparse vegetation) with potential influences on paddy rice identification were removed (masked out) due to their different temporal profiles. The accuracy assessment using high-resolution images showed that the resultant MODIS-derived paddy rice map of northeastern China in 2010 had a high accuracy (producer and user accuracies of 92% and 96%, respectively). The MODIS-based map also had a comparable accuracy to the 2010 Landsat-based National Land Cover Dataset (NLCD) of China in terms of both area and spatial pattern. This study demonstrated that our improved algorithm by using both thermal and optical MODIS data, provides a robust, simple and automated approach to identify and map paddy rice fields in temperate and cold temperate zones, the northern frontier of rice planting.

  3. Mapping Vegetation Morphology Types in Southern Africa Savanna Using MODIS Time-Series Metrics: A Case Study of Central Kalahari, Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niti B. Mishra

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Savanna ecosystems are geographically extensive and both ecologically and economically important; they therefore require monitoring over large spatial extents. There are, in particular, large areas within southern Africa savanna ecosystems that lack consistent geospatial data on vegetation morphological properties, which is a prerequisite for biodiversity conservation and sustainable management of ecological resources. Given the challenges involved in distinguishing and mapping savanna vegetation assemblages using remote sensing, the objective of this study was to develop a vegetation morphology map for the largest protected area in Africa, the central Kalahari. Six vegetation morphology classes were developed and sample training/validation pixels were selected for each class by analyzing extensive in situ data on vegetation structural and functional properties, in combination with existing ancillary data and coarse scale land cover products. The classification feature set consisted of annual and intra annual matrices derived from 14 years of satellite-derived vegetation indices images, and final classification was achieved using an ensemble tree based classifier. All vegetation morphology classes were mapped with high accuracy and the overall classification accuracy was 91.9%. Besides filling the geospatial data gap for the central Kalahari area, this vegetation morphology map is expected to serve as a critical input to ecological studies focusing on habitat use by wildlife and the efficacy of game fencing, as well as contributing to sustainable ecosystem management in the central Kalahari.

  4. Grazing-index method procedures of vegetation surveys

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the past, veld condition in the Karoo was assessed using the ecological index methods. This recently changed to the graxing-index method on account of the of the differently estimated grazing-index values being used. The principles governing the method of survey remain the same. The method employs ...

  5. Field Plot Points for Bluestone National Scenic River Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This feature class contains point features which represent locations of vegetation sampling plots in Bluestone National Scenic River. Location coordinates for most...

  6. Accuracy Assessment Points for Scotts Bluff National Monument Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — The accuracy assessment field work was performed in August, 1997 to verify the accuracy of the vegetation communities spatial data developed by the USGS-NPS...

  7. Field Plot Points for De Soto National Memorial Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — These points represent locations within De Soto National Memorial and Riverview Pointe Preserve that the SFCN field crew visited in December 2007. The vegetation was...

  8. Accuracy Assessment Points for Mount Rushmore National Memorial Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — The accuracy assessment field work was performed in July and August, 1996 to verify the accuracy of the vegetation communities spatial data developed by the USGS-NPS...

  9. Accuracy Assessment Points for Fort Laramie National Historic Site Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — The accuracy assessment field work was performed in August and September, 1998 to verify the accuracy of the vegetation communities spatial data developed by the...

  10. Color Infrared Aerial Photosmosaics for Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — Color infrared (CIR) aerial photographs were acquired as baseline imagery data to produce vegetation spatial database coverages of Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore...

  11. DS 827, Vegetation Database for Land-Cover Mapping in Clark and Lincoln Counties, Nevada

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This geodatabase consists of a point feature class and related tables representing sample sites where vegetation data were collected from 2007 to 2013 in Clark and...

  12. Accuracy Assessment Plots for Chickasaw National Recreation Area Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This file represents the accuracy assessment plots used to characterize the vegetation at Chickasaw National Recreation Area for the purposes of assessing the...

  13. Accuracy Assessment Points for Florissant Fossil Beds National Monument Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — The accuracy assessment field work was performed in July - August, 2001 to verify the accuracy of the vegetation communities spatial data developed by the USGS-NPS...

  14. Field Plot Points for Devils Tower National Monument Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — Vegetation field plots at Devils Tower NM were visited, described, and documented in a digital database. The database consists of 2 parts - (1) Physical Descriptive...

  15. Field Plot Points for Wind Cave National Park Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — Vegetation field plots at Wind Cave NP were visited, described, and documented in a digital database. The database consists of 2 parts - (1) Physical Descriptive...

  16. Field Plot Points Modified for Fort Necessity National Battlefield Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — Locations of vegetation classification sampling plots at Fort Necessity National Battlefield. In this data set, the X, Y coordinates for three plots have been...

  17. Color Infrared Aerial Photographs for Petrified Forest National Park Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — Color infrared (CIR) aerial photographs were acquired as baseline imagery data to produce vegetation spatial database coverages of Petrified Forest National Park...

  18. Accuracy Assessment Points for Theodore Roosevelt National Park Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This metadata is for the accuracy assessment data associated with the vegetation land cover and land use geospatial database for Theodore Roosevelt National Park and...

  19. Accuracy Assessment Points for Devils Tower National Monument Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — The accuracy assessment field work was performed in July and August, 1996 to verify the accuracy of the vegetation communities spatial data developed by the USGS-NPS...

  20. Kaloko-Honokohau National Historical Park Vegetation Mapping Project - Field Plots, Observation and Accuracy Assessment Points

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This metadata is for the 2008 vegetation (classification) field plots (spatial database) and 2010 accuracy assessment points (spatial database) created from the...

  1. Aerial Photomosaic August for Effigy Mounds National Monument Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — Color infrared (CIR) aerial photographs were acquired to compliment another set of aerial photos used to produce vegetation spatial database coverages of Effigy...

  2. METHODS OF SIMULATION ON THE MAP OF ETHNOGEOGRAPHICAL KNOWLEDGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Saraeva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the features of the spatial representation of the location of objects and phenomena on the Earth. One of the types of “cartographic representation” is modeling on the contour map. The advantages of the method are revealed. The application of modeling techniques that allows one to include ethnogeographic data in the content of the characteristics of the territory and reflect them on the contour map. The basis of ethnogeographic modeling is the identification and creation of elements of the material and spiritual culture of peoples by means of conventional signs. Comparison of these elements, their superimposition with respect to each other, as well as their comparison with geographic maps allow us to determine the interrelations and the dependence of the phenomenon. Modeling on contour maps is the basic method of learning in geography. On the one hand, it creates a cartographic image of the studied territory, and on the other hand it facilitates the creation of “visual supports” on the map.Modeling on contour maps, at the beginning students put the basic geographical names, which will serve as the basic knowledge. Then, by purposefully analyzing and comparing the thematic maps of the atlas or textbook, the students reflect specific ethno-geographical knowledge on contour maps. As a result, contour maps acquire “their own face”, and do not become a simple copy of maps of an atlas or textbook.Also, the features of the effect of this technique on the formation of spatial representations about the studied object have been analyzed. Thanks to the cartographic model, one can maintain a constant cognitive interest in the material studied. Modeling on the contour map will allow one to present the structure of the links between the elements of the ethnogeographical material. The basis of ethnogeographic modeling on the contour map is the identification and mapping of elements of the material and spiritual culture of

  3. Progress in Geo-Electrical Methods for Hydrogeological Mapping?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Niels

    2014-01-01

    In most of the 20th century the geo-electrical methods were primarily used for groundwater exploration and the application of the methods were normally followed by a borehole, and a moment of truth. In this process the use of DC (direct current) soundings have been developed to a high grade of ex....... The test area was earlier mapped by DC-soundings, so it is possible to test the methods against each other. It is concluded that well performed DC-soundings with a Schlumberger configuration still provide the best base for hydrogeological mapping...

  4. Mapping species of submerged aquatic vegetation with multi-seasonal satellite images and considering life history information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Juhua; Duan, Hongtao; Ma, Ronghua; Jin, Xiuliang; Li, Fei; Hu, Weiping; Shi, Kun; Huang, Wenjiang

    2017-05-01

    Spatial information of the dominant species of submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) is essential for restoration projects in eutrophic lakes, especially eutrophic Taihu Lake, China. Mapping the distribution of SAV species is very challenging and difficult using only multispectral satellite remote sensing. In this study, we proposed an approach to map the distribution of seven dominant species of SAV in Taihu Lake. Our approach involved information on the life histories of the seven SAV species and eight distribution maps of SAV from February to October. The life history information of the dominant SAV species was summarized from the literature and field surveys. Eight distribution maps of the SAV were extracted from eight 30 m HJ-CCD images from February to October in 2013 based on the classification tree models, and the overall classification accuracies for the SAV were greater than 80%. Finally, the spatial distribution of the SAV species in Taihu in 2013 was mapped using multilayer erasing approach. Based on validation, the overall classification accuracy for the seven species was 68.4%, and kappa was 0.6306, which suggests that larger differences in life histories between species can produce higher identification accuracies. The classification results show that Potamogeton malaianus was the most widely distributed species in Taihu Lake, followed by Myriophyllum spicatum, Potamogeton maackianus, Potamogeton crispus, Elodea nuttallii, Ceratophyllum demersum and Vallisneria spiralis. The information is useful for planning shallow-water habitat restoration projects.

  5. Cost-Effectiveness of Seven Approaches to Map Vegetation Communities — A Case Study from Northern Australia’s Tropical Savannas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart Phinn

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Vegetation communities are traditionally mapped from aerial photography interpretation. Other semi-automated methods include pixel- and object-based image analysis. While these methods have been used for decades, there is a lack of comparative research. We evaluated the cost-effectiveness of seven approaches to map vegetation communities in a northern Australia’s tropical savanna environment. The seven approaches included: (1. aerial photography interpretation, (2. pixel-based image-only classification (Maximum Likelihood Classifier, (3. pixel-based integrated classification (Maximum Likelihood Classifier, (4. object-based image-only classification (nearest neighbor classifier, (5. object-based integrated classification (nearest neighbor classifier, (6. object-based image-only classification (step-wise ruleset, and (7. object-based integrated classification (step-wise ruleset. Approach 1 was applied to 1:50,000 aerial photography and approaches 2–7 were applied to SPOT5 and Landsat5 TM multispectral data. The integrated approaches (3, 5 and 7 included ancillary data (a digital elevation model, slope model, normalized difference vegetation index and hydrology information. The cost-effectiveness was assessed taking into consideration the accuracy and costs associated with each classification approach and image dataset. Accuracy was assessed in terms of overall accuracy and the costs were evaluated using four main components: field data acquisition and preparation, image data acquisition and preparation, image classification and accuracy assessment. Overall accuracy ranged from 28%, for the image-only pixel-based approach, to 67% for the aerial photography interpretation, while total costs ranged from AU$338,000 to AU$388,180 (Australian dollars, for the pixel-based image-only classification and aerial photography interpretation respectively. The most labor-intensive component was field data acquisition and preparation, followed by image data

  6. Weighted analysis methods for mapped plot forest inventory data: Tables, regressions, maps and graphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul C. Van Deusen; Linda S. Heath

    2010-01-01

    Weighted estimation methods for analysis of mapped plot forest inventory data are discussed. The appropriate weighting scheme can vary depending on the type of analysis and graphical display. Both statistical issues and user expectations need to be considered in these methods. A weighting scheme is proposed that balances statistical considerations and the logical...

  7. Airfoil optimization by using the Manifold Mapping method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van der Jagt (Martin)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractIn this report it is investigated if the Manifold Mapping method can be used in airfoil optimization. Before the method can be implemented, a suitable airfoil parametrization must be chosen. Furthermore a coarse and fine model must be assigned. These models are the key to success for the

  8. Quantifying Uncertainties from Presence Data Sampling Methods for Species Distribution Modeling: Focused on Vegetation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, S.; Kim, H. G.; Lee, D. K.; Park, J. H.; Mo, Y.; Kil, S.; Park, C.

    2016-12-01

    The impact of climate change has been observed throughout the globe. The ecosystem experiences rapid changes such as vegetation shift, species extinction. In these context, Species Distribution Model (SDM) is one of the popular method to project impact of climate change on the ecosystem. SDM basically based on the niche of certain species with means to run SDM present point data is essential to find biological niche of species. To run SDM for plants, there are certain considerations on the characteristics of vegetation. Normally, to make vegetation data in large area, remote sensing techniques are used. In other words, the exact point of presence data has high uncertainties as we select presence data set from polygons and raster dataset. Thus, sampling methods for modeling vegetation presence data should be carefully selected. In this study, we used three different sampling methods for selection of presence data of vegetation: Random sampling, Stratified sampling and Site index based sampling. We used one of the R package BIOMOD2 to access uncertainty from modeling. At the same time, we included BioCLIM variables and other environmental variables as input data. As a result of this study, despite of differences among the 10 SDMs, the sampling methods showed differences in ROC values, random sampling methods showed the lowest ROC value while site index based sampling methods showed the highest ROC value. As a result of this study the uncertainties from presence data sampling methods and SDM can be quantified.

  9. SAFARI 2000 NBI Vegetation Map of the Savannas of Southern Africa

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: The National Botanical Institute (NBI) has mapped woody plant species distribution to provide estimates of individual species contribution to peak leaf...

  10. Development of a dynamic web mapping service for vegetation productivity using earth observation and in situ sensors in a sensor web based approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooistra, L.; Bergsma, A.R.; Chuma, B.; Bruin, de S.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a sensor web based approach which combines earth observation and in situ sensor data to derive typical information offered by a dynamic web mapping service (WMS). A prototype has been developed which provides daily maps of vegetation productivity for the

  11. Object-based random forest classification for mapping floodplain vegetation structure from nation-wide CIR and LiDAR datasets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooistra, L.; Kuilder, E.T.; Mucher, C.A.

    2017-01-01

    Very high resolution aerial images and LiDAR (AHN2) datasets with a national coverage provide opportunities to produce vegetation maps automatically. As such the entire area of the river floodplains in the Netherlands may be mapped with high accuracy and regular updates, capturing the dynamic

  12. A Progressive Buffering Method for Road Map Update Using OpenStreetMap Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changyong Liu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Web 2.0 enables a two-way interaction between servers and clients. GPS receivers become available to more citizens and are commonly found in vehicles and smart phones, enabling individuals to record and share their trajectory data on the Internet and edit them online. OpenStreetMap (OSM makes it possible for citizens to contribute to the acquisition of geographic information. This paper studies the use of OSM data to find newly mapped or built roads that do not exist in a reference road map and create its updated version. For this purpose, we propose a progressive buffering method for determining an optimal buffer radius to detect the new roads in the OSM data. In the next step, the detected new roads are merged into the reference road maps geometrically, topologically, and semantically. Experiments with OSM data and reference road maps over an area of 8494 km2 in the city of Wuhan, China and five of its 5 km × 5 km areas are conducted to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the method. It is shown that the OSM data can add 11.96% or a total of 2008.6 km of new roads to the reference road maps with an average precision of 96.49% and an average recall of 97.63%.

  13. A Hybrid Vision-Map Method for Urban Road Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Fernández

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A hybrid vision-map system is presented to solve the road detection problem in urban scenarios. The standardized use of machine learning techniques in classification problems has been merged with digital navigation map information to increase system robustness. The objective of this paper is to create a new environment perception method to detect the road in urban environments, fusing stereo vision with digital maps by detecting road appearance and road limits such as lane markings or curbs. Deep learning approaches make the system hard-coupled to the training set. Even though our approach is based on machine learning techniques, the features are calculated from different sources (GPS, map, curbs, etc., making our system less dependent on the training set.

  14. Soil organic carbon mapping of partially vegetated agricultural fields with imaging spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartholomeus, H.; Kooistra, L.; Stevens, A.; Leeuwen, van M.; Wesemael, van B.; Ben-Dor, E.; Tychon, B.

    2011-01-01

    Soil Organic Carbon (SOC) is one of the key soil properties, but the large spatial variation makes continuous mapping a complex task. Imaging spectroscopy has proven to be an useful technique for mapping of soil properties, but the applicability decreases rapidly when fields are partially covered

  15. Concept mapping: an effective, active teaching-learning method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Laura H

    2006-01-01

    Nurse educators, under pressure to prepare graduates who are able to think critically and solve problems in a variety of clinical practice settings, require active teaching strategies to promote meaningful learning, instead of relying on traditional methods that promote rote memorization. A review of the current state of the science with regard to concept mapping demonstrates that this teaching-learning method assists nurse educators to prepare graduates to think critically in the complex health care environment. However, further research is needed to determine the effectiveness of concept mapping on the graduate's performance on the NCLEX exam and on critical thinking and prioritization skills in the clinical environment.

  16. Mapping Land, Vegetation, and Ice with Wide-swath, Full-waveform Laser Altimetry from High-altitude UAV Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, B.; Rabine, D. L.; Wake, S.; Hofton, M. A.; Mitchell, S.

    2011-12-01

    While the majority of airborne lidar sensors are restricted to low-altitude operations due to sensor limitations, the Land, Vegetation, and Ice Sensor (LVIS - formerly the Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor) has transitioned to the Global Hawk aircraft for operations at 20 km altitude. NASA's Earth Science Technology Office (ESTO) has assisted in procuring funding to transition the LVIS sensor into the Global Hawk aircraft and the sensor is readying for integration onto the aircraft based at NASA Dryden. The current LVIS sensor has operated with sub-decimeter accuracy from as high as 13 km altitude while fully mapping a > 2 km wide swath and the new instrument will maintain that level of accuracy while extending the swath coverage to 4 km. Both the transmitted waveform and the return echo waveform are sampled and recorded for post-processing for a wide range of Earth science applications, including ice sheet elevation and change mapping, sea ice coverage, natural hazards such as volcanoes, and forest mapping for biomass and habitat assessment. The LVIS data are distributed in a unique waveform vector format that is an accurate representation of the entire interaction of the laser pulse with the surface roughness, texture, slope, and any complex structure such as forest canopies or crevassed ice surfaces. End-user scientists can reinterpret the waveform using their own algorithms and still capture the full accuracy of the sensor data. Once LVIS is fully operational on the Global Hawk aircraft, it will collect data at a rate of 2,500 km^2 per hour and the Global Hawk has a flight duration of over 30 hours. The extraordinary range of the Global Hawk opens up the possibility of mapping remote areas such as Antarctica and Greenland. Performance expectations and examples of existing data will be shown as well as potential future flight plans.

  17. Sensitivity analysis of a coupled hydrodynamic-vegetation model using the effectively subsampled quadratures method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, Tarandeep S.; Aretxabaleta, Alfredo; Seshadri, Pranay; Ganju, Neil K.; Beudin, Alexis

    2017-01-01

    Coastal hydrodynamics can be greatly affected by the presence of submerged aquatic vegetation. The effect of vegetation has been incorporated into the Coupled-Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport (COAWST) Modeling System. The vegetation implementation includes the plant-induced three-dimensional drag, in-canopy wave-induced streaming, and the production of turbulent kinetic energy by the presence of vegetation. In this study, we evaluate the sensitivity of the flow and wave dynamics to vegetation parameters using Sobol' indices and a least squares polynomial approach referred to as Effective Quadratures method. This method reduces the number of simulations needed for evaluating Sobol' indices and provides a robust, practical, and efficient approach for the parameter sensitivity analysis. The evaluation of Sobol' indices shows that kinetic energy, turbulent kinetic energy, and water level changes are affected by plant density, height, and to a certain degree, diameter. Wave dissipation is mostly dependent on the variation in plant density. Performing sensitivity analyses for the vegetation module in COAWST provides guidance for future observational and modeling work to optimize efforts and reduce exploration of parameter space.

  18. Vegetation Monitoring of Mashhad Using AN Object-Oriented POST Classification Comparison Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalili Moghadam, N.; Delavar, M. R.; Forati, A.

    2017-09-01

    By and large, todays mega cities are confronting considerable urban development in which many new buildings are being constructed in fringe areas of these cities. This remarkable urban development will probably end in vegetation reduction even though each mega city requires adequate areas of vegetation, which is considered to be crucial and helpful for these cities from a wide variety of perspectives such as air pollution reduction, soil erosion prevention, and eco system as well as environmental protection. One of the optimum methods for monitoring this vital component of each city is multi-temporal satellite images acquisition and using change detection techniques. In this research, the vegetation and urban changes of Mashhad, Iran, were monitored using an object-oriented (marker-based watershed algorithm) post classification comparison (PCC) method. A Bi-temporal multi-spectral Landsat satellite image was used from the study area to detect the changes of urban and vegetation areas and to find a relation between these changes. The results of this research demonstrate that during 1987-2017, Mashhad urban area has increased about 22525 hectares and the vegetation area has decreased approximately 4903 hectares. These statistics substantiate the close relationship between urban development and vegetation reduction. Moreover, the overall accuracies of 85.5% and 91.2% were achieved for the first and the second image classification, respectively. In addition, the overall accuracy and kappa coefficient of change detection were assessed 84.1% and 70.3%, respectively.

  19. Use of Dynamic Time Warping and Network Based Techniques for Mapping Trends and Patterns in Vegetation Using MODIS Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, N.; Lucey, R.; Lunga, D.

    2016-12-01

    Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) can be used as an indicator of healthy, green vegetation. NDVI values can be used to categorize the characteristics of land features. Similarly, a time-series analysis of NDVI can be used to monitor trends of vegetation patterns on the land surface. However vegetation has a natural phenology cycle, which varies from location to location based on various parameters like rainfall, temperature, soil etc. which makes it difficult to identify changes in land cover changes using conventional change detection techniques. Changes in vegetation pattern can be detected by using high temporal resolution satellite data but it can be computationally challenging to apply change detection over large areas and normal classification techniques don't perform well. In this study, we use annual stacks of NDVI time-series data at 8-day temporal resolution obtained from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite to classify and monitor land cover change. We show how dynamic time warping (DTW) and deep recurrent network based techniques perform better in classifying land cover and detecting changes using noisy high temporal resolution satellite data which is not possible by conventional remote sensing classification techniques. We present the application and results of the DTW and network based techniques and compare the results with standard supervised classification methods.

  20. Mapping vegetation and fuels for fire management on the Gila National Forest Complex, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert E. Keane; Scott A. Mincemoyer; Kirsten M. Schmidt; Donald G. Long; Janice L. Garner

    2000-01-01

    (Please note: This PDF is part of a CD-ROM package only and was not printed on paper.) Fuels and vegetation spatial data layers required by the spatially explicit fire growth model FARSITE were developed for all lands in and around the Gila National Forest in New Mexico. Satellite imagery, terrain modeling, and biophysical simulation were used to create the three...

  1. High spatial resolution three-dimensional mapping of vegetation spectral dynamics using computer vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonathan P. Dandois; Erle C. Ellis

    2013-01-01

    High spatial resolution three-dimensional (3D) measurements of vegetation by remote sensing are advancing ecological research and environmental management. However, substantial economic and logistical costs limit this application, especially for observing phenological dynamics in ecosystem structure and spectral traits. Here we demonstrate a new aerial remote sensing...

  2. Comparing Different Approaches for Mapping Urban Vegetation Cover from Landsat ETM+ Data: A Case Study on Brussels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Canters

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Urban growth and its related environmental problems call for sustainable urban management policies to safeguard the quality of urban environments. Vegetation plays an important part in this as it provides ecological, social, health and economic benefits to a city’s inhabitants. Remotely sensed data are of great value to monitor urban green and despite the clear advantages of contemporary high resolution images, the benefits of medium resolution data should not be discarded. The objective of this research was to estimate fractional vegetation cover from a Landsat ETM+ image with sub-pixel classification, and to compare accuracies obtained with multiple stepwise regression analysis, linear spectral unmixing and multi-layer perceptrons (MLP at the level of meaningful urban spatial entities. Despite the small, but nevertheless statistically significant differences at pixel level between the alternative approaches, the spatial pattern of vegetation cover and estimation errors is clearly distinctive at neighbourhood level. At this spatially aggregated level, a simple regression model appears to attain sufficient accuracy. For mapping at a spatially more detailed level, the MLP seems to be the most appropriate choice. Brightness normalisation only appeared to affect the linear models, especially the linear spectral unmixing.

  3. The classification, mapping and description of the vegetation of the Rooipoort Nature Reserve, Northern Cape, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Bezuidenhout

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The need for a scientifically-based wildlife management plan and for more knowledge on vegetation led to an investigation into the plant ecology of the Rooipoort Nature Reserve. The main aim of this study was therefore to classify, describe and map the vegetation of the reserve. The floristic data were analysed according to the Braun-Blanquet procedure using the BBPC suite. The data analysis resulted in the identification of 15 communities that can be grouped into ten major community types. This resulted in five ecology-based management units, which could assist with the compilation of an ecologically sound management plan for the reserve in order to achieve sustainable utilisation of the natural resources. The Rooipoort Nature Reserve is one of the oldest and largest private nature reserves in South Africa and as such deserves to be conserved and protected. The riverine and pan vegetation communities are considered to be endangered and are in need of special conservation and protection.Conservation implication: The results suggest five management units, which will assist in the compilation of an ecologically sound management plan for the RNR, in order to allow sustainable utilization of natural resources.

  4. SAFARI 2000 NBI Vegetation Map of the Savannas of Southern Africa

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The National Botanical Institute (NBI) has mapped woody plant species distribution to provide estimates of individual species contribution to peak leaf area index...

  5. Pre-ABoVE: Land Cover and Vegetation Map, Arctic National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides a landcover map with 16 landcover classes for the northern coastal plain of the the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) on the North Slope...

  6. LBA-ECO LC-08 Soil, Vegetation, and Land Cover Maps for Brazil and South America

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides (1) soil maps for Brazil that are digital versions of the MAPA DE SOLOS DO BRASIL (EMBRAPA, 1981) classified at three levels of detail,...

  7. Pu`ukohola Heiau National Historic Site Vegetation Mapping Project - Orthorectified Photomosaic

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — Digital orthoimages combine the image characteristics of a digital image with the geometric qualities of a map. The primary dynamic digital orthophoto quarter...

  8. Kaloko-Honokohau National Historical Park Vegetation Mapping Project - Orthorectified Photomosaic

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — Digital orthoimages combine the image characteristics of a digital image with the geometric qualities of a map. The primary dynamic digital orthophoto quarter...

  9. Pu`uhonua o Honaunau National Historical Park Vegetation Mapping Project - Orthorectified Photomosaic

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — Digital orthoimages combine the image characteristics of a digital image with the geometric qualities of a map. The primary dynamic digital orthophoto quarter...

  10. Digital Color Infrared Orthophotos of Great Smoky Mountains National Park Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This digital color infrared orthophoto was created by the Center for Remote Sensing and Mapping the Science (CRMS) at The University of Georgia to support the...

  11. Orthorectified Photomosaic for Sunset Crater Volcano National Monument Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — Orthophotos combine the image characteristics of a photograph with the geometric qualities of a map. The primary digital orthophotoquad (DOQ) is a 1-meter ground...

  12. Clustered Simple Cell Mapping: An extension to the Simple Cell Mapping method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyebrószki, Gergely; Csernák, Gábor

    2017-01-01

    When a dynamical system has a complex structure of fixed points, periodic cycles or even chaotic attractors, Cell Mapping methods are excellent tools to discover and thoroughly analyse all features in the state space. These methods discretize a region of the state space into cells and examine the dynamics in the cell state space. By determining one or more image cells for each cell, the global behaviour within the region can be quickly determined. In the simplest case - Simple Cell Mapping (SCM) method - only one image corresponds to a cell and usually a rectangular grid of cells is used. In typical applications the grid of cells is refined at specific locations. This paper, however, introduces a different approach, which is useful to expand the analysed state space region to include all features which properly characterize the global dynamics of the system. Instead of refining the initial cell state space, we start with a small initial state space region, analyse other interesting regions of the state space and incorporate them into a cluster of cell mapping solutions. By this approach, trajectories escaping the original state space region can be followed automatically and additional objects in the state space can be discovered. To illustrate the benefits of the method, we present the exploration of the phase-space of the micro-chaos map - a simple model of digitally controlled systems.

  13. Mapping enzymatic catalysis using the effective fragment molecular orbital method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Casper Steinmann; Fedorov, Dmitri G.; Jensen, Jan Halborg

    2013-01-01

    We extend the Effective Fragment Molecular Orbital (EFMO) method to the frozen domain approach where only the geometry of an active part is optimized, while the many-body polarization effects are considered for the whole system. The new approach efficiently mapped out the entire reaction path of ...

  14. Food Mapping: A Psychogeographical Method for Raising Food Consciousness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wight, R. Alan; Killham, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Food mapping is a new, participatory, interdisciplinary pedagogical approach to learning about our modern food systems. This method is inspired by the Situationist International's practice of the "dérive" and draws from the discourses of critical geography, the food movement's research on food deserts, and participatory action…

  15. A comparison of multidimensional scaling methods for perceptual mapping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijmolt, T.H.A.; Wedel, M.

    Multidimensional scaling has been applied to a wide range of marketing problems, in particular to perceptual mapping based on dissimilarity judgments. The introduction of methods based on the maximum likelihood principle is one of the most important developments. In this article, the authors compare

  16. Building maps to search the web: the method Sewcom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corrado Petrucco

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Seeking information on the Internet is becoming a necessity 'at school, at work and in every social sphere. Unfortunately the difficulties' inherent in the use of search engines and the use of unconscious cognitive approaches inefficient limit their effectiveness. It is in this respect presented a method, called SEWCOM that lets you create conceptual maps through interaction with search engines.

  17. Application of MEDALUS Method for Desertification Mapping in SEJZI plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhshandehmehr, L.; Soltani, S.; Sepehr, A.

    2009-04-01

    According to the UNCCD definition, "Desertification" is land degradation in arid, semi-arid and dry subhumid areas resulting from various factors, including climatic variations and human activities. According to this definition, natural and anthropogenic processes have main roles in desertification severity. The MEDALUS methodology is a practical approach to assess the status of desertification and evaluating of desertification risk. In this study, have been developed a regional model for desertification assessment and mapping in SEJZI plain (Eastern Isfahan) based on MEDALUS methodology. At first step, main factors and indicators affecting on desertification process were identified. According to the local condition, seven factors include: climate, soil, vegetation cover, ground water, water erosion, wind erosion and policy and management were recognized. Each factor included several indicators accounting as factor quality determination. These indicators quantified based on their influences on desertification process. For each indicator a score ranging from 100 to 200 have been assigned and desertification weighting was extracting. Ultimately, desertification severity was classified in four level including low, moderate, severe and high severe. Results showed that 1.69% of study area classified as moderate class, 34.86% classified as severe and 63.45% involved high severe class. The climate and management and policy were the most important factors affecting on desertification process. Keywords: Desertification, MEDALUS, SEJZI Plain, Desertification Mapping

  18. Methodical Aspects of Applying Strategy Map in an Organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Markiewicz

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available One of important aspects of strategic management is the instrumental aspect included in a rich set of methods and techniques used at particular stages of strategic management process. The object of interest in this study is the development of views and the implementation of strategy as an element of strategic management and instruments in the form of methods and techniques. The commonly used method in strategy implementation and measuring progress is Balanced Scorecard (BSC. The method was created as a result of implementing the project “Measuring performance in the Organization of the future” of 1990, completed by a team under the supervision of David Norton (Kaplan, Norton 2002. The developed method was used first of all to evaluate performance by decomposition of a strategy into four perspectives and identification of measures of achievement. In the middle of 1990s the method was improved by enriching it, first of all, with a strategy map, in which the process of transition of intangible assets into tangible financial effects is reflected (Kaplan, Norton 2001. Strategy map enables illustration of cause and effect relationship between processes in all four perspectives and performance indicators at the level of organization. The purpose of the study being prepared is to present methodical conditions of using strategy maps in the strategy implementation process in organizations of different nature.

  19. Local-scale flood mapping on vegetated floodplains from radiometrically calibrated airborne LiDAR data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malinowski, Radoslaw; Höfle, Bernhard; König, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    , but the exact strength of the recorded laser pulse depends on the area covered by the targets located within a laser pulse footprint area. To account for this we analysed the physical quantity of radiometrically calibrated ALS data, the backscattering coefficient, in relation to water and vegetation coverage...... of herbaceous vegetation. To address this problem, this study presents the application of full-waveform airborne laser scanning (ALS) data for detection of floodwater extent. In general, water surfaces are characterised by low values of backscattered energy due to water absorption of the infrared laser shots...... within a single laser footprint. The results showed that the backscatter was negatively correlated to water coverage, and that of the three distinguished classes of water coverage (low, medium, and high) only the class with the largest extent of water cover (>70%) had relatively distinct characteristics...

  20. A METHOD OF GENERATING PANORAMIC STREET STRIP IMAGE MAP WITH MOBILE MAPPING SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Tianen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores a method of generating panoramic street strip image map which is called as “Pano-Street” here and contains both sides, ground surface and overhead part of a street with a sequence of 360° panoramic images captured with Point Grey’s Ladybug3 mounted on the top of Mitsubishi MMS-X 220 at 2m intervals along the streets in urban environment. On-board GPS/IMU, speedometer and post sequence image analysis technology such as bundle adjustment provided much more accuracy level position and attitude data for these panoramic images, and laser data. The principle for generating panoramic street strip image map is similar to that of the traditional aero ortho-images. A special 3D DEM(3D-Mesh called here was firstly generated with laser data, the depth map generated from dense image matching with the sequence of 360° panoramic images, or the existing GIS spatial data along the MMS trajectory, then all 360° panoramic images were projected and stitched on the 3D-Mesh with the position and attitude data. This makes it possible to make large scale panoramic street strip image maps for most types of cities, and provides another kind of street view way to view the 360° scene along the street by avoiding the switch of image bubbles like Google Street View and Bing Maps Streetside.

  1. a Method of Generating Panoramic Street Strip Image Map with Mobile Mapping System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tianen, Chen; Yamamoto, Kohei; Tachibana, Kikuo

    2016-06-01

    This paper explores a method of generating panoramic street strip image map which is called as "Pano-Street" here and contains both sides, ground surface and overhead part of a street with a sequence of 360° panoramic images captured with Point Grey's Ladybug3 mounted on the top of Mitsubishi MMS-X 220 at 2m intervals along the streets in urban environment. On-board GPS/IMU, speedometer and post sequence image analysis technology such as bundle adjustment provided much more accuracy level position and attitude data for these panoramic images, and laser data. The principle for generating panoramic street strip image map is similar to that of the traditional aero ortho-images. A special 3D DEM(3D-Mesh called here) was firstly generated with laser data, the depth map generated from dense image matching with the sequence of 360° panoramic images, or the existing GIS spatial data along the MMS trajectory, then all 360° panoramic images were projected and stitched on the 3D-Mesh with the position and attitude data. This makes it possible to make large scale panoramic street strip image maps for most types of cities, and provides another kind of street view way to view the 360° scene along the street by avoiding the switch of image bubbles like Google Street View and Bing Maps Streetside.

  2. Satellite image based methods for fuels maps updating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Benito, Alfonso; Hernandez-Leal, Pedro A.; Arbelo, Manuel; Gonzalez-Calvo, Alejandro; Moreno-Ruiz, Jose A.; Garcia-Lazaro, Jose R.

    2016-10-01

    Regular updating of fuels maps is important for forest fire management. Nevertheless complex and time consuming field work is usually necessary for this purpose, which prevents a more frequent update. That is why the assessment of the usefulness of satellite data and the development of remote sensing techniques that enable the automatic updating of these maps, is of vital interest. In this work, we have tested the use of the spectral bands of OLI (Operational Land Imager) sensor on board Landsat 8 satellite, for updating the fuels map of El Hierro Island (Spain). From previously digitized map, a set of 200 reference plots for different fuel types was created. A 50% of the plots were randomly used as a training set and the rest were considered for validation. Six supervised and 2 unsupervised classification methods were applied, considering two levels of detail. A first level with only 5 classes (Meadow, Brushwood, Undergrowth canopy cover >50%, Undergrowth canopy cover 84% for Maximun Likelihood. Meanwhile, level 2 results showed at best, an unacceptable overall accuracy of 34%, which prevents the use of this data for such a detailed characterization. Anyway it has been demonstrated that in some conditions, images of medium spatial resolution, like Landsat 8-OLI, could be a valid tool for an automatic upgrade of fuels maps, minimizing costs and complementing traditional methodologies.

  3. Landscape Measures of Rangeland Condition in the BLM Owyhee Pilot Project: Shrub Canopy Mapping, Vegetation Classification, and Detection of Anomalous Land Areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tagestad, Jerry D.; Downs, Janelle L.

    2007-12-28

    In 2006, the BLM tasked PNNL to collaborate in research being conducted under the Owyhee Uplands Pilot Project to assess rangeland condition. The objective of this effort was to provide Owyhee Uplands Pilot Project with a sophisticated suite of data and tools to assist in evaluating the health and condition of the Owyhee Uplands study area. We focused on three technical areas. The first involved enhancing existing algorithms to estimate shrub canopy cover in the Lower Reynolds Creek Watershed. The second task involved developing and applying a strategy to assess and compare three vegetation map products for the Idaho portion of the Owyhee study area. The third task developed techniques and data that can be used to identify areas exhibiting anomalous rangeland conditions (for example exotic plants or excessive bare soil exposure). This report documents the methods used, results obtained, and conclusions drawn.

  4. A rapid method to authenticate vegetable oils through surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Ming Yang; Zhang, Xin; Ren, Hai Rui; Liu, Luo; Zhao, Yong Mei; Wang, Zheng; Wu, Zheng Long; Liu, Li Min; Xu, Hai Jun

    2016-03-01

    Vegetable oils are essential in our daily diet. Among various vegetable oils, the major difference lies in the composition of fatty acids, including unsaturated fatty acids (USFA) and saturated fatty acids (SFA). USFA include oleic acid (OA), linoleic acid (LA), and α-linolenic acid (ALA), while SFA are mainly palmitic acid (PA). In this study, the most typical and abundant USFA present with PA in vegetable oils were quantified. More importantly, certain proportional relationships between the integrated intensities of peaks centered at 1656 cm-1 (S1656) in the surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectra of different USFA were confirmed. Therefore, the LA or ALA content could be converted into an equivalent virtual OA content enabling the characterization of the USFA content in vegetable oils using the equivalent total OA content. In combination with the S1656 of pure OA and using peanut, sesame, and soybean oils as examples, the ranges of S1656 corresponding to the National Standards of China were established to allow the rapid authentication of vegetable oils. Gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer analyses verified the accuracy of the method, with relative errors of less than 5%. Moreover, this method can be extended to other detection fields, such as diseases.

  5. Comparison of antioxidative properties of raw vegetables and thermally processed ones using the conventional and sous-vide methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosewski, Grzegorz; Górna, Ilona; Bolesławska, Izabela; Kowalówka, Magdalena; Więckowska, Barbara; Główka, Anna K; Morawska, Anna; Jakubowski, Karol; Dobrzyńska, Małgorzata; Miszczuk, Piotr; Przysławski, Juliusz

    2018-02-01

    The study determines the antioxidant properties of methanol vegetable extracts from raw vegetables, conventionally cooked vegetables and sous-vide. In the research, two methods were used: free radical scavenging DPPH (µM Trolox) and the reduction of Fe3+to Fe2+ - FRAP (µM Fe2+). Antioxidative properties for raw vegetables were obtained with the range of 7.47-235 (µM Trolox/100g of vegetables) and 2.66-103 (µM Fe2+/100g of vegetables), for vegetables after the conventional cooking process 6.15-657 (µM Trolox/100g of vegetables) and 3.03-99.9 (µM Fe2+/100g of vegetables), for vegetables after the sous-vide process 4.45-648 (µM Trolox/100g of vegetables) and 3.06-99.9 (µM Fe2+/100g of vegetables). For some vegetables, an increase in the antioxidative potential was observed as a result of cooking processes; however, it was much higher for the sous-vide technique. All results were subjected to a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and, if significant differences were revealed, the POST-HOC Duncan test was used (α=0.05). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Sampling and Mapping Soil Erosion Cover Factor for Fort Richardson, Alaska. Integrating Stratification and an Up-Scaling Method

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Guangxing; Gertner, George; Anderson, Alan B; Howard, Heidi

    2006-01-01

    When a ground and vegetation cover factor related to soil erosion is mapped with the aid of remotely sensed data, a cost-efficient sample design to collect ground data and obtain an accurate map is required...

  7. Adaptive multiresolution method for MAP reconstruction in electron tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acar, Erman, E-mail: erman.acar@tut.fi [Department of Signal Processing, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 553, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); BioMediTech, Tampere University of Technology, Biokatu 10, 33520 Tampere (Finland); Peltonen, Sari; Ruotsalainen, Ulla [Department of Signal Processing, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 553, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); BioMediTech, Tampere University of Technology, Biokatu 10, 33520 Tampere (Finland)

    2016-11-15

    3D image reconstruction with electron tomography holds problems due to the severely limited range of projection angles and low signal to noise ratio of the acquired projection images. The maximum a posteriori (MAP) reconstruction methods have been successful in compensating for the missing information and suppressing noise with their intrinsic regularization techniques. There are two major problems in MAP reconstruction methods: (1) selection of the regularization parameter that controls the balance between the data fidelity and the prior information, and (2) long computation time. One aim of this study is to provide an adaptive solution to the regularization parameter selection problem without having additional knowledge about the imaging environment and the sample. The other aim is to realize the reconstruction using sequences of resolution levels to shorten the computation time. The reconstructions were analyzed in terms of accuracy and computational efficiency using a simulated biological phantom and publically available experimental datasets of electron tomography. The numerical and visual evaluations of the experiments show that the adaptive multiresolution method can provide more accurate results than the weighted back projection (WBP), simultaneous iterative reconstruction technique (SIRT), and sequential MAP expectation maximization (sMAPEM) method. The method is superior to sMAPEM also in terms of computation time and usability since it can reconstruct 3D images significantly faster without requiring any parameter to be set by the user. - Highlights: • An adaptive multiresolution reconstruction method is introduced for electron tomography. • The method provides more accurate results than the conventional reconstruction methods. • The missing wedge and noise problems can be compensated by the method efficiently.

  8. Manual herbicide application methods for managing vegetation in Appalachian hardwood forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey D. Kochenderfer; James N. Kochenderfer; Gary W. Miller

    2012-01-01

    Four manual herbicide application methods are described for use in Appalachian hardwood forests. Stem injection, basal spray, cut-stump, and foliar spray techniques can be used to control interfering vegetation and promote the development of desirable reproduction and valuable crop trees in hardwood forests. Guidelines are presented to help the user select the...

  9. A HYBRID METHOD IN VEGETATION HEIGHT ESTIMATION USING POLINSAR IMAGES OF CAMPAIGN BIOSAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Dehnavi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently, there have been plenty of researches on the retrieval of forest height by PolInSAR data. This paper aims at the evaluation of a hybrid method in vegetation height estimation based on L-band multi-polarized air-borne SAR images. The SAR data used in this paper were collected by the airborne E-SAR system. The objective of this research is firstly to describe each interferometry cross correlation as a sum of contributions corresponding to single bounce, double bounce and volume scattering processes. Then, an ESPIRIT (Estimation of Signal Parameters via Rotational Invariance Techniques algorithm is implemented, to determine the interferometric phase of each local scatterer (ground and canopy. Secondly, the canopy height is estimated by phase differencing method, according to the RVOG (Random Volume Over Ground concept. The applied model-based decomposition method is unrivaled, as it is not limited to specific type of vegetation, unlike the previous decomposition techniques. In fact, the usage of generalized probability density function based on the nth power of a cosine-squared function, which is characterized by two parameters, makes this method useful for different vegetation types. Experimental results show the efficiency of the approach for vegetation height estimation in the test site.

  10. A simple method for estimating potential relative radiation (PRR) for landscape-vegetation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenneth B. Jr. Pierce; Todd Lookingbill; Dean. Urban

    2005-01-01

    Radiation is one of the primary influences on vegetation composition and spatial pattern. Topographic orientation is often used as a proxy for relative radiation load due to its effects on evaporative demand and local temperature. Common methods for incorporating this information (i.e., site measures of slope and aspect) fail to include daily or annual changes in solar...

  11. A new method to infer vegetation boundary movement from 'snapshot' data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eppinga, M.B.; Pucko, C.A.; Baudena, M.; Beckage, B.; Molofsky, J.

    2012-01-01

    Global change may induce shifts in plant community distributions at multiple spatial scales. At the ecosystem scale, such shifts may result in movement of ecotones or vegetation boundaries. Most indicators for ecosystem change require timeseries data, but here a new method is proposed enabling

  12. Construction of Large Period Symplectic Maps by Interpolative Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warnock, Robert; Cai, Yunhai; /SLAC; Ellison, James A.; /New Mexico U.

    2009-12-17

    The goal is to construct a symplectic evolution map for a large section of an accelerator, say a full turn of a large ring or a long wiggler. We start with an accurate tracking algorithm for single particles, which is allowed to be slightly non-symplectic. By tracking many particles for a distance S one acquires sufficient data to construct the mixed-variable generator of a symplectic map for evolution over S, given in terms of interpolatory functions. Two ways to find the generator are considered: (1) Find its gradient from tracking data, then the generator itself as a line integral. (2) Compute the action integral on many orbits. A test of method (1) has been made in a difficult example: a full turn map for an electron ring with strong nonlinearity near the dynamic aperture. The method succeeds at fairly large amplitudes, but there are technical difficulties near the dynamic aperture due to oddly shaped interpolation domains. For a generally applicable algorithm we propose method (2), realized with meshless interpolation methods.

  13. A technique for the determination of Louisiana marsh salinity zone from vegetation mapped by multispectral scanner data: A comparison of satellite and aircraft data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butera, M. K.

    1977-01-01

    Vegetation in selected study areas on the Louisiana coast was mapped using low altitude aircraft and satellite (LANDSAT) multispectral scanner data. Fresh, brackish, and saline marshes were then determined from the remotely sensed presence of dominant indicator plant associations. Such vegetational classifications were achieved from data processed through a standard pattern recognition computer program. The marsh salinity zone maps from the aircraft and satellite data compared favorably within the broad salinity regimes. The salinity zone boundaries determined by remote sensing compared favorably with those interpolated from line-transect field observations from an earlier year.

  14. Description and validation of an automated methodology for mapping mineralogy, vegetation, and hydrothermal alteration type from ASTER satellite imagery with examples from the San Juan Mountains, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockwell, Barnaby W.

    2012-01-01

    The efficacy of airborne spectroscopic, or "hyperspectral," remote sensing for geoenvironmental watershed evaluations and deposit-scale mapping of exposed mineral deposits has been demonstrated. However, the acquisition, processing, and analysis of such airborne data at regional and national scales can be time and cost prohibitive. The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) sensor carried by the NASA Earth Observing System Terra satellite was designed for mineral mapping and the acquired data can be efficiently used to generate uniform mineral maps over very large areas. Multispectral remote sensing data acquired by the ASTER sensor were analyzed to identify and map minerals, mineral groups, hydrothermal alteration types, and vegetation groups in the western San Juan Mountains, Colorado, including the Silverton and Lake City calderas. This mapping was performed in support of multidisciplinary studies involving the predictive modeling of surface water geochemistry at watershed and regional scales. Detailed maps of minerals, vegetation groups, and water were produced from an ASTER scene using spectroscopic, expert system-based analysis techniques which have been previously described. New methodologies are presented for the modeling of hydrothermal alteration type based on the Boolean combination of the detailed mineral maps, and for the entirely automated mapping of alteration types, mineral groups, and green vegetation. Results of these methodologies are compared with the more detailed maps and with previously published mineral mapping results derived from analysis of high-resolution spectroscopic data acquired by the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) sensor. Such comparisons are also presented for other mineralized and (or) altered areas including the Goldfield and Cuprite mining districts, Nevada and the central Marysvale volcanic field, Wah Wah Mountains, and San Francisco Mountains, Utah. The automated

  15. Use of airborne electromagnetic methods for resource mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacky, G. J.

    1993-11-01

    Airborne electromagnetic (AEM) methods complement spaceborne remote sensing techniques. AEM surveys carried out from low flying aircraft are capable of detecting geological structures not visible on the surface. The flight height of AEM systems above the ground ranges from 30 to 120 m. Most systems generate primary EM fields by using a loop transmitter; conducting coils are used as antenna to measure the secondary magnetic field caused by conductive inhomogeneities in the ground. The frequency used in AEM surveys (100 Hz to 50 kHz) allows ground penetration in excess of 100 m. At present, two types of AEM systems are widely used: helicopter, frequency-domain, and fixed-wing, towed-bird, time-domain. The most common survey products are apparent conductivity maps. AEM methods are extensively used in prospecting for base and precious metal deposits, kimberlites, uranium, and also in geological mapping, groundwater exploration and environmental investigations.

  16. Identification and Mapping of Soils, Vegetation, and Water Resources of Lynn County, Texas, by Computer Analysis of ERTS MSS Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgardner, M. F.; Kristof, S. J.; Henderson, J. A., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Results of the analysis and interpretation of ERTS multispectral data obtained over Lynn County, Texas, are presented. The test site was chosen because it embodies a variety of problems associated with the development and management of agricultural resources in the Southern Great Plains. Lynn County is one of ten counties in a larger test site centering around Lubbock, Texas. The purpose of this study is to examine the utility of ERTS data in identifying, characterizing, and mapping soils, vegetation, and water resources in this semiarid region. Successful application of multispectral remote sensing and machine-processing techniques to arid and seminarid land-management problems will provide valuable new tools for the more than one-third of the world's lands lying in arid-semiarid regions.

  17. Studying the NDVI dynamics features for vegetation monitoring method development in the south of Central Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugacheva, Irina

    Monitoring of vegetation state can be based on studying their dynamics features. Effective methods of satellite data interpretation using spectral feature distinctions should be applied for this purpose. Studying the time series of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) during growth period is one of such approaches. The analysis of NDVI temporal profile shape allows to identify vegetation objects on satellite image. The NDVI curve transformation regularities during growth period are studied in the process of study carried out. Growth rate in specific phenological phases (growth of vegetative organs; maturation and fruiting) and extreme NDVI values during total growth period are detected. Growth rate is calculated as a NDVI curve slope. The NDVI dynamics of different vegetation types (agricultural crops - wheat, oats, buckwheat; abandoned fields of different age, meadow steppe, stony steppe, feather-grass steppe, flood meadow etc.), located in the south of Central Siberia (Krasnoyarsk krai, Khakasia), has been derived and analyzed. Results of this study are as the basis for developed software, which produces the automatic identification of canopy using Terra Modis satellite measurement data.

  18. Interferometric methods for mapping static electric and magnetic fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pozzi, Giulio; Beleggia, Marco; Kasama, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    The mapping of static electric and magnetic fields using electron probes with a resolution and sensitivity that are sufficient to reveal nanoscale features in materials requires the use of phase-sensitive methods such as the shadow technique, coherent Foucault imaging and the Transport of Intensity......) the model-independent determination of the locations and magnitudes of field sources (electric charges and magnetic dipoles) directly from electron holographic data....

  19. Comparison of association mapping methods in a complex pedigreed population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sahana, Goutam; Guldbrandtsen, Bernt; Janss, Luc

    2010-01-01

    Association mapping methods were compared using a simulation with a complex pedigree structure. The pedigree was simulated while keeping the present Danish Holstein population pedigree in view. A total of 15 quantitative trait loci (QTL) with varying effect sizes (10%, 5% and 2% of total genetic...... variance) were simulated. We compared the single-marker test, haplotype-based analysis, mixed model approach, and Bayesian analysis. The methods were compared for power, precision of location estimates, and type I error rates. Results found the best performance in a Bayesian method that included genetic...... background effects and simultaneously fitted all single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with a variable selection method. A mixed model analysis that fitted genetic background effects and tested one SNP at a time performed nearly as well as the Bayesian method. For the Bayesian method, it proved necessary...

  20. Landslide Mapping in Vegetated Areas Using Change Detection Based on Optical and Polarimetric SAR Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Plank

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Mapping of landslides, quickly providing information about the extent of the affected area and type and grade of damage, is crucial to enable fast crisis response, i.e., to support rescue and humanitarian operations. Most synthetic aperture radar (SAR data-based landslide detection approaches reported in the literature use change detection techniques, requiring very high resolution (VHR SAR imagery acquired shortly before the landslide event, which is commonly not available. Modern VHR SAR missions, e.g., Radarsat-2, TerraSAR-X, or COSMO-SkyMed, do not systematically cover the entire world, due to limitations in onboard disk space and downlink transmission rates. Here, we present a fast and transferable procedure for mapping of landslides, based on change detection between pre-event optical imagery and the polarimetric entropy derived from post-event VHR polarimetric SAR data. Pre-event information is derived from high resolution optical imagery of Landsat-8 or Sentinel-2, which are freely available and systematically acquired over the entire Earth’s landmass. The landslide mapping is refined by slope information from a digital elevation model generated from bi-static TanDEM-X imagery. The methodology was successfully applied to two landslide events of different characteristics: A rotational slide near Charleston, West Virginia, USA and a mining waste earthflow near Bolshaya Talda, Russia.

  1. Development of a Dynamic Web Mapping Service for Vegetation Productivity Using Earth Observation and in situ Sensors in a Sensor Web Based Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Sytze de Bruin; Beatus Chuma; Lammert Kooistra; Aldo Bergsma

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a sensor web based approach which combines earth observation and in situ sensor data to derive typical information offered by a dynamic web mapping service (WMS). A prototype has been developed which provides daily maps of vegetation productivity for the Netherlands with a spatial resolution of 250 m. Daily available MODIS surface reflectance products and meteorological parameters obtained through a Sensor Observation Service (SOS) were used as input fo...

  2. Ecosystem mapping at the African continent scale using a hybrid clustering approach based on 1-km resolution multi-annual data from SPOT/VEGETATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaptué, A.T.; Jong, S.M. de; Roujean, J.L.; Favier, C.; Mering, C. von

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this study is to propose a new classification of African ecosystems based on an 8-year analysis of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) data sets from SPOT/VEGETATION. We develop two methods of classification. The first method is obtained from a k-nearest neighbour (k-NN)

  3. A method for multi-hazard mapping in poorly known volcanic areas: an example from Kanlaon (Philippines)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neri, M.; Le Cozannet, G.; Thierry, P.; Bignami, C.; Ruch, J.

    2013-08-01

    Hazard mapping in poorly known volcanic areas is complex since much evidence of volcanic and non-volcanic hazards is often hidden by vegetation and alteration. In this paper, we propose a semi-quantitative method based on hazard event tree and multi-hazard map constructions developed in the frame of the FP7 MIAVITA project. We applied this method to the Kanlaon volcano (Philippines), which is characterized by poor geologic and historical records. We combine updated geological (long-term) and historical (short-term) data, building an event tree for the main types of hazardous events at Kanlaon and their potential frequencies. We then propose an updated multi-hazard map for Kanlaon, which may serve as a working base map in the case of future unrest. The obtained results extend the information already contained in previous volcanic hazard maps of Kanlaon, highlighting (i) an extensive, potentially active ~5 km long summit area striking north-south, (ii) new morphological features on the eastern flank of the volcano, prone to receiving volcanic products expanding from the summit, and (iii) important riverbeds that may potentially accumulate devastating mudflows. This preliminary study constitutes a basis that may help local civil defence authorities in making more informed land use planning decisions and in anticipating future risk/hazards at Kanlaon. This multi-hazard mapping method may also be applied to other poorly known active volcanoes.

  4. Evaluation of sample preparation methods and optimization of nickel determination in vegetable tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Fernando dos Santos Salazar

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Nickel, although essential to plants, may be toxic to plants and animals. It is mainly assimilated by food ingestion. However, information about the average levels of elements (including Ni in edible vegetables from different regions is still scarce in Brazil. The objectives of this study were to: (a evaluate and optimize a method for preparation of vegetable tissue samples for Ni determination; (b optimize the analytical procedures for determination by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (FAAS and by Electrothermal Atomic Absorption (ETAAS in vegetable samples and (c determine the Ni concentration in vegetables consumed in the cities of Lorena and Taubaté in the Vale do Paraíba, State of São Paulo, Brazil. By means of the analytical technique for determination by ETAAS or FAAS, the results were validated by the test of analyte addition and recovery. The most viable method tested for quantification of this element was HClO4-HNO3 wet digestion. All samples but carrot tissue collected in Lorena contained Ni levels above the permitted by the Brazilian Ministry of Health. The most disturbing results, requiring more detailed studies, were the Ni concentrations measured in carrot samples from Taubaté, where levels were five times higher than permitted by Brazilian regulations.

  5. Global Seabed Materials and Habitats Mapped: The Computational Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, C. J.

    2016-02-01

    What the seabed is made of has proven difficult to map on the scale of whole ocean-basins. Direct sampling and observation can be augmented with proxy-parameter methods such as acoustics. Both avenues are essential to obtain enough detail and coverage, and also to validate the mapping methods. We focus on the direct observations such as samplings, photo and video, probes, diver and sub reports, and surveyed features. These are often in word-descriptive form: over 85% of the records for site materials are in this form, whether as sample/view descriptions or classifications, or described parameters such as consolidation, color, odor, structures and components. Descriptions are absolutely necessary for unusual materials and for processes - in other words, for research. This project dbSEABED not only has the largest collection of seafloor materials data worldwide, but it uses advanced computing math to obtain the best possible coverages and detail. Included in those techniques are linguistic text analysis (e.g., Natural Language Processing, NLP), fuzzy set theory (FST), and machine learning (ML, e.g., Random Forest). These techniques allow efficient and accurate import of huge datasets, thereby optimizing the data that exists. They merge quantitative and qualitative types of data for rich parameter sets, and extrapolate where the data are sparse for best map production. The dbSEABED data resources are now very widely used worldwide in oceanographic research, environmental management, the geosciences, engineering and survey.

  6. Random-breakage mapping method applied to human DNA sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobrich, M.; Rydberg, B.; Cooper, P. K.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The random-breakage mapping method [Game et al. (1990) Nucleic Acids Res., 18, 4453-4461] was applied to DNA sequences in human fibroblasts. The methodology involves NotI restriction endonuclease digestion of DNA from irradiated calls, followed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, Southern blotting and hybridization with DNA probes recognizing the single copy sequences of interest. The Southern blots show a band for the unbroken restriction fragments and a smear below this band due to radiation induced random breaks. This smear pattern contains two discontinuities in intensity at positions that correspond to the distance of the hybridization site to each end of the restriction fragment. By analyzing the positions of those discontinuities we confirmed the previously mapped position of the probe DXS1327 within a NotI fragment on the X chromosome, thus demonstrating the validity of the technique. We were also able to position the probes D21S1 and D21S15 with respect to the ends of their corresponding NotI fragments on chromosome 21. A third chromosome 21 probe, D21S11, has previously been reported to be close to D21S1, although an uncertainty about a second possible location existed. Since both probes D21S1 and D21S11 hybridized to a single NotI fragment and yielded a similar smear pattern, this uncertainty is removed by the random-breakage mapping method.

  7. Combination of Geophysical Methods to Support Urban Geological Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabàs, A.; Macau, A.; Benjumea, B.; Bellmunt, F.; Figueras, S.; Vilà, M.

    2014-07-01

    Urban geological mapping is a key to assist management of new developed areas, conversion of current urban areas or assessment of urban geological hazards. Geophysics can have a pivotal role to yield subsurface information in urban areas provided that geophysical methods are capable of dealing with challenges related to these scenarios (e.g., low signal-to-noise ratio or special logistical arrangements). With this principal aim, a specific methodology is developed to characterize lithological changes, to image fault zones and to delineate basin geometry in the urban areas. The process uses the combination of passive and active techniques as complementary data: controlled source audio-magnetotelluric method (CSAMT), magnetotelluric method (MT), microtremor H/V analysis and ambient noise array measurements to overcome the limitations of traditional geophysical methodology. This study is focused in Girona and Salt surrounding areas (NE of Spain) where some uncertainties in subsurface knowledge (maps of bedrock depth and the isopach maps of thickness of quaternary sediments) need to be resolved to carry out the 1:5000 urban geological mapping. These parameters can be estimated using this proposed methodology. (1) Acoustic impedance contrast between Neogene sediments and Paleogene or Paleozoic bedrock is detected with microtremor H/V analysis that provides the soil resonance frequency. The minimum value obtained is 0.4 Hz in Salt city, and the maximum value is the 9.5 Hz in Girona city. The result of this first method is a fast scanner of the geometry of basement. (2) Ambient noise array constrains the bedrock depth using the measurements of shear-wave velocity of soft soil. (3) Finally, the electrical resistivity models contribute with a good description of lithological changes and fault imaging. The conductive materials (1-100 Ωm) are associated with Neogene Basin composed by unconsolidated detrital sediments; medium resistive materials (100-400 Ωm) correspond to

  8. Holographic fluorescence mapping using space-division matching method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Ryosuke; Hayasaki, Yoshio

    2017-10-01

    Three-dimensional mapping of fluorescence light sources was performed by using self-interference digital holography. The positions of the sources were quantitatively determined by using Gaussian fitting of the axial and lateral intensity distributions obtained from diffraction calculations through position calibration from the observation space to the sample space. A space-division matching method was developed to perform the mapping of many fluorescence light sources, in this experiment, 500 nm fluorescent nanoparticles fixed in gelatin. A fluorescence digital holographic microscope having a 60 × objective lens with a numerical aperture of 1.25 detected 13 fluorescence light sources in a measurable region with a radius of ∼ 20 μm and a height of ∼ 5 μm. It was found that the measurable region had a conical shape resulting from the overlap between two beams.

  9. Vegetation map for the Hakalau Forest Unit of the Big Island National Wildlife Refuge Complex on the island of Hawai‘i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobi, James D.

    2017-01-01

    This vegetation map was produced to serve as an updated habitat base for management of natural resources of the Hakalau Forest Unit (HFU) of the Big Island National Wildlife Refuge Complex (Refuge) on the island of Hawai‘i. The map is based on a vegetation map originally produced as part of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Hawai‘i Forest Bird Survey to depict the distribution, structure, and composition of plant communities on the island of Hawai‘i as they existed in 1977. The current map has been updated to represent current conditions of plant communities in the HFU, based on WorldView 2 imagery taken in 2012 and very-high-resolution imagery collected by Pictometry International from 2010 to 2014. Thirty-one detailed plant communities are identified on this map, and fourteen of these units are found within the boundaries of HFU. Additionally, the mapped units can be displayed as five tree canopy cover units, three moisture zones units, eight dominant tree species units, and four habitat status units by choosing the various fields to group the units from the map attribute table. This updated map will provide a foundation for the refinement and tracking of management actions on the Refuge for the near future, particularly as the habitats in this area are subject to projected climate change.

  10. A NOVEL IHS-GA FUSION METHOD BASED ON ENHANCEMENT VEGETATED AREA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Niazi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Pan sharpening methods aim to produce a more informative image containing the positive aspects of both source images. However, the pan sharpening process usually introduces some spectral and spatial distortions in the resulting fused image. The amount of these distortions varies highly depending on the pan sharpening technique as well as the type of data. Among the existing pan sharpening methods, the Intensity-Hue-Saturation (IHS technique is the most widely used for its efficiency and high spatial resolution. When the IHS method is used for IKONOS or QuickBird imagery, there is a significant color distortion which is mainly due to the wavelengths range of the panchromatic image. Regarding the fact that in the green vegetated regions panchromatic gray values are much larger than the gray values of intensity image. A novel method is proposed which spatially adjusts the intensity image in vegetated areas. To do so the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI is used to identify vegetation areas where the green band is enhanced according to the red and NIR bands. In this way an intensity image is obtained in which the gray values are comparable to the panchromatic image. Beside the genetic optimization algorithm is used to find the optimum weight parameters in order to gain the best intensity image. Visual and statistical analysis proved the efficiency of the proposed method as it significantly improved the fusion quality in comparison to conventional IHS technique. The accuracy of the proposed pan sharpening technique was also evaluated in terms of different spatial and spectral metrics. In this study, 7 metrics (Correlation Coefficient, ERGAS, RASE, RMSE, SAM, SID and Spatial Coefficient have been used in order to determine the quality of the pan-sharpened images. Experiments were conducted on two different data sets obtained by two different imaging sensors, IKONOS and QuickBird. The result of this showed that the evaluation metrics are

  11. a Novel Ihs-Ga Fusion Method Based on Enhancement Vegetated Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niazi, S.; Mokhtarzade, M.; Saeedzadeh, F.

    2015-12-01

    Pan sharpening methods aim to produce a more informative image containing the positive aspects of both source images. However, the pan sharpening process usually introduces some spectral and spatial distortions in the resulting fused image. The amount of these distortions varies highly depending on the pan sharpening technique as well as the type of data. Among the existing pan sharpening methods, the Intensity-Hue-Saturation (IHS) technique is the most widely used for its efficiency and high spatial resolution. When the IHS method is used for IKONOS or QuickBird imagery, there is a significant color distortion which is mainly due to the wavelengths range of the panchromatic image. Regarding the fact that in the green vegetated regions panchromatic gray values are much larger than the gray values of intensity image. A novel method is proposed which spatially adjusts the intensity image in vegetated areas. To do so the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) is used to identify vegetation areas where the green band is enhanced according to the red and NIR bands. In this way an intensity image is obtained in which the gray values are comparable to the panchromatic image. Beside the genetic optimization algorithm is used to find the optimum weight parameters in order to gain the best intensity image. Visual and statistical analysis proved the efficiency of the proposed method as it significantly improved the fusion quality in comparison to conventional IHS technique. The accuracy of the proposed pan sharpening technique was also evaluated in terms of different spatial and spectral metrics. In this study, 7 metrics (Correlation Coefficient, ERGAS, RASE, RMSE, SAM, SID and Spatial Coefficient) have been used in order to determine the quality of the pan-sharpened images. Experiments were conducted on two different data sets obtained by two different imaging sensors, IKONOS and QuickBird. The result of this showed that the evaluation metrics are more promising for

  12. On the suitability of MODIS time series metrics to map vegetation types in dry savanna ecosystems: A case study in the Kalahari of NE Namibia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hüttich, C.; Gessner, U.; Herold, M.; Strohbach, B.; Schmidt, M.; Keil, M.; Dech, S.

    2009-01-01

    The characterization and evaluation of the recent status of biodiversity in Southern Africa’s Savannas is a major prerequisite for suitable and sustainable land management and conservation purposes. This paper presents an integrated concept for vegetation type mapping in a dry savanna ecosystem

  13. Mapping Vegetation Morphology Types in Southern Africa Savanna Using MODIS Time-Series Metrics: A Case Study of Central Kalahari, Botswana

    OpenAIRE

    Niti B. Mishra; Kelley A. Crews; Jennifer A. Miller; Thoralf Meyer

    2015-01-01

    Savanna ecosystems are geographically extensive and both ecologically and economically important; they therefore require monitoring over large spatial extents. There are, in particular, large areas within southern Africa savanna ecosystems that lack consistent geospatial data on vegetation morphological properties, which is a prerequisite for biodiversity conservation and sustainable management of ecological resources. Given the challenges involved in distinguishing and mapping savanna vegeta...

  14. A User-Friendly Method for Teaching Restriction Enzyme Mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrman, Patrick

    1990-01-01

    Presented is a teaching progression that enhances learning through low-cost, manipulative transparencies. Discussed is instruction about restriction enzymes, plasmids, cutting plasmids, plasmid maps, recording data, and mapping restriction sites. Mapping wheels for student use is included. (CW)

  15. A method for statistically comparing spatial distribution maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reynolds Mary G

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ecological niche modeling is a method for estimation of species distributions based on certain ecological parameters. Thus far, empirical determination of significant differences between independently generated distribution maps for a single species (maps which are created through equivalent processes, but with different ecological input parameters, has been challenging. Results We describe a method for comparing model outcomes, which allows a statistical evaluation of whether the strength of prediction and breadth of predicted areas is measurably different between projected distributions. To create ecological niche models for statistical comparison, we utilized GARP (Genetic Algorithm for Rule-Set Production software to generate ecological niche models of human monkeypox in Africa. We created several models, keeping constant the case location input records for each model but varying the ecological input data. In order to assess the relative importance of each ecological parameter included in the development of the individual predicted distributions, we performed pixel-to-pixel comparisons between model outcomes and calculated the mean difference in pixel scores. We used a two sample Student's t-test, (assuming as null hypothesis that both maps were identical to each other regardless of which input parameters were used to examine whether the mean difference in corresponding pixel scores from one map to another was greater than would be expected by chance alone. We also utilized weighted kappa statistics, frequency distributions, and percent difference to look at the disparities in pixel scores. Multiple independent statistical tests indicated precipitation as the single most important independent ecological parameter in the niche model for human monkeypox disease. Conclusion In addition to improving our understanding of the natural factors influencing the distribution of human monkeypox disease, such pixel-to-pixel comparison

  16. Development of a Dynamic Web Mapping Service for Vegetation Productivity Using Earth Observation and in situ Sensors in a Sensor Web Based Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooistra, Lammert; Bergsma, Aldo; Chuma, Beatus; de Bruin, Sytze

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a sensor web based approach which combines earth observation and in situ sensor data to derive typical information offered by a dynamic web mapping service (WMS). A prototype has been developed which provides daily maps of vegetation productivity for the Netherlands with a spatial resolution of 250 m. Daily available MODIS surface reflectance products and meteorological parameters obtained through a Sensor Observation Service (SOS) were used as input for a vegetation productivity model. This paper presents the vegetation productivity model, the sensor data sources and the implementation of the automated processing facility. Finally, an evaluation is made of the opportunities and limitations of sensor web based approaches for the development of web services which combine both satellite and in situ sensor sources.

  17. Comparative characteristic of the methods of protein antigens epitope mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Yu. Galkin

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Comparative analysis of experimental methods of epitope mapping of protein antigens has been carried out. The vast majority of known techniques are involved in immunochemical study of the interaction of protein molecules or peptides with antibodies of corresponding specifici­ty. The most effective and widely applicable metho­dological techniques are those that use synthetic and genetically engineered peptides. Over the past 30 years, these groups of methods have travelled a notable evolutionary path up to the maximum automation and the detection of antigenic determinants of various types (linear and conformational epitopes, and mimotopes. Most of epitope searching algorithms were integrated into a computer program, which greatly facilitates the analysis of experimental data and makes it possible to create spatial models. It is possible to use comparative epitope mapping for solving the applied problems; this less time-consuming method is based on the analysis of competition between different antibodies interactions with the same antigen. The physical method of antigenic structure study is X-ray analysis of antigen-antibody complexes, which may be applied only to crystallizing­ proteins, and nuclear magnetic resonance.

  18. Comparison of low-altitude UAV photogrammetry with terrestrial laser scanning as data-source methods for terrain covered in low vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruszczyński, Wojciech; Matwij, Wojciech; Ćwiąkała, Paweł

    2017-04-01

    This article juxtaposes results from an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) and a terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) survey conducted to determine land relief. The determination of terrain relief is a task that requires precision in order to, for example, map natural and anthropogenic uplifts and subsidences of the land surface. One of the problems encountered when using either method to determine relief is the impact of any vegetation covering the given site on the determination of the height of the site's surface. In the discussed case, the site was covered mostly in low vegetation (grass). In one part, it had been mowed, whereas in the other it was 30-40 cm high. An attempt was made to filter point clouds in such a way as to leave only those points that represented the land surface and to eliminate those whose height was substantially affected by the surrounding vegetation. The reference land surface was determined from dense measurements obtained by means of a tacheometer and a rod-mounted reflector. This method ensures that the impact of vegetation is minimized. A comparison of the obtained accuracy levels, costs and effort related to each method leads to the conclusion that it is more efficient to use UAV than to use TLS for dense land relief modeling.

  19. Large scale floodplain mapping using a hydrogeomorphic method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardi, F.; Yan, K.; Di Baldassarre, G.; Grimaldi, S.

    2013-12-01

    Floodplain landforms are clearly distinguishable as respect to adjacent hillslopes being the trace of severe floods that shaped the terrain. As a result digital topography intrinsically contains the floodplain information, this works presents the results of the application of a DEM-based large scale hydrogeomorphic floodplain delineation method. The proposed approach, based on the integration of terrain analysis algorithms in a GIS framework, automatically identifies the potentially frequently saturated zones of riparian areas by analysing the maximum flood flow heights associated to stream network nodes as respect to surrounding uplands. Flow heights are estimated by imposing a Leopold's law that scales with the contributing area. Presented case studies include the floodplain map of large river basins for the entire Italian territory , that are also used for calibrating the Leopold scaling parameters, as well as additional large international river basins in different climatic and geomorphic characteristics posing the base for the use of such approach for global floodplain mapping. The proposed tool could be useful to detect the hydrological change since it can easily provide maps to verify the flood impact on human activities and vice versa how the human activities changed in floodplain areas at large scale.

  20. Exploring biomedical ontology mappings with graph theory methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocbek, Simon; Kim, Jin-Dong

    2017-01-01

    In the era of semantic web, life science ontologies play an important role in tasks such as annotating biological objects, linking relevant data pieces, and verifying data consistency. Understanding ontology structures and overlapping ontologies is essential for tasks such as ontology reuse and development. We present an exploratory study where we examine structure and look for patterns in BioPortal, a comprehensive publicly available repository of live science ontologies. We report an analysis of biomedical ontology mapping data over time. We apply graph theory methods such as Modularity Analysis and Betweenness Centrality to analyse data gathered at five different time points. We identify communities, i.e., sets of overlapping ontologies, and define similar and closest communities. We demonstrate evolution of identified communities over time and identify core ontologies of the closest communities. We use BioPortal project and category data to measure community coherence. We also validate identified communities with their mutual mentions in scientific literature. With comparing mapping data gathered at five different time points, we identified similar and closest communities of overlapping ontologies, and demonstrated evolution of communities over time. Results showed that anatomy and health ontologies tend to form more isolated communities compared to other categories. We also showed that communities contain all or the majority of ontologies being used in narrower projects. In addition, we identified major changes in mapping data after migration to BioPortal Version 4.

  1. Qualitative screening method for pesticide residues detection in fruits and vegetables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iván Mauricio Huérfano Barco

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Because of the importance of developing methodologies that allow agricultural residues analysis, a rapid screening qualitative method for the determination of pesticides residues in fruits and vegetables was validated. The methodology was based on the European QuEChERS extraction method with an additional cleaning step by gel permeation chromatography (GPC, which helped to reduce the number of matrix components in the final extract. The analysis was carried out by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry with a single quadrupole analyzer. The methodology was appropriate for the qualitative analysis of 31 pesticides at their respective maximum residue limits. Consistent results were obtained with respect to a quantitative routine methodology in the analysis of real samples, hence the methodology was proven to be a good alternative for the fast analysis of these contaminants in fruits and vegetables.

  2. Mapping Congo Basin vegetation types from 300 m and 1 km multi-sensor time series for carbon stocks and forest areas estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Verhegghen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to contribute to the understanding of the Congo Basin forests by delivering a detailed map of vegetation types with an improved spatial discrimination and coherence for the whole Congo Basin region. A total of 20 land cover classes were described with the standardized Land Cover Classification System (LCCS developed by the FAO. Based on a semi-automatic processing chain, the Congo Basin vegetation types map was produced by combining 19 months of observations from the Envisat MERIS full resolution products (300 m and 8 yr of daily SPOT VEGETATION (VGT reflectances (1 km. Four zones (north, south and two central were delineated and processed separately according to their seasonal and cloud cover specificities. The discrimination between different vegetation types (e.g. forest and savannas was significantly improved thanks to the MERIS sharp spatial resolution. A better discrimination was achieved in cloudy areas by taking advantage of the temporal consistency of the SPOT VGT observations. This resulted in a precise delineation of the spatial extent of the rural complex in the countries situated along the Atlantic coast. Based on this new map, more accurate estimates of the surface areas of forest types were produced for each country of the Congo Basin. Carbon stocks of the Basin were evaluated to a total of 49 360 million metric tons. The regional scale of the map was an opportunity to investigate what could be an appropriate tree cover threshold for a forest class definition in the Congo Basin countries. A 30% tree cover threshold was suggested. Furthermore, the phenology of the different vegetation types was illustrated systematically with EVI temporal profiles. This Congo Basin forest types map reached a satisfactory overall accuracy of 71.5% and even 78.9% when some classes are aggregated. The values of the Cohen's kappa coefficient, respectively 0.64 and 0.76 indicates a result significantly better than random.

  3. Vegetation survey of Sengwa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. C. Craig

    1983-12-01

    Full Text Available The approach and initial results of a vegetation survey of the Sengwa Wildlife Area are outlined. The objectives were to produce a vegetation classification and map sufficiently detailed to serve as a base for the management of the natural vegetation. The methods adopted consist of (a stratification of the area into homogeneous units using 1:10 000 colour aerial photographs; (b plotless random sampling of each stratum by recording cover abundance on the Braun-Blaunquet scale for all woody species; and (c analysis of the data by indicator species analysis using the computer programme 'Twinspan’. The classification produced is successful in achieving recognizable vegetation types which tie in well with known environmental features.

  4. Theory, methods and tools for determining environmental flows for riparian vegetation: Riparian vegetation-flow response guilds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, D.M.; Scott, M.L.; Leroy, Poff N.; Auble, G.T.; Lytle, D.A.

    2010-01-01

    Riparian vegetation composition, structure and abundance are governed to a large degree by river flow regime and flow-mediated fluvial processes. Streamflow regime exerts selective pressures on riparian vegetation, resulting in adaptations (trait syndromes) to specific flow attributes. Widespread modification of flow regimes by humans has resulted in extensive alteration of riparian vegetation communities. Some of the negative effects of altered flow regimes on vegetation may be reversed by restoring components of the natural flow regime. 2. Models have been developed that quantitatively relate components of the flow regime to attributes of riparian vegetation at the individual, population and community levels. Predictive models range from simple statistical relationships, to more complex stochastic matrix population models and dynamic simulation models. Of the dozens of predictive models reviewed here, most treat one or a few species, have many simplifying assumptions such as stable channel form, and do not specify the time-scale of response. In many cases, these models are very effective in developing alternative streamflow management plans for specific river reaches or segments but are not directly transferable to other rivers or other regions. 3. A primary goal in riparian ecology is to develop general frameworks for prediction of vegetation response to changing environmental conditions. The development of riparian vegetation-flow response guilds offers a framework for transferring information from rivers where flow standards have been developed to maintain desirable vegetation attributes, to rivers with little or no existing information. 4. We propose to organise riparian plants into non-phylogenetic groupings of species with shared traits that are related to components of hydrologic regime: life history, reproductive strategy, morphology, adaptations to fluvial disturbance and adaptations to water availability. Plants from any river or region may be grouped

  5. Examining Discrepancies Among Three Methods Used to Make Hydrophytic Vegetation Determinations for Wetland Delineation Purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    ER D C/ CR RE L TR -1 4- 2 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program (WRAP) Examining Discrepancies Among Three Methods Used to Make...Hydrophytic Vegetation Determinations for Wetland Delineation Purposes Co ld R eg io ns R es ea rc h an d En gi ne er in g La bo ra to ry...online library at http://acwc.sdp.sirsi.net/client/default. Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program (WRAP) ERDC/CRREL TR-14-2 March 2014 Examining

  6. Adopting of Agile methods in Software Development Organizations: Systematic Mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samia Abdalhamid

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Adoption of agile methods in the software development organization is considered as a powerful solution to deal with the quickly changing and regularly developing business environment and fully-educated customers with constantly rising expectation, such as shorter time periods and an extraordinary level of response and service. This study investigates the adoption of agile approaches in software development organizations by using systematic mapping. Six research questions are identified, and to answer these questions a number of research papers have been reviewed in electronic databases. Finally, 25 research papers are examined and answers to all research questions are provided.

  7. Application of structural methods for stereo depth map improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malashin, Roman; Peterson, Maxim; Lutsiv, Vadim

    2013-05-01

    The paper describes an approach to integrating the structural methods in correlation algorithms for dense depth map construction from a stereo pair. The main idea is to modify the matrix of correlation energy according to the result of structural analysis. The modified matrix forces the Graph Cuts and SGM optimization functions to build a 3D surface through the depths of structural elements that are more reliable than individual pixels. In some cases, significant improvements were achieved. A technique for measuring the disparity range via local features matching is considered.

  8. Cape Hangklip area. II. The vegetation*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Boucher

    1978-12-01

    Full Text Available Various habitat factors influencing the fynbos vegetation of the Cape Hangklip area, such as topography, geology, soil and climate and historical features, are outlined. Data collected at 250 sampling sites are ordered using the Braun-Blanquet table method. The vegetation is subdivided into three main categories, namely coastal plain vegetation, mountain vegetation and riparian vegetation. A total of 29 communities is distinguished and related to habitat features. Aggressive introduced species which have become naturalized in the area, are also listed. A map showing the distribution of the plant communities is included.

  9. Evaluating Landsat 8 Satellite Sensor Data for Improved Vegetation Mapping Accuracy of the New Hampshire Coastal Watershed Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledoux, Lindsay

    Remote sensing is a technology that has been used for many years to generate land cover maps. These maps provide insight as to the landscape, and features that are on the ground. One way in which this is useful is through the visualization of forest cover types. The forests of New England have been notoriously difficult to map, due to their high complexity and fine-scale heterogeneity. In order to be able to better map these features, the newest satellite imagery available may be the best technology to use. Landsat 8 is the newest satellite created by a team of scientists and engineers from the United States Geological Survey and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and was launched in February of 2013. The Landsat 8 satellite sensor is considered an improvement over previous Landsat sensors, as it has three additional bands: (1) a coastal/ aerosol band, band 1, that senses light in deep blue, (2) a cirrus band, band 9, that provides detection of wispy clouds that may interfere with analysis, and (3) a Quality Assessment band whose bits contain information regarding conditions that may affect the quality and applicability of certain image pixels. In addition to these added bands, the data generated by Landsat 8 are delivered at an increased radiometric resolution compared with previous Landsat sensors, increasing the dynamic range of the data the sensor can retrieve. In order to investigate the satellite sensor data, a novel approach to classifying Landsat 8 imagery was used. Object-Based Image Analysis was employed, along with the random forest machine learning classifier, to segment and classify the land cover of the Coastal Watershed of southeastern New Hampshire. In order to account strictly for band improvements, supervised classification using the maximum likelihood classifier was completed, on imagery created: (1) using all of the original bands provided by Landsat 8, and (2) an image created using Landsat 8 bands that were only available on

  10. Concentric Ring Method for generating pollen maps. Quercus as case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oteros, Jose; Valencia, Rosa Mª; Del Río, Sara; Vega, Ana Mª; García-Mozo, Herminia; Galán, Carmen; Gutiérrez, Pablo; Mandrioli, Paolo; Fernández-González, Delia

    2017-01-15

    Mapping pollen concentrations is of great interest to study the health impact and ecological implications or for forestry or agronomical purposes. A deep knowledge about factors affecting airborne pollen is essential for predicting and understanding its dynamics. The present work sought to predict annual Quercus pollen over the Castilla and León region (Central and Northern Spain). Also to understand the relationship between airborne pollen and landscape. Records of Quercus and Quercus pyrenaica pollen types were collected at 13 monitoring sites over a period of 8years. They were analyzed together with land use data applying the Concentric Ring Method (CRM), a technique that we developed to study the relationship between airborne particle concentrations and emission sources in the region. The maximum correlation between the Quercus pollen and forms of vegetation was determined by shrubland and "dehesa" areas. For the specific Qi pyrenaica model (Q. pyrenaica pollen and Q. pyrenaica forest distribution), the maximum influence of emission sources on airborne pollen was observed at 14km from the pollen trap location with some positive correlations up to a distance of 43km. Apart from meteorological behavior, the local features of the region can explain pollen dispersion patterns. The method that we develop here proved to be a powerful tool for multi-source pollen mapping based on land use. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Proposed method for hazard mapping of landslide propagation zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serbulea, Manole-Stelian; Gogu, Radu; Manoli, Daniel-Marcel; Gaitanaru, Dragos Stefan; Priceputu, Adrian; Andronic, Adrian; Anghel, Alexandra; Liviu Bugea, Adrian; Ungureanu, Constantin; Niculescu, Alexandru

    2013-04-01

    Sustainable development of communities situated in areas with landslide potential requires a fully understanding of the mechanisms that govern the triggering of the phenomenon as well as the propagation of the sliding mass, with catastrophic consequences on the nearby inhabitants and environment. Modern analysis methods for areas affected by the movement of the soil bodies are presented in this work, as well as a new procedure to assess the landslide hazard. Classical soil mechanics offer sufficient numeric models to assess the landslide triggering zone, such as Limit Equilibrium Methods (Fellenius, Janbu, Morgenstern-Price, Bishop, Spencer etc.), blocks model or progressive mobilization models, Lagrange-based finite element method etc. The computation methods for assessing the propagation zones are quite recent and have high computational requirements, thus not being sufficiently used in practice to confirm their feasibility. The proposed procedure aims to assess not only the landslide hazard factor, but also the affected areas, by means of simple mathematical operations. The method can easily be employed in GIS software, without requiring engineering training. The result is obtained by computing the first and second derivative of the digital terrain model (slope and curvature maps). Using the curvature maps, it is shown that one can assess the areas most likely to be affected by the propagation of the sliding masses. The procedure is first applied on a simple theoretical model and then used on a representative section of a high exposure area in Romania. The method is described by comparison with Romanian legislation for risk and vulnerability assessment, which specifies that the landslide hazard is to be assessed, using an average hazard factor Km, obtained from various other factors. Following the employed example, it is observed that using the Km factor there is an inconsistent distribution of the polygonal surfaces corresponding to different landslide

  12. Mapping underwater sound noise and assessing its sources by using a self-organizing maps method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rako, Nikolina; Vilibić, Ivica; Mihanović, Hrvoje

    2013-03-01

    This study aims to provide an objective mapping of the underwater noise and its sources over an Adriatic coastal marine habitat by applying the self-organizing maps (SOM) method. Systematic sampling of sea ambient noise (SAN) was carried out at ten predefined acoustic stations between 2007 and 2009. Analyses of noise levels were performed for 1/3 octave band standard centered frequencies in terms of instantaneous sound pressure levels averaged over 300 s to calculate the equivalent continuous sound pressure levels. Data on vessels' presence, type, and distance from the monitoring stations were also collected at each acoustic station during the acoustic sampling. Altogether 69 noise surveys were introduced to the SOM predefined 2 × 2 array. The overall results of the analysis distinguished two dominant underwater soundscapes, associating them mainly to the seasonal changes in the nautical tourism and fishing activities within the study area and to the wind and wave action. The analysis identified recreational vessels as the dominant anthropogenic source of underwater noise, particularly during the tourist season. The method demonstrated to be an efficient tool in predicting the SAN levels based on the vessel distribution, indicating also the possibility of its wider implication for marine conservation.

  13. [Research on Accuracy and Stability of Inversing Vegetation Chlorophyll Content by Spectral Index Method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hai-ling; Yang, Hang; Chen, Xiao-ping; Wang, Shu-dong; Li, Xue-ke; Liu, Kai; Cen, Yi

    2015-04-01

    Spectral index method was widely applied to the inversion of crop chlorophyll content. In the present study, PSR3500 spectrometer and SPAD-502 chlorophyll fluorometer were used to acquire the spectrum and relative chlorophyll content (SPAD value) of winter wheat leaves on May 2nd 2013 when it was at the jointing stage of winter wheat. Then the measured spectra were resampled to simulate TM multispectral data and Hyperion hyperspectral data respectively, using the Gaussian spectral response function. We chose four typical spectral indices including normalized difference vegetation index (NDVD, triangle vegetation index (TVI), the ratio of modified transformed chlorophyll absorption ratio index (MCARI) to optimized soil adjusted vegetation index (OSAVI) (MCARI/OSAVI) and vegetation index based on universal pattern decomposition (VIUPD), which were constructed with the feature bands sensitive to the vegetation chlorophyll. After calculating these spectral indices based on the resampling TM and Hyperion data, the regression equation between spectral indices and chlorophyll content was established. For TM, the result indicates that VIUPD has the best correlation with chlorophyll (R2 = 0.819 7) followed by NDVI (R2 = 0.791 8), while MCARI/OSAVI and TVI also show a good correlation with R2 higher than 0.5. For the simulated Hyperion data, VIUPD again ranks first with R2 = 0.817 1, followed by MCARI/OSAVI (R2 = 0.658 6), while NDVI and TVI show very low values with R2 less than 0.2. It was demonstrated that VIUPD has the best accuracy and stability to estimate chlorophyll of winter wheat whether using simulated TM data or Hyperion data, which reaffirms that VIUPD is comparatively sensor independent. The chlorophyll estimation accuracy and stability of MCARI/OSAVI also works well, partly because OSAVI could reduce the influence of backgrounds. Two broadband spectral indices NDVI and TVI are weak for the chlorophyll estimation of simulated Hyperion data mainly because of

  14. Uncertainty of Coupled Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere Modelling Methods for Estimating Groundwater Recharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Y.; Cook, P. G.; Simmons, C. T.; Partington, D.; Crosbie, R.; Batelaan, O.

    2016-12-01

    Coupled soil-vegetation-atmosphere models have become increasingly popular for estimating groundwater recharge, because of the integration of carbon, energy and water balances. The carbon and energy balances act to constrain the water balance and as a result should reduce the uncertainty of groundwater recharge estimates. However, the addition of carbon and energy balances also introduces a large number of plant physiological parameters which complicates the estimation of groundwater recharge. Moreover, this method often relies on existing pedotransfer functions to derive soil water retention curve parameters and saturated hydraulic conductivity from soil attribute data. The choice of a pedotransfer function is usually subjective and several pedotransfer functions may be fit for the purpose. These different pedotransfer functions (and thus the uncertainty of soil water retention curve parameters and saturated hydraulic conductivity) are likely to increase the prediction uncertainty of recharge estimates. In this study, we aim to assess the potential uncertainty of groundwater recharge when using a coupled soil-vegetation-atmosphere modelling method. The widely used WAter Vegetation Energy and Solute (WAVES) modelling code was used to perform simulations of different water balances in order to estimate groundwater recharge in the Campaspe catchment in southeast Australia. We carefully determined the ranges of the vegetation parameters based upon a literature review. We also assessed a number of existing pedotransfer functions and selected the four most appropriate. Then the Monte Carlo analysis approach was employed to examine potential uncertainties introduced by different types of errors. Preliminary results suggest that for a mean rainfall of about 500 mm/y and annual pasture vegetation, the estimated recharge may range from 10 to 150 mm/y due to the uncertainty in vegetation parameters. This upper bound of the recharge range may double to 300 mm/y if different

  15. Evaluation of antioxidant activity of leafy vegetables and beans with myoglobin method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terashima, Masaaki; Fukukita, Akiko; Kodama, Riho; Miki, Haruka; Suzuki, Mayuko; Ikegami, Maya; Tamura, Noriko; Yasuda, Akari; Morikawa, Mami; Matsumura, Saki

    2013-03-01

    KEY MESSAGE : Antioxidant activity of seven leafy vegetables and four beans against five reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species was clearly characterized with a protocol using myoglobin as a reporter probe. Antioxidant activity of seven leafy vegetables and four beans against peroxyl radical, hydroxyl radical, hypochlorite ion, and peroxynitrite ion has been measured using myoglobin as a reporter probe (myoglobin method). Conventional DPPH method was also used to evaluate antioxidant activity of the samples. Difference of activity against different reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) was characterized by plotting the data in a 5-axe cobweb chart. This plot clearly showed the characteristics of the antioxidant activity of the leafy vegetables and the beans. The samples examined in this work were categorized into four groups. (1) The samples showed high antioxidant activity against all ROS and RNS: daikon sprout, spinach, Qing-geng-cai, and onion. (2) The samples showed high antioxidant activity against peroxyl radical: red bean and soy bean. (3) The samples showed high antioxidant against hypochlorite ion: broccoli floret, cabbage, and Chinese cabbage. (4) The samples showed weak antioxidant activity against all ROS and RNS: cowpea and common beans. Our protocol is probably useful to characterize antioxidant activity of the crops of different cultivars, the crops obtained in different growing environments and growing seasons, the crops harvested at different age, and the crops stored in the different conditions, as well as the changes of activity during cooking process of the crops.

  16. Why Map Issues? On Controversy Analysis as a Digital Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    This article takes stock of recent efforts to implement controversy analysis as a digital method in the study of science, technology, and society (STS) and beyond and outlines a distinctive approach to address the problem of digital bias. Digital media technologies exert significant influence on the enactment of controversy in online settings, and this risks undermining the substantive focus of controversy analysis conducted by digital means. To address this problem, I propose a shift in thematic focus from controversy analysis to issue mapping. The article begins by distinguishing between three broad frameworks that currently guide the development of controversy analysis as a digital method, namely, demarcationist, discursive, and empiricist. Each has been adopted in STS, but only the last one offers a digital “move beyond impartiality.” I demonstrate this approach by analyzing issues of Internet governance with the aid of the social media platform Twitter. PMID:26336325

  17. Why Map Issues? On Controversy Analysis as a Digital Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marres, Noortje

    2015-09-01

    This article takes stock of recent efforts to implement controversy analysis as a digital method in the study of science, technology, and society (STS) and beyond and outlines a distinctive approach to address the problem of digital bias. Digital media technologies exert significant influence on the enactment of controversy in online settings, and this risks undermining the substantive focus of controversy analysis conducted by digital means. To address this problem, I propose a shift in thematic focus from controversy analysis to issue mapping. The article begins by distinguishing between three broad frameworks that currently guide the development of controversy analysis as a digital method, namely, demarcationist, discursive, and empiricist. Each has been adopted in STS, but only the last one offers a digital "move beyond impartiality." I demonstrate this approach by analyzing issues of Internet governance with the aid of the social media platform Twitter.

  18. Vegetation type classification and vegetation cover percentage estimation in urban green zone using pleiades imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trisakti, Bambang

    2017-01-01

    Open green space in the urban area has aims to maintain the availability of land as a water catchment area, creating aspects of urban planning through a balance between the natural environment and the built environment that are useful for the public needs. Local governments have to make the green zone plan map and monitor the green space changes in their territory. Medium and high resolution satellite imageries have been widely utilized to map and monitor the changes of vegetation cover as an indicator of green space area. This paper describes the use of pleaides imagery to classify vegetation types and estimate vegetation cover percentage in the green zone. Vegetation cover was mapped using a combination of NDVI and blue band. Furthermore, vegetation types in the green space were classified using unsupervised and supervised (ISODATA and MLEN) methods. Vegetation types in the study area were divided into sparse vegetation, low-medium vegetation and medium-high vegetation. The classification accuracies were 97.9% and 98.9% for unsupervised and supervised method respectively. The vegetation cover percentage was determined by calculating the ratio between the vegetation type area and the green zone area. These information are useful to support green zone management activities.

  19. Comments on mapping in the use of finite element method | Ahie ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The use of mapping in finite element method is either parametric or non parametric, while the space under mapping could be finite or infinite. Here our claim is that parametric mapping by blending function is cheaper and has this same accuracy with her competitor 'mapping by solving auxillary Equation'. This is because ...

  20. Increasing fruit and vegetable consumption among kindergarten children:Developing taste awareness using the Sapere method

    OpenAIRE

    Sansolios, Sanne; Brandhøj, Mia; Mikkelsen, Bent Egberg

    2010-01-01

    Objectives:The objective of the study was to test the Sapere-method as a method to develop taste awareness for fruits and vegetables among kindergarten aged children. The study aimed at linking consumption of F&V to knowledge and awareness of different senses such as taste and texture. It was also intended to increase the children’s courage to taste new types of F&V and consumption of F&V by putting taste into words through food exposure. Methodology:Results from the baseline stud...

  1. Genome Sequencing and Mapping Reveal Loss of Heterozygosity as a Mechanism for Rapid Adaptation in the Vegetable Pathogen Phytophthora capsici

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamour, Kurt H.; Mudge, Joann; Gobena, Daniel; Hurtado-Gonzales, Oscar P.; Schmutz, Jeremy; Kuo, Alan; Miller, Neil A.; Rice, Brandon J.; Raffaele, Sylvain; Cano, Liliana M.; Bharti, Arvind K.; Donahoo, Ryan S.; Finely, Sabra; Huitema, Edgar; Hulvey, Jon; Platt, Darren; Salamov, Asaf; Savidor, Alon; Sharma, Rahul; Stam, Remco; Sotrey, Dylan; Thines, Marco; Win, Joe; Haas, Brian J.; Dinwiddie, Darrell L.; Jenkins, Jerry; Knight, James R.; Affourtit, Jason P.; Han, Cliff S.; Chertkov, Olga; Lindquist, Erika A.; Detter, Chris; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Kamoun, Sophien; Kingsmore, Stephen F.

    2012-02-07

    The oomycete vegetable pathogen Phytophthora capsici has shown remarkable adaptation to fungicides and new hosts. Like other members of this destructive genus, P. capsici has an explosive epidemiology, rapidly producing massive numbers of asexual spores on infected hosts. In addition, P. capsici can remain dormant for years as sexually recombined oospores, making it difficult to produce crops at infested sites, and allowing outcrossing populations to maintain significant genetic variation. Genome sequencing, development of a high-density genetic map, and integrative genomic or genetic characterization of P. capsici field isolates and intercross progeny revealed significant mitotic loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in diverse isolates. LOH was detected in clonally propagated field isolates and sexual progeny, cumulatively affecting >30percent of the genome. LOH altered genotypes for more than 11,000 single-nucleotide variant sites and showed a strong association with changes in mating type and pathogenicity. Overall, it appears that LOH may provide a rapid mechanism for fixing alleles and may be an important component of adaptability for P. capsici.

  2. Mapping the intake of different elements in vegetal tissues by dual-energy X-ray imaging at DaPhine synchrotron light source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reale, L; Kaiser, J; Reale, A; Lai, A; Flora, F; Balerna, A; Cinque, G; Fanelli, M; Ruggieri, F; Faenov, A; Pikuz, T; Tucci, A; Poma, A; Zuppella, P; Liska, M; Malina, R

    2008-03-01

    This article reports on the first utilization of the soft X-ray beamline at the DaPhine synchrotron light source for mapping the intake of different elements in plant tissues. As a test, the method of dual-energy X-ray microradiography was applied to the investigation of the natural sulfur content in dried leaf and root samples. Our ultimate goal was to monitor the pollutant lead and its intake, which was added in controlled doses to the hydroponic medium of laboratory-controlled samples of vegetal species. The results obtained by the nondestructive X-ray radiographic analysis are compared to the values of concentrations determined by a standard chemical analysis utilizing atomic absorption spectroscopy. From this comparison the validity of the X-ray detection of heavy metals in biological samples has been confirmed. The superposition of the dual energy results on the simple planar radiography shows the representation of the pollutant intake directly on the sample structures. It should be pointed out that this method, developed here for plant root and leaves could be applied to any biological sample of interest, but the preparation and observation conditions necessitate different strategies according to the type of sample under analysis. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Sensitive spectrophotometric methods for determination of some organophosphorus pesticides in vegetable samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAGDA A. AKL

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Three rapid, simple, reproducible and sensitive spectrophotometric methods (A, B and C are described for the determination of two organophosphorus pesticides, (malathion and dimethoate in formulations and vegetable samples. The methods A and B involve the addition of an excess of Ce4+ into sulphuric acid medium and the determination of the unreacted oxidant by decreasing the red color of chromotrope 2R (C2R at a suitable lmax = 528 nm for method A, or a decrease in the orange pink color of rhodamine 6G (Rh6G at a suitable lmax = = 525 nm. The method C is based on the oxidation of malathion or dimethoate with the slight excess of N-bromosuccinimide (NBS and the determination of unreacted oxidant by reacting it with amaranth dye (AM in hydrochloric acid medium at a suitable lmax = 520 nm. A regression analysis of Beer-Lambert plots showed a good correlation in the concentration range of 0.1-4.2 μg mL−1. The apparent molar absorptivity, Sandell sensitivity, the detection and quantification limits were calculated. For more accurate analysis, Ringbom optimum concentration ranges are 0.25-4.0 μg mL−1. The developed methods were successfully applied to the determination of malathion, and dimethoate in their formulations and environmental vegetable samples.

  4. River basin soil-vegetation condition assessment applying mathematic simulation methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishchenko, Natalia; Trifonova, Tatiana; Shirkin, Leonid

    2013-04-01

    Meticulous attention paid nowadays to the problem of vegetation cover productivity changes is connected also to climate global transformation. At the same time ecosystems anthropogenic transformation, basically connected to the changes of land use structure and human impact on soil fertility, is developing to a great extent independently from climatic processes and can seriously influence vegetation cover productivity not only at the local and regional levels but also globally. Analysis results of land use structure and soil cover condition influence on river basin ecosystems productive potential is presented in the research. The analysis is carried out applying integrated characteristics of ecosystems functioning, space images processing results and mathematic simulation methods. The possibility of making permanent functional simulator defining connection between macroparameters of "phytocenosis-soil" system condition on the basis of basin approach is shown. Ecosystems of river catchment basins of various degrees located in European part of Russia were chosen as research objects. For the integrated assessment of ecosystems soil and vegetation conditions the following characteristics have been applied: 1. Soil-productional potential, characterizing the ability of natural and natural-anthropogenic ecosystem in certain soil-bioclimatic conditions for long term reproduction. This indicator allows for specific phytomass characteristics and ecosystem produce, humus content in soil and bioclimatic parameters. 2. Normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) has been applied as an efficient, remotely defined, monitoring indicator characterizing spatio-temporal unsteadiness of soil-productional potential. To design mathematic simulator functional simulation methods and principles on the basis of regression, correlation and factor analysis have been applied in the research. Coefficients values defining in the designed static model of phytoproductivity distribution has been

  5. USING IMAGE PROCESSING METHODS WITH RASTER EDITING TOOLS FOR MAPPING EELGRASS DISTRIBUTIONS IN PACIFIC NORHWEST ESTUARIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    False-color near-infrared (CIR) aerial photography of seven Oregon estuaries was acquired at extreme low tides and digitally orthorectified with a ground pixel resolution of 25 cm to provide data for intertidal vegetation mapping. Exposed, semi-exposed and some submerged eelgras...

  6. A taxonomy of behaviour change methods: an Intervention Mapping approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, Gerjo; Gottlieb, Nell H; Peters, Gjalt-Jorn Y; Mullen, Patricia Dolan; Parcel, Guy S; Ruiter, Robert A C; Fernández, María E; Markham, Christine; Bartholomew, L Kay

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we introduce the Intervention Mapping (IM) taxonomy of behaviour change methods and its potential to be developed into a coding taxonomy. That is, although IM and its taxonomy of behaviour change methods are not in fact new, because IM was originally developed as a tool for intervention development, this potential was not immediately apparent. Second, in explaining the IM taxonomy and defining the relevant constructs, we call attention to the existence of parameters for effectiveness of methods, and explicate the related distinction between theory-based methods and practical applications and the probability that poor translation of methods may lead to erroneous conclusions as to method-effectiveness. Third, we recommend a minimal set of intervention characteristics that may be reported when intervention descriptions and evaluations are published. Specifying these characteristics can greatly enhance the quality of our meta-analyses and other literature syntheses. In conclusion, the dynamics of behaviour change are such that any taxonomy of methods of behaviour change needs to acknowledge the importance of, and provide instruments for dealing with, three conditions for effectiveness for behaviour change methods. For a behaviour change method to be effective: (1) it must target a determinant that predicts behaviour; (2) it must be able to change that determinant; (3) it must be translated into a practical application in a way that preserves the parameters for effectiveness and fits with the target population, culture, and context. Thus, taxonomies of methods of behaviour change must distinguish the specific determinants that are targeted, practical, specific applications, and the theory-based methods they embody. In addition, taxonomies should acknowledge that the lists of behaviour change methods will be used by, and should be used by, intervention developers. Ideally, the taxonomy should be readily usable for this goal; but alternatively, it should be

  7. Total Vegetation 2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These are polygons that contain vegetated pixels in the May, 2002 imagery from aerial overflight of the Grand Canyon. Vegetation was mapped between stage elevations...

  8. EVALUATION OF THE PERFORMANCE OF IMAGE CLASSIFICATION METHODS IN THE IDENTIFICATION OF VEGETATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio Augusto Reolon Schmidt

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Orbital imaging techniques offer comprehensive coverage of different regions for numerous environmental and socioeconomic applications, revealing the spatial characteristics and land use of those regions. The advantages of remote sensing include its ability to record spatial distribution patterns, and spectral and temporal data over large regions. The objective of this research is to evaluate the performance of different multispectral image classification methods in the selection of general vegetation, based on a set of samples taken from a Landsat 8 image. The quality of multispectral images and their final classification is usually evaluated based on the Kappa index, which is used as the quality standard in many remote sensing software programs. The classification methods chosen for this study were Parallelepiped, Maximum Likelihood, Mahalanobis Distance, and neural networks. The most suitable classification was used as standard and the other images were compared with it to determine the degree of similarity ranking (IS1x, defined as the percentage of pixels classified differently from those of the standard image. The IS1x was determined using a Matlab routine involving pixel subtraction between images. The results indicate that probability distribution methods are more suitable for discriminating vegetation types than other methods, and that some band combinations should be chosen.

  9. GAPPARD: a computationally efficient method of approximating gap-scale disturbance in vegetation models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Scherstjanoi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Models of vegetation dynamics that are designed for application at spatial scales larger than individual forest gaps suffer from several limitations. Typically, either a population average approximation is used that results in unrealistic tree allometry and forest stand structure, or models have a high computational demand because they need to simulate both a series of age-based cohorts and a number of replicate patches to account for stochastic gap-scale disturbances. The detail required by the latter method increases the number of calculations by two to three orders of magnitude compared to the less realistic population average approach. In an effort to increase the efficiency of dynamic vegetation models without sacrificing realism, we developed a new method for simulating stand-replacing disturbances that is both accurate and faster than approaches that use replicate patches. The GAPPARD (approximating GAP model results with a Probabilistic Approach to account for stand Replacing Disturbances method works by postprocessing the output of deterministic, undisturbed simulations of a cohort-based vegetation model by deriving the distribution of patch ages at any point in time on the basis of a disturbance probability. With this distribution, the expected value of any output variable can be calculated from the output values of the deterministic undisturbed run at the time corresponding to the patch age. To account for temporal changes in model forcing (e.g., as a result of climate change, GAPPARD performs a series of deterministic simulations and interpolates between the results in the postprocessing step. We integrated the GAPPARD method in the vegetation model LPJ-GUESS, and evaluated it in a series of simulations along an altitudinal transect of an inner-Alpine valley. We obtained results very similar to the output of the original LPJ-GUESS model that uses 100 replicate patches, but simulation time was reduced by approximately the factor 10

  10. A Method for Chlorophyll Fluorescence Imaging Control of the Vegetation under Microgravity Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumov, A.; Vassilev, V.; Vassilev, N.

    , indicating the biostate of the plant cells, and of 690nm and 740nm, indicating the content of the chlorophyll, i.e. the physiological vitality. discontinuous spectrum light flux, two approaches can be applied. First, several light sources can be used in combination with corresponding optical filters to produce the required spectral sub-fluxes, fitted between the frequency bands in which the fluorescence will be measured. The second approach is to use diffracted light from a single source and to blank the required bands in its spectrum. In both cases the mixing of the bands is done by multiple diffusion reflection. The fluorescence detection is realized by a wide frame digital (14-16 bit) CCD sensor. A sequential switching of the narrow band optical filters is used to collect the images, representing the metric characteristics for the intensity and the spatial resolution of the fluorescent light. The images obtained without spectral filters, contain information for the position, size and the structure/texture of the plants. Adding an optical system for collection images from two different view angles allows 3D interpretation of the data. multifactor analysis of the physiological vegetation activities. The influence of the stress factors can be detected earlier and faster than by conventional methods. The express information achieved can be used in addition to improve and control the spacecraft systems supporting the vegetation chamber bio-environment conditions during long-term flights. The system can be applied for on-ground laboratory studies as well.

  11. The XH-map algorithm: A method to process stereo video to produce a real-time obstacle map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosselot, Donald; Hall, Ernest L.

    2005-10-01

    This paper presents a novel, simple and fast algorithm to produce a "floor plan" obstacle map in real time using video. The XH-map algorithm is a transformation of stereo vision data in disparity map space into a two dimensional obstacle map space using a method that can be likened to a histogram reduction of image information. The classic floor-ground background noise problem is addressed with a simple one-time semi-automatic calibration method incorporated into the algorithm. This implementation of this algorithm utilizes the Intel Performance Primitives library and OpenCV libraries for extremely fast and efficient execution, creating a scaled obstacle map from a 480x640x256 stereo pair in 1.4 milliseconds. This algorithm has many applications in robotics and computer vision including enabling an "Intelligent Robot" robot to "see" for path planning and obstacle avoidance.

  12. Development and validation of QuEChERS method for estimation of chlorantraniliprole residue in vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Balwinder; Kar, Abhijit; Mandal, Kousik; Kumar, Rajinder; Sahoo, Sanjay Kumar

    2012-12-01

    An easy, simple and efficient analytical method was standardized and validated for the estimation of residues of chlorantraniliprole in different vegetables comprising brinjal, cabbage, capsicum, cauliflower, okra, and tomato. QuEChERS method was used for the extraction and cleanup of chlorantraniliprole residues on these vegetables. Final clear extracts of ethyl acetate were concentrated under vacuum and reconstituted into high performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC) grade acetonitrile, and residues were estimated using HPLC equipped with PDA detector system, C(18) column and confirmed by liquid chromatograph mass spectrometer (LC-MS/MS), and high performance thin layer chromatograph (HPTLC). HPLC grade acetonitrile:water (80:20, v/v) was used as mobile phase @ 0.4 mL/min. Chlorantraniliprole presented distinct peak at retention time of 9.82 min. Consistent recoveries ranging from 85% to 96% for chlorantraniliprole were observed when samples were spiked at 0.10, 0.25, 0.50, and 1.00 mg/kg levels. The limit of quantification of this method was worked out to be 0.10 mg/kg. © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists®

  13. High levels of microbial contamination of vegetables irrigated with wastewater by the drip method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadovski, A Y; Fattal, B; Goldberg, D; Katzenelson, E; Shuval, H I

    1978-12-01

    The public health aspects of the use of wastewater in agriculture and the effects of the drip irrigation method on the contamination of vegetables were studied. The method used was to simulate enteric microorganisms' dissemination by contaminated irrigation water in the field. The vegetables were irrigated with an effluent inoculated with a high titer of traceable microorganisms: poliovirus vaccine and a drug-resistant Escherichia coli. The dissemination of the marker organisms in the field was followed, and the effects of certain manipulations of the drip irrigation method on the contamination of the crops by the effluent were examined. It was shown that drip irrigation under plastic sheet cover with the drip lines placed either on the soil surface or buried at a depth of 10 cm significantly reduced crop contamination from inoculated irrigation water even when massive doses of bacteria and viruses were used. The microbial contamination was found to persist in the irrigation pipes and in the soil for at least 8 and 18 days, respectively. The data indicate that the recovery of the marker organisms was affected by soil texture and environmental conditions.

  14. A method for mapping flood hazard along roads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalantari, Zahra; Nickman, Alireza; Lyon, Steve W; Olofsson, Bo; Folkeson, Lennart

    2014-01-15

    A method was developed for estimating and mapping flood hazard probability along roads using road and catchment characteristics as physical catchment descriptors (PCDs). The method uses a Geographic Information System (GIS) to derive candidate PCDs and then identifies those PCDs that significantly predict road flooding using a statistical modelling approach. The method thus allows flood hazards to be estimated and also provides insights into the relative roles of landscape characteristics in determining road-related flood hazards. The method was applied to an area in western Sweden where severe road flooding had occurred during an intense rain event as a case study to demonstrate its utility. The results suggest that for this case study area three categories of PCDs are useful for prediction of critical spots prone to flooding along roads: i) topography, ii) soil type, and iii) land use. The main drivers among the PCDs considered were a topographical wetness index, road density in the catchment, soil properties in the catchment (mainly the amount of gravel substrate) and local channel slope at the site of a road-stream intersection. These can be proposed as strong indicators for predicting the flood probability in ungauged river basins in this region, but some care is needed in generalising the case study results other potential factors are also likely to influence the flood hazard probability. Overall, the method proposed represents a straightforward and consistent way to estimate flooding hazards to inform both the planning of future roadways and the maintenance of existing roadways. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The Change4Life Convenience Store Programme to Increase Retail Access to Fresh Fruit and Vegetables: A Mixed Methods Process Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Jean; Halligan, Joel; Burges Watson, Duika; Ryan, Vicky; Penn, Linda; Adamson, Ashley J.; White, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Background Consumption of fruit and vegetables is important for health, but is often lower than recommended and tends to be socio-economically patterned with lower consumption in more deprived groups. In 2008, the English Department of Health introduced the Change4Life convenience store programme. This aimed to increase retail access to fresh fruit and vegetables in deprived, urban areas by providing existing convenience stores with a range of support and branded point-of-sale materials and equipment. Methods We undertook a mixed-methods study of the Change4Life convenience store programme in the North East of England around two years after initial implementation. Store mapping (n = 87; 100% stores) and systematic in-store observations (n = 74; 85% stores) provided information on intervention fidelity; the variety, purchase price and quality of fresh fruit and vegetables on sale; and purchase price compared to a major supermarket. Ten qualitative interviews with a purposive sample of retailers and other professionals explored experiences of the intervention and provided further insight on quantitative results. Results Intervention stores were primarily located in socio-economically disadvantaged areas. Fidelity, in terms of presence of branded materials and equipment, was low and much was not being used as intended. Fresh fruit and vegetables on sale were of high quality and had a purchase price around 10% more than comparable products at a major supermarket. Interviewees were supportive of the health improvement aim of the intervention. Retailers were appreciative of part-funding for chill cabinets and free point-of-sale materials. The intervention suffered from: poor initial and on-going communication between the intervention delivery team and retailers; poor availability of replacement point-of-sale materials; and failure to cement intended links with health workers and community organisations. Conclusions Overall, intervention fidelity was low and the

  16. Applying Clustering Methods in Drawing Maps of Science: Case Study of the Map For Urban Management Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Abuei Ardakan

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The present paper offers a basic introduction to data clustering and demonstrates the application of clustering methods in drawing maps of science. All approaches towards classification and clustering of information are briefly discussed. Their application to the process of visualization of conceptual information and drawing of science maps are illustrated by reviewing similar researches in this field. By implementing aggregated hierarchical clustering algorithm, which is an algorithm based on complete-link method, the map for urban management science as an emerging, interdisciplinary scientific field is analyzed and reviewed.

  17. On the Suitability of MODIS Time Series Metrics to Map Vegetation Types in Dry Savanna Ecosystems: A Case Study in the Kalahari of NE Namibia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Dech

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The characterization and evaluation of the recent status of biodiversity in Southern Africa’s Savannas is a major prerequisite for suitable and sustainable land management and conservation purposes. This paper presents an integrated concept for vegetation type mapping in a dry savanna ecosystem based on local scale in-situ botanical survey data with high resolution (Landsat and coarse resolution (MODIS satellite time series. In this context, a semi-automated training database generation procedure using object-oriented image segmentation techniques is introduced. A tree-based Random Forest classifier was used for mapping vegetation type associations in the Kalahari of NE Namibia based on inter-annual intensity- and phenology-related time series metrics. The utilization of long-term inter-annual temporal metrics delivered the best classification accuracies (Kappa = 0.93 compared with classifications based on seasonal feature sets. The relationship between annual classification accuracies and bi-annual precipitation sums was conducted using data from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM. Increased error rates occurred in years with high rainfall rates compared to dry rainy seasons. The variable importance was analyzed and showed high-rank positions for features of the Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI and the blue and middle infrared bands, indicating that soil reflectance was crucial information for an accurate spectral discrimination of Kalahari vegetation types. Time series features related to reflectance intensity obtained increased rank-positions compared to phenology-related metrics.

  18. Estimating and mapping chlorophyll content for a heterogeneous grassland: Comparing prediction power of a suite of vegetation indices across scales between years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Alexander; He, Yuhong

    2017-04-01

    This study investigates the performance of existing vegetation indices for retrieving chlorophyll content for a semi-arid mixed grass prairie ecosystem across scales using in situ data collected in 2012 and 2013. A 144 published broadband (21) and narrowband (123) vegetation indices are evaluated to estimate chlorophyll content. Results indicate that narrowband indices utilize reflectance data from one or more wavelengths in the red-edge region (˜690-750 nm) perform better. Broadband indices are found to be as effective as narrowband indices for chlorophyll content estimation at both leaf and canopy scales. The empirical relationships are generally stronger at the canopy than the leaf scale, attributable to the fact that leaf samples are collected during the peak growing season when chlorophyll in plant species are uniform. SPOT-5 and CASI-550 derived chlorophyll maps result in map accuracies of 63.56% and 78.88% respectively. The assessment of vegetation chlorophylls at the canopy level, especially using remote sensing imagery is important for providing information pertaining to ecosystem health such as the physiological status, productivity, or phenology of vegetation.

  19. AVALIAÇÃO E MAPEAMENTO DA COBERTURA VEGETAL DA REGIÃO CENTRAL DA CIDADE DE JUIZ DE FORA – MG - EVALUATION AND MAPPING OF REGION CENTRAL VEGETATION COVER OF JUIZ DE FORA – MG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabela Fernanda Moraes de Paula

    2017-04-01

    proposed by Jim (1989, in the analysis of the shape and spatial distribution of vegetation cover. In this sense, the results achieved show that most regions of the central area of the city of Juiz de Fora are less than desirable in vegetation cover, requiring investments, mainly in the areas of urban integration, whose percentage of areas covered by vegetation in respect of all covers only 2%. It is noteworthy that the higher the population density, the lower the percentage of vegetation cover, it can be said that the vegetation cover in the central area of the city of Juiz de Fora is fragmented, discontinuous and presents many "empty spaces". In the mapping carried out was found 15.401% of areas covered by woody vegetation, about 1.694% of shrub and 8.59% of undergrowth. The largest expanses of green spots are scattered in between, scattered throughout the area and disconnect with each other. Therefore, its measurement, classification and spatial distribution are of paramount importance as it become essential basis for improvements and planning in the context of urban areas.

  20. Simpler Neill mapping function using nonlinear curve fitting method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batcha, Siti Rahimah; Sakidin, Hamzah; Ahmad, Asmala

    2016-11-01

    For Neill mapping function,there are 26 mathematical operations for hydrostatic component and 11 operations for wet components need to be carried out in order to get the mapping function value. The Neill mapping function model for both hydrostatics and wet component are given in a form of continued fraction. In order to obtain fast results, the mapping function model need to be simplified. In this paper, the nonlinear curve fitting is used to simplify Neill Mapping Function model. Selection of model to be simplified is based on the model ability to reach mapping function value as low as 3 degree of elevation angle. To sum of error shows how close the simplified model result with the original model. The number of mathematical operation can be reduced after the process of simplification of the model. The percentage of reduction of operation for simplified model, especially for hydrostatic component is more than 80 percent.

  1. Visual and colorimetric methods for rapid determination of total tannins in vegetable raw materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. Kalinkina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is dedicated to the development of rapid colorimetric method for determining the amount of tannins in aqueous extracts of vegetable raw materials. The sorption-based colorimetric test is determining sorption tannins polyurethane foam, impregnated of FeCl3, receiving on its surface painted in black and green color of the reaction products and the determination of their in sorbent matrix. Selectivity is achieved by determining the tannins specific interaction of polyphenols with iron ions (III. The conditions of sorption-colorimetric method: the concentration of ferric chloride (III, impregnated in the polyurethane foam; sorbent mass in the analytical cartridge; degree of loading his agent; the contact time of the phases. color scales have been developed for the visual determination of the amount of tannins in terms of gallic acid. Spend a digitized image obtained scales using computer program “Sorbfil TLC”, excluding a subjective assessment of the intensity of the color scale of the test. The results obtained determine the amount of tannins in aqueous extracts of vegetable raw rapid method using tablets and analytical cartridges. The results of the test determination of tannins with visual and densitometric analytical signal registration are compared to known methods. Spend a metrological evaluation of the results of determining the amount of tannins sorption rapid colorimetric methods. Time visual and densitometric rapid determination of tannins, taking into account the sample preparation is 25–30 minutes, the relative error does not exceed 28 %. The developed test methods for quantifying the content of tannins allow to exclude the use of sophisticated analytical equipment, carry out the analysis in non-laboratory conditions do not require highly skilled personnel.

  2. Methods in Mapping Usability of Malaysia’s Shopping Centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Ghani Aida Affina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available With more than 200 number of shopping centre in Klang Valley itself, we the consumer actually have vast of choices. Instead of the machineries varieties from the lower class product till the posh one, each of those shopping centres eventually offers the typical product same as others. Those shopping centers are competing with each other and in great endeavour to attract more consumers, to visit and spend. As for the visitor, the typical product and boring ambience seems similar in all malls, and is looking something beyond the standard. Something that promising quality embedded in shopping centre which evokes the various emotions of the user along their journey in malls. This quality is known as usability. Usability; as defined generally is a global user’s experience response with product, environment, service or facilities. It is an assessment in extracting the qualities of shopping centre design. In mapping it, there are a few synthesizing methods to implement it. Therefore, this paper purposely to review the method that been used in usability of Malaysia’s shopping centre research with a few references on previous research done in usability assessment by predecessor’s scholars. With the accentuation on three elements that anchoring what the usability is: effectiveness, efficient and satisfaction, it is hope that this overview can lead other researcher in portraying its relationship with the quality and ‘user friendly’ design of shopping centre.

  3. [Comparative analysis of parasite detection methods in vegetables for human consumption].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnabé, Anderson Sena; Ferraz, Renato Ribeiro Nogueira; Pincinato, Eder de Carvalho; Gomes, Ronnie Clayton Ferreira; Galleguillos, Tatiana Gabriela Brassea; Cerqueira, Mayara Zabeu; Soares, Elislando Gean Lima; Lage, Paula Souza; Araújo, Célia Xavier; Szamszoryk, Michel; Massara, Cristiano Lara

    2010-01-01

    vegetable contamination is a persistent health problem. The different methods of processing and diagnosis make it difficult to determine the most effective and sensitive technique. a comparative analysis of parasitological technique sensitivity in vegetable samples. a total of 30 samples were harvested -lettuce (Lactuca sativa), rocket (Eruca sativa) and watercress (Nasturtium officinale)--and later analyzed using Hoffman, Pons, and Janer (HPJ) and Faust (f) techniques. Data were analyzed, using the Bland-Altman test to evaluate the correlation and the Mann-Whitney test to compare the medians. of the analyzed samples, 46.6% were positive for intestinal parasites; Balantidium coli, accounting for 20% of contamination, Entamoeba coli (21.6) and Entamoeba histolityca (5%), Trichuris trichiura (3.3%) and Strongyloides stercoralis (2.5%) The Bland-Altman test showed significant correlation between the analyzed methods. When evaluating the averages separately, there was significant difference (p = 0.05) among the results. this study proved that the HPJ technique was more effective for the detection of eggs, helminth larvae and protozoan cysts in the plants under study.

  4. MULTIMEDIA CARTOGRAPHY: MAPS WITH SOUND DESIGN AND SOUND MAPS

    OpenAIRE

    A. A. Medvedev

    2013-01-01

     Today,sound maps is not so popular like other and not so interested for social oriented projects. Basically only these typesof thematic maps are use sound like the way of representation: political, zoogeographical, vegetation, ethnographic isthe most meeting application of sound registration to maps. In this article a new way of presenting the terrain with sound that is designed for interactive maps with audio support for disabled people is described. The method is based on a comparison betw...

  5. Nitrogen Use Efficiency of Coffee at the Vegetative Stage as Influenced by Fertilizer Application Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamanca-Jimenez, Alveiro; Doane, Timothy A.; Horwath, William R.

    2017-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) is the most limiting nutrient for coffee production in Colombia. An adequate supply is especially important during the vegetative period of growth, since any deficiency during this short period is known to have lasting effects on subsequent coffee bean production. Urea fertilizer is commonly applied on the soil surface since steep slopes hamper incorporation into soil, a practice which increases the risk of N volatilization. Little information is available on N recovery during early growth stages under different fertilizer application practices. The aim of this study was therefore to provide a comparison of 15N uptake during the early vegetative growth stage under surface-applied and incorporation practices at two contrasting locations. The highest proportion of plant N derived from fertilizer (Ndff) occurred 60 days following application at the site with greater precipitation and soil organic matter, where surface application also increased the Ndff in roots and stems after 120 days. Although fertilizer N supplied approximately 20–29% of total plant N after 4 months, this fertilizer-derived N corresponded on average to only 5% of the total application, indicating that very little fertilizer (relative to how much is applied) reaches plants during this time. Apart from the difference in Ndff observed at the wetter site, there was no effect of application method on dry weight and macronutrient content in different plant components, root to shoot ratio, and leaf 13C content. However, site effects were registered for most of these measurements, with the exception of total nutrient uptake. Similarly to Ndff trends, lower root/shoot ratio and higher concentrations of N, K, and Mg in aboveground biomass were found in the site with higher rainfall and soil organic matter, likely resulting from higher soil water and N availability. These findings provide new information useful as a direction for further research looking toward increasing NUE during the

  6. Mapping the Wetland Vegetation Communities of the Australian Great Artesian Basin Springs Using SAM, Mtmf and Spectrally Segmented PCA Hyperspectral Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, D. C.; Lewis, M. M.

    2012-07-01

    The Australian Great Artesian Basin (GAB) supports a unique and diverse range of groundwater dependent wetland ecosystems termed GAB springs. In recent decades the ecological sustainability of the springs has become uncertain as demands on this iconic groundwater resource increase. The impacts of existing water extractions for mining and pastoral activities are unknown. This situation is compounded by the likelihood of future increasing demand for extractions. Hyperspectral remote sensing provides the necessary spectral and spatial detail to discriminate wetland vegetation communities. Therefore the objectives of this paper are to discriminate the spatial extent and distribution of key spring wetland vegetation communities associated with the GAB springs evaluating three hyperspectral techniques: Spectral Angle Mapper (SAM), Mixture Tuned Matched Filtering (MTMF) and Spectrally Segmented PCA. In addition, to determine if the hyperspectral techniques developed can be applied at a number of sites representative of the range of spring formations and geomorphic settings and at two temporal intervals. Two epochs of HyMap airborne hyperspectral imagery were captured for this research in March 2009 and April 2011 at a number of sites representative of the floristic and geomorphic diversity of GAB spring groups/complexes within South Australia. Colour digital aerial photography at 30 cm GSD was acquired concurrently with the HyMap imagery. The image acquisition coincided with a field campaign of spectroradiometry measurements and a botanical survey. To identify key wavebands which have the greatest capability to discriminate vegetation communities of the GAB springs and surrounding area three hyperspectral data reduction techniques were employed: (i) Spectrally Segmented PCA (SSPCA); (ii) the Minimum Noise Transform (MNF); and (iii) the Pixel Purity Index (PPI). SSPCA was applied to NDVI-masked vegetation portions of the HyMap imagery with wavelength regions spectrally

  7. The Change4Life convenience store programme to increase retail access to fresh fruit and vegetables: a mixed methods process evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Adams

    Full Text Available Consumption of fruit and vegetables is important for health, but is often lower than recommended and tends to be socio-economically patterned with lower consumption in more deprived groups. In 2008, the English Department of Health introduced the Change4Life convenience store programme. This aimed to increase retail access to fresh fruit and vegetables in deprived, urban areas by providing existing convenience stores with a range of support and branded point-of-sale materials and equipment.We undertook a mixed-methods study of the Change4Life convenience store programme in the North East of England around two years after initial implementation. Store mapping (n = 87; 100% stores and systematic in-store observations (n = 74; 85% stores provided information on intervention fidelity; the variety, purchase price and quality of fresh fruit and vegetables on sale; and purchase price compared to a major supermarket. Ten qualitative interviews with a purposive sample of retailers and other professionals explored experiences of the intervention and provided further insight on quantitative results.Intervention stores were primarily located in socio-economically disadvantaged areas. Fidelity, in terms of presence of branded materials and equipment, was low and much was not being used as intended. Fresh fruit and vegetables on sale were of high quality and had a purchase price around 10% more than comparable products at a major supermarket. Interviewees were supportive of the health improvement aim of the intervention. Retailers were appreciative of part-funding for chill cabinets and free point-of-sale materials. The intervention suffered from: poor initial and on-going communication between the intervention delivery team and retailers; poor availability of replacement point-of-sale materials; and failure to cement intended links with health workers and community organisations.Overall, intervention fidelity was low and the intervention is unlikely to have

  8. Microwave Wire Interrogation Method Mapping Pressure under High Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyong Chen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available It is widely accepted that wireless reading for in-situ mapping of pressure under high-temperature environments is the most feasible method, because it is not subject to frequent heterogeneous jointing failures and electrical conduction deteriorating, or even disappearing, under heat load. However, in this article, we successfully demonstrate an in-situ pressure sensor with wire interrogation for high-temperature applications. In this proof-of-concept study of the pressure sensor, we used a microwave resonator as a pressure-sensing component and a microwave transmission line as a pressure characteristic interrogation tunnel. In the sensor, the line and resonator are processed into a monolith, avoiding a heterogeneous jointing failure; further, microwave signal transmission does not depend on electrical conduction, and consequently, the sensor does not suffer from the heat load. We achieve pressure monitoring under 400 °C when employing the sensor simultaneously. Our sensor avoids restrictions that exist in wireless pressure interrogations, such as environmental noise and interference, signal leakage and security, low transfer efficiency, and so on.

  9. A detection method of vegetable oils in edible blended oil based on three-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jing; Liu, Xiao-Fei; Wang, Yu-Tian

    2016-12-01

    Edible blended vegetable oils are made from two or more refined oils. Blended oils can provide a wider range of essential fatty acids than single vegetable oils, which helps support good nutrition. Nutritional components in blended oils are related to the type and content of vegetable oils used, and a new, more accurate, method is proposed to identify and quantify the vegetable oils present using cluster analysis and a Quasi-Monte Carlo integral. Three-dimensional fluorescence spectra were obtained at 250-400nm (excitation) and 260-750nm (emission). Mixtures of sunflower, soybean and peanut oils were used as typical examples to validate the effectiveness of the method. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A Prior Knowledge-Based Method to Derivate High-Resolution Leaf Area Index Maps with Limited Field Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuechan Shi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available High-resolution leaf area index (LAI maps from remote sensing data largely depend on empirical models, which link field LAI measurements to the vegetation index. The existing empirical methods often require the field measurements to be sufficient for constructing a reliable model. However, in many regions of the world, there are limited field measurements available. This paper presents a prior knowledge-based (PKB method to derivate LAI with limited field measurements, in an effort to improve the accuracy of empirical model. Based on the assumption that the experimental sites with the same vegetation type can be represented by similar models, a priori knowledge for crops was extracted from the published models in various cropland sites. The knowledge, composed of an initial guess of each model parameter with the associated uncertainty, was then combined with the local field measurements to determine a semi-empirical model using the Bayesian inversion method. The proposed method was evaluated at a cropland site in the Huailai region of Hebei Province, China. Compared with the regression method, the proposed PKB method can effectively improve the accuracy of empirical model and LAI estimation, when the field measurements were limited. The results demonstrate that a priori knowledge extracted from the universal sites can provide important auxiliary information to improve the representativeness of the empirical model in a given study area.

  11. Extending electromagnetic methods to map coastal pore water salinities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Wm. J.; Kruse, S.; Swarzenski, P.

    2006-01-01

    The feasibility of mapping pore water salinity based on surface electromagnetic (EM) methods over land and shallow marine water is examined in a coastal wetland on Tampa Bay, Florida. Forward models predict that useful information on seabed conductivity can be obtained through saline water, using floating EM-31 and EM-34 instruments from Geonics Ltd. The EM-31 functioned as predicted when compared against resistivity soundings and pore water samples and proved valuable for profiling in otherwise inaccessible terrain due to its relatively small size. Experiments with the EM-34 in marine water, however, did not reproduce the theoretical instrument response. The most effective technique for predicting pore water conductivities based on EM data entailed (1) computing formation factors from resistivity surveys and pore water samples at representative sites and (2) combining these formation factors with onshore and offshore EM-31 readings for broader spatial coverage. This method proved successful for imaging zones of elevated pore water conductivities/ salinities associated with mangrove forests, presumably caused by salt water exclusion by mangrove roots. These zones extend 5 to 10 m seaward from mangrove trunks fringing Tampa Bay. Modeling indicates that EM-31 measurements lack the resolution necessary to image the subtle pore water conductivity variations expected in association with diffuse submarine ground water discharge of fresher water in the marine water of Tampa Bay. The technique has potential for locating high-contrast zones and other pore water salinity anomalies in areas not accessible to conventional marine- or land-based resistivity arrays and hence may be useful for studies of coastal-wetland ecosystems. Copyright ?? 2005 National Ground Water Association.

  12. Concept mapping as a promising method to bring practice into science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bon, M.J.H.; van de Goor, L.A.M.; Holsappel, J.C.; Kuunders, T.J.M.; Jacobs-van der Bruggen, M.A.M.; te Brake, J.H.M.; van Oers, J.A.M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Concept mapping is a method for developing a conceptual framework of a complex topic for use as a guide to evaluation or planning. In concept mapping, thoughts and ideas are represented in the form of a picture or map, the content of which is determined by a group of stakeholders. This

  13. A Satellite Based Method for Wetland Inundation Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Vittorio, C.; Georgakakos, A. P.

    2016-12-01

    in other regions to develop improved wetland models and support better river basin management. Other potential applications of the method include flood disaster and land cover mapping.

  14. Evaluation of a pictorial method to assess liking of familiar fruits and vegetables among preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carraway-Stage, Virginia; Spangler, Hillary; Borges, Michelle; Goodell, L Suzanne

    2014-04-01

    Research suggests fruit and vegetable (FV) preferences greatly influence on FV intake. Methods for assessing children's FV preference in a reliable and valid manner are needed. The purpose of this study was to develop a practical, reliable, and valid method for evaluating FV liking among preschool-aged children using photographs. Authors formatively assessed a series of digital FV photographs and hedonic scales to develop content for the liking measure. The measure for assessment included 20 high-quality, digital photographs presenting 13 FVs. A non-gendered 5-point face scale (super yummy to super yucky) was chosen to determine level of liking. We used this measure to establish reliability (i.e., test re-test) and concurrent validity (i.e., photograph versus tasting experience) of the pictorial method. Data were analyzed using Spearman's Rho Correlation Coefficients and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests. The measure demonstrated varying levels of reliability/validity for individual FV items and the fruit scale; however, the vegetable scale and collapsed FV scale were determined to be valid measures. Authors recommended the removal of one weak pictorial fruit item (halved peach) from the fruit and FV scales to improve validity. The final recommended measure included 19 high-quality, digital photographs presenting 12 FVs. The pictorial FV measure and subscales may be useful for assessing FV liking among groups of preschool-aged children within the studied population. Additional research is needed to further validate the use of the pictorial FV measures in a larger, more generalizable sample. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Mineral and Vegetation Maps of the Bodie Hills, Sweetwater Mountains, and Wassuk Range, California/Nevada, Generated from ASTER Satellite Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockwell, Barnaby W.

    2010-01-01

    Multispectral remote sensing data acquired by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) were analyzed to identify and map minerals, vegetation groups, and volatiles (water and snow) in support of geologic studies of the Bodie Hills, Sweetwater Mountains, and Wassuk Range, California/Nevada. Digital mineral and vegetation mapping results are presented in both portable document format (PDF) and ERDAS Imagine format (.img). The ERDAS-format files are suitable for integration with other geospatial data in Geographic Information Systems (GIS) such as ArcGIS. The ERDAS files showing occurrence of 1) iron-bearing minerals, vegetation, and water, and 2) clay, sulfate, mica, carbonate, Mg-OH, and hydrous quartz minerals have been attributed according to identified material, so that the material detected in a pixel can be queried with the interactive attribute identification tools of GIS and image processing software packages (for example, the Identify Tool of ArcMap and the Inquire Cursor Tool of ERDAS Imagine). All raster data have been orthorectified to the Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) projection using a projective transform with ground-control points selected from orthorectified Landsat Thematic Mapper data and a digital elevation model from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Elevation Dataset (1/3 arc second, 10 m resolution). Metadata compliant with Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) standards for all ERDAS-format files have been included, and contain important information regarding geographic coordinate systems, attributes, and cross-references. Documentation regarding spectral analysis methodologies employed to make the maps is included in these cross-references.

  16. From local spectral measurements to maps of vegetation cover and biomass on the Qinghai-Tibet-Plateau: Do we need hyperspectral information?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Hanna; Lehnert, Lukas W.; Wang, Yun; Reudenbach, Christoph; Nauss, Thomas; Bendix, Jörg

    2017-03-01

    Though the relevance of pasture degradation on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau (QTP) is widely postulated, its extent is still unknown. Due to the enormous spatial extent, remote sensing provides the only possibility to investigate pasture degradation via frequently used proxies such as vegetation cover and aboveground biomass (AGB). However, unified remote sensing approaches are still lacking. This study tests the applicability of hyper- and multispectral in situ measurements to map vegetation cover and AGB on regional scales. Using machine learning techniques, it is tested whether the full hyperspectral information is needed or if multispectral information is sufficient to accurately estimate pasture degradation proxies. To regionalize pasture degradation proxies, the transferability of the locally derived ML-models to high resolution multispectral satellite data is assessed. 1183 hyperspectral measurements and vegetation records were performed at 18 locations on the QTP. Random Forests models with recursive feature selection were trained to estimate vegetation cover and AGB using narrow-band indices (NBI) as predictors. Separate models were calculated using NBI from hyperspectral data as well as from the same data resampled to WorldView-2, QuickBird and RapidEye channels. The hyperspectral results were compared to the multispectral results. Finally, the models were applied to satellite data to map vegetation cover and AGB on a regional scale. Vegetation cover was accurately predicted by Random Forest if hyperspectral measurements were used (cross validated R2 = 0.89). In contrast, errors in AGB estimations were considerably higher (cross validated R2 = 0.32). Only small differences in accuracy were observed between the models based on hyperspectral compared to multispectral data. The application of the models to satellite images generally resulted in an increase of the estimation error. Though this reflects the challenge of applying in situ measurements to satellite

  17. Remote and field level quantification of vegetation covariates for malaria mapping in three rice agro-village complexes in Central Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shililu Josephat

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We examined algorithms for malaria mapping using the impact of reflectance calibration uncertainties on the accuracies of three vegetation indices (VI's derived from QuickBird data in three rice agro-village complexes Mwea, Kenya. We also generated inferential statistics from field sampled vegetation covariates for identifying riceland Anopheles arabiensis during the crop season. All aquatic habitats in the study sites were stratified based on levels of rice stages; flooded, land preparation, post-transplanting, tillering, flowering/maturation and post-harvest/fallow. A set of uncertainty propagation equations were designed to model the propagation of calibration uncertainties using the red channel (band 3: 0.63 to 0.69 μm and the near infra-red (NIR channel (band 4: 0.76 to 0.90 μm to generate the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI and the Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index (SAVI. The Atmospheric Resistant Vegetation Index (ARVI was also evaluated incorporating the QuickBird blue band (Band 1: 0.45 to 0.52 μm to normalize atmospheric effects. In order to determine local clustering of riceland habitats Gi*(d statistics were generated from the ground-based and remotely-sensed ecological databases. Additionally, all riceland habitats were visually examined using the spectral reflectance of vegetation land cover for identification of highly productive riceland Anopheles oviposition sites. Results The resultant VI uncertainties did not vary from surface reflectance or atmospheric conditions. Logistic regression analyses of all field sampled covariates revealed emergent vegetation was negatively associated with mosquito larvae at the three study sites. In addition, floating vegetation (-ve was significantly associated with immature mosquitoes in Rurumi and Kiuria (-ve; while, turbidity was also important in Kiuria. All spatial models exhibit positive autocorrelation; similar numbers of log-counts tend to cluster in

  18. Comparison of model reference and map based control method for vehicle stability enhancement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baek, S.; Son, M.; Song, J.; Boo, K.; Kim, H.

    2012-01-01

    A map based controller method to improve a vehicle lateral stability is proposed in this study and compared with the conventional method, a model referenced controller. A model referenced controller to determine compensated yaw moment uses the sliding mode method, but the proposed map based

  19. A Body of Work Standard-Setting Method with Construct Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyse, Adam E.; Bunch, Michael B.; Deville, Craig; Viger, Steven G.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a novel variation of the Body of Work method that uses construct maps to overcome problems of transparency, rater inconsistency, and scores gaps commonly occurring with the Body of Work method. The Body of Work method with construct maps was implemented to set cut-scores for two separate K-12 assessment programs in a large…

  20. Use of multiple cluster analysis methods to explore the validity of a community outcomes concept map.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsi, Rebecca

    2017-02-01

    Concept mapping is now a commonly-used technique for articulating and evaluating programmatic outcomes. However, research regarding validity of knowledge and outcomes produced with concept mapping is sparse. The current study describes quantitative validity analyses using a concept mapping dataset. We sought to increase the validity of concept mapping evaluation results by running multiple cluster analysis methods and then using several metrics to choose from among solutions. We present four different clustering methods based on analyses using the R statistical software package: partitioning around medoids (PAM), fuzzy analysis (FANNY), agglomerative nesting (AGNES) and divisive analysis (DIANA). We then used the Dunn and Davies-Bouldin indices to assist in choosing a valid cluster solution for a concept mapping outcomes evaluation. We conclude that the validity of the outcomes map is high, based on the analyses described. Finally, we discuss areas for further concept mapping methods research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. IODINATION OF VEGETABLE OIL AS A METHOD FOR CORRECTING IODINE DEFFICIENCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodica Sturza

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is the study made for obtaining iodized oil that would satisfy the requirements in iodine for human body. The sunflower oil is a product with the most important value, thus the production of oil fortified with iodine would be a cheap and accessible option. These studies indicate that lipids present an important vehicle for the fortification with iodine. Eradication of the iodine deficiency may be realized not only by injection of the iodinated oil, but also by its use as an ingredient for the formulation of different food compositions. This method, complementary with the iodinated salt, would allow the increase of the efficiency of the prophylactic undertaken measures, because is based on the use of vegetal material – sunflower oil; it is cost-efficient and does not require substantial investments.

  2. Method and apparatus for measuring solar radiation in a vegetative canopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutschick, V.P.; Barron, M.H.; Waechter, D.A.; Wolf, M.A.

    1985-04-30

    An apparatus and method for measuring solar radiation received in a vegetative canopy. A multiplicity of sensors selectively generates electrical signals in response to impinging photosynthetically active radiation in sunlight. Each sensor is attached to a plant within the canopy and is electrically connected to a separate port in a junction box having a multiplicity of ports. Each port is connected to an operational amplifier. Each amplifier amplifies the signals generated by the sensors. Each amplifier is connected to an analog-to-digital convertor which digitizes each signal. A computer is connected to the convertors and accumulates and stores solar radiation data. A data output device such as a printer is connected to the computer and displays the data.

  3. Framework of a Contour Based Depth Map Coding Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Minghui; He, Xun; Jin, Xin; Goto, Satoshi

    Stereo-view and multi-view video formats are heavily investigated topics given their vast application potential. Depth Image Based Rendering (DIBR) system has been developed to improve Multiview Video Coding (MVC). Depth image is introduced to synthesize virtual views on the decoder side in this system. Depth image is a piecewise image, which is filled with sharp contours and smooth interior. Contours in a depth image show more importance than interior in view synthesis process. In order to improve the quality of the synthesized views and reduce the bitrate of depth image, a contour based coding strategy is proposed. First, depth image is divided into layers by different depth value intervals. Then regions, which are defined as the basic coding unit in this work, are segmented from each layer. The region is further divided into the contour and the interior. Two different procedures are employed to code contours and interiors respectively. A vector-based strategy is applied to code the contour lines. Straight lines in contours cost few of bits since they are regarded as vectors. Pixels, which are out of straight lines, are coded one by one. Depth values in the interior of a region are modeled by a linear or nonlinear formula. Coefficients in the formula are retrieved by regression. This process is called interior painting. Unlike conventional block based coding method, the residue between original frame and reconstructed frame (by contour rebuilt and interior painting) is not sent to decoder. In this proposal, contour is coded in a lossless way whereas interior is coded in a lossy way. Experimental results show that the proposed Contour Based Depth map Coding (CBDC) achieves a better performance than JMVC (reference software of MVC) in the high quality scenarios.

  4. Comparison of Two Static in Vitro Digestion Methods for Screening the Bioaccessibility of Carotenoids in Fruits, Vegetables, and Animal Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Daniele B; Chitchumroonchokchai, Chureeporn; Mariutti, Lilian R B; Mercadante, Adriana Z; Failla, Mark L

    2017-12-27

    In vitro digestion methods are routinely used to assess the bioaccessibility of carotenoids and other dietary lipophilic compounds. Here, we compared the recovery of carotenoids and their efficiency of micellarization in digested fruits, vegetables, egg yolk, and salmon and also in mixed-vegetable salads with and without either egg yolk or salmon using the static INFOGEST method22 and the procedure of Failla et al.16 Carotenoid stability during the simulated digestion was ≥70%. The efficiencies of the partitioning of carotenoids into mixed micelles were similar when individual plant foods and salad meals were digested using the two static methods. Furthermore, the addition of cooked egg or salmon to vegetable salads increased the bioaccessibility of some carotenoids. Our findings showed that the two methods of in vitro digestion generated similar estimates of carotenoid retention and bioaccessibility for diverse foods.

  5. MODERN INSTRUMENTAL METHODS TO CONTROL THE SEED QUALITY IN ROOT VEGETABLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. B. Musaev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The standard methods of analysis don’t meet all modern requirements to determine the seed a quality. These methods can’t unveil inner deficiencies that are very important to control seed viability. The capabilities of new instrumental method to analyze the seed quality of root vegetables were regarded in the article. The method of micro-focus radiography is distinguished from other existing methods by more sensitivity, rapidity and easiness to be performed. Based on practical importance the visualization of inner seed structure, it allows determining far before seed germination the degree of endosperm development and embryo; the presence of inner damages and infections, occupation and damage caused by pests. The use of micro-focus radiography enables to detect the degree of seed quality difference for some traits such as monogermity and self-fertilization that are economically valuable for breeding program in red beet. With the aid of the method the level of seed development, damage and inner deficiencies in carrot and parsnip can be revealed. In X-ray projection seeds of inbred lines of radish significantly differed from variety population ones for their underdevelopment in the inner structure. The advantage of the method is that seeds rest undamaged after quality analyzing and both can be used for further examination with the use of other methods or be sown; that is quite important for breeders, when handling with small quantity or collectable plant breeding material. The results radiography analyses can be saved and archived that enables to watch for seed qualities in dynamic; this data can be also used at possible arbitration cases. 

  6. An intercomparison of Satellite Burned Area Maps derived from MODIS, MERIS, SPOT-VEGETATION, and ATSR images. An application to the August 2006 Galicia (Spain forest fires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Huesca

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim of study: The following paper presents an inter-comparison of three global products: MCD45A1 (MODIS - MODerate resolution Imaging Spectrometer - Burned Area Product, L3JRC (Terrestrial Ecosystem Monitoring Global Burnt Area Product, and GLOBCARBON Burnt Area Estimate (BAE Product; and three local products, two of them based on MODIS data and the other one based on MERIS (MEdium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer data.Area of study: The study was applied to the Galician forest fires occurred in 2006.Materials and Methods: Materials used involved the three already mentioned global products together with two MODIS and one MERIS reflectance images, and MODIS thermal anomalies. The algorithm we used, which is based on the determination of thresholds values on infrared bands, allowed the identification of burned pixels. The determination of such threshold values was based on the maximum spatial correlation between MODIS thermal anomalies, and infrared reflectance values. This methodology was applied to MODIS and MERIS reflectance bands, and to the NBR (Normalized Burn Ratio. Burned area validation was evaluated using burned area polygons as derived from an AWiFS (Advanced Wide Field Sensor image of 60m pixel size.Main results: Best results were reached when using the MERIS infrared bands, followed by the MODIS infrared bands. Worst results were reached when using the MCD45A1 product, which clearly overestimated; and when using the L3JRC product, which clearly underestimated.Research highlights: Since the efficiency of the performance of the available burned area products is highly variable, much work is needed in terms of comparison among the available sensors, the burned area mapping algorithms and the resulting products.Keywords: forest fires; MODIS; MERIS; MCD45A1; L3JRC; GLOBCARBON-BAE; SPOT-VEGETATION; ATSR.Abbreviations used: ATSR: Along Scanning Radiometer; AVHRR: Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer; AWiFS: Advanced Wide Field Sensor; EOS

  7. Pu`ukohola Heiau National Historic Site Vegetation Mapping Project - Field Plots, Observation and Accuracy Assessment Points

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This metadata is for the 2008 vegetation (classification) field plots (spatial database) and 2010 accuracy assessment points (spatial database) created from the...

  8. Sensitivity analysis of a coupled hydrodynamic-vegetation model using the effectively subsampled quadratures method (ESQM v5.2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, Tarandeep S.; Aretxabaleta, Alfredo; Seshadri, Pranay; Ganju, Neil K.; Beudin, Alexis

    2017-12-01

    Coastal hydrodynamics can be greatly affected by the presence of submerged aquatic vegetation. The effect of vegetation has been incorporated into the Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport (COAWST) modeling system. The vegetation implementation includes the plant-induced three-dimensional drag, in-canopy wave-induced streaming, and the production of turbulent kinetic energy by the presence of vegetation. In this study, we evaluate the sensitivity of the flow and wave dynamics to vegetation parameters using Sobol' indices and a least squares polynomial approach referred to as the Effective Quadratures method. This method reduces the number of simulations needed for evaluating Sobol' indices and provides a robust, practical, and efficient approach for the parameter sensitivity analysis. The evaluation of Sobol' indices shows that kinetic energy, turbulent kinetic energy, and water level changes are affected by plant stem density, height, and, to a lesser degree, diameter. Wave dissipation is mostly dependent on the variation in plant stem density. Performing sensitivity analyses for the vegetation module in COAWST provides guidance to optimize efforts and reduce exploration of parameter space for future observational and modeling work.

  9. Mapping stream habitats with a global positioning system: Accuracy, precision, and comparison with traditional methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauwalter, D.C.; Fisher, W.L.; Belt, K.C.

    2006-01-01

    We tested the precision and accuracy of the Trimble GeoXT??? global positioning system (GPS) handheld receiver on point and area features and compared estimates of stream habitat dimensions (e.g., lengths and areas of riffles and pools) that were made in three different Oklahoma streams using the GPS receiver and a tape measure. The precision of differentially corrected GPS (DGPS) points was not affected by the number of GPS position fixes (i.e., geographic location estimates) averaged per DGPS point. Horizontal error of points ranged from 0.03 to 2.77 m and did not differ with the number of position fixes per point. The error of area measurements ranged from 0.1% to 110.1% but decreased as the area increased. Again, error was independent of the number of position fixes averaged per polygon corner. The estimates of habitat lengths, widths, and areas did not differ when measured using two methods of data collection (GPS and a tape measure), nor did the differences among methods change at three stream sites with contrasting morphologies. Measuring features with a GPS receiver was up to 3.3 times faster on average than using a tape measure, although signal interference from high streambanks or overhanging vegetation occasionally limited satellite signal availability and prolonged measurements with a GPS receiver. There were also no differences in precision of habitat dimensions when mapped using a continuous versus a position fix average GPS data collection method. Despite there being some disadvantages to using the GPS in stream habitat studies, measuring stream habitats with a GPS resulted in spatially referenced data that allowed the assessment of relative habitat position and changes in habitats over time, and was often faster than using a tape measure. For most spatial scales of interest, the precision and accuracy of DGPS data are adequate and have logistical advantages when compared to traditional methods of measurement. ?? 2006 Springer Science+Business Media

  10. A vegetation survey of the Cape of Good Hope Nature Reserve. I. The use of association-analysis and Braun-Blanquet methods*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. C. Taylor

    1984-12-01

    Full Text Available The survey aimed to establish broad vegetation units that could be mapped on an extensive scale in the Cape of Good Hope Nature Reserve at the southern tip of the Cape Peninsula. This paper compares the performance of two methods, association-analysis and the Braun-Blanquet method as developed by the Zurich-Montpellier School of Phytosociology. One hundred 50 m2  sample plots, covering the whole Reserve, were placed systematically at grid intersections on the 1:18 000 topographical map. at 1 000-yard (914 m intervals. Species lists, recording merely presence of all species with permanently recognizable aerial parts, were made for each plot. The association-analysis resulted in a classification of 23 final groups of sample plots, of which only five groups showed high floristic and ecological homogeneity. Of the remainder, eight groups contained some anomalous, misplaced plots, and ten represented small, isolated fragments of natural units. The original data were then analysed using Braun-Blanquet methods to provide an independent classification for comparison with the former. The Braun-Blanquet communities were found to be more homogeneous in terms of previously defined habitat groupings and showed floristic relationships consistent with these groupings. It is concluded that, with the type of sampling used, the synthetic phytosociological Braun-Blanquet method provides a more natural classification of plant communities of the Reserve than does the monothetic divisive association-analysis method.

  11. Review of Methods for the Monitoring of Biomass and Vegetal Carbon in Tropical Forest Ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Fonseca

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The quantification of vegetal biomass is the key to know the carbon that forest ecosystems store, and therefore, its capacity to mitigate climatic change. There is a variety of methods to estimate biomass, many with small variations, such as size and shape of sampling units, inclusion or not of any reservoir component (leaves, branches, roots, necromasses, minimum diameter inventoried, among others. The objective of the paper is to explain the most important aspects to be considered in the inventory of removals, based on the inventory design (statistical design, size and shape of the sampling units, components of the biomass to be evaluated. A second point deals with the determination of aerial biomass and roots, referring to the direct or destructive method, and indirect methods, especially to the use of mathematical models for their easy application and low cost; besides, some models for natural forest and plantations are noted. Reference is also made to the study of carbon in soils, biomass expansion factors, and how to determine carbon in biomass. We hope that these notes will facilitate the understanding of the topic and be a reference for the establishment of monitoring, reporting and verification schemes.

  12. Golden Gate National Recreation Area Vegetation Inventory Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — High resolution vegetation polygons mapped by the National Park Service. The vegetation units of this map were determined through stereoscopic interpretation of...

  13. A Novel in Situ FPAR Measurement Method for Low Canopy Vegetation Based on a Digital Camera and Reference Panel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quanjun Jiao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The fraction of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (FPAR is a key parameter in describing the exchange of fluxes of energy, mass and momentum between the surface and atmosphere. In this study, we present a method to measure FPAR using a digital camera and a reference panel. A digital camera was used to capture color images of low canopy vegetation, which contained a reference panel in one corner of the field of view (FOV. The digital image was classified into photosynthetically active vegetation, ground litter, sunlit soil, shadow soil, and the reference panel. The relative intensity of the incident photosynthetically active radiation (PAR, scene-reflected PAR, exposed background absorbed PAR and the green vegetation-covered ground absorbed PAR were derived from the digital camera image, and then FPAR was calculated. This method was validated on eight plots with four vegetation species using FPAR measured by a SunScan instrument. A linear correlation with a coefficient of determination (R2 of 0.942 and mean absolute error (MAE of 0.031 was observed between FPAR values derived from the digital camera and measurement using the SunScan instrument. The result suggests that the present method can be used to accurately measure the FPAR of low canopy vegetation.

  14. A method for producing digital probabilistic seismic landslide hazard maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jibson, R.W.; Harp, E.L.; Michael, J.A.

    2000-01-01

    The 1994 Northridge, California, earthquake is the first earthquake for which we have all of the data sets needed to conduct a rigorous regional analysis of seismic slope instability. These data sets include: (1) a comprehensive inventory of triggered landslides, (2) about 200 strong-motion records of the mainshock, (3) 1:24 000-scale geologic mapping of the region, (4) extensive data on engineering properties of geologic units, and (5) high-resolution digital elevation models of the topography. All of these data sets have been digitized and rasterized at 10 m grid spacing using ARC/INFO GIS software on a UNIX computer. Combining these data sets in a dynamic model based on Newmark's permanent-deformation (sliding-block) analysis yields estimates of coseismic landslide displacement in each grid cell from the Northridge earthquake. The modeled displacements are then compared with the digital inventory of landslides triggered by the Northridge earthquake to construct a probability curve relating predicted displacement to probability of failure. This probability function can be applied to predict and map the spatial variability in failure probability in any ground-shaking conditions of interest. We anticipate that this mapping procedure will be used to construct seismic landslide hazard maps that will assist in emergency preparedness planning and in making rational decisions regarding development and construction in areas susceptible to seismic slope failure. ?? 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. A Distributed Bio-Inspired Method for Multisite Grid Mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. De Falco

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Computational grids assemble multisite and multiowner resources and represent the most promising solutions for processing distributed computationally intensive applications, each composed by a collection of communicating tasks. The execution of an application on a grid presumes three successive steps: the localization of the available resources together with their characteristics and status; the mapping which selects the resources that, during the estimated running time, better support this execution and, at last, the scheduling of the tasks. These operations are very difficult both because the availability and workload of grid resources change dynamically and because, in many cases, multisite mapping must be adopted to exploit all the possible benefits. As the mapping problem in parallel systems, already known as NP-complete, becomes even harder in distributed heterogeneous environments as in grids, evolutionary techniques can be adopted to find near-optimal solutions. In this paper an effective and efficient multisite mapping, based on a distributed Differential Evolution algorithm, is proposed. The aim is to minimize the time required to complete the execution of the application, selecting from among all the potential ones the solution which reduces the use of the grid resources. The proposed mapper is tested on different scenarios.

  16. A New General Iterative Method for a Finite Family of Nonexpansive Mappings in Hilbert Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singthong Urailuk

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a new general iterative method by using the -mapping for finding a common fixed point of a finite family of nonexpansive mappings in the framework of Hilbert spaces. A strong convergence theorem of the purposed iterative method is established under some certain control conditions. Our results improve and extend the results announced by many others.

  17. Current Methods for Extraction and Concentration of Enteric Viruses from Fresh Fruit and Vegetables: Towards International Standards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Croci, L.; Dubois, E.; Cook, N.

    2008-01-01

    Virus-contaminated soft fruits or vegetables are increasingly identified as causes of foodborne viral illness. Noroviruses and hepatitis A virus are the most common pathogens in viral infections transmitted by these kinds of foods. To improve microbiological detection and monitoring and to increase...... insights into the contribution of fruits and vegetables to foodborne viral transmission, sensitive, reliable, and standardized methods are needed. More studies on virus detection methods for foods are being published, but validated consensus protocols are not yet available. In this paper, different...

  18. Evaluating and Quantifying the Climate-Driven Interannual Variability in Global Inventory Modeling and Mapping Studies (GIMMS) Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI3g) at Global Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Fanwei; Collatz, George James; Pinzon, Jorge E.; Ivanoff, Alvaro

    2013-01-01

    Satellite observations of surface reflected solar radiation contain informationabout variability in the absorption of solar radiation by vegetation. Understanding thecauses of variability is important for models that use these data to drive land surface fluxesor for benchmarking prognostic vegetation models. Here we evaluated the interannualvariability in the new 30.5-year long global satellite-derived surface reflectance index data,Global Inventory Modeling and Mapping Studies normalized difference vegetation index(GIMMS NDVI3g). Pearsons correlation and multiple linear stepwise regression analyseswere applied to quantify the NDVI interannual variability driven by climate anomalies, andto evaluate the effects of potential interference (snow, aerosols and clouds) on the NDVIsignal. We found ecologically plausible strong controls on NDVI variability by antecedent precipitation and current monthly temperature with distinct spatial patterns. Precipitation correlations were strongest for temperate to tropical water limited herbaceous systemswhere in some regions and seasons 40 of the NDVI variance could be explained byprecipitation anomalies. Temperature correlations were strongest in northern mid- to-high-latitudes in the spring and early summer where up to 70 of the NDVI variance was explained by temperature anomalies. We find that, in western and central North America,winter-spring precipitation determines early summer growth while more recent precipitation controls NDVI variability in late summer. In contrast, current or prior wetseason precipitation anomalies were correlated with all months of NDVI in sub-tropical herbaceous vegetation. Snow, aerosols and clouds as well as unexplained phenomena still account for part of the NDVI variance despite corrections. Nevertheless, this study demonstrates that GIMMS NDVI3g represents real responses of vegetation to climate variability that are useful for global models.

  19. Concept mapping as an empowering method to promote learning, thinking, teaching and research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauri Kalervo Åhlberg

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Results and underpinning of over twenty years of research and development program of concept mapping is presented. Different graphical knowledge presentation tools, especially concept mapping and mind mapping, are compared. There are two main dimensions that differentiate graphical knowledge presentation methods: The first dimension is conceptual explicitness: from mere concepts to flexibly named links and clear propositions in concept maps. The second dimension in the classification system I am suggesting is whether there are pictures or not. Åhlbergʼs and his research groupʼs applications and developments of Novakian concept maps are compared to traditional Novakian concept maps. The main innovations include always using arrowheads to show direction of reading the concept map. Centrality of each concept is estimated from number of links to other concepts. In our empirical research over two decades, number of relevant concepts, and number of relevant propositions in studentsʼ concept maps, have been found to be the best indicators and predictors of meaningful learning. This is used in assessment of learning. Improved concept mapping is presented as a tool to analyze texts. The main innovation is numbering the links to show order of reading the concept map and to make it possible to transform concept map back to the original prose text as closely as possible. In Åhlberg and his research groupʼs research, concept mapping has been tested in all main phases of research, teaching and learning.

  20. Nonlinear mapping methods with adjustable computational complexity for hyperspectral image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myasnikov, E. V.

    2015-12-01

    Nonlinear mapping (Sammon mapping) is a well-known dimensionality reduction technique. Recently several nonlinear mapping methods with reduced computational complexity have been proposed but they do not provide a flexible control over a computational complexity. In this paper a nonlinear mapping method with adjustable computational complexity is proposed. The proposed method is based on the hierarchical decomposition of the multidimensional space, priority queues, and simple optimization procedure to provide fast and flexible dimensionality reduction process. The proposed method is compared to an alternative one based on stochastic optimization. The experiments are carried out on well-known hyperspectral images. Studied methods are evaluated in terms of the data mapping error and runtime. Experimental results for both two- and three-dimensional output spaces are presented.

  1. Fast-HPLC Fingerprinting to Discriminate Olive Oil from Other Edible Vegetable Oils by Multivariate Classification Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Carvelo, Ana M; González-Casado, Antonio; Pérez-Castaño, Estefanía; Cuadros-Rodríguez, Luis

    2017-03-01

    A new analytical method for the differentiation of olive oil from other vegetable oils using reversed-phase LC and applying chemometric techniques was developed. A 3 cm short column was used to obtain the chromatographic fingerprint of the methyl-transesterified fraction of each vegetable oil. The chromatographic analysis took only 4 min. The multivariate classification methods used were k-nearest neighbors, partial least-squares (PLS) discriminant analysis, one-class PLS, support vector machine classification, and soft independent modeling of class analogies. The discrimination of olive oil from other vegetable edible oils was evaluated by several classification quality metrics. Several strategies for the classification of the olive oil were used: one input-class, two input-class, and pseudo two input-class.

  2. Vegetation - McKenzie Preserve [ds703

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The California Native Plant Society (CNPS) Vegetation Program produced a vegetation map and classification for approximately 11,600 acres primarily within Millerton...

  3. Polyphenol content and antioxidant capacity of fruit and vegetable beverages processed by different technology methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Mlček

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the natural drinks production is the preservation of biologically active compounds in maximal amount in prepared drinks. The issue is the loss of these substances due to conventional conservation methods, such as pasteurization. Pascalization, a conservation method using high pressure, performs a new trend in conservation. According to available research, it causes only a minimal loss of bioactive compounds. Influence of conservation technology of fruit and vegetable beverages on the content of bioactive substances - polyphenols, flavonoids and on their antioxidative activity has been investigated. Their content has been compared in fresh juice samples, in samples conserved by pasteurization and after the appliance of high pressure treatment - pascalization (HPP. HPP has a positive effect on total antioxidative capacity of juices - broccoli with apple (increase of the amount from 189.12 mg.100 mL-1 to 217.12 mg.100 mL-1 and beetroot and on total polyphenol content within all samples of beverages except from carrot juice. Decrease of the amounts of flavonoids has been observed within all beverages. For drinks after pasteurization treatment there is evident the decrease of total polyphenols content and total antioxidant activity, besides carrot juice, where the antioxidant capacity value had increased from 37.24 to 43.14 mg.100 mL-1. The flavonoid content of fruit and vegetable juices after heat treatment had increased only in the juice prepared from broccoli with apple (from 40.71 mg.100 mL-1 to 45.14 mg.100 mL-1, the content in other juices had decreased. However, the decrease of the flavonoid content is lower after heat treatment in comparison to HPP, except the samples of cabbage juice with apple. With the exception of flavonoids, HPP has been proved as a gentle conservation technology enabling preserving higher amounts of bioactive substances with antioxidative properties if compared with the heat treatment. For the samples

  4. Mapping and monitoring carbon stocks with satellite observations: a comparison of methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, Scott J; Baccini, Alessandro; Laporte, Nadine T; Johns, Tracy; Walker, Wayne; Kellndorfer, Josef; Houghton, Richard A; Sun, Mindy

    2009-03-25

    Mapping and monitoring carbon stocks in forested regions of the world, particularly the tropics, has attracted a great deal of attention in recent years as deforestation and forest degradation account for up to 30% of anthropogenic carbon emissions, and are now included in climate change negotiations. We review the potential for satellites to measure carbon stocks, specifically aboveground biomass (AGB), and provide an overview of a range of approaches that have been developed and used to map AGB across a diverse set of conditions and geographic areas. We provide a summary of types of remote sensing measurements relevant to mapping AGB, and assess the relative merits and limitations of each. We then provide an overview of traditional techniques of mapping AGB based on ascribing field measurements to vegetation or land cover type classes, and describe the merits and limitations of those relative to recent data mining algorithms used in the context of an approach based on direct utilization of remote sensing measurements, whether optical or lidar reflectance, or radar backscatter. We conclude that while satellite remote sensing has often been discounted as inadequate for the task, attempts to map AGB without satellite imagery are insufficient. Moreover, the direct remote sensing approach provided more coherent maps of AGB relative to traditional approaches. We demonstrate this with a case study focused on continental Africa and discuss the work in the context of reducing uncertainty for carbon monitoring and markets.

  5. Mapping and monitoring carbon stocks with satellite observations: a comparison of methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kellndorfer Josef

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mapping and monitoring carbon stocks in forested regions of the world, particularly the tropics, has attracted a great deal of attention in recent years as deforestation and forest degradation account for up to 30% of anthropogenic carbon emissions, and are now included in climate change negotiations. We review the potential for satellites to measure carbon stocks, specifically aboveground biomass (AGB, and provide an overview of a range of approaches that have been developed and used to map AGB across a diverse set of conditions and geographic areas. We provide a summary of types of remote sensing measurements relevant to mapping AGB, and assess the relative merits and limitations of each. We then provide an overview of traditional techniques of mapping AGB based on ascribing field measurements to vegetation or land cover type classes, and describe the merits and limitations of those relative to recent data mining algorithms used in the context of an approach based on direct utilization of remote sensing measurements, whether optical or lidar reflectance, or radar backscatter. We conclude that while satellite remote sensing has often been discounted as inadequate for the task, attempts to map AGB without satellite imagery are insufficient. Moreover, the direct remote sensing approach provided more coherent maps of AGB relative to traditional approaches. We demonstrate this with a case study focused on continental Africa and discuss the work in the context of reducing uncertainty for carbon monitoring and markets.

  6. A protein mapping method based on physicochemical properties and dimension reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Zhao-Hui; Jin, Meng-Zhe; Li, Su-Li; Feng, Jun

    2015-02-01

    The graphical mapping of a protein sequence is more difficult than the graphical mapping of a DNA sequence because of the twenty amino acids and their complicated physicochemical properties. However, the graphical mapping for protein sequences attracts many researchers to develop different mapping methods. Currently, researchers have proposed their mapping methods based on several physicochemical properties. In this article, a new mapping method for protein sequences is developed by considering additional physicochemical properties, which is a simple and effective approach. Based on the 12 major physicochemical properties of amino acids and the PCA method, we propose a simple and intuitive 2D graphical mapping method for protein sequences. Next, we extract a 20D vector from the graphical mapping which is used to characterize a protein sequence. The proposed graphical mapping consists of three important properties, one-to-one, no circuit, and good visualization. This mapping contains more physicochemical information. Next, this proposed method is applied to two separate applications. The results illustrate the utility of the proposed method. To validate the proposed method, we first give a comparison of protein sequences, which consists of nine ND6 proteins. The similarity/dissimilarity matrix for the ssnine ND6 proteins correctly reveals their evolutionary relationship. Next, we give another application for the cluster analysis of HA genes of influenza A (H1N1) isolates. The results are consistent with the known evolution fact of the H1N1 virus. The separate applications further illustrate the utility of the proposed method. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. LANDSCAPE ECOLOGICAL METHOD TO STUDY AGRICULTURAL VEGETATION: SOME EXAMPLES FROM THE PO VALLEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. GIGLIO

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Vegetation is the most important landscape component, as regards to its ability to catch solar energy and to transform it, but also to shape the landscape, to structure the space, to create the fit environment for different animal species, to contribute to the maintenance of a correct metastability level for the landscape, etc. It is a biological system which acts under the constraints of the principles of the System Theory and owns the same properties of any other living system: so, it is a complex adaptive, hierarchical, dynamic, dissipative, self-organizing, self-transcendent, autocatalytic, self-maintaining system and follows the non-equilibrium thermodynamic. Its ecological state can be investigated through the comparison between “gathered data” (pathology and “normal data” (physiology for analogous types of vegetation. The Biological Integrated School of Landscape Ecology provides an integrated methodology to define ecological threshold limits of the different Agricultural Landscape types and applies to agricultural vegetation the specific part of the new methodology already tested to studying forests (the Landscape Biological Survey of Vegetation. Ecological quality, better and worst parameters, biological territorial capacity of vegetated corridors, agricultural field, poplar groves, orchards and woody remnant patches are investigated. Some examples from diverse agricultural landscapes of the Po Valley will be discussed. KEY WORDS: agricultural landscape, vegetation, landscape ecology, landscape health, Biological Integrated Landscape Ecology, Landscape Biological Survey of vegetation.

  8. Vegetation mapping in the St Lucia estuary using very high-resolution multispectral imagery and LiDAR

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Lück-Vogel, Melanie

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the value of very high-resolution multispectral satellite imagery and LiDAR-derived digital elevation information for classifying estuarine vegetation types. Satellite images used are from the WorldView-2, RapidEye, and SPOT-6...

  9. Automated mapping of mineral groups and green vegetation from Landsat Thematic Mapper imagery with an example from the San Juan Mountains, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockwell, Barnaby W.

    2013-01-01

    Multispectral satellite data acquired by the ASTER (Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer) and Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (TM) sensors are being used to populate an online Geographic Information System (GIS) of the spatial occurrence of mineral groups and green vegetation across the western conterminous United States and Alaska. These geospatial data are supporting U.S. Geological Survey national-scale mineral deposit database development and other mineral resource and geoenvironmental research as a means of characterizing mineral exposures related to mined and unmined hydrothermally altered rocks and mine waste. This report introduces a new methodology for the automated analysis of Landsat TM data that has been applied to more than 180 scenes covering the western United States. A map of mineral groups and green vegetation produced using this new methodology that covers the western San Juan Mountains, Colorado, and the Four Corners Region is presented. The map is provided as a layered GeoPDF and in GIS-ready digital format. TM data analysis results from other well-studied and mineralogically characterized areas with strong hydrothermal alteration and (or) supergene weathering of near-surface sulfide minerals are also shown and compared with results derived from ASTER data analysis.

  10. Solving variational problems and partial differential equations that map between manifolds via the closest point method

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Nathan D.; Ruuth, Steven J.

    2017-05-01

    Maps from a source manifold M to a target manifold N appear in liquid crystals, color image enhancement, texture mapping, brain mapping, and many other areas. A numerical framework to solve variational problems and partial differential equations (PDEs) that map between manifolds is introduced within this paper. Our approach, the closest point method for manifold mapping, reduces the problem of solving a constrained PDE between manifolds M and N to the simpler problems of solving a PDE on M and projecting to the closest points on N. In our approach, an embedding PDE is formulated in the embedding space using closest point representations of M and N. This enables the use of standard Cartesian numerics for general manifolds that are open or closed, with or without orientation, and of any codimension. An algorithm is presented for the important example of harmonic maps and generalized to a broader class of PDEs, which includes p-harmonic maps. Improved efficiency and robustness are observed in convergence studies relative to the level set embedding methods. Harmonic and p-harmonic maps are computed for a variety of numerical examples. In these examples, we denoise texture maps, diffuse random maps between general manifolds, and enhance color images.

  11. A novel quantitative analysis method of three-dimensional fluorescence spectra for vegetable oils contents in edible blend oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jing; Wang, Yu-Tian; Liu, Xiao-Fei

    2015-04-01

    Edible blend oil is a mixture of vegetable oils. Eligible blend oil can meet the daily need of two essential fatty acids for human to achieve the balanced nutrition. Each vegetable oil has its different composition, so vegetable oils contents in edible blend oil determine nutritional components in blend oil. A high-precision quantitative analysis method to detect the vegetable oils contents in blend oil is necessary to ensure balanced nutrition for human being. Three-dimensional fluorescence technique is high selectivity, high sensitivity, and high-efficiency. Efficiency extraction and full use of information in tree-dimensional fluorescence spectra will improve the accuracy of the measurement. A novel quantitative analysis is proposed based on Quasi-Monte-Carlo integral to improve the measurement sensitivity and reduce the random error. Partial least squares method is used to solve nonlinear equations to avoid the effect of multicollinearity. The recovery rates of blend oil mixed by peanut oil, soybean oil and sunflower are calculated to verify the accuracy of the method, which are increased, compared the linear method used commonly for component concentration measurement.

  12. Melting Temperature Mapping Method: A Novel Method for Rapid Identification of Unknown Pathogenic Microorganisms within Three Hours of Sample Collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niimi, Hideki; Ueno, Tomohiro; Hayashi, Shirou; Abe, Akihito; Tsurue, Takahiro; Mori, Masashi; Tabata, Homare; Minami, Hiroshi; Goto, Michihiko; Akiyama, Makoto; Yamamoto, Yoshihiro; Saito, Shigeru; Kitajima, Isao

    2015-07-28

    Acquiring the earliest possible identification of pathogenic microorganisms is critical for selecting the appropriate antimicrobial therapy in infected patients. We herein report the novel "melting temperature (Tm) mapping method" for rapidly identifying the dominant bacteria in a clinical sample from sterile sites. Employing only seven primer sets, more than 100 bacterial species can be identified. In particular, using the Difference Value, it is possible to identify samples suitable for Tm mapping identification. Moreover, this method can be used to rapidly diagnose the absence of bacteria in clinical samples. We tested the Tm mapping method using 200 whole blood samples obtained from patients with suspected sepsis, 85% (171/200) of which matched the culture results based on the detection level. A total of 130 samples were negative according to the Tm mapping method, 98% (128/130) of which were also negative based on the culture method. Meanwhile, 70 samples were positive according to the Tm mapping method, and of the 59 suitable for identification, 100% (59/59) exhibited a "match" or "broad match" with the culture or sequencing results. These findings were obtained within three hours of whole blood collection. The Tm mapping method is therefore useful for identifying infectious diseases requiring prompt treatment.

  13. Effect of traditional Chinese cooking methods on fatty acid profiles of vegetable oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yamin; Hao, Pengfei; Liu, Bingjie; Meng, Xianghong

    2017-10-15

    The effect of four frying processes (vegetable salad, stir frying, pan frying, and deep frying) on fatty acid composition of ten vegetable oils (peanut oil, soybean oil, rapeseed oil, corn oil, sunflower seed oil, rice bran oil, olive oil, sesame oil, linseed oil, and peony seed oil) was investigated using GC-MS. The result showed that trans-fatty acid (TFA) was produced during all processes. Rapeseed oil had the highest TFA content in vegetable salad oil with 2.88% of total fatty acid. The TFA content of sunflower seed oil was 0.00% in vegetable salad oil, however, after stir frying and pan frying, it increased to 1.53% and 1.29%, respectively. Peanut oil had the lowest TFA content after deep frying for 12h with 0.74mg/g. It was concluded that a healthy cooking process could be acquired by a scientific collocation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Evaluation of a Method for Measuring Lateral Obscuration of Coastal Marsh Vegetation in Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    important area for wave and surge propagation/attenuation during Hurricane Katrina in 2005. Wave and surge data were also collected in Biloxi Marsh...front of the board. Wind blowing from the side has the effect of swaying a portion of the vegetation so that the backboard is no longer behind it...Laboratory and numerical studies of wave damping by emergent and near-emergent wetland vegetation. In preparation, Coastal Engineering. Cooper, N. J

  15. Mapping Post-Fire Vegetation Recovery at Different Lithologies of Taygetos mt (greece) with Multi-Temporal Remote Sensing Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassilakis, Emmanuel; Mallinis, George; Christopoulou, Anastasia; Farangitakis, Georgios-Pavlos; Papanikolaou, Ioannis; Arianoutsou, Margarita

    2017-04-01

    Mt Taygetos (2407m), located at southern Peloponnese (Greece) suffered a large fire during the summer of 2007. The fire burned approximately 45% of the area covered by the endemic Greek fir (Abies cephalonica) and Black Pine (Pinus nigra) forest ecosystems. The aim of the current study is to examine the potential differences on post-fire vegetation recovery imposed by the lithology as well as the geomorphology of the given area over sites of the same climatic and landscape conditions (elevation, aspect, slope etc.). The main lithologies consist of carbonate, permeable, not easily erodible formations (limestones and marbles) and clastic, impermeable (schists, slate and flysch) erodible ones. A time-series of high spatial resolution satellite images were interpreted, analyzed and compared in order to detect changes in vegetation coverage which could prioritize areas of interest for fieldwork campaigns. The remote sensing datasets were acquired before (Ikonos-2), a few months after (Quickbird-2) and some years after (Worldview-3) the 2007 fire. High resolution Digital Elevation Model was used for the ortho-rectification and co-registration of the remote sensing data, but also for the extraction of the mountainous landscape characteristics. The multi-temporal image dataset was analyzed through GEographic-Object Based Image Analysis (GEOBIA). Objects corresponding to different vegetation types through time were identified through spectral and textural features. The classification results were combined with basic layers such as lithological outcrops, pre-fire vegetation, landscape morphology etc., supplementing a spatial geodatabase used for classifying burnt areas with varying post-fire plant community recovery. We validated the results of the classification during fieldwork and found that at a local scale, where the landscape features are quite similar, the bedrock type proves to be an important factor for vegetation recovery, as it clearly defines the soil generation

  16. A Different Approach to Preparing Novakian Concept Maps: The Indexing Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turan Oluk, Nurcan; Ekmekci, Güler

    2016-01-01

    People who claim that applying Novakian concept maps in Turkish is problematic base their arguments largely upon the structural differences between the English and Turkish languages. This study aims to introduce the indexing method to eliminate problems encountered in Turkish applications of Novakian maps and to share the preliminary results of…

  17. Empirical evaluation of a practical indoor mobile robot navigation method using hybrid maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Özkil, Ali Gürcan; Fan, Zhun; Xiao, Jizhong

    2010-01-01

    . The navigation scheme based on the hybrid metric-topologica maps saves memory space and is also scalable and adaptable since new local maps can be easily added to the global topology, and the method can be deployed with minimum amount of modification if new areas are to be explored. The video demonstrated...

  18. Concept mapping as a method to enhance evidence-based public health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bon-Martens, M.J.H.; Van De Goor, L.A.M.; van Oers, J.A.M.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we explore the suitability of concept mapping as a method for integrating knowledge from science, practice, and policy. In earlier research we described and analysed five cases of concept mapping procedures in the Netherlands, serving different purposes and fields in public health. In

  19. Sequential Pattern Analysis: Method and Application in Exploring How Students Develop Concept Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Chiung-Hui; Lin, Chien-Liang

    2012-01-01

    Concept mapping is a technique that represents knowledge in graphs. It has been widely adopted in science education and cognitive psychology to aid learning and assessment. To realize the sequential manner in which students develop concept maps, most research relies upon human-dependent, qualitative approaches. This article proposes a method for…

  20. A non-rigid map fusion-based direct SLAM method for endoscopic capsule robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turan, Mehmet; Almalioglu, Yasin; Araujo, Helder; Konukoglu, Ender; Sitti, Metin

    2017-01-01

    Since the development of capsule endoscopy technology, medical device companies and research groups have made significant progress to turn passive capsule endoscopes into robotic active capsule endoscopes. However, the use of robotic capsules in endoscopy still has some challenges. One such challenge is the precise localization of the actively controlled robot in real-time. In this paper, we propose a non-rigid map fusion based direct simultaneous localization and mapping method for endoscopic capsule robots. The proposed method achieves high accuracy for extensive evaluations of pose estimation and map reconstruction performed on a non-rigid, realistic surgical EsophagoGastroDuodenoscopy Simulator and outperforms state-of-the art methods.

  1. The transcription factor Ste12 mediates the regulatory role of the Tmk1 MAP kinase in mycoparasitism and vegetative hyphal fusion in the filamentous fungus Trichoderma atroviride.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Gruber

    Full Text Available Mycoparasitic species of the fungal genus Trichoderma are potent antagonists able to combat plant pathogenic fungi by direct parasitism. An essential step in this mycoparasitic fungus-fungus interaction is the detection of the fungal host followed by activation of molecular weapons in the mycoparasite by host-derived signals. The Trichoderma atroviride MAP kinase Tmk1, a homolog of yeast Fus3/Kss1, plays an essential role in regulating the mycoparasitic host attack, aerial hyphae formation and conidiation. However, the transcription factors acting downstream of Tmk1 are hitherto unknown. Here we analyzed the functions of the T. atroviride Ste12 transcription factor whose orthologue in yeast is targeted by the Fus3 and Kss1 MAP kinases. Deletion of the ste12 gene in T. atroviride not only resulted in reduced mycoparasitic overgrowth and lysis of host fungi but also led to loss of hyphal avoidance in the colony periphery and a severe reduction in conidial anastomosis tube formation and vegetative hyphal fusion events. The transcription of several orthologues of Neurospora crassa hyphal fusion genes was reduced upon ste12 deletion; however, the Δste12 mutant showed enhanced expression of mycoparasitism-relevant chitinolytic and proteolytic enzymes and of the cell wall integrity MAP kinase Tmk2. Based on the comparative analyses of Δste12 and Δtmk1 mutants, an essential role of the Ste12 transcriptional regulator in mediating outcomes of the Tmk1 MAPK pathway such as regulation of the mycoparasitic activity, hyphal fusion and carbon source-dependent vegetative growth is suggested. Aerial hyphae formation and conidiation, in contrast, were found to be independent of Ste12.

  2. TRANSFORMATION METHODS FOR USING COMBINATION OF REMOTELY SENSED DATA AND CADASTRAL MAPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ş. Ö. Dönmez

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to examine using cadastral maps as base maps for aerial orthophotos, two different 2D transformation methods were applied between various coordinate systems. Study area was chosen from Kagithane district in Istanbul. The used data is an orthophoto (30 cm spatial resolution, and cadastral map (1:1000 taken from land office, containing the same region. Transformation methods are chosen as; 1st Order Polynomial Transformation and Helmert 2D Transformation within this study. The test points, used to determine the coefficients between the datums, were 26 common traverse points and the check points, used to compare the transformed coordinates to reliable true coordinates, were 10 common block corners. The transformation methods were applied using Matlab software. After applying the methods, residuals were calculated and compared between each transformation method in order to use cadastral maps as reliable vector data.

  3. Mapping Mixed Methods Research in Library and Information ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article explores the use of mixed methods research (MMR) in articles published in library and information science (LIS) journals in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) from 2004 to 2008. Mixed methods research entails using multiple observers, theories, methods, and data sources in a single study, thereby enabling the different ...

  4. Method for Pre-Conditioning a Measured Surface Height Map for Model Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidick, Erkin

    2012-01-01

    This software allows one to up-sample or down-sample a measured surface map for model validation, not only without introducing any re-sampling errors, but also eliminating the existing measurement noise and measurement errors. Because the re-sampling of a surface map is accomplished based on the analytical expressions of Zernike-polynomials and a power spectral density model, such re-sampling does not introduce any aliasing and interpolation errors as is done by the conventional interpolation and FFT-based (fast-Fourier-transform-based) spatial-filtering method. Also, this new method automatically eliminates the measurement noise and other measurement errors such as artificial discontinuity. The developmental cycle of an optical system, such as a space telescope, includes, but is not limited to, the following two steps: (1) deriving requirements or specs on the optical quality of individual optics before they are fabricated through optical modeling and simulations, and (2) validating the optical model using the measured surface height maps after all optics are fabricated. There are a number of computational issues related to model validation, one of which is the "pre-conditioning" or pre-processing of the measured surface maps before using them in a model validation software tool. This software addresses the following issues: (1) up- or down-sampling a measured surface map to match it with the gridded data format of a model validation tool, and (2) eliminating the surface measurement noise or measurement errors such that the resulted surface height map is continuous or smoothly-varying. So far, the preferred method used for re-sampling a surface map is two-dimensional interpolation. The main problem of this method is that the same pixel can take different values when the method of interpolation is changed among the different methods such as the "nearest," "linear," "cubic," and "spline" fitting in Matlab. The conventional, FFT-based spatial filtering method used to

  5. Mapping biomass with remote sensing: a comparison of methods for the case study of Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Matieu

    2011-10-01

    reference data to which they are compared, are considered in the interpretation of the results. Conclusions The strong disagreement between existing products and the large impact of biomass reference data on the estimates indicate that the first, critical step to improve the accuracy of the biomass maps consists of the collection of accurate biomass field data for all relevant vegetation types. However, detailed and accurate spatial datasets are crucial to obtain accurate estimates at specific locations.

  6. The effects of groundwater discharge, mowing, and eutrophication on fen vegetation evaluated over half a century

    OpenAIRE

    Belle, J.; Barendregt, Arie; P. P. Schot; M. J. Wassen

    2006-01-01

    Questions: Were continued groundwater discharge and mowing regimes sufficient for vegetation preservation from 1944 to 1993? Which has a stronger effect on vegetation development; groundwater discharge or mowing? What is the role of surface water eutrophication as driver of vegetation change? Location: Het Hol, The Netherlands (ca. 92 ha, 52°13' N, 5°05' E). Methods: Hydrology was simulated for the late 1940s, early 1960s and 1987. Vegetation maps (1944, 1960, 1975 and 1993) were compared for...

  7. Applying process mapping and analysis as a quality improvement strategy to increase the adoption of fruit, vegetable, and water breaks in Australian primary schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggs, Janice S; Farrell, Louise; Lawrence, Glenda; Johnson, Julie K

    2014-03-01

    Over the past decade, public health policy in Australia has prioritized the prevention and control of obesity and invested in programs that promote healthy eating-related behaviors, which includes increasing fruit and vegetable consumption in children. This article reports on a study that used process mapping and analysis as a quality improvement strategy to improve the delivery of a nutrition primary prevention program delivered in primary schools in New South Wales, Australia. Crunch&Sip® has been delivered since 2008. To date, adoption is low with only 25% of schools implementing the program. We investigated the cause of low adoption and propose actions to increase school participation. We conducted semistructured interviews with key stakeholders and analyzed the process of delivering Crunch&Sip to schools. Interviews and process mapping and analysis identified a number of barriers to schools adopting the program. The analyses identified the need to simplify and streamline the process of delivering the program to schools and introduce monitoring and feedback loops to track ongoing participation. The combination of stakeholder interviews and process mapping and analysis provided important practical solutions to improving program delivery and also contributed to building an understanding of factors that help and hinder program adoption. The insight provided by this analysis helped identify usable routine measures of adoption, which were an improvement over those used in the existing program plan. This study contributed toward improving the quality and efficiency of delivering a health promoting program to work toward achieving healthy eating behaviors in children.

  8. A validated liquid chromatographic method for determining folates in vegetables, milk powder, liver, and flour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konings, E J

    1999-01-01

    A liquid chromatographic (LC) method was elaborated for determining folates in foods. Folates were extracted by homogenizing in buffer and heat treatment. A portion was incubated with an enzyme preparation containing conjugase, amylase, and protease. After purification by affinity chromatography, folate monoglutamates were determined by reversed-phase LC with fluorescence and diode array detection. Gradient elution with phosphate buffer and acetonitrile was used to separate vitamers. The most abundant folate forms naturally present in foods were detected, including tetrahydrofolic acid, 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid, and 5-formyltetrahydrofolic acid. 10-Formylfolic acid could be detected by applying a second fluorescence detector. Folic acid, used for fortification, might also be quantitated with this system. The difference between folate concentrations in sample extracts, with and without treatment of conjugase, is a measure of the quantity of polyglutamates in the food matrixes. An additional treatment with conjugase, amylase, and protease reflects the amount of matrix-bound folates. The LC system gave a linear response over the range 0-100 ng/mL. Detection limit for these compounds were 7 pg/mL for tetrahydrofolic acid and 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid and 59 pg/mL for 10-formylfolic acid (signal-to-noise ratio > or = 3) when 100 microL was injected. Detection limits for 5-formyltetrahydrofolic acid and folic acid were 1 ng/mL. Repeatability relative standard deviation values for separate folates in 3 candidate Certified Reference Materials (CRMs)--mixed vegetables (CRM 485), pig liver (CRM 487), and whole-meal flour (CRM 121)--and a Certified Reference Material milk powder (CRM 421) varied from 3.3 to 21.0% for the concentration range 1.8-1440 micrograms/100 g. Recoveries ranged from 73 to 109%. Use of amylase and protease was advantageous. Use of a commercially available folate-binding protein for cleanup saved time and money and was effective. Results for 5

  9. Matching methods to produce maps for pest risk analysis to resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Baker

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Decision support systems (DSSs for pest risk mapping are invaluable for guiding pest risk analysts seeking to add maps to pest risk analyses (PRAs. Maps can help identify the area of potential establishment, the area at highest risk and the endangered area for alien plant pests. However, the production of detailed pest risk maps may require considerable time and resources and it is important to match the methods employed to the priority, time and detail required. In this paper, we apply PRATIQUE DSSs to Phytophthora austrocedrae, a pathogen of the Cupressaceae, Thaumetopoea pityocampa, the pine processionary moth, Drosophila suzukii, spotted wing Drosophila, and Thaumatotibia leucotreta, the false codling moth. We demonstrate that complex pest risk maps are not always a high priority and suggest that simple methods may be used to determine the geographic variation in relative risks posed by invasive alien species within an area of concern.

  10. Mapping Norway - A Method to Register and Survey the Status of Accessibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bögelsack, Kathrin; Michaelis, Sven

    2016-01-01

    The Norwegian mapping authority has developed an APP and a standard method for mapping accessibility for people with limited or no walking abilities, the blind and the partially sighted in urban and recreational areas. We choose an object-orientated approach where points, lines and polygons represents objects in the environment. All data are stored in a geospatial database, so they can be presented as web map and analysed using GIS software. To this day, more than 160 municipalities are mapped using that method. The aim of this project is to establish a national standard for mapping and to provide a geodatabase that shows the status of accessibility throughout Norway. The data provide a useful tool for national statistics, local planning authorities and private users. First results show that accessibility is low and Norway still faces many challenges to meet the government's goals for Universal Design.

  11. Effect of the method of preparation for consumption on calcium retention, calcium:phosphorus ratio, nutrient density and recommended daily allowance in fourteen vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Słupski, Jacek; Gębczyński, Piotr; Korus, Anna; Lisiewska, Zofia

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate calcium retention in 14 species of vegetable (from four usable groups). The material investigated consisted of raw and boiled fresh vegetables and two types of frozen product prepared for consumption after 12-month storage: one traditionally produced; the other obtained using the modified method (convenience food). The highest calcium content was found in leafy vegetables, followed (in descending order) by leguminous, root and brassica vegetables. The proportion by weight of Ca to P was highest in leafy vegetables and decreased with calcium retention despite the fact that levels of phosphorus were highest in leguminous and lowest in leafy vegetables. The nutrient density (ND%) of calcium for adults exceeded 100 for each individual vegetable species. The recommended daily allowance (RDA) percentage value varied between 23.04 (kale) and 1.46 (white cauliflower). Of the three types of product, ND and RDA values were generally greater in the frozen convenience products.

  12. Hyper-temporal remote sensing for digital soil mapping: Characterizing soil-vegetation response to climatic variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indices derived from remotely-sensed imagery are commonly used to predict soil properties with digital soil mapping (DSM) techniques. The use of images from single dates or a small number of dates is most common for DSM; however, selection of the appropriate images is complicated by temporal variabi...

  13. Vegetation - Medium Scale Central Valley Riparian Vegetation and Land Use, 2011 [ds723

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Geodatabase (SDE) feature class containing map of vegetation along mainstem rivers and major tributaries (including ancillary natural and semi-natural vegetation)...

  14. Hybrid optimisation of added value with value stream mapping and methods-time measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Kuhlang, Peter; Minichmayr, Jürgen; Sihn, W.

    2008-01-01

    This paper is about a new methodical approach of the joint and simultaneous application of Value Stream Mapping and Methods-Time Measurement (MTM). The focus of Value Stream Mapping is the alignment and combination of individual processes to form a continuous, efficient value stream through the organisation (macro consideration). MTM provides an exact determination of times and focuses on executions of individual tasks and working places (micro consideration). A hybrid optimisation of added v...

  15. A demonstration of wetland vegetation mapping in Florida from computer-processed satellite and aircraft multispectral scanner data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butera, M. K. (Principal Investigator)

    1978-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Major vegetative classes identified by the remote sensing technique were cypress swamp, pine, wetland grasses, salt grass, mixed mangrove, black mangrove, Brazilian pepper. Australian pine and melaleuca were not satisfactorily classified from LANDSAT. Aircraft scanners provided better resolution resulting in a classification of finer surface detail. An edge effect, created by the integration of diverse spectral responses within boundary elements of digital data, affected the wetlands classification. Accuracy classification for aircraft was 68% and for LANDSAT was 74%.

  16. A remote sensing method for mapping sillimanite mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amer, Reda; El-Desoky, Hatem

    2017-10-01

    This study aims to analyze the spectral profiles of the sillimanite mineral to identify sillimanite mineralization in the Migif-Hafafit area in the southern Eastern Desert of Egypt. ASTER imagery and reference spectra of sillimanite from the USGS and Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) spectral libraries were used to map the zones mineralized with sillimanite. The spectra of sillimanite in the JPL spectral library is presented at three different particle sizes coarse, medium, and fine (125-500, 45-125, and indicated that there are no significant changes in composition of the USGS and JPL samples, and the sillimanite samples collected from the study area. The position, depth, and full-width-half-maximum (FWHM) of the absorption features were calculated for all of the continuum-removed spectra. Results demonstrated that the absorption features attributes are affected by varying particle sizes. The occurrence of a prominent absorption feature in the SWIR spectra at 1.72 μm associated with absorption features at ∼1.40, ∼1.91 and 2.20-2.40 μm can be used to distinguish sillimanite mineral mixtures from the other hydroxylated and hydrated silicate minerals. This study suggests that spectral libraries should include spectra of different particle sizes and mineral mixtures.

  17. A facile method to compare EFTEM maps obtained from materials changing composition over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casu, Alberto; Genovese, Alessandro; Di Benedetto, Cristiano; Lentijo Mozo, Sergio; Sogne, Elisa; Zuddas, Efisio; Falqui, Andrea

    2015-12-01

    Energy Filtered Transmission Electron Microscopy (EFTEM) is an analytical tool that has been successfully and widely employed in the last two decades for obtaining fast elemental maps in TEM mode. Several studies and efforts have been addressed to investigate limitations and advantages of such technique, as well as to improve the spatial resolution of compositional maps. Usually, EFTEM maps undergo post-acquisition treatments by changing brightness and contrast levels, either via dedicated software or via human elaboration, in order to maximize their signal-to-noise ratio and render them as visible as possible. However, elemental maps forming a single set of EFTEM images are usually subjected to independent map-by-map image treatment. This post-acquisition step becomes crucial when analyzing materials that change composition over time as a consequence of an external stimulus, because the map-by-map approach doesn't take into account how the chemical features of the imaged materials actually progress, in particular when the investigated elements exhibit very low signals. In this article, we present a facile procedure applicable to whole sets of EFTEM maps acquired on a sample that is evolving over time. The main aim is to find a common method to treat the images features, in order to make them as comparable as possible without affecting the information there contained. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Hybrid Map-Based Navigation Method for Unmanned Ground Vehicle in Urban Scenario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiyan Chen

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available To reduce the data size of metric map and map matching computational cost in unmanned ground vehicle self-driving navigation in urban scenarios, a metric-topological hybrid map navigation system is proposed in this paper. According to the different positioning accuracy requirements, urban areas are divided into strong constraint (SC areas, such as roads with lanes, and loose constraint (LC areas, such as intersections and open areas. As direction of the self-driving vehicle is provided by traffic lanes and global waypoints in the road network, a simple topological map is fit for the navigation in the SC areas. While in the LC areas, the navigation of the self-driving vehicle mainly relies on the positioning information. Simultaneous localization and mapping technology is used to provide a detailed metric map in the LC areas, and a window constraint Markov localization algorithm is introduced to achieve accurate position using laser scanner. Furthermore, the real-time performance of the Markov algorithm is enhanced by using a constraint window to restrict the size of the state space. By registering the metric maps into the road network, a hybrid map of the urban scenario can be constructed. Real unmanned vehicle mapping and navigation tests demonstrated the capabilities of the proposed method.

  19. A facile method to compare EFTEM maps obtained from materials changing composition over time

    KAUST Repository

    Casu, Alberto

    2015-10-31

    Energy Filtered Transmission Electron Microscopy (EFTEM) is an analytical tool that has been successfully and widely employed in the last two decades for obtaining fast elemental maps in TEM mode. Several studies and efforts have been addressed to investigate limitations and advantages of such technique, as well as to improve the spatial resolution of compositional maps. Usually, EFTEM maps undergo post-acquisition treatments by changing brightness and contrast levels, either via dedicated software or via human elaboration, in order to maximize their signal-to-noise ratio and render them as visible as possible. However, elemental maps forming a single set of EFTEM images are usually subjected to independent map-by-map image treatment. This post-acquisition step becomes crucial when analyzing materials that change composition over time as a consequence of an external stimulus, because the map-by-map approach doesn\\'t take into account how the chemical features of the imaged materials actually progress, in particular when the investigated elements exhibit very low signals. In this article, we present a facile procedure applicable to whole sets of EFTEM maps acquired on a sample that is evolving over time. The main aim is to find a common method to treat the images features, in order to make them as comparable as possible without affecting the information there contained. Microsc. Res. Tech. 78:1090–1097, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Vegetable oil feeding into modern diesel engines. Effects, regulation methods, limit values; Pflanzenoeleintrag in moderne Dieselmotoren. Auswirkungen, Bestimmungsmethoden, Grenzwerte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heine, C.; Fischer, T.

    2008-01-15

    The need for a reliable method for the detection of the amount of fuel in engine oils is nearly as old as the first engine oil specification. An increased amount of conventional fuel in the engine oil can cause several problems up to a mechanical breakdown of the engine. Modern fuels and new concepts in the base oil technology of modern engine oils up to so called 'bio engine oils' are responsible for the intensification of the discussion about of the acceptable amount of fuel in the engine oil. Especially in Germany there is an increasing volume of vegetable oil in the market which is used as an alternative fuel for conventional diesel fuel. Actually we have the first engine manufacturers who offer engines for the use with rape oil as a fuel. Unfortunately, up to now, we don't have a proved European - or DIN standard (only the prestandard DIN V 51605) for vegetable oils as fuel. The DIN prestandard is only for rape oil. But in the field palm-oil, sunflower-oil and several more can be found in the tanks of the engines. Moreover, up to know no official information exists about the allowed amount of vegetable oil in the engine oil. Even of those manufacturers who now offer the engines for the use with rape oil. The main answer of some engine manufacturers sounds like 'We don't allow the use of vegetable oil so there is no need for a limit value'. That is logical - at the first moment. But it is well known that a lot of trucks and power units are fired with vegetable oil. Till today WEARCHECK analysed several thousand used engine oils which where used in diesel engines with vegetable oil as fuel. The presentation gives some examples of rape oil fuel dilution and the influence on the engine and engine oil. Moreover it will give an idea how to determine the vegetable oil in engine oils. At the end the presentation shall initiate a discussion about a recommendation for the max. amount of vegetable oil dilution in engine oils. (orig.)