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Sample records for vegetation fsub ipar

  1. Modeling of flow and reactive transport in IPARS

    KAUST Repository

    Wheeler, Mary Fanett; Sun, Shuyu; Thomas, Sunil G.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we describe a number of efficient and locally conservative methods for subsurface flow and reactive transport that have been or are currently being implemented in the IPARS (Integrated Parallel and Accurate Reservoir Simulator

  2. Institutional Support : Institute of Policy Analysis and Research (IPAR)

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This grant from IDRC's Think Tank Initiative (TTI) will help IPAR address its sustainability issues by offering competitive remuneration packages to reduce staff turnover, recruiting additional staff, training existing staff, improving organizational systems and infrastructure, expanding its policy advocacy work, enhancing the ...

  3. Modeling of flow and reactive transport in IPARS

    KAUST Repository

    Wheeler, Mary Fanett

    2012-03-11

    In this work, we describe a number of efficient and locally conservative methods for subsurface flow and reactive transport that have been or are currently being implemented in the IPARS (Integrated Parallel and Accurate Reservoir Simulator). For flow problems, we consider discontinuous Galerkin (DG) methods and mortar mixed finite element methods. For transport problems, we employ discontinuous Galerkin methods and Godunov-mixed methods. For efficient treatment of reactive transport simulations, we present a number of state-of-the-art dynamic mesh adaptation strategies and implementations. Operator splitting approaches and iterative coupling techniques are also discussed. Finally, numerical examples are provided to illustrate the capability of IPARS to treat general biogeochemistry as well as the effectivity of mesh adaptations with DG for transport. © 2012 Bentham Science Publishers. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of a synthetic drilling fluid (IPAR) on antioxidant enzymes and peroxisome proliferation in the American lobster, Homarsus americanus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamoutene, D.; Payne, J.F.; Andrews, C.; Wells, J.; Guiney, J.

    2004-07-01

    The acute, sublethal toxicity of a synthetic paraffinic drilling fluid (IPAR) was examined in this study which exposed 2 sets of 14 lobsters to the substance. Synthetic-based muds (SBMs) make up the fluid component of drilling muds along with water-based muds (WBMs) and oil-based muds (OBMs). Although SBMs are proposed to replace OBMs, little is known about their environmental impact. IPAR, an ultra-pure isoalkane with no aromatics or sulphur compounds, is currently used in the Newfoundland offshore. This study examined the effect of IPAR on benthic crustacean because most of the wastes discharged from drilling platforms sediment quickly and the impact is greatest on benthic animals. The lobsters were injected with 1 mL of IPAR every 3 days, to a maximum of 5 mL. They were also exposed to very high levels of the fluid, which would not be expected under field conditions. Different aspects of lipid and protein metabolism were monitored along with the effect of IPAR on peroxisome proliferations and various serum and organ enzymes. The study showed that even at the high dose administered to the lobsters, the isoalkane mixture had no influence on peroxisome proliferation. Increased amounts of protein was found in claw muscles, but no increase was observed in gills, hepatopancreas or heart, suggesting no adverse impact of IPAR. A slight increase was also noted in serum aminotransferases. The study results are in agreement with the hypothesis that IPAR has little or no ecotoxicological potential. 32 refs., 3 tabs., 2 figs.

  5. Effect of a synthetic drilling fluid (IPAR) on antioxidant enzymes and peroxisome proliferation in the American lobster, Homarsus americanus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamoutene, D.; Payne, J.F.; Andrews, C.; Wells, J.; Guiney, J.

    2004-01-01

    The acute, sublethal toxicity of a synthetic paraffinic drilling fluid (IPAR) was examined in this study which exposed 2 sets of 14 lobsters to the substance. Synthetic-based muds (SBMs) make up the fluid component of drilling muds along with water-based muds (WBMs) and oil-based muds (OBMs). Although SBMs are proposed to replace OBMs, little is known about their environmental impact. IPAR, an ultra-pure isoalkane with no aromatics or sulphur compounds, is currently used in the Newfoundland offshore. This study examined the effect of IPAR on benthic crustacean because most of the wastes discharged from drilling platforms sediment quickly and the impact is greatest on benthic animals. The lobsters were injected with 1 mL of IPAR every 3 days, to a maximum of 5 mL. They were also exposed to very high levels of the fluid, which would not be expected under field conditions. Different aspects of lipid and protein metabolism were monitored along with the effect of IPAR on peroxisome proliferations and various serum and organ enzymes. The study showed that even at the high dose administered to the lobsters, the isoalkane mixture had no influence on peroxisome proliferation. Increased amounts of protein was found in claw muscles, but no increase was observed in gills, hepatopancreas or heart, suggesting no adverse impact of IPAR. A slight increase was also noted in serum aminotransferases. The study results are in agreement with the hypothesis that IPAR has little or no ecotoxicological potential. 32 refs., 3 tabs., 2 figs

  6. HYPERDIRE. HYPERgeometric functions DIfferential REduction. MATHEMATICA based packages for differential reduction of generalized hypergeometric functions {sub p}F{sub p-1}, F{sub 1}, F{sub 2}, F{sub 3}, F{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bytev, Vladimir V.; Kalmykov, Mikhail Yu. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Kniehl, Bernd A. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    2013-05-15

    HYPERDIRE is a project devoted to the creation of a set of Mathematica based programs for the differential reduction of hypergeometric functions. The current version includes two parts: one, pfq, is relevant for manipulations of hypergeometric functions {sub p+1}F{sub p}, and the second one, AppellF1F4, for manipulations with Appell hypergeometric functions F{sub 1}, F{sub 2}, F{sub 3}, F{sub 4} of two variables.

  7. Twist expansion of the nucleon structure functions, F{sub 2} and F{sub L}, in the DGLAP improved saturation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartels, Jochen [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Golec-Biernat, Krzysztof [Rzeszow Univ. (Poland). Inst. of Physics; Polish Academy of Sciences, Krakow (Poland). Inst. of Nuclear Physics; Motkyka, Leszek [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Uniwersytet Jagiellonski, Krakow (Poland). Inst. Fizyki

    2009-11-15

    Higher twist effects in the deeply inelastic scattering are studied. We start with a short review of the theoretical results on higher twists in QCD. Within the saturation model we perform a twist analysis of the nucleon structure functions F{sub T} and F{sub L} at small value of the Bjorken variable x. The parameters of the model are fitted to the HERA F{sub 2} data, and we derive a prediction for the longitudinal structure function F{sub L}. We conclude that for F{sub L} the higher twist corrections are sizable whereas for F{sub 2}=F{sub T}+F{sub L} there is a nearly complete cancellation of twist-4 corrections in F{sub T} and F{sub L}. We discuss a few consequences for future LHC measurements. (orig.)

  8. Vegetation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Epstein, H.E.; Walker, D.A.; Bhatt, U.S.

    2012-01-01

    increased 20-26%. • Increasing shrub growth and range extension throughout the Low Arctic are related to winter and early growing season temperature increases. Growth of other tundra plant types, including graminoids and forbs, is increasing, while growth of mosses and lichens is decreasing. • Increases...... in vegetation (including shrub tundra expansion) and thunderstorm activity, each a result of Arctic warming, have created conditions that favor a more active Arctic fire regime....

  9. Search for the glueball candidates f/sub 0/(1500) and f/sub J/(1710) in gamma gamma collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Shan, Jin

    2001-01-01

    Summary form only given. Data taken with the ALEPH detector at LEP1 have been used to search for gamma gamma production of the glueball candidates f/sub 0/(1500) and f/sub J/(1710) via their decay to pi /sup +/ pi /sup -//sub ./ No signal is observed and upper limits to the product of gamma gamma width and pi /sup +/ pi /sup b/ranching ratio of the f/sub 0/(1500) and the f/sub J/(1710) have been measured to be Gamma ( gamma gamma to f/sub 0/(1500)) BR(f/sub 0/(1500) to pi /sup +/ pi /sup -/) < 0 31keV and Gamma ( gamma gamma to f/sub J /(1710)) BR(f/sub J/(1710) to pi /sup +/ pi /sup -/) < 0 55keV at 95% confidence level.

  10. Discharge pumped F/sub 2/ laser at 1580 A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pummer, H; Hohla, K; Diegelmann, M; Reilly, J P

    1979-01-01

    By pumping mixtures of F/sub 2/ and He in a fast uv-preionized discharge laser emission at 1578 A, probably stemming from the /sup 3/PI/sub 2g/ ..-->.. /sup 3/PI/sub 2u/ transition in molecular fluorine have been obtained. Observed energy is 8.5 mJ in pulses of 15 ns half-width. First experimental results on laser performance and scalability are given.

  11. Evolution of f{sub NL} to the adiabatic limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliston, Joseph; Mulryne, David J.; Tavakol, Reza [School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Seery, David, E-mail: J.Elliston@qmul.ac.uk, E-mail: D.Mulryne@qmul.ac.uk, E-mail: D.Seery@sussex.ac.uk, E-mail: R.Tavakol@qmul.ac.uk [Astronomy Centre, University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton BN1 9QH (United Kingdom)

    2011-11-01

    We study inflationary perturbations in multiple-field models, for which ζ typically evolves until all isocurvature modes decay — the {sup a}diabatic limit{sup .} We use numerical methods to explore the sensitivity of the local-shape bispectrum to the process by which this limit is achieved, finding an appreciable dependence on model-specific data such as the time at which slow-roll breaks down or the timescale of reheating. In models with a sum-separable potential where the isocurvature modes decay before the end of the slow-roll phase we give an analytic criterion for the asymptotic value of f{sub NL} to be large. Other examples can be constructed using a waterfall field to terminate inflation while f{sub NL} is transiently large, caused by descent from a ridge or convergence into a valley. We show that these two types of evolution are distinguished by the sign of the bispectrum, and give approximate expressions for the peak f{sub NL}.

  12. Photoproduction of the f{sub 2}(1270) resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Ju-Jun [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Modern Physics, Lanzhou (China); Institute of Modern Physics of CAS and Lanzhou University, Research Center for Hadron and CSR Physics, Lanzhou (China); Chinese Academy of Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Beijing (China); Oset, E. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Modern Physics, Lanzhou (China); Centro Mixto Universidad de Valencia-CSIC Institutos de Investigacion de Paterna, Departamento de Fisica Teorica y IFIC, Valencia (Spain)

    2015-09-15

    We have performed a calculation of the γp → π {sup +} π {sup -} p reaction, where the two pions have been separated in D-wave producing the f{sub 2}(1270) resonance. We use elements of the local hidden gauge approach that provides the interaction of vector mesons in which the f{sub 2}(1270) resonance appears as a ρ-ρ molecular state in L = 0 and spin 2. The vector meson dominance, incorporated in the local hidden gauge approach converts a photon into a ρ {sup 0} meson and the other meson connects the photon with the proton. The picture is simple and has no free parameters, since the parameters of the theory have been constrained in the previous study of the vector-vector states. In a second step we introduce new elements, not present in the local hidden gauge approach, adapting the ρN N propagator to Regge phenomenology and introducing the ρ tensor coupling. We find that both the differential cross section as well as the t dependence of the cross section are in good agreement with the experimental results and provide support for the molecular picture of the f{sub 2}(1270) resonance in the first baryonic reaction where it has been tested. (orig.)

  13. First observation of the decay π+->e+νe+e- and a determination of the form factors Fsub(V), Fsub(A), R

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egli, S.; Engfer, R.; Grab, C.; Hermes, E.A.; Pruys, H.S.; Schaaf, A. van der; Vermeulen, D.

    1986-01-01

    The radiative pion decay π + ->e + νe + e - has been observed for the first time. Information on the form factors was obtained from the kinematical distribution of 79 events. The vector form factor has the same sign as the pion decay constant fsub(π). The ratios of axial-vector form factors to the vector form factor are γ=Fsub(A)/Fsub(V)=0.7+-0.5 and xi=R/Fsub(V)=2.3+-0.6. The value for γ is in agreement with the small positive value (0.53+-0.06) and excludes the large negative value (-2.49+-0.06) of γ obtained in π + ->e + νγ experiments. (orig.)

  14. Heterotic studies and inbreeding depression in f/sub 2/populations of upland cotton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panni, M.K.

    2012-01-01

    To study the genetic potential, heterotic effects and inbreeding depression, 8 X 8 F/sub 2/diallel populations with parental lines of upland cotton were grown during crop season 2010 in a randomized complete block design at Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Agricultural University Peshawar, Pakistan. Highly significant ( p = 0.01 ) variations were noticed among parental lines and F/sub 2/ populations for all the traits. According to genotypes mean performance for various traits, plant height varied from 101.60 to 126.30 cm and 98.60 to 140.60 cm, bolls plant/sup -1/ (12.87 to 19.53; 12.13 to 22.60), boll weight (3.80 to 5.01 g; 3.04 to 5.38 g) and seed cotton yield plant/sup -1/ varied from 55.74 to 85.47 g and 45.57 to 96.05 g in parental cultivars and their F/sub 2/ populations, respectively. However, 12 and 7 F/sub 2/ populations manifested significant heterosis over mid and better parents for plant height, 7 and 3 for bolls plant/sup -1/, 13 and 9 for boll weight and 13 and 5 F/sub 2/ populations for seed cotton yield plant/sup -1/, respectively. F/sub 2/ populations i.e. CIM-554 X CIM-473, CIM-554 X CIM-499, CIM-496 X SLH-284, CIM-473 X CIM-446 and CIM-554 X SLH-284 with low mean values for plant height performed better and manifested highly significant heterotic values over mid and better parents for bolls per plant, boll weight and seed cotton yield. By comparing F/sub 2/ mean values with F/sub 1/s, inbreeding depression was observed for plant height (0.66 to 23. 99%), bolls per plant (5.00 to 63.16%), boll weight (0.20 to 23.24%) and seed cotton yield (0.44 to 75.52%). However, 62% of F/sub 2/ populations revealed negative values for inbreeding depression, 14% for bolls per plant, 77% for boll weight and 21% for yield, revealed that these F/sub 2/ populations were more stable and performed better than F/sub 1/s even after segregation. Although, F/sub 2/ populations may display less heterosis as compared to F/sub 1/, but still better than high parents and can be used as

  15. Growth of electron plasma waves above and below f/sub p/ in the electron foreshock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cairns, I.H.; Fung, S.F.

    1988-01-01

    With increasing penetration into the electron foreshock the characteristics of the electrostatic waves driven by streaming electrons change continuously from the familiar intense waves near the electron plasma frequency f/sub p/ to weak bursts of broadband waves initially significantly above f/sub p/ and then well below f/sub p/. Growth well below f/sub p/ has been demonstrated theoretically for slow, cold electron beams, and the broadband waves below f/sub p/ in the foreshock have been interpreted in terms of the very cold or sharp ''cutoff'' feature of a cutoff distribution for small cutoff speeds. However, an approximate theoretical criterion indicates that the electron beams studied hitherto are unstable to reactive rather than kinetic growth, thereby favoring very narrow-band growth contrary to the observed broadband growth. In this paper we determine conditions for kinetic growth well above and below f/sub p/ for both cold and warm beams over a wide range of beam densities and speeds. We verify that kinetic growth below f/sub p/ is possible for cold, slow beams and for warm, dense beams (over wide range of beam velocities)

  16. Review of measured values of the milk transfer coefficient f/sub m/ for iodine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, F O [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)

    1978-08-01

    Most published assessments of the environmental transport of iodine have used a value of 1 X 10/sup -2/ days per litre (d/1) for the transfer coefficient (fsub(m)) which relates the concentration per litre of milk to the daily amount of the element ingested by a cow. However, the USNRC has recommended (USNRC 77) a value of 0.6 X 10/sup -2/ d/1 for the transfer of iodine to cow's milk and 6 X 10/sup -2/ d/1 for goat's milk. A literature survey of published values of fsub(m) leads to a recommendation which deviates from the values chosen by the USNRC. An fsub(m) of 0.5 d/1 for goat's milk and an fsub(m) of 1 X 10/sup -2/ for cow's milk appear to be more appropriate.

  17. A review of measured values of the milk transfer coefficient (fsub(m)) for iodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, F.O.

    1978-01-01

    Most published assessments of the environmental transport of iodine have used a value of 1 X 10 -2 days per litre (d/1) for the transfer coefficient (fsub(m)) which relates the concentration per litre of milk to the daily amount of the element ingested by a cow. However, the USNRC has recommended (USNRC 77) a value of 0.6 X 10 -2 d/1 for the transfer of iodine to cow's milk and 6 X 10 -2 d/1 for goat's milk. A literature survey of published values of fsub(m) leads to a recommendation which deviates from the values chosen by the USNRC. An fsub(m) of 0.5 d/1 for goat's milk and an fsub(m) of 1 X 10 -2 for cow's milk appear to be more appropriate. (author)

  18. Concentration quenching of F{sub a}(II) emission in KCl:Li

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldacchini, G.; Giovenale, E. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Frascati, Rome (Italy). Dip. Innovazione; Grassano, U.M. [Rome Univ. `Tor Vergata` (Italy); Scacco, A. [Rome Univ. `La Sapienza` (Italy)

    1996-12-01

    The concentration quenching of luminescence is a well known phenomenon for the F centers in alkali halides. On the contrary very little is known on this subject for F{sub A} centers which are a class of axial color centers still of some importance both in basic and applied research, for instance as color center laser sources. The authors have studied carefully the optical properties of the F{sub A}(II) centers, especially in KCl:Li in extreme physical conditions, such as high F{sub A} concentration, high optical pumping, low temperatures and high magnetic fields, and, among other results, a new weak luminescence has been found at 1.4 {mu}m. At moment is not yet clear whether this emission is related to the concentration quenching itself or to more complex color centers, among them F{sub A}(I) centers. However, general hypothesis and reliable measurements are proposed in order to clarify the still unknown microscopic mechanisms which reduces the emission intensity of the F{sub A}(II) centers when they are highly concentrated.

  19. Measurement of the electron structure function F{sub 2}{sup e} at LEP energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdallah, J. [LPNHE, IN2P3-CNRS, Univ. Paris VI et VII, 4 place Jussieu, FR-75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Abreu, P. [LIP, IST, FCUL, Av. Elias Garcia, 14-1" o, PT-1000 Lisboa Codex (Portugal); Adam, W. [Institut für Hochenergiephysik, Österr. Akad. d. Wissensch., Nikolsdorfergasse 18, AT-1050 Vienna (Austria); Adzic, P. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, N.C.S.R. Demokritos, P.O. Box 60228, GR-15310 Athens (Greece); Albrecht, T. [Institut für Experimentelle Kernphysik, Universität Karlsruhe, Postfach 6980, DE-76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Alemany-Fernandez, R. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Allmendinger, T. [Institut für Experimentelle Kernphysik, Universität Karlsruhe, Postfach 6980, DE-76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Allport, P.P. [Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, P.O. Box 147, Liverpool L69 3BX (United Kingdom); Amaldi, U. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Univ. di Milano-Bicocca and INFN-Milano, Piazza della Scienza 3, IT-20126 Milan (Italy); Amapane, N. [Dipartimento di Fisica Sperimentale, Università di Torino and INFN, Via P. Giuria 1, IT-10125 Turin (Italy); Amato, S. [Univ. Federal do Rio de Janeiro, C.P. 68528 Cidade Univ., Ilha do Fundão, BR-21945-970 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Anashkin, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Padova and INFN, Via Marzolo 8, IT-35131 Padua (Italy); Andreazza, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Milano and INFN-Milano, Via Celoria 16, IT-20133 Milan (Italy); Andringa, S.; Anjos, N. [LIP, IST, FCUL, Av. Elias Garcia, 14-1" o, PT-1000 Lisboa Codex (Portugal); Antilogus, P. [LPNHE, IN2P3-CNRS, Univ. Paris VI et VII, 4 place Jussieu, FR-75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); and others

    2014-10-07

    The hadronic part of the electron structure function F{sub 2}{sup e} has been measured for the first time, using e{sup +}e{sup −} data collected by the DELPHI experiment at LEP, at centre-of-mass energies of √(s)=91.2–209.5 GeV. The data analysis is simpler than that of the measurement of the photon structure function. The electron structure function F{sub 2}{sup e} data are compared to predictions of phenomenological models based on the photon structure function. It is shown that the contribution of large target photon virtualities is significant. The data presented can serve as a cross-check of the photon structure function F{sub 2}{sup γ} analyses and help in refining existing parameterisations.

  20. The [U{sub 2}F{sub 12}]{sup 2-} anion of Sr[U{sub 2}F{sub 12}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheibe, Benjamin; Pietzonka, Clemens; Conrad, Matthias; Kraus, Florian [Fachbereich Chemie, Philipps-Universitaet Marburg (Germany); Mustonen, Otto; Karppinen, Maarit; Karttunen, Antti J. [Department of Chemistry, Aalto University (Finland); Atanasov, Mihail; Neese, Frank [Max-Planck Institute for Chemical Energy Conversion, Muelheim an der Ruhr (Germany)

    2018-03-05

    The D{sub 2h}-symmetric dinuclear complex anion [U{sub 2}F{sub 12}]{sup 2-} of pastel green Sr[U{sub 2}F{sub 12}] shows a hitherto unknown structural feature: The coordination polyhedra around the U atoms are edge-linked monocapped trigonal prisms, the U{sup V} atoms are therefore seven-coordinated. This leads to a U-U distance of 3.8913(6) Aa. A weak U{sup V}-U{sup V} interaction is observed for the dinuclear [U{sub 2}F{sub 12}]{sup 2-} complex and described by the antiferromagnetic exchange J{sub exp} of circa -29.9 cm{sup -1}. The crystalline compound can be easily prepared from SrF{sub 2} and β-UF{sub 5} in anhydrous hydrogen fluoride (aHF) at room temperature. It was studied by means of single crystal X-ray diffraction, IR, Raman and UV/VIS spectroscopy, magnetic measurements, and by molecular as well as by solid-state quantum chemical calculations. (copyright 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  1. A comparison of isozyme and quantitative genetic variation in Pinus contorta ssp. latifolia by F{sub ST}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Rong-Cai; Yeh, F.C. [Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada); Yanchuk, A.D. [British Columbia Ministry of Forests (Canada)

    1996-03-01

    We employed F-statistics to analyze quantitative and isozyme variation among five populations of Pinus contorta ssp. latifolia, a wind-pollinated outcrossing conifer with wide and continuous distribution in west North America. Estimates of population differentiation (F{sub ST}) for six quantitative traits were compared with the overall estimate of the differentiation (F*{sub ST}) from 19 isozymes that tested neutral to examine whether similar evolutionary processes were involved in morphological and isozyme differentiation. While the F{sub ST} estimates for specific gravity, stem diameter, stem height and branch length were significantly greater than the F*{sub ST} estimate, as judged from the 95% confidence intervals by bootstrapping, the F{sub ST} estimates for branch angle and branch diameter were indistinguishable from the F*{sub ST} estimate. Differentiation in stem height and stem diameter might reflect the inherent adaptation of the populations for rapid growth to escape suppression by neighboring plants during establishment and to regional differences in photoperiod, precipitation and temperature. In contrast, divergences in wood specific gravity and branch length might be correlated responses to population differentiation in stem growth. Possible bias in the estimation of F{sub ST} due to Hardy-Weinberg disequilibrium (F{sub IS} {ne} 0), linkage disequilibrium, maternal effects and nonadditive genetic effects was discussed with special reference to P. contorta ssp. latifolia. 48 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  2. The slab albedo problem for the triplet scattering kernel with modified F{sub N} method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuereci, Demet [Ministry of Education, 75th year Anatolia High School, Ankara (Turkey)

    2016-12-15

    One speed, time independent neutron transport equation for a slab geometry with the quadratic anisotropic scattering kernel is considered. The albedo and transmission factor are calculated by the modified F{sub N} method. The obtained numerical results are listed for different scattering coefficients.

  3. Proposal to measure the D meson decay constant F/sub D/

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deshpande, N.G.; Iskandar, D.

    1978-08-01

    Because the branching ratios of the purely leptonic modes of D meson are small compared to the semileptonic decays, it is suggested that the decay D → K + l + ν might be used to deduce the value of F/sub D/, the weak decay constant of D meson. 17 references

  4. Proposal to measure the D meson decay constant F/sub D/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deshpande, N.G.; Iskandar, D.

    1978-08-01

    Because the branching ratios of the purely leptonic modes of D meson are small compared to the semileptonic decays, it is suggested that the decay D ..-->.. K + l + ..nu.. might be used to deduce the value of F/sub D/, the weak decay constant of D meson. 17 references.

  5. Slab albedo for linearly and quadratically anisotropic scattering kernel with modified F{sub N} method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuereci, R. Goekhan [Kirikkale Univ. (Turkey). Kirikkale Vocational School; Tuereci, D. [Ministry of Education, Ankara (Turkey). 75th year Anatolia High School

    2017-11-15

    One speed, time independent and homogeneous medium neutron transport equation is solved with the anisotropic scattering which includes both the linearly and the quadratically anisotropic scattering kernel. Having written Case's eigenfunctions and the orthogonality relations among of these eigenfunctions, slab albedo problem is investigated as numerically by using Modified F{sub N} method. Selected numerical results are presented in tables.

  6. Third-order QCD corrections to the charged-current structure function F{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moch, S. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Vermaseren, J.A.M. [NIKHEF, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Vogt, A. [Liverpool Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Mathematical Sciences

    2008-12-15

    We compute the coefficient function for the charge-averaged W{sup {+-}}-exchange structure function F{sub 3} in deep-inelastic scattering (DIS) to the third order in massless perturbative QCD. Our new three-loop contribution to this quantity forms, at not too small values of the Bjorken variable x, the dominant part of the next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order corrections. It thus facilitates improved determinations of the strong coupling {alpha}{sub s} and of 1/Q{sup 2} power corrections from scaling violations measured in neutrino-nucleon DIS. The expansion of F{sub 3} in powers of {alpha}{sub s} is stable at all values of x relevant to measurements at high scales Q{sup 2}. At small x the third-order coefficient function is dominated by diagrams with the colour structure d{sup abc}d{sub abc} not present at lower orders. At large x the coefficient function for F{sub 3} is identical to that of F{sub 1} up to terms vanishing for x{yields}1. (orig.)

  7. Az ipar 4.0 fogalma, összetevői és hatása az értékláncra ----- Industry 4.0: definition, elements and effect on corporate value chain

    OpenAIRE

    Nagy, Judit

    2017-01-01

    Absztrakt: A tanulmány célja, hogy meghatározza az Ipar 4.0 fogalmát és mögé tekintsen, azaz magyarázatot találjon kialakulására, mozgatórugóira és legfőképpen, jelentőségére a vállalati értéklánc szempontjából. A dolgozat során rövid kitekintés erejéig foglalkozom makro, vagy gazdaságpolitikai kérdésekkel, de legfőképpen a vállalati szint vizsgálatára fókuszálok. A tanulmány megírása során azt tapasztaltam, hogy a szakirodalom is még ismerkedik a fogalommal, annak gazdasági hatásaival...

  8. Study of UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} - H{sub 2}O - HF compounds; Etude des composes UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} - H{sub 2}O - HF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neveu, G [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1961-07-01

    We study various compounds resulting from the interaction of UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} with H{sub 2}O and HF (gas), and various triple compounds UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} - H{sub 2}O - HF; the conditions of decomposition and the thermodynamic limits of stability are specified. (author) [French] Nous etudions divers composes formes par reaction de UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} avec H{sub 2}O et HF (gaz) et divers composes triples UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} - H{sub 2}O - HF, en essayant de preciser les decompositions et domaines d'exisfence thermodynamiques de ces corps. (auteur)

  9. Inclusive production of {rho}{sup 0}(770), f{sub 0}(980) and f{sub 2}(1270) mesons in {nu}{sub {mu}} charged current interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astier, P.; Autiero, D.; Baldisseri, A.; Baldo-Ceolin, M.; Banner, M.; Bassompierre, G.; Benslama, K.; Besson, N.; Bird, I.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bobisut, F.; Bouchez, J.; Boyd, S.; Bueno, A.; Bunyatov, S.; Camilleri, L.; Cardini, A.; Cattaneo, P.W.; Cavasinni, V.; Cervera-Villanueva, A.; Collazuol, G.; Conforto, G.; Conta, C.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cousins, R.; Daniels, D.; Degaudenzi, H.; Del Prete, T.; De Santo, A.; Dignan, T.; Di Lella, L.; Couto e Silva, E. do; Dumarchez, J.; Ellis, M.; Fazio, T.; Feldman, G.J.; Ferrari, R.; Ferrere, D.; Flaminio, V.; Fraternali, M.; Gaillard, J.-M.; Gangler, E.; Geiser, A.; Geppert, D.; Gibin, D.; Gninenko, S.; Godley, A.; Gomez-Cadenas, J.-J.; Gosset, J.; Goessling, C.; Gouanere, M.; Grant, A.; Graziani, G.; Guglielmi, A.; Hagner, C.; Hernando, J.; Hubbard, D.; Hurst, P.; Hyett, N.; Iacopini, E.; Joseph, C.; Juget, F.; Kirsanov, M. E-mail: mikhail.kirsanov@cern.ch; Klimov, O.; Kokkonen, J.; Kovzelev, A.; Krasnoperov, A.; Kuznetsov, V.; Lacaprara, S.; Lachaud, C.; Lakic, B.; Lanza, A.; LaRotonda, L.; Laveder, M.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Levy, J.-M.; Linssen, L.; Ljubicic, A.; Long, J.; Lupi, A.; Marchionni, A.; Martelli, F.; Mechain, X.; Mendiburu, J.-P.; Meyer, J.-P.; Mezzetto, M.; Mishra, S.R.; Moorhead, G.F.; Naumov, D.; Nedelec, P.; Nefedov, Yu.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Orestano, D.; Pastore, F.; Peak, L.S.; Pennacchio, E.; Pessard, H.; Petti, R.; Placci, A.; Polesello, G.; Pollmann, D.; Polyarush, A.; Popov, B.; Poulsen, C.; Rathouit, P.; Rico, J.; Roda, C.; Rubbia, A.; Salvatore, F.; Schahmaneche, K.; Schmidt, B.; Sevior, M.; Sillou, D.; Soler, F.J.P.; Sozzi, G.; Steele, D.; Stiegler, U.; Stipcevic, M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Tareb-Reyes, M.; Taylor, G.N.; Tereshchenko, V.; Toropin, A.; Touchard, A.-M.; Tovey, S.N.; Tran, M.-T.; Tsesmelis, E.; Ulrichs, J.; Vacavant, L.; Valdata-Nappi, M.; Valuev, V.; Vannucci, F.; Varvell, K.E.; Veltri, M.; Vercesi, V.; Vidal-Sitjes, G.; Vieira, J.-M.; Vinogradova, T.; Weber, F.V.; Weisse, T. [and others

    2001-05-07

    The inclusive production of the meson resonances {rho}{sup 0}(770), f{sub 0}(980) and f{sub 2}(1270) in neutrino-nucleus charged current interactions has been studied with the NOMAD detector exposed to the wide band neutrino beam generated by 450 GeV protons at the CERN SPS. For the first time the f{sub 0}(980) meson is observed in neutrino interactions. The statistical significance of its observation is 6 standard deviations. The presence of f{sub 2}(1270) in neutrino interactions is reliably established. The average multiplicity of these three resonances is measured as a function of several kinematic variables. The experimental results are compared to the multiplicities obtained from a simulation based on the Lund model. In addition, the average multiplicity of {rho}{sup 0}(770) in antineutrino-nucleus interactions is measured.

  10. Nuclear charge radii of the 1fsub(7/2) shell nuclei from muonic atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wohlfahrt, H.D.

    1979-01-01

    Muonic X-ray of medium-weight nuclei have been performed in recent years by the Los Alamos muonic X-ray group, using the high intensity muon beam available at the LAMPF 800 MeV proton accelerator. These studies, which together include all stable 1fsub(7/2) neutron shell nuclei, provide information about the proton core polarization due to the successive addition of neutrons for the proton cores Z = 20 (Ca), 22 (Ti), 24(Cr), 26(Fe) and 28(Ni). In addition, these studies, which represent the first systematic investigations of isotone shifts, provide the opportunity to compare the core polarization caused by protons with core polarization caused by neutrons in the same (1fsub(7/2)) shell. (KBE)

  11. Synchrotron diffraction characterization of nanostructured KY{sub 3}F{sub 10}:Tb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichikawa, Rodrigo U.; Teixeira, Maria I.; Ranieri, Izilda M.; Martinez, Luis G., E-mail: ichikawa@usp.br, E-mail: miteixeira@ipen.br, E-mail: iranieri@ipen.br, E-mail: lgallego@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Linhares, Horacio M.S.M.D., E-mail: horacio_marconi@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal Fluminense (INFES/UFF), Santo Antonio de Padua, RJ (Brazil); Turrillas, Xavier, E-mail: turrillas@gmail.com [Institut de Ciència de Materials de Barcelona (ICMAB/CSIC), Dept. of Crystallography, Bellaterra (Spain)

    2015-07-01

    Nanostructured rare-earth fluorides materials are being intensively studied recently due to their potential applications in high-dose dosimetry. Particularly, nanostructured Tb-doped KY{sub 3}F{sub 10} has shown satisfactory results to be used in this area. In the present work, the structure and microstructure of KY{sub 3}F{sub 10}:Tb was investigated by means of X-ray synchrotron diffraction. One of the samples was analyzed as synthesized and another after a heat treatment. Rietveld refinement of synchrotron diffraction data was applied to obtain cell parameters, atomic positions and atomic displacement factors and the results were compared to values found in literature. X-ray line profile analysis methods were applied to determine mean crystallite sizes and their distribution. (author)

  12. Selective cell culture on UV transparent polymer by F{sub 2} laser surface modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanada, Yasutaka, E-mail: y-hanada@riken.jp [RIKEN-Advanced Science Institute, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Sugioka, Koji [RIKEN-Advanced Science Institute, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Kawano, Hiroyuki [RIKEN-Brain Science Institute, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Tsuchimoto, Takayoshi [RIKEN-Advanced Science Institute, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Applied Electronics, Faculty of Industrial Science and Technology Tokyo University of Science, 2641 Yamazaki, Noda, Chiba 278-8510 (Japan); Miyamoto, Iwao [Department of Applied Electronics, Faculty of Industrial Science and Technology Tokyo University of Science, 2641 Yamazaki, Noda, Chiba 278-8510 (Japan); Miyawaki, Atsushi [RIKEN-Brain Science Institute, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Midorikawa, Katsumi [RIKEN-Advanced Science Institute, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2009-09-30

    A microchip made of UV transparent polymer (CYTOP) that can perform selective cell culture has been fabricated by F{sub 2} laser surface modification. The refractive index of CYTOP is almost the same as that of culture medium, which is essential for three-dimensional (3D) observation of cells. The F{sub 2} laser modification of CYTOP achieves hydrophilicity only on the laser irradiated area with little deterioration of the optical properties and surface smoothness. After the laser modification, HeLa cells were successfully cultured and strongly adhered only on the modified area of CYTOP. The cells patterned on CYTOP were applied for clear 3D observation using an optical microscope in phase contrast mode.

  13. HYPERDIRE. HYPERgeometric functions DIfferential REduction. MATEMATICA based packages for differential reduction of generalized hypergeometric functions. F{sub D} and F{sub S} Horn-type hypergeometric functions of three variables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bytev, Vladimir V. [Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Kalmykov, Mikhail Yu. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Moch, Sven-Olaf [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    2013-12-15

    HYPERDIRE is a project devoted to the creation of a set of Mathematica based programs for the differential reduction of hypergeometric functions. The current version includes two parts: the first one, FdFunction, for manipulations with Appell hypergeometric functions F{sub D} of r variables; and the second one, FsFunction, for manipulations with Lauricella-Saran hypergeometric functions F{sub S} of three variables. Both functions are related with one-loop Feynman diagrams.

  14. Characterization of cetuximab F{sub c/2} dimers by off-line CZE-MS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    François, Yannis-Nicolas, E-mail: yfrancois@unistra.fr [Laboratoire de Spectrométrie de Masse des Interactions et des Systèmes (LSMIS), UDS-CNRS UMR 7140, Université de Strasbourg, Strasbourg (France); Biacchi, Michael; Said, Nassur; Renard, Charly [Laboratoire de Spectrométrie de Masse des Interactions et des Systèmes (LSMIS), UDS-CNRS UMR 7140, Université de Strasbourg, Strasbourg (France); Beck, Alain [Centre d' immunologie Pierre Fabre, Saint-Julien-en-Genevois (France); Gahoual, Rabah [Laboratoire de Spectrométrie de Masse des Interactions et des Systèmes (LSMIS), UDS-CNRS UMR 7140, Université de Strasbourg, Strasbourg (France); Laboratory of Bioanalytical Chemistry and Spectroscopy, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Leize-Wagner, Emmanuelle [Laboratoire de Spectrométrie de Masse des Interactions et des Systèmes (LSMIS), UDS-CNRS UMR 7140, Université de Strasbourg, Strasbourg (France)

    2016-02-18

    Monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapeutics attract the largest concern due to their strong therapeutic potency and specificity. The Fc region of mAbs is common to many new biotherapeutics as biosimilar, antibody drug conjugate or fusion protein. Fc region has consequences for Fc-mediated effector functions that might be desirable for therapeutic applications. As a consequence, there is a continuous need for improvement of analytical methods to enable fast and accurate characterization of biotherapeutics. Capillary zone electrophoresis-Mass spectrometry couplings (CZE-MS) appear really attractive methods for the characterization of biological samples. In this report, we used CZE-MS systems developed in house and native MS infusion to allow precise middle-up characterization of F{sub c/2} variant of cetuximab. Molecular weights were measured for three F{sub c/2} charge variants detected in the CZE separation of cetuximab subunits. Two F{sub c/2} C-terminal lysine variants were identified and separated. As the aim is to understand the presence of three peaks in the CZE separation for two F{sub c/2} subunits, we developed a strategy using CZE-UV/MALDI-MS and CZE-UV/ESI-MS to evaluate the role of N-glycosylation and C-terminal lysine truncation on the CZE separation. The chemical structure of N-glycosylation expressed on the Fc region of cetuximab does not influence CZE separation while C-terminal lysine is significantly influencing separation. In addition, native MS infusion demonstrated the characterization of F{sub c/2} dimers at pH 5.7 and 6.8 and the first separation of these dimers using CZE-MS. - Highlights: • We confirm the power of off-line CE/MS coupling for the separation of mAb isoforms. • We demonstrate the role of C-terminal lysine truncation in the separation process. • We demonstrate the presence of non-covalent interactions between Fc/2 subunit. • We identify Fc/2 homo- and heterodimers.

  15. Sudden f/sub min/ enhancements and sudden cosmic noise absorptions associated with solar X-ray flares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, T [Hyogo Coll. of Medicine, Hyogo (Japan). Dept. of Physics

    1975-01-01

    Sudden fsub(min) enhancements (SFsub(m)E's) and sudden cosmic noise absorptions (SCNA's) associated with increments of X-ray fluxes during solar flares are studied on the basis of X-ray flux data measured by SOLRAD 9 and 10 satellites. Some statistical analyses on SFsub(m)E's observed at five observatories in Japan, corresponding to increased X-ray fluxes in the 1-8 A band are made for 50 solar flare events during the period January 1972 to December 1973, and value of fsub(min) is expressed as functions of cos x(x; solar zenith angle) and 1-8 A band X-ray flux. Similar study is also made for SCNA's observed by 30 MHz riometer at Hiraiso for 15 great solar flare events during the same period, together with 27.6 MHz riometer data reported by Schwentek (1973) and 18 MHz data published by Deshpande and Mitra (1972b). It is found that fsub(min) value (MHz) and SCNA value (L, dB) of a radio wave with frequency f(MHz) are related to X-ray flux (F/sub 0/, erg cm/sup -2/ sec/sup -1/) in the 1-8 A band and to cos x, by following approximate expressions, fsub(min)(MHz)=10F/sub 0/sup(1/4) cossup(1/2) x, and L(dB)=4.37x10/sup 3/f/sup -2/F/sub 0/sup(1/2) cos x, respectively. Blackout seems to occur for F/sub 0/ values causing fsub(min)'s greater than about 5 MHz. It is shown that these expressions can be derived from a brief theoretical calculation of radio wave absorption in the lower ionosphere. Also it is suggested that threshold X-ray fluxes in the 1-8 A band which may produce a minimum SFsub(m)E (2 MHz), blackout and minimum SCNA (0.27-0.36 dB for 30 MHz noise) are 1.6x10/sup -3/, 6.2x10/sup -2/ and (3-8) x 10/sup -3/ erg cm/sup -2/ sec/sup -1/, respectively, for cos x=1.

  16. Further Search for the Two-Photon Production of the Glueball Candidate {ital f}{sub {ital J}}(2220)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam, M.S.; Athar, S.B.; Ling, Z.; Mahmood, A.H.; Timm, S.; Wappler, F. [State University of New York at Albany, Albany, New York 12222 (United States); Anastassov, A.; Duboscq, J.E.; Gan, K.K.; Hart, T.; Honscheid, K.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Lee, J.; Schwarthoff, H.; Spencer, M.B.; Wolf, A.; Zoeller, M.M. [Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Richichi, S.J.; Severini, H.; Skubic, P.; Undrus, A. [University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States); Bishai, M.; Fast, J.; Hinson, J.W.; Menon, N.; Miller, D.H.; Shibata, E.I.; Shipsey, I.P. [Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Glenn, S.; Kwon, Y.; Lyon, A.L.; Roberts, S.; Thorndike, E.H. [University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Jessop, C.P.; Lingel, K.; Marsiske, H.; Perl, M.L.; Savinov, V.; Ugolini, D.; Zhou, X. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94309 (United States); Coan, T.E.; Fadeyev, V.; Korolkov, I.; Maravin, Y.; Narsky, I.; Shelkov, V.; Staeck, J.; Stroynowski, R.; Volobouev, I.; Ye, J. [Southern Methodist University, Dallas, Texas 75275 (United States); Artuso, M.; Dambasuren, E.; Efimov, A.; Kopp, S.; Moneti, G.C.; Mountain, R.; Schuh, S.; Skwarnicki, T.; Stone, S.; Titov, A.; Viehhauser, G.; Wang, J.C. [Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York 13244 (United States); Bartelt, J.; Csorna, S.E.; McLean, K.W.; Marka, S. [Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States); Godang, R.; Kinoshita, K.; Lai, I.C.; Pomianowski, P.; Schrenk, S. [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States); Bonvicini, G.; Cinabro, D.; Greene, R.; Perera, L.P.; Zhou, G.J. [Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States); Chadhha, M.; Chan, S.; Eigen, G.; Miller, J.S.; Schmidtler, M.; Urheim, J.; Weinstein, A.J.; Wuerthwein, F. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)

    1998-10-01

    The CLEO II detector at the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} storage ring CESR has been used to search for two-photon production of the f{sub J}(2220) decaying into {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}} . No evidence for a signal is found in 4.77 fb{sup {minus}1} of data and a 95{percent} C.L. upper limit on [{Gamma}{sub {gamma}{gamma}}B{sub {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}}}]{sub f{sub J}( 2220)} of 2.5thinspthinspeV is set. If this result is combined with the BES Collaboration{close_quote}s measurement of f{sub J}(2220){r_arrow}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}} in radiative J/{psi} decay and the recent CLEO result for [{Gamma}{sub {gamma}{gamma}}B{sub K{sup 0}{sub S}K{sup 0}{sub S}}]{sub f{sub J} (2220)} , a 95{percent} C.L. lower limit on the stickiness of 102 is obtained. This result for the stickiness provides further support for a substantial neutral parton content in the f{sub J}(2220) . {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society }

  17. Induction of Male sterile mutants in vegetable crops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagata, Nobuhiko [Hokkaido National Agricultural Experiment Station, Sapporo (Japan)

    1982-03-01

    The cultivars of vegetable crops in Japan are almost all F/sub 1/ hybrid lines. These hybrid cultivars are superior in yield, quality and uniformity by heterosis, and play an important role in the protection of breeder's rights. Utilization of male sterile mutants has such advantages as the reduction of cost for F/sub 1/ production by saving labor, production of better seeds, that is, pollination without emasculation and avoidance of contamination caused by self pollination. Male sterility must be used for some species in which seed production is difficult because of tiny flowers and meager seed production by artificial crossing such as carrot and onion, and those in which pollination by bag or emasculation is expensive such as tomato, and sweet pepper. However, for vegetable crop breeeding, the induction and use of genetic male sterility are more difficult than for other crops, considering the economy and efficiency of research because the type of cultivars needed changes rapidly.

  18. Induction of Male sterile mutants in vegetable crops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagata, Nobuhiko (Hokkaido National Agricultural Experiment Station, Sapporo (Japan))

    1982-03-01

    The cultivars of vegetable crops in Japan are almost all F/sub 1/ hybrid lines. These hybrid cultivars are superior in yield, quality and uniformity by heterosis, and play an important role in the protection of breeder's rights. Utilization of male sterile mutants has such advantages as the reduction of cost for F/sub 1/ production by saving labor, production of better seeds, that is, pollination without emasculation and avoidance of contamination caused by self pollination. Male sterility must be used for some species in which seed production is difficult because of tiny flowers and meager seed production by artificial crossing such as carrot and onion, and those in which pollination by bag or emasculation is expensive such as tomato, and sweet pepper. However, for vegetable crop breeeding, the induction and use of genetic male sterility are more difficult than for other crops, considering the economy and efficiency of research because the type of cultivars needed changes rapidly.

  19. Measurement of the diffractive longitudinal structure function F{sub L}{sup D} at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaron, F.D. [National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), Bucharest (Romania); Bucharest Univ. (Romania). Faculty of Physics; Alexa, C. [National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), Bucharest (Romania); Andreev, V. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (RU)] (and others)

    2011-07-15

    First measurements are presented of the diffractive cross section {sigma}{sub ep{yields}}{sub eXY} at centre-of-mass energies {radical}(s) of 225 and 252 GeV, together with a precise new measurement at {radical}(s) of 319 GeV, using data taken with the H1 detector in the years 2006 and 2007. Together with previous H1 data at {radical}(s) of 301 GeV, the measurements are used to extract the diffractive longitudinal structure function F{sub L}{sup D} in the range of photon virtualities 4.0{<=} Q{sup 2} {<=}44.0 GeV{sup 2} and fractional proton longitudinal momentum loss 5.10{sup -4}{<=}x{sub P}{<=}3.10{sup -3}. The measured F{sub L}{sup D} is compared with leading twist predictions based on diffractive parton densities extracted in NLO QCD fits to previous measurements of diffractive Deep-Inelastic Scattering and with a model which additionally includes a higher twist contribution derived from a colour dipole approach. The ratio of the diffractive cross section induced by longitudinally polarised photons to that for transversely polarised photons is extracted and compared with the analogous quantity for inclusive Deep-Inelastic Scattering. (orig.)

  20. Measurement of the diffractive longitudinal structure function F{sub L}{sup D} at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaron, F.D.; Alexa, C.; Rotaru, M.; Stoicea, G. [National Inst. for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest (Romania); Andreev, V.; Belousov, A.; Eliseev, A.; Fomenko, A.; Gogitidze, N.; Lebedev, A.; Malinovski, E.; Rusakov, S.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Soloviev, Y.; Vazdik, Y. [Lebedev Physical Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation); Backovic, S.; Dubak, A.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Picuric, I.; Raicevic, N. [Univ. of Montenegro, Faculty of Science, Podgorica (ME); Baghdasaryan, A.; Baghdasaryan, S.; Zohrabyan, H. [Yerevan Physics Inst. (Armenia); Barrelet, E. [Univ. Pierre et Marie Curie Paris 6, Univ. Denis Diderot Paris 7, CNRS/IN2P3, LPNHE, Paris (France); Bartel, W.; Belov, P.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Britzger, D.; Campbell, A.J.; Eckerlin, G.; Elsen, E.; Felst, R.; Fischer, D.J.; Fleischer, M.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Glazov, A.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grebenyuk, A.; Grell, B.R.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Helebrant, C.; Kleinwort, C.; Kogler, R.; Kraemer, M.; Levonian, S.; Lipka, K.; List, J.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, J.; Niebuhr, C.; Nowak, K.; Olsson, J.E.; Pahl, P.; Panagoulias, I.; Papadopoulou, T.; Petrukhin, A.; Piec, S.; Pitzl, D.; Schmitt, S.; Sefkow, F.; South, D.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Toll, T.; Wuensch, E. [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Begzsuren, K.; Ravdandorj, T.; Tseepeldorj, B. [Inst. of Physics and Technology of the Mongolian Academy of Sciences, Ulaanbaatar (Mongolia); Bizot, J.C.; Brisson, V.; Delcourt, B.; Jacquet, M.; Pascaud, C.; Tran, T.H.; Zhang, Z.; Zomer, F. [Univ. Paris-Sud, LAL, Orsay (France); Boudry, V.; Moreau, F.; Specka, A. [Ecole Polytechnique, LLR, Palaiseau (France); Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Mudrinic, M.; Pandurovic, M.; Smiljanic, I. [Univ. of Belgrade, Vinca Inst. of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade (RS); Bracinik, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Newman, P.R.; Thompson, P.D. [Univ. of Birmingham, School of Physics and Astronomy (United Kingdom); Bruncko, D.; Cerny, V.; Ferencei, J. [Slovak Academy of Sciences, Kosice (Slovakia)] [and others

    2011-12-15

    First measurements are presented of the diffractive cross section {sigma}{sub ep{yields}}{sub eXY} at centre-of-mass energies {radical}(s) of 225 and 252 GeV, together with a precise new measurement at {radical}(s) of 319 GeV, using data taken with the H1 detector in the years 2006 and 2007. Together with previous H1 data at {radical}(s) of 301 GeV, the measurements are used to extract the diffractive longitudinal structure function F{sub L}{sup D} in the range of photon virtualities 4.0{<=}Q{sup 2}{<=} 44.0 GeV{sup 2} and fractional proton longitudinal momentum loss 5 x 10{sup -4}{<=}x{sub P}{<=}3 x 10{sup -3}. The measured F{sub L}{sup D} is compared with leading twist predictions based on diffractive parton densities extracted in NLO QCD fits to previous measurements of diffractive Deep-Inelastic Scattering and with a model which additionally includes a higher twist contribution derived from a colour dipole approach. The ratio of the diffractive cross section induced by longitudinally polarised photons to that for transversely polarised photons is extracted and compared with the analogous quantity for inclusive Deep-Inelastic Scattering. (orig.)

  1. Generalized zeta function representation of groups and 2-dimensional topological Yang-Mills theory: The example of GL(2, #Mathematical Double-Struck Capital F#{sub q}) and PGL(2, #Mathematical Double-Struck Capital F#{sub q})

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roche, Ph., E-mail: philippe.roche@univ-montp2.fr [Université Montpellier 2, CNRS, L2C, IMAG, Montpellier (France)

    2016-03-15

    We recall the relation between zeta function representation of groups and two-dimensional topological Yang-Mills theory through Mednikh formula. We prove various generalisations of Mednikh formulas and define generalization of zeta function representations of groups. We compute some of these functions in the case of the finite group GL(2, #Mathematical Double-Struck Capital F#{sub q}) and PGL(2, #Mathematical Double-Struck Capital F#{sub q}). We recall the table characters of these groups for any q, compute the Frobenius-Schur indicator of their irreducible representations, and give the explicit structure of their fusion rings.

  2. Revised numerical model for F{sub 2} bubble breakdown in molten flibe and its economics in the fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seto, K., E-mail: kelvin.seto@uoit.ca [University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Oshawa, ON (Canada)

    2015-07-01

    A one-dimensional numerical model of the breakdown for a fluorine bubble due to break-up and chemical reactions with dissolved UF{sub 4} and PuF{sub 4} in the molten salt reactor (MSR) volatilization process was revised. The updated model utilized a more realistic, 1.0 cm F{sub 2} bubble to study the breakdown process in the idealized MSR fuel purification vessel. Although more accurate reaction interface and F{sub 2} reactivity values were used, chemical reactions were still found to be the primary cause of bubble breakdown. The importance of efficiency in F{sub 2} usage in the purification process on the economic and safety point of view was discussed. (author)

  3. Atomic layer deposition of boron-containing films using B{sub 2}F{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mane, Anil U., E-mail: amane@anl.gov; Elam, Jeffrey W. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60126 (United States); Goldberg, Alexander; Halls, Mathew D. [Schrödinger, Inc., San Diego, California 92122 (United States); Seidel, Thomas E. [Seitek50, Palm Coast, Florida 32135 (United States); Current, Michael I. [Current Scientific, San Jose, California 95124 (United States); Despres, Joseph; Byl, Oleg; Tang, Ying; Sweeney, Joseph [Entegris, Danbury, Connecticut 06810 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Ultrathin and conformal boron-containing atomic layer deposition (ALD) films could be used as a shallow dopant source for advanced transistor structures in microelectronics manufacturing. With this application in mind, diboron tetrafluoride (B{sub 2}F{sub 4}) was explored as an ALD precursor for the deposition of boron containing films. Density functional theory simulations for nucleation on silicon (100) surfaces indicated better reactivity of B{sub 2}F{sub 4} in comparison to BF{sub 3}. Quartz crystal microbalance experiments exhibited growth using either B{sub 2}F{sub 4}-H{sub 2}O for B{sub 2}O{sub 3} ALD, or B{sub 2}F{sub 4}-disilane (Si{sub 2}H{sub 6}) for B ALD, but in both cases, the initial growth per cycle was quite low (≤0.2 Å/cycle) and decreased to near zero growth after 8–30 ALD cycles. However, alternating between B{sub 2}F{sub 4}-H{sub 2}O and trimethyl aluminum (TMA)-H{sub 2}O ALD cycles resulted in sustained growth at ∼0.65 Å/cycle, suggesting that the dense –OH surface termination produced by the TMA-H{sub 2}O combination enhances the uptake of B{sub 2}F{sub 4} precursor. The resultant boron containing films were analyzed for composition by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and capacitance measurements indicated an insulating characteristic. Finally, diffused boron profiles less than 100 Å were obtained after rapid thermal anneal of the boron containing ALD film.

  4. Method for fluorination of actinide fluorides and oxyfluorides using O/sub 2/F/sub 2/

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eller, P.G.; Malm, J.G.; Penneman, R.A.

    1984-08-01

    The present invention relates generally to methods of fluorination and more particularly to the use of O/sub 2/F/sub 2/ for the preparation of actinide hexafluorides, and for the extraction of deposited actinides and fluorides and oxyfluorides thereof from reaction vessels. The experiments set forth hereinabove demonstrate that the room temperature or below use of O/sub 2/F/sub 2/ will be highly beneficial for the preparation of pure actinide hexafluorides from their respective tetrafluorides without traces of HF being present as occurs using other fluorinating agents: and decontamination of equipment previously exposed to actinides: e.g., walls, feed lines, etc.

  5. f{sub 0}(500), f{sub 0}(980), and a{sub 0}(980) production in the χ{sub c1} → ηπ{sup +}π{sup -} reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Wei-Hong [Guangxi Normal University, Department of Physics, Guilin (China); Xie, Ju-Jun [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Modern Physics, Lanzhou (China); Lanzhou University, Research Center for Hadron and CSR Physics, Institute of Modern Physics of CAS, Lanzhou (China); Oset, Eulogio [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Modern Physics, Lanzhou (China); Institutos de Investigacion de Paterna, Departamento de Fisica Teorica y IFIC, Centro Mixto Universidad de Valencia-CSIC, Valencia (Spain)

    2016-12-15

    We study the χ{sub c1} → ηπ{sup +}π{sup -} decay, paying attention to the production of f{sub 0}(500), f{sub 0}(980), and a{sub 0}(980) from the final state interaction of pairs of mesons that can lead to these three mesons in the final state, which is implemented using the chiral unitary approach. Very clean and strong signals are obtained for the a{sub 0}(980) excitation in the ηπ invariant mass distribution and for the f{sub 0}(500) in the π{sup +}π{sup -} mass distribution. A smaller, but also clear signal for the f{sub 0}(980) excitation is obtained. The results are contrasted with experimental data and the agreement found is good, providing yet one more test in support of the picture where these resonances are dynamically generated from the meson-meson interaction. (orig.)

  6. Calculation of the Coulomb nuclear energy for the 1fsub(7/2) shell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaminski, V.A.; Shpikovski, S.

    1980-01-01

    Calculated was the Coulomb energy for nuclei with half-filled 1fsub(7/2) shell i.e. for configurations, where quasiparticle basis can serve as a total basis for precise calculations. Presented are calculation results of vector and tensor components of the Coulomb energy for Ca-Se-Ti-V isobaric pairs, as well as experimental and theoretical values for the Coulomb displacements. To estimate the Coulomb energies used were wave functions of a Hamiltonian taking account of pair and quadrupole interactions. There is good agreement with experimental data. Quasiparticle consideration is useful for calculating matrix elements of half-filled shells and for the cases of such an isospin value, where the technique of genealogical coefficients becomes extremely cumbersome

  7. Genetic variability, heritability, character association and path analysis in F/sub 1/ hybrids of tomato

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleem, M.Y.; Iqbal, Q.; Asghar, M.

    2013-01-01

    Twenty-five F/sub 1/ hybrids generated from 5*5 diallel crosses were evaluated to study the quantitative genetics of yield and some yield related traits during 2009-10. Worth of room was realized for improvement due to highly significant genetic variations among all traits studied. The highest estimates of genotypic and phenotypic coefficients of variability were recorded for number of fruits per plant while fruit width was the most heritable trait. Plant height, number of fruits per plant and fruit weight revealed significant positive genotypic and phenotypic association along with direct positive effect on fruit yield per plant. It is therefore, recommended that fruit weight, number of fruits per plant and plant height should be given due importance in selection of promising crosses to develop commercial hybrid variety in tomato. (author)

  8. Measurement of Coster-Kronig yields f{sub 23} for W, Pt, Pb and U

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Sheenu; Mittal, V K; Mittal, Raj, E-mail: sheenu85gupta@gmail.co, E-mail: vijay_52_mittal@yahoo.co, E-mail: rmsingla@yahoo.co [Nuclear Science Laboratories, Physics Department, Punjabi University, Patiala-147002 (India)

    2010-12-14

    The non-radiative shifting of vacancy from L{sub 2} to L{sub 3} sub-shell, Coster-Kronig yield f{sub 23}, is measured for W, Pt, Pb and U using the selective excitation technique for L{sub 2} and L{sub 3} sub-shell electrons in a compact tri-axial double-reflection geometrical setup with minimum scattered background. The setup consists of a low-power x-ray tube with Rh anode as a photon source, primary exciter for L{sub 2} and L{sub 3} sub-shells of an experimental target and the experimental target itself in one plane and a Si-PIN detector to record the emitted x-rays from the experimental target in the perpendicular plane. A separate experimental procedure has been adopted in a 90{sup 0} single-reflection setup both to determine the exciting photon flux that strikes at the experimental target and to nullify exactly the irrelevant L x-rays produced by tube photons which are scattered from the primary exciter. The procedure leads to reduction of probable errors in the measurements and authenticity of determined values.

  9. Hyperfine interactions in ferromagnetic materials and magnetic properties of 1fsub(7/2) nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozek, E.

    1976-01-01

    Hyperfine interactions of light nuclei recoil-implanted into iron, nickel and cobalt were studied using the perturbed integral angular distribution IMPAD. Isomeric states of lifetimes within the nanosecond range were excited in the following reactions: 28 Si 14 N, xn, yp 37 Ar, 39 K, 40 K; 27 Al 16 O, xn, yp 41 K, 41 Ca. In all cases except implantation of potassium isotopes into nickel observed shifts of angular distribution were found much smaller than the ones calculated using the known values of g factors, livetimes and strengths of the hyperfine fields. This effect can be explained under the assumption that only a fraction of nuclei feel the full magnetic field. Different fractions obtained for 40 K and 41 K suggest a migration process on a ns time scale. The magnetic moments of isomeric nuclear states excited in reaction 27 Al 14 N, p 36 Cl, 24 Mg 19 F, 2pn 40 K and 48 Ca, 2n 50 Ti were measured using the perturbed integral angular distribution technique - IPAD in an external magnetic field. The g factors for the investigated states were interpreted on the base of the shell model, assuming the effective magnetic moments associated with shell model orbitals dsub(3/2) and fsub(7/2). (author)

  10. Seasonal variability in virtual height of ionospheric f/sub 2/ layer at the pakistan atmospheric region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jilani, A.A.; Afridi, F.A.K.; Mian, K.; Zai, M.A.K.Y.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the seasonal variability in virtual height of ionospheric F/sub 2/ layer for Pakistan's atmospheric region (PAR). In this communication virtual height variations have been analyzed by the descriptive statistical techniques. These methodologies comprise an autoregressive strategy, linear regression and polynomial regression. The relevance of these models has been illuminated using predicted values of different parameters under the seasonal variation of ionospheric F/sub 2/ layer in virtual height that affect the radio wave propagation through the ionosphere. These techniques are implemented to theorize the physical process of varying the virtual heights that leads this study towards formulating the variations due to interaction of radio wave propagation with this ionospheric layer. (author)

  11. Exploration on anion ordering, optical properties and electronic structure in K{sub 3}WO{sub 3}F{sub 3} elpasolite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atuchin, V.V. [Laboratory of Optical Materials and Structures, Institute of Semiconductor Physics, SB RAS, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Isaenko, L.I. [Laboratory of Crystal Growth, Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, SB RAS, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Kesler, V.G. [Laboratory of Physical Principles for Integrated Microelectronics, Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Lin, Z.S., E-mail: zslin@mail.ipc.ac.cn [Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2711, Beijing 100190 (China); Molokeev, M.S. [Laboratory of Crystal Physics, Institute of Physics, SB RAS, Krasnoyarsk 660036 (Russian Federation); Yelisseyev, A.P.; Zhurkov, S.A. [Laboratory of Crystal Growth, Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, SB RAS, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2012-03-15

    Room-temperature modification of potassium oxyfluorotungstate, G2-K{sub 3}WO{sub 3}F{sub 3}, has been prepared by low-temperature chemical route and single crystal growth. Wide optical transparency range of 0.3-9.4 {mu}m and forbidden band gap E{sub g}=4.32 eV have been obtained for G2-K{sub 3}WO{sub 3}F{sub 3} crystal. Meanwhile, its electronic structure has been calculated with the first-principles calculations. The good agreement between the theorectical and experimental results have been achieved. Furthermore, G2-K{sub 3}WO{sub 3}F{sub 3} is predicted to possess the relatively large nonlinear optical coefficients. - Graphical abstract: Using the cm-size K{sub 3}WO{sub 3}F{sub 3} crystal (left upper), the transmission spectrum (right upper) and XPS valence electronic states (left lower) were measured, agreed with the ab initio results (right lower). Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The cm-size G2-K{sub 3}WO{sub 3}F{sub 3} single crystals are obtained. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Optical absorption edge and transmission range are defined for G2-K{sub 3}WO{sub 3}F{sub 3} crystal. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Crystal structures of all known K{sub 3}WO{sub 3}F{sub 3} polymorph modifications are determined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Experimental electronic structure is consistent with the first-principles result. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer G2-K{sub 3}WO{sub 3}F{sub 3} is predicted as a crystal with large NLO coefficients.

  12. The ionic conductivity and defect structure of fluorite-type solid solutions Basub(1-x)Usub(x)Fsub(2+2x)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouwerkerk, M.

    1986-01-01

    The crystal growth and the characterization of the solid solutions Msub(1-x)Usub(x)Fsub(2+2x) (M = Ca, Sr, Ba and Pb) are described. X-ray diffraction and X-ray fluorescence methods have been utilized to determine the U 4+ content of the solid solutions. The incorporation of UF 4 in PbF 2 is found to have a stabilizing effect on the β-PbF 2 (fluorite) structure. A study of the conductivity properties of Basub(1-x)Usub(x)Fsub(2+2x) and of Pbsub(1-x)Usub(x)Fsub(2+2x) is presented. The effect of an anion excess on the diffuse phase transition and the specific heat anomaly of single crystals Msub(1-x)Usub(x)Fsub(2+2x) was studied with impedance spectroscopy and calorimetric measurements. Finally, a study of the fluorite-type solid solutions Basub(1-x)Lasub(x)Fsub(2+x) and Basub(1-x)Usub(x)Fsub(2+2x) using the Thermally Stimulated Depolarization Current (TSDC) technique is presented. (Auth.)

  13. Involvement of prostaglandins F/sub 2α/ and E1 with rabbit endometrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlicky, D.J.

    1985-01-01

    Several growth factors and hormones are thought to play a role in the growth control of endometrial cells. The authors have shown that prostaglandin F/sub 2→/ (PGF/sub 2α/) is a growth factor for primary cultures of rabbit endometrium cultured in chemically-defined serum-free medium and that prostaglandin E 1 (PGE 1 ) antagonizes the PGF/sub 2→/ induction of growth. Both [ 3 H]PGF/sub 2α/ and [ 3 H]PGE 1 bind in a time and temperature dependent, dissociable, saturable and specific manner. The binding of [ 3 H]PGF/sub 2α/ and [ 3 H]PGE 1 can be both down and up regulated and is enzyme sensitive. PGE 1 stimulates intracellular cAMP synthesis and accumulation in a time and concentration dependent manner. PGF/sub 2α/ probably exerts its effects through an amiloride-sensitive intermediate. Both PGF/sub 2α/ and PGE 1 are constitutively synthesized by these primary cultures, and they have shown this synthesis to be both drug and hormone sensitive. They hypothesize that it is the ratio, rather than the absolute quantities, of PGF/sub 2α/ and PGE 1 which is of more importance in the regulation of endometrial cell growth. Furthermore, they believe this regulation of endometrial growth plays a role in control of proliferation during the decidual response and that a derangement in the ratio of these prostaglandins may lead to either infertility or hyperplasia. The ability of these cultures to synthesize prostaglandins in a hormonally regulatable manner may be of importance in the study of dysmenorrhea and uterine cramping as caused by the myometrial contracting prostaglandin, PGF/sub 2α/

  14. Moments of F>2 Structure Functions and Multiparton Correlations in Nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osipenko, Mikhail [Moscow State Univ., Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2002-10-01

    The inclusive inelastic electron scattering o the proton was measured at five different beam energies 1.5, 2.5, 4.0, 4.2 and 4.4 GeV. The data were taken, during February-March 1999, on a liquid hydrogen target with the CLAS detector installed in Hall-B of the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF). The obtained high statistics and high precision data appear to be in good agreement with previously measured world data and permit to integrate experimental values of F>2 over x at fixed Q2 , allowing for the first time the evaluation of its experimental moments at low and moderate values of Q2 . In a combined analysis of CLAS and world data, the Q2-evolution of the experimental moments was explored in the range from 0.3 up to 100 GeV2 . This offered a unique possibility to trace changes of the proton structure function from hard DIS down to the non-perturbative regime through the transition region, which is of particular interest for the TJNAF physics program. The obtained experimental moments allowed to perform a separation between the leading twist, calculable in the framework of the perturbative QCD (pQCD), and higher twists, treated effectively. A comparison with theoretical predictions based either on lattice QCD simulations or obtained within models of the nucleon structure may represent an important test of our understanding of the nucleon structure as observed at large wavelengths.

  15. Combining ability analysis in intraspecific f/sub 1/ diallel cross of upland cotton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, S.A.; Khan, N.U.; Mohammad, F.

    2011-01-01

    be vacated earlier for following crop like wheat. However, it was also concluded that we could not rely on F/sub 1/s only, however, the combined performance of F1 and F2 hybrids could be a good selection criteria to identify the most promising populations to be utilized either as F2 hybrids or as a source population for further selection in advanced generations. (author)

  16. Luminescence properties of Yb:Nd:Tm:KY{sub 3}F{sub 10} nanophosphor and thermal treatment effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Laércio, E-mail: lgomes@ipen.br [Centro de Lasers e Aplicações, Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares, IPEN-CNEN/SP, Butantã, P.O. Box 11049, São Paulo, SP o5422-970 (Brazil); Linhares, Horácio Marconi da Silva M.D. [Centro de Lasers e Aplicações, Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares, IPEN-CNEN/SP, Butantã, P.O. Box 11049, São Paulo, SP o5422-970 (Brazil); Ichikawa, Rodrigo Uchida; Martinez, Luis Gallego [Departamento de Ciências dos Materiais, Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (Brazil); Ranieri, Izilda Marcia [Centro de Lasers e Aplicações, Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares, IPEN-CNEN/SP, Butantã, P.O. Box 11049, São Paulo, SP o5422-970 (Brazil)

    2015-01-15

    In this work, we present the spectroscopic properties of KY{sub 3}F{sub 10} (KY3F) nanocrystals activated with thulium and codoped with ytterbium and neodymium ions. The most important processes that lead to the thulium upconversion emissions in the blue region were identified. A time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy technique was employed to measure the luminescence decays and to determine the most important mechanisms involved in the upconversion process that populates {sup 1}G{sub 4} (Tm{sup 3+}) excited states. Analysis of the energy-transfer processes dynamics using selective pulsed-laser excitations in Yb:Nd:Tm, Nd:KY3F nanocrystals shows that the direct energy transfer from Nd{sup 3+} to Tm{sup 3+} ions is the mechanism responsible for the 78% of the blue upconversion luminescence in the Yb:Nd:Tm:KY3F when compared with the Yb:Nd:Tm:KY3F bulk crystal for an laser excitation at 802 nm. An investigation of the {sup 1}G{sub 4} level luminescence kinetic of Tm{sup 3+} in Yb/Nd/Tm system revealed that the luminescence efficiency ({sup 1}G{sub 4}) starts with a very low value (0.38%) for the synthesized nanocrystal (as grown) and strongly increases to 97% after thermal treatment at 550 °C for 6 h under argon flow. As a consequence of the thermal treatment at T=550 °C, the contributions of the (Nd×Tm) (Up{sub 1}) and (Nd×Yb×Tm) (Up{sub 2}) upconversion processes to the {sup 1}G{sub 4} luminescence are 33% (Up{sub 1}) and 67% for Up{sub 2}. Up{sub 2} process represented by Nd{sup 3+} ({sup 4}F{sub 3/2})→Yb{sup 3+} ({sup 2}F{sub 7/2}) followed by Yb{sup 3+} ({sup 2}F{sub 5/2})→Tm ({sup 3}H{sub 4})→Tm{sup 3+} ({sup 1}G{sub 4}) was previously reported as the main mechanism to produce the blue luminescence in Yb:Nd:Tm:YLiF{sub 4} and KY{sub 3}F{sub 10} bulk crystals. Results of X-ray diffraction analysis of nanopowder using the Rietveld method reveled that crystallite sizes remain unchanged (12–14 nm) after thermal treatments with T≤400 °C, while the

  17. Half-space albedo problem with modified F{sub N} method for linear and quadratic anisotropic scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuereci, R.G. [Kirikkale Univ., Kirikkale (Turkey). Kirikkale Vocational School; Tuereci, D. [Ministry of Education, Ankara (Turkey). 75th year Anatolia High School

    2017-05-15

    One speed, time independent and homogeneous medium neutron transport equation can be solved with the anisotropic scattering which includes both the linear anisotropic and the quadratic anisotropic scattering properties. Having solved Case's eigenfunctions and the orthogonality relations among these eigenfunctions, some neutron transport problems such as albedo problem can be calculated as numerically by using numerical or semi-analytic methods. In this study the half-space albedo problem is investigated by using the modified F{sub N} method.

  18. Improved process for generating ClF/sub 3/ from ClF and F/sub 2/

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiner, R.H.; Pashley, J.H.; Barber, E.J.

    The invention is an improvement in the process for producing gaseous ClF/sub 3/ by reacting ClF and F/sub 2/ at elevated temperature. The improved process comprises conducting the reaction in the presence of NiF/sub 2/, which preferably is in the form of particles or in the form of a film or layer on a particulate substrate. The nickel fluoride acts as a reaction catalyst, significantly increasing the reaction rate and thus permitting valuable reductions in process temperature, pressure, and/or reactor volume.

  19. Development of doxorubicin-induced chronic cardiotoxicity in the B6C3F{sub 1} mouse model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desai, Varsha G., E-mail: varsha.desai@fda.hhs.gov [Personalized Medicine Branch, Division of Systems Biology, National Center for Toxicological Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Herman, Eugene H. [Division of Drug Safety Research, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, MD 20993 (United States); Moland, Carrie L.; Branham, William S. [Personalized Medicine Branch, Division of Systems Biology, National Center for Toxicological Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Lewis, Sherry M. [Office of Scientific Coordination, National Center for Toxicological Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Davis, Kelly J. [Toxicologic Pathology Associates, National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); George, Nysia I. [Division Bioinformatics and Biostatistics, National Center for Toxicological Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Lee, Taewon [Department of Information and Mathematics, Korea University, Jochiwon, Chungnam 339-700 (Korea, Republic of); Kerr, Susan [Arkansas Heart Hospital, Little Rock, AR 72211 (United States); Fuscoe, James C. [Personalized Medicine Branch, Division of Systems Biology, National Center for Toxicological Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Serum levels of cardiac troponins serve as biomarkers of myocardial injury. However, troponins are released into the serum only after damage to cardiac tissue has occurred. Here, we report development of a mouse model of doxorubicin (DOX)-induced chronic cardiotoxicity to aid in the identification of predictive biomarkers of early events of cardiac tissue injury. Male B6C3F{sub 1} mice were administered intravenous DOX at 3 mg/kg body weight, or an equivalent volume of saline, once a week for 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, and 14 weeks, resulting in cumulative DOX doses of 12, 18, 24, 30, 36, and 42 mg/kg, respectively. Mice were sacrificed a week following the last dose. A significant reduction in body weight gain was observed in mice following exposure to a weekly DOX dose for 1 week and longer compared to saline-treated controls. DOX treatment also resulted in declines in red blood cell count, hemoglobin level, and hematocrit compared to saline-treated controls after the 2nd weekly dose until the 8th and 9th doses, followed by a modest recovery. All DOX-treated mice had significant elevations in cardiac troponin T concentrations in plasma compared to saline-treated controls, indicating cardiac tissue injury. Also, a dose-related increase in the severity of cardiac lesions was seen in mice exposed to 24 mg/kg DOX and higher cumulative doses. Mice treated with cumulative DOX doses of 30 mg/kg and higher showed a significant decline in heart rate, suggesting drug-induced cardiac dysfunction. Altogether, these findings demonstrate the development of DOX-induced chronic cardiotoxicity in B6C3F{sub 1} mice. -- Highlights: ► 24 mg/kg was a cumulative cardiotoxic dose of doxorubicin in male B6C3F{sub 1} mice. ► Doxorubicin-induced hematological toxicity was in association with splenomegaly. ► Doxorubicin induced severe testicular toxicity in B6C3F{sub 1} male mice.

  20. Diffractive production of {pi}{sup -}f{sub 1} in {pi}{sup -}p interactions at COMPASS(CERN)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Hao

    2012-11-06

    Diffractive dissociation of a {pi}{sup -} beam(190 GeV/c) on a proton target was measured at the COMPASS spectrometer. During a run in 2008, a large number of events with {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{eta} in the final state was recorded. Partial wave analyses(PWA) of these data are being performed, concentrating on the kinematic domain of momentum transfer t' from 0.1 to 1.0 GeV{sup 2}/c{sup 2}. Subject of this thesis is the diffractive production of X from {pi}{sup -}p{yields}Xp with the subsequent decays X{yields}{pi}{sup -}f{sub 1} and f{sub 1}{yields}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{eta}. Two different decays of the {eta} were selected: {eta}{yields}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}({gamma}{gamma}) and {eta}{yields}{gamma}{gamma}. A kinematic fitting routine was used to improve the data selection. In order to do the PWA, a Monte Carlo(MC) simulation is needed to account for the detector acceptance. In the mass-independent PWA the angular distributions of the real events are compared with the event distributions imposed on Monte Carlo(MC) events in order to determine the production amplitudes of different assumed partial waves in mass bins of 50 MeV/c{sup 2} of the invariant mass m{sub X} of X in the range 1.3 < m{sub X} < 3.0 GeV/c{sup 2}, by means of a maximum-likelihood-fit. Then a simplified mass-dependent fit of Breit-Wigner amplitudes has been applied to the distributions of production intensities as a function of m{sub X} in order to determine the contributions of known or presumed resonances. In the {pi}{sup -}f{sub 1} channel, we focus on the S, P and D wave i.e. orbital angular momentum L=0, 1, 2 between {pi}{sup -} and f{sub 1}. Significant intensity and phase motion are observed for the following J{sup PC}M{sup {epsilon}} combinations, where J, P, C, M and {epsilon} stand for the total angular momentum, parity and charge conjugation, total spin projection and reflectivity: 1{sup -+}1{sup +} (S wave), 1{sup ++}0{sup +} (P wave), 2{sup -+}0{sup +} (D

  1. Estimated Critical Conditions for UO(Sub 2)F(Sub 2)-H(Sub 2)O Systems in Fully Water-Reflected Spherical Geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, W.C.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to document reference calculations performed using the SCALE-4.0 code system to determine the critical parameters of UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O spheres. The calculations are an extension of those documented in ORNL/CSD/TM-284. Specifically, the data for low-enriched UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O spheres have been extended to highly enriched uranium. These calculations, together with those reported in ORNL/CSD/TM-284, provide a consistent set of critical parameters (k{sub {infinity}}, volume, mass, mass of water) for UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} and water over the full range of enrichment and moderation ratio.

  2. Estimated critical conditions for UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}--H{sub 2}O systems in fully water-reflected spherical geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, W.C.; Turner, J.C.

    1992-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to document reference calculations performed using the SCALE-4.0 code system to determine the critical parameters of UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O spheres. The calculations are an extension of those documented in ORNL/CSD/TM-284. Specifically, the data for low-enriched UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O spheres have been extended to highly enriched uranium. These calculations, together with those reported in ORNL/CSD/TM-284, provide a consistent set of critical parameters (k{sub {infinity}}, volume, mass, mass of water) for UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} and water over the full range of enrichment and moderation ratio.

  3. Crystal structure and luminescence properties of a novel red-emitting phosphor BaAlBO{sub 3}F{sub 2}:Eu{sup 3+}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Wanping, E-mail: cwp0918@aliyun.com; Zhou, Ahong; Liu, Yan; Dai, Xiaoyan; Yang, Xin

    2014-12-15

    A series of novel red-emitting phosphors BaAlBO{sub 3}F{sub 2}:xEu{sup 3+} (0.001≤x≤0.08) were first synthesized via a high temperature solid-state reaction. X-ray diffraction and photoluminescence spectroscopy were used to characterize the crystal structure and photoluminescence properties of the phosphor, respectively. The phosphor can be effectively excited with a 395 nm light, and shows a dominant {sup 5}D{sub 0}−{sup 7}F{sub 2} emission with chromatic coordination of 0.628 and 0.372. The optimal doping concentration is about 0.04. Rietveld refinement results and the luminescence behavior of Eu{sup 3+} indicate that the Eu{sup 3+} ion occupies a C{sub 3} symmetry site, and the host BaAlBO{sub 3}F{sub 2} has a hexagonal structure with P-6 space group. In addition, the phosphor could be a potential candidate as red-emitting phosphor for application in white light-emitting diode. - Graphical abstract: The luminescence behavior and Rietveld refinement of BaAlBO{sub 3}F{sub 2}:Eu{sup 3+} indicate that the red-emitting phosphor has potential application in white LED and the host has a hexagonal structure with P-6 space group. - Highlights: • A novel red-emitting phosphor BaAlBO{sub 3}F{sub 2}:Eu{sup 3+} is first synthesized. • The crystal structure of BaAlBO{sub 3}F{sub 2} is confirmed. • The phosphor shows potential application in white LED.

  4. Vegetation species composition and canopy architecture information expressed in leaf water absorption measured in the 1000 nm and 2200 spectral region by an imaging spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Robert O.; Roberts, Dar A.

    1995-01-01

    Plant species composition and plant architectural attributes are critical parameters required for the measuring, monitoring, and modeling of terrestrial ecosystems. Remote sensing is commonly cited as an important tool for deriving vegetation properties at an appropriate scale for ecosystem studies, ranging from local to regional and even synoptic scales. Classical approaches rely on vegetation indices such as the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) to estimate biophysical parameters such as leaf area index or intercepted photosynthetically active radiation (IPAR). Another approach is to apply a variety of classification schemes to map vegetation and thus extrapolate fine-scale information about specific sites to larger areas of similar composition. Imaging spectrometry provides additional information that is not obtainable through broad-band sensors and that may provide improved inputs both to direct biophysical estimates as well as classification schemes. Some of this capability has been demonstrated through improved discrimination of vegetation, estimates of canopy biochemistry, and liquid water estimates from vegetation. We investigate further the potential of leaf water absorption estimated from Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data as a means for discriminating vegetation types and deriving canopy architectural information. We expand our analysis to incorporate liquid water estimates from two spectral regions, the 1000-nm region and the 2200-nm region. The study was conducted in the vicinity of Jasper Ridge, California, which is located on the San Francisco peninsula to the west of the Stanford University campus. AVIRIS data were acquired over Jasper Ridge, CA, on June 2, 1992, at 19:31 UTC. Spectra from three sites in this image were analyzed. These data are from an area of healthy grass, oak woodland, and redwood forest, respectively. For these analyses, the AVIRIS-measured upwelling radiance spectra for the entire Jasper

  5. Estimated critical conditions for UO[sub 2]F[sub 2]--H[sub 2]O systems in fully water-reflected spherical geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, W.C.; Turner, J.C.

    1992-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to document reference calculations performed using the SCALE-4.0 code system to determine the critical parameters of UO[sub 2]F[sub 2]-H[sub 2]O spheres. The calculations are an extension of those documented in ORNL/CSD/TM-284. Specifically, the data for low-enriched UO[sub 2]F[sub 2]-H[sub 2]O spheres have been extended to highly enriched uranium. These calculations, together with those reported in ORNL/CSD/TM-284, provide a consistent set of critical parameters (k[sub [infinity

  6. The 3-loop pure singlet heavy flavor contributions to the structure function F{sub 2}(x,Q{sup 2}) and the anomalous dimension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ablinger, J. [Research Institute for Symbolic Computation (RISC), Johannes Kepler University, Altenbergerstraße 69, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Behring, A.; Blümlein, J.; De Freitas, A. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, DESY, Platanenallee 6, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Manteuffel, A. von [PRISMA Cluster of Excellence, Institute of Physics, J. Gutenberg University, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Schneider, C. [Research Institute for Symbolic Computation (RISC), Johannes Kepler University, Altenbergerstraße 69, A-4040 Linz (Austria)

    2015-01-15

    The pure singlet asymptotic heavy flavor corrections to 3-loop order for the deep-inelastic scattering structure function F{sub 2}(x,Q{sup 2}) and the corresponding transition matrix element A{sub Qq}{sup (3),PS} in the variable flavor number scheme are computed. In Mellin-N space these inclusive quantities depend on generalized harmonic sums. We also recalculate the complete 3-loop pure singlet anomalous dimension for the first time. Numerical results for the Wilson coefficients, the operator matrix element and the contribution to the structure function F{sub 2}(x,Q{sup 2}) are presented.

  7. The three-loop splitting functions P{sup (2)}{sub qg} and P{sup (2,N{sub F})}{sub gg}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ablinger, J.; Schneider, C. [Johannes Kepler Univ., Linz (Austria). Research Inst. for Symbolic Computation (RISC); Behring, A. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Teilchenphysik und Kosmologie; Bluemlein, J.; Freitas, A. de [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Von Manteuffel, A. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

    2017-04-15

    We calculate the unpolarized twist-2 three-loop splitting functions P{sup (2)}{sub qg}(x) and P{sup (2,N{sub F})}{sub gg}(x) and the associated anomalous dimensions using massive three-loop operator matrix elements. While we calculate P{sup (2,N{sub F})}{sub gg}(x) directly, P{sup (2)}{sub qg}(x) is computed from 1200 even moments, without any structural prejudice, using a hierarchy of recurrences obtained for the corresponding operator matrix element. The largest recurrence to be solved is of order 12 and degree 191. We confirm results in the foregoing literature.

  8. Kuchler Vegetation

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — Digital version of potential natural plant communites as compiled and published on 'Map of the Natural Vegetation of California' by A. W. Kuchler, 1976. Source map...

  9. Wieslander Vegetation

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — Digital version of the 1945 California Vegetation Type Maps by A. E. Wieslander of the U.S. Forest Service. Source scale of maps are 1:100,000. These compiled maps...

  10. Measruement of beauty production in DIS and F{sub 2}{sup b} {sup anti} {sup b} extraction at ZEUS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramowicz, H. [Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel). School of Physics; Univ. College London (United Kingdom); Max Planck Institute, Munich (Germany); Abt, I. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Adamczyk, L. [AGH-Univ. of Science and Technology, Cracow (PL). Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science] (and others)

    2010-04-15

    Beauty production in deep inelastic scattering with events in which a muon and a jet are observed in the final state has been measured with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 114 pb{sup -1}. The fraction of events with beauty quarks in the data was determined using the distribution of the transverse momentum of the muon relative to the jet. The cross section for beauty production was measured in the kinematic range of photon virtuality, Q{sup 2}>2 GeV{sup 2}, and inelasticity, 0.05F{sub 2} was extracted and is compared to theoretical predictions. (orig.)

  11. Investigations of collective and single-particle aspects of excitation in 1fsub(7/2) shell nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Styczen, J.

    1976-01-01

    Experimental data are presented which were obtained in spectroscopic studies on 1fsub(7/2) shell nuclei in the following reactions: 30 Si( 16 0,pn) 44 Sc, 44 Ca(p,n) 44 Sc, 42 Ca(α,p) 45 Sc, 42 Ca(α,n) 45 Sc, 45 Sc(α,pn) 47 Ti, 46 Ti(α,p) 49 V, 47 Ti(α,pn) 49 V, and 49 Ti(p,n) 49 V. Experimental reduced transition probabilities B(M1) and B(E2) have been systematically compared for inband transitions of Ksup(π)=3/2 + bands in sup(43,45,47)Sc, 45 Ti and sup(47,49)V nuclei. In the framework of the pure rotational model, intrinsic quadrupole moments |Qsub(o)| and |gsub(K)-gsub(R)| ratios have been derived. Band mixing calculations in a strong coupling model treating more correctly the j 2 term in the hamiltonian and hole excitations, have been indertaken on properties of negativeparity states in the cross-conjugate nuclei 47 Ti- 49 V and V 47 - 49 Dr. There is an overall good agreement between the experimental data and the theoretical predictions. The strong coupling model has been also used to study possible regions of stable deformation for the positive parity states of the odd nuclei in the 1fsub(7/2) shell. Band mixing calculations performed for these states have shown that the experimental data are well reproduced in the calculations with a deformation parameter corresponding to a minimum of the static potential energy. (author)

  12. Synthesis and characterization of boron trifluoride (B F[sub 3]). Sintese e caracterizacao de trifluoreto de boro (BF[sub 3])

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastos, E T.R.; Umeda, K; Echternacht, M V; Silva, E.F. da.

    1994-08-01

    High purity boron trifluoride (B F[sub 3]) has been prepared from reaction of ammonium fluorborate and boron oxide in concentrated sulfuric acid. Fluorborate was synthesized by reaction of ammonium bi fluoride and boric acid produced from enrichment plant. (author).

  13. HYPERDIRE HYPERgeometric functions DIfferential REduction. Mathematica-based packages for the differential reduction of generalized hypergeometric functions. Lauricella function F{sub C} of three variables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bytev, Vladimir V. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Kniehl, Bernd A. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    2016-12-15

    We present a further extension of the HYPERDIRE project, which is devoted to the creation of a set of Mathematica-based program packages for manipulations with Horn-type hypergeometric functions on the basis of differential equations. Specifically, we present the implementation of the differential reduction for the Lauricella function F{sub C} of three variables.

  14. Interaction of xenon difluoride with the fluorocomplexes of lanthanides and rubidium of the Rb/sub 3/M/sup 3/F/sub 6/ composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goryachenkov, S.A.; Fadeeva, N.E.; Kiselev, Yu.M.; Martynenko, L.I.; Spitsyn, V.I. (Moskovskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ. (USSR))

    The possibility of preparing rubidium fluorocomplexes of tetravalent lanthanides of the Rb/sub 3/M/sup 4/F/sub 7/ composition from Rb/sub 3/M/sup 3/F/sub 6/ (M/sup 3/=Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb) with XeF/sub 2/ has been studied. By the DTA method it is shown that Ce and Pr salts are fluorinated respectively at approximately 100 and approximately 235 deg C with a noticeable exoeffect. Tb and Dy salts fluorination proceeds with considerable kinetic difficulties. The fluorination products composition, Rb/sub 3/M/sup 4/F/sub 7/ (M/sup 4/=Ce, Pr, Tb, Dy) is confirmed by the methods of chemical, IR-spectroscopic and X-ray phase analyses. XeF/sub 2/ interaction with Rb/sub 3/M/sup 3/F/sub 6/ salts of other lanthanides up to 400 deg C has not been observed.

  15. Parental resistance of irradiated mice to (CBAXM523)F/sub 1/ lymphocytes: the destiny of transplanted cells, duration of resistance and its specificity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondrat' eva, T K; Fontalin, L N; Nagurskaya, E V; Novikova, T K; Blandova, Z K; Chernousov, A D [Akademiya Meditsinskikh Nauk SSSR, Moscow. Inst. Ehpidemiologii i Mikrobiologii

    1979-05-01

    The immunologic reactivity of mouse (CBAxM523)F/sub 1/ lymphocytes to alien antigens (ram erythrocytes) in the organisms of lethally irradiated CBA mice was studied. If the irradiation, cell transfer and antigen test-injection were performed on the same day, the activity of the transplant was suppressed as compared to the syngenic system. If the intervals between these procedures increased to three days the activity of donor cells was recovered. The retransplantation of recipient spleen cells to the irradiated CBA and F/sub 1/ mice demonstrated the viability of the transplanted cells and the absence of their transadaptation to nonsyngenic microenvironment. The resistance of the recipients could be overcome specifically by preliminary injection of F/sub 1/ mouse cells in combination with cyclophosphamide or without it. The results obtained suggest to conclude, that the genetic parental resistance of CBA mice to F/sub 1/ mouse cells is caused by the immunologically competent recipient cells that are inactivated after three days following irradiation. They do not produce a cytotoxic effect on donor cells, but limit temporarily the activity of the latter.

  16. VEGETATION MAPPING IN WETLANDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. PEDROTTI

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The current work examines the main aspects of wetland vegetation mapping, which can be summarized as analysis of the ecological-vegetational (ecotone gradients; vegetation complexes; relationships between vegetation distribution and geomorphology; vegetation of the hydrographic basin lo which the wetland in question belongs; vegetation monitoring with help of four vegetation maps: phytosociological map of the real and potential vegetation, map of vegetation dynamical tendencies, map of vegetation series.

  17. Vegetative regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    George A. Schier; John R. Jones; Robert P. Winokur

    1985-01-01

    Aspen is noted for its ability to regenerate vegetatively by adventitious shoots or suckers that arise on its long lateral roots. It also produces sprouts from stumps and root collars; but they are not common. In a survey of regeneration after clearcutting mature aspen in Utah. Baker (1918b) found that 92% of the shoots originated from roots, 7% from root collars, and...

  18. Understory vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steve Sutherland; Todd F. Hutchinson; Jennifer L. Windus

    2003-01-01

    This chapter documents patterns of species composition and diversity within the understory vegetation layer and provides a species list for the four study areas in southern Ohio. Within each of 108 plots, we recorded the frequency of all vascular plant species in sixteen 2-m² quadrats. We recorded 297 species, including 187 forbs (176 perennials, 9 annuals, 2...

  19. Determination of the kinetic parameters of K{sub 2}Y F{sub 5}: Tb; Determinacion de los parametros cineticos de K{sub 2}Y F{sub 5}: Tb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallegos, A.A. [CICATA-IPN, Legaria 694, Col. Irrigacion, 11500 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Khaidukov, N.M. [Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Moscow (Russian Federation); Azorin, J. [UAM-I, 09340 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2005-07-01

    In this work the K{sub 2}Y doped materials with percentages of 0.01 and 0.2 of F{sub 5} and, 0.8 and 0.99 of Tb{sup 3+} were studied to determine the kinetic parameters (activation energy and frequency factor) of TL peaks with the purpose of comparing those sensitive qualities of the materials at the doping with TR and their candidacy for tests of TL dosimetry (linearity of the response with the absorbed dose and the reproducibility of the measures of the dose). The samples were irradiated with a beta source of {sup 90} Sr/{sup 90} Y, to ambient temperature, giving its a dose of 236.6 mGy, later the kinetic parameters with different experimental procedures were determined: isothermal decay to ambient temperature and erased of peaks not desired to greater temperature than the ambient. The glow curves (TL curves) were obtained with an TL analyzer Harshaw 4000, with interface to CPU for the handling of the data of the curves, which were treated with the curve form method and the models of: Chen first approach and Chen modified, corrected Lushchik approach and Grossweiner approach, to calculate the kinetic parameters of the sample. (Author)

  20. componente vegetal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Moscovich

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to determine environmental impact, indicators based on vegetation characteristics that would generate the forestry monoculture with the adjacent native forest, 32 sample unit were installed in an area of LIPSIA private enterprise, Esperanza Department, Misiones with those characteristics. The plots of 100 m2 were distributed systematically every 25 meters. The vegetation was divided in stratum: superior (DBH ≥ 10 cm, middle (1,6 cm ≤ DBH > 10 cm and inferior (DBH< cm. There were installed 10 plots in a logged native forest, 10 plots in a 18 years old Pinus elliottii Engelm. with approximately 400 trees/ha., 6 plots in a 10 – 25 years old Araucaria angustifolia (Bertd. Kuntze limiting area with approximately 900 trees/ha., and 6 plots located in this plantation. In the studied area were identified 150 vegetation species. In the inferior stratum there were found differences as function of various floristic diversity indexes. In all the cases the native forest showed larger diversity than plantations, followed by Pinus elliottii, Araucaria plantation and Araucaria limiting area. All the studied forest fitted to a logarithmical series of species distributions, that would indicate the incidence of a environmental factor in this distribution.

  1. Silicon isotope separation utilizing infrared multiphoton dissociation of Si{sub 2}F{sub 6} irradiated with two-color CO{sub 2} laser light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoyama, Atsushi; Ohba, Hironori; Hashimoto, Masashi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Ishii, Takeshi; Ohya, Akio [Nuclear Development Corp., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Arai, Shigeyoshi [Hill Research Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2002-08-01

    Silicon isotope separation has been done by utilizing the Infrared Multiphoton Dissociation (IRMPD) of Si{sub 2}F{sub 6} irradiated with two-color CO{sub 2} laser lights. The two-color excitation method improved the separation efficiency keeping the high enrichment factors. For example, 99.74% of {sup 28}Si was obtained at 49.63% dissociation of Si{sub 2}F{sub 6} after the simultaneous irradiation of 200 pulses with 966.23 cm{sup -1} photons (0.084 J/cm{sup 2}) and 954.55 cm{sup -1} photons (0.658 J/cm{sup 2}), while 2000 pulses were needed to obtain 99.35% of {sup 28}Si at 35.6% dissociation in the case of only one-color irradiation at 954.55 cm{sup -1} (0.97 J/cm{sup 2}). (author)

  2. New heavy flavor contributions to the DIS structure function F{sub 2}(x,Q{sup 2}) at O({alpha}{sub s}{sup 3})

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ablinger, J. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Johannes Kepler Univ., Linz (Austria). RISC; Bluemlein, J.; Hasselhuhn, A.; Wissbrock, F. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Klein, S. [RWTH Aachen Univ., Aachen (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Teilchenphysik und Kosmologie; Schneider, C. [Johannes Kepler Univ., Linz (Austria). RISC

    2012-02-15

    We report on recent results obtained for the massive Wilson coefficients which contribute to the structure function F{sub 2}(x,Q{sup 2}) at O({alpha}{sub s}{sup 3}) in the region Q{sup 2}/m{sup 2}>or similar 10. In the calculation new species of harmonic sums and harmonic polylogarithms generated by cyclotomic polynomials arise in intermediary results which are briefly discussed. (orig.)

  3. Unusual spin frozen state in a frustrated pyrochlore system NaCaCo{sub 2}F{sub 7} as observed by NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkar, R.; Brueckner, F.; Klauss, H.H. [IFP, TU Dresden (Germany); Krizan, J.W.; Cava, R.J. [Department of Chemistry, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2016-07-01

    We present {sup 23}Na -and {sup 19}F NMR results on the magnetically frustrated pyrochlore NaCaCo{sub 2}F{sub 7} with a frustration index of f = θ{sub CW}/T{sub f} ∝ 56. Recent neutron scattering experiments proposed XY like antiferromagnetic spin clusters at low energies in NaCaCo{sub 2}F{sub 7}. {sup 23}Na NMR -spectra reveal the presence of two magnetically non equivalent Na sites in conjunction with the local Co{sup 2+} spin structure. Below 3.6 K both the {sup 23}Na -and {sup 19}F spectra broaden due to the formation of static spin correlations. A huge reduction of the {sup 19}F -and {sup 23}Na NMR signal intensity hints at a quasi-static field distribution in NaCaCo{sub 2}F{sub 7} in this regime. The {sup 19}F spin-lattice relaxation rate {sup 19}(1/T{sub 1}) exhibits a peak at around 2.9 K, at the same temperature range where ac and dc susceptibility data show a broad maximum. The character of the spin fluctuation appears to be isotropic. The overall temperature dependence of {sup 19}(1/T{sub 1}) can be described by the BPP theory considering a fluctuating hyperfine field with an autocorrelation function. The correlation time of the autocorrelation function exhibits an activation behavior further indicating the spin-frozen state. While the present NMR studies suggest the spin frozen state at low temperatures, μSR investigations however reveal the presence of so called persistent spin dynamics down to 20 mK implying an exotic ground state in NaCaCo{sub 2}F{sub 7}.

  4. An electron paramagnetic resonance study on Sm{sup 3+} and Yb{sup 3+} in KY{sub 3}F{sub 10} crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaga, M. [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Gifu University, Gifu (Japan); Honda, M. [Faculty of Science, Naruto University of Education, Naruto, Tokushima (Japan); Wells, J.P.R. [FELIX Free Electron Laser Facility, FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics, Rijnhuizen, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Han, T.P.J.; Gallagher, H.G. [Department of Physics and Applied Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2000-10-09

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of Sm{sup 3+} and Yb{sup 3+} ions in KY{sub 3}F{sub 10} single crystals have been measured at X-band microwave frequencies and low temperatures. The EPR lines have been fitted to a tetragonal spin Hamiltonian to determine effective g-values (g{sub parallel},g{sub perpendicular}). The observed g-values, (g{sub parallel} = 0.714(2),g{sub perpendicular} = 0.11(1)), for Sm{sup 3+} are in agreement with those calculated via crystal-field J-mixing of the first excited-state multiplet {sup 6}H{sub 7/2} into the groundstate multiplet {sup 6}H{sub 5/2} of Sm{sup 3+} as the second-order perturbation. On the other hand, the observed g-values, (g{sub parallel}=5.363(5), g{sub perpendicular}=1.306(2)) for Yb{sup 3+} are coincident with those calculated via mixing in only the groundstate multiplet {sup 2}F{sub 7/2} as the first-order perturbation because the first excited-state multiplet {sup 2}F{sub 5/2} lies above {approx}10,000 cm{sup -1} from the groundstate. The groundstate eigenfunctions of Sm{sup 3+} and Yb{sup 3+} obtained from the EPR results are close to those calculated from a C{sub 4v} symmetry crystal-field analysis applied to their optical transitions. The distortions of the Sm{sup 3+} and Yb{sup 3+} complexes in KY{sub 3}F{sub 10} are discussed in the term of the crystal-field Hamiltonian in comparison with LiYF{sub 4}. (author)

  5. {sup 5}D{sub 3}{yields}{sup 7}F{sub J} emission of Tb doped sol-gel silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seed Ahmed, H.A.A.; Ntwaeaborwa, O.M.; Gusowski, M.A. [Department of Physics, University of the Free State, IB51, Box 339, Bloemfontein 9300 (South Africa); Botha, J.R. [Department of Physics, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Box 77000, Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa); Kroon, R.E., E-mail: KroonRE@ufs.ac.za [Department of Physics, University of the Free State, IB51, Box 339, Bloemfontein 9300 (South Africa)

    2012-05-15

    Amorphous silica samples doped with 0.1 and 1 mol% of terbium (Tb) were synthesized by the sol-gel method. In addition to the green light associated with {sup 5}D{sub 4}{yields}{sup 7}F{sub J} transitions of Tb{sup 3+}, the sample containing 0.1 mol% also emitted blue light as a result of {sup 5}D{sub 3}{yields}{sup 7}F{sub J} transitions during photoluminescence (PL) measurements. As a result of concentration quenching this blue emission was not observed for the samples doped with the higher concentration (1 mol%). However the blue {sup 5}D{sub 3} {yields}{sup 7}F{sub J} emission was observed in the 1 mol% doped samples during cathodoluminescence (CL) measurements. Since a rough calculation indicated that the excitation rate in the CL system where the blue emission is observed may be similar to a laser PL system under conditions where the blue emission is not observed, the difference is attributed to the nature of the excitation sources. It is suggested that during the CL excitation incident electrons can reduce non-luminescent Tb{sup 4+} ions in the silica, substituting for Si{sup 4+} ions, to the excited (Tb{sup 3+}) Low-Asterisk state and that these are responsible for the blue emission, which does not occur during PL excitation.

  6. An alkaline tin(II) halide compound Na{sub 3}Sn{sub 2}F{sub 6}Cl: Synthesis, structure, and characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Pifu [Beijing Center for Crystal Research and Development, Key Laboratory of Functional Crystals and Laser Technology, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Luo, Siyang [Beijing Center for Crystal Research and Development, Key Laboratory of Functional Crystals and Laser Technology, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Huang, Qian; Yang, Yi [Beijing Center for Crystal Research and Development, Key Laboratory of Functional Crystals and Laser Technology, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Jiang, Xingxing [Beijing Center for Crystal Research and Development, Key Laboratory of Functional Crystals and Laser Technology, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Liang, Fei [Beijing Center for Crystal Research and Development, Key Laboratory of Functional Crystals and Laser Technology, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Chen, Chuangtian [Beijing Center for Crystal Research and Development, Key Laboratory of Functional Crystals and Laser Technology, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Lin, Zheshuai, E-mail: zslin@mail.ipc.ac.cn [Beijing Center for Crystal Research and Development, Key Laboratory of Functional Crystals and Laser Technology, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2017-04-15

    A new alkali tin(II) halide compound, Na{sub 3}Sn{sub 2}F{sub 6}Cl, is synthesized by hydrothermal method. This compound crystallizes trigonally in space group of R-3c (167), and processes a zero-dimensional (0D) structure consisted of Na{sup +} cations, Cl{sup −} anions and the isolated [SnF{sub 3}]{sup -} trigonal pyramids in which the stereochemically active 5s{sup 2} lone pair electrons are attached to the Sn{sup 2+} cations. Interestingly, the [SnF{sub 3}]{sup −} trigonal pyramids are parallel arranged in the a-b plane, while oppositely arranged in line with rotation along the c- axis. Moreover, the energy bandgap, thermal stability and electronic structure of Na{sub 3}Sn{sub 2}F{sub 6}Cl are characterized and the results reveal that this compound has and indirect bandgap of 3.88 eV and is stable under 270 °C. - Graphical abstract: A zero-dimensional alkaline tin halide compound, Na{sub 3}Sn{sub 2}F{sub 6}Cl, is synthesized by hydrothermal method. Interestingly, both the anions and cations coordinating polyhedra exhibit order arranged with the [SnF{sub 3}]{sup -} trigonal pyramids rotating along the c- axis.

  7. Measurement of the proton structure function F{sub L}(x,Q{sup 2}) with the H1 detector at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piec, Sebastian

    2010-12-15

    A measurement of the inclusive cross section for the deep-inelastic scattering of positrons on protons at low four-momentum transfer squared Q{sup 2} is presented. The measurement is used for the extraction of the longitudinal proton structure function F{sub L}. The analysis is based on data collected by the H1 experiment during special, low energy runs in the year 2007. The direct technique of the F{sub L} determination based on the extraction of the reduced DIS cross sections for three different centre-of-mass energies is used. For the purpose of the analysis a dedicated electron finder has been developed and integrated with the standard H1 reconstruction software H1REC. The algorithm employs information from two independent tracking detectors the Backward Silicon Tracker and the Central Jet Chamber. The performance of the finder is studied. The thesis presents the cross section and the F{sub L} measurements in the range of 2.5 GeV{sup 2}{<=}Q{sup 2}{<=}25 GeV{sup 2}. (orig.)

  8. Heat capacity and magnetic properties of fluoride CsFe{sup 2+}Fe{sup 3+}F{sub 6} with defect pyrochlore structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorev, M.V., E-mail: gorev@iph.krasn.ru [Kirensky Institute of Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Siberian Branch, 660036 Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation); Institute of Engineering Physics and Radio Electronics, Siberian State University, 660074 Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation); Flerov, I.N. [Kirensky Institute of Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Siberian Branch, 660036 Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation); Institute of Engineering Physics and Radio Electronics, Siberian State University, 660074 Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation); Tressaud, A. [Institut de Chimie de la Matière Condensée, ICMCB-CNRS, Université Bordeaux, 33608 Pessac Cedex (France); Bogdanov, E.V. [Kirensky Institute of Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Siberian Branch, 660036 Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation); Astafijev Krasnoyarsk State Pedagogical University, 660049 Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation); Kartashev, A.V. [Kirensky Institute of Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Siberian Branch, 660036 Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation); Krasnoyarsk State Agrarian University, 660049 Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation); Bayukov, O.A. [Kirensky Institute of Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Siberian Branch, 660036 Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation); Eremin, E.V. [Kirensky Institute of Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Siberian Branch, 660036 Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation); Institute of Engineering Physics and Radio Electronics, Siberian State University, 660074 Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation); Krylov, A.S. [Kirensky Institute of Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Siberian Branch, 660036 Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation)

    2016-05-15

    Heat capacity, Mössbauer and Raman spectra as well as magnetic properties of fluoride CsFe{sub 2}F{sub 6} with defect pyrochlore structure were studied. In addition to recently found above room temperature three successive structural transformations Pnma-Imma-I4{sub 1}amd-Fd-3m, phase transition of antiferromagnetic nature with the 13.7 K Neel temperature and a broad heat capacity anomaly with a maximum at about 30 K were observed. The room temperature symmetry Pnma is unchanged at least down to 7 K. Simple model of indirect bond used to estimate the exchange interactions and to propose a magnetic structure model. - Graphical abstract: The ordered arrangement of Fe{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+} ions in high-spin states as well as antiferromagnetic phase transition followed by significant magnetic frustrations were found in pyrocholore-related CsFe{sup 2+}Fe{sup 3+}F{sub 6}. A magnetic structure was proposed using a simple model of indirect bonds. - Highlights: • The Pnma structure in pyrocholore CsFe{sub 2}F{sub 6} is stable down to helium temperature. • Mössbauer spectra confirmed the ordering of Fe{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+} ions. • Antiferromagnetic transformation and significant magnetic frustrations are found. • Experimental magnetic entropy agrees with entropy for Fe ions in high-spin state. • Superexchange interactions were calculated and a magnetic structure was proposed.

  9. Mild hydrothermal crystal growth of new uranium(IV) fluorides, Na{sub 3.13}Mg{sub 1.43}U{sub 6}F{sub 30} and Na{sub 2.50}Mn{sub 1.75}U{sub 6}F{sub 30}: Structures, optical and magnetic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeon, Jeongho; Smith, Mark D. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Tapp, Joshua; Möller, Angela [Department of Chemistry and Texas Center for Superconductivity, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204 (United States); Loye, Hans-Conrad zur, E-mail: zurloye@mailbox.sc.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States)

    2016-04-15

    Two new uranium(IV) fluorides, Na{sub 3.13}Mg{sub 1.43}U{sub 6}F{sub 30} (1) and Na{sub 2.50}Mn{sub 1.75}U{sub 6}F{sub 30} (2), were synthesized through an in situ mild hydrothermal route, and were structurally characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The compounds exhibit complex crystal structures composed of corner- or edge-shared UF{sub 9} and MF{sub 6} (M=Mg, Mn) polyhedra, forming hexagonal channels in the three-dimensional framework, in which ordered or disordered divalent metal and sodium atoms reside. The large hexagonal voids contain the nearly regular M(II)F{sub 6} octahedra and sodium ions, whereas the small hexagonal cavities include M(II) and sodium ions on a mixed-occupied site. Magnetic susceptibility measurements yielded effective magnetic moments of 8.36 and 11.6 µ{sub B} for 1 and 2, respectively, confirming the presence and oxidation states of U(IV) and Mn(II). The large negative Weiss constants indicate the spin gap between a triplet and a singlet state in the U(IV). Magnetization data as a function of applied fields revealed that 2 exhibits paramagnetic behavior due to the nonmagnetic singlet ground state of U(IV) at low temperature. UV–vis diffuse reflectance and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data were also analyzed. - Graphical abstract: Two new quaternary U(IV) fluorides, Na{sub 3.13}Mg{sub 1.43}U{sub 6}F{sub 30} and Na{sub 2.50}Mn{sub 1.75}U{sub 6}F{sub 30}, were crystallized via an in situ reduction step of U(VI) to U(IV) under mild hydrothermal conditions. The compounds show complex crystal structures based on the 3-D building block of U{sub 6}F{sub 30}. Magnetic property measurements revealed that the U(IV) exhibits a nonmagnetic singlet ground state at low temperature with a spin gap. - Highlights: • Na{sub 3.13}Mg{sub 1.43}U{sub 6}F{sub 30} and Na{sub 2.50}Mn{sub 1.75}U{sub 6}F{sub 30} have been synthesized and characterized. • The U(IV) fluorides exhibit complex three-dimensional crystal structures. • The

  10. Involvement of prostaglandins F/sub 2. cap alpha. / and E/sub 1/ with rabbit endometrium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orlicky, D.J.

    1985-01-01

    Several growth factors and hormones are thought to play a role in the growth control of endometrial cells. The authors have shown that prostaglandin F/sub 2..-->../ (PGF/sub 2..cap alpha../) is a growth factor for primary cultures of rabbit endometrium cultured in chemically-defined serum-free medium and that prostaglandin E/sub 1/ (PGE/sub 1/) antagonizes the PGF/sub 2..-->../ induction of growth. Both (/sup 3/H)PGF/sub 2..cap alpha../ and (/sup 3/H)PGE/sub 1/ bind in a time and temperature dependent, dissociable, saturable and specific manner. The binding of (/sup 3/H)PGF/sub 2..cap alpha../ and (/sup 3/H)PGE/sub 1/ can be both down and up regulated and is enzyme sensitive. PGE /sub 1/ stimulates intracellular cAMP synthesis and accumulation in a time and concentration dependent manner. PGF/sub 2..cap alpha../ probably exerts its effects through an amiloride-sensitive intermediate. Both PGF/sub 2..cap alpha../ and PGE/sub 1/ are constitutively synthesized by these primary cultures, and they have shown this synthesis to be both drug and hormone sensitive. They hypothesize that it is the ratio, rather than the absolute quantities, of PGF/sub 2..cap alpha../ and PGE/sub 1/ which is of more importance in the regulation of endometrial cell growth. Furthermore, they believe this regulation of endometrial growth plays a role in control of proliferation during the decidual response and that a derangement in the ratio of these prostaglandins may lead to either infertility or hyperplasia. The ability of these cultures to synthesize prostaglandins in a hormonally regulatable manner may be of importance in the study of dysmenorrhea and uterine cramping as caused by the myometrial contracting prostaglandin, PGF/sub 2..cap alpha../.

  11. Investigations of the radial distributions of nucleons in 1fsub(7/2)-shell nuclei by elastic alpha particle scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gils, H.J.

    1984-12-01

    The radial size and shape of the distribution of nucleons - i.e. the sum of protons and neutrons - in atomic nuclei of the 1fsub(7/2) shell is investigated in the present work. The experimental basis of the studies are differential cross sections of elastic α particle scattering by sup(40,42,43,44,48)Ca, 50 Ti, 51 V, 52 Cr precisely measured over a wide angular range at the 104 MeV α particle beam from the Karlsruhe Isochronous Cyclotron. The experimental cross sections are analyzed using so-called 'model independent' optical potentials by which the data are very well reproduced. The error bands of these potentials are determined in a well-defined form from the analyses. The high sensitivity of the data to the radial form of the real optical potential justifies, in principle, that the experiments are a suitable tool for investigating nuclear density distributions. Some pre-informations on this question are obtained from the optical potential analyses. For a more direct access to the nuclear matter distributions - in particular to differences between neighbouring nuclei - a semimicroscopic reaction model is presented which on the one hand is based on a fully microscopic many body approach. On the other hand all quantities being not of particular interest for the results are treated in a phenomenological way. Thereby, it is possible to reproduce the experimental cross sections as well as by the 'model independent' potentials and to obtain full consistency between the two approaches. This has not been achieved by any other microscopic reaction model. (orig./HSI) [de

  12. Mellin moments of heavy flavor contributions to F{sub 2}(x,Q{sup 2}) at NNLO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, Sebastian Werner Gerhard

    2009-10-15

    The main parts of this thesis are the extension of the description of the contributions of heavy quark mass-effects to the deep-inelastic Wilson coefficients to NNLO. In course of that, we also obtain a first independent calculation of fixed moments of the fermionic parts of the NNLO anomalous dimensions. The calculation of the 3-loop heavy flavor Wilson coefficients in the whole Q{sup 2} region is currently not within reach. However, a very precise description of the heavy flavor Wilson coefficients contributing to the structure function F{sub 2}(x,Q{sup 2}) at NLO is obtained for Q{sup 2} >or similar 10 m{sub Q}{sup 2}, disregarding the power corrections {proportional_to}(m{sub Q}{sup 2}/Q{sup 2}){sup k}, k {>=} 1. If one considers the charm quark, this covers an important region for deep-inelastic physics at HERA. In this limit, the massive Wilson coefficients factorize into universal massive operator matrix elements (OMEs) A{sub ij}(x, {mu}{sup 2}/m{sub Q}{sup 2}) and the light flavor Wilson coefficients C{sub (q,g),(2,L)}(x,Q{sup 2}/{mu}{sup 2}). The former are process independent quantities and describe all quark mass effects. They are given by matrix elements of the leading twist local composite operators O{sub i} between partonic states j (i, j = q, g), including quark masses. The process dependence is described by the massless Wilson coefficients. (orig.)

  13. Sex-related differential susceptibility to doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity in B6C3F{sub 1} mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenkins, G. Ronald [Personalized Medicine Branch, Division of Systems Biology, National Center for Toxicological Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Lee, Taewon [Department of Mathematics, Korea University, Sejong (Korea, Republic of); Moland, Carrie L.; Vijay, Vikrant [Personalized Medicine Branch, Division of Systems Biology, National Center for Toxicological Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Herman, Eugene H. [Toxicology and Pharmacology Branch, Developmental Therapeutics Program, Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis, The National Cancer Institute, Rockville, MD 20850-9734 (United States); Lewis, Sherry M. [Office of Scientific Coordination, National Center for Toxicological Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Davis, Kelly J.; Muskhelishvili, Levan [Toxicologic Pathology Associates, National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Kerr, Susan [Arkansas Heart Hospital, Little Rock, AR 72211 (United States); Fuscoe, James C. [Personalized Medicine Branch, Division of Systems Biology, National Center for Toxicological Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Desai, Varsha G., E-mail: varsha.desai@fda.hhs.gov [Personalized Medicine Branch, Division of Systems Biology, National Center for Toxicological Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Sex is a risk factor for development of cardiotoxicity, induced by the anti-cancer drug, doxorubicin (DOX), in humans. To explore potential mechanisms underlying differential susceptibility to DOX between sexes, 8-week old male and female B6C3F{sub 1} mice were dosed with 3 mg/kg body weight DOX or an equivalent volume of saline via tail vein once a week for 6, 7, 8, and 9 consecutive weeks, resulting in 18, 21, 24, and 27 mg/kg cumulative DOX doses, respectively. At necropsy, one week after each consecutive final dose, the extent of myocardial injury was greater in male mice compared to females as indicated by higher plasma concentrations of cardiac troponin T at all cumulative DOX doses with statistically significant differences between sexes at the 21 and 24 mg/kg cumulative doses. A greater susceptibility to DOX in male mice was further confirmed by the presence of cytoplasmic vacuolization in cardiomyocytes, with left atrium being more vulnerable to DOX cardiotoxicity. The number of TUNEL-positive cardiomyocytes was mostly higher in DOX-treated male mice compared to female counterparts, showing a statistically significant sex-related difference only in left atrium at 21 mg/kg cumulative dose. DOX-treated male mice also had an increased number of γ-H2A.X-positive (measure of DNA double-strand breaks) cardiomyocytes compared to female counterparts with a significant sex effect in the ventricle at 27 mg/kg cumulative dose and right atrium at 21 and 27 mg/kg cumulative doses. This newly established mouse model provides a means to identify biomarkers and access potential mechanisms underlying sex-related differences in DOX-induced cardiotoxicity. - Highlights: • Doxorubicin caused greater heart injury in male mice than females. • Doxorubicin caused vacuolization in cardiomyocytes only in male mice. • TUNEL-positive cardiomyocytes was higher in DOX-treated male mice. • γ-H2A.X-positive cardiomyocytes was greater in DOX-treated male mice.

  14. Lake Bathymetric Aquatic Vegetation

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Aquatic vegetation represented as polygon features, coded with vegetation type (emergent, submergent, etc.) and field survey date. Polygons were digitized from...

  15. Coexistence of spin frozen state and persistent spin dynamics in NaSrCo{sub 2}F{sub 7} as probed by μSR and NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dengre, Shanu; Sarkar, Rajib; Braeuninger, Sascha Albert; Brueckner, Felix; Materne, Philipp; Klauss, Hans-Henning [Institute for Solid State Physics, TU Dresden (Germany); Krizan, Jason W.; Cava, Robert J. [Department of Chemistry, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ (United States); Luetkens, Hubertus; Baines, Chris [Laboratory for Muon-Spin Spectroscopy, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland)

    2016-07-01

    {sup 23}Na -and {sup 19}F NMR, and μSR experiments are performed to explore the microscopic properties of NaSrCo{sub 2}F{sub 7}, which is a newly discovered magnetically frustrated pyrochlore with weak bond disorder and with a frustration index of f = 42. While {sup 23}Na and {sup 19}F NMR experiments clearly suggest the presence of quasi static field distribution below ∝3 K as reflected in the huge NMR line broadening and wipe out effect of NMR signal intensity, μSR experiments on the other hand remains passive to this spin frozen state. Both NMR and μSR results indicate the slowing down of the magnetic (spin) fluctuations upon cooling towards the NMR spin frozen state. μSR relaxation rate increases slightly below ∝ 3 K, and remains not only constant down to 20 mK, but also stands independent in longitudinal magnetic field upto 4000 G implying that the spin fluctuations are dynamic. These observations suggest the coexistence of partial spin frozen state and persistent spin dynamics in NaSrCo{sub 2}F{sub 7}.

  16. The 3-loop non-singlet heavy flavor contributions and anomalous dimensions for the structure function F{sub 2}(x,Q{sup 2}) and transversity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ablinger, J. [Research Institute for Symbolic Computation (RISC), Johannes Kepler University, Altenbergerstraße 69, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Behring, A.; Blümlein, J.; De Freitas, A. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, DESY, Platanenallee 6, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Hasselhuhn, A. [Research Institute for Symbolic Computation (RISC), Johannes Kepler University, Altenbergerstraße 69, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Manteuffel, A. von [PRISMA Cluster of Excellence and Institute of Physics, J. Gutenberg University, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Round, M. [Research Institute for Symbolic Computation (RISC), Johannes Kepler University, Altenbergerstraße 69, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, DESY, Platanenallee 6, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Schneider, C. [Research Institute for Symbolic Computation (RISC), Johannes Kepler University, Altenbergerstraße 69, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Wißbrock, F. [Research Institute for Symbolic Computation (RISC), Johannes Kepler University, Altenbergerstraße 69, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, DESY, Platanenallee 6, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany)

    2014-09-15

    We calculate the massive flavor non-singlet Wilson coefficient for the heavy flavor contributions to the structure function F{sub 2}(x,Q{sup 2}) in the asymptotic region Q{sup 2}≫m{sup 2} and the associated operator matrix element A{sub qq,Q}{sup (3),NS}(N) to 3-loop order in Quantum Chromodynamics at general values of the Mellin variable N. This matrix element is associated with the vector current and axial vector current for the even and the odd moments N, respectively. We also calculate the corresponding operator matrix elements for transversity, compute the contributions to the 3-loop anomalous dimensions to O(N{sub F}) and compare to results in the literature. The 3-loop matching of the flavor non-singlet distribution in the variable flavor number scheme is derived. All results can be expressed in terms of nested harmonic sums in N space and harmonic polylogarithms in x-space. Numerical results are presented for the non-singlet charm quark contribution to F{sub 2}(x,Q{sup 2})

  17. Vegetation dynamics and dynamic vegetation science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Maarel, E

    1996-01-01

    his contribution presents a review of the development of the study of vegetation dynamics since 1979, in the framework of a jubilee meeting on progress in the study of vegetation. However, an exhaustive review is both impossible and unnecessary. It is impossible within the few pages available

  18. Benzene metabolite levels in blood and bone marrow of B6C3F{sub 1} mice after low-level exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechtold, W.E.; Strunk, M.R.; Thornton-Manning, J.R. [and others

    1995-12-01

    Studies at the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute (ITRI) have explored the species-specific uptake and metabolism of benzene. Results have shown that metabolism is dependent on both dose and route of administration. Of particular interest were shifts in the major metabolic pathways as a function of exposure concentration. In these studies, B6C3F{sub 1} mice were exposed to increasing levels of benzene by either gavage or inhalation. As benzene internal dose increased, the relative amounts of muconic acid and hydroquinone decreased. In contrast, the relative amount of catechol increased with increasing exposure. These results show that the relative levels of toxic metabolites are a function of exposure level. Based on these results and assuming a linear relationship between exposure concentration and levels of bone marrow metabolites, it would be difficult to detect an elevation of any phenolic metabolites above background after occupational exposures to the OSHA Permissible Exposure Limit of 1 ppm benzene.

  19. Muonium chemistry: kinetics of the gas phase reaction Mu + F/sub 2/. -->. MuF + F from 300 to 400 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garner, D M; Fleming, D G; Brewer, J H [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver (Canada). Faculty of Medicine

    1978-04-01

    The MSR (muonium spin rotation) technique was used to measure the chemical reaction rate for ..mu.. + F/sub 2/ ..-->.. ..mu..F + F in N/sub 2/ moderator at approximately 1 atm from 295 to 383 K giving the Arrhenius expression: log/sub 10/k (l/mole s) = (10.83+-0.20) - (200+-50)/T, with k = (1.46+-0.11) X 10/sup 10/ l/mole s at 300 K. This is a least 6.8 times the room temperature rate constant for the analogous H atom reaction. The measured activation energy and enhancement over the H reaction rate are indicative of significant tunnelling in the Mu reaction, in agreement with the recent collinear quantum mechanical calculations of Connor et al.

  20. Optical and structural characterization of the pure and doped BaY{sub 2}F{sub 8} with rare earths for application in radiation detectors and scintillators; Caracterizacao optica e estrutural do BaY{sub 2}F{sub 8} puro e dopado com terras raras visando aplicacao em detectores de radiacao e cintiladores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mello, Ana Carolina Santana de

    2008-07-01

    In this work Barium Yttrium Fluoride (BaY{sub 2}F{sub 8} -BaYF) doped with different concentrations of ions Tb{sup 3+}, Er{sup 3+}, Tm{sup 3+} e Nd{sup 3+} were characterized, aiming the application in radiation detection devices that use the scintillating properties. Two types of samples were produced in the CLA-IPEN-SP, polycrystalline samples, obtained via solid state reaction of BaF{sub 2} and YF{sub 3} under HF atmosphere, and single crystals, obtained via the zone melting method also in a HF atmosphere. The samples were characterized using the following experimental techniques: X-ray powder diffraction, Radioluminescence (RL), Optical Absorption and Dispersive X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (DXAS). The X-ray diffraction pattern showed the presence of the phase BaY{sub 2}F{sub 8} and a small amount of the phase Ba{sub 4}Y{sub 3}F{sub 17} in the polycrystalline pure and Tb{sup 3+}doped samples. The other samples showed only the desired BaY{sub 2}F{sub 8} phase. The radioluminescence measurements of the doped BaYF, when irradiated with X-rays, showed emission peaks in energies that are characteristics of the 4f-4f transitions of rare earths. The RL of the samples with 2 mol por cent and 3 mold of Tb{sup 3+}showed quite intense peaks with a maximum emission peak at 545 nm. The Tm{sup 3+}doped BYF showed that the scintillation efficiency is not directly proportional to the doping level, and the highest RL emission were obtained for the polycrystalline samples doped with 1 mol por cent, showing a maximum peak intensity at 456 nm (the blue region of the visible spectrum). All samples showed a phosphorescent decay time of the order of seconds. Single crystals of BaYF doped with 2 mol por cent of Er{sup 3+}, in addition to one of the highest phosphorescence time, presents a quite strong Rl in the green region of the spectra. The radiation damage was evaluated by the optical absorption techniques and the results showed that the formation of the absorption bands can be

  1. Tables of the 3-j, 6-j, Fsub(k)-, Asub(k)-, Rsub(k)-, and Asub(kk)-coefficients for angular correlation measurements involving half integer spins up to 15/2 and transitions up to L = 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gueven, H.H.; Kardon, B.; Seyfarth, H.

    1975-07-01

    Theoretical directional correlation coefficiencts are given as 3-j, 6-j, Fsub(k), Asub(k), Rsub(k) and Asub(kk) coefficients for half integer spins up to 15/2 and for transitions up to L = 3. (WL) [de

  2. Fruits and vegetables (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A healthy diet includes adding vegetables and fruit every day. Vegetables like broccoli, green beans, leafy greens, zucchini, cauliflower, cabbage, carrots, and tomatoes are low in calories and high in fiber, vitamins, and minerals. ...

  3. Vegetable Production System (Veggie)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Vegetable Production System (Veggie) was developed to be a simple, easily stowed, high growth volume, low resource facility capable of producing fresh vegetables...

  4. Up-conversion routines of Er{sup 3+}–Yb{sup 3+} doped Y{sub 6}O{sub 5}F{sub 8} and YOF phosphors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sangmoon, E-mail: spark@silla.ac.kr [Center for Green Fusion Technology and Department of Engineering in Energy & Applied Chemistry, Silla University, Busan 617-736 (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Wonseok; Park, Chu-Young; Noh, Minhee; Choi, Seulki [Center for Green Fusion Technology and Department of Engineering in Energy & Applied Chemistry, Silla University, Busan 617-736 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Dahye; Jang, Ho Seong; Cho, So-Hye [Center for Materials Architecturing, Institute of Multidisciplinary Convergence of Materials, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 130-650 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Single-phase optical materials of Y{sub 6}O{sub 5}F{sub 8}:Er and YOF:Er were prepared. • Effective spectral converting properties were observed in Y{sub 6}O{sub 5}F{sub 8}:Er,Yb. • 980 nm diode laser was irradiated for up-converting analysis. • A multi-photon process in the phosphors was investigated. - Abstract: Optical materials composed of a Y{sub 6(1−p−q)}Er{sub 6p}Yb{sub 6q}O{sub 5}F{sub 8} (p = 0.001–0.1, q = 0.005–0.1) solid solution with Y{sub 0.99}Er{sub 0.01}OF were prepared via a solid-state reaction using excess NH{sub 4}F flux at 950 °C for 30 min. X-ray diffraction patterns of Y{sub 6(1−p−q)}Er{sub 6p}Yb{sub 6q}O{sub 5}F{sub 8} and Y{sub 0.99}Er{sub 0.01}OF were compared upon altering the synthesis temperature and the molar ratio of the NH{sub 4}F flux to the Y{sup 3+} (Er{sup 3+}, Yb{sup 3+}) ions. The effective spectral-conversion properties of Er{sup 3+} and Er{sup 3+}–Yb{sup 3+} ions in Y{sub 6}O{sub 5}F{sub 8} phosphors were monitored during excitation with a 980 nm wavelength diode-laser. Selection of appropriate Er{sup 3+} and/or Yb{sup 3+} concentrations in the Y{sub 6}O{sub 5}F{sub 8} structure led to achievement of the desired up-conversion emission, from the green to the red regions of the spectra. Furthermore, the mechanism of up-conversion in the phosphors was described by an energy-level schematic. Up-conversion emission spectra and the dependence of the emission intensity on pump power (between 193 and 310 mW) in the Y{sub 6(0.995−q)}Er{sub 0.03}Yb{sub 6q}O{sub 5}F{sub 8} phosphors were also investigated.

  5. European Vegetation Archive (EVA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chytrý, Milan; Hennekens, S.M.; Jiménez-Alfaro, Borja; Schaminée, J.H.J.; Haveman, Rense; Janssen, J.A.M.

    2016-01-01

    The European Vegetation Archive (EVA) is a centralized database of European vegetation plots developed by the IAVS Working Group European Vegetation Survey. It has been in development since 2012 and first made available for use in research projects in 2014. It stores copies of national and

  6. Effect of combination processing on the microbial, chemical and sensory quality of ready-to-eat (RTE) vegetable pulav

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, R., E-mail: kumardfrl@gmail.com [Defence Food Research Laboratory, Mysore, Karnataka 570011 (India); George, Johnsy; Rajamanickam, R.; Nataraju, S.; Sabhapathy, S.N.; Bawa, A.S. [Defence Food Research Laboratory, Mysore, Karnataka 570011 (India)

    2011-12-15

    Effect of irradiation in combination with retort processing on the shelf life and safety aspects of an ethnic Indian food product like vegetable pulav was investigated. Gamma irradiation of RTE vegetable pulav was carried out at different dosage rates with {sup 60}Co followed by retort processing. The combination processed samples were analysed for microbiological, chemical and sensory characteristics. Microbiological analysis indicated that irradiation in combination with retort processing has significantly reduced the microbial loads whereas the chemical and sensory analysis proved that this combination processing is effective in retaining the properties even after storage for one year at ambient conditions. The results also indicated that a minimum irradiation dosage at 4.0 kGy along with retort processing at an F{sub 0} value of 2.0 is needed to achieve the desired shelf life with improved organoleptic qualities. - Highlights: > A combination processing involving gamma irradiation and retort processing. > Combination processing reduced microbial loads. > Minimum dose of 4.0 kGy together with retort processing at F{sub 0}-2.0 is required to achieve commercial sterility.

  7. Irradiation of dehydrated vegetables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esterhuyse, A; Esterhuizen, T.

    1985-01-01

    The reason for radurization was to decreased the microbial count of dehydrated vegetables. The average absorbed irradiation dose range between 2kGy and 15kGy. The product catagories include a) Green vegetables b) White vegetables c) Powders of a) and b). The microbiological aspects were: Declining curves for the different products of T.P.C., Coliforms, E. Coli, Stap. areus, Yeast + Mold at different doses. The organoleptical aspects were: change in taste, flavour, texture, colour and moisture. The aim is the marketing of irradiated dehydrated vegetables national and international basis

  8. Measurement of the photon structure function F/sub 2/sup(. gamma. ) at Q/sup 2/ from 7 to 70 (GeV/c)/sup 2/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Althoff, M; Braunschweig, W; Gerhards, R; Kirschfink, F J; Martyn, H U; Rosskamp, P; Wallraff, W; Bock, B; Eisenmann, J; Fischer, H M

    1986-08-01

    We have measured the process e/sup +/e/sup -/->e/sup +/e/sup -/+hadrons, where one of the scattered electrons was detected at large angles, with Q/sup 2/ ranging from 7 to 70 (GeV/c)/sup 2/. The photon structure function F/sub 2/sup(..gamma..)(x, Q/sup 2/) was determined at an average Q/sup 2/ of 23 (GeV/c)/sup 2/. The measurements were compared to theoretical predictions of the Quark Parton Model and Quantum Chromodynamics. In both models a hadronic part was added. Within the errors the data are in agreement with the QPM using quark masses of 300 MeV/c/sup 2/ for the light quarks. The data also agree with a QCD calculation including higher order corrections. A fit yielded a ..lambda..sub(anti M)anti S) value of 140(+190-65) MeV, where the errors include statistical and systematic uncertainties.

  9. Stable carbon isotope composition (δ{sup 13}C), water use efficiency, and biomass productivity of Lycopersicon esculentum, Lycopersicon pennellii, and the F{sub 1} hybrid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, B.; Thorstenson, Y. R.

    1988-09-01

    Three tomatoes, Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cv UC82B, a droughttolerant wild related species, Lycopersicon pennellii (Cor.) D'Arcy, and their F{sub 1}, hybrid, were grown in containers maintained at three levels of soil moisture. Season-long water use was obtained by summing over the season daily weight losses of each container corrected for soil evaporation. Plant biomass was determined by harvesting and weighing entire dried plants. Season-long water use efficiency (gram dry weight/kilogram H{sub 2}O) was calculated by dividing the dry biomass by the season-long water use. The season-long water use efficiency was greatest in the wild parent, poorest in the domestic parent, and intermediate (but closer to the wild parent) in the F, hybrid. Instantaneous water-use efficiency (micromole CO{sub 2}/millimole H{sub 2}O) determined by gas exchange measurements on individual leaves was poorly correlated with season-long water use efficiency. However, the relative abundance of stable carbon isotopes of leaf tissue samples was strongly correlated with the season-long water use efficiency. Also, the isotopic composition and the season-long water use efficiency of each genotype alone were strongly negatively correlated with plant dry weight when the dry weight varied as a function of soil moisture. (author)

  10. ϕ{sup 3} theory with F{sub 4} flavor symmetry in 6−2ϵ dimensions: 3-loop renormalization and conformal bootstrap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pang, Yi [Max-Planck-Insitut für Gravitationsphysik (Albert-Einstein-Institut),Am Mühlenberg 1, Potsdam, DE-14476 (Germany); Rong, Junchen [Fields, Gravity & Strings, Center for Theoretical Physics of the Universe,Institute for Basic Sciences, Daejeon, 305-811 (Korea, Republic of); Su, Ning [CAS Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics,Chinese Academy of Sciences, Zhong Guan Cun East Street 55 #,P.O. Box 2735, Beijing, 100190 (China)

    2016-12-14

    We consider ϕ{sup 3} theory in 6−2ϵ with F{sub 4} global symmetry. The beta function is calculated up to 3 loops, and a stable unitary IR fixed point is observed. The anomalous dimensions of operators quadratic or cubic in ϕ are also computed. We then employ conformal bootstrap technique to study the fixed point predicted from the perturbative approach. For each putative scaling dimension of ϕ (Δ{sub ϕ}), we obtain the corresponding upper bound on the scaling dimension of the second lowest scalar primary in the 26 representation (Δ{sub 26}{sup 2nd}) which appears in the OPE of ϕ×ϕ. In D=5.95, we observe a sharp peak on the upper bound curve located at Δ{sub ϕ} equal to the value predicted by the 3-loop computation. In D=5, we observe a weak kink on the upper bound curve at (Δ{sub ϕ},Δ{sub 26}{sup 2nd})=(1.6,4).

  11. Peak effect and superconducting properties of SmFeAsO{sub 0.8}F{sub 0.2} wires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y L; Cui, Y J; Yang, Y; Zhang, Y; Wang, L; Zhao, Y [Key Laboratory of Magnetic Levitation Technologies and Maglev Trains, Ministry of Education of China, and Superconductivity R and D Center (SRDC), Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China); Cheng, C H; Sorrell, C [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia)], E-mail: yzhao@swjtu.edu.cn

    2008-11-15

    Ta-sheathed SmFeAsO{sub 0.8}F{sub 0.2} superconducting wires with T{sub c} = 52.5 K have been fabricated using the powder-in-tube (PIT) method and the superconducting properties of the wires have been investigated. The wires exhibit a very large intragrain critical current density at a temperature below 30 K. A peak effect with maximal J{sub c} = 0.6 MA cm{sup -2} at 10 K under 6 T field was observed. The peak field H{sub pear} is strongly temperature-dependent. A severe weak-link effect depresses the development of global supercurrent owing to a very short coherence length. The wires also show a power law temperature dependence for the irreversibility line with H{sub irr}{approx_equal}(1-T/T{sub c}){sup 1.5}. The H-T phase diagram was found to be similar to that of other superconducting cuprates.

  12. Influence of prostaglandins E2 and F/sub 2α/ on the zinc transport across rat mid-intestine in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, M.K.; Adham, N.F.; Lee, D.B.N.; Carmack, C.R.

    1986-01-01

    Effects of physiological (5.0 μM) and pharmacological (50 μM) doses of prostaglandins (PG) E 2 and F/sub 2α/ on the zinc transport rate across rat jejunum mounted on a Ussing Chamber were determined. Zinc transport rate from mucosal to serosal direction was 4.82 +/- 0.81 n moles/hr/cm 2 whereas the opposite direction was 18.71 +/- 0.96 n moles/hr/cm 2 . When 5.0 μM or 50 μM PGE 2 or PGF/sub 2α/ were added into Ringers-Krebs bicarbonate solution containing 3 mM L-histidine and 0.5 mM 65 Zn Cl 2 to the mucosal side of mucosa, no significant difference in 65 Zn transport rate was observed compared to controls. However, 5.0 μM PGF/sub 2α/ and 50 μM PGE 2 significantly inhibited zinc transport from mucosal to serosal direction. When PGs were added to the opposite side of mucosa, only 5.0 μM PGs significantly inhibited zinc transport from serosal to mucosal direction. Results suggest that PGs act on the inhibition of zinc transport across the basolateral membrane of columnar absorbing cells and that 50 μM PGE 2 was the most powerful inhibitor

  13. Measurement of the D{sup *{+-}} meson production cross section and F{sub 2}{sup c} {sup anti} {sup c} at high Q{sup 2} in ep scattering at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brinkmann, Martin

    2010-04-15

    The inclusive production cross section of D{sup *{+-}}(2010) mesons in deep-inelastic e{sup {+-}}p scattering is measured in the kinematic region of photon virtuality 1001.5 GeV. The data were collected by the H1 experiment during the period from 2004 to 2007 and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 351 pb{sup -1}. The charm contribution, F{sub 2}{sup c} {sup anti} {sup c}, to the proton structure function F{sub 2} is determined. The measurements are compared with QCD predictions. (orig.)

  14. Balkan Vegetation Database

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vassilev, Kiril; Pedashenko, Hristo; Alexandrova, Alexandra; Tashev, Alexandar; Ganeva, Anna; Gavrilova, Anna; Gradevska, Asya; Assenov, Assen; Vitkova, Antonina; Grigorov, Borislav; Gussev, Chavdar; Filipova, Eva; Aneva, Ina; Knollová, Ilona; Nikolov, Ivaylo; Georgiev, Georgi; Gogushev, Georgi; Tinchev, Georgi; Pachedjieva, Kalina; Koev, Koycho; Lyubenova, Mariyana; Dimitrov, Marius; Apostolova-Stoyanova, Nadezhda; Velev, Nikolay; Zhelev, Petar; Glogov, Plamen; Natcheva, Rayna; Tzonev, Rossen; Boch, Steffen; Hennekens, Stephan M.; Georgiev, Stoyan; Stoyanov, Stoyan; Karakiev, Todor; Kalníková, Veronika; Shivarov, Veselin; Russakova, Veska; Vulchev, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    The Balkan Vegetation Database (BVD; GIVD ID: EU-00-019; http://www.givd.info/ID/EU-00- 019) is a regional database that consists of phytosociological relevés from different vegetation types from six countries on the Balkan Peninsula (Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Kosovo, Montenegro

  15. Soil and vegetation surveillance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonio, E.J.

    1995-06-01

    Soil sampling and analysis evaluates long-term contamination trends and monitors environmental radionuclide inventories. This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the soil and vegetation surveillance programs which were conducted during 1994. Vegetation surveillance is conducted offsite to monitor atmospheric deposition of radioactive materials in areas not under cultivation and onsite at locations adjacent to potential sources of radioactivity.

  16. Lanthanide-activated Na{sub 5}Gd{sub 9}F{sub 32} nanocrystals precipitated from a borosilicate glass: Phase-separation-controlled crystallization and optical property

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Daqin, E-mail: dqchen@hdu.edu.cn [College of Materials and Environmental Engineering, Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Key Laboratory of Design and Assembly of Functional Nanostructures, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, CAS, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Wan, Zhongyi; Zhou, Yang [College of Materials and Environmental Engineering, Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Chen, Yan, E-mail: chenyan@hdu.edu.cn [College of Materials and Environmental Engineering, Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Yu, Hua; Lu, Hongwei; Ji, Zhenguo [College of Materials and Environmental Engineering, Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Huang, Ping, E-mail: phuang@fjirsm.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Design and Assembly of Functional Nanostructures, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, CAS, Fuzhou 350002 (China)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • Na{sub 5}Gd{sub 9}F{sub 32} nanocrystals embedded glass ceramics were fabricated for the first time. • Such glass ceramics were achieved by phase-separation-controlled crystallization. • Elemental mapping evidenced the segregation of activators into the Na{sub 5}Gd{sub 9}F{sub 32} lattice. • Luminescent color could be tuned by controlling glass crystallization temperature. - Abstract: Lanthanide-activated cubic Na{sub 5}Gd{sub 9}F{sub 32} nanocrystals were precipitated from a borosilicate glass with a specifically designed composition. The precursor glass is already phase-separated after melt-quenching, which is beneficial to the realization of the controllable glass crystallization for affording desirable size, morphology and activator partition. Elemental mapping in the scanning transmission electron microscopy evidenced that the segregation of lanthanide ions into the Na{sub 5}Gd{sub 9}F{sub 32} lattice was in situ formed without the requirement of long-range ionic diffusion. Impressively, such fabricated glass ceramic co-doped with Yb{sup 3+}/Er{sup 3+} ions exhibited intense upconversion luminescence, which was about 500 times higher than that of the precursor glass, and its luminescent color could be easily tuned from red to green by controlling glass crystallization temperature. It is anticipated that such phase-separation synthesis strategy with precise control over nanostructure of glass ceramics offer a great opportunity to design other highly transparent nanocomposites with a wide range of tunable optical properties.

  17. Two ternary mixed-anion chlorides with divalent europium: Eu{sub 2}H{sub 3}Cl and Eu{sub 7}F{sub 12}Cl{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reckeweg, Olaf [Baker Laboratory, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-1301 (United States); Institut fuer Anorganische Chemie, Universitaet Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 55, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); DiSalvo, Francis J. [Baker Laboratory, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-1301 (United States); Wolf, Sarah; Schleid, Thomas [Institut fuer Anorganische Chemie, Universitaet Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 55, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2014-06-15

    Dark ruby-red, transparent, triangular plate-shaped single crystals of Eu{sub 2}H{sub 3}Cl and colorless, transparent, needle-shaped single crystals of Eu{sub 7}F{sub 12}Cl{sub 2} were obtained by solid-state reactions of Eu, NaH, NaCl, and Na (2:4:1:2 molar ratio) or Eu, EuCl{sub 3}, and LiF (1:1:4 molar ratio), respectively, in silica-jacketed tantalum ampoules at 900 C for 13 h. Eu{sub 2}H{sub 3}Cl crystallizes isotypically to Ba{sub 2}H{sub 3}X (X = Cl, Br, I) in the trigonal space group P anti 3m1 (no. 164) with lattice parameters a = 409.67(4) and c = 696.18(7) pm, whereas Eu{sub 7}F{sub 12}Cl{sub 2} crystallizes isotypically to Ba{sub 7}F{sub 12}Cl{sub 2} or Sr{sub 7}H{sub 12}Cl{sub 2} in the hexagonal space group P anti 6 (no. 174) with lattice parameters a = 1002.31(5) and c = 392.54(2) pm. Both compounds contain Eu{sup 2+} cations with coordination numbers as high as nine (Eu{sub 7}F{sub 12}Cl{sub 2}) and ten (Eu{sub 2}H{sub 3}Cl) with respect to the halide anions (F{sup -} or H{sup -} and Cl{sup -}). The structural results are corroborated by EUTAX and MAPLE calculations on both ternary mixed-anion europium(II) chlorides in comparison to these for related binary and ternary compounds with divalent europium. (Copyright copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. Ion mobility and conductivity in the M{sub 0.5–x}Pb{sub x}Bi{sub 0.5}F{sub 2+x} (M=K, Rb) solid solutions with fluorite structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kavun, V. Ya., E-mail: kavun@ich.dvo.ru [Institute of Chemistry FEBRAS, 159, Pr. 100-letya Vladivostoka, Vladivostok 690022 (Russian Federation); Uvarov, N.F. [Institute of Solid State Chemistry and Mechanochemistry, SB RAS, 18, Kutateladze Str., Novosibirsk 630128 (Russian Federation); Slobodyuk, A.B.; Polyantsev, M.M.; Merkulov, E.B. [Institute of Chemistry FEBRAS, 159, Pr. 100-letya Vladivostoka, Vladivostok 690022 (Russian Federation); Ulihin, A.S. [Institute of Solid State Chemistry and Mechanochemistry, SB RAS, 18, Kutateladze Str., Novosibirsk 630128 (Russian Federation); Goncharuk, V.K. [Institute of Chemistry FEBRAS, 159, Pr. 100-letya Vladivostoka, Vladivostok 690022 (Russian Federation)

    2017-05-15

    Ionic mobility and conductivity in the K{sub 0.5–x}Pb{sub x}Bi{sub 0.5}F{sub 2+x} and Rb{sub 0.5–x}Pb{sub x}Bi{sub 0.5}F{sub 2+x} (x=0.05, 0.09) solid solutions with the fluorite structure have been investigated using the methods of {sup 19}F NMR, X-ray diffraction and impedance spectroscopy. Types of ionic motions in the fluoride sublattice of solid solutions have been established and temperature ranges of their realization have been determined (150–450 K). Diffusion of fluoride ions is a dominating type of ionic motions in the fluoride sublattice of solid solutions under study above 350 K. Due to high ionic conductivity, above 10{sup –3} S/cm at 450 K, these solid solutions can be used as solid electrolytes in various electrochemical devices and systems. - Graphical abstract: Temperature dependence of the concentration of mobile (2, 4) and immobile (1, 3) F ions in the K{sub 0.5–x}Pb{sub x}Bi{sub 0.5}F{sub 2+x} solid solutions. - Highlights: • Studied the ion mobility, conductivity in M{sub 0.5–x}Pb{sub x}Bi{sub 0.5}F{sub 2+x} solid solutions (M=K, Rb). • An analysis of {sup 19}F NMR spectra made it possible to identify types of ion mobility. • The main type of ion motion above 300 K in solid solutions is a diffusion of ions F{sup –}. • The ionic conductivity of the solid solutions studied more than 10{sup –3} S/cm at 450 K.

  19. Method of producing vegetable puree

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2004-01-01

    A process for producing a vegetable puree, comprising the sequential steps of: a)crushing, chopping or slicing the vegetable into pieces of 1 to 30 mm; b) blanching the vegetable pieces at a temperature of 60 to 90°C; c) contacted the blanched vegetable pieces with a macerating enzyme activity; d......) blending the macerated vegetable pieces and obtaining a puree....

  20. Absolute number density and kinetic analysis of CF, CF{sub 2} and C{sub 2}F{sub 4} molecules in pulsed CF{sub 4}/H{sub 2} rf plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stepanov, Sergey

    2010-04-26

    Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy in the mid InfraRed spectral range (IR-TDLAS) has been applied to investigate the behaviour of CF, CF{sub 2} and C{sub 2}F{sub 4} species produced in pulsed CF{sub 4}/H{sub 2} capacitively coupled radio frequency plasmas (13.56 MHz CCP). This experimental technique was shown to be suitable for temporally resolved measurements of the absolute number density of the target molecules in the studied fluorocarbon discharges. The temporal resolution of about 20..40 ms typically achieved in the standard data acquisition mode (''stream mode'') was sufficient for the real-time measurements of CF{sub 2} and C{sub 2}F{sub 4}, but not of CF whose kinetics was observed to be much faster. Therefore, a more sophisticated approach (''burst mode'') providing a temporal resolution of 0.94 ms was established and successfully applied to CF density measurements. In order to enable the TDLAS measurements of the target species, preliminary investigations on their spectroscopic data had been carried out. In particular, pure C{sub 2}F{sub 4} has been produced in laboratory by means of vacuum thermal decomposition (pyrolysis) of polytetrafluoroethylene and used as a reference gas. Therefore, an absorption structure consisting of several overlapping C{sub 2}F{sub 4} lines around 1337.11 cm{sup -1} was selected and carefully calibrated, which provided the first absolute measurements of the species by means of the applied experimental technique. The absolute number density traces measured for CF, CF{sub 2} and C{sub 2}F{sub 4} in the studied pulsed plasmas were then analysed, in which two differential balance equations were proposed for each of the species to describe their behaviour during both ''plasma on'' and ''plasma off'' phases. Analytical solutions of the balance equations were used to fit the experimental data and hence to deduce important information on the

  1. Ba{sub 2.2}Ca{sub 0.8}Mg{sub 4}F{sub 14}, a new ''solid solution stabilized'' matrix for an intense blue phosphor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubel, F.; Pantazi, M. [TU Vienna, Inst. of Chemical Technologies and Analytics, Getreidemarkt 9, 164-SC, 1060 Vienna (Austria); Hagemann, H. [Departement de Chimie Physique, Universite de Geneve, 30, quai E.Ansermet, 1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland)

    2011-09-15

    Barium calcium magnesium fluoride (Ba{sub 2}(Ba{sub x}Ca{sub 1-x})Mg{sub 4}F{sub 14}, x=0.19-0.26) has been synthesized at 850 C from precursors prepared by the solution precipitation method. Single crystals with composition of Ba{sub 2.200(2)}Ca{sub 0.800(2)}Mg{sub 4}F{sub 14}were obtained after prolonged heating. Lattice parameters from single crystal data are a = 12.4203(8) and c = 7.4365(5) A [tetragonal, space group P4{sub 2}/mnm (No. 136)]. They increase with increasing barium concentration within a given stability window. The structure is built of a network of MgF{sub 6} octahedra forming a pyrochlore related channel system and isolated fluorine ions. Within the channels, heavy alkaline earth ions are located. The wide channel is filled with off-center positioned barium ions. The channel with a narrow cross section hosts both ions, Ca{sup 2+}and Ba{sup 2+}. The structure is isotypic with Pb{sub 3}Nb{sub 4}O{sub 12}F{sub 2} but has a different coordination around Ba/Ca and Pb, respectively. Doped with {proportional_to}1% Eu(II), the compound shows intense blue luminescence under UV activation. (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  2. Noticeable red emission and Raman active modes in nanoscale gadolinium oxyfluoride (Gd{sub 4}O{sub 3}F{sub 6}) systems with Eu{sup 3+} inclusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazarika, Samiran; Mohanta, Dambarudhar [Tezpur University, Nanoscience and Soft Matter Laboratory, Department of Physics, Tezpur, Assam (India)

    2017-05-15

    Eu{sup 3+} doped gadolinium oxyfluoride (Gd{sub 4}O{sub 3}F{sub 6}, GOF) nanoscale systems have been synthesized following a modified Pechini method. While exhibiting a tetragonal crystal structure, the GOF nanosystem gave an average crystallite size (d) of ∝21-26 nm. The Lotgering factor (L{sub F}), which is a measure of orientation of crystallites along the preferred direction was found to vary between 0.22 and 0.48. In the photoluminescence spectra, ∝595 and ∝613 nm peaks were identified as magnetically driven ({sup 5}D{sub 0} → {sup 7}F{sub 1}) and electrically driven ({sup 5}D{sub 0} → {sup 7}F{sub 2}) transitions with latter (red emission) being strongly manifested with Eu{sup 3+} doping concentration and intrinsic defects. Moreover, several Raman active modes have been probed in the Raman spectra with low frequency peaks (<300 cm{sup -1}) and moderate frequency peaks (∝481 and 567 cm{sup -1}) assigned to observable vibration of heavy atom Gd-Gd pairs and Gd-O groups, respectively. Apart from manifestation of phononic features, inclusion of Eu{sup 3+} in the host lattice would bring new insight on improving the red emission response prior to concentration quenching. (orig.)

  3. Absolute number density and kinetic analysis of CF, CF{sub 2} and C{sub 2}F{sub 4} molecules in pulsed CF{sub 4}/H{sub 2} rf plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stepanov, Sergey

    2010-04-26

    Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy in the mid InfraRed spectral range (IR-TDLAS) has been applied to investigate the behaviour of CF, CF{sub 2} and C{sub 2}F{sub 4} species produced in pulsed CF{sub 4}/H{sub 2} capacitively coupled radio frequency plasmas (13.56 MHz CCP). This experimental technique was shown to be suitable for temporally resolved measurements of the absolute number density of the target molecules in the studied fluorocarbon discharges. The temporal resolution of about 20..40 ms typically achieved in the standard data acquisition mode (''stream mode'') was sufficient for the real-time measurements of CF{sub 2} and C{sub 2}F{sub 4}, but not of CF whose kinetics was observed to be much faster. Therefore, a more sophisticated approach (''burst mode'') providing a temporal resolution of 0.94 ms was established and successfully applied to CF density measurements. In order to enable the TDLAS measurements of the target species, preliminary investigations on their spectroscopic data had been carried out. In particular, pure C{sub 2}F{sub 4} has been produced in laboratory by means of vacuum thermal decomposition (pyrolysis) of polytetrafluoroethylene and used as a reference gas. Therefore, an absorption structure consisting of several overlapping C{sub 2}F{sub 4} lines around 1337.11 cm{sup -1} was selected and carefully calibrated, which provided the first absolute measurements of the species by means of the applied experimental technique. The absolute number density traces measured for CF, CF{sub 2} and C{sub 2}F{sub 4} in the studied pulsed plasmas were then analysed, in which two differential balance equations were proposed for each of the species to describe their behaviour during both ''plasma on'' and ''plasma off'' phases. Analytical solutions of the balance equations were used to fit the experimental data and hence to deduce important information on the kinetics of the studied molecules. In particular, during the ''plasma off'' phase

  4. Vegetation survey: a new focus for Applied Vegetation Science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chytry, M.; Schaminee, J.H.J.; Schwabe, A.

    2011-01-01

    Vegetation survey is an important research agenda in vegetation science. It defines vegetation types and helps understand differences among them, which is essential for both basic ecological research and applications in biodiversity conservation and environmental monitoring. In this editorial, we

  5. Renal scintigraphy in the 21st Century {sup 99m} Tc-MAG{sub 3} with zero time injection of furosemide (MAG{sub 3}-F{sub 0}): a fast and easy protocol, one for all indications. Part 1. Introduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sfakianakis, G.N. [Professor of Radiology and Pediatrics, Director Division of Nuclear Medicine, University of Miami, School of Medicine, Florida (United States)

    2007-07-01

    In this work the MAG{sub 3}-F{sub 0} protocol is presented. Did you ever want to have one fast and easy protocol for Scintirenography?. The same for all indications. (Parenchymal and Drainage ). Irrespective of the age of the patient, the degree of impairment of the renal function, the general clinical condition of the patient, and obtain also information about prognosis absolutely safely and reproducibly. This is the MAG{sub 3}-F{sub 0} protocol. (Author)

  6. Renal scintigraphy in the 21st Century {sup 99m} Tc-MAG{sub 3} with zero time injection of furosemide (MAG{sub 3}-F{sub 0}): a fast and easy protocol, one for all indications. Part 3. Clinical experience. Congenital disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sfakianakis, G.N. [Professor of Radiology and Pediatrics, Director Division of Nuclear Medicine, University of Miami, School of Medicine, Florida (United States)

    2007-07-01

    In this work the Protocol for MAG{sub 3}-F{sub 0} is presented. Patient preparation, easy (only restriction, oral hydration, no bladder cathartic). Dynamic study (iv 1-10 mCi MAG{sub 3} + 40-80 mg LASIX), simultaneous injection of furosemide: MAG{sub 3}-F{sub 0}, duration of the study: 25 minutes. Tomography-SPECT (20 mCi MAG{sub 3}). No diuretic needed, duration of the study: 4 minutes. (Author)

  7. Vegetation Identification With LIDAR

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Helt, Michael F

    2005-01-01

    .... The specific terrain element of interest is vegetation, and in particular, tree type. Data taken on April 12th, 2005, were taken over a 10 km 20 km region which is mixed use agriculture and wetlands...

  8. Vegetation and soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, M.K.; King, S.L.; Eisenbies, M.H.; Gartner, D.

    2000-01-01

    Intro paragraph: Characterization of bottomland hardwood vegetation in relatively undisturbed forests can provide critical information for developing effective wetland creation and restoration techniques and for assessing the impacts of management and development. Classification is a useful technique in characterizing vegetation because it summarizes complex data sets, assists in hypothesis generation about factors influencing community variation, and helps refine models of community structure. Hierarchical classification of communities is particularly useful for showing relationships among samples (Gauche 1982).

  9. Oxide fluoride sulfides of the lanthanoids with the formula M{sub 6}O{sub 2}F{sub 8}S{sub 3} (M = La-Nd, Sm, Gd); Oxidfluoridsulfide der Lanthanoide vom Formeltyp M{sub 6}O{sub 2}F{sub 8}S{sub 3} (M = La-Nd, Sm, Gd)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grossholz, Hagen; Zimmermann, Dirk D.; Janka, Oliver; Schleid, Thomas [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Anorganische Chemie

    2013-07-15

    The lanthanoid(III) oxide fluoride sulfides M{sub 6}O{sub 2}F{sub 8}S{sub 3} (M = La-Nd, Sm, Gd) can be obtained by reacting the rare-earth metals, their trifluorides and sesquioxides with elemental sulfur in appropriate molar ratios at 850 C flux-assisted by NaCl in gas-tightly sealed niobium or tantalum ampoules. All compounds are colorless, except for those containing M = Pr with green, M = Nd with lilac and M = Sm with yellow color. They form transparent single crystals as needles or rods. The M{sub 6}O{sub 2}F{sub 8}S{sub 3} representatives crystallize in a hexagonal structure (space group: P6{sub 3}/m; a {approx} 1382-1326, c {approx} 398-376 pm, c/a {approx} 0.288-0.284; Z = 2) with two different crystallographic M{sup 3+} positions. The (M2){sup 3+} cations reside in ninefold coordination of anions arranged as tricapped trigonal prisms formed by three F{sup -}, four mixed-occupied O{sup 2-}/F{sup -} and two S{sup 2-} anions, resembling the unique M{sup 3+} coordination sphere of the M{sub 3}OF{sub 5}S-type oxide fluoride sulfides. The (M1){sup 3+} cations are surrounded by square antiprisms built of four O{sup 2-}/F{sup -} and S{sup 2-} anions each, which are capped by one F{sup -} anion each, again resulting in a ninefold coordination similar to that of the A-MFS-type fluoride sulfides. While the crystallographically unique S{sup 2-} anions have six cationic neighbors arranged in trigonal prisms, there are four different light-anion positions. Two of them, representing only fluoride anions, are situated in a triangular environment of cations ((F1){sup -}: planar, (F2){sup -}: non-planar). The mixed-occupied light-anion positions (F3){sup -}/(O3){sup 2-} and (F4){sup -}/(O4){sup 2-} exhibit tetrahedral coordination spheres with a ratio F{sup -}: O{sup 2-} = 2:1. The M{sub 6}O{sub 2}F{sub 8}S{sub 3} arrangement is characterized by an empty hexagonal channel structure created by (F1){sup -} anions with a potential of accommodating alkali-metal cations like Na

  10. An experimental and ab initio study of the electronic spectrum of the jet-cooled F{sub 2}BO free radical

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimminger, Robert; Clouthier, Dennis J., E-mail: dclaser@uky.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506-0055 (United States); Sheridan, Phillip M. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Canisius College, Buffalo, New York 14208 (United States)

    2014-04-28

    We have studied the B{sup ~} {sup 2}A{sub 1}–X{sup ~} {sup 2}B{sub 2} laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectrum of the jet-cooled F{sub 2}BO radical for the first time. The transition consists of a strong 0{sub 0}{sup 0} band at 446.5 nm and eight weak sequence bands to shorter wavelengths. Single vibronic level emission spectra obtained by laser excitation of individual levels of the B{sup ~} state exhibit two electronic transitions: a very weak, sparse B{sup ~}–X{sup ~} band system in the 450–500 nm region and a stronger, more extensive set of B{sup ~} {sup 2}A{sub 1}–A{sup ~} {sup 2}B{sub 1} bands in the 580–650 nm region. We have also performed a series of high level ab initio calculations to predict the electronic energies, molecular structures, vibrational frequencies, and rotational and spin-rotation constants in the X{sup ~} {sup 2}B{sub 2}, A{sup ~2}B{sub 1} and B{sup ~} {sup 2}A{sub 1} electronic states as an aid to the analysis of the experimental data. The theoretical results have been used as input for simulations of the rotationally resolved B{sup ~} {sup 2}A{sub 1}–X{sup ~} {sup 2}B{sub 2} 0{sub 0}{sup 0} LIF band and Franck-Condon profiles of the LIF and single vibronic level emission spectra. The agreement between the simulations obtained with purely ab initio parameters and the experimental spectra validates the geometries calculated for the ground and excited states and the conclusion that the radical has C{sub 2v} symmetry in the X{sup ~}, A{sup ~}, and B{sup ~} states. The spectra provide considerable new information about the vibrational energy levels of the X{sup ~} and A{sup ~} states, but very little for the B{sup ~} state, due to the very restrictive Franck-Condon factors in the LIF spectra.

  11. Visible-to-UVC upconversion efficiency and mechanisms of Lu{sub 7}O{sub 6}F{sub 9}:Pr{sup 3+} and Y{sub 2}SiO{sub 5}:Pr{sup 3+} ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cates, Ezra L. [Department of Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, Clemson University, Anderson, SC 29625 (United States); Center for Optical Materials Science and Engineering Technologies, Clemson University, Anderson, SC 29625 (United States); Wilkinson, Angus P. [School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States); Kim, Jae-Hong, E-mail: jaehong.kim@yale.edu [Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Visible-to-UVC upconversion (UC) by Pr{sup 3+}-doped materials is a promising candidate for application to sustainable disinfection technologies, including light-activated antimicrobial surfaces and solar water treatment. In this work, we studied Pr{sup 3+} upconversion in an oxyfluoride host system for the first time, employing Lu{sub 7}O{sub 6}F{sub 9}:Pr{sup 3+} ceramics. Compared to the previously studied Y{sub 2}SiO{sub 5}:Pr{sup 3+} reference material, the oxyfluoride host resulted in a 5-fold increase in intermediate state lifetime, likely due to a lower maximum phonon energy; however, only a 60% gain in UC intensity was observed. To explain this discrepancy, luminescence spectral distribution and decay kinetics were studied in both phosphor systems. The Pr{sup 3+} 4f5d band energy distribution in each phosphor was found to play a key role by allowing or disallowing the occurrence of a previously unexplored UC mechanism, which had a significant impact on overall efficiency. - Highlights: • Visible-to-UVC upconversion by Pr{sup 3+} was studied in an oxyfluoride host matrix for the first time. • Lu{sub 7}O{sub 6}F{sub 9}:Pr{sup 3+} ceramics were synthesized and characterized. • Lu{sub 7}O{sub 6}F{sub 9}:Pr{sup 3+} shows more intense UV upconversion than Y{sub 2}SiO{sub 5}:Pr{sup 3+}, with differing mechanisms. • 4f5d band energy and {sup 1}D{sub 2} involvement are important in maximizing upconversion efficiency.

  12. Fluorocarbon assisted atomic layer etching of SiO{sub 2} and Si using cyclic Ar/C{sub 4}F{sub 8} and Ar/CHF{sub 3} plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metzler, Dominik; Oehrlein, Gottlieb S., E-mail: oehrlein@umd.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, and Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20740 (United States); Li, Chen [Department of Physics, and Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20740 (United States); Engelmann, Sebastian; Bruce, Robert L.; Joseph, Eric A. [IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    The need for atomic layer etching (ALE) is steadily increasing as smaller critical dimensions and pitches are required in device patterning. A flux-control based cyclic Ar/C{sub 4}F{sub 8} ALE based on steady-state Ar plasma in conjunction with periodic, precise C{sub 4}F{sub 8} injection and synchronized plasma-based low energy Ar{sup +} ion bombardment has been established for SiO{sub 2} [Metzler et al., J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 32, 020603 (2014)]. In this work, the cyclic process is further characterized and extended to ALE of silicon under similar process conditions. The use of CHF{sub 3} as a precursor is examined and compared to C{sub 4}F{sub 8}. CHF{sub 3} is shown to enable selective SiO{sub 2}/Si etching using a fluorocarbon (FC) film build up. Other critical process parameters investigated are the FC film thickness deposited per cycle, the ion energy, and the etch step length. Etching behavior and mechanisms are studied using in situ real time ellipsometry and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Silicon ALE shows less self-limitation than silicon oxide due to higher physical sputtering rates for the maximum ion energies used in this work, ranged from 20 to 30 eV. The surface chemistry is found to contain fluorinated silicon oxide during the etching of silicon. Plasma parameters during ALE are studied using a Langmuir probe and establish the impact of precursor addition on plasma properties.

  13. The Vegetables Turned:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carter, Dale

    2009-01-01

    in the relationship between creative artists and the Anglo-American popular music industry in the mid-1960s. Finally, and in retrospect, the figure of the vegetable cast into relief the counter-culture's utopian and dystopian dynamics as manifested in these song-writers' personal lives, now rendered as contemporary...... lyricist Van Dyke Parks, the incongruous, semantically complex figure of the vegetable came to illuminate aspects of psychedelic consciousness and - part by design, part by accident - the link between LSD and Anglo-American popular music. It threw light, too, on the scope and limits of changes...

  14. CsSc{sub 3}F{sub 6}[SeO{sub 3}]{sub 2}. A new rare-earth metal(III) fluoride oxoselenate(IV) with sections of the ReO{sub 3}-type structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greiner, Stefan; Schleid, Thomas [Institut fuer Anorganische Chemie, Universitaet Stuttgart (Germany)

    2017-09-04

    A new representative of rare-earth metal(III) fluoride oxoselenates(IV) derivatized with alkali metals could be synthesized via solid-state reactions. Colorless single crystals of CsSc{sub 3}F{sub 6}[SeO{sub 3}]{sub 2} were obtained through the reaction of Sc{sub 2}O{sub 3}, ScF{sub 3}, and SeO{sub 2} (molar ratio 1:1:3) with CsBr as reactant and fluxing agent. For this purpose, corundum crucibles embedded as liners into evacuated silica ampoules were applied as containers for these reactions at 700 C for seven days. The new quintenary compound crystallizes in the trigonal space group P3m1 with a = 565.34(4) and c = 1069.87(8) pm (c/a = 1.892) for Z = 1. The crystal structure of CsSc{sub 3}F{sub 6}[SeO{sub 3}]{sub 2} contains two crystallographically different Sc{sup 3+} cations. Each (Sc1){sup 3+} is surrounded by six fluoride anions as octahedron, while the octahedra about (Sc2){sup 3+} are formed by three fluoride anions and three oxygen atoms from three terminal [SeO{sub 3}]{sup 2-} anions. The [(Sc1)F{sub 6}]{sup 3-} octahedra link via common F{sup -} vertices to six fac-[(Sc2)F{sub 3}O{sub 3}]{sup 6-} octahedra forming {sup 2}{sub ∞}{[Sc_3F_6O_6]"9"-} layers parallel to (001). These layers are separated by oxygen-coordinated Cs{sup +} cations (C.N. = 12), arranging for the charge compensation, while Se{sup 4+} cations within the layers surrounded by three oxygen atoms as ψ{sup 1}-tetrahedral [SeO{sub 3}]{sup 2-} units complete the structure. EDX measurements confirmed the composition of the title compound and single-crystal Raman studies showed the typical vibrational modes of isolated [SeO{sub 3}]{sup 2-} anions with ideal C{sub 3v} symmetry. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. Synthesis and characterization of new fluoride-containing manganese vanadates A{sub 2}Mn{sub 2}V{sub 2}O{sub 7}F{sub 2} (A=Rb, Cs) and Mn{sub 2}VO{sub 4}F

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanjeewa, Liurukara D. [Department of Chemistry and Center for Optical Materials Science and Engineering Technologies (COMSET), Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634-0973 (United States); McGuire, Michael A. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Smith Pellizzeri, Tiffany M.; McMillen, Colin D. [Department of Chemistry and Center for Optical Materials Science and Engineering Technologies (COMSET), Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634-0973 (United States); Ovidiu Garlea, V. [Quantum Condensed Matter Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Willett, Daniel; Chumanov, George [Department of Chemistry and Center for Optical Materials Science and Engineering Technologies (COMSET), Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634-0973 (United States); Kolis, Joseph W., E-mail: kjoseph@clemson.edu [Department of Chemistry and Center for Optical Materials Science and Engineering Technologies (COMSET), Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634-0973 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    Large single crystals of A{sub 2}Mn{sub 2}V{sub 2}O{sub 7}F{sub 2} (A=Rb, Cs) and Mn{sub 2}VO{sub 4}F were grown using a high-temperature (~600 °C) hydrothermal technique. Single crystal X-ray diffraction and powder X-ray diffraction were utilized to characterize the structures, which both possess MnO{sub 4}F{sub 2} building blocks. The A{sub 2}Mn{sub 2}V{sub 2}O{sub 7}F{sub 2} series crystallizes as a new structure type in space group Pbcn (No. 60), Z=4 (Rb{sub 2}Mn{sub 2}V{sub 2}O{sub 7}F{sub 2}: a=7.4389(17) Å, b=11.574(3) Å, c=10.914(2) Å; Cs{sub 2}Mn{sub 2}V{sub 2}O{sub 7}F{sub 2}: a=7.5615(15) Å, b=11.745(2) Å, c=11.127(2) Å). The structure is composed of zigzag chains of edge-sharing MnO{sub 4}F{sub 2} units running along the a-axis, and interconnected through V{sub 2}O{sub 7} pyrovanadate groups. Temperature dependent magnetic susceptibility measurements on this interesting one-dimensional structural feature based on Mn{sup 2+} indicated that Cs{sub 2}Mn{sub 2}V{sub 2}O{sub 7}F{sub 2} is antiferromagnetic with a Neél temperature, T{sub N}=~3 K and a Weiss constant, θ, of −11.7(1) K. Raman and infrared spectra were also analyzed to identify the fundamental V–O vibrational modes in Cs{sub 2}Mn{sub 2}V{sub 2}O{sub 7}F{sub 2}. Mn{sub 2}(VO{sub 4})F crystalizes in the monoclinic space group of C2/c (no. 15), Z=8 with unit cell parameters of a=13.559(2) Å, b=6.8036(7) Å, c=10.1408(13) Å and β=116.16(3)°. The structure is associated with those of triplite and wagnerite. Dynamic fluorine disorder gives rise to complex alternating chains of five-and six-coordinate Mn{sup 2+}. These interpenetrating chains are additionally connected through isolated VO{sub 4} tetrahedra to form the condensed structure. - Graphical abstract: New vanadate fluorides A{sub 2}Mn{sub 2}V{sub 2}O{sub 7}F{sub 2} (A=Rb, Cs) and Mn{sub 2}(VO{sub 4})F have been synthesized hydrothermally. Upon cooling, the one-dimensional Mn(II) substructure results in antiferromagnetic

  16. leafy vegetable, Gnetum africanum

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A prerequisite for successful in vitro culture is the establishment of an aseptic technique, thus the experiment was to investigate suitable sterilization regimes for the leaf explants of Gnetum africanum, an endangered green leafy vegetable. Three sterilization regimes were tested to establish the best regime using three to four ...

  17. Canopy Modeling of Aquatic Vegetation: Construction of Submerged Vegetation Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Z.; Zhou, G.

    2018-04-01

    The unique spectral characteristics of submerged vegetation in wetlands determine that the conventional terrestrial vegetation index cannot be directly employed to species identification and parameter inversion of submerged vegetation. Based on the Aquatic Vegetation Radiative Transfer model (AVRT), this paper attempts to construct an index suitable for submerged vegetation, the model simulated data and a scene of Sentinel-2A image in Taihu Lake, China are utilized for assessing the performance of the newly constructed indices and the existent vegetation indices. The results show that the angle index composed by 525 nm, 555 nm and 670 nm can resist the effects of water columns and is more sensitive to vegetation parameters such as LAI. Furthermore, it makes a well discrimination between submerged vegetation and water bodies in the satellite data. We hope that the new index will provide a theoretical basis for future research.

  18. Review of Vegetable Market Development in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chaoping; LUO; Yuandong; NI; Qiong; ZHAI

    2013-01-01

    This paper has reviewed vegetable market development from vegetable circulation system, the develop history of the liberalize vegetable market and the growth of the vegetable wholesale market in China. From the development of vegetables market in China and its characteristics: the development of vegetable market in China is related to vegetable market system, the change of institution, some technology development and infrastructure. this paper has put forward some related measures to perfect the vegetable market and improve the vegetable circulation efficiency in China.

  19. Synthesis, crystal structure and Raman spectrum of Ba{sub 7}[BO{sub 3}]{sub 3}Br(O{sub 1.33}F{sub 1.33})

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reckeweg, Olaf; DiSalvo, Francis J. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Chemical Biology; Schulz, Armin [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2017-05-01

    In addition to amorphous material and Ba{sub 7}[BO{sub 3}]{sub 4-x}F{sub 2-3x}, air and moisture sensitive single crystals of Ba{sub 7}[BO{sub 3}]{sub 3}Br(O{sub 1.33}F{sub 1.33}) were formed from H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}, Ba(OH){sub 2}, BaF{sub 2} and BaBr{sub 2} . H{sub 2}O in alumina crucibles open to the atmosphere at 1300 K for 13 h. Ba{sub 7}[BO{sub 3}]{sub 3}Br(O{sub 1.33}F{sub 1.33}) crystallizes in the hexagonal space group P6{sub 3}mc (no. 186, Z=2) with the lattice parameters a=1118.1(2) and c=723.93(13) pm. The Raman spectrum of the title compounds was also acquired and is compared to literature data.

  20. Characteristics of SiO{sub 2} etching with a C{sub 4}F{sub 8}/Ar/CHF{sub 3}/O{sub 2} gas mixture in 60-MHz/2-MHz dual-frequency capacitively coupled plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, M. H.; Kang, S. K.; Park, J. Y.; Yeom, G. Y. [Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-15

    Nanoscale SiO{sub 2} contact holes were etched by using C{sub 4}F{sub 8}/CHF{sub 3}/O{sub 2}/Ar gas mixtures in dual frequency capacitively coupled plasmas (DF-CCPs) where a 60-MHz source power was applied to the top electrode while a 2-MHz bias power was applied to the bottom electrode. The initial increase in the CHF{sub 3} gas flow rate at a fixed CHF{sub 3}+O{sub 2} flow rate increased the SiO{sub 2} etch rate as well as SiO{sub 2} etch selectivity over that of the amorphous carbon layer (ACL). When the high-frequency (HF) power was increased both SiO{sub 2} etch rate and the etch selectivity over ACL were increased. For a 300 W/500 W power ratio of 60-MHz HF power/ 2-MHz low-freqeuncy (LF) and a gas mixture of Ar (140 sccm) /C{sub 4}F{sub 8} (30 sccm) /CHF{sub 3} (25 sccm) /O{sub 2} (5 sccm) while maintaining 20 mTorr, an anisotropic etch profile with an SiO{sub 2} etch rate of 3350 A/min and an etch selectivity of higher than 6 over ACL could be obtained.

  1. Measurement of D{sup *{+-}} meson production and determination of F{sub 2}{sup c} {sup anti} {sup c} at low Q{sup 2} in deep-inelastic scattering at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaron, F.D.; Alexa, C.; Rotaru, M.; Stoicea, G. [National Inst. for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest (Romania); Andreev, V.; Belousov, A.; Eliseev, A.; Fomenko, A.; Gogitidze, N.; Lebedev, A.; Malinovski, E.; Rusakov, S.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Soloviev, Y.; Vazdik, Y. [Lebedev Physical Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation); Backovic, S.; Dubak, A.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Picuric, I.; Raicevic, N. [Univ. of Montenegro, Podgorica (ME); Baghdasaryan, A.; Baghdasaryan, S.; Zohrabyan, H. [Yerevan Physics Inst. (Armenia); Barrelet, E. [Univ. Pierre et Marie Curie Paris 6, Univ. Denis Diderot Paris 7, CNRS/IN2P3, LPNHE, Paris (France); Bartel, W.; Belov, P.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Britzger, D.; Campbell, A.J.; Eckerlin, G.; Elsen, E.; Felst, R.; Fischer, D.J.; Fleischer, M.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Glazov, A.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grebenyuk, A.; Grell, B.R.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Helebrant, C.; Kleinwort, C.; Kogler, R.; Kraemer, M.; Levonian, S.; Lipka, K.; List, J.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, J.; Niebuhr, C.; Nowak, K.; Olsson, J.E.; Pahl, P.; Panagoulias, I.; Papadopoulou, T.; Petrukhin, A.; Piec, S.; Pitzl, D.; Schmitt, S.; Sefkow, F.; South, D.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Toll, T.; Wuensch, E. [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Begzsuren, K.; Ravdandorj, T.; Tseepeldorj, B. [Inst. of Physics and Technology of the Mongolian Academy of Sciences, Ulaanbaatar (Mongolia); Bizot, J.C.; Brisson, V.; Delcourt, B.; Jacquet, M.; Pascaud, C.; Tran, T.H.; Zhang, Z.; Zomer, F. [Univ. Paris-Sud, CNRS/IN2P3,LAL, Orsay (France); Boenig, M.O.; Wegener, D. [TU Dortmund, Inst. fuer Physik, Dortmund (Germany); Boudry, V.; Moreau, F.; Specka, A. [Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3, LLR, Palaiseau (France); Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Mudrinic, M.; Pandurovic, M.; Smiljanic, I. [Univ. of Belgrade (RS); Bracinik, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Newman, P.R.; Thompson, P.D. [Univ. of Birmingham (United Kingdom); Bruncko, D.; Cerny, V.; Ferencei, J. [Slovak Academy of Sciences, Kosice (Slovakia)] [and others

    2011-10-15

    Inclusive production of D{sup *} mesons in deep-inelastic ep scattering at HERA is studied in the range 51.25 GeV and vertical stroke {eta}(D{sup *}) vertical stroke <1.8. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 348 pb {sup -1} collected with the H1 detector. Single and double differential cross sections are measured and the charm contribution F{sub 2}{sup c} {sup anti} {sup c} to the proton structure function F{sub 2} is determined. The results are compared to perturbative QCD predictions at next-to-leading order implementing different schemes for the charm mass treatment and with Monte Carlo models based on leading order matrix elements with parton showers. (orig.)

  2. Cruciferous Vegetables and Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... case-control studies have found that people who ate greater amounts of cruciferous vegetables had a lower ... Professionals’ Follow-up Study—showed that women who ate more than 5 servings of cruciferous vegetables per ...

  3. Comparison of vegetation roughness descriptions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Augustijn, Dionysius C.M.; Huthoff, Freek; van Velzen, E.H.; Altinakar, M.S.; Kokpinar, M.A.; Aydin, I.; Cokgor, S.; Kirkgoz, S.

    2008-01-01

    Vegetation roughness is an important parameter in describing flow through river systems. Vegetation impedes the flow, which affects the stage-discharge curve and may increase flood risks. Roughness is often used as a calibration parameter in river models, however when vegetation is allowed to

  4. Treatment by (N H{sub 4}){sub 2} Si F{sub 6} of hydrothermally stabilized Y zeolite: NMR, infrared and atomic absorption monitoring; Tratamento por (NH4){sub 2} SiF{sub 6} de zeolito Y estabilizado hidrotermicamente: monitoramento por RMN, IV e A.A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Ruth L; Camorim, Vera L.D.D.; Menezes, Sonia M.C. de [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas

    1992-12-31

    The kinetics of NFA leaching of a hydrothermal treated Y zeolite was determined by using AAS, IR and NMR techniques. It was observed first order with respect to NFA onto intra crystalline volume. The transformation of octahedral Aluminium into mainly tetrahedral species was observed at the first contact with the fluorinated reagent,being leached as NM{sub 4} Al F{sub 4} and, in a less amount, as (N H{sub 4}){sub 3} Al F{sub 6}. (author) 4 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Phenolation of vegetable oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZORAN S. PETROVIĆ

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Novel bio-based compounds containing phenols suitable for the syn­thesis of polyurethanes were prepared. The direct alkylation of phenols with different vegetable oils in the presence of superacids (HBF4, triflic acid as ca­talysts was studied. The reaction kinetics was followed by monitoring the de­crease of the double bond content (iodine value with time. In order to under­stand the mechanism of the reaction, phenol was alkylated with model com­pounds. The model compounds containing one internal double bond were 9-oc­tadecene and methyl oleate and those with three double bonds were triolein and high oleic safflower oil (82 % oleic acid. It was shown that the best structures for phenol alkylation are fatty acids with only one double bond (oleic acid. Fatty acids with two double bonds (linoleic acid and three double bonds (lino­lenic acid lead to polymerized oils by a Diels–Alder reaction, and to a lesser extent to phenol alkylated products. The reaction product of direct alkylation of phenol with vegetable oils is a complex mixture of phenol alkylated with poly­merized oil (30–60 %, phenyl esters formed by transesterification of phenol with triglyceride ester bonds (<10 % and unreacted oil (30 %. The phenolated vegetable oils are new aromatic–aliphatic bio-based raw materials suitable for the preparation of polyols (by propoxylation, ethoxylation, Mannich reactions for the preparation of polyurethanes, as intermediates for phenolic resins or as bio-based antioxidants.

  6. Adsorption of F{sub 2}C=CFCl on TiO{sub 2} nano-powder: Structures, energetics and vibrational properties from DRIFT spectroscopy and periodic quantum chemical calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tasinato, Nicola, E-mail: tasinato@unive.it; Moro, Daniele; Stoppa, Paolo; Pietropolli Charmet, Andrea; Toninello, Piero; Giorgianni, Santi

    2015-10-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Adsorption of F{sub 2}C=CFCl on TiO{sub 2} unveiled by DRIFTS and periodic DFT. • Structural, energetic and vibrational properties of F{sub 2}C=CFCl @ anatase (1 0 1). • Binding energies (B3LYP-D2) between −17 and −46 kJ mol{sup −1} depending on the anchor point. • Theory and experiment converge on the CF{sub 2} moiety as the main anchor point. - Abstract: Photodegradation over titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) is a very appealing technology for removing environmental pollutants from the air, the adsorption interaction being the first step of the whole reaction pathway. In the present work the adsorption of F{sub 2}C=CFCl (chlorotrifluoroethene, halon 1113), a compound used by industry and detected in the atmosphere, on a commercial TiO{sub 2} nano-powder is investigated experimentally by in situ DRIFT spectroscopy and theoretically through periodic ab initio calculations rooted in DFT. The spectra of the adsorbed molecule suggest that the anchoring to the surface mainly takes place through F atoms. Theoretically, five adsorption configurations for the molecule interacting with the anatase (1 0 1) surface are simulated at B3LYP level and for each of them, structures, binding energies and vibrational frequencies are derived. The interplay between theory and experiments shows the coexistence of different adsorption configurations, the foremost ones featuring the interaction of one F atom with a fivefold coordinated Ti{sup 4+} of the surface. These two adsorption models, which mostly differ for the orientation of the adsorbate with respect to the surface, feature a binding energy of −45.6 and −41.0 kJ mol{sup −1} according to dispersion corrected DFT calculations. The favorable adsorption interaction appears as an important requirement toward the application of titanium dioxide technologies for the photocatalytic degradation of halon 1113.

  7. An analysis of leukaemia, lymphoma and other malignancies together with certain categories of non-cancer mortality in the first generation offspring (F[sub 1]) of the Japanese bomb survivors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Little, M.P. (National Radiological Protection Board, Chilton (United Kingdom)); Wakeford, R. (British Nuclear Fuels plc, Risley (United Kingdom)); Charles, M.W. (Nuclear Electric plc, Berkeley (United Kingdom). Berkeley Technology Centre)

    1994-09-01

    The absence of any significant excess of childhood leukaemia in the offspring of the Japanese bomb survivors has provided strong evidence against a causal interpretation of the association between paternal preconception radiation dose and the incidence of childhood leukaemia in the offspring of employees at the Sellafield nuclear installation, West Cumbria. The use of the Japanese data has, however, been questioned on the basis that leukaemia cases may have been under-recorded in the years immediately following the bombings. In order to investigate possible misdiagnoses of leukaemia cases in the first generation offspring (F[sub 1]) of the Japanese bomb survivors, analyses have been undertaken of cases of leukaemia, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), and all other malignancies, together with deaths due to blood diseases, deaths due to infectious diseases and deaths from unknown causes. (author).

  8. Effects of metals on vegetation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Press, N P

    1972-01-01

    Prospectors have long known that abnormal concentrations of metals in the soil overlying an ore deposit can affect the vegetation rooting in this soil; mineral deposits have even been discovered because of such vegetation changes. Recently, many people have become interested in the possibility of remote sensing such vegetation changes, and perhaps using the results in conjunction with airborne geophysics and photogeological interpretation in integrated prospecting programs.

  9. Vegetation and acidification, Chapter 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    David R. DeWalle; James N. Kochenderfer; Mary Beth Adams; Gary W. Miller

    2006-01-01

    In this chapter, the impact of watershed acidification treatments on WS3 at the Fernow Experimental Forest (FEF) and at WS9 on vegetation is presented and summarized in a comprehensive way for the first time. WS7 is used as a vegetative reference basin for WS3, while untreated plots within WS9 are used as a vegetative reference for WS9. Bioindicators of acidification...

  10. Relishes: The new pickled vegetables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tepić Aleksandra N.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available There have been an increasing interest of consumers for a ide variety of pickled vegetable products worldwide. Regarding the regional vegetable supplies and relatively poor assortment of ready-to-use products, the need to broaden the offer of domestic pickled vegetables at the market came out. In this work recipes for different vegetables, spices and condiments were developed. The best graded samples were analyzed for their main chemical composition (dry matter, proteins, oils and fats, total acidity, total sugars, sucrose, starch, cellulose, pH and energy- values.

  11. Crestridge Vegetation Map [ds211

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — This layer represents vegetation communities in the Department of Fish and Game's Crestridge Ecological Reserve. The County of San Diego, the Conservation Biology...

  12. Encouraging children to eat vegetables

    OpenAIRE

    Buh, Alenka

    2014-01-01

    It is important for children to maintain a healthy and balanced diet throughout their childhood and youth. Children tend to skip vegetables in their meals as they are not much liked; the tastes of vegetables are also highly specific and each individual has to get used to them by repeated tasting. The aim of this undergraduate thesis was to analyse how often children eat vegetables, which types of vegetables they like and which they do not, to determine if the executed method of pedagogica...

  13. Renal scintigraphy in the 21st Century {sup 99m} Tc-MAG{sub 3} with zero time injection of furosemide (MAG{sub 3}-F{sub 0}): a fast and easy protocol, one for all indications. Part 2. Introduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sfakianakis, G.N. [Professor of Radiology and Pediatrics, Director Division of Nuclear Medicine, University of Miami, School of Medicine, Florida (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Current research on renal function to develop a method to calculate from the MAG{sub 3}-F{sub 0} study the renal global function (RGF) we use: a) the kidney uptake/body background activity (at 2 minutes), b) the residual cortical activity (at 20 minutes). Both these parameters are related with the creatinine levels. (Author)

  14. A vegetal Geiger counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1999-01-01

    In order to study the Chernobyl accident impact on ecosystems, Ukrainian and Swiss scientists have used a plant: the Arabidopsis thaliana. They have introduced in its genome a gene coding an enzyme called β-glucuronidase. This substance, when it is expressed, colours vegetal cells blue. In fact the introduced gene is divided between 2 paired chromosomes. When the plant is placed on a nuclear contaminated soil, radiation damaged chromosomes exchange fragments and the 2 parts of the enzyme gene may recombine, the enzyme can then be expressed. For low and medium contamination ( 2 ) biologists have found a correlation between the number of blue spots on the plant and the irradiation rate. (A.C.)

  15. Genetic improvement of vegetables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaramillo Vasquez, J.G.

    2001-01-01

    Some genetic bases of the improvement of vegetables are given. The objectives of the genetic improvement and the fundamental stages of this process are done. The sources of genetic variation are indicated and they are related the reproduction systems of the main horticultural species. It is analyzed the concept of genetic inheritance like base to determine the procedures more appropriate of improvement. The approaches are discussed, has more than enough phenotypic value, genetic action and genotypic variance; Equally the heredability concepts and value of improvement. The conventional methods of improvement are described, like they are: the introduction of species or varieties, the selection, the pure line, the pedigree method, the selection for families, the recurrent selection, the selection for unique seed, the haploids method, the selection for heterosis and the synthetic varieties

  16. Fruits and vegetables dehydration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Ita, A; Flores, G; Franco, F

    2015-01-01

    Dehydration diagrams were determined by means of Differential Thermal Analysis, DTA, and Thermo Gravimetric Analysis, TGA, curves of several simultaneous fruits and vegetables, all under the same conditions. The greater mass loss is associated with water containing in the structure of the investigated materials at low temperature. In poblano chile water is lost in a single step. The banana shows a very sharply two stages, while jicama can be observed although with a little difficulty three stages. The major mass loss occurs in the poblano chile and the lower in banana. The velocity and temperature of dehydration vary within a small range for most materials investigated, except for banana and cactus how are very different

  17. Fruits and vegetables dehydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ita, A.; Flores, G.; Franco, F.

    2015-01-01

    Dehydration diagrams were determined by means of Differential Thermal Analysis, DTA, and Thermo Gravimetric Analysis, TGA, curves of several simultaneous fruits and vegetables, all under the same conditions. The greater mass loss is associated with water containing in the structure of the investigated materials at low temperature. In poblano chile water is lost in a single step. The banana shows a very sharply two stages, while jicama can be observed although with a little difficulty three stages. The major mass loss occurs in the poblano chile and the lower in banana. The velocity and temperature of dehydration vary within a small range for most materials investigated, except for banana and cactus how are very different.

  18. Heavy metals in green vegetables and soils from vegetable gardens ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Edible portions of five varieties of green vegetables, namely amaranth, chinese cabbage, cowpea leaves, leafy cabbage and pumpkin leaves, collected from several areas in Dar es Salaam, were analyzed for lead, cadmium, chromium, zinc, nickel and copper. Except for zinc, the levels of heavy metals in the vegetables ...

  19. Analysis of ({sup 7}F{sub 0}){gamma}{sub 1g}{yields}({sup 5}D{sub 2}){gamma}{sub 5g}, {gamma}{sub 3g} and ({sup 7}F{sub 0}){gamma}{sub 1g}{yields}({sup 5}L{sub 6}){gamma}{sub 1g}, a{gamma}{sub 5g} two-photon absorption spectra of Cs{sub 2}NaYF{sub 6}:Eu{sup 3+}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ning Lixin; Wang Dianyuan; Xia Shangda [Structure Research Laboratory, Academica Sinica, Department of Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Heifei, Anhui (China); Thorne, Jonathan R.G. [Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of Oxford (United Kingdom); Tanner, Peter A. [Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon (China)

    2002-04-15

    The direct calculation of transition line strengths and relative intensities is presented for two intraconfigurational two-photon absorption (TPA) transitions of Eu{sup 3+} in the cubic Cs{sub 2}NaYF{sub 6} host. Crystal field wavefunctions were utilized for the initial and final f{sup N}-electron states and various approaches were used in constructing all the 4f{sup N-1} 5d{sup 1} intermediate-state wavefunctions. The calculated relative intensities of the ({sup 7}F{sub 0}) {gamma}{sub 1g}{yields}({sup 5}D{sub 2}){gamma}{sub 5g}, {gamma}{sub 3g} TPA transitions are in reasonable agreement with experiment. The neglect of J-mixing in the initial state has only a small effect upon the calculation, whereas the neglect of spin-orbit couplings within the initial and terminal states drastically reduces the calculated transition linestrengths, but does not markedly change the intensity ratios. In the case of the ({sup 7}F{sub 0}){gamma}{sub 1g}{yields}({sup 5}L{sub 6}){gamma}{sub 1g}, a{gamma}{sub 5g} transitions, serious discrepancies between experiment and theory are found if the intermediate states are constructed from a 4f{sup 5} core comprising free ion states and the 5d{sup 1} crystal field states. Satisfactory agreement is, however, found when the 4f{sup 5} crystal field states are utilized in constructing the intermediate states. The contributions to the transition moment have been evaluated for various Hamiltonian terms and the results are discussed. (author)

  20. Vegetable Genetic Resources in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiping WANG

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available China is recognized as an important region for plant biodiversity based on its vast and historical collection of vegetable germplasm. The aim of this review is to describe the exploration status of vegetable genetic resources in China, including their collection, preservation, evaluation, and utilization. China has established a number of national-level vegetable genetic resources preservation units, including the National Mid-term Genebank for Vegetable Germplasm Resources, the National Germplasm Repository for Vegetatively-Propagated Vegetables, and the National Germplasm Repository for Aquatic Vegetables. In 2015, at least 36 000 accessions were collected and preserved in these units. In the past decade, 44 descriptors and data standards for different species have been published, and most accessions have been evaluated for screening the germplasms for specific important traits such as morphological characteristics, disease resistance, pest resistance, and stress tolerance. Moreover, the genetic diversity and evolution of some vegetable germplasms have been evaluated at the molecular level. Recently, more than 1 000 accessions were distributed to researchers and breeders each year by various means for vegetable research and production. However, additional wild-relative and abroad germplasms from other regions need to be collected and preserved in the units to expand genetic diversity. Furthermore, there is a need to utilize advanced techniques to better understand the background and genetic diversity of a wide range of vegetable genetic resources. This review will provide agricultural scientists’ insights into the genetic diversity in China and provide information on the distribution and potential utilization of these valuable genetic resources. Keywords: vegetable, genetic resource, preservation, evaluation, utilization

  1. Toxicología Vegetal

    OpenAIRE

    García Fernández, Antonio Juan

    2010-01-01

    Presentaciones de clase de los temas de Toxicología Vegetal de la licenciatura de Veterinaria de la Universidad de Murcia del curso 2011/12. Presentaciones de Toxicología Vegetal de la asignatura de Toxicología de la Licenciatura de Veterinaria del curso 2011/12

  2. Special study on vegetative covers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-11-01

    This report describes the findings of a special study on the use of vegetative covers to stabilize tailings piles for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The principal rationale for using plants would be to establish a dynamic system for controlling water balance. Specifically, vegetation would be used to intercept and transpire precipitation to the atmosphere, rather than allowing water to drain into the tailings and mobilize contaminants. This would facilitate compliance with groundwater standards proposed for the UMTRA Project by the Environmental Protection Agency. The goals of the study were to evaluate the feasibility of using vegetative covers on UMTRA Project piles, define the advantages and disadvantages of vegetative covers, and develop general guidelines for their use when such use seems reasonable. The principal method for the study was to analyze and apply to the UMTRA Project the results of research programs on vegetative covers at other US Department of Energy (DOE) waste management facilities. The study also relied upon observations made of existing stabilized piles at UMTRA Project sites where natural vegetation is growing on the rock-covered surfaces. Water balance and erosion models were also used to quantify the long-term performance of vegetative covers planned for the topslopes of stabilized piles at Grand Junction and Durango, Colorado, two UMTRA Project sites where the decision was made during the course of this special study to use vegetative covers. Elements in the design and construction of the vegetative covers at these two sites are discussed in the report, with explanations of the differing features that reflect differing environmental conditions. 28 refs., 18 figs., 9 tabs

  3. Radiation and the vegetable industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, P.B.

    1984-01-01

    The possible uses of irradiation in the vegetable industry are considered. Interest has been increasing because of possible bans on chemical fumigants and clearance of irradiation as an acceptable process, up to certain dose limits, by Codex Alimentarius and the US FDA. Inhibition of sprouting in potatoes and onions would be one possibility for exploitation. However, the main incentive for vegetable irradiation would be as a quarantine treatment for exported products. The shelf-life of a few vegetables could also be increased by combining radiation with heat treatments. Costs in New Zealand and consumer attitudes are briefly considered

  4. Vegetation - McKenzie Preserve [ds703

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — The California Native Plant Society (CNPS) Vegetation Program produced a vegetation map and classification for approximately 11,600 acres primarily within Millerton...

  5. Aspects of the production of /sup 18/F-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose via /sup 18/F/sub 2/ with a tandem Van de Graaf accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaughnessy, W J; Gatley, S J; Hichwa, R D; Lieberman, L M; Nickles, R J [Wisconsin Univ., Madison (USA). Dept. of Radiology

    1981-01-01

    During deuteron irradiation of 100 psig neon containing 1-2% of elemental fluorine, the induced /sup 18/F partitions into three main fractions. About 50% remains in the passivated nickel target after elution of the gas mixture. Some of the gaseous /sup 18/F is capable of performing fluorination reactions and is presumed to be /sup 18/F/sub 2/: the rest is a mixture of at least two unreactive gases, one of which behaves on gas chromatography like CF/sub 4/. The ratio of reactive to unreactive gaseous /sup 18/F decreases with longer irradiation times but increases when the target gas is cooled to -30C during bombardment. Reaction of the presumed /sup 18/F/sub 2/ with 4.5,6-triacetyl-D-glucal, essentially by the published method, yielded /sup 18/F-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-4,5,6-triacetyl-x-D-glucosyl fluoride and the corresponding ..beta..-D-mannosyl fluoride. These were separated either by column chromatography or preparative TLC, using plates with a pre-absorbent layer. Hydrolysis of the glucoyl fluoride gave /sup 18/F-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose (/sup 18/F-2FDG) with a decay-corrected yield of about 10% based on /sup 18/F trapped by the triacetylglucal. The 60 min organ distribution of /sup 18/F from /sup 18/F-2-FDG in tumor bearing rats was compared with the corresponding distribution after administration of /sup 18/F-3-deoxy-3-fluoro-D-glucose (/sup 18/F-3FDG). Organ/blood ratios were uniformly higher for /sup 18/F-2FDG than for no carrier added /sup 18/F-3FDG; only heart, brain and thyroid had ratios greater than unity. Added carrier 3-FDG further lowered organ/blood ratios. The main conclusion drawn from this animal work is that /sup 18/F-3FDG is unlikely to rival /sup 18/F-2FDG for nuclear medicine studies, where high target /blood ratios (obtained by metabolic trapping as the sugar-6-phosphate) are necessary. However /sup 18/F-3FDG may be useful for estimating the concentration of free glucose in organs if further work confirms that it is an essentially non

  6. {rho}{sup 0}-{gamma} mixing in the neutral channel pion form factor F{sub {pi}}{sup (e)}(s) and its role in comparing e{sup +}e{sup -} with {tau} spectral functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jegerlehner, Fred [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Humboldt Univ. Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik; Szafron, Robert [Uniwersytet Slaski, Katowice (Poland). Inst. Fizyki

    2011-01-15

    We study the effect of {rho}{sup 0}-{gamma} mixing in e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and its relevance for the comparison of the square modulus of the pion form-factor vertical stroke F{sub {pi}}{sup (e)}(s) vertical stroke {sup 2}, as measured in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation experiments, and vertical stroke F{sub {pi}}{sup ({tau})}(s) vertical stroke {sup 2} the corresponding quantity obtained after accounting for known isospin breaking effects by an isospin rotation from the {tau}-decay spectra. After correcting the {tau} data for the missing {rho}-{gamma} mixing contribution, besides the other known isospin symmetry violating corrections, the {pi}{pi} I=1 part of the hadronic vacuum polarization contribution to the muon g - 2 are fully compatible between {tau} based and e{sup +}e{sup -} based evaluations. {tau} data thus confirm result obtained with e{sup +}e{sup -} data. Our evaluation of the leading order vacuum polarization contribution, based on all e{sup +}e{sup -} data including more recent BaBar and KLOE data, yields a{sub {mu}}{sup had,LO}[e]=690.75(4.72) x 10{sup -10} (e{sup +}e{sup -} based), while including {tau} data we find a{sub {mu}}{sup had,LO}[e, {tau}]=690.96(4.65) x 10{sup -10} (e{sup +}e{sup -} + {tau} based). This backs the {proportional_to}3{sigma} deviation between a{sub {mu}}{sup experiment} and a{sub {mu}}{sup theory}. For the {tau} di-pion branching fraction we find B{sub {pi}}{sub {pi}{sup 0}}{sup CVC} = 25.20 {+-} 0.0.17 {+-} 0.28 from e{sup +}e{sup -}+CVC, while B{sub {pi}}{sub {pi}{sup 0}}0 = 25.34 {+-} 0.0.06 {+-} 0.08 is evaluated directly from the {tau} spectra. (orig.)

  7. Vegetation - Lassen Foothills [ds564

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — In 2007 Aerial Information Systems, Inc. (AIS) was contracted by the California Native Plant Society (CNPS) to produce a vegetation map for approximately 100,000...

  8. in Leafy Vegetable and Pharmaceutical

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bheema

    successfully employed for the determination of copper (II) in leafy vegetable and pharmaceutical samples. ... Our previous studies of transition metal ions such as zinc, cobalt and ..... A new method for extractive photometric determination of.

  9. Buffers and vegetative filter strips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew J. Helmers; Thomas M. Isenhart; Michael G. Dosskey; Seth M. Dabney

    2008-01-01

    This chapter describes the use of buffers and vegetative filter strips relative to water quality. In particular, we primarily discuss the herbaceous components of the following NRCS Conservation Practice Standards.

  10. Handling Procedures of Vegetable Crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perchonok, Michele; French, Stephen J.

    2004-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is working towards future long duration manned space flights beyond low earth orbit. The duration of these missions may be as long as 2.5 years and will likely include a stay on a lunar or planetary surface. The primary goal of the Advanced Food System in these long duration exploratory missions is to provide the crew with a palatable, nutritious, and safe food system while minimizing volume, mass, and waste. Vegetable crops can provide the crew with added nutrition and variety. These crops do not require any cooking or food processing prior to consumption. The vegetable crops, unlike prepackaged foods, will provide bright colors, textures (crispy), and fresh aromas. Ten vegetable crops have been identified for possible use in long duration missions. They are lettuce, spinach, carrot, tomato, green onion, radish, bell pepper, strawberries, fresh herbs, and cabbage. Whether these crops are grown on a transit vehicle (e.g., International Space Station) or on the lunar or planetary surface, it will be necessary to determine how to safely handle the vegetables while maintaining acceptability. Since hydrogen peroxide degrades into water and oxygen and is generally recognized as safe (GRAS), hydrogen peroxide has been recommended as the sanitizer. The objective of th is research is to determine the required effective concentration of hydrogen peroxide. In addition, it will be determined whether the use of hydrogen peroxide, although a viable sanitizer, adversely affects the quality of the vegetables. Vegetables will be dipped in 1 % hydrogen peroxide, 3% hydrogen peroxide, or 5% hydrogen peroxide. Treated produce and controls will be stored in plastic bags at 5 C for up to 14 days. Sensory, color, texture, and total plate count will be measured. The effect on several vegetables including lettuce, radish, tomato and strawberries has been completed. Although each vegetable reacts to hydrogen peroxide differently, the

  11. Crystalfield symmetries of luminescent Eu{sup 3+} centers in GaN: The importance of the {sup 5}D{sub 0} to {sup 7}F{sub 1} transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Donnell, K. P., E-mail: k.p.odonnell@strath.ac.uk; Edwards, P. R. [SUPA Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, 107 Rottenrow, Glasgow G4 0NG, Scotland (United Kingdom); Yamaga, M. [Department of Mathematical and Design Engineering, Gifu University, Gifu 501-1193 (Japan); Lorenz, K. [IPFN, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Campus Tecnológico e Nuclear, Estrada Nacional 10, 2695-066 Bobadela LRS (Portugal); Kappers, M. J. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, 27 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS, England (United Kingdom); Boćkowski, M. [Institute of High Pressure Physics PAS, Sokolowska 29/37, 01-142 Warsaw (Poland)

    2016-01-11

    Eu-doped GaN is a promising material with potential application not only in optoelectronics but also in magneto-optical and quantum optical devices “beyond the light emitting diode.” Its interesting spectroscopy is unfortunately complicated by spectral overlaps due to “site multiplicity,” the existence in a given sample of multiple composite centers in which Eu ions associate with intrinsic or extrinsic defects. We show here that elementary crystalfield analysis of the {sup 5}D{sub 0} to {sup 7}F{sub 1} transition can critically distinguish such sites. Hence, we find that the center involved in the hysteretic photochromic switching observed in GaN(Mg):Eu, proposed as the basis of a solid state qubit material, is not in fact Eu1, as previously reported, but a related defect, Eu1(Mg). Furthermore, the decomposition of the crystalfield distortions of Eu0, Eu1(Mg), and Eu1 into axial and non-axial components strongly suggests reasonable microscopic models for the defects themselves.

  12. Extended chiral Khuri-Treiman formalism for η → 3π and the role of the a{sub 0}(980), f{sub 0}(980) resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albaladejo, M. [Centro Mixto CSIC-Universidad de Valencia, Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular (IFIC), Valencia (Spain); Universidad de Murcia, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Quimica, Murcia (Spain); Moussallam, B. [IPN (UMR8608), Universite Paris-Sud 11, Groupe de Physique Theorique, Orsay (France)

    2017-08-15

    Recent experiments on η → 3π decays have provided an extremely precise knowledge of the amplitudes across the Dalitz region which represent stringent constraints on theoretical descriptions. We reconsider an approach in which the low-energy chiral expansion is assumed to be optimally convergent in an unphysical region surrounding the Adler zero, and the amplitude in the physical region is uniquely deduced by an analyticity-based extrapolation using the Khuri-Treiman dispersive formalism. We present an extension of the usual formalism which implements the leading inelastic effects from the K anti K channel in the final-state ππ interaction as well as in the initial-state ηπ interaction. The constructed amplitude has an enlarged region of validity and accounts in a realistic way for the influence of the two light scalar resonances f{sub 0}(980) and a{sub 0}(980) in the dispersive integrals. It is shown that the effect of these resonances in the low-energy region of the η → 3π decay is not negligible, in particular for the 3π{sup 0} mode, and improves the description of the energy variation across the Dalitz plot. Some remarks are made on the scale dependence and the value of the double quark mass ratio Q. (orig.)

  13. Measurement of inclusive ep cross sections at high Q{sup 2} at √(s) = 225 and 252 GeV and of the longitudinal proton structure function F{sub L} at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreev, V.; Belousov, A.; Fomenko, A.; Gogitidze, N.; Lebedev, A.; Malinovski, E.; Rusakov, S.; Vazdik, Y. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Baghdasaryan, A.; Baghdasaryan, S.; Zohrabyan, H. [Yerevan Physics Institute, Yerevan (Armenia); Begzsuren, K.; Ravdandorj, T.; Tseepeldorj, B. [Institute of Physics and Technology of the Mongolian Academy of Sciences, Ulaanbaatar (Mongolia); Belov, P.; Brinkmann, M.; Britzger, D.; Campbell, A.J.; Dodonov, V.; Eckerlin, G.; Elsen, E.; Fleischer, M.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Glazov, A.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grebenyuk, A.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Kleinwort, C.; Krueger, K.; Levonian, S.; Lipka, K.; List, B.; List, J.; Lobodzinski, B.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, J.; Niebuhr, C.; Olsson, J.E.; Ozerov, D.; Pahl, P.; Petrukhin, A.; Pirumov, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Radescu, V.; Raspereza, A.; Schmitt, S.; Sefkow, F.; Shushkevich, S.; South, D.; Steder, M.; Wuensch, E. [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Boudry, V.; Specka, A. [LLR, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3, Palaiseau (France); Bradt, G. [Oxford University, Department of Physics, Oxford (United Kingdom); Brisson, V.; Jacquet, M.; Pascaud, C.; Zhang, Z.; Zomer, F. [LAL, Universite Paris-Sud, CNRS/IN2P3, Orsay (France); Buniatyan, A.; Huber, F.; Sauter, M.; Schoening, A. [Universitaet Heidelberg, Physikalisches Institut, Heidelberg (Germany); Bylinkin, A.; Bystritskaya, L.; Fedotov, A.; Rostovtsev, A. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Cantun Avila, K.B.; Contreras, J.G. [CINVESTAV, Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Merida, Yucatan (Mexico); Ceccopieri, F.; Wolf, E.A. de; Favart, L.; Hreus, T.; Janssen, X.; Roosen, R.; Mechelen, P. van [Brussels and Universiteit Antwerpen, Inter-University Institute for High Energies ULB-VUB, Antwerp (Belgium); Cerny, K.; Pokorny, B.; Polifka, R.; Salek, D.; Valkarova, A.; Zacek, J.; Zlebcik, R. [Charles University, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Prague (Czech Republic); Chekelian, V.; Grindhammer, G.; Kiesling, C.; Olivier, B. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Munich (Germany); Dainton, J.B.; Gabathuler, E.; Greenshaw, T.; Klein, M.; Kretzschmar, J.; Laycock, P.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Patel, G.D. [University of Liverpool, Department of Physics, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Daum, K.; Meyer, H. [Universitaet Wuppertal, Fachbereich C, Wuppertal (Germany); Diaconu, C.; Hoffmann, D.; Sauvan, E.; Vallee, C. [CPPM, Aix-Marseille Univ, CNRS/IN2P3, Marseille (France); Dobre, M.; Rotaru, M. [National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), Bucharest (Romania); Dossanov, A. [Universitaet Hamburg, Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Hamburg (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Munich (Germany); Dubak, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Munich (Germany); University of Montenegro, Faculty of Science, Podgorica (Montenegro); Egli, S.; Hildebrandt, M.; Horisberger, R. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland); Feltesse, J.; Perez, E.; Schoeffel, L. [CEA, DSM/Irfu, CE-Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Ferencei, J. [Slovak Academy of Sciences, Institute of Experimental Physics, Kosice (Slovakia); Goerlich, L.; Mikocki, S.; Nowak, G.; Sopicki, P.; Turnau, J. [Institute for Nuclear Physics, Cracow (Poland); Grab, C. [ETH, Institut fuer Teilchenphysik, Zurich (Switzerland); Henderson, R.C.W. [University of Lancaster, Department of Physics, Lancaster (United Kingdom); Herbst, M.; Jung, A.W.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C. [Universitaet Heidelberg, Kirchhoff-Institut fuer Physik, Heidelberg (Germany); Hladka, J.; Reimer, P. [Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Institute of Physics, Prague (Czech Republic); Jung, H. [Brussels and Universiteit Antwerpen, Inter-University Institute for High Energies ULB-VUB, Antwerp (Belgium); DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Kapichine, M.; Morozov, A.; Spaskov, V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (RU); Kogler, R.; Nowak, K. [Universitaet Hamburg, Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Hamburg (DE); Kostka, P.; Lange, W.; Naumann, T. [DESY, Zeuthen (DE); Landon, M.P.J.; Rizvi, E.; Traynor, D. [University of London, School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary, London (GB); Lubimov, V. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (RU); Martyn, H.U. [I. Physikalisches Institut der RWTH, Aachen (DE); Mueller, K.; Robmann, P.; Straumann, U.; Truoel, P. [Physik-Institut der Universitaet Zuerich, Zurich (CH); Newman, P.R.; Thompson, P.D. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Birmingham (GB); Picuric, I.; Raicevic, N. [University of Montenegro, Faculty of Science, Podgorica (ME); Sankey, D.P.C. [STFC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Oxfordshire (GB); Soloviev, Y. [DESY, Hamburg (DE); Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (RU); Stella, B. [Universita di Roma Tre (IT); INFN Roma 3, Dipartimento di Fisica, Rome (IT); Sykora, T. [Brussels and Universiteit Antwerpen, Inter-University Institute for High Energies ULB-VUB, Antwerp (BE); Charles University, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Prague (CZ); Tsakov, I. [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Sofia (BG); Wegener, D. [Institut fuer Physik, TU Dortmund, Dortmund (DE); Collaboration: H1 Collaboration

    2014-04-15

    Inclusive ep double differential cross sections for neutral current deep inelastic scattering are measured with the H1 detector at HERA.The data were taken with a lepton beam energy of 27.6 GeV and two proton beam energies of E{sub p} = 460 and 575 GeV corresponding to centre-of-mass energies of 225 and 252 GeV, respectively. The measurements cover the region of 6.5 x 10{sup -4} ≤ x ≤ 0.65 for 35 ≤ Q{sup 2} ≤ 800 GeV{sup 2} up to y = 0.85. The measurements are used together with previously published H1 data at E{sub p} = 920 GeV and lower Q{sup 2} data at E{sub p} = 460, 575 and 920 GeV to extract the longitudinal proton structure function F{sub L} in the region 1.5 ≤ Q{sup 2} ≤ 800 GeV{sup 2}. (orig.)

  14. Description and crystal structure of albrechtschraufite, MgCa{sub 4}F{sub 2}[UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}]{sub 2}.17-18H{sub 2}O

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mereiter, K. [Vienna Univ. of Technology (Austria). Inst. of Chemical Technologies and Analytics

    2013-04-15

    Albrechtschraufite, MgCa{sub 4}F{sub 2}[UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}]{sub 2}.17-18H{sub 2}O, triclinic, space group P anti 1, a = 13.569(2), b = 13.419(2), c = 11.622(2) Aa, α = 115.82(1), β = 107.61(1), γ = 92.84(1) (structural unit cell, not reduced), V = 1774.6(5) Aa{sup 3}, Z = 2, Dc = 2.69 g/cm{sup 3} (for 17.5 H{sub 2}O), is a mineral that was found in small amounts with schroeckingerite, NaCa{sub 3}F[UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}](SO{sub 4}).10H{sub 2}O, on a museum specimen of uranium ore from Joachimsthal (Jachymov), Czech Republic. The mineral forms small grain-like subhedral crystals (= 0.2 mm) that resemble in appearance liebigite, Ca{sub 2}[UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}]. ∝ 11H{sub 2}O. Colour pale yellow-green, luster vitreous, transparent, pale bluish green fluorescence under ultraviolet light. Optical data: Biaxial negative, nX = 1.511(2), nY = 1.550(2), nZ = 1.566(2), 2V = 65(1) (λ = 589 nm), r < v weak. After qualitative tests had shown the presence of Ca, U, Mg, CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O, the chemical formula was determined by a crystal structure analysis based on X-ray four-circle diffractometer data. The structure was later on refined with data from a CCD diffractometer to R1 = 0.0206 and wR2 = 0.0429 for 9,236 independent observed reflections. The crystal structure contains two independent [UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}]{sup 4-} anions of which one is bonded to two Mg and six Ca while the second is bonded to only one Mg and three Ca. Magnesium forms a MgF{sub 2}(O{sub carbonate}){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O) octahedron that is linked via the F atoms with three Ca atoms so as to provide each F atom with a flat pyramidal coordination by one Mg and two Ca. Calcium is 7- and 8-coordinate forming CaFO{sub 6}, CaF{sub 2}O{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}, CaFO{sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 4} and CaO{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 6} coordination polyhedra. The crystal structure is built up from MgCa{sub 3}F{sub 2}[UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}].8H{sub 2}O layers parallel to (001) which

  15. East African Cenozoic vegetation history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, Hans Peter

    2017-11-01

    The modern vegetation of East Africa is a complex mosaic of rainforest patches; small islands of tropic-alpine vegetation; extensive savannas, ranging from almost pure grassland to wooded savannas; thickets; and montane grassland and forest. Here I trace the evolution of these vegetation types through the Cenozoic. Paleogene East Africa was most likely geomorphologically subdued and, as the few Eocene fossil sites suggest, a woodland in a seasonal climate. Woodland rather than rainforest may well have been the regional vegetation. Mountain building started with the Oligocene trap lava flows in Ethiopia, on which rainforest developed, with little evidence of grass and none of montane forests. The uplift of the East African Plateau took place during the middle Miocene. Fossil sites indicate the presence of rainforest, montane forest and thicket, and wooded grassland, often in close juxtaposition, from 17 to 10 Ma. By 10 Ma, marine deposits indicate extensive grassland in the region and isotope analysis indicates that this was a C 3 grassland. In the later Miocene rifting, first of the western Albertine Rift and then of the eastern Gregory Rift, added to the complexity of the environment. The building of the high strato-volcanos during the later Mio-Pliocene added environments suitable for tropic-alpine vegetation. During this time, the C 3 grassland was replaced by C 4 savannas, although overall the extent of grassland was reduced from the mid-Miocene high to the current low level. Lake-level fluctuations during the Quaternary indicate substantial variation in rainfall, presumably as a result of movements in the intertropical convergence zone and the Congo air boundary, but the impact of these fluctuations on the vegetation is still speculative. I argue that, overall, there was an increase in the complexity of East African vegetation complexity during the Neogene, largely as a result of orogeny. The impact of Quaternary climatic fluctuation is still poorly understood

  16. Chapter 3: Status and trends of vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    James M. Guldin; Frank R. Thompson; Lynda L. Richards; Kyra C. Harper

    1999-01-01

    This chapter provides information about the vegetation cover of the Assessment area. The types and areal extent of vegetation in the Highlands are of interest for many reasons. Vegetation cover largely determines the availability of habitat for terrestrial animals, plants, and other organisms. Vegetation cover strongly influences what uses {e.g., timber, forage,...

  17. Vegetables and other core food groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poelman, Astrid A.M.; Delahunty, Conor M.; Graaf, de Kees

    2017-01-01

    Vegetables are the food category least liked by children. This research investigated the sensory properties of vegetables vis-a-vis other core foods that comprise children's diets, to determine to what degree low acceptance of vegetables can be attributed to sensory properties. Vegetables (n =

  18. 18 CFR 1304.203 - Vegetation management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vegetation management...-Owned Residential Access Shoreland § 1304.203 Vegetation management. No vegetation management shall be approved on TVA-owned Residential Access Shoreland until a Vegetation Management Plan meeting the...

  19. MODIST_L3m_SNWI_FLH_ipar_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — MODIS (or Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) is a key instrument aboard the Terra (EOS AM) and Aqua (EOS PM) satellites. Terra's orbit around the Earth...

  20. MODIST_L3m_YR_FLH_ipar_9km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — MODIS (or Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) is a key instrument aboard the Terra (EOS AM) and Aqua (EOS PM) satellites. Terra's orbit around the Earth...

  1. MODISA_L3m_MC_FLH_ipar_4km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — MODIS (or Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) is a key instrument aboard the Terra (EOS AM) and Aqua (EOS PM) satellites. Terra's orbit around the Earth...

  2. Mutation breeding in vegetable crops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, Takashi

    1984-03-01

    Vegetables breed by seeds and vegetative organs. In main vegetables, the differentiation of clopping types, the adoption of monoculture and year-round production and shipment are carried out, adapting to various socio-economic and cultivation conditions. Protected agriculture has advanced mainly for fruit vegetables, and the seeds for sale have become almost hybrid varieties. Reflecting this situation, the demand for breeding is diversified and characteristic. The present status of mutation breeding of vegetables is not yet well under way, but reports of about 40 raised varieties have been published in the world. The characters introduced by induced mutation and irradiation are compact form, harvesting aptitude, the forms and properties of stems and leaves, anti-lodging property, the size, form and uniformity of fruits, male sterility and so on. The radiation sources used were mostly gamma ray or X-ray, but sometimes, combined irradiation was used. Results obtained in Japan include: burdocks as an example to gamma ray irradiation of seeds; tomatoes as an example of inducing compound resistance against disease injury; and lettuce as an example of internal beta irradiation. (Kako, I.).

  3. Mutation breeding in vegetable crops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Takashi

    1984-01-01

    Vegetables breed by seeds and vegetative organs. In main vegetables, the differentiation of clopping types, the adoption of monoculture and year-round production and shipment are carried out, adapting to various socio-economic and cultivation conditions. Protected agriculture has advanced mainly for fruit vegetables, and the seeds for sale have become almost hybrid varieties. Reflecting the situation like this, the demand for breeding is diversified and characteristic, and the case of applying mutation breeding seems to be many. The present status of the mutation breeding of vegetables is not yet well under way, but about 40 raised varieties have been published in the world. The characters introduced by induced mutation and irradiation were compact form, harvesting aptitude, the forms and properties of stems and leaves, anti-lodging property, the size, form and uniformity of fruits, male sterility and so on. The radiation sources used were mostly gamma ray or X-ray, but sometimes, combined irradiation was used. As the results obtained in Japan, burdocks as an example of gamma ray irradiation to seeds, tomatoes as an example of inducing the compound resistance against disease injury and lettuces as an example of internal beta irradiation are reported. (Kako, I.)

  4. Nuclear magnetism of liquid {sup 3}He: new determination of the Landau parameter F{sub 0}{sup a}; Magnetisme nucleaire de l'{sup 3}He liquide: nouvelle determination du parametre de Landau F{sup a}{sub 0}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goudon, V

    2006-10-15

    He{sup 3} is a liquid Fermi model, isotropic, with an attainable Fermi temperature and the interaction between atoms can be controlled by changing the pressure of the liquid. In this document, we present accurate NMR measurements of the nuclear magnetic susceptibility of liquid He{sup 3} as a function of temperature and pressure. The emphasis has been placed on reliable thermometry and on He{sup 3} pressure measurements directly in the cell to increase the measuring range until solidification, and an accurate characterization of the NMR spectrometer. Our measurements give an effective Fermi temperature 5% lower than former results. The Landau parameter F{sub 0}{sup a} depends on the effective mass, which is determined by specific heat measurements, and consequently on the temperature scale. The re-analysis of the specific heat measurements with the PLTS-2000 temperature scale yields an effective mass increase of 4.5%. In this document, F{sub 0}{sup a} is determined for 2 temperature scales (PLTS-2000 and Greywall). Contrarily to former measurements, the F{sub 0}{sup a} density dependence does not show any saturation at high pressures. (author)

  5. Temporal reflectance changes in vegetables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dissing, Bjørn Skovlund; Clemmensen, Line Katrine Harder; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær

    2009-01-01

    Quality control in the food industry is often performed by measuring various chemical compounds of the food involved. We propose an imaging concept for acquiring high quality multispectral images to evaluate changes of carrots and celeriac over a period of 14 days. Properties originating...... in the surface chemistry of vegetables may be captured in an integrating sphere illumination which enables the creation of detailed surface chemistry maps with a good combination of spectral and spatial resolutions. Prior to multispectral image recording, the vegetables were prefried and frozen at -30Â......°C for four months. During the 14 days of image recording, the vegetables were kept at +5°C in refrigeration. In this period, surface changes and thereby reflectance properties were very subtle. To describe this small variation we employed advanced statistical techniques to search a large featurespace...

  6. ROOT VEGETABLES, BREEDING TRENDS, RESULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Fedorova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The main advantage of root vegetables is their unique specificity and high economic importance. The benefits and medicinal properties of root vegetables being highly demanded by the market requirements to the commodity are highlighted in the article. The main directions of breeding program for root vegetable crops, including species of Apiaceae family with carrot, parsnips; Chenopodioideae family with red beet; Brassicaceae family with radish, Daikon, Raphanus sativus L. var. lobo Sazonova & Stank, turnip and rutabaga. Initial breeding accessions of carrot, red beet, radish, Daikon, Raphanus sativus L. var. lobo Sazonova & Stank, turnip and rutabaga have been selected out to be used for breeding program for heterosis. The mf and ms breeding lines were developed, and with the use of them the new gene pool was created. Variety supporting breeding program and methods were also proposed. 

  7. Local vegetables in Cameroon: Corchorus species used as a vegetable.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westphal-Stevels, J.M.C.

    1986-01-01

    An agro-botanical study of local vegetables in Cameroon is in preparation, including the taxonomy, identity, morphology, agronomy and nutritional value of about 70 species. Corchorus olitorius L. and other edible species of the genus Corchorus L. (Tiliaceae) are part of this study. The wide

  8. Vegetables, Coctails & Reflections / Marco Laimre

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Laimre, Marko, 1968-

    2006-01-01

    Pealkirja "Vegetables, Coctails & Reflections" kandis Tallinna Kunstihoones 8.04.-28.05.2006 avatud Elin Kardi, Marko Mäetamme, Marco Laimre ja Andres Tali ühisnäitusel "Vägivald ja propaganda" Marco Laimre installatsioon. Marco Laimre esinemine raadiosaates "kunst.er" Klassikaraadios 16.04.2006

  9. Vegetable Crop Pests. MEP 311.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantzes, James G.; And Others

    As part of a cooperative extension service series by the University of Maryland, this publication introduces the identification and control of common agricultural pests of vegetable crops. The first of the five sections defines "pest" and "weed" and generally introduces different kinds of pests in the categories of insects,…

  10. Self-crafting vegetable snacks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raghoebar, Sanne; Kleef, van Ellen; Vet, de Emely

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to test whether the IKEA-effect (Norton et al., 2012) – better liking for self-crafted products than for identical products crafted by others – can be exploited to increase liking and consumption of vegetable snacks in children. Design/methodology/approach: A

  11. Flavour release from dried vegetables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruth, van S.M.

    1995-01-01

    The research described in this thesis was focused on the development of an in vitro model system for isolation of volatile compounds from dried vegetables under mouth conditions, such as volume of the mouth, temperature, salivation and mastication. Instrumental analysis of these

  12. Vegetative and reproductive plasticity of broccoli at three levels of incident photosynthetically active radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francescangeli, N.; Martí, H.R.; Sangiacomo, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    To study the effects of shading on the growth, development, dry matter partitioning, and plant architecture of broccoli, ‘Legacy’ hybrid plants were grown in pots in a greenhouse under black shading meshes to generate different levels of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR). The average incident PAR was 23 mol PPF m –2 d –1 under control conditions, 15.2 under a 35% mesh, and 6.7 under a 70% mesh. The air temperature was within the range 15-22°C. As shading increased so did the duration of the growth cycle and the leaf area (LA). Shading did not affect the number of leaves, although the upper ones were more erect. The stem length and the accumulated intercepted PAR (IPAR) were negatively related. Inflorescence diameter and commercial fresh weight decreased only with the 70% mesh. Shading did not affect stem dry weight (DW) but altered dry matter allocation in the root and spear. The DW of the leaves maintained an average 45.7% of the total DW despite the greater LA developed under shade. The net assimilation rate diminished with the reduction of IPAR, and the LA increased; the plant relative growth rate was therefore practically constant. With increased shading, the leaves and the stem became the dominant photosynthate sinks. The commercial fresh weight achieved with 15.2 mol photosynthetic photon flux (PPF) m –2 d –1 was equivalent to that obtained with 23 mol PPF m –2 d –1 , but the cycle was extended for 4.5 days. With 6.7 mol PPF m –2 d –1 , yield diminished because of the lower DW produced in a cycle extended by 15 days, and because more dry matter was allocated to the stem than to the spear. Based on these results, broccoli could be considered a shade-tolerant plant. (author) [es

  13. First Observation of {tau}{r_arrow}3{pi}{eta}{nu}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{r_arrow} {ital f}{sub 1}{pi}{nu}{sub {tau}} Decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergfeld, T.; Eisenstein, B.I.; Ernst, J.; Gladding, G.E.; Gollin, G.D.; Hans, R.M.; Johnson, E.; Karliner, I.; Marsh, M.A.; Palmer, M.; Selen, M.; Thaler, J.J. [University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Edwards, K.W.; Edwards, K.W. [the Institute of Particle Physics, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Bellerive, A.; Bellerive, A.; Janicek, R.; Janicek, R.; MacFarlane, D.B.; MacFarlane, D.B.; Patel, P.M.; Patel, P.M. [the Institute of Particle Physics, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Sadoff, A.J. [Ithaca College, Ithaca, New York 14850 (United States); Ammar, R.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Besson, D.; Coppage, D.; Darling, C.; Davis, R.; Hancock, N.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, N. [University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas 66045 (United States); Anderson, S.; Kubota, Y.; Lee, S.J.; ONeill, J.J.; Patton, S.; Poling, R.; Riehle, T.; Savinov, V.; Smith, A. [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States); Alam, M.S.; Athar, S.B.; Ling, Z.; Mahmood, A.H.; Severini, H.; Timm, S.; Wappler, F. [State University of New York at Albany, Albany, New York 12222 (United States); Anastassov, A.; Blinov, S.; Duboscq, J.E.; Fujino, D.; Gan, K.K.; Hart, T.; Honscheid, K.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Lee, J.; Spencer, M.B.; Sung, M.; Undrus, A.; Wanke, R.; Wolf, A.; Zoeller, M.M. [The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Nemati, B.; Richichi, S.J.; Ross, W.R.; Skubic, P. [University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States); Bishai, M.; Fast, J.; Gerndt, E.; Hinson, J.W.; Menon, N.; Miller, D.H.; Shibata, E.I.; Shipsey, I.P.; Yurko, M. [Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Gibbons, L.; Glenn, S.; Johnson, S.D.; Kwon, Y.; Roberts, S.; Thorndike, E.H. [University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Jessop, C.P.; Lingel, K.; Marsiske, H.; Perl, M.L.; Ugolini, D.; Wang, R.; Zhou, X.; and others

    1997-09-01

    We have observed new channels for {tau} decays with an {eta} in the final state. We study 3-prong tau decays, using the {eta}{r_arrow}{gamma}{gamma} and {eta}{r_arrow}3{pi}{sup 0} decay modes and 1-prong decays with two {pi}{sup 0} {close_quote}s using the {eta}{r_arrow}{gamma}{gamma} channel. The measured branching fractions are B({tau}{sup {minus}}{r_arrow}{pi}{sup {minus}} {pi}{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup +}{eta}{nu}{sub {tau}})=(3.4{sup +0.6}{sub {minus}0.5} {plus_minus}0.6){times}10{sup {minus}4} and B({tau}{sup {minus}}{r_arrow}{pi}{sup {minus}} 2{pi}{sup 0}{eta}{nu}{sub {tau}}) =(1.4{plus_minus}0.6{plus_minus}0.3){times}10{sup {minus}4} . We observe clear evidence for f{sub 1}{r_arrow}{eta}{pi}{pi} substructure and measure B({tau}{sup {minus}}{r_arrow}f{sub 1}{pi}{sup {minus}}{nu}{sub {tau}})=(5.8{sup +1.4 }{sub {minus}1.3}{plus_minus}1.8){times}10{sup {minus}4} . We have also searched for {eta}{sup {prime}}(958) production and obtain 90{percent} C.L.upper limits B({tau}{sup {minus}}{r_arrow}{pi}{sup {minus}} {eta}{sup {prime}}{nu}{sub {tau}}){lt} 7.4{times}10{sup {minus}5} and B({tau}{sup {minus}}{r_arrow}{pi}{sup {minus}} {pi}{sup 0}{eta}{sup {prime}}{nu}{sub {tau} }){lt}8.0{times}10{sup {minus}5} . {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  14. Serving vegetables first: A strategy to increase vegetable consumption in elementary school cafeterias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsbernd, S L; Reicks, M M; Mann, T L; Redden, J P; Mykerezi, E; Vickers, Z M

    2016-01-01

    Vegetable consumption in the United States is low despite the wealth of evidence that vegetables play an important role in reducing risk of various chronic diseases. Because eating patterns developed in childhood continue through adulthood, we need to form healthy eating habits in children. The objective of this study was to determine if offering vegetables before other meal components would increase the overall consumption of vegetables at school lunch. We served kindergarten through fifth-grade students a small portion (26-33 g) of a raw vegetable (red and yellow bell peppers) while they waited in line to receive the rest of their lunch meal. They then had the options to take more of the bell peppers, a different vegetable, or no vegetable from the lunch line. We measured the amount of each vegetable consumed by each child. Serving vegetables first greatly increased the number of students eating vegetables. On intervention days most of the vegetables consumed came from the vegetables-first portions. Total vegetable intake per student eating lunch was low because most students chose to not eat vegetables, but the intervention significantly increased this value. Serving vegetables first is a viable strategy to increase vegetable consumption in elementary schools. Long-term implementation of this strategy may have an important impact on healthy eating habits, vegetable consumption, and the health consequences of vegetable intake. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Biologically active matters in soy vegetative mass

    OpenAIRE

    GNOEVYY I.V.

    2013-01-01

    Maintenance of row of bioactive matters of phenic nature in particular, isoflavonoids is investigational at to soy-bean cakes to vegetative mass of soy in the phases of vegetation of 8 the most widespread sorts of soy in Ukraine.

  16. Vegetation - San Felipe Valley [ds172

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — This Vegetation Map of the San Felipe Valley Wildlife Area in San Diego County, California is based on vegetation samples collected in the field in 2002 and 2005 and...

  17. Biota - 2009 Vegetation Inventory - Lake Ashtabula, ND

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — 2009 Vegetation Classification for Lake Ashtabula, ND Vegetation Project Report, OMBIL Environmental Stewardship - Level 1 Inventory, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers...

  18. Ecosystems past: prehistory of California vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    C.I. Millar; W.B. Woolfenden

    2016-01-01

    The history of California's vegetation, from origins in the Mesozoic through Quaternary is outlined. Climatic and geologic history and the processes driving changes in vegetation over time are also described. 

  19. Marketing African Leafy Vegetables: Challenges and Opportunities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Marketing African Leafy Vegetables: Challenges and Opportunities in the Kenyan Context. ... The market share of ALVs vis-à-vis other vegetable species, particularly kales, cabbages and ... EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT

  20. Biota - 2011 Vegetation Inventory - Marsh Lake, MN

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — 2011 Vegetation Classification for Marsh Lake, MN Vegetation Project Report, OMBIL Environmental Stewardship - Level 1 Inventory. Marsh Lake is located on the...

  1. Irradiation of fruit and vegetables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Beirne, David

    1987-01-01

    There is likely to be less economic incentive to irradiate fruits and vegetables compared with applications which increase the safety of foods such as elimination of Salmonella or decontamination of food ingredients. Of the fruit and vegetable applications, irradiation of mushrooms may offer the clearest economic benefits in North-Western Europe. The least likely application appears to be sprout inhibition in potatoes and onions, because of the greater efficiency and flexibility of chemical sprout inhibitors. In the longer-term, combinations between irradiation/MAP/other technologies will probably be important. Research in this area is at an early stage. Consumer attitudes to food irradiation remain uncertain. This will be a crucial factor in the commercial application of the technology and in the determining the balance between utilisation of irradiation and of technologies which compete with irradiation. (author)

  2. Hyperspectral remote sensing of vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thenkabail, Prasad S.; Lyon, John G.; Huete, Alfredo

    2011-01-01

    Hyperspectral narrow-band (or imaging spectroscopy) spectral data are fast emerging as practical solutions in modeling and mapping vegetation. Recent research has demonstrated the advances in and merit of hyperspectral data in a range of applications including quantifying agricultural crops, modeling forest canopy biochemical properties, detecting crop stress and disease, mapping leaf chlorophyll content as it influences crop production, identifying plants affected by contaminants such as arsenic, demonstrating sensitivity to plant nitrogen content, classifying vegetation species and type, characterizing wetlands, and mapping invasive species. The need for significant improvements in quantifying, modeling, and mapping plant chemical, physical, and water properties is more critical than ever before to reduce uncertainties in our understanding of the Earth and to better sustain it. There is also a need for a synthesis of the vast knowledge spread throughout the literature from more than 40 years of research.

  3. Phenolic Compounds in Brassica Vegetables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Velasco

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Phenolic compounds are a large group of phytochemicals widespread in the plant kingdom. Depending on their structure they can be classified into simple phenols, phenolic acids, hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives and flavonoids. Phenolic compounds have received considerable attention for being potentially protective factors against cancer and heart diseases, in part because of their potent antioxidative properties and their ubiquity in a wide range of commonly consumed foods of plant origin. The Brassicaceae family includes a wide range of horticultural crops, some of them with economic significance and extensively used in the diet throughout the world. The phenolic composition of Brassica vegetables has been recently investigated and, nowadays, the profile of different Brassica species is well established. Here, we review the significance of phenolic compounds as a source of beneficial compounds for human health and the influence of environmental conditions and processing mechanisms on the phenolic composition of Brassica vegetables.

  4. Clearing and vegetation management issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    Clearing and continued management of incompatible plant species is critical to maintaining safe and reliable transmission and distribution lines at British Columbia Hydro. As part of a general review of policies regarding rights-of-way, the clearing of BC Hydro rights-of-way was studied by a task team in order to formulate a set of recommended policies and procedures to guide employees in all rights-of-way decisions, and to provide clear direction for resolution of all rights-of-way issues in a cost-effective manner. Issues reviewed were: clearing standards and line security standardization for transmission circuits; clearing rights for removal of trees or management of vegetation beyond the statutory right-of-way; clearing and vegetation management procedures; tree replacement; arboricultural techniques; periodic reviewing of clearing practices; compensation for tree removal; herbicide use; and heritage and wildlife trees. Justification for the recommendation is provided along with alternate options and costs of compliance

  5. Waste vegetable oil survey report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacLeod, R. [Science enterprise Algoma seA, Sault Ste. Marie, ON (Canada)

    2009-02-06

    This study was conducted to estimate potential sources of feedstock waste oils for biodiesel production in the Sault Ste. Marie region of Ontario. Two feedstocks were investigated over a period of several months, notably cooking oil and waste vegetable oil. The study was conducted to examine oil throughput, collection practices, and to gauge interest in local initiatives. A distribution list of commercial restaurant listings was developed, and surveys were conducted with members of private enterprises, city government, and non-profit stakeholders in the region. Average volumes of waste vegetable oil were presented for different types of restaurants. The various types of oil used in the restaurants were also quantified. Results of the study showed a positive public response to the idea of a local biodiesel initiative. Steak house, fast food, and Italian establishments generated the largest portion of waste vegetable oil amongst survey respondents. However, the highest response rates came from establishments with little or no oil consumption. Many franchise fast food restaurants are already in contracts with waste oil removal companies. 3 tabs., 3 figs.

  6. Health Benefits of Fruits and Vegetables1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin, Joanne L.; Lloyd, Beate

    2012-01-01

    Fruits and vegetables are universally promoted as healthy. The Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010 recommend you make one-half of your plate fruits and vegetables. Myplate.gov also supports that one-half the plate should be fruits and vegetables. Fruits and vegetables include a diverse group of plant foods that vary greatly in content of energy and nutrients. Additionally, fruits and vegetables supply dietary fiber, and fiber intake is linked to lower incidence of cardiovascular disease and obesity. Fruits and vegetables also supply vitamins and minerals to the diet and are sources of phytochemicals that function as antioxidants, phytoestrogens, and antiinflammatory agents and through other protective mechanisms. In this review, we describe the existing dietary guidance on intake of fruits and vegetables. We also review attempts to characterize fruits and vegetables into groups based on similar chemical structures and functions. Differences among fruits and vegetables in nutrient composition are detailed. We summarize the epidemiological and clinical studies on the health benefits of fruits and vegetables. Finally, we discuss the role of fiber in fruits and vegetables in disease prevention. PMID:22797986

  7. Tuning crystal field symmetry of hexagonal NaY{sub 0.92}Yb{sub 0.05}Er{sub 0.03}F{sub 4} by Ti{sup 4+} codoping for high-performance upconversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Han, E-mail: fjfzyh@fzu.edu.cn [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou, Fujian 350108 (China); Huang, Qingming [Instrumentation Analysis and Research Center, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China); Ma, En [Fujian Institue of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China); Zhang, Xinqi [Instrumentation Analysis and Research Center, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China); Yu, Jianchang [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou, Fujian 350108 (China)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Upconversion emission of Er{sup 3+} was obviously enhanced by Ti{sup 4+} codoped in NaYF{sub 4}. • The upconversion luminescence lifetime was also obviously prolonged. • Na{sup +} could be induced to occupy Y{sup 3+} sites if Ti{sup 4+} was codoped with appropriate concentration. • The crystal field asymmetry was enhanced for better upconversion performance. • Crystal growth was prevented and small-sized NaYF{sub 4} were obtained. - Abstract: 378 nm, 408 nm and 521 nm upconversion emissions of Er{sup 3+} ions were obviously enhanced by Ti{sup 4+} codoped with Yb{sup 3+}/Er{sup 3+} in hexagonal NaYF{sub 4}, and the corresponding upconversion luminescence lifetimes were also prolonged, especially for 378 nm and 408 nm emissions. X-ray powder diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and upconversion emission spectra were employed to explore the relationships of the structure and properties. From these characterizations we made a novel discovery that Na{sup +} could be induced to occupy Y{sup 3+} sites for establishing valence balance of the system if Ti{sup 4+} ions were codoped with appropriate concentration. As a result the crystal field asymmetry of NaY{sub 0.92}Yb{sub 0.05}Er{sub 0.03}F{sub 4} was enhanced and then its upconversion properties were improved because the hypersensitive electron transition of Yb{sup 3+}/Er{sup 3+} ions was promoted greatly. At the same time, the crystal sizes of the codoped NaYF{sub 4} became smaller because the crystal growth was prevented by more negative charges gathering at the crystal surface. This study provides an exploration of the relationship among impurity doping, structural changes and upconversion performance, which may be useful for design and synthesis of high-performance upconversion codoping materials.

  8. Microbiological Spoilage of Fruits and Vegetables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Margaret; Hankinson, Thomas R.; Zhuang, Hong; Breidt, Frederick

    Consumption of fruit and vegetable products has dramatically increased in the United States by more than 30% during the past few decades. It is also estimated that about 20% of all fruits and vegetables produced is lost each year due to spoilage. The focus of this chapter is to provide a general background on microbiological spoilage of fruit and vegetable products that are organized in three categories: fresh whole fruits and vegetables, fresh-cut fruits and vegetables, and fermented or acidified vegetable products. This chapter will address characteristics of spoilage microorganisms associated with each of these fruit and vegetable categories including spoilage mechanisms, spoilage defects, prevention and control of spoilage, and methods for detecting spoilage microorganisms.

  9. Estimating vegetation dryness to optimize fire risk assessment with spot vegetation satellite data in savanna ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbesselt, J.; Somers, B.; Lhermitte, S.; van Aardt, J.; Jonckheere, I.; Coppin, P.

    2005-10-01

    The lack of information on vegetation dryness prior to the use of fire as a management tool often leads to a significant deterioration of the savanna ecosystem. This paper therefore evaluated the capacity of SPOT VEGETATION time-series to monitor the vegetation dryness (i.e., vegetation moisture content per vegetation amount) in order to optimize fire risk assessment in the savanna ecosystem of Kruger National Park in South Africa. The integrated Relative Vegetation Index approach (iRVI) to quantify the amount of herbaceous biomass at the end of the rain season and the Accumulated Relative Normalized Difference vegetation index decrement (ARND) related to vegetation moisture content were selected. The iRVI and ARND related to vegetation amount and moisture content, respectively, were combined in order to monitor vegetation dryness and optimize fire risk assessment in the savanna ecosystems. In situ fire activity data was used to evaluate the significance of the iRVI and ARND to monitor vegetation dryness for fire risk assessment. Results from the binary logistic regression analysis confirmed that the assessment of fire risk was optimized by integration of both the vegetation quantity (iRVI) and vegetation moisture content (ARND) as statistically significant explanatory variables. Consequently, the integrated use of both iRVI and ARND to monitor vegetation dryness provides a more suitable tool for fire management and suppression compared to other traditional satellite-based fire risk assessment methods, only related to vegetation moisture content.

  10. Combining remote sensing and climatic data to estimate net primary production across Oregon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Law, B.E.; Waring, R.H.

    1994-01-01

    A range in productivity and climate exists along an east—west transect in Oregon. Remote sensing and climatic data for several of the Oregon Transect Ecosystem Research Project (OTTER) forested sites and neighboring shrub sites were combined to determined whether percentage intercepted photosynthetically active radiation (%IPAR) can be estimated from remotely sensed observations and to evaluate climatic constraints on the ability of vegetation to utilize intercepted of radiation for production. The Thematic Mappers Simulator (TMS) normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) provided a good linear estimate of %IPAR (R 2 = 0.97). Vegetation intercepted from 24.8% to 99.9% of incident photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), and aboveground net primary production (ANPP) ranged from 53 to 1310 g·m —2 ·yr —1 . The ANPP was linearly related to annual IPAR across sites (R 2 = 0.70). Constraints on the ability of each species to utilize intercepted light, as defined by differential responses to freezing temperatures, drought, and vapor pressure deficit, were quantified from hourly meteorological station measurements near the sites and field physiological measurements. Vegetation could utilize from 30% of intercepted radiation at the eastside semiarid juniper woodland and shrub sites to 97% at the maritime coastal sites. Energy—size efficiency (ϵu), calculated from aboveground production and IPAR modified by the environmental limits, averaged 0.5 g/MJ for the shrub sites and 0.9 g/MJ for the forested sites. (author)

  11. Controllable solvothermal synthesis and photocatalytic properties of complex (oxy)fluorides K{sub 2}TiOF{sub 4}, K{sub 3}TiOF{sub 5}, K{sub 7}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 4}F{sub 7} and K{sub 2}TiF{sub 6}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng Jie [Division of Nanomaterials and Nanochemistry, Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Department of Chemistry, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Tang Kaibin, E-mail: kbtang@ustc.edu.cn [Division of Nanomaterials and Nanochemistry, Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Department of Chemistry, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Cheng Wei; Wang Junli; Nie Yanxiang; Yang Qing [Division of Nanomaterials and Nanochemistry, Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Department of Chemistry, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2009-11-15

    Complex (oxy)fluorides K{sub 2}TiF{sub 6}, K{sub 2}TiOF{sub 4}, K{sub 3}TiOF{sub 5} and K{sub 7}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 4}F{sub 7} have been successfully synthesized for the first time through a controllable solvothermal route involving different solvents, for example, methanol, methanol-H{sub 2}O and methanol-H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The as-prepared products were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, N{sub 2} surface area adsorption, scanning electron microscope, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, UV-vis absorption spectra and X-ray fluorescence. The influences of reaction conditions such as the ratio of methanol to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} or methanol to H{sub 2}O, reaction temperature on the phase, crystallizability and purity of the (oxy)fluorides products were discussed in detail. Meanwhile, the photocatalytic behaviors of the as-prepared K{sub 2}TiF{sub 6}, K{sub 2}TiOF{sub 4}, K{sub 3}TiOF{sub 5} and K{sub 7}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 4}F{sub 7} were evaluated by degradation of rhodamine B molecules, and the results showed that all of the products possessed photocatalytic activities in the order of K{sub 2}TiOF{sub 4} > K{sub 2}TiF{sub 6} > K{sub 7}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 4}F{sub 7} > K{sub 3}TiOF{sub 5} at room temperature under the UV light.

  12. Vegetation fire proneness in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Mário; Aranha, José; Amraoui, Malik

    2015-04-01

    Fire selectivity has been studied for vegetation classes in terms of fire frequency and fire size in a few European regions. This analysis is often performed along with other landscape variables such as topography, distance to roads and towns. These studies aims to assess the landscape sensitivity to forest fires in peri-urban areas and land cover changes, to define landscape management guidelines and policies based on the relationships between landscape and fires in the Mediterranean region. Therefore, the objectives of this study includes the: (i) analysis of the spatial and temporal variability statistics within Europe; and, (ii) the identification and characterization of the vegetated land cover classes affected by fires; and, (iii) to propose a fire proneness index. The datasets used in the present study comprises: Corine Land Cover (CLC) maps for 2000 and 2006 (CLC2000, CLC2006) and burned area (BA) perimeters, from 2000 to 2013 in Europe, provided by the European Forest Fire Information System (EFFIS). The CLC is a part of the European Commission programme to COoRdinate INformation on the Environment (Corine) and it provides consistent, reliable and comparable information on land cover across Europe. Both the CLC and EFFIS datasets were combined using geostatistics and Geographical Information System (GIS) techniques to access the spatial and temporal evolution of the types of shrubs and forest affected by fires. Obtained results confirms the usefulness and efficiency of the land cover classification scheme and fire proneness index which allows to quantify and to compare the propensity of vegetation classes and countries to fire. As expected, differences between northern and southern Europe are notorious in what concern to land cover distribution, fire incidence and fire proneness of vegetation cover classes. This work was supported by national funds by FCT - Portuguese Foundation for Science and Technology, under the project PEst-OE/AGR/UI4033/2014 and by

  13. Vegetative propagation of Bambusa vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Malfitano Braga

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Bamboo is an important source of raw material of multiple uses. The development of simple techniques for its propagation is a practical way to enable its implementation in ownership of low technology. The present work had the objective of evaluating artisanal propagation methods for Bambusa vulgaris. Two types of propagules were tested, with buds budded or not, and three relative positions to the removal of vegetative material on the culm. The best propagule was with only one node, extracted from the lower thirds of the stem, presenting 72% of rooting. This result demonstrates its potential for seedling production of this species under low tech.

  14. Vegetable oils as diesel fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedeli, E.; Girelli, A.

    2001-01-01

    During the seventies, one of the recurring fuels crisis gave rise to research on alternative sources and among them to the idea of utilizing vegetable oils. The research work made clear that the oils cannot be utilized as such but they must be transformed in simple esters, eliminating the problems arising from the presence of the glycerine. The Experiment Stations of the Industry, Commerce and Handicraft Department of the Italian Government, by request of the last one, in the '70/'80 has done a successful experimentation that is presented in the paper [it

  15. Acid precipitation and forest vegetation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamm, C O; Cowling, E B

    1977-04-01

    Effects of acidic precipitation on forest vegetation may be classified as being either direct or indirect. Among the most important direct effects are damage to protective cuticular layers, interference with normal functioning of guard cells, poisoning of plant cells after diffusion of acidic substances through stomata or cuticle and interference with reproductive processes. Indirect effects include accelerated leaching of substances from foliar organs, increased susceptibility to drought and other environmental stress factors, and alteration of symbiotic associations and host-parasite interactions. The potential importance of nutrient uptake through foliage and the need to understand atmosphere-plant-soil interactions are stressed.

  16. The Hydromechanics of Vegetation for Slope Stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulyono, A.; Subardja, A.; Ekasari, I.; Lailati, M.; Sudirja, R.; Ningrum, W.

    2018-02-01

    Vegetation is one of the alternative technologies in the prevention of shallow landslide prevention that occurs mostly during the rainy season. The application of plant for slope stabilization is known as bioengineering. Knowledge of the vegetative contribution that can be considered in bioengineering was the hydrological and mechanical aspects (hydromechanical). Hydrological effect of the plant on slope stability is to reduce soil water content through transpiration, interception, and evapotranspiration. The mechanical impact of vegetation on slope stability is to stabilize the slope with mechanical reinforcement of soils through roots. Vegetation water consumption varies depending on the age and density, rainfall factors and soil types. Vegetation with high ability to absorb water from the soil and release into the atmosphere through a transpiration process will reduce the pore water stress and increase slope stability, and vegetation with deep root anchoring and strong root binding was potentially more significant to maintain the stability of the slope.

  17. Wetland vegetation establishment in L-Lake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroeger, S.R.

    1990-07-01

    Wetland vegetation was transplanted from PAR Pond to L-Lake between January and August, 1987. Approximately 100,000 individual plants representing over 40 species were transplanted along the southern shoreline. Three zones of vegetation were created: (1) submersed/floating-leaved, (2) emergent, (3) upper emergent/shrub. During the summers of 1987, 1988, 1989, the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory sampled the vegetation in 54 permanent transects located in planted (N=32) and unplanted areas (N=22). The 1989 vegetation data from L-Lake were compared to 1985 data from PAR Pond

  18. The marsh vegetation of Kleinmond Lagoon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. O'Callaghan

    1994-10-01

    Full Text Available The vegetation of Kleinmond Lagoon suggests that this system is in transition from an estuary to a coastal lake. Two major types of vegetation were recognized, one which is subjected to soil and water conditions of marine origin and the other which is subjected to conditions of terrestrial origin. These vegetation types are discussed and compared to the vegetation of other estuarine systems. Artificial manipulations of the mouth seem to have resulted in sediment deposition and a freshening of the system. These unseasonable manipulations also threaten the continued existence of a number of species in the system.

  19. Submersed Aquatic Vegetation Modeling Output Online

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yin, Yao; Rogala, Jim; Sullivan, John; Rohweder, Jason

    2005-01-01

    .... Predictions for distribution of submerged aquatic vegetation beds can potentially increase hunter observance of voluntary avoidance zones where foraging birds are left alone to feed undisturbed...

  20. Comparison in the electronic structure of YBa{sub 2}Fe{sub 3}O{sub 8} insulator with YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} and SmFeAsO{sub 0.8}F{sub 0.2} superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y.; Guan, X.Y. [Key Laboratory of Magnetic Suspension Technology and Maglev Vehicle, Ministry of Education, Superconductivity R and D Center, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Cheng, C.H. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, 2052 NSW (Australia); Pan, M. [Key Laboratory of Magnetic Suspension Technology and Maglev Vehicle, Ministry of Education, Superconductivity R and D Center, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Zhang, H. [Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhao, Y., E-mail: yzhao@home.swjtu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Magnetic Suspension Technology and Maglev Vehicle, Ministry of Education, Superconductivity R and D Center, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, 2052 NSW (Australia)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • The electronic structure of YBa{sub 2}Fe{sub 3}O{sub 8}, YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} and SmFeAsO{sub 0.8}F{sub 0.2} were investigated by XPS. • The core-level and valence-band structures of these systems are different. • The density of states at Fermi level is related to the superconductivity. -- Abstract: The electronic structure and chemical states of relevant elements of YBa{sub 2}Fe{sub 3}O{sub 8} are investigated using X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), compared with those of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} and SmFeAsO{sub 0.8}F{sub 0.2} superconductors. The typical differences and similarities in core-level and valence-band structures of these systems have been detected, strongly suggesting that the superconductivity have the finite density of states around Fermi level. Several features of O1s, Y3d, Ba3d, and Fe2p core lines in XPS spectra are also carefully compared and analyzed.

  1. Volatilization of iodine from vegetation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amiro, B.D.; Johnston, F.L.

    1989-01-01

    Gaseous emissions of iodine were measured from bean plant foliage. A gamma-emitting iodine tracer, Na 125 I, was taken up by the plants from a hydroponic growth medium and released to a cuvette atmosphere. The dynamics of the flux were studied using a flow-through gamma detector. The relationship between leaf radioactive tracer activity and growth-medium activity was linear, as was the relationship between the iodine flux and both leaf and growth-medium activity. Iodine flux and leaf conductance to water responded similarly to changes in light levels, suggesting that the stomata may partially control the flux. The flux was inhibited by aeration of the hydroponic growth media, and we postulate that methylation causes the iodine flux. Iodine emissions from living vegetation probably contribute < 0.1% to the stable iodine concentration in the atmosphere above terrestrial areas. However, this pathway may be a direct route for radioactive iodine transport from contaminated soils to the atmosphere. (author)

  2. Vegetable oil basestocks for lubricants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garcés, Rafael

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of vegetable biodegradable basestocks for lubricant oils present several advantages over the much more extended mineral bases. These advantages refer to biodegradability, a renewable feedstock of local production, lubricant and viscosity index and lower costs than synthetic lubricant bases. Despite these benefits, their use in industry and motor vehicles is not yet extensive due their lower stability and higher pour points. Vegetable oils are esters of fatty acids and glycerol, and their physicochemical properties rely mainly on the composition of their acyl moieties. Thus, to assure the maximum levels of stability while maintaining acceptable behavior at low temperatures, monounsaturated fatty acids are preferred for this purpose. The presence of natural antioxidants also improves the properties of these vegetable based stocks as lubricants. These oils usually require additives to improve their viscosity value, oxidative stability and properties at low temperatures. In the present work, the different sources of vegetable oils appropriate for biolubricant production were reviewed. Their properties and the future improvement of the oil bases, oil based stock production, uses and additives are discussed.

    El uso de bases vegetales biodegradables para aceites lubricantes presenta varias ventajas sobre las mucho más extendidas bases minerales. Estas ventajas se centran sobre todo en su biodegradabilidad, en ser un recurso renovable de producción local, en su lubricidad y en su índice de viscosidad, presentando además costes más bajos que las bases sintéticas. Sin embargo, estas ventajas no han extendido el uso de bases vegetales ni en industria ni en automoción debido a su menor estabilidad y sus mayores puntos críticos de fluidez. Los aceites vegetales son ésteres de ácidos grasos y glicerol y sus propiedades físico-químicas dependen principalmente de su composición acílica. Así, para asegurar los máximos niveles de

  3. Children and vegetables: strategies to increase children’s liking and intake of vegetables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wild, de V.W.T.

    2015-01-01

    Background and aim

    Children’s vegetable intake is far below that recommended. Despite increased awareness of the importance of vegetable consumption for health, it remains challenging to improve children’s vegetable intake. Since food preferences are central to

  4. Add More Vegetables to Your Day: 10 Tips to Help You Eat More Vegetables

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sip on some vegetable soup Heat it and eat it. Try tomato, butternut squash, or garden vegetable soup. Look for reduced- or low-sodium soups. Make your own soups with a low-sodium broth and your favorite vegetables. 8 while you’re out If dinner is away from home, no need to worry. ...

  5. Effects of Telecoupling on Global Vegetation Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viña, A.; Liu, J.

    2016-12-01

    With the ever increasing trend in telecoupling processes, such as international trade, all countries around the world are becoming more interdependent. However, the effects of this growing interdependence on vegetation (e.g., shifts in the geographic extent and distribution) remain unknown even though vegetation dynamics are crucially important for food production, carbon sequestration, provision of other ecosystem services, and biodiversity conservation. In this study we evaluate the effects of international trade on the spatio-temporal trajectories of vegetation at national and global scales, using vegetation index imagery collected over more than three decades by the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) satellite sensor series together with concurrent national and international data on international trade (and its associated movement of people, goods, services and information). The spatio-temporal trajectories of vegetation are obtained using the scale of fluctuation technique, which is based on the decomposition of the AVHRR image time series to obtain information on its spatial dependence structure over time. Similar to the correlation length, the scale of fluctuation corresponds to the range over which fluctuations in the vegetation index are spatially correlated. Results indicate that global vegetation has changed drastically over the last three decades. These changes are not uniform across space, with hotspots in active trading countries. This study not only has direct implications for understanding global vegetation dynamics, but also sheds important insights on the complexity of human-nature interactions across telecoupled systems.

  6. Spectrophotometric Determination of Nitrate in Vegetables Using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. MIKE HORSFALL

    ABSTRACT: A rapid and sensitive spectrophotometric method for the determination of nitrate in vegetables is described. The method is based on the measurement of the absorbance of yellow sodium nitrophenoxide formed via the reaction of phenol with the vegetable-based nitrate in presence of sulphuric acid.

  7. Man-influenced vegetation of North Korea

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolbek, Jiří; Jarolímek, I.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 1 (2008), s. 381-404 ISSN 0253-116X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA206/05/0119 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : vegetation classification * weed communities * man-depending vegetation Subject RIV: EF - Botanics

  8. Technical efficiency of irrigated vegetable production among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out to analyse the technical efficiency of irrigated vegetable production among smallholder farmers in the guinea savannah, Nigeria, and determine the cost and returns on irrigated vegetable production. Two-stage sampling technique was used, purposive selection of two states and three Local ...

  9. Measurement Of Technical Efficiency In Irrigated Vegetable ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study measured technical efficiency and identified its determinants in irrigated vegetable production in Nasarawa State of Nigeria using a stochastic frontier model. A complete enumeration of 193 NADP-registered vegetable farmers was done. The predicted farm technical efficiency ranges from 25.94 to 96.24 per cent ...

  10. Gelation and interfacial behaviour of vegetable proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, T. van; Martin, A.H.; Bos, M.A.

    2002-01-01

    Recent studies on gelation and interfacial properties of vegetable protiens are reviewed. Attention is focused on legume proteins, mainly soy proteins, and on wheat proteins. The rheological properteis of vegetable protein gels as a function of heating time or temperature is discussed as well as the

  11. Gelation and interfacial behaviour of vegetable proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, van T.; Martin, A.H.; Bos, M.A.

    2002-01-01

    Recent studies on gelation and interfacial properties of vegetable proteins are reviewed. Attention is focused on legume proteins, mainly soy proteins, and on wheat proteins. The rheological properties of vegetable protein gels as a function of heating time or temperature is discussed as well as the

  12. Food design strategies to increase vegetable intake

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oliviero, Teresa; Fogliano, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Public campaigns promoting consumption of fruits and vegetables had limited results as consumers habits are difficult to modify. The incorporation of fruits and vegetables into regularly eaten products is a food design strategy that leads to several advantages. Pasta is a staple food

  13. STOVE: Seed treatments for organic vegetable production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmitt, A.; Jahn, M.; Kromphardt, C.; Krauthausen, H.J.; Roberts, S.J.; Wright, S.A.I.; Amein, T.; Forsberg, G.; Tinivella, F.; Gullino, M.L.; Wikström, M.; Wolf, van der J.M.; Groot, S.P.C.; Werner, S.; Koch, E.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the EU-financed research project „STOVE“ (Seed Treatments for Organic Vegetable Production) is to evaluate different methods potentially suited for seed treatment of vegetables in organic farming regarding their efficacy, to optimise these methods, and where feasible to combine them with

  14. Natural Vegetation of the Flora area

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sebsebe, Demissew; Friis, Ib

    2009-01-01

    A review article summarising the recent ideas about the natural vegetation in the area covered by the Flora of Ethiopia and Eritrea......A review article summarising the recent ideas about the natural vegetation in the area covered by the Flora of Ethiopia and Eritrea...

  15. Atlas of the potential vegetation of Ethiopia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Ib; Demissew, Sebsebe; van Breugel, Paulo

    Based on many years of field work by the two senior authors (Ib Friis and Sebsebe Demissew) and with the application of GIS analyses (by P. van Breugel) 15 major vegetation types in Ethiopia are described and mapped. The book descibes the structure and floristic composition of the vegetation types...

  16. Use of Plastic Mulch for Vegetable Production

    OpenAIRE

    Maughan, Tiffany; Drost, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Plastic mulches are used commercially for both vegetables and small fruit crops. Vegetable crops well suited for production with plastic mulch are typically high value row crops. This fact sheet describes the advantages, disadvantages, installation, and planting considerations. It includes sources for plastic and equipment.

  17. Classification and mapping of rangeland vegetation physiognomic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Plot vegetation species growth form, cover and height data were collected from 450 sampling sites based on eight spectral strata generated using unsupervised image classification. Field data were grouped at four levels of seven, six, three and two vegetation physiognomic classes which were subjected to both ML and ...

  18. Effects of aquatic vegetation type on denitrification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veraart, A.J.; Bruijne, de W.J.J.; Peeters, E.T.H.M.; Klein, de J.J.M.; Scheffer, M.

    2011-01-01

    In a microcosm 15N enrichment experiment we tested the effect of floating vegetation (Lemna sp.) and submerged vegetation (Elodea nuttallii) on denitrification rates, and compared it to systems without macrophytes. Oxygen concentration, and thus photosynthesis, plays an important role in regulating

  19. Role of vegetation on river bank accretion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vargas Luna, A.

    2016-01-01

    There is rising awareness of the need to include the effects of vegetation in studies dealing with the morphological response of rivers. Vegetation growth on river banks and floodplains alters the river bed topography, reduces the bank erosion rates and enhances the development of new floodplains

  20. Weed Identification and Control in Vegetable Crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferretti, Peter A., Comp.

    This agriculture extension service publication from Pennsylvania State University examines weed control and identification in vegetable crops. Contents include: (1) Types of weeds; (2) Reducing losses caused by weeds, general control methods and home garden weed control; (3) How herbicides are used; (4) Specific weeds in vegetable plantings; and…

  1. Radiation processing of foods: fruits and vegetables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Paul

    1990-01-01

    Post-harvest irradiation of fruits and vegetables improves their shelf-life by: (1) delaying ripening and senescence of fruits, (2) controlling fungal diseases, (3) inhibiting sprouting, and (4) disinfestation. Nutritional and quality aspects of irradiated fruits and vegetables are discussed. Commercial prospects are briefly described. (M.G.B.)

  2. Radionuclide interception and loss processes in vegetation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proehl, G.; Hoffman, F.O.

    1996-01-01

    Data available since the Chernobyl accident have strengthened the view that the transfer of radionuclides from air to vegetation is a primary area of uncertainty in the estimation of the contamination of food chains leading to human exposure. The processes affecting the overall transfer from air to vegetation involve wet and dry deposition, interception and initial retention, and post-deposition retention of radioactive substances by vegetation. During the growing season, the time-integrated concentrations of radionuclides on vegetation in the first few months after initial deposition are dominated by the direct foliar interception of deposited material. Chapter 2 contains a review of data for modelling the direct foliar interception and initial retention of radioactivity deposited by dry and wet processes, together with data on the factors affecting post-deposition retention of radioactivity on the vegetation. 82 refs, 9 figs, 11 tabs

  3. Post Fire Vegetation Recovery in Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouveia, Celia; Bastos, Ana; DaCamara, Carlos; Trigo, Ricardo M.

    2011-01-01

    Fires in Portugal, as in the Mediterranean ecosystems, have a complex effect on vegetation regeneration due to the different responses of vegetation to the variety of fire regimes and to the complexity of landscape structures. A thorough evaluation of vegetation recovery after fire events becomes therefore crucial in land management. In 2005, Portugal suffered a strong damage from forest fires that damaged an area of 300 000 ha of forest and shrub. This year are particularly interesting because it is associated the severe drought of 2005. The aim of the present study is to identify large burnt scars in Portugal during the 2005 fire seasons and monitoring vegetation behaviour throughout the pre and the post fire periods. The mono-parametric model developed by Gouveia et al. (2010), based on monthly values of NDVI, at the 1km×1km spatial scale, as obtained from the VEGETATION-SPOT5 instrument, from 1999 to 2009, was used.

  4. Vegetable oil spills : oil properties and behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fingas, M.; Fieldhouse, B.; Jokuty, P.

    2001-01-01

    In 1997, the United States Environmental Protection Agency conducted a thorough review of the issue regarding vegetable oil spills. Recent attention has refocused on this issue as a result of an incident where 20 tons of canola oil was spilled in the Vancouver Harbour in 2000. In the past, vegetable oils were suggested to be a useful test material because they were thought to be innocuous. It was even suggested they be used to remove petroleum oil residues from beaches. However, recent studies have shown that spills of vegetable oils can have major environmental consequences, equivalent to those of petroleum oil spills. The spills have devastating effects on birds and intertidal organisms. This paper presented a summary of historical vegetable spills from around the world. In this study, specific behaviour tests were examined for several oils including canola, soy bean, olive, castor and corn oils. Evaporation, water-in-oil emulsification and chemical dispersion were measured and were found to be nearly zero, suggesting that vegetable oil spills are not very soluble in water. The aquatic toxicity of vegetable oil is low, but their fate is quite different from petroleum. Vegetable oils do not evaporate to a significant degree, they do not form water-in-oil emulsions, nor do they disperse in water. The physical properties of vegetable oils were also measured, including density and viscosity. This paper presented the aquatic toxicity of several vegetable oils along with other environmental data including the degradation rates noted in the literature. Most environmental damage reported in the literature is by contact with birds feathers resulting in hypothermia and secondly by smothering of intertidal organisms. The effect of vegetable oil on fish has not been well studied, but it is expected that there will be little destructive effect except where smothering can occur. 35 refs., 3 tabs

  5. Vegetable oil spills : oil properties and behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fingas, M.; Fieldhouse, B.; Jokuty, P. [Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Emergencies Science Div

    2001-07-01

    In 1997, the United States Environmental Protection Agency conducted a thorough review of the issue regarding vegetable oil spills. Recent attention has refocused on this issue as a result of an incident where 20 tons of canola oil was spilled in the Vancouver Harbour in 2000. In the past, vegetable oils were suggested to be a useful test material because they were thought to be innocuous. It was even suggested they be used to remove petroleum oil residues from beaches. However, recent studies have shown that spills of vegetable oils can have major environmental consequences, equivalent to those of petroleum oil spills. The spills have devastating effects on birds and intertidal organisms. This paper presented a summary of historical vegetable spills from around the world. In this study, specific behaviour tests were examined for several oils including canola, soy bean, olive, castor and corn oils. Evaporation, water-in-oil emulsification and chemical dispersion were measured and were found to be nearly zero, suggesting that vegetable oil spills are not very soluble in water. The aquatic toxicity of vegetable oil is low, but their fate is quite different from petroleum. Vegetable oils do not evaporate to a significant degree, they do not form water-in-oil emulsions, nor do they disperse in water. The physical properties of vegetable oils were also measured, including density and viscosity. This paper presented the aquatic toxicity of several vegetable oils along with other environmental data including the degradation rates noted in the literature. Most environmental damage reported in the literature is by contact with birds feathers resulting in hypothermia and secondly by smothering of intertidal organisms. The effect of vegetable oil on fish has not been well studied, but it is expected that there will be little destructive effect except where smothering can occur. 35 refs., 3 tabs.

  6. Formation of banded vegetation patterns resulted from interactions between sediment deposition and vegetation growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tousheng; Zhang, Huayong; Dai, Liming; Cong, Xuebing; Ma, Shengnan

    2018-03-01

    This research investigates the formation of banded vegetation patterns on hillslopes affected by interactions between sediment deposition and vegetation growth. The following two perspectives in the formation of these patterns are taken into consideration: (a) increased sediment deposition from plant interception, and (b) reduced plant biomass caused by sediment accumulation. A spatial model is proposed to describe how the interactions between sediment deposition and vegetation growth promote self-organization of banded vegetation patterns. Based on theoretical and numerical analyses of the proposed spatial model, vegetation bands can result from a Turing instability mechanism. The banded vegetation patterns obtained in this research resemble patterns reported in the literature. Moreover, measured by sediment dynamics, the variation of hillslope landform can be described. The model predicts how treads on hillslopes evolve with the banded patterns. Thus, we provide a quantitative interpretation for coevolution of vegetation patterns and landforms under effects of sediment redistribution. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  7. Volatilization of iodine from vegetation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amiro, B D; Johnston, F L [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Pinawa, MB (Canada). Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment

    1989-01-01

    Gaseous emissions of iodine were measured from bean plant foliage. A gamma-emitting iodine tracer, Na {sup 125}I, was taken up by the plants from a hydroponic growth medium and released to a cuvette atmosphere. The dynamics of the flux were studied using a flow-through gamma detector. The relationship between leaf radioactive tracer activity and growth-medium activity was linear, as was the relationship between the iodine flux and both leaf and growth-medium activity. Iodine flux and leaf conductance to water responded similarly to changes in light levels, suggesting that the stomata may partially control the flux. The flux was inhibited by aeration of the hydroponic growth media, and we postulate that methylation causes the iodine flux. Iodine emissions from living vegetation probably contribute < 0.1% to the stable iodine concentration in the atmosphere above terrestrial areas. However, this pathway may be a direct route for radioactive iodine transport from contaminated soils to the atmosphere. (author).

  8. Transfer of 137Cs to wild vegetables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Nobuhiko; Natsuhori, Masahiro; Mezawa, Akane; Kawakami, Akira

    1998-01-01

    For the evaluation of internal radiation dose, it is needed to estimate the amount of radionuclide incorporated to human body using a simulation model. 137 Cesium (Cs) is easily transferred associating with food intake as well as potassium and so, Cs is an important nuclide for evaluation of internal radiation. 137 Cs concentrations in wild vegetables are higher than those of cultured vegetables and milk. Therefore, the transfer coefficients of 137 Cs from soil to wild vegetables were estimated in this study. Wild vegetables and soils of their farms were collected in the Hakkoda Mountain range of Aomori Prefecture. The levels of 137 Cs in wild vegetables were 0.42-18.35 (Bq/kg), whereas those in cabbage and spinach were 0.08 and 0.01 (Bq/kg), respectively, indicating that the Cs level is dozens to several hundreds times higher in wild vegetables than cultured ones. And the transfer coefficient was estimated as 0.003-0.94 for the former and 0.001-0.8 for the latter. On the other hand, 1 37 Cs levels of the soils on which wild vegetables grew was 28.0 Bq/kg and it was 3.9 Bq/kg for the farm soil. Furthermore, the effects of water content and pH of the soil on the transfer coefficient were studied. (M.N.)

  9. Karoo biome: a preliminary synthesis. Part 2 - vegetation and history

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Cowling, RM

    1987-01-01

    Full Text Available and soil erosion. The focus of this volume is vegetation and its history. Included are chapters on vegetation physiognomy, plant growth, vegetation change, phytogeography, palaeo-ecology, palaeontology and archaeology...

  10. Nigerian women reap benefits from indigenous vegetables | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-06-06

    Jun 6, 2016 ... Demand for fresh indigenous vegetables in Nigeria has increased ... greater returns from indigenous vegetables compared to conventional vegetables. ... In Kolli Hills, Tamil Nadu, monocropping of a single, non-edible variety ...

  11. Formalized classification of European fen vegetation at the alliance level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peterka, Tomáš; Hájek, Michal; Jiroušek, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Aims Phytosociological classification of fen vegetation (Scheuchzerio palustris-Caricetea fuscae class) differs among European countries. Here we propose a unified vegetation classification of European fens at the alliance level, provide unequivocal assignment rules for individual vegetation plot...

  12. Determination of zinc contents in vegetables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salah-ud-Din; Salariya, A.M.; Yasin, M.

    1996-01-01

    Zinc content of three groups of vegetables (roots and tuber, leaves and fruits) collected from local markets was determined and are reported here. The determination was made by Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer. The results obtained show that the zinc content of different vegetables ranged from 6.26-36.80 ppm, 8.80-70-70 ppm and 7.20-35.10 ppm for roots and tubers, fruits of vegetables respectively on dry weight basis. Generally, the values obtained in majority are not above, the maximum permissible limits. (author)

  13. [Allelopathy of Andrographis paniculata vegetative].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Zhou, Xiao-Yan; Lu, Zhan-Hong

    2010-12-01

    Andrographis paniculata at vegetative stage were analyzed for the allelopathic effect on cabbage (Brassica chinensis), Radis (Raphanus sativus), and Desmodium styracifolium, and provided the theory reference for their application of compounding planting pattern in practice. Water extracts of Andrographis paniculata root, stem and leaf were used to dispose Brassica chinensis, Raphanus sativus and Desmodium styracifolium seeds, young seedlings. There were allelopathic effect of water extracts of Andrographis paniculata on seed germination of Brassica chinensis, Raphanus sativus and Desmodium styracifolium, but there were difference on allelopathic effect. The suppression effects of roots on seed germination rates of Brassica chinensis showed more significantly, the stems and leaves of Andrographis paniculata on the allelopathic effects on Brassica chinensis seed germination rate index was also significantly higher than the other two receptors plants. Under the treating condition of root, stem and leaf aqueous extracts of Andrographis paniculata, the root growth of receptors seeding mostly showed inhibition effect. Under low concentrations treated. The effects on the seedlings height of Raphanus sativus and Desmodium styracifolium showed the results in which low concentration promoted and high concentration inhibited, and with increasing concentration increased the promotion or inhibition effects. But in the measured concentration range, the effects on the seedlings height of Brassica chinensis were showed promote effect. Within the testing concentration range, water extracts of Andrographis paniculata on allelopathic effects of cabbage (Brassica chinensis), Radis (Raphanus sativus) and Desmodium styracifolium showed allelopathic effect, and roughly showed inhibiti effect. However, showed different effect in which high concentration inhibitied and low concentration promoted to different receptor.

  14. Use of Different Vegetable Products to Increase Preschool-Aged Children's Preference for and Intake of a Target Vegetable

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wild, de Victoire W.T.; Graaf, de Kees; Jager, Gerry

    2017-01-01

    Background: Children's low vegetable consumption requires effective strategies to enhance preference for and intake of vegetables. Objective: The study compared three preparation practices for a target vegetable (spinach) on their effectiveness in increasing preschool-aged children's preference

  15. Golden Gate National Recreation Area Vegetation Inventory Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — High resolution vegetation polygons mapped by the National Park Service. The vegetation units of this map were determined through stereoscopic interpretation of...

  16. Vegetation - Napa County and Blue Ridge Berryessa [ds201

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — In 1995, the Manual of California Vegetation (MCV) introduced a quantitatively based method for classifying and mapping vegetation in California. In 2002 Department...

  17. Vegetation - Napa County and Blue Ridge Berryessa [ds201

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — In 1995, the Manual of California Vegetation (MCV) introduced a quantitatively based method for classifying and mapping vegetation in California. In 2002 Department...

  18. Central American Vegetation/Land Cover Classification and Conservation Status

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Central American Vegetation/Land Cover Classification and Conservation Status data set consists of GIS coverages of vegetation classes (forests, woodlands,...

  19. Exploring vegetation in the fourth dimension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Fraser J G

    2011-01-01

    Much ecological research focuses on changes in vegetation on spatial scales from stands to landscapes; however, capturing data on vegetation change over relevant timescales remains a challenge. Pollen analysis offers unrivalled access to data with global coverage over long timescales. Robust techniques have now been developed that enable pollen data to be converted into vegetation data in terms of individual taxa, plant communities or biomes, with the possibility of deriving from those data a range of plant attributes and ecological indicators. In this review, I discuss how coupling pollen with macrofossil, charcoal and genetic data opens up the extensive pollen databases to investigation of the drivers of vegetation change over time and also provides extensive data sets for testing hypotheses with wide ecological relevance. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Innovative Remote Sensing techniques for vegetation monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borfecchia, F.; De Cecco, L.; Della Rocca, A.B.; Farneti, A.; La Porta, L.; Martini, S.; Giordano, L.; Trotta, C.; Marcoccia, S.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes methods developed for using ASPIS (Advanced Spectroscopic Imaging System) to monitor biophysical parameters in studying the effects of climatic change, desertification and land degradation on semi-natural and agricultural vegetation in the Mediterranean region [it

  1. Bonneville - Hood River Vegetation Management Environmental Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N/A

    1998-08-01

    To maintain the reliability of its electrical system, BPA, in cooperation with the U.S. Forest Service, needs to expand the range of vegetation management options used to clear unwanted vegetation on about 20 miles of BPA transmission line right-of-way between Bonneville Dam and Hood River; Oregon, within the Columbia Gorge National Scenic Area (NSA). We propose to continue controlling undesirable vegetation using a program of Integrated Vegetation Management (IVM) which includes manual, biological and chemical treatment methods. BPA has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1257) evaluating the proposed project. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI.

  2. relationships between vegetation composition and environmental

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    Borana region, studies on the plant-environment interactions are scanty .... The ordination methods used for the vegetation ..... adaptation, rangeland restoration and also for identifying places ... mangrove forests in Kenya and Sri Lanka. Plant.

  3. African indigenous and traditional vegetables in Tanzania ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Indigenous and traditional African vegetables (AITVs) are important sources of ... and (iii) marketing: retail markup, price variation by season, year and region, ... size and cost, retailer storage, remainders, processing and less common AITVs.

  4. ISLSCP II Potential Natural Vegetation Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set was developed to describe the state of the global land cover in terms of 15 major vegetation types, plus water, before alteration by humans....

  5. Hydrolyzed Vegetable Protein Containing Products Recalls

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This list includes products subject to recall in the United States since February 2010 related to hydrolyzed vegetable protein (HVP) paste and powder distributed by...

  6. Sustainable landscaping practices for enhancing vegetation establishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Soil compaction can severely limit the success of vegetation establishment. Current grading and landscaping : practices commonly produce compacted soils of varied textures and profiles within SHA medians and roadsides, : resulting in limited capacity...

  7. Soil-vegetation-atmosphere transfer modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikonen, J.P.; Sucksdorff, Y. [Finnish Environment Agency, Helsinki (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    In this study the soil/vegetation/atmosphere-model based on the formulation of Deardorff was refined to hour basis and applied to a field in Vihti. The effect of model parameters on model results (energy fluxes, temperatures) was also studied as well as the effect of atmospheric conditions. The estimation of atmospheric conditions on the soil-vegetation system as well as an estimation of the effect of vegetation parameters on the atmospheric climate was estimated. Areal surface fluxes, temperatures and moistures were also modelled for some river basins in southern Finland. Land-use and soil parameterisation was developed to include properties and yearly variation of all vegetation and soil types. One classification was selected to describe the hydrothermal properties of the soils. Evapotranspiration was verified against the water balance method

  8. Vegetation patterns and environmental gradients in Benin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adomou, A.

    2005-01-01

    Key words: West Africa, Benin, vegetation patterns, floristic areas, phytogeography, chorology, floristic gradients, climatic factors, water availability, Dahomey Gap, threatened plants, biodiversity, conservation.Understanding plant species distribution patterns and the underlying factors is a

  9. African leafy vegetables in South Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    some of them grow as weeds, has a long history that has been intimately linked to women and their ..... African smallholders has been rapidly spreading from Vhembe ..... vegetables in household food security: a preliminary case study in.

  10. ISLSCP II C4 Vegetation Percentage

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The photosynthetic composition (C3 or C4) of vegetation on the land surface is essential for accurate simulations of biosphere-atmosphere exchanges of carbon, water,...

  11. ISLSCP II C4 Vegetation Percentage

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: The photosynthetic composition (C3 or C4) of vegetation on the land surface is essential for accurate simulations of biosphere-atmosphere exchanges of...

  12. Delta Vegetation and Land Use [ds292

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — Vegetation and land use are mapped for the approximately 725,000 acres constituting the Legal Delta portion of the Sacramento and San Joaquin River Delta area....

  13. Soil-vegetation-atmosphere transfer modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikonen, J P; Sucksdorff, Y [Finnish Environment Agency, Helsinki (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    In this study the soil/vegetation/atmosphere-model based on the formulation of Deardorff was refined to hour basis and applied to a field in Vihti. The effect of model parameters on model results (energy fluxes, temperatures) was also studied as well as the effect of atmospheric conditions. The estimation of atmospheric conditions on the soil-vegetation system as well as an estimation of the effect of vegetation parameters on the atmospheric climate was estimated. Areal surface fluxes, temperatures and moistures were also modelled for some river basins in southern Finland. Land-use and soil parameterisation was developed to include properties and yearly variation of all vegetation and soil types. One classification was selected to describe the hydrothermal properties of the soils. Evapotranspiration was verified against the water balance method

  14. Vegetation - Suisun Marsh 2000 [ds161

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — This vegetation mapping project of Suisun Marsh blends ground-based classification, aerial photo interpretation, and GIS editing and processing. The method is based...

  15. Vegetation - Suisun Marsh 1999 [ds160

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — This vegetation mapping project of Suisun Marsh blends ground-based classification, aerial photo interpretation, and GIS editing and processing. The method is based...

  16. Review article: Vegetative growth, reproduction, browse production ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vegetative growth, reproduction, browse production and response to tree clearing of ... water stress, soil nutrient availability, carbohydrate reserves, plant hormones, ... animal-plant interactions) of woody plants in various savanna ecosystems.

  17. Vegetation - Suisun Marsh 2003 [ds162

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — This vegetation mapping project of Suisun Marsh blends ground-based classification, aerial photo interpretation, and GIS editing and processing. The method is based...

  18. Vegetation composition and structure influences bird species ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vegetation composition and structure influences bird species community ... variables on bird species diversity and richness of respective foraging guilds, and ... of the species assessed: (1) increasing closed cover due to woody plant density, ...

  19. Impact of concomitant Y and Mn substitution on properties of La{sub 1-z}Y{sub z}Fe{sub 1-y}Mn{sub y}AsO{sub 0.9}F{sub 0.1}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kappenberger, Rhea; Hammerath, Franziska; Wurmehl, Sabine; Buechner, Bernd [Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research Dresden, IFW Dresden (Germany); Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, TU Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Asfaw Afrassa, Mesfin [Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research Dresden, IFW Dresden (Germany); Addis Ababa University, College of Natural Science, Addis Ababa (Ethiopia); Rousse, Pierre; Hess, Christian; Prando, Giacomo; Moroni, Matteo; Wolter, Anja U.B. [Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research Dresden, IFW Dresden (Germany); Sanna, Samuele; Carretta, Pietro [Dipartimento di Fisica e Unita di CNISM, Pavia (Italy); Lamura, Gianrico [Universita di Genova (Italy); CNR-SPIN, Genova (Italy); Kamusella, Sirko; Klauss, Hans-Henning [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, TU Dresden, Dresden (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The substitution of constituents is frequently used as a local probe to check the microscopic properties of an unconventional superconductor in response to such an ''impurity''. In this talk, we present several structural parameters and the superconducting critical temperatures in response to different substitution levels of Mn and Y in La{sub 1-z}Y{sub z}Fe{sub 1-y}Mn{sub y}AsO{sub 0.9}F{sub 0.1}. We will discuss our findings in the light of chemical pressure inflicted by Y, which has a significantly smaller ionic radius than La, and strong electron localization caused by small amounts of paramagnetic Mn impurities.

  20. Monitoring of vegetation dynamics and assessing vegetation response to drought in the Iberian Peninsula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Haro, F. J.; Moreno, A.; Perez-Hoyos, A.; Gilabert, M. A.; Melia, J.; Belda, F.; Poquet, D.; Martinez, B.; Verger, A.

    2009-07-01

    Monitoring the vegetation activity over long time-scales is necessary to discern ecosystem response to climate variability. Spatial and temporally consistent estimates of the biophysical variables such as fractional vegetation cover (FVC) and leaf area index (LAI) have been obtained in the context of DULCINEA Project. We used long-term monthly climate statistics to build simple climatic indices (SPI, moisture index) at different time scales. From these indices, we estimated that the climatic disturbances affected both the growing season and the total amount of vegetation. This implies that the anomaly of vegetation cover is a good indicator of moisture condition and can be an important data source when used for detecting an monitoring drought in the Iberian Peninsula. The impact of climate variability on the vegetation dynamics has shown not to be the same for every region. We concluded that the relationships between vegetation anomaly and moisture availability are significant for the arid and semiarid areas. (Author) 6 refs.

  1. Monitoring of vegetation dynamics and assessing vegetation response to drought in the Iberian Peninsula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Haro, F. J.; Moreno, A.; Perez-Hoyos, A.; Gilabert, M. A.; Melia, J.; Belda, F.; Poquet, D.; Martinez, B.; Verger, A.

    2009-01-01

    Monitoring the vegetation activity over long time-scales is necessary to discern ecosystem response to climate variability. Spatial and temporally consistent estimates of the biophysical variables such as fractional vegetation cover (FVC) and leaf area index (LAI) have been obtained in the context of DULCINEA Project. We used long-term monthly climate statistics to build simple climatic indices (SPI, moisture index) at different time scales. From these indices, we estimated that the climatic disturbances affected both the growing season and the total amount of vegetation. This implies that the anomaly of vegetation cover is a good indicator of moisture condition and can be an important data source when used for detecting an monitoring drought in the Iberian Peninsula. The impact of climate variability on the vegetation dynamics has shown not to be the same for every region. We concluded that the relationships between vegetation anomaly and moisture availability are significant for the arid and semiarid areas. (Author) 6 refs.

  2. Becquerel in raw fruit and vegetables?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heilgeist, M.

    1989-01-01

    After a general introduction and definition of the basic terms, the quantity of radionuclides of natural and artificial origin in our environment is shown. The specific activity of Cs-134 and Cs-137 in fruit and vegetables before and after the accident in Chernobyl is demonstrated. Finally, the quantity of the radioactivity consumed by the human being with fruit and vegetable is compared with the values of the total food consumption. (orig./HP) [de

  3. Recent Vegetation Fire Incidence in Russia

    OpenAIRE

    Hayasaka, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    MODIS hotspot data from NASA have now become a standard means of evaluating vegetation fires worldwide. Remote sensing is the most effective tool for large countries like Russia because it is hard to obtain exact, detailed forest fire data. Accumulated MODIS hotspot data of the nine years from 2002 to 2010 may allow us to assess recent changes in the vegetation fire incidence in Russia. This kind of analysis using various satellites is useful in estimating fire intensity and sever...

  4. CONSIDERATIONS ON ROMANIA’S VEGETABLE MARKET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agatha POPESCU

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper aimed to present the situation of Romania’s vegetable market in the period 2007-2011 based on the statistical data regarding the main vegetables: tomatoes, onion, garlic, cabbage, green peppers and melons. The vegetable production increased by 33.99 from 3,166.8 tons in 2007 to 4,176.3 tons in 2011.This was due to the yield gain as follows: 58.55 % for melons, 27.62 % for green peppers, 27.05 % for tomatoes, 25.99 % for dry garlic, 24.96 % for dry onion, 12.61 % for white cabbage. In 2011, the contribution of various categories of vegetables to production was: 24.55 % white cabbage, 21.81 % tomatoes, 15.45 % melons, 9.44 % onion, 6.06 % green pepper, 1.59 % garlic and 21.1 % other vegetables. The contribution of the micro regions to vegetable production in 2011 was: 19.46 % South Muntenia, 18.95 % South East Romania, 17.30 % South West Oltenia, 15.92 % North East Romania, 10.43 % West Romania, 8.47 % North West Romania, 6.54 % Central Romania, 2.93 % Bucharest Ilfov. Vegetable production per inhabitant is higher in Romania compared to the average production per capita in the EU. The average consumption increased as a postive aspect reflecting the obtained production and import. Vegetable production should increase in order to cover much better the doestic market needs and support export to the EU market.

  5. Comparison of Pasture Vegetation in LFA Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klára Kecseiová

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare pasture vegetation in LFA areas located in two different altitudes. Pasture vegetation sampling was performed 1 month on two different farms (Těšov, Vlčí Jámy. The selected places were marked by three representative places at 10 m2. Dried samples were weighed and chemically analyzed by standard methods ÚKZÚZ.

  6. Phytosociological characteristics of forest vegetation NPR Dubnik

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrabovsky, A.; Balkovic, J.; Kollar, J.

    2010-01-01

    National Wildlife (NPR) Dubnik represents a unique fragment of natural forest vegetation in the region of Nitra loess upland. Status of oak and oak-hornbeam forests in this book was last documented in 1965. The aim of the contribution is to assess the current status of forest vegetation in the NPR Dubnik by modern methods of phytosociology in accordance with current thinking on the classification of oak and oak-hornbeam forests.

  7. Radar for Measuring Soil Moisture Under Vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddam, Mahta; Moller, Delwyn; Rodriguez, Ernesto; Rahmat-Samii, Yahya

    2004-01-01

    A two-frequency, polarimetric, spaceborne synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) system has been proposed for measuring the moisture content of soil as a function of depth, even in the presence of overlying vegetation. These measurements are needed because data on soil moisture under vegetation canopies are not available now and are necessary for completing mathematical models of global energy and water balance with major implications for global variations in weather and climate.

  8. Compositional Changes in Selected Minimally Processed Vegetables

    OpenAIRE

    O'Reilly, Emer, (Thesis)

    2000-01-01

    Compositional, physiological and microbiological changes in selected minimally processed vegetables packaged under a modified atmosphere of 2% oxygen and 5% carbon dioxide were monitored over a ten day storage period at 40 C and 80 C. The analysis targeted specific changes in the nutritional, chemical and physiological make up of the vegetables as well as the changes in the microbial levels. In addition the changes in the gas atmospheres within the packs were monitored. It has been widely acc...

  9. Hydraulic Aspects of Vegetation Maintanence in Streams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Torben; Vestergaard, Kristian

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the importance of the underwater vegetation on Danish streams and some of the consequences of vegetation maintenance. the influence of the weed on the hydraulic conditions is studied through experiments in a smaller stream and the effect of cutting channels through the weed...... is measured. A method for predicting the Manning's n as a function of the discharge conditions is suggested, and also a working hypothesis for predictions of the effect of channel cutting is presented....

  10. Color-tunable up-conversion emission of luminescent-plasmonic, core/shell nanomaterials – KY{sub 3}F{sub 10}:Yb{sup 3+},Tm{sup 3+}/SiO{sub 2}-NH{sub 2}/Au

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Runowski, Marcin, E-mail: runowski@amu.edu.pl

    2017-06-15

    Multifunctional luminescent-plasmonic KY{sub 3}F{sub 10}:Yb{sup 3+},Tm{sup 3+}/SiO{sub 2}-NH{sub 2}/Au nanomaterials were successfully obtained. The lanthanide-doped fluoride nanoparticles (NPs), synthesized under hydrothermal conditions exhibited bright blue up-conversion luminescence (λ{sub ex}=980 nm). Such lanthanide nanocrystals (20–40 nm) were coated with amine modified silica shell, forming core/shell nanostructures. Their surface was further uniformly covered with ultra-small gold NPs (4–7 nm). The as-prepared luminescent-plasmonic core/shell nanomaterials exhibited tunable up-conversion emission, due to the interactions between plasmonic and luminescent phases. The emission of Tm{sup 3+} ion was affected by the surface Au NPs, which exhibited strong plasmonic absorption in the visible range (450–650 nm). The increasing amount of the surface Au NPs, led to the significant alterations in a ratio of the Tm{sup 3+} emission bands. The NIR band ({sup 3}H{sub 4}→{sup 3}H{sub 6}) was unchanged, whereas the ratio and relative intensity of the bands in a visible range ({sup 1}G{sub 4}→{sup 3}H{sub 6} and {sup 1}G{sub 4}→{sup 3}F{sub 4}) was altered. This led to the significant change of the emission spectra shape and influenced color of emission, tuning it from bright blue to blue-violet. The products obtained were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV–vis absorption spectroscopy and luminescence spectroscopy (excitation/emission spectra and luminescence decay curves).

  11. Fruits, vegetables, 100% juices, and cognitive function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamport, Daniel J; Saunders, Caroline; Butler, Laurie T; Spencer, Jeremy Pe

    2014-12-01

    Although reviews of the association between polyphenol intake and cognition exist, research examining the cognitive effects of fruit, vegetable, and juice consumption across epidemiological and intervention studies has not been previously examined. For the present review, critical inclusion criteria were human participants, a measure of fruit, vegetable, or 100% juice consumption, an objective measure of cognitive function, and a clinical diagnosis of neuropsychological disease. Studies were excluded if consumption of fruits, vegetables, or juice was not assessed in isolation from other food groups, or if there was no statistical control for education or IQ. Seventeen of 19 epidemiological studies and 3 of 6 intervention studies reported significant benefits of fruit, vegetable, or juice consumption for cognitive performance. The data suggest that chronic consumption of fruits, vegetables, and juices is beneficial for cognition in healthy older adults. The limited data from acute interventions indicate that consumption of fruit juices can have immediate benefits for memory function in adults with mild cognitive impairment; however, as of yet, acute benefits have not been observed in healthy adults. Conclusions regarding an optimum dietary intake for fruits, vegetables, and juices are difficult to quantify because of substantial heterogeneity in the categorization of consumption of these foods. © 2014 International Life Sciences Institute.

  12. Fruit and vegetable consumption: benefits and barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maclellan, Debbie L; Gottschall-Pass, Katherine; Larsen, Roberta

    2004-01-01

    Few people on Prince Edward Island meet the goal of consuming five or more servings of vegetables and fruit a day. The main objective of this qualitative study was to explore the perceptions of the nutritional benefits and barriers to vegetable and fruit intake among adult women in Prince Edward Island. Participants were 40 women aged 20-49, with or without children at home, who were or were not currently meeting the objective of eating five or more fruit and vegetable servings a day. In-home, one-on-one interviews were used for data collection. Thematic analysis was conducted on the transcribed interviews. Data were examined for trustworthiness in the context of credibility, transferability, and dependability. Most participants identified one or more benefits of eating fruit and vegetables; however, comments tended to be non-specific. The main barriers that participants identified were effort, lack of knowledge, sociopsychological and socioenvironmental factors, and availability. Internal influences, life events, and food rules were identified as encouraging women to include vegetables and fruit in their diets. Given the challenges of effecting meaningful dietary change, dietitians must look for broader dietary behavioural interventions that are sensitive to women's perceptions of benefits and barriers to fruit and vegetable intake.

  13. Radiocesium cycling in vegetation and soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlman, R.C.; Francis, C.W.; Tamura, T.

    1975-01-01

    Data on cesium dynamics in vegetation and soils are reviewed. Special emphasis is placed on typical environments in the southeastern United States. Clay minerals of soil, especially micaceous types, effectively fix cesium and remove it from biotic components of ecosystems. Fallout 137 Cs enters food chains principally by direct deposition on vegetation; uptake by the root pathway is usually less than direct contamination of plant foliage. Cesium-137 levels in vegetation of the southeastern U. S. Coastal Plain are estimated on the basis of direct deposition from the atmosphere and root uptake from soil. Estimated concentrations, based on current concepts of 137 Cs dynamics in vegetation and fixation in soil, are in good agreement with observed values of 137 Cs in vegetation collected in 1969 and 1970. Mechanisms of direct deposition and of increased uptake by roots due to the absence of micaceous clays adequately explain the higher levels of 137 Cs in vegetation of the Coastal Plain and thus are responsible for the elevated 137 Cs reported for milk of the Tampa, Fla., milkshed

  14. Seasonally asymmetric enhancement of northern vegetation productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, T.; Myneni, R.

    2017-12-01

    Multiple evidences of widespread greening and increasing terrestrial carbon uptake have been documented. In particular, enhanced gross productivity of northern vegetation has been a critical role leading to observed carbon uptake trend. However, seasonal photosynthetic activity and its contribution to observed annual carbon uptake trend and interannual variability are not well understood. Here, we introduce a multiple-source of datasets including ground, atmospheric and satellite observations, and multiple process-based global vegetation models to understand how seasonal variation of land surface vegetation controls a large-scale carbon exchange. Our analysis clearly shows a seasonally asymmetric enhancement of northern vegetation productivity in growing season during last decades. Particularly, increasing gross productivity in late spring and early summer is obvious and dominant driver explaining observed trend and variability. We observe more asymmetric productivity enhancement in warmer region and this spatially varying asymmetricity in northern vegetation are likely explained by canopy development rate, thermal and light availability. These results imply that continued warming may facilitate amplifying asymmetric vegetation activity and cause these trends to become more pervasive, in turn warming induced regime shift in northern land.

  15. Vegetation index anomaly response to varying lengths of drought across vegetation and climatic gradients in Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, M.; Miura, T.; Trauernicht, C.; Frazier, A. G.

    2017-12-01

    A drought which results in prolonged and extended deficit in naturally available water supply and creates multiple stresses across ecosystems is classified as an ecological drought. Detecting and understanding the dynamics and response of such droughts in tropical systems, specifically across various vegetation and climatic gradients is fairly undetermined, yet increasingly important for better understandings of the ecological effects of drought. To understanding the link between what lengths and intensities of known meteorological drought triggers detectable ecological vegetation responses, a landscape scale regression analysis evaluating the response (slope) and relationship strength (R-squared) of several cumulative SPI (standard precipitation index) lengths(1, 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, 36, 48, and 60 month), to various satellite derived monthly vegetation indices anomalies (NDVI, EVI, EVI2, and LSWI) was performed across a matrix of dominant vegetation covers (grassland, shrubland, and forest) and climatic moisture zones (arid, dry, mesic, and wet). The nine different SPI lags across these climactic and vegetation gradients was suggest that stronger relationships and steeper slopes were found in dryer climates (across all vegetation covers) and finer vegetation types (across all moisture zones). Overall NDVI, EVI and EVI2 showed the best utility in these dryer climatic zones across all vegetation types. Within arid and dry areas "best" fits showed increasing lengths of cumulative SPI were with increasing vegetation coarseness respectively. Overall these findings suggest that rainfall driven drought may have a stronger impact on the ecological condition of vegetation in water limited systems with finer vegetation types ecologically responding more rapidly to meteorological drought events than coarser woody vegetation systems. These results suggest that previously and newly documented trends of decreasing rainfall and increasing drought in Hawaiian drylands may have

  16. Development of indicators of vegetation recovery based on time series analysis of SPOT Vegetation data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lhermitte, S.; Tips, M.; Verbesselt, J.; Jonckheere, I.; Van Aardt, J.; Coppin, Pol

    2005-10-01

    Large-scale wild fires have direct impacts on natural ecosystems and play a major role in the vegetation ecology and carbon budget. Accurate methods for describing post-fire development of vegetation are therefore essential for the understanding and monitoring of terrestrial ecosystems. Time series analysis of satellite imagery offers the potential to quantify these parameters with spatial and temporal accuracy. Current research focuses on the potential of time series analysis of SPOT Vegetation S10 data (1999-2001) to quantify the vegetation recovery of large-scale burns detected in the framework of GBA2000. The objective of this study was to provide quantitative estimates of the spatio-temporal variation of vegetation recovery based on remote sensing indicators. Southern Africa was used as a pilot study area, given the availability of ground and satellite data. An automated technique was developed to extract consistent indicators of vegetation recovery from the SPOT-VGT time series. Reference areas were used to quantify the vegetation regrowth by means of Regeneration Indices (RI). Two kinds of recovery indicators (time and value- based) were tested for RI's of NDVI, SR, SAVI, NDWI, and pure band information. The effects of vegetation structure and temporal fire regime features on the recovery indicators were subsequently analyzed. Statistical analyses were conducted to assess whether the recovery indicators were different for different vegetation types and dependent on timing of the burning season. Results highlighted the importance of appropriate reference areas and the importance of correct normalization of the SPOT-VGT data.

  17. Post-fire vegetation recovery in Portugal based ewline on spot/vegetation data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Gouveia

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available A procedure is presented that allows identifying large burned scars and the monitoring of vegetation recovery in the years following major fire episodes. The procedure relies on 10-day fields of Maximum Value Composites of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (MVC-NDVI, with a 1 km×1 km spatial resolution obtained from the VEGETATION instrument. The identification of fire scars during the extremely severe 2003 fire season is performed based on cluster analysis of NDVI anomalies that persist during the vegetative cycle of the year following the fire event. Two regions containing very large burned scars were selected, located in Central and Southwestern Portugal, respectively, and time series of MVC-NDVI analysed before the fire events took place and throughout the post-fire period. It is shown that post-fire vegetation dynamics in the two selected regions may be characterised based on maps of recovery rates as estimated by fitting a monoparametric model of vegetation recovery to MVC-NDVI data over each burned scar. Results indicated that the recovery process in the region located in Central Portugal is mostly related to fire damage rather than to vegetation density before 2003, whereas the latter seems to have a more prominent role than vegetation conditions after the fire episode, e.g. in the case of the region in Southwestern Portugal. These differences are consistent with the respective predominant types of vegetation. The burned area located in Central Portugal is dominated by Pinus Pinaster whose natural regeneration crucially depends on the destruction of seeds present on the soil surface during the fire, whereas the burned scar in Southwestern Portugal was populated by Eucalyptus that may quickly re-sprout from buds after fire. Besides its simplicity, the monoparametric model of vegetation recovery has the advantage of being easily adapted to other low-resolution satellite data, as well as to other types of vegetation

  18. Post-fire vegetation recovery in Portugal based on spot/vegetation data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouveia, C.; Dacamara, C. C.; Trigo, R. M.

    2010-04-01

    A procedure is presented that allows identifying large burned scars and the monitoring of vegetation recovery in the years following major fire episodes. The procedure relies on 10-day fields of Maximum Value Composites of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (MVC-NDVI), with a 1 km×1 km spatial resolution obtained from the VEGETATION instrument. The identification of fire scars during the extremely severe 2003 fire season is performed based on cluster analysis of NDVI anomalies that persist during the vegetative cycle of the year following the fire event. Two regions containing very large burned scars were selected, located in Central and Southwestern Portugal, respectively, and time series of MVC-NDVI analysed before the fire events took place and throughout the post-fire period. It is shown that post-fire vegetation dynamics in the two selected regions may be characterised based on maps of recovery rates as estimated by fitting a monoparametric model of vegetation recovery to MVC-NDVI data over each burned scar. Results indicated that the recovery process in the region located in Central Portugal is mostly related to fire damage rather than to vegetation density before 2003, whereas the latter seems to have a more prominent role than vegetation conditions after the fire episode, e.g. in the case of the region in Southwestern Portugal. These differences are consistent with the respective predominant types of vegetation. The burned area located in Central Portugal is dominated by Pinus Pinaster whose natural regeneration crucially depends on the destruction of seeds present on the soil surface during the fire, whereas the burned scar in Southwestern Portugal was populated by Eucalyptus that may quickly re-sprout from buds after fire. Besides its simplicity, the monoparametric model of vegetation recovery has the advantage of being easily adapted to other low-resolution satellite data, as well as to other types of vegetation indices.

  19. Quantitative indicators of fruit and vegetable consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmar Kozelová

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The quantitative research of the market is often based on surveys and questionnaires which are finding out the behavior of customers in observed areas. Before purchasing process consumers consider where they will buy fruit and vegetables, what kind to choose and in what quantity of goods. Consumers' behavior is affected by the factors as: regional gastronomic traditions, price, product appearance, aroma, place of buying, own experience and knowledge, taste preferences as well as specific health issues of consumers and others. The consumption of fruit and vegetables brings into the human body biological active substances that favorably affect the health of consumers. In the presented research study we were interested in differences of consumers' behavior in the consumption of fruit and vegetables according to the place of residence and gender. In the survey 200 respondents has participated; their place of residence was city or village. The existence of dependences and statistical significance were examined by selected statistical testing methods. Firstly we analyzed the responses via statistical F-test whether observed random samples have the same variance. Then we applied two-sample unpaired t-test with equal variance and χ2-test of statistical independence. The statistical significance was tested by corresponding p values. Correlations were proved by the Cramer's V coefficient. We found that place of residence has no impact on the respondents' consumption of fruit. The gender of respondents does not affect their consumption of fruit. Equally, the gender does not affect the respondents' consumption of vegetables. Only in one observed case the significant differences proved that the place of respondent residence has impact on the consumption of vegetables. Higher consumption of vegetables is due to the fact that the majority of citizens, who live in villages, have a possibility to grow their own vegetables and, thus, the demand for it in village

  20. Assessment of vegetable production practices in Qwaqwa within ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, the information such as biographical information of the vegetable farmers, information about the vegetable gardens or farms, the current vegetable farming practices, irrigation practices on the vegetable soil and the farmers' physical and financial records were assessed. The assessment was conducted through ...

  1. Assessment of human impacts on landuse and vegetation cover ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper is an assessment of the impact of man's activities on the landuse and vegetation cover of Mubi region. Landsat MSS Landuse/vegetation image of 1978 and Spot XS landuse/vegetation image of 1995 were used to study the landuse/vegetation cover changes of the region between 1978 and 1995 – a period of 17 ...

  2. Ecogeomorphology of Sand Dunes Shaped by Vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoar, H.

    2014-12-01

    Two dune types associated with vegetation are known: Parabolic and Vegetated Linear Dunes (VLDs), the latters are the dominant dune type in the world deserts. Parabolic dunes are formed in humid, sub-humid and semi-arid environments (rather than arid) where vegetation is nearby. VLDs are known today in semiarid and arid lands where the average yearly rainfall is ≥100 mm, enough to support sparse cover of vegetation. These two dune types are formed by unidirectional winds although they demonstrate a different form and have a distinct dynamics. Conceptual and mathematical models of dunes mobility and stability, based on three control parameters: wind power (DP), average annual precipitation (p), and the human impact parameter (μ) show that where human impact is negligible the effect of wind power (DP) on vegetative cover is substantial. The average yearly rainfall of 60-80 mm is the threshold of annual average rainfall for vegetation growth on dune sand. The model is shown to follow a hysteresis path, which explains the bistability of active and stabilized dunes under the same climatic conditions with respect to wind power. We have discerned formation of parabolic dunes from barchans and transverse dunes in the coastal plain of Israel where a decrease in human activity during the second half of the 20th century caused establishment of vegetation on the crest of the dunes, a process that changed the dynamics of these barchans and transverse dunes and led to a change in the shape of the windward slope from convex to concave. These dunes gradually became parabolic. It seems that VLDs in Australia or the Kalahari have always been vegetated to some degree, though the shrubs were sparser in colder periods when the aeolian erosion was sizeable. Those ancient conditions are characterized by higher wind power and lower rainfall that can reduce, but not completely destroy, the vegetation cover, leading to the formation of lee (shadow) dunes behind each shrub. Formation of

  3. SPINIFICI-SCAEVOLETEA SERICEAE, A NEW VEGETATION CLASS FOR PSAMMOPHYTIC DUNE VEGETATION IN THAILAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. PIGNATII

    1996-04-01

    Full Text Available This is a short account on the coastal dune vegetation of the Gulf of Siam in Thailand. Vegetation is mainly composed by succulent creeping plants with herbaceous habit as to Canavalia maritima (Papilionaceae and Iponwea pes-caprae (Convolvulaceae and the robust stoloniferous grass Spinijex littoreus, the last having an important function for the fonnation of coastal dunes.

  4. SPINIFICI-SCAEVOLETEA SERICEAE, A NEW VEGETATION CLASS FOR PSAMMOPHYTIC DUNE VEGETATION IN THAILAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. PIGNATII

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a short account on the coastal dune vegetation of the Gulf of Siam in Thailand. Vegetation is mainly composed by succulent creeping plants with herbaceous habit as to Canavalia maritima (Papilionaceae and Iponwea pes-caprae (Convolvulaceae and the robust stoloniferous grass Spinijex littoreus, the last having an important function for the fonnation of coastal dunes.

  5. Forest Vegetation Simulator translocation techniques with the Bureau of Land Management's Forest Vegetation Information system database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timothy A. Bottomley

    2008-01-01

    The BLM uses a database, called the Forest Vegetation Information System (FORVIS), to store, retrieve, and analyze forest resource information on a majority of their forested lands. FORVIS also has the capability of easily transferring appropriate data electronically into Forest Vegetation Simulator (FVS) for simulation runs. Only minor additional data inputs or...

  6. Microscale vegetation-soil feedback boosts hysteresis in a regional vegetation-climate system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, R.H.H.; Meinders, M.B.J.; Nes, van E.H.; Scheffer, M.

    2008-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that a positive feedback between vegetation cover and monsoon circulation may lead to the existence of two alternative stable states in the Sahara region: a vegetated state with moderate precipitation and a desert state with low precipitation. This could explain the sudden

  7. 9 CFR 319.311 - Chow mein vegetables with meat, and chop suey vegetables with meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Chow mein vegetables with meat, and chop suey vegetables with meat. 319.311 Section 319.311 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY...

  8. Vegetative buffer strips for reducing herbicide transport in runoff: effects of buffer width, vegetation, and season

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effect of vegetative buffer strip (VBS) width, vegetation, and season of the year on herbicide transport in runoff has not been well documented for runoff prone soils. A multi-year replicated plot-scale study was conducted on an eroded claypan soil with the following objectives: 1) assess the ef...

  9. Formalized classification of species-poor vegetation: a proposal of a consistent protocol for aquatic vegetation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Landucci, F.; Tichý, L.; Šumberová, Kateřina; Chytrý, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 4 (2015), s. 791-803 ISSN 1100-9233 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36079G Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : vegetation classification * vegetation database * Coctail method Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 3.151, year: 2015

  10. The Impact of the Rise in Vegetable Prices on Vegetable Producer Behavior–Based on the survey of vegetable producers in Jiayu, Hubei Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Pan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the impact of the rise in prices of vegetables on vegetable producers, and to increase the revenue of vegetable producers, this paper does a survey by anonymous sampling questionnaire. Results shows that: most vegetable growers think that vegetable prices should rise and would continue to rise, and that vegetable prices would increase their revenue, thus in the coming year they would expand the planting scale of vegetable variety whose increase rate is the largest in this year. But because of the increase of logistics costs and production costs, some farmers benefit very little from the rising trend of vegetable prices. Most farmers expect too much in the trend estimation of the prices of vegetables and also lack of planning and forward-looking in production, thus the planting area of single variety is often decided by the market of previous year. According to analysis of the impact of the rise in vegetable prices on vegetable producer behavior, this paper gives the following suggestions to increase revenue of vegetable producers: change the mode of thinking, improve rural information platform, and increase capital investment for vegetable production base.

  11. New Approaches to Irrigation Scheduling of Vegetables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D. Cahn

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Using evapotranspiration (ET data for scheduling irrigations on vegetable farms is challenging due to imprecise crop coefficients, time consuming computations, and the need to simultaneously manage many fields. Meanwhile, the adoption of soil moisture monitoring in vegetables has historically been limited by sensor accuracy and cost, as well as labor required for installation, removal, and collection of readings. With recent improvements in sensor technology, public weather-station networks, satellite and aerial imaging, wireless communications, and cloud computing, many of the difficulties in using ET data and soil moisture sensors for irrigation scheduling of vegetables can now be addressed. Web and smartphone applications have been developed that automate many of the calculations involved in ET-based irrigation scheduling. Soil moisture sensor data can be collected through wireless networks and accessed using web browser or smartphone apps. Energy balance methods of crop ET estimation, such as eddy covariance and Bowen ratio, provide research options for further developing and evaluating crop coefficient guidelines of vegetables, while recent advancements in surface renewal instrumentation have led to a relatively low-cost tool for monitoring crop water requirement in commercial farms. Remote sensing of crops using satellite, manned aircraft, and UAV platforms may also provide useful tools for vegetable growers to evaluate crop development, plant stress, water consumption, and irrigation system performance.

  12. European Vegetation Archive (EVA): an integrated database of European vegetation plots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chytrý, M; Hennekens, S M; Jiménez-Alfaro, B

    2015-01-01

    vegetation- plot databases on a single software platform. Data storage in EVA does not affect on-going independent development of the contributing databases, which remain the property of the data contributors. EVA uses a prototype of the database management software TURBOVEG 3 developed for joint management......The European Vegetation Archive (EVA) is a centralized database of European vegetation plots developed by the IAVS Working Group European Vegetation Survey. It has been in development since 2012 and first made available for use in research projects in 2014. It stores copies of national and regional...... data source for large-scale analyses of European vegetation diversity both for fundamental research and nature conservation applications. Updated information on EVA is available online at http://euroveg.org/eva-database....

  13. Vegetation extraction from high-resolution satellite imagery using the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlShamsi, Meera R.

    2016-10-01

    Over the past years, there has been various urban development all over the UAE. Dubai is one of the cities that experienced rapid growth in both development and population. That growth can have a negative effect on the surrounding environment. Hence, there has been a necessity to protect the environment from these fast pace changes. One of the major impacts this growth can have is on vegetation. As technology is evolving day by day, there is a possibility to monitor changes that are happening on different areas in the world using satellite imagery. The data from these imageries can be utilized to identify vegetation in different areas of an image through a process called vegetation detection. Being able to detect and monitor vegetation is very beneficial for municipal planning and management, and environment authorities. Through this, analysts can monitor vegetation growth in various areas and analyze these changes. By utilizing satellite imagery with the necessary data, different types of vegetation can be studied and analyzed, such as parks, farms, and artificial grass in sports fields. In this paper, vegetation features are detected and extracted through SAFIY system (i.e. the Smart Application for Feature extraction and 3D modeling using high resolution satellite ImagerY) by using high-resolution satellite imagery from DubaiSat-2 and DEIMOS-2 satellites, which provide panchromatic images of 1m resolution and spectral bands (red, green, blue and near infrared) of 4m resolution. SAFIY system is a joint collaboration between MBRSC and DEIMOS Space UK. It uses image-processing algorithms to extract different features (roads, water, vegetation, and buildings) to generate vector maps data. The process to extract green areas (vegetation) utilize spectral information (such as, the red and near infrared bands) from the satellite images. These detected vegetation features will be extracted as vector data in SAFIY system and can be updated and edited by end-users, such as

  14. Hidden vegetables: an effective strategy to reduce energy intake and increase vegetable intake in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatt, Alexandria D; Roe, Liane S; Rolls, Barbara J

    2011-04-01

    The overconsumption of energy-dense foods leads to excessive energy intakes. The substitution of low-energy-dense vegetables for foods higher in energy density can help decrease energy intakes but may be difficult to implement if individuals dislike the taste of vegetables. We investigated whether incorporating puréed vegetables to decrease the energy density of entrées at multiple meals reduced daily energy intakes and increased daily vegetable intakes. In this crossover study, 20 men and 21 women ate ad libitum breakfast, lunch, and dinner in the laboratory once a week for 3 wk. Across conditions, entrées at meals varied in energy density from standard versions (100% condition) to reduced versions (85% and 75% conditions) by the covert incorporation of 3 or 4.5 times the amount of puréed vegetables. Entrées were accompanied by unmanipulated side dishes. Participants rated their hunger and fullness before and after meals. Subjects consumed a consistent weight of foods across conditions of energy density; thus, the daily energy intake significantly decreased by 202 ± 60 kcal in the 85% condition (P kcal in the 75% condition (P Daily vegetable consumption significantly increased from 270 ± 17 g of vegetables in the 100% condition to 487 ± 25 g of vegetables in the 75% condition (P < 0.0001). Despite the decreased energy intake, ratings of hunger and fullness did not significantly differ across conditions. Entrées were rated as similar in palatability across conditions. Large amounts of puréed vegetables can be incorporated into various foods to decrease the energy density. This strategy can lead to substantial reductions in energy intakes and increases in vegetable intakes. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01165086.

  15. Australian consumer awareness of health benefits associated with vegetable consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekhy, Reetica; Khan, Aila; Eason, Jocelyn; Mactavish-West, Hazel; Lister, Carolyn; Mcconchie, Robyn

    2017-04-01

    The present study investigated the perceived health benefits of specific vegetable consumption to guide the use of nutrition and health claims on vegetable marketing collateral. Free elicitation and consumer ranking data were collected through an online survey of 1000 adults from across Australia and analysed for the perceived importance of vegetables in the daily diet, number of serves consumed per day, knowledge about health-related benefits of specific vegetables and perceived health benefits of vegetable consumption. The importance of vegetables in the diet and daily vegetable consumption was higher in people from an English-speaking background, females, people aged 45 years and over and people living in non-metropolitan areas. Digestion was selected as the major health benefit from consumption of specific vegetables. However, understanding of the health benefits of specific vegetable consumption was relatively low among consumers. Half of the respondents were not sure of the health benefits associated with specific vegetables, except for carrots and spinach. Some respondents volunteered nutrient content or other information. There was no clear indication that consumers understand the specific health benefits conferred by consumption of vegetables. Nutrient and health benefit labelling therefore has the capacity to enhance knowledge of vegetable consumers. It is recommended that health benefit labelling be tailored to promote greater consumption of vegetables in those demographic groups where vegetable consumption was lower. The present study assists the Australian vegetable industry in helping consumers make more informed consumption choices. © 2016 Dietitians Association of Australia.

  16. Flavonoids as fruit and vegetable intake biomarkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogholm, Kirstine Suszkiewicz

    of fruit and vegetable intakes. In Paper I, the urinary recovery of the 7 flavonoids in morning spot urine (i.e. all urine voids from midnight including the first morning void) was also found to respond to moderate increases in the intake of fruits and vegetables. However, the association was somewhat...... weaker than in 24h urine samples, indicating that the 24h urinary recovery of the 7 flavonoids is a stronger biomarker of the intake of fruit and vegetables than the urinary recovery of the 7 flavonoids in morning spot urine. In Paper II, the biokinetic profiles of some of the most important dietary......-individual variation in the absorption and urinary recovery of the flavonoids, and this makes it very difficult to separate individuals according to intake by use of the flavonoid biomarker in urine. The intra-individual variation was on the contrary low, and Paper II therefore supports the assumption, that 24h...

  17. Flavonoids as fruit and vegetable intake biomarkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogholm, Kirstine Suszkiewicz

    calculation of the bivariate correlation coefficients is the common approach when using only one reference method. Back in 2002, a strictly controlled dietary intervention study indicated that the sum of 7 different flavonoid aglycones excreted in 24h urine samples potentially could be used as a biomarker...... and cohort studies. The Ph.D. thesis contains four scientific papers. Paper I provides evidence that the sum of 7 flavonoids in 24h urine respond in a linear and sensitive manner to moderate increases in the intake of fruits and vegetables, and thus consolidates that the flavonoids are a valid biomarker...... of fruit and vegetable intakes. In Paper I, the urinary recovery of the 7 flavonoids in morning spot urine (i.e. all urine voids from midnight including the first morning void) was also found to respond to moderate increases in the intake of fruits and vegetables. However, the association was somewhat...

  18. The impact of spices on vegetable consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Zhaoping; Krak, Michael; Zerlin, Alona

    2015-01-01

    This pilot study was conducted to evaluate the impact of spices added to broccoli, cauliflower, and spinach on amount and rate of vegetable consumption. Twenty overweight subjects who routinely ate less than three daily servings of vegetables were recruited. On six occasions, subjects were assigned...... in random order to eat broccoli, cauliflower, or spinach with or without added spices. Dishes were placed on a modified Universal Eating Monitor (UEM) that recorded rate of eating (g/sec), duration of eating (min) and total amount consumed (g). Total intake and duration of eating were increased...... significantly for broccoli with spices compared to plain broccoli, but there was no significant difference for cauliflower or spinach. No significant differences were noted in any of the visual analog scale (VAS) responses. This study suggests that adding spices may increase vegetable intake, but more studies...

  19. Biological effects of fruit and vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragsted, Lars O; Krath, Britta; Ravn-Haren, Gitte; Vogel, Ulla B; Vinggaard, Anne Marie; Bo Jensen, Per; Loft, Steffen; Rasmussen, Salka E; Sandstrom, The late BrittMarie; Pedersen, Anette

    2006-02-01

    A strong and persistent effect of plant-derived foods on the prevention of lifestyle diseases has emerged from observational studies. Several groups of constituents in plants have been identified as potentially health promoting in animal studies, including cholesterol-lowering factors, antioxidants, enzyme inducers, apoptosis inducers etc. In human intervention studies the dose levels achieved tend to be lower than the levels found to be effective in animals and sampling from target organs is often not possible. A controlled dietary human intervention study was performed with forty-three volunteers, providing 600 g fruit and vegetables/d or in the controls a carbohydrate-rich drink to balance energy intake. Surrogate markers of oxidative damage to DNA, protein and lipids, enzymic defence and lipid metabolism were determined in blood and urine. It was found that a high intake of fruit and vegetables tends to increase the stability of lipids towards oxidative damage. Markers of oxidative enzymes indicate a steady increase in glutathione peroxidase (GPX1) activity in erythrocytes during intervention with fruit and vegetables but there is no effect on GPX1 transcription levels in leucocytes. No change occurs in glutathione-conjugating or -reducing enzyme activities in erythrocytes or plasma, and there are no effects on the transcription of genes involved in phase 2 enzyme induction or DNA repair in leucocytes. Fruit and vegetable intake decreases the level of total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol, but does not affect sex hormones. In conclusion, it has been shown that total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol, markers of peripheral lipid oxidation, and erythrocyte GPX1 activity are affected by high intakes of fruit and vegetables. This finding provides support for a protective role of dietary fruit and vegetables against CVD.

  20. Riparian Vegetation Mapping Along the Hanford Reach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FOGWELL, T.W.

    2003-01-01

    During the biological survey and inventory of the Hanford Site conducted in the mid-1990s (1995 and 1996), preliminary surveys of the riparian vegetation were conducted along the Hanford Reach. These preliminary data were reported to The Nature Conservancy (TNC), but were not included in any TNC reports to DOE or stakeholders. During the latter part of FY2001, PNNL contracted with SEE Botanical, the parties that performed the original surveys in the mid 1990s, to complete the data summaries and mapping associated with the earlier survey data. Those data sets were delivered to PNNL and the riparian mapping by vegetation type for the Hanford Reach is being digitized during the first quarter of FY2002. These mapping efforts provide the information necessary to create subsequent spatial data layers to describe the riparian zone according to plant functional types (trees, shrubs, grasses, sedges, forbs). Quantification of the riparian zone by vegetation types is important to a number of DOE'S priority issues including modeling contaminant transport and uptake in the near-riverine environment and the determination of ecological risk. This work included the identification of vegetative zones along the Reach by changes in dominant plant species covering the shoreline from just to the north of the 300 Area to China Bar near Vernita. Dominant and indicator species included Agropyron dasytachyudA. smithii, Apocynum cannabinum, Aristida longiseta, Artemisia campestris ssp. borealis var scouleriana, Artemisa dracunculus, Artemisia lindleyana, Artemisia tridentata, Bromus tectorum, Chrysothamnus nauseosus, Coreopsis atkinsoniana. Eleocharis palustris, Elymus cinereus, Equisetum hyemale, Eriogonum compositum, Juniperus trichocarpa, Phalaris arundinacea, Poa compressa. Salk exigua, Scirpus acutus, Solidago occidentalis, Sporobolus asper,and Sporobolus cryptandrus. This letter report documents the data received, the processing by PNNL staff, and additional data gathered in FY2002

  1. Radionuclide accumulation peculiarities demonstrated by vegetable varieties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruk, A.V.; Goncharenko, G.G.; Kilchevsky, A.V.

    2004-01-01

    This study focused on ecological and genetic aspects of radionuclide accumulation demonstrated by a number of vegetable varieties. The researches resulted in determining the cabbage varieties which were characterised by the minimal level of radionuclide accumulation. It was shown that the above varieties manifested the relation between radionuclide accumulation and morphobiological characteristics such as vegetation period duration and yield criteria. The study specified the genotypes with high ecological stability as regards to radionuclide accumulation: 'Beloruskaya 85' cabbage and 'Dokhodny' tomato showed the best response to Cs 137, while 'Beloruskaya 85', 'Rusinovka', 'Amager 611' cabbage varieties and 'Sprint' tomato showed the minimal level of Sr 90 accumulation. (authors)

  2. A vegetation map for eastern Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lillesø, Jens-Peter Barnekow; van Breugel, Paulo; Graudal, Lars

    2015-01-01

    The potential natural vegetation (PNV) map of eastern and southern Africa covers the countries Burundi, Ethiopia, Kenya, Uganda, Rwanda, Tanzania, and Zambia. The first version of the map was developed by various partners in East Africa and Europe in 2010 and has now reached version 2. The map...... is available in different formats and is accompanied by an extensive documentation of the floristic, physiognomic and other characteristics of the different vegetation types and useful woody species in the 8 countries. It is complemented by a species selection tool, which can be used to 'find the right tree...

  3. Ultrasonic characterization of vegetable oil product

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidek Hj Abd Aziz; Chow Sai Pew; Abdul Halim Shaari; Nor Azizah Shaari

    1992-01-01

    The ultrasonic wave velocity and attenuation of a number vegetable oil products were measured using an ultrasonic pulse echo overlap technique from room temperature up to 90 0 C. Among the liquid samples studied were refined bleach deodorized (RED) palm oil, palm olein, coconut oil, corn oil and soya bean oil. The velocity of sound in vegetable oil products varies from about 1200 to 200 ms-1 and decrease linearly as the temperature increases. The ultrasonic properties of the oil are much dependent on their viscosity, density, relaxation effect and vibrational anharmonicity

  4. Pre-sowing irradiation of vegetable seeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoyanov, S

    1975-01-01

    Results are reported of trials with radiation stimulation of vegetable crops conducted under farm conditions in different regions. They were based on exact tests accomplished at the IGHB. Pre-sowing irradiation of seed increased the greenhouse yield of Extase tomato variety by 15%; it increased the yield of Triumph tomato variety under field conditions as well. The pepper variety Kourtovska Kapiya and eggplant variety Bulgarski 12, both grown from irradiated seed in open field produced 18% and 5.5% higher yields, respectively. Irradiation of vegetable seeds finds a large application in the farm practice.

  5. Risk elements in selected types of vegetables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ľuboš Harangozo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Vegetable has an important role in human nutrition. Various parts of the plants have been part of the human diet since the beginning. Vegetables have a number of properties that make its consumption very healthful. It not only is a good source of vitamins, minerals and fiber but also contains protective components so called phytonutrients, has an antioxidant and antimicrobial effects. Daily intake of vegetables offers many health benefits, helps to improve health for example the function of digestive and immune system, reduces the risk of various diseases and so we should take care to its regular consumption. It is widely used, except that it is the basic raw material for the preparation of foods and is also an important raw material for the processing industry. Nowadays has become environmental pollution by heavy metals as a big problem. The contamination of water, soil as well as air pollution by heavy metals negatively affects agricultural production and production of non-harmful to health, safe and quality food, which may be adverse effects on human health. Therefore, it is important that we devote this issue more attention. The aim of this work was to identify and determine content of heavy metals in selected vegetables. Defined objectives have been achieved by analyzing of selected species samples of root from brassica vegetables: carrot (Daucus carota L. ssp. sativus, parsley (Petroselinum hortesne HOFFM conv. radicosum, kohlrabi (Brassica oleracea L. var. gongylodes, celery (Apium graveolens L. var. rapaceum and beetroot (Beta vulgaris L. var. conditiva ssp. vulgaris. The crops were bought in local market. The obtained results were compared with the results obtained from analyzes of vegetables that were grown in home conditions respectively from markets of local growers. All crops were grown in Slovak Republic. By using Varian AA 240FS and AAS method were analyzed the contents of risk metals in selected vegetables. It was confirmed that

  6. Fruit and Vegetable Consumption and Mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leenders, Max; Sluijs, Ivonne; Ros, Martine M

    2013-01-01

    % CI: 0.70, 1.54), and with a preventable proportion of 2.95%. This association was driven mainly by cardiovascular disease mortality (for the highest quartile, hazard ratio = 0.85, 95% CI: 0.77, 0.93). Stronger inverse associations were observed for participants with high alcohol consumption or high...... body mass index and suggested in smokers. Inverse associations were stronger for raw than for cooked vegetable consumption. These results support the evidence that fruit and vegetable consumption is associated with a lower risk of death....

  7. Straight Vegetable Oil as a Diesel Fuel?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2014-01-01

    Biodiesel, a renewable fuel produced from animal fats or vegetable oils, is popular among many vehicle owners and fleet managers seeking to reduce emissions and support U.S. energy security. Questions sometimes arise about the viability of fueling vehicles with straight vegetable oil (SVO), or waste oils from cooking and other processes, without intermediate processing. But SVO and waste oils differ from biodiesel (and conventional diesel) in some important ways and are generally not considered acceptable vehicle fuels for large-scale or long-term use.

  8. Pre-sowing irradiation of vegetable seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoyanov, S.

    1975-01-01

    Results are reported of trials with radiation stimulation of vegetable crops conducted under farm conditions in different regions. They were based on exact tests accomplished at the IGHB. Pre-sowing irradiation of seed increased the greenhouse yield of Extase tomato variety by 15%; it increased the yield of Triumph tomato variety under field conditions as well. The pepper variety Kourtovska Kapiya and eggplant variety Bulgarski 12, both grown from irradiated seed in open field produced 18% and 5.5% higher yields, respectively. Irradiation of vegetable seeds finds a large application in the farm practice. (author)

  9. Simulations of Vegetation Impacts on Arctic Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfils, C.; Phillips, T. J.; Riley, W. J.; Post, W. M.; Torn, M. S.

    2009-12-01

    Because global warming disproportionately influences high-latitude climate, changes in arctic vegetation are in progress. These land-cover changes include redistribution of local vegetation types as well as northward migration of lower-latitude species in response to the increasing warming. The resulting displacement of low-lying tundra vegetation by shrubs and trees darkens the surface, thus accelerating regional warming. As participants in the U.S. Department of Energy IMPACTS Project, we are investigating the potential for abrupt arctic climatic change resulting from such variations in vegetation, among other mechanisms. To estimate the relative magnitudes of effects to be expected from changes in high-latitude land cover, we are conducting several numerical experiments with the Community Climate System Model (CCSM). These experiments include: 1) A “present-day-climate” control experiment with current atmospheric greenhouse-gas concentrations and climatological monthly sea surface temperatures and sea ice extents prescribed, and with “standard” CLM plant functional types (PFTs) specified; 2) A “changed-vegetation-type” experiment that is the same as 1), except that the “standard” PFTs are augmented by additional vegetation types (forbs, sedges, shrubs, mosses, and lichens) that are not presently represented in CLM. This experiment will require information on the location, fractional cover, and physiological parameterizations of these new PFTs. 3) A “changed-vegetation-extent experiment” that is the same as 2), except that the spatial extents of selected PFTs (e.g. shrubs or boreal forest PFTs) are shifted northward from their present locations in the CLM. We will report on the atmospheric climate and land-surface feedbacks associated with these vegetation changes, with emphasis on local and regional surface energy and moisture fluxes and near-surface temperature, humidity, and clouds. Acknowledgments This work was performed under the auspices

  10. Multispectral Imaging of Wok-Fried Vegetables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Line Katrine Harder; Dissing, Bjørn Skovlund; Hyldig, Grethe

    2012-01-01

    Quality control in the food industry is often performed by measuring various chemical compounds in the food involved. The authors propose an imaging concept for acquiring high-quality multispectral images to evaluate optical reflection changes in carrots and celeriac over a period of 14 days....... For comparison, sensory analysis was performed on the same samples. Prior to multispectral image recording, the vegetables were prefried and frozen at -30 °C for 4 months. During the 14 days of image recording, the vegetables were kept at +5 °C. In this period, surface changes and thereby reflectance properties...

  11. Nutrición vegetal (III).

    OpenAIRE

    Moyeja Santana, Juan de Jesús

    2007-01-01

    Editorial. Suniaga Q., José La codorniz fuente proteica para consumo humano. Díaz Cuellar, Doraida R. y González, Diomary Diagnóstico de parásitos gastrointestinales en bovinos y su importancia en la productividad de los sistemas ganaderos. Castillo O., Mayela; Hernández, Javier A.; Betancourt, Arquímedes y Suniaga Q., José Nutrición vegetal (II). Moyeja Santana, Juan de Jesús Nutrición vegetal (III). Moyeja Santana, Juan de Jesús Plagas chupadoras de las cítrica...

  12. Nutrición vegetal (II).

    OpenAIRE

    Moyeja Santana, Juan de Jesús

    2007-01-01

    Editorial. Suniaga Q., José La codorniz fuente proteica para consumo humano. Díaz Cuellar, Doraida R. y González, Diomary Diagnóstico de parásitos gastrointestinales en bovinos y su importancia en la productividad de los sistemas ganaderos. Castillo O., Mayela; Hernández, Javier A.; Betancourt, Arquímedes y Suniaga Q., José Nutrición vegetal (II). Moyeja Santana, Juan de Jesús Nutrición vegetal (III). Moyeja Santana, Juan de Jesús Plagas chupadoras de las cítrica...

  13. Effects of vegetation structure on biomass accumulation in a Balanced Optimality Structure Vegetation Model (BOSVM v1.0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Yin

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A myriad of interactions exist between vegetation and local climate for arid and semi-arid regions. Vegetation function, structure and individual behavior have large impacts on carbon–water–energy balances, which consequently influence local climate variability that, in turn, feeds back to the vegetation. In this study, a conceptual vegetation structure scheme is formulated and tested in the new Balanced Optimality Structure Vegetation Model (BOSVM to explore the importance of vegetation structure and vegetation adaptation to water stress on equilibrium biomass states. Surface energy, water and carbon fluxes are simulated for a range of vegetation structures across a precipitation gradient in West Africa and optimal vegetation structures that maximize biomass for each precipitation regime are determined. Two different strategies of vegetation adaptation to water stress are included. Under dry conditions vegetation tries to maximize the water use efficiency and leaf area index as it tries to maximize carbon gain. However, a negative feedback mechanism in the vegetation–soil water system is found as the vegetation also tries to minimize its cover to optimize the surrounding bare ground area from which water can be extracted, thereby forming patches of vertical vegetation. Under larger precipitation, a positive feedback mechanism is found in which vegetation tries to maximize its cover as it then can reduce water loss from bare soil while having maximum carbon gain due to a large leaf area index. The competition between vegetation and bare soil determines a transition between a "survival" state to a "growing" state.

  14. Estimating fractional vegetation cover and the vegetation index of bare soil and highly dense vegetation with a physically based method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wanjuan; Mu, Xihan; Ruan, Gaiyan; Gao, Zhan; Li, Linyuan; Yan, Guangjian

    2017-06-01

    Normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) of highly dense vegetation (NDVIv) and bare soil (NDVIs), identified as the key parameters for Fractional Vegetation Cover (FVC) estimation, are usually obtained with empirical statistical methods However, it is often difficult to obtain reasonable values of NDVIv and NDVIs at a coarse resolution (e.g., 1 km), or in arid, semiarid, and evergreen areas. The uncertainty of estimated NDVIs and NDVIv can cause substantial errors in FVC estimations when a simple linear mixture model is used. To address this problem, this paper proposes a physically based method. The leaf area index (LAI) and directional NDVI are introduced in a gap fraction model and a linear mixture model for FVC estimation to calculate NDVIv and NDVIs. The model incorporates the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) model parameters product (MCD43B1) and LAI product, which are convenient to acquire. Two types of evaluation experiments are designed 1) with data simulated by a canopy radiative transfer model and 2) with satellite observations. The root-mean-square deviation (RMSD) for simulated data is less than 0.117, depending on the type of noise added on the data. In the real data experiment, the RMSD for cropland is 0.127, for grassland is 0.075, and for forest is 0.107. The experimental areas respectively lack fully vegetated and non-vegetated pixels at 1 km resolution. Consequently, a relatively large uncertainty is found while using the statistical methods and the RMSD ranges from 0.110 to 0.363 based on the real data. The proposed method is convenient to produce NDVIv and NDVIs maps for FVC estimation on regional and global scales.

  15. [Effects of road construction on regional vegetation types].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shi-Liang; Liu, Qi; Wang, Cong; Yang, Jue-Jie; Deng, Li

    2013-05-01

    As a regional artificial disturbance component, road exerts great effects on vegetation types, and plays a substantial role in defining vegetation distribution to a certain extent. Aiming at the tropical rainforest degradation and artificial forest expansion in Yunnan Province of Southwest China, this paper analyzed the effects of road network extension on regional vegetation types. In the Province, different classes of roads had different effects on the vegetation types, but no obvious regularity was observed in the effects on the patch areas of different vegetation types due to the great variations of road length and affected distance. However, the vegetation patch number was more affected by lower class roads because of their wide distribution. As for different vegetation types, the vegetations on cultivated land were most affected by roads, followed by Castanopsis hystrix and Schima wallichii forests. Road network formation contributed most to the vegetation fragmentation, and there existed significant correlations between the human disturbance factors including village- and road distributions.

  16. Heavy Metals Accumulation Characteristics of Vegetables in Hangzhou City, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GU Yan-qing

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A field survey of heavy metal concentrations in soils and vegetables grown in 30 vegetable farmlands of Hangzhou City were carried out. Through calculating the bioconcentration factor(BCFand transfer factor(TFfor different heavy metals(Cu, Zn, Cd, Cr and Pbin 27 kinds of different vegetables which belong to leafy vegetables, root vegetables or eggplant fruit vegetables, assessing their accumulation characteristics of heavy metals according to the differences of the bio-concentration factor, the reasonable proposals were put forward to optimize the planting structure of vegetables in mild and middle-level heavy metal contamination soils. The experimental results were as follows: In soils with mild and middle-level heavy metal contamination, leafy vegetables, such as crown daisy, cabbage, celery and Chinese long cabbage, had relatively low enrichment ability of heavy metals, so as the root and fruit vegetables like white radish, carrot, tomatoes, hence these vegetables could be planted preferentially. In contrast, some kinds of vegetables, including white amaranth, red amaranth, tatsoi, broccoli, gynura, brassica juncea and lettuce of leafy vegetables, lactuca sativa, taro, red radish and cherry radish of rhizome vegetables and sweet pepper of fruit vegetables, had relatively high accumulation ability of heavy metal, which should be avoided to be planted in soils with mild and middle-level heavy metal contamination.

  17. Consumer Acceptance Comparison Between Seasoned and Unseasoned Vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yiming; Albiol Tapia, Marta; Okada, Kyle; Castaneda Lazo, Nuria Blanca; Chapman-Novakofski, Karen; Phillips, Carter; Lee, Soo-Yeun

    2018-02-01

    Recent findings show that approximately 87% of the U.S. population fail to meet the vegetable intake recommendations, with unpleasant taste of vegetables being listed as the primary reason for this shortfall. In this study, spice and herb seasoning was used to enhance palatability of vegetables, in order to increase consumer acceptance. In total, 749 panelists were screened and recruited as specific vegetable likers of the vegetable being tested or general vegetable likers. Four sessions were designed to evaluate the effect of seasoning within each type of vegetable, including broccoli, cauliflower, carrot, and green bean. Each panelist was only allowed to participate in one test session to evaluate only one vegetable type, so as to mitigate potential learning effect. Overall, the results showed that seasoned vegetables were significantly preferred over unseasoned vegetables (P trend of seasoned vegetable being preferred remained. The findings from this study demonstrate the effect of seasoning in enhancing consumer liking of vegetables, which may lead to increased consumption to be assessed in future studies. To improve the sensory properties of vegetables, masking the bitter taste of vegetables using spice and herb seasoning are gaining increasing attention. Our findings suggest that the overall liking of vegetables could be improved by incorporating spice and herb seasonings that are specifically formulated for each vegetable. Ultimately, developing and commercializing spice and herb seasonings may aid to increase vegetable consumption, as well as expanding the vegetable seasoning market. © 2018 The Authors Journal of Food Science published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Institute of Food Technologists.

  18. Influence of uranium and lead upon vegetation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoklasa, M J

    1913-01-01

    Experiments were performed to determine the effects of radioactive waters on the growth and production of vegetables. Results show that small amounts of radioactive uranium, lead, and radium have a beneficial effect upon the germination and growth of plants. Although uranium is the strongest source of energy, it had less effect than radium.

  19. Nigerian women reap benefits from indigenous vegetables

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Working in four administrative states in south- western Nigeria, the Sustainable Production and Utilization of Underutilized Nigerian. Vegetables to Enhance Rural .... children's school fees and health care needs of the family. This will continue to sustain their use of improved production and cultivation once the project has ...

  20. A MODIS-based vegetation index climatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our motivation here is to provide information for the NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite soil moisture retrieval algorithms (launch in 2014). Vegetation attenuates the signal and the algorithms must correct for this effect. One approach is to use data that describes the canopy water ...

  1. Vegetables, Soups, Sauces, Gravies and Beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    Developed as part of the Marine Corps Institute (MCI) correspondence training program, this course on vegetables, soups, sauces, gravies, and beverages is designed to increase Marine Corps cooks' effectiveness as food handlers, using the proper techniques in the preparation of these items. Introductory materials include specific information for…

  2. Building the United States National Vegetation Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, S.B.; Faber-Langendoen, D.; Jennings, M.; Keeler-Wolf, T.; Loucks, O.; Peet, R.; Roberts, D.; McKerrow, A.

    2012-01-01

    The Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) Vegetation Subcommittee, the Ecological Society of America Panel on Vegetation Classification, and NatureServe have worked together to develop the United States National Vegetation Classification (USNVC). The current standard was accepted in 2008 and fosters consistency across Federal agencies and non-federal partners for the description of each vegetation concept and its hierarchical classification. The USNVC is structured as a dynamic standard, where changes to types at any level may be proposed at any time as new information comes in. But, because much information already exists from previous work, the NVC partners first established methods for screening existing types to determine their acceptability with respect to the 2008 standard. Current efforts include a screening process to assign confidence to Association and Group level descriptions, and a review of the upper three levels of the classification. For the upper levels especially, the expectation is that the review process includes international scientists. Immediate future efforts include the review of remaining levels and the development of a proposal review process.

  3. Vegetable Consumption patterns in Yaounde, Cameroon | Kamga ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A survey was conducted in August and September 2008 in Yaoundé, Cameroon to assess vegetable consumption attitudes, constraints and factors that stimulate households' consumption. Stratified sample based on district size, socioeconomic status and ethnics groups were used. Three hundred households were ...

  4. Health promoting compounds in vegetables and fruits:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, K.; Christensen, L.P.; Hansen-Møller, J.

    2004-01-01

    Vegetables contain unknown compounds with important health promoting effect. The described project defined and tested a two-step screening procedure for identification of such compounds. Step 1 is initial screening according to three criteria: 1.1, chemically reactive functional groups; 1...

  5. 8518 CONSUMPTION OF LEAFY VEGETABLES IN RURAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael

    2014-03-01

    Mar 1, 2014 ... The head of the household was interviewed and question items ... crops which include alfalfa, wheat and barley with edible leaves are known [5]. .... vegetables for minimum loss of water-soluble nutrients, in spite of the high ...

  6. METHANE PHYTOREMEDIATION BY VEGETATIVE LANDFILL COVER SYSTEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landfill gas, consisting of methane and other gases, is produced from organic compounds degrading in landfills, contributes to global climate change, is toxic to various types of vegetation, and may pose a combustion hazard at higher concentrations. New landfills are required to ...

  7. Continuous wok-frying of vegetables:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adler-Nissen, Jens

    2007-01-01

    of loosely bound water from the vegetables allows the products to be frozen and re-heated without drip loss, and it is also an advantage when using them as ingredients in composite foods, such as pâtés. Examples developed by a professional chef indicate that he saved up to half of the cooking time compared...

  8. Fruit and vegetable films and uses thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    The present invention is directed to monolayer, bilayer, and multilayer films made from fruit, vegetable or a combination thereof, which films have the thinness, strength, flexibility and crispness to serve as alternates or substitutes for seaweed-based films such as nori, while providing nutrition ...

  9. SOLID BIOFUEL UTILIZATION IN VEGETABLE OIL PRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slusarenko V.

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with questions of creating at JSC “Alimentarmash "in the last 20 years the technological equipment for the production of vegetable oils from oilseeds: from the press for the final spin to mini oilfactory, using as an energy source for heating the liquid coolant (Thermal oil "Arian" of solid biofuels - husk of sunflower seeds.

  10. Regional vegetation management standards for commercial pine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although the understanding gained from these trials allowed for the development of vegetation management standards, their operational and economic viability need to be tested on a commercial basis. Four pine trials were thus initiated to test the applicability of these standards when utilised on a commercial scale. Two of ...

  11. Willow vegetation filters: Principles, results and economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perttu, K.

    1996-01-01

    During recent years, it has become obvious that it is both environmentally and economically appropriate to use vegetation filters of different short rotation willows (Salix spp.) to purify water and soil. Swedish experiences of vegetation filter efficiencies have been demonstrated in several laboratory, field lysimeter, and full-scale experiments. However, there are still many questions to be answered, for example, how the uptake and allocation mechanisms of heavy metals and recalcitrant organic constituents function, or which maximum doses are possible in a particular situation without any risk of leachate losses. As far as plant nutrition is concerned, the past two decades of integrated research in Sweden have demonstrated that the willows have capacity for efficient uptake both of macro and micro nutrients, which is reflected in their high productivity. The purpose of this paper is to present some results on how vegetation filter stands of willow, irrigated with municipal wastewater, can function as purification plants, while at the same time producing fuelwood. This twofold utilization benefits both the environment and the economy. Treatment plants for wastewater purification using various types of vegetation filters have been tried in Sweden. The experiences consider both the nutrient and heavy metal uptake, and the whole process chain from establishment, cultivation and harvesting of the wastewater irrigated willow stands, to the utilization of the wood in heating plants. 33 refs, 5 tabs

  12. Remote sensing of vegetation dynamics in drylands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, Feng; Brandt, Martin Stefan; Liu, Yi Y.

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring long-term biomass dynamics in drylands is of great importance for many environmental applications including land degradation and global carbon cycle modeling. Biomass has extensively been estimated based on the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) as a measure of the vegetatio...

  13. Sustainable Production of Underutilized Vegetables to Enhance ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ... Research Fund (CIFSRF), a joint program of IDRC and the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) - aims to increase the food security and economic empowerment of resource-poor rural women farmers in Nigeria through the cultivation, processing, consumption and marketing of underutilized vegetables.

  14. Weeds as important vegetables for farmers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cruz Garcia, G.S.; Price, L.L.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the multiple uses and cognitive importance of edible weeds in Northeast Thailand. Research methods included focus group discussions and freelistings. A total of 43 weeds consumed as vegetable were reported, including economic, naturalized, agricultural

  15. Vegetable oils as lube basestocks: A review

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    anjanas

    2013-02-27

    Feb 27, 2013 ... widespread use of natural oils and fats. Vegetable oils are promising candidates as base ... Synthetic esters form a large group of products, which can be either from petrochemical or oleo chemical ... In order to combine the environmental behavior and the technical properties of lubricants, a lot of countries ...

  16. Infection potential of vegetative incompatible Ganoderma boninense ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    LiP), manganese peroxidase (MnP) and laccase to degrade the lignin composition in plant cell walls. The present study aimed to evaluate the infection potential of vegetative incompatible isolates of G. boninense in causing Basal Stem Rot ...

  17. Mathematical Modeling of Flow Through Vegetated Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    of Illinois at Urbana - Champaign, 1996. [24] M.J. Dwyer, E.G. Patton, and R.H. Shaw. Turbulent kinetic energy budgets from a large-eddy simulation of...retardance in vegetated channels. Journal of the Irrigation and Drainage Division, ASCE, 96:351–357, 1970. [33] W.H. Graf and S.C. Ko. Tests on cylinders

  18. The market for vegetables in North Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijk, S.; Everaarts, A.P.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this project is first to develop the technical oppertunities for vegetable cultivation in the Hoa Binh highlands, and later to establish the ways and means for marketing of the product. To get some first insights in the marketing possibilities, a desk study was carried out of the

  19. Optimization of lamp spectrum for vegetable growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prikupets, L.B.; Tikhomirov, A.A. [Institute of Biophysics, Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation)

    1994-12-31

    Commmercial light sources were evaluated as to the optimum conditions for the production of tomatoes and cucumbers. Data is presented which corresponds to the maximum productivity and optimal spectral ratios. It is suggested that the commercial light sources evaluated were not efficient for the growing of the vegetables.

  20. Coatings for minimally processed fruits and vegetables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fresh-cut fruit and vegetables are gaining increasing popularity and market share. Techniques to enhance stability of fresh cut produce are reviewed. Among these techniques, edibles coatings can provide protection against dehydration, microbial decay and decrease events related to physiological sene...

  1. Minimally processed vegetable salads: microbial quality evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröder, Hans; Martins, Cecília Geraldes; De Souza, Katia Leani Oliveira; Landgraf, Mariza; Franco, Bernadette D G M; Destro, Maria Teresa

    2007-05-01

    The increasing demand for fresh fruits and vegetables and for convenience foods is causing an expansion of the market share for minimally processed vegetables. Among the more common pathogenic microorganisms that can be transmitted to humans by these products are Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Salmonella. The aim of this study was to evaluate the microbial quality of a selection of minimally processed vegetables. A total of 181 samples of minimally processed leafy salads were collected from retailers in the city of Sao Paulo, Brazil. Counts of total coliforms, fecal coliforms, Enterobacteriaceae, psychrotrophic microorganisms, and Salmonella were conducted for 133 samples. L. monocytogenes was assessed in 181 samples using the BAX System and by plating the enrichment broth onto Palcam and Oxford agars. Suspected Listeria colonies were submitted to classical biochemical tests. Populations of psychrotrophic microorganisms >10(6) CFU/g were found in 51% of the 133 samples, and Enterobacteriaceae populations between 10(5) and 106 CFU/g were found in 42% of the samples. Fecal coliform concentrations higher than 10(2) CFU/g (Brazilian standard) were found in 97 (73%) of the samples, and Salmonella was detected in 4 (3%) of the samples. Two of the Salmonella-positive samples had minimally processed vegetables had poor microbiological quality, and these products could be a vehicle for pathogens such as Salmonella and L. monocytogenes.

  2. Zur Flora und Vegetation des Jeschkenkammes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Petřík, Petr; Višňák, R.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 14, - (2006), s. 127-140 ISSN 0941-0627 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA6005202 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : phytogeography * potential natural vegetation * nature conservation Subject RIV: EF - Botanics

  3. Multispectral imaging of wok fried vegetables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løje, Hanne; Dissing, Bjørn Skovlund; Clemmensen, Line Katrine Harder

    2011-01-01

    This paper shows how multispectral images can be used to assess color change over time in wok fried vegetables. We present results where feature selection was performed with sparse methods from the multispectral images to detect the color changes of wok fried carrots and celeriac stored at +5°C...

  4. Phytostabilization of metals by indigenous riparian vegetation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    When measured against an ideal hypothetical buffer zone, the buffer zones under investigation varied between intact and severely compromised. Intact riparian zones showed elevated metal concentrations in the soil, yet significantly lower concentrations in the river water compared to areas with insufficient vegetative cover ...

  5. Vermicomposting of Vegetable Wastes Using Cow Dung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Muthukumaravel

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Municipal solid wastes are mainly from domestic and commercial areas containing recyclable toxic substances, compostable organic matter and others. With rapid increase in population, the generation of municipal solid wastes has increased several folds during last few years. Disposal of solid wastes can be done by methods like land filling, incineration, recycling, conversion into biogas, disposal into sea and composting. Vermicomposting is one of the recycling technologies which will improve the quality of the products. The present study aims to find out the possibility of utilization of vegetable wastes for vermiculture. Earthworm Megascolex mauritii cultured in plastic trays (45 x 30 x 30 cm containing soil alone (control (T1, soil + cow dung (T2, soil + vegetable waste (T3 and soil + vegetable waste + cow dung (T4 for 60 days. Nutrient values were determined from the compost and compared with that of the control. From these results, it was found that NPK values were maximum in compost obtained from vegetable waste with the use of cow dung.

  6. Remote sensing applications for monitoring rangeland vegetation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Remote sensing techniques hold considerable promise for the inventory and monitoring of natural resources on rangelands. A significant lack of information concerning basic spectral characteristics of range vegetation and soils has resulted in a lack of rangeland applications. The parameters of interest for range condition ...

  7. High pressure effects on fruits and vegetables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmermans, R.A.H.; Matser, A.M.

    2016-01-01

    The chapter provides an overview on different high pressure based treatments (high pressure pasteurization, blanching, pressure-assisted thermal processing, pressure-shift freezing and thawing) available for the preservation of fruits and vegetable products and extending their shelf life. Pressure

  8. Recycling of uranium by a perennial vegetation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiry, Y.

    2005-01-01

    At sites of large scale mining and processing of uranium ore, tailings and waste rock piles are today the most visible relics of the uranium extractive industry. These mining relics are constantly subjected to weathering and leaching processes causing the dissemination of radioactive and toxic elements and sometimes requiring remedial operations. The in situ remediation of waste rock piles usually includes their revegetation for minimizing the water infiltration and for increasing surface soil stability. Thanks to its biomass density and longevity, the perennial vegetation plays an important role in stabilisation of the water cycling. The buffer role of forest vegetation can reduce water export from watersheds as well as erosion and hydrological losses of chemicals including radionuclides from contaminated sites. If long term reduction of contaminant dispersion at revegetated uranium mining sites is to be fully appreciated, then the extent of radioactive contaminant availability to forest vegetation and ecosystem cycling as well as the possible economic valorisation of the woody products must be considered. Concerned study focused on a Scots pine plantation established 35 years ago on a uranium waste rock pile (Wismuth GmbH) situated near Schlema (Germany). This investigation aimed at quantifying the mobility of uranium in the mining debris and its transport to the different tree compartments with emphasis on the processes involved. The influence of pine vegetation on uranium cycling dynamics was further assessed in terms of annual fluxes)

  9. Genetic characterization of two traditional leafy vegetables ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic characterization of two traditional leafy vegetables (Sesamum radiatum Thonn. ex Hornem and Ceratotheca sesamoides Endl.) of Benin, using flow cytometry and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers. K Adéoti, A Rival, A Dansi, S Santoni, S Brown, T Beule, A Nato, Y Henry, R Vodouhe, L Loko, ...

  10. Vermicomposting of vegetable waste: A biophysicochemical process ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    some cities, the organic waste (market, municipal, household) are dumped indiscriminately or littered on the streets causing environmental deterioration. Biological processes such as composting followed by vermicomposting to convert vegetables waste (as valuable nutrient source) in agriculturally useful organic fertilizer ...

  11. Semi-Dried Fruits and Vegetables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamze Uysal Seçkin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Since ancient times, the preservation of fruit and vegetables is an ancient method of drying. Sun drying method has been used more widely. In general, consumer-ready products are dried fruits, while the dried vegetables are the foods subjected to the rehydration processes such as boiling, heating and baking before consumption. In recent years, new products with high eating quality have been attempted to achieve without losing characteristic of raw material. With the improving of food technology, using developed methods (pH reduction with reducing aw, slight heating, preservatives use etc. as protective agent, and using a combination of a low rate as an alternative to traditional food preservation process, products have been obtained without changing original characteristics of food. ‘Semi-dried 'or 'medium moist 'products with little difference between the taste and texture of the product with a damp have gained importance in recent years in terms of consumer preferences. Vegetables or fruits, which have water activity levels between 0.50 and 0.95 and the moisture content of between 26% and 60%, are called 'medium moist fruit or vegetables'. Two different manufacturing process to obtain a semi-dried or intermediate moisture products are applied. First, fully dried fruits and vegetables to be rehydrated with water are brought to the desired level of their moisture content. Second, in the first drying process, when the product moisture content is reduced to the desired level, the drying process is finished. The semi-dried products are preferred by consumers because they have a softer texture in terms of eating quality and like fresh products texture.

  12. Dry deposition of radionuclides on leafy vegetables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuberger, H.; Tschiersch, J.; Shinonaga, T.; Bunzl, K.; Pliml, A.; Dietl, F.; Keusch, M.

    2004-01-01

    The dry deposition of gaseous elemental radio-iodine and particulate radio-caesium on mature leafy vegetable was studied in chamber experiments. The simultaneous exposition of endive, head lettuce, red oak leaf lettuce and spinach (spring leafy vegetable) rsp. curly kale, white cabbage and spinach (summer leafy vegetable) was performed under homogeneous and controlled conditions. The sample collective of each species was such large that for the expected variation of the results a statistically firm analysis was possible. Significant differences were observed for the 131 I deposition on spring vegetable: the deposition on spinach was roughly 3times that on leaf lettuce, 4times that on endive and 9times that on head lettuce. For 134 Cs, there was no significant difference between spinach and leaf lettuce, about twice the amount was deposited on both species as on endive and 3times as on head lettuce. All summer vegetables showed differences in deposition. For lodine, the deposition on spinach was roughly 3times (6times) that on curly kale and 35times (100times) that on white cabbage in the 2 experiments. For caesium, the deposition to curly kale was highest, about twice that on spinach and 35times (80times) that on white cabbage. The deposition velocity could be estimated, in average it was about 8times higher for 131 I than for 134 Cs. The influence of the particle size on the deposition velocity was small in the considered size range. Washing could reduce the contamination by about 10% for 131 I and 45% for 134 Cs. (orig.)

  13. Impacts of vegetation change on groundwater recharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, W. J.; Verburg, K.; Smith, C. J.

    2003-12-01

    Vegetation change is the accepted cause of increasing river salt concentrations and the salinisation of millions of hectares of farm land in Australia. Replacement of perennial native vegetation by annual crops and pastures following European settlement has altered the water balance causing increased groundwater recharge and mobilising the naturally saline groundwater. The Redesigning Agriculture for Australian Landscapes Program, of which the work described here is a part, was established to develop agricultural practices that are more attuned to the delicate water balance described above. Results of field measurements will be presented that contrast the water balance characteristics of native vegetation with those of conventional agricultural plants, and indicate the functional characteristics required of new agricultural practices to reduce recharge. New agricultural practices may comprise different management of current crops and pastures, or may involve introducing totally new species. In either case, long-term testing is required to examine their impact on recharge over a long enough climate record to encompass the natural variability of rainfall that is characteristic of most Australian farming regions. Field experimentation therefore needs to be complemented and extended by computer simulation. This requires a modelling approach that is more robust than conventional crop modelling because (a) it needs to be sensitive enough to predict small changes in the residual recharge term, (b) it needs to be able to simulate a variety of vegetation in different sequences, (c) it needs to be able to simulate continuously for several decades of input data, and (d) it therefore needs to be able to simulate the period between crops, which often has a critical impact on recharge. The APSIM simulation framework will be used to illustrate these issues and to explore the effect of different vegetation combinations on recharge.

  14. Two hexagonal series of lanthanoid(III) oxide fluoride selenides.: M{sub 6}O{sub 2}F{sub 8}Se{sub 3} (M = La - Nd) and M{sub 2}OF{sub 2}Se (M = Nd, Sm, Gd - Ho)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmermann, Dirk D.; Grossholz, Hagen; Wolf, Sarah; Schleid, Thomas [Institut fuer Anorganische Chemie, Universitaet Stuttgart (Germany); Janka, Oliver [Institut fuer Anorganische Chemie, Universitaet Stuttgart (Germany); Institut fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie, Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster (Germany); Mueller, Alexander C. [Institut fuer Anorganische Chemie, Universitaet Stuttgart (Germany); Institut fuer Textilchemie und Chemiefasern, Denkendorf (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    Two hexagonal series of lanthanoid(III) oxide fluoride selenides with similar structure types can be obtained by the reaction of the components MF{sub 3}, M{sub 2}O{sub 3}, M, and Se in sealed niobium tubes at 850 C using CsI as fluxing agent. The compounds with the lighter and larger representatives (M = La - Nd) occur with the formula M{sub 6}O{sub 2}F{sub 8}Se{sub 3}, whereas with the heavier and smaller ones (M = Nd, Sm, Gd - Ho) their composition is M{sub 2}OF{sub 2}Se. For both systems single-crystal determinations were used in all cases. The compounds crystallize in the hexagonal crystal system (space group: P6{sub 3}/m) with lattice parameters of a = 1394-1331 pm and c = 403-372 pm (Z = 2 for M{sub 6}O{sub 2}F{sub 8}Se{sub 3} and Z = 6 for M{sub 2}OF{sub 2}Se). The (M1){sup 3+} cations show different square antiprismatic coordination spheres with or without an extra capping fluoride anion. All (M2){sup 3+} cations exhibit a ninefold coordination environment shaped as tricapped trigonal prism. In both structure types the Se{sup 2-} anions are sixfold coordinated as trigonal prisms of M{sup 3+} cations, being first condensed by edges to generate trimeric units and then via faces to form strands running along [001]. The light anions reside either in threefold triangular or in fourfold tetrahedral cationic coordination. For charge compensation, both structures have to contain a certain amount of oxide besides fluoride anions. Since F{sup -} and O{sup 2-} can not be distinguished by X-ray diffraction, bond-valence calculations were used to address the problem of their adjunction to the available crystallographic sites. (Copyright copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. Vegetation Index and Phenology (VIP) Vegetation Indices Monthly Global 0.05Deg CMG V004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NASA Making Earth System Data Records for Use in Research Environments (MEaSUREs) Vegetation Index and Phenology (VIP) global datasets were created using...

  16. Investigation on the Patterns of Global Vegetation Change Using a Satellite-Sensed Vegetation Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ainong Li

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The pattern of vegetation change in response to global change still remains a controversial issue. A Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI dataset compiled by the Global Inventory Modeling and Mapping Studies (GIMMS was used for analysis. For the period 1982–2006, GIMMS-NDVI analysis indicated that monthly NDVI changes show homogenous trends in middle and high latitude areas in the northern hemisphere and within, or near, the Tropic of Cancer and Capricorn; with obvious spatio-temporal heterogeneity on a global scale over the past two decades. The former areas featured increasing vegetation activity during growth seasons, and the latter areas experienced an even greater amplitude in places where precipitation is adequate. The discussion suggests that one should be cautious of using the NDVI time-series to analyze local vegetation dynamics because of its coarse resolution and uncertainties.

  17. Sensory determinants of stated liking for vegetable names and actual liking for canned vegetables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dinnella, Caterina; Morizet, David; Masi, Camilla

    2016-01-01

    tastes (sweet, umami), delicate flavour and bright appealing colour. A second group of highly disliked vegetables consists of cauliflowers and broccoli, characterized by disliked sensations such as bitter taste and objectionable flavour. Internal Preference Maps from actual liking scores indicate...

  18. Vegetable Grafting: The Implications of a Growing Agronomic Imperative for Vegetable Fruit Quality and Nutritive Value

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marios C. Kyriacou

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Grafting has become an imperative for intensive vegetable production since chlorofluorocarbon-based soil fumigants were banned from use on grounds of environmental protection. Compelled by this development, research into rootstock–scion interaction has broadened the potential applications of grafting in the vegetable industry beyond aspects of soil phytopathology. Grafting has been increasingly tapped for cultivation under adverse environs posing abiotic and biotic stresses to vegetable crops, thus enabling expansion of commercial production onto otherwise under-exploited land. Vigorous rootstocks have been employed not only in the open field but also under protected cultivation where increase in productivity improves distribution of infrastructural and energy costs. Applications of grafting have expanded mainly in two families: the Cucurbitaceae and the Solanaceae, both of which comprise major vegetable crops. As the main drives behind the expansion of vegetable grafting have been the resistance to soilborne pathogens, tolerance to abiotic stresses and increase in yields, rootstock selection and breeding have accordingly conformed to the prevailing demand for improving productivity, arguably at the expense of fruit quality. It is, however, compelling to assess the qualitative implications of this growing agronomic practice for human nutrition. Problems of impaired vegetable fruit quality have not infrequently been associated with the practice of grafting. Accordingly, the aim of the current review is to reassess how the practice of grafting and the prevalence of particular types of commercial rootstocks influence vegetable fruit quality and, partly, storability. Physical, sensorial and bioactive aspects of quality are examined with respect to grafting for watermelon, melon, cucumber, tomato, eggplant, and pepper. The physiological mechanisms at play which mediate rootstock effects on scion performance are discussed in interpreting the

  19. Post-fire vegetation dynamics in Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouveia, C.; Dacamara, C. C.; Trigo, R. M.

    2009-04-01

    The number of fires and the extent of the burned surface in Mediterranean Europe have increased significantly during the last three decades. This may be due either to modifications in land-use (e.g. land abandonment and fuel accumulation) or to climatic changes (e.g. reduction of fuel humidity), both factors leading to an increase of fire risk and fire spread. As in the Mediterranean ecosystems, fires in Portugal have an intricate effect on vegetation regeneration due to the complexity of landscape structures as well as to the different responses of vegetation to the variety of fire regimes. A thorough evaluation of vegetation recovery after fire events becomes therefore crucial in land management. In the above mentioned context remote sensing plays an important role because of its ability to monitor and characterise post-fire vegetation dynamics. A number of fire recovery studies, based on remote sensing, have been conducted in regions characterised by Mediterranean climates and the use of NDVI to monitor plant regeneration after fire events was successfully tested (Díaz-Delgado et al., 1998). In particular, several studies have shown that rapid regeneration occurs within the first 2 years after the fire occurrences, with distinct recovery rates according to the geographical facing of the slopes (Pausas and Vallejo, 1999). In 2003 Portugal was hit by the most devastating sequence of large fires, responsible by a total burnt area of 450 000 ha (including 280 000 ha of forest), representing about 5% of the Portuguese mainland (Trigo et al., 2006). The aim of the present work is to assess and monitor the vegetation behaviour over Portugal following the 2003 fire episodes. For this purpose we have used the regional fields of the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) as obtained from the VEGETATION-SPOT5 instrument, from 1999 to 2008. We developed a methodology to identify large burnt scars in Portugal for the 2003 fire season. The vegetation dynamics was then

  20. Riparian Vegetation Mapping Along the Hanford Reach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FOGWELL, T.W.

    2003-07-11

    During the biological survey and inventory of the Hanford Site conducted in the mid-1990s (1995 and 1996), preliminary surveys of the riparian vegetation were conducted along the Hanford Reach. These preliminary data were reported to The Nature Conservancy (TNC), but were not included in any TNC reports to DOE or stakeholders. During the latter part of FY2001, PNNL contracted with SEE Botanical, the parties that performed the original surveys in the mid 1990s, to complete the data summaries and mapping associated with the earlier survey data. Those data sets were delivered to PNNL and the riparian mapping by vegetation type for the Hanford Reach is being digitized during the first quarter of FY2002. These mapping efforts provide the information necessary to create subsequent spatial data layers to describe the riparian zone according to plant functional types (trees, shrubs, grasses, sedges, forbs). Quantification of the riparian zone by vegetation types is important to a number of DOE'S priority issues including modeling contaminant transport and uptake in the near-riverine environment and the determination of ecological risk. This work included the identification of vegetative zones along the Reach by changes in dominant plant species covering the shoreline from just to the north of the 300 Area to China Bar near Vernita. Dominant and indicator species included Agropyron dasytachyudA. smithii, Apocynum cannabinum, Aristida longiseta, Artemisia campestris ssp. borealis var scouleriana, Artemisa dracunculus, Artemisia lindleyana, Artemisia tridentata, Bromus tectorum, Chrysothamnus nauseosus, Coreopsis atkinsoniana. Eleocharis palustris, Elymus cinereus, Equisetum hyemale, Eriogonum compositum, Juniperus trichocarpa, Phalaris arundinacea, Poa compressa. Salk exigua, Scirpus acutus, Solidago occidentalis, Sporobolus asper,and Sporobolus cryptandrus. This letter report documents the data received, the processing by PNNL staff, and additional data gathered in FY

  1. Vegetation (MCV / NVCS) Mapping Projects - California [ds515

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — This metadata layer shows the footprint of vegetation mapping projects completed in California that have used the Manual California of Vegetation ( MCV 1st edition)...

  2. Assessing the vegetation canopy influences on wind flow using wind ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Artificial plastic vegetations with different porosity and canopy shape were introduced as ... Wind erosion is the Aeolian process by which soil particles are detached from ..... the stabilizing role of vegetation on wind erosion. And therefore, for ...

  3. Prevalence of Parasitic Contamination of Salad Vegetables in Ilorin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EBUBE AMAECHICHARLES

    Keywords: Parasitic, Salad vegetables, Contamination, Ilorin, Nigeria. 1. ... domestic animal origin as fertilizer, and the habit of eating vegetables raw or undercooked are ..... for cleaning the farm products before they are offered for sale.

  4. Genetically engineered plants with increased vegetative oil content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benning, Christoph

    2017-05-23

    The invention relates to genetically modified agricultural plants with increased oil content in vegetative tissues, as well as to expression systems, plant cells, seeds and vegetative tissues related thereto.

  5. Advances on Modelling Riparian Vegetation-Hydromorphology Interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Solari, L.; Van Oorschot, M.; Belletti, B.; Hendriks, D.; Rinaldi, M.; Vargas-Luna, A.

    2016-01-01

    Riparian vegetation actively interacts with fluvial systems affecting river hydrodynamics, morphodynamics and groundwater. These interactions can be coupled because both vegetation and hydromorphology (i.e. the combined scientific study of hydrology and fluvial geomorphology) involve dynamic

  6. Vegetation - Anza-Borrego Desert State Park [ds165

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — The Anza Borrego Desert State Park (ABDSP) Vegetation Map depicts vegetation within the Park and its surrounding environment. The map was prepared by the Department...

  7. Terrestrial transect study on driving mechanism of vegetation changes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In terms of Chinese climate-vegetation model based on the classification of plant functional types, to- gether with climatic data from 1951 to 1980 and two future climatic scenarios (SRES-A2 and SRES-B2) in China from the highest and the lowest emission scenarios of greenhouse gases, the distribution patterns of vegetation types and their changes along the Northeast China Transect (NECT) and the North-South Transect of Eastern China (NSTEC) were simulated in order to understand the driving mechanisms of vegetation changes under climatic change. The results indicated that the vegetation distribution patterns would change significantly under future climate, and the major factors driving the vegetation changes were water and heat. However, the responses of various vegetation types to the changes in water and heat factors were obviously different. The vegetation changes were more sensi- tive to heat factors than to water factors. Thus, in the future climate warming will significantly affect vegetation distribution patterns.

  8. Remote sensing application for delineating coastal vegetation - A case study

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kunte, P.D.; Wagle, B.G.

    Remote sensing data has been used for mapping coastal vegetation along the Goa Coast, India. The study envisages the use of digital image processing techniques for delineating geomorphic features and associated vegetation, including mangrove, along...

  9. Effect of variety mixtures on cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) vegetable ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    jokonya

    AN EVALUATION OF SIX COWPEA VARIETIES GROWN ... provide cheap sources of protein, micronutrients and mineral elements that can ... traditional vegetables is that, these leafy vegetables are present in most home ..... REFERENCES. 1.

  10. Vegetation damage and recovery after Chiginagak Volcano Crater drainage event

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of the Interior — From August 20 — 23, 2006, I revisited Chiginigak volcano to document vegetation recovery after the crater drainage event that severely damaged vegetation in May of...

  11. Metals in leafy vegetables grown in Addis Ababa and toxicological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Metals in leafy vegetables grown in Addis Ababa and toxicological implications. ... the leafy vegetables is attributed to plant differences in tolerance to heavy metals. ... Treatment of industrial effluents and phyto-extraction of excess metals from ...

  12. Landscape level assessment of critically endangered vegetation of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    techniques. Littoral vegetation is the only natural vegetation type of Lakshadweep islands. Altogether ... is the best method to analyse patch size, shape ..... qualitative levels. .... 285, USDA Forest Service, Pacific North West Research. Station ...

  13. Assessing the accuracy of remote sensing techniques in vegetation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Assessing the accuracy of remote sensing techniques in vegetation fractions estimation. ... This study aimed at exploring different remote sensing (RS) techniques for quantitatively measuring vegetation and bare soil ... HOW TO USE AJOL.

  14. Evaluation of land and vegetation degradation indicators in Kiang ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of land and vegetation degradation indicators in Kiang'ombe ... land and vegetation degradation risk and analyzing the effectiveness of various ... The methods used included; Focus Group Discussions (FGD), key informant ...

  15. Biota - 2011 Vegetation Inventory - Mud Lake, MN/SD

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — 2011 Vegetation Classification for Mud Lake, MN/SD Vegetation Project Report, OMBIL Environmental Stewardship - Level 1 Inventory. Mud Lake, located on the Minnesota...

  16. Identification of Distribution Channels to Create Sustainable Vegetable Prices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aflit Nuryulia Praswati

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The price of vegetables has a role as a contributor to the rate of inflation. Currently the number of vegetable production in Boyolali region can no longer meet the needs of local communities. The limited amount of vegetable production and the inhibition of the vegetable distribution channel creates a scarcity of vegetables that result in price increases. This study aims to identify the distribution channel and the formation of vegetable prices derived from Boyolali area. The method used in this research is quantitative and qualitative. Respondents from this study consisted of farmers, wholesalers, small trader and end consumers. The type of distribution channel prevailing in Boyolali area are traditional and modern distribution channels. Intermediate distribution channels play a greater role in determining vegetable prices. If farmers want to improve their economic condition, it needs innovation and creativity in the process of planting, harvesting, packaging and marketing vegetable products.

  17. Predicting gender differences in liking for vegetables and preference for a variety of vegetables among 11-year-old children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehto, Elviira; Ray, Carola; Haukkala, Ari; Yngve, Agneta; Thorsdottir, Inga; Roos, Eva

    2015-12-01

    We studied the factors that predict liking for vegetables and preference for a variety of vegetables among schoolchildren. Additionally, we examined if there were gender differences in the predictors that explain the hypothesized higher scores in liking vegetables and preferences among girls. The data from the PRO GREENS project included 424 Finnish children (response rate 77%) aged 11 to 12. The children completed validated measures about social and environmental factors related to their liking for vegetables and preferences both at baseline 2009 and follow-up 2010. The associations were examined with regression and mediation analyses. The strongest predictors of both girls' and boys' liking and preferences were higher levels of eating vegetables together with the family, previous vegetable intake and a lower level of perceived barriers. Liking was additionally predicted by a lower level of parental demand that their child should eat vegetables. Girls reported higher levels of liking and preferences in the follow-up. This gender difference was mainly explained by girls' lower level of perceived barriers related to vegetable intake and girls' higher previous vegetable intake. Interventions that aim to increase the low vegetable intake among boys by increasing their liking for vegetables and preference for a variety of vegetables could benefit from targeting perceived barriers, namely boys' perception and values concerning the consumption of vegetables. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. How Much Do Americans Pay for Fruits and Vegetables?

    OpenAIRE

    Reed, Jane; Frazao, Elizabeth; Itskowitz, Rachel

    2004-01-01

    Many Americans do not consume the recommended amount of fruits and vegetables. Almost half of Americans think eating more fruits and vegetables would make their diets healthier, so why don't they? One argument is that fruits and vegetables are expensive, especially when purchased fresh. According to an ERS study, a consumer can meet the recommendation of three servings of fruits and four servings of vegetables daily for 64 cents.

  19. Determinants of fruit and vegetable consumption among children and adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Mette; Krølner, Rikke; Klepp, Knut-Inge

    2006-01-01

    In order to more effectively promote fruit and vegetable intake among children and adolescents, insight into determinants of intake is necessary. We conducted a review of the literature for potential determinants of fruit and vegetable intake in children and adolescents.......In order to more effectively promote fruit and vegetable intake among children and adolescents, insight into determinants of intake is necessary. We conducted a review of the literature for potential determinants of fruit and vegetable intake in children and adolescents....

  20. Price Trends Are Similar for Fruits, Vegetables, and Snack Foods

    OpenAIRE

    Kuchler, Fred; Stewart, Hayden

    2008-01-01

    An increase in the price of fruits and vegetables relative to less healthy foods could reduce consumers’ incentives to purchase fruits and vegetables and result in less healthy diets. Whether such a change in relative prices and incentives has occurred in the United States is difficult to prove because of substantial quality improvements in many fresh fruits and vegetables. For commonly consumed fresh fruits and vegetables for which quality has remained fairly constant, analysis of price tren...

  1. Beryllium-free β-Rb{sub 2}Al{sub 2}B{sub 2}O{sub 7} as a possible deep-ultraviolet nonlinear optical material replacement for KBe{sub 2}BO{sub 3}F{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tran, T. Thao; Halasyamani, P. Shiv [Department of Chemistry, University of Houston, TX (United States); Koocher, Nathan Z.; Rondinelli, James M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL (United States)

    2017-03-06

    A new beryllium-free deep-ultraviolet (DUV) nonlinear optical (NLO) material, β-Rb{sub 2}Al{sub 2}B{sub 2}O{sub 7} (β-RABO), has been synthesized and characterized. The chiral nonpolar acentric material shows second-harmonic generation (SHG) activity at both 1064 and 532 nm with efficiencies of 2 x KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} and 0.4 x β-BaB{sub 2}O{sub 4}, respectively, and exhibits a short absorption edge below 200 nm. β-Rb{sub 2}Al{sub 2}B{sub 2}O{sub 7} has a three-dimensional structure of corner-shared Al(BO{sub 3}){sub 3}O polyhedra. The discovery of β-RABO shows that through careful synthesis and characterization, replacement of KBe{sub 2}BO{sub 3}F{sub 2} (KBBF) by a Be-free DUV NLO material is possible. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  2. NEW GREENHOUSE TECHNOLOGIES FOR VEGETABLE PRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Sirota

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available First decade of XXI century is characterized by significant augmentation in vegetable world’s production. Average annual vegetable production has been 346 million tons, and it has exceeded the average annual potato production (318 million tons. It has occurred due to the use of up-to-date technologies for vegetable production and, particularly, in greenhouses. In Russian Federation, the total production of vegetables was 5 275.6 thousand tons in 2015 that was 13.3% more than in 2014. But the total vegetable production in greenhouses was only 722.8 thousand tons, that was 0.7% less than in 2014 (728.1 thousand tons. It can be explained that the old technologies have been used for many greenhouses around Russia. Up-to-date technologies for greenhouses are described in the article. Small-volume hydroponics. Plants are grown in mineral wadding, packed up in the special chutes. Mineral nutrition and water are supplied through special pipe with many branch pipes toward each plant. Advantage: pH and nutrition are maintained, consumption of water and mineral nutrition are optimized, and that improves plants grow control. Expenditures of labor decreased, quality of fruit became better and the yield increased significantly by 45-50 kg/m2 comparing with growing on the soil (25-30 kg/m2. Hydroponics with flowing water (salad production lines. Conveyor for salad and vegetable growing on horizontal moving chutes with flowing water and nutrition was developed. Advantage: high level of automation and mechanization of all processes of growing increased the effectiveness of the use of greenhouse areas (we can place 30% plants more at the same area. Seedling production lines. Production lines for seedlings enable to grow vegetables and leafy vegetables on stationary benches, being furnished with periodical nutrition and water supply at times. Advantage: 700 seedlings additionally on each m2 a year. Future technologies are

  3. Water dynamics of vegetable using radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakanishi, Tomoko

    2000-01-01

    Neutral ray is specifically adsorbed and scattered by hydrogen, which is construction element of water. We applied nondestructive visualization of water dynamics in vegetable using neutral ray. The neutron ray was produced by JRR-3M of JAERI. Water dynamics of epigeal part of vegetable, tree, seed, root and soil near root were observed. The distribution and behavior of water were seen by image. For examples, the dry process of cedar, water adsorption process of seed of broad beam, corn, morning glory, rice and wheat. The growing process of root in the soil was analyzed by CT images that constructed three-dimensional image. Water image of root-soil system made clear water dynamics of the optional site near root. The distribution of water in the cut carnation was observed before and after dry treatment. The change of distribution of water was observed. (S.Y.)

  4. Mathematical Modeling of Vegetable-Oil Crystallization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Jeppe Lindegaard

    be desirable to enhance specific properties such as shelf life, viscosity, texture, sensory aspects and physical appearance. Vegetable oils and fats constitute a considerable part of many food products such as chocolate, margarine, bread, spreads and ice cream. Several attractive properties found......In recent years the food sector has experienced a great boost in demand for tailor-made fats and oils to produce so-called functional foods, where ingredients have been carefully modified to yield products with specific, valuable properties. Depending on market segment and product, it may...... in these products, including flavor release, melting profile and appearance, are governed by the oils and fats added. Consequently, altering the fat phase may lead to enhanced properties of the products. The primary focus of the present work is vegetable oils and fats originating from different sources covering...

  5. Vegetation survey of PEN Branch wetlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-01-01

    A survey was conducted of vegetation along Pen Branch Creek at Savannah River Site (SRS) in support of K-Reactor restart. Plants were identified to species by overstory, understory, shrub, and groundcover strata. Abundance was also characterized and richness and diversity calculated. Based on woody species basal area, the Pen Branch delta was the most impacted, followed by the sections between the reactor and the delta. Species richness for shrub and groundcover strata were also lowest in the delta. No endangered plant species were found. Three upland pine areas were also sampled. In support of K Reactor restart, this report summarizes a study of the wetland vegetation along Pen Branch. Reactor effluent enters Indian Grove Branch and then flows into Pen Branch and the Pen Branch Delta.

  6. Radioactivity in Scottish soils and grassy vegetation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, G.R.; Horrill, A.D.; Thomson, A.J.; Howson, G.

    1989-05-01

    In June 1987, soil and graminoid vegetation samples were collected from 159 randomly selected Scottish sites and analysed for radioactivity due to potassium-40, caesium-134 and caesium-137. Activity due to plutonium-238 and plutonium-239/240 was also measured in soils from 47 of the sites. The main aims of this survey were to determine: (a) the geographic distribution of radiocaesium activity due to fallout from the Chernobyl reactor disaster, (b) the pattern of radiation due to the naturally occurring isotope potassium-40, (c) the activity attributable to caesium-137 fallout from nuclear weapons testing prior to the Chernobyl deposition, (d) the uptake of caesium-137 by vegetation from different soil types. (author)

  7. Antimicrobial Effect of Extracts of Cruciferous Vegetables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Hui Hu

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The cruciferous vegetables cauliflower, broccoli, cabbage, Chinese radish, Chinese kale, and Chinese kitam were used in this study to prepare water-soluble and methanol-water extracts. Crude protein extracts were also obtained by diethylaminoethyl (DEAE anion exchange chromatography. Water-soluble polysaccharides were prepared by ethanol precipitation followed by ultrafiltration. The antimicrobial effects of all these extracts were evaluated against Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative bacteria, and yeast. Crude protein extracts exhibited the greatest antimicrobial activity in monoculture experiments. The antimicrobial effects of cruciferous vegetables were also studied by steeping beef, carrot, and celery in chlorine (10 ppm or citric acid solution (1% containing the crude protein extract (500 ppm for different time periods. Total aerobic plate counts and coliform counts on these foods decreased significantly after 10 minutes in all steeping solutions (p < 0.05.

  8. Vegetation attached to the elephant trunk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Akiko; Sakamoto, Toshihito; Okada, Kenji; Okita, Yutaka

    2013-09-01

    The elephant trunk technique is used as a standard method in the approach to staged repair of extensive thoracic aneurysms. Here, we present a rare case of a graft infection, in which vegetation was attached to the distal end of the elephant trunk. A 36-year old male who had undergone total arch replacement with elephant trunk installation for type A aortic dissection was readmitted for high-grade fever. At the time of admission, Osler's nodules were present and brain magnetic resonance imaging showed multiple small emboli and haemorrhages. Transoesophageal echocardiography could not locate any sign of infection within the cardiac chambers, but disclosed vegetation attached to the elephant trunk. He underwent successful emergent graft replacement of the lesion, and no recurrence of the infection has been observed.

  9. Availability and consumption of fruits and vegetables in nine regions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bernt Lindtjorn

    children studied did not eat vegetable and fruit in the week preceding the survey, respectively. .... refer to households who never saw a single fruit/ vegetable, even once ..... did not eat vegetables even once, let alone three times in a week is.

  10. Parasitic contamination of leafy vegetables: a function of the leaf ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A survey was undertaken to determine the degree of contamination of some stable vegetables and their surrounding soils by parasites in Uyo, Nigeria. Out of the 780 leaves from six vegetables and 50 soil samples screened, 498 (63.9%) of vegetables and 36 (72%) of the soil samples were positive for parasite ova, larvae ...

  11. Nutritional potentials of some tropical vegetable leaf meals ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three tropical vegetable species (Talium triangulare, Amaranthus cruentus and Telfairia occidentalis) were selected based on their availability and agronomic desirability. The freshly harvested vegetable leaves were subjected to 2 processing techniques (shredding and sundrying) before milling into the vegetable leaf ...

  12. Comparative study of trace element levels in some local vegetable ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The level of heavy metals in two varieties of vegetables harvested during the dry and wet seasons from seven different locations in Ilorin, Nigeria, were determined. The correlation between the level of metals in the vegetables and the irrigation water was also studied. Vegetables harvested during the dry season were found ...

  13. Field vegetable production in the Lake Zone of Tanzania

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Everaarts, A.P.; Putter, de H.; Maerere, A.P.; Amon, W.

    2014-01-01

    In November 2012 and in August 2014 surveys were carried out in field vegetable producing areas in the Lake Zone of Tanzania. The aim of the surveys was to learn the conditions for field vegetable production and marketing in these areas. Recommendations for the development of vegetable production

  14. Proximate analysis of some dry season vegetables in Anyigba, Kogi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-05-16

    May 16, 2008 ... Key words: Sensory evaluation, dry season vegetable, available, Anyigba, Nigeria. INTRODUCTION. Dry season vegetables are shrubs or herbaceous annuals or biennial plants. In Nigeria, most of the com- monly eaten vegetables are the succulent leaves of plants; they are eaten as supplementary foods, ...

  15. Assessment of nutritional quality of cooked Swazi leafy vegetables ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Brassica oleracea and Spinacia oleracea were also analysed and compared with other vegetables. Sampled vegetables were divided into two categories. All vegetables in category one were cooked without any additives. In category two Hibiscus escolentus and Corchorius olitorus were cooked with bicarbonate of soda ...

  16. Conveyance estimation in channels with emergent bank vegetation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Emergent vegetation along the banks of a river channel influences its conveyance considerably. The total channel discharge can be estimated as the sum of the discharges of the vegetated and clear channel zones calculated separately. The vegetated zone discharge is often negligible, but can be estimated using ...

  17. Taste intensities of ten vegetables commonly consumed in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stokkom, van V.L.; Teo, P.S.; Mars, M.; Graaf, de Kees; Kooten, van O.; Stieger, M.

    2016-01-01

    Bitterness has been suggested to be the main reason for the limited palatability of several vegetables. Vegetable acceptance has been associated with preparation method. However, the taste intensity of a variety of vegetables prepared by different methods has not been studied yet. The objective

  18. Preliminary study on sterilization effect of irradiation on dry vegetable

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhai Jianqing; Bao Jianzhong; Cao Hong; Wang Jinrong; Chen Xiulan

    2004-01-01

    The number of surviving germs relationship to irradiation dose for several species dry vegetable was studied, and the original value D 10 of the dry vegetable was given. The value will provide a theoretical reference to ascertain the appropriate irradiation dose in the irradiation process of the dry vegetable

  19. Integrating Vegetation Classification, Mapping, and Strategic Inventory for Forest Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    C. K. Brewer; R. Bush; D. Berglund; J. A. Barber; S. R. Brown

    2006-01-01

    Many of the analyses needed to address multiple resource issues are focused on vegetation pattern and process relationships and most rely on the data models produced from vegetation classification, mapping, and/or inventory. The Northern Region Vegetation Mapping Project (R1-VMP) data models are based on these three integrally related, yet separate processes. This...

  20. Spatial relationship between climatologies and changes in global vegetation activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, de R.; Schaepman, M.E.; Furrer, R.; Bruin, de S.; Verburg, P.H.

    2013-01-01

    Vegetation forms a main component of the terrestrial biosphere and plays a crucial role in land-cover and climate-related studies. Activity of vegetation systems is commonly quantified using remotely sensed vegetation indices (VI). Extensive reports on temporal trends over the past decades in time

  1. Vegetation Change in Blue Oak Woodlands in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbara A. Holzman; Barbara H. Allen-Diaz

    1991-01-01

    A preliminary report of a statewide project investigating vegetation change in blue oak (Quercus douglasii) woodlands in California is presented. Vegetation plots taken in the 1930s, as part of a statewide vegetation mapping project, were relocated and surveyed. Species composition, cover and tree stand structure data from the earlier study were...

  2. Phytochemical profile of some green leafy vegetables in South East ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The potential of eight common green leafy vegetables (GLV) in the raw and cooked forms as natural source of phytochemicals was assessed. The vegetables studied were the common ones found in southeast Nigeria and they included Ugu, Nchanwu, Okazi, Utazi, Oha, Nturukpa, Ahihara, and Onugbo. The vegetables ...

  3. Understanding and changing children’s sensory acceptance for vegetables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poelman, A.A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Vegetable intake of children is well below recommendations in Australia and in most other western countries. Vegetables are the food category least liked by children. As acceptance is a key driver of intake, strategies are needed to increase children’s acceptance of vegetables. The present thesis

  4. Discharge/Stage Relations in Vegetated Danish Streams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Torben; Frier, Jens-Ole; Vestergaard, Kristian

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes how the friction in danish streams varies as function of the vegetation. The major species of vegetation are represented. A series of laboratory and field experiments are described, and a hypothesis for the influence of the vegetation on the Manning's n is discussed....

  5. Analysis of Post-Fire Vegetation Recovery in the Mediterranean Basin using MODIS Derived Vegetation Indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawtree, Daniel; San Miguel, Jesus; Sedano, Fernando; Kempeneers, Pieter

    2010-05-01

    The Mediterranean basin region is highly susceptible to wildfire, with approximately 60,000 individual fires and half a million ha of natural vegetation burnt per year. Of particular concern in this region is the impact of repeated wildfires on the ability of natural lands to return to a pre-fire state, and of the possibility of desertification of semi-arid areas. Given these concerns, understanding the temporal patterns of vegetation recovery is important for the management of environmental resources in the region. A valuable tool for evaluating these recovery patterns are vegetation indices derived from remote sensing data. Previous research on post-fire vegetation recovery conducted in this region has found significant variability in recovery times across different study sites. It is unclear what the primary variables are affecting the differences in the rates of recovery, and if any geographic patterns of behavior exist across the Mediterranean basin. This research has primarily been conducted using indices derived from Landsat imagery. However, no extensive analysis of vegetation regeneration for large regions has been published, and assessment of vegetation recovery on the basis of medium-spatial resolution imagery such as that of MODIS has not yet been analyzed. This study examines the temporal pattern of vegetation recovery in a number of fire sites in the Mediterranean basin, using data derived from MODIS 16 -day composite vegetation indices. The intent is to develop a more complete picture of the temporal sequence of vegetation recovery, and to evaluate what additional factors impact variations in the recovery sequence. In addition, this study evaluates the utility of using MODIS derived vegetation indices for regeneration studies, and compares the findings to earlier studies which rely on Landsat data. Wildfires occurring between the years 2000 and 2004 were considered as potential study sites for this research. Using the EFFIS dataset, all wildfires

  6. Monitoring leafy vegetables through packaging films with

    OpenAIRE

    Diezma Iglesias, Belen; Lara, M.A.; Molina, Marta; Lleó García, Lourdes; Ruiz-Altisent, Margarita; Artés Hernández, Francisco; Roger, Jean-Michel

    2012-01-01

    Fresh-cut or minimally processed fruit and vegetables have been physically modified from its original form (by peeling, trimming, washing and cutting) to obtain a 100% edible product that is subsequently packaged (usually under modified atmosphere packaging –MAP) and kept in refrigerated storage. In fresh-cut products, physiological activity and microbiological spoilage, determine their deterioration and shelf-life. The major preservation techniques applied to delay spoilage are chilling s...

  7. How to deal with radiologically contaminated vegetation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilde, E.W.; Murphy, C.E.; Lamar, R.T.; Larson, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the findings from a literature review conducted as part of a Department of Energy, Office of Technology Development Biomass Remediation Task. The principal objective of this project is to develop a process or group of processes to treat radiologically contaminated vegetation in a manner that minimizes handling, processing, and treatment costs. Contaminated, woody vegetation growing on waste sites at SRS poses a problem to waste site closure technologies that are being considered for these sites. It is feared that large sections of woody vegetation (logs) can not be buried in waste sites where isolation of waste is accomplished by capping the site. Logs or large piles of woody debris have the potential of decaying and leaving voids under the cap. This could lead to cap failure and entrance of water into the waste. Large solid objects could also interfere with treatments like in situ mixing of soil with grout or other materials to encapsulate the contaminated sediments and soils in the waste sites. Optimal disposal of the wood includes considerations of volume reduction, treatment of the radioactive residue resulting from volume reduction, or confinement without volume reduction. Volume reduction consists primarily of removing the carbon, oxygen, and hydrogen in the wood, leaving an ash that would contain most of the contamination. The only contaminant that would be released by volume reduction would by small amounts of the radioactive isotope of hydrogen, tritium. The following sections will describe the waste sites at SRS which contain contaminated vegetation and are potential candidates for the technology developed under this proposal. The description will provide a context for the magnitude of the problem and the logistics of the alternative solutions that are evaluated later in the review. 76 refs

  8. Quantitative indicators of fruit and vegetable consumption

    OpenAIRE

    Dagmar Kozelová; Dana Országhová; Milan Fiľa; Zuzana Čmiková

    2015-01-01

    The quantitative research of the market is often based on surveys and questionnaires which are finding out the behavior of customers in observed areas. Before purchasing process consumers consider where they will buy fruit and vegetables, what kind to choose and in what quantity of goods. Consumers' behavior is affected by the factors as: regional gastronomic traditions, price, product appearance, aroma, place of buying, own experience and knowledge, taste preferences as well as specific heal...

  9. Extrusion Cooking Systems and Textured Vegetable Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Many fabricated foods are cooked industrially and are given desired textures, shapes, density and rehydration characteristics by an extrusion cooking process. This relatively new process is used in the preparation of “engineered” convenience foods: textured vegetable proteins, breakfast cereals, snacks, infant foods, dry soup mixes, breading, poultry stuffing, croutons, pasta products, beverage powders, hot breakfast gruels, and in the gelatinization of starch or the starchy component of foods.

  10. Quality determinants of fruit and vegetables productions

    OpenAIRE

    Bruno Mezzetti; Cherubino Leonardi

    2009-01-01

    Nowadays, the main goal for modern horticultural production is the increase of quality. Furthermore, in consideration of the new consumer demand, always more attracted by a diet based on a larger consumption of fruit and vegetables without risks of pesticides residues and with increased nutritional value, new important features in addition to the traditional quality attributes are now requested. For a program of qualification and valorisation of modern horticultural productions, it is fundame...

  11. Rapid Vegetative Propagation Method for Carob

    OpenAIRE

    Hamide GUBBUK; Esma GUNES; Tomas AYALA-SILVA; Sezai ERCISLI

    2011-01-01

    Most of fruit species are propagated by vegetative methods such as budding, grafting, cutting, suckering, layering etc. to avoid heterozygocity. Carob trees (Ceratonia siliqua L.) are of highly economical value and are among the most difficult to propagate fruit species. In the study, air-layering propagation method was investigated first time to compare wild and cultivated (�Sisam�) carob types. In the experiment, one year old carob limbs were air-layered on coco peat medium by wrapping with...

  12. High pressure effects on fruits and vegetables

    OpenAIRE

    Timmermans, R.A.H.; Matser, A.M.

    2016-01-01

    The chapter provides an overview on different high pressure based treatments (high pressure pasteurization, blanching, pressure-assisted thermal processing, pressure-shift freezing and thawing) available for the preservation of fruits and vegetable products and extending their shelf life. Pressure treatment can be used for product modification through pressure gelatinization of starch and pressure denaturation of proteins. Key pressure–thermal treatment effects on vitamin, enzymes, flavor, co...

  13. How to deal with radiologically contaminated vegetation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilde, E.W.; Murphy, C.E.; Lamar, R.T.; Larson, M.J.

    1996-12-31

    This report describes the findings from a literature review conducted as part of a Department of Energy, Office of Technology Development Biomass Remediation Task. The principal objective of this project is to develop a process or group of processes to treat radiologically contaminated vegetation in a manner that minimizes handling, processing, and treatment costs. Contaminated, woody vegetation growing on waste sites at SRS poses a problem to waste site closure technologies that are being considered for these sites. It is feared that large sections of woody vegetation (logs) can not be buried in waste sites where isolation of waste is accomplished by capping the site. Logs or large piles of woody debris have the potential of decaying and leaving voids under the cap. This could lead to cap failure and entrance of water into the waste. Large solid objects could also interfere with treatments like in situ mixing of soil with grout or other materials to encapsulate the contaminated sediments and soils in the waste sites. Optimal disposal of the wood includes considerations of volume reduction, treatment of the radioactive residue resulting from volume reduction, or confinement without volume reduction. Volume reduction consists primarily of removing the carbon, oxygen, and hydrogen in the wood, leaving an ash that would contain most of the contamination. The only contaminant that would be released by volume reduction would by small amounts of the radioactive isotope of hydrogen, tritium. The following sections will describe the waste sites at SRS which contain contaminated vegetation and are potential candidates for the technology developed under this proposal. The description will provide a context for the magnitude of the problem and the logistics of the alternative solutions that are evaluated later in the review. 76 refs.

  14. Substitution or addition? How overweight and obese adults incorporate vegetables into their diet during a randomized controlled vegetable feeding trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objective: When attempting to eat healthier, individuals may add vegetables to their diet (addition) without changing other eating behaviors. Alternatively, individuals adding vegetables may decrease consumption of other foods (substitution). Distinguishing between the two means of incorporation of ...

  15. Lead pollution of road-side vegetation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinche, J P; Zuber, R; Bovay, E

    1969-01-01

    In Switzerland, investigations have been made in 1967/1968 concerning the distribution of lead issued from the antiknocking additive of petrol. Observations show that the deposits in meadows in the immediate surrounding (first meter) of roads and highways with high traffic density were especially high (50-100 ppm in dry matter). The pollution is still perceptible even as far as 50 meters from the road. Moreover, during the summer (July and August), a second zone of high lead accumulation (more than 100 ppm) was detected 50 to 100 m from the road, particularly along the highways. This probably is caused by certain climatic conditions and the increase of traffic volume. With regard to fruits, only the downy species (e.g. apricots, peaches) retain some quantities of lead on their skin. Vegetables with large leaves, e.g. lettuce, spinach, and particularly vegetables with definite dissected foliage, such as fennel and parsley, may accumulate relatively high quantities of lead. According to some authors, up to 50 percent of these deposits may be eliminated by washing with water. Conversely, root vegetables (e.g. carrots, onions) do not show a perceptible lead contamination. Likewise the flesh of fruits is not markedly polluted by lead. Trials with foddering milk cows using hay harvested along a highway are not yet analyzed. The results from these trials should permit determining the proportion of lead which remains in the tissues (meat etc.) or passes over into the milk.

  16. Plant metabolites and nutritional quality of vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hounsome, N; Hounsome, B; Tomos, D; Edwards-Jones, G

    2008-05-01

    Vegetables are an important part of the human diet and a major source of biologically active substances such as vitamins, dietary fiber, antioxidants, and cholesterol-lowering compounds. Despite a large amount of information on this topic, the nutritional quality of vegetables has not been defined. Historically, the value of many plant nutrients and health-promoting compounds was discovered by trial and error. By the turn of the century, the application of chromatography, mass spectrometry, infrared spectrometry, and nuclear magnetic resonance allowed quantitative and qualitative measurements of a large number of plant metabolites. Approximately 50000 metabolites have been elucidated in plants, and it is predicted that the final number will exceed 200000. Most of them have unknown function. Metabolites such as carbohydrates, organic and amino acids, vitamins, hormones, flavonoids, phenolics, and glucosinolates are essential for plant growth, development, stress adaptation, and defense. Besides the importance for the plant itself, such metabolites determine the nutritional quality of food, color, taste, smell, antioxidative, anticarcinogenic, antihypertension, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, immunostimulating, and cholesterol-lowering properties. This review is focused on major plant metabolites that characterize the nutritional quality of vegetables, and methods of their analysis.

  17. Night sleep in patients with vegetative state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, Yuri G; Gais, Steffen; Müller, Friedemann; Schönauer, Monika; Schäpers, Barbara; Born, Jan; Kotchoubey, Boris

    2017-10-01

    Polysomnographic recording of night sleep was carried out in 15 patients with the diagnosis vegetative state (syn. unresponsive wakefulness syndrome). Sleep scoring was performed by three raters, and confirmed by means of a spectral power analysis of the electroencephalogram, electrooculogram and electromyogram. All patients but one exhibited at least some signs of sleep. In particular, sleep stage N1 was found in 13 patients, N2 in 14 patients, N3 in nine patients, and rapid eye movement sleep in 10 patients. Three patients exhibited all phenomena characteristic for normal sleep, including spindles and rapid eye movements. However, in all but one patient, sleep patterns were severely disturbed as compared with normative data. All patients had frequent and long periods of wakefulness during the night. In some apparent rapid eye movement sleep episodes, no eye movements were recorded. Sleep spindles were detected in five patients only, and their density was very low. We conclude that the majority of vegetative state patients retain some important circadian changes. Further studies are necessary to disentangle multiple factors potentially affecting sleep pattern of vegetative state patients. © 2017 European Sleep Research Society.

  18. Dry deposition to vegetated surfaces: parametric dependencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Underwood, B.Y.

    1987-12-01

    The dry deposition velocity of airborne pollutants to vegetated surfaces depends on the physico-chemical form of the pollutant, on meteorological conditions (windspeed, atmospheric stability) and on characteristics of the surface cover. This report examines these dependencies, drawing on experimental data and on information from theoretical analyses. A canopy model is outlined which uses first-order closure of the equations for turbulent transport of momentum (or matter), with losses of momentum (or matter) to individual canopy elements parameterised in terms of the mean windspeed: the model has previously been tested against experimental data on an artificial 'grass' canopy. The model is used to elucidate the features of the dependence of deposition velocity on windspeed and on whether the pollutant is in gaseous or particulate form: in the former case, the dependence on the molecular diffusivity of the gas is shown; in the latter case, dependencies on particle diameter and density are deduced. The predictions are related to available measurements. Additional hypotheses are introduced to treat the influence of atmospheric stability on deposition, and the analysis is used to shed light on the somewhat confusing picture that has emerged from past experimental studies. In considering the dependence of deposition velocity on the structural properties of the vegetation, it is established that more parameters than the single one conventionally used -aerodynamic roughness length - are needed to characterise the surface cover. Some indications of the extent of variation in deposition velocity from one type of vegetation to another are elicited from the model. (author)

  19. Vegetable oil based liquid nanocomposite dielectric

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leon Chetty

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Physically smaller dielectric materials would improve the optimisation of space for power systems. Development of nanotechnology provides an effective way to improve the performances of insulating oils used in power system applications. In this research study, we focused on the development of nanomodified vegetable oils to be used in power transformers. Higher conduction currents were observed in virgin linseed oil than in virgin castor oil. However, for both virgin linseed and virgin castor oil, the DC conduction current increased approximately linearly with the applied DC voltage. In nanomodified linseed oil, the characteristic curve showed two distinct regions: a linear region (at lower applied voltage and a saturation region (at slightly higher voltage. Conversely, in nanomodified castor oil, the characteristic curve showed three distinct regions: a linear region (at lower applied voltage, a saturation region (at intermediate applied voltage and an exponential growth region (at higher applied voltage. The nanomodified linseed oil exhibited a better dielectric performance than the nanomodified castor oil. Overall, the addition of nanodielectrics to vegetable oils decreased the dielectric performance of the vegetable oils. The results of this study contribute to the understanding of the pre-breakdown phenomenon in liquid nanocomposite dielectrics.

  20. Benthic algal vegetation in Isfjorden, Svalbard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stein Fredriksen

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Benthic algal vegetation was investigated at 10 sites in Isfjorden, Svalbard. Five sites were visited during summer 2010 and five during summer 2012. Both the littoral and sublittoral vegetation were sampled, the littoral by hand-picking and use of a throwable rake and the sublittoral using a triangular dredge. A total of 88 different taxa were registered, comprising 17 Chlorophyta, 40 Ochrophyta, 30 Rhodophyta and the Xantophyceae Vaucheria sp. The green algae Ulvaria splendens (Ruprecht Vinogradova was recorded in Svalbard for the first time. Most of the sites consisted of hard bottom substrate, but one site, Kapp Wijk, consisted of loose-lying calcareous red algae (rhodoliths and had species not recorded elsewhere. The sublittoral at the other sites was dominated by kelp. Molecular analysis confirmed the presence of the red alga Ceramium virgatum and a dwarf form of the brown alga Fucus vesiculosus. This study provides a baseline for future studies investigating changes in the vegetation due to environmental changes.

  1. Application of Cocktail method in vegetation classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Asadi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study intends to assess the application of Cocktail method in the classification of large vegetation databases. For this purpose, Buxus hyrcana dataset consisted of 442 relevés with 89 species were used and by the modified TWINSPAN. For running the Cocktail method, first primarily classification was done by modified TWINSPAN, and by performing phi analysis in the groups resulted five species were selected which had the highest fidelity value. Then sociological species groups were formed by examining co-occurrence of these 5 species with other species in the database. 21 plant communities belongs to 6 variant, 17 sub associations, 11 associations, 4 alliance, 1 order and 1 class were recognized by assigning 379 releves to the sociological species groups by using logical formulas. Also, 63 releves by the logical formula were not assigned to any sociological species groups, by FPFI index were assigned to the sociological species groups which had the most index value. According to 91% classification agreement with Brown-Blanquet classification and Cocktail classification, we suggest Cocktail method to vegetation scientists as an efficient alternative of Braun-Blanquet method to classify large vegetation databases.

  2. Evaluation of vegetation cover using the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Camargos Lima

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Soil loss by water erosion is the main cause of soil degradation in Brazil. However, erosion can be reduced by the presence of vegetation. The Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI makes it possible to identify the vegetative vigor of crops or natural vegetation which facilities the identification of areas with vegetation covers. This information is very important in identifying the phenomena which might be occurring in a particular area, especially those related to soil degradation by water erosion. Thus, the aim of this work was to assess the canopy cover by using NDVI, checking the image accuracy using the Coverage Index (CI based on the Stocking method, in the Sub-basin of Posses, which belongs to the Cantareira System, located in the Extrema municipality, Minas Gerais, Brazil. Landsat-5 TM images were used. The sub-basin of Posses was very altered in comparison to the surrounding areas. The NDVI technique proved to be a suitable tool to assess the uses that occur in the sub-basin of Posses, as validated by the Stocking methodology. The map derived from NDVI allowed the geographic distribution of different land uses to be observed and allowed for the identification of critical areas in relation to vegetation cover as well. This finding can be used to optimize efforts to recover and protect soil in areas with bare soil and degraded pasture, in order to reduce environmental degradation. The CI has not exceeded 40% for land use classes that occur in the majority of the sub-basin (91%, except in areas of woody vegetation.

  3. [Differences of vegetation phenology monitoring by remote sensing based on different spectral vegetation indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Lu; Wang, Huan Jiong; Liu, Rong Gao; Liu, Yang; Shang, Rong

    2018-02-01

    Vegetation phenology is a comprehensive indictor for the responses of terrestrial ecosystem to climatic and environmental changes. Remote sensing spectrum has been widely used in the extraction of vegetation phenology information. However, there are many differences between phenology extracted by remote sensing and site observations, with their physical meaning remaining unclear. We selected one tile of MODIS data in northeastern China (2000-2014) to examine the SOS and EOS differences derived from the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and the simple ratio vegetation index (SR) based on both the red and near-infrared bands. The results showed that there were significant differences between NDVI-phenology and SR-phenology. SOS derived from NDVI averaged 18.9 days earlier than that from SR. EOS derived from NDVI averaged 19.0 days later than from SR. NDVI-phenology had a longer growing season. There were significant differences in the inter-annual variation of phenology from NDVI and SR. More than 20% of the pixel SOS and EOS derived from NDVI and SR showed the opposite temporal trend. These results caused by the seasonal curve characteristics and noise resistance differences of NDVI and SR. The observed data source of NDVI and SR were completely consistent, only the mathematical expressions were different, but phenology results were significantly different. Our results indicated that vegetation phenology monitoring by remote sensing is highly dependent on the mathematical expression of vegetation index. How to establish a reliable method for extracting vegetation phenology by remote sensing needs further research.

  4. The use of a commercial vegetable juice as a practical means to increase vegetable intake: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoy, Sonia F; Kazaks, Alexandra G; Holt, Roberta R; Chen, Hsin Ju; Winters, Barbara L; Khoo, Chor San; Poston, Walker S C; Haddock, C Keith; Reeves, Rebecca S; Foreyt, John P; Gershwin, M Eric; Keen, Carl L

    2010-09-17

    Recommendations for daily dietary vegetable intake were increased in the 2005 USDA Dietary Guidelines as consumption of a diet rich in vegetables has been associated with lower risk of certain chronic health disorders including cardiovascular disease. However, vegetable consumption in the United States has declined over the past decade; consequently, the gap between dietary recommendations and vegetable intake is widening. The primary aim of this study is to determine if drinking vegetable juice is a practical way to help meet daily dietary recommendations for vegetable intake consistent with the 2005 Dietary Guidelines and the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet. The secondary aim is to assess the effect of a vegetable juice on measures of cardiovascular health. We conducted a 12-week, randomized, controlled, parallel-arm study consisting of 3 groups of free-living, healthy volunteers who participated in study visits at the Ragle Human Nutrition Research Center at the University of California, Davis. All subjects received education on the DASH diet and 0, 8 or 16 fluid ounces of vegetable juice daily. Assessments were completed of daily vegetable servings before and after incorporation of vegetable juice and cardiovascular health parameters including blood pressure. Without the juice, vegetable intake in all groups was lower than the 2005 Dietary Guidelines and DASH diet recommendations. The consumption of the vegetable juice helped participants reach recommended intake. In general, parameters associated with cardiovascular health did not change over time. However, in the vegetable juice intervention groups, subjects who were pre-hypertensive at the start of the study showed a significant decrease in blood pressure during the 12-week intervention period. Including 1-2 cups of vegetable juice daily was an effective and acceptable way for healthy adults to close the dietary vegetable gap. Increase in daily vegetable intake was associated with a

  5. Effects of repeated exposure to either vegetables or fruits on infant's vegetable and fruit acceptance at the beginning of weaning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barends, C.; Vries, de J.; Mojet, J.; Graaf, de C.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of repeated exposure to either vegetables or fruits on an infant's vegetable and fruit acceptance during the first 18 days of weaning. We hypothesized that repeated exposure to a type of vegetable or fruit, would increase its intake. Furthermore, we expected that

  6. The MODIS Vegetation Canopy Water Content product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustin, S. L.; Riano, D.; Trombetti, M.

    2008-12-01

    Vegetation water stress drives wildfire behavior and risk, having important implications for biogeochemical cycling in natural ecosystems, agriculture, and forestry. Water stress limits plant transpiration and carbon gain. The regulation of photosynthesis creates close linkages between the carbon, water, and energy cycles and through metabolism to the nitrogen cycle. We generated systematic weekly CWC estimated for the USA from 2000-2006. MODIS measures the sunlit reflectance of the vegetation in the visible, near-infrared, and shortwave infrared. Radiative transfer models, such as PROSPECT-SAILH, determine how sunlight interacts with plant and soil materials. These models can be applied over a range of scales and ecosystem types. Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) were used to optimize the inversion of these models to determine vegetation water content. We carried out multi-scale validation of the product using field data, airborne and satellite cross-calibration. An Algorithm Theoretical Basis Document (ATBD) of the product is under evaluation by NASA. The CWC product inputs are 1) The MODIS Terra/Aqua surface reflectance product (MOD09A1/MYD09A1) 2) The MODIS land cover map product (MOD12Q1) reclassified to grassland, shrub-land and forest canopies; 3) An ANN trained with PROSPECT-SAILH; 4) A calibration file for each land cover type. The output is an ENVI file with the CWC values. The code is written in Matlab environment and is being adapted to read not only the 8 day MODIS composites, but also daily surface reflectance data. We plan to incorporate the cloud and snow mask and generate as output a geotiff file. Vegetation water content estimates will help predicting linkages between biogeochemical cycles, which will enable further understanding of feedbacks to atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases. It will also serve to estimate primary productivity of the biosphere; monitor/assess natural vegetation health related to drought, pollution or diseases

  7. Drought impact on vegetation growth and mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, C.; Wang, M.; Allen, C. D.; McDowell, N. G.; Middleton, R. S.

    2017-12-01

    Vegetation is a key regulator of the global carbon cycle via CO2 absorption through photosynthesis and subsequent growth; however, low water availability, heat stress, and disturbances associated with droughts could substantially reduce vegetation growth and increase vegetation mortality. As far as we know, there are few studies have assessed the drought impact on vegetation growth and mortality at regional and global scales. In this study, we analyzed 13 Earth System models (ESMs) to quantify the impact of drought on GPP and linked the remote-sensing based tree mortality to observed drought indices to assess the drought impact on tree mortality in continental US (CONUS). Our analysis of 13 Earth System models (ESMs) shows that the average global gross primary production (GPP) reduction per year associated with extreme droughts over years 2075-2099 is predicted to be 3-5 times larger than that over years 1850-1999. The annual drought-associated reduction in GPP over years 2075-2099 could be 52 and 74 % of annual fossil fuel carbon emission during years 2000-2007. Increasing drought impacts on GPP are driven primarily by the increasing drought frequency. The risks of drought-associated GPP reduction are particularly high for temperate and tropical regions. The consistent prediction of higher drought-associated reduction in NPP across 13 ESMs suggests increasing impacts of drought on the global carbon cycle with atmospheric warming. Our analysis of drought impact on tree mortality showed that drought-associated carbon loss accounts for 12% of forest carbon loss in CONUS for 2000-2014, which is about one-fifth of that resulting from timber harvesting and 1.35 % of average annual fossil fuel emissions in the U.S. for the same period. The carbon stock loss from natural disturbances for 2000-2014 is approximately 75% of the total carbon loss from anthropogenic disturbance (timber harvesting), suggesting that natural disturbances play a very important role on forest

  8. Diesel fuel from vegetable oil via transesterification and soap pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demirbas, A.

    2002-09-15

    Transesterifications of 6 vegetable oil samples in supercritical methanol (SC MeOH) were studied without using any catalyst. Methyl esters of vegetable oils have several outstanding advantages among other new-renewable and clean engine fuel alternatives. The variables affecting the methyl ester yielded during the transesterification reaction, such as the molar ratio of alcohol to vegetable oil and reaction temperature, were investigated. Compared to No. 2 diesel fuel, all of the vegetable oils are much more viscous, while methyl esters of vegetable oils are the slightly more viscous. The methyl esters are more volatile than those of the vegetable oils. The soaps obtained from the vegetable oils can be pyrolyzed into hydrocarbon-rich products. (author)

  9. The Vegetable industry in China; Developments in policies, production, marketing and international trade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Y.M.; Jinsong, C.; Zhang XiaoYong, Xiaoyong; Kamphuis, B.M.

    2004-01-01

    Development of Chinese vegetable industry over the past three decades. The changes of governmental vegetable policy and the major institutions involved. The major production regions in China, their leading vegetable varieties and cultivation technology. The reform of vegetable marketing structure

  10. Investigation of the multiphotonic excitation processes of the 4f{sup 2} 5d configuration in LiYF{sub 4}, LiLuF{sub 4} and BaY{sub 2}F{sub 8} crystals doped with trivalent neodymium; Investigacao dos processos de excitacao multifotonica da configuracao 4f{sup 2} 5d nos cristais de LiYF{sub 4}, LiLuF{sub 4} e BaY{sub 2}F{sub 8} dopados com neodimio trivalente

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Librantz, Andre Felipe Henriques

    2004-07-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) fluorescence of Nd{sup 3+} ions induced by multistep laser excitation was investigated in Nd-doped LiYF{sub 4} (YLF), LiLuF{sub 4} (LLF) and BaY{sub 2}F{sub 8} (BaYF) crystals using a technique of time-resolved spectroscopy. The observed UV luminescence was due to transitions between the bottom of 4f{sup 2} 5d configuration and the 4f{sup 3} states of Nd{sup 3+} ions. The lower excited state 4f {sup 2}({sup 3}H)5d [{sup 4}K{sub 11/2}] was reached by three stepwise absorptions of photons at 521 nm (green) and 478 nm (blue) of a short pulse laser excitation. The three sequential absorptions at 478 nm constitutes a new multiphoton excitation process of Nd{sup 3+} in these crystals with the following excitation sequence: {sup 4}I{sub 9/2} + hv(480 nm){yields} {sup 2}G(1){sub 9/2} + hv(480 nm){yields} {sup 2}F(2){sub 7/2} + hv(480 nm){yields} 4f {sup 2}({sup 3}H)5d [{sup 4}K{sub 9/2}] (excited state at {approx} 63000 cm{sup -1}). The observed UV emissions from [{sup 4}K{sub 11/2}] state have a lifetime of 35 ns (parity allowed) and are: broadband in contrast to UV emissions from 4f{sup 3} configuration, which are also present in the luminescence investigation but having longer lifetime (8 {mu}s) and structures composed of narrow lines. The excitation spectrum of fast UV luminescence exhibited different structure depending on the excitation geometry ({sigma} or {pi}) with respect to the c-axis of the crystal. It was seen two new emissions from [{sup 4}K{sub 11/2}] and {sup 2}F(2){sub 5/2} states near 528 nm, which modified the branching ratio of the bottom of the 4f{sup 2} 5d configuration ({approx} 55500 cm{sup -1} for the YLF and LLF crystals and {approx}-53700 cm{sup -1} for the BaYF crystal). The equivalent cross-section of three and two excitation process was estimated at 521 nm by solving the rate equations of the system under short laser excitation, which leads us to infer that is possible to have laser action under pulsed laser pumping with

  11. A qualitative and quantitative analysis of vegetable pricing in supermarket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Suci

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the variables affecting the determination of the sale price of vegetable which is constant over time in a supermarket qualitatively and quantitavely. It focuses on the non-organic vegetable with a fixed selling price over time such as spinach, beet, and parsley. In qualitative analysis, the sale price determination is influenced by the vegetable characteristics: (1) vegetable segmentation (low to high daily consumed); (2) vegetable age (how long it can last related to freshness); which both characteristic relates to the inventory management and ultimately to the sale price in supermarket. While quantitatively, the vegetables are divided into two categories: the leaf vegetable group that the leaves are eaten as a vegetable with the aging product (a) = 0 and the shelf life (t) = 0, and the non-leafy vegetable group with the aging group (a) = a+1 and the shelf life (t) = t+1. The vegetable age (a) = 0 means they only last for one day when they are ordered then they have to terminate. Whereas a+1 is that they have a longer life for more than a day such as beet, white radish, and string beans. The shelf life refers to how long it will be placed in a shelf in supermarket in line with the vegetable age. According to the cost plus pricing method using full price costing approach, production costs, non-production costs, and markup are adjusted differently for each category. There is a holding cost added to the sale price of the non-leafy vegetable, yet it is assumed a 0 holding cost for the leafy vegetable category. The amount of expected margin of each category is correlated to the vegetable characteristics.

  12. Climatic drivers of vegetation based on wavelet analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claessen, Jeroen; Martens, Brecht; Verhoest, Niko E. C.; Molini, Annalisa; Miralles, Diego

    2017-04-01

    Vegetation dynamics are driven by climate, and at the same time they play a key role in forcing the different bio-geochemical cycles. As climate change leads to an increase in frequency and intensity of hydro-meteorological extremes, vegetation is expected to respond to these changes, and subsequently feed back on their occurrence. This response can be analysed using time series of different vegetation diagnostics observed from space, in the optical (e.g. Normalised Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), Solar Induced Fluorescence (SIF)) and microwave (Vegetation Optical Depth (VOD)) domains. In this contribution, we compare the climatic drivers of different vegetation diagnostics, based on a monthly global data-cube of 24 years at a 0.25° resolution. To do so, we calculate the wavelet coherence between each vegetation-related observation and observations of air temperature, precipitation and incoming radiation. The use of wavelet coherence allows unveiling the scale-by-scale response and sensitivity of the diverse vegetation indices to their climatic drivers. Our preliminary results show that the wavelet-based statistics prove to be a suitable tool for extracting information from different vegetation indices. Going beyond traditional methods based on linear correlations, the application of wavelet coherence provides information about: (a) the specific periods at which the correspondence between climate and vegetation dynamics is larger, (b) the frequencies at which this correspondence occurs (e.g. monthly or seasonal scales), and (c) the time lag in the response of vegetation to their climate drivers, and vice versa. As expected, areas of high rainfall volumes are characterised by a strong control of radiation and temperature over vegetation. Furthermore, precipitation is the most important driver of vegetation variability over short terms in most regions of the world - which can be explained by the rapid response of leaf development towards available water content

  13. Consumer attitudes towards vegetable attributes: potential buyers of pesticide-free vegetables in Accra and Kumasi, Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Probst, Lorenz; Aigelsperger, Lisa; Hauser, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Considering the inappropriate use of synthetic pesticides on vegetables in West Africa, the rationale behind this research was to assess the extent to which consumers can function as demanders of risk reduced vegetables and hence act as innovators towards vegetable safety. Using the cases of Kumasi and Accra in Ghana, the study examined possible consumer responses to product certification that communicates freedom from pesticides (e.g., organic certification). Generally, search attributes such as the fresh and healthy appearance of a vegetable were found to be central to consumer choice. While consumers stress the importance of health value, they are mostly unaware of agro-chemical risks related to vegetable consumption.

  14. Vegetable communities and degradation patterns and succession in the vegetation of the Western Hills of Chia, Cundinamarca - Colombia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortes S, Sandra P; Van der Hammen, Thomas; Rangel Ch, J Orlando

    1999-01-01

    Two physiognomic plant communities were characterized: open vegetation which include the associations Dichondro repentis - Cupheetum serpyllifoliae (meadows), Baccharido rupicolae - Dodonaeetum viscosae (low shrubby vegetation), Andropogono aequatoriensis - Epidendretum elongatae (casmophytic vegetation) and Chaetolepido microphyllae-Espeletiopsietum corymbosae (shrubby vegetation-type with rosette plants). The closed vegetation includes two kinds of forests, Miconio ligustrinae- Weinmannietum tomentosae and Daphnopsio caracasanae - Xylosmetum spiculiferae. According to the floristic composition, depth of the soil, slope climate, relief and the anthropic influence (including degradation and natural succession), two trends in plant succession were defined

  15. Vegetation Description, Rare Plant Inventory, and Vegetation Monitoring for Craig Mountain, Idaho.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mancuso, Michael; Moseley, Robert

    1994-12-01

    The Craig Mountain Wildlife Mitigation Area was purchased by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as partial mitigation for wildlife losses incurred with the inundation of Dworshak Reservoir on the North Fork Clearwater River. Upon completion of the National Environmental Protection Act (NEPA) process, it is proposed that title to mitigation lands will be given to the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG). Craig Mountain is located at the northern end of the Hells Canyon Ecosystem. It encompasses the plateau and steep canyon slopes extending from the confluence of the Snake and Salmon rivers, northward to near Waha, south of Lewiston, Idaho. The forested summit of Craig Mountain is characterized by gently rolling terrain. The highlands dramatically break into the canyons of the Snake and Salmon rivers at approximately the 4,700 foot contour. The highly dissected canyons are dominated by grassland slopes containing a mosaic of shrubfield, riparian, and woodland habitats. During the 1993 and 1994 field seasons, wildlife, habitat/vegetation, timber, and other resources were systematically inventoried at Craig Mountain to provide Fish and Game managers with information needed to draft an ecologically-based management plan. The results of the habitat/vegetation portion of the inventory are contained in this report. The responsibilities for the Craig Mountain project included: (1) vegetation data collection, and vegetation classification, to help produce a GIS-generated Craig Mountain vegetation map, (2) to determine the distribution and abundance of rare plants populations and make recommendations concerning their management, and (3) to establish a vegetation monitoring program to evaluate the effects of Fish and Game management actions, and to assess progress towards meeting habitat mitigation goals.

  16. Vegetation description, rare plant inventory, and vegetation monitoring for Craig Mountain, Idaho

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mancuso, M.; Moseley, R.

    1994-12-01

    The Craig Mountain Wildlife Mitigation Area was purchased by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as partial mitigation for wildlife losses incurred with the inundation of Dworshak Reservoir on the North Fork Clearwater River. Upon completion of the National Environmental Protection Act (NEPA) process, it is proposed that title to mitigation lands will be given to the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG). Craig Mountain is located at the northern end of the Hells Canyon Ecosystem. It encompasses the plateau and steep canyon slopes extending from the confluence of the Snake and Salmon rivers, northward to near Waha, south of Lewiston, Idaho. The forested summit of Craig Mountain is characterized by gently rolling terrain. The highlands dramatically break into the canyons of the Snake and Salmon rivers at approximately the 4,700 foot contour. The highly dissected canyons are dominated by grassland slopes containing a mosaic of shrubfield, riparian, and woodland habitats. During the 1993 and 1994 field seasons, wildlife, habitat/vegetation, timber, and other resources were systematically inventoried at Craig Mountain to provide Fish and Game managers with information needed to draft an ecologically-based management plan. The results of the habitat/vegetation portion of the inventory are contained in this report. The responsibilities for the Craig Mountain project included: (1) vegetation data collection, and vegetation classification, to help produce a GIS-generated Craig Mountain vegetation map, (2) to determine the distribution and abundance of rare plants populations and make recommendations concerning their management, and (3) to establish a vegetation monitoring program to evaluate the effects of Fish and Game management actions, and to assess progress towards meeting habitat mitigation goals

  17. Forest vegetation of Xishuangbanna, south China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Hua

    2006-01-01

    Xishuangbanna of southern Yunnan is biogeographically located at a transitional zone from tropical southeast (SE) Asia to subtropical east Asia and is at the junction of the Indian and Burmese plates of Gondwana and the Eurasian plate of Laurasia. The region, though surprisingly far from the equator and at a relatively high altitude, has a rich tropical flora and a typical tropical rain forest in the lowland areas. Based on physiognomic and ecological characteristics, floristic composition and habitats combined, the primary vegetation in Xishuangbanna can be organized into four main vegetation types: tropical rain forest, tropical seasonal moist forest, tropical montane evergreen broad-leaved forest and tropical monsoon forest. The tropical rain forest can be classified into two subtypes, i.e. a tropical seasonal rain forest in the lowlands and a tropical montane rain forest at higher elevations. The tropical seasonal rain forest has almost the same forest profile and physiognomic characteristics as equatorial lowland rain forests and is a type of truly tropical rain forest. Because of conspicuous similarity on ecological and floristic characteristics, the tropical rain forest in Xishuangbanna is a type of tropical Asian rain forest. However, since the tropical rain forest of Xishuangbanna occurs at the northern edge of tropical SE Asia, it differs from typical lowland rain forests in equatorial areas in having some deciduous trees in the canopy layer, fewer megaphanerophytes and epiphytes but more abundant lianas and more plants with microphyll. It is a type of semi-evergreen rain forest at the northern edge of the tropical zone. The tropical montane rain forest occurs at wet montane habitats and is similar to the lower montane rain forest in equatorial Asia in floristic composition and physiognomy. It is a type of lower montane rain forests within the broader category of tropical rain forests. The tropical seasonal moist forest occurs on middle and upper

  18. Recall of vegetable eating affects future predicted enjoyment and choice of vegetables in British University undergraduate students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Eric; Blissett, Jackie; Higgs, Suzanne

    2011-10-01

    Predictions about enjoyment of future experiences are influenced by recalling similar past experiences. However, little is known about the relationship between hedonic memories of past eating episodes and future eating behavior. We investigated recall of previous experiences of eating vegetables and the effect of recall on future predicted liking for and consumption of vegetables. British University undergraduate students were asked to retrieve memories of previous occasions when they ate vegetables and were asked to rate how enjoyable those experiences were (Study 1, n=54). The effect of different types of memory recall (including vegetable eating recall) and visualization of someone else eating vegetables (to control for priming effects) on predicted likelihood of choosing vegetables and predicted enjoyment of eating vegetables was examined (Study 2, n=95). Finally, the effect of recalling vegetable eating memories on actual food choice from a buffet was assessed (Study 3, n=63). It is reported that people recall positive memories of past vegetable consumption (Precall of a personal nonfood memory, a nonvegetable food memory, or visualization of someone else enjoying eating vegetables (increase of approximately 70% in vegetable portion size compared to controls). The results suggest that recall of previous eating experiences could be a potential strategy for altering food choices. Copyright © 2011 American Dietetic Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Vegetable milks and their fermented derivative products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neus Bernat

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The so-called vegetable milks are in the spotlight thanks to their lactose-free, animal protein-free and cholesterol-free features which fit well with the current demand for healthy food products. Nevertheless, and with the exception of soya, little information is available about these types of milks and their derivatives. The aims of this review, therefore, are to: highlight the main nutritional benefits of the nut and cereal vegetable milks available on the market, fermented or not; describe the basic processing steps involved in their manufacturing process; and analyze the major problems affecting their overall quality, together with the current feasible solutions. On the basis of the information gathered, vegetable milks and their derivatives have excellent nutritional properties which provide them a high potential and positive market expectation. Nevertheless, optimal processing conditions for each raw material or the application of new technologies have to be researched in order to improve the quality of the products. Hence, further studies need to be developed to ensure the physical stability of the products throughout their whole shelf-life. These studies would also allow for a reduction in the amount of additives (hydrocolloids and/or emulsifiers and thus reduce the cost of the products. In the particular case of fermented products, the use of starters which are able to both improve the quality (by synthesizing enhanced flavors and providing optimal textures and exert health benefits for consumers (i.e. probiotics is the main challenge to be faced in future studies.

  20. Integrated High Resolution Monitoring of Mediterranean vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesaraccio, Carla; Piga, Alessandra; Ventura, Andrea; Arca, Angelo; Duce, Pierpaolo; Mereu, Simone

    2017-04-01

    The study of the vegetation features in a complex and highly vulnerable ecosystems, such as Mediterranean maquis, leads to the need of using continuous monitoring systems at high spatial and temporal resolution, for a better interpretation of the mechanisms of phenological and eco-physiological processes. Near-surface remote sensing techniques are used to quantify, at high temporal resolution, and with a certain degree of spatial integration, the seasonal variations of the surface optical and radiometric properties. In recent decades, the design and implementation of global monitoring networks involved the use of non-destructive and/or cheaper approaches such as (i) continuous surface fluxes measurement stations, (ii) phenological observation networks, and (iii) measurement of temporal and spatial variations of the vegetation spectral properties. In this work preliminary results from the ECO-SCALE (Integrated High Resolution Monitoring of Mediterranean vegetation) project are reported. The project was manly aimed to develop an integrated system for environmental monitoring based on digital photography, hyperspectral radiometry , and micrometeorological techniques during three years of experimentation (2013-2016) in a Mediterranean site of Italy (Capo Caccia, Alghero). The main results concerned the analysis of chromatic coordinates indices from digital images, to characterized the phenological patterns for typical shrubland species, determining start and duration of the growing season, and the physiological status in relation to different environmental drought conditions; then the seasonal patterns of canopy phenology, was compared to NEE (Net Ecosystem Exchange) patterns, showing similarities. However, maximum values of NEE and ER (Ecosystem respiration), and short term variation, seemed mainly tuned by inter annual pattern of meteorological variables, in particular of temperature recorded in the months preceding the vegetation green-up. Finally, green signals

  1. Accumulation of fluoride by plants and vegetables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Njenga, L.W.; Kariuki, D.N.

    1994-01-01

    Fluoride in plant and vegetable samples has been determined using ion selective electrode. The analysis was carried out after ashing the sample on an open flame, adding perchloric acid and allowing the hydrogen fluoride to diffuse into sodium hydroxide layer.The results obtained show that kale and pumpkins can accumulate more than ten times their normal values of fluoride while plants were found to accumulate upto 100μg/g fluoride when exposed to highlevels of fluoride in water or soil. (author)

  2. Analysis of physical characteristics of vegetable oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piamba Tulcan, Oscar Edwin [Universidade Nacional da Colombia (UNAL), Bogota (Colombia). Fac. de Ingenieria; Universidade Federal Fluminense (PGMEC/UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Mecanica], E-mail: oepiambat@unal.edu.co; Andrade, Danielle Oliveira de; Andrade, Ednilton Tavares de [Universidade Federal Fluminense (TER/UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Agricola e do Meio Ambiente; Pereira, Roberto Guimaraes [Universidade Federal Fluminense (TER/UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica

    2008-07-01

    Different vegetable oils were characterized using standardized methods. The evaluated characteristics were density, viscosity, flow point, cloud point and corrosion. The obtained data was tabulated and compared with average composition values of oils in percentage of fatty acids and iodine number for each oil. In this analysis it is shown that viscosity decreases with the increase of the iodine number, and density decrease. The cloud and flow point have greater relation with the presence of saturated or highly unsaturated fatty acids, respectively. The index of corrosion is greater when oil saturation or its iodine number are increased. (author)

  3. New views on changing Arctic vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Robert E.

    2012-03-01

    As climate changes, how will terrestrial vegetation respond? Because the fates of many biogeochemical, hydrological and economic cycles depend on vegetation, this question is fundamental to climate change science but extremely challenging to address. This is particularly true in the Arctic, where temperature change has been most acute globally (IPCC 2007) and where potential feedbacks to carbon, energy and hydrological cycles have important implications for the rest of the Earth system (Chapin et al 2000). It is well known that vegetation is tightly coupled to precipitation and temperature (Whittaker 1975), but predicting the response of vegetation to changes in climate involves much more than invoking the limitations of climate envelopes (Thuiller et al 2008). Models must also consider efficacy of dispersal, soil constraints, ecological interactions, possible CO2 fertilization impacts and the changing impact of other, more proximal anthropogenic effects such as pollution, disturbance, etc (Coops and Waring 2011, Lenihan et al 2008, Scheller and Mladenoff 2005). Given this complexity, a key test will be whether models can match empirical observations of changes that have already occurred. The challenge is finding empirical observations of change that are appropriate to test hypothesized impacts of climate change. As climate gradually changes across broad bioclimatic gradients, vegetation condition may change gradually as well. To capture these gradual trends, observations need at least three characteristics: (1) they must quantify a vegetation attribute that is expected to change, (2) they must measure that attribute in exactly the same way over long periods of time, and (3) they must sample diverse communities at geographic scales commensurate with the scale of expected climatic shifts. Observation networks meeting all three criteria are rare anywhere on the globe, but particularly so in remote areas. For this reason, satellite images have long been used as a

  4. New options for conversion of vegetable oils to alternative fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demirbas, A.; Kara, H. [Selcuk University, Konya (Turkey). Department of Chemical Engineering

    2006-05-15

    Biodiesel from transesterification of vegetable oils is an excellent alternative fuel. There is, however, a need to develop a direct process for conversion of vegetable oils into gasoline-competitive biodiesel and other petroleum products. Methyl esters of vegetable oils have several outstanding advantages among other new-renewable and clean engine fuel alternatives. The purpose of the transesterification process is to lower the viscosity of vegetable oil. Compared to No. 2 diesel fuel, all of the vegetable oils are much more viscous, whereas methyl esters of vegetable oils are slightly more viscous. The methyl esters are more volatile than those of the vegetable oils. Conversion of vegetable oils to useful fuels involves the pyrolysis and catalytic cracking of the oils into lower molecular products. Pyrolysis produces more biogasoline than biodiesel fuel. Soap pyrolysis products of vegetable oils can be used as alternative diesel engine fuel. The soaps obtained from the vegetable oils can be pyrolyzed into hydrocarbon-rich products. Zinc chloride catalyst contributed greatly to high amounts of hydrocarbons in the liquid product. The yield of ZnCl2 catalytic conversion of the soybean oil reached the maximum 79.9% at 660 K. (author)

  5. A morphometric analysis of vegetation patterns in dryland ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mander, Luke; Dekker, Stefan C.; Li, Mao; Mio, Washington; Punyasena, Surangi W.; Lenton, Timothy M.

    2017-02-01

    Vegetation in dryland ecosystems often forms remarkable spatial patterns. These range from regular bands of vegetation alternating with bare ground, to vegetated spots and labyrinths, to regular gaps of bare ground within an otherwise continuous expanse of vegetation. It has been suggested that spotted vegetation patterns could indicate that collapse into a bare ground state is imminent, and the morphology of spatial vegetation patterns, therefore, represents a potentially valuable source of information on the proximity of regime shifts in dryland ecosystems. In this paper, we have developed quantitative methods to characterize the morphology of spatial patterns in dryland vegetation. Our approach is based on algorithmic techniques that have been used to classify pollen grains on the basis of textural patterning, and involves constructing feature vectors to quantify the shapes formed by vegetation patterns. We have analysed images of patterned vegetation produced by a computational model and a small set of satellite images from South Kordofan (South Sudan), which illustrates that our methods are applicable to both simulated and real-world data. Our approach provides a means of quantifying patterns that are frequently described using qualitative terminology, and could be used to classify vegetation patterns in large-scale satellite surveys of dryland ecosystems.

  6. Parasitic Contamination of Raw Vegetables in Zanjan Markets, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negin Torabi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Complex surface of vegetables facilitate attachment and transmission of several pathogens. No previous study has been conducted in survey of parasitic contamination of vegetables in Zanjan. This study aimed to detect the parasitic contamination in common raw vegetables in Zanjan markets. Methods: A total of 352 raw vegetable samples, including leek, parsley, basil, mint, radish, cress and dill were collected from grocery stores using cluster sampling in different regions of the city during 2014. The edible parts of vegetables were separated and immersed in normal saline solution. Floating vegetables were removed and the solution was allowed to sediment at room temperature for 24 hours. The pellet was examined following sedimentation and floatation methods. Results:Various Organisms were detected in 54% (190 of the 352 samples, but only 2.8% of samples had pathogenic parasites including; Trichostrongylus eggs (3, Hookworm eggs (2, Eimeria oocysts (2, Sarcocystis oocyst (1, Strongyloides larvae (1, and Fasciola eggs (1. The contamination rate of vegetables was highest (90.4% in the fall (p˂0.05. Conclusion: Vegetable contamination with parasitic organisms in this area was low, maybe due to irrigation of vegetables with sources other than sewage water, but it is still necessary to improve sanitary conditions of vegetables.

  7. Evaluating vegetation management practices for woody and herbaceous vegetation : phase III : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    To train ODOT staff to recognize trees along the right-of-way that may be hazardous, identify trees that may be of a species-specific concern for vegetation management objectives, make pruning cuts based on industry standards, and oversee the tree wo...

  8. Reconstructing vegetation past: Pre-Euro-American vegetation for the midwest driftless area, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monika E. Shea; Lisa A. Schulte; Brian J. Palik

    2014-01-01

    Historical reference conditions provide important context for creating ecological restoration and management plans. The U.S. 19th Century Public Land Survey (PLS) records provide extensive ecological information for constructing such reference conditions. We used PLS records to reconstruct pre-Euro-American tree species cover class and vegetation structure types for...

  9. A method for climate and vegetation reconstruction through the inversion of a dynamic vegetation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garreta, Vincent; Guiot, Joel; Hely, Christelle [CEREGE, UMR 6635, CNRS, Universite Aix-Marseille, Europole de l' Arbois, Aix-en-Provence (France); Miller, Paul A.; Sykes, Martin T. [Lund University, Department of Physical Geography and Ecosystems Analysis, Geobiosphere Science Centre, Lund (Sweden); Brewer, Simon [Universite de Liege, Institut d' Astrophysique et de Geophysique, Liege (Belgium); Litt, Thomas [University of Bonn, Paleontological Institute, Bonn (Germany)

    2010-08-15

    Climate reconstructions from data sensitive to past climates provide estimates of what these climates were like. Comparing these reconstructions with simulations from climate models allows to validate the models used for future climate prediction. It has been shown that for fossil pollen data, gaining estimates by inverting a vegetation model allows inclusion of past changes in carbon dioxide values. As a new generation of dynamic vegetation model is available we have developed an inversion method for one model, LPJ-GUESS. When this novel method is used with high-resolution sediment it allows us to bypass the classic assumptions of (1) climate and pollen independence between samples and (2) equilibrium between the vegetation, represented as pollen, and climate. Our dynamic inversion method is based on a statistical model to describe the links among climate, simulated vegetation and pollen samples. The inversion is realised thanks to a particle filter algorithm. We perform a validation on 30 modern European sites and then apply the method to the sediment core of Meerfelder Maar (Germany), which covers the Holocene at a temporal resolution of approximately one sample per 30 years. We demonstrate that reconstructed temperatures are constrained. The reconstructed precipitation is less well constrained, due to the dimension considered (one precipitation by season), and the low sensitivity of LPJ-GUESS to precipitation changes. (orig.)

  10. The Global Index of Vegetation-Plot Databases 1 (GIVD): a new resource for vegetation science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dengler, J.; Jansen, F.; Glockler, F.; Schaminee, J.H.J.

    2011-01-01

    Question: How many vegetation plot observations (relevés) are available in electronic databases, how are they geographically distributed, what are their properties and how might they be discovered and located for research and application? Location: Global. Methods: We compiled the Global Index of

  11. The Flemish frozen-vegetable industry as an example of cluster analysis : Flanders Vegetable Valley

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanhaverbeke, W.P.M.; Larosse, J.; Winnen, W.; Hulsink, W.; Dons, J.J.M.

    2008-01-01

    In this contribution we present a strategic analysis of the cluster dynamics in the frozen-vegetable industry in Flanders (Belgium)1. The main purpose of this case is twofold. First, we determine the added value of using data about customer and supplier relationships in cluster analysis. Second, we

  12. [Simulation of vegetation indices optimizing under retrieval of vegetation biochemical parameters based on PROSPECT + SAIL model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ling; Liu, Xiang-Nan; Zhou, Bo-Tian; Liu, Chuan-Hao; Li, Lu-Feng

    2012-12-01

    This study analyzed the sensitivities of three vegetation biochemical parameters [chlorophyll content (Cab), leaf water content (Cw), and leaf area index (LAI)] to the changes of canopy reflectance, with the effects of each parameter on the wavelength regions of canopy reflectance considered, and selected three vegetation indices as the optimization comparison targets of cost function. Then, the Cab, Cw, and LAI were estimated, based on the particle swarm optimization algorithm and PROSPECT + SAIL model. The results showed that retrieval efficiency with vegetation indices as the optimization comparison targets of cost function was better than that with all spectral reflectance. The correlation coefficients (R2) between the measured and estimated values of Cab, Cw, and LAI were 90.8%, 95.7%, and 99.7%, and the root mean square errors of Cab, Cw, and LAI were 4.73 microg x cm(-2), 0.001 g x cm(-2), and 0.08, respectively. It was suggested that to adopt vegetation indices as the optimization comparison targets of cost function could effectively improve the efficiency and precision of the retrieval of biochemical parameters based on PROSPECT + SAIL model.

  13. Orbital scale vegetation change in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupont, Lydie

    2011-12-01

    Palynological records of Middle and Late Pleistocene marine sediments off African shores is reviewed in order to reveal long-term patterns of vegetation change during climate cycles. Whether the transport of pollen and spores from the source areas on the continent to the ocean floor is mainly by wind or predominantly by rivers depends on the region. Despite the differences in transportation, accumulation rates in the marine sediments decline exponentially with distance to the shore. The marine sediments provide well-dated records presenting the vegetation history of the main biomes of western and southern Africa. The extent of different biomes varied with the climate changes of the glacial interglacial cycle. The Mediterranean forest area expanded during interglacials, the northern Saharan desert during glacials, and the semi-desert area in between during the transitions. In the sub-Saharan mountains ericaceous scrubland spread mainly during glacials and the mountainous forest area often increased during intermediate periods. Savannahs extended or shifted to lower latitudes during glacials. While the representation of the tropical rain forest fluctuated with summer insolation and precession, that of the subtropical biomes showed more obliquity variability or followed the pattern of glacial and interglacials.

  14. Final vegetative cover for closed waste sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, J.R.; Salvo, S.K.

    1993-01-01

    Low-level, hazardous, and mixed waste disposal sites normally require some form of plant material to prevent erosion of the final closure cap. Waste disposal sites are closed and capped in a complex scientific manner to minimize water infiltration and percolation into and through the waste material. Turf type grasses are currently being used as an interim vegetative cover for most sites. This coverage allows for required monitoring of the closure cap for settlement and maintenance activities. The purpose of this five year study was to evaluate plant materials for use on wastes sites after the post-closure care period that are quickly and easily established and economically maintained, retard water infiltration, provide maximum year-round evapotranspiration, are ecologically acceptable and do not harm the closure cap. The results of the study suggest that two species of bamboo (Phyllostachys (P.) bissetii and P. rubromarginata) can be utilized to provide long lived, low maintenance, climax vegetation for the waste sites after surveillance and maintenance requirements have ceased

  15. VEGETATIVE PROPAGATION OF Schizolobium amazonicum BY cutting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poliana Coqueiro Dias

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to develop a methodology for the vegetative propagation of paricá (Schizolobium amazonicum through cutting, evaluating the effect of IBA (0, 8000, 16000 and 32,000 mg.L-1 on rooting of apical and intermediate stakes. The base of the cuttings were dipped in IBA solution for 10 seconds and then were staked in polyethylene tubes of 110 cm³, filled with organic substrate (Bioplant®. The irrigation of the seedlings was carried out by means of a nebulization system with a uniform flow rate of 7 L.h-1. After 40 days, were evaluated: percentage of survival, rooting percentage, percentage of roots observed at the lower end of the plastic tube, average number of roots, length of roots, presence of calluses, vigor and root dry matter. The results for the characteristics evaluated, with emphasis on survival, showed the highest averages were obtained at intermediate stakes, regardless of the dose of IBA. The highest rooting percentage, root number, length and dry mass of roots, in both types of cuttings was obtained with the highest dose tested of AIB (32,000 mg.L-1. Based on these results, it is concluded that the technique of cutting associated with application of plant growth regulators can be used for vegetative propagation of S. amazonicum.

  16. Carotenoid composition of hydroponic leafy vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Mieko; Rodriguez-Amaya, Delia B

    2003-04-23

    Because hydroponic production of vegetables is becoming more common, the carotenoid composition of hydroponic leafy vegetables commercialized in Campinas, Brazil, was determined. All samples were collected and analyzed in winter. Lactucaxanthin was quantified for the first time and was found to have concentrations similar to that of neoxanthin in the four types of lettuce analyzed. Lutein predominated in cress, chicory, and roquette (75.4 +/- 10.2, 57.0 +/- 10.3, and 52.2 +/- 12.6 microg/g, respectively). In the lactucaxanthin-containing lettuces, beta-carotene and lutein were the principal carotenoids (ranging from 9.9 +/- 1.5 to 24.6 +/- 3.1 microg/g and from 10.2 +/- 1.0 to 22.9 +/- 2.6 microg/g, respectively). Comparison of hydroponic and field-produced curly lettuce, taken from neighboring farms, showed that the hydroponic lettuce had significantly lower lutein, beta-carotene, violaxanthin, and neoxanthin contents than the conventionally produced lettuce. Because the hydroponic farm had a polyethylene covering, less exposure to sunlight and lower temperatures may have decreased carotenogenesis.

  17. Effects of sulfur dioxide on vegetation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitby, G S

    1939-11-11

    A discussion is presented on the effects of sulfur dioxide on vegetation as observed at Trail, British Columbia. The investigation was carried out over a period of eight years, 1929 to 1937. The concentration of sulfur dioxide at the United States border was carefully determined throughout the crop season at a point 16 miles from the source of sulfur dioxide. Maximum and average concentrations in part per million are given. The sulfur content of vegetation was determined and was found to diminish as the distance from the smelter increased. It was determined that the sulfur content may rise to four times the normal amount without injurious effect. This is particularly so with prolonged low concentration. The effect on the soil was determined by measuring soluble sulfate, pH and exchangeable bases. The soil near the plant was affected, but this fell off rapidly with increase in distance so that eight miles from the smelter the soil was substantially normal. No effect on water supplies was found. An appreciable retardation in growth, as determined by annular rings, was noted for trees exposed to the sulfur dioxide. This effect was lost following installation of sulfur dioxide control at Trail. Conifers were found more susceptible during periods of active growth than when dormant. Also, transplanted conifers were more severly affected than native trees. Seedlings were less resistant that older trees.

  18. Ionizing energy treatment of fruit and vegetables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rigney, C.J.

    1983-01-01

    The potential of ionising energy treatment of fresh fruit and vegetables may be considered within four major use areas. The shelf life of such fruits as bananas, mangoes and pawpaws can be extended by a direct physiological effect on the fruit. This treatment renders the fruit less sensitive to ethylene, a natural senescence-promoting chemical, and retards the onset of the climactric rise in respiration which is associated with fruit ripening. Postharvest decay caused by radio-sensitive organisms can also be controlled by low irradiation treatments, although this is only applicable in cases where the host fruit is less sensitive to the treatment than the decay causing organism. The sprouting of onions and potatoes can be controlled by a single low dose treatment which has a direct effect on the meristematic tissue. By killing insects of quarantine significance the interstate and export marketing of Australian fresh fruit may be expanded, with a consequent expansion of these horticultural industries. Ionising energy treatment of fruit and vegetables is therefore a valuable postharvest tool to improve the quality of fresh produce on local and export markets

  19. Parasitic Contamination of Raw Vegetables in Shahroud, Semnan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Nazemi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Given the importance of healthy vegetables, the present study was conducted to determine parasitic infection of vegetable consumed in Shahroud.Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study has been conducted on 92 samples of various vegetables collected from 16 vegetable growing farms and 1 vegetable process workshop. Results: Sixty two percent of tested vegetables lacked parasites and the highest amount of parasites observed (34.78% was related to Giardia lamblia. A significant relationship was observed between parasite and having toilets in the farms as well as the extent of farms.Conclusion: safety of fertilizers consumed by farms and healthy fruits can have an effective role in reducing the parasitic infections.

  20. Vegetation Parameter Extraction Using Dual Baseline Polarimetric SAR Interferometry Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H.; Wang, C.; Chen, X.; Tang, Y.

    2009-04-01

    For vegetation parameter inversion, the single baseline polarimetric SAR interferometry (POLinSAR) technique, such as the three-stage method and the ESPRIT algorithm, is limited by the observed data with the minimum ground to volume amplitude ration, which effects the estimation of the effective phase center for the vegetation canopy or the surface, and thus results in the underestimated vegetation height. In order to remove this effect of the single baseline inversion techniques in some extend, another baseline POLinSAR data is added on vegetation parameter estimation in this paper, and a dual baseline POLinSAR technique for the extraction of the vegetation parameter is investigated and improved to reduce the dynamic bias for the vegetation parameter estimation. Finally, the simulated data and real data are used to validate this dual baseline technique.

  1. Effects of Vegetables on Cardiovascular Diseases and Related Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Yi Tang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies have shown that vegetable consumption is inversely related to the risk of cardiovascular diseases. Moreover, research has indicated that many vegetables like potatoes, soybeans, sesame, tomatoes, dioscorea, onions, celery, broccoli, lettuce and asparagus showed great potential in preventing and treating cardiovascular diseases, and vitamins, essential elements, dietary fibers, botanic proteins and phytochemicals were bioactive components. The cardioprotective effects of vegetables might involve antioxidation; anti-inflammation; anti-platelet; regulating blood pressure, blood glucose, and lipid profile; attenuating myocardial damage; and modulating relevant enzyme activities, gene expression, and signaling pathways as well as some other biomarkers associated to cardiovascular diseases. In addition, several vegetables and their bioactive components have been proven to protect against cardiovascular diseases in clinical trials. In this review, we analyze and summarize the effects of vegetables on cardiovascular diseases based on epidemiological studies, experimental research, and clinical trials, which are significant to the application of vegetables in prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases.

  2. Modern High Technology Solutions for Quality and Longterm Vegetable Preservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nacheva, I.; Miteva, D.; Todorov, Y.; Loginovska, K.; Tsvetkov, Ts.

    2012-01-01

    In the publication the authors present the results of the applying of two modern technologies for long term and safe vegetable preservation – freeze-drying and gamma sterilization. The freeze-dried vegetables feature minimum moisture – from 2 – 5% and taste-aroma complex preserved to the highest degree. The carried out gamma sterilization ensures a high microbial purity of the vegetables and guarantees for their long term preservation - up to 5 years in polymer packing, under usual conditions

  3. Osmotic dehydration of fruits and vegetables: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Yadav, Ashok Kumar; Singh, Satya Vir

    2012-01-01

    The main cause of perishability of fruits and vegetables are their high water content. To increase the shelf life of these fruits and vegetables many methods or combination of methods had been tried. Osmotic dehydration is one of the best and suitable method to increase the shelf life of fruits and vegetables. This process is preferred over others due to their vitamin and minerals, color, flavor and taste retention property. In this review different methods, treatments, optimization and effec...

  4. Incineration of Low Level Radioactive Vegetation for Waste Volume Reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malik, N.P.S.; Rucker, G.G.; Looper, M.G.

    1995-01-01

    The DOE changing mission at Savannah River Site (SRS) are to increase activities for Waste Management and Environmental Restoration. There are a number of Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) locations that are contaminated with radioactivity and support dense vegetation, and are targeted for remediation. Two such locations have been studied for non-time critical removal actions under the National Contingency Plan (NCP). Both of these sites support about 23 plant species. Surveys of the vegetation show that radiation emanates mainly from vines, shrubs, and trees and range from 20,000 to 200,000 d/m beta gamma. Planning for removal and disposal of low-level radioactive vegetation was done with two principal goals: to process contaminated vegetation for optimum volume reduction and waste minimization, and for the protection of human health and environment. Four alternatives were identified as candidates for vegetation removal and disposal: chipping the vegetation and packing in carbon steel boxes (lined with synthetic commercial liners) and disposal at the Solid Waste Disposal Facility at SRS; composting the vegetation; burning the vegetation in the field; and incinerating the vegetation. One alternative 'incineration' was considered viable choice for waste minimization, safe handling, and the protection of the environment and human health. Advantages and disadvantages of all four alternatives considered have been evaluated. For waste minimization and ultimate disposal of radioactive vegetation incineration is the preferred option. Advantages of incineration are that volume reduction is achieved and low-level radioactive waste are stabilized. For incineration and final disposal vegetation will be chipped and packed in card board boxes and discharged to the rotary kiln of the incinerator. The slow rotation and longer resident time in the kiln will ensure complete combustion of the vegetative material

  5. Study on the air quality near vegetation along the highway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weijers, E.P.; Kos, G.P.A.; Van den Bulk, W.C.M.; Vermeulen, A.T.

    2007-08-01

    The results of downwind measurements of air quality around vegetation near a motorway are presented and discussed. The study (first ever in the Netherlands) was performed by order of the Innovation Programme Air Quality. At a carefully selected location measurements of PM and NOx were carried out downwind from a motorway in front of and (at various distances) behind a parallel orientated vegetation strip. Results are compared with synchronized data collected at a nearby location without vegetation (the 'reference' situation) and at the same distances from the motorway. Major findings are: Comparing measurements in front of and behind the vegetation strip show that the presence of vegetation tends to lower PM10 and PM2.5 concentrations immediately behind the vegetation. However, no such change is apparent in the concentrations of NO and NO2. The comparison with measurements executed without vegetation ('reference') indicate that concentration levels close to the vegetation strip are similar or somewhat higher. At a larger distance from motorway and vegetation (>30 m) NO and NO2 concentrations tend to be lower than what is observed in the reference situation. This could not be determined for PM [nl

  6. Investigation of NPK in fertilized and unfertilized vegetables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deeba, F.; Butt, M.T.; Iqubal, K.; Shafiq, T.

    2010-01-01

    Contents of selected minerals and moisture in Ridge Gourd, Gourd and Brinjal vegetables, collected from house and market of different localities, were determined. In house vegetables from kitchen garden of PCSIR colony the moisture contents were high (90%) as compared to market vegetables of Taj Bagh, Railway workshop Mandy and Singpura Lahore Mandy was 87%, 86.5% and 87.5% respectively. Regarding nitrogen, nitrate, nitrite, phosphate, sodium and potassium was high in market vegetables as compared to house samples due to the accumulation of nutrients in soil and crop. (author)

  7. Uncovering effects of climate variables on global vegetation

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this project is to understand the causal relationships of how ecosystem dynamics, mostly characterized by vegetation changes, in different...

  8. 24 GHz cmWave Radio Propagation Through Vegetation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodriguez, Ignacio; Abreu, Renato Barbosa; Portela Lopes de Almeida, Erika

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a measurement-based analysis of cm-wave radio propagation through vegetation at 24 GHz. A set of dedicated directional measurements were performed with horn antennas located close to street level inside a densely-vegetated area illuminated from above. The full azimuth was exam......This paper presents a measurement-based analysis of cm-wave radio propagation through vegetation at 24 GHz. A set of dedicated directional measurements were performed with horn antennas located close to street level inside a densely-vegetated area illuminated from above. The full azimuth...

  9. Oscillations in a simple climate–vegetation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Rombouts

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We formulate and analyze a simple dynamical systems model for climate–vegetation interaction. The planet we consider consists of a large ocean and a land surface on which vegetation can grow. The temperature affects vegetation growth on land and the amount of sea ice on the ocean. Conversely, vegetation and sea ice change the albedo of the planet, which in turn changes its energy balance and hence the temperature evolution. Our highly idealized, conceptual model is governed by two nonlinear, coupled ordinary differential equations, one for global temperature, the other for vegetation cover. The model exhibits either bistability between a vegetated and a desert state or oscillatory behavior. The oscillations arise through a Hopf bifurcation off the vegetated state, when the death rate of vegetation is low enough. These oscillations are anharmonic and exhibit a sawtooth shape that is characteristic of relaxation oscillations, as well as suggestive of the sharp deglaciations of the Quaternary. Our model's behavior can be compared, on the one hand, with the bistability of even simpler, Daisyworld-style climate–vegetation models. On the other hand, it can be integrated into the hierarchy of models trying to simulate and explain oscillatory behavior in the climate system. Rigorous mathematical results are obtained that link the nature of the feedbacks with the nature and the stability of the solutions. The relevance of model results to climate variability on various timescales is discussed.

  10. Oscillations in a simple climate-vegetation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rombouts, J.; Ghil, M.

    2015-05-01

    We formulate and analyze a simple dynamical systems model for climate-vegetation interaction. The planet we consider consists of a large ocean and a land surface on which vegetation can grow. The temperature affects vegetation growth on land and the amount of sea ice on the ocean. Conversely, vegetation and sea ice change the albedo of the planet, which in turn changes its energy balance and hence the temperature evolution. Our highly idealized, conceptual model is governed by two nonlinear, coupled ordinary differential equations, one for global temperature, the other for vegetation cover. The model exhibits either bistability between a vegetated and a desert state or oscillatory behavior. The oscillations arise through a Hopf bifurcation off the vegetated state, when the death rate of vegetation is low enough. These oscillations are anharmonic and exhibit a sawtooth shape that is characteristic of relaxation oscillations, as well as suggestive of the sharp deglaciations of the Quaternary. Our model's behavior can be compared, on the one hand, with the bistability of even simpler, Daisyworld-style climate-vegetation models. On the other hand, it can be integrated into the hierarchy of models trying to simulate and explain oscillatory behavior in the climate system. Rigorous mathematical results are obtained that link the nature of the feedbacks with the nature and the stability of the solutions. The relevance of model results to climate variability on various timescales is discussed.

  11. Global vegetation change predicted by the modified Budyko model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monserud, R.A.; Tchebakova, N.M.; Leemans, R. (US Department of Agriculture, Moscow, ID (United States). Intermountain Research Station, Forest Service)

    1993-09-01

    A modified Budyko global vegetation model is used to predict changes in global vegetation patterns resulting from climate change (CO[sub 2] doubling). Vegetation patterns are predicted using a model based on a dryness index and potential evaporation determined by solving radiation balance equations. Climate change scenarios are derived from predictions from four General Circulation Models (GCM's) of the atmosphere (GFDL, GISS, OSU, and UKMO). All four GCM scenarios show similar trends in vegetation shifts and in areas that remain stable, although the UKMO scenario predicts greater warming than the others. Climate change maps produced by all four GCM scenarios show good agreement with the current climate vegetation map for the globe as a whole, although over half of the vegetation classes show only poor to fair agreement. The most stable areas are Desert and Ice/Polar Desert. Because most of the predicted warming is concentrated in the Boreal and Temperate zones, vegetation there is predicted to undergo the greatest change. Most vegetation classes in the Subtropics and Tropics are predicted to expand. Any shift in the Tropics favouring either Forest over Savanna, or vice versa, will be determined by the magnitude of the increased precipitation accompanying global warming. Although the model predicts equilibrium conditions to which many plant species cannot adjust (through migration or microevolution) in the 50-100 y needed for CO[sub 2] doubling, it is not clear if projected global warming will result in drastic or benign vegetation change. 72 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Does urban vegetation mitigate air pollution in northern conditions?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setälä, Heikki; Viippola, Viljami; Rantalainen, Anna-Lea; Pennanen, Arto; Yli-Pelkonen, Vesa

    2013-01-01

    It is generally accepted that urban vegetation improves air quality and thereby enhances the well-being of citizens. However, empirical evidence on the potential of urban trees to mitigate air pollution is meager, particularly in northern climates with a short growing season. We studied the ability of urban park/forest vegetation to remove air pollutants (NO 2 , anthropogenic VOCs and particle deposition) using passive samplers in two Finnish cities. Concentrations of each pollutant in August (summer; leaf-period) and March (winter, leaf-free period) were slightly but often insignificantly lower under tree canopies than in adjacent open areas, suggesting that the role of foliage in removing air pollutants is insignificant. Furthermore, vegetation-related environmental variables (canopy closure, number and size of trees, density of understorey vegetation) did not explain the variation in pollution concentrations. Our results suggest that the ability of urban vegetation to remove air pollutants is minor in northern climates. -- Highlights: ► The ability of northern urban vegetation to remove air pollutants is minor. ► Vegetation-related environmental variables had no effect on air pollution levels. ► The ability of vegetation to clean air did not differ between summer and winter. ► Dry deposition passive samplers proved applicable in urban air pollution study. -- The ability of urban vegetation to remove air pollutants seems to be minor in northern climates

  13. Be-7 concentration in garden and wild vegetables in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nobuhiko Ito; Iwao Kunugijama; Yoshinori Furukawa.

    1996-01-01

    Beryllium-7 is a natural radionuclide produced by cosmic rays. Be-7 is found vividly in the atmosphere, so the concentrations in airborne particles were analyzed by many investigators. It is known that airborne particles with Be-7 in the atmosphere fall slowly to the ground and adhere to plant surface. However, Be-7 concentrations of foods were not measured too much. So we measured Be-7 concentrations of garden vegetables, wild vegetables, grasses, beef and milk, and calculated internal exposure dose from Be-7. Beryllium-7 concentrations of plant samples are shown. Beryllium-7 concentrations of garden vegetables were from 0.2 to 25.3 Bq/kg, and concentrations of wild vegetables were from 0.8 to 23.5 Bq/kg. There is no difference in Be-7 concentrations between garden vegetables and wild vegetables. Leaf vegetables have almost higher concentration of Be-7. Though Matteuccia Struthiopteris and Pteridium aquilinum are ferns, their eatable stages are sprouts. The relationship between surface area and Be-7 concentration in some vegetable leaves gathered simultaneously at the same farm is shown. Beryllium-7 concentrations of leaves correlate significantly with the surface area/weight ratios. What high concentration vegetables have proportionately broad leaves suggests that atmospheric Be-7 particles adhere to surface of leaves. (author)

  14. Increasing portion sizes of fruits and vegetables in an elementary school lunch program can increase fruit and vegetable consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Nicole; Reicks, Marla; Redden, Joseph P; Mann, Traci; Mykerezi, Elton; Vickers, Zata

    2015-08-01

    Increasing portion size can increase children's consumption of food. The goal of this study was to determine whether increasing the portion sizes of fruits and vegetables in an elementary school cafeteria environment would increase children's consumption of them. We measured each child's consumption of the fruit and vegetables served in a cafeteria line on a control day (normal cafeteria procedures) and on two intervention days. When we increased the portion size of 3 of the 4 fruits and vegetables by about 50%, children who took those foods increased their consumption of them. Although this was an effective strategy for increasing fruit and vegetable consumption among students who took those foods, many children chose not to take any fruits or vegetables. Further efforts are needed to increase children's selection and consumption of fruits and vegetables in an environment of competing foods of higher palatability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Interception of radioactive fallout by vegetation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamberlain, A.C.; Garland, J.A.

    1991-12-01

    A review has been carried out of information on the fraction of radioactive material, deposited by dry or wet deposition processes, that is intercepted by vegetation. The amount of information available is limited, but it is clear that a substantial fraction may be intercepted in some circumstances. In dry deposition, the results of measurements indicate that interception decreases with increasing particle size for particles larger than about 40 μm. In low volume water sprays, interception fractions for 7 Be, 89 Sr and microspheres of 3 to 25 μm diameter were similar, but that for periodate was lower. The fraction intercepted decreased with an increase in the amount of simulated rainfall. The data are particularly sparse for dry deposition of particles smaller than 30 μm diameter. In addition, there is no information on interception at the moderate rates of rainfall common in Britain, and little is known of the differences between various species of plants. (author)

  16. Inorganic matter characterization in vegetable biomass feedstocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suarez-Garcia, F.; Martinez-Alonso, A.; Fernandez Llorenta, M.; Tascon, J.M.D. [Instituto Nacional del Carbon, CSIC, Oviedo (Spain)

    2002-06-01

    A combination of techniques was used to characterize the inorganic constituents of four types of vegetable biomass: apple pulp, olive cake, olive tree pruning and thistle. Two methods were used to selectively eliminate organic matter: low-temperature oxidation in an oxygen plasma, and medium-temperature oxidation in air. Inorganic species present in the residues were identified by X-ray diffraction and FT-IR spectroscopy. The combination of these techniques allowed one to detect SiO{sub 2}, CaCO{sub 3} and various other Ca-, Mg-, Na- and K-containing phases as inorganic constituents of the studied biomass residues. It is concluded that the oxygen plasma treatment produces sulphates and nitrates that were not present in the starting material. Medium-temperature oxidation does not produce these artificial species but induces some thermal transformations in the mineral constituents of biomass, so that each technique has its own advantages and disadvantages. 27 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Vegetable Protein Sources Used as Feed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olimpia Colibar

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The comparative effect of using some vegetal raw flours (Glycine hispida, Phaseolus vulgaris and Vicia faba, treated by autoclaving, introduced in the feeding white rats, was followed by the presented experiments. Feeding growing rats with diets containing raw grain legumes, as the main source of protein, reduce the rate of growth. This effect attenuates with the aging of rats. Inhibition of growth is the most evident in the consumption of raw beans (by 33% over the control group. Autoclaving reduces the level of anti-nutritive factors (with 0.2% - 36.73% and decreases the growth inhibition (with 10.7% - 27.51%.

  18. Investigating Dry Deposition of Ozone to Vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Sam J.; Heald, Colette L.

    2018-01-01

    Atmospheric ozone loss through dry deposition to vegetation is a critically important process for both air quality and ecosystem health. The majority of atmospheric chemistry models calculate dry deposition using a resistance-in-series parameterization by Wesely (1989), which is dependent on many environmental variables and lookup table values. The uncertainties contained within this parameterization have not been fully explored, ultimately challenging our ability to understand global scale biosphere-atmosphere interactions. In this work, we evaluate the GEOS-Chem model simulation of ozone dry deposition using a globally distributed suite of observations. We find that simulated daytime deposition velocities generally reproduce the magnitude of observations to within a factor of 1.4. When correctly accounting for differences in land class between the observations and model, these biases improve, most substantially over the grasses and shrubs land class. These biases do not impact the global ozone burden substantially; however, they do lead to local absolute changes of up to 4 ppbv and relative changes of 15% in summer surface concentrations. We use MERRA meteorology from 1979 to 2008 to assess that the interannual variability in simulated annual mean ozone dry deposition due to model input meteorology is small (generally less than 5% over vegetated surfaces). Sensitivity experiments indicate that the simulation is most sensitive to the stomatal and ground surface resistances, as well as leaf area index. To improve ozone dry deposition models, more measurements are necessary over rainforests and various crop types, alongside constraints on individual depositional pathways and other in-canopy ozone loss processes.

  19. Production of biodiesel from vegetable oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luque, Susana

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel is produced by transesterification of triglycerides present in animal fat or vegetable oils, by displacing glycerine with a low molar mass alcohol. This resulting ester mixture has physico-chemical properties similar to those of petroleum diesel. This paper reviews the synthetic paths that lead to biodiesel by means of the catalytic transesterification of vegetable oils. Although methyl esters are at present the only ones produced at industrial scale, the use of ethanol, which can also be obtained from renewable resources, has been considered, since it would generate a cleaner and more biocompatible fuel.El biodiésel se produce mediante la transesterificación de triglicéridos, presentes en grasas animales o aceites vegetales, en un proceso en el que un alcohol de bajo peso molecular desplaza a la glicerina. La mezcla de esteres así resultante posee unas propiedades físico-químicas similares a las del diésel procedente de petróleo. En este artículo se revisan las vías de síntesis de biodiésel mediante la transesterificación catalítica de aceites vegetales. Aunque actualmente a escala industrial solo se producen ésteres metílicos, también se ha considerado el uso de etanol, ya que éste se obtiene también de fuentes renovables, generando así un combustible más limpio y biocompatible.

  20. Suppression of vegetation in LANDSAT ETM+ remote sensing images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Le; Porwal, Alok; Holden, Eun-Jung; Dentith, Michael

    2010-05-01

    Vegetation cover is an impediment to the interpretation of multispectral remote sensing images for geological applications, especially in densely vegetated terrains. In order to enhance the underlying geological information in such terrains, it is desirable to suppress the reflectance component of vegetation. One form of spectral unmixing that has been successfully used for vegetation reflectance suppression in multispectral images is called "forced invariance". It is based on segregating components of the reflectance spectrum that are invariant with respect to a specific spectral index such as the NDVI. The forced invariance method uses algorithms such as software defoliation. However, the outputs of software defoliation are single channel data, which are not amenable to geological interpretations. Crippen and Blom (2001) proposed a new forced invariance algorithm that utilizes band statistics, rather than band ratios. The authors demonstrated the effectiveness of their algorithms on a LANDSAT TM scene from Nevada, USA, especially in open canopy areas in mixed and semi-arid terrains. In this presentation, we report the results of our experimentation with this algorithm on a densely to sparsely vegetated Landsat ETM+ scene. We selected a scene (Path 119, Row 39) acquired on 18th July, 2004. Two study areas located around the city of Hangzhou, eastern China were tested. One of them covers uninhabited hilly terrain characterized by low rugged topography, parts of the hills are densely vegetated; another one covers both inhabited urban areas and uninhabited hilly terrain, which is densely vegetated. Crippen and Blom's algorithm is implemented in the following sequential steps: (1) dark pixel correction; (2) vegetation index calculation; (3) estimation of statistical relationship between vegetation index and digital number (DN) values for each band; (4) calculation of a smooth best-fit curve for the above relationships; and finally, (5) selection of a target average DN