WorldWideScience

Sample records for vegetables tomatoes metadata

  1. Metadata

    CERN Document Server

    Zeng, Marcia Lei

    2016-01-01

    Metadata remains the solution for describing the explosively growing, complex world of digital information, and continues to be of paramount importance for information professionals. Providing a solid grounding in the variety and interrelationships among different metadata types, Zeng and Qin's thorough revision of their benchmark text offers a comprehensive look at the metadata schemas that exist in the world of library and information science and beyond, as well as the contexts in which they operate. Cementing its value as both an LIS text and a handy reference for professionals already in the field, this book: * Lays out the fundamentals of metadata, including principles of metadata, structures of metadata vocabularies, and metadata descriptions * Surveys metadata standards and their applications in distinct domains and for various communities of metadata practice * Examines metadata building blocks, from modelling to defining properties, and from designing application profiles to implementing value vocabu...

  2. Metadata

    CERN Document Server

    Pomerantz, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    When "metadata" became breaking news, appearing in stories about surveillance by the National Security Agency, many members of the public encountered this once-obscure term from information science for the first time. Should people be reassured that the NSA was "only" collecting metadata about phone calls -- information about the caller, the recipient, the time, the duration, the location -- and not recordings of the conversations themselves? Or does phone call metadata reveal more than it seems? In this book, Jeffrey Pomerantz offers an accessible and concise introduction to metadata. In the era of ubiquitous computing, metadata has become infrastructural, like the electrical grid or the highway system. We interact with it or generate it every day. It is not, Pomerantz tell us, just "data about data." It is a means by which the complexity of an object is represented in a simpler form. For example, the title, the author, and the cover art are metadata about a book. When metadata does its job well, it fades i...

  3. Effect of vegetable proteins on physical characteristics of spray-dried tomato powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tontul, Ismail; Topuz, Ayhan; Ozkan, Ceren; Karacan, Merve

    2016-09-01

    In the present study, the effectiveness of different vegetable proteins (pea protein isolate, soy protein isolate and zein from maize) at two different ratios (1% and 5%) on product yield and physical properties of spray-dried pulpy tomato juice was investigated. Additionally, these proteins were compared with whey protein concentrate which has a superior effect on spray dried products at the same concentrations. Additionally, plain tomato juice was also spray dried for comparison with vegetable proteins. The product yield of the tomato powders dried with the vegetable proteins was lower than with the whey protein concentrate. Among vegetable proteins, the highest product yield was produced with 1% soy protein isolate. In all products, there was a slight colour difference between the reconstituted tomato powders and the raw tomato juice, which indicated that pulpy tomato juice can be spray dried with minor colour change. All powders had unique free-flowing properties estimated as Carr index and Hausner ratio due to their large particles. © The Author(s) 2016.

  4. [Examination of processed vegetable foods for the presence of common DNA sequences of genetically modified tomatoes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagawa, Mamiko; Nakamura, Kosuke; Kondo, Kazunari; Ubukata, Shoji; Akiyama, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    The contamination of processed vegetable foods with genetically modified tomatoes was investigated by the use of qualitative PCR methods to detect the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter (P35S) and the kanamycin resistance gene (NPTII). DNA fragments of P35S and NPTII were detected in vegetable juice samples, possibly due to contamination with the genomes of cauliflower mosaic virus infecting juice ingredients of Brassica species and soil bacteria, respectively. Therefore, to detect the transformation construct sequences of GM tomatoes, primer pairs were designed for qualitative PCR to specifically detect the border region between P35S and NPTII, and the border region between nopaline synthase gene promoter and NPTII. No amplification of the targeted sequences was observed using genomic DNA purified from the juice ingredients. The developed qualitative PCR method is considered to be a reliable tool to check contamination of products with GM tomatoes.

  5. Comparative Energy Generation of Irish-potato, Tomato and Pineapple ZN/CU Vegetative Batteries

    OpenAIRE

    S.M. Talai; Z.O. Siagi; S.K. Kimutai; S.S. Simiyu; W.T. Ngigi; A.B. Makokha

    2014-01-01

    Environmental pollution associated with petroleum sources of energy has reinvigorated interest in the need to find “greener” electrical energy alternatives without a net carbon emission into the ecosystem to solve these problems. This research study analyzed electricity generation through bioelectrolytic reaction from an irish-potato, pineapple and tomato as electrolyte for the vegetative batteries with Zn/Cu as electrode. Treatments were performed on samples. In the first treatment, vegetati...

  6. Vegetative growth and yield of tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum Mill.) in response to the systemic insecticide phorate

    OpenAIRE

    Raul N. C. Guedes; Guedes,Nelsa M. P.; Picanço,Marcelo

    1998-01-01

    The effect of the systemic insecticide phorate on vegetative growth and yield of tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum Mill.) was studied in the greenhouse. Three dosages of phorate (1.5, 7.5, and 13.5 mg a.i./ 1.5 L pot) were applied along with a control (without insecticide application). The plants were harvested at 17, 32, 51, 69, and 90 days after tilling. Regression analysis did not show any significant effect of insecticide dosages in plant and root length. However, an overall negative effect...

  7. Influence of Epicuticular Physicochemical Properties on Porcine Rotavirus Adsorption to 24 Leafy Green Vegetables and Tomatoes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Lu

    Full Text Available Foodborne diseases are a persistent problem in the United States and worldwide. Fresh produce, especially those used as raw foods like salad vegetables, can be contaminated, causing illness. In this study, we determined the number of rotaviruses adsorbed on produce surfaces using group A porcine rotaviruses and 24 cultivars of leafy vegetables and tomato fruits. We also characterized the physicochemical properties of each produce's outermost surface layer, known as the epicuticle. The number of rotaviruses found on produce surfaces varied among cultivars. Three-dimensional crystalline wax structures on the epicuticular surfaces were found to significantly contribute to the inhibition of viral adsorption to the produce surfaces (p = 0.01. We found significant negative correlations between the number of rotaviruses adsorbed on the epicuticular surfaces and the concentrations of alkanes, fatty acids, and total waxes on the epicuticular surfaces. Partial least square model fitting results suggest that alkanes, ketones, fatty acids, alcohols, contact angle and surface roughness together can explain 60% of the variation in viral adsorption. The results suggest that various fresh produce surface properties need to be collectively considered for efficient sanitation treatments. Up to 10.8% of the originally applied rotaviruses were found on the produce surfaces after three washing treatments, suggesting a potential public health concern regarding rotavirus contamination.

  8. BIOFERTILISERS - EFFICIENCY ON THE VEGETATIVE GROWTH AND PRODUCTIVITY OF TOMATOES CULTIVATED UNDER THE CONDITIONS OF ORGANIC FARMING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veselka Vlahova

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to examine the influence of biofertilisers on the vegetative growth, yield and productivity of tomatoes cultivated under the conditions of organic farming. The research was carried out in the polyethylene greenhouse and experimental field of the Agroecological centre at the Agricultural University- Plovdiv (Bulgaria, in the period from 2013 until 2014 with on determinant tomatoes (solanum lycopersicum l., of the variety of “Trapezitsa”. The standard yield had its highest value upon the application of biofertiliser Emosan on the basic fertilization Boneprot- 3140 kg/da (2013 and 3116 kg/da (2014, thus determining the positive impact of the tested combination of biofertilisers. The combined application of biofertilisers in the form of basic fertilisation and additional vegetation feeding had a positive impact on the formation of the standard yield, the number and the mass of fruits.

  9. Metadata (MD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert E. Keane

    2006-01-01

    The Metadata (MD) table in the FIREMON database is used to record any information about the sampling strategy or data collected using the FIREMON sampling procedures. The MD method records metadata pertaining to a group of FIREMON plots, such as all plots in a specific FIREMON project. FIREMON plots are linked to metadata using a unique metadata identifier that is...

  10. Study protocol: a cluster randomised controlled trial of a school based fruit and vegetable intervention – Project Tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conner Mark T

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The School Fruit and Vegetable Scheme (SFVS is an important public health intervention. The aim of this scheme is to provide a free piece of fruit and/or vegetable every day for children in Reception to Year 2. When children are no longer eligible for the scheme (from Year 3 their overall fruit and vegetable consumption decreases back to baseline levels. This proposed study aims to design a flexible multi-component intervention for schools to support the maintenance of fruit and vegetable consumption for Year 3 children who are no longer eligible for the scheme. Method This study is a cluster randomised controlled trial of Year 2 classes from 54 primary schools across England. The schools will be randomly allocated into two groups to receive either an active intervention called Project Tomato, to support maintenance of fruit intake in Year 3 children, or a less active intervention (control group, consisting of a 5 A DAY booklet. Children's diets will be analysed using the Child And Diet Evaluation Tool (CADET, and height and weight measurements collected, at baseline (Year 2 and 18 month follow-up (Year 4. The primary outcome will be the ability of the intervention (Project Tomato to maintain consumption of fruit and vegetable portions compared to the control group. Discussion A positive result will identify how fruit and vegetable consumption can be maintained in young children, and will be useful for policies supporting the SFVS. A negative result would be used to inform the research agenda and contribute to redefining future strategies for increasing children's fruit and vegetable consumption. Trial registration Medical Research Council Registry code G0501297

  11. Distribution of Amblydromalus limonicus in northeastern Spain and diversity of phytoseiid mites (Acari: Phytoseiidae) in tomato and other vegetable crops after its introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chorąży, Alicja; Kropczyńska-Linkiewicz, Danuta; Sas, Daniel; Escudero-Colomar, Lucia-Adriana

    2016-08-01

    Amblydromalus limonicus (Garman and McGregor) was detected for the first time in 2011 on tomatoes of several locations of the northeastern Spain. During 2012 and 2013 samplings on tomato crop cultivars in the two provinces of Catalonia where the species was found were carried out. The goals of the study were to know the range of spread of the species in these two provinces, its abundance in tomato cultivars, non-crop vegetation among them, in the different parts of the tomato plant and in some other vegetable crops. Results showed that A. limonicus was present at both regions sampled, although there were significant differences in the abundance of the species between sampling points. It is the second in abundance in tomato and the cultivars that most frequently host A. limonicus were Anaidis, Hybrid and Marmande. No significant differences were found in the abundance of A. limonicus among tomato plant canopy strata. On average, it accounted for 31.6 % of all sampled phytoseiids. It was present in four crops (tomato, bean, cucumber and strawberry) and in Amaranthus cruentus, Chenopodium polyspermum, Cynodon dactylon, Mentha sp., Parietaria officinalis and Phleum pratense. Amblydromalus limonicus is well established in the extreme northeast of Spain all year round in crops and non-crops.

  12. A cluster-randomised controlled trial of a school-based fruit and vegetable intervention: Project Tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Charlotte E L; Ransley, Joan K; Christian, Meaghan S; Greenwood, Darren C; Thomas, James D; Cade, Janet E

    2013-06-01

    The present study aimed to determine whether a multi-component school-based intervention can maintain children's fruit and vegetable intake post eligibility for free school fruit and vegetables. A random sample of fifty-four English primary schools was randomised to receive the 10-month intervention Project Tomato, a multi-component theory-based intervention, or the control. Each group consisted of twenty-seven schools. Children's intake of fruit and vegetables is below recommendations. The English School Fruit and Vegetable Scheme has a short-term impact on intake while children are eligible for the scheme. Dietary measurements were collected from 658 Year 2 pupils aged 7-8 years at baseline and at follow-up 20 months later. Following an intention to treat analysis, the intervention as delivered compared with the control had no impact on the intake of fruit and vegetables (2 g/d, 95 % CI -23, 26 g/d) or on the number of portions of fruit (0.0 portions, 95 % CI - 0.3, 0.3) or vegetables (0.0 portions, 95 % CI - 0.2, 0.3) consumed daily by children. Intake of fruit and vegetables at school and home dropped by ≈ 100 g/d and 50 g/d, respectively, between baseline and follow-up in both the intervention and control groups. Implementation of the intervention was low, with associated lack of impact on fruit and vegetable consumption in children. Alternatives to the delivery of an intervention by teachers and parents are needed to improve the dietary intake of primary-school children.

  13. The usage of mutant genotypes in tomato selection for specific traits at the institute for vegetable crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdravković Jasmina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to find a superdominant gene for yield, a collection of 350 samples with genes mutations and different expression in different phases of growth and development: fruit size, leaf shape, plant architecture, number of fruits, etc., has been studied (through multi-year research. Current seed production at the Institute for Vegetable Crops in Smederevska Palanka includes 26 hybrids and two in acceptation process, of different purposes and characteristics. The most common mutation genes in tomato selection at the Institute are: sp (self-pruning inbuilt in determinant hybrids (Balkan F1, Marko F1, Rebus F1 and varieties (Narvik SPF, SP-109, Adonis, u (uniform ripening - Lido F1, Atina F1, Danubius F1, rin (ripening inhibitor- Nada F1, Šampion F1, Sef F1, Sidra F1, Rebus F1, j (jointless - Narvik, Adonis, SP-109, c (potato leaf - Mi-13, Enigma F1, Rebus F1, Ph -2 (Phytophtora infestans resistance - Luna F1, Zlatni jubilej F1, Sef F1. Quality of tomato fruits is defined by two groups of genes which determinate the organoleptic traits and nutrition composition. Organoleptic quality includes taste and smell, colour and texture of fruits established in variety differences, nutritive regime of plants, maturity phase and yield. Little is known about gene regulation, responsible for variation of these traits.

  14. ENHANCEMENT OF CULTURE MEDIA FOR PROPIONIBACTERIUM SHERMANII ON THE BASIS OF TOMATO JUICE AS VEGETABLE FILLING

    OpenAIRE

    Volobueva E. S.; Aniskina M. V.; Petenko A. I.; Gneush A. N.

    2016-01-01

    The article presents materials about selection and optimization of the nutrient medium for cultivation of Propionibacterium shermanii. We have shown a high positive effect expressed in the intensive growth of microorganisms of Propionibacterium shermanii on optimized medium with the juice from the tomatoes, as well as replacement of glucose on corn extract, which allows concluding that these components have a positive impact on the accumulation of biomass of Propionibacterium shermanii

  15. Tomato Leaf Curl New Delhi Virus: An Emerging Virus Complex Threatening Vegetable and Fiber Crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Moriones

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus (ToLCNDV (genus Begomovirus, family Geminiviridae represents an important constraint to tomato production, as it causes the most predominant and economically important disease affecting tomato in the Indian sub-continent. However, in recent years, ToLCNDV has been fast extending its host range and spreading to new geographical regions, including the Middle East and the western Mediterranean Basin. Extensive research on the genome structure, protein functions, molecular biology, and plant–virus interactions of ToLCNDV has been conducted in the last decade. Special emphasis has been given to gene silencing suppression ability in order to counteract host plant defense responses. The importance of the interaction with DNA alphasatellites and betasatellites in the biology of the virus has been demonstrated. ToLCNDV genetic variability has been analyzed, providing new insights into the taxonomy, host adaptation, and evolution of this virus. Recombination and pseudorecombination have been shown as motors of diversification and adaptive evolution. Important progress has also been made in control strategies to reduce disease damage. This review highlights these various achievements in the context of the previous knowledge of begomoviruses and their interactions with plants.

  16. Survival and growth of foodborne pathogens in pesticide solutions routinely used in leafy green vegetables and tomato production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobhal, Shefali; Zhang, Guodong; Royer, Tom; Damicone, John; Ma, Li Maria

    2014-11-01

    The consumption of fresh produce has increased tremendously in the past few years as have outbreaks of foodborne illnesses associated with these commodities. Pesticides routinely used in crop production could influence the outcomes of foodborne pathogen contamination of fresh produce. Experiments were performed to determine the effects of pesticides on the survival and growth characteristics of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella spp. Eight commercial fungicides and insecticides commonly used for disease and insect pest control on leafy green vegetables and tomatoes were evaluated. Among the pesticides tested, copper hydroxide, acetamiprid, cypermethrin and permethrin were found to be significantly (P effect was observed for chlorothalonil, flonicamid and methoxyfenozide. At the highest concentration tested (2.66%), azoxystrobin had a significant (P effect on the growth of E. coli O157:H7 after 24 h incubation. The results indicated that some pesticides can stimulate the growth of human pathogens if contaminated water is used in their preparation, whereas others were likely to inhibit or reduce pathogen populations. This information is helpful in mitigating the risk of microbial contamination in fresh produce, which is critical to public health and safety. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  17. Characterization of vegetative inflorescence (mc-vin) mutant provides new insight into the role of MACROCALYX in regulating inflorescence development of tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuste-Lisbona, Fernando J; Quinet, Muriel; Fernández-Lozano, Antonia; Pineda, Benito; Moreno, Vicente; Angosto, Trinidad; Lozano, Rafael

    2016-01-04

    Inflorescence development is a key factor of plant productivity, as it determines flower number. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms that regulate inflorescence architecture is critical for reproductive success and crop yield. In this study, a new mutant, vegetative inflorescence (mc-vin), was isolated from the screening of a tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) T-DNA mutant collection. The mc-vin mutant developed inflorescences that reverted to vegetative growth after forming two to three flowers, indicating that the mutated gene is essential for the maintenance of inflorescence meristem identity. The T-DNA was inserted into the promoter region of the MACROCALYX (MC) gene; this result together with complementation test and expression analyses proved that mc-vin is a new knock-out allele of MC. Double combinations between mc-vin and jointless (j) and single flower truss (sft) inflorescence mutants showed that MC has pleiotropic effects on the reproductive phase, and that it interacts with SFT and J to control floral transition and inflorescence fate in tomato. In addition, MC expression was mis-regulated in j and sft mutants whereas J and SFT were significantly up-regulated in the mc-vin mutant. Together, these results provide new evidences about MC function as part of the genetic network regulating the development of tomato inflorescence meristem.

  18. 7 CFR 966.5 - Tomatoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Tomatoes. 966.5 Section 966.5 Agriculture Regulations... Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE TOMATOES GROWN IN FLORIDA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 966.5 Tomatoes. Tomatoes means all varieties of the edible fruit (Lycopersicon...

  19. Molecular characterization of Yucatan tomato phytoplasma (Group ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) is an important vegetable crop in Mexico. Recently, a phytoplasma associated with leaf yellowing and curling, severe stunting and little leaf in tomato plant was identified as Yucatan tomato phytoplasma (16SrIII group). DNAs extracted from tomato leaves with symptoms were examined for ...

  20. Molecular characterization of Yucatan tomato phytoplasma (Group ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-01-31

    Jan 31, 2012 ... Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) is an important vegetable crop in Mexico. Recently, a phytoplasma associated with leaf yellowing and curling, severe stunting and little leaf in tomato plant was identified as Yucatan tomato phytoplasma (16SrIII group). DNAs extracted from tomato leaves with symptoms.

  1. Semi-determinate growth habit adjusts the vegetative-to-reproductive balance and increases productivity and water-use efficiency in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente, Mateus Henrique; Zsögön, Agustin; de Sá, Ariadne Felicio Lopo; Ribeiro, Rafael V; Peres, Lázaro E P

    2015-04-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) shows three growth habits: determinate, indeterminate and semi-determinate. These are controlled mainly by allelic variation in the self-pruning (SP) gene family, which also includes the "florigen" gene single flower TRUSS (SFT). Determinate cultivars have synchronized flower and fruit production, which allows mechanical harvesting in the tomato processing industry, whereas indeterminate ones have more vegetative growth with continuous flower and fruit formation, being thus preferred for fresh market tomato production. The semi-determinate growth habit is poorly understood, although there are indications that it combines advantages of determinate and indeterminate growth. Here, we used near-isogenic lines (NILs) in the cultivar Micro-Tom (MT) with different growth habit to characterize semi-determinate growth and to determine its impact on developmental and productivity traits. We show that semi-determinate genotypes are equivalent to determinate ones with extended vegetative growth, which in turn impacts shoot height, number of leaves and either stem diameter or internode length. Semi-determinate plants also tend to increase the highly relevant agronomic parameter Brix × ripe yield (BRY). Water-use efficiency (WUE), evaluated either directly as dry mass produced per amount of water transpired or indirectly through C isotope discrimination, was higher in semi-determinate genotypes. We also provide evidence that the increases in BRY in semi-determinate genotypes are a consequence of an improved balance between vegetative and reproductive growth, a mechanism analogous to the conversion of the overly vegetative tall cereal varieties into well-balanced semi-dwarf ones used in the Green Revolution. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. Validated UPLC-MS/MS Methods To Quantitate Free and Conjugated Alternaria Toxins in Commercially Available Tomato Products and Fruit and Vegetable Juices in Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walravens, Jeroen; Mikula, Hannes; Rychlik, Michael; Asam, Stefan; Devos, Tom; Njumbe Ediage, Emmanuel; Diana Di Mavungu, José; Jacxsens, Liesbeth; Van Landschoot, Anita; Vanhaecke, Lynn; De Saeger, Sarah

    2016-06-22

    Ultraperformance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry and Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged, and Safe based analytical methodologies to quantitate both free (alternariol (1), alternariol monomethyl ether (2), tenuazonic acid (3), tentoxin (4), altenuene (5), altertoxin-I (6)) and conjugated (sulfates and glucosides of 1 and 2) Alternaria toxins in fruit and vegetable juices and tomato products were developed and validated. Acceptable limits of quantitation (0.7-5.7 μg/kg), repeatability (RSDr Alternaria toxins (sulfates of 1 and 2) were repeatedly detected. A deterministic dietary exposure assessment revealed the possible risk for human health related to the presence of 1 and 2 in tomato based foodstuffs, whereas 3 is unlikely to be of human health concern.

  3. Metadata Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennant, Roy

    2004-01-01

    Libraries must increasingly accommodate bibliographic records encoded with a variety of standards and emerging standards, including Dublin Core, MODS, and VRA Core. The problem is that many libraries still rely solely on MARC and AACR2. The best-trained professionals to lead librarians through the metadata maze are catalogers. Catalogers…

  4. Peeling tomato paste subsidies

    OpenAIRE

    Bunte, Frank H.J.

    2007-01-01

    The Common Market Organisation (CMO) for fruit and vegetable products is currently evaluated by the European Commission. The evaluation may lead to a reform of the CMO. One of the elements under debate is the production subsidy for processing tomatoes. The processing tomato sector is one of most heavily subsidized sectors in primary production of fruit and vegetables. The current production subsidy equals approximately 50% of producer turnover. This paper evaluates two possible reforms of the...

  5. 21 CFR 156.145 - Tomato juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tomato juice. 156.145 Section 156.145 Food and... CONSUMPTION VEGETABLE JUICES Requirements for Specific Standardized Vegetable Juices § 156.145 Tomato juice. (a) Identity—(1) Definition. Tomato juice is the food intended for direct consumption, obtained from...

  6. Microbiological quality of fresh leafy vegetables, salad components and ready-to-eat salads: an evidence of inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes in tomatoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pingulkar, K; Kamat, A; Bongirwar, D

    2001-01-01

    A total of 116 samples of 11 different fresh vegetables from a local market generally consumed in raw form as well as 12 samples of ready-to-eat green salads procured from three grade 1 and 2 restaurants in Mumbai, India were examined for overall microbial quality in terms of bacterial, mold and coliform levels and incidence of pathogens such as Listeria and Yersinia. Standard procedures and media were used for isolation and identification studies. Thoroughly washed samples of 26 leafy vegetables, 12 roots, 62 tomatoes and four samples each of cabbage, capsicum and cucumber showed total bacterial and yeast-mold count in 10(6)-10(7) cfu/gm and 10(2)-10(5) cfu/gm range respectively. On the other hand, higher range of bacterial (10(6)-10(8) cfu/gm) and mold (10(4)-10(7) cfu/gm) count were noticed in ready-to-eat salads from restaurants. The MPN index/gm for coliforms for vegetables from a local market ranged from 1100 whereas for ready-to-eat salads it was 11 to 460. Evidence of higher number of coliforms was observed mostly in green leafy vegetables. All (100%) local vegetables exhibited the incidence of Listeria and Yersinia. On the other hand, ready-to-eat salads showed 20 and 73% presence of Yersinia and Listeria respectively. Higher occurrence of fecal coliforms was (65.6%) found in raw vegetables while they were absent in ready-to-eat salad samples. Non-pathogenic species like Y. intermedia and L. innocua were predominating species in most of the samples. Nevertheless, presence of L. monocytogenes was observed in 7 out of 62 tomatoes, 5 out of 10 coriander leaves, 2 out of 4 spinach samples and one from 4 cabbage samples. Studies conducted to understand the ability of L. monocytogenes 036 and 35152 to grow in tomato in the presence of naturally occurring bacteria suggested that artificially inoculated (10(3) cfu/ml) cells are killed after 3 days, 12 days and 14 days of incubation at 37 degrees C, 8-10 degrees C and 2-4 degrees C respectively.

  7. CMR Metadata Curation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shum, Dana; Bugbee, Kaylin

    2017-01-01

    This talk explains the ongoing metadata curation activities in the Common Metadata Repository. It explores tools that exist today which are useful for building quality metadata and also opens up the floor for discussions on other potentially useful tools.

  8. Potassium deficiency affects water status and photosynthetic rate of the vegetative sink in green house tomato prior to its effects on source activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanai, Synsuke; Moghaieb, Reda E; El-Shemy, Hany A; Panigrahi, R; Mohapatra, Pravat K; Ito, J; Nguyen, Nguyen T; Saneoka, Hirofumi; Fujita, Kounosuke

    2011-02-01

    The potassium requirement of green house tomatoes is very high for vegetative growth and fruit production. Potassium deficiency in plants takes long time for expression of visible symptoms. The objective of this study is to detect the deficiency early during the vegetative growth and define the roles of aquaporin and K-channel transporters in the process of regulation of water status and source-sink relationship. The tomato plants were grown hydroponically inside green house of Hiroshima University, Japan and subjected to different levels of K in the rooting medium. Potassium deficiency stress decreased photosynthesis, expansion and transport of ¹⁴C assimilates of the source leaf, but the effects became evident only after diameter expansion of the growing stem (sink) was down-regulated. The depression of stem diameter expansion is assumed to be associated with the suppression of water supply more than photosynthate supply to the organ. The stem diameter expansion is parameterized by root water uptake and leaf transpiration rates. The application of aquaporin inhibitor (AgNO₃) decreased leaf water potential, stem expansion and root hydraulic conductance within minutes of application. Similar results were obtained for application of the K-channel inhibitors. These observations suggested a close relationship between stem diameter expansion and activities of aquaporins and K-channel transporters in roots. The deficiency of potassium might have reduced aquaporin activity, consequently suppressing root hydraulic conductance and water supply to the growing stem for diameter expansion and leaf for transpiration. We conclude that close coupling between aquaporins and K-channel transporters in water uptake of roots is responsible for regulation of stem diameter dynamics of green house tomato plants. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Long-term wastewater irrigation of vegetables in real agricultural systems: Concentration of pharmaceuticals in soil, uptake and bioaccumulation in tomato fruits and human health risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christou, Anastasis; Karaolia, Popi; Hapeshi, Evroula; Michael, Costas; Fatta-Kassinos, Despo

    2017-02-01

    Wastewater (WW) reuse for vegetable crops irrigation is regularly applied worldwide. Such a practice has been found to allow the uptake of pharmaceutical active compounds (PhACs) by plants and their subsequent entrance to the food web, representing an important alternative pathway for the exposure of humans to PhACs, with potential health implications. Herein we report the impacts of the long-term (three consecutive years) WW irrigation of a tomato crop with two differently treated effluents under real agricultural conditions, on (1) the soil concentration of selected PhACs (i.e. diclofenac, DCF; sulfamethoxazole, SMX; trimethoprim, TMP), (2) the bioaccumulation of these PhACs in tomato fruits, and (3) the human risks associated with the consumption of WW-irrigated fruits. Results revealed that the concentration of the studied PhACs in both the soil and tomato fruits varied depending on the qualitative characteristics of the treated effluent applied and the duration of WW irrigation. The PhAC with the highest soil concentration throughout the studied period was SMX (0.98 μg kg-1), followed by TMP (0.62 μg kg-1) and DCF (0.35 μg kg-1). DCF was not found in tomato fruits harvested from WW-irrigated plants during the first year of the study. However, DCF displayed the highest fruit concentration (11.63 μg kg-1) throughout the study (as a result of prolonged WW irrigation), followed by SMX (5.26 μg kg-1) and TMP (3.40 μg kg-1). The calculated fruit bioconcentration factors (BCFF) were extremely high for DCF in the 2nd (108) and 3rd year (132) of the experimental period, with the respective values for SMX (0.5-5.4) and TMP (0.2-6.4) being significantly lower. The estimated threshold of toxicity concern (TTC) and hazard quotients (HQ) values revealed that the consumption of fruits harvested from tomato plants irrigated for long period with the WW applied for irrigation under field conditions in this study represent a de minimis risk to human health

  10. Emergence of Groundnut ringspot virus and Tomato chlorotic spot virus in Vegetables in Florida and the Southeastern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Craig G; Frantz, Galen; Reitz, Stuart R; Funderburk, Joseph E; Mellinger, H Charles; McAvoy, Eugene; Turechek, William W; Marshall, Spencer H; Tantiwanich, Yaowapa; McGrath, Margaret T; Daughtrey, Margery L; Adkins, Scott

    2015-03-01

    Groundnut ringspot virus (GRSV) and Tomato chlorotic spot virus (TCSV) are two emerging tospoviruses in Florida. In a survey of the southeastern United States, GRSV and TCSV were frequently detected in solanaceous crops and weeds with tospovirus-like symptoms in south Florida, and occurred sympatrically with Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) in tomato and pepper in south Florida. TSWV was the only tospovirus detected in other survey locations, with the exceptions of GRSV from tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) in South Carolina and New York, both of which are first reports. Impatiens (Impatiens walleriana) and lettuce (Lactuca sativa) were the only non-solanaceous GRSV and/or TCSV hosts identified in experimental host range studies. Little genetic diversity was observed in GRSV and TCSV sequences, likely due to the recent introductions of both viruses. All GRSV isolates characterized were reassortants with the TCSV M RNA. In laboratory transmission studies, Frankliniella schultzei was a more efficient vector of GRSV than F. occidentalis. TCSV was acquired more efficiently than GRSV by F. occidentalis but upon acquisition, transmission frequencies were similar. Further spread of GRSV and TCSV in the United States is possible and detection of mixed infections highlights the opportunity for additional reassortment of tospovirus genomic RNAs.

  11. Big Metadata, Smart Metadata, and Metadata Capital: Toward Greater Synergy Between Data Science and Metadata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Greenberg

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of the paper is to provide a framework for addressing the disconnect between metadata and data science. Data science cannot progress without metadata research. This paper takes steps toward advancing the synergy between metadata and data science, and identifies pathways for developing a more cohesive metadata research agenda in data science. Design/methodology/approach: This paper identifies factors that challenge metadata research in the digital ecosystem, defines metadata and data science, and presents the concepts big metadata, smart metadata, and metadata capital as part of a metadata lingua franca connecting to data science. Findings: The “utilitarian nature” and “historical and traditional views” of metadata are identified as two intersecting factors that have inhibited metadata research. Big metadata, smart metadata, and metadata capital are presented as part of a metadata lingua franca to help frame research in the data science research space. Research limitations: There are additional, intersecting factors to consider that likely inhibit metadata research, and other significant metadata concepts to explore. Practical implications: The immediate contribution of this work is that it may elicit response, critique, revision, or, more significantly, motivate research. The work presented can encourage more researchers to consider the significance of metadata as a research worthy topic within data science and the larger digital ecosystem. Originality/value: Although metadata research has not kept pace with other data science topics, there is little attention directed to this problem. This is surprising, given that metadata is essential for data science endeavors. This examination synthesizes original and prior scholarship to provide new grounding for metadata research in data science.

  12. Tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Eck, Joyce; Kirk, Dwayne D; Walmsley, Amanda M

    2006-01-01

    Tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum) is an important fruit crop in the Americas, southern Europe, the Middle East, and India, with increasing production in China, Japan, and Southeast Asia. It is amenable to producing pharmaceuticals, particularly for oral delivery; for many of the same reasons, it is a popular vegetable. Its fruit does not contain toxic substances and is palatable uncooked; it is easily processed; the plants are able to be propagated by seed or clonally by tip or shoot cuttings; the plants have a high yield of fruit; there is reasonable biomass and protein content; and they are easily grown under containment. This chapter describes Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of the tomato nucleus using cotyledons as explants. We have used this protocol to generate transgenic lines from several tomato cultivars expressing various genes of interest and selectable markers. We also provide protocols for molecular characterization of transgenic lines and batch processing tomato fruit.

  13. Active Marine Station Metadata

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Active Marine Station Metadata is a daily metadata report for active marine bouy and C-MAN (Coastal Marine Automated Network) platforms from the National Data...

  14. Tethys Acoustic Metadata Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Tethys database houses the metadata associated with the acoustic data collection efforts by the Passive Acoustic Group. These metadata include dates, locations...

  15. Metadata in CHAOS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, Marianne; Skov, Mette; Lund, Haakon

    . To optimally sup-port the researchers a user-centred approach was taken to develop the platform and related metadata scheme. Based on the requirements a three level metadata scheme was developed: (1) core archival metadata, (2) LARM metadata, and (3) project-specific metadata. The paper analyses how...... researchers apply the metadata scheme in their research work. The study consists of two studies, a) a qualitative study of subjects and vo-cabulary of the applied metadata and annotations, and 5 semi-structured interviews about goals for tagging. The findings clearly show that the primary role of LARM.......fm is to provide access to broadcasts and provide tools to segment and manage concrete segments of radio broadcasts. Although the assigned metadata are project-specific, they serve as invaluable access points for fellow researchers due to their factual and neutral nature. The researchers particularly stress LARM...

  16. Predicting structured metadata from unstructured metadata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posch, Lisa; Panahiazar, Maryam; Dumontier, Michel; Gevaert, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Enormous amounts of biomedical data have been and are being produced by investigators all over the world. However, one crucial and limiting factor in data reuse is accurate, structured and complete description of the data or data about the data-defined as metadata. We propose a framework to predict structured metadata terms from unstructured metadata for improving quality and quantity of metadata, using the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) microarray database. Our framework consists of classifiers trained using term frequency-inverse document frequency (TF-IDF) features and a second approach based on topics modeled using a Latent Dirichlet Allocation model (LDA) to reduce the dimensionality of the unstructured data. Our results on the GEO database show that structured metadata terms can be the most accurately predicted using the TF-IDF approach followed by LDA both outperforming the majority vote baseline. While some accuracy is lost by the dimensionality reduction of LDA, the difference is small for elements with few possible values, and there is a large improvement over the majority classifier baseline. Overall this is a promising approach for metadata prediction that is likely to be applicable to other datasets and has implications for researchers interested in biomedical metadata curation and metadata prediction. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  17. Fruits and vegetables (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A healthy diet includes adding vegetables and fruit every day. Vegetables like broccoli, green beans, leafy greens, zucchini, cauliflower, cabbage, carrots, and tomatoes are low in calories and high in fiber, vitamins, and minerals. ...

  18. Vegetation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Epstein, H.E.; Walker, D.A.; Bhatt, U.S.

    2012-01-01

    • Over the past 30 years (1982-2011), the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), an index of green vegetation, has increased 15.5% in the North American Arctic and 8.2% in the Eurasian Arctic. In the more southern regions of Arctic tundra, the estimated aboveground plant biomass has...... in vegetation (including shrub tundra expansion) and thunderstorm activity, each a result of Arctic warming, have created conditions that favor a more active Arctic fire regime....

  19. Learning resource metadata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Temesio

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Metadata of educational resources are subject of analysis including LOM, OBAA and in a particular way LOM-ES Profile and accesibility VII annex. Conclusions are the importance of getting quality descriptions of resources to fulfill discovery, localization and reuse operations. The information professionals have a principal importance in the metadata registration.

  20. Visualization of JPEG Metadata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik Mohamad, Kamaruddin; Deris, Mustafa Mat

    There are a lot of information embedded in JPEG image than just graphics. Visualization of its metadata would benefit digital forensic investigator to view embedded data including corrupted image where no graphics can be displayed in order to assist in evidence collection for cases such as child pornography or steganography. There are already available tools such as metadata readers, editors and extraction tools but mostly focusing on visualizing attribute information of JPEG Exif. However, none have been done to visualize metadata by consolidating markers summary, header structure, Huffman table and quantization table in a single program. In this paper, metadata visualization is done by developing a program that able to summarize all existing markers, header structure, Huffman table and quantization table in JPEG. The result shows that visualization of metadata helps viewing the hidden information within JPEG more easily.

  1. Biochemical evaluation of tomato germplasm part I: workflow and methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Of the seed crop species conserved at PGRU, tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) is the largest in terms of numbers of accessions. Furthermore, tomato ranks very high among vegetable crops in economic importance to the US. We are characterizing a tomato core collection for traits that are of interest to...

  2. Postharvest fungal deterioration of tomato ( Lycopersicum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research set out to identify fungi associated with physically damaged tomato and pepper and verify their effects on the nutritional composition of these vegetables. Healthy looking and physically damaged tomatoes and pepper were sourced from Mile 12 Market in Lagos state. Fungi (Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus ...

  3. Application of visible/near infrared spectroscopy to quality control of fresh fruits and vegetables in large-scale mass distribution channels: a preliminary test on carrots and tomatoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beghi, Roberto; Giovenzana, Valentina; Tugnolo, Alessio; Guidetti, Riccardo

    2017-11-02

    The market for fruits and vegetables is mainly controlled by the mass distribution channel (MDC). MDC buyers do not have useful instruments to rapidly evaluate the quality of the products. Decisions by the buyers are driven primarily by pricing strategies rather than product quality. Simple, rapid and easy-to-use methods for objectively evaluating the quality of postharvest products are needed. The present study aimed to use visible and near-infrared (vis/NIR) spectroscopy to estimate some qualitative parameters of two low-price products (carrots and tomatoes) of various brands, as well as evaluate the applicability of this technique for use in stores. A non-destructive optical system (vis/NIR spectrophotometer with a reflection probe, spectral range 450-1650 nm) was tested. The differences in quality among carrots and tomatoes purchased from 13 stores on various dates were examined. The reference quality parameters (firmness, water content, soluble solids content, pH and colour) were correlated with the spectral readings. The models derived from the optical data gave positive results, in particular for the prediction of the soluble solids content and the colour, with better results for tomatoes than for carrots. The application of optical techniques may help MDC buyers to monitor the quality of postharvest products, leading to an effective optimization of the entire supply chain. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. Tomato Preserves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Wendy Tessman

    1996-01-01

    Describes a project in which students selected seeds from two heirloom varieties of tomatoes, sowed the seeds, harvested the tomatoes, and fermented the seeds. Details are provided for each step of the project and the school address is included so that other students can begin similar projects. (DDR)

  5. NAIP National Metadata

    Data.gov (United States)

    Farm Service Agency, Department of Agriculture — The NAIP National Metadata Map contains USGS Quarter Quad and NAIP Seamline boundaries for every year NAIP imagery has been collected. Clicking on the map also makes...

  6. ATLAS Metadata Task Force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ATLAS Collaboration; Costanzo, D.; Cranshaw, J.; Gadomski, S.; Jezequel, S.; Klimentov, A.; Lehmann Miotto, G.; Malon, D.; Mornacchi, G.; Nemethy, P.; Pauly, T.; von der Schmitt, H.; Barberis, D.; Gianotti, F.; Hinchliffe, I.; Mapelli, L.; Quarrie, D.; Stapnes, S.

    2007-04-04

    This document provides an overview of the metadata, which are needed to characterizeATLAS event data at different levels (a complete run, data streams within a run, luminosity blocks within a run, individual events).

  7. GSN Photo Metadata

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — GSN Photo Metadata contains photographs of Global Climate Observing System (GCOS) Surface Network (GSN) stations that have been submitted to the National Climatic...

  8. Data, Metadata - Who Cares?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Peter

    2013-04-01

    There is a traditional saying that metadata are understandable, semantic-rich, and searchable. Data, on the other hand, are big, with no accessible semantics, and just downloadable. Not only has this led to an imbalance of search support form a user perspective, but also underneath to a deep technology divide often using relational databases for metadata and bespoke archive solutions for data. Our vision is that this barrier will be overcome, and data and metadata become searchable likewise, leveraging the potential of semantic technologies in combination with scalability technologies. Ultimately, in this vision ad-hoc processing and filtering will not distinguish any longer, forming a uniformly accessible data universe. In the European EarthServer initiative, we work towards this vision by federating database-style raster query languages with metadata search and geo broker technology. We present our approach taken, how it can leverage OGC standards, the benefits envisaged, and first results.

  9. The RBV metadata catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andre, Francois; Fleury, Laurence; Gaillardet, Jerome; Nord, Guillaume

    2015-04-01

    RBV (Réseau des Bassins Versants) is a French initiative to consolidate the national efforts made by more than 15 elementary observatories funded by various research institutions (CNRS, INRA, IRD, IRSTEA, Universities) that study river and drainage basins. The RBV Metadata Catalogue aims at giving an unified vision of the work produced by every observatory to both the members of the RBV network and any external person interested by this domain of research. Another goal is to share this information with other existing metadata portals. Metadata management is heterogeneous among observatories ranging from absence to mature harvestable catalogues. Here, we would like to explain the strategy used to design a state of the art catalogue facing this situation. Main features are as follows : - Multiple input methods: Metadata records in the catalog can either be entered with the graphical user interface, harvested from an existing catalogue or imported from information system through simplified web services. - Hierarchical levels: Metadata records may describe either an observatory, one of its experimental site or a single dataset produced by one instrument. - Multilingualism: Metadata can be easily entered in several configurable languages. - Compliance to standards : the backoffice part of the catalogue is based on a CSW metadata server (Geosource) which ensures ISO19115 compatibility and the ability of being harvested (globally or partially). On going tasks focus on the use of SKOS thesaurus and SensorML description of the sensors. - Ergonomy : The user interface is built with the GWT Framework to offer a rich client application with a fully ajaxified navigation. - Source code sharing : The work has led to the development of reusable components which can be used to quickly create new metadata forms in other GWT applications You can visit the catalogue (http://portailrbv.sedoo.fr/) or contact us by email rbv@sedoo.fr.

  10. Geographical distribution and prevalence of the main tomato fungal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tomato is one of the most economically important vegetable crops in Benin and its production represents more than 51% of the total production of vegetable crops. The ecological peculiarity of its farming exposes it to diseases and pests. Tomato wilt constitutes the major phytosanitary constraint for its production. To identify ...

  11. Metadata Extraction and Search Interfaces - Specification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demidova, Elena; Zenz, Gideon; Olmedilla, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    The Metadata Extraction and Search Interfaces offer a framework which allows for crawling specific knowledge resources and extraction their metadata. Furthermore, extracted metadata can be made persistently available for search using Metadata Extraction Listener and Search Interfaces of the

  12. A Metadata Action Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Keith; Clancy, Dan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The data management problem comprises data processing and data tracking. Data processing is the creation of new data based on existing data sources. Data tracking consists of storing metadata descriptions of available data. This paper addresses the data management problem by casting it as an AI planning problem. Actions are data-processing commands, plans are dataflow programs and goals are metadata descriptions of desired data products. Data manipulation is simply plan generation and execution, and a key component of data tracking is inferring the effects of an observed plan. We introduce a new action language for data management domains, called ADILM. We discuss the connection between data processing and information integration and show how a language for the latter must be modified to support the former. The paper also discusses information gathering within a data-processing framework, and show how ADILM metadata expressions are a generalization of Local Completeness.

  13. SERVICE META-DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Hauptvogel

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Service meta-data plays the crucial role in the process of service specification. They can help companies to create transparent categorization of the services in the enterprise which is leading to more efficient methods of searching for required services and to understand their meaning and relevance. In the paper I have presented an example of service meta-data usage for visualization of the service execution context via associations to the surroundings of the service. It leaded to the dynamical recording of the flow of information, and provided a tool for depicting the impact of the service changes on the surrounding environment.

  14. A Programmatic View of Metadata, Metadata Services, and Metadata Flow in ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    The volume and diversity of metadata in an experiment of the size and scope of ATLAS is considerable. Even the definition of metadata may seem context-dependent: data that are primary for one purpose may be metadata for another. Trigger information and data from the Large Hadron Collider itself provide cases in point, but examples abound. Metadata about logical or physics constructs, such as data-taking periods and runs and luminosity blocks and events and algorithms, often need to be mapped to deployment and production constructs, such as datasets and jobs and files and software versions, and vice versa. Metadata at one level of granularity may have implications at another. ATLAS metadata services must integrate and federate information from inhomogeneous sources and repositories, map metadata about logical or physics constructs to deployment and production constructs, provide a means to associate metadata at one level of granularity with processing or decision-making at another, offer a coherent and ...

  15. Managing Metadata for Philatelic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Ozeran

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Stamp collectors frequently donate their stamps to cultural heritage institutions. As digitization becomes more prevalent for other kinds of materials, it is worth exploring how cultural heritage institutions are digitizing their philatelic materials. This paper begins with a review of the literature about the purpose of metadata, current metadata standards, and metadata that are relevant to philatelists. The paper then examines the digital philatelic collections of four large cultural heritage institutions, discussing the metadata standards and elements employed by these institutions. The paper concludes with a recommendation to create international standards that describe metadata management explicitly for philatelic materials.

  16. Behavior of Listeria monocytogenes inoculated into raw tomatoes and processed tomato products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuchat, L R; Brackett, R E

    1991-01-01

    Rates of death and growth of Listeria monocytogenes inoculated onto raw whole and into chopped tomatoes stored at 10 and 21 degrees C were not influenced by prior treatment of tomatoes with chlorine or packaging under an atmosphere of 3% O2 and 97% N2. Growth of the pathogen occurred in whole tomatoes held at 21 degrees C but not at 10 degrees C, while death occurred in chopped tomatoes stored at these temperatures. Likewise, growth patterns of mesophilic aerobic microorganisms, psychrotrophic microorganisms, and yeasts and molds on whole and chopped tomatoes were essentially unaffected by chlorine and modified atmosphere packaging treatments. Populations of L. monocytogenes inoculated into commercially processed tomato juice and sauce and held at 5 degrees C remained constant for 14 days. A gradual decrease in the number of viable L. monocytogenes cells was observed in juice and sauce held at 21 degrees C. In contrast, the organism died rapidly when suspended in commercial tomato ketchup at 5 and 21 degrees C. Unlike low-acid raw salad vegetables such as lettuce, broccoli, asparagus, and cauliflower on which we have observed L. monocytogenes grow at refrigeration temperatures, tomatoes are not a good growth substrate for the organism. Nevertheless, L. monocytogens can remain viable on raw whole and chopped tomatoes and in commercial tomato juice and sauce for periods extending beyond their normal shelf-life expectancy. PMID:1906697

  17. Hinokitiol Enhanced Vegetative Growth Parameters of Tomato cv. �Falkato� Compared with Salicylic Acid and Paclobutrazol under In Vitro Salinity Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behrooz ESMAEILPOUR

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the potential in vitro effect of hinokitiol on improvement of tomato seedling resistance to salinity stress. Effect of hinokitiol was compared with two anti-stress compounds, salicylic acid and paclobutrazol. Leaf numbers, shoot and root fresh weight and root fresh weight were recorded after about 8 weeks. Salt stress was accomplished by application of two levels of pure NaCl (50 and 100 mM on MS basal medium. The treatments consisted of different concentrations of hinokitiol (0, 1, 5 and 10 ppm, paclobutrazol (0, 1, 2 and 4 ?M and salicylic acid (0, 0.01, 0.1 and 1 mM. Results revealed that salinity blocked seed germination in media containing only 100 mM of pure NaCl without any treatment. In general all three compounds increased tomato seedling growth, indicating these compounds are able to alleviate the negative effect of salinity on tomato plants. However, Hinokitiol was the most efficient compound. Compared with SA, application of hinokitiol significantly increased leaf numbers, shoot length and shoot and root dry weight. Also, media containing different concentrations of hinokitiol produced higher root and shoot fresh weight than control and other treatments. Future physiological studies are needed to clarify the mechanism of induction of salt tolerance activity by hinokitiol.

  18. Spatial Vegetation Data for Zion National Park Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This metadata is for the vegetation and land-use geo-spatial database for Zion National Park and surrounding areas. The project is authorized as part of the USGS/NPS...

  19. Spatial Vegetation Data for Badlands National Park Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This metadata is for all coverages associated with the vegetation land cover and land use geospatial database for Badlands National Park and surrounding areas. The...

  20. Spatial Vegetation Data for Wupatki National Monument Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This metadata is for the vegetation and land-use geo-spatial database for Wupatki National Monument and surrounding areas. The project is authorized as part of the...

  1. Antioxidant Activity from Various Tomato Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Retno Sri Iswari

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Tomato is one of the high antioxidant potential vegetables. Nowadays, there are many techniques of tomato processings instead of fresh consumption, i.e. boiled, steamed, juiced and sauteed. Every treatment of cooking will influence the chemical compound inside the fruits and the body's nutrition intake. It is important to conduct the research on antioxidant compound especially lycopene, β-carotene, vitamin C, α-tocopherol, and its activity after processing. This research has been done using the experimental method. Tomatoes were cooked into six difference ways, and then it was extracted using the same procedure continued with antioxidant measurement. The research results showed that steaming had promoted the higher antioxidant numbers (lycopene. α-tocopherol, β-carotene and vitamin C and higher TCA and antioxidant activities in the tomatoes than other processings. It was indicated that steaming was the best way to enhance amount, capacity and activities of antioxidants of the tomatoes.

  2. Genomics of Fungal Disease Resistance in Tomato

    OpenAIRE

    Panthee, Dilip R.; Chen, Feng

    2010-01-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) is an important vegetable crop worldwide. Often times, its production is hindered by fungal diseases. Important fungal diseases limiting tomato production are late blight, caused by Phytophthora infestans, early blight, caused by Alternaria solanii, and septoria leaf spot, caused by Septoria lycopersici, fusarium wilt caused by Fusarium oxysporium fsp. oxysporium, and verticilium wilt caused by Verticilium dahlea. The Phytophthora infestans is the same fungus tha...

  3. 21 CFR 155.190 - Canned tomatoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... (tomato juice). (iv) Tomato paste, or tomato puree, or tomato pulp complying with the compositional... appropriate. (e) The name of the packing medium: “tomato paste”, “tomato puree”, or “tomato pulp” as provided...

  4. The Case for Open Metadata

    OpenAIRE

    Chessell, Mandy

    2017-01-01

    An open source project called Apache Atlas was approved as an incubator project on 5th May 2015. This project aims to provide an open metadata repository and information governance frameworks. The appearance of metadata management in open source offers an exciting opportunity to rethink the way we manage data in data science projects to create trust to both share and consume data. This paper describes the role of Apache Atlas in changing the availability and quality of metadata, which will in...

  5. Metazen - metadata capture for metagenomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischof, Jared; Harrison, Travis; Paczian, Tobias; Glass, Elizabeth; Wilke, Andreas; Meyer, Folker

    2014-01-01

    As the impact and prevalence of large-scale metagenomic surveys grow, so does the acute need for more complete and standards compliant metadata. Metadata (data describing data) provides an essential complement to experimental data, helping to answer questions about its source, mode of collection, and reliability. Metadata collection and interpretation have become vital to the genomics and metagenomics communities, but considerable challenges remain, including exchange, curation, and distribution. Currently, tools are available for capturing basic field metadata during sampling, and for storing, updating and viewing it. Unfortunately, these tools are not specifically designed for metagenomic surveys; in particular, they lack the appropriate metadata collection templates, a centralized storage repository, and a unique ID linking system that can be used to easily port complete and compatible metagenomic metadata into widely used assembly and sequence analysis tools. Metazen was developed as a comprehensive framework designed to enable metadata capture for metagenomic sequencing projects. Specifically, Metazen provides a rapid, easy-to-use portal to encourage early deposition of project and sample metadata. Metazen is an interactive tool that aids users in recording their metadata in a complete and valid format. A defined set of mandatory fields captures vital information, while the option to add fields provides flexibility.

  6. In Vitro screening of tomato genotypes for drought resistance using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Drought is a major abiotic factor that limits plant growth and productivity. Tomato is an important vegetable crop and area under production is limited by irrigation water scarcity. Effort was made to screen tomato germplasm under in vitro condition using polyethylene glycol (PEG) at four concentrations (0, 20, 40 and 60 g/l) ...

  7. In vitro response of promising tomato genotypes for tolerance to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-06-28

    Jun 28, 2010 ... Drought is a major abiotic factor that limits plant growth and productivity. Tomato is an important vegetable crop and area under production is limited by irrigation water scarcity. Four cultivars of tomato were grown as callus cultures under conditions of water stress, which was induced by addition.

  8. INDUCED-GROWTH AND YIE BY SODIUM AZIDE IN TOMATO ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    userpc

    the large family Solanaceae (Purseglove, 1968. Hille et al., 1989). Tomato isnowadays the major vegetable crops cultivated the world, grown in a wide range o environments comprising natural and protecte conditions (Dhaliwal et al., 2002) of both th tropical, sub-tropical and temperate parts o the world.However, tomato is a ...

  9. Antioxidant activity in selected tomato genotypes cultivated in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study is a compilation of results obtained at the Vegetable Research and Development Station Bacau regarding the influence of the culture system on the quantitative and qualitative yield of tomatoes. The present study provides comparative information regarding yield achievements of tomato genotypes ...

  10. Evaluation of a Biostimulant (Pepton Based in Enzymatic Hydrolyzed Animal Protein in Comparison to Seaweed Extracts on Root Development, Vegetative Growth, Flowering, and Yield of Gold Cherry Tomatoes Grown under Low Stress Ambient Field Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Polo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this experiment were to determine the effects of different application rates of an enzyme hydrolyzed animal protein biostimulant (Pepton compared to a standard application rate of a biostimulant derived from seaweed extract (Acadian on plant growth parameters and yield of gold cherry tomatoes (Solanum lycopersicum L.. Biostimulant treatments were applied starting at 15 days after transplant and every 2 weeks thereafter for a total of 5 applications. One treatment group received no biostimulant (Control. Three treatment groups (Pepton-2, Pepton-3, Pepton-4 received Pepton at different application rates equivalent to 2, 3, or 4 kg/ha applied by foliar (first 2 applications and by irrigation (last 3 applications. Another treatment group (Acadian received Acadian at 1.5 L/ha by irrigation for all five applications. All groups received the regular fertilizer application for this crop at transplantation, flowering, and fruiting periods. There were four plots per treatment group. Each plot had a surface area of 21 m2 that consisted of two rows that were 7 m long and 1.5 m wide. Plant height, stem diameter, distance from head to bouquet flowering, fruit set distance between the entire cluster and cluster flowering fruit set, leaf length, and number of leaves per plant was recorded for 20 plants (5 plants per plot at 56 and 61 days after the first application. Root length and diameter of cherry tomatoes were determined at harvest from 20 randomly selected plants. Harvesting yield per plot was registered and production per hectare was calculated. Both biostimulants improved (P < 0.05 all vegetative parameters compared with the control group. There was a positive linear (P < 0.001 effect of Pepton application rate for all parameters. The calculated yield was 7.8 and 1 Ton/ha greater that represent 27 and 2.9% higher production for Pepton applied at 4 kg/ha compared to the control and to Acadian, respectively. In conclusion, Pepton was

  11. Flexible Community-driven Metadata with the Component Metadata Infrastructure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Windhouwer, M.; Goosen, Twan; Mosutka, Jozef; Van Uytvanck, D.; Broeder, D.

    Many researchers, from the humanities and other domains, have a strong need to study resources in close detail. Nowadays more and more of these resources are available online. To make these resources discoverable, they are described with metadata. These metadata records are collected and made

  12. Metadata Realities for Cyberinfrastructure: Data Authors as Metadata Creators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayernik, Matthew Stephen

    2011-01-01

    As digital data creation technologies become more prevalent, data and metadata management are necessary to make data available, usable, sharable, and storable. Researchers in many scientific settings, however, have little experience or expertise in data and metadata management. In this dissertation, I explore the everyday data and metadata…

  13. Consumer sensory analysis of high flavonoid transgenic tomatoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Wansang; Miller, Rebecca; Park, Jungeun; Park, Sunghun

    2014-06-01

    Tomatoes have ameliorative effects on cardiovascular disease and cancer. In this study, metabolic engineering of flavonoids was utilized to improve the nutritional value of tomatoes by increasing flavonol and anthocyanin content. Total flavonol content was significantly increased in both the peel and flesh using the onion chalcone isomerase (CHI) gene. The Delila (Del) and Rosea1 (Ros1) genes from the snapdragon Antirrhinum majus were concomitantly expressed to produce an anthocyanin-rich tomato which was purple in color. Sensory evaluation by a panel of 81 untrained consumers revealed no significant difference in liking of color or texture between CHI, Del/Ros1, and wild-type tomatoes. Consumers reported marginal but significantly higher preference for the flavor and overall liking of CHI tomatoes over Del/Ros1 and wild-type tomatoes. This study is the first to report the results of sensory tests of transgenic tomatoes by a consumer panel representing the general consuming public. Transgenic procedures were used to increase the flavonol and anthocyanin contents of tomatoes. An untrained consumer panel scored flavor and overall liking of the 2 transgenic tomatoes higher than wild-type tomatoes and reported no difference in liking of texture or color between the 3 tomatoes. After participating in the sensory study, 14% of the panelists changed their attitudes positively toward transgenic vegetables and 96% of the consumers on the panel reported that they would buy transgenic food if they believed that it would promote health. © 2014 Institute of Food Technologists®

  14. Federating Metadata Catalogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baru, C.; Lin, K.

    2009-04-01

    The Geosciences Network project (www.geongrid.org) has been developing cyberinfrastructure for data sharing in the Earth Science community based on a service-oriented architecture. The project defines a standard "software stack", which includes a standardized set of software modules and corresponding service interfaces. The system employs Grid certificates for distributed user authentication. The GEON Portal provides online access to these services via a set of portlets. This service-oriented approach has enabled the GEON network to easily expand to new sites and deploy the same infrastructure in new projects. To facilitate interoperation with other distributed geoinformatics environments, service standards are being defined and implemented for catalog services and federated search across distributed catalogs. The need arises because there may be multiple metadata catalogs in a distributed system, for example, for each institution, agency, geographic region, and/or country. Ideally, a geoinformatics user should be able to search across all such catalogs by making a single search request. In this paper, we describe our implementation for such a search capability across federated metadata catalogs in the GEON service-oriented architecture. The GEON catalog can be searched using spatial, temporal, and other metadata-based search criteria. The search can be invoked as a Web service and, thus, can be imbedded in any software application. The need for federated catalogs in GEON arises because, (i) GEON collaborators at the University of Hyderabad, India have deployed their own catalog, as part of the iGEON-India effort, to register information about local resources for broader access across the network, (ii) GEON collaborators in the GEO Grid (Global Earth Observations Grid) project at AIST, Japan have implemented a catalog for their ASTER data products, and (iii) we have recently deployed a search service to access all data products from the EarthScope project in the US

  15. Peeling tomato paste subsidies : the impact of a revision of the CMO for processing tomatoes on European horticulture

    OpenAIRE

    Bunte, F.H.J.; Roza, P.

    2007-01-01

    This report evaluates the effects of a possible reform of the Common Market Organisation for processing tomatoes on production and trade of fruits and vegetables in Europe. The report describes the processing tomato supply chain and EU policy since 1978 and analyses the effects of possible reforms of EU policy using the HORTUS simulation model.

  16. Peeling tomato paste subsidies : the impact of a revision of the CMO for processing tomatoes on European horticulture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bunte, F.H.J.; Roza, P.

    2007-01-01

    This report evaluates the effects of a possible reform of the Common Market Organisation for processing tomatoes on production and trade of fruits and vegetables in Europe. The report describes the processing tomato supply chain and EU policy since 1978 and analyses the effects of possible reforms

  17. Improving the Tanzanian-Mombasa cross-border tomato product chain: a study of Mombasa tomato market : draft report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Onduru, D.; Wiersinga, R.C.; Jager, de A.

    2008-01-01

    The study of Mombasa tomato market is part of the project “Development of Commercial Field Vegetable Production, Distribution and Marketing for the East African Market”. The project is implementing a pilot activity on improving crossborder tomato chains from Ngarenanyuki, Tanzania, to Mombasa,

  18. A study of the South African tomato curly stunt virus pathosystem: epidemiology, molecular diversity and resistance

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    PhD In South Africa, tomato (Solanum /ycopersicum) is an important vegetable crop with considerable nutritional and economic value. Over the last decade, begomovirus (family Geminiviridae) infections associated with an upsurge of the whitefly vector, Bemisia tabaci, on tomato crops has become a serious threat to sustainable tomato production in South Africa. Begomovirus disease control in tomato is challenging and requires an integrated "pest" and "vector" management strategy, primarily ba...

  19. Philadelphia and the Tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew F.; Kling, Tatiana

    This booklet describes for elementary students the many contributions of people, traveling many places, over many years to bring the tomato to Philadelphia. The booklet includes the following: (1) "Introduction to the Tomato"; (2) "Where Does the Tomato Come From?"; (3) "The Spanish Tomato"; (4) "The Philadelphia…

  20. Mercury Toolset for Spatiotemporal Metadata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Bruce E.; Palanisamy, Giri; Devarakonda, Ranjeet; Rhyne, B. Timothy; Lindsley, Chris; Green, James

    2010-01-01

    Mercury (http://mercury.ornl.gov) is a set of tools for federated harvesting, searching, and retrieving metadata, particularly spatiotemporal metadata. Version 3.0 of the Mercury toolset provides orders of magnitude improvements in search speed, support for additional metadata formats, integration with Google Maps for spatial queries, facetted type search, support for RSS (Really Simple Syndication) delivery of search results, and enhanced customization to meet the needs of the multiple projects that use Mercury. It provides a single portal to very quickly search for data and information contained in disparate data management systems, each of which may use different metadata formats. Mercury harvests metadata and key data from contributing project servers distributed around the world and builds a centralized index. The search interfaces then allow the users to perform a variety of fielded, spatial, and temporal searches across these metadata sources. This centralized repository of metadata with distributed data sources provides extremely fast search results to the user, while allowing data providers to advertise the availability of their data and maintain complete control and ownership of that data. Mercury periodically (typically daily) harvests metadata sources through a collection of interfaces and re-indexes these metadata to provide extremely rapid search capabilities, even over collections with tens of millions of metadata records. A number of both graphical and application interfaces have been constructed within Mercury, to enable both human users and other computer programs to perform queries. Mercury was also designed to support multiple different projects, so that the particular fields that can be queried and used with search filters are easy to configure for each different project.

  1. ATLAS Metadata Interface (AMI), a generic metadata framework

    CERN Document Server

    Fulachier, Jerome; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS Metadata Interface (AMI) is a mature application of more than 15 years of existence. Mainly used by the ATLAS experiment at CERN, it consists of a very generic tool ecosystem for metadata aggregation and cataloguing. We briefly describe the architecture, the main services and the benefits of using AMI in big collaborations, especially for high energy physics. We focus on the recent improvements, for instance: the lightweight clients (Python, Javascript, C++), the new smart task server system and the Web 2.0 AMI framework for simplifying the development of metadata-oriented web interfaces.

  2. ATLAS Metadata Interface (AMI), a generic metadata framework

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)573735; The ATLAS collaboration; Odier, Jerome; Lambert, Fabian

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS Metadata Interface (AMI) is a mature application of more than 15 years of existence. Mainly used by the ATLAS experiment at CERN, it consists of a very generic tool ecosystem for metadata aggregation and cataloguing. We briefly describe the architecture, the main services and the benefits of using AMI in big collaborations, especially for high energy physics. We focus on the recent improvements, for instance: the lightweight clients (Python, JavaScript, C++), the new smart task server system and the Web 2.0 AMI framework for simplifying the development of metadata-oriented web interfaces.

  3. ATLAS Metadata Interface (AMI), a generic metadata framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulachier, J.; Odier, J.; Lambert, F.; ATLAS Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    The ATLAS Metadata Interface (AMI) is a mature application of more than 15 years of existence. Mainly used by the ATLAS experiment at CERN, it consists of a very generic tool ecosystem for metadata aggregation and cataloguing. We briefly describe the architecture, the main services and the benefits of using AMI in big collaborations, especially for high energy physics. We focus on the recent improvements, for instance: the lightweight clients (Python, JavaScript, C++), the new smart task server system and the Web 2.0 AMI framework for simplifying the development of metadata-oriented web interfaces.

  4. Developing the CUAHSI Metadata Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piasecki, M.; Bermudez, L.; Islam, S.; Beran, B.

    2004-12-01

    The Hydrologic Information System (HIS), of the Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Science Inc., (CUAHSI), has as one of its goals to improve access to large volume, high quality, and heterogeneous hydrologic data sets. This will be attained in part by adopting a community metadata profile to achieve consistent descriptions that will facilitate data discovery. However, common standards are quite general in nature and typically lack domain specific vocabularies, complicating the adoption of standards for specific communities. We will show and demonstrate the problems encountered in the process of adopting ISO standards to create a CUAHSI metadata profile. The final schema is expressed in a simple metadata format, Metadata Template File (MTF), to leverage metadata annotations/viewer tools already developed by the San Diego Super Computer Center. The steps performed to create an MTF starting from ISO 19115:2003 are the following: 1) creation of ontologies using the Web Ontology Language (OWL) for ISO:19115 2003 and related ISO/TC 211 documents; 2) conceptualization in OWL of related hydrologic vocabularies such as NASA's Global Change Master Directory and units from the Hydrologic Handbook; 3) definition of CUAHSI profile by importing and extending the previous ontologies; 4) explicit creation of CUAHSI core set 5) export of the core set to MTF); 6) definition of metadata blocks for arbitrary digital objects (e.g. time series vs static-spatial data) using ISO's methodology for feature cataloguing; and 7) export of metadata blocks to MTF.

  5. Assessing Field Spectroscopy Metadata Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara A. Rasaiah

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the proposed criteria for measuring the quality and completeness of field spectroscopy metadata in a spectral archive. Definitions for metadata quality and completeness for field spectroscopy datasets are introduced. Unique methods for measuring quality and completeness of metadata to meet the requirements of field spectroscopy datasets are presented. Field spectroscopy metadata quality can be defined in terms of (but is not limited to logical consistency, lineage, semantic and syntactic error rates, compliance with a quality standard, quality assurance by a recognized authority, and reputational authority of the data owners/data creators. Two spectral libraries are examined as case studies of operationalized metadata policies, and the degree to which they are aligned with the needs of field spectroscopy scientists. The case studies reveal that the metadata in publicly available spectral datasets are underperforming on the quality and completeness measures. This paper is part two in a series examining the issues central to a metadata standard for field spectroscopy datasets.

  6. Comparison and evaluation of the roles of tomato farmer cooperatives in Taiwan and The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lin, B.-S.

    2012-01-01

    Tomato is one of the most popular vegetables all over the world and the production was 145 million tonnes in 2011. In Taiwan and The Netherlands, tomato also became an important vegetable nowadays. In both countries, the farmer cooperatives are the way to help farmers accessing markets. However,

  7. Making Metadata Better with CMR and MMT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilman, Jason Arthur; Shum, Dana

    2016-01-01

    Ensuring complete, consistent and high quality metadata is a challenge for metadata providers and curators. The CMR and MMT systems provide providers and curators options to build in metadata quality from the start and also assess and improve the quality of already existing metadata.

  8. Metadata Dictionary Database: A Proposed Tool for Academic Library Metadata Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southwick, Silvia B.; Lampert, Cory

    2011-01-01

    This article proposes a metadata dictionary (MDD) be used as a tool for metadata management. The MDD is a repository of critical data necessary for managing metadata to create "shareable" digital collections. An operational definition of metadata management is provided. The authors explore activities involved in metadata management in…

  9. The metadata manual a practical workbook

    CERN Document Server

    Lubas, Rebecca; Schneider, Ingrid

    2013-01-01

    Cultural heritage professionals have high levels of training in metadata. However, the institutions in which they practice often depend on support staff, volunteers, and students in order to function. With limited time and funding for training in metadata creation for digital collections, there are often many questions about metadata without a reliable, direct source for answers. The Metadata Manual provides such a resource, answering basic metadata questions that may appear, and exploring metadata from a beginner's perspective. This title covers metadata basics, XML basics, Dublin Core, VRA C

  10. Detection of human norovirus in cherry tomatoes, blueberries and vegetable salad by using a receptor-binding capture and magnetic sequestration (RBCMS) method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Liangwen; Zhang, Qigang; Li, Xiang; Tian, Peng

    2012-06-01

    In this study, we developed a sensitive receptor-binding capture and magnetic sequestration (RBCMS) method capable of concentrating human norovirus (HuNoV) from various food samples within few hours. We found that distilled water was suitable for the elution of HuNoV from inoculated tomatoes and blueberries, and glycine buffer improved the elution of HuNoV from inoculated salad. A significant improvement in post-extraction RNA yield was achieved by sequentially heat-releasing and column-extracting over either technique alone. The viral recovery of the RBCMS method was significantly higher than both the same-day PEG method (90 min PEG precipitation) and the two-day PEG method (overnight PEG precipitation) with a recovery rate of 8.75%, 1.03% and 5.40%, respectively. The detection limit of HuNoV by RBCMS method was significantly improved to 0.056 RTU. The estimated minimal concentration powers (MCPs) were 6.11, 30.48, and 63.60-fold for the same-day PEG, two-day PEG, and RBCMS methods, respectively. RNase protection assay suggests that the viral genome was protected from RNase attack by remaining within the viral capsid. The signal detected by the RBCMS method might be more biologically relevant, as it requires both intact viral capsid to bind to HBGA receptors and the presence of viral genome to be amplified. Overall, the RBCMS method takes significantly less time than current PEG precipitation methods, recovers a higher yield of HuNoV from various food samples, and hence exhibits higher sensitivity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. phosphorus retention data and metadata

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — phosphorus retention in wetlands data and metadata. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Lane , C., and B. Autrey. Phosphorus retention of...

  12. Why metadata matters in archaeology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Wise

    1997-04-01

    Full Text Available Metadata means 'data about data' or 'information about information'. It is a technique for cataloging the contents of information files, whether digital or paper-based, so related resources can be more easily linked and so potential users can decide quickly and easily whether to spend time exploring the file contents in detail. In our digital age with ever-increasing quantities of archaeological data being collected, stored, and distributed in computer-readable forms, interconnection of information is becoming essential. In this paper we provide a general background to metadata especially for archaeologists. Three of the major types of metadata (the Dublin Core, Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC, and Direct Interchange Format (DIF are discussed in order to provide an overview for the variety of metadata approaches which exist. The Dublin Core seems the most useful metadata system for the majority of archaeologists as it provides an easy and concise 15 element core designed to describe any type of information. Though much more complicated, both FGDC and DIF are useful to archaeologists who work with more specialized categories of information (e.g. satellite images and palaeoenvironmental data. An archaeological example of Dublin Core style metadata in action is included.

  13. Tomato contact dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Evy; Christensen, Lars P; Andersen, Klaus Ejner

    2012-01-01

    The tomato plant (Solanum lycopersicum) is an important crop worldwide. Whereas immediate-type reactions to tomato fruits are well known, contact dermatitis caused by tomatoes or tomato plants is rarely reported. The aims of this study were to present new data on contact sensitization to tomato...... plants and review the literature on contact dermatitis caused by both plants and fruits. An ether extract of tomato plants made as the original oleoresin plant extracts, was used in aimed patch testing, and between 2005 and 2011. 8 of 93 patients (9%) tested positive to the oleoresin extracts....... This prevalence is in accordance with the older literature that reports tomato plants as occasional sensitizers. The same applies to tomato fruits, which, in addition, may cause protein contact dermatitis. The allergens of the plant are unknown, but both heat-stable and heat-labile constituents seem...

  14. Genomics of Fungal Disease Resistance in Tomato

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panthee, Dilip R.; Chen, Feng

    2010-01-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) is an important vegetable crop worldwide. Often times, its production is hindered by fungal diseases. Important fungal diseases limiting tomato production are late blight, caused by Phytophthora infestans, early blight, caused by Alternaria solanii, and septoria leaf spot, caused by Septoria lycopersici, fusarium wilt caused by Fusarium oxysporium fsp. oxysporium, and verticilium wilt caused by Verticilium dahlea. The Phytophthora infestans is the same fungus that caused the devastating loss of potato in Europe in 1845. A similar magnitude of crop loss in tomato has not occurred but Phytophthora infestans has caused the complete loss of tomato crops around the world on a small scale. Several attempts have been made through conventional breeding and the molecular biological approaches to understand the biology of host-pathogen interaction so that the disease can be managed and crop loss prevented. In this review, we present a comprehensive analysis of information produced by molecular genetic and genomic experiments on host-pathogen interactions of late blight, early blight, septoria leaf spot, verticilim wilt and fusarium wilt in tomato. Furthermore, approaches adopted to manage these diseases in tomato including genetic transformation are presented. Attempts made to link molecular markers with putative genes and their use in crop improvement are discussed. PMID:20808521

  15. Evaluating and Evolving Metadata in Multiple Dialects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozimor, J.; Habermann, T.; Powers, L. A.; Gordon, S.

    2016-12-01

    Despite many long-term homogenization efforts, communities continue to develop focused metadata standards along with related recommendations and (typically) XML representations (aka dialects) for sharing metadata content. Different representations easily become obstacles to sharing information because each representation generally requires a set of tools and skills that are designed, built, and maintained specifically for that representation. In contrast, community recommendations are generally described, at least initially, at a more conceptual level and are more easily shared. For example, most communities agree that dataset titles should be included in metadata records although they write the titles in different ways. This situation has led to the development of metadata repositories that can ingest and output metadata in multiple dialects. As an operational example, the NASA Common Metadata Repository (CMR) includes three different metadata dialects (DIF, ECHO, and ISO 19115-2). These systems raise a new question for metadata providers: if I have a choice of metadata dialects, which should I use and how do I make that decision? We have developed a collection of metadata evaluation tools that can be used to evaluate metadata records in many dialects for completeness with respect to recommendations from many organizations and communities. We have applied these tools to over 8000 collection and granule metadata records in four different dialects. This large collection of identical content in multiple dialects enables us to address questions about metadata and dialect evolution and to answer those questions quantitatively. We will describe those tools and results from evaluating the NASA CMR metadata collection.

  16. Master Metadata Repository and Metadata-Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Edward; Reed, Nate; Zhang, Wen

    2007-01-01

    A master metadata repository (MMR) software system manages the storage and searching of metadata pertaining to data from national and international satellite sources of the Global Ocean Data Assimilation Experiment (GODAE) High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature Pilot Project [GHRSSTPP]. These sources produce a total of hundreds of data files daily, each file classified as one of more than ten data products representing global sea-surface temperatures. The MMR is a relational database wherein the metadata are divided into granulelevel records [denoted file records (FRs)] for individual satellite files and collection-level records [denoted data set descriptions (DSDs)] that describe metadata common to all the files from a specific data product. FRs and DSDs adhere to the NASA Directory Interchange Format (DIF). The FRs and DSDs are contained in separate subdatabases linked by a common field. The MMR is configured in MySQL database software with custom Practical Extraction and Reporting Language (PERL) programs to validate and ingest the metadata records. The database contents are converted into the Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) standard format by use of the Extensible Markup Language (XML). A Web interface enables users to search for availability of data from all sources.

  17. On the Origin of Metadata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Coppens

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Metadata has been around and has evolved for centuries, albeit not recognized as such. Medieval manuscripts typically had illuminations at the start of each chapter, being both a kind of signature for the author writing the script and a pictorial chapter anchor for the illiterates at the time. Nowadays, there is so much fragmented information on the Internet that users sometimes fail to distinguish the real facts from some bended truth, let alone being able to interconnect different facts. Here, the metadata can both act as noise-reductors for detailed recommendations to the end-users, as it can be the catalyst to interconnect related information. Over time, metadata thus not only has had different modes of information, but furthermore, metadata’s relation of information to meaning, i.e., “semantics”, evolved. Darwin’s evolutionary propositions, from “species have an unlimited reproductive capacity”, over “natural selection”, to “the cooperation of mutations leads to adaptation to the environment” show remarkable parallels to both metadata’s different modes of information and to its relation of information to meaning over time. In this paper, we will show that the evolution of the use of (metadata can be mapped to Darwin’s nine evolutionary propositions. As mankind and its behavior are products of an evolutionary process, the evolutionary process of metadata with its different modes of information is on the verge of a new-semantic-era.

  18. Spatial Vegetation Data for Theodore Roosevelt National Park Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This metadata is for all coverages associated with the vegetation land cover and land use geo-spatial database for Theodore Roosevelt National Park and surrounding...

  19. Spatial Vegetation Data for San Antonio Missions National Historical Park Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This metadata is for the vegetation and land-use geo-spatial database for San Antonio Missions National Historical Park (SAAN) and surrounding areas. This project is...

  20. Spatial Vegetation Data for Craters of Moon National Monument and Preserve Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This metadata is for the vegetation and land-use geo-spatial database for Craters of Moon National Monument and Preserve (CRMO), Idaho and surrounding areas. This...

  1. Spatial Vegetation Data for Lyndon B. Johnson National Historical Park Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — his metadata is for the vegetation and land-use geo-spatial database for Lydon B. Johnson National Historical Site and surrounding areas. This project is authorized...

  2. Spatial Vegetation Data for Fort Larned National Historic Site Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This metadata is for the vegetation and land-use geo-spatial database for Fort Larned National Historic Site and surrounding areas. This project is authorized as...

  3. Spatial Vegetation Data for Washita Battlefield National Historic Site Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This metadata is for the vegetation and land-use geo-spatial database for Washita Battlefield National Historic Site and surrounding areas. This project is...

  4. Spatial Vegetation Data for Walnut Canyon National Monument Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This metadata is for the vegetation and land-use geo-spatial database for Walnut Canyon National Monument and surrounding areas. The project is authorized as part of...

  5. Spatial Vegetation Data for Sunset Crater Volcano National Monument Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This metadata is for the vegetation and land-use geo-spatial database for Sunset Crater Volcano National Monument and surrounding areas. The project is authorized as...

  6. Pu`ukohola Heiau National Historic Site Vegetation Mapping Project - Spatial Vegetation Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This metadata is for the vegetation and land-use geo-spatial database for Pu'ukohola Heiau National Historic Site (PUHE) , Island of Hawai'i and surrounding areas....

  7. Kaloko-Honokohau National Historical Park Vegetation Mapping Project - Spatial Vegetation Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This metadata is for the vegetation and land-use geo-spatial database for Kaloko-Honokohau National Historical Park (KAHO), Island of Hawai'i and surrounding areas....

  8. Spatial Vegetation Data for Grand Teton National Park Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This metadata is for the vegetation and land-use geo-spatial database for Grand Teton National Park and surrounding areas. This project is authorized as part of the...

  9. Metadata extraction using text mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seth, Shivani; Rüping, Stefan; Wrobel, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    Grid technologies have proven to be very successful in the area of eScience, and healthcare in particular, because they allow to easily combine proven solutions for data querying, integration, and analysis into a secure, scalable framework. In order to integrate the services that implement these solutions into a given Grid architecture, some metadata is required, for example information about the low-level access to these services, security information, and some documentation for the user. In this paper, we investigate how relevant metadata can be extracted from a semi-structured textual documentation of the algorithm that is underlying the service, by the use of text mining methods. In particular, we investigate the semi-automatic conversion of functions of the statistical environment R into Grid services as implemented by the GridR tool by the generation of appropriate metadata.

  10. U.S. EPA Metadata Editor (EME)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The EPA Metadata Editor (EME) allows users to create geospatial metadata that meets EPA's requirements. The tool has been developed as a desktop application that...

  11. Advanced Search Technologies for Unfamiliar Metadata

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gey, Fredric C; Chen, Hui-Min; Norgard, Barbara; Buckland, Michael; Kim, Youngin; Chen, Aitao; Lam, Byron; Purat, Jacek; Larson, Ray R

    2001-01-01

    ... (metadata vocabularies) being searched. Therefore, it is obviously beneficial to provide a bridge between the user's ordinary language and the metadata vocabularies of the unfamiliar database to compensate for abbreviated, cryptic...

  12. Metadata, Identifiers, and Physical Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arctur, D. K.; Lenhardt, W. C.; Hills, D. J.; Jenkyns, R.; Stroker, K. J.; Todd, N. S.; Dassie, E. P.; Bowring, J. F.

    2016-12-01

    Physical samples are integral to much of the research conducted by geoscientists. The samples used in this research are often obtained at significant cost and represent an important investment for future research. However, making information about samples - whether considered data or metadata - available for researchers to enable discovery is difficult: a number of key elements related to samples are difficult to characterize in common ways, such as classification, location, sample type, sampling method, repository information, subsample distribution, and instrumentation, because these differ from one domain to the next. Unifying these elements or developing metadata crosswalks is needed. The iSamples (Internet of Samples) NSF-funded Research Coordination Network (RCN) is investigating ways to develop these types of interoperability and crosswalks. Within the iSamples RCN, one of its working groups, WG1, has focused on the metadata related to physical samples. This includes identifying existing metadata standards and systems, and how they might interoperate with the International Geo Sample Number (IGSN) schema (schema.igsn.org) in order to help inform leading practices for metadata. For example, we are examining lifecycle metadata beyond the IGSN `birth certificate.' As a first step, this working group is developing a list of relevant standards and comparing their various attributes. In addition, the working group is looking toward technical solutions to facilitate developing a linked set of registries to build the web of samples. Finally, the group is also developing a comparison of sample identifiers and locators. This paper will provide an overview and comparison of the standards identified thus far, as well as an update on the technical solutions examined for integration. We will discuss how various sample identifiers might work in complementary fashion with the IGSN to more completely describe samples, facilitate retrieval of contextual information, and

  13. Enriching The Metadata On CDS

    CERN Document Server

    Chhibber, Nalin

    2014-01-01

    The project report revolves around the open source software package called Invenio. It provides the tools for management of digital assets in a repository and drives CERN Document Server. Primary objective is to enhance the existing metadata in CDS with data from other libraries. An implicit part of this task is to manage disambiguation (within incoming data), removal of multiple entries and handle replications between new and existing records. All such elements and their corresponding changes are integrated within Invenio to make the upgraded metadata available on the CDS. Latter part of the report discuss some changes related to the Invenio code-base itself.

  14. Effect of diets fortified with tomatoes or onions with variable quercetin-glycoside content on azoxymethane-induced aberrant crypt foci in the colon of rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Femia, A.P.; Caderni, G.; Ianni, M.; Salvadori, M.; Schijlen, E.G.W.M.; Collins, G.; Bovy, A.G.; Dolara, P.

    2003-01-01

    Background: Onion and tomato are vegetables widely consumed by humans and epidemiological studies show an inverse association between vegetable consumption and colon cancer risk; however, the effect on colon cancer of diets containing high levels of vegetables like onion and tomato are not clear.

  15. Survey of tomato diseases in Cameroon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fontem, DA.

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. is the most widely cultivated field vegetable crop in Cameroon. On-farm surveys were undertaken from November 1988 to October 1991 to identify nursery and field diseases in major tomato producing areas of Cameroon, Damping-off and seedling blights were the main seedling diseases. Of the eleven diseases observed in the field, the most widely distributed and severe on the foliage and fruits were early (Alternaria solani and late (Phytophthora infestans blights. Late blight was the most severe disease in the wet season while early blight was most severe in the dry season. Nine pathogens were associated with various fruit rots. This study indicates the need for an identification of appropriate control methods for early and late blights of tomato in Cameroon.

  16. BDML Metadata - SSBD | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription of data contents Meta-information of quantitative data in BDML format Data file File name: ssbd_bdml_metada...ta.zip File URL: ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/ssbd/LATEST/ssbd_bdml_metadata.zip File size: 467...KB Simple search URL http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/ssbd_bdml_metadat

  17. Omics Metadata Management Software (OMMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Arriaga, Martha O; Wilson, Susan; Williams, Kelly P; Schoeniger, Joseph; Waymire, Russel L; Powell, Amy Jo

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing projects have underappreciated information management tasks requiring detailed attention to specimen curation, nucleic acid sample preparation and sequence production methods required for downstream data processing, comparison, interpretation, sharing and reuse. The few existing metadata management tools for genome-based studies provide weak curatorial frameworks for experimentalists to store and manage idiosyncratic, project-specific information, typically offering no automation supporting unified naming and numbering conventions for sequencing production environments that routinely deal with hundreds, if not thousands of samples at a time. Moreover, existing tools are not readily interfaced with bioinformatics executables, (e.g., BLAST, Bowtie2, custom pipelines). Our application, the Omics Metadata Management Software (OMMS), answers both needs, empowering experimentalists to generate intuitive, consistent metadata, and perform analyses and information management tasks via an intuitive web-based interface. Several use cases with short-read sequence datasets are provided to validate installation and integrated function, and suggest possible methodological road maps for prospective users. Provided examples highlight possible OMMS workflows for metadata curation, multistep analyses, and results management and downloading. The OMMS can be implemented as a stand alone-package for individual laboratories, or can be configured for webbased deployment supporting geographically-dispersed projects. The OMMS was developed using an open-source software base, is flexible, extensible and easily installed and executed. The OMMS can be obtained at http://omms.sandia.gov. The OMMS can be obtained at http://omms.sandia.gov.

  18. Detection of Residual Levels and Associated Health Risk of Seven Pesticides in Fresh Eggplant and Tomato Samples from Narayanganj District, Bangladesh

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alam, Md. Nur; Chowdhury, M. Alamgir Zaman; Hossain, M. Sabir; Mijanur Rahman, Mohammad; Rahman, M. Abdur; Gan, Siew Hua; Khalil, Md. Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    Residual levels of seven frequently used pesticides were investigated in 140 samples of two common vegetables, eggplants and tomatoes, from agricultural fields in the Narayanganj district of Bangladesh...

  19. The essential guide to metadata for books

    CERN Document Server

    Register, Renee

    2013-01-01

    In The Essential Guide to Metadata for Books, you will learn exactly what you need to know to effectively generate, handle and disseminate metadata for books and ebooks. This comprehensive but digestible document will explain the life-cycle of book metadata, industry standards, XML, ONIX and the essential elements of metadata. It will also show you how effective, well-organized metadata can improve your efforts to sell a book, especially when it comes to marketing, discoverability and converting at the point of sale. This information-packed document also includes a glossary of terms

  20. A Method for Automating Geospatial Dataset Metadata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert I. Dunfey

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Metadata have long been recognised as crucial to geospatial asset management and discovery, and yet undertaking their creation remains an unenviable task often to be avoided. This paper proposes a practical approach designed to address such concerns, decomposing various data creation, management, update and documentation process steps that are subsequently leveraged to contribute towards metadata record completion. Using a customised utility embedded within a common GIS application, metadata elements are computationally derived from an imposed feature metadata standard, dataset geometry, an integrated storage protocol and pre-prepared content, and instantiated within a common geospatial discovery convention. Yielding 27 out of a 32 total metadata elements (or 15 out of 17 mandatory elements the approach demonstrably lessens the burden of metadata authorship. It also encourages improved geospatial asset management whilst outlining core requisites for developing a more open metadata strategy not bound to any particular application domain.

  1. Log-Less Metadata Management on Metadata Server for Parallel File Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianwei Liao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel metadata management mechanism on the metadata server (MDS for parallel and distributed file systems. In this technique, the client file system backs up the sent metadata requests, which have been handled by the metadata server, so that the MDS does not need to log metadata changes to nonvolatile storage for achieving highly available metadata service, as well as better performance improvement in metadata processing. As the client file system backs up certain sent metadata requests in its memory, the overhead for handling these backup requests is much smaller than that brought by the metadata server, while it adopts logging or journaling to yield highly available metadata service. The experimental results show that this newly proposed mechanism can significantly improve the speed of metadata processing and render a better I/O data throughput, in contrast to conventional metadata management schemes, that is, logging or journaling on MDS. Besides, a complete metadata recovery can be achieved by replaying the backup logs cached by all involved clients, when the metadata server has crashed or gone into nonoperational state exceptionally.

  2. Log-less metadata management on metadata server for parallel file systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Jianwei; Xiao, Guoqiang; Peng, Xiaoning

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a novel metadata management mechanism on the metadata server (MDS) for parallel and distributed file systems. In this technique, the client file system backs up the sent metadata requests, which have been handled by the metadata server, so that the MDS does not need to log metadata changes to nonvolatile storage for achieving highly available metadata service, as well as better performance improvement in metadata processing. As the client file system backs up certain sent metadata requests in its memory, the overhead for handling these backup requests is much smaller than that brought by the metadata server, while it adopts logging or journaling to yield highly available metadata service. The experimental results show that this newly proposed mechanism can significantly improve the speed of metadata processing and render a better I/O data throughput, in contrast to conventional metadata management schemes, that is, logging or journaling on MDS. Besides, a complete metadata recovery can be achieved by replaying the backup logs cached by all involved clients, when the metadata server has crashed or gone into nonoperational state exceptionally.

  3. Shareable Metadata (or Metadata for you and me)

    OpenAIRE

    Shreeves, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    Introducción a los metadatos: formatos mas comunes, y usos; su importancia para el intercambio de información y ejemplos. Introducció a les metadades: formats més comuns, i usos, la seva importància per a l'intercanvi d'informació i exemples. Introduction to metadata: the most common formats, and uses, its importance for the exchange of information and examples.

  4. Provenance Description of Metadata Vocabularies for the Long-term Maintenance of Metadata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunqiu Li

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to discuss provenance description of metadata terms and metadata vocabularies as a set of metadata terms. Provenance is crucial information to keep track of changes of metadata terms and metadata vocabularies for their consistent maintenance. Design/methodology/approach: The W3C PROV standard for general provenance description and Resource Description Framework (RDF are adopted as the base models to formally define provenance description for metadata vocabularies. Findings: This paper defines a few primitive change types of metadata terms, and a provenance description model of the metadata terms based on the primitive change types. We also provide examples of provenance description in RDF graphs to show the proposed model. Research limitations: The model proposed in this paper is defined based on a few primitive relationships (e.g. addition, deletion, and replacement between pre-version and post-version of a metadata term. The model is simplified and the practical changes of metadata terms can be more complicated than the primitive relationships discussed in the model. Practical implications: Formal provenance description of metadata vocabularies can improve maintainability of metadata vocabularies over time. Conventional maintenance of metadata terms is the maintenance of documents of terms. The proposed model enables effective and automated tracking of change history of metadata vocabularies using simple formal description scheme defined based on widely-used standards. Originality/value: Changes in metadata vocabularies may cause inconsistencies in the long-term use of metadata. This paper proposes a simple and formal scheme of provenance description of metadata vocabularies. The proposed model works as the basis of automated maintenance of metadata terms and their vocabularies and is applicable to various types of changes.

  5. The cell size distribution of tomato fruit can be changed by overexpression of CDKA1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Czerednik, A.; Busscher, M.; Angenent, G.C.; Maagd, de R.A.

    2015-01-01

    Tomato is one of the most cultivated vegetables in the world and an important ingredient of the human diet. Tomato breeders and growers face a continuous challenge of combining high quantity (production volume) with high quality (appearance, taste and perception for the consumers, processing quality

  6. Field Plot Points for Washita Battlefield National Historic Site Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This metadata is for the 2005 vegetation data points (spatial database) created from the sample vegetation plots collected at Washita Battlefield National Historic...

  7. Field Plot Points for Fort Larned National Historic Site Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This metadata is for the 2005 vegetation data points (spatial database) created from the sample vegetation plots collected at Fort Larned National Historic Site.

  8. Field Plot Points for Lyndon B. Johnson National Historical Park Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This metadata is for the 2005 vegetation data points (spatial database) created from the sample vegetation plots collected at Lyndon B. Johnson National Historical...

  9. Evolution in Metadata Quality: Common Metadata Repository's Role in NASA Curation Efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilman, Jason; Shum, Dana; Baynes, Katie

    2016-01-01

    Metadata Quality is one of the chief drivers of discovery and use of NASA EOSDIS (Earth Observing System Data and Information System) data. Issues with metadata such as lack of completeness, inconsistency, and use of legacy terms directly hinder data use. As the central metadata repository for NASA Earth Science data, the Common Metadata Repository (CMR) has a responsibility to its users to ensure the quality of CMR search results. This poster covers how we use humanizers, a technique for dealing with the symptoms of metadata issues, as well as our plans for future metadata validation enhancements. The CMR currently indexes 35K collections and 300M granules.

  10. EOS ODL Metadata On-line Viewer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, J.; Rabi, M.; Bane, B.; Ullman, R.

    2002-12-01

    We have recently developed and deployed an EOS ODL metadata on-line viewer. The EOS ODL metadata viewer is a web server that takes: 1) an EOS metadata file in Object Description Language (ODL), 2) parameters, such as which metadata to view and what style of display to use, and returns an HTML or XML document displaying the requested metadata in the requested style. This tool is developed to address widespread complaints by science community that the EOS Data and Information System (EOSDIS) metadata files in ODL are difficult to read by allowing users to upload and view an ODL metadata file in different styles using a web browser. Users have the selection to view all the metadata or part of the metadata, such as Collection metadata, Granule metadata, or Unsupported Metadata. Choices of display styles include 1) Web: a mouseable display with tabs and turn-down menus, 2) Outline: Formatted and colored text, suitable for printing, 3) Generic: Simple indented text, a direct representation of the underlying ODL metadata, and 4) None: No stylesheet is applied and the XML generated by the converter is returned directly. Not all display styles are implemented for all the metadata choices. For example, Web style is only implemented for Collection and Granule metadata groups with known attribute fields, but not for Unsupported, Other, and All metadata. The overall strategy of the ODL viewer is to transform an ODL metadata file to a viewable HTML in two steps. The first step is to convert the ODL metadata file to an XML using a Java-based parser/translator called ODL2XML. The second step is to transform the XML to an HTML using stylesheets. Both operations are done on the server side. This allows a lot of flexibility in the final result, and is very portable cross-platform. Perl CGI behind the Apache web server is used to run the Java ODL2XML, and then run the results through an XSLT processor. The EOS ODL viewer can be accessed from either a PC or a Mac using Internet

  11. The Evolving Resource Metadata Infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biemesderfer, Chris

    The search and discovery mechanisms that will facilitate and simplify systematic research on the Internet depend on systematic classifications of resources, as well as on standardized access to such metadata. The principles and technologies that will make this possible are evolving in the work of the Internet Engineering Task Force and the digital library initiatives, among others. The desired outcome is a set of standards, tools, and practices that permits both cataloging and retrieval to be comprehensive and efficient.

  12. Finding Atmospheric Composition (AC) Metadata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strub, Richard F..; Falke, Stefan; Fiakowski, Ed; Kempler, Steve; Lynnes, Chris; Goussev, Oleg

    2015-01-01

    The Atmospheric Composition Portal (ACP) is an aggregator and curator of information related to remotely sensed atmospheric composition data and analysis. It uses existing tools and technologies and, where needed, enhances those capabilities to provide interoperable access, tools, and contextual guidance for scientists and value-adding organizations using remotely sensed atmospheric composition data. The initial focus is on Essential Climate Variables identified by the Global Climate Observing System CH4, CO, CO2, NO2, O3, SO2 and aerosols. This poster addresses our efforts in building the ACP Data Table, an interface to help discover and understand remotely sensed data that are related to atmospheric composition science and applications. We harvested GCMD, CWIC, GEOSS metadata catalogs using machine to machine technologies - OpenSearch, Web Services. We also manually investigated the plethora of CEOS data providers portals and other catalogs where that data might be aggregated. This poster is our experience of the excellence, variety, and challenges we encountered.Conclusions:1.The significant benefits that the major catalogs provide are their machine to machine tools like OpenSearch and Web Services rather than any GUI usability improvements due to the large amount of data in their catalog.2.There is a trend at the large catalogs towards simulating small data provider portals through advanced services. 3.Populating metadata catalogs using ISO19115 is too complex for users to do in a consistent way, difficult to parse visually or with XML libraries, and too complex for Java XML binders like CASTOR.4.The ability to search for Ids first and then for data (GCMD and ECHO) is better for machine to machine operations rather than the timeouts experienced when returning the entire metadata entry at once. 5.Metadata harvest and export activities between the major catalogs has led to a significant amount of duplication. (This is currently being addressed) 6.Most (if not all

  13. Lycopene Content of Selected Tomato Based Products, Fruits and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Among the yellowish-red vegetables, lycopene content ranged from 14.88±0.70 mg/kg in red bell pepper to 45.49±0.98 mg/kg in ripe tomato fruit. In green leafy vegetables, lycopene ranged from 4.96±0.13 mg/kg in waterleaf to 11.79±0.28 mg/kg in bitter leaf. This study has shown that tomato paste is very rich in lycopene ...

  14. XML for catalogers and metadata librarians

    CERN Document Server

    Cole, Timothy W

    2013-01-01

    How are today's librarians to manage and describe the everexpanding volumes of resources, in both digital and print formats? The use of XML in cataloging and metadata workflows can improve metadata quality, the consistency of cataloging workflows, and adherence to standards. This book is intended to enable current and future catalogers and metadata librarians to progress beyond a bare surfacelevel acquaintance with XML, thereby enabling them to integrate XML technologies more fully into their cataloging workflows. Building on the wealth of work on library descriptive practices, cataloging, and metadata, XML for Catalogers and Metadata Librarians explores the use of XML to serialize, process, share, and manage library catalog and metadata records. The authors' expert treatment of the topic is written to be accessible to those with little or no prior practical knowledge of or experience with how XML is used. Readers will gain an educated appreciation of the nuances of XML and grasp the benefit of more advanced ...

  15. Security in a Replicated Metadata Catalogue

    CERN Document Server

    Koblitz, B

    2007-01-01

    The gLite-AMGA metadata has been developed by NA4 to provide simple relational metadata access for the EGEE user community. As advanced features, which will be the focus of this presentation, AMGA provides very fine-grained security also in connection with the built-in support for replication and federation of metadata. AMGA is extensively used by the biomedical community to store medical images metadata, digital libraries, in HEP for logging and bookkeeping data and in the climate community. The biomedical community intends to deploy a distributed metadata system for medical images consisting of various sites, which range from hospitals to computing centres. Only safe sharing of the highly sensitive metadata as provided in AMGA makes such a scenario possible. Other scenarios are digital libraries, which federate copyright protected (meta-) data into a common catalogue. The biomedical and digital libraries have been deployed using a centralized structure already for some time. They now intend to decentralize ...

  16. The history of tomato: from domestication to biopharming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergougnoux, Véronique

    2014-01-01

    Imported from the Andean region to Europe in the 16th century, today tomato is widespread throughout the world and represents the most economically important vegetable crop worldwide. Tomato is not only traded in the fresh market but is also used in the processing industry in soups, as paste, concentrate, juice, and ketchup. It is an incredible source of important nutrients such as lycopene, β-carotene and vitamin C, which all have positive impacts on human health. Its production and consumption is increasing with population growth. In this review, we report how tomato was already domesticated by the ancient Incan and Aztec civilizations, and how it came to Europe, where its breeding history started. The development of genetic, molecular biology and plant biotechnology have opened the doors towards the modern genetic engineering of tomato. The different goals of tomato genetic engineering are presented, as well as examples of successfully engineered tomatoes in terms of resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses, and fruit quality. The development of GM tomato for biopharming is also described. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Accuracy Assessment Points for Badlands National Park Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This metadata is for the accuracy assessment data associated with the vegetation land cover and land use geospatial database for Badlands National Park and...

  18. Field Plot Points for Badlands National Park Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This metadata is for the field data associated with the vegetation land cover and land use geospatial database for Badlands National Park and surrounding areas. The...

  19. Improvement of tomato local varieties by grafting in organic farming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Marta M.; Villena, Jaime; Moreno, Carmen; García, Arántzazu M.; Mancebo, Ignacio; Meco, Ramón

    2015-04-01

    Grafting is the union of two or more pieces of living plant tissue that grow as a single plant. The early use of grafted vegetables was associated with protected cultivation which involves successive cropping (Lee et al., 2010). For this reason, in the past, grafting was used with vegetable crops to limit the effects of soil-borne diseases. However, the reasons for grafting as well as the kinds of vegetable grafted have increased considerably over the years. In tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.), one of the most important horticultural crops in the world, the effect of grafting has also been widely studied. These effects on commercial tomato varieties can be summarized in increasing plant vigor and crop yield or inducing tolerance to abiotic stresses, although the effects on tomato fruit quality or on the sensory properties are not so patent (David et al., 2008). However, a few studies about the effect of grafting on local tomato varieties, which are especially recommended for organic production in spite of their lower yields in many cases, have been developed. In this work we evaluated the effect of grafting on tomato local varieties under organic management using vigorous commercial rootstocks, and aspects related to vigor, yield and tomato fruit composition were analyzed. In general terms, grafting increased the plant vigor, the crop yield and the fruit antioxidant content, although no modification of morphological fruit attributes was observed. Keywords: grafting, Solanum lycopersicum L., local varieties, organic farming. References: Davis A.R., Perkins-Veazie P., Hassell R., Levi A., King S.R., Zhang X. 2008. Grafting effects on vegetable quality. HortScience 43(6): 1670-1671. Lee J.M., Kubota C., Tsao S.J., Bie Z., Hoyos-Echevarría P., Morra L., Oda M. 2010. Current status of vegetable grafting: Diffusion, grafting techniques, automation. Scientia Horticulturae 127: 93-105.

  20. Critical Metadata for Spectroscopy Field Campaigns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara A. Rasaiah

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A field spectroscopy metadata standard is defined as those data elements that explicitly document the spectroscopy dataset and field protocols, sampling strategies, instrument properties and environmental and logistical variables. Standards for field spectroscopy metadata affect the quality, completeness, reliability, and usability of datasets created in situ. Currently there is no standardized methodology for documentation of in situ spectroscopy data or metadata. This paper presents results of an international experiment comprising a web-based survey and expert panel evaluation that investigated critical metadata in field spectroscopy. The survey participants were a diverse group of scientists experienced in gathering spectroscopy data across a wide range of disciplines. Overall, respondents were in agreement about a core metadataset for generic campaign metadata, allowing for a prioritization of critical metadata elements to be proposed including those relating to viewing geometry, location, general target and sampling properties, illumination, instrument properties, reference standards, calibration, hyperspectral signal properties, atmospheric conditions, and general project details. Consensus was greatest among individual expert groups in specific application domains. The results allow the identification of a core set of metadata fields that enforce long term data storage and serve as a foundation for a metadata standard. This paper is part one in a series about the core elements of a robust and flexible field spectroscopy metadata standard.

  1. Metazen – metadata capture for metagenomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background As the impact and prevalence of large-scale metagenomic surveys grow, so does the acute need for more complete and standards compliant metadata. Metadata (data describing data) provides an essential complement to experimental data, helping to answer questions about its source, mode of collection, and reliability. Metadata collection and interpretation have become vital to the genomics and metagenomics communities, but considerable challenges remain, including exchange, curation, and distribution. Currently, tools are available for capturing basic field metadata during sampling, and for storing, updating and viewing it. Unfortunately, these tools are not specifically designed for metagenomic surveys; in particular, they lack the appropriate metadata collection templates, a centralized storage repository, and a unique ID linking system that can be used to easily port complete and compatible metagenomic metadata into widely used assembly and sequence analysis tools. Results Metazen was developed as a comprehensive framework designed to enable metadata capture for metagenomic sequencing projects. Specifically, Metazen provides a rapid, easy-to-use portal to encourage early deposition of project and sample metadata. Conclusions Metazen is an interactive tool that aids users in recording their metadata in a complete and valid format. A defined set of mandatory fields captures vital information, while the option to add fields provides flexibility. PMID:25780508

  2. Mitogenome metadata: current trends and proposed standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohm, Jeff H T; Gwiazdowski, Rodger A; Hanner, Robert

    2016-09-01

    Mitogenome metadata are descriptive terms about the sequence, and its specimen description that allow both to be digitally discoverable and interoperable. Here, we review a sampling of mitogenome metadata published in the journal Mitochondrial DNA between 2005 and 2014. Specifically, we have focused on a subset of metadata fields that are available for GenBank records, and specified by the Genomics Standards Consortium (GSC) and other biodiversity metadata standards; and we assessed their presence across three main categories: collection, biological and taxonomic information. To do this we reviewed 146 mitogenome manuscripts, and their associated GenBank records, and scored them for 13 metadata fields. We also explored the potential for mitogenome misidentification using their sequence diversity, and taxonomic metadata on the Barcode of Life Datasystems (BOLD). For this, we focused on all Lepidoptera and Perciformes mitogenomes included in the review, along with additional mitogenome sequence data mined from Genbank. Overall, we found that none of 146 mitogenome projects provided all the metadata we looked for; and only 17 projects provided at least one category of metadata across the three main categories. Comparisons using mtDNA sequences from BOLD, suggest that some mitogenomes may be misidentified. Lastly, we appreciate the research potential of mitogenomes announced through this journal; and we conclude with a suggestion of 13 metadata fields, available on GenBank, that if provided in a mitogenomes's GenBank record, would increase their research value.

  3. Evaluating the privacy properties of telephone metadata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Jonathan; Mutchler, Patrick; Mitchell, John C

    2016-05-17

    Since 2013, a stream of disclosures has prompted reconsideration of surveillance law and policy. One of the most controversial principles, both in the United States and abroad, is that communications metadata receives substantially less protection than communications content. Several nations currently collect telephone metadata in bulk, including on their own citizens. In this paper, we attempt to shed light on the privacy properties of telephone metadata. Using a crowdsourcing methodology, we demonstrate that telephone metadata is densely interconnected, can trivially be reidentified, and can be used to draw sensitive inferences.

  4. International Metadata Standards and Enterprise Data Quality Metadata Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habermann, Ted

    2016-01-01

    Well-documented data quality is critical in situations where scientists and decision-makers need to combine multiple datasets from different disciplines and collection systems to address scientific questions or difficult decisions. Standardized data quality metadata could be very helpful in these situations. Many efforts at developing data quality standards falter because of the diversity of approaches to measuring and reporting data quality. The one size fits all paradigm does not generally work well in this situation. I will describe these and other capabilities of ISO 19157 with examples of how they are being used to describe data quality across the NASA EOS Enterprise and also compare these approaches with other standards.

  5. Presença dos gêneros Trichoderma e Fusarium em solo rizosférico e não rizosférico cultivado com tomateiro e pepineiro, em horta e estufa Presence of the genus Trichoderma and Fusarium in rhizosphere and bulk soil cultivated with tomato and cucumber, in vegetable garden and greenhouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Zago Ethur

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Para a elaboração adequada de programas de biocontrole de patógenos de solo, é necessário conhecer a distribuição de patógenos e antagonistas nesse ambiente. O objetivo deste trabalho foi estudar a presença dos gêneros Trichoderma e Fusarium em solo rizosférico e não-rizosférico, cultivado com tomateiro e pepineiro, em horta e estufa, e identificar os isolados de Fusarium spp. patogênicos às culturas. Para isso, em horta e estufa, foram realizadas 40 amostragens de solo rizosférico (tomateiro e pepineiro e 20 de solo não-rizosférico. As suspensões dos solos foram diluídas, incubadas em meio BDA e os fungos identificados. Posteriormente, foi realizado o teste de patogenicidade para o tomateiro e o pepineiro, com os isolados de Fusarium spp. obtidos dos solos coletados. Em estufa, para o tomateiro e para o pepineiro, o número de pontos de amostragem com a presença de Trichoderma spp. em solo rizosférico foi significativamente maior (95 e 45%, respectivamente do que em solo não-rizosférico (10%. Neste ambiente, ocorreu diferença na presença de Trichoderma spp. e Fusarium spp., sendo encontrados, respectivamente, em 10 e 55% dos pontos de amostragem. No teste de patogenicidade, cinco isolados de Fusarium oxysporum do tomateiro e seis do pepineiro foram patogênicos às respectivas culturas. Em estufa, Trichoderma spp. ocorre com maior freqüência na rizosfera, enquanto Fusarium spp. está distribuído no solo, e a maioria dos isolados de Fusarium spp. não é patogênica ao tomateiro nem ao pepineiro.For the adequate elaboration of biocontrol programs of soil borne pathogens, it is necessary to understand the distribution of pathogens and antagonists in this environment. This research was aimed at studing the presence of the fungi Trichoderma and Fusarium in rhizosphere and bulk soil, cultivated with tomato and cucumber, in vegetable garden and greenhouse, and to quantify the isolates of Fusarium spp. pathogenic to the

  6. Industrial tomato lines: morphological properties and productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peixoto, J V M; Neto, C de M S; Campos, L F C; Dourado, W de S; Nogueira, A P O; Nascimento, A Dos R

    2017-04-13

    The tomato is the second most produced vegetable in the world, with significant participation in the human diet. In addition, the production of tomatoes generates jobs and family income. The availability of improved cultivars that provide greater profitability to the producer and satisfactorily meets the needs of the fresh fruit market and the processing industry becomes imperative due to its importance. Therefore, this study aimed to characterize and select industrial tomato lines in regard to fruit yield, number of leaf branches, and number of flower racemes (NFR). The experiment was conducted in 2014 in the experimental area of the Federal University of Goiás (Universidade Federal de Goiás). The design was a randomized block design with four replicates and 25 genotypes. The number of leaf branches (NB), NFR, and fruit productivity were evaluated. The results were analyzed using analysis of variance and the means compared by the Tukey test. A difference was observed (P ≤ 0.01) for all traits analyzed. The NB and NFR were related, where more branches promoted an increase in NFR and thus the productivity increases. In addition, a greater number of fruits implied in smaller fruit size, and consequently lower fruit mass. The lowest number of fruit per plant caused increased fruit size and mass. The lines CVR 1, CVR 3, CVR 4, CVR 5, CVR 21, and CVR 22 were suitable for genetic enhancement of tomato and provided the greatest productivity.

  7. Identification and Quantification of Major Carotenoids in Some Vegetables

    OpenAIRE

    Jafar M. EL-Qudah

    2009-01-01

    An HPLC study of 6 raw vegetables (Okra, green beans, eggplant zucchini, carrot and tomato) most frequently consumed worldwide was carried out to determine their carotenoid composition. The samples were purchased from supermarket in the city of Boston, USA. Neoxanthin, violaxanthin and lutein were contained in all samples except tomato for neoxanthin, carrot and tomato for violaxanthin and carrot for lutein. β-carotene was contained in all samples while α-carotene was contained only...

  8. Feeding tomato and broccoli powders enriched with bioactives improves bioactivity markers in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ann G; Volker, Sonja E; Jeffery, Elizabeth H; Erdman, John W

    2009-08-26

    Many studies have evaluated the cancer -preventive potential of individual bioactives from tomatoes and broccoli, but few have examined them within the context of a whole food. Male Copenhagen rats were fed diets containing 10% standard tomato powder, tomato enriched with lycopene or total carotenoids, standard broccoli floret, broccoli sprouts, or broccoli enriched with indole glucosinolates or selenium for 7 days. All broccoli diets increased the activity of colon quinone reductase (NQO1). Indole glucosinolate-enriched broccoli and selenium-enriched broccoli increased hepatic NQO1 and cytochrome P450 1A activity (P tomato diets down-regulated prostatic glutathione S-transferase P1 mRNA expression. Different tomato diets resulted in altered hepatic accumulation of lycopene, phytofluene, and phytoene. These results demonstrate that the bioactive content of vegetables affects both tissue content of bioactives and activity of detoxification enzymes. Enhancing bioactive content of tomatoes and broccoli may enhance efficacy in the prevention of prostate cancer.

  9. Two nonspecific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTPs) from tomato seeds are associated to severe symptoms of tomato-allergic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Pedraza, Laura; González, Miguel; Gómez, Francisca; Blanca-López, Natalia; Garrido-Arandia, María; Rodríguez, Rosalía; Torres, María J; Blanca, Miguel; Villalba, Mayte; Mayorga, Cristobalina

    2016-05-01

    Tomato has become one of the most consumed vegetables worldwide, but its intake is often accompanied by an increasing risk of inducing allergic symptoms. The aim of the work was the identification of new seed-specific allergens associated with severe symptoms in patients allergic to this edible vegetable. We used 22 sera from well-defined tomato-allergic patients. Tomato seed proteins were purified and analyzed for biochemical and immunological characterization. A mixture of two associated IgE-binding nsLTPs was purified from tomato seeds. Both allergens, Sola l 7 and Sola l 6, displayed primary structure differences with respect to their counterpart, Sola l 3, from tomato pulp/peel. They retained the ability to bind IgE from 71.4% of patients with severe symptoms. The purified proteins induced positive basophil activation test and skin prick test, and displayed cross-reactivity with homologous allergens from peanut and sunflower seeds, among others. We herein described two novel allergens from tomato seeds that belong to the nonspecific lipid transfer protein family classes 1 and 2, respectively. This is the first work associating IgE reactivity to these proteins with severe symptoms of certain tomato-allergic patients. Therefore, they are optimal candidates for clarifying the diagnosis of the tomato allergy. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Resistance in tomato and wild relatives to crown and root rot caused by Phytophthora capsici.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesada-Ocampo, L M; Hausbeck, M K

    2010-06-01

    Phytophthora capsici causes root, crown, and fruit rot of tomato, a major vegetable crop grown worldwide. The objective of this study was to screen tomato cultivars and wild relatives of tomato for resistance to P. capsici. Four P. capsici isolates were individually used to inoculate 6-week-old seedlings (1 g of P. capsici-infested millet seed per 10 g of soilless medium) of 42 tomato cultivars and wild relatives of tomato in a greenhouse. Plants were evaluated daily for wilting and death. All P. capsici isolates tested caused disease in seedlings but some isolates were more pathogenic than others. A wild relative of cultivated tomato, Solanum habrochaites accession LA407, was resistant to all P. capsici isolates tested. Moderate resistance to all isolates was identified in the host genotypes Ha7998, Fla7600, Jolly Elf, and Talladega. P. capsici was frequently recovered from root and crown tissue of symptomatic inoculated seedlings but not from leaf tissue or asymptomatic or control plants. The phenotype of the recovered isolate matched the phenotype of the inoculum. Pathogen presence was confirmed in resistant and moderately resistant tomato genotypes by species-specific polymerase chain reaction of DNA from infected crown and root tissue. Amplified fragment length polymorphisms of tomato genotypes showed a lack of correlation between genetic clusters and susceptibility to P. capsici, indicating that resistance is distributed in several tomato lineages. The results of this study create a baseline for future development of tomato cultivars resistant to P. capsici.

  11. Effect of Tomato Industrial Processing on Phenolic Profile and Antiplatelet Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iván Palomo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Regular consumption of fruits and vegetables (e.g., tomatoes has been shown to be beneficial in terms of reducing the incidence of cardiovascular diseases. The industrial processing of tomatoes into tomato-based products includes several thermal treatments. Very little is known on the effect of tomato industrial processing on antiaggregatory activity and phenolic profile. Methods: It was assessed the effect of tomato and by-products extracts on platelet aggregation induced by ADP, collagen, TRAP-6 and arachidonic acid. These in vitro antithrombotic properties were further supported in an in vivo model of thrombosis. A set of antiplatelet compounds has been selected for HPLC analysis in the different extracts. Results: Some natural compounds such as chlorogenic, caffeic, ferulic and p-coumaric acids were identified by HPLC in tomatoes and its products may inhibit platelet activation. Red tomatoes, tomato products (sauce, ketchup and juice and by-products extracts inhibited platelet aggregation induced adenosine 5'-diphosphate, collagen, thrombin receptor activator peptide-6 and arachidonic acid, but to a different extent. Also, pomace extract presents antithrombotic activity. Conclusions: Processed tomatoes may have a higher content of health-benefiting compounds than fresh ones. Pomace even presents the best antiplatelet activity. Finally, tomato products may be used as a functional ingredient adding antiplatelet activities to processed foods.

  12. Effect of tomato industrial processing on phenolic profile and antiplatelet activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Eduardo; Forero-Doria, Oscar; Carrasco, Gilda; Maricán, Adolfo; Santos, Leonardo S; Alarcón, Marcelo; Palomo, Iván

    2013-09-17

    Regular consumption of fruits and vegetables (e.g., tomatoes) has been shown to be beneficial in terms of reducing the incidence of cardiovascular diseases. The industrial processing of tomatoes into tomato-based products includes several thermal treatments. Very little is known on the effect of tomato industrial processing on antiaggregatory activity and phenolic profile. It was assessed the effect of tomato and by-products extracts on platelet aggregation induced by ADP, collagen, TRAP-6 and arachidonic acid. These in vitro antithrombotic properties were further supported in an in vivo model of thrombosis. A set of antiplatelet compounds has been selected for HPLC analysis in the different extracts. Some natural compounds such as chlorogenic, caffeic, ferulic and p-coumaric acids were identified by HPLC in tomatoes and its products may inhibit platelet activation. Red tomatoes, tomato products (sauce, ketchup and juice) and by-products extracts inhibited platelet aggregation induced adenosine 5'-diphosphate, collagen, thrombin receptor activator peptide-6 and arachidonic acid, but to a different extent. Also, pomace extract presents antithrombotic activity. Processed tomatoes may have a higher content of health-benefiting compounds than fresh ones. Pomace even presents the best antiplatelet activity. Finally, tomato products may be used as a functional ingredient adding antiplatelet activities to processed foods.

  13. Tomato handling practices in restaurants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkland, Elizabeth; Green, Laura R; Stone, Carmily; Reimann, Dave; Nicholas, Dave; Mason, Ryan; Frick, Roberta; Coleman, Sandra; Bushnell, Lisa; Blade, Henry; Radke, Vincent; Selman, Carol

    2009-08-01

    In recent years, multiple outbreaks of Salmonella infection have been associated with fresh tomatoes. Investigations have indicated that tomato contamination likely occurred early in the farm-to-consumer chain, although tomato consumption occurred mostly in restaurants. Researchers have hypothesized that tomato handling practices in restaurants may contribute to these outbreaks. However, few empirical data exist on how restaurant workers handle tomatoes. This study was conducted to examine tomato handling practices in restaurants. Members of the Environmental Health Specialists Network (EHS-Net) observed tomato handling practices in 449 restaurants. The data indicated that handling tomatoes appropriately posed a challenge to many restaurants. Produce-only cutting boards were not used on 49% of tomato cutting observations, and gloves were not worn in 36% of tomato cutting observations. Although tomatoes were washed under running water as recommended in most (82%) of the washing observations, tomatoes were soaked in standing water, a practice not recommended by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), in 18% of observations, and the temperature differential between the wash water and tomatoes did not meet FDA guidelines in 21% of observations. About half of all batches of cut tomatoes in holding areas were above 41 degrees F (5 degrees C), the temperature recommended by the FDA. The maximum holding time for most (73%) of the cut tomatoes held above 41 degrees F exceeded the FDA recommended holding time of 4 h for unrefrigerated tomatoes (i.e., tomatoes held above 41 degrees F). The information provided by this study can be used to inform efforts to develop interventions and thus prevent tomato-associated illness outbreaks.

  14. Survival of Salmonella on tomatoes stored at high relative humidity, in soil, and on tomatoes in contact with soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xuan; Chen, Jinru; Brackett, Robert E; Beuchat, Larry R

    2002-02-01

    Salmonellosis has been linked to the consumption of several types of raw fruits and vegetables, some of which may have been contaminated with Salmonella before harvesting. The objectives of this study were to investigate water and soil as reservoirs of Salmonella for the contamination of mature green tomato fruits. Salmonella survived for at least 45 days in inoculated moist soil. The population of Salmonella on tomatoes in contact with soil increased by 2.5 log10 CFU per tomato during storage for 4 days at 20 degrees C and remained constant for an additional 10 days. The number of cells inoculated on tomatoes decreased by approximately 4 log10 CFU per tomato during storage for 14 days at 20 degrees C and 70% relative humidity. Fruits in contact with inoculated soil for 1 day at 20 degrees C harbored Salmonella only near or on the skin surface. More Salmonella cells were observed in stem scar and subsurface areas of tomatoes as the time of storage increased. PCR fingerprinting revealed that among five Salmonella serotypes in the inoculum, Salmonella Montevideo was the most persistent on tomatoes in contact with inoculated soil and on spot-inoculated tomatoes, followed by Salmonella Poona and Salmonella Michigan. The results of this study demonstrate that an enhanced green fluorescent protein marker can be used to detect cells and monitor the growth of Salmonella in the presence of other microorganisms. Observations on the infiltration of Salmonella into tomato tissues support the contention that preharvest contact of produce with contaminated water or soil exacerbates problems associated with the postharvest removal of pathogens or their accessibility to treatment with sanitizers.

  15. A Dynamic Metadata Community Profile for CUAHSI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermudez, L.; Piasecki, M.

    2004-12-01

    Common Metadata standards typically lack of domain specific elements, have limited extensibility and do not always resolve semantic heterogeneities that could occur in the annotations. To facilitate the use and extension of metadata specifications a methodology called Dynamic Community Profiles, DCP, is presented. The methodology allows to overwrite elements definitions and to specify core elements as metadata tree paths. DCP uses the Web Ontology Language (OWL), the Resource Description Framework (RDF) and XML syntax to formalize specifications and to create controlled vocabularies in ontologies, which enhances interoperability. This methodology was employed to create a metadata profile for the Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Science Inc. (CUAHSI). The profile was created by extending ISO-19115:2003 geographic metadata standard and restricting the permissible values of some elements. The values used as controlled vocabularies were inferred from hydrologic keywords found in the Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) and from measurement units found in the Hydrologic Handbook. Also, a core metadata set for CUAHSI was formally expressed as tree paths, containing the ISO core set plus additional elements. Finally a tool was developed to test the extension and to allow creation of metadata instances in RDF/XML which conforms to the profile. Also this tool is able to export the core elements to other schema formats such as Metadata Template Files (MTF).

  16. A Metadata-Rich File System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ames, S; Gokhale, M B; Maltzahn, C

    2009-01-07

    Despite continual improvements in the performance and reliability of large scale file systems, the management of file system metadata has changed little in the past decade. The mismatch between the size and complexity of large scale data stores and their ability to organize and query their metadata has led to a de facto standard in which raw data is stored in traditional file systems, while related, application-specific metadata is stored in relational databases. This separation of data and metadata requires considerable effort to maintain consistency and can result in complex, slow, and inflexible system operation. To address these problems, we have developed the Quasar File System (QFS), a metadata-rich file system in which files, metadata, and file relationships are all first class objects. In contrast to hierarchical file systems and relational databases, QFS defines a graph data model composed of files and their relationships. QFS includes Quasar, an XPATH-extended query language for searching the file system. Results from our QFS prototype show the effectiveness of this approach. Compared to the defacto standard, the QFS prototype shows superior ingest performance and comparable query performance on user metadata-intensive operations and superior performance on normal file metadata operations.

  17. Metadata for Content-Based Image Retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Sterca

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an image retrieval technique that combines content based image retrieval with pre-computed metadata-based image retrieval. The resulting system will have the advantages of both approaches: the speed/efficiency of metadata-based image retrieval and the accuracy/power of content-based image retrieval.

  18. Leveraging Metadata to Create Better Web Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Libraries have been increasingly concerned with data creation, management, and publication. This increase is partly driven by shifting metadata standards in libraries and partly by the growth of data and metadata repositories being managed by libraries. In order to manage these data sets, libraries are looking for new preservation and discovery…

  19. Assessment of cobalt levels in wastewater, soil and vegetable ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    spinach, cabbage, tomato and okra) samples collected on seasonal basis from January, 2013 to ... Technol. availability and scarcity of fresh water. Irrigation ..... le s (mg. /Kg. ) Seasons. Fig. 3: Cobalt Concentration in Vegetables from Kubanni Stream. Channels, Zaria. Carrot. Lettuce. Onion. Spinach. Cabbage. Tomato. Okro ...

  20. Integrated Array/Metadata Analytics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misev, Dimitar; Baumann, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Data comes in various forms and types, and integration usually presents a problem that is often simply ignored and solved with ad-hoc solutions. Multidimensional arrays are an ubiquitous data type, that we find at the core of virtually all science and engineering domains, as sensor, model, image, statistics data. Naturally, arrays are richly described by and intertwined with additional metadata (alphanumeric relational data, XML, JSON, etc). Database systems, however, a fundamental building block of what we call "Big Data", lack adequate support for modelling and expressing these array data/metadata relationships. Array analytics is hence quite primitive or non-existent at all in modern relational DBMS. Recognizing this, we extended SQL with a new SQL/MDA part seamlessly integrating multidimensional array analytics into the standard database query language. We demonstrate the benefits of SQL/MDA with real-world examples executed in ASQLDB, an open-source mediator system based on HSQLDB and rasdaman, that already implements SQL/MDA.

  1. 75 FR 10409 - Tomatoes Grown in Florida; Decreased Assessment Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-08

    ... Manager, Southeast Marketing Field Office, Marketing Order Administration Branch, Fruit and Vegetable... / Monday, March 8, 2010 / Rules and Regulations#0;#0; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 966 Tomatoes Grown in Florida; Decreased Assessment Rate AGENCY: Agricultural Marketing...

  2. Hybridisation between cherry tomato (small fry) and Petomech for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum var. cerasiforme) is among the most important vegetable crops grown world wide providing good nutritional requirements and boost incomes, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. The objective of this study was to determin the heritability of shortened fruit maturation (SFM) period in a hybrid ...

  3. Opportunities and constraints of tomato production in Eritrea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asgedom, S.; Struik, P.C.; Heuvelink, E.; Araia, W.

    2011-01-01

    Tomato is an important vegetable in Eritrea, grown across the entire country. Yields in Eritrea are comparatively low, due to agronomic, institutional and market constraints. We carried out a survey throughout the country based on a participatory rural appraisal, discussion groups and interviews

  4. Herbicide and cover crop residue integration in conservation tillage tomato

    Science.gov (United States)

    The increased adoption of conservation tillage in vegetable production requires more information on the role of various cover crops in weed control, tomato quality, and yield. Three conservation-tillage systems utilizing crimson clover, turnip, and cereal rye as winter cover crops were compared to a...

  5. 'Omics' approaches in tomato aimed at identifying candidate genes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    adriana

    2013-12-04

    Dec 4, 2013 ... Accepted 24 October, 2013. Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) is one of the most important vegetables in the world with significant importance for human health and nutrition. This species has long served as model system for plant genetics, development, physiology, pathology, and fleshy fruit ripening, ...

  6. Development of Infrared Radiation Heating Method for Sustainable Tomato Peeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although lye peeling is the widely industrialized method for producing high quality peeled fruit and vegetable products, the peeling method has resulted in negative impacts by significantly exerting both environmental and economic pressure on the tomato processing industry due to its associated sali...

  7. Collection Metadata Solutions for Digital Library Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Linda L.; Janee, Greg; Dolin, Ron; Frew, James; Larsgaard, Mary

    1999-01-01

    Within a digital library, collections may range from an ad hoc set of objects that serve a temporary purpose to established library collections intended to persist through time. The objects in these collections vary widely, from library and data center holdings to pointers to real-world objects, such as geographic places, and the various metadata schemas that describe them. The key to integrated use of such a variety of collections in a digital library is collection metadata that represents the inherent and contextual characteristics of a collection. The Alexandria Digital Library (ADL) Project has designed and implemented collection metadata for several purposes: in XML form, the collection metadata "registers" the collection with the user interface client; in HTML form, it is used for user documentation; eventually, it will be used to describe the collection to network search agents; and it is used for internal collection management, including mapping the object metadata attributes to the common search parameters of the system.

  8. Assessing Public Metabolomics Metadata, Towards Improving Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, João D; Inácio, Bruno; Salek, Reza M; Couto, Francisco M

    2017-12-13

    Public resources need to be appropriately annotated with metadata in order to make them discoverable, reproducible and traceable, further enabling them to be interoperable or integrated with other datasets. While data-sharing policies exist to promote the annotation process by data owners, these guidelines are still largely ignored. In this manuscript, we analyse automatic measures of metadata quality, and suggest their application as a mean to encourage data owners to increase the metadata quality of their resources and submissions, thereby contributing to higher quality data, improved data sharing, and the overall accountability of scientific publications. We analyse these metadata quality measures in the context of a real-world repository of metabolomics data (i.e. MetaboLights), including a manual validation of the measures, and an analysis of their evolution over time. Our findings suggest that the proposed measures can be used to mimic a manual assessment of metadata quality.

  9. Incorporating ISO Metadata Using HDF Product Designer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelenak, Aleksandar; Kozimor, John; Habermann, Ted

    2016-01-01

    The need to store in HDF5 files increasing amounts of metadata of various complexity is greatly overcoming the capabilities of the Earth science metadata conventions currently in use. Data producers until now did not have much choice but to come up with ad hoc solutions to this challenge. Such solutions, in turn, pose a wide range of issues for data managers, distributors, and, ultimately, data users. The HDF Group is experimenting on a novel approach of using ISO 19115 metadata objects as a catch-all container for all the metadata that cannot be fitted into the current Earth science data conventions. This presentation will showcase how the HDF Product Designer software can be utilized to help data producers include various ISO metadata objects in their products.

  10. Hybrid dryer (solar and biomass furnance) to address the problem of post harvest losses of tomatoes in Rwanda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mukaminega, D.

    2008-01-01

    Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) is one of the important vegetables in Rwandese diet, since it is rich in health valued food components such as carotenoids (Lycopene), ascorbic acid (Vitamin C), vitamin E, folate and dietary fibers. The post harvest loss in tomatoes has been estimated to be about

  11. Handling Metadata in a Neurophysiology Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehl, Lyuba; Jaillet, Florent; Stoewer, Adrian; Grewe, Jan; Sobolev, Andrey; Wachtler, Thomas; Brochier, Thomas G; Riehle, Alexa; Denker, Michael; Grün, Sonja

    2016-01-01

    To date, non-reproducibility of neurophysiological research is a matter of intense discussion in the scientific community. A crucial component to enhance reproducibility is to comprehensively collect and store metadata, that is, all information about the experiment, the data, and the applied preprocessing steps on the data, such that they can be accessed and shared in a consistent and simple manner. However, the complexity of experiments, the highly specialized analysis workflows and a lack of knowledge on how to make use of supporting software tools often overburden researchers to perform such a detailed documentation. For this reason, the collected metadata are often incomplete, incomprehensible for outsiders or ambiguous. Based on our research experience in dealing with diverse datasets, we here provide conceptual and technical guidance to overcome the challenges associated with the collection, organization, and storage of metadata in a neurophysiology laboratory. Through the concrete example of managing the metadata of a complex experiment that yields multi-channel recordings from monkeys performing a behavioral motor task, we practically demonstrate the implementation of these approaches and solutions with the intention that they may be generalized to other projects. Moreover, we detail five use cases that demonstrate the resulting benefits of constructing a well-organized metadata collection when processing or analyzing the recorded data, in particular when these are shared between laboratories in a modern scientific collaboration. Finally, we suggest an adaptable workflow to accumulate, structure and store metadata from different sources using, by way of example, the odML metadata framework.

  12. Metadata Standards and Workflow Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habermann, T.

    2012-12-01

    All modern workflow systems include mechanisms for recording inputs, outputs and processes. These descriptions can include details required to reproduce the workflows exactly and, in some cases, can include virtual images of the hardware and operating system. There are several on-going and emerging standards for representing these detailed workflows including the Open Provenance Model (OPM) and the W3C PROV. At the same time, ISO metadata standards include a simple provenance or lineage model that includes many important elements of workflows. The ISO model could play a critical role in sharing and discovering workflow information for collections and perhaps in recording some details in granules. In order for this goal to be reached, connections between the detailed standards and ISO must be understood and conventions for using them must be developed.

  13. Cultivation Trial of Various Vegetables in Gambella istrict, Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Shiomi, Shinjiro; Nakamura, Reinosuke

    1996-01-01

    A study to obtain information on the potential of cultivating various vegetables on a site in the Gambella district of Ethiopia was undertaken in 1987. The results indicate indicate that the vegetable crops studied (6 fruit vegetables, 5 beans, 8 leafy vegetables and 10 root vegetables) could divided into four groups according to their suitability in the district as follows. 1: Very suitable and promising-tomatoes (cvs. 'uC204-Select', 'Money Maker', 'Roma', 'Peto 94-C'), hot pepper, egg plan...

  14. Handbook of metadata, semantics and ontologies

    CERN Document Server

    Sicilia, Miguel-Angel

    2013-01-01

    Metadata research has emerged as a discipline cross-cutting many domains, focused on the provision of distributed descriptions (often called annotations) to Web resources or applications. Such associated descriptions are supposed to serve as a foundation for advanced services in many application areas, including search and location, personalization, federation of repositories and automated delivery of information. Indeed, the Semantic Web is in itself a concrete technological framework for ontology-based metadata. For example, Web-based social networking requires metadata describing people and

  15. Evaluating and Evolving Metadata in Multiple Dialects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozimore, John; Habermann, Ted; Gordon, Sean; Powers, Lindsay

    2016-01-01

    Despite many long-term homogenization efforts, communities continue to develop focused metadata standards along with related recommendations and (typically) XML representations (aka dialects) for sharing metadata content. Different representations easily become obstacles to sharing information because each representation generally requires a set of tools and skills that are designed, built, and maintained specifically for that representation. In contrast, community recommendations are generally described, at least initially, at a more conceptual level and are more easily shared. For example, most communities agree that dataset titles should be included in metadata records although they write the titles in different ways.

  16. CanCore: Metadata for Learning Objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norm Friesen

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available The vision of reusable digital learning resources or objects, made accessible through coordinated repository architectures and metadata technologies, has gained considerable attention within distance education and training communities. However, the pivotal role of metadata in this vision raises important and longstanding issues about classification, description and meaning. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of this vision, focusing specifically on issues of semantics. It will describe the CanCore Learning Object Metadata Application Profile as an important first step in addressing these issues in the context of the discovery, reuse and management of learning resources or objects.

  17. Assessing Metadata Quality of a Federally Sponsored Health Data Repository.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marc, David T; Beattie, James; Herasevich, Vitaly; Gatewood, Laël; Zhang, Rui

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Federal Government developed HealthData.gov to disseminate healthcare datasets to the public. Metadata is provided for each datasets and is the sole source of information to find and retrieve data. This study employed automated quality assessments of the HealthData.gov metadata published from 2012 to 2014 to measure completeness, accuracy, and consistency of applying standards. The results demonstrated that metadata published in earlier years had lower completeness, accuracy, and consistency. Also, metadata that underwent modifications following their original creation were of higher quality. HealthData.gov did not uniformly apply Dublin Core Metadata Initiative to the metadata, which is a widely accepted metadata standard. These findings suggested that the HealthData.gov metadata suffered from quality issues, particularly related to information that wasn't frequently updated. The results supported the need for policies to standardize metadata and contributed to the development of automated measures of metadata quality.

  18. Diversity, Distribution, and Evolution of Tomato Viruses in China Uncovered by Small RNA Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chenxi; Sun, Xuepeng; Taylor, Angela; Jiao, Chen; Xu, Yimin; Cai, Xiaofeng; Wang, Xiaoli; Ge, Chenhui; Pan, Guanghui; Wang, Quanxi; Fei, Zhangjun; Wang, Quanhua

    2017-06-01

    Tomato is a major vegetable crop that has tremendous popularity. However, viral disease is still a major factor limiting tomato production. Here, we report the tomato virome identified through sequencing small RNAs of 170 field-grown samples collected in China. A total of 22 viruses were identified, including both well-documented and newly detected viruses. The tomato viral community is dominated by a few species, and they exhibit polymorphisms and recombination in the genomes with cold spots and hot spots. Most samples were coinfected by multiple viruses, and the majority of identified viruses are positive-sense single-stranded RNA viruses. Evolutionary analysis of one of the most dominant tomato viruses, Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV), predicts its origin and the time back to its most recent common ancestor. The broadly sampled data have enabled us to identify several unreported viruses in tomato, including a completely new virus, which has a genome of ∼13.4 kb and groups with aphid-transmitted viruses in the genus Cytorhabdovirus Although both DNA and RNA viruses can trigger the biogenesis of virus-derived small interfering RNAs (vsiRNAs), we show that features such as length distribution, paired distance, and base selection bias of vsiRNA sequences reflect different plant Dicer-like proteins and Argonautes involved in vsiRNA biogenesis. Collectively, this study offers insights into host-virus interaction in tomato and provides valuable information to facilitate the management of viral diseases. IMPORTANCE Tomato is an important source of micronutrients in the human diet and is extensively consumed around the world. Virus is among the major constraints on tomato production. Categorizing virus species that are capable of infecting tomato and understanding their diversity and evolution are challenging due to difficulties in detecting such fast-evolving biological entities. Here, we report the landscape of the tomato virome in China, the leading country in

  19. Semantic Web: Metadata, Linked Data, Open Data

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vanessa Russo

    2015-01-01

    .... This metadata system represents the innovative element through web 2.0 to web 3.0. In this context will try to understand what are the theoretical and informatic requirements of the Semantic Web...

  20. WDCC Metadata Generation with GeoNetwork

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramthun, Hans; Lautenschlager, Michael; Winter, Hans-Hermann

    2010-05-01

    Earth system science data like modeling output data are described by metadata. At the WDCC (World Data Center of Climate) the data and metadata are stored inside the CERA (Climate and Environmental Retrieval and Archive) relational database. To fill in the describing metadata several types of XML documents are used to upload data into the database. GeoNetwork is an Ajax based web framework, which offers a wide range of XML data handling for search and update and is especially designed to meet the ISO19115/19139 standard. This framework was extended by the schema's which allow create and update CERA upload XML records. An upload function is also included as well as a connection to the local LDAP (Lightweight Directory Access Protocol) for authentication. Keywords: metadata, WDCC, CERA, Ajax

  1. Mining Building Metadata by Data Stream Comparison

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmegaard, Emil; Kjærgaard, Mikkel Baun

    2016-01-01

    to handle data streams with only slightly similar patterns. We have evaluated Metafier with points and data from one building located in Denmark. We have evaluated Metafier with 903 points, and the overall accuracy, with only 3 known examples, was 94.71%. Furthermore we found that using DTW for mining...... ways to annotate sensor and actuation points. This makes it difficult to create intuitive queries for retrieving data streams from points. Another problem is the amount of insufficient or missing metadata. We introduce Metafier, a tool for extracting metadata from comparing data streams. Metafier...... enables a semi-automatic labeling of metadata to building instrumentation. Metafier annotates points with metadata by comparing the data from a set of validated points with unvalidated points. Metafier has three different algorithms to compare points with based on their data. The three algorithms...

  2. Structural Metadata Research in the Ears Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liu, Yang; Shriberg, Elizabeth; Stolcke, Andreas; Peskin, Barbara; Ang, Jeremy; Hillard, Dustin; Ostendorf, Mari; Tomalin, Marcus; Woodland, Phil; Harper, Mary

    2005-01-01

    Both human and automatic processing of speech require recognition of more than just words. In this paper we provide a brief overview of research on structural metadata extraction in the DARPA EARS rich transcription program...

  3. USGS Digital Orthophoto Quad (DOQ) Metadata

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Metadata for the USGS DOQ Orthophoto Layer. Each orthophoto is represented by a Quarter 24k Quad tile polygon. The polygon attributes contain the quarter-quad tile...

  4. Traps and trap placement may affect location of brown marmorated stink bug (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) and increase injury to tomato fruits in home gardens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargent, Chris; Martinson, Holly M; Raupp, Michael J

    2014-04-01

    The invasive brown marmorated stink bug, Halyomorpha halys (Stål) (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae), is an important pest of field crops, fruit orchards, commercial vegetables, ornamental plants, and home vegetable gardens. Pheromone-baited traps designed to attract, trap, and kill H. halys are marketed for use in home gardens to reduce damage to plants. To test this assertion, we conducted the following experiment: One group of 15 gardeners placed stink bug traps at the end of a row of tomatoes, Solanum lycopersicum (L.), in their vegetable garden and another group of 14 placed no traps in their garden and served as controls. Gardeners with traps were no more or less likely to have H. halys on tomato plants than those without traps, but the abundance of H. halys on tomato fruits was marginally greater in gardens with traps. However, tomato fruits grown in gardens with traps sustained significantly more injury than tomato fruits grown in gardens without traps. Furthermore, tomato fruits on plants near the trap housed more H. halys than tomato fruits on plants at the end of a row away from the trap. Traps may be useful in identifying gardens where H. halys is likely to be found and ones in which stink bug injury to tomatoes is likely. We found no evidence that stink bug traps protected tomatoes from H. halys, and it appears that the addition of traps to gardens may increase injury to tomato fruits.

  5. Metadata for the description of broadcast assets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Efthimiadis, Efthimis N.; Mai, Jens Erik; Burrows, Paul E.

    2003-01-01

    and media companies to deal with the creationand maintenance of metadata, indexing and controlled vocabularies required for effective Media Asset Management of broadcasts. Panelist will provide perspectives of their organization or project, for example, the CPB's PB Core metadata element set, which...... is currently under development; the Disney Nomenclature Registry at Disney Corporation; and the ViDe (video access group) MPEG-7 and Dublin Core mapping....

  6. The Stanford Digital Library Metadata Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    InfoBus components ?This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Cooperative Agreement IRI-9411306. Funding for...proxy-based infra- structure the InfoBus [1]. This paper provides a framework for understanding the classes of metadata and range of metadata needs that...are necessary for our InfoBus services. We outline and ground this framework in Sect. 2 by surveying our InfoBus services and analyzing the

  7. Implementing Metadata that Guide Digital Preservation Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Dappert

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Effective digital preservation depends on a set of preservation services that work together to ensure that digital objects can be preserved for the long-term. These services need digital preservation metadata, in particular, descriptions of the properties that digital objects may have and descriptions of the requirements that guide digital preservation services. This paper analyzes how these services interact and use these metadata and develops a data dictionary to support them.

  8. Biological control of whitefly on greenhouse tomato in Colombia: Encarsia formosa or Amitus fuscipennis?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vis, De R.M.J.

    2001-01-01

    In Colombia, biological control of pests in greenhouse crops is only applied on a very limited scale in ornamentals and as yet non-existent in greenhouse vegetables. Greenhouse production of vegetables - mostly tomatoes- is a recent development, as a result of the high losses of field production due

  9. Mineral composition of organically grown tomato

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghambashidze, Giorgi

    2014-05-01

    In recent years, consumer concerns on environmental and health issues related to food products have increased and, as a result, the demand for organically grown production has grown. Results indicate that consumers concerned about healthy diet and environmental degradation are the most likely to buy organic food, and are willing to pay a high premium. Therefore, it is important to ensure the quality of the produce, especially for highly consumed products. The tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) is one of the most widely consumed fresh vegetables in the world. It is also widely used by the food industries as a raw material for the production of derived products such as purees or ketchup. Consequently, many investigations have addressed the impact of plant nutrition on the quality of tomato fruit. The concentrations of minerals (P, Na, K, Ca and Mg) and trace elements (Cu, Zn and Mn) were determined in tomatoes grown organically in East Georgia, Marneuli District. The contents of minerals and Mn seem to be in the range as shown in literature. Cu and Zn were found in considerably high amounts in comparison to maximum permissible values established in Georgia. Some correlations were observed between the minerals and trace elements studied. K and Mg were strongly correlated with Cu and Zn. Statistically significant difference have shown also P, K and Mg based between period of sampling.

  10. Disease management of tomato through PGPB: current trends and future perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vipin Kumar; Singh, Amit Kishore; Kumar, Ajay

    2017-08-01

    Tomato is the world's second most cultivated vegetable. During cultivation or post-harvest storage, it is susceptible to more than 200 diseases caused by an array of pathogenic fungi, nematodes, bacteria, and viruses. Although wide range of chemical pesticides are currently available to manage plant diseases, continuous application of pesticides not only affect the nutritional contents of tomato but also the texture or productivity of soil. In this context, plant growth promoting bacteria (PGPB) are one of the nature friendly, safe, and effective alternatives for the management of diseases and pathogens of tomato. Currently, numbers of microbes have been used as soil or plant inoculants in different plants including tomato as biocontrol. Besides disease inhibition, these inoculants also act as growth modulators. The present article describes the biocontrol potential of PGPB strains and mechanisms for the diseases management in tomato.

  11. Transfer factors of technetium from soil to vegetables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanagisawa, K. (Lab. for Radioecology, Nakaminato, National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Ibaraki (Japan)); Muramatsu, Y. (Lab. for Radioecology, Nakaminato, National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Ibaraki (Japan))

    1993-01-01

    Laboratory experiments on the transfer of technetium from soil to edible parts of vegetables have been carried out. Soil-plant transfer factors of Tc for leaf vegetables such as spinach and komatsuna (Brassica rapa L.) were considerably higher than those for edible parts of non-leaf vegetables (e.g. carrot, onion, sweet potato, tomato). The following average values (on a wet weight basis) for the transfer factors in edible parts of vegetables were obtained. Cabbage, 0.3; Chinese cabbage, 0.1; spinach, 2.4; komatsuna, 1.1; carrot, 0.3; onion, 0.05; sweet potato, 0.03 and tomato, 0.03. (orig.)

  12. Science friction: data, metadata, and collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Paul N; Mayernik, Matthew S; Batcheller, Archer L; Bowker, Geoffrey C; Borgman, Christine L

    2011-10-01

    When scientists from two or more disciplines work together on related problems, they often face what we call 'science friction'. As science becomes more data-driven, collaborative, and interdisciplinary, demand increases for interoperability among data, tools, and services. Metadata--usually viewed simply as 'data about data', describing objects such as books, journal articles, or datasets--serve key roles in interoperability. Yet we find that metadata may be a source of friction between scientific collaborators, impeding data sharing. We propose an alternative view of metadata, focusing on its role in an ephemeral process of scientific communication, rather than as an enduring outcome or product. We report examples of highly useful, yet ad hoc, incomplete, loosely structured, and mutable, descriptions of data found in our ethnographic studies of several large projects in the environmental sciences. Based on this evidence, we argue that while metadata products can be powerful resources, usually they must be supplemented with metadata processes. Metadata-as-process suggests the very large role of the ad hoc, the incomplete, and the unfinished in everyday scientific work.

  13. Distributed metadata servers for cluster file systems using shared low latency persistent key-value metadata store

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bent, John M.; Faibish, Sorin; Pedone, Jr., James M.; Tzelnic, Percy; Ting, Dennis P. J.; Ionkov, Latchesar A.; Grider, Gary

    2017-12-26

    A cluster file system is provided having a plurality of distributed metadata servers with shared access to one or more shared low latency persistent key-value metadata stores. A metadata server comprises an abstract storage interface comprising a software interface module that communicates with at least one shared persistent key-value metadata store providing a key-value interface for persistent storage of key-value metadata. The software interface module provides the key-value metadata to the at least one shared persistent key-value metadata store in a key-value format. The shared persistent key-value metadata store is accessed by a plurality of metadata servers. A metadata request can be processed by a given metadata server independently of other metadata servers in the cluster file system. A distributed metadata storage environment is also disclosed that comprises a plurality of metadata servers having an abstract storage interface to at least one shared persistent key-value metadata store.

  14. Synthesis of vaterite and aragonite crystals using biomolecules of tomato and capsicum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Long; Xu, Wang-Hua; Zhao, Ying-Guo; Kang, Yan; Liu, Shao-Hua; Zhang, Zai-Yong

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, biomimetic synthesis of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) in the presence of biomolecules of two vegetables-tomato and capsicum is investigated. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray powder diffractometry were used to characterize the CaCO3 obtained. The biomolecules in the extracts of two vegetables are determined by UV-vis or FTIR. The results indicate that a mixture of calcite and vaterite spheres constructed from small particles is produced with the extract of tomato, while aragonite rods or ellipsoids are formed in the presence of extract of capsicum. The possible formation mechanism of the CaCO3 crystals with tomato biomolecules can be interpreted by particle-aggregation based non-classical crystallization laws. The proteins and/or other biomolecules in tomato and capsicum may control the formation of vaterite and aragonite crystals by adsorbing onto facets of them.

  15. octadecenoic acid in tomato

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    ,12,13-. THODA. It has recently been shown that the enzyme peroxygenase is involved in the synthe- sis of 9,12,13-THODA in tomato fruits and that this trihydroxy fatty acid was probably further broken down or converted into other metabo-.

  16. Solanum lycopersicum (Tomato)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pavan, S.N.C.; Heusden, van A.W.; Bai, Y.

    2009-01-01

    After its introduction in Europe the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) has gone a long way. Dedicated breeding has resulted in numerous cultivars grown all over the world, differing in all kind of aspects such as yield, shape, resistance, taste and quality. Modern cultivars are sold as hybrids with a

  17. Exposing and Harvesting Metadata Using the OAI Metadata Harvesting Protocol A Tutorial

    CERN Document Server

    Warner, Simeon

    2001-01-01

    In this article I outline the ideas behind the Open Archives Initiative metadata harvesting protocol (OAIMH), and attempt to clarify some common misconceptions. I then consider how the OAIMH protocol can be used to expose and harvest metadata. Perl code examples are given as practical illustration.

  18. Efficient increase of ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA) content in tomato fruits by targeted mutagenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Nonaka, Satoko; Arai, Chikako; Takayama, Mariko; Matsukura, Chiaki; Ezura, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a non-proteinogenic amino acid that has hypotensive effects. Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) is among the most widely cultivated and consumed vegetables in the world and contains higher levels of GABA than other major crops. Increasing these levels can further enhance the blood pressure-lowering function of tomato fruit. Glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) is a key enzyme in GABA biosynthesis; it has a C-terminal autoinhibitory domain that regulates enzymatic function...

  19. Impact of Piriformospora indica on tomato growth and on interaction with fungal and viral pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhro, Ahmad; Andrade-Linares, Diana Rocío; von Bargen, Susanne; Bandte, Martina; Büttner, Carmen; Grosch, Rita; Schwarz, Dietmar; Franken, Philipp

    2010-03-01

    Piriformospora indica is a root endophytic fungus with plant-promoting properties in numerous plant species and induces resistance against root and shoot pathogens in barley, wheat, and Arabidopsis. A study over several years showed that the endophyte P. indica colonised the roots of the most consumed vegetable crop tomato. P. indica improved the growth of tomato resulting in increased biomass of leaves by up to 20%. Limitation of disease severity caused by Verticillium dahliae by more than 30% was observed on tomato plants colonised by the endophyte. Further experiments were carried out in hydroponic cultures which are commonly used for the indoor production of tomatoes in central Europe. After adaptation of inoculation techniques (inoculum density, plant stage), it was shown that P. indica influences the concentration of Pepino mosaic virus in tomato shoots. The outcome of the interaction seems to be affected by light intensity. Most importantly, the endophyte increases tomato fruit biomass in hydroponic culture concerning fresh weight (up to 100%) and dry matter content (up to 20%). Hence, P. indica represents a suitable growth promoting endophyte for tomato which can be applied in production systems of this important vegetable plant not only in soil, but also in hydroponic cultures.

  20. Transcriptome Analysis of Cytokinin Response in Tomato Leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiuling; Gupta, Sarika; Lindquist, Ingrid E.; Cameron, Connor T.; Mudge, Joann; Rashotte, Aaron M.

    2013-01-01

    Tomato is one of the most economically and agriculturally important Solanaceous species and vegetable crops, serving as a model for examination of fruit biology and compound leaf development. Cytokinin is a plant hormone linked to the control of leaf development and is known to regulate a wide range of genes including many transcription factors. Currently there is little known of the leaf transcriptome in tomato and how it might be regulated by cytokinin. We employ high throughput mRNA sequencing technology and bioinformatic methodologies to robustly analyze cytokinin regulated tomato leaf transcriptomes. Leaf samples of two ages, 13d and 35d were treated with cytokinin or the solvent vehicle control dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) for 2 h or 24 h, after which RNA was extracted for sequencing. To confirm the accuracy of RNA sequencing results, we performed qPCR analysis of select transcripts identified as cytokinin regulated by the RNA sequencing approach. The resulting data provide the first hormone transcriptome analysis of leaves in tomato. Specifically we identified several previously untested tomato orthologs of cytokinin-related genes as well as numerous novel cytokinin-regulated transcripts in tomato leaves. Principal component analysis of the data indicates that length of cytokinin treatment and plant age are the major factors responsible for changes in transcripts observed in this study. Two hour cytokinin treatment showed a more robust transcript response indicated by both greater fold change of induced transcripts and the induction of twice as many cytokinin-related genes involved in signaling, metabolism, and transport in young vs. older leaves. This difference in transcriptome response in younger vs. older leaves was also found to a lesser extent with an extended (24 h) cytokinin treatment. Overall data presented here provides a solid foundation for future study of cytokinin and cytokinin regulated genes involved in compound leaf development or other

  1. Streamlining geospatial metadata in the Semantic Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fugazza, Cristiano; Pepe, Monica; Oggioni, Alessandro; Tagliolato, Paolo; Carrara, Paola

    2016-04-01

    In the geospatial realm, data annotation and discovery rely on a number of ad-hoc formats and protocols. These have been created to enable domain-specific use cases generalized search is not feasible for. Metadata are at the heart of the discovery process and nevertheless they are often neglected or encoded in formats that either are not aimed at efficient retrieval of resources or are plainly outdated. Particularly, the quantum leap represented by the Linked Open Data (LOD) movement did not induce so far a consistent, interlinked baseline in the geospatial domain. In a nutshell, datasets, scientific literature related to them, and ultimately the researchers behind these products are only loosely connected; the corresponding metadata intelligible only to humans, duplicated on different systems, seldom consistently. Instead, our workflow for metadata management envisages i) editing via customizable web- based forms, ii) encoding of records in any XML application profile, iii) translation into RDF (involving the semantic lift of metadata records), and finally iv) storage of the metadata as RDF and back-translation into the original XML format with added semantics-aware features. Phase iii) hinges on relating resource metadata to RDF data structures that represent keywords from code lists and controlled vocabularies, toponyms, researchers, institutes, and virtually any description one can retrieve (or directly publish) in the LOD Cloud. In the context of a distributed Spatial Data Infrastructure (SDI) built on free and open-source software, we detail phases iii) and iv) of our workflow for the semantics-aware management of geospatial metadata.

  2. Transgenic tomato hybrids resistant to tomato spotted wilt virus infection.

    OpenAIRE

    de Haan,; Ultzen, T.; Prins, M; Gielen, J.; Goldbach, R; Grinsven, van, Saskia

    1996-01-01

    Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) infections cause significant economic losses in the commercial culture of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum). Culture practices have only been marginally effective in controlling TSWV. The ultimate way to minimize losses caused by TSWV is resistant varieties. These can be obtained by introgression of natural sources of resistance from wild relatives or by expressing viral sequences in transgenic tomato plants. We report high levels of resistance to TSWV obtained...

  3. Imagery metadata development based on ISO/TC 211 standards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Xie

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the present status and major problems of the existing ISO standards related to imagery metadata. An imagery metadata model is proposed to facilitate the development of imagery metadata on the basis of conformance to these standards and combination with other ISO standards related to imagery. The model presents an integrated metadata structure and content description for any imagery data for finding data and data integration. Using the application of satellite data integration in CEOP as an example, satellite imagery metadata is developed, and the resulting satellite metadata list is given.

  4. Contamination of tomatoes with coliforms and Escherichia coli on farms and in markets of northwest Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenge, Kenneth C; Whong, Clement M Z; Yakubu, Lydia L; Omolehin, Raphael A; Erbaugh, J Mark; Miller, Sally A; LeJeune, Jeffrey T

    2015-01-01

    Although recent reports indicated that produce contamination with foodborne pathogens is widespread in Nigeria, the sources and magnitude of microbial contamination of fruits and vegetables on farms and in markets have not been thoroughly identified. To ascertain possible pathways of contamination, the frequency and magnitude of coliform and Escherichia coli contamination of tomatoes produced in northwest Nigeria was assessed on farms and in markets. Eight hundred twenty-six tomato fruit samples and 36 irrigation water samples were collected and assessed for fecal indicator organisms. In addition, the awareness and use of food safety practices by tomato farmers and marketers were determined. Median concentration of coliforms on all field- and market-sourced tomato fruit samples, as well as in irrigation water sources, in Kaduna, Kano, and Katsina states exceeded 1,000 most probable number (MPN) per g. Median E. coli counts from 73 (17%) of 420 field samples and 231 (57%) of 406 market tomato fruit samples exceeded 100 MPN/g. Median E. coli concentrations on tomato fruits were higher (P market tomato fruit samples (2.66 Log MPN/g) were higher (P marketers were generally unaware of the relationship between food safety practices and microbial contamination on fresh produce. Good agricultural practices pertaining to food safety on farms and in local markets were seldom used. Adoption of food safety practices on-farm, during transport, and during marketing could improve the microbial quality of tomatoes available to the public in this region of the world.

  5. Seeking the Path to Metadata Nirvana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graybeal, J.

    2008-12-01

    Scientists have always found reusing other scientists' data challenging. Computers did not fundamentally change the problem, but enabled more and larger instances of it. In fact, by removing human mediation and time delays from the data sharing process, computers emphasize the contextual information that must be exchanged in order to exchange and reuse data. This requirement for contextual information has two faces: "interoperability" when talking about systems, and "the metadata problem" when talking about data. As much as any single organization, the Marine Metadata Interoperability (MMI) project has been tagged with the mission "Solve the metadata problem." Of course, if that goal is achieved, then sustained, interoperable data systems for interdisciplinary observing networks can be easily built -- pesky metadata differences, like which protocol to use for data exchange, or what the data actually measures, will be a thing of the past. Alas, as you might imagine, there will always be complexities and incompatibilities that are not addressed, and data systems that are not interoperable, even within a science discipline. So should we throw up our hands and surrender to the inevitable? Not at all. Rather, we try to minimize metadata problems as much as we can. In this we increasingly progress, despite natural forces that pull in the other direction. Computer systems let us work with more complexity, build community knowledge and collaborations, and preserve and publish our progress and (dis-)agreements. Funding organizations, science communities, and technologists see the importance interoperable systems and metadata, and direct resources toward them. With the new approaches and resources, projects like IPY and MMI can simultaneously define, display, and promote effective strategies for sustainable, interoperable data systems. This presentation will outline the role metadata plays in durable interoperable data systems, for better or worse. It will describe times

  6. Textural modification of processing tomatoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, D M; Garcia, E; Wayne, J E

    1998-04-01

    Knowledge of the textural properties of processing tomatoes is crucial to ensuing product acceptability; measurement, control, and optimization of these properties through judicious selection of varieties and control of unit operations results in products that the consumer prefers. It is important to first define the terms texture, rheology, consistency, and viscosity prior to discussing principles of their measurement. The textural properties of processing tomatoes may be measured using both sensory and objective tests, and the latter may be either destructive or nondestructive in nature. The unique anatomy of tomato fruit (peel, pericarp, columella, and locules) in part dictates the method of texture measurement. Numerous factors, including variety, maturity, genetic modification, cultural particles, and environmental conditions, processing conditions, and calcium addition affect the textural integrity of tomatoes. Textural properties of raw tomatoes and most processed tomato products are reviewed in this article.

  7. Accuracy Assessment Points for Theodore Roosevelt National Park Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This metadata is for the accuracy assessment data associated with the vegetation land cover and land use geospatial database for Theodore Roosevelt National Park and...

  8. Kaloko-Honokohau National Historical Park Vegetation Mapping Project - Field Plots, Observation and Accuracy Assessment Points

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This metadata is for the 2008 vegetation (classification) field plots (spatial database) and 2010 accuracy assessment points (spatial database) created from the...

  9. VEGETABLE GROWING - HOBBY AND BENEFIT FOR AGED PERSON HEALTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scurtu Ion

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Vegetable growing in small areas (open field, plastic tunnels, unheated or heated green house or even in balcony may be a very pleasant activity for many old persons who want to preserve their physical and mental health. Beside many common vegetable species like tomatoes, pepper, eggplant, onion, garlic, cabbage, cucumber, lettuce and so on - can be cultivated in small areas many others vegetables like broccoli, Brussels cabbage, Scorzonera hispanica, asparagus, Witloof Chicory (French endive and vegetable with medicinal properties.

  10. A Web-Based Geospatial Metadata Browser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arko, R. A.; Chayes, D. N.

    2002-12-01

    We are developing a simple Web-based browser for the search and display of earth science metadata. Our design goals are: 1. to permit both map-based (geographical) and forms-based (textual) searching; 2. to integrate a wide variety of data types in a hierarchical fashion; 3. to conform to the FGDC metadata standard; 4. to take advantage of existing open source software wherever possible; 5. to be platform-independent, browser-independent, and "robust" (i.e. avoid application layers which are resource-intensive or behave unpredictably, such as Java applets); and 6. to present metadata in a dynamic fashion via live database connections. Our implementation is based on the MapServer GIS platform (developed at the University of Minnesota with NSF and NASA funding), PostgreSQL relational database management system, and PostGIS geographic database extensions (developed by Refractions Research Inc and available under GNU Public License). All of these packages are well-documented open source software and have been proven in commercial-grade applications. We combine geographical searching (click-and-drag on maps, in both global and polar projections) and textual searching (drop-down menus organized by FGDC category) for a range of geophysical, chemical, and biological data types. A corresponding framework for collecting and ingesting earth science metadata is reported elsewhere at this meeting (Chayes & Arko, "Real-time Metadata Capture Implementations").

  11. Antioxidant and Antiplatelet Activities in Extracts from Green and Fully Ripe Tomato Fruits (Solanum lycopersicum) and Pomace from Industrial Tomato Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Eduardo; Carle, Reinhold; Astudillo, Luis; Guzmán, Luis; Gutiérrez, Margarita; Carrasco, Gilda; Palomo, Iván

    2013-01-01

    The consumption of fruits and vegetables is accepted to be one of the strategies to reduce risk factors for these diseases. The aim of this study was to examine potential relationships between the antioxidant and the antiplatelet activities in green mature and fully ripe (red) tomatoes and of lycopene-rich byproducts of tomato paste processing such as pomace. The total phenol content of tomato components was the highest in peels, pulp, and in the mucilaginous myxotesta covering the tomato seeds with values 36.9 ± 0.8, 33.3 ± 00.5, and 17.6 ± 0.9 mg GAE/100 g, respectively (P < 0.05). Tomato peels had the highest antioxidant activity, both, as measured by the FRAP (46.9 ± 0.9 μmol Fe+2/g, P < 0.05) and the DPPH assays (97.4 ± 0.2%, 1000 μg/mL, P < 0.05). Pomace extracts showed the highest antiplatelet activity induced by ADP, collagen, TRAP-6, and arachidonic acid. While the maturation stage of the tomato fruit affected the antioxidant effect, antiplatelet activity was independent of fruit ripeness. Finally, based on the present results, tomato and its byproducts may be considered as a valuable source of antioxidant and antiplatelet activities. PMID:23476707

  12. Antioxidant and Antiplatelet Activities in Extracts from Green and Fully Ripe Tomato Fruits (Solanum lycopersicum) and Pomace from Industrial Tomato Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Eduardo; Carle, Reinhold; Astudillo, Luis; Guzmán, Luis; Gutiérrez, Margarita; Carrasco, Gilda; Palomo, Iván

    2013-01-01

    The consumption of fruits and vegetables is accepted to be one of the strategies to reduce risk factors for these diseases. The aim of this study was to examine potential relationships between the antioxidant and the antiplatelet activities in green mature and fully ripe (red) tomatoes and of lycopene-rich byproducts of tomato paste processing such as pomace. The total phenol content of tomato components was the highest in peels, pulp, and in the mucilaginous myxotesta covering the tomato seeds with values 36.9 ± 0.8, 33.3 ± 00.5, and 17.6 ± 0.9 mg GAE/100 g, respectively (P Tomato peels had the highest antioxidant activity, both, as measured by the FRAP (46.9 ± 0.9  μ mol Fe(+2)/g, P tomato fruit affected the antioxidant effect, antiplatelet activity was independent of fruit ripeness. Finally, based on the present results, tomato and its byproducts may be considered as a valuable source of antioxidant and antiplatelet activities.

  13. A Decision Support System (GesCoN for Managing Fertigation in Vegetable Crops. Part II – Model calibration and validation under different environmental growing conditions on field grown tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia eConversa

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The GesCoN model was evaluated for its capability to simulate growth, nitrogen uptake and productivity of open field tomato grown under different environmental and cultural conditions. Five datasets collected from experimental trials carried out in Foggia (IT were used for calibration and 13 datasets collected from trials conducted in Foggia, Perugia (IT and Florida (USA were used for validation. The goodness of fitting was performed by comparing the observed and simulated shoot dry weight (SDW and N crop uptake during crop seasons, total dry weight (TDW, N uptake and fresh yield (TFY. In SDW model calibration, the relative RMSE values fell within the good 10 to 15% range, percent BIAS (PBIAS ranged between -11.5% and 7.4%. The Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE was very close to the optimal value 1. In the N uptake calibration RRMSE and PBIAS were very low(7%, and -1.78, respectively and NSE close to 1. The validation of SDW (RRMSE=16.7%; NSE=0.96 and N uptake (RRMSE=16.8%; NSE=0.96 showed the good accuracy of GesCoN. A model under- or overestimation of the SDW and N uptake occurred when higher or a lower N rates and/or a more or less efficient system were used compared to the calibration trial. The in-season adjustment, using the SDWcheck procedure, greatly improved model simulations both in the calibration and in the validation phases. The TFY prediction was quite good except in Florida, where a large overestimation (+16% was linked to a different harvest index (0.53 compared the cultivars used for model calibration and validation in Italian areas. The soil water content at the 10-30 cm depth appears to be well simulated by the software, and the GesCoN proved to be able to adaptively control potential yield and DW accumulation under limited N soil availability scenarios and consequently to modify fertilizer application. The DSSwell simulate SDW accumulation and N uptake of different tomato genotypes grown under Mediterranean and subtropical

  14. Omics Metadata Management Software v. 1 (OMMS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2013-09-09

    Our application, the Omics Metadata Management Software (OMMS), answers both needs, empowering experimentalists to generate intuitive, consistent metadata, and to perform bioinformatics analyses and information management tasks via a simple and intuitive web-based interface. Several use cases with short-read sequence datasets are provided to showcase the full functionality of the OMMS, from metadata curation tasks, to bioinformatics analyses and results management and downloading. The OMMS can be implemented as a stand alone-package for individual laboratories, or can be configured for web-based deployment supporting geographically dispersed research teams. Our software was developed with open-source bundles, is flexible, extensible and easily installed and run by operators with general system administration and scripting language literacy.

  15. Building a Disciplinary Metadata Standards Directory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Ball

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The Research Data Alliance (RDA Metadata Standards Directory Working Group (MSDWG is building a directory of descriptive, discipline-specific metadata standards. The purpose of the directory is to promote the discovery, access and use of such standards, thereby improving the state of research data interoperability and reducing duplicative standards development work.This work builds upon the UK Digital Curation Centre's Disciplinary Metadata Catalogue, a resource created with much the same aim in mind. The first stage of the MSDWG's work was to update and extend the information contained in the catalogue. In the current, second stage, a new platform is being developed in order to extend the functionality of the directory beyond that of the catalogue, and to make it easier to maintain and sustain. Future work will include making the directory more amenable to use by automated tools.

  16. U.S. EPAs Public Geospatial Metadata Service

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — EPAs public geospatial metadata service provides external parties (Data.gov, GeoPlatform.gov, and the general public) with access to EPA's geospatial metadata...

  17. Pembuatan Aplikasi Metadata Generator untuk Koleksi Peninggalan Warisan Budaya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wimba Agra Wicesa

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Warisan budaya merupakan suatu aset penting yang digunakan sebagai sumber informasi dalam mempelajari ilmu sejarah. Mengelola data warisan budaya menjadi suatu hal yang harus diperhatikan guna menjaga keutuhan data warisan budaya di masa depan. Menciptakan sebuah metadata warisan budaya merupakan salah satu langkah yang dapat diambil untuk menjaga nilai dari sebuah artefak. Dengan menggunakan konsep metadata, informasi dari setiap objek warisan budaya tersebut menjadi mudah untuk dibaca, dikelola, maupun dicari kembali meskipun telah tersimpan lama. Selain itu dengan menggunakan konsep metadata, informasi tentang warisan budaya dapat digunakan oleh banyak sistem. Metadata warisan budaya merupakan metadata yang cukup besar. Sehingga untuk membangun metada warisan budaya dibutuhkan waktu yang cukup lama. Selain itu kesalahan (human error juga dapat menghambat proses pembangunan metadata warisan budaya. Proses pembangkitan metadata warisan budaya melalui Aplikasi Metadata Generator menjadi lebih cepat dan mudah karena dilakukan secara otomatis oleh sistem. Aplikasi ini juga dapat menekan human error sehingga proses pembangkitan menjadi lebih efisien.

  18. octadecenoic acid in tomato

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    The MMS medium was a mixture of 2.15 g of Murashige and Skoog me- dium, 0.97g of 2-(N-morpholino) ethanesulphonic acid and 10 g of saccharose in. 500 ml of distilled water. The pH of the MMS medium was adjusted to 5.6 with 1 M KOH solution. Plant material and treatments. Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L. cv ...

  19. Optimization of productivity and quality of irrigated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) by smallholder farmers in the Central Rift Valley area of Oromia, Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gemechis, Ambecha O.

    2017-01-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) is a vegetable crop with high potential to contribute to poverty reduction via increased income and food security. It is widely grown by smallholders, has high productivity and its demand is increasing. Ethiopia produced about 30,700 Mg of tomatoes on 5,027 ha

  20. Transgenic tomato hybrids resistant to tomato spotted wilt virus infection.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haan, de P.; Ultzen, T.; Prins, M.; Gielen, J.; Goldbach, R.; Grinsven, van M.

    1996-01-01

    Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) infections cause significant economic losses in the commercial culture of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum). Culture practices have only been marginally effective in controlling TSWV. The ultimate way to minimize losses caused by TSWV is resistant varieties. These can

  1. Optimization of lamp spectrum for vegetable growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prikupets, L.B.; Tikhomirov, A.A. [Institute of Biophysics, Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation)

    1994-12-31

    Commmercial light sources were evaluated as to the optimum conditions for the production of tomatoes and cucumbers. Data is presented which corresponds to the maximum productivity and optimal spectral ratios. It is suggested that the commercial light sources evaluated were not efficient for the growing of the vegetables.

  2. Multimedia Learning Systems Based on IEEE Learning Object Metadata (LOM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzinger, Andreas; Kleinberger, Thomas; Muller, Paul

    One of the "hottest" topics in recent information systems and computer science is metadata. Learning Object Metadata (LOM) appears to be a very powerful mechanism for representing metadata, because of the great variety of LOM Objects. This is on of the reasons why the LOM standard is repeatedly cited in projects in the field of eLearning…

  3. Ontology-based metadata generation from semi-structured information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stuckenschmidt, Heiner; Van Harmelen, Frank

    2001-01-01

    Content-related metadata plays an important role in intelligent information systems. Especially on the world-wide web meaningful metadata describing the contents of a web-site is the key to intelligent retrieval and access of information. Metadata description standards like RDF and RDF schema have

  4. Handling multiple metadata streams regarding digital learning material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roes, J.B.M.; Vuuren, J. van; Verbeij, N.; Nijstad, H.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the outcome of a study performed in the Netherlands on handling multiple metadata streams regarding digital learning material. The paper describes the present metadata architecture in the Netherlands, the present suppliers and users of metadata and digital learning materials. It

  5. A quick scan on possibilities for automatic metadata generation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benneker, Frank

    2006-01-01

    The Quick Scan is a report on research into useable solutions for automatic generation of metadata or parts of metadata. The aim of this study is to explore possibilities for facilitating the process of attaching metadata to learning objects. This document is aimed at developers of digital learning

  6. From CLARIN Component Metadata to Linked Open Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Durco, M.; Windhouwer, Menzo

    2014-01-01

    In the European CLARIN infrastructure a growing number of resources are described with Component Metadata. In this paper we describe a transformation to make this metadata available as linked data. After this first step it becomes possible to connect the CLARIN Component Metadata with other valuable

  7. 21 CFR 73.585 - Tomato lycopene extract; tomato lycopene concentrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tomato lycopene extract; tomato lycopene... SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.585 Tomato lycopene extract; tomato lycopene concentrate. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive tomato lycopene extract is a...

  8. Transactions costs and spatial integration of vegetable and fruit ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper analyzes transaction costs and spatial market integration of vegetable and fruit markets between major surplus producing zones and the Addis Ababa retail market taking onions, potatoes, and tomatoes from vegetables and root crops and bananas from fruits. Monthly retail price data from the Central Statistical ...

  9. Effects of Red Light Night Break Treatment on Growth and Flowering of Tomato Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai eCao

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Compact and healthy young plants increase crop production and improve vegetable quality. Adverse climatic conditions and shading can cause young plants to become elongated and spindly. We investigated the effects of night break (NB treatments on tomato plants using red light (RL with an intensity of 20 µmol•m2•s-1. Tomato plants were subjected to NB treatments with different frequencies ranging from every 1, 2, 3, and 4 h, and plant growth, flowering, and yield were monitored. The results showed that with the increase of RL NB frequency, plant height decreased, stem diameter increased, and flower initiation delayed, the content of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA and gibberellin 3 (GA3 in the leaf and stem declined. When the RL NB frequency was every 1 h, the heights of tomato plant decreased by 32.73% compared with the control, the diameter of tomato plants increased by 27.09% compared with the control, the number of leaves produced before flowering increased to 11, compared with 8 in the control, the contents of IAA and GA3 in the leaf decreased by 33.3% and 41.29% respectively compared with the control, the contents of IAA and GA3 in the stem decreased by 56.04% and 57.14% respectively compared with the control. After RL NB treatments, tomato plants were transplanted into a solar greenhouse to evaluate tomato yield. When tomato plants pre-treated with RL NB, per tomato fresh weight of the first spica increased with the increase of RL NB frequencies. These results indicate that more compact and healthier tomato plants could be gotten by RL NB treatments and improve tomato early yield.

  10. Effects of Red Light Night Break Treatment on Growth and Flowering of Tomato Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Kai; Cui, Lirong; Ye, Lin; Zhou, Xiaoting; Bao, Encai; Zhao, Hailiang; Zou, Zhirong

    2016-01-01

    Compact and healthy young plants increase crop production and improve vegetable quality. Adverse climatic conditions and shading can cause young plants to become elongated and spindly. We investigated the effects of night break (NB) treatments on tomato plants using red light (RL) with an intensity of 20 μmol·m(2)·s(-1). Tomato plants were subjected to NB treatments with different frequencies ranging from every 1, 2, 3, and 4 h, and plant growth, flowering, and yield were monitored. The results showed that with the increase of RL NB frequency, plant height decreased, stem diameter increased, and flower initiation delayed, the content of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and gibberellin 3 (GA3) in the leaf and stem declined. When the RL NB frequency was every 1 h, the heights of tomato plant decreased by 32.73% compared with the control, the diameter of tomato plants increased by 27.09% compared with the control, the number of leaves produced before flowering increased to 11, compared with 8 in the control, the contents of IAA and GA3 in the leaf decreased by 33.3 and 41.29% respectively compared with the control, the contents of IAA and GA3 in the stem decreased by 56.04 and 57.14% respectively compared with the control. After RL NB treatments, tomato plants were transplanted into a solar greenhouse to evaluate tomato yield. When tomato plants pre-treated with RL NB, per tomato fresh weight of the first spica increased with the increase of RL NB frequencies. These results indicate that more compact and healthier tomato plants could be gotten by RL NB treatments and improve tomato early yield.

  11. RESPONSE OF PACKAGED TOMATOES (Lycopersicon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    diseases (often encouraged by mechanical damage) are clear indications of the ... transportation. However this loading may cause some level of deterioration to tomato if the load on it is beyond what the tomato can withstand. Hence if the load cannot be .... modulus is often useful in relating the mechanical properties of the ...

  12. Greenhouse gas emissions in the life-cycle of carrots and tomatoes. Methods, data and results from a study of the types and amounts of carrots and tomatoes consumed in Sweden. With arable land use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlsson Kanyama, Annika

    1997-03-01

    Methods, data and results from an assessment of the arable land use and some greenhouse gas emissions during part of the life-cycle of the consumed carrots and tomatoes in Sweden during 1992-1993 are presented in the report. The life-cycle was delineated to transportation, storage, farm production and production of fertilizers. Carrots from six countries and tomatoes from four countries were analyzed. The study is reported with full transparency. The results are presented as the use of arable land (in m{sup 2}) and as the amount of greenhouse gas emissions (in g CO{sub 2} equivalents) required to sustain current Swedish consumption patterns of carrots and tomatoes. Emissions per kg of consumed tomato were 10 times higher than for carrots. Emissions from carrots were lowest when they were produced within or close to Sweden, while the opposite was the case for tomatoes. The key issues in the life-cycle of the analyzed carrots and tomatoes are identified and discussed. The general conclusions are that storage may be a key issue for vegetables with a long durability and adapted to a northern European climate. For vegetables with short durability, the key issue may be transportation if they are not adapted to a northern European climate but still cultivated in the open. The key issue for vegetables with a short durability may be energy requirements during farm production if the vegetables are not adapted to a northern European climate and therefore cultivated under glass. 3 figs, 57 tabs

  13. Metadata Effectiveness in Internet Discovery: An Analysis of Digital Collection Metadata Elements and Internet Search Engine Keywords

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Le

    2016-01-01

    This study analyzed digital item metadata and keywords from Internet search engines to learn what metadata elements actually facilitate discovery of digital collections through Internet keyword searching and how significantly each metadata element affects the discovery of items in a digital repository. The study found that keywords from Internet…

  14. Metadata-catalogue of European spatial datasets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemen, J.P.M.; Kooistra, L.

    2004-01-01

    In order to facilitate a more effective accessibility of European spatial datasets, an assessment was carried out by the GeoDesk of the WUR to identify and describe key datasets that will be relevant for research carried out within WUR and MNP. The outline of the Metadata catalogue European spatial

  15. A Rich Metadata Filesystem for Scientific Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Hoang

    2012-01-01

    As scientific research becomes more data intensive, there is an increasing need for scalable, reliable, and high performance storage systems. Such data repositories must provide both data archival services and rich metadata, and cleanly integrate with large scale computing resources. ROARS is a hybrid approach to distributed storage that provides…

  16. Efficient Processing of Secured XML Metadata

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feng, L.; meersman, R; Jonker, Willem; Tari, Z

    2003-01-01

    Metadata management is a key issue in intelligent Web-based environments. It plays an important role in a wide spectrum of areas, ranging from semantic explication, information handling, knowledge management, multimedia processing to personalized service delivery. As a result, security issues around

  17. Metadata Guidelines for Digital Moving Images

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Flynn, Marcy

    2000-01-01

    ...." Examples for each data element and sample records are presented. Technical metadata essential to the preservation and management of digital materials is also addressed in the Guidelines. This manual is also available at the Defense Virtual Library Web site, http://dvl.dtic.mil:8100/notes.html.

  18. Metadata management and semantics in microarray repositories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocabaş, F; Can, T; Baykal, N

    2011-12-01

    The number of microarray and other high-throughput experiments on primary repositories keeps increasing as do the size and complexity of the results in response to biomedical investigations. Initiatives have been started on standardization of content, object model, exchange format and ontology. However, there are backlogs and inability to exchange data between microarray repositories, which indicate that there is a great need for a standard format and data management. We have introduced a metadata framework that includes a metadata card and semantic nets that make experimental results visible, understandable and usable. These are encoded in syntax encoding schemes and represented in RDF (Resource Description Frame-word), can be integrated with other metadata cards and semantic nets, and can be exchanged, shared and queried. We demonstrated the performance and potential benefits through a case study on a selected microarray repository. We concluded that the backlogs can be reduced and that exchange of information and asking of knowledge discovery questions can become possible with the use of this metadata framework.

  19. A Highly Available Grid Metadata Catalog

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henrik Thostrup; Kleist, Joshva

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a metadata catalog, intended foruse in grids. The catalog provides high availability, by replication across several hosts. The replicas are kept consistent using a replication protocol based on the Paxos algorithm. A majority of the replicas must be available in order...

  20. DIRAC File Replica and Metadata Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Poss, S.

    2012-12-01

    File replica and metadata catalogs are essential parts of any distributed data management system, which are largely determining its functionality and performance. A new File Catalog (DFC) was developed in the framework of the DIRAC Project that combines both replica and metadata catalog functionality. The DFC design is based on the practical experience with the data management system of the LHCb Collaboration. It is optimized for the most common patterns of the catalog usage in order to achieve maximum performance from the user perspective. The DFC supports bulk operations for replica queries and allows quick analysis of the storage usage globally and for each Storage Element separately. It supports flexible ACL rules with plug-ins for various policies that can be adopted by a particular community. The DFC catalog allows to store various types of metadata associated with files and directories and to perform efficient queries for the data based on complex metadata combinations. Definition of file ancestor-descendent relation chains is also possible. The DFC catalog is implemented in the general DIRAC distributed computing framework following the standard grid security architecture. In this paper we describe the design of the DFC and its implementation details. The performance measurements are compared with other grid file catalog implementations. The experience of the DFC Catalog usage in the CLIC detector project are discussed.

  1. Making metadata usable in a multi-national research setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellul, Claire; Foord, Joanna; Mooney, John

    2013-11-01

    SECOA (Solutions for Environmental Contrasts in Coastal Areas) is a multi-national research project examining the effects of human mobility on urban settlements in fragile coastal environments. This paper describes the setting up of a SECOA metadata repository for non-specialist researchers such as environmental scientists and tourism experts. Conflicting usability requirements of two groups - metadata creators and metadata users - are identified along with associated limitations of current metadata standards. A description is given of a configurable metadata system designed to grow as the project evolves. This work is of relevance for similar projects such as INSPIRE. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  2. SM4AM: A Semantic Metamodel for Analytical Metadata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varga, Jovan; Romero, Oscar; Pedersen, Torben Bach

    2014-01-01

    analysis tasks. System and user related metadata are the base for enabling user assistance features. However, current approaches typically store these metadata in ad-hoc manners. In this paper, we propose a generic and extensible approach for the definition and modeling of the relevant metadata artifacts....... We present SM4AM, a Semantic Metamodel for Analytical Metadata created as an RDF formalization of the Analytical Metadata artifacts needed for user assistance exploitation purposes in next generation BI systems. We consider the Linked Data initiative and its relevance for user assistance...

  3. Making Interoperability Easier with NASA's Metadata Management Tool (MMT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shum, Dana; Reese, Mark; Pilone, Dan; Baynes, Katie

    2016-01-01

    While the ISO-19115 collection level metadata format meets many users' needs for interoperable metadata, it can be cumbersome to create it correctly. Through the MMT's simple UI experience, metadata curators can create and edit collections which are compliant with ISO-19115 without full knowledge of the NASA Best Practices implementation of ISO-19115 format. Users are guided through the metadata creation process through a forms-based editor, complete with field information, validation hints and picklists. Once a record is completed, users can download the metadata in any of the supported formats with just 2 clicks.

  4. ALE: automated label extraction from GEO metadata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Cory B; Brown, Chase A; Ripperger, Michael; Dennis, Zane; Roopnarinesingh, Xiavan; Porter, Hunter; Perz, Aleksandra; Wren, Jonathan D

    2017-12-28

    NCBI's Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) is a rich community resource containing millions of gene expression experiments from human, mouse, rat, and other model organisms. However, information about each experiment (metadata) is in the format of an open-ended, non-standardized textual description provided by the depositor. Thus, classification of experiments for meta-analysis by factors such as gender, age of the sample donor, and tissue of origin is not feasible without assigning labels to the experiments. Automated approaches are preferable for this, primarily because of the size and volume of the data to be processed, but also because it ensures standardization and consistency. While some of these labels can be extracted directly from the textual metadata, many of the data available do not contain explicit text informing the researcher about the age and gender of the subjects with the study. To bridge this gap, machine-learning methods can be trained to use the gene expression patterns associated with the text-derived labels to refine label-prediction confidence. Our analysis shows only 26% of metadata text contains information about gender and 21% about age. In order to ameliorate the lack of available labels for these data sets, we first extract labels from the textual metadata for each GEO RNA dataset and evaluate the performance against a gold standard of manually curated labels. We then use machine-learning methods to predict labels, based upon gene expression of the samples and compare this to the text-based method. Here we present an automated method to extract labels for age, gender, and tissue from textual metadata and GEO data using both a heuristic approach as well as machine learning. We show the two methods together improve accuracy of label assignment to GEO samples.

  5. Genome-Wide Analysis of the Cyclin Gene Family in Tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingyan Zhang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Cyclins play important roles in cell division and cell expansion. They also interact with cyclin-dependent kinases to control cell cycle progression in plants. Our genome-wide analysis identified 52 expressed cyclin genes in tomato. Phylogenetic analysis of the deduced amino sequences of tomato and Arabidopsis cyclin genes divided them into 10 types, A-, B-, C-, D-, H-, L-, T-, U-, SDS- and J18. Pfam analysis indicated that most tomato cyclins contain a cyclin-N domain. C-, H- and J18 types only contain a cyclin-C domain, and U-type cyclins contain another potential cyclin domain. All of the cyclin genes are distributed throughout the tomato genome except for chromosome 8, and 30 of them were found to be segmentally duplicated; they are found on the duplicate segments of chromosome 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 10, 11 and 12, suggesting that tomato cyclin genes experienced a mass of segmental duplication. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis indicates that the expression patterns of tomato cyclin genes were significantly different in vegetative and reproductive stages. Transcription of most cyclin genes can be enhanced or repressed by exogenous application of gibberellin, which implies that gibberellin maybe a direct regulator of cyclin genes. The study presented here may be useful as a guide for further functional research on tomato cyclins.

  6. Towards Data Value-Level Metadata for Clinical Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zozus, Meredith Nahm; Bonner, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    While several standards for metadata describing clinical studies exist, comprehensive metadata to support traceability of data from clinical studies has not been articulated. We examine uses of metadata in clinical studies. We examine and enumerate seven sources of data value-level metadata in clinical studies inclusive of research designs across the spectrum of the National Institutes of Health definition of clinical research. The sources of metadata inform categorization in terms of metadata describing the origin of a data value, the definition of a data value, and operations to which the data value was subjected. The latter is further categorized into information about changes to a data value, movement of a data value, retrieval of a data value, and data quality checks, constraints or assessments to which the data value was subjected. The implications of tracking and managing data value-level metadata are explored.

  7. In-package atmospheric pressure cold plasma treatment of cherry tomatoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Nrusimha Nath; Keener, Kevin M; Bourke, Paula; Mosnier, Jean-Paul; Cullen, Patrick J

    2014-08-01

    Cold plasma is increasingly under research for decontamination of foods, especially fresh fruits and vegetables. The effect of cold plasma on food quality, however, remains under researched. This study investigates the effects of cold plasma generated within a sealed package from a dielectric barrier discharge on the physical quality parameters and respiration rates of cherry tomatoes. Respiration rates and weight loss were monitored continuously, while other parameters are reported at the end of storage period. Differences among weight loss, pH and firmness for control and treated cherry tomatoes were insignificant towards the end of storage life. Changes in respiration rates and colour of tomatoes were recorded as a function of treatment, which were not drastic. The results implicate that cold plasma could be employed as a means for decontamination of cherry tomatoes while retaining product quality. Copyright © 2014 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Selection of tomato hybrids (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. for cultivation in the extended culture winter greenhouses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    І. Л. Гаврись

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the estimation of economic and biological characteristics of indeterminant tomato hyb­ rids (Raisa F1, Macarena F1, Emotion F1, Anabel F1, Mariachi F1 under conditions of winter hydroponic. The earliest emergence of fruits is established for Macarena F1 tomato hydrid. The total number of brushes, flo­ ers and w fruits formed on the plant during the vegetation period, is determined. The degree of fruit inception, yield per plant and average weight of the plant are measured. The monthly dynamics of hybrid tomato crops is presented. The largest harvest was collected through May to July. Marketable and non-marketable portions of the harvest and commercial quality of tomato fruits are determined. A close correlation between fruit weight and fruit yield is established. The Macarena F1 hybrid is distinguished as the most precocious and high-yielding variety.

  9. Bioflavour production from tomato and pepper pomaces by Kluyveromyces marxianus and Debaryomyces hansenii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güneşer, Onur; Demirkol, Aslı; Karagül Yüceer, Yonca; Özmen Toğay, Sine; İşleten Hoşoğlu, Müge; Elibol, Murat

    2015-06-01

    Bioflavours are called natural flavour and/or fragrance compounds which are produced using metabolic pathway of the microorganism and/or plant cells or their enzyme systems with bioengineering approaches. The aim of this study was to investigate bioflavour production from tomato and red pepper pomaces by Kluyveromyces marxianus and Debaryomyces hansenii. Obtained specific growth rates of K. marxianus and D. hansenii in tomato pomace were 0.081/h and 0.177/h, respectively. The bioflavour profile differed between the yeasts. Both yeasts can produce esters and alcohols such as phenyl ethyl alcohol, isoamyl alcohol, isoamyl acetate, phenyl ethyl acetate and isovaleric acid. "Tarhana" and "rose" were descriptive flavour terms for tomato and pepper pomaces fermented by K. marxianus, respectively. Tomato pomace fermented by D. hansenii had the most intense "green bean" flavour while "fermented vegetable" and "storage/yeast" were defined as characteristic flavour terms for pepper pomaces fermented by D. hansenii.

  10. Responses of grafted tomato (Solanum lycopersiocon L. to abiotic stresses in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulaziz Al-Harbi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Quantity and quality of irrigation water are considered the most imperative limiting factors for plant production in arid environment. Adoptions of strategies can minimize crop water consumption while nonexistent yield reduction is considered challenge for scholars especially in arid environment. Grafting is regarded as a promising tool to avoid or reduce yield loss caused by abiotic stresses. Tomato (Solanum lycopersium Mill., commercial cultivar Faridah was grafted on Unifort rootstock and grown under regulated deficit irrigation (RDI (100%, 80% and 60% ETc, using two types of irrigation water, fresh (EC = 0.86 dS/m and brackish (EC = 3.52 dS/m. The effects of grafting and RDI on water use efficiency, vegetative growth, yield, fruit quality were investigated. Plant vegetative growth was reduced under water and salinity stresses. Grafting the plant significantly improves the vegetative growth under both conditions. The results showed that crop yield, Ca+2 and K+ were considerably increased in grafted tomato compared to non-grafted plants under water and salinity stresses. Grafted tomato plants accumulated less Na+ and Cl−, especially under high levels of salinity compared to non-grafted plants. Grafting tomato plants showed a slight decrease on the fruit quality traits such as vitamin C, titratable acidity (TA and total soluble solids (TSS. This study confirmed that grafted tomato plants can mitigate undesirable impact of salt stress on growth and fruit quality.

  11. Responses of grafted tomato (Solanum lycopersioconL.) to abiotic stresses in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Harbi, Abdulaziz; Hejazi, Ahmad; Al-Omran, Abdulrasoul

    2017-09-01

    Quantity and quality of irrigation water are considered the most imperative limiting factors for plant production in arid environment. Adoptions of strategies can minimize crop water consumption while nonexistent yield reduction is considered challenge for scholars especially in arid environment. Grafting is regarded as a promising tool to avoid or reduce yield loss caused by abiotic stresses. Tomato ( Solanum lycopersium Mill.), commercial cultivar Faridah was grafted on Unifort rootstock and grown under regulated deficit irrigation (RDI) (100%, 80% and 60% ETc), using two types of irrigation water, fresh (EC = 0.86 dS/m) and brackish (EC = 3.52 dS/m). The effects of grafting and RDI on water use efficiency, vegetative growth, yield, fruit quality were investigated. Plant vegetative growth was reduced under water and salinity stresses. Grafting the plant significantly improves the vegetative growth under both conditions. The results showed that crop yield, Ca +2 and K + were considerably increased in grafted tomato compared to non-grafted plants under water and salinity stresses. Grafted tomato plants accumulated less Na + and Cl - , especially under high levels of salinity compared to non-grafted plants. Grafting tomato plants showed a slight decrease on the fruit quality traits such as vitamin C, titratable acidity (TA) and total soluble solids (TSS). This study confirmed that grafted tomato plants can mitigate undesirable impact of salt stress on growth and fruit quality.

  12. PRODUCTION OF TOMATO SEEDLINGS UNDER SALINE IRRIGATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alberto Brasiliano Campos

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Processing tomato is the most important vegetable crop of the Brazilian agribusiness and few researches have been conducted to evaluate the tolerance of this crop to saline stress. In this study, the effects of five levels of salinity of the irrigation water (1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 dS m-1 and three equivalent proportions of Na:Ca:Mg (1:1:0.5, 4:1:0.5 and 7:1:0.5 were tested on the emergence and vigor of processing tomato, cultivar IPA 6. Seeds were sowed in expanded polystyrene tray (128 cells and each tray received 1 L of water after sowing. The trays were piled and, four days after sowing, they were placed on suspended supports in a greenhouse. Irrigation was accomplished daily from the fifth day after sowing. Only dry weight of shoot and root was affected by sodium proportions, while linear reductions of the speed of emergence, stem length and the dry weight of shoot and root were observed with increasing salinity. Root was more affected than shoot by salinity and relative growth ratioincreased with salinity levels on the 14-21 days after sowing period, indicating that the crop showed a certain increase of salinity tolerance with the time of exposure to salts.

  13. Pu`ukohola Heiau National Historic Site Vegetation Mapping Project - Field Plots, Observation and Accuracy Assessment Points

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This metadata is for the 2008 vegetation (classification) field plots (spatial database) and 2010 accuracy assessment points (spatial database) created from the...

  14. Creating context for the experiment record. User-defined metadata: investigations into metadata usage in the LabTrove ELN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willoughby, Cerys; Bird, Colin L; Coles, Simon J; Frey, Jeremy G

    2014-12-22

    The drive toward more transparency in research, the growing willingness to make data openly available, and the reuse of data to maximize the return on research investment all increase the importance of being able to find information and make links to the underlying data. The use of metadata in Electronic Laboratory Notebooks (ELNs) to curate experiment data is an essential ingredient for facilitating discovery. The University of Southampton has developed a Web browser-based ELN that enables users to add their own metadata to notebook entries. A survey of these notebooks was completed to assess user behavior and patterns of metadata usage within ELNs, while user perceptions and expectations were gathered through interviews and user-testing activities within the community. The findings indicate that while some groups are comfortable with metadata and are able to design a metadata structure that works effectively, many users are making little attempts to use it, thereby endangering their ability to recover data in the future. A survey of patterns of metadata use in these notebooks, together with feedback from the user community, indicated that while a few groups are comfortable with metadata and are able to design a metadata structure that works effectively, many users adopt a "minimum required" approach to metadata. To investigate whether the patterns of metadata use in LabTrove were unusual, a series of surveys were undertaken to investigate metadata usage in a variety of platforms supporting user-defined metadata. These surveys also provided the opportunity to investigate whether interface designs in these other environments might inform strategies for encouraging metadata creation and more effective use of metadata in LabTrove.

  15. VEGETABLE GROWING - HOBBY AND BENEFIT FOR AGED PERSON HEALTH

    OpenAIRE

    Scurtu Ion

    2015-01-01

    Vegetable growing in small areas (open field, plastic tunnels, unheated or heated green house or even in balcony) may be a very pleasant activity for many old persons who want to preserve their physical and mental health. Beside many common vegetable species like tomatoes, pepper, eggplant, onion, garlic, cabbage, cucumber, lettuce and so on - can be cultivated in small areas many others vegetables like broccoli, Brussels cabbage, Scorzonera hispanica, asparagus, Witloof Chicory (French endiv...

  16. Changes in oxidative stress in transgenic RNAi ACO1 tomato fruit during ripening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eglous, Najat Mohamed; Ali, Zainon Mohd; Hassan, Maizom; Zainal, Zamri

    2013-11-01

    Tomato (Solanum Lycopersicum L.) is the second most cultivated vegetable in the world and widely used as a system for studying the role of ethylene during fruit ripening. Our objective was to study the oxidative stress and antioxidative metabolism during ripening of non transgenic tomato and transgenic line-21 tomato which reduced ethylene. The line-21 of transgenic tomato plants (RNAi ACO1) had lower ethylene production and longer shelf-life more than 32 days as compared to the wild-type fruits which have very short shelf-life. In this study, tomato fruit were divided into five different stages (MG: mature green 5%, B: breaker 25%, T: turning 50%, O: orange75%, RR: red ripe100%). The activity of lipoxygenase (LOX) and lipid peroxidation (MDA) were measured to assess changes in oxidative stress. The LOX activity and MDA content decreased significantly obtaining 2.6-fold and 1.2-fold, respectively, as compared to the wild type fruit. However, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities were increased to 1.9 and 1.2 folds from the mature green to the fully ripe stage in transgenic tomatoes. Furthermore, the wild type tomato increases 1.3 in SOD and 1.6 in CAT activities. The overall results indicate that the wild type tomato fruit showed a faster rate of ripening, parallel to decline in the rate of enzymatic antioxidative systems as compared to the transgenic line-21 tomato fruit. In addition, the results show that the antioxidant capacity is improved during the ripening process and is accompanied by an increase in the oxidative stress.

  17. Mdmap: A Tool for Metadata Collection and Matching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rico Simke

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a front-end for the semi-automatic collection, matching, and generation of bibliographic metadata obtained from different sources for use within a digitization architecture. The Library of a Billion Words project is building an infrastructure for digitizing text that requires high-quality bibliographic metadata, but currently only sparse metadata from digitized editions is available. The project’s approach is to collect metadata for each digitized item from as many sources as possible. An expert user can then use an intuitive front-end tool to choose matching metadata. The collected metadata are centrally displayed in an interactive grid view. The user can choose which metadata they want to assign to a certain edition, and export these data as MARCXML. This paper presents a new approach to bibliographic work and metadata correction. We try to achieve a high quality of the metadata by generating a large amount of metadata to choose from, as well as by giving librarians an intuitive tool to manage their data.

  18. Transforming Dermatologic Imaging for the Digital Era: Metadata and Standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffery, Liam J; Clunie, David; Curiel-Lewandrowski, Clara; Malvehy, Josep; Soyer, H Peter; Halpern, Allan C

    2018-01-17

    Imaging is increasingly being used in dermatology for documentation, diagnosis, and management of cutaneous disease. The lack of standards for dermatologic imaging is an impediment to clinical uptake. Standardization can occur in image acquisition, terminology, interoperability, and metadata. This paper presents the International Skin Imaging Collaboration position on standardization of metadata for dermatologic imaging. Metadata is essential to ensure that dermatologic images are properly managed and interpreted. There are two standards-based approaches to recording and storing metadata in dermatologic imaging. The first uses standard consumer image file formats, and the second is the file format and metadata model developed for the Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine (DICOM) standard. DICOM would appear to provide an advantage over using consumer image file formats for metadata as it includes all the patient, study, and technical metadata necessary to use images clinically. Whereas, consumer image file formats only include technical metadata and need to be used in conjunction with another actor-for example, an electronic medical record-to supply the patient and study metadata. The use of DICOM may have some ancillary benefits in dermatologic imaging including leveraging DICOM network and workflow services, interoperability of images and metadata, leveraging existing enterprise imaging infrastructure, greater patient safety, and better compliance to legislative requirements for image retention.

  19. COMPLEX PROCESSING TECHNOLOGY OF TOMATO RAW MATERIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Gadzhieva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tomatoes grown in the central and southern parts of the country, which contain 5-6 % of solids, including 0.13 % of pectin, 0.86 % of fat, 0.5 % of organic acids; 0.5 % minerals, etc. were used as a subject of research. These tomatoes, grown in the mountains, on soils with high salinity, contain high amounts of valuable components and have a long-term preservation. For the extraction of valuable components from dried tomato pomace CO2 extraction method was applied. Technological and environmental feasibility of tomatoes stage drying in the atmosphere of inert gas in solar dry kiln were evaluated; production scheme of dried tomatoes is improved; a system for tomato pomace drying is developed; a production scheme of powders of pulp, skin and seeds of tomatoes is developed. Combined method of tomato pomace drying involves the simultaneous use of the electromagnetic field of low and ultra-high frequency and blowing product surface with hot nitrogen. Conducting the drying process in an inert gas atmosphere of nitrogen intensified the process of moisture removing from tomatoes. The expediency of using tomato powder as enriching additive was proved. Based on the study of the chemical composition of the tomato powder made from Dagestan varieties of tomatoes, and on the organoleptic evaluation and physico-chemical studies of finished products, we have proved the best degree of recoverability of tomato powder during the production of reconstituted juice and tomato beverages.

  20. Metadata Analysis at the Command-Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Phillips

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past few years the University of North Texas Libraries' Digital Projects Unit (DPU has developed a set of metadata analysis tools, processes, and methodologies aimed at helping to focus limited quality control resources on the areas of the collection where they might have the most benefit. The key to this work lies in its simplicity: records harvested from OAI-PMH-enabled digital repositories are transformed into a format that makes them easily parsable using traditional Unix/Linux-based command-line tools. This article describes the overall methodology, introduces two simple open-source tools developed to help with the aforementioned harvesting and breaking, and provides example commands to demonstrate some common metadata analysis requests. All software tools described in the article are available with an open-source license via the author's GitHub account.

  1. Testing Metadata Existence of Web Map Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Růžička

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available For a general user is quite common to use data sources available on WWW. Almost all GIS software allow to use data sources available via Web Map Service (ISO/OGC standard interface. The opportunity to use different sources and combine them brings a lot of problems that were discussed many times on conferences or journal papers. One of the problem is based on non existence of metadata for published sources. The question was: were the discussions effective? The article is partly based on comparison of situation for metadata between years 2007 and 2010. Second part of the article is focused only on 2010 year situation. The paper is created in a context of research of intelligent map systems, that can be used for an automatic or a semi-automatic map creation or a map evaluation.

  2. LABEX L-IPSL Arctic Metadata Portal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Cordero-Llana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Institut Pierre Simon Laplace (IPSL encompasses a wide diversity of projects that focus on the Arctic. From these observations the IPSL has generated a large number of datasets gathering Arctic observations. These observations include measurements on atmospheric chemical composition, snow micro-physical properties or ocean measurements. However, some of these datasets remain locally stored and there is a lack of public awareness regarding these resources, which has hindered their visualisation and sharing. This motivated the creation of the LABEX L-IPSL Arctic metadata Portal (http://climserv.ipsl.polytechnique.fr/arcticportal/, presented here, which improves the visibility of the variety of observations collected within the institute as well as the evaluation of numerical models. The LABEX L-IPSL Arctic metadata Portal will also promote new avenues in Arctic research within the IPSL and with other collaborating institutions.

  3. Evaluating non-relational storage technology for HEP metadata and meta-data catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigorieva, M. A.; Golosova, M. V.; Gubin, M. Y.; Klimentov, A. A.; Osipova, V. V.; Ryabinkin, E. A.

    2016-10-01

    Large-scale scientific experiments produce vast volumes of data. These data are stored, processed and analyzed in a distributed computing environment. The life cycle of experiment is managed by specialized software like Distributed Data Management and Workload Management Systems. In order to be interpreted and mined, experimental data must be accompanied by auxiliary metadata, which are recorded at each data processing step. Metadata describes scientific data and represent scientific objects or results of scientific experiments, allowing them to be shared by various applications, to be recorded in databases or published via Web. Processing and analysis of constantly growing volume of auxiliary metadata is a challenging task, not simpler than the management and processing of experimental data itself. Furthermore, metadata sources are often loosely coupled and potentially may lead to an end-user inconsistency in combined information queries. To aggregate and synthesize a range of primary metadata sources, and enhance them with flexible schema-less addition of aggregated data, we are developing the Data Knowledge Base architecture serving as the intelligence behind GUIs and APIs.

  4. HIS Central and the Hydrologic Metadata Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitenack, T.; Zaslavsky, I.; Valentine, D. W.

    2008-12-01

    The CUAHSI Hydrologic Information System project maintains a comprehensive workflow for publishing hydrologic observations data and registering them to the common Hydrologic Metadata Catalog. Once the data are loaded into a database instance conformant with the CUAHSI HIS Observations Data Model (ODM), the user configures ODM web service template to point to the new database. After this, the hydrologic data become available via the standard CUAHSI HIS web service interface, that includes both data discovery (GetSites, GetVariables, GetSiteInfo, GetVariableInfo) and data retrieval (GetValues) methods. The observations data then can be further exposed via the global semantics-based search engine called Hydroseek. To register the published observations networks to the global search engine, users can now use the HIS Central application (new in HIS 1.1). With this online application, the WaterML-compliant web services can be submitted to the online catalog of data services, along with network metadata and a desired network symbology. Registering services to the HIS Central application triggers a harvester which uses the services to retrieve additional network metadata from the underlying ODM (information about stations, variables, and periods of record). The next step in HIS Central application is mapping variable names from the newly registered network, to the terms used in the global search ontology. Once these steps are completed, the new observations network is added to the map and becomes available for searching and querying. The number of observations network registered to the Hydrologic Metadata Catalog at SDSC is constantly growing. At the time of submission, the catalog contains 51 registered networks, with estimated 1.7 million stations.

  5. A Translation Layer to Convey Preservation Metadata

    OpenAIRE

    Di Iorio, Angela

    2009-01-01

    The long term preservation is a responsibility to share with other organizations, even adopting different preservation methods and tools. The overcoming of the interoperability issues, by means of the achievement of a flawless exchange of digital assets to preserve, enables the feasibility of applying distributed digital preservation policies. The Archives Ready To AIP Transmission a PREMIS Based Project (ARTAT-PBP) aims to experiment with the adoption of a common preservation metadata standa...

  6. Semantic Web: Metadata, Linked Data, Open Data

    OpenAIRE

    Vanessa Russo

    2015-01-01

    What's the Semantic Web? What's the use? The inventor of the Web Tim Berners-Lee describes it as a research methodology able to take advantage of the network to its maximum capacity. This metadata system represents the innovative element through web 2.0 to web 3.0. In this context will try to understand what are the theoretical and informatic requirements of the Semantic Web. Finally will explain Linked Data applications to develop new tools for active citizenship.

  7. Ontology-Based Search of Genomic Metadata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Javier D; Lenzerini, Maurizio; Masseroli, Marco; Venco, Francesco; Ceri, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) is a huge and still expanding public repository of more than 4,000 experiments and 25,000 data files, assembled by a large international consortium since 2007; unknown biological knowledge can be extracted from these huge and largely unexplored data, leading to data-driven genomic, transcriptomic, and epigenomic discoveries. Yet, search of relevant datasets for knowledge discovery is limitedly supported: metadata describing ENCODE datasets are quite simple and incomplete, and not described by a coherent underlying ontology. Here, we show how to overcome this limitation, by adopting an ENCODE metadata searching approach which uses high-quality ontological knowledge and state-of-the-art indexing technologies. Specifically, we developed S.O.S. GeM (http://www.bioinformatics.deib.polimi.it/SOSGeM/), a system supporting effective semantic search and retrieval of ENCODE datasets. First, we constructed a Semantic Knowledge Base by starting with concepts extracted from ENCODE metadata, matched to and expanded on biomedical ontologies integrated in the well-established Unified Medical Language System. We prove that this inference method is sound and complete. Then, we leveraged the Semantic Knowledge Base to semantically search ENCODE data from arbitrary biologists' queries. This allows correctly finding more datasets than those extracted by a purely syntactic search, as supported by the other available systems. We empirically show the relevance of found datasets to the biologists' queries.

  8. The role of metadata in managing large environmental science datasets. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melton, R.B.; DeVaney, D.M. [eds.] [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); French, J. C. [Univ. of Virginia, (United States)

    1995-06-01

    The purpose of this workshop was to bring together computer science researchers and environmental sciences data management practitioners to consider the role of metadata in managing large environmental sciences datasets. The objectives included: establishing a common definition of metadata; identifying categories of metadata; defining problems in managing metadata; and defining problems related to linking metadata with primary data.

  9. Detection of cuticle defects on cherry tomatoes based on hyperspectral fluorescence imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Even though cherry tomato is one of the major vegetables consumed in the fresh-cut market, its quality evaluation process has been dependent on simple size- or color-sorting techniques, which currently is inadequate for meeting the increased consumer demand for high quality and safety products. Of ...

  10. Development and dry matter distribution in glasshouse tomato : a quantitative approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, de A.N.M.

    1994-01-01

    In the glasshouse cultivation of a long-season tomato crop, maximum fruit production is obtained when there is a proper balance between the demand and the supply of assimilate, and an optimum proportion of vegetative growth throughout the season in order to sustain the crop photosynthetic

  11. Current status of Tomato chlorotic spot virus in Florida and the Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damaging outbreaks of Tomato chlorotic spot virus (TCSV), an emerging thrips-vectored tospovirus, and several invasive species of thrips are significantly impacting vegetable and other crops in Florida and the Caribbean. Host and geographic ranges of TCSV are continuing to expand in this region. Dev...

  12. El virus de la mancha clorótica del tomate: Tomato chlorotic spot virus (TCSV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomato chlorotic spot virus has emerged as a major pathogen of vegetables in Puerto Rico, the Caribbean and Florida. This virus is transmitted by thrips making management difficult. Growers must be aware of the distribution, host range, insect vectors, symptoms, modes of transmission to successfully...

  13. Azadirachtin powder for control of root-knot nematodes in tomato

    Science.gov (United States)

    USDA ARS Daniel K. Inouye U.S. Pacific Basin Agricultural Research Center, 64 Nowelo St., Hilo, HI 96720. Root-knot nematodes cause root galling and yield reductions in many vegetable crops, including tomato. Three organic treatments to improve root growth and reduce nematode infestation were eval...

  14. Towards the development of integrated cultural control of tomato late blight (phytophthora infestans) in Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tumwine, J.

    1999-01-01

    Tomato ( Lycopersicon esculentum ) is a major vegetable crop in Uganda. Moneymaker, Marglobe, Heinz and Roma are the major commercial varieties grown in the country, the first two being the most popular. Late blight ( Phytophthora infestans ) is the

  15. The Design of an Automated Workflow for Metadata Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manso-Callejo, Miguel; Wachowicz, Mónica; Bernabé-Poveda, Miguel

    The important role of digital resources relies on whether metadata is available and has been correctly catalogued and indexed so that the user can discover and use geospatial datasets. However, the cost and the error-proneness in the manual metadata creation, the lack of information provided by the producers of geospatial datasets and the lack of experience in cataloguing have motivated us to propose a new workflow for the automated metadata generation for geospatial datasets. This paper describes this workflow based on tasks synchronization that gives support for four metadata functions: discovery, use, evaluate and retrieval of digital geodata. The workflow was implemented using a multi-tier architecture system where the Data, Application and User Tiers can run a single use application as well as web services. The prototype evaluation is discussed in terms of the type of metadata being generated and the type of metadata function being supported by the workflow.

  16. An Approach to Metadata Generation for Learning Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menendez D., Victor; Zapata G., Alfredo; Vidal C., Christian; Segura N., Alejandra; Prieto M., Manuel

    Metadata describe instructional resources and define their nature and use. Metadata are required to guarantee reusability and interchange of instructional resources into e-Learning systems. However, fulfilment of large metadata attributes is a hard and complex task for almost all LO developers. As a consequence many mistakes are made. This can cause the impoverishment of data quality in indexing, searching and recovering process. We propose a methodology to build Learning Objects from digital resources. The first phase includes automatic preprocessing of resources using techniques from information retrieval. Initial metadata obtained in this first phase are then used to search similar LO to propose missed metadata. The second phase considers assisted activities that merge computer advice with human decisions. Suggestions are based on metadata of similar Learning Object using fuzzy logic theory.

  17. An emergent theory of digital library metadata enrich then filter

    CERN Document Server

    Stevens, Brett

    2015-01-01

    An Emergent Theory of Digital Library Metadata is a reaction to the current digital library landscape that is being challenged with growing online collections and changing user expectations. The theory provides the conceptual underpinnings for a new approach which moves away from expert defined standardised metadata to a user driven approach with users as metadata co-creators. Moving away from definitive, authoritative, metadata to a system that reflects the diversity of users’ terminologies, it changes the current focus on metadata simplicity and efficiency to one of metadata enriching, which is a continuous and evolving process of data linking. From predefined description to information conceptualised, contextualised and filtered at the point of delivery. By presenting this shift, this book provides a coherent structure in which future technological developments can be considered.

  18. Cytogenetic and molecular studies on tomato chromosomes using diploid tomato and tomato monosomic additions in tetraploid potato

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chang, S.B.

    2004-01-01

    Geneticists have studied the tomato, Lycopersicon esculentum, for several decades and now obtained a saturated linkage map on which numerous genes controlling morphological traits and disease resistances, and molecular markers have been positioned. They also investigated the chromosomes of tomato,

  19. A metadata-driven approach to data repository design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Matthew J; McLean, Andrew; Rzepa, Henry S

    2017-01-01

    The design and use of a metadata-driven data repository for research data management is described. Metadata is collected automatically during the submission process whenever possible and is registered with DataCite in accordance with their current metadata schema, in exchange for a persistent digital object identifier. Two examples of data preview are illustrated, including the demonstration of a method for integration with commercial software that confers rich domain-specific data analytics without introducing customisation into the repository itself.

  20. CONSIDERATIONS ON ROMANIA’S VEGETABLE MARKET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agatha POPESCU

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper aimed to present the situation of Romania’s vegetable market in the period 2007-2011 based on the statistical data regarding the main vegetables: tomatoes, onion, garlic, cabbage, green peppers and melons. The vegetable production increased by 33.99 from 3,166.8 tons in 2007 to 4,176.3 tons in 2011.This was due to the yield gain as follows: 58.55 % for melons, 27.62 % for green peppers, 27.05 % for tomatoes, 25.99 % for dry garlic, 24.96 % for dry onion, 12.61 % for white cabbage. In 2011, the contribution of various categories of vegetables to production was: 24.55 % white cabbage, 21.81 % tomatoes, 15.45 % melons, 9.44 % onion, 6.06 % green pepper, 1.59 % garlic and 21.1 % other vegetables. The contribution of the micro regions to vegetable production in 2011 was: 19.46 % South Muntenia, 18.95 % South East Romania, 17.30 % South West Oltenia, 15.92 % North East Romania, 10.43 % West Romania, 8.47 % North West Romania, 6.54 % Central Romania, 2.93 % Bucharest Ilfov. Vegetable production per inhabitant is higher in Romania compared to the average production per capita in the EU. The average consumption increased as a postive aspect reflecting the obtained production and import. Vegetable production should increase in order to cover much better the doestic market needs and support export to the EU market.

  1. CHIME: A Metadata-Based Distributed Software Development Environment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dossick, Stephen E; Kaiser, Gail E

    2005-01-01

    We introduce CHIME, the Columbia Hypermedia IMmersion Environment, a metadata-based information environment, and describe its potential applications for internet and intranet-based distributed software development...

  2. Efficient increase of ɣ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) content in tomato fruits by targeted mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonaka, Satoko; Arai, Chikako; Takayama, Mariko; Matsukura, Chiaki; Ezura, Hiroshi

    2017-08-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a non-proteinogenic amino acid that has hypotensive effects. Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) is among the most widely cultivated and consumed vegetables in the world and contains higher levels of GABA than other major crops. Increasing these levels can further enhance the blood pressure-lowering function of tomato fruit. Glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) is a key enzyme in GABA biosynthesis; it has a C-terminal autoinhibitory domain that regulates enzymatic function, and deleting this domain increases GAD activity. The tomato genome has five GAD genes (SlGAD1-5), of which two (SlGAD2 and SlGAD3) are expressed during tomato fruit development. To increase GABA content in tomato, we deleted the autoinhibitory domain of SlGAD2 and SlGAD3 using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein (Cas)9 technology. Introducing a stop codon immediately before the autoinhibitory domain increased GABA accumulation by 7 to 15 fold while having variable effects on plant and fruit size and yield. This is the first study describing the application of the CRISPR/Cas9 system to increase GABA content in tomato fruits. Our findings provide a basis for the improvement of other types of crop by CRISPR/Cas9-based genetic modification.

  3. Minimum number and best combinations of harvests to evaluate accessions of tomato plants from germplasm banks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Barbosa Abreu

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the minimum number and the best combination of tomato harvests needed to compare tomato accessions from germplasm banks. Number and weight of fruit in tomato plants are important as auxiliary traits in the evaluation of germplasm banks and should be studied simultaneously with other desirable characteristics such as pest and disease resistance, improved flavor and early production. Brazilian tomato breeding programs should consider not only the number of fruit but also fruit size because Brazilian consumers value fruit that are homogeneous, large and heavy. Our experiment was a randomized block design with three replicates of 32 tomato accessions from the Vegetable Germplasm Bank (Banco de Germoplasma de Hortaliças at the Federal University of Viçosa, Minas Gerais, Brazil plus two control cultivars (Debora Plus and Santa Clara. Nine harvests were evaluated for four production-related traits. The results indicate that six successive harvests are sufficient to compare tomato genotypes and germplasm bank accessions. Evaluation of genotypes according to the number of fruit requires analysis from the second to the seventh harvest. Evaluation of fruit weight by genotype requires analysis from the fourth to the ninth harvest. Evaluation of both number and weight of fruit require analysis from the second to the ninth harvest.

  4. Control of postharvest decay on cherry tomatoes by marine yeast Rhodosporidium paludigenum and calcium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y; Ren, X; Song, X; Yu, T; Lu, H; Wang, P; Wang, J; Zheng, X D

    2010-08-01

    In this study, the potential of calcium chloride (CaCl(2)) application to improve the efficacy of the marine antagonist Rhodosporidium paludigenum in controlling postharvest diseases of cherry tomatoes was assessed. CaCl(2) alone was found not to have any direct influence on the population growth of R. paludigenum in NYDB cultures or in cherry tomato wounds. However, the combined treatments with 1 x 10(8) cells ml(-1)R. paludigenum and CaCl(2) at the concentration from 0.5 to 2% showed high activities to reduce black rot caused by Alternaria alternata in cherry tomato wounds, significantly higher than those of R. paludigenum or CaCl(2) alone. Meanwhile, 0.5% CaCl(2) in combination with 1 x 10(8) cells ml(-1)R. paludigenum greatly inhibited the natural decay of cherry tomatoes in 21 days' storage at 25 degrees C. The combination of R. paludigenum and CaCl(2) enhances the inhibition of black rot and natural decay of postharvest cherry tomatoes. The results from this study provide a new way to improve the efficiency of R. paludigenum in maintaining the quality of postharvest fruits and vegetables. The marine yeast R. paludigenum combined with CaCl(2) has greatly potential use as an alternative to chemical fungicides in inhibiting postharvest decay on cherry tomatoes.

  5. High speed intelligent classifier of tomatoes by colour, size and weight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cement, J.; Novas, N.; Gazquez, J. A.; Manzano-Agugliaro, F.

    2012-11-01

    At present most horticultural products are classified and marketed according to quality standards, which provide a common language for growers, packers, buyers and consumers. The standardisation of both product and packaging enables greater speed and efficiency in management and marketing. Of all the vegetables grown in greenhouses, tomatoes are predominant in both surface area and tons produced. This paper will present the development and evaluation of a low investment classification system of tomatoes with these objectives: to put it at the service of producing farms and to classify for trading standards. An intelligent classifier of tomatoes has been developed by weight, diameter and colour. This system has optimised the necessary algorithms for data processing in the case of tomatoes, so that productivity is greatly increased, with the use of less expensive and lower performance electronics. The prototype is able to achieve very high speed classification, 12.5 ratings per second, using accessible and low cost commercial equipment for this. It decreases fourfold the manual sorting time and is not sensitive to the variety of tomato classified. This system facilitates the processes of standardisation and quality control, increases the competitiveness of tomato farms and impacts positively on profitability. The automatic classification system described in this work represents a contribution from the economic point of view, as it is profitable for a farm in the short term (less than six months), while the existing systems, can only be used in large trading centers. (Author) 36 refs.

  6. Chloroxyanion Residues in Cantaloupe and Tomatoes after Chlorine Dioxide Gas Sanitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D J; Ernst, W; Herges, G R

    2015-11-04

    Chlorine dioxide gas is effective at cleansing fruits and vegetables of bacterial pathogens and(or) rot organisms, but little data are available on chemical residues remaining subsequent to chlorine gas treatment. Therefore, studies were conducted to quantify chlorate and perchlorate residues after tomato and cantaloupe treatment with chlorine dioxide gas. Treatments delivered 50 mg of chlorine dioxide gas per kg of tomato (2-h treatment) and 100 mg of gas per kg of cantaloupe (6-h treatment) in sealed, darkened containers. Chlorate residues in tomato and cantaloupe edible flesh homogenates were less than the LC-MS/MS limit of quantitation (60 and 30 ng/g respectively), but were 1319 ± 247 ng/g in rind + edible flesh of cantaloupe. Perchlorate residues in all fractions of chlorine dioxide-treated tomatoes and cantaloupe were not different (P > 0.05) than perchlorate residues in similar fractions of untreated tomatoes and cantaloupe. Data from this study suggest that chlorine dioxide sanitation of edible vegetables and melons can be conducted without the formation of unwanted residues in edible fractions.

  7. MARKET PRICE COINTEGRATION OF TOMATO: EFFECTS TO NEPALESE FARMERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudra Bahadur Shrestha

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Market price cointegration is a critical issue in Nepalese vegetable industry. This study intended to analyze the market price cointegration of tomato and its effect on Nepalese farmers, using secondary monthly time series of wholesale price data (since 2000 to 2010 of the Government of Nepal. The results of error correction model (ECM showed that the series were stationary, and Kathmandu market was well cointegrated with source markets (Chitwan and Morang. Meanwhile, the vector error correction model (VECM revealed that price adjustment process was much faster in source markets especially in negative price shocks in response to Kathmandu market, which affected the farmers for speedy price adjustment that leads to be hurt and discouraged. The study recommend policies to establish alternative vegetable markets that reduce the price dependency of farmers on Kathmandu market, encourage traders in involving vegetable marketing, and enhance effective market information services.

  8. Isolation, identification, and biocontrol of antagonistic bacterium against Botrytis cinerea after tomato harvest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Feng Shi

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Tomato is one of the most important vegetables in the world. Decay after harvest is a major issue in the development of tomato industry. Currently, the most effective method for controlling decay after harvest is storage of tomato at low temperature combined with usage of chemical bactericide; however, long-term usage of chemical bactericide not only causes pathogen resistance but also is harmful for human health and environment. Biocontrol method for the management of disease after tomato harvest has great practical significance. In this study, antagonistic bacterium B-6-1 strain was isolated from the surface of tomato and identified as Enterobacter cowanii based on morphological characteristics and physiological and biochemical features combined with sequence analysis of 16SrDNA and ropB gene and construction of dendrogram. Effects of different concentrations of antagonistic bacterium E. cowanii suspension on antifungal activity after tomato harvest were analyzed by mycelium growth rate method. Results revealed that antifungal activity was also enhanced with increasing concentrations of antagonistic bacterium; inhibitory rates of 1 × 105 colony-forming units (cfu/mL antagonistic bacterial solution on Fusarium verticillioides, Alternaria tenuissima, and Botrytis cinerea were 46.31%, 67.48%, and 75.67%, respectively. By using in vivo inoculation method, it was further confirmed that antagonistic bacterium could effectively inhibit the occurrence of B. cinerae after tomato harvest, biocontrol effect of 1 × 109 cfu/mL zymotic fluid reached up to 95.24%, and antagonistic bacterium E. cowanii has biocontrol potential against B. cinerea after harvest of fruits and vegetables.

  9. Inheritance rules for Hierarchical Metadata Based on ISO 19115

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabala, A.; Masó, J.; Pons, X.

    2012-04-01

    Mainly, ISO19115 has been used to describe metadata for datasets and services. Furthermore, ISO19115 standard (as well as the new draft ISO19115-1) includes a conceptual model that allows to describe metadata at different levels of granularity structured in hierarchical levels, both in aggregated resources such as particularly series, datasets, and also in more disaggregated resources such as types of entities (feature type), types of attributes (attribute type), entities (feature instances) and attributes (attribute instances). In theory, to apply a complete metadata structure to all hierarchical levels of metadata, from the whole series to an individual feature attributes, is possible, but to store all metadata at all levels is completely impractical. An inheritance mechanism is needed to store each metadata and quality information at the optimum hierarchical level and to allow an ease and efficient documentation of metadata in both an Earth observation scenario such as a multi-satellite mission multiband imagery, as well as in a complex vector topographical map that includes several feature types separated in layers (e.g. administrative limits, contour lines, edification polygons, road lines, etc). Moreover, and due to the traditional split of maps in tiles due to map handling at detailed scales or due to the satellite characteristics, each of the previous thematic layers (e.g. 1:5000 roads for a country) or band (Landsat-5 TM cover of the Earth) are tiled on several parts (sheets or scenes respectively). According to hierarchy in ISO 19115, the definition of general metadata can be supplemented by spatially specific metadata that, when required, either inherits or overrides the general case (G.1.3). Annex H of this standard states that only metadata exceptions are defined at lower levels, so it is not necessary to generate the full registry of metadata for each level but to link particular values to the general value that they inherit. Conceptually the metadata

  10. Toxic effects of heavy metals and their accumulation in vegetables grown in a saline soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qusheng; Cai, Shasha; Mo, Cehui; Chu, Bei; Peng, Lihua; Yang, Fangbing

    2010-01-01

    A pot experiment was carried out to evaluate the effects of heavy metals on biomass, chlorophyll, and antioxidative enzyme activities of eight vegetables grown in a saline soil. The heavy metal accumulation in vegetables was also investigated. Results show that biomass and chlorophyll content of crops decreased with the increase of heavy metal concentration while peroxidase activity increased at low concentration and decreased at high concentration. The total translocation factor values in the eight vegetables are in order: water spinach>Chinese kale>pakchoi>edible amaranth>leaf mustard>Chinese flowering cabbage>green capsicum>tomato. Tomato, which is the most salt tolerant crop of the eight vegetables, also is the most heavy metals resistant studied in terms of growth, peroxidase activity and heavy metals translocation. Salt tolerant fruit vegetables such as tomato might be potential crops for the safe use of saline soils polluted with heavy metals.

  11. Assessing Salinity in Cotton and Tomato Plants by Using Reflectance Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldshleger, Naftaly

    2016-04-01

    Irrigated lands in semi-arid and arid areas are subjected to salinization processes. An example of this phenomenon is the Jezreel Valley in northern Israel where soil salinity has increased over the years. The increase in soil salinity results in the deterioration of the soil structure and crops damage. In this experiment we quantified the relation between the chemical and spectral features of cotton and tomato plants and their mutual relationship to soil salinity. The experiment was carried out as part of ongoing research aiming to detect and monitor saline soils and vegetation by combining different remote sensing methods. The aim of this study was to use vegetation reflectance measurements to predict foliar Cl and Na concentration and assess salinity in the soil and in vegetation by their reflectance measurements. The model developed for determining concentrations of chlorine and sodium in tomato and cotton produced good results ( R2 = 0.92 for sodium and 0.85 for chlorine in tomato and R2 = 0.84 for sodium and 0.82 for chlorine in cotton). Lately, we extend the method to calculate vegetation salinity, by doing correlation between the reflectance slopes of the tested crops CL and Na from two research areas. The developed model produced a good results for all the data (R2=0.74) Our method can be implemented to assess vegetation salinity ahead of planting, and developed as a generic tool for broader use for agriculture in semi-arid regions. In our opinion these results show the possibility of monitoring for a threshold level of salinity in tomato and cotton leaves so remedial action can be taken in time to prevent crop damage. Our results strongly suggest that future imaging spectroscopy remote sensing measurements collected by airborne and satellite platforms could measure the salinity of soil and vegetation over larger areas. These results can be the first steps for generic a model which includes more vegetation for salinity measurements.

  12. Managing thrips and tospoviruses in tomato

    Science.gov (United States)

    This fact sheet reports current management recommendations for Tomato spotted wilt virus, Groundnut ringspot virus and Tomato chlorotic spot virus and the thrips that transmits each of these viruses. All three viruses are important pathogens for Florida tomato crops. This information is useful for...

  13. Managing thrips and tospoviruses in tomato

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomato spotted wilt virus and more recently emerged Tomato chlorotic spot virus and Groundnut ringspot virus are all transmitted by thrips, making managment complex. All three viruses and the thrips vector are major pests of tomato in Florida. Current management tools for these viruses and the th...

  14. Carotenes in processed tomato after thermal treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luterotti, S.; Bicanic, D.D.; Markovic, K.; Franko, M.

    2015-01-01

    This report adds to the ongoing vivid dispute on the fate of carotenes in tomato upon thermal processing. Although many papers dealing with changes in the raw tomatoes during industrial treatment have already appeared, data on the fate of finished, processed tomato products when they are

  15. Impact of Wild Loci on the Allergenic Potential of Cultivated Tomato Fruits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Ghiani

    Full Text Available Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum is one of the most extensively consumed vegetables but, unfortunately, it is also able to induce allergic reactions. In the past, it has been shown that the choice of tomato cultivar significantly influenced the allergic reaction of tomato allergic subjects. In this study we investigated the allergenic potential of the cultivated tomato line M82 and of two selected lines carrying small chromosome regions from the wild species Solanum pennellii (i.e. IL7-3 and IL12-4. We evaluated the positive interactions of IgEs of allergic subjects in order to investigate the different allergenic potential of the lines under investigation. We used proteomic analyses in order to identify putative tomato allergens. In addition, bioinformatic and transcriptomic approaches were applied in order to analyse the structure and the expression profiles of the identified allergen-encoding genes. These analyses demonstrated that fruits harvested from the two selected introgression lines harbour a different allergenic potential as those from the cultivated genotype M82. The different allergenicity found within the three lines was mostly due to differences in the IgE recognition of a polygalacturonase enzyme (46 kDa, one of the major tomato allergens, and of a pectin methylesterase (34 kDa; both the proteins were more immunoreactive in IL7-3 compared to IL12-4 and M82. The observed differences in the allergenic potential were mostly due to line-dependent translational control or post-translational modifications of the allergens. We demonstrated, for the first time, that the introgression from a wild species (S. pennellii in the genomic background of a cultivated tomato line influences the allergenic properties of the fruits. Our findings could support the isolation of favorable wild loci promoting low allergenic potential in tomato.

  16. Metadata For Identity Management of Population Registers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Glassey

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available A population register is an inventory of residents within a country, with their characteristics (date of birth, sex, marital status, etc. and other socio-economic data, such as occupation or education. However, data on population are also stored in numerous other public registers such as tax, land, building and housing, military, foreigners, vehicles, etc. Altogether they contain vast amounts of personal and sensitive information. Access to public information is granted by law in many countries, but this transparency is generally subject to tensions with data protection laws. This paper proposes a framework to analyze data access (or protection requirements, as well as a model of metadata for data exchange.

  17. The JAMSTEC Metadata Publication and Search System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y Hanafusa

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC provides users of its data with comprehensive search services that enable users to find data in JAMSTEC's various data dissemination sites. These are the "JAMSTEC Data Search Portal" that helps users to search for observational data on a map and the "JAMSTEC Data Catalog" that enables users to find data sites by selecting science keywords. The "Data Search Portal" and the "Data Catalog" have been developed and operated as dedicated metadata publication and search services that collaborate with data sites in JAMSTEC.

  18. Information resource description creating and managing metadata

    CERN Document Server

    Hider, Philip

    2012-01-01

    An overview of the field of information organization that examines resource description as both a product and process of the contemporary digital environment.This timely book employs the unifying mechanism of the semantic web and the resource description framework to integrate the various traditions and practices of information and knowledge organization. Uniquely, it covers both the domain-specific traditions and practices and the practices of the ?metadata movement' through a single lens ? that of resource description in the broadest, semantic web sense.This approach more readily accommodate

  19. Semantic Web: Metadata, Linked Data, Open Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Russo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available What's the Semantic Web? What's the use? The inventor of the Web Tim Berners-Lee describes it as a research methodology able to take advantage of the network to its maximum capacity. This metadata system represents the innovative element through web 2.0 to web 3.0. In this context will try to understand what are the theoretical and informatic requirements of the Semantic Web. Finally will explain Linked Data applications to develop new tools for active citizenship.

  20. Tomato plant inheritance of antixenotic resistance to tomato leafminer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adilson de Castro Antônio

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to determine the inheritance of resistance by antixenosis in tomato plants (Lycopersicon esculentum to tomato leafminer [Tuta absoluta (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae]. Evaluations were performed for tomato plants of the generations P1, P2, F1, F2, RC1 and RC2. The measured characteristic in the parents, BGH-1497 (P2 male and 'Santa Clara' (P1 female, and in the F1, F2, RC1 and RC2 generations was the number of eggs per plant. This number was converted to the oviposition nonpreference index. The inheritance of antixenosis resistance of genotype BGH-1497 is ruled by a gene of greater effect and polygenes in epistatic interactions, with a phenotypic proportion of 13:3 between susceptible and resistant genotypes, respectively.

  1. The Metadata Coverage Index (MCI): A standardized metric for quantifying database metadata richness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liolios, Konstantinos; Schriml, Lynn; Hirschman, Lynette; Pagani, Ioanna; Nosrat, Bahador; Sterk, Peter; White, Owen; Rocca-Serra, Philippe; Sansone, Susanna-Assunta; Taylor, Chris; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Field, Dawn

    2012-07-30

    Variability in the extent of the descriptions of data ('metadata') held in public repositories forces users to assess the quality of records individually, which rapidly becomes impractical. The scoring of records on the richness of their description provides a simple, objective proxy measure for quality that enables filtering that supports downstream analysis. Pivotally, such descriptions should spur on improvements. Here, we introduce such a measure - the 'Metadata Coverage Index' (MCI): the percentage of available fields actually filled in a record or description. MCI scores can be calculated across a database, for individual records or for their component parts (e.g., fields of interest). There are many potential uses for this simple metric: for example; to filter, rank or search for records; to assess the metadata availability of an ad hoc collection; to determine the frequency with which fields in a particular record type are filled, especially with respect to standards compliance; to assess the utility of specific tools and resources, and of data capture practice more generally; to prioritize records for further curation; to serve as performance metrics of funded projects; or to quantify the value added by curation. Here we demonstrate the utility of MCI scores using metadata from the Genomes Online Database (GOLD), including records compliant with the 'Minimum Information about a Genome Sequence' (MIGS) standard developed by the Genomic Standards Consortium. We discuss challenges and address the further application of MCI scores; to show improvements in annotation quality over time, to inform the work of standards bodies and repository providers on the usability and popularity of their products, and to assess and credit the work of curators. Such an index provides a step towards putting metadata capture practices and in the future, standards compliance, into a quantitative and objective framework.

  2. Vegetables, fruit, and cancer prevention: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmetz, K A; Potter, J D

    1996-10-01

    In this review of the scientific literature on the relationship between vegetable and fruit consumption and risk of cancer, results from 206 human epidemiologic studies and 22 animal studies are summarized. The evidence for a protective effect of greater vegetable and fruit consumption is consistent for cancers of the stomach, esophagus, lung, oral cavity and pharynx, endometrium, pancreas, and colon. The types of vegetables or fruit that most often appear to be protective against cancer are raw vegetables, followed by allium vegetables, carrots, green vegetables, cruciferous vegetables, and tomatoes. Substances present in vegetables and fruit that may help protect against cancer, and their mechanisms, are also briefly reviewed; these include dithiolthiones, isothiocyanates, indole-3-carbinol, allium compounds, isoflavones, protease inhibitors, saponins, phytosterols, inositol hexaphosphate, vitamin C, D-limonene, lutein, folic acid, beta carotene, lycopene, selenium, vitamin E, flavonoids, and dietary fiber. Current US vegetable and fruit intake, which averages about 3.4 servings per day, is discussed, as are possible noncancer-related effects of increased vegetable and fruit consumption, including benefits against cardiovascular disease, diabetes, stroke, obesity, diverticulosis, and cataracts. Suggestions for dietitians to use in counseling persons toward increasing vegetable and fruit intake are presented.

  3. Metadata as a means for correspondence on digital media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stouffs, R.; Kooistra, J.; Tuncer, B.

    2004-01-01

    Metadata derive their action from their association to data and from the relationship they maintain with this data. An interpretation of this action is that the metadata lays claim to the data collection to which it is associated, where the claim is successful if the data collection gains quality as

  4. Shared Geospatial Metadata Repository for Ontario University Libraries: Collaborative Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forward, Erin; Leahey, Amber; Trimble, Leanne

    2015-01-01

    Successfully providing access to special collections of digital geospatial data in academic libraries relies upon complete and accurate metadata. Creating and maintaining metadata using specialized standards is a formidable challenge for libraries. The Ontario Council of University Libraries' Scholars GeoPortal project, which created a shared…

  5. Forensic devices for activism: Metadata tracking and public proof

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Velden, L.

    2015-01-01

    The central topic of this paper is a mobile phone application, ‘InformaCam’, which turns metadata from a surveillance risk into a method for the production of public proof. InformaCam allows one to manage and delete metadata from images and videos in order to diminish surveillance risks related to

  6. To Teach or Not to Teach: The Ethics of Metadata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Cynthia; Cavaliere, Frank

    2009-01-01

    Metadata is information about computer-generated documents that is often inadvertently transmitted to others. The problems associated with metadata have become more acute over time as word processing and other popular programs have become more receptive to the concept of collaboration. As more people become involved in the preparation of…

  7. Metadata in Chaos: how researchers tag radio broadcasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, Marianne; Lund, Haakon; Skov, Mette

    2015-01-01

    apply the metadata scheme in their research work. The study consists of two studies, a) a qualitative study of subjects and vocabulary of the applied metadata and annotations, and 5 semi-structured interviews about goals for tagging. The findings clearly show that the primary role of LARM...

  8. Sensory determinants of stated liking for vegetable names and actual liking for canned vegetables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dinnella, Caterina; Morizet, David; Masi, Camilla

    2016-01-01

    and similarities in liking for canned pea and sweet corn samples across the countries. A close positive relationship between stated liking and familiarity was found. Irrespective of the country, one group of highly liked vegetables (carrots, tomatoes, green salad) was identified, characterized by innately liked......Sensory properties are reported as one of the main factors hindering an appropriate vegetable intake by the young. In the present work the sensory determinants of likings for vegetables were explored in adolescents of four European countries (Denmark, n = 88; France, n = 206; Italy, n = 110...... and United Kingdom, n = 93). A questionnaire was designed to study cross country differences in stated liking for and familiarity with a list of vegetables popular among European markets (between-vegetable approach). A within-vegetable comparison approach with actual tasting was used to analyze differences...

  9. Developing Cyberinfrastructure Tools and Services for Metadata Quality Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mecum, B.; Gordon, S.; Habermann, T.; Jones, M. B.; Leinfelder, B.; Powers, L. A.; Slaughter, P.

    2016-12-01

    Metadata and data quality are at the core of reusable and reproducible science. While great progress has been made over the years, much of the metadata collected only addresses data discovery, covering concepts such as titles and keywords. Improving metadata beyond the discoverability plateau means documenting detailed concepts within the data such as sampling protocols, instrumentation used, and variables measured. Given that metadata commonly do not describe their data at this level, how might we improve the state of things? Giving scientists and data managers easy to use tools to evaluate metadata quality that utilize community-driven recommendations is the key to producing high-quality metadata. To achieve this goal, we created a set of cyberinfrastructure tools and services that integrate with existing metadata and data curation workflows which can be used to improve metadata and data quality across the sciences. These tools work across metadata dialects (e.g., ISO19115, FGDC, EML, etc.) and can be used to assess aspects of quality beyond what is internal to the metadata such as the congruence between the metadata and the data it describes. The system makes use of a user-friendly mechanism for expressing a suite of checks as code in popular data science programming languages such as Python and R. This reduces the burden on scientists and data managers to learn yet another language. We demonstrated these services and tools in three ways. First, we evaluated a large corpus of datasets in the DataONE federation of data repositories against a metadata recommendation modeled after existing recommendations such as the LTER best practices and the Attribute Convention for Dataset Discovery (ACDD). Second, we showed how this service can be used to display metadata and data quality information to data producers during the data submission and metadata creation process, and to data consumers through data catalog search and access tools. Third, we showed how the centrally

  10. Metadata Laws, Journalism and Resistance in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedetta Brevini

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The intelligence leaks from Edward Snowden in 2013 unveiled the sophistication and extent of data collection by the United States’ National Security Agency and major global digital firms prompting domestic and international debates about the balance between security and privacy, openness and enclosure, accountability and secrecy. It is difficult not to see a clear connection with the Snowden leaks in the sharp acceleration of new national security legislations in Australia, a long term member of the Five Eyes Alliance. In October 2015, the Australian federal government passed controversial laws that require telecommunications companies to retain the metadata of their customers for a period of two years. The new acts pose serious threats for the profession of journalism as they enable government agencies to easily identify and pursue journalists’ sources. Bulk data collections of this type of information deter future whistleblowers from approaching journalists, making the performance of the latter’s democratic role a challenge. After situating this debate within the scholarly literature at the intersection between surveillance studies and communication studies, this article discusses the political context in which journalists are operating and working in Australia; assesses how metadata laws have affected journalism practices and addresses the possibility for resistance.

  11. SPASE, Metadata, and the Heliophysics Virtual Observatories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieman, James; King, Todd; Roberts, Aaron

    2010-01-01

    To provide data search and access capability in the field of Heliophysics (the study of the Sun and its effects on the Solar System, especially the Earth) a number of Virtual Observatories (VO) have been established both via direct funding from the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and through other funding agencies in the U.S. and worldwide. At least 15 systems can be labeled as Virtual Observatories in the Heliophysics community, 9 of them funded by NASA. The problem is that different metadata and data search approaches are used by these VO's and a search for data relevant to a particular research question can involve consulting with multiple VO's - needing to learn a different approach for finding and acquiring data for each. The Space Physics Archive Search and Extract (SPASE) project is intended to provide a common data model for Heliophysics data and therefore a common set of metadata for searches of the VO's. The SPASE Data Model has been developed through the common efforts of the Heliophysics Data and Model Consortium (HDMC) representatives over a number of years. We currently have released Version 2.1 of the Data Model. The advantages and disadvantages of the Data Model will be discussed along with the plans for the future. Recent changes requested by new members of the SPASE community indicate some of the directions for further development.

  12. EXIF Custom: Automatic image metadata extraction for Scratchpads and Drupal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ed Baker

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Many institutions and individuals use embedded metadata to aid in the management of their image collections. Many deskop image management solutions such as Adobe Bridge and online tools such as Flickr also make use of embedded metadata to describe, categorise and license images. Until now Scratchpads (a data management system and virtual research environment for biodiversity  have not made use of these metadata, and users have had to manually re-enter this information if they have wanted to display it on their Scratchpad site. The Drupal described here allows users to map metadata embedded in their images to the associated field in the Scratchpads image form using one or more customised mappings. The module works seamlessly with the bulk image uploader used on Scratchpads and it is therefore possible to upload hundreds of images easily with automatic metadata (EXIF, XMP and IPTC extraction and mapping.

  13. Interpreting the ASTM 'content standard for digital geospatial metadata'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebert, Douglas D.

    1996-01-01

    ASTM and the Federal Geographic Data Committee have developed a content standard for spatial metadata to facilitate documentation, discovery, and retrieval of digital spatial data using vendor-independent terminology. Spatial metadata elements are identifiable quality and content characteristics of a data set that can be tied to a geographic location or area. Several Office of Management and Budget Circulars and initiatives have been issued that specify improved cataloguing of and accessibility to federal data holdings. An Executive Order further requires the use of the metadata content standard to document digital spatial data sets. Collection and reporting of spatial metadata for field investigations performed for the federal government is an anticipated requirement. This paper provides an overview of the draft spatial metadata content standard and a description of how the standard could be applied to investigations collecting spatially-referenced field data.

  14. Making the Case for Embedded Metadata in Digital Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Kari R.; Saunders, Sarah; Kejser, U.B.

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the standards, methods, use cases, and opportunities for using embedded metadata in digital images. In this paper we explain the past and current work engaged with developing specifications, standards for embedding metadata of different types, and the practicalities of data...... exchange in heritage institutions and the culture sector. Our examples and findings support the case for embedded metadata in digital images and the opportunities for such use more broadly in non-heritage sectors as well. We encourage the adoption of embedded metadata by digital image content creators...... and curators as well as those developing software and hardware that support the creation or re-use of digital images. We conclude that the usability of born digital images as well as physical objects that are digitized can be extended and the files preserved more readily with embedded metadata....

  15. EXIF Custom: Automatic image metadata extraction for Scratchpads and Drupal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Ed

    2013-01-01

    Many institutions and individuals use embedded metadata to aid in the management of their image collections. Many deskop image management solutions such as Adobe Bridge and online tools such as Flickr also make use of embedded metadata to describe, categorise and license images. Until now Scratchpads (a data management system and virtual research environment for biodiversity) have not made use of these metadata, and users have had to manually re-enter this information if they have wanted to display it on their Scratchpad site. The Drupal described here allows users to map metadata embedded in their images to the associated field in the Scratchpads image form using one or more customised mappings. The module works seamlessly with the bulk image uploader used on Scratchpads and it is therefore possible to upload hundreds of images easily with automatic metadata (EXIF, XMP and IPTC) extraction and mapping.

  16. Managing ebook metadata in academic libraries taming the tiger

    CERN Document Server

    Frederick, Donna E

    2016-01-01

    Managing ebook Metadata in Academic Libraries: Taming the Tiger tackles the topic of ebooks in academic libraries, a trend that has been welcomed by students, faculty, researchers, and library staff. However, at the same time, the reality of acquiring ebooks, making them discoverable, and managing them presents library staff with many new challenges. Traditional methods of cataloging and managing library resources are no longer relevant where the purchasing of ebooks in packages and demand driven acquisitions are the predominant models for acquiring new content. Most academic libraries have a complex metadata environment wherein multiple systems draw upon the same metadata for different purposes. This complexity makes the need for standards-based interoperable metadata more important than ever. In addition to complexity, the nature of the metadata environment itself typically varies slightly from library to library making it difficult to recommend a single set of practices and procedures which would be releva...

  17. DES-TOMATO: A Knowledge Exploration System Focused On Tomato Species

    KAUST Repository

    Salhi, Adil

    2017-07-14

    Tomato is the most economically important horticultural crop used as a model to study plant biology and particularly fruit development. Knowledge obtained from tomato research initiated improvements in tomato and, being transferrable to other such economically important crops, has led to a surge of tomato-related research and published literature. We developed DES-TOMATO knowledgebase (KB) for exploration of information related to tomato. Information exploration is enabled through terms from 26 dictionaries and combination of these terms. To illustrate the utility of DES-TOMATO, we provide several examples how one can efficiently use this KB to retrieve known or potentially novel information. DES-TOMATO is free for academic and nonprofit users and can be accessed at http://cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/des_tomato/, using any of the mainstream web browsers, including Firefox, Safari and Chrome.

  18. DES-TOMATO: A Knowledge Exploration System Focused On Tomato Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salhi, Adil; Negrão, Sónia; Essack, Magbubah; Morton, Mitchell J L; Bougouffa, Salim; Razali, Rozaimi; Radovanovic, Aleksandar; Marchand, Benoit; Kulmanov, Maxat; Hoehndorf, Robert; Tester, Mark; Bajic, Vladimir B

    2017-07-20

    Tomato is the most economically important horticultural crop used as a model to study plant biology and particularly fruit development. Knowledge obtained from tomato research initiated improvements in tomato and, being transferrable to other such economically important crops, has led to a surge of tomato-related research and published literature. We developed DES-TOMATO knowledgebase (KB) for exploration of information related to tomato. Information exploration is enabled through terms from 26 dictionaries and combination of these terms. To illustrate the utility of DES-TOMATO, we provide several examples how one can efficiently use this KB to retrieve known or potentially novel information. DES-TOMATO is free for academic and nonprofit users and can be accessed at http://cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/des_tomato/, using any of the mainstream web browsers, including Firefox, Safari and Chrome.

  19. Influence of simulated Quinclorac drift on the accumulation and movement of herbicide in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovelace, Michael L; Hoagland, Robert E; Talbert, Ronald E; Scherder, Eric F

    2009-07-22

    Quinclorac (3,7-dichloro-8-quinolinecarboxylic acid) is a herbicide commonly used in rice, and its drift has been suspected of causing injury to off-target tomato fields throughout Arkansas. Studies were conducted to evaluate the effects of single and multiple simulated quinclorac drift applications on tomato plant growth and development. Residues extracted from tomato plants treated with 0.42 g of ai ha(-1) were below the detection limit of liquid chromatography-double mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis. Quinclorac residue levels and half-lives in tomato tissue increased as the application rate and number of applications increased. From 3 to 72 h after (14)C-quinclorac treatment of plants, most of the absorbed (14)C was retained in the treated leaf, and translocations of (14)C out of the treated leaf of vegetative and flowering tomato plant tissues were similar. Of the (14)C that translocated out of the treated leaf, the greatest movement was acropetally. The flower cluster contained 1% of the total absorbed (14)C, which suggests the potential for quinclorac translocation into tomato fruit. More extensive research will be required to understand the impact that quinclorac may have on tomato production in the area.

  20. Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) variety discrimination and hybridization analysis based on the 5S rRNA region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yan-Lin; Kang, Ho-Min; Kim, Young-Sik; Baek, Jun-Pill; Zheng, Shi-Lin; Xiang, Jin-Jun; Hong, Soon-Kwan

    2014-05-04

    The tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) is a major vegetable crop worldwide. To satisfy popular demand, more than 500 tomato varieties have been bred. However, a clear variety identification has not been found. Thorough understanding of the phylogenetic relationship and hybridization information of tomato varieties is very important for further variety breeding. Thus, in this study, we collected 26 tomato varieties and attempted to distinguish them based on the 5S rRNA region, which is widely used in the determination of phylogenetic relations. Sequence analysis of the 5S rRNA region suggested that a large number of nucleotide variations exist among tomato varieties. These variable nucleotide sites were also informative regarding hybridization. Chromas sequencing of Yellow Mountain View and Seuwiteuking varieties indicated three and one variable nucleotide sites in the non-transcribed spacer (NTS) of the 5S rRNA region showing hybridization, respectively. Based on a phylogenetic tree constructed using the 5S rRNA sequences, we observed that 16 tomato varieties were divided into three groups at 95% similarity. Rubiking and Sseommeoking, Lang Selection Procedure and Seuwiteuking, and Acorn Gold and Yellow Mountain View exhibited very high identity with their partners. This work will aid variety authentication and provides a basis for further tomato variety breeding.

  1. Detection of Residual Levels and Associated Health Risk of Seven Pesticides in Fresh Eggplant and Tomato Samples from Narayanganj District, Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Nur Alam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Residual levels of seven frequently used pesticides were investigated in 140 samples of two common vegetables, eggplants and tomatoes, from agricultural fields in the Narayanganj district of Bangladesh. The analysis of pesticide residues was performed by high-performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detection. A large percentage of the eggplants (50% and tomatoes (60% from the Narayanganj district were contaminated with pesticides, and all of the levels were above the maximum residual limit (MRL proposed by the EC regulation. Diazinon was the most common (35% pesticide detected in the vegetable samples at a concentration of 45–450 times higher than the MRL. The health risk index for diazinon was highest for both eggplant and tomato samples, which may be due to its physiochemical properties. Fenitrothion and linuron are the two second most common types of pesticides detected in the vegetable samples. Regular monitoring of the use of common pesticides on vegetables should be conducted.

  2. Developing an Integrated Pest Management Program for Tomatoes in The Red River Delta of Vietnam: A mini review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuan M. Ha

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Ecologically based approaches to pest management in crop production have been embraced in recent decades due to their validity and effectiveness. Integrated Pest Management (IPM is not a new concept. It has been adopted in various regions in Vietnam, particularly in tomato production, an economically important vegetable crop in the Red River Delta (RRD. Given the occurrence and development of tomato pests are influenced by many factors such as soil types, crop varieties and growth habits, production practices, local climatic conditions, and growing seasons, this paper therefore developed an IPM program for tomatoes in the RRD based on the defined major pests in the region. Detailed factsheets for six major pests were developed and different components of the IPM were explored and employed for the ease of identification and management. Practical suggestions for tomato growers were also presented.

  3. Obtaining of Grafted Planting Material at Some Romanian Tomatoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madalina Doltu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The tomatoes have highest share in Romanian crops from protected spaces (greenhouses, solariums. The grafting is an agronomical technique that induces or improves some qualities of the tomato cultivars (resistance to soil diseases and pests, resistance to abiotic factors, quantity and quality of fruit production. The research was aimed the establishing of the technological stages for producing of scion and rootstock seedlings from L. esculentum species, to obtain compatible phenotype when is grafted. The observations of this research were conducted on Department of Horticultural Cultures in Protected Spaces from Horting Institute Bucharest. The experience was carry out on a cultivar collection consisting from L. esculentum plants: scions (‘Siriana’–F1 hybrid and ‘Buzău 1600’– variety, creations from the germplasm bank of Research and Development Station for Vegetable Growing Buzău Romania (VDRS Buzău and rootstock (‘Groundforce’–F1 hybrid. The plant diameters were correlated for a grafting by the annexation method, cutting at 45 degrees. The grafting was performed successfully. The technological steps have achieved phenotypic compatibility of the symbiotes when was the grafting by annexation. The technology for producing of scion and rootstock seedlings at these Romanian tomatoes (‘Siriana’ and ‘Buzău’ 1600 was established for the crops in protected spaces in south area of Romania.

  4. Tomato Fruits-A Platform for Metabolic Engineering of Terpenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutensohn, M; Dudareva, N

    2016-01-01

    Terpenoids are a large and diverse class of plant metabolites including mono-, sesqui-, and diterpenes. They have numerous functions in basic physiological processes as well as the interaction of plants with their biotic and abiotic environment. Due to the tight regulation of biosynthetic pathways and the resulting limited natural availability of terpenes, there is a strong interest in increasing their production in plants by metabolic engineering for agricultural, pharmaceutical, and industrial applications. The tomato fruit system was developed as a platform for metabolic engineering of terpenes to overcome detrimental effects on overall plant growth and photosynthesis traits, which are affected when terpenoid engineering is performed in vegetative tissues. Here we describe how the use of fruit-specific promoters for transgene expression can avoid these unwanted effects. In addition, targeting the expression of the introduced terpene biosynthetic gene to fruit tissue can take advantage of the large precursor pool provided by the methylerythritol-phosphate (MEP) pathway, which is highly active during tomato fruit ripening to facilitate the accumulation of carotenoids. We also discuss how the production of high levels of target terpene compounds can be achieved in fruits by the expression of individual or a combination of (i) the MEP or mevalonic acid pathway enzymes, (ii) prenyltransferases, and/or (iii) terpene synthases. Finally, we provide a brief outline of how the emitted as well as internal pools of terpenes can be analyzed in transgenic tomato fruits. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. First Report of Tomato torrado virus Infecting Tomato in Colombia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek, M.; Dullemans, A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) plants grown in plastic greenhouses near Villa de Leyva, northeast of Bogota, Colombia showed necrotic spots on the leaves in September 2008. Initial symptoms were necrosis beginning at the base of leaflets that were surrounded by yellow areas. These symptoms

  6. The XML Metadata Editor of GFZ Data Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulbricht, Damian; Elger, Kirsten; Tesei, Telemaco; Trippanera, Daniele

    2017-04-01

    Following the FAIR data principles, research data should be Findable, Accessible, Interoperable and Reuseable. Publishing data under these principles requires to assign persistent identifiers to the data and to generate rich machine-actionable metadata. To increase the interoperability, metadata should include shared vocabularies and crosslink the newly published (meta)data and related material. However, structured metadata formats tend to be complex and are not intended to be generated by individual scientists. Software solutions are needed that support scientists in providing metadata describing their data. To facilitate data publication activities of 'GFZ Data Services', we programmed an XML metadata editor that assists scientists to create metadata in different schemata popular in the earth sciences (ISO19115, DIF, DataCite), while being at the same time usable by and understandable for scientists. Emphasis is placed on removing barriers, in particular the editor is publicly available on the internet without registration [1] and the scientists are not requested to provide information that may be generated automatically (e.g. the URL of a specific licence or the contact information of the metadata distributor). Metadata are stored in browser cookies and a copy can be saved to the local hard disk. To improve usability, form fields are translated into the scientific language, e.g. 'creators' of the DataCite schema are called 'authors'. To assist filling in the form, we make use of drop down menus for small vocabulary lists and offer a search facility for large thesauri. Explanations to form fields and definitions of vocabulary terms are provided in pop-up windows and a full documentation is available for download via the help menu. In addition, multiple geospatial references can be entered via an interactive mapping tool, which helps to minimize problems with different conventions to provide latitudes and longitudes. Currently, we are extending the metadata editor

  7. Ozone microbubble treatment at various water temperatures for the removal of residual pesticides with negligible effects on the physical properties of lettuce and cherry tomatoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeura, H; Kobayashi, F; Tamaki, M

    2013-02-01

    In this study, the effects of ozone microbubbles (OMCB) treatment at various water temperatures on the removal of residual fenitrothion (FT) pesticides and on the physical properties of lettuce and cherry tomatoes was examined. The residual FT percentage in lettuce and cherry tomatoes was shown decreased by using higher water temperatures, particularly at 30 °C, resulting in a decrease within the range of 32% to 52%, after the 20-min treatment. In addition, bubbling OMCB treatment did not alter the color and pulling strength of lettuce and cherry tomatoes. These results indicate that bubbling OMCB treatment at 30 °C is a highly effective method for the removal of FT residues in lettuce and cherry tomatoes, with relatively little effect on crop quality. The bubbling OMCB has a potential of reducing the FT reduces on vegetables with no adverse effect on the sensory quality of vegetables. © 2013 Institute of Food Technologists®

  8. An undigested cherry tomato as a rare cause of small bowel obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortezavi, A; Schneider, P M; Lurje, G

    2015-07-01

    Small bowel obstruction due to undigested fibre from fruits and vegetables is a rare but known medical condition. We report a case of small bowel obstruction caused by a whole cherry tomato in a patient without a past medical history of abdominal surgery. A 66-year-old man presented to the emergency department complaining of lower abdominal pain with nausea and vomiting. His last bowel movement had occurred on the morning of presentation. He underwent abdominal computed tomography (CT), which showed a sudden change of diameter in the distal ileum with complete collapse of the proximal small bowel segment. Laparoscopy confirmed a small bowel obstruction with a transition point close to the ileocaecal valve. An enterotomy was performed and a completely undigested cherry tomato was retrieved. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a small bowel obstruction caused by a whole cherry tomato.

  9. A Survey of the Insect Pests and Farmers' Practices in the Cropping of Tomato in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umeh, VC.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A survey of some tomato producing areas of Nigeria indicated that the major insects attacking tomato included the fruit borer Helicoverpa armigera Hübner, the grasshopper Zonocerus variegatus L., the whitefly Bemisia tabacci Gennadius, and various species of aphids, mostly Aphis gossypii Glover. Interviews conducted to assess farmers' practices which contribute to insect damage showed that inappropriate application of insecticides and the use of wrong dosages may have contributed to insect control failures. Intercropping tomato with crops such as cereals tubers and other vegetables reduced infestation in some areas. However, most farmers' practices did not affect insect pest abundance. Insect populations and percentages of infestation were, in most cases, found to be significantly higher in Oyo state (in the rain forest agro-ecological zone than in other surveyed states located in the savannah agro-ecological zones.

  10. Screening tomato genotypes for adaptation to high temperature in West Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kugblenu, Yvonne O.; Danso, Eric Oppong; Ofori, Kwadjo

    2013-01-01

    Tomato is an important vegetable widely grown in the tropics due to its nutritional value and financial benefits for farmers. In Ghana, there is an undersupply caused by production ceasing entirely from October to May due to high temperatures. Heat stress has been reported to cause excessive flower...... drop leading to drastic reduction in yield; however, genotypic differences in heat tolerance exist in tomato. A greenhouse experiment was conducted to screen 19 different tomato genotypes for their tolerance to heat stress. The genotypes were selected because they were the commercial varieties widely...... available to farmers. The average day and night temperatures recorded were 33.8°C and 25.9°C, respectively. Cultivars were evaluated for heat adaptation traits such as flower drop and number of fruits. There were highly significant differences between the genotypes for numbers of fruits per plant, ranging...

  11. calcium and iron levels in some fruits and vegetables commonly

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    usern

    ABSTRACT. Four different fruits and vegetables (i.e. Apple, Egg Plant, Pineapple, Watermelon, Cabbage,. Pepper, Spinach, and Tomato) in each case were analysed for their Calcium and iron levels using spectrophotometric method of analysis; From the results, it was found that the concentration of. Calcium was highest in ...

  12. The study of antioxidant activity of multicomponent vegetable puree

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Trushechkin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Studied the antioxidant activity of multicomponent vegetable puree, consisting of 20 % of eggplant, 20 % of zucchini, 16 % of bell peppers, 15 % of tomatoes, 14 % of carrots, 10 % of onions and 5 % of garlic. These results showed an increase in concentration of the antioxidant activity of puree and, consequently, increase its quality.

  13. Pulp colour evaluation of dried sweet tomatoes to prepare jams.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delia Paola Urfalino-Rodríguez

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the colour of dried sweet tomatoes, to prepare jams. The assay was carried out during 2013 at the Fruits and Vegetables Drying Laboratory from the National Institute of Agricultural Technology (INTA Rama Caída Agricultural Experimental Station, Argentina. Franco variety tomatoes were used; these were peeled and cut, then 8 groups of 0,5 kg each were formed in order to attain 4 treatments with two repetitions. The tomatoes were covered with sucrose (0,5 kg mixed with four doses of sodium metabisulfite (A: 0%; B: 0,2%; C: 0,5%; D: 0,8% and were left resting 24 hours. They were rinsed and dehydrated in an electric oven with forced ventilation at 55 °C until 0,47 ± 0,02 (humidity inferior to 20 % of water activity was reached. Subsequently, the colour of the pulp of the dried tomatoes was measured every three months and the content of sulphur dioxide was determined after one year in storage. The four treatments evaluated presented stable colours in time; however, treatments C and D showed the highest values in colour space CIE L*, a*, b* (most intense and attractive red colours. Also, these treatments were the ones with the greatest residual amount of sulphur dioxide, however, they were below of the allowed limit established by the Argentine Food Code for the manufacturing of jams(C 160 ± 22,63; D 1.160 ± 214,96 ppm.

  14. Tomato ABSCISIC ACID STRESS RIPENING (ASR gene family revisited.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ido Golan

    Full Text Available Tomato ABSCISIC ACID RIPENING 1 (ASR1 was the first cloned plant ASR gene. ASR orthologs were then cloned from a large number of monocot, dicot and gymnosperm plants, where they are mostly involved in response to abiotic (drought and salinity stress and fruit ripening. The tomato genome encodes five ASR genes: ASR1, 2, 3 and 5 encode low-molecular-weight proteins (ca. 110 amino acid residues each, whereas ASR4 encodes a 297-residue polypeptide. Information on the expression of the tomato ASR gene family is scarce. We used quantitative RT-PCR to assay the expression of this gene family in plant development and in response to salt and osmotic stresses. ASR1 and ASR4 were the main expressed genes in all tested organs and conditions, whereas ASR2 and ASR3/5 expression was two to three orders of magnitude lower (with the exception of cotyledons. ASR1 is expressed in all plant tissues tested whereas ASR4 expression is limited to photosynthetic organs and stamens. Essentially, ASR1 accounted for most of ASR gene expression in roots, stems and fruits at all developmental stages, whereas ASR4 was the major gene expressed in cotyledons and young and fully developed leaves. Both ASR1 and ASR4 were expressed in flower organs, with ASR1 expression dominating in stamens and pistils, ASR4 in sepals and petals. Steady-state levels of ASR1 and ASR4 were upregulated in plant vegetative organs following exposure to salt stress, osmotic stress or the plant abiotic stress hormone abscisic acid (ABA. Tomato plants overexpressing ASR1 displayed enhanced survival rates under conditions of water stress, whereas ASR1-antisense plants displayed marginal hypersensitivity to water withholding.

  15. EFFECTS OF HEALTH INFORMATION ON FRUIT AND VEGETABLE CONSUMPTION

    OpenAIRE

    Padilla, Luis; Acharya, Ram N.

    2000-01-01

    US per capita fruit and vegetable consumption is below the level recommended for better health. The paper examines how health information linking diet and health, as measured by a health information index has affected fruit and vegetable consumption. Results indicate that health information has a significant impact on the consumption of grapes, bananas and citrus as well as in carrots, tomatoes and bell peppers. This suggests that raising public awareness about specific health benefits of eat...

  16. Lead, cadmium, mercury and insecticide residue control of fresh vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köck, M; Sixl, W; Möse, J R

    1989-01-01

    Comparative investigations were carried out for heavy metals and heptenophos the sole used insecticide in used water, soil samples and harvest vegetables of a fresh cultivation region and of supplies of large plants. If one compares the recommended levels given with the levels found in the different types of vegetables investigated (cucumber, green pepper, tomatoes) then the values found lie far below the recommended levels.

  17. RESPONSE OF PACKAGED TOMATOES (Lycopersicon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    35mm and below, the material was able to withstand high pressure force radially than axially before yielding. Keywords: axial loading, radial loading, deformation, Instron universal compression test machine and tomato. 1. INTRODUCTION. Mechanical behavior of a compressed material at bioyield can be expressed in ...

  18. Hormones and tomato seed germination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Y.

    1996-01-01

    Using GA- and ABA-deficient mutants, exogenous gibberellins (GAs), abscisic acid (ABA) and osmoticum, we studied the roles of GAs and ABA in the induction of cell cycle activities, internal free space formation and changes in water relations during seed development and imbibition in tomato. First of

  19. Temperature, light and the tomato

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkerk, K.

    1955-01-01

    In good illumination, six tomato varieties all responded to an increase in day or/and night temperature by faster stem and fruit growth, earlier but smaller fruit yield with fewer fruits in shorter and lighter clusters, and a reduction in root, stem and leaf weight. Optimum temperatures for moderate

  20. Design and Implementation of a Metadata-rich File System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ames, S; Gokhale, M B; Maltzahn, C

    2010-01-19

    Despite continual improvements in the performance and reliability of large scale file systems, the management of user-defined file system metadata has changed little in the past decade. The mismatch between the size and complexity of large scale data stores and their ability to organize and query their metadata has led to a de facto standard in which raw data is stored in traditional file systems, while related, application-specific metadata is stored in relational databases. This separation of data and semantic metadata requires considerable effort to maintain consistency and can result in complex, slow, and inflexible system operation. To address these problems, we have developed the Quasar File System (QFS), a metadata-rich file system in which files, user-defined attributes, and file relationships are all first class objects. In contrast to hierarchical file systems and relational databases, QFS defines a graph data model composed of files and their relationships. QFS incorporates Quasar, an XPATH-extended query language for searching the file system. Results from our QFS prototype show the effectiveness of this approach. Compared to the de facto standard, the QFS prototype shows superior ingest performance and comparable query performance on user metadata-intensive operations and superior performance on normal file metadata operations.

  1. Emedding MPEG-7 metadata within a media file format

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wo

    2005-08-01

    Embedding metadata within a media file format becomes evermore popular for digital media. Traditional digital media files such as MP3 songs and JPEG photos do not carry any metadata structures to describe the media content until these file formats were extended with ID3 and EXIF. Recently both ID3 and EXIF advanced to version 2.4 and version 2.2 respectively with much added new description tags. Currently, most MP3 players and digital cameras support the latest revisions of these metadata structures as the de-facto standard formats. Given the benefits of having metadata to describe the media content is very critical to consumers for viewing and searching media content. However, both ID3 and EXIF were designed with very different approaches in terms of syntax, semantics, and data structures. Therefore, these two metadata file formats are not compatible and cannot be utilized for other common applications such as slideshow for playing MP3 music in the background and shuffle through images in the foreground. This paper presents the idea of embedding the international standard of ISO/IEC MPEG-7 metadata descriptions inside the rich ISO/IEC MPEG-4 file format container so that a general metadata framework can be used for images, audio, and video applications.

  2. Achieving interoperability for metadata registries using comparative object modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yu Rang; Kim, Ju Han

    2010-01-01

    Achieving data interoperability between organizations relies upon agreed meaning and representation (metadata) of data. For managing and registering metadata, many organizations have built metadata registries (MDRs) in various domains based on international standard for MDR framework, ISO/IEC 11179. Following this trend, two pubic MDRs in biomedical domain have been created, United States Health Information Knowledgebase (USHIK) and cancer Data Standards Registry and Repository (caDSR), from U.S. Department of Health & Human Services and National Cancer Institute (NCI), respectively. Most MDRs are implemented with indiscriminate extending for satisfying organization-specific needs and solving semantic and structural limitation of ISO/IEC 11179. As a result it is difficult to address interoperability among multiple MDRs. In this paper, we propose an integrated metadata object model for achieving interoperability among multiple MDRs. To evaluate this model, we developed an XML Schema Definition (XSD)-based metadata exchange format. We created an XSD-based metadata exporter, supporting both the integrated metadata object model and organization-specific MDR formats.

  3. Evolution of the ATLAS Metadata Interface (AMI)

    CERN Document Server

    Odier, Jerome; The ATLAS collaboration; Fulachier, Jerome; Lambert, Fabian

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS Metadata Interface (AMI) can be considered to be a mature application because it has existed for at least 10 years. Over the years, the number of users and the number of functions provided for these users has increased. It has been necessary to adapt the hardware infrastructure in a seamless way so that the Quality of Service remains high. We will describe the evolution of the application from the initial one, using single server with a MySQL backend database, to the current state, where we use a cluster of Virtual Machines on the French Tier 1 Cloud at Lyon, an ORACLE database backend also at Lyon, with replication to CERN using ORACLE streams behind a back-up server.

  4. Metadata specification in a dynamic geometry software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radaković, Davorka; Herceg, Äńorde

    2017-07-01

    Attributes in C# are a mechanism that provides association of declarative information with C# code such as classes, types, methods, properties, namespaces etc. Once defined and associated with a program entity, an attribute can be queried at run time. However, the attributes have certain restrictions which limit their application to representing complex metadata necessary for development of dynamic geometry software (DGS). We have devised a solution, independent of attributes, which was developed to overcome the limitations, while maintaining the functionality of attributes. Our solution covers a wide range of uses, from providing extensibility to a functional programming language and declaring new data types and operations, to being a foundation for runtime optimizations of expression tree evaluation, and helpful user interface features, such as code completion.

  5. SEMANTIC METADATA FOR HETEROGENEOUS SPATIAL PLANNING DOCUMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Iwaniak

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Spatial planning documents contain information about the principles and rights of land use in different zones of a local authority. They are the basis for administrative decision making in support of sustainable development. In Poland these documents are published on the Web according to a prescribed non-extendable XML schema, designed for optimum presentation to humans in HTML web pages. There is no document standard, and limited functionality exists for adding references to external resources. The text in these documents is discoverable and searchable by general-purpose web search engines, but the semantics of the content cannot be discovered or queried. The spatial information in these documents is geographically referenced but not machine-readable. Major manual efforts are required to integrate such heterogeneous spatial planning documents from various local authorities for analysis, scenario planning and decision support. This article presents results of an implementation using machine-readable semantic metadata to identify relationships among regulations in the text, spatial objects in the drawings and links to external resources. A spatial planning ontology was used to annotate different sections of spatial planning documents with semantic metadata in the Resource Description Framework in Attributes (RDFa. The semantic interpretation of the content, links between document elements and links to external resources were embedded in XHTML pages. An example and use case from the spatial planning domain in Poland is presented to evaluate its efficiency and applicability. The solution enables the automated integration of spatial planning documents from multiple local authorities to assist decision makers with understanding and interpreting spatial planning information. The approach is equally applicable to legal documents from other countries and domains, such as cultural heritage and environmental management.

  6. Classifying the precancers: A metadata approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henson Donald E

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During carcinogenesis, precancers are the morphologically identifiable lesions that precede invasive cancers. In theory, the successful treatment of precancers would result in the eradication of most human cancers. Despite the importance of these lesions, there has been no effort to list and classify all of the precancers. The purpose of this study is to describe the first comprehensive taxonomy and classification of the precancers. As a novel approach to disease classification, terms and classes were annotated with metadata (data that describes the data so that the classification could be used to link precancer terms to data elements in other biological databases. Methods Terms in the UMLS (Unified Medical Language System related to precancers were extracted. Extracted terms were reviewed and additional terms added. Each precancer was assigned one of six general classes. The entire classification was assembled as an XML (eXtensible Mark-up Language file. A Perl script converted the XML file into a browser-viewable HTML (HyperText Mark-up Language file. Results The classification contained 4700 precancer terms, 568 distinct precancer concepts and six precancer classes: 1 Acquired microscopic precancers; 2 acquired large lesions with microscopic atypia; 3 Precursor lesions occurring with inherited hyperplastic syndromes that progress to cancer; 4 Acquired diffuse hyperplasias and diffuse metaplasias; 5 Currently unclassified entities; and 6 Superclass and modifiers. Conclusion This work represents the first attempt to create a comprehensive listing of the precancers, the first attempt to classify precancers by their biological properties and the first attempt to create a pathologic classification of precancers using standard metadata (XML. The classification is placed in the public domain, and comment is invited by the authors, who are prepared to curate and modify the classification.

  7. Semantic Metadata for Heterogeneous Spatial Planning Documents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwaniak, A.; Kaczmarek, I.; Łukowicz, J.; Strzelecki, M.; Coetzee, S.; Paluszyński, W.

    2016-09-01

    Spatial planning documents contain information about the principles and rights of land use in different zones of a local authority. They are the basis for administrative decision making in support of sustainable development. In Poland these documents are published on the Web according to a prescribed non-extendable XML schema, designed for optimum presentation to humans in HTML web pages. There is no document standard, and limited functionality exists for adding references to external resources. The text in these documents is discoverable and searchable by general-purpose web search engines, but the semantics of the content cannot be discovered or queried. The spatial information in these documents is geographically referenced but not machine-readable. Major manual efforts are required to integrate such heterogeneous spatial planning documents from various local authorities for analysis, scenario planning and decision support. This article presents results of an implementation using machine-readable semantic metadata to identify relationships among regulations in the text, spatial objects in the drawings and links to external resources. A spatial planning ontology was used to annotate different sections of spatial planning documents with semantic metadata in the Resource Description Framework in Attributes (RDFa). The semantic interpretation of the content, links between document elements and links to external resources were embedded in XHTML pages. An example and use case from the spatial planning domain in Poland is presented to evaluate its efficiency and applicability. The solution enables the automated integration of spatial planning documents from multiple local authorities to assist decision makers with understanding and interpreting spatial planning information. The approach is equally applicable to legal documents from other countries and domains, such as cultural heritage and environmental management.

  8. Tomato phytochemicals and prostate cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Jessica K; Canene-Adams, Kirstie; Lindshield, Brian L; Boileau, Thomas W-M; Clinton, Steven K; Erdman, John W

    2004-12-01

    Mounting evidence over the past decade suggests that the consumption of fresh and processed tomato products is associated with reduced risk of prostate cancer. The emerging hypothesis is that lycopene, the primary red carotenoid in tomatoes, may be the principle phytochemical responsible for this reduction in risk. A number of potential mechanisms by which lycopene may act have emerged, including serving as an important in vivo antioxidant, enhancing cell-to-cell communication via increasing gap junctions between cells, and modulating cell-cycle progression. Although the effect of lycopene is biologically relevant, the tomato is also an excellent source of nutrients, including folate, vitamin C, and various other carotenoids and phytochemicals, such as polyphenols, which also may be associated with lower cancer risk. Tomatoes also contain significant quantities of potassium, as well as some vitamin A and vitamin E. Our laboratory has been interested in identifying specific components or combination of components in tomatoes that are responsible for reducing prostate cancer risk. We carried out cell culture trials to evaluate the effects of tomato carotenoids and tomato polyphenols on growth of prostate cancer cells. We also evaluated the ability of freeze-dried whole-tomato powder or lycopene alone to reduce growth of prostate tumors in rats. This paper reviews the epidemiological evidence, evaluating the relationship between prostate cancer risk and tomato consumption, and presents experimental data from this and other laboratories that support the hypothesis that whole tomato and its phytochemical components reduce the risk of prostate cancer.

  9. Potential of Pseudomonas putida PCI2 for the Protection of Tomato Plants Against Fungal Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor, Nicolás; Masciarelli, Oscar; Fischer, Sonia; Luna, Virginia; Rovera, Marisa

    2016-09-01

    Tomato is one of the most economically attractive vegetable crops due to its high yields. Diseases cause significant losses in tomato production worldwide. We carried out Polymerase Chain Reaction studies to detect the presence of genes encoding antifungal compounds in the DNA of Pseudomonas putida strain PCI2. We also used liquid chromatography-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry to detect and quantify the production of compounds that increase the resistance of plants to diseases from culture supernatants of PCI2. In addition, we investigated the presence of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase in PCI2. Finally, PCI2 was used for inoculation of tomato seeds to study its potential biocontrol activity against Fusarium oxysporum MR193. The obtained results showed that no fragments for the encoding genes of hydrogen cyanide, pyoluteorin, 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol, pyrrolnitrin, or phenazine-1-carboxylic acid were amplified from the DNA of PCI2. On the other hand, PCI2 produced salicylic acid and jasmonic acid in Luria-Bertani medium and grew in a culture medium containing ACC as the sole nitrogen source. We observed a reduction in disease incidence from 53.33 % in the pathogen control to 30 % in tomato plants pre-inoculated with PCI2 as well as increases in shoot and root dry weights in inoculated plants, as compared to the pathogenicity control. This study suggests that inoculation of tomato seeds with P. putida PCI2 increases the resistance of plants to root rot caused by F. oxysporum and that PCI2 produces compounds that may be involved at different levels in increasing such resistance. Thus, PCI2 could represent a non-contaminating management strategy potentially applicable in vegetable crops such as tomato.

  10. [Analysis of some nutrients and minerals in organic and traditional cherry tomato by ICP-OES method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Ji-Ping; Liu, Can; Shen, Lin

    2009-08-01

    In the present study, the contents of nutritional elements such as Ca, Mg, K, Zn, Fe and Mn and heavy elements such as Cu, Cd and Pb in organic and traditional cherry tomato fruit were analyzed by ICP-OES, and the contents of some nutritional ingredients such as water, total soluble solid, soluble sugar and asorbic acid were also investigated. The results showed that the contents of K, Ca and Zn in organic cherry tomato were 1.62, 71.7 and 1.34 mg x g(-1), which were 4.52%, 129.81% and 65.43% respectively higher than those in traditional tomato. There were no significant differences in the contents of Mg and Fe, which showed 73.8 and 2.05 mg x g(-1) in organic cherry tomato. But the content of Mn in organic tomato was 0.475 mg x g(-1), 11.22% lower than that in traditional one (alpha = 0.05). The contents of Cu, Cd and Pb showed no significant differences in the two kinds of tomato, which were 0.457 mg x g(-1), 4.86 ng x g(-1) and 0.127 mg x g(-1) respectively in organic cherry tomato, and all the contents were lower than the national requirement. There were no significant differences in the contents of water, soluble sugar, and asorbic acid, but the total soluble solid and the content of soluble protein were significantly higher in organic cherry tomato. The differences in the nutritional ingredients and mineral elements and safety status in the two kinds of tomato provide academic data for the evaluation of organic vegetables and traditional ones.

  11. Identification of microRNAs and their targets in tomato infected with Cucumber mosaic virus based on deep sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Junli; Liu, Shasha; Wang, Mengna; Lang, Qiulei; Jin, Chunzhi

    2014-12-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important regulatory roles in plant development and stress responses. Tomato is an economically important vegetable crop in the world with publicly available genomic information database, but only a limited number of tomato miRNAs have been identified. In this study, two independent small RNA libraries from mock and Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV)-infected tomatoes were constructed, respectively, and sequenced with a high-throughput Illumina Solexa system. Based on sequence analysis and hairpin structure prediction, a total of 50 plant miRNAs and 273 potentially candidate miRNAs (PC-miRNAs) were firstly identified in tomato, with 12 plant miRNAs and 82 PC-miRNAs supported by both the 3p and 5p strands. Comparative analysis revealed that 79 miRNAs (including 15 new tomato miRNAs) and 40 PC-miRNAs were differentially expressed between the two libraries, and the expression patterns of some new tomato miRNAs and PC-miRNAs were further validated by qRT-PCR. Moreover, potential targets for some of the known and new tomato miRNAs were identified by the recently developed degradome sequencing approach, and target annotation indicated that they were involved in multiple biological processes, including transcriptional regulation and virus resistance. Gene ontology analysis of these target transcripts demonstrated that defense response- and photosynthesis-related genes were most affected in CMV-Fny-infected tomatoes. Because tomato is not only an important crop but also is a genetic model for basic biology research, our study contributes to the understanding of miRNAs in response to virus infection.

  12. Forum Guide to Metadata: The Meaning behind Education Data. NFES 2009-805

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Forum on Education Statistics, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this guide is to empower people to more effectively use data as information. To accomplish this, the publication explains what metadata are; why metadata are critical to the development of sound education data systems; what components comprise a metadata system; what value metadata bring to data management and use; and how to…

  13. Acoustic Metadata Management and Transparent Access to Networked Oceanographic Data Sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. FINAL REPORT Acoustic Metadata Management and...derived from these recordings ( metadata of the recordings) becomes crucial in order to combine data across disparate studies to provide information...productivity of various animal stocks. Of particular importance for bioacoustic metadata is the specification of the how the metadata were generated

  14. Optimization of productivity and quality of irrigated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) by smallholder farmers in the Central Rift Valley area of Oromia, Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Gemechis, Ambecha O.

    2017-01-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) is a vegetable crop with high potential to contribute to poverty reduction via increased income and food security. It is widely grown by smallholders, has high productivity and its demand is increasing. Ethiopia produced about 30,700 Mg of tomatoes on 5,027 ha annually in 2014/2015. Average yields are only 6.1 Mg ha-1, below the world average yields. There is both a need and a potential to increase tomato production per unit area. The aim of this thesis is to ...

  15. Proximate Analysis and Total Lycopene Content of Some Tomato ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MBI

    2017-06-05

    Jun 5, 2017 ... Standard analytical techniques were employed to determine the proximate composition and lycopene content of three tomato cultivars namely: ... Keywords: Antioxidant, lycopene content, proximate composition, tomato cultivars. INTRODUCTION ..... from oranges, tomatoes and carrots. African. Journal of ...

  16. Bacterial community diversity and variation in spray water sources and the tomato fruit surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ottesen Andrea R

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum consumption has been one of the most common causes of produce-associated salmonellosis in the United States. Contamination may originate from animal waste, insects, soil or water. Current guidelines for fresh tomato production recommend the use of potable water for applications coming in direct contact with the fruit, but due to high demand, water from other sources is frequently used. We sought to describe the overall bacterial diversity on the surface of tomato fruit and the effect of two different water sources (ground and surface water when used for direct crop applications by generating a 454-pyrosequencing 16S rRNA dataset of these different environments. This study represents the first in depth characterization of bacterial communities in the tomato fruit surface and the water sources commonly used in commercial vegetable production. Results The two water sources tested had a significantly different bacterial composition. Proteobacteria was predominant in groundwater samples, whereas in the significantly more diverse surface water, abundant phyla also included Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Verrucomicrobia. The fruit surface bacterial communities on tomatoes sprayed with both water sources could not be differentiated using various statistical methods. Both fruit surface environments had a high representation of Gammaproteobacteria, and within this class the genera Pantoea and Enterobacter were the most abundant. Conclusions Despite the major differences observed in the bacterial composition of ground and surface water, the season long use of these very different water sources did not have a significant impact on the bacterial composition of the tomato fruit surface. This study has provided the first next-generation sequencing database describing the bacterial communities living in the fruit surface of a tomato crop under two different spray water regimes, and therefore represents an

  17. Metadata Evaluation and Improvement: Evolving Analysis and Reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habermann, Ted; Kozimor, John; Gordon, Sean

    2017-01-01

    ESIP Community members create and manage a large collection of environmental datasets that span multiple decades, the entire globe, and many parts of the solar system. Metadata are critical for discovering, accessing, using and understanding these data effectively and ESIP community members have successfully created large collections of metadata describing these data. As part of the White House Big Earth Data Initiative (BEDI), ESDIS has developed a suite of tools for evaluating these metadata in native dialects with respect to recommendations from many organizations. We will describe those tools and demonstrate evolving techniques for sharing results with data providers.

  18. The tomato sauce making process affects the bioaccessibility and bioavailability of tomato phenolics: a pharmacokinetic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Huélamo, Miriam; Tulipani, Sara; Estruch, Ramón; Escribano, Elvira; Illán, Montserrat; Corella, Dolores; Lamuela-Raventós, Rosa M

    2015-04-15

    Tomato sauce is the most commonly consumed processed tomato product worldwide, but very little is known about how the manufacturing process may affect the phenolic composition and bioavailability after consumption. In a prospective randomised, cross-over intervention study, we analysed the plasma and urinary levels of tomato phenolic compounds and their metabolites after acute consumption of raw tomatoes and tomato sauce, enriched or not with refined olive oil during production. Respectively, eleven and four phenolic metabolites were found in urine and plasma samples. The plasma concentration and urinary excretion of naringenin glucuronide were both significantly higher after the consumption of tomato sauce than raw tomatoes. The results suggest that the mechanical and thermal treatments during tomato sauce manufacture may help to deliver these potentially bioactive phenolics from the food matrix more effectively than the addition of an oil component, thus increasing their bioavailability. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Desorption isotherms and mathematical modeling of thin layer drying kinetics of tomato

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belghith, Amira; Azzouz, Soufien; ElCafsi, Afif

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, there is an increased demand on the international market of dried fruits and vegetables with significant added value. Due to its important production, consumption and nutrient intake, drying of tomato has become a subject of extended and varied research works. The present work is focused on the drying behavior of thin-layer tomato and its mathematical modeling in order to optimize the drying processes. The moisture desorption isotherms of raw tomato were determined at four temperature levels namely 45, 50, 60 and 65 °C using the static gravimetric method. The experimental data obtained were modeled by five equations and the (GAB) model was found to be the best-describing these isotherms. The drying kinetics were experimentally investigated at 45, 55 and 65 °C and performed at air velocities of 0.5 and 2 m/s. In order to investigate the effect of the exchange surface on drying time, samples were dried into two different shapes: tomato halves and tomato quarters. The impact of various drying parameters was also studied (temperature, air velocity and air humidity). The drying curves showed only the preheating period and the falling drying rate period. In this study, attention was paid to the modeling of experimental thin-layer drying kinetics. The experimental results were fitted with four different models.

  20. A Role for APETALA1/FRUITFULL Transcription Factors in Tomato Leaf Development[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burko, Yogev; Shleizer-Burko, Sharona; Yanai, Osnat; Shwartz, Ido; Zelnik, Iris Daphne; Jacob-Hirsch, Jasmine; Kela, Itai; Eshed-Williams, Leor; Ori, Naomi

    2013-01-01

    Flexible maturation rates underlie part of the diversity of leaf shape, and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) leaves are compound due to prolonged organogenic activity of the leaf margin. The CINCINNATA -TEOSINTE BRANCHED1, CYCLOIDEA, PCF (CIN-TCP) transcription factor LANCEOLATE (LA) restricts this organogenic activity and promotes maturation. Here, we show that tomato APETALA1/FRUITFULL (AP1/FUL) MADS box genes are involved in tomato leaf development and are repressed by LA. AP1/FUL expression is correlated negatively with LA activity and positively with the organogenic activity of the leaf margin. LA binds to the promoters of the AP1/FUL genes MBP20 and TM4. Overexpression of MBP20 suppressed the simple-leaf phenotype resulting from upregulation of LA activity or from downregulation of class I knotted like homeobox (KNOXI) activity. Overexpression of a dominant-negative form of MBP20 led to leaf simplification and partly suppressed the increased leaf complexity of plants with reduced LA activity or increased KNOXI activity. Tomato plants overexpressing miR319, a negative regulator of several CIN-TCP genes including LA, flower with fewer leaves via an SFT-dependent pathway, suggesting that miR319-sensitive CIN-TCPs delay flowering in tomato. These results identify a role for AP1/FUL genes in vegetative development and show that leaf and plant maturation are regulated via partially independent mechanisms. PMID:23771895

  1. Genetic Divergent of Tomato Lines Based on AFLP Molecular Markers and Relationship with Heterosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Nabipoor

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Tomato as a highly nutritious vegetable crop is widely grown in the world. Hybrid seed is preferably used for tomato production. Identification of superior hybrid combination is one of the most important steps in the hybrid breeding programs. Breeding of high yielding hybrids is expensive and involves testing large numbers of hybrid combinations in multi-environment trials. Successful prediction of heterosis from the genetic similarity of their parents based on molecular markers has been reported in several crops and can be very helpful in hybrid breeding. The present study was carried out to evaluate genetic divergent among tomato lines and to assess the relationship between genetic distance and heterosis among them. Thirty genotypes were examined for DNA polymorphism, using amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs. A total of 165 polymorphic variants were generated and genetic distances ranged from 0.04 to 0.23. Our result indicated that AFLP markers were successful in identification of polymorphism and genetic distances among tomato lines, but correlation of genetic distance based on AFLPs with mid-parent heterosis of yield, fruit weight, fruit number and fruit durability time was low and not useful for predicting heterosis in tomato genotypes.

  2. Combinations of tomato and broccoli enhance antitumor activity in dunning r3327-h prostate adenocarcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canene-Adams, Kirstie; Lindshield, Brian L; Wang, Shihua; Jeffery, Elizabeth H; Clinton, Steven K; Erdman, John W

    2007-01-15

    The consumption of diets containing 5 to 10 servings of fruits and vegetables daily is the foundation of public health recommendations for cancer prevention, yet this concept has not been tested in experimental models of prostate cancer. We evaluated combinations of tomato and broccoli in the Dunning R3327-H prostate adenocarcinoma model. Male Copenhagen rats (n=206) were fed diets containing 10% tomato, 10% broccoli, 5% tomato plus 5% broccoli (5:5 combination), 10% tomato plus 10% broccoli (10:10 combination) powders, or lycopene (23 or 224 nmol/g diet) for approximately 22 weeks starting 1 month prior to receiving s.c. tumor implants. We compared the effects of diet to surgical castration (2 weeks before termination) or finasteride (5 mg/kg body weight orally, 6 d/wk). Castration reduced prostate weights, tumor areas, and tumor weight (62%, Ptomato reduced tumor weight by 34% (Ptomato and broccoli was more effective at slowing tumor growth than either tomato or broccoli alone and supports the public health recommendations to increase the intake of a variety of plant components.

  3. The effect of water stress and salinity on growth and physiology of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giannakoula Anastasia E.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Carotenoids like lycopene are important pigments found in photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes in plants. They are responsible for the bright colors of fruits and vegetables and perform various functions in photosynthesis. Our research has shown that the application of moderate salt stress on tomato plants can enhance lycopene and potentially other antioxidant concentrations in fruits. The increase in lycopene in response to salt stress in the tomato fruits varied from 20% to 80%. Although the specific biological mechanisms involved in increasing fruit lycopene deposition has not been clearly elucidated, evidence suggests that increasing antioxidant concentrations is a primary physiological response of the plant to salt stress. Additionally drought stress during cultivation increased the antioxidant capacity of tomato fruit while maintaining the lycopene concentration. In addition, the effects of silicium were investigated, added to the nutrient solution either at low concentration or at an increased concentration. The present study clearly indicates that an enhanced silicium supply to tomato increases markedly the lycopene contents, irrespective of the salinity status in the tomato fruit.

  4. Behavior of Listeria monocytogenes inoculated into raw tomatoes and processed tomato products.

    OpenAIRE

    Beuchat, L R; Brackett, R E

    1991-01-01

    Rates of death and growth of Listeria monocytogenes inoculated onto raw whole and into chopped tomatoes stored at 10 and 21 degrees C were not influenced by prior treatment of tomatoes with chlorine or packaging under an atmosphere of 3% O2 and 97% N2. Growth of the pathogen occurred in whole tomatoes held at 21 degrees C but not at 10 degrees C, while death occurred in chopped tomatoes stored at these temperatures. Likewise, growth patterns of mesophilic aerobic microorganisms, psychrotrophi...

  5. Anti-atherosclerotic effects of tomatoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidekatsu Yanai

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Tomatoes are rich in lycopene, which causes the red coloring of tomatoes. Several reports have suggested lycopene plays a role in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases. In this study, we systematically reviewed the interventional studies using tomatoes or tomato products to understandtheanti-atherosclerotic effects of the tomatoas a functional food. We found that a significantnumber of interventional studies reportedtheanti-atherosclerotic effects of tomatoes, includinganti-obesity effects, hypotensiveeffects, improvement of lipid/glucose metabolismand endothelial function, anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory effect, and anti-platelet effect; however, the anti-platelet effect was disagreed uponby some studies. Furthermore, we discoveredcooking methods significantlyaffect anti-atherosclerotic effects of tomatoes.

  6. The Effect of Washing and Peeling on Reduction of Dithiocarbamates Residues in Cucumber and Tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Mehrasebi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dithiocarbamates, the main group of fungicides, are used to control about 400 pathogens in more than 70 crops. These pesticides are widely applied to crops including potato, cereal, apple, pear and leafy vegetables throughout the world since 1960. From the late 1980s, using these fungicides has caused much debate among regulators about their long-term effects on consumers and occupational users. Method: In this study the residues of Dithiocarbamates in cucumber and tomato using the colorimetric method (Keppel method was measured. Respectively 80 and 45 samples of greenhouse cucumber and tomato were collected from Zanjan vegetables center in autumns and winter 2013. The samples were analyzed in 4 treatments of: unwashed, washing with water, washing whit detergent and peeling. Result: The results showed that the average concentration of Dithiocarbamates residues in unwashed greenhouse cucumber and tomatoes were 384.5 µg/kg and 65 µg/kg respectively. 35% and 5% of unwashed and water washed cucumber and tomato samples (respectively had higher Dithiocarbamates residue than MRL recommended by Institute of Standards and Industrial Research of Iran (0.5mg/kg. Conclusion: The treatments of washing and peeling had significant effect on the reduction of Dithiocarbamates residues in the all samples.

  7. Western flower thrips can transmit Tomato spotted wilt virus from virus-infected tomato fruits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acquisition and transmission of Tomato spotted wilt virus from symptomatic tomato fruits by western flower thrips was demonstrated for the first time. This suggests that infected tomato fruits may be a source of virus and also provide an additional means of virus movement between geographic areas....

  8. Predicting the presence of whiteflies and tomato yellow leaf curl virus in Florida tomato fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florida is one of the leading states for production of fresh market tomatoes. Production is severely affected by Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV). The objective of this study was to identify landscape and climatic factors that drive whitefly populations and TYLCV incidence in commercial tomato ...

  9. Trade Performance of Fruit and Vegetable Industry in Selected ASEAN Countries

    OpenAIRE

    Emmy, F.A.; Mohd Mansor, Ismail

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the trade performance for thirteen commodities in the fruit and vegetable industry in relation to that of selected ASEAN countries (Philippines, Indonesia, Singapore and Thailand), based on Revealed Comparative Advantage (RCA) indicator. The analysis shows that Singapore has comparative advantage in 5 commodities (ground-nuts, hazelnuts, plums, apricots and walnuts), Philippines has comparative advantage in 3 commodities (tomatoes nes prepared or preserved, tomatoes whole ...

  10. Plasma and hepatic cholesterol-lowering in hamsters by tomato pomace, tomato seed oil and defatted tomato seed supplemented in high fat diets

    Science.gov (United States)

    We determined the cholesterol-lowering effects of tomato pomace (TP), a byproduct of tomato processing, and its components such as tomato seed oil (TSO) and defatted tomato seed (DTS) in hamsters, a widely used animal model for cholesterol metabolism. Male Syrian Golden hamsters were fed high-fat di...

  11. Presettlement Vegetation

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Presettlement vegetation of Minnesota based on Marschner's original analysis of Public Land Survey notes and landscape patterns. Marschner compiled his results in...

  12. The case of tomato in Ghana: Processing

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, Elizabeth J. Z.; Kolavalli, Shashi L.

    2010-01-01

    Processing of highly perishable non-storable crops, such as tomato, is typically promoted for two reasons: as a way of absorbing excess supply, particularly during gluts that result from predominantly rainfed cultivation; and to enhance the value chain through a value-added process. For Ghana, improving domestic tomato processing would also reduce the country's dependence on imported tomato paste and so improve foreign exchange reserves, as well as provide employment opportunities and develop...

  13. USGS 24k Digital Raster Graphic (DRG) Metadata

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Metadata for the scanned USGS 24k Topograpic Map Series (also known as 24k Digital Raster Graphic). Each scanned map is represented by a polygon in the layer and the...

  14. Requirements for multimedia metadata schemes in surveillance applications for security

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rest, J.H.C. van; Grootjen, F.A.; Grootjen, M.; Wijn, R.; Aarts, O.A.J.; Roelofs, M.L.; Burghouts, G.J.; Bouma, H.; Alic, L.; Kraaij, W.

    2013-01-01

    Surveillance for security requires communication between systems and humans, involves behavioural and multimedia research, and demands an objective benchmarking for the performance of system components.Metadata representation schemes are extremely important to facilitate (system) interoperability

  15. Toward element-level interoperability in bibliographic metadata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Childress

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses an approach and set of tools for translating bibliographic metadata from one format to another. A computational model is proposed to formalize the notion of a 'crosswalk'. The translation process separates semantics from syntax, and specifies a crosswalk as machine executable translation files which are focused on assertions of element equivalence and are closely associated with the underlying intellectual analysis of metadata translation. A data model developed by the authors called Morfrom serves as an internal generic metadata format. Translation logic is written in an XML scripting language designed by the authors called the Semantic Equivalence Expression Language (Seel. These techniques have been built into an OCLC software toolkit to manage large and diverse collections of metadata records, called the Crosswalk Web Service.

  16. Metadata and Metacognition: How can we stimulate reflection for learning?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Specht, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    Specht, M. (2012, 12 September). Metadata and Metacognition: How can we stimulate reflection for learning? Invited presentation given at the seminar on awareness and reflection in learning at the University of Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.

  17. Large geospatial images discovery: metadata model and technological framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukáš Brůha

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The advancements in geospatial web technology triggered efforts for disclosure of valuable resources of historical collections. This paper focuses on the role of spatial data infrastructures (SDI in such efforts. The work describes the interplay between SDI technologies and potential use cases in libraries such as cartographic heritage. The metadata model is introduced to link up the sources from these two distinct fields. To enhance the data search capabilities, the work focuses on the representation of the content-based metadata of raster images, which is the crucial prerequisite to target the search in a more effective way. The architecture of the prototype system for automatic raster data processing, storage, analysis and distribution is introduced. The architecture responds to the characteristics of input datasets, namely to the continuous flow of very large raster data and related metadata. Proposed solutions are illustrated on the case study of cartometric analysis of digitised early maps and related metadata encoding.

  18. Precision Pointing Reconstruction and Geometric Metadata Generation for Cassini Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, R. S.; Showalter, M. R.; Gordon, M. K.

    2017-06-01

    We are reconstructing accurate pointing for 400,000 images taken by Cassini at Saturn. The results will be provided to the public along with per-pixel metadata describing precise image contents such as geographical location and viewing geometry.

  19. Distributed metadata in a high performance computing environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bent, John M.; Faibish, Sorin; Zhang, Zhenhua; Liu, Xuezhao; Tang, Haiying

    2017-07-11

    A computer-executable method, system, and computer program product for managing meta-data in a distributed storage system, wherein the distributed storage system includes one or more burst buffers enabled to operate with a distributed key-value store, the co computer-executable method, system, and computer program product comprising receiving a request for meta-data associated with a block of data stored in a first burst buffer of the one or more burst buffers in the distributed storage system, wherein the meta data is associated with a key-value, determining which of the one or more burst buffers stores the requested metadata, and upon determination that a first burst buffer of the one or more burst buffers stores the requested metadata, locating the key-value in a portion of the distributed key-value store accessible from the first burst buffer.

  20. Metafier - a Tool for Annotating and Structuring Building Metadata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmegaard, Emil; Johansen, Aslak; Kjærgaard, Mikkel Baun

    2018-01-01

    in achieving this goal, but often they work as silos. Improving at scale the energy performance of buildings depends on applications breaking these silos and being portable among buildings. To enable portable building applications, the building instrumentation should be supported by a metadata layer......, describing the instrumentation of the building. We have created Metafier, a tool for annotating and structuring metadata for buildings. Metafier optimizes the workflow of establishing metadata for buildings by enabling a human-in-the-loop to validate, search and group points. We have evaluated Metafier...... for two buildings, with different sizes, locations, ages and purposes. The evaluation was performed as a user test with three subjects with different backgrounds. The evaluation results indicates that the tool enabled the users to validate, search and group points while annotating metadata. One challenge...

  1. Home | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available m and stable state as national public goods. The Archive makes it easier for many people to search datasets by metada... Metadata (Materials and Methods) whole organism A database specified for managing information on experimental methods (metada...argets: [0] } ] }); // 「全メタデータをエクスポート」ボタン jQuery('.metadata-export-all').on('clic

  2. Heavy Metals Accumulation Characteristics of Vegetables in Hangzhou City, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GU Yan-qing

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A field survey of heavy metal concentrations in soils and vegetables grown in 30 vegetable farmlands of Hangzhou City were carried out. Through calculating the bioconcentration factor(BCFand transfer factor(TFfor different heavy metals(Cu, Zn, Cd, Cr and Pbin 27 kinds of different vegetables which belong to leafy vegetables, root vegetables or eggplant fruit vegetables, assessing their accumulation characteristics of heavy metals according to the differences of the bio-concentration factor, the reasonable proposals were put forward to optimize the planting structure of vegetables in mild and middle-level heavy metal contamination soils. The experimental results were as follows: In soils with mild and middle-level heavy metal contamination, leafy vegetables, such as crown daisy, cabbage, celery and Chinese long cabbage, had relatively low enrichment ability of heavy metals, so as the root and fruit vegetables like white radish, carrot, tomatoes, hence these vegetables could be planted preferentially. In contrast, some kinds of vegetables, including white amaranth, red amaranth, tatsoi, broccoli, gynura, brassica juncea and lettuce of leafy vegetables, lactuca sativa, taro, red radish and cherry radish of rhizome vegetables and sweet pepper of fruit vegetables, had relatively high accumulation ability of heavy metal, which should be avoided to be planted in soils with mild and middle-level heavy metal contamination.

  3. Forensic devices for activism: Metadata tracking and public proof

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lonneke van der Velden

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The central topic of this paper is a mobile phone application, ‘InformaCam’, which turns metadata from a surveillance risk into a method for the production of public proof. InformaCam allows one to manage and delete metadata from images and videos in order to diminish surveillance risks related to online tracking. Furthermore, it structures and stores the metadata in such a way that the documentary material becomes better accommodated to evidentiary settings, if needed. In this paper I propose InformaCam should be interpreted as a ‘forensic device’. By using the conceptualization of forensics and work on socio-technical devices the paper discusses how InformaCam, through a range of interventions, rearranges metadata into a technology of evidence. InformaCam explicitly recognizes mobile phones as context aware, uses their sensors, and structures metadata in order to facilitate data analysis after images are captured. Through these modifications it invents a form of ‘sensory data forensics'. By treating data in this particular way, surveillance resistance does more than seeking awareness. It becomes engaged with investigatory practices. Considering the extent by which states conduct metadata surveillance, the project can be seen as a timely response to the unequal distribution of power over data.

  4. Using Metadata to Build Geographic Information Sharing Environment on Internet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-hong Sun

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Internet provides a convenient environment to share geographic information. Web GIS (Geographic Information System even provides users a direct access environment to geographic databases through Internet. However, the complexity of geographic data makes it difficult for users to understand the real content and the limitation of geographic information. In some cases, users may misuse the geographic data and make wrong decisions. Meanwhile, geographic data are distributed across various government agencies, academic institutes, and private organizations, which make it even more difficult for users to fully understand the content of these complex data. To overcome these difficulties, this research uses metadata as a guiding mechanism for users to fully understand the content and the limitation of geographic data. We introduce three metadata standards commonly used for geographic data and metadata authoring tools available in the US. We also review the current development of geographic metadata standard in Taiwan. Two metadata authoring tools are developed in this research, which will enable users to build their own geographic metadata easily.[Article content in Chinese

  5. Evolving Metadata in NASA Earth Science Data Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, A.; Cechini, M. F.; Walter, J.

    2011-12-01

    NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) is a coordinated series of satellites for long term global observations. NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) is a petabyte-scale archive of environmental data that supports global climate change research by providing end-to-end services from EOS instrument data collection to science data processing to full access to EOS and other earth science data. On a daily basis, the EOSDIS ingests, processes, archives and distributes over 3 terabytes of data from NASA's Earth Science missions representing over 3500 data products ranging from various types of science disciplines. EOSDIS is currently comprised of 12 discipline specific data centers that are collocated with centers of science discipline expertise. Metadata is used in all aspects of NASA's Earth Science data lifecycle from the initial measurement gathering to the accessing of data products. Missions use metadata in their science data products when describing information such as the instrument/sensor, operational plan, and geographically region. Acting as the curator of the data products, data centers employ metadata for preservation, access and manipulation of data. EOSDIS provides a centralized metadata repository called the Earth Observing System (EOS) ClearingHouse (ECHO) for data discovery and access via a service-oriented-architecture (SOA) between data centers and science data users. ECHO receives inventory metadata from data centers who generate metadata files that complies with the ECHO Metadata Model. NASA's Earth Science Data and Information System (ESDIS) Project established a Tiger Team to study and make recommendations regarding the adoption of the international metadata standard ISO 19115 in EOSDIS. The result was a technical report recommending an evolution of NASA data systems towards a consistent application of ISO 19115 and related standards including the creation of a NASA-specific convention for core ISO 19115 elements. Part of

  6. Characterization and quantification of phenolic compounds in four tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.) farmers' varieties in northeastern Portugal homegardens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Lillian; Dueñas, Montserrat; Pinela, José; Carvalho, Ana Maria; Buelga, Celestino Santos; Ferreira, Isabel C F R

    2012-09-01

    Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.) is one of the most widely consumed fresh and processed vegetables in the world, and contains bioactive key components. Phenolic compounds are one of those components and, according to the present study, farmers' varieties of tomato cultivated in homegardens from the northeastern Portuguese region are a source of phenolic compounds, mainly phenolic acid derivatives. Using HPLC-DAD-ESI/MS, it was concluded that a cis p-coumaric acid derivative was the most abundant compound in yellow (Amarelo) and round (Batateiro) tomato varieties, while 4-O-caffeolyquinic acid was the most abundant in long (Comprido) and heart (Coração) varieties. The most abundant flavonoid was quercetin pentosylrutinoside in the four tomato varieties. Yellow tomato presented the highest levels of phenolic compounds (54.23 μg/g fw), including phenolic acids (43.30 μg/g fw) and flavonoids (10.93 μg/g fw). The phenolic compounds profile obtained for the studied varieties is different from other tomato varieties available in different countries, which is certainly related to genetic features, cultivation conditions, and handling and storage methods associated to each sample.

  7. Factors that affect proliferation of Salmonella in tomatoes post-harvest: the roles of seasonal effects, irrigation regime, crop and pathogen genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvasi, Massimiliano; Hochmuth, George J; Giurcanu, Mihai C; George, Andrée S; Noel, Jason T; Bartz, Jerry; Teplitski, Max

    2013-01-01

    Fresh fruits and vegetables become increasingly recognized as vehicles of human salmonellosis. Physiological, ecological, and environmental factors are all thought to contribute to the ability of Salmonella to colonize fruits and vegetables pre- and post-harvest. The goal of this study was to test how irrigation levels, fruit water congestion, crop and pathogen genotypes affect the ability of Salmonella to multiply in tomatoes post-harvest. Fruits from three tomato varieties, grown over three production seasons in two Florida locations, were infected with seven strains of Salmonella and their ability to multiply post-harvest in field-grown tomatoes was tested. The field experiments were set up as a two-factor factorial split plot experiment, with the whole-plot treatments arranged in a randomized complete-block design. The irrigation treatment (at three levels) was the whole-plot factor, and the split-plot factor was tomato variety, with three levels. The significance of the main, two-way, and three-way interaction effects was tested using the (type III) F-tests for fixed effects. Mean separation for each significant fixed effect in the model was performed using Tukey's multiple comparison testing procedure. The irrigation regime per se did not affect susceptibility of the crop to post-harvest proliferation of Salmonella. However, Salmonella grew significantly better in water-congested tissues of green tomatoes. Tomato maturity and genotype, Salmonella genotype, and inter-seasonal differences were the strongest factors affecting proliferation. Red ripe tomatoes were significantly and consistently more conducive to proliferation of Salmonella. Tomatoes harvested in the driest, sunniest season were the most conducive to post-harvest proliferation of the pathogen. Statistically significant interactions between production conditions affected post-harvest susceptibility of the crop to the pathogen. UV irradiation of tomatoes post-harvest promoted Salmonella growth.

  8. Characteristics important for organic breeding of vegetable crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdravković Jasmina

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The remarkable development and application of new genetic The Institute for Vegetable Crops possesses a rich germplasm collection of vegetables, utilized as gene resource for breeding specific traits. Onion and garlic breeding programs are based on chemical composition improvement. There are programs for identification and use of genotypes characterized by high tolerance to economically important diseases. Special attention is paid to breeding cucumber and tomato lines tolerant to late blight. As a result, late blight tolerant pickling cucumber line, as well as late blight tolerant tomato lines and hybrids are realized. Research on bean drought stress tolerance is initiated. Lettuce breeding program including research on spontaneous flora is started and interspecies hybrids were observed as possible genetic variability source. It is important to have access to a broad range of vegetable genotypes in order to meet the needs of organic agriculture production. Appreciating the concept of sustainable agriculture, it is important to introduce organic agriculture programs in breeding institutions.

  9. Educational Rationale Metadata for Learning Objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Carey

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Instructors searching for learning objects in online repositories will be guided in their choices by the content of the object, the characteristics of the learners addressed, and the learning process embodied in the object. We report here on a feasibility study for metadata to record process-oriented information about instructional approaches for learning objects, though a set of Educational Rationale [ER] tags which would allow authors to describe the critical elements in their design intent. The prototype ER tags describe activities which have been demonstrated to be of value in learning, and authors select the activities whose support was critical in their design decisions. The prototype ER tag set consists descriptors of the instructional approach used in the design, plus optional sub-elements for Comments, Importance and Features which implement the design intent. The tag set was tested by creators of four learning object modules, three intended for post-secondary learners and one for K-12 students and their families. In each case the creators reported that the ER tag set allowed them to express succinctly the key instructional approaches embedded in their designs. These results confirmed the overall feasibility of the ER tag approach as a means of capturing design intent from creators of learning objects. Much work remains to be done before a usable ER tag set could be specified, including evaluating the impact of ER tags during design to improve instructional quality of learning objects.

  10. Automated metadata--final project report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schissel, David [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2016-04-01

    This report summarizes the work of the Automated Metadata, Provenance Cataloging, and Navigable Interfaces: Ensuring the Usefulness of Extreme-Scale Data Project (MPO Project) funded by the United States Department of Energy (DOE), Offices of Advanced Scientific Computing Research and Fusion Energy Sciences. Initially funded for three years starting in 2012, it was extended for 6 months with additional funding. The project was a collaboration between scientists at General Atomics, Lawrence Berkley National Laboratory (LBNL), and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). The group leveraged existing computer science technology where possible, and extended or created new capabilities where required. The MPO project was able to successfully create a suite of software tools that can be used by a scientific community to automatically document their scientific workflows. These tools were integrated into workflows for fusion energy and climate research illustrating the general applicability of the project’s toolkit. Feedback was very positive on the project’s toolkit and the value of such automatic workflow documentation to the scientific endeavor.

  11. The Effect of Washing and Peeling on Reduction of Dithiocarbamates Residues in Cucumber and Tomato

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Reza Mehrasebi; Rohangiz Moradjoo; Mehran Mohseni; Koroosh Kamali; Zohre Farahmankia; Jafar Taran

    2016-01-01

    Background: Dithiocarbamates, the main group of fungicides, are used to control about 400 pathogens in more than 70 crops. These pesticides are widely applied to crops including potato, cereal, apple, pear and leafy vegetables throughout the world since 1960. From the late 1980s, using these fungicides has caused much debate among regulators about their long-term effects on consumers and occupational users. Method: In this study the residues of Dithiocarbamates in cucumber and tomato usin...

  12. In-Package Atmospheric Pressure Cold Plasma Treatment of Cherry Tomatoes

    OpenAIRE

    Misra, N.; Keener, Kevin; Bourke, Paula; Mosnier, J.; Cullen, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Cold plasma is increasingly under research for decontamination of foods, especially fresh fruits and vegetables. The effect of cold plasma on food quality, however, remains under researched. This study investigates the effects of cold plasma generated within a sealed package from a dielectric barrier discharge on the physical quality parameters and respiration rates of cherry tomatoes. Respiration rates and weight loss were monitored continuously, while other parameters are reported at the en...

  13. Pulsed light effects on surface decontamination, physical qualities and nutritional composition of tomato fruit

    OpenAIRE

    Charles, Florence; Renard, Catherine; Page, David; Carlin, Frederic

    2013-01-01

    Pulsed light (PL) is a nonthermal food technology with a potential as postharvest decontamination strategy for fruit and vegetables. The feasibility of PL in extending shelf-life of food products while assuring appropriate quality is still under investigation. The effect of pulsed light (PL) on surface decontamination (natural and inoculated microorganisms), physical (colour, texture and weight) and nutritional quality (ascorbic acid and major carotenoids) was investigated in red-ripe tomatoe...

  14. Salmonella Persistence in Tomatoes Requires a Distinct Set of Metabolic Functions Identified by Transposon Insertion Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Moraes, Marcos H; Desai, Prerak; Porwollik, Steffen; Canals, Rocio; Perez, Daniel R; Chu, Weiping; McClelland, Michael; Teplitski, Max

    2017-03-01

    Human enteric pathogens, such as Salmonella spp. and verotoxigenic Escherichia coli , are increasingly recognized as causes of gastroenteritis outbreaks associated with the consumption of fruits and vegetables. Persistence in plants represents an important part of the life cycle of these pathogens. The identification of the full complement of Salmonella genes involved in the colonization of the model plant (tomato) was carried out using transposon insertion sequencing analysis. With this approach, 230,000 transposon insertions were screened in tomato pericarps to identify loci with reduction in fitness, followed by validation of the screen results using competition assays of the isogenic mutants against the wild type. A comparison with studies in animals revealed a distinct plant-associated set of genes, which only partially overlaps with the genes required to elicit disease in animals. De novo biosynthesis of amino acids was critical to persistence within tomatoes, while amino acid scavenging was prevalent in animal infections. Fitness reduction of the Salmonella amino acid synthesis mutants was generally more severe in the tomato rin mutant, which hyperaccumulates certain amino acids, suggesting that these nutrients remain unavailable to Salmonella spp. within plants. Salmonella lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was required for persistence in both animals and plants, exemplifying some shared pathogenesis-related mechanisms in animal and plant hosts. Similarly to phytopathogens, Salmonella spp. required biosynthesis of amino acids, LPS, and nucleotides to colonize tomatoes. Overall, however, it appears that while Salmonella shares some strategies with phytopathogens and taps into its animal virulence-related functions, colonization of tomatoes represents a distinct strategy, highlighting this pathogen's flexible metabolism. IMPORTANCE Outbreaks of gastroenteritis caused by human pathogens have been increasingly associated with foods of plant origin, with tomatoes being

  15. Study of Biological Effects of Low Energy Ion Implantation on Tomato and Radish Breeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Qiuxia; Huang, Qunce; Cao, Gangqiang; Ying, Fangqing; Liu, Yanbo; Huang, Wen

    2008-04-01

    Biological effects of 30 keV low energy nitrogen ion implantation on the seeds of five types of tomato and one type of radish were investigated. Results showed that low energy ions have different effects on different vegetables. The whole dose-response curve of the germination ratio did not take on "the shape of saddle", but was a rising and falling waveform with the increase or decrease in ion implantation. In the vegetable of Solanaceae, two outstanding aberrant plants were selected from M1 of Henan No.4 tomato at a dose of 7 × 1017 nitrogen ions/cm2, which had thin-leaves, long-petal and nipple tip fruit stably inherited to M7. Furthermore the analysis of the isozyme showed that the activity of the mutant tomato seedling was distinct in quantity and color. In Raphanus sativus L., the aberrances were obvious in the mutant of radish 791 at a dose of 5 × 1017 nitrogen ions/cm2, and the weight of succulent root and the volume of growth were over twice the control's. At present, many species for breeding have been identified in the field and only stable species have been selected for the experiment of production. It is evident that the low energy ion implantation technology has clear effects on vegetables' genetic improvement.

  16. Risk of damage to tomato crops by the generalist zoophytophagous predator Nesidiocoris tenuis (Reuter) (Hemiptera: Miridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnó, J; Castañé, C; Riudavets, J; Gabarra, R

    2010-02-01

    Nesidiocoris tenuis (Reuter) (Hem. Miridae) is a native zoophytophagous predator of the Mediterranean region, and its populations colonize tomato crops when they are not heavily treated with insecticides. This generalist predator has a high capacity for controlling insect pests, and it is currently commercially produced and released in some areas to control Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hem. Aleyrodidae). However, its status as a pest and/or as beneficial is controversial. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the risk of damage to tomatoes in extreme conditions of prey scarcity, as well as high predator populations. Three predator densities were tested in a greenhouse cage experiment during a summer tomato crop. The crop did not display any negative effect caused by the predators during the first six weeks of interaction, independently of the density released. However, subsequently, the effect was dramatic, both on the vegetative growth of the plant and on the production of fruits. The reduction in vegetative growth was located at truss eight and it was expressed mainly by a lower number of leaves and a shorter length of the shoot above the truss. There was a significant reduction of yield with a lower number of fruits collected and a smaller mean weight, although this was not observable until truss seven. It seems that feeding on the plant by this mirid bug competed with the vegetative growth and fruiting processes of the plant in the extreme conditions of prey shortage maintained in our experiment.

  17. Prediction of processing tomato peeling outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeling outcomes of processing tomatoes were predicted using multivariate analysis of Magnetic Resonance (MR) images. Tomatoes were obtained from a whole-peel production line. Each fruit was imaged using a 7 Tesla MR system, and a multivariate data set was created from 28 different images. After ...

  18. Growing Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.) in Nematode ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    number of fruit clusters, number of branches, internodes length, and plant height with gall index. This reflects that root-knot nematodes negatively affect the general physiology of the plant growth (Netscher and Sikora, 1990). Tomato plant pests on post-harvested tomato plants in surveyed fields. Management of fields after ...

  19. Carbohydrate metabolism in tomato ( Lycopersicon esculentum Mill ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order to clarify carbohydrate content and enzymes activities involved in sugar metabolism in tomato seedling leaves and yield and fruit quality under low night temperature and subsequent recovery, tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cv. Liaoyuanduoli) were grown in different climatic controlledenvironment ...

  20. Toxins of molds from decaying tomato fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwig, J; Scott, P M; Stoltz, D R; Blanchfield, B J

    1979-01-01

    Among 27 mold isolates from decaying tomatoes, culture filtrates or ethyl acetate extracts of 8 isolates grown in yeast extract-sucrose medium were markedly toxic (mortality, greater than 50%) to brine shrimp larvae. The toxicity of six of these isolates could be attributed to the presence of citrinin, tenuazonic acid, or T-2 toxin. Ethyl acetate extracts of five Alternaria isolates and one Fusarium isolate were mutagenic for Salmonella typhimurium strains. In ripe tomatoes inoculated with toxin-producing isolates and incubated at 25 degrees C, one Alternaria alternata isolate produced tenuazonic acid in seven of seven tomatoes at levels of up to 106 micrograms/g and alternariol methyl ether in one of the seven tomatoes at 0.8 microgram/g. Another A. alternata isolate produced tenuazonic acid or alternariol methyl ether at much lower levels in only three of seven tomatoes. Patulin and citrinin were produced by a Penicillium expansum isolate at levels of up to 8.4 and 0.76 microgram/g, respectively. In tomatoes incubated at 15 degrees C, a Fusarium sulphureum isolate produced T-2 toxin, HT-2 toxin, and neosolaniol at levels of up to 37.5, 37.8 and 5.6 micrograms/g, respectively. If these mycotoxins are thermostable, they may occur at detectable levels in tomato products whenever partially moldy tomatoes are used as raw material. PMID:391152

  1. Tomato: Potentials for Alternative Source of Economic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper is a study of the potentials of tomato production as a viable source of economic empowerment. An empirical survey was undertaken through oral interviews in Kano to identify farmers' revenues, and agricultural development thereby assessing the connection between tomato production and economic reliance.

  2. An improved Agrobacterium mediated transformation in tomato ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bacterial wilt is a devastating disease of tomato crop throughout the world. This disease is very dangerous in hot and humid regions, where it spreads with the irrigation water to whole field within days, which resulted in severe decline in yield. Two varieties of tomato were used for developing bacterial wilt resistance.

  3. The expanded tomato fruit volatile landscape

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rambla, J.L.; Tikunov, Y.M.; Monforte, A.J.; Bovy, A.G.; Granell, A.

    2014-01-01

    The present review aims to synthesize our present knowledge about the mechanisms implied in the biosynthesis of volatile compounds in the ripe tomato fruit, which have a key role in tomato flavour. The difficulties in identifiying not only genes or genomic regions but also individual target

  4. Callus formation and organogenesis of tomato (Lycopersicon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-07-12

    Jul 12, 2010 ... Characterization and functional expression of a ubiquitously expressed tomato pectin methylesterase. Plant Phys. 114: 1547-1556. Gubis J, Lajchová Z, Faragó J, Jureková Z (2004). Effect of growth regulators on shoot induction and plant regeneration in tomato. (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) Biologia.

  5. Mycorrhizal Dependency and Response of Tomato ( Lycopersicon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A pot experiment was conducted on tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) to evaluate the responses of tomato to inoculation of mycorrhiza (AMF) under different levels of soil phosphorus (P) concentrations in a greenhouse study. The results showed different responses on dry matter yield, shoot phosphorus concentration, ...

  6. Modelling the firmness behaviour of cut tomatoes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, R.E.; Natalini, A.; Tijskens, L.M.M.; Woltering, E.J.; Kooten, van O.

    2010-01-01

    Firmness is one of the main quality attributes of sliced tomatoes. Here, a physiology-based mechanism is proposed that describes the development of firmness as measured by limited compression. The mechanism assumes that softening of slices is radically different from that of whole tomatoes and

  7. Metabolomics of a model fruit: tomato

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, de R.C.H.; Hall, R.D.; Moing, A.

    2011-01-01

    Tomato has quickly become a favoured species for metabolomics research. Tomato fills a niche that cannot be occupied by Arabidopsis, particularly regarding studies on fleshy fruit. Variations in genotype and phenotype have been broadly exploited using metabolomics approaches in order to gain a

  8. Mineral Content in Leaves of Tomato Plants Grafted on Solanum Rootstocks

    OpenAIRE

    松添, 直隆; 間, 浩美; 花田, 勝美; モハメド, アリ; 大久保, 敬; 藤枝, 國光

    1995-01-01

    Nutrient uptake of tomato plants cv. Momotaro grafted on Solanum sisymbriifoliulm, S. torvum and S. toxicarium which are resistant to soil-born disease were compared with tomato grafted on its own root, a tomato/tomato, scion/rootstock combination. Mineral content in leaves of tomato/S. sisymbriifoliulm was nearly equal to that of tomato/tomato. In leaves of tomato/S. torvum, nitrogen content was higher, and magnesium content was lower than those of tomato/tomato. Furthermore, phosphorus and ...

  9. Preference Mapping of Fresh Tomatoes Across 3 Stages of Consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oltman, A E; Yates, M D; Drake, M A

    2016-06-01

    Tomatoes (Solanum lycoperiscum) are a popular produce choice and provide many bioactive compounds. Consumer choice of tomatoes is influenced by flavor and visual appearance and external texture cues including hand firmness and sliceability. The objective of this study was to determine drivers of liking for fresh tomatoes across 3 stages of consumption. Seven tomato cultivars were ripened to a 6 on the USDA color chart. Trained panelists documented appearance, flavor, and texture attributes of tomatoes in triplicate. Tomato consumers (n = 177) were provided with knives and cutting boards and evaluated tomatoes across 3 stages: appearance (stage 1), slicing (stage 2), and consumption (stage 3). Consumers evaluated overall liking at each stage. Analysis of variance and external preference mapping were conducted. Overall liking was highest during the appearance portion of the test and lowest during the consumption portion (P sweet and umami tastes were drivers of liking for tomatoes at consumption (stage 3). Four separate clusters of tomato consumers were identified. Cluster 1 preferred tomatoes with even color, higher color intensity, and flavor intensity. Cluster 2 preferred firm tomatoes. Cluster 3 preferred tomatoes that were soft and at peak ripeness; this cluster also had the highest liking scores for all tomatoes. Cluster 4 consumers generally consumed tomatoes in sandwiches rather than as-is and preferred tomatoes with even and intense color. Tomato growers can utilize these results to target cultivars that are well liked by consumers. © 2016 Institute of Food Technologists®

  10. Large-scale analysis of full-length cDNAs from the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum cultivar Micro-Tom, a reference system for the Solanaceae genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kikuchi Mari

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Solanaceae family includes several economically important vegetable crops. The tomato (Solanum lycopersicum is regarded as a model plant of the Solanaceae family. Recently, a number of tomato resources have been developed in parallel with the ongoing tomato genome sequencing project. In particular, a miniature cultivar, Micro-Tom, is regarded as a model system in tomato genomics, and a number of genomics resources in the Micro-Tom-background, such as ESTs and mutagenized lines, have been established by an international alliance. Results To accelerate the progress in tomato genomics, we developed a collection of fully-sequenced 13,227 Micro-Tom full-length cDNAs. By checking redundant sequences, coding sequences, and chimeric sequences, a set of 11,502 non-redundant full-length cDNAs (nrFLcDNAs was generated. Analysis of untranslated regions demonstrated that tomato has longer 5'- and 3'-untranslated regions than most other plants but rice. Classification of functions of proteins predicted from the coding sequences demonstrated that nrFLcDNAs covered a broad range of functions. A comparison of nrFLcDNAs with genes of sixteen plants facilitated the identification of tomato genes that are not found in other plants, most of which did not have known protein domains. Mapping of the nrFLcDNAs onto currently available tomato genome sequences facilitated prediction of exon-intron structure. Introns of tomato genes were longer than those of Arabidopsis and rice. According to a comparison of exon sequences between the nrFLcDNAs and the tomato genome sequences, the frequency of nucleotide mismatch in exons between Micro-Tom and the genome-sequencing cultivar (Heinz 1706 was estimated to be 0.061%. Conclusion The collection of Micro-Tom nrFLcDNAs generated in this study will serve as a valuable genomic tool for plant biologists to bridge the gap between basic and applied studies. The nrFLcDNA sequences will help annotation of the

  11. Large-scale analysis of full-length cDNAs from the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) cultivar Micro-Tom, a reference system for the Solanaceae genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Koh; Yano, Kentaro; Suzuki, Ayako; Kawamura, Shingo; Sakurai, Nozomu; Suda, Kunihiro; Kurabayashi, Atsushi; Suzuki, Tatsuya; Tsugane, Taneaki; Watanabe, Manabu; Ooga, Kazuhide; Torii, Maiko; Narita, Takanori; Shin-I, Tadasu; Kohara, Yuji; Yamamoto, Naoki; Takahashi, Hideki; Watanabe, Yuichiro; Egusa, Mayumi; Kodama, Motoichiro; Ichinose, Yuki; Kikuchi, Mari; Fukushima, Sumire; Okabe, Akiko; Arie, Tsutomu; Sato, Yuko; Yazawa, Katsumi; Satoh, Shinobu; Omura, Toshikazu; Ezura, Hiroshi; Shibata, Daisuke

    2010-03-30

    The Solanaceae family includes several economically important vegetable crops. The tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) is regarded as a model plant of the Solanaceae family. Recently, a number of tomato resources have been developed in parallel with the ongoing tomato genome sequencing project. In particular, a miniature cultivar, Micro-Tom, is regarded as a model system in tomato genomics, and a number of genomics resources in the Micro-Tom-background, such as ESTs and mutagenized lines, have been established by an international alliance. To accelerate the progress in tomato genomics, we developed a collection of fully-sequenced 13,227 Micro-Tom full-length cDNAs. By checking redundant sequences, coding sequences, and chimeric sequences, a set of 11,502 non-redundant full-length cDNAs (nrFLcDNAs) was generated. Analysis of untranslated regions demonstrated that tomato has longer 5'- and 3'-untranslated regions than most other plants but rice. Classification of functions of proteins predicted from the coding sequences demonstrated that nrFLcDNAs covered a broad range of functions. A comparison of nrFLcDNAs with genes of sixteen plants facilitated the identification of tomato genes that are not found in other plants, most of which did not have known protein domains. Mapping of the nrFLcDNAs onto currently available tomato genome sequences facilitated prediction of exon-intron structure. Introns of tomato genes were longer than those of Arabidopsis and rice. According to a comparison of exon sequences between the nrFLcDNAs and the tomato genome sequences, the frequency of nucleotide mismatch in exons between Micro-Tom and the genome-sequencing cultivar (Heinz 1706) was estimated to be 0.061%. The collection of Micro-Tom nrFLcDNAs generated in this study will serve as a valuable genomic tool for plant biologists to bridge the gap between basic and applied studies. The nrFLcDNA sequences will help annotation of the tomato whole-genome sequence and aid in tomato functional

  12. Effects of Vegetables on Cardiovascular Diseases and Related Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Yi Tang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies have shown that vegetable consumption is inversely related to the risk of cardiovascular diseases. Moreover, research has indicated that many vegetables like potatoes, soybeans, sesame, tomatoes, dioscorea, onions, celery, broccoli, lettuce and asparagus showed great potential in preventing and treating cardiovascular diseases, and vitamins, essential elements, dietary fibers, botanic proteins and phytochemicals were bioactive components. The cardioprotective effects of vegetables might involve antioxidation; anti-inflammation; anti-platelet; regulating blood pressure, blood glucose, and lipid profile; attenuating myocardial damage; and modulating relevant enzyme activities, gene expression, and signaling pathways as well as some other biomarkers associated to cardiovascular diseases. In addition, several vegetables and their bioactive components have been proven to protect against cardiovascular diseases in clinical trials. In this review, we analyze and summarize the effects of vegetables on cardiovascular diseases based on epidemiological studies, experimental research, and clinical trials, which are significant to the application of vegetables in prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases.

  13. Kuchler Vegetation

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Digital version of potential natural plant communites as compiled and published on 'Map of the Natural Vegetation of California' by A. W. Kuchler, 1976. Source map...

  14. Wieslander Vegetation

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Digital version of the 1945 California Vegetation Type Maps by A. E. Wieslander of the U.S. Forest Service. Source scale of maps are 1:100,000. These compiled maps...

  15. Using XML to encode TMA DES metadata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Lyttleton

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Tissue Microarray Data Exchange Specification (TMA DES is an XML specification for encoding TMA experiment data. While TMA DES data is encoded in XML, the files that describe its syntax, structure, and semantics are not. The DTD format is used to describe the syntax and structure of TMA DES, and the ISO 11179 format is used to define the semantics of TMA DES. However, XML Schema can be used in place of DTDs, and another XML encoded format, RDF, can be used in place of ISO 11179. Encoding all TMA DES data and metadata in XML would simplify the development and usage of programs which validate and parse TMA DES data. XML Schema has advantages over DTDs such as support for data types, and a more powerful means of specifying constraints on data values. An advantage of RDF encoded in XML over ISO 11179 is that XML defines rules for encoding data, whereas ISO 11179 does not. Materials and Methods: We created an XML Schema version of the TMA DES DTD. We wrote a program that converted ISO 11179 definitions to RDF encoded in XML, and used it to convert the TMA DES ISO 11179 definitions to RDF. Results: We validated a sample TMA DES XML file that was supplied with the publication that originally specified TMA DES using our XML Schema. We successfully validated the RDF produced by our ISO 11179 converter with the W3C RDF validation service. Conclusions: All TMA DES data could be encoded using XML, which simplifies its processing. XML Schema allows datatypes and valid value ranges to be specified for CDEs, which enables a wider range of error checking to be performed using XML Schemas than could be performed using DTDs.

  16. Using XML to encode TMA DES metadata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyttleton, Oliver; Wright, Alexander; Treanor, Darren; Lewis, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The Tissue Microarray Data Exchange Specification (TMA DES) is an XML specification for encoding TMA experiment data. While TMA DES data is encoded in XML, the files that describe its syntax, structure, and semantics are not. The DTD format is used to describe the syntax and structure of TMA DES, and the ISO 11179 format is used to define the semantics of TMA DES. However, XML Schema can be used in place of DTDs, and another XML encoded format, RDF, can be used in place of ISO 11179. Encoding all TMA DES data and metadata in XML would simplify the development and usage of programs which validate and parse TMA DES data. XML Schema has advantages over DTDs such as support for data types, and a more powerful means of specifying constraints on data values. An advantage of RDF encoded in XML over ISO 11179 is that XML defines rules for encoding data, whereas ISO 11179 does not. We created an XML Schema version of the TMA DES DTD. We wrote a program that converted ISO 11179 definitions to RDF encoded in XML, and used it to convert the TMA DES ISO 11179 definitions to RDF. We validated a sample TMA DES XML file that was supplied with the publication that originally specified TMA DES using our XML Schema. We successfully validated the RDF produced by our ISO 11179 converter with the W3C RDF validation service. All TMA DES data could be encoded using XML, which simplifies its processing. XML Schema allows datatypes and valid value ranges to be specified for CDEs, which enables a wider range of error checking to be performed using XML Schemas than could be performed using DTDs.

  17. ECONOMIC EFFICIENCY IN TOMATOES PRODUCTION IN GREENHOUSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A POPESCU

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to appreciate the evolution of economic efficiency in tomatoes production in greenhouses within a private firm situated next to the capital. The firm owns 4 ha greenhouses and the weight of tomatoes crop in the cultivated area is just 38.75 %. In fact, during the last three years, the tomatoes cultivated surface has been diminished in favour of flowers production which, like tomatoes production is an important income source for any producer. The reduction of the tomatoes cultivated area was compensated by the increase of intensification grade using new high performance hybrids and modern technologies. Thus, the scientific production management has been looking for maintaining the total production at the same level from a year to another by an increased average tomatoes yield by 53.33 % . The continuous increase of farm input price has doubled the cost per surface unit and increased the cost per tomatoes kilogram by 33 %. The increase of tomatoes demand and of market price by 31 % have had a positive influence on the farm incomes which has doubled during the last three years. In the year 2000, the company has obtained USD 41,818 income/ha of which subtracting the related production cost we can easily get USD 4,815 profit/ha. The average profit rate recorded by the firm is 13 % in the period 2000-2002, when the study was made. As a conclusion, tomatoes production in greenhouses is a good deal. To keep a high economic efficiency, under the diminishing of the cultivated area, the producers have to increase average tomatoes production by using high performance technology based on high economic value hybrids.

  18. Diversity in conserved genes in tomato

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Deynze, Allen; Stoffel, Kevin; Buell, C Robin; Kozik, Alexander; Liu, Jia; van der Knaap, Esther; Francis, David

    2007-01-01

    Background Tomato has excellent genetic and genomic resources including a broad set of Expressed Sequence Tag (EST) data and high-density genetic maps. In addition, emerging physical maps and bacterial artificial clone sequence data serve as template to investigate genetic variation within the cultivated germplasm pool with the goal to manipulate agriculturally important traits. Unfortunately, the nearly exclusive focus of resource development on interspecific populations for genetic analyses and diversity studies has left a void in our understanding of genotypic variation within tomato breeding programs that focus on intra-specific populations. We describe the results of a study to identify nucleotide variation within tomato breeding germplasm and mapping parents for a set of conserved single-copy ESTs that are orthologous between tomato and Arabidopsis. Results Using a pooled sequencing strategy, 967 tomato transcripts were screened for polymorphism in 12 tomato lines. Although intron position was conserved, intron lengths were 2-fold larger in tomato than in Arabidopsis. A total of 1,487 single nucleotide polymorphisms and 282 insertion/deletions were identified, of which 579 and 206 were polymorphic in breeding germplasm, respectively. Fresh market and processing germplasm were clearly divergent, as were Solanum lycopersicum var. cerasiformae and Solanum pimpinellifolium, tomato's closest relatives. The polymorphisms identified serve as marker resources for tomato. The COS is also applicable to other Solanaceae crops. Conclusions The results from this research enabled significant progress towards bridging the gap between genetic and genomic resources developed for populations derived from wide crosses and those applicable to intra-specific crosses for breeding in tomato. PMID:18088428

  19. Genome Sequences of Two Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato Race 1 Strains, Isolated from Tomato Fields in California

    OpenAIRE

    Thapa, Shree P.; Coaker, Gitta

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato race 1 strains have evolved to overcome genetic resistance in tomato. Here, we present the draft genome sequences of two race 1 P.?syringae pv. tomato strains, A9 and 407, isolated from diseased tomato plants in California.

  20. The ground truth about metadata and community detection in networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peel, Leto; Larremore, Daniel B; Clauset, Aaron

    2017-05-01

    Across many scientific domains, there is a common need to automatically extract a simplified view or coarse-graining of how a complex system's components interact. This general task is called community detection in networks and is analogous to searching for clusters in independent vector data. It is common to evaluate the performance of community detection algorithms by their ability to find so-called ground truth communities. This works well in synthetic networks with planted communities because these networks' links are formed explicitly based on those known communities. However, there are no planted communities in real-world networks. Instead, it is standard practice to treat some observed discrete-valued node attributes, or metadata, as ground truth. We show that metadata are not the same as ground truth and that treating them as such induces severe theoretical and practical problems. We prove that no algorithm can uniquely solve community detection, and we prove a general No Free Lunch theorem for community detection, which implies that there can be no algorithm that is optimal for all possible community detection tasks. However, community detection remains a powerful tool and node metadata still have value, so a careful exploration of their relationship with network structure can yield insights of genuine worth. We illustrate this point by introducing two statistical techniques that can quantify the relationship between metadata and community structure for a broad class of models. We demonstrate these techniques using both synthetic and real-world networks, and for multiple types of metadata and community structures.

  1. Tomato fruits: a good target for iodine biofortification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia eKiferle

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Iodine is a trace element that is fundamental for human health: its deficiency affects about two billion people worldwide. Fruits and vegetables are usually poor sources of iodine; however plants can accumulate iodine if it is either present or exogenously administered to the soil. The biofortification of crops with iodine has therefore been proposed as a strategy for improving human nutrition. A greenhouse pot experiment was carried out to evaluate the possibility of biofortifying tomato fruits with iodine. Increasing concentrations of iodine supplied as KI or KIO3 were administered to plants as root treatments and the iodine accumulation in fruits was measured. The influences of the soil organic matter content or the nitrate level in the nutritive solution were analyzed. Finally, yield and qualitative properties of the biofortified tomatoes were considered, as well as the possible influence of fruit storage and processing on the iodine content. Results showed that the use of both the iodized salts induced a significant increase in the fruit’s iodine content in doses that did not affect plant growth and development. The final levels ranged from a few mg up to 10 mg iodine kg-1 fruit fresh weight and are more than adequate for a biofortification program, since 150 µg iodine per day is the recommended dietary allowance for adults. In general, the iodine treatments scarcely affected fruit appearance and quality, even with the highest concentrations applied. In contrast, the use of KI in plants fertilized with low doses of nitrate induced moderate phytotoxicity symptoms. Organic matter-rich soils improved the plant’s health and production, with only mild reductions in iodine stored in the fruits. Finally, a short period of storage at room temperature or a 30-minute boiling treatment did not reduce the iodine content in the fruits, if the peel was maintained. All these results suggest that tomato is a particularly suitable crop for iodine

  2. Influence of Heat Treatments on Carotenoid Content of Cherry Tomatoes

    OpenAIRE

    D?Evoli, Laura; Lombardi-Boccia, Ginevra; Lucarini, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Tomatoes and tomato products are rich sources of carotenoids—principally lycopene, followed by β-carotene and lutein. The aim of this work was to study the effect of heat treatment on carotenoid content in cherry tomatoes. Raw and canned products were sampled and analysed; furthermore whole, skin and pulp fractions of cherry tomatoes were analysed when raw and home-processed, in order to better understand heat treatment effects. Lycopene content in canned tomatoes was two-fold higher than in ...

  3. A Generic Metadata Editor Supporting System Using Drupal CMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, J.; Banks, N. G.; Leggott, M.

    2011-12-01

    Metadata handling is a key factor in preserving and reusing scientific data. In recent years, standardized structural metadata has become widely used in Geoscience communities. However, there exist many different standards in Geosciences, such as the current version of the Federal Geographic Data Committee's Content Standard for Digital Geospatial Metadata (FGDC CSDGM), the Ecological Markup Language (EML), the Geography Markup Language (GML), and the emerging ISO 19115 and related standards. In addition, there are many different subsets within the Geoscience subdomain such as the Biological Profile of the FGDC (CSDGM), or for geopolitical regions, such as the European Profile or the North American Profile in the ISO standards. It is therefore desirable to have a software foundation to support metadata creation and editing for multiple standards and profiles, without re-inventing the wheels. We have developed a software module as a generic, flexible software system to do just that: to facilitate the support for multiple metadata standards and profiles. The software consists of a set of modules for the Drupal Content Management System (CMS), with minimal inter-dependencies to other Drupal modules. There are two steps in using the system's metadata functions. First, an administrator can use the system to design a user form, based on an XML schema and its instances. The form definition is named and stored in the Drupal database as a XML blob content. Second, users in an editor role can then use the persisted XML definition to render an actual metadata entry form, for creating or editing a metadata record. Behind the scenes, the form definition XML is transformed into a PHP array, which is then rendered via Drupal Form API. When the form is submitted the posted values are used to modify a metadata record. Drupal hooks can be used to perform custom processing on metadata record before and after submission. It is trivial to store the metadata record as an actual XML file

  4. Enhancing Media Personalization by Extracting Similarity Knowledge from Metadata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Butkus, Andrius

    with many interrelated parts – recommendation engines, content metadata, contextual information and user profiles. In the center of any type of recommendation lies the notion of similarity. The most popular way to approach similarity is to look for the feature overlaps. This results often in recommending......, especially when we talk about the contents of music. Therefore the main focus in the thesis is how to extract such emotional information from media, and how to use it to enhance media personalization. This dissertation proposes a novel method to extract emotional information from text (unstructured metadata......) using Latent Semantic Analysis (one of the unsupervised machine learning techniques). It presents three separate cases to illustrate the similarity knowledge extraction from the metadata, where the emotional components in each case represents different abstraction levels – genres, synopsis and lyrics...

  5. Principles of metadata organization at the ENCODE data coordination center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Eurie L; Sloan, Cricket A; Chan, Esther T; Davidson, Jean M; Malladi, Venkat S; Strattan, J Seth; Hitz, Benjamin C; Gabdank, Idan; Narayanan, Aditi K; Ho, Marcus; Lee, Brian T; Rowe, Laurence D; Dreszer, Timothy R; Roe, Greg R; Podduturi, Nikhil R; Tanaka, Forrest; Hilton, Jason A; Cherry, J Michael

    2016-01-01

    The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) Data Coordinating Center (DCC) is responsible for organizing, describing and providing access to the diverse data generated by the ENCODE project. The description of these data, known as metadata, includes the biological sample used as input, the protocols and assays performed on these samples, the data files generated from the results and the computational methods used to analyze the data. Here, we outline the principles and philosophy used to define the ENCODE metadata in order to create a metadata standard that can be applied to diverse assays and multiple genomic projects. In addition, we present how the data are validated and used by the ENCODE DCC in creating the ENCODE Portal (https://www.encodeproject.org/). Database URL: www.encodeproject.org. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  6. Statistical Data Processing with R – Metadata Driven Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudi SELJAK

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years the Statistical Office of the Republic of Slovenia has put a lot of effort into re-designing its statistical process. We replaced the classical stove-pipe oriented production system with general software solutions, based on the metadata driven approach. This means that one general program code, which is parametrized with process metadata, is used for data processing for a particular survey. Currently, the general program code is entirely based on SAS macros, but in the future we would like to explore how successfully statistical software R can be used for this approach. Paper describes the metadata driven principle for data validation, generic software solution and main issues connected with the use of statistical software R for this approach.

  7. Metadata for fine-grained processing at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Cranshaw, Jack; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    High energy physics experiments are implementing highly parallel solutions for event processing on resources that support concurrency at multiple levels. These range from the inherent large-scale parallelism of HPC resources to the multiprocessing and multithreading needed for effective use of multi-core and GPU-augmented nodes. Such modes of processing, and the efficient opportunistic use of transiently-available resources, lead to finer-grained processing of event data. Previously metadata systems were tailored to jobs that were atomic and processed large, well-defined units of data. The new environment requires a more fine-grained approach to metadata handling, especially with regard to bookkeeping. For opportunistic resources metadata propagation needs to work even if individual jobs are not finalized. This contribution describes ATLAS solutions to this problem in the context of the multiprocessing framework currently in use for LHC Run 2, development underway for the ATLAS multithreaded framework (Athena...

  8. Meta-Data Objects as the Basis for System Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Estrella, Florida; Tóth, N; Kovács, Z; Le Goff, J M; Clatchey, Richard Mc; Toth, Norbert; Kovacs, Zsolt; Goff, Jean-Marie Le

    2001-01-01

    One of the main factors driving object-oriented software development in the Web- age is the need for systems to evolve as user requirements change. A crucial factor in the creation of adaptable systems dealing with changing requirements is the suitability of the underlying technology in allowing the evolution of the system. A reflective system utilizes an open architecture where implicit system aspects are reified to become explicit first-class (meta-data) objects. These implicit system aspects are often fundamental structures which are inaccessible and immutable, and their reification as meta-data objects can serve as the basis for changes and extensions to the system, making it self- describing. To address the evolvability issue, this paper proposes a reflective architecture based on two orthogonal abstractions - model abstraction and information abstraction. In this architecture the modeling abstractions allow for the separation of the description meta-data from the system aspects they represent so that th...

  9. Accumulation of heavy metals by vegetables grown in mine wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cobb, G.P.; Sands, K.; Waters, M.; Wixson, B.G.; Dorward-King, E.

    2000-03-01

    Lead, cadmium, arsenic, and zinc were quantified in mine wastes and in soils mixed with mine wastes. Metal concentrations were found to be heterogeneous in the wastes. Iceberg lettuce, Cherry Belle radishes, Roma bush beans, and Better Boy tomatoes were cultivated in mine wastes and in waste-amended soils. Lettuce and radishes had 100% survival in the 100% mine waste treatments compared to 0% and 25% survival for tomatoes and beans, respectively. Metal concentrations were determined in plant tissues to determine uptake and distribution of metals in the edible plant parts. Individual soil samples were collected beneath each plant to assess metal content in the immediate plant environment. This analysis verified heterogeneous metal content of the mine wastes. The four plant species effectively accumulated and translocated lead, cadmium, arsenic, and zinc. Tomato and bean plants contained the four metals mainly in the roots and little was translocated to the fruits. Radish roots accumulated less metals compared to the leaves, whereas lettuce roots and leaves accumulated similar concentrations of the four metals. Lettuce leaves and radish roots accumulated significantly more metals than bean and tomato fruits. This accumulation pattern suggests that consumption of lettuce leaves or radish roots from plants grown in mine wastes would pose greater risks to humans and wildlife than would consumption of beans or tomatoes grown in the same area. The potential risk may be mitigated somewhat in humans, as vegetables grown in mine wastes exhibited stunted growth and chlorosis.

  10. Do Organic Cherry Vine Tomatoes Taste Better Than Conventional Cherry Vine Tomatoes? A Sensory and Instrumental Comparative Study from Ireland

    OpenAIRE

    Gilsenan, Clare; Burke, Roisin; Barry-Ryan, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    A consumer panel was able to distinguish a perceptible difference between organically farmed and conventionally produced tomatoes, and preferred the taste of the conventional tomatoes. The sensory evaluation results of the trained panel revealed that the conventional tomatoes were sweeter and less sour than the organic tomatoes. In addition to this, the conventional tomatoes showed significant differences for oBrix, reducing sugars and electrical conductivity. No significant differences were ...

  11. IZK OLIMP F1 - NEW BULGARIAN TOMATO VARIETY FOR PROCESSING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Ganeva

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The hybrid IZK Olimp F1 is developed by a team at the Maritsa Vegetable Crops Research Institute, Plovdiv as a result of hybridization between female line М-441 and male line R-469. The F1 hybrid was tested in the Executive Agency for Variety Testing, Field Inspection and Seed Control in 2009-2010. It was recognised as a new tomato F1 hybrid variety by the Expert commission in 2009 and has a certificate №10987/ 31.08.2012 issued by the Patent Office of Republic of Bulgaria. Hybrid IZK Olimp F1 is a determinate, high-yielding tomato variety for mid-early field production. The total yield and earliness of this F1 hybrid are close to those of the hybrid var. Vodolei F1 and exceeds the direct var. Bela and var. Zhaklin. The fruits are oval-elongated, with an average weight of 55-68 g, uniform red coloured, thick, firm, crack resistant, with small and low pedicle hole. Being with good chemical and technological properties this hybrid is suitable for processing.

  12. Metadata Standards for Digital Records: Helping the Public Find the Records They Need

    OpenAIRE

    Walters, Cheryl D.; Willey, Kayla; McIntyre, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    Presentation explains how metadata and metadata standards can be used by records managers to make digital records more discoverable and easily accessible by their intended audience, in this case, the general public.

  13. Linked data for libraries, archives and museums how to clean, link and publish your metadata

    CERN Document Server

    Hooland, Seth van

    2014-01-01

    This highly practical handbook teaches you how to unlock the value of your existing metadata through cleaning, reconciliation, enrichment and linking and how to streamline the process of new metadata creation. Libraries, archives and museums are facing up to the challenge of providing access to fast growing collections whilst managing cuts to budgets. Key to this is the creation, linking and publishing of good quality metadata as Linked Data that will allow their collections to be discovered, accessed and disseminated in a sustainable manner. This highly practical handbook teaches you how to unlock the value of your existing metadata through cleaning, reconciliation, enrichment and linking and how to streamline the process of new metadata creation. Metadata experts Seth van Hooland and Ruben Verborgh introduce the key concepts of metadata standards and Linked Data and how they can be practically applied to existing metadata, giving readers the tools and understanding to achieve maximum results with limited re...

  14. A novel framework for assessing metadata quality in epidemiological and public health research settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Christiana; Denaxas, Spiros

    2016-01-01

    Metadata are critical in epidemiological and public health research. However, a lack of biomedical metadata quality frameworks and limited awareness of the implications of poor quality metadata renders data analyses problematic. In this study, we created and evaluated a novel framework to assess metadata quality of epidemiological and public health research datasets. We performed a literature review and surveyed stakeholders to enhance our understanding of biomedical metadata quality assessment. The review identified 11 studies and nine quality dimensions; none of which were specifically aimed at biomedical metadata. 96 individuals completed the survey; of those who submitted data, most only assessed metadata quality sometimes, and eight did not at all. Our framework has four sections: a) general information; b) tools and technologies; c) usability; and d) management and curation. We evaluated the framework using three test cases and sought expert feedback. The framework can assess biomedical metadata quality systematically and robustly.

  15. Using URIs to effectively transmit sensor data and metadata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokkinaki, Alexandra; Buck, Justin; Darroch, Louise; Gardner, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Autonomous ocean observation is massively increasing the number of sensors in the ocean. Accordingly, the continuing increase in datasets produced, makes selecting sensors that are fit for purpose a growing challenge. Decision making on selecting quality sensor data, is based on the sensor's metadata, i.e. manufacturer specifications, history of calibrations etc. The Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) has developed the Sensor Web Enablement (SWE) standards to facilitate integration and interoperability of sensor data and metadata. The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) Semantic Web technologies enable machine comprehensibility promoting sophisticated linking and processing of data published on the web. Linking the sensor's data and metadata according to the above-mentioned standards can yield practical difficulties, because of internal hardware bandwidth restrictions and a requirement to constrain data transmission costs. Our approach addresses these practical difficulties by uniquely identifying sensor and platform models and instances through URIs, which resolve via content negotiation to either OGC's sensor meta language, sensorML or W3C's Linked Data. Data transmitted by a sensor incorporate the sensor's unique URI to refer to its metadata. Sensor and platform model URIs and descriptions are created and hosted by the British Oceanographic Data Centre (BODC) linked systems service. The sensor owner creates the sensor and platform instance URIs prior and during sensor deployment, through an updatable web form, the Sensor Instance Form (SIF). SIF enables model and instance URI association but also platform and sensor linking. The use of URIs, which are dynamically generated through the SIF, offers both practical and economical benefits to the implementation of SWE and Linked Data standards in near real time systems. Data can be linked to metadata dynamically in-situ while saving on the costs associated to the transmission of long metadata descriptions. The transmission

  16. Differential Attachment of Salmonella enterica and Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli to Alfalfa, Fenugreek, Lettuce, and Tomato Seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yue; Walcott, Ronald; Chen, Jinru

    2017-04-01

    Vegetable seeds have the potential to disseminate and transmit foodborne bacterial pathogens. This study was undertaken to assess the abilities of selected Salmonella and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) strains to attach to fungicide-treated versus untreated, and intact versus mechanically damaged, seeds of alfalfa, fenugreek, lettuce, and tomato. Surface-sanitized seeds (2 g) were exposed to four individual strains of Salmonella or EHEC at 20°C for 5 h. Contaminated seeds were rinsed twice, each with 10 ml of sterilized water, before being soaked overnight in 5 ml of phosphate-buffered saline at 4°C. The seeds were then vortexed vigorously for 1 min, and pathogen populations in seed rinse water and soaking buffer were determined using a standard plate count assay. In general, the Salmonella cells had higher attachment ratios than the EHEC cells. Lettuce seeds by unit weight had the highest numbers of attached Salmonella or EHEC cells, followed by tomato, alfalfa, and fenugreek seeds. In contrast, individual fenugreek seeds had more attached pathogen cells, followed by lettuce, alfalfa, and tomato seeds. Significantly more Salmonella and EHEC cells attached to mechanically damaged seeds than to intact seeds ( P EHEC cells were recovered from untreated than fungicide-treated seeds ( P 0.05), with a few exceptions. This study fills gaps in the current body of literature and helps explain bacterial interactions with vegetable seeds with differing surface characteristics. IMPORTANCE Vegetable seeds, specifically sprout seeds, have the potential to disseminate and transmit foodborne bacterial pathogens. This study investigated the interaction between two important bacterial pathogens, i.e., Salmonella and EHEC, and vegetable seeds with differing surface characteristics. This research helps understand whether seed surface structure, integrity, and fungicide treatment affect the interaction between bacterial cells and vegetable seeds. Copyright © 2017

  17. Impact of processing on odour-active compounds of a mixed tomato-onion puree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutidou, Maria; Grauwet, Tara; Van Loey, Ann; Acharya, Parag

    2017-08-01

    Gas chromatography-olfactometry revealed thirty-two odour-active compounds in a heat-processed tomato-onion puree, among which twenty-seven were identified by gas chromatography-olfactometry-mass spectrometry (GC-O-MS) and comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC-TOF MS). Based on the results of two olfactometric methods, i.e. detection frequency and aroma extract dilution analysis, the most potent aroma components include: dipropyl disulfide, S-propyl thioacetate, dimethyl trisulfide, 1-octen-3-one, methional, dipropyl trisulfide, 4,5-dimethylthiazole, 2-phenylacetaldehyde and sotolone. Processing of mixed vegetable systems can add complexity in their aroma profiles due to (bio)chemical interactions between the components. Therefore, the impact of different processing steps (i.e. thermal blanching, all-in-one and split-stream processes) on the volatile profile and aroma of a mixed tomato-onion puree has been investigated using a GC-MS fingerprinting approach. Results showed the potential to control the aroma in a mixed tomato-onion system through process-induced enzymatic modulations for producing tomato-onion food products with distinct aroma characteristics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Computational deciphering of biotic stress associated genes in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Tandon

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum is one of the major vegetable plant and a model system for fruit development. Its global importance is due to its lycopene pigment which has anti-oxidative and anti-cancerous properties. Though >1.5 M biotic stress associated ESTs of tomato are available but cumulative analysis to predict genes is warranted. Availability of whole genome de novo assembly can advantageously be used to map them over different chromosome. Further, available 0.14 M catalogued markers can be used to introgress specific desirable genes in varietal improvement program. We report here 57 novel genes associated with biotic stress of tomato along with 50 genes having physical location over different chromosomes. We also report 52 cis-regulating elements and 69 putative miRNAs which are involved in regulation of these biotic stresses associated genes. These putative candidate genes associated with biotic stress can be used in molecular breeding in the endeavor of tomato productivity along with its sustainable germplasm management.

  19. Estimation of antioxidant components of tomato using VIS-NIR reflectance data by handheld portable spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szuvandzsiev, Péter; Helyes, Lajos; Lugasi, Andrea; Szántó, Csongor; Baranowski, Piotr; Pék, Zoltán

    2014-10-01

    Processing tomato production represents an important part of the total production of processed vegetables in the world. The quality characteristics of processing tomato, important for the food industry, are soluble solids content and antioxidant content (such as lycopene and polyphenols) of the fruit. Analytical quantification of these components is destructive, time and labour consuming. That is why researchers try to develop a non-destructive and rapid method to assess those quality parameters. The present study reports the suitability of a portable handheld visible near infrared spectrometer to predict soluble solids, lycopene and polyphenol content of tomato fruit puree. Spectral ranges of 500-1000 nm were directly acquired on fruit puree of five different tomato varieties using a FieldSpec HandHeld 2™ Portable Spectroradiometer. Immediately after spectral measurement, each fruit sample was analysed to determine soluble solids, lycopene and polyphenol content. Partial least square regressions were carried out to create models of prediction between spectral data and the values obtained from the analytical results. The accuracy of the predictions was analysed according to the coefficient of determination value (R2), the root mean square error of calibration/ cross-validation.

  20. Carotenoid Profile of Tomato Sauces: Effect of Cooking Time and Content of Extra Virgin Olive Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Vallverdú-Queralt

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The consumption of carotenoid-rich vegetables such as tomatoes and tomato sauces is associated with reduced risk of several chronic diseases. The predominant carotenoids in tomato products are in the (all-E configuration, but (Z isomers can be formed during thermal processing. The effect of cooking time (15, 30, 45 and 60 min and the addition of extra virgin olive oil (5% and 10% on the carotenoid extractability of tomato sauces was monitored using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS and LC-ultraviolet detection (LC-UV. The thermal treatment and the addition of extra virgin olive oil increased the levels of antioxidant activity, total carotenoids, Z-lycopene isomers, α-carotene and β-carotene. These results are of particular nutritional benefit since higher lycopene intake has been associated with a reduced risk of lethal prostate and a reduction of prostate-specific antigen (PSA levels. Moreover, β-carotene has been reported to suppress the up-regulation of heme oxygenase-1 gene expression in a dose dependent manner and to suppress UVA-induced HO-1 gene expression in cultured FEK4.

  1. A spectroscopy-based detector to monitor tomato growth condition in greenhouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ce; Li, Minzan; Cui, Di

    2008-12-01

    A spectroscopy-based detector is developed to measure the nitrogen and chlorophyll content of tomato leaves and then to predict the growth condition of tomato plants in greenhouse. The detector uses two wavebands, 527 nm and 762 nm, since it is proved that these wavebands are sensitive to nitrogen and chlorophyll content in plant leaves by previous field test. The detector contains: A Y-type optic fiber, two silicon photocells, a signal processing unit, and a MCU. Light reflection from tomato leaves is transmitted by the Y-type optic fiber to the surface of the silicon photo cells, which transfer optical signal into electrical signal. Then the analog signal is amplified to conform to the TTL level signal standard and finally converted to digital signal by MAX186. After that, the MCU carries on a series of actions, including data calculating, displaying and storage. Using the measured data, the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) is calculated to estimate the nitrogen and chlorophyll content in plant leaves. The result is directly displayed on an LCD screen. Users have an option in saving data, either into a USB-memory stick or into a database over the PC serial port. The detector is portable, inexpensive, and convenient, which make it meet farmers' need in China. The performance test shows that the growth model works very well, and the device has high accuracy in predicting the growth condition of tomato plants in greenhouse.

  2. Consumer sensory analysis of organically and conventionally grown vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xin; Chambers, Edgar; Matta, Ziad; Loughin, Thomas M; Carey, Edward E

    2007-03-01

    Consumers of organically grown fruits and vegetables often believe that these products taste better than conventional produce. However, comparison of produce from supermarket shelves does not permit adequate assessment of this consumer perception, given potentially confounding cultivar and environmental effects. We used replicated side-by-side plots to produce organic and conventional vegetables for consumer sensory studies. In one test, red loose leaf lettuce, spinach, arugula, and mustard greens, grown organically and conventionally, were evaluated for overall liking as well as for intensity of flavor and bitterness. Another consumer test was conducted comparing organically and conventionally grown tomatoes, cucumbers, and onions. Overall, organically and conventionally grown vegetables did not show significant differences in consumer liking or consumer-perceived sensory quality. The only exception was in tomatoes where the conventionally produced tomato was rated as having significantly stronger flavor than the organically produced tomato. However, overall liking was the same for both organic and conventional samples. As conventional tomatoes also were scored marginally significantly higher in ripeness and a positive correlation was found between ratings of flavor intensity and ripeness, the flavor difference observed could not be simply ascribed to the contrasting growing conditions. Consumer panelists in both tests considered organic produce to be healthier (72%) and more environmentally friendly (51%) than conventional produce, while 28% considered organic produce to have better taste. Covariance analysis indicated that consumer demographics affected sensory comparisons of organic and conventional lettuce and cucumbers. Future study is needed to substantiate the influence of segmentation of consumers on their preference for organic food.

  3. Baseline survey of the anatomical microbial ecology of an important food plant: Solanum lycopersicum (tomato)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Research to understand and control microbiological risks associated with the consumption of fresh fruits and vegetables has examined many environments in the farm to fork continuum. An important data gap however, that remains poorly studied is the baseline description of microflora that may be associated with plant anatomy either endemically or in response to environmental pressures. Specific anatomical niches of plants may contribute to persistence of human pathogens in agricultural environments in ways we have yet to describe. Tomatoes have been implicated in outbreaks of Salmonella at least 17 times during the years spanning 1990 to 2010. Our research seeks to provide a baseline description of the tomato microbiome and possibly identify whether or not there is something distinctive about tomatoes or their growing ecology that contributes to persistence of Salmonella in this important food crop. Results DNA was recovered from washes of epiphytic surfaces of tomato anatomical organs; leaves, stems, roots, flowers and fruits of Solanum lycopersicum (BHN602), grown at a site in close proximity to commercial farms previously implicated in tomato-Salmonella outbreaks. DNA was amplified for targeted 16S and 18S rRNA genes and sheared for shotgun metagenomic sequencing. Amplicons and metagenomes were used to describe “native” bacterial microflora for diverse anatomical parts of Virginia-grown tomatoes. Conclusions Distinct groupings of microbial communities were associated with different tomato plant organs and a gradient of compositional similarity could be correlated to the distance of a given plant part from the soil. Unique bacterial phylotypes (at 95% identity) were associated with fruits and flowers of tomato plants. These include Microvirga, Pseudomonas, Sphingomonas, Brachybacterium, Rhizobiales, Paracocccus, Chryseomonas and Microbacterium. The most frequently observed bacterial taxa across aerial plant regions were Pseudomonas and Xanthomonas

  4. Study of optimal extraction conditions for achieving high yield and antioxidant activity of tomato seed oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Dongyan; Atungulu, Griffiths G; Pan, Zhongli; Yue, Tianli; Zhang, Ang; Li, Xuan

    2012-08-01

    Value of tomato seed has not been fully recognized. The objectives of this research were to establish suitable processing conditions for extracting oil from tomato seed by using solvent, determine the impact of processing conditions on yield and antioxidant activity of extracted oil, and elucidate kinetics of the oil extraction process. Four processing parameters, including time, temperature, solvent-to-solid ratio and particle size were studied. A second order model was established to describe the oil extraction process. Based on the results, increasing temperature, solvent-to-solid ratio, and extraction time increased oil yield. In contrast, larger particle size reduced the oil yield. The recommended oil extraction conditions were 8 min of extraction time at temperature of 25 °C, solvent-to-solids ratio of 5/1 (v/w) and particle size of 0.38 mm, which gave oil yield of 20.32% with recovery rate of 78.56%. The DPPH scavenging activity of extracted oil was not significantly affected by the extraction parameters. The inhibitory concentration (IC(50) ) of tomato seed oil was 8.67 mg/mL which was notably low compared to most vegetable oils. A 2nd order model successfully described the kinetics of tomato oil extraction process and parameters of extraction kinetics including initial extraction rate (h), equilibrium concentration of oil (C(s) ), and the extraction rate constant (k) could be precisely predicted with R(2) of at least 0.957. The study revealed that tomato seed which is typically treated as a low value byproduct of tomato processing has great potential in producing oil with high antioxidant capability. The impact of processing conditions including time, temperature, solvent-to-solid ratio and particle size on yield, and antioxidant activity of extracted tomato seed oil are reported. Optimal conditions and models which describe the extraction process are recommended. The information is vital for determining the extraction processing conditions for industrial

  5. The Benefits and Future of Standards: Metadata and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stracke, Christian M.

    This article discusses the benefits and future of standards and presents the generic multi-dimensional Reference Model. First the importance and the tasks of interoperability as well as quality development and their relationship are analyzed. Especially in e-Learning their connection and interdependence is evident: Interoperability is one basic requirement for quality development. In this paper, it is shown how standards and specifications are supporting these crucial issues. The upcoming ISO metadata standard MLR (Metadata for Learning Resource) will be introduced and used as example for identifying the requirements and needs for future standardization. In conclusion a vision of the challenges and potentials for e-Learning standardization is outlined.

  6. Abstracts - Metadata Workshop – The way to open science, June 22, 2016

    OpenAIRE

    Blumesberger, Susanne; Preza, José Luis; Fensel, Anna; Head, Tim; Barbera, Roberto; Szepe, Stefan; Kopacsi, Sandor; Teetor, Sarah; Jeitler, Andreas; Petritsch, Barbara; Neubauer, Georg; Durco, Matej; Koch, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Abstracts *Roberto Barbera - From Metadata to Open Data to Open Science *Tim Head - How to get to a bright future of reusable science *Anna Fensel - Towards Semantic APIs for Research Data Services *Walter Koch - Aggregation and Management of Metadata in the Context of Europeana *Matej Durco - Metadata for the Humanities – a use case from ÖAW *Georg Neubauer - Visualization of typed links in linked data *Barbara Petritsch - Metadata for research data in practice *Andr...

  7. A theoretical framework for the inclusion of socially-constructed metadata in library resource description

    OpenAIRE

    Alemu, Getaneh

    2013-01-01

    Taking into account the present challenges libraries face to incorporate user-generated metadata in their cataloguing and resource discovery functions, a theoretical metadata framework which aims at the inclusion of socially-constructed metadata in library resource description is suggested. Concepts and principles that underpin standards-based and socially-constructed metadata approaches have been identified and analysed using a constructivist grounded theory method (Charmaz, 2006). In-depth ...

  8. Dyniqx: a novel meta-search engine for metadata based cross search

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Jianhan; Song, Dawei; Eisenstadt, Marc; Barladeanu, Cristi; Rüger, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    The effect of metadata in collection fusion has not been sufficiently studied. In response to this, we present a novel meta-search engine called Dyniqx for metadata based cross search. Dyniqx exploits the availability of metadata in academic search services such as PubMed and Google Scholar etc for fusing search results from heterogeneous search engines. In addition, metadata from these search engines are used for generating dynamic query controls such as sliders and tick boxes etc which are ...

  9. DESIGN OF A WEB SEMI-INTELLIGENT METADATA SEARCH MODEL APPLIED IN DATA WAREHOUSING SYSTEMS

    OpenAIRE

    Luna Ramírez,Enrique; Ambriz Delgadillo,Humberto; Nungaray Ornelas,J. Antonio; Álvarez Rodríguez, Francisco Javier; Jorge N Mondragón Reyes

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, the design of a Web metadata search model with semi-intelligent features is proposed. The search model is oriented to retrieve the metadata associated to a data warehouse in a fast, flexible and reliable way. Our proposal includes a set of distinctive functionalities, which consist of the temporary storage of the frequently used metadata in an exclusive store, different to the global data warehouse metadata store, and of the use of control processes to retrieve information from...

  10. Genome-wide identification and expression profiling of tomato Hsp20 gene family in response to biotic and abiotic stresses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    jiahong yu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The Hsp20 genes are involved in the response of plants to environment stresses including heat shock and also play a vital role in plant growth and development. They represent the most abundant small heat shock proteins (sHsps in plants, but little is known about this family in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum, an important vegetable crop in the world. Here, we characterized heat shock protein 20 (SlHsp20 gene family in tomato through integration of gene structure, chromosome location, phylogenetic relationship and expression profile. Using bioinformatics-based methods, we identified at least 42 putative SlHsp20 genes in tomato. Sequence analysis revealed that most of SlHsp20 genes possessed no intron or a relatively short intron in length. Chromosome mapping indicated that inter-arm and intra-chromosome duplication events contributed remarkably to the expansion of SlHsp20 genes. Phylogentic tree of Hsp20 genes from tomato and other plant species revealed that SlHsp20 genes were grouped into 13 subfamilies, indicating that these genes may have a common ancestor that generated diverse subfamilies prior to the mono-dicot split. In addition, expression analysis using RNA-seq in various tissues and developmental stages of cultivated tomato and the wild relative Solanum pimpinellifolium revealed that most of these genes (83% were expressed in at least one stage from at least one genotype. Out of 42 genes, 4 genes were expressed constitutively in almost all the tissues analyzed, implying that these genes might have specific housekeeping function in tomato cell under normal growth conditions. Two SlHsp20 genes displayed differential expression levels between cultivated tomato and S. pimpinellifolium in vegetative (leaf and root and reproductive organs (floral bud and flower, suggesting inter-species diversification for functional specialization during the process of domestication. Based on genome-wide microarray analysis, we showed that the transcript

  11. Energy Accounting in Canning Tomato Products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, R P; Carroad, P A; Chhinnan, M S; Rose, W W; Jacob, N L

    1979-01-01

    An energy-accounting method was used to determine energy use in various unit operations in canning tomato juice, whole-peeled tomatoes, and tomato paste. Data on steam and electric consumption were obtained from a canning plant with the use of steam flow meters and electric transducers. Unit operations associated with the following equipment were investigated: crushers, hot-break heaters, pulpers, finishers, lye-bath peelers, evaporators, and retorts. Data were analyzed to determine amount of energy used per unit of raw product. Energy-intensive operations were identified for future modifications to reduce energy consumption.

  12. TOMATO YIELD AT TREATMENT BY BIOLOGICAL PRODUCT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. S. Baydelyuk

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of bacterial products Mizorin and PG-5 for treatment of seeds and seedlings roots of tomato cv. Novichok was studied. The positive effect of these biological products on productivity and disease resistance of tomato was revealed. The most effective was Mizorin when both treatments were applied. Biological efficiency was 46% and 38% against Septoria disease and Phytophtora, respectively. The yield of tomato increased (0.4 – 3.3 t/ha when Mizorin was applied.

  13. COMPLEX PROCESSING TECHNOLOGY OF TOMATO RAW MATERIALS

    OpenAIRE

    A. M. Gadzhieva; G. I. Kasianov

    2015-01-01

    Tomatoes grown in the central and southern parts of the country, which contain 5-6 % of solids, including 0.13 % of pectin, 0.86 % of fat, 0.5 % of organic acids; 0.5 % minerals, etc. were used as a subject of research. These tomatoes, grown in the mountains, on soils with high salinity, contain high amounts of valuable components and have a long-term preservation. For the extraction of valuable components from dried tomato pomace CO2 extraction method was applied. Technological and environm...

  14. COMPARISON OF CAROTENOID CONTENT IN TOMATO, TOMATO PULP AND KETCHUP BY LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. T. GAMA

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available

    Although tomatoes are commonly consumed fresh, over 80 % the consumption of tomatoes is in the form of processed products such as tomato pulp, ketchup, juice and sauce. Research has indicated the potential health benefits of a diet rich in tomatoes and tomato products. The present study was carried out to determine the carotenoid content of fresh tomato, tomato pulp and ketchup by high performance liquid chromatography. The major differences among these products were in the concentration of some of the pigments. Tomato had all-trans-lycopene (1046-1099 μg/g DW, cislycopene (125-132 μg/g DW and all-trans- -carotene (45-59 μg/g DW as principal carotenoids. Tomato pulp and ketchup had all-trans-lycopene (951-999 μg/g DW and 455-476 μg/g DW, all-trans- -carotene (76-88 DW μg/g and 20-27 DW μg/g and cis-lycopene (71-83 μg/g DW and 14-25 μg/g DW as the main pigments, respectively. They also contained other carotenoids in much smaller amounts (lycoxanthin, zeaxanthin, anteraxanthin, lutein, -carotene, -carotene and phytofluene.

  15. Metadata squared: enhancing its usability for volunteered geographic information and the GeoWeb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poore, Barbara S.; Wolf, Eric B.; Sui, Daniel Z.; Elwood, Sarah; Goodchild, Michael F.

    2013-01-01

    The Internet has brought many changes to the way geographic information is created and shared. One aspect that has not changed is metadata. Static spatial data quality descriptions were standardized in the mid-1990s and cannot accommodate the current climate of data creation where nonexperts are using mobile phones and other location-based devices on a continuous basis to contribute data to Internet mapping platforms. The usability of standard geospatial metadata is being questioned by academics and neogeographers alike. This chapter analyzes current discussions of metadata to demonstrate how the media shift that is occurring has affected requirements for metadata. Two case studies of metadata use are presented—online sharing of environmental information through a regional spatial data infrastructure in the early 2000s, and new types of metadata that are being used today in OpenStreetMap, a map of the world created entirely by volunteers. Changes in metadata requirements are examined for usability, the ease with which metadata supports coproduction of data by communities of users, how metadata enhances findability, and how the relationship between metadata and data has changed. We argue that traditional metadata associated with spatial data infrastructures is inadequate and suggest several research avenues to make this type of metadata more interactive and effective in the GeoWeb.

  16. Turning Data into Information: Assessing and Reporting GIS Metadata Integrity Using Integrated Computing Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulrooney, Timothy J.

    2009-01-01

    A Geographic Information System (GIS) serves as the tangible and intangible means by which spatially related phenomena can be created, analyzed and rendered. GIS metadata serves as the formal framework to catalog information about a GIS data set. Metadata is independent of the encoded spatial and attribute information. GIS metadata is a subset of…

  17. Postharvest Quality Of Tomato Fruits Cv. Andréa Treated With Ethylene [qualidade Pós-colheita De Frutos De Tomate Cv. Andréa Tratados Com Etileno

    OpenAIRE

    Andreuccetti C.; Ferreira M.D.; Moretti C.L.; Honorio S.L.

    2007-01-01

    Tomatoes are one of the most important vegetable crops grown in Brazil and treatments that facilitate ripening control are extremely desirable. The present work was carried out aiming to evaluate postharvest quality of roma-type tomatoes treated with ethylene. 'Andréa' tomatoes were harvested in commercial fields at the mature-green stage, were graded for size and color, and treated with ethylene (100 μL L-1) for 48 hours at 20°±1°C and relative humidity of 90±5%. The experiments were carried...

  18. The effect of the lenght of storage on the amount of lycopene in the fruits of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Uher

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We focused on tomatoes for industrial processing due to its economical importance for its lycopene content. The objective of our research is to find the variation of lycopene content in tomato fruits depending upon the length of after harvest storage and thermic treatment, which is inevitable when being industrialy processed. From the point of view of nutritional qualities the most relevant contentual substance of tomatos are carotenoids, included lycopene.At average for tree following experimental years we learnt significant differences regarding the content of lycopene and the length of storage of tomato fruits. Immediately after the harvest and proccesing tomato fruits contained, at average for tree years, 103.24 mg of lycopene. After 14 days the content of lycopene declined to 46.76 mg . kg−1 of fresh mass. After 30 days the average value dropped to 29.26 mg . kg−1. This fact comfirms that boiling respectively thermic treatment increases the content of lycopene in tomato fruits, particulary in our experiment to the value 83.33 mg . kg−1. At varieties Ladislav, Peto 86, Prémium, Salus the content of lycopene has even risen in comparison with its content up to 48 hours after the harvest. Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L. belongs to the most signifficant vegetable varieties either for its exploitation in processing industry as well as for its nutritional value with extraordinary beneficial effect for human organism.Although the content of lycopene is genetically stable attribute, its content in our experiment ranged from 45.39 mg . kg−1 (Prémium variety to 77.98 mg . kg−1 (Zámčan variety, which are significant differences.

  19. The effect of transitional organic production practices on soilborne pests of tomato in a simulated microplot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chellemi, Dan O; Rosskopf, Erin N; Kokalis-Burelle, Nancy

    2013-08-01

    The perceived risk of pest resurgence upon transition from conventional to organic-based farming systems remains a critical obstacle to expanding organic vegetable production, particularly where chemical fumigants have provided soilborne pest and disease control. Microplots were used to study the effects of soil amendments and cropping sequences applied over a 2-year transitional period from conventional to organic tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) cultivation on the incidence of bacterial wilt caused by Ralstonia solanacearum, purple nutsedge (Cyperus rotundus) reproduction, root galling by Meloidogyne incognita, and soil nematode populations. A continuation of tomato monoculture during the transitional period resulted in a disease incidence of 33%, as compared with 9% in microplots that were rotated with sunn hemp (Crotalaria juncea) and Japanese millet (Echinochloa crusgalli var. frumentacea). The benefits of disease control from a crop rotation extended into to a second season of organic tomato cultivation season, where bacterial wilt declined from 40% in microplots with a tomato monoculture to 17% in plots with a crop rotation sequence. Combining applications of urban plant debris with a continued tomato monoculture increased the incidence of bacterial wilt to 60%. During the transition period, tomato plants following a cover crop regime also had significantly lower levels of root galling from root-knot nematode infection compared with plants in the continuous tomato monoculture. Nutsedge tuber production was significantly increased in plots amended with broiler litter but not urban plant debris. Compared with a continuous monoculture, the results illustrate the importance of a systems-based approach to implementing transitional organic practices that is cognizant of their interactive effects on resident soilborne disease, weed, and pest complexes.

  20. Effect of water-soluble fraction of cherry tomatoes on the adhesion of probiotics and Salmonella to intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Jong Ho; Kim, Narae; Hwang, Dahyun; Lim, Young-Hee

    2013-12-01

    Tomato is one of the most consumed vegetables in the world and contains many valuable nutritional components. Here we investigate the prebiotic effects of cherry tomatoes for improving gut health. Water-soluble dietary fiber was prepared from fresh and processed (heat treatment at 80 °C for 15 min) cherry tomato samples, each with and without Viscozyme L treatment. In the adhesion assays, all water-soluble dietary fiber samples improved adhesion of probiotics (Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Bifidobacterium bifidum) to intestinal epithelial cells (Caco-2 cells). Heat treatment in the preparation of juice from cherry tomatoes showed no significant effect on the adhesion of probiotics to Caco-2 cells. The oligofructose content of samples affected the intestinal adhesion of probiotic bacteria, with higher oligosaccharide concentrations associated with greater adhesion of probiotics and more inhibition of the adhesion of pathogens to Caco-2 cells. The present results suggest that cherry tomato can act as a prebiotic, with oligofructose potentially being one of its major prebiotic components. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  1. Effects of a tomato (Solanum lycopersicum extract on the labeling of blood constituents with technetium-99m

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Severo de Paoli

    Full Text Available Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum is the second most produced and consumed vegetable in the world. It has been indicated in the prevention and treatment of cancer, asthma and atherosclerosis. Blood constituents labeled with radionuclides have been used in procedures in nuclear medicine. Data have shown that food and drugs can alter the labeling of blood constituents with technetium-99m (99mTc. This study evaluated the influence of a tomato extract on this radiolabeling procedure. Heparinized blood (Wistar rats was incubated in vitro with different concentrations of a tomato extract and 99mTc-labeling was performed. Plasma (P and blood cells (BC were separated following soluble (SF-P/SF-BC and insoluble (IF-P/IF-BC fractions isolation by precipitation and centrifugation. The radioactivities on blood constituents (P, BC, IF-P, SF-P, IF-BC and SF-BC were determined and the percentage of radioactivity (%ATI was calculated. The tomato extract used at the highest concentrations (2.00 and 4.00g/mL, reduced significantly (p < 0.05 the %ATI in IF-P, although this extract did not modify the radiolabeling on BC, neither the radioactivity fixation on IF-BC. In conclusion, our data suggest that the chemical compounds present in the aqueous tomato extract could have some properties capable of change the fixation of 99mTc on plasma proteins.

  2. Growth response of tomato ( Lycopersicum esculentum Mill ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Growth response of tomato ( Lycopersicum esculentum Mill) inoculated with ... The field study attempted to validate positive responses obtained in the greenhouse. ... height and girth with the regression coefficient (r2) ranging from 0.74 to 0.96.

  3. Molecular characterization of Yucatan tomato phytoplasma (Group ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-01-31

    Medina JA, Méndez-Lozano J, Leyva-. López NE (2008). Detection and molecular characterization of two little leaf phytoplasma strains associated with pepper and tomato diseases in Guanajuato and Sinaloa, Mexico. Plant Dis.

  4. Canned fish bites in tomato sauce

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Baker, R.C; Darfler, J.M

    1980-01-01

    Meatballs in tomato sauce are a popular canned convenience product. Since small bite-sized portions of a fish mixture in a creamy sauce had been found to be an acceptable product (Creamy Fish Bites...

  5. Transforming and enhancing metadata for enduser discovery: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward M. Corrado

    2014-05-01

    The Libraries’ workflow and portions of code will be shared; issues and challenges involved will be discussed. While this case study is specific to Binghamton University Libraries, examples of strategies used at other institutions will also be introduced. This paper should be useful to anyone interested in describing large quantities of photographs or other materials with preexisting embedded metadata.

  6. ATLAS Metadata Infrastructure Evolution for Run 2 and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gemmeren, P.; Cranshaw, J.; Malon, D.; Vaniachine, A.

    2015-12-01

    ATLAS developed and employed for Run 1 of the Large Hadron Collider a sophisticated infrastructure for metadata handling in event processing jobs. This infrastructure profits from a rich feature set provided by the ATLAS execution control framework, including standardized interfaces and invocation mechanisms for tools and services, segregation of transient data stores with concomitant object lifetime management, and mechanisms for handling occurrences asynchronous to the control framework's state machine transitions. This metadata infrastructure is evolving and being extended for Run 2 to allow its use and reuse in downstream physics analyses, analyses that may or may not utilize the ATLAS control framework. At the same time, multiprocessing versions of the control framework and the requirements of future multithreaded frameworks are leading to redesign of components that use an incident-handling approach to asynchrony. The increased use of scatter-gather architectures, both local and distributed, requires further enhancement of metadata infrastructure in order to ensure semantic coherence and robust bookkeeping. This paper describes the evolution of ATLAS metadata infrastructure for Run 2 and beyond, including the transition to dual-use tools—tools that can operate inside or outside the ATLAS control framework—and the implications thereof. It further examines how the design of this infrastructure is changing to accommodate the requirements of future frameworks and emerging event processing architectures.

  7. Metadata Schema Used in OCLC Sampled Web Pages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Yu

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The tremendous growth of Web resources has made information organization and retrieval more and more difficult. As one approach to this problem, metadata schemas have been developed to characterize Web resources. However, many questions have been raised about the use of metadata schemas such as which metadata schemas have been used on the Web? How did they describe Web accessible information? What is the distribution of these metadata schemas among Web pages? Do certain schemas dominate the others? To address these issues, this study analyzed 16,383 Web pages with meta tags extracted from 200,000 OCLC sampled Web pages in 2000. It found that only 8.19% Web pages used meta tags; description tags, keyword tags, and Dublin Core tags were the only three schemas used in the Web pages. This article revealed the use of meta tags in terms of their function distribution, syntax characteristics, granularity of the Web pages, and the length distribution and word number distribution of both description and keywords tags.

  8. Use of Internet Facilities and Metadata as Precursors to Electronic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study examined use of internet facilities and metadata as precursors to electronic resource cataloguing in selected academic libraries in South-West Nigeria. Six University libraries were randomly selected. One hundred (100) respondents comprising current cataloguers and those who had worked as cataloguers were ...

  9. A statistical metadata model for clinical trials' data management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardaki, Maria; Papageorgiou, Haralambos; Pentaris, Fragkiskos

    2009-08-01

    We introduce a statistical, process-oriented metadata model to describe the process of medical research data collection, management, results analysis and dissemination. Our approach explicitly provides a structure for pieces of information used in Clinical Study Data Management Systems, enabling a more active role for any associated metadata. Using the object-oriented paradigm, we describe the classes of our model that participate during the design of a clinical trial and the subsequent collection and management of the relevant data. The advantage of our approach is that we focus on presenting the structural inter-relation of these classes when used during datasets manipulation by proposing certain transformations that model the simultaneous processing of both data and metadata. Our solution reduces the possibility of human errors and allows for the tracking of all changes made during datasets lifecycle. The explicit modeling of processing steps improves data quality and assists in the problem of handling data collected in different clinical trials. The case study illustrates the applicability of the proposed framework demonstrating conceptually the simultaneous handling of datasets collected during two randomized clinical studies. Finally, we provide the main considerations for implementing the proposed framework into a modern Metadata-enabled Information System.

  10. Competence Based Educational Metadata for Supporting Lifelong Competence Development Programmes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sampson, Demetrios; Fytros, Demetrios

    2008-01-01

    Sampson, D., & Fytros, D. (2008). Competence Based Educational Metadata for Supporting Lifelong Competence Development Programmes. In P. Diaz, Kinshuk, I. Aedo & E. Mora (Eds.), Proceedings of the 8th IEEE International Conference on Advanced Learning Technologies (ICALT 2008), pp. 288-292. July,

  11. Syndicating Rich Bibliographic Metadata Using MODS and RSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Many libraries use RSS to syndicate information about their collections to users. A survey of 65 academic libraries revealed their most common use for RSS is to disseminate information about library holdings, such as lists of new acquisitions. Even though typical RSS feeds are ill suited to the task of carrying rich bibliographic metadata, great…

  12. Metadata Harvesting in Regional Digital Libraries in the PIONIER Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazurek, Cezary; Stroinski, Maciej; Werla, Marcin; Weglarz, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The paper aims to present the concept of the functionality of metadata harvesting for regional digital libraries, based on the OAI-PMH protocol. This functionality is a part of regional digital libraries platform created in Poland. The platform was required to reach one of main objectives of the Polish PIONIER Programme--to enrich the…

  13. Metadata Quality Improvement : DASISH deliverable 5.2A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L'Hours, Hervé; Offersgaard, Lene; Wittenberg, M.; Wloka, Bartholomäus

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this task was to analyse and compare the different metadata strategies of CLARIN, DARIAH and CESSDA, and to identify possibilities of cross-fertilization to take profit from each other solutions where possible. To have a better understanding in which stages of the research lifecycle

  14. Map Metadata: Essential Elements for Search and Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beamer, Ashley

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to develop an understanding of the issues surrounding the cataloguing of maps in archives and libraries. An investigation into appropriate metadata formats, such as MARC21, EAD and Dublin Core with RDF, shows how particular map data can be stored. Mathematical map elements, specifically co-ordinates, are…

  15. A metadata schema for data objects in clinical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canham, Steve; Ohmann, Christian

    2016-11-24

    A large number of stakeholders have accepted the need for greater transparency in clinical research and, in the context of various initiatives and systems, have developed a diverse and expanding number of repositories for storing the data and documents created by clinical studies (collectively known as data objects). To make the best use of such resources, we assert that it is also necessary for stakeholders to agree and deploy a simple, consistent metadata scheme. The relevant data objects and their likely storage are described, and the requirements for metadata to support data sharing in clinical research are identified. Issues concerning persistent identifiers, for both studies and data objects, are explored. A scheme is proposed that is based on the DataCite standard, with extensions to cover the needs of clinical researchers, specifically to provide (a) study identification data, including links to clinical trial registries; (b) data object characteristics and identifiers; and (c) data covering location, ownership and access to the data object. The components of the metadata scheme are described. The metadata schema is proposed as a natural extension of a widely agreed standard to fill a gap not tackled by other standards related to clinical research (e.g., Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium, Biomedical Research Integrated Domain Group). The proposal could be integrated with, but is not dependent on, other moves to better structure data in clinical research.

  16. Big Earth Data Initiative: Metadata Improvement: Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozimor, John; Habermann, Ted; Farley, John

    2016-01-01

    Big Earth Data Initiative (BEDI) The Big Earth Data Initiative (BEDI) invests in standardizing and optimizing the collection, management and delivery of U.S. Government's civil Earth observation data to improve discovery, access use, and understanding of Earth observations by the broader user community. Complete and consistent standard metadata helps address all three goals.

  17. Automatic Extraction of Metadata from Scientific Publications for CRIS Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacevic, Aleksandar; Ivanovic, Dragan; Milosavljevic, Branko; Konjovic, Zora; Surla, Dusan

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this paper is to develop a system for automatic extraction of metadata from scientific papers in PDF format for the information system for monitoring the scientific research activity of the University of Novi Sad (CRIS UNS). Design/methodology/approach: The system is based on machine learning and performs automatic extraction…

  18. Training and Best Practice Guidelines: Implications for Metadata Creation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuttur, Mohammad Y.

    2012-01-01

    In response to the rapid development of digital libraries over the past decade, researchers have focused on the use of metadata as an effective means to support resource discovery within online repositories. With the increasing involvement of libraries in digitization projects and the growing number of institutional repositories, it is anticipated…

  19. Metadata management for high content screening in OMERO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Simon; Besson, Sébastien; Blackburn, Colin; Carroll, Mark; Ferguson, Richard K; Flynn, Helen; Gillen, Kenneth; Leigh, Roger; Lindner, Dominik; Linkert, Melissa; Moore, William J; Ramalingam, Balaji; Rozbicki, Emil; Rustici, Gabriella; Tarkowska, Aleksandra; Walczysko, Petr; Williams, Eleanor; Allan, Chris; Burel, Jean-Marie; Moore, Josh; Swedlow, Jason R

    2016-03-01

    High content screening (HCS) experiments create a classic data management challenge-multiple, large sets of heterogeneous structured and unstructured data, that must be integrated and linked to produce a set of "final" results. These different data include images, reagents, protocols, analytic output, and phenotypes, all of which must be stored, linked and made accessible for users, scientists, collaborators and where appropriate the wider community. The OME Consortium has built several open source tools for managing, linking and sharing these different types of data. The OME Data Model is a metadata specification that supports the image data and metadata recorded in HCS experiments. Bio-Formats is a Java library that reads recorded image data and metadata and includes support for several HCS screening systems. OMERO is an enterprise data management application that integrates image data, experimental and analytic metadata and makes them accessible for visualization, mining, sharing and downstream analysis. We discuss how Bio-Formats and OMERO handle these different data types, and how they can be used to integrate, link and share HCS experiments in facilities and public data repositories. OME specifications and software are open source and are available at https://www.openmicroscopy.org. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The evolution of chondrichthyan research through a metadata ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Recent international conferences focused on chondrichthyan research provide an opportunity to assess how the research environment of chondrichthyan science has evolved through time. We compiled metadata from Sharks Down Under (1991) and the two Sharks International conferences (2010 and 2014), spanning 23 ...

  1. PRODUCTION AND MARKETABILITY OF CONVENTIONAL, SUSTAINABLE AND ORGANIC PRODUCED TOMATOES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dean BAN

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Conventional agricultural production is denoted by high levels of chemisation, strait specialised production, high yields and low costs per production unit, however this production causes risky interventions, which could affect negatively on environment and human health Research results indicate possibilities for growing vegetables in alternative systems, less risky for environment with satisfying economic success. The aim of this research was to determine economic success of organic, sustainable and conventional production of tomato in the Mediterranean area of Republic Croatia. Bianual research was conducted during 2002/2003. During vegetation we examined parameters of growth, marketable yields and costs for materials, work and machinery which are used in economic analysis. Economical analysis of tomatoes production indicate worst results in organic production system. Loses in tomatoes organic production were consequences of two main factors: lower marketed yield and equal product price for all three production types. Lower yields in organic production were expected, therefore bad financial results were caused by mainly low market prices, which do not validate quality and food safety. Therefore financial success is preconditioned by higher market validation, which can be obtained through market analysis and product development. Consumer awareness about organic agriculture is still very weak and this point requires further attention. The link between organic agriculture and the environment/nature protection is missing too. The purchase of organic food is influenced by the level of information and knowledge of consumers with reference to these products. Doubts about the truthfulness and significance of some data were raised by main places where organic food is purchased, since an excessive greatest limitations are high prices and a low level of information to consumers. Current standard of life of most Croatian consumers does not permit them to

  2. Using NDVI and guided sampling to develop yield prediction maps of processing tomato crop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortes, A.; Henar Prieto, M. del; García-Martín, A.; Córdoba, A.; Martínez, L.; Campillo, C.

    2015-07-01

    The use of yield prediction maps is an important tool for the delineation of within-field management zones. Vegetation indices based on crop reflectance are of potential use in the attainment of this objective. There are different types of vegetation indices based on crop reflectance, the most commonly used of which is the NDVI (normalized difference vegetation index). NDVI values are reported to have good correlation with several vegetation parameters including the ability to predict yield. The field research was conducted in two commercial farms of processing tomato crop, Cantillana and Enviciados. An NDVI prediction map developed through ordinary kriging technique was used for guided sampling of processing tomato yield. Yield was studied and related with NDVI, and finally a prediction map of crop yield for the entire plot was generated using two geostatistical methodologies (ordinary and regression kriging). Finally, a comparison was made between the yield obtained at validation points and the yield values according to the prediction maps. The most precise yield maps were obtained with the regression kriging methodology with RRMSE values of 14% and 17% in Cantillana and Enviciados, respectively, using the NDVI as predictor. The coefficient of correlation between NDVI and yield was correlated in the point samples taken in the two locations, with values of 0.71 and 0.67 in Cantillana and Enviciados, respectively. The results suggest that the use of a massive sampling parameter such as NDVI is a good indicator of the distribution of within-field yield variation. (Author)

  3. Impact of FFS on farmer's adoption of IPM options for tomato: A case study from the Gezira State, Sudan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Mirghani Abdel Rahman

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In Sudan pests and diseases are the major problem of vegetables production. Tomato crop is considered as the most important vegetable crop in the country according to its economic and nutrition value. There are many pest and diseases retarding tomato production such as whitefly, American bollworm, TYLCV and powdery mildew. Therefore some IPM options for tomato and onion were validated in FFS in order to help farmers in controlling the most important pests and diseases. The main objective of this study was to determine the impact of FFS on farmer's adoption of IPM options for tomato in the Gezira State, Sudan. Field survey was used to collect data from three Farmer Field Schools in the Gezira State namely: Um Dagarsi, Hantoub and Faris in the 2009/2010 growing season. All FFS participants were used, i.e. 30 FFS- participants from each school. Equal number of non-FFS participants (90 was used for comparison, by using the simple random sampling technique. The collected data were statistically analyzed and interpreted using percentage, frequency distribution and chi-square test. The results showed that the FFS schools were positively affected farmer's adoption of IPM options for tomato. It can be concluded that the FFS approach is very efficient in the transfer of farm technology for vegetable farmers through their participation in various activities of FFS schools. Thus, FFS approach must become national policy, share authority of extension organizations in control and execution of FFS activities with farmer unions for more effective participations of clientele in all activities of the schools and More efforts should be exerted in distribution of all inputs to farmers with reasonable prices through various agricultural centres.

  4. ONEMercury: Towards Automatic Annotation of Earth Science Metadata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuarob, S.; Pouchard, L. C.; Noy, N.; Horsburgh, J. S.; Palanisamy, G.

    2012-12-01

    Earth sciences have become more data-intensive, requiring access to heterogeneous data collected from multiple places, times, and thematic scales. For example, research on climate change may involve exploring and analyzing observational data such as the migration of animals and temperature shifts across the earth, as well as various model-observation inter-comparison studies. Recently, DataONE, a federated data network built to facilitate access to and preservation of environmental and ecological data, has come to exist. ONEMercury has recently been implemented as part of the DataONE project to serve as a portal for discovering and accessing environmental and observational data across the globe. ONEMercury harvests metadata from the data hosted by multiple data repositories and makes it searchable via a common search interface built upon cutting edge search engine technology, allowing users to interact with the system, intelligently filter the search results on the fly, and fetch the data from distributed data sources. Linking data from heterogeneous sources always has a cost. A problem that ONEMercury faces is the different levels of annotation in the harvested metadata records. Poorly annotated records tend to be missed during the search process as they lack meaningful keywords. Furthermore, such records would not be compatible with the advanced search functionality offered by ONEMercury as the interface requires a metadata record be semantically annotated. The explosion of the number of metadata records harvested from an increasing number of data repositories makes it impossible to annotate the harvested records manually, urging the need for a tool capable of automatically annotating poorly curated metadata records. In this paper, we propose a topic-model (TM) based approach for automatic metadata annotation. Our approach mines topics in the set of well annotated records and suggests keywords for poorly annotated records based on topic similarity. We utilize the

  5. Provenance metadata gathering and cataloguing of EFIT++ code execution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lupelli, I., E-mail: ivan.lupelli@ccfe.ac.uk [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Muir, D.G.; Appel, L.; Akers, R.; Carr, M. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Abreu, P. [Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • An approach for automatic gathering of provenance metadata has been presented. • A provenance metadata catalogue has been created. • The overhead in the code runtime is less than 10%. • The metadata/data size ratio is about ∼20%. • A visualization interface based on Gephi, has been presented. - Abstract: Journal publications, as the final product of research activity, are the result of an extensive complex modeling and data analysis effort. It is of paramount importance, therefore, to capture the origins and derivation of the published data in order to achieve high levels of scientific reproducibility, transparency, internal and external data reuse and dissemination. The consequence of the modern research paradigm is that high performance computing and data management systems, together with metadata cataloguing, have become crucial elements within the nuclear fusion scientific data lifecycle. This paper describes an approach to the task of automatically gathering and cataloguing provenance metadata, currently under development and testing at Culham Center for Fusion Energy. The approach is being applied to a machine-agnostic code that calculates the axisymmetric equilibrium force balance in tokamaks, EFIT++, as a proof of principle test. The proposed approach avoids any code instrumentation or modification. It is based on the observation and monitoring of input preparation, workflow and code execution, system calls, log file data collection and interaction with the version control system. Pre-processing, post-processing, and data export and storage are monitored during the code runtime. Input data signals are captured using a data distribution platform called IDAM. The final objective of the catalogue is to create a complete description of the modeling activity, including user comments, and the relationship between data output, the main experimental database and the execution environment. For an intershot or post-pulse analysis (∼1000

  6. A Metadata Standard for Hydroinformatic Data Conforming to International Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notay, Vikram; Carstens, Georg; Lehfeldt, Rainer

    2017-04-01

    The affordable availability of computing power and digital storage has been a boon for the scientific community. The hydroinformatics community has also benefitted from the so-called digital revolution, which has enabled the tackling of more and more complex physical phenomena using hydroinformatic models, instruments, sensors, etc. With models getting more and more complex, computational domains getting larger and the resolution of computational grids and measurement data getting finer, a large amount of data is generated and consumed in any hydroinformatics related project. The ubiquitous availability of internet also contributes to this phenomenon with data being collected through sensor networks connected to telecommunications networks and the internet long before the term Internet of Things existed. Although generally good, this exponential increase in the number of available datasets gives rise to the need to describe this data in a standardised way to not only be able to get a quick overview about the data but to also facilitate interoperability of data from different sources. The Federal Waterways Engineering and Research Institute (BAW) is a federal authority of the German Federal Ministry of Transport and Digital Infrastructure. BAW acts as a consultant for the safe and efficient operation of the German waterways. As part of its consultation role, BAW operates a number of physical and numerical models for sections of inland and marine waterways. In order to uniformly describe the data produced and consumed by these models throughout BAW and to ensure interoperability with other federal and state institutes on the one hand and with EU countries on the other, a metadata profile for hydroinformatic data has been developed at BAW. The metadata profile is composed in its entirety using the ISO 19115 international standard for metadata related to geographic information. Due to the widespread use of the ISO 19115 standard in the existing geodata infrastructure

  7. Establishment of papaya banker plant system for Parasitoid, Encarsia sophia (Hymenoptera: Aphilidae) against Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) in greenhouse tomato production

    Science.gov (United States)

    The silverleaf whitefly, Bemisia tabaci biotype B (Gennadius) (Hemiptera:Aleyrodidae), is a key pest of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) and other vegetable crops worldwide. To combat this pest, a non-crop banker plant system was evaluated that employs a parasitoid, Encarsia sophia (Girault & Dodd) ...

  8. Modelling the Survival of Escherichia coli O157:H7 on Raw Portioned Tomatoes, Inoculated with Aspergillus fumigatus and Emericella nidulans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Cardillo

    2009-01-01

    The results of this paper suggested that the metabiotic interactions aspergilli/E. coli O 157:H7 could be of public concern, as the consumption of tomatoes (or other fruits and vegetables contaminated both by the moulds and the pathogen is a possible scenario.

  9. Organic weed conrol and cover crop residue integration impacts on weed control, quality, and yield and economics in conservation tillage tomato - A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    The increased use of conservation tillage in vegetable production requires more information be developed on the role of cover crops in weed control, tomato quality and yield. Three conservation-tillage systems utilizing crimson clover, brassica and cereal rye as winter cover crops were compared to ...

  10. IPM of the southern green stink bug, Nezara viridula (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) using trap and refuge crops within tomato fields in North Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Southern Green Stink Bug (SGSB), Nezara viridula (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) is a serious insect pest of tomatoes and numerous vegetable and fruit plants in north Florida. We evaluated three trap crops and three refuge crops to investigate their potential to be used for IPM (Integrated Pest Manag...

  11. Tomato R2R3-MYB Proteins SlANT1 and SlAN2: Same Protein Activity, Different Roles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiferle, C.; Fantini, E.; Bassolino, L.; Povero, G.; Spelt, C.; Buti, S.; Giuliano, G.; Quattrocchio, F.; Koes, R.; Perata, P.; Gonzali, S.

    2015-01-01

    Anthocyanins are water-soluble polyphenolic compounds with a high nutraceutical value. Despite the fact that cultivated tomato varieties do not accumulate anthocyanins in the fruit, the biosynthetic pathway can be activated in the vegetative organs by several environmental stimuli. Little is known

  12. Tomato R2R3-MYB proteins SlANT1 and SlAN2 : Same protein activity, different roles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiferle, Claudia; Fantini, Elio; Bassolino, Laura; Povero, Giovanni; Spelt, Cornelis; Buti, Sara; Giuliano, Giovanni; Quattrocchio, Francesca; Koes, Ronald; Perata, Pierdomenico; Gonzali, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Anthocyanins are water-soluble polyphenolic compounds with a high nutraceutical value. Despite the fact that cultivated tomato varieties do not accumulate anthocyanins in the fruit, the biosynthetic pathway can be activated in the vegetative organs by several environmental stimuli. Little is known

  13. Comparative study of the cell wall composition of broccoli, carrot, and tomato: structural characterization of the extractable pectins and hemicelluloses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houben, Ken; Jolie, Ruben P; Fraeye, Ilse; Van Loey, Ann M; Hendrickx, Marc E

    2011-07-01

    This study delivers a comparison of the pectic and hemicellulosic cell wall polysaccharides between the commonly used vegetables broccoli (stem and florets separately), carrot, and tomato. Alcohol-insoluble residues were prepared from the plant sources and sequentially extracted with water, cyclohexane-trans-1,2-diamine tetra-acetic acid, sodium carbonate, and potassium hydroxide solutions, to obtain individual fractions, each containing polysaccharides bound to the cell wall in a specific manner. Structural characterization of the polysaccharide fractions was conducted using colorimetric and chromatographic approaches. Sugar ratios were defined to ameliorate data interpretation. These ratios allowed gaining information concerning polysaccharide structure from sugar composition data. Structural analysis of broccoli revealed organ-specific characteristics: the pectin degree of methoxylation (DM) of stem and florets differed, the sugar composition data inferred differences in polymeric composition. On the other hand, the molar mass (MM) distribution profiles of the polysaccharide fractions were virtually identical for both organs. Carrot root displayed a different MM distribution for the polysaccharides solubilized by potassium hydroxide compared to broccoli and tomato, possibly due to the high contribution of branched pectins to this otherwise hemicellulose-enriched fraction. Tomato fruit showed the pectins with the broadest range in DM, the highest MM, the greatest overall linearity and the lowest extent of branching of rhamnogalacturonan I, pointing to particularly long, linear pectins in tomato compared with the other vegetable organs studied, suggesting possible implications toward functional behavior. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Empirical Analysis of Errors on Human-Generated Learning Objects Metadata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cechinel, Cristian; Sánchez-Alonso, Salvador; Sicilia, Miguel Ángel

    Learning object metadata is considered crucial for the right management of learning objects stored in public repositories. Search operations, in particular, rely on the quality of these metadata as an essential precondition for finding results adequate to users requirements and needs. However, learning object metadata are not always reliable, as many factors have a negative influence in metadata quality (human annotators not having the minimum skills, unvoluntary mistakes, lack of information, for instance). This paper analyses human-generated learning object metadata records described according to the IEEE LOM standard, identifies the most significant errors committed and points out which parts of the standard should be improved for the sake of quality.

  15. A Solr Powered Architecture for Scientific Metadata Search Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, S. A.; Billingsley, B. W.; Harper, D.; Kovarik, J.; Brandt, M.

    2014-12-01

    Discovering and obtaining resources for scientific research is increasingly difficult but Open Source tools have been implemented to provide inexpensive solutions for scientific metadata search applications. Common practices used in modern web applications can improve the quality of scientific data as well as increase availability to a wider audience while reducing costs of maintenance. Motivated to improve discovery and access of scientific metadata hosted at NSIDC and the need to aggregate many areas of arctic research, the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) and Advanced Cooperative Arctic Data and Information Service (ACADIS) contributed to a shared codebase used by the NSIDC Search and Arctic Data Explorer (ADE) portals. We implemented the NSIDC Search and ADE to improve search and discovery of scientific metadata in many areas of cryospheric research. All parts of the applications are available free and open for reuse in other applications and portals. We have applied common techniques that are widely used by search applications around the web and with the goal of providing quick and easy access to scientific metadata. We adopted keyword search auto-suggest which provides a dynamic list of terms and phrases that closely match characters as the user types. Facet queries are another technique we have implemented to filter results based on aspects of the data like the instrument used or temporal duration of the data set. Service APIs provide a layer between the interface and the database and are shared between the NSIDC Search and ACADIS ADE interfaces. We also implemented a shared data store between both portals using Apache Solr (an Open Source search engine platform that stores and indexes XML documents) and leverage many powerful features including geospatial search and faceting. This presentation will discuss the application architecture as well as tools and techniques used to enhance search and discovery of scientific metadata.

  16. Serious Games for Health: The Potential of Metadata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göbel, Stefan; Maddison, Ralph

    2017-02-01

    Numerous serious games and health games exist, either as commercial products (typically with a focus on entertaining a broad user group) or smaller games and game prototypes, often resulting from research projects (typically tailored to a smaller user group with a specific health characteristic). A major drawback of existing health games is that they are not very well described and attributed with (machine-readable, quantitative, and qualitative) metadata such as the characterizing goal of the game, the target user group, or expected health effects well proven in scientific studies. This makes it difficult or even impossible for end users to find and select the most appropriate game for a specific situation (e.g., health needs). Therefore, the aim of this article was to motivate the need and potential/benefit of metadata for the description and retrieval of health games and to describe a descriptive model for the qualitative description of games for health. It was not the aim of the article to describe a stable, running system (portal) for health games. This will be addressed in future work. Building on previous work toward a metadata format for serious games, a descriptive model for the formal description of games for health is introduced. For the conceptualization of this model, classification schemata of different existing health game repositories are considered. The classification schema consists of three levels: a core set of mandatory descriptive fields relevant for all games for health application areas, a detailed level with more comprehensive, optional information about the games, and so-called extension as level three with specific descriptive elements relevant for dedicated health games application areas, for example, cardio training. A metadata format provides a technical framework to describe, find, and select appropriate health games matching the needs of the end user. Future steps to improve, apply, and promote the metadata format in the health games

  17. INSECTICIDES FOR CONTROL OF GREENHOUSE WHITEFLY (TRIALEURODES VAPORARIORUM WESTW. IN GROWING OF TOMATO IN GREENHOUSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinelina Yankova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A screening of plant protection products for their effectiveness against the greenhouse whitefly (Trialeurodes vaporariorum Westw. was made in growing of tomatoes in greenhouses. The experiments were conducted during the period 2009-2014 in unheated greenhouses in the „Maritsa” Vegetable Crops Research Institute, Plovdiv. It was found that the products Confidor Energy OD 0,08%, Actara 25 WG 0,03%, Mospilan 20 SP 0,02% and Eforia 45 CS 125 ml/da have very good effectiveness against adults and larvae of the greenhouse whitefly. Phytopesticide Piros 0,08% has good effectiveness against adults and satisfactory against the greenhouse whitefly larvae. This product could be used as an alternative to control this pest in integrated and organic production of tomatoes in greenhouses.

  18. Principal component analysis of tomato genotypes based on some morphological and biochemical quality indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glogovac Svetlana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates variability of tomato genotypes based on morphological and biochemical fruit traits. Experimental material is a part of tomato genetic collection from Institute of Filed and Vegetable Crops in Novi Sad, Serbia. Genotypes were analyzed for fruit mass, locule number, index of fruit shape, fruit colour, dry matter content, total sugars, total acidity, lycopene and vitamin C. Minimum, maximum and average values and main indicators of variability (CV and σ were calculated. Principal component analysis was performed to determinate variability source structure. Four principal components, which contribute 93.75% of the total variability, were selected for analysis. The first principal component is defined by vitamin C, locule number and index of fruit shape. The second component is determined by dry matter content, and total acidity, the third by lycopene, fruit mass and fruit colour. Total sugars had the greatest part in the fourth component.

  19. Application of protein-phenolic based coating on tomatoes (Lycopersicum esculentum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Pereira Cipolatti

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the use of protein-phenolic based coating made from fermented rice bran on cherry tomatoes (Lycopersicum esculentum. Tests were performed with glycerol 3% (v/v, glycerol with protein-phenolic rice bran extract (5%, glycerol with protein-phenolic extract after 96 hours of fermentation (5%, and a control (without coating. The coated cherry tomatoes were kept at room temperature for 28 days. Mass loss, pH and acidity, total soluble solids, and carotenoids were determined every 96 hours. The coating made from the biomass extract reduced the carotenoid and acidity levels in the fruits studied by 17 and 21.1%, respectively, compared to the control. The coating proved an efficient barrier to water vapor with mass loss of 57% less than the control suggesting that it can be used as an alternative for vegetable tissue conservation.

  20. Automatic handling of shade net and irrigation in greenhouse with tomatoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Hahn

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Greenhouse vegetable production in México and worldwide has become important. Following greenhouses automation, a simple controller was designed to open and close shading nets to reduce incident radiation and excessive evapotranspiration. Irrigation period were radiation controlled and did not turn on the pump with clouds or moon radiation, saving 35% of water. The nets remained closed during the night and were opened during scarce radiation. In the tomato greenhouse experiment, every three months analysis was carried on manual and automatic net control. Maximum incident radiation was achieved in May and August when no shading nets were used. Air temperature increased to 28°C in August decreasing by 50% fruit size. Fruit temperature decreased 2.5°C when nets were used decreasing tomato cracking.